National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for graphene composite material

  1. Electrode material comprising graphene-composite materials in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Electrode material comprising graphene-composite materials in a graphite network A durable electrode material suitable for use in Li ion batteries is provided. The material ...

  2. Electrode material comprising graphene-composite materials in a graphite network

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kung, Harold H.; Lee, Jung K.

    2014-07-15

    A durable electrode material suitable for use in Li ion batteries is provided. The material is comprised of a continuous network of graphite regions integrated with, and in good electrical contact with a composite comprising graphene sheets and an electrically active material, such as silicon, wherein the electrically active material is dispersed between, and supported by, the graphene sheets.

  3. Methods for preparation of concentrated graphene compositions and related composite materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hersam, Mark C.; Liang, Yu Teng

    2015-07-14

    A rapid, scalable methodology for graphene dispersion with a polymer-organic solvent solution and subsequent solvent exchange, as can be utilized without centrifugation, to enhance graphene concentration.

  4. Strong and Electrically Conductive Graphene Based Composite Fibers and Laminates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vlassiouk, Ivan V.; Polyzos, Georgios; Cooper, Ryan C.; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Keum, Jong Kahk; Paulauskas, Felix L.; Datskos, Panos G.; Smirnov, Sergei

    2015-04-28

    Graphene is an ideal candidate for lightweight, high-strength composite materials given its superior mechanical properties (specific strength of 130 GPa and stiffness of 1 TPa). To date, easily scalable graphene-like materials in a form of separated flakes (exfoliated graphene, graphene oxide, and reduced graphene oxide) have been investigated as candidates for large-scale applications such as material reinforcement. These graphene-like materials do not fully exhibit all the capabilities of graphene in composite materials. In this study, we show that macro (2 inch 2 inch) graphene laminates and fibers can be produced using large continuous sheets of single-layer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition. The resulting composite structures have potential to outperform the current state-of-the-art composite materials in both mechanical properties and electrical conductivities (>8 S/cm with only 0.13% volumetric graphene loading and 5 103 S/cm for pure graphene fibers) with estimated graphene contributions of >10 GPa in strength and 1 TPa in stiffness.

  5. Highly tunable quantum Hall far-infrared photodetector by use of GaAs/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}As-graphene composite material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Chiu-Chun [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Ling, D. C. [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui Dist., New Taipei City 25137, Taiwan (China); Chi, C. C.; Chen, Jeng-Chung [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Frontier Research Center on Fundamental and Applied Sciences of Matters, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2014-11-03

    We have developed a highly tunable, narrow band far-infrared (FIR) photodetector which utilizes the characteristic merits of graphene and two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in GaAs/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}As heterostructure in the Quantum Hall states (QHS). The heterostructure surface is covered with chemical vapor-deposited graphene, which functions as a transparent top-gate to vary the electron density of the 2DEG. FIR response observed in the vicinity of integer QH regime can be effectively tuned in a wide range of 27102?cm{sup ?1} with a bias voltage less than ?1?V. In addition, we have found that the presence of graphene can genuinely modulate the photoresponse. Our results demonstrate a promising direction for realizing a tunable long-wavelength FIR detector using QHS in GaAs 2DEG/ graphene composite material.

  6. Composite material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hutchens, Stacy A.; Woodward, Jonathan; Evans, Barbara R.; O'Neill, Hugh M.

    2012-02-07

    A composite biocompatible hydrogel material includes a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa. A calcium comprising salt is disposed in at least some of the pores. The porous polymer matrix can comprise cellulose, including bacterial cellulose. The composite can be used as a bone graft material. A method of tissue repair within the body of animals includes the steps of providing a composite biocompatible hydrogel material including a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa, and inserting the hydrogel material into cartilage or bone tissue of an animal, wherein the hydrogel material supports cell colonization in vitro for autologous cell seeding.

  7. Enhanced optical limiting effects of graphene materials in polyimide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gan, Yao; Feng, Miao; Zhan, Hongbing

    2014-04-28

    Three different graphene nanostructure suspensions of graphene oxide nanosheets (GONSs), graphene oxide nanoribbons (GONRs), and graphene oxide quantum dots (GOQDs) are prepared and characterized. Using a typical two-step method, the GONSs, GONRs, and GOQDs are incorporated into a polyimide (PI) matrix to synthesize graphene/PI composite films, whose nonlinear optical (NLO) and optical limiting (OL) properties are investigated at 532?nm in the nanosecond regime. The GONR suspension exhibits superior NLO and OL effects compared with those of GONSs and GOQDs because of its stronger nonlinear scattering and excited-state absorption. The graphene/PI composite films exhibit NLO and OL performance superior to that of their corresponding suspensions, which is attributed primarily to a combination of nonlinear mechanisms, charge transfer between graphene materials and PI, and the matrix effect.

  8. Graphene-Au Nanoparticles Composite-Based Electrochemical Aptamer...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Graphene-Au Nanoparticles Composite-Based Electrochemical Aptamer Biosensors Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Graphene-Au Nanoparticles Composite-Based Electrochemical ...

  9. Graphene-Au Nanoparticles Composite-Based Electrochemical Aptamer...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Graphene-Au Nanoparticles Composite-Based Electrochemical Aptamer Biosensors Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Graphene-Au Nanoparticles Composite-Based ...

  10. Strong and electrically conductive graphene-based composite fibers and laminates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vlassiouk, Ivan V.; Polyzos, Georgios; Cooper, Ryan C.; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Keum, Jong Kahk; Paulauskas, Felix L.; Datskos, Panos G.; Smirnov, Sergei

    2015-04-28

    In this study, graphene is an ideal candidate for lightweight, high-strength composite materials given its superior mechanical properties (specific strength of 130 GPa and stiffness of 1 TPa). To date, easily scalable graphene-like materials in a form of separated flakes (exfoliated graphene, graphene oxide, and reduced graphene oxide) have been investigated as candidates for large-scale applications such as material reinforcement. These graphene-like materials do not fully exhibit all the capabilities of graphene in composite materials. In this study, we show that macro (2 inch × 2 inch) graphene laminates and fibers can be produced using large continuous sheets of single-layer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition. The resulting composite structures have potential to outperform the current state-of-the-art composite materials in both mechanical properties and electrical conductivities (>8 S/cm with only 0.13% volumetric graphene loading and 5 × 103 S/cm for pure graphene fibers) with estimated graphene contributions of >10 GPa in strength and 1 TPa in stiffness.

  11. Strong and electrically conductive graphene-based composite fibers and laminates

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Vlassiouk, Ivan V.; Polyzos, Georgios; Cooper, Ryan C.; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Keum, Jong Kahk; Paulauskas, Felix L.; Datskos, Panos G.; Smirnov, Sergei

    2015-04-28

    In this study, graphene is an ideal candidate for lightweight, high-strength composite materials given its superior mechanical properties (specific strength of 130 GPa and stiffness of 1 TPa). To date, easily scalable graphene-like materials in a form of separated flakes (exfoliated graphene, graphene oxide, and reduced graphene oxide) have been investigated as candidates for large-scale applications such as material reinforcement. These graphene-like materials do not fully exhibit all the capabilities of graphene in composite materials. In this study, we show that macro (2 inch × 2 inch) graphene laminates and fibers can be produced using large continuous sheets of single-layermore » graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition. The resulting composite structures have potential to outperform the current state-of-the-art composite materials in both mechanical properties and electrical conductivities (>8 S/cm with only 0.13% volumetric graphene loading and 5 × 103 S/cm for pure graphene fibers) with estimated graphene contributions of >10 GPa in strength and 1 TPa in stiffness.« less

  12. Synthesis of reduced graphene oxide/ZnO nanorods composites on graphene coated PET flexible substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Lei, E-mail: leihuang@shnu.edu.cn; Guo, Guilue; Liu, Yang; Chang, Quanhong; Shi, Wangzhou

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: ZnO nanorods synthesized on CVD-graphene and rGO surfaces, respectively. ZnO/CVD-graphene and ZnO/rGO form a distinctive porous 3D structure. rGO/ZnO nanostructures possibility in energy storage devices. - Abstract: In this work, reduced graphene oxide (rGO)/ZnO nanorods composites were synthesized on graphene coated PET flexible substrates. Both chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) films were prepared following by hydrothermal growth of vertical aligned ZnO nanorods. Reduced graphene sheets were then spun coated on the ZnO materials to form a three dimensional (3D) porous nanostructure. The morphologies of the ZnO/CVD graphene and ZnO/rGO were investigated by SEM, which shows that the ZnO nanorods grown on rGO are larger in diameters and have lower density compared with those grown on CVD graphene substrate. As a result of fact, the rough surface of nano-scale ZnO on rGO film allows rGO droplets to seep into the large voids of ZnO nanorods, then to form the rGO/ZnO hierarchical structure. By comparison of the different results, we conclude that rGO/ZnO 3D nanostructure is more desirable for the application of energy storage devices.

  13. Nanocomposite of graphene and metal oxide materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Jun; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Choi, Daiwon; Wang, Donghai; Yang, Zhenguo

    2012-09-04

    Nanocomposite materials comprising a metal oxide bonded to at least one graphene material. The nanocomposite materials exhibit a specific capacity of at least twice that of the metal oxide material without the graphene at a charge/discharge rate greater than about 10C.

  14. Nanocomposite of graphene and metal oxide materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Jun; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Choi, Daiwon; Wang, Donghai; Yang, Zhenguo

    2015-06-30

    Nanocomposite materials comprising a metal oxide bonded to at least one graphene material. The nanocomposite materials exhibit a specific capacity of at least twice that of the metal oxide material without the graphene at a charge/discharge rate greater than about 10 C.

  15. Nanocomposite of graphene and metal oxide materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Jun; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Choi, Daiwon; Wang, Donghai; Yang, Zhenguo

    2013-10-15

    Nanocomposite materials comprising a metal oxide bonded to at least one graphene material. The nanocomposite materials exhibit a specific capacity of at least twice that of the metal oxide material without the graphene at a charge/discharge rate greater than about 10 C.

  16. Mesoporous metal oxide graphene nanocomposite materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Jun; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Kou, Rong; Wang, Donghai

    2016-05-24

    A nanocomposite material formed of graphene and a mesoporous metal oxide having a demonstrated specific capacity of more than 200 F/g with particular utility when employed in supercapacitor applications. A method for making these nanocomposite materials by first forming a mixture of graphene, a surfactant, and a metal oxide precursor, precipitating the metal oxide precursor with the surfactant from the mixture to form a mesoporous metal oxide. The mesoporous metal oxide is then deposited onto a surface of the graphene.

  17. Graphene-based structure, method of suspending graphene membrane, and method of depositing material onto graphene membrane

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zettl, Alexander K.; Meyer, Jannik Christian

    2013-04-02

    An embodiment of a method of suspending a graphene membrane across a gap in a support structure includes attaching graphene to a substrate. A pre-fabricated support structure having the gap is attached to the graphene. The graphene and the pre-fabricated support structure are then separated from the substrate which leaves the graphene membrane suspended across the gap in the pre-fabricated support structure. An embodiment of a method of depositing material includes placing a support structure having a graphene membrane suspended across a gap under vacuum. A precursor is adsorbed to a surface of the graphene membrane. A portion of the graphene membrane is exposed to a focused electron beam which deposits a material from the precursor onto the graphene membrane. An embodiment of a graphene-based structure includes a support structure having a gap, a graphene membrane suspended across the gap, and a material deposited in a pattern on the graphene membrane.

  18. Green synthesis of graphene nanosheets/ZnO composites and electrochemical properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Jun; Gao Zan; Li Zhanshuang; Wang Bin; Yan Yanxia; Liu Qi; Mann, Tom; Zhang Milin; Jiang Zhaohua

    2011-06-15

    A green and facile approach was demonstrated to prepare graphene nanosheets/ZnO (GNS/ZnO) composites for supercapacitor materials. Glucose, as a reducing agent, and exfoliated graphite oxide (GO), as precursor, were used to synthesize GNS, then ZnO directly grew onto conducting graphene nanosheets as electrode materials. The small ZnO particles successfully anchored onto graphene sheets as spacers to keep the neighboring sheets separate. The electrochemical performances of these electrodes were analyzed by cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectrometry and chronopotentiometry. Results showed that the GNS/ZnO composites displayed superior capacitive performance with large capacitance (62.2 F/g), excellent cyclic performance, and maximum power density (8.1 kW/kg) as compared with pure graphene electrodes. Our investigation highlight the importance of anchoring of small ZnO particles on graphene sheets for maximum utilization of electrochemically active ZnO and graphene for energy storage application in supercapacitors. - Graphical abstract: Glucose was used to synthesize GNS, then ZnO directly grew onto conducting graphene nanosheets as electrode materials for supercapacitor. Results showed that the composites have superior capacitive performance. Highlights: > Graphene nanosheets were synthesized via using glucose as a reducing agent. > The reductant and the oxidized product are environmentally friendly. > ZnO grew onto conducting graphene sheets keeping neighboring sheets separate. > The structure improves the contact between the electrode and the electrolyte. > Results showed that these composites have good electrochemical property.

  19. Composite of refractory material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcombe, Cressie E. (Knoxville, TN); Morrow, Marvin S. (Kingston, TN)

    1994-01-01

    A composite refractory material composition comprises a boron carbide matrix and minor constituents of yttrium-boron-oxygen-carbon phases uniformly distributed throughout the boron carbide matrix.

  20. Composite of refractory material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcombe, C.E.; Morrow, M.S.

    1994-07-19

    A composite refractory material composition comprises a boron carbide matrix and minor constituents of yttrium-boron-oxygen-carbon phases uniformly distributed throughout the boron carbide matrix.

  1. Composite material dosimeters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Steven D.

    1996-01-01

    The present invention is a composite material containing a mix of dosimeter material powder and a polymer powder wherein the polymer is transparent to the photon emission of the dosimeter material powder. By mixing dosimeter material powder with polymer powder, less dosimeter material is needed compared to a monolithic dosimeter material chip. Interrogation is done with excitation by visible light.

  2. Nano-composite materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Se-Hee; Tracy, C. Edwin; Pitts, J. Roland

    2010-05-25

    Nano-composite materials are disclosed. An exemplary method of producing a nano-composite material may comprise co-sputtering a transition metal and a refractory metal in a reactive atmosphere. The method may also comprise co-depositing a transition metal and a refractory metal composite structure on a substrate. The method may further comprise thermally annealing the deposited transition metal and refractory metal composite structure in a reactive atmosphere.

  3. Graphene Modified LiFePO4 Cathode Materials for High Power Lithium ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, X.; Wang, F.; Zhu, Y.; Liu, Z.

    2011-01-24

    Graphene-modified LiFePO{sub 4} composite has been developed as a Li-ion battery cathode material with excellent high-rate capability and cycling stability. The composite was prepared with LiFePO{sub 4} nanoparticles and graphene oxide nanosheets by spray-drying and annealing processes. The LiFePO{sub 4} primary nanoparticles embedded in micro-sized spherical secondary particles were wrapped homogeneously and loosely with a graphene 3D network. Such a special nanostructure facilitated electron migration throughout the secondary particles, while the presence of abundant voids between the LiFePO{sub 4} nanoparticles and graphene sheets was beneficial for Li{sup +} diffusion. The composite cathode material could deliver a capacity of 70 mAh g{sup -1} at 60C discharge rate and showed a capacity decay rate of <15% when cycled under 10C charging and 20C discharging for 1000 times.

  4. Electrically conductive composite material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clough, Roger L.; Sylwester, Alan P.

    1989-01-01

    An electrically conductive composite material is disclosed which comprises a conductive open-celled, low density, microcellular carbon foam filled with a non-conductive polymer or resin. The composite material is prepared in a two-step process consisting of first preparing the microcellular carbon foam from a carbonizable polymer or copolymer using a phase separation process, then filling the carbon foam with the desired non-conductive polymer or resin. The electrically conductive composites of the present invention has a uniform and consistant pattern of filler distribution, and as a result is superior over prior art materials when used in battery components, electrodes, and the like.

  5. Electrically conductive composite material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clough, R.L.; Sylwester, A.P.

    1989-05-23

    An electrically conductive composite material is disclosed which comprises a conductive open-celled, low density, microcellular carbon foam filled with a non-conductive polymer or resin. The composite material is prepared in a two-step process consisting of first preparing the microcellular carbon foam from a carbonizable polymer or copolymer using a phase separation process, then filling the carbon foam with the desired non-conductive polymer or resin. The electrically conductive composites of the present invention has a uniform and consistent pattern of filler distribution, and as a result is superior over prior art materials when used in battery components, electrodes, and the like. 2 figs.

  6. Electrically conductive composite material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clough, R.L.; Sylwester, A.P.

    1988-06-20

    An electrically conductive composite material is disclosed which comprises a conductive open-celled, low density, microcellular carbon foam filled with a non-conductive polymer or resin. The composite material is prepared in a two-step process consisting of first preparing the microcellular carbon foam from a carbonizable polymer or copolymer using a phase separation process, then filling the carbon foam with the desired non-conductive polymer or resin. The electrically conductive composites of the present invention has a uniform and consistent pattern of filler distribution, and as a result is superior over prior art materials when used in battery components, electrodes, and the like. 2 figs.

  7. Graphene materials having randomly distributed two-dimensional structural defects

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    2013-10-08

    Graphene-based storage materials for high-power battery applications are provided. The storage materials are composed of vertical stacks of graphene sheets and have reduced resistance for Li ion transport. This reduced resistance is achieved by incorporating a random distribution of structural defects into the stacked graphene sheets, whereby the structural defects facilitate the diffusion of Li ions into the interior of the storage materials.

  8. Graphene materials having randomly distributed two-dimensional structural defects

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kung, Harold H.; Zhao, Xin; Hayner, Cary M.; Kung, Mayfair C.

    2016-05-31

    Graphene-based storage materials for high-power battery applications are provided. The storage materials are composed of vertical stacks of graphene sheets and have reduced resistance for Li ion transport. This reduced resistance is achieved by incorporating a random distribution of structural defects into the stacked graphene sheets, whereby the structural defects facilitate the diffusion of Li ions into the interior of the storage materials.

  9. Nanostructured composite reinforced material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seals, Roland D.; Ripley, Edward B.; Ludtka, Gerard M.

    2012-07-31

    A family of materials wherein nanostructures and/or nanotubes are incorporated into a multi-component material arrangement, such as a metallic or ceramic alloy or composite/aggregate, producing a new material or metallic/ceramic alloy. The new material has significantly increased strength, up to several thousands of times normal and perhaps substantially more, as well as significantly decreased weight. The new materials may be manufactured into a component where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the bulk and/or matrix material, or as a coating where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the coating or surface of a "normal" substrate material. The nanostructures are incorporated into the material structure either randomly or aligned, within grains, or along or across grain boundaries.

  10. Graphene-Au Nanoparticles Composite-Based Electrochemical Aptamer

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Biosensors (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Graphene-Au Nanoparticles Composite-Based Electrochemical Aptamer Biosensors Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Graphene-Au Nanoparticles Composite-Based Electrochemical Aptamer Biosensors Authors: Guo, Shaojun [1] + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Laboratory Publication Date: 2014-03-27 OSTI Identifier: 1126641 Report Number(s): LA-UR-13-28234 DOE Contract Number: AC52-06NA25396 Resource Type: Conference Resource

  11. Nano-Composite Material Development for 3-D Printers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Satches, Michael Randolph

    2015-12-01

    Graphene possesses excellent mechanical properties with a tensile strength that may exceed 130 GPa, excellent electrical conductivity, and good thermal properties. Future nano-composites can leverage many of these material properties in an attempt to build designer materials for a broad range of applications. 3-D printing has also seen vast improvements in recent years that have allowed many companies and individuals to realize rapid prototyping for relatively low capital investment. This research sought to create a graphene reinforced, polymer matrix nano-composite that is viable in commercial 3D printer technology, study the effects of ultra-high loading percentages of graphene in polymer matrices and determine the functional upper limit for loading. Loadings varied from 5 wt. % to 50 wt. % graphene nanopowder loaded in Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS) matrices. Loaded sample were characterized for their mechanical properties using three point bending, tensile tests, as well as dynamic mechanical analysis.

  12. Composite Materials for Battery Applications | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials for Battery Applications Technology available for licensing: Process for the production of Si- Graphene nano-composite materials for use as anode materials in Lithium Ion Batteries Improved cycling performance in nano- composites through increased electrical conductivity and stabilization of structure during delithiation IN-10-018 US 2012/0282527 A1 Availability: Technology available for license to organizations with commercial interest. Collaborative research is available under a

  13. Graphene-based Materials for Biosensing and Bioimaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, Dan; Yang, Yuqi; Lin, Yuehe

    2012-12-01

    Graphene, a free-standing two-dimensional crystal with one-atom thickness, exhibits distinct properties that are highly attractive for biosensing and bioimaging, such as a high electrical conductivity, a large planar area, and an excellent ability to quench fluorescence. This article selectively reviews recent advances in the field of graphene-based materials for biosensing and bioimaging. In particular, graphene-based enzyme biosensors, DNA biosensors, and immunosensors are summarized in detail. Graphene-based biotechnology for cell imaging is also described. Future perspectives and possible challenges in this rapidly developing area are also discussed.

  14. Synthesis of MnO{sub 2}-graphene composites with enhanced supercapacitive performance via pulse electrodeposition under supergravity field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Tingting; Shao, Guangjie; Ji, Mingtong; Wang, Guiling

    2014-07-01

    A method of pulse electrodeposition under supergravity field was proposed to synthesize MnO{sub 2}-graphene composites. Supergravity is very efficient for promoting mass transfer and decreasing concentration polarization during the electrodeposition process. The synthesis was conducted on our homemade supergravity equipment. The strength of supergravity field depended on the rotating speed of the ring electrode. 3D flower like MnO{sub 2} spheres composed of nanoflakes were acquired when the rotating speed was 3000 rpm. Graphene nanosheets play as a role of conductive substrates for MnO{sub 2} growing. The composites are evaluated as electrode materials for supercapacitors. Electrochemical results show that the maximum specific capacitance of the MnO{sub 2}-graphene composite is 595.7 F g{sup ?1} at a current density of 0.5 A g{sup ?1}. In addition, the composite exhibits excellent cycle stability with no capacitance attenuation after 1000 cycles. The approach provides new ideas for developing supercapacitor electrode materials with high performance. - Graphical abstract: 3D flower like MnO{sub 2} spheres composed of nanoflakes were acquired at 3000 rpm. - Highlights: MnO{sub 2}-graphene composites were prepared by pulse electrodeposition under supergravity. 3D flower like MnO{sub 2} spheres are anchored on the graphene nanosheets. The MnO{sub 2}-graphene electrode exhibits a specific capacitance of 595.7 F g{sup ?1}.

  15. Recent Advances in Two-Dimensional Materials Beyond Graphene

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Meunier, Vincent; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Terrones Maldonado, Mauricio; Terrones Maldonado, Humberto; Liang, Liangbo; Cooper, Valentino R.; Bhimanapati, Ganesh; Lin, Zhong; Jung, Yeongwoong; Cha, Judy; et al

    2015-11-06

    The isolation of graphene in 2004 by peeling apart the atomically-thin sheets that comprise graphite was a defining moment for the birth of a field: Two-dimensional (2D) materials. In recent years, there has been a rapidly increasing number of papers focusing on non-graphene layered materials, including transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), because of the new properties and applications that emerge upon 2D confinement. Here we review significant recent advances and important new developments in 2D materials beyond graphene . We provide insight into the theoretical modeling and understanding of the van der Waals forces that hold together the 2D layers in bulkmore » solids, as well as their excitonic properties and growth morphologies. Additionally, we highlight recent breakthroughs in TMD synthesis and characterization and discuss the newest families of 2D materials, including monoelement 2D materials (i.e., silicene, phosphorene, etc.) and transition metal carbide- and carbon nitride-based MXenes. We then discuss the doping and functionalization of 2D materials beyond graphene, which enable device applications, followed by advances in electronic, optoelectronic, and magnetic devices and theory. Finally, we provide perspectives on the future of 2D materials beyond graphene.« less

  16. Recent Advances in Two-Dimensional Materials Beyond Graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meunier, Vincent; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Terrones Maldonado, Mauricio; Terrones Maldonado, Humberto; Liang, Liangbo; Cooper, Valentino R.; Bhimanapati, Ganesh; Lin, Zhong; Jung, Yeongwoong; Cha, Judy; Das, Saptarshi; Xiao, Di; Son, Youngwoo; Strano, Michael; Louie, Steven G.; Ringe, Emilie; Xia, Fengnian; Wang, Yeliang; Akinwande, Deji; Zhu, Jun; Schuller, John; Schaak, Raymond; Robinson, Joshua A

    2015-11-06

    The isolation of graphene in 2004 by peeling apart the atomically-thin sheets that comprise graphite was a defining moment for the birth of a field: Two-dimensional (2D) materials. In recent years, there has been a rapidly increasing number of papers focusing on non-graphene layered materials, including transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), because of the new properties and applications that emerge upon 2D confinement. Here we review significant recent advances and important new developments in 2D materials beyond graphene . We provide insight into the theoretical modeling and understanding of the van der Waals forces that hold together the 2D layers in bulk solids, as well as their excitonic properties and growth morphologies. Additionally, we highlight recent breakthroughs in TMD synthesis and characterization and discuss the newest families of 2D materials, including monoelement 2D materials (i.e., silicene, phosphorene, etc.) and transition metal carbide- and carbon nitride-based MXenes. We then discuss the doping and functionalization of 2D materials beyond graphene, which enable device applications, followed by advances in electronic, optoelectronic, and magnetic devices and theory. Finally, we provide perspectives on the future of 2D materials beyond graphene.

  17. Graphene: Amazing Material Found Thanks to Scotch Tape and Persistent

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Science | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) 1 » Graphene: Amazing Material Found Thanks to Scotch Tape and Persistent Science News News Home Featured Articles 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 Science Headlines Science Highlights Presentations & Testimony News Archives Communications and Public Affairs Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 03.25.11 Graphene: Amazing

  18. Three-dimensional graphene/LiFePO{sub 4} nanostructures as cathode materials for flexible lithium-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Y.H., E-mail: yhding@xtu.edu.cn [College of Chemical Engineering, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); Institute of Rheology Mechanics, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); Ren, H.M. [Institute of Rheology Mechanics, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); Huang, Y.Y. [BTR New Energy Materials Inc., Shenzhen 518000 (China); Chang, F.H.; Zhang, P. [Institute of Rheology Mechanics, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China)

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: Graphene/LiFePO{sub 4} composites as a high-performance cathode material for flexible lithium-ion batteries have been prepared by using a co-precipitation method to synthesize graphene/LiFePO4 powders as precursors and then followed by a solvent evaporation process. - Highlights: Flexible LiFePO{sub 4}/graphene films were prepared first time by a solvent evaporation process. The flexible electrode exhibited a high discharge capacity without conductive additives. Graphene network offers the electrode adequate strength to withstand repeated flexing. - Abstract: Three-dimensional graphene/LiFePO{sub 4} nanostructures for flexible lithium-ion batteries were successfully prepared by solvent evaporation method. Structural characteristics of flexible electrodes were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Electrochemical performance of graphene/LiFePO{sub 4} was examined by a variety of electrochemical testing techniques. The graphene/LiFePO{sub 4} nanostructures showed high electrochemical properties and significant flexibility. The composites with low graphene content exhibited a high capacity of 163.7 mAh g{sup ?1} at 0.1 C and 114 mAh g{sup ?1} at 5 C without further incorporation of conductive agents.

  19. Erosion-resistant composite material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Finch, C.B.; Tennery, V.J.; Curlee, R.M.

    A highly erosion-resistant composite material is formed of chemical vapor-deposited titanium diboride on a sintered titanium diboride-nickel substrate. This material may be suitable for use in cutting tools, coal liquefaction systems, etc.

  20. One-step in situ synthesis of grapheneTiO{sub 2} nanorod hybrid composites with enhanced photocatalytic activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Mingxuan Li, Weibin; Sun, Shanfu; He, Jia; Zhang, Qiang; Shi, Yuying

    2015-01-15

    Chemically bonded graphene/TiO{sub 2} nanorod hybrid composites with superior dispersity were synthesized by a one-step in situ hydrothermal method using graphene oxide (GO) and TiO{sub 2} (P25) as the starting materials. The as-prepared samples were characterized by XRD, XPS, TEM, FE-SEM, EDX, Raman, N{sub 2} adsorption, and UVvis DRS techniques. Enhanced light absorption and a red shift of absorption edge were observed for the composites in the ultravioletvisible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (UVvis DRS). Their effective photocatalytic activity was evaluated by the photodegradation of methylene blue under visible light irradiation. An enhancement of photocatalytic performance was observed over graphene/TiO{sub 2} nanorod hybrid composite photocatalysts, as 3.7 times larger than that of pristine TiO{sub 2} nanorods. This work demonstrated that the synthesis of TiO{sub 2} nanorods and simultaneous conversion of GO to graphene without using reducing agents had shown to be a rapid, direct and clean approach to fabricate chemically bonded graphene/TiO{sub 2} nanorod hybrid composites with enhanced photocatalytic performance.

  1. Carbon nanotube composite materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2015-03-24

    A material consisting essentially of a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes dissolved in a solvent. Un-functionalized carbon nanotube concentrations up to 30 wt % and hydroxylated carbon nanotube concentrations up to 40 wt % can be used with even small concentrations of each (less than 2 wt %) useful in producing enhanced conductivity properties of formed thin films.

  2. Graphene oxide as a photocatalytic material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishnamoorthy, Karthikeyan; Mohan, Rajneesh; Kim, S.-J.

    2011-06-13

    The photocatalytic characteristics of graphene oxide (GO) nanostructures synthesized by modified Hummer's method were investigated by measuring reduction rate of resazurin (RZ) into resorufin (RF) as a function of UV irradiation time. The progress of the photocatalytic reaction was monitored by change in color from blue (RZ) into pink (RF) followed by absorption spectra. It exhibited excellent photocatalytic activity, leading to the reduction of RZ in UV irradiation. The fitting of absorbance maximum versus time suggests that the reduction of RZ follow the pseudo first-order reaction kinetics. These results indicate that GO have great potential for use as a photocatalyst.

  3. Nano-Composite Material Development for 3-D Printers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Satches, Michael Randolph

    2015-10-14

    The objectives of the project was to create a graphene reinforced polymer nano-composite viable in a commercial 3-D printer; study the effects of ultra-high loading of graphene in polymer matrices; and determine the functional upper limit of graphene loading.

  4. Nanotube Composite Anode Materials | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanotube Composite Anode Materials Technology available for licensng: A composite material suitable for use in an anode for a lithium-ion battery Reduces manufacturing costs. ...

  5. Performance Assessment and Composit Analysis Material Disposal...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Performance Assessment and Composit Analysis Material Disposal Area G Revision 4 Performance Assessment and Composit Analysis Material Disposal Area G Revision 4 Los Alamos...

  6. Dense, finely, grained composite materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunmead, Stephen D. (Davis, CA); Holt, Joseph B. (San Jose, CA); Kingman, Donald D. (Danville, CA); Munir, Zuhair A. (Davis, CA)

    1990-01-01

    Dense, finely grained composite materials comprising one or more ceramic phase or phase and one or more metallic and/or intermetallic phase or phases are produced by combustion synthesis. Spherical ceramic grains are homogeneously dispersed within the matrix. Methods are provided, which include the step of applying mechanical pressure during or immediately after ignition, by which the microstructures in the resulting composites can be controllably selected.

  7. Graphene oxide-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticle composite with high transverse proton relaxivity value for magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venkatesha, N.; Srivastava, Chandan; Poojar, Pavan; Geethanath, Sairam; Qurishi, Yasrib

    2015-04-21

    The potential of graphene oxideFe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticle (GO-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) composite as an image contrast enhancing material in magnetic resonance imaging has been investigated. Proton relaxivity values were obtained in three different homogeneous dispersions of GO-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} composites synthesized by precipitating Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles in three different reaction mixtures containing 0.01?g, 0.1?g, and 0.2?g of graphene oxide. A noticeable difference in proton relaxivity values was observed between the three cases. A comprehensive structural and magnetic characterization revealed discrete differences in the extent of reduction of the graphene oxide and spacing between the graphene oxide sheets in the three composites. The GO-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} composite framework that contained graphene oxide with least extent of reduction of the carboxyl groups and largest spacing between the graphene oxide sheets provided the optimum structure for yielding a very high transverse proton relaxivity value. It was found that the GO-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} composites possessed good biocompatibility with normal cell lines, whereas they exhibited considerable toxicity towards breast cancer cells.

  8. Paper-based ultracapacitors with carbon nanotubes-graphene composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Jian E-mail: keidar@gwu.edu; Cheng, Xiaoqian; Brand, Cameron; Shashurin, Alexey; Keidar, Michael E-mail: keidar@gwu.edu; Sun, Jianwei; Reeves, Mark

    2014-04-28

    In this paper, a paper-based ultracapacitors were fabricated by the rod-rolling method with the ink of carbon nanomaterials, which were synthesized by arc discharge under various magnetic conditions. Composites of carbon nanostructures, including high-purity single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and graphene flakes were synthesized simultaneously in a magnetically enhanced arc. These two nanostructures have promising electrical properties and synergistic effects in the application of ultracapacitors. Scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, and Raman spectroscopy were employed to characterize the properties of carbon nanostructures and their thin films. The sheet resistance of the SWCNT and composite thin films was also evaluated by four-point probe from room temperature to the cryogenic temperature as low as 90?K. In addition, measurements of cyclic voltammetery and galvanostatic charging/discharging showed the ultracapacitor based on composites possessed a superior specific capacitance of up to 100?F/g, which is around three times higher than the ultracapacitor entirely fabricated with SWCNT.

  9. Tuning Interfacial Thermal Conductance of Graphene Embedded in Soft Materials by Vacancy Defects

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, Ying; Hu, Chongze; Huang, Jingsong; Sumpter, Bobby G; Qiao, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Nanocomposites based on graphene dispersed in matrices of soft materials are promising thermal management materials. Their effective thermal conductivity depends on both the thermal conductivity of graphene and the conductance of the thermal transport across graphene-matrix interfaces. Here we report on molecular dynamics simulations of the thermal transport across the interfaces between defected graphene and soft materials in two different modes: in the across mode, heat enters graphene from one side of its basal plane and leaves through the other side; in the non-across mode, heat enters or leaves a graphene simultaneously from both sides of its basal plane. Wemore » show that, as the density of vacancy defects in graphene increases from 0 to 8%, the conductance of the interfacial thermal transport in the across mode increases from 160.4 16 to 207.8 11 MW/m2K, while that in the non-across mode increases from 7.2 0.1 to 17.8 0.6 MW/m2K. The molecular mechanisms for these variations of thermal conductance are clarified by using the phonon density of states and structural characteristics of defected graphenes. On the basis of these results and effective medium theory, we show that it is possible to enhance the effective thermal conductivity of thermal nanocomposites by tuning the density of vacancy defects in graphene despite the fact that graphene s thermal conductivity always decreases as vacancy defects are introduced.« less

  10. Tuning Interfacial Thermal Conductance of Graphene Embedded in Soft Materials by Vacancy Defects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Ying; Hu, Chongze; Huang, Jingsong; Sumpter, Bobby G; Qiao, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Nanocomposites based on graphene dispersed in matrices of soft materials are promising thermal management materials. Their effective thermal conductivity depends on both the thermal conductivity of graphene and the conductance of the thermal transport across graphene-matrix interfaces. Here we report on molecular dynamics simulations of the thermal transport across the interfaces between defected graphene and soft materials in two different modes: in the across mode, heat enters graphene from one side of its basal plane and leaves through the other side; in the non-across mode, heat enters or leaves a graphene simultaneously from both sides of its basal plane. We show that, as the density of vacancy defects in graphene increases from 0 to 8%, the conductance of the interfacial thermal transport in the across mode increases from 160.4 16 to 207.8 11 MW/m2K, while that in the non-across mode increases from 7.2 0.1 to 17.8 0.6 MW/m2K. The molecular mechanisms for these variations of thermal conductance are clarified by using the phonon density of states and structural characteristics of defected graphenes. On the basis of these results and effective medium theory, we show that it is possible to enhance the effective thermal conductivity of thermal nanocomposites by tuning the density of vacancy defects in graphene despite the fact that graphene s thermal conductivity always decreases as vacancy defects are introduced.

  11. Nano-Composite Materials - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Find More Like This Return to Search Nano-Composite Materials National Renewable Energy ... have developed a method of producing a nano-composite material by co-sputtering a ...

  12. Self assembled multi-layer nanocomposite of graphene and metal oxide materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Jun; Aksay, Ilhan A; Choi, Daiwon; Kou, Rong; Nie, Zimin; Wang, Donghai; Yang, Zhenguo

    2015-04-28

    Nanocomposite materials having at least two layers, each layer consisting of one metal oxide bonded to at least one graphene layer were developed. The nanocomposite materials will typically have many alternating layers of metal oxides and graphene layers, bonded in a sandwich type construction and will be incorporated into an electrochemical or energy storage device.

  13. Self assembled multi-layer nanocomposite of graphene and metal oxide materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Jun; Choi, Daiwon; Kou, Rong; Nie, Zimin; Wang, Donghai; Yang, Zhenguo

    2014-09-16

    Nanocomposite materials having at least two layers, each layer consisting of one metal oxide bonded to at least one graphene layer were developed. The nanocomposite materials will typically have many alternating layers of metal oxides and graphene layers, bonded in a sandwich type construction and will be incorporated into an electrochemical or energy storage device.

  14. Self assembled multi-layer nanocomposite of graphene and metal oxide materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Jun; Aksay, Ilhan A; Choi, Daiwon; Kou, Rong; Nie, Zimin; Wang, Donghai; Yang, Zhenguo

    2013-10-22

    Nanocomposite materials having at least two layers, each layer consisting of one metal oxide bonded to at least one graphene layer were developed. The nanocomposite materials will typically have many alternating layers of metal oxides and graphene layers, bonded in a sandwich type construction and will be incorporated into an electrochemical or energy storage device.

  15. Compositions for saccharification of cellulosic material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McBrayer, Brett; Shaghasi, Tarana; Vlasenko, Elena

    2013-11-12

    The present invention relates to enzyme compositions for high temperature saccharification of cellulosic material and to uses thereof.

  16. Compositions for saccharification of cellulosic material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McBrayer, Brett; Shaghasi, Tarana; Vlasenko, Elena

    2015-11-04

    The present invention relates to enzyme compositions for high temperature saccharification of cellulosic material and to uses thereof.

  17. Thin film dielectric composite materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jia, Quanxi; Gibbons, Brady J.; Findikoglu, Alp T.; Park, Bae Ho

    2002-01-01

    A dielectric composite material comprising at least two crystal phases of different components with TiO.sub.2 as a first component and a material selected from the group consisting of Ba.sub.1-x Sr.sub.x TiO.sub.3 where x is from 0.3 to 0.7, Pb.sub.1-x Ca.sub.x TiO.sub.3 where x is from 0.4 to 0.7, Sr.sub.1-x Pb.sub.x TiO.sub.3 where x is from 0.2 to 0.4, Ba.sub.1-x Cd.sub.x TiO.sub.3 where x is from 0.02 to 0.1, BaTi.sub.1-x Zr.sub.x O.sub.3 where x is from 0.2 to 0.3, BaTi.sub.1-x Sn.sub.x O.sub.3 where x is from 0.15 to 0.3, BaTi.sub.1-x Hf.sub.x O.sub.3 where x is from 0.24 to 0.3, Pb.sub.1-1.3x La.sub.x TiO.sub.3+0.2x where x is from 0.23 to 0.3, (BaTiO.sub.3).sub.x (PbFeo.sub.0.5 Nb.sub.0.5 O.sub.3).sub.1-x where x is from 0.75 to 0.9, (PbTiO.sub.3).sub.- (PbCo.sub.0.5 W.sub.0.5 O.sub.3).sub.1-x where x is from 0.1 to 0.45, (PbTiO.sub.3).sub.x (PbMg.sub.0.5 W.sub.0.5 O.sub.3).sub.1-x where x is from 0.2 to 0.4, and (PbTiO.sub.3).sub.x (PbFe.sub.0.5 Ta.sub.0.5 O.sub.3).sub.1-x where x is from 0 to 0.2, as the second component is described. The dielectric composite material can be formed as a thin film upon suitable substrates.

  18. Polyolefin composites containing a phase change material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, Ival O.

    1991-01-01

    A composite useful in thermal energy storage, said composite being formed of a polyolefin matrix having a phase change material such as a crystalline alkyl hydrocarbon incorporated therein, said polyolefin being thermally form stable; the composite is useful in forming pellets, sheets or fibers having thermal energy storage characteristics; methods for forming the composite are also disclosed.

  19. Composite material and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fryxell, Glen E.; Samuels, William D.; Simmons, Kevin L.

    2004-04-20

    The composite material and methods of making the present invention rely upon a fully dense monolayer of molecules attached to an oxygenated surface at one end, and an organic terminal group at the other end, which is in turn bonded to a polymer. Thus, the composite material is a second material chemically bonded to a polymer with fully dense monolayer there between.

  20. DOE Science Showcase - Graphene | OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Graphene has promising applications in many areas such as the development of solar cells, composite materials, lithium-ion batteries, biological and chemical sensors, transistors, ...

  1. Composite materials formed with anchored nanostructures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seals, Roland D; Menchhofer, Paul A; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2015-03-10

    A method of forming nano-structure composite materials that have a binder material and a nanostructure fiber material is described. A precursor material may be formed using a mixture of at least one metal powder and anchored nanostructure materials. The metal powder mixture may be (a) Ni powder and (b) NiAl powder. The anchored nanostructure materials may comprise (i) NiAl powder as a support material and (ii) carbon nanotubes attached to nanoparticles adjacent to a surface of the support material. The process of forming nano-structure composite materials typically involves sintering the mixture under vacuum in a die. When Ni and NiAl are used in the metal powder mixture Ni.sub.3Al may form as the binder material after sintering. The mixture is sintered until it consolidates to form the nano-structure composite material.

  2. Process for producing dispersed particulate composite materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Henager, Jr., Charles H.; Hirth, John P.

    1995-01-01

    This invention is directed to a process for forming noninterwoven dispersed particulate composite products. In one case a composite multi-layer film product comprises a substantially noninterwoven multi-layer film having a plurality of discrete layers. This noninterwoven film comprises at least one discrete layer of a first material and at least one discrete layer of a second material. In another case the first and second materials are blended together with each other. In either case, the first material comprises a metalloid and the second material a metal compound. At least one component of a first material in one discrete layer undergoes a solid state displacement reaction with at least one component of a second material thereby producing the requisite noninterwoven composite film product. Preferably, the first material comprises silicon, the second material comprises Mo.sub.2 C, the third material comprises SiC and the fourth material comprises MoSi.sub.2.

  3. Polymer/Pristine graphene based composites: from emulsions to strong, electrically conducting foams

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Woltornist, Steven J.; Carrillo, Jan-Michael Y.; Xu, Thomas O.; Dobrynin, Andrey V.; Adamson, Douglas H.

    2015-01-21

    The unique electrical, thermal, and mechanical properties of graphene make it a perfect candidate for applications in graphene/graphite based polymer composites, yet challenges due to the lack of solubility of pristine graphene/graphite in water and common organic solvents have limited its practical utilization. In this paper, we report a scalable and environmentally friendly technique to form water-in-oil type emulsions stabilized by overlapping pristine graphene sheets, enabling the synthesis of open cell foams containing a continuous graphitic network. Our approach utilizes the insolubility of graphene/graphite in both water and organic solvents and so does not require oxidation, reduction, surfactants, high boilingmore » solvents, chemical functionalization, or the input of large amounts of mechanical energy or heat. At the heart of our technique is the strong attraction of graphene to high-energy oil and water interfaces. This allows for the creation of stable water-in-oil emulsions with controlled droplet size and overlapping graphene sheets playing the role of surfactant by covering the droplet surface and stabilizing the interfaces with a thin graphitic skin. Finally, these emulsions are used as templates for the synthesis of open cell foams with densities below 0.35 g/cm3 that exhibit remarkable mechanical and electrical properties including compressive moduli up to ~100 MPa, compressive strengths of over 8.3 MPa (1200 psi), and bulk conductivities approaching 7 S/m.« less

  4. Polymer/Pristine graphene based composites: from emulsions to strong, electrically conducting foams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woltornist, Steven J.; Carrillo, Jan-Michael Y.; Xu, Thomas O.; Dobrynin, Andrey V.; Adamson, Douglas H.

    2015-01-21

    The unique electrical, thermal, and mechanical properties of graphene make it a perfect candidate for applications in graphene/graphite based polymer composites, yet challenges due to the lack of solubility of pristine graphene/graphite in water and common organic solvents have limited its practical utilization. In this paper, we report a scalable and environmentally friendly technique to form water-in-oil type emulsions stabilized by overlapping pristine graphene sheets, enabling the synthesis of open cell foams containing a continuous graphitic network. Our approach utilizes the insolubility of graphene/graphite in both water and organic solvents and so does not require oxidation, reduction, surfactants, high boiling solvents, chemical functionalization, or the input of large amounts of mechanical energy or heat. At the heart of our technique is the strong attraction of graphene to high-energy oil and water interfaces. This allows for the creation of stable water-in-oil emulsions with controlled droplet size and overlapping graphene sheets playing the role of surfactant by covering the droplet surface and stabilizing the interfaces with a thin graphitic skin. Finally, these emulsions are used as templates for the synthesis of open cell foams with densities below 0.35 g/cm3 that exhibit remarkable mechanical and electrical properties including compressive moduli up to ~100 MPa, compressive strengths of over 8.3 MPa (1200 psi), and bulk conductivities approaching 7 S/m.

  5. Electrode material comprising graphene-composite materials in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Issue Date: 2014-07-15 OSTI Identifier: 1144740 Assignee: Northwestern University (Evanston, IL) CHO Patent Number(s): 8,778,538 Application Number: 12940,241 Contract Number: ...

  6. R25 Polyisocyanurate Composite Insulation Material | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    R25 Polyisocyanurate Composite Insulation Material R25 Polyisocyanurate Composite Insulation Material R25 Polyisocyanurate Composite Insulation Material R25 Polyisocyanurate Composite Insulation Material R25 Polyisocyanurate Composite Insulation Material R25 Polyisocyanurate Composite Insulation Material Lead Performer: Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) - Oak Ridge, TN Partners: -- NanoPore Inc. - Albuquerque, NM; -- Firestone Building Products Company - Indianapolis, IN DOE Funding:

  7. Composite, nanostructured, super-hydrophobic material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    D'Urso, Brian R.; Simpson, John T.

    2007-08-21

    A hydrophobic disordered composite material having a protrusive surface feature includes a recessive phase and a protrusive phase, the recessive phase having a higher susceptibility to a preselected etchant than the protrusive phase, the composite material having an etched surface wherein the protrusive phase protrudes from the surface to form a protrusive surface feature, the protrusive feature being hydrophobic.

  8. Composite materials and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simmons, Kevin L [Kennewick, WA; Wood, Geoffrey M [North Saanich, CA

    2011-05-17

    A method for forming improved composite materials using a thermosetting polyester urethane hybrid resin, a closed cavity mold having an internal heat transfer mechanism used in this method, and the composite materials formed by this method having a hybrid of a carbon fiber layer and a fiberglass layer.

  9. Polymer/Elastomer and Composite Material Science

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    / Elastomer and Composite Material Science KEVIN L. SIMMONS Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA DOE Headquarters, Forrestal Bldg. October 17-18, 2012 January 17, 2013 Kevin.simmons@pnnl.gov 1 Outline Hydrogen production, transmission, distribution, delivery system Common themes in the hydrogen system Automotive vs infrastructure Hydrogen use conditions Polymer/elastomer and composites compatibility? Common materials in BOP components, hoses, and liners Common materials in

  10. Improving Alloy Memory by Tuning Material Composition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Improving Alloy Memory by Tuning Material Composition Improving Alloy Memory by Tuning Material Composition Print Wednesday, 10 August 2016 00:00 Upon deformation, some metal alloys can "remember" their original form and return to it repeatedly when heated. Called "shape memory alloys," these materials have emerging applications in medical devices (stents, artery guide wires, and heart valves) and microelectromechanical actuators and sensors. Usually, within a few cycles, the

  11. Combinatorial synthesis of inorganic or composite materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldwasser, Isy; Ross, Debra A.; Schultz, Peter G.; Xiang, Xiao-Dong; Briceno, Gabriel; Sun, Xian-Dong; Wang, Kai-An

    2010-08-03

    Methods and apparatus for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials or, alternatively, allowing the components to interact to form at least two different materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, nonbiological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties.

  12. Advanced Composite Materials | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The fan blade is a work of art, with each stripe of composite material laid by hand to ... GE Innovation and Manufacturing in Europe 3-1-9-v-industrial-inspec...

  13. Polymer and Composite Materials Meeting Agenda

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Agenda from the Polymer and Composite Materials Meeting held by the U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office and Sandia National Laboratories on October 17-18, 2012, in Washington, D.C.

  14. Polymer/Elastomer and Composite Material Science

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation by Kevin Simmons, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, at the U.S. Department of Energy's Polymer and Composite Materials Meeting, held October 17-18, 2012, in Washington, D.C.

  15. Method of making a composite refractory material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morrow, M.S.; Holcombe, C.E.

    1995-09-26

    A composite refractory material is prepared by combining boron carbide with furan resin to form a mixture containing about 8 wt. % furan resin. The mixture is formed into a pellet which is placed into a grit pack comprising an oxide of an element such as yttrium to form a sinterable body. The sinterable body is sintered under vacuum with microwave energy at a temperature no greater than 2000 C to form a composite refractory material.

  16. Method of making a composite refractory material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morrow, Marvin S. (Kingston, TN); Holcombe, Cressie E. (Knoxville, TN)

    1995-01-01

    A composite refractory material is prepared by combining boron carbide with furan resin to form a mixture containing about 8 wt. % furan resin. The mixture is formed into a pellet which is placed into a grit pack comprising an oxide of an element such as yttrium to form a sinterable body. The sinterable body is sintered under vacuum with microwave energy at a temperature no greater than 2000.degree. C. to form a composite refractory material.

  17. Composite materials with improved phyllosilicate dispersion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaiko, David J.

    2004-09-14

    The present invention provides phyllosilicates edge modified with anionic surfactants, composite materials made from the edge modified phyllosilicates, and methods for making the same. In various embodiments the phyllosilicates are also surface-modified with hydrophilic lipophilic balance (HLB) modifying agents, polymeric hydrotropes, and antioxidants. The invention also provides blends of edge modified phyllosilicates and semicrystalline waxes. The composite materials are made by dispersing the edge modified phyllosilicates with polymers, particularly polyolefins and elastomers.

  18. Composite, ordered material having sharp surface features

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    D'Urso, Brian R.; Simpson, John T.

    2006-12-19

    A composite material having sharp surface features includes a recessive phase and a protrusive phase, the recessive phase having a higher susceptibility to a preselected etchant than the protrusive phase, the composite material having an etched surface wherein the protrusive phase protrudes from the surface to form a sharp surface feature. The sharp surface features can be coated to make the surface super-hydrophobic.

  19. Method to fabricate layered material compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fleming, James G.; Lin, Shawn-Yu

    2002-01-01

    A new class of processes suited to the fabrication of layered material compositions is disclosed. Layered material compositions are typically three-dimensional structures which can be decomposed into a stack of structured layers. The best known examples are the photonic lattices. The present invention combines the characteristic features of photolithography and chemical-mechanical polishing to permit the direct and facile fabrication of, e.g., photonic lattices having photonic bandgaps in the 0.1-20.mu. spectral range.

  20. Method to fabricate layered material compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fleming, James G.; Lin, Shawn-Yu

    2004-11-02

    A new class of processes suited to the fabrication of layered material compositions is disclosed. Layered material compositions are typically three-dimensional structures which can be decomposed into a stack of structured layers. The best known examples are the photonic lattices. The present invention combines the characteristic features of photolithography and chemical-mechanical polishing to permit the direct and facile fabrication of, e.g., photonic lattices having photonic bandgaps in the 0.1-20.mu. spectral range.

  1. R25 Polyisocyanurate Composite Insulation Material

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    R25 Polyisocyanurate Composite Insulation Material 2016 Building Technologies Office Peer Review Kaushik Biswas, biswask@ornl.gov Oak Ridge National Laboratory 2 Project Summary Timeline: Start date: Oct 1, 2014 Planned end date: Sep 30, 2017 Key Milestones 1. First full-scale MAI-polyiso composite measured to be R-10/inch; 9/30/15 2. Verify R-value of improved MAI-polyiso composite produced on the production line to be R-12/inch ; 9/30/2016 3. Optimized cost of commercial composite panels with

  2. Controlled fabrication and tunable photoluminescence properties of Mn{sup 2+} doped grapheneZnO composite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luan, Xinglong; Zhang, Yihe Tong, Wangshu; Shang, Jiwu; An, Qi; Huang, Hongwei

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: GrapheneZnO composites were synthesized by a mixed solvothermal method. ZnO quantum dots are distributed uniformly on the graphene sheets. A possible hypothesis is raised for the influence of graphene oxide on the nucleation of ZnO. Mn{sup 2+} doped grapheneZnO composites were fabricated and the emission spectra can be tuned by doping. - Abstract: GrapheneZnO composites (GZnO) with controlled morphology and photoluminescence property were synthesized by a mixed solvothermal method. Mixed solvent were composed by dimethyl sulfoxide and ethylene glycol. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and photoluminescence spectra were used to characterize GZnO. Graphene as a substrate can help the distribution and the dispersity of ZnO, and a possible model of the interaction between graphene oxide and ZnO particles is proposed. At the same time, graphene also reduce the size of ZnO particles to about 5 nm. Furthermore, Mn{sup 2+} ions dopes GZnO successfully by the mixed solvothermal synthesis and the doping of Mn{sup 2+} makes GZnO shift red from 465 nm to 548 nm and 554 nm in the emission spectrum. The changes of the emission spectrum by the adding of Mn{sup 2+} make GZnO have tunable photoluminescence spectrum which is desirable for practical applications.

  3. Nickelcobalt layered double hydroxide ultrathin nanoflakes decorated on graphene sheets with a 3D nanonetwork structure as supercapacitive materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Tao; Li, Ruiyi; Li, Zaijun

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: The microwave heating reflux approach was developed for the fabrication of nickelcobalt layered double hydroxide ultrathin nanoflakes decorated on graphene sheets, in which ammonia and ethanol were used as the precipitator and medium for the synthesis. The obtained composite shows a 3D flowerclusters morphology with nanonetwork structure and largely enhanced supercapacitive performance. - Highlights: The paper reported the microwave synthesis of nickelcobalt layered double hydroxide/graphene composite. The novel synthesis method is rapid, green, efficient and can be well used to the mass production. The as-synthesized composite offers a 3D flowerclusters morphology with nanonetwork structure. The composite offers excellent supercapacitive performance. This study provides a promising route to design and synthesis of advanced graphene-based materials with the superiorities of time-saving and cost-effective characteristics. - Abstract: The study reported a novel microwave heating reflux method for the fabrication of nickelcobalt layered double hydroxide ultrathin nanoflakes decorated on graphene sheets (GS/NiCo-LDH). Ammonia and ethanol were employed as precipitant and reaction medium for the synthesis, respectively. The resulting GS/NiCo-LDH offers a 3D flowerclusters morphology with nanonetwork structure. Due to the greatly enhanced rate of electron transfer and mass transport, the GS/NiCo-LDH electrode exhibits excellent supercapacitive performances. The maximum specific capacitance was found to be 1980.7 F g{sup ?1} at the current density of 1 A g{sup ?1}. The specific capacitance can remain 1274.7 F g{sup ?1} at the current density of 15 A g{sup ?1} and it has an increase of about 2.9% after 1500 cycles. Moreover, the study also provides a promising approach for the design and synthesis of metallic double hydroxides/graphene hybrid materials with time-saving and cost-effective characteristics, which can be potentially applied in

  4. Advanced Composite Materials for Cold and Cryogenic Hydrogen...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Composite Materials for Cold and Cryogenic Hydrogen Storage Applications in Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles Workshop Advanced Composite Materials for Cold and Cryogenic Hydrogen ...

  5. Luminescent single-walled carbon nanotube/silica composite materials...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Luminescent single-walled carbon nanotubesilica composite materials Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Luminescent single-walled carbon nanotubesilica composite materials ...

  6. Advanced Materials and Processing of Composites for High Volume...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Applications Advanced Materials and Processing of Composites for High Volume Applications ... More Documents & Publications Advanced Materials and Processing of Composites for High ...

  7. Advanced Materials and Processing of Composites for High Volume...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Applications (ACC932) Advanced Materials and Processing of Composites for High Volume ... More Documents & Publications Advanced Materials and Processing of Composites for High ...

  8. Shanghai Yuke Composite Material Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Yuke Composite Material Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Shanghai Yuke Composite Material Co., Ltd Place: Shanghai Municipality, China Zip: 20012 Sector: Wind energy...

  9. Luminescent single-walled carbon nanotube/silica composite materials...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Luminescent single-walled carbon nanotubesilica composite materials Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Luminescent single-walled carbon nanotubesilica composite materials...

  10. Processes for fabricating composite reinforced material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seals, Roland D.; Ripley, Edward B.; Ludtka, Gerard M.

    2015-11-24

    A family of materials wherein nanostructures and/or nanotubes are incorporated into a multi-component material arrangement, such as a metallic or ceramic alloy or composite/aggregate, producing a new material or metallic/ceramic alloy. The new material has significantly increased strength, up to several thousands of times normal and perhaps substantially more, as well as significantly decreased weight. The new materials may be manufactured into a component where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the bulk and/or matrix material, or as a coating where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the coating or surface of a "normal" substrate material. The nanostructures are incorporated into the material structure either randomly or aligned, within grains, or along or across grain boundaries.

  11. Atomic-scale friction modulated by potential corrugation in multi-layered graphene materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhuang, Chunqiang; Liu, Lei

    2015-03-21

    Friction is an important issue that has to be carefully treated for the fabrication of graphene-based nano-scale devices. So far, the friction mechanism of graphene materials on the atomic scale has not yet been clearly presented. Here, first-principles calculations were employed to unveil the friction behaviors and their atomic-scale mechanism. We found that potential corrugations on sliding surfaces dominate the friction force and the friction anisotropy of graphene materials. Higher friction forces correspond to larger corrugations of potential energy, which are tuned by the number of graphene layers. The friction anisotropy is determined by the regular distributions of potential energy. The sliding along a fold-line path (hollow-atop-hollow) has a relatively small potential energy barrier. Thus, the linear sliding observed in macroscopic friction experiments may probably be attributed to the fold-line sliding mode on the atomic scale. These findings can also be extended to other layer-structure materials, such as molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) and graphene-like BN sheets.

  12. Health monitoring method for composite materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Watkins, Jr., Kenneth S.; Morris, Shelby J.

    2011-04-12

    An in-situ method for monitoring the health of a composite component utilizes a condition sensor made of electrically conductive particles dispersed in a polymeric matrix. The sensor is bonded or otherwise formed on the matrix surface of the composite material. Age-related shrinkage of the sensor matrix results in a decrease in the resistivity of the condition sensor. Correlation of measured sensor resistivity with data from aged specimens allows indirect determination of mechanical damage and remaining age of the composite component.

  13. Composite materials and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Uribe, Francisco A.; Wilson, Mahlon S.; Garzon, Fernando H.

    2009-09-15

    A method of depositing noble metals on a metal hexaboride support. The hexaboride support is sufficiently electropositive to allow noble metals to deposit spontaneously from solutions containing ionic species of such metals onto the support. The method permits the deposition of metallic films of controlled thickness and particle size at room temperature without using separate reducing agents. Composite materials comprising noble metal films deposited on such metal hexaborides are also described. Such composite materials may be used as catalysts, thermionic emitters, electrical contacts, electrodes, adhesion layers, and optical coatings.

  14. Making better batteries with metal oxide & graphene composites

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2012-12-31

    Learn how PNNL and Princeton scientists create better materials for batteries, materials that assemble on their own into durable nanocomposites.

  15. Thermal treatment effects on charge storage performance of graphene-based materials for supercapacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Hongxin; Bhat, Vinay V; Gallego, Nidia C; Contescu, Cristian I

    2012-01-01

    Graphene materials were synthesized by reduction of exfoliated graphene oxide sheets by hydrazine hydrate and then thermally treated in nitrogen to improve the surface area and their electrochemical performance as electrical double-layer capacitor electrodes. The structural and surface properties of the prepared reduced graphite oxide (RGO) were investigated using atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectra, X-ray diffraction, and nitrogen adsorption / desorption. RGO forms a continuous network of crumpled sheets, which consist of numerous few-layer and single-layer graphenes. Electrochemical studies were conducted by cyclic voltammetry, impedance spectroscopy, and galvanostatic charge-discharge measurements. The modified RGO materials showed enhanced electrochemical performance, with maximum specific capacitance of 96 F/g, energy density of 12.8 Wh/kg, and power density of 160 kW/kg. The results demonstrate that thermal treatment of RGO at selected conditions is a convenient and efficient method for improving specific capacitance, energy, and power density.

  16. Modeling of laser interactions with composite materials

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rubenchik, Alexander M.; Boley, Charles D.

    2013-05-07

    In this study, we develop models of laser interactions with composite materials consisting of fibers embedded within a matrix. A ray-trace model is shown to determine the absorptivity, absorption depth, and optical power enhancement within the material, as well as the angular distribution of the reflected light. We also develop a macroscopic model, which provides physical insight and overall results. We show that the parameters in this model can be determined from the ray trace model.

  17. Method of making carbon nanotube composite materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2014-05-20

    The present invention is a method of making a composite polymeric material by dissolving a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes and optionally additives in a solvent to make a solution and removing at least a portion of the solvent after casting onto a substrate to make thin films. The material has enhanced conductivity properties due to the blending of the un-functionalized and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes.

  18. Self-assembly of 2D sandwich-structured MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/graphene composites for high-performance lithium storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Songmei Wang, Bo; Li, Bin; Liu, Jianhua; Yu, Mei; Wu, Xiaoyu

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • MFO/GN composites were synthesized by a facile in situ solvothermal approach. • The MFO microspheres are sandwiched between the graphene layers. • Each MFO microsphere is an interstitial cluster of nanoparticles. • The MFO/GN electrode exhibits an enhanced cyclability for Li-ion batteries anodes. - Abstract: In this study, two-dimensional (2D) sandwich-structured MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/graphene (MFO/GN) composites are synthesized by a facile in situ solvothermal approach, using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as cationic surfactant. As a consequence, the nanocomposites of MFO/GN self-assembled into a 2D sandwich structure, in which the interstitial cluster structure of microsphere-type MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} is sandwiched between the graphene layers. This special structure of the MFO/GN composites used as anodes for lithium-ion batteries will be favorable for the maximum accessible surface of electroactive materials, fast diffusion of lithium ions and migration of electron, and elastomeric space to accommodate volume changes during the discharge–charge processes. The as-synthesized MFO/GN composites deliver a high specific reversible capacity of 987.95 mA h g{sup −1} at a current density of 200 mA g{sup −1}, a good capacity retention of 69.27% after 80 cycles and excellent rate performance for lithium storage.

  19. Preparation of reduced graphene oxide/gelatin composite films with reinforced mechanical strength

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Wenchao; Wang, Zhipeng; Liu, Yu; Li, Nan; Wang, Wei; Gao, Jianping

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: ► We used and compared different proportion of gelatin and chitosan as reducing agents. ► The mechanical properties of the films are investigated, especially the wet films. ► The cell toxicity of the composite films as biomaterial is carried out. ► The water absorption capabilities of the composite films also studied. -- Abstract: Graphene oxide (GO) was reduced by chitosan/gelatin solution and added to gelatin (Gel) to fabricate reduced graphene oxide/gelatin (RGO/Gel) films by a solvent-casting method using genipin as cross-linking agent. The structure and properties of the films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and UV–vis spectroscopy. The addition of RGO increased the tensile strength of the RGO/Gel films in both dry and wet states, but decreased their elongation at break. The incorperation of RGO also decreased the swelling ability of the films in water. Cell cultures were carried out in order to test the cytotoxicity of the films. The cells grew and reproduced well on the RGO/Gel films, indicating that the addition of RGO has no negative effect on the compatibility of the gelatin. Therefore, the reduced graphene oxide/gelatin composite is a promising biomaterial with excellent mechanical properties and good cell compatibility.

  20. Anomalous magnetic behavior in nanocomposite materials of reduced graphene oxide-Ni/NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kollu, Pratap E-mail: anirmalagrace@vit.ac.in; Prathapani, Sateesh; Varaprasadarao, Eswara K.; Mallick, Sudhanshu; Bahadur, D. E-mail: anirmalagrace@vit.ac.in; Santosh, Chella; Grace, Andrews Nirmala E-mail: anirmalagrace@vit.ac.in

    2014-08-04

    Magnetic Reduced Graphene Oxide-Nickel/NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (RGO-Ni/NF) nanocomposite has been synthesized by one pot solvothermal method. Respective phase formations and their purities in the composite are confirmed by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope and X Ray Diffraction, respectively. For the RGO-Ni/NF composite material finite-size effects lead to the anomalous magnetic behavior, which is corroborated in temperature and field dependent magnetization curves. Here, we are reporting the behavior of higher magnetization values for Zero Field Cooled condition to that of Field Cooled for the RGO-Ni/NF nanocomposite. Also, the observed negative and positive moments in Hysteresis loops at relatively smaller applied fields (100?Oe and 200?Oe) are explained on the basis of surface spin disorder.

  1. PAMAM dendrimers and graphene: Materials for removing aromatic contaminants from water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeFever, Ryan S.; Geitner, Nicholas K.; Bhattacharya, Priyanka; Ding, Feng; Ke, Pu Chun; Sarupria, Sapna

    2015-04-07

    We present results from experiments and atomistic molecular dynamics simulations on the association of naphthalene with polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers and graphene oxide (GrO). Specifically, we investigate 3rd-6th generation (G3-G6) PAMAM dendrimers and GrO with different levels of oxidation. The work is motivated by the potential applications of these materials in removing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon contaminants from water. Our experimental results indicate that graphene oxide outperforms dendrimers in removing naphthalene from water. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the prominent factors driving naphthalene association to these seemingly disparate materials are similar. Interestingly, we find that cooperative interactions between the naphthalene molecules play a significant role in enhancing their association to the dendrimers and graphene oxide. Our findings highlight that while selection of appropriate materials is important, the interactions between the contaminants themselves can also be important in governing the effectiveness of a given material. The combined use of experiments and molecular dynamics simulations allows us to comment on the possible factors resulting in better performance of graphene oxide in removing naphthalene from water.

  2. Cyclododecane as support material for clean and facile transfer of large-area few-layer graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Capasso, A.; Leoni, E.; Dikonimos, T.; Buonocore, F.; Lisi, N. [ENEA, Materials Technology Unit, Surface Technology Laboratory, Casaccia Research Centre, Via Anguillarese 301, 00060 Rome (Italy); De Francesco, M. [ENEA, Technical Unit for Renewable Energies Sources, Casaccia Research Center, Via Anguillarese 301, 00060 Rome (Italy); Lancellotti, L.; Bobeico, E. [ENEA, Portici Research Centre, P.le E. Fermi 1, 80055 Portici (Italy); Sarto, M. S.; Tamburrano, A.; De Bellis, G. [Research Center on Nanotechnology Applied to Engineering of Sapienza (CNIS), SSNLab, Sapienza University of Rome, P.le Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy)

    2014-09-15

    The transfer of chemical vapor deposited graphene is a crucial process, which can affect the quality of the transferred films and compromise their application in devices. Finding a robust and intrinsically clean material capable of easing the transfer of graphene without interfering with its properties remains a challenge. We here propose the use of an organic compound, cyclododecane, as a transfer material. This material can be easily spin coated on graphene and assist the transfer, leaving no residues and requiring no further removal processes. The effectiveness of this transfer method for few-layer graphene on a large area was evaluated and confirmed by microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, x-ray photoemission spectroscopy, and four-point probe measurements. Schottky-barrier solar cells with few-layer graphene were fabricated on silicon wafers by using the cyclododecane transfer method and outperformed reference cells made by standard methods.

  3. Polymer and Composite Materials Meeting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Polymer and Composite Materials Meeting Polymer and Composite Materials Meeting The U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Office and Sandia National Laboratories held a Polymer and Composite Materials Meeting on October 17-18, 2012, in Washington, D.C., to share information about the use of polymer and composite materials in hydrogen applications. Meeting objectives were 1) to discuss knowledge gaps and data needs for using polymers and composite materials systems in hydrogen

  4. Metalized T graphene: A reversible hydrogen storage material at room temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ye, Xiao-Juan; Zhong, Wei, E-mail: csliu@njupt.edu.cn, E-mail: wzhong@nju.edu.cn; Du, You-Wei [Nanjing National Laboratory of Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Liu, Chun-Sheng, E-mail: csliu@njupt.edu.cn, E-mail: wzhong@nju.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Radio Frequency and Micro-Nano Electronics of Jiangsu Province, Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Nanjing 210023 (China); Zeng, Zhi [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2014-09-21

    Lithium (Li)-decorated graphene is a promising hydrogen storage medium due to its high capacity. However, homogeneous mono-layer coating graphene with lithium atoms is metastable and the lithium atoms would cluster on the surface, resulting in the poor reversibility. Using van der Waals-corrected density functional theory, we demonstrated that lithium atoms can be homogeneously dispersed on T graphene due to a nonuniform charge distribution in T graphene and strong hybridizations between the C-2p and Li-2p orbitals. Thus, Li atoms are not likely to form clusters, indicating a good reversible hydrogen storage. Both the polarization mechanism and the orbital hybridizations contribute to the adsorption of hydrogen molecules (storage capacity of 7.7 wt. %) with an optimal adsorption energy of 0.19 eV/H?. The adsorption/desorption of H? at ambient temperature and pressure is also discussed. Our results can serve as a guide in the design of new hydrogen storage materials based on non-hexagonal graphenes.

  5. Conductor-polymer composite electrode materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ginley, D.S.; Kurtz, S.R.; Smyrl, W.H.; Zeigler, J.M.

    1984-06-13

    A conductive composite material useful as an electrode, comprises a conductor and an organic polymer which is reversibly electrochemically dopable to change its electrical conductivity. Said polymer continuously surrounds the conductor in intimate electrical contact therewith and is prepared by electrochemical growth on said conductor or by reaction of its corresponding monomer(s) on said conductor which has been pre-impregnated or pre-coated with an activator for said polymerization. Amount of the conductor is sufficient to render the resultant composite electrically conductive even when the polymer is in an undoped insulating state.

  6. Graphene nanocomposites for electrochemical cell electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhamu, Aruna; Jang, Bor Z.; Shi, Jinjun

    2015-11-19

    A composite composition for electrochemical cell electrode applications, the composition comprising multiple solid particles, wherein (a) a solid particle is composed of graphene platelets dispersed in or bonded by a first matrix or binder material, wherein the graphene platelets are not obtained from graphitization of the first binder or matrix material; (b) the graphene platelets have a length or width in the range of 10 nm to 10 .mu.m; (c) the multiple solid particles are bonded by a second binder material; and (d) the first or second binder material is selected from a polymer, polymeric carbon, amorphous carbon, metal, glass, ceramic, oxide, organic material, or a combination thereof. For a lithium ion battery anode application, the first binder or matrix material is preferably amorphous carbon or polymeric carbon. Such a composite composition provides a high anode capacity and good cycling response. For a supercapacitor electrode application, the solid particles preferably have meso-scale pores therein to accommodate electrolyte.

  7. Alkali metal protective garment and composite material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ballif, III, John L.; Yuan, Wei W.

    1980-01-01

    A protective garment and composite material providing satisfactory heat resistance and physical protection for articles and personnel exposed to hot molten alkali metals, such as sodium. Physical protection is provided by a continuous layer of nickel foil. Heat resistance is provided by an underlying backing layer of thermal insulation. Overlying outer layers of fireproof woven ceramic fibers are used to protect the foil during storage and handling.

  8. Fluorescent single walled nanotube/silica composite materials...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Fluorescent single walled nanotubesilica composite materials Fluorescent composites of surfactant-wrapped single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were prepared by exposing ...

  9. Green synthesis of boron doped graphene and its application as high performance anode material in Li ion battery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sahoo, Madhumita; Sreena, K.P.; Vinayan, B.P.; Ramaprabhu, S.

    2015-01-15

    Graphical abstract: Boron doped graphene (B-G), synthesized by simple hydrogen induced reduction technique using boric acid as boron precursor, have more uneven surface as a result of smaller bonding distance of boron compared to carbon, showed high capacity and high rate capability compared to pristine graphene as an anode material for Li ion battery application. - Abstract: The present work demonstrates a facile route for the large-scale, catalyst free, and green synthesis approach of boron doped graphene (B-G) and its use as high performance anode material for Li ion battery (LIB) application. Boron atoms were doped into graphene framework with an atomic percentage of 5.93% via hydrogen induced thermal reduction technique using graphite oxide and boric acid as precursors. Various characterization techniques were used to confirm the boron doping in graphene sheets. B-G as anode material shows a discharge capacity of 548 mAh g{sup ?1} at 100 mA g{sup ?1} after 30th cycles. At high current density value of 1 A g{sup ?1}, B-G as anode material enhances the specific capacity by about 1.7 times compared to pristine graphene. The present study shows a simplistic way of boron doping in graphene leading to an enhanced Li ion adsorption due to the change in electronic states.

  10. Composite materials for thermal energy storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, David K.; Burrows, Richard W.; Shinton, Yvonne D.

    1986-01-01

    The present invention discloses composite material for thermal energy storage based upon polyhydric alcohols, such as pentaerythritol, trimethylol ethane (also known as pentaglycerine), neopentyl glycol and related compounds including trimethylol propane, monoaminopentaerythritol, diamino-pentaerythritol and tris(hydroxymethyl)acetic acid, separately or in combinations, which provide reversible heat storage through crystalline phase transformations. These phase change materials do not become liquid during use and are in contact with at least one material selected from the group consisting of metals, carbon siliceous, plastic, cellulosic, natural fiber, artificial fiber, concrete, gypsum, porous rock, and mixtures thereof. Particulate additions, such as aluminum or graphite powders, as well as metal and carbon fibers can also be incorporated therein. Particulate and/or fibrous additions can be introduced into molten phase change materials which can then be cast into various shapes. After the phase change materials have solidified, the additions will remain dispersed throughout the matrix of the cast solid. The polyol is in contact with at least one material selected from the group consisting of metals, carbon siliceous, plastic, cellulosic, natural fiber, artificial fiber, concrete, gypsum, and mixtures thereof.

  11. Nonvolatile memory behavior of nanocrystalline cellulose/graphene oxide composite films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valentini, L. Cardinali, M.; Fortunati, E.; Kenny, J. M.

    2014-10-13

    With the continuous advance of modern electronics, the demand for nonvolatile memory cells rapidly grows. In order to develop post-silicon electronic devices, it is necessary to find innovative solutions to the eco-sustainability problem of materials for nonvolatile memory cells. In this work, we realized a resistive memory device based on graphene oxide (GO) and GO/cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) thin films. Aqueous solutions of GO and GO with CNC have been prepared and drop cast between two metal electrodes. Such thin-film based devices showed a transition between low and high conductivity states upon the forward and backward sweeping of an external electric field. This reversible current density transition behavior demonstrates a typical memory characteristic. The obtained results open an easy route for electronic information storage based on the integration of nanocrystalline cellulose onto graphene based devices.

  12. Solvothermal synthesis of graphene-Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} composite and the degradation activity under visible light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tao, Wenguang; Chang, Jiuli; Wu, Dapeng; Gao, Zhiyong; Duan, Xiaoli; Xu, Fang; Engineering Technology Research Center of Motive Power and Key Materials, Henan, 453007 ; Jiang, Kai; Engineering Technology Research Center of Motive Power and Key Materials, Henan, 453007

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ? Graphene-Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} composites were synthesized through a facile solvothermal method. ? Hydroxyl radicals are the main species responsible for the photodegradation activity. ? Graphene-Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} demonstrated dramatically improved visible light degradation activity. -- Abstract: Novel graphene-Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} (G-Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3}) composites were synthesized via a facile solvothermal method with graphene oxide (GO), SbCl{sub 3} and thiourea as the reactants. GO played an important role in controlling the size and the distribution of the formed Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanoparticles on the graphene sheets with different density. Due to the negative surface charge, smaller Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} particles size and efficient electrons transfer from Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} to graphene, the composites demonstrated improved photodegradation activity on rhodamine B (RhB). Among these composites, the product G-Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} 0.1, which was synthesized with the GO concentration of 0.1 mg/mL, exhibited the highest photodegradation activity owing to the considerable density of Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanoparticles onto graphene sheet free of aggregation. Hydroxyl radicals (OH) derived from conduction band (CB) electrons of Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} is suggested to be responsible for the photodegradation of RhB. The high visible light degradation activity and the satisfactory cycling stability made the as-prepared G-Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} 0.1 an applicable photocatalyst.

  13. Poor fluorinated graphene sheets carboxymethylcellulose polymer composite mode locker for erbium doped fiber laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mou, Chengbo E-mail: a.rozhin@aston.ac.uk; Turitsyn, Sergei; Rozhin, Aleksey E-mail: a.rozhin@aston.ac.uk; Arif, Raz; Lobach, Anatoly S.; Spitsina, Nataliya G.; Khudyakov, Dmitry V.; Kazakov, Valery A.

    2015-02-09

    We report poor fluorinated graphene sheets produced by thermal exfoliation embedding in carboxymethylcellulose polymer composite (GCMC) as an efficient mode locker for erbium doped fiber laser. Two GCMC mode lockers with different concentration have been fabricated. The GCMC based mode locked fiber laser shows stable soliton output pulse shaping with repetition rate of 28.5 MHz and output power of 5.5 mW was achieved with the high concentration GCMC, while a slightly higher output power of 6.9 mW was obtained using the low concentration GCMC mode locker.

  14. Composite materials for thermal energy storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, D.K.; Burrows, R.W.; Shinton, Y.D.

    1985-01-04

    A composite material for thermal energy storage based upon polyhydric alcohols, such as pentaerythritol, trimethylol ethane (also known as pentaglycerine), neopentyl glycol and related compounds including trimethylol propane, monoaminopentaerythritol, diamino-pentaerythritol and tris(hydroxymethyl)acetic acid, separately or in combinations, which provide reversible heat storage through crystalline phase transformations. These PCM's do not become liquid during use and are in contact with at least one material selected from the group consisting of metals, carbon, siliceous, plastic, cellulosic, natural fiber, artificial fiber, concrete, gypsum, porous rock, and mixtures thereof. Particulate additions such as aluminum or graphite powders, as well as metal and carbon fibers can also be incorporated therein. Particulate and/or fibrous additions can be introduced into molten phase change materials which can then be cast into various shapes. After the phase change materials have solidified, the additions will remain dispersed throughout the matrix of the cast solid. The polyol is in contact with at least one material selected from the group consisting of metals, carbon, siliceous, plastic, cellulosic, natural fiber, artificial fiber, concrete, gypsum, and mixtures thereof.

  15. Polymer and Composite Materials Meeting Agenda

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Day 1 (all times in Eastern Time Zone) Start End Activity POC 08:00 08:45 Reception and badging DOE 08:45 09:00 Welcome and meeting objectives / expectations / time horizon for research activities (targets) Erika Sutherland, Sunita Satyapal 09:00 10:00 Polymer/elastomer and composite material science: key issues, knowledge gaps, R&D/testing data needs (40 min speaking, 20 min Q&A) Kevin Simmons 10:00 10:30 Codes and standards requirements - SAE J2579, SAE J2601: knowledge gaps, R&D

  16. Structural Automotive Components from Composite Materials | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy 12 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting lm049_berger_2012_o.pdf (4.04 MB) More Documents & Publications Advanced Materials and Processing of Composites for High Volume Applications Advanced Materials and Processing of Composites for High Volume Applications Structural Automotive Components from Composite Materials

  17. Structural Automotive Components from Composite Materials | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy lm_08_kia.pdf (2.6 MB) More Documents & Publications Structural Automotive Components from Composite Materials Advanced Materials and Processing of Composites for High Volume Applications Advanced Materials and Processing of Composites for High Volume Applications

  18. Dielectric composite materials and method for preparing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauf, Robert J.; Anderson, Kimberly K.; Montgomery, Frederick C.; Collins, Jack L.; Felten, John J.

    2003-07-29

    The invention allows the fabrication of small, dense beads of dielectric materials with selected compositions, which are incorporated into a polymeric matrix for use in capacitors, filters, and the like. A porous, generally spherical bead of hydrous metal oxide containing titanium or zirconium is made by a sol-gel process to form a substantially rigid bead having a generally fine crystallite size and correspondingly finely distributed internal porosity. The resulting gel bead may be washed and hydrothermally reacted with a soluble alkaline earth salt (typically Ba or Sr) at elevated temperature and pressure to convert the bead into a mixed hydrous titanium- or zirconium-alkaline earth oxide while retaining the generally spherical shape. Alternatively, the gel bead may be made by coprecipitation. This mixed oxide bead is then washed, dried and calcined to produce the desired (BaTiO.sub.3, PbTiO.sub.3, SrZrO.sub.3) structure. The sintered beads are incorporated into a selected polymer matrix. The resulting dielectric composite material may be electrically "poled" if desired.

  19. Method for preparing dielectric composite materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauf, Robert J.; Anderson, Kimberly K.; Montgomery, Frederick C.; Collins, Jack L.; Felten, John J.

    2004-11-23

    The invention allows the fabrication of small, dense beads of dielectric materials with selected compositions, which are incorporated into a polymeric matrix for use in capacitors, filters, and the like. A porous, generally spherical bead of hydrous metal oxide containing titanium or zirconium is made by a sol-gel process to form a substantially rigid bead having a generally fine crystallite size and correspondingly finely distributed internal porosity. The resulting gel bead may be washed and hydrothermally reacted with a soluble alkaline earth salt (typically Ba or Sr) at elevated temperature and pressure to convert the bead into a mixed hydrous titanium- or zirconium-alkaline earth oxide while retaining the generally spherical shape. Alternatively, the gel bead may be made by coprecipitation. This mixed oxide bead is then washed, dried and calcined to produce the desired (BaTiO.sub.3, PbTiO.sub.3, SrZrO.sub.3) structure. The sintered beads are incorporated into a selected polymer matrix. The resulting dielectric composite material may be electrically "poled" if desired.

  20. Solvothermal synthesis of NiAl double hydroxide microspheres on a nickel foam-graphene as an electrode material for pseudo-capacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Momodu, Damilola; Bello, Abdulhakeem; Dangbegnon, Julien; Barzeger, Farshad; Taghizadeh, Fatimeh; Fabiane, Mopeli; Manyala, Ncholu; Johnson, A. T. Charlie

    2014-09-15

    In this paper, we demonstrate excellent pseudo-capacitance behavior of nickel-aluminum double hydroxide microspheres (NiAl DHM) synthesized by a facile solvothermal technique using tertbutanol as a structure-directing agent on nickel foam-graphene (NF-G) current collector as compared to use of nickel foam current collector alone. The structure and surface morphology were studied by X-ray diffraction analysis, Raman spectroscopy and scanning and transmission electron microscopies respectively. NF-G current collector was fabricated by chemical vapor deposition followed by an ex situ coating method of NiAl DHM active material which forms a composite electrode. The pseudocapacitive performance of the composite electrode was investigated by cyclic voltammetry, constant chargedischarge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements. The composite electrode with the NF-G current collector exhibits an enhanced electrochemical performance due to the presence of the conductive graphene layer on the nickel foam and gives a specific capacitance of 1252 F g{sup ?1} at a current density of 1 A g{sup ?1} and a capacitive retention of about 97% after 1000 chargedischarge cycles. This shows that these composites are promising electrode materials for energy storage devices.

  1. Environmentally benign graphite intercalation compound composition for exfoliated graphite, flexible graphite, and nano-scaled graphene platelets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhamu, Aruna; Jang, Bor Z.

    2014-06-17

    A carboxylic-intercalated graphite compound composition for the production of exfoliated graphite, flexible graphite, or nano-scaled graphene platelets. The composition comprises a layered graphite with interlayer spaces or interstices and a carboxylic acid residing in at least one of the interstices, wherein the composition is prepared by a chemical oxidation reaction which uses a combination of a carboxylic acid and hydrogen peroxide as an intercalate source. Alternatively, the composition may be prepared by an electrochemical reaction, which uses a carboxylic acid as both an electrolyte and an intercalate source. Exfoliation of the invented composition does not release undesirable chemical contaminants into air or drainage.

  2. Hot electron dynamics in graphene Ling, Meng-Chieh 36 MATERIALS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    intrinsic graphene property that has not been investigated. Our motivation for studying clean graphene at low temperature is based on the following effect: for a fixed electric...

  3. Method of preparing corrosion resistant composite materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1993-01-01

    Method of manufacture of ceramic materials which require stability in severely-corrosive environment having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200.degree.-550.degree. C. or organic salt (including SO.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2) at temperatures of 25.degree.-200.degree. C. These surfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components.

  4. A reduced graphene oxide/Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} composite for supercapacitor electrode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiang, Chengcheng; Li, Ming; Zhi, Mingjia; Manivannan, Ayyakkannu; Wu, Nianqiang

    2013-03-15

    20 nm sized Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles are in-situ grown on the chemically reduced graphene oxide (rGO) sheets to form a rGO-Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} composite during hydrothermal processing. The rGO-Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} composite is employed as the pseudocapacitor electrode in the 2 M KOH aqueous electrolyte solution. The rGOCo{sub 3}O{sub 4} composite electrode exhibits a specific capacitance of 472 F/g at a scan rate of 2 mV/s in a two-electrode cell. 82.6% of capacitance is retained when the scan rate increases to 100 mV/s. The rGOCo{sub 3}O{sub 4} composite electrode shows high rate capability and excellent long-term stability. It also exhibits high energy density at relatively high power density. The energy density reaches 39.0 Wh/kg at a power density of 8.3 kW/kg. The super performance of the composite electrode is attributed to the synergistic effects of small size and good redox activity of the Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} particles combined with high electronic conductivity of the rGO sheets.

  5. Fabricating porous materials using interpenetrating inorganic-organic composite gels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seo, Dong-Kyun; Volosin, Alex

    2016-06-14

    Porous materials are fabricated using interpenetrating inorganic-organic composite gels. A mixture or precursor solution including an inorganic gel precursor, an organic polymer gel precursor, and a solvent is treated to form an inorganic wet gel including the organic polymer gel precursor and the solvent. The inorganic wet gel is then treated to form a composite wet gel including an organic polymer network in the body of the inorganic wet gel, producing an interpenetrating inorganic-organic composite gel. The composite wet gel is dried to form a composite material including the organic polymer network and an inorganic network component. The composite material can be treated further to form a porous composite material, a porous polymer or polymer composite, a porous metal oxide, and other porous materials.

  6. Composition and method for removing photoresist materials from electronic components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davenhall, Leisa B.; Rubin, James B.; Taylor, Craig M.

    2005-01-25

    Composition and method for removing photoresist materials from electronic components. The composition is a mixture of at least one dense phase fluid and at least one dense phase fluid modifier. The method includes exposing a substrate to at least one pulse of the composition in a supercritical state to remove photoresist materials from the substrate.

  7. Composition and method for removing photoresist materials from electronic components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davenhall, Leisa B.; Rubin, James B.; Taylor, Craig M. V.

    2008-06-03

    Composition and method for removing photoresist materials from electronic components. The composition is a mixture of at least one dense phase fluid and at least one dense phase fluid modifier. The method includes exposing a substrate to at least one pulse of the composition in a supercritical state to remove photoresist materials from the substrate.

  8. Method for preparing polyolefin composites containing a phase change material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, Ival O.

    1990-01-01

    A composite useful in thermal energy storage, said composite being formed of a polyolefin matrix having a phase change material such as a crystalline alkyl hydrocarbon incorporated therein. The composite is useful in forming pellets, sheets or fibers having thermal energy storage characteristics; methods for forming the composite are also disclosed.

  9. Graphene-wrapped sulfur/metal organic framework-derived microporous carbon composite for lithium sulfur batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Renjie E-mail: chenrj@bit.edu.cn; Zhao, Teng; Tian, Tian; Fairen-Jimenez, David; Cao, Shuai; Coxon, Paul R.; Xi, Kai E-mail: chenrj@bit.edu.cn; Vasant Kumar, R.; Cheetham, Anthony K.

    2014-12-01

    A three-dimensional hierarchical sandwich-type graphene sheet-sulfur/carbon (GS-S/C{sub ZIF8-D}) composite for use in a cathode for a lithium sulfur (Li-S) battery has been prepared by an ultrasonic method. The microporous carbon host was prepared by a one-step pyrolysis of Zeolitic Imidazolate Framework-8 (ZIF-8), a typical zinc-containing metal organic framework (MOF), which offers a tunable porous structure into which electro-active sulfur can be diffused. The thin graphene sheet, wrapped around the sulfur/zeolitic imidazolate framework-8 derived carbon (S/C{sub ZIF8-D}) composite, has excellent electrical conductivity and mechanical flexibility, thus facilitating rapid electron transport and accommodating the changes in volume of the sulfur electrode. Compared with the S/C{sub ZIF8-D} sample, Li-S batteries with the GS-S/C{sub ZIF8-D} composite cathode showed enhanced capacity, improved electrochemical stability, and relatively high columbic efficiency by taking advantage of the synergistic effects of the microporous carbon from ZIF-8 and a highly interconnected graphene network. Our results demonstrate that a porous MOF-derived scaffold with a wrapped graphene conductive network structure is a potentially efficient design for a battery electrode that can meet the challenge arising from low conductivity and volume change.

  10. Polymer and Composite Materials Used in Hydrogen Service - Meeting Proceedings

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Polymer and Composite Materials Used in Hydrogen Service MEETING PROCEEDINGS Polymer and Composite Materials Meeting Fuel Cell Technologies Office Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Washington, D.C. October 17-18, 2012 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY This report 1 describes the results from an information-sharing meeting on the use of polymer and composite materials in hydrogen applications. The meeting, which was organized by the U.S. Department of Energy,

  11. Multi-material Preforming of Structural Composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norris, Robert E.; Eberle, Cliff C.; Pastore, Christopher M.; Sudbury, Thomas Z.; Xiong, Fue; Hartman, David

    2015-05-01

    Fiber-reinforced composites offer significant weight reduction potential, with glass fiber composites already widely adopted. Carbon fiber composites deliver the greatest performance benefits, but their high cost has inhibited widespread adoption. This project demonstrates that hybrid carbon-glass solutions can realize most of the benefits of carbon fiber composites at much lower cost. ORNL and Owens Corning Reinforcements along with program participants at the ORISE collaborated to demonstrate methods for produce hybrid composites along with techniques to predict performance and economic tradeoffs. These predictions were then verified in testing coupons and more complex demonstration articles.

  12. Argonne and CalBattery strike deal for silicon-graphene anode material -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Innovation Portal Energy Storage Energy Storage Return to Search Argonne and CalBattery strike deal for silicon-graphene anode material Argonne National Laboratory CalBattery has worked with Argonne for more than a year under a Work for Others agreement to develop the technology under the Department of Energy&#39;s Startup America program, which is part of a White House initiative to inspire and accelerate high-growth entrepreneurship. CalBattery has worked with Argonne for more

  13. Graphene Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Texas Sector: Carbon Product: Graphene develops nano-technology based ultracapacitors for energy storage using a unique form of carbon, called graphene, for electrode material....

  14. Polymer and Composite Materials Used in Hydrogen Service - Meeting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Polymer and Composite Materials Used in Hydrogen Service - Meeting Proceedings This report describes the results from an information-sharing meeting on the use of polymer and ...

  15. Advanced Materials and Processing of Composites for High Volume...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Predictive Technology Development and Crash Energy Management Advanced Materials and Processing of Composites for High Volume Applications FY 2009 ...

  16. Flexible hydrogel-based functional composite materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    2013-10-08

    A composite having a flexible hydrogel polymer formed by mixing an organic phase with an inorganic composition, the organic phase selected from the group consisting of a hydrogel monomer, a crosslinker, a radical initiator, and/or a solvent. A polymerization mixture is formed and polymerized into a desired shape and size.

  17. Process for fabricating composite material having high thermal conductivity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Colella, Nicholas J.; Davidson, Howard L.; Kerns, John A.; Makowiecki, Daniel M.

    2001-01-01

    A process for fabricating a composite material such as that having high thermal conductivity and having specific application as a heat sink or heat spreader for high density integrated circuits. The composite material produced by this process has a thermal conductivity between that of diamond and copper, and basically consists of coated diamond particles dispersed in a high conductivity metal, such as copper. The composite material can be fabricated in small or relatively large sizes using inexpensive materials. The process basically consists, for example, of sputter coating diamond powder with several elements, including a carbide forming element and a brazeable material, compacting them into a porous body, and infiltrating the porous body with a suitable braze material, such as copper-silver alloy, thereby producing a dense diamond-copper composite material with a thermal conductivity comparable to synthetic diamond films at a fraction of the cost.

  18. Cured composite materials for reactive metal battery electrolytes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harrup, Mason K.; Stewart, Frederick F.; Peterson, Eric S.

    2006-03-07

    A solid molecular composite polymer-based electrolyte is made for batteries, wherein silicate compositing produces a electrolytic polymer with a semi-rigid silicate condensate framework, and then mechanical-stabilization by radiation of the outer surface of the composited material is done to form a durable and non-tacky texture on the electrolyte. The preferred ultraviolet radiation produces this desirable outer surface by creating a thin, shallow skin of crosslinked polymer on the composite material. Preferably, a short-duration of low-medium range ultraviolet radiation is used to crosslink the polymers only a short distance into the polymer, so that the properties of the bulk of the polymer and the bulk of the molecular composite material remain unchanged, but the tough and stable skin formed on the outer surface lends durability and processability to the entire composite material product.

  19. Polymer Composites Research in the LM Materials Program Overview |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Polymer Composites Research in the LM Materials Program Overview Polymer Composites Research in the LM Materials Program Overview 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. lm_06_warren.pdf (2.67 MB) More Documents & Publications Composite Underbody Attachment Carbon Fiber Pilot Plant and Research Facilities Low Cost Carbon Fiber Overview

  20. Corrosion inhibiting composition for treating asbestos containing materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hartman, Judithann Ruth

    1998-04-21

    A composition for transforming a chrysotile asbestos-containing material into a non-asbestos material is disclosed, wherein the composition comprises water, at least about 30% by weight of an acid component, optionally a source of fluoride ions, and a corrosion inhibiting amount of thiourea, a lower alkylthiourea, a C.sub.8 -C.sub.15 alkylpyridinium halide or mixtures thereof. A method of transforming an asbestos-containing building material, while part of a building structure, into a non-asbestos material by using the present composition also is disclosed.

  1. Corrosion inhibiting composition for treating asbestos containing materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hartman, J.R.

    1998-04-21

    A composition for transforming a chrysotile asbestos-containing material into a non-asbestos material is disclosed. The composition comprises water, at least about 30% by weight of an acid component, optionally a source of fluoride ions, and a corrosion inhibiting amount of thiourea, a lower alkylthiourea, a C{sub 8}{single_bond}C{sub 15} alkylpyridinium halide or mixtures. A method of transforming an asbestos-containing building material, while part of a building structure, into a non-asbestos material by using the present composition also is disclosed.

  2. Fabrication and long-wavelength characterization of neat and chemically modified graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalugin, Nikolai G.

    2014-03-31

    Graphene, a single- or several layer-thick carbon, attracts significant research activity because of its exceptional material properties. Graphene is a promising material for optoelectronic applications. Neat graphene demonstrates potential as a material for long wavelength photodetectors working at elevated temperatures. Chemical modification of graphene opens up many new applications of this material in electronics, in new composite materials, and in new catalysts for different chemical processes. Chemical vapor deposition-grown large-area graphene can be successfully modified with the creation of benzyne attachments. The investigation of microwave properties is an important part of graphene research. Two variants of near-field long wavelength microscopy were found efficient with graphene. Measurements with a probe formed by an electrically open end of a 4 GHz half-lambda parallel-strip transmission line resonator allow the implementation of an electrodynamic model of graphene microwave impedance. The results of near-field scanning superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) RF microscopy of graphite and graphene at 200 MHz shed light on mechanisms of AC graphene response: screening currents induced in graphene by an external RF magnetic field tend to localize near structural defects.

  3. Composite metal foil and ceramic fabric materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Webb, Brent J.; Antoniak, Zen I.; Prater, John T.; DeSteese, John G.

    1992-01-01

    The invention comprises new materials useful in a wide variety of terrestrial and space applications. In one aspect, the invention comprises a flexible cloth-like material comprising a layer of flexible woven ceramic fabric bonded with a layer of metallic foil. In another aspect, the invention includes a flexible fluid impermeable barrier comprising a flexible woven ceramic fabric layer having metal wire woven therein. A metallic foil layer is incontinuously welded to the woven metal wire. In yet another aspect, the invention includes a material comprising a layer of flexible woven ceramic fabric bonded with a layer of an organic polymer. In still another aspect, the invention includes a rigid fabric structure comprising a flexible woven ceramic fabric and a resinous support material which has been hardened as the direct result of exposure to ultraviolet light. Inventive methods for producing such material are also disclosed.

  4. Composite metal foil and ceramic fabric materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Webb, B.J.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Prater, J.T.; DeSteese, J.G.

    1992-03-24

    The invention comprises new materials useful in a wide variety of terrestrial and space applications. In one aspect, the invention comprises a flexible cloth-like material comprising a layer of flexible woven ceramic fabric bonded with a layer of metallic foil. In another aspect, the invention includes a flexible fluid impermeable barrier comprising a flexible woven ceramic fabric layer having metal wire woven therein. A metallic foil layer is incontinuously welded to the woven metal wire. In yet another aspect, the invention includes a material comprising a layer of flexible woven ceramic fabric bonded with a layer of an organic polymer. In still another aspect, the invention includes a rigid fabric structure comprising a flexible woven ceramic fabric and a resinous support material which has been hardened as the direct result of exposure to ultraviolet light. Inventive methods for producing such material are also disclosed. 11 figs.

  5. Metallic behavior in the graphene analogue Ni3(HITP)2 and a strategy to render the material a semiconductor.

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Foster, Michael E.; Sohlberg, Karl; Spataru, Dan Catalin; Allendorf, Mark D.

    2016-06-19

    The metal organic framework material Ni3(2,3,6,7,10,11 - hexaiminotriphenylene)2, (Ni3(HITP)2) is composed of layers of extended conjugated planes analogous to graphene. We carried out Density functional theory (DFT) calculations to model the electronic structure of bulk and monolayer Ni3(HITP)2. The layered 3D material is metallic, similar to graphene. Our calculations predict that there is appreciable band dispersion not only in-plane, but perpendicular to the stacking planes as well, suggesting that, unlike graphene, the conductivity may be nearly isotropic. In contrast, a 2D monolayer of the material exhibits a band gap, consistent with previously published results. Insight obtained from studies of themore » evolution of the material from semiconducting to metallic as the material is transitioned from 2D to 3D suggests the possibility of modifying the material to render it semiconducting by changing the metal center and inserting spacer moieties between the layers. Furthermore, the DFT calculations predict that the modified material will be structurally stable and exhibit a band gap.« less

  6. Photorefractivity in liquid crystalline composite materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiederrecht, G.P.; Wasielewski, M.R.

    1997-09-01

    We report recent improvements in the photorefractive of liquid crystalline thin film composites containing electron donor and acceptor molecules. The improvements primarily result from optimization of the exothermicity of the intermolecular charge transfer reaction and improvement of the diffusion characteristics of the photogenerated ions. Intramolecular charge transfer dopants produce greater photorefractivity and a 10-fold decrease in the concentration of absorbing chromophores. The mechanism for the generation of mobile ions is discussed.

  7. Metal oxide composite dosimeter method and material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Steven D.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a method of measuring a radiation dose wherein a radiation responsive material consisting essentially of metal oxide is first exposed to ionizing radiation. The metal oxide is then stimulating with light thereby causing the radiation responsive material to photoluminesce. Photons emitted from the metal oxide as a result of photoluminescence may be counted to provide a measure of the ionizing radiation.

  8. New radiological material detection technologies for nuclear forensics: Remote optical imaging and graphene-based sensors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, Richard Karl; Martin, Jeffrey B.; Wiemann, Dora K.; Choi, Junoh; Howell, Stephen W.

    2015-09-01

    We developed new detector technologies to identify the presence of radioactive materials for nuclear forensics applications. First, we investigated an optical radiation detection technique based on imaging nitrogen fluorescence excited by ionizing radiation. We demonstrated optical detection in air under indoor and outdoor conditions for alpha particles and gamma radiation at distances up to 75 meters. We also contributed to the development of next generation systems and concepts that could enable remote detection at distances greater than 1 km, and originated a concept that could enable daytime operation of the technique. A second area of research was the development of room-temperature graphene-based sensors for radiation detection and measurement. In this project, we observed tunable optical and charged particle detection, and developed improved devices. With further development, the advancements described in this report could enable new capabilities for nuclear forensics applications.

  9. Advanced Composite Materials for Cold and Cryogenic Hydrogen Storage

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Applications in Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles Workshop | Department of Energy Composite Materials for Cold and Cryogenic Hydrogen Storage Applications in Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles Workshop Advanced Composite Materials for Cold and Cryogenic Hydrogen Storage Applications in Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles Workshop The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Office and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory hosted the "Advanced

  10. Fire water systems in composite materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sundt, J.L.

    1993-12-31

    Due to corrosion problems in fire water systems offshore there is a need for a corrosion resistant material to improve the reliability of onboard fire fighting systems. Glass Reinforced Epoxy (GRE) pipe is seen as a cost effective and light weight alternative to metals. Through a test program run by AMAT, Advanced Materials a/s in collaboration with the Norwegian Fire and Research Laboratory (NBL, SINTEF), GRE pipes have proved to be viable materials for offshore fire water systems. The test program included furnace testing, jetfire testing and simulated explosion testing. GRE pipes (2--12 inches) from two suppliers were fire tested and evaluated. Both adhesively bonded joints and flange connections were tested. During the course of the project, application methods of passive fire protection and nozzle attachments were improved.

  11. Graphene's 3D Counterpart

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    odd parity of the energy bands. Two of the most exciting new materials in the world of high technology today are graphene and topological insulators, crystalline materials that...

  12. Method of tissue repair using a composite material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hutchens, Stacy A.; Woodward, Jonathan; Evans, Barbara R.; O'Neill, Hugh M.

    2016-03-01

    A composite biocompatible hydrogel material includes a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa. A calcium comprising salt is disposed in at least some of the pores. The porous polymer matrix can comprise cellulose, including bacterial cellulose. The composite can be used as a bone graft material. A method of tissue repair within the body of animals includes the steps of providing a composite biocompatible hydrogel material including a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa, and inserting the hydrogel material into cartilage or bone tissue of an animal, wherein the hydrogel material supports cell colonization in vitro for autologous cell seeding.

  13. Method of tissue repair using a composite material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hutchens, Stacy A; Woodward, Jonathan; Evans, Barbara R; O'Neill, Hugh M

    2014-03-18

    A composite biocompatible hydrogel material includes a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa. A calcium comprising salt is disposed in at least some of the pores. The porous polymer matrix can comprise cellulose, including bacterial cellulose. The composite can be used as a bone graft material. A method of tissue repair within the body of animals includes the steps of providing a composite biocompatible hydrogel material including a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa, and inserting the hydrogel material into cartilage or bone tissue of an animal, wherein the hydrogel material supports cell colonization in vitro for autologous cell seeding.

  14. Composition/bandgap selective dry photochemical etching of semiconductor materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ashby, C.I.H.; Dishman, J.L.

    1985-10-11

    Disclosed is a method of selectively photochemically dry etching a first semiconductor material of a given composition and direct bandgap Eg/sub 1/ in the presence of a second semiconductor material of a different composition and direct bandgap Eg/sub 2/, wherein Eg/sub 2/ > Eg/sub 1/, said second semiconductor material substantially not being etched during said method. The method comprises subjecting both materials to the same photon flux and to the same gaseous etchant under conditions where said etchant would be ineffective for chemical etching of either material were the photons not present, said photons being of an energy greater than Eg/sub 1/ but less than Eg/sub 2/, whereby said first semiconductor material is photochemically etched and said second material is substantially not etched.

  15. Composition/bandgap selective dry photochemical etching of semiconductor materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ashby, Carol I. H.; Dishman, James L.

    1987-01-01

    A method of selectively photochemically dry etching a first semiconductor material of a given composition and direct bandgap Eg.sub.1 in the presence of a second semiconductor material of a different composition and direct bandgap Eg.sub.2, wherein Eg.sub.2 >Eg.sub.1, said second semiconductor material substantially not being etched during said method, comprises subjecting both materials to the same photon flux and to the same gaseous etchant under conditions where said etchant would be ineffective for chemical etching of either material were the photons not present, said photons being of an energy greater than Eg.sub.1 but less than Eg.sub.2, whereby said first semiconductor material is photochemically etched and said second material is substantially not etched.

  16. Composition and process for making an insulating refractory material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pearson, A.; Swansiger, T.G.

    1998-04-28

    A composition and process are disclosed for making an insulating refractory material. The composition includes calcined alumina powder, flash activated alumina powder, an organic polymeric binder and a liquid vehicle which is preferably water. Starch or modified starch may also be added. A preferred insulating refractory material made with the composition has a density of about 2.4--2.6 g/cm{sup 3} with reduced thermal conductivity, compared with tabular alumina. Of importance, the formulation has good abrasion resistance and crush strength during intermediate processing (commercial sintering) to attain full strength and refractoriness.

  17. Composition and process for making an insulating refractory material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pearson, Alan; Swansiger, Thomas G.

    1998-04-28

    A composition and process for making an insulating refractory material. The composition includes calcined alumina powder, flash activated alumina powder, an organic polymeric binder and a liquid vehicle which is preferably water. Starch or modified starch may also be added. A preferred insulating refractory material made with the composition has a density of about 2.4-2.6 g/cm.sup.3 with reduced thermal conductivity, compared with tabular alumina. Of importance, the formulation has good abrasion resistance and crush strength during intermediate processing (commercial sintering) to attain full strength and refractoriness, good abrasion resistance and crush strength.

  18. Lithium diffusion at Si-C interfaces in silicon-graphene composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Odbadrakh, Khorgolkhuu [Joint Institute for Computational Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States); McNutt, N. W. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Nicholson, D. M. [Computational Science and Mathematics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States); Department of Physics, University of North Carolina, Asheville, North Carolina 28804 (United States); Rios, O. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States); Keffer, D. J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States)

    2014-08-04

    Models of intercalated Li and its diffusion in Si-Graphene interfaces are investigated using density functional theory. Results suggest that the presence of interfaces alters the energetics of Li binding and diffusion significantly compared to bare Si or Graphene surfaces. Our results show that cavities along reconstructed Si surface provide diffusion paths for Li. Diffusion barriers calculated along these cavities are significantly lower than penetration barriers to bulk Si. Interaction with Si surface results in graphene defects, creating Li diffusion paths that are confined along the cavities but have still lower barrier than in bulk Si.

  19. Lightweight Composite Materials for Heavy Duty Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pruez, Jacky; Shoukry, Samir; Williams, Gergis; Shoukry, Mark

    2013-08-31

    The main objective of this project is to develop, analyze and validate data, methodologies and tools that support widespread applications of automotive lightweighting technologies. Two underlying principles are guiding the research efforts towards this objective: • Seamless integration between the lightweight materials selected for certain vehicle systems, cost-effective methods for their design and manufacturing, and practical means to enhance their durability while reducing their Life-Cycle-Costs (LCC). • Smooth migration of the experience and findings accumulated so far at WVU in the areas of designing with lightweight materials, innovative joining concepts and durability predictions, from applications to the area of weight savings for heavy vehicle systems and hydrogen storage tanks, to lightweighting applications of selected systems or assemblies in light–duty vehicles.

  20. Graphene-assisted near-field radiative heat transfer between corrugated polar materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, X. L.; Zhang, Z. M.

    2014-06-23

    Graphene has attracted great attention in nanoelectronics, optics, and energy harvesting. Here, the near-field radiative heat transfer between graphene-covered corrugated silica is investigated based on the exact scattering theory. It is found that graphene can improve the radiative heat flux between silica gratings by more than one order of magnitude and alleviate the performance sensitivity to lateral shift. The underlying mechanism is mainly attributed to the improved photon tunneling of modes away from phonon resonances. Besides, coating with graphene leads to nonlocal radiative transfer that breaks Derjaguin's proximity approximation and enables corrugated silica to outperform bulk silica in near-field radiation.

  1. Polymeric compositions incorporating polyethylene glycol as a phase change material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, Ival O.; Griffen, Charles W.

    1989-01-01

    A polymeric composition comprising a polymeric material and polyethylene glycol or end-capped polyethylene glycol as a phase change material, said polyethylene glycol and said end-capped polyethylene glycol having a molecular weight greater than about 400 and a heat of fusion greater than about 30 cal/g; the composition is useful in making molded and/or coated materials such as flooring, tiles, wall panels and the like; paints containing polyethylene glycols or end-capped polyethylene glycols are also disclosed.

  2. Modifying the chemistry of graphene with substrate selection: A study of gold nanoparticle formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaniewski, Anna M.; Trimble, Christie J.; Nemanich, Robert J.

    2015-03-23

    Graphene and metal nanoparticle composites are a promising class of materials with unique electronic, optical, and chemical properties. In this work, graphene is used as a reducing surface to grow gold nanoparticles out of solution-based metal precursors. The nanoparticle formation is found to strongly depend upon the graphene substrate selection. The studied substrates include diamond, p-type silicon, aluminum oxide, lithium niobate, and copper. Our results indicate that the chemical properties of graphene depend upon this selection. For example, for the same reaction times and concentration, the reduction of gold chloride to gold nanoparticles on graphene/lithium niobate results in 3% nanoparticle coverage compared to 20% coverage on graphene/silicon and 60% on graphene/copper. On insulators, nanoparticles preferentially form on folds and edges. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis is used to confirm the nanoparticle elemental makeup.

  3. Composite Materials for Hazard Mitigation of Reactive Metal Hydrides.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratt, Joseph William; Cordaro, Joseph Gabriel; Sartor, George B.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Reeder, Craig L.

    2012-02-01

    In an attempt to mitigate the hazards associated with storing large quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials were synthesized and tested under simulated usage and accident conditions. The composites were made by polymerizing vinyl monomers using free-radical polymerization chemistry, in the presence of the metal hydride. Composites with vinyl-containing siloxane oligomers were also polymerized with and without added styrene and divinyl benzene. Hydrogen capacity measurements revealed that addition of the polymer to the metal hydride reduced the inherent hydrogen storage capacity of the material. The composites were found to be initially effective at reducing the amount of heat released during oxidation. However, upon cycling the composites, the mitigating behavior was lost. While the polymer composites we investigated have mitigating potential and are physically robust, they undergo a chemical change upon cycling that makes them subsequently ineffective at mitigating heat release upon oxidation of the metal hydride. Acknowledgements The authors would like to thank the following people who participated in this project: Ned Stetson (U.S. Department of Energy) for sponsorship and support of the project. Ken Stewart (Sandia) for building the flow-through calorimeter and cycling test stations. Isidro Ruvalcaba, Jr. (Sandia) for qualitative experiments on the interaction of sodium alanate with water. Terry Johnson (Sandia) for sharing his expertise and knowledge of metal hydrides, and sodium alanate in particular. Marcina Moreno (Sandia) for programmatic assistance. John Khalil (United Technologies Research Corp) for insight into the hazards of reactive metal hydrides and real-world accident scenario experiments. Summary In an attempt to mitigate and/or manage hazards associated with storing bulk quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials (a mixture of a mitigating polymer and a metal hydride) were synthesized and tested

  4. Sandia Energy - Three-Dimensional Graphene Architectures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Three-Dimensional Graphene Architectures Home Office of Science Capabilities News News & Events Research & Capabilities Materials Science Three-Dimensional Graphene Architectures...

  5. A Roadmap for Engineering Piezoelectricity in Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Roadmap for Engineering Piezoelectricity in Graphene A Roadmap for Engineering Piezoelectricity in Graphene Doping this 'Miracle Material' May Lead to New Array of Nanoscale ...

  6. Grained composite materials prepared by combustion synthesis under mechanical pressure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunmead, Stephen D.; Holt, Joseph B.; Kingman, Donald D.; Munir, Zuhair A.

    1990-01-01

    Dense, finely grained composite materials comprising one or more ceramic phase or phase and one or more metallic and/or intermetallic phase or phases are produced by combustion synthesis. Spherical ceramic grains are homogeneously dispersed within the matrix. Methods are provided, which include the step of applying mechanical pressure during or immediately after ignition, by which the microstructures in the resulting composites can be controllably selected.

  7. Novel Composite Materials for SOFC Cathode-Interconnect Contact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. H. Zhu

    2009-07-31

    This report summarized the research efforts and major conclusions of our University Coal Research Project, which focused on developing a new class of electrically-conductive, Cr-blocking, damage-tolerant Ag-perovksite composite materials for the cathode-interconnect contact of intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stacks. The Ag evaporation rate increased linearly with air flow rate initially and became constant for the air flow rate {ge} {approx} 1.0 cm {center_dot} s{sup -1}. An activation energy of 280 KJ.mol{sup -1} was obtained for Ag evaporation in both air and Ar+5%H{sub 2}+3%H{sub 2}O. The exposure environment had no measurable influence on the Ag evaporation rate as well as its dependence on the gas flow rate, while different surface morphological features were developed after thermal exposure in the oxidizing and reducing environments. Pure Ag is too volatile at the SOFC operating temperature and its evaporation rate needs to be reduced to facilitate its application as the cathode-interconnect contact. Based on extensive evaporation testing, it was found that none of the alloying additions reduced the evaporation rate of Ag over the long-term exposure, except the noble metals Au, Pt, and Pd; however, these noble elements are too expensive to justify their practical use in contact materials. Furthermore, the addition of La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}MnO{sub 3} (LSM) into Ag to form a composite material also did not significantly modify the Ag evaporation rate. The Ag-perovskite composites with the perovskite being either (La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4})(Co{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.2})O{sub 3} (LSCF) or LSM were systematically evaluated as the contact material between the ferritic interconnect alloy Crofer 22 APU and the LSM cathode. The area specific resistances (ASRs) of the test specimens were shown to be highly dependent on the volume percentage and the type of the perovskite present in the composite contact material as well as the amount of thermal cycling

  8. Dynamically Driven Phase Transformations in Damaged Composite Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plohr, JeeYeon N.; Clements, Brad E.; Addessio, Frank L

    2006-07-28

    A model developed for composite materials undergoing dynamicaly driven phase transitions in its constituents has been extended to allow for complex material micro-structure and evolution of damage. In this work, damage is described by interfacial debonding and micro-crack growth. We have applied the analysis to silicon carbide-titanium (SiC-Ti) unidirectional metal matrix composites. In these composites, Ti can undergo a low pressure and temperature solid-solid phase transition. With these extensions we have carried out simulations to study the complex interplay between loading rates, micro-structure, damage, and the thermo-mechanical response of the system as it undergoes a solid-solid phase transitions.

  9. Compendium of Material Composition Data for Radiation Transport Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Ralph G.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Pagh, Richard T.

    2006-10-31

    Computational modeling of radiation transport problems including homeland security, radiation shielding and protection, and criticality safety all depend upon material definitions. This document has been created to serve two purposes: 1) to provide a quick reference of material compositions for analysts and 2) a standardized reference to reduce the differences between results from two independent analysts. Analysts are always encountering a variety of materials for which elemental definitions are not readily available or densities are not defined. This document provides a location where unique or hard to define materials will be located to reduce duplication in research for modeling purposes. Additionally, having a common set of material definitions helps to standardize modeling across PNNL and provide two separate researchers the ability to compare different modeling results from a common materials basis.

  10. Bilayer Graphene Gets a Bandgap

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bilayer Graphene Gets a Bandgap Print Graphene is the two-dimensional crystalline form of carbon whose extraordinary electron mobility and other unique features hold great promise for nanoscale electronics and photonics. But without a bandgap, graphene's promise can't be realized. As with monolayer graphene, bilayer graphene also has a zero bandgap and thus behaves like a metal. But a bandgap can be introduced if an electric displacement field is applied to the two layers; the material then

  11. Bilayer Graphene Gets a Bandgap

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bilayer Graphene Gets a Bandgap Print Graphene is the two-dimensional crystalline form of carbon whose extraordinary electron mobility and other unique features hold great promise for nanoscale electronics and photonics. But without a bandgap, graphene's promise can't be realized. As with monolayer graphene, bilayer graphene also has a zero bandgap and thus behaves like a metal. But a bandgap can be introduced if an electric displacement field is applied to the two layers; the material then

  12. Bilayer Graphene Gets a Bandgap

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bilayer Graphene Gets a Bandgap Print Graphene is the two-dimensional crystalline form of carbon whose extraordinary electron mobility and other unique features hold great promise for nanoscale electronics and photonics. But without a bandgap, graphene's promise can't be realized. As with monolayer graphene, bilayer graphene also has a zero bandgap and thus behaves like a metal. But a bandgap can be introduced if an electric displacement field is applied to the two layers; the material then

  13. Development of novel graphene and carbon nanotubes based multifunctional polymer matrix composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leung, S. N. Khan, M. O. Naguib, H. E.

    2014-05-15

    This paper investigates strategies to alter the nano-and-microstructures of carbon-based filler-reinforced polymer matrix composites (PMCs). The matrix materials being studied in this work include polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) and liquid crystal polymer (LCP). A set of experiments were performed to investigate various strategies (i) to fabricate a morphological structure within the polymer matrix; (ii) to develop a thermally and electrically conductive network of nano-scaled fillers; and (iii) to produce a thermally conductive but electrically insulative network of hybrid fillers of nano-and-micro scales. The PMCs' structure-to-property relationships, including electrical and thermal properties, were revealed. In particular, the composites' effective thermal conductivities could be increased by as much as 10-folded over the neat polymers. By structuring the embedded electrically conductive pathways in the PMCs, their electrical conductivities could be tailored to levels that ranged from those of electrical insulators to those of semi-conductors. These multifunctional carbon-based filler-reinforced PMCs are envisioned to be potential solutions of various engineering problems. For example, light-weight thermally conductive PMCs with tailored electrical conductivities can serve as a new family of materials for electronic packaging or heat management applications.

  14. Unraveling the Hydrogenation of TiO 2 and Graphene Oxide/TiO 2 Composites in Real Time by in Situ Synchrotron X-ray Powder Diffraction and Pair Distribution Function Analysis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nguyen-Phan, Thuy-Duong; Liu, Zongyuan; Luo, Si; Gamalski, Andrew D.; Vovchok, Dimitry; Xu, Wenqian; Stach, Eric A.; Polyansky, Dmitry E.; Fujita, Etsuko; Rodriguez, José A.; et al

    2016-02-18

    The functionalization of graphene oxide (GO) and graphene by TiO2 and other metal oxides has attracted considerable attention due to numerous promising applications in catalysis, energy conversion, and storage. We propose hydrogenation of this class of materials as a promising way to tune catalytic properties by altering the structural and chemical transformations that occur upon H incorporation. We also investigate the structural changes that occur during the hydrogenation process using in situ powder X-ray diffraction and pair distribution function analysis of GO–TiO2 and TiO2 under H2 reduction. Sequential Rietveld refinement was employed to gain insight into the evolution of crystalmore » growth of TiO2 nanoparticles in the presence of two-dimensional (2D) GO nanosheets. GO sheets not only significantly retarded the nucleation and growth of rutile impurities, stabilizing the anatase structure, but was also partially reduced to hydrogenated graphene by the introduction of atomic hydrogen into the honeycomb lattice. We discuss the hydrogenation processes and the resulting composite structure that occurs during the incorporation of atomic H and the dynamic structural transformations that leads to a highly active photocatalyst.« less

  15. Compendium of Material Composition Data for Radiation Transport Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McConn, Ronald J.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Pagh, Richard T.; Rucker, Robert A.; Williams III, Robert

    2011-03-04

    Introduction Meaningful simulations of radiation transport applications require realistic definitions of material composition and densities. When seeking that information for applications in fields such as homeland security, radiation shielding and protection, and criticality safety, researchers usually encounter a variety of materials for which elemental compositions are not readily available or densities are not defined. Publication of the Compendium of Material Composition Data for Radiation Transport Modeling, Revision 0, in 2006 was the first step toward mitigating this problem. Revision 0 of this document listed 121 materials, selected mostly from the combined personal libraries of staff at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and thus had a scope that was recognized at the time to be limited. Nevertheless, its creation did provide a well-referenced source of some unique or hard-to-define material data in a format that could be used directly in radiation transport calculations being performed at PNNL. Moreover, having a single common set of material definitions also helped to standardize at least one aspect of the various modeling efforts across the laboratory by providing separate researchers the ability to compare different model results using a common basis of materials. The authors of the 2006 compendium understood that, depending on its use and feedback, the compendium would need to be revised to correct errors or inconsistencies in the data for the original 121 materials, as well as to increase (per users suggestions) the number of materials listed. This 2010 revision of the compendium has accomplished both of those objectives. The most obvious change is the increased number of materials from 121 to 372. The not-so-obvious change is the mechanism used to produce the data listed here. The data listed in the 2006 document were compiled, evaluated, entered, and error-checked by a group of individuals essentially by hand, providing no library

  16. Composite slip table of dissimilar materials for damping longitudinal modes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gregory, Danny L. (Albuquerque, NM); Priddy, Tommy G. (Albuquerque, NM); Smallwood, David O. (Albuquerque, NM); Woodall, Tommy D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1991-01-01

    A vibration slip table for use in a vibration testing apparatus. The table s comprised of at least three composite layers of material; a first metal layer, a second damping layer, and a third layer having a high acoustic velocity relative to the first layer. The different acoustic velocities between the first and third layers cause relative shear displacements between the layers with the second layer damping the displacements between the first and third layers to reduce the table longitudinal vibration modes.

  17. Nanotube composite anode materials improve lithium-ion battery performance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (ANL-09-034) - Energy Innovation Portal Vehicles and Fuels Vehicles and Fuels Energy Storage Energy Storage Find More Like This Return to Search Nanotube composite anode materials improve lithium-ion battery performance (ANL-09-034) Argonne National Laboratory Contact ANL About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary Rechargeable lithium-ion batteries are a critical technology for many applications, including consumer electronics and electric vehicles. As the demand for hybrid and

  18. Polymer and Composite Materials Used in Hydrogen Service- Meeting Proceedings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report describes the results from an information-sharing meeting on the use of polymer and composite materials in hydrogen applications. The meeting, which was organized by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Fuel Cell Technologies (FCT) Office and Sandia National Laboratories staff along with consultant Jim Ohi, was held on October 17-18, 2012, in Washington, D.C.

  19. Composite, nanostructured, super-hydrophobic material - Energy Innovation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Portal 258,731 Site Map Printable Version Share this resource About Search Categories (15) Advanced Materials Biomass and Biofuels Building Energy Efficiency Electricity Transmission Energy Analysis Energy Storage Geothermal Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Hydropower, Wave and Tidal Industrial Technologies Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Startup America Vehicles and Fuels Wind Energy Partners (27) Visual Patent Search Success Stories Find More Like This Return to Search Composite, nanostructured,

  20. Composite, ordered material having sharp surface features - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovation Portal 50,904 Site Map Printable Version Share this resource About Search Categories (15) Advanced Materials Biomass and Biofuels Building Energy Efficiency Electricity Transmission Energy Analysis Energy Storage Geothermal Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Hydropower, Wave and Tidal Industrial Technologies Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Startup America Vehicles and Fuels Wind Energy Partners (27) Visual Patent Search Success Stories Find More Like This Return to Search Composite, ordered

  1. Ultrafast Probes for Dirac Materials Yarotski, Dmitry Anatolievitch...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Science(36) Material Science; topological insulators, ultrafast spectroscopy, graphene Material Science; topological insulators, ultrafast spectroscopy, graphene Abstract...

  2. Compositions for enhancing hydroysis of cellulosic material by cellulolytic enzyme compositions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinlan, Jason; Xu, Feng; Sweeney, Matthew; Johansen, Katja Salomon

    2014-09-30

    The present invention relates to compositions comprising a GH61 polypeptide having cellulolytic enhancing activity and an organic compound comprising a carboxylic acid moiety, a lactone moiety, a phenolic moiety, a flavonoid moiety, or a combination thereof, wherein the combination of the GH61 polypeptide having cellulolytic enhancing activity and the organic compound enhances hydrolysis of a cellulosic material by a cellulolytic enzyme compared to the GH61 polypeptide alone or the organic compound alone. The present invention also relates to methods of using the compositions.

  3. Pressure-reaction synthesis of titanium composite materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oden, Laurance L.; Ochs, Thomas L.; Turner, Paul C.

    1993-01-01

    A pressure-reaction synthesis process for producing increased stiffness and improved strength-to-weight ratio titanium metal matrix composite materials comprising exothermically reacting a titanium powder or titanium powder alloys with non-metal powders or gas selected from the group consisting of C, B, N, BN, B.sub.4 C, SiC and Si.sub.3 N.sub.4 at temperatures from about 900.degree. to about 1300.degree. C., for about 5 to about 30 minutes in a forming die under pressures of from about 1000 to 5000 psi.

  4. Composite material including nanocrystals and methods of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bawendi, Moungi G.; Sundar, Vikram C.

    2008-02-05

    Temperature-sensing compositions can include an inorganic material, such as a semiconductor nanocrystal. The nanocrystal can be a dependable and accurate indicator of temperature. The intensity of emission of the nanocrystal varies with temperature and can be highly sensitive to surface temperature. The nanocrystals can be processed with a binder to form a matrix, which can be varied by altering the chemical nature of the surface of the nanocrystal. A nanocrystal with a compatibilizing outer layer can be incorporated into a coating formulation and retain its temperature sensitive emissive properties

  5. Composite material including nanocrystals and methods of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bawendi, Moungi G.; Sundar, Vikram C.

    2010-04-06

    Temperature-sensing compositions can include an inorganic material, such as a semiconductor nanocrystal. The nanocrystal can be a dependable and accurate indicator of temperature. The intensity of emission of the nanocrystal varies with temperature and can be highly sensitive to surface temperature. The nanocrystals can be processed with a binder to form a matrix, which can be varied by altering the chemical nature of the surface of the nanocrystal. A nanocrystal with a compatibilizing outer layer can be incorporated into a coating formulation and retain its temperature sensitive emissive properties.

  6. Composite slip table of dissimilar materials for damping longitudinal modes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gregory, D.L.; Priddy, T.G.; Smallwood, D.O.; Woodall, T.D.

    1991-06-18

    A vibration slip table for use in a vibration testing apparatus is disclosed. The tables comprised of at least three composite layers of material; a first metal layer, a second damping layer, and a third layer having a high acoustic velocity relative to the first layer. The different acoustic velocities between the first and third layers cause relative shear displacements between the layers with the second layer damping the displacements between the first and third layers to reduce the table longitudinal vibration modes. 6 figures.

  7. My Spring with Graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Leary, Timothy Sean

    2015-06-08

    Graphene is a two-dimensional structure, one atom thick, with many uses in the world of technology. It has many useful electrical properties, is a very strong and durable material, and can be used to protect different types of substances. The world would be able to use these properties to further the strength of cars, protect metals from oxidation, increase computer speeds, use to improve superconductors, and whatever future uses that scientist invent or discover. We sought to optimize the growth and transfer of graphene. We grew graphene on copper foils by heating the foil in a furnace, and having various gases flow through a tube, where the copper foil was placed. We varied some of the concentrations of gases, along with having different times for heating the copper foil, different times for graphene growth, or a combination of the two. The focus of our experiment was to specifically grow monolayer single crystal graphene, which means that we do not want multiplayers of graphene, and do not want multiple crystals growing to form a bigger crystal. Our goal was to grow large single crystals from the growth experiment. We used a few different types of transfer methods that ranged from: using heat and pressure to press the graphene on different materials, using a polymer to cover the graphene with a method to destroy the copper, but leave the graphene and polymer intact, and using a type of heat tape with a combination of varying pressures to transfer the graphene, and then destroy the copper foil. To discover if we grew graphene we used different techniques involving lasers and microscopes to take different types of measurements. Discovering the best way of growing and transferring graphene will help with managing the cost of the future uses of graphene.

  8. New Composite Thermoelectric Materials for Macro-size Applications

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Dresselhaus, Mildred [MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States

    2010-01-08

    A review will be given of several important recent advances in both thermoelectrics research and industrial thermoelectric applications, which have attracted much attention, increasing incentives for developing advanced materials appropriate for large-scale applications of thermoelectric devices. One promising strategy is the development of materials with a dense packing of random nanostructures as a route for the sacle-up of thermoelectrics applications. The concepts involved in designing composite materials containing nanostructures for thermoelectric applications will be discussed in general terms. Specific application is made to the Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanocomposite system for use in power generation. Also emphasized are the scientific advantages of the nanocomposite approach for the simultaneous increase in the power factor and decrease of the thermal conductivity, along with the practical advantages of having bulk samples for property measurements and device applications. A straightforward path is identified for the scale-up of thermoelectric materials synthesis containing nanostructured constituents for use in thermoelectric applications. We end with some vision of where the field of thermoelectrics is now heading.

  9. From Laboratory to Industry: Unlocking the Potential of Graphene...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    From Laboratory to Industry: Unlocking the Potential of Graphene Brookhaven Lab and Graphene Laboratories collaborate to bring atom-thin material to the masses Brookhaven National ...

  10. Enabling graphene nanoelectronics. (Technical Report) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Enabling graphene nanoelectronics. Recent work has shown that graphene, a 2D ... Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ...

  11. Composition and method for removing photoresist materials from electronic components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davenhall, Leisa B.; Rubin, James B.

    2002-01-01

    The invention is a combination of at least one dense phase fluid and at least one dense phase fluid modifier which can be used to contact substrates for electronic parts such as semiconductor wafers or chips to remove photoresist materials which are applied to the substrates during manufacture of the electronic parts. The dense phase fluid modifier is one selected from the group of cyclic, aliphatic or alicyclic compounds having the functional group: ##STR1## wherein Y is a carbon, oxygen, nitrogen, phosphorus or sulfur atom or a hydrocarbon group having from 1 to 10 carbon atoms, a halogen or halogenated hydrocarbon group having from 1 to 10 carbon atoms, silicon or a fluorinated silicon group; and wherein R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 can be the same or different substituents; and wherein, as in the case where X is nitrogen, R.sub.1 or R.sub.2 may not be present. The invention compositions generally are applied to the substrates in a pulsed fashion in order to remove the hard baked photoresist material remaining on the surface of the substrate after removal of soft baked photoresist material and etching of the barrier layer.

  12. Functionalized Graphene Sheets as Molecular Templates for Controlled Nucleation and Self-Assembly of Metal Oxide-Graphene Nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Xiaolin; Qi, Wen N.; Mei, Donghai; Sushko, Maria L.; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Liu, Jun

    2012-09-25

    Graphene sheets have been extensively studied as a key functional component of graphene-based nanocomposites for electronics, energy, catalysis,and sensing applications. However, fundamental understanding of the interfacial binding and nucleation processes at graphene surfaces remains lacking, and the range of controlled structures that can be produced are limited. Here, by using a combination of theoretical and experimental approaches, we demonstrate that functionalized graphene sheets (FGS) can function as a new class of molecular templates to direct nucleation and self-assembly and produce novel, three-dimensional nanocomposite materials. Two key aspects are demonstrated: First, the functional groups on FGS surface determine the nucleation energy, and thus control the nucleation sites and nucleation density, as well as the preferred crystalline phases. Second, FGS can function as a template to direct the self-assembly of surfactant micelles and produce ordered, mesoporous arrays of crystalline metal oxides and composites.

  13. Predicting crack growth in continuous-fiber composite materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cordes, J.A.; Yazici, R.

    1995-12-31

    Pre-notched composite lamina with unidirectional fibers were studied experimentally and using finite element analysis. Experiments were conducted on notched graphite/aluminum and glass/epoxy panels and the results were compared to a finite element method. Under remote tensile loading, cracks in the graphite/aluminum panels propagated perpendicular to the applied load without stable crack growth. In the glass/epoxy panels, crack propagation was initially stable and parallel to the fibers. A nonlinear damage zone method (DZM) was used to predict the crack growth directions, estimate damages, model stable and unstable crack growths, and predict the loads at failure. For both materials, the predicted loads at failure were within 20% of experimental loads.

  14. Method of making molecularly doped composite polymer material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Affinito, John D. [Tucson, AZ; Martin, Peter M. [Kennewick, WA; Graff, Gordon L. [West Richland, WA; Burrows, Paul E. [Kennewick, WA; Gross, Mark E. , Sapochak, Linda S.

    2005-06-21

    A method of making a composite polymer of a molecularly doped polymer. The method includes mixing a liquid polymer precursor with molecular dopant forming a molecularly doped polymer precursor mixture. The molecularly doped polymer precursor mixture is flash evaporated forming a composite vapor. The composite vapor is cryocondensed on a cool substrate forming a composite molecularly doped polymer precursor layer, and the cryocondensed composite molecularly doped polymer precursor layer is cross linked thereby forming a layer of the composite polymer layer of the molecularly doped polymer.

  15. Graphene's 3D Counterpart

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Print ALS researchers have discovered a material that is essentially a 3D version of graphene-the 2D sheets of carbon through which electrons race at many times the speed at which...

  16. Graphene's 3D Counterpart

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    some exciting phenomena and applications of graphene in 3D materials-it also gives rise to many unusual properties. In addition to these unusual properties, the 3DTDS is the...

  17. Chemically Bonded Phosphorus/Graphene Hybrid as a High Performance Anode for Sodium-Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Jiangxuan; Yu, Zhaoxin; Gordin, Mikhail; Hu, Shilin; Yi, Ran; Tang, Duihai; Walter, Timothy; Regula, Michael; Choi, Daiwon; Li, Xiaolin; Manivannan, Ayyakkannu; Wang, Donghai

    2014-11-12

    Room temperature sodium-ion batteries are of great interest for high-energy-density energy storage systems because of low-cost, natural abundance of sodium. Here, we report a novel graphene nanosheets-wrapped phosphorus composite as an anode for high performance sodium-ion batteries though a facile ball-milling of red phosphorus and graphene nanosheets. Not only can the graphene nanosheets significantly improve the electrical conductivity, but they also serve as a buffer layer to accommodate the large volume change of phosphorus in the charge-discharge process. As a result, the graphene wrapped phosphorus composite anode delivers a high reversible capacity of 2077 mAh/g with excellent cycling stability (1700 mAh/g after 60 cycles) and high Coulombic efficiency (>98%). This simple synthesis approach and unique nanostructure can potentially extend to other electrode materials with unstable solid electrolyte interphases in sodium-ion batteries.

  18. Durable polymer-aerogel based superhydrophobic coatings, a composite material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kissel, David J; Brinker, Charles Jeffrey

    2014-03-04

    Provided are polymer-aerogel composite coatings, devices and articles including polymer-aerogel composite coatings, and methods for preparing the polymer-aerogel composite. The exemplary article can include a surface, wherein the surface includes at least one region and a polymer-aerogel composite coating disposed over the at least one region, wherein the polymer-aerogel composite coating has a water contact angle of at least about 140.degree. and a contact angle hysteresis of less than about 1.degree.. The polymer-aerogel composite coating can include a polymer and an ultra high water content catalyzed polysilicate aerogel, the polysilicate aerogel including a three dimensional network of silica particles having surface functional groups derivatized with a silylating agent and a plurality of pores.

  19. Durable polymer-aerogel based superhydrophobic coatings: a composite material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kissel, David J.; Brinker, Charles Jeffrey

    2016-02-02

    Provided are polymer-aerogel composite coatings, devices and articles including polymer-aerogel composite coatings, and methods for preparing the polymer-aerogel composite. The exemplary article can include a surface, wherein the surface includes at least one region and a polymer-aerogel composite coating disposed over the at least one region, wherein the polymer-aerogel composite coating has a water contact angle of at least about 140.degree. and a contact angle hysteresis of less than about 1.degree.. The polymer-aerogel composite coating can include a polymer and an ultra high water content catalyzed polysilicate aerogel, the polysilicate aerogel including a three dimensional network of silica particles having surface functional groups derivatized with a silylating agent and a plurality of pores.

  20. A Roadmap for Engineering Piezoelectricity in Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Roadmap for Engineering Piezoelectricity in Graphene A Roadmap for Engineering Piezoelectricity in Graphene Doping this 'Miracle Material' May Lead to New Array of Nanoscale Devices, Simulations Reveal February 23, 2012 Linda Vu, lvu@lbl.gov, +1 510 495 2402 This illustration shows lithium atoms (red) doped on graphene (black hexagons) and generating electricity. Graphic courtesy of Mitchell Ong, Stanford University. Some scientists refer to graphene as the "miracle material" of the

  1. Activated carbon fiber composite material and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burchell, Timothy D.; Weaver, Charles E.; Chilcoat, Bill R.; Derbyshire, Frank; Jagtoyen, Marit

    2001-01-01

    An activated carbon fiber composite for separation and purification, or catalytic processing of fluids is described. The activated composite comprises carbon fibers rigidly bonded to form an open, permeable, rigid monolith capable of being formed to near-net-shape. Separation and purification of gases are effected by means of a controlled pore structure that is developed in the carbon fibers contained in the composite. The open, permeable structure allows the free flow of gases through the monolith accompanied by high rates of adsorption. By modification of the pore structure and bulk density the composite can be rendered suitable for applications such as gas storage, catalysis, and liquid phase processing.

  2. Activated carbon fiber composite material and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burchell, Timothy D.; Weaver, Charles E.; Chilcoat, Bill R.; Derbyshire, Frank; Jagtoyen, Marit

    2000-01-01

    An activated carbon fiber composite for separation and purification, or catalytic processing of fluids is described. The activated composite comprises carbon fibers rigidly bonded to form an open, permeable, rigid monolith capable of being formed to near-net-shape. Separation and purification of gases are effected by means of a controlled pore structure that is developed in the carbon fibers contained in the composite. The open, permeable structure allows the free flow of gases through the monolith accompanied by high rates of adsorption. By modification of the pore structure and bulk density the composite can be rendered suitable for applications such as gas storage, catalysis, and liquid phase processing.

  3. Sandia Energy - Composite-Materials Fatigue Database Updated

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fatigue loading, testing new materials such as urethane resins and aligned strand material forms that may have manufacturing and cost advantages, studying adhesive fracture...

  4. Sandia Energy - Latest Version of the Composite Materials Database...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the design of large blades; and testing and analysis of aligned-strand laminates as a new material form with potentially enhanced manufacturing advantages over current materials....

  5. Orderly Deposition of Uncontaminated Graphene - Energy Innovation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    These structures were visualized with scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, and their graphene composition was confirmed with Raman spectroscopy. The nanolines ...

  6. Ultrathin Planar Graphene Supercapacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Jingsong; Meunier, Vincent; Sumpter, Bobby G; Ajayan, Pullikel M; Yoo, Jung Joon; Balakrishnan, Kaushik; Srivastava, Anchal; Conway, Michelle; Reddy, Arava Leela Mohan; Yu, Jin; Vajtai, Robert

    2011-01-01

    With the advent of atomically thin and flat layers of conducting materials such as graphene, new designs for thin film energy storage devices with good performance have become possible. Here, we report an in-plane fabrication approach for ultrathin supercapacitors based on electrodes comprised of pristine graphene and multi-layer reduced graphene oxide. The in-plane design is straightforward to implement and exploits efficiently the surface of each graphene layer for energy storage. The open architecture and the effect of graphene edges enable even the thinnest of devices, made from as grown 1-2 graphene layers, to reach specific capacities up to 80 Fcm-2. While, much higher (394 Fcm-2) specific capacities are observed in case of multi-layered graphene oxide electrodes, owing to the better utilization of the available electrochemical surface area. The performances of devices with pristine as well as thicker graphene based structures are examined using a combination of experiments and model calculations. The demonstrated all solid-state supercapacitors provide a prototype for a broad range of thin-film based energy storage devices.

  7. Composite material having high thermal conductivity and process for fabricating same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Colella, Nicholas J.; Davidson, Howard L.; Kerns, John A.; Makowiecki, Daniel M.

    1998-01-01

    A process for fabricating a composite material such as that having high thermal conductivity and having specific application as a heat sink or heat spreader for high density integrated circuits. The composite material produced by this process has a thermal conductivity between that of diamond and copper, and basically consists of coated diamond particles dispersed in a high conductivity metal, such as copper. The composite material can be fabricated in small or relatively large sizes using inexpensive materials. The process basically consists, for example, of sputter coating diamond powder with several elements, including a carbide forming element and a brazeable material, compacting them into a porous body, and infiltrating the porous body with a suitable braze material, such as copper-silver alloy, thereby producing a dense diamond-copper composite material with a thermal conductivity comparable to synthetic diamond films at a fraction of the cost.

  8. Composite material having high thermal conductivity and process for fabricating same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Colella, N.J.; Davidson, H.L.; Kerns, J.A.; Makowiecki, D.M.

    1998-07-21

    A process is disclosed for fabricating a composite material such as that having high thermal conductivity and having specific application as a heat sink or heat spreader for high density integrated circuits. The composite material produced by this process has a thermal conductivity between that of diamond and copper, and basically consists of coated diamond particles dispersed in a high conductivity metal, such as copper. The composite material can be fabricated in small or relatively large sizes using inexpensive materials. The process basically consists, for example, of sputter coating diamond powder with several elements, including a carbide forming element and a brazeable material, compacting them into a porous body, and infiltrating the porous body with a suitable braze material, such as copper-silver alloy, thereby producing a dense diamond-copper composite material with a thermal conductivity comparable to synthetic diamond films at a fraction of the cost. 7 figs.

  9. Preparation and Characterization of Graphene Oxide Paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dikin,D.; Stankovich, S.; Zimney, E.; Piner, R.; Dommett, G.; Evmenenko, G.; Nguyen, S.; Ruoff, R.

    2007-01-01

    Free-standing paper-like or foil-like materials are an integral part of our technological society. Their uses include protective layers, chemical filters, components of electrical batteries or supercapacitors, adhesive layers, electronic or optoelectronic components, and molecular storage. Inorganic 'paper-like' materials based on nanoscale components such as exfoliated vermiculite or mica platelets have been intensively studied and commercialized as protective coatings, high-temperature binders, dielectric barriers and gas-impermeable membranes. Carbon-based flexible graphite foils composed of stacked platelets of expanded graphite have long been used in packing and gasketing applications because of their chemical resistivity against most media, superior sealability over a wide temperature range, and impermeability to fluids. The discovery of carbon nanotubes brought about bucky paper, which displays excellent mechanical and electrical properties that make it potentially suitable for fuel cell and structural composite applications. Here we report the preparation and characterization of graphene oxide paper, a free-standing carbon-based membrane material made by flow-directed assembly of individual graphene oxide sheets. This new material outperforms many other paper-like materials in stiffness and strength. Its combination of macroscopic flexibility and stiffness is a result of a unique interlocking-tile arrangement of the nanoscale graphene oxide sheets.

  10. Production and characterization of a composite insulation material from waste polyethylene teraphtalates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtulmus, Erhan; Karaboyac?, Mustafa; Yigitarslan, Sibel

    2013-12-16

    The pollution of polyethylene teraphtalate (PET) is in huge amounts due to the most widely usage as a packaging material in several industries. Regional pumice has several desirable characteristics such as porous structure, low-cost and light-weight. Considering the requirements approved by the Ministry of Public Works on isolation, composite insulation material consisting of PET and pumice was studied. Sheets of composites differing both in particle size of pumice and composition of polymer were produced by hot-molding technique. Characterization of new composite material was achieved by measuring its weight, density, flammability, endurance against both to common acids and bases, and to a force applied, heat insulation and water adsorption capacity. The results of the study showed that produced composite material is an alternative building material due to its desirable characteristics; low weight, capability of low heat conduction.

  11. The Development of Low-Cost Integrated Composite Seal for SOFC: Materials and Design Methodologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xinyu Huang; Kristoffer Ridgeway; Srivatsan Narasimhan; Serg Timin; Wei Huang; Didem Ozevin; Ken Reifsnider

    2006-07-31

    This report summarizes the work conducted by UConn SOFC seal development team during the Phase I program and no cost extension. The work included composite seal sample fabrication, materials characterizations, leak testing, mechanical strength testing, chemical stability study and acoustic-based diagnostic methods. Materials characterization work revealed a set of attractive material properties including low bulk permeability, high electrical resistivity, good mechanical robustness. Composite seal samples made of a number of glasses and metallic fillers were tested for sealing performance under steady state and thermal cycling conditions. Mechanical testing included static strength (pull out) and interfacial fracture toughness measurements. Chemically stability study evaluated composite seal material stability after aging at 800 C for 168 hrs. Acoustic based diagnostic test was conducted to help detect and understand the micro-cracking processes during thermal cycling test. The composite seal concept was successfully demonstrated and a set of material (coating composition & fillers) were identified to have excellent thermal cycling performance.

  12. Foam composition for treating asbestos-containing materials and method of using same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Block, J.; Krupkin, N.V.; Kuespert, D.R.; Nishioka, G.M.; Lau, J.W.K.; Palmer, N.I.

    1998-04-28

    A composition for transforming a chrysotile asbestos-containing material into a non-asbestos material is disclosed. The composition comprises water, at least about 30% by weight of an acid component, at least about 0.1% by weight of a source of fluoride ions, and a stable foam forming amount of a foaming agent system having both cationic and non-ionic functionality. A method of transforming the asbestos-containing material into a non-asbestos material using the present composition in the form of a foam also disclosed.

  13. Foam composition for treating asbestos-containing materials and method of using same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Block, Jacob; Krupkin, Natalia Vera; Kuespert, Daniel Reid; Nishioka, Gary Masaru; Lau, John Wing-Keung; Palmer, Nigel Innes

    1998-04-28

    A composition for transforming a chrysotile asbestos-containing material into a non-asbestos material is disclosed, wherein the composition comprises water, at least about 30% by weight of an acid component, at least about 0.1% by weight of a source of fluoride ions, and a stable foam forming amount of a foaming agent system having both cationic and non-ionic functionality. A method of transforming the asbestos-containing material into a non-asbestos material using the present composition in the form of a foam also disclosed.

  14. Graphene's 3D Counterpart

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Graphene's 3D Counterpart Graphene's 3D Counterpart Print Monday, 21 July 2014 08:59 ALS researchers have discovered a material that is essentially a 3D version of graphene-the 2D sheets of carbon through which electrons race at many times the speed at which they move through silicon. The discovery promises exciting new things to come for the high--tech industry, including much faster transistors and far more compact hard drives. Researchers discovered that sodium bismuthide can exist as a form

  15. Silicon nitride/silicon carbide composite densified materials prepared using composite powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunmead, S.D.; Weimer, A.W.; Carroll, D.F.; Eisman, G.A.; Cochran, G.A.; Susnitzky, D.W.; Beaman, D.R.; Nilsen, K.J.

    1997-07-01

    Prepare silicon nitride-silicon carbide composite powders by carbothermal reduction of crystalline silica powder, carbon powder and, optionally, crystalline silicon nitride powder. The crystalline silicon carbide portion of the composite powders has a mean number diameter less than about 700 nanometers and contains nitrogen. The composite powders may be used to prepare sintered ceramic bodies and self-reinforced silicon nitride ceramic bodies.

  16. Composite materials comprising two jonal functions and methods for making the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fareed, Ali Syed; Garnier, John Edward; Schiroky, Gerhard Hans; Kennedy, Christopher Robin; Sonuparlak, Birol

    2001-01-01

    The present invention generally relates to mechanisms for preventing undesirable oxidation (i.e., oxidation protection mechanisms) in composite bodies. The oxidation protection mechanisms include getterer materials which are added to the composite body which gather or scavenge undesirable oxidants which may enter the composite body. The getterer materials may be placed into at least a portion of the composite body such that any undesirable oxidant approaching, for example, a fiber reinforcement, would be scavenged by (e.g., reacted with) the getterer. The getterer materials) may form at least one compound which acts as a passivation layer, and/or is able to move by bulk transport (e.g., by viscous flow as a glassy material) to a crack, and sealing the crack, thereby further enhancing the oxidation protection of the composite body. One or more ceramic filler materials which serve as reinforcements may have a plurality of super-imposed coatings thereon, at least one of which coatings may function as or contain an oxidation protection mechanism. Specifically, a coating comprising boron nitride which has been engineered or modified to contain some silicon exhibits improved corrosion resistance, specifically to oxygen and moisture. The coated materials may be useful as reinforcing materials in high performance composites to provide improved mechanical properties such as fracture toughness. The present invention also relates to improved composites which incorporate these materials, and to their methods of manufacture.

  17. Nonaqueous composition for slip casting or cold forming refractory material into solid shapes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montgomery, L.C.

    1993-08-24

    A composition is described for slip casting or cold forming non-oxide refractory material(s) into solid shape comprising finely divided solid refractory materials selected from the group consisting of metal boride, refractory carbide, nitride, silicide and a refractory metal of tungsten, molybdenum, tantalum and chromium suspended in a nonaqueous liquid slip composition consisting essentially of a deflocculent composed of a vinyl chloride-vinyl acetate resin dissolved in an organic solvent.

  18. Boron cage compound materials and composites for shielding and absorbing neutrons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bowen, III, Daniel E; Eastwood, Eric A

    2014-03-04

    Boron cage compound-containing materials for shielding and absorbing neutrons. The materials include BCC-containing composites and compounds. BCC-containing compounds comprise a host polymer and a BCC attached thereto. BCC-containing composites comprise a mixture of a polymer matrix and a BCC filler. The BCC-containing materials can be used to form numerous articles of manufacture for shielding and absorbing neutrons.

  19. GeOx/Reduced Graphene Oxide Composite as an Anode for Li-ion Batteries: Enhanced Capacity via Reversible Utilization of Li2O along with Improved Rate Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lv, Dongping; Gordin, Mikhail; Yi, Ran; Xu, Terrence (Tianren); Song, Jiangxuan; Jiang, Yingbing; Choi, Daiwon; Wang, Donghai

    2014-09-01

    A self-assembled GeOx/reduced graphene oxide (GeOx/RGO) composite, where GeOx nanoparticles were grown directly on reduced graphene oxide sheets, was synthesized via a facile one-step reduction approach and studied by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy elemental mapping, and other techniques. Electrochemical evaluation indicates that incorporation of reduced graphene oxide enhances both the rate capability and reversible capacity of GeOx, with the latter being due to the RGO enabling reversible utilization of Li2O. The composite delivers a high reversible capacity of 1600 mAhg-1 at a current density of 100 mAg-1, and still maintains a capacity of 410 mAhg-1 at a high current density of 20 Ag-1. Owing to the flexible reduced graphene oxide sheets enwrapping the GeOx particles, the cycling stability of the composite was also improved significantly. To further demonstrate its feasibility in practical applications, the synthesized GeOx/RGO composite anode was successfully paired with a high voltage LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode to form a full cell, which showed good cycling and rate performance.

  20. Lightweight Composite Materials for Heavy Duty Vehicles (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    between the lightweight materials selected for certain vehicle systems, cost-effective methods for their design and manufacturing, and practical means to enhance their ...

  1. ,"SNL/MSU/DOE COMPOSITE MATERIAL FATIGUE DATABASE"

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in terms of the sequence through the thickness of individual ply orientation. Many infusion " ,"fabrics contain parallel aligned strands on one face and backing material (mat or...

  2. Disorder-free sputtering method on graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qiu Xue Peng; Shin Young Jun; Niu Jing; Kulothungasagaran, Narayanapillai; Kalon, Gopinadhan; Yang, Hyunsoo; Qiu Caiyu; Yu Ting

    2012-09-15

    Deposition of various materials onto graphene without causing any disorder is highly desirable for graphene applications. Especially, sputtering is a versatile technique to deposit various metals and insulators for spintronics, and indium tin oxide to make transparent devices. However, the sputtering process causes damage to graphene because of high energy sputtered atoms. By flipping the substrate and using a high Ar pressure, we demonstrate that the level of damage to graphene can be reduced or eliminated in dc, rf, and reactive sputtering processes.

  3. Cell-based composite materials with programmed structures and functions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    None

    2016-03-01

    The present invention is directed to the use of silicic acid to transform biological materials, including cellular architecture into inorganic materials to provide biocomposites (nanomaterials) with stabilized structure and function. In the present invention, there has been discovered a means to stabilize the structure and function of biological materials, including cells, biomolecules, peptides, proteins (especially including enzymes), lipids, lipid vesicles, polysaccharides, cytoskeletal filaments, tissue and organs with silicic acid such that these materials may be used as biocomposites. In many instances, these materials retain their original biological activity and may be used in harsh conditions which would otherwise destroy the integrity of the biological material. In certain instances, these biomaterials may be storage stable for long periods of time and reconstituted after storage to return the biological material back to its original form. In addition, by exposing an entire cell to form CSCs, the CSCs may function to provide a unique system to study enzymes or a cascade of enzymes which are otherwise unavailable.

  4. Fluorescent single walled nanotube/silica composite materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dattelbaum, Andrew M.; Gupta, Gautam; Duque, Juan G.; Doorn, Stephen K.; Hamilton, Christopher E.; DeFriend Obrey, Kimberly A.

    2013-03-12

    Fluorescent composites of surfactant-wrapped single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were prepared by exposing suspensions of surfactant-wrapped carbon nanotubes to tetramethylorthosilicate (TMOS) vapor. Sodium deoxycholate (DOC) and sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS) were the surfactants. No loss in emission intensity was observed when the suspension of DOC-wrapped SWNTs were exposed to the TMOS vapors, but about a 50% decrease in the emission signal was observed from the SDS-wrapped SWNTs nanotubes. The decrease in emission was minimal by buffering the SDS/SWNT suspension prior to forming the composite. Fluorescent xerogels were prepared by adding glycerol to the SWNT suspensions prior to TMOS vapor exposure, followed by drying the gels. Fluorescent aerogels were prepared by replacing water in the gels with methanol and then exposing them to supercritical fluid drying conditions. The aerogels can be used for gas sensing.

  5. Aqueous processing of composite lithium ion electrode material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Jianlin; Armstrong, Beth L; Daniel, Claus; Wood, III, David L

    2015-02-17

    A method of making a battery electrode includes the steps of dispersing an active electrode material and a conductive additive in water with at least one dispersant to create a mixed dispersion; treating a surface of a current collector to raise the surface energy of the surface to at least the surface tension of the mixed dispersion; depositing the dispersed active electrode material and conductive additive on a current collector; and heating the coated surface to remove water from the coating.

  6. Nano-scaled graphene platelets with a high length-to-width aspect ratio

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhamu, Aruna; Guo, Jiusheng; Jang, Bor Z.

    2010-09-07

    This invention provides a nano-scaled graphene platelet (NGP) having a thickness no greater than 100 nm and a length-to-width ratio no less than 3 (preferably greater than 10). The NGP with a high length-to-width ratio can be prepared by using a method comprising (a) intercalating a carbon fiber or graphite fiber with an intercalate to form an intercalated fiber; (b) exfoliating the intercalated fiber to obtain an exfoliated fiber comprising graphene sheets or flakes; and (c) separating the graphene sheets or flakes to obtain nano-scaled graphene platelets. The invention also provides a nanocomposite material comprising an NGP with a high length-to-width ratio. Such a nanocomposite can become electrically conductive with a small weight fraction of NGPs. Conductive composites are particularly useful for shielding of sensitive electronic equipment against electromagnetic interference (EMI) or radio frequency interference (RFI), and for electrostatic charge dissipation.

  7. Improved method and composition for immobilization of waste in cement-based material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tallent, O.K.; Dodson, K.E.; McDaniel, E.W.

    1987-10-01

    A composition and method for fixation or immobilization of aqueous hazardous waste material in cement-based materials (grout) is disclosed. The amount of drainable water in the cured grout is reduced by the addition of an ionic aluminum compound to either the waste material or the mixture of waste material and dry-solid cement- based material. This reduction in drainable water in the cured grout obviates the need for large, expensive amounts of gelling clays in grout materials and also results in improved consistency and properties of these cement-based waste disposal materials.

  8. ARRA Material Handling Equipment Composite Data Products: Data Through Quarter 4 of 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, J.; Sprik, S.; Peters, M.

    2014-06-01

    This report includes 47 composite data products (CDPs) produced for American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) fuel cell material handling equipment, with data through the fourth quarter of 2013.

  9. ARRA Material Handling Equipment Composite Data Products: Data Through Quarter 4 of 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, J.; Sprik, S.; Ainscough, C.; Saur, G.; Post, M.; Peters, M.; Ramsden, T.

    2013-05-01

    This presentation from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory includes American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) fuel cell material handling equipment composite data products for data through the fourth quarter of 2012.

  10. ARRA Material Handling Equipment Composite Data Products: Data through Quarter 2 of 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, J.; Sprik, S.; Ainscough, C.; Saur, G.; Post, M.; Peters, M.

    2013-11-01

    This report includes 47 composite data products (CDPs) produced for American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) fuel cell material handling equipment, with data through the second quarter of 2013.

  11. Compositions and methods comprising cellulase variants with reduced affinity to non-cellulosic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cascao-Pereira, Luis G.; Kaper, Thijs; Kelemen, Bradley R; Liu, Amy D.

    2012-08-07

    The present disclosure relates to cellulase variants. In particular the present disclosure relates to cellulase variants having reduced binding to non-cellulosic materials. Also described are nucleic acids encoding the cellulase, compositions comprising said cellulase, methods of identifying cellulose variants and methods of using the compositions.

  12. Compositions and methods comprising cellulase variants with reduced affinity to non-cellulosic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cascao-Pereira, Luis G; Kaper, Thijs; Kelemen, Bradley R; Liu, Amy D

    2015-04-07

    The present disclosure relates to cellulase variants. In particular the present disclosure relates to cellulase variants having reduced binding to non-cellulosic materials. Also described are nucleic acids encoding the cellulase, compositions comprising said cellulase, methods of identifying cellulose variants and methods of using the compositions.

  13. Compression under conditions of the plane-strain state of composite powdered materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leshchinskii, V.M.; Blokhin, A.G.; Ermolaeva, I.E.

    1995-03-01

    The deviator part of the stress tensor has a key effect on the compaction of a highly-porous powdered material. The composition of the powder mixture promotes strengthening processes in the plastic phase. The nature of the macroscopic behavior of the composite powdered mixture is affected substantially by the reinforcement of contacts between particles.

  14. Graphene aerogels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pauzauskie, Peter J; Worsley, Marcus A; Baumann, Theodore F; Satcher, Jr., Joe H; Biener, Juergen

    2015-03-31

    Graphene aerogels with high conductivity and surface areas including a method for making a graphene aerogel, including the following steps: (1) preparing a reaction mixture comprising a graphene oxide suspension and at least one catalyst; (2) curing the reaction mixture to produce a wet gel; (3) drying the wet gel to produce a dry gel; and (4) pyrolyzing the dry gel to produce a graphene aerogel. Applications include electrical energy storage including batteries and supercapacitors.

  15. Chapter 6: Innovating Clean Energy Technologies in Advanced Manufacturing | Composite Materials Technology Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Composite Materials Chapter 6: Technology Assessments This technology assessment is available as an appendix to the 2015 Quadrennial Technology Review (QTR). Composite Materials is one of fourteen manufacturing-focused technology assessments prepared in support of Chapter 6: Innovating Clean Energy Technologies in Advanced Manufacturing. For context within the 2015 QTR, key connections between this technology assessment, other QTR technology chapters, and other Chapter 6 technology assessments

  16. New Proton Conductive Composit Materials with Co-continuous Phases Using

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Functionalized and Crosslinkable TFE/VDF Fluoropolymers | Department of Energy Proton Conductive Composit Materials with Co-continuous Phases Using Functionalized and Crosslinkable TFE/VDF Fluoropolymers New Proton Conductive Composit Materials with Co-continuous Phases Using Functionalized and Crosslinkable TFE/VDF Fluoropolymers A presentation to the High Temperature Membranes Working Group meeting, May 19, 2006. lvov.pdf (732.33 KB) More Documents & Publications High Temperature

  17. Probing the nature of electron transfer in metalloproteins on graphene-family materials as nanobiocatalytic scaffold using electrochemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, Sanju; Irihamye, Aline

    2015-03-15

    Graphene-based nanomaterials have shown great promise not only in nanoelectronics due to ultrahigh electron mobility but also as biocatalytic scaffolds owing to irreversible protein surface adsorption and facilitating direct electron transfer. In this work, we synthesized stable dispersions of graphene using liquid-phase exfoliation approach based on non-covalent interactions between graphene and 1-pyrenesulfonic acid sodium salt (Py–1SO{sub 3}), 1-pyrenemethylamine salt (Py − Me-NH{sub 2}) and Pluronic{sup ®} P-123 surfactant using only water as solvent compatible with biomolecules. The resulting graphene nanoplatelets (Gr-LPE) are characterized by a combination of analytical (microscopy and spectroscopy) techniques revealing mono- to few-layer graphene displaying that the exfoliation efficiency strongly depends upon the type of pyrene-based salts and organic surfactants. Moreover being completely water-based approach, we build robust nanoscaffolds of graphene-family nanomaterials (GFNs) namely, monolayer graphene, Gr-LPE (the one prepared with Pluronic{sup ®} P-123), graphene oxide (GO) and its reduced form (rGO) on glassy carbon electrode surface with three important metalloproteins include cytochrome c (Cyt c) [for electron transfer], myoglobin (Mb) [for oxygen storage] and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) [for catalyzing the biochemical reaction]. In order to demonstrate the nanobiocatalytical activity of these proteins, we used electrochemical interfacial direct electron transfer (DET) kinetics and attempt to determine the rate constant (k{sub ET}) using two different analytical approaches namely, linear sweep voltammetry and Laviron’s theory. We elucidated that all of the metalloproteins retain their structural integrity (secondary structure) upon forming mixtures with GFNs confirmed through optical and vibrational spectroscopy and biological activity using electrochemistry. Among the GFNs studied, Gr-LPE, GO and rGO support the efficient electrical

  18. Cleaning graphene with a titanium sacrificial layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joiner, C. A. Roy, T.; Hesabi, Z. R.; Vogel, E. M.; Chakrabarti, B.

    2014-06-02

    Graphene is a promising material for future electronic applications and chemical vapor deposition of graphene on copper is a promising method for synthesizing graphene on the wafer scale. The processing of such graphene films into electronic devices introduces a variety of contaminants which can be difficult to remove. An approach to cleaning residues from the graphene channel is presented in which a thin layer of titanium is deposited via thermal e-beam evaporation and immediately removed. This procedure does not damage the graphene as evidenced by Raman spectroscopy, greatly enhances the electrical performance of the fabricated graphene field effect transistors, and completely removes the chemical residues from the surface of the graphene channel as evidenced by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  19. Composite materials and bodies including silicon carbide and titanium diboride and methods of forming same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lillo, Thomas M.; Chu, Henry S.; Harrison, William M.; Bailey, Derek

    2013-01-22

    Methods of forming composite materials include coating particles of titanium dioxide with a substance including boron (e.g., boron carbide) and a substance including carbon, and reacting the titanium dioxide with the substance including boron and the substance including carbon to form titanium diboride. The methods may be used to form ceramic composite bodies and materials, such as, for example, a ceramic composite body or material including silicon carbide and titanium diboride. Such bodies and materials may be used as armor bodies and armor materials. Such methods may include forming a green body and sintering the green body to a desirable final density. Green bodies formed in accordance with such methods may include particles comprising titanium dioxide and a coating at least partially covering exterior surfaces thereof, the coating comprising a substance including boron (e.g., boron carbide) and a substance including carbon.

  20. Yields and composition of syrups resulting from the flash pyrolysis of cellulosic materials using radiant energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Jenga, C.I.; Antal, M.J. Jr.; Jones, M. Jr.

    1982-11-01

    Cellulosic materials have been flash pyrolyzed using concentrated solar energy. The syrups obtained were composed mainly of levoglucosan. Radiant flash pyrolysis has thus been identified as a potentially attractive means of selectively degrading biomass material into good yields of relatively few products. The techniques and equipment employed to determine the composition of the pyrolyzates are described.

  1. In-situ growth of zinc tungstate nanorods on graphene for enhanced photocatalytic performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rao, Lei; Xu, Junling; Ao, Yanhui; Wang, Peifang

    2014-09-15

    Graphical abstract: Graphene/ZnWO{sub 4} (GZnWO{sub 4}) nanorod composite photocatalysts were prepared by a simple one-step method. Namely, the reduction of graphene oxide and the growth of ZnWO{sub 4} nanorod occurred simultaneously in one single process. An enhancement in the photocatalytic activities were observed in GZnWO{sub 4} composites compared with pure ZnWO{sub 4} under UV light irradiation. - Highlights: GrapheneZnWO{sub 4} composite photocatalyst was prepared for the first time. The as-prepared composite photocatalysts show high activity for dye degradation. Effect of graphene amount on the photocatalytic activity was investigated. - Abstract: Graphenezinc tungstate (GZnWO{sub 4}) hybrid photocatalysts were prepared by an in-situ growth method in which the reduction of graphene oxide (GO) and the growth of ZnWO{sub 4} crystals occurred simultaneously. The materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, UVvis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The photocatalytic activity was investigated by the degradation of dye methylene blue (MB). An enhancement in the photocatalytic activity was observed for GZnWO{sub 4} hybrids compared with pure ZnWO{sub 4} under UV light. This improvement was attributed to the following two reasons: increased migration efficiency of photo-induced electrons and increased adsorption activity for dye molecules. The effect of the amount of graphene on the photocatalytic activity was also investigated. Results showed that there was an optimum amount of 2%.

  2. Tunable Electrochemical Properties of Fluorinated Graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meduri, Praveen; Chen, Honghao; Xiao, Jie; Martinez, Jayson J.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Zhang, Jiguang; Deng, Zhiqun

    2013-06-18

    The structural and electrochemical properties of fluorinated graphene have been investigated by using a series of graphene fluorides (CFx, x=0.47, 0.66, 0.89). Fluorinated graphene exhibited high capacity retentions of 75-81% of theoretical capacity at moderate rates as cathode materials for primary lithium batteries. Specifically, CF0.47 maintained a capacity of 356 mAhg-1 at a 5C rate, superior to that of traditional fluorinated graphite. The discharged graphene fluorides also provide an electrochemical tool to probe the chemical bonding on the parent graphene substrate.

  3. Quantitative evaluation of material composition of composites using x-ray energy-dispersive NDE technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ting, J.

    1993-09-01

    This technique worked well for determining the thickness and densities for composite components having the higher linear attenuation coefficient; it accurately determined thickness of epoxy-resin and Al metal, and the denisty of bone, to {le} 4% in the graphite-epoxy, bone-plexiglas, and Al-Al corrosion composites. Accuracy is dictated by the magnitude and uncertainty of the linear attenuation coefficient. Use of Ge detector and multichannel analyzer are limited by inspection time (1 day for point measurement) and access limitation. Immediate development of a rapid in-service inspection tool is limited by the amplifier and MCA systems. The MCA should be replaced with a single-channel analyzer, and an electronic device should be built for monitoring the incoming signal for Pile-Up-Rejection.

  4. Structural properties of laminated Douglas fir/epoxy composite material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spera, D.A. . Lewis Research Center); Esgar, J.B. ); Gougeon, M.; Zuteck, M.D. )

    1990-05-01

    This publication contains a compilation of static and fatigue and strength data for laminated-wood material made from Douglas fir and epoxy. Results of tests conducted by several organizations are correlated to provide insight into the effects of variables such as moisture, size, lamina-to-lamina joint design, wood veneer grade, and the ratio of cyclic stress to steady stress during fatigue testing. These test data were originally obtained during development of wood rotor blades for large-scale wind turbines of the horizontal-axis (propeller) configuration. Most of the strength property data in this compilation are not found in the published literature. Test sections ranged from round cylinders 2.25 in. in diameter to rectangular slabs 6 in. by 24 in. in cross section and approximately 30 ft long. All specimens were made from Douglas fir veneers 0.10 in. thick, bonded together with the WEST epoxy system developed for fabrication and repair of wood boats. Loading was usually parallel to the grain. Size effects (reduction in strength with increase in test volume) are observed in some of the test data, and a simple mathematical model is presented that includes the probability of failure. General characteristics of the wood/epoxy laminate are discussed, including features that make it useful for a wide variety of applications. 9 refs.

  5. First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene Print Wednesday, 30 June 2010 00:00 An international team of scientists performing angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) experiments at ALS Beamline 7.0.1 have found that composite particles called plasmarons play a vital role in determining graphene's properties. A plasmaron consists of a charge carrier (electron or hole) coupled with a plasmon-an electron density wave. Although plasmarons were

  6. Single-layer graphene cathodes for organic photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, Marshall P.; Gorodetsky, Alon A.; Kim, Bumjung; Kim, Keun Soo; Jia, Zhang; Kim, Philip; Nuckolls, Colin; Kymissis, Ioannis

    2011-01-01

    A laminated single-layer graphene is demonstrated as a cathode for organic photovoltaicdevices. The measured properties indicate that graphene offers two potential advantages over conventional photovoltaic electrode materials; work function matching via contact doping, and increased power conversion efficiency due to transparency. These findings indicate that flexible, light-weight all carbon solar cells can be constructed using graphene as the cathode material.

  7. Effect of ignition conditions on upward flame spread on a composite material in a corner configuration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohlemiller, T.; Cleary, T.; Shields, J.

    1996-12-31

    This paper focuses on the issue of fire growth on composite materials beyond the region immediately subjected to an ignition source. Suppression of this growth is one of the key issues in realizing the safe usage of composite structural materials. A vinyl ester/glass composite was tested in the form of a 90{degrees} comer configuration with an inert ceiling segment 2.44 m above the top of the fire source. The igniter was a propane burner, either 23 or 38 cm in width with power output varied from 30 to 150 Kw. Upward flame spread rate and heat release rate were measured mainly for a brominated vinyl ester resin but limited results were also obtained for a non-flame retarded vinyl ester and a similar composite coated with an intumescent paint. Rapid fire growth beyond the igniter region was seen for the largest igniter power case; the intumescent coating successfully prevented fire growth for this case.

  8. Composite Materials under Extreme Radiation and Temperature Environments of the Next Generation Nuclear Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simos, N.

    2011-05-01

    In the nuclear energy renaissance, driven by fission reactor concepts utilizing very high temperatures and fast neutron spectra, materials with enhanced performance that exceeds are expected to play a central role. With the operating temperatures of the Generation III reactors bringing the classical reactor materials close to their performance limits there is an urgent need to develop and qualify new alloys and composites. Efforts have been focused on the intricate relations and the high demands placed on materials at the anticipated extreme states within the next generation fusion and fission reactors which combine high radiation fluxes, elevated temperatures and aggressive environments. While nuclear reactors have been in operation for several decades, the structural materials associated with the next generation options need to endure much higher temperatures (1200 C), higher neutron doses (tens of displacements per atom, dpa), and extremely corrosive environments, which are beyond the experience on materials accumulated to-date. The most important consideration is the performance and reliability of structural materials for both in-core and out-of-core functions. While there exists a great body of nuclear materials research and operating experience/performance from fission reactors where epithermal and thermal neutrons interact with materials and alter their physio-mechanical properties, a process that is well understood by now, there are no operating or even experimental facilities that will facilitate the extreme conditions of flux and temperature anticipated and thus provide insights into the behaviour of these well understood materials. Materials, however, still need to be developed and their interaction and damage potential or lifetime to be quantified for the next generation nuclear energy. Based on material development advances, composites, and in particular ceramic composites, seem to inherently possess properties suitable for key functions within the

  9. Synthesis and characterizations of graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide nanosheets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venkanna, M. Chakraborty, Amit K.

    2014-04-24

    Interest in graphene on its excellent mechanical, electrical, thermal and optical properties, its very high specific surface area, and our ability to influence these properties through chemical functionalization. Chemical reduction of graphene oxide is one of the main routes of preparation for large quantities of graphenes. Hydrazine hydrate used as reducing agent to prepare for the reduced graphene oxide (RGO). There are a number of methods for generating graphene and chemically modified graphene from natural graphite flakes, graphite derivative (such as graphite oxide) and graphite interaction compounds (i.e. expandable graphite). Here we review the use of colloidal suspensions of reduced graphene oxide (RGO) with large scalable, and is adaptable to a wide variety of applications. The graphene oxide (GO) and the reduced material (RGO) were characterized by XRD, UV-Vis spectroscopy, Thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), Raman spectroscopy and Field emission Scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) etc.

  10. DOE Science Showcase - Graphene | OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Scientific and Technical Information Graphene A remarkable material called graphene is composed of carbon atoms arranged in tightly bound hexagons just one atom thick. Graphene is the strongest known substance, an unmatched thermal and electrical conductor, stretchable and almost transparent. Since graphene was first isolated in 2004, researchers have been excited about graphene's phenomenal properties and its potential. Graphene has promising applications in many areas such as the

  11. Composite material reinforced with atomized quasicrystalline particles and method of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Biner, S.B.; Sordelet, D.J.; Lograsso, B.K.; Anderson, I.E.

    1998-12-22

    A composite material comprises an aluminum or aluminum alloy matrix having generally spherical, atomized quasicrystalline aluminum-transition metal alloy reinforcement particles disposed in the matrix to improve mechanical properties. A composite article can be made by consolidating generally spherical, atomized quasicrystalline aluminum-transition metal alloy particles and aluminum or aluminum alloy particles to form a body that is cold and/or hot reduced to form composite products, such as composite plate or sheet, with interfacial bonding between the quasicrystalline particles and the aluminum or aluminum alloy matrix without damage (e.g. cracking or shape change) of the reinforcement particles. The cold and/or hot worked composite exhibits substantially improved yield strength, tensile strength, Young`s modulus (stiffness). 3 figs.

  12. Bending response of 3-D woven and braided preform composite materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pochiraju, K.; Parvizi-Majidi, A.; Chou, T.W.; Shah, B.

    1994-12-31

    Three dimensional textile carbon-epoxy composites exhibit general anisotropy. Further, these materials may possess different modulus in uniaxial tension than that in compression. In an earlier material characterization effort, the tension, compression, and shear properties of these composites were determined. In this paper, theoretical modeling of flexure of the textile composites and experimental correlation are presented. Four point bending tests were conducted according to STM D709 standards to determine the load to mid-span deflection relationships for typical textile composites. The results of experimental analysis are compared with classical beam theory, theory of elasticity solutions considering material orthotropy and shear deflection, and finite element analysis considering material orthotropy and finite deformation/rotations. The derivation of a harmonic function, required for the theory of elasticity solution, is described in the paper. Homogeneous orthotropic elastic properties are assumed for the 3-D textile composites, which is a reasonable approximation for specimens considerably larger than the repeated geometric unit of the fiber preform. The so called ``flex modulus`` is determined from the experimental data.

  13. Titania-graphene anode electrode paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Jun; Choi, Daiwon; Bennett, Wendy D.; Graff, Gordon L.; Shin, Yongsoon

    2015-05-26

    A method for forming a nanocomposite material, the nanocomposite material formed thereby, and a battery made using the nanocomposite material. Metal oxide and graphene are placed in a solvent to form a suspension. The suspension is then applied to a current collector. The solvent is then evaporated to form a nanocomposite material. The nanocomposite material is then electrochemically cycled to form a nanocomposite material of at least one metal oxide in electrical communication with at least one graphene layer.

  14. Titania-graphene anode electrode paper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Jun; Choi, Daiwon; Bennett, Wendy D; Graff, Gordon L; Shin, Yongsoon

    2013-10-15

    A method for forming a nanocomposite material, the nanocomposite material formed thereby, and a battery made using the nanocomposite material. Metal oxide and graphene are placed in a solvent to form a suspension. The suspension is then applied to a current collector. The solvent is then evaporated to form a nanocomposite material. The nanocomposite material is then electrochemically cycled to form a nanocomposite material of at least one metal oxide in electrical communication with at least one graphene layer.

  15. Graphene's 3D Counterpart

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Graphene's 3D Counterpart Print ALS researchers have discovered a material that is essentially a 3D version of graphene-the 2D sheets of carbon through which electrons race at many times the speed at which they move through silicon. The discovery promises exciting new things to come for the high--tech industry, including much faster transistors and far more compact hard drives. Researchers discovered that sodium bismuthide can exist as a form of quantum matter called a three--dimensional

  16. Graphene's 3D Counterpart

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Graphene's 3D Counterpart Print ALS researchers have discovered a material that is essentially a 3D version of graphene-the 2D sheets of carbon through which electrons race at many times the speed at which they move through silicon. The discovery promises exciting new things to come for the high--tech industry, including much faster transistors and far more compact hard drives. Researchers discovered that sodium bismuthide can exist as a form of quantum matter called a three--dimensional

  17. Graphene's 3D Counterpart

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Graphene's 3D Counterpart Print ALS researchers have discovered a material that is essentially a 3D version of graphene-the 2D sheets of carbon through which electrons race at many times the speed at which they move through silicon. The discovery promises exciting new things to come for the high--tech industry, including much faster transistors and far more compact hard drives. Researchers discovered that sodium bismuthide can exist as a form of quantum matter called a three--dimensional

  18. Graphene's 3D Counterpart

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Graphene's 3D Counterpart Print ALS researchers have discovered a material that is essentially a 3D version of graphene-the 2D sheets of carbon through which electrons race at many times the speed at which they move through silicon. The discovery promises exciting new things to come for the high--tech industry, including much faster transistors and far more compact hard drives. Researchers discovered that sodium bismuthide can exist as a form of quantum matter called a three--dimensional

  19. Insensitive high-energy energetic structural material of tungsten-polytetrafluoroethylene-aluminum composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Liu; Liu, Jinxu Zhang, Xinbo; Li, Shukui

    2015-11-15

    Energetic structural material is a kind of materials that are inert under normal conditions but could produce exothermic chemical reaction when subjected to impact. This report shows a kind of energetic structural material of tungsten (W)-polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)-aluminum (Al) with density of 4.12 g/cm{sup 3}, excellent ductility and dynamic compressive strength of 96 MPa. Moreover, 50W-35PTFE-15Al (wt%) can exhibit a high reaction energy value of more than 2 times of TNT per unit mass and 5 times of TNT per unit volume, respectively, but with excellent insensitivity compared with traditional explosives. Under thermal conditions, the W-PTFE-Al composite can keep stable at 773 K. Under impact loading, when the strain rate up to ∼4820 s{sup −1} coupled with the absorbed energy per unit volume of 120 J/cm{sup 3}, deflagration occurs and combustion lasts for 500 μs. During impact compressive deformation, the PTFE matrix is elongated into nano-fibers, thus significantly increases the reaction activity of W-PTFE-Al composites. The nano-fiber structure is necessary for the reaction of W-PTFE-Al composites. The formation of PTFE nano-fibers must undergo severe plastic deformation, and therefore the W-PTFE-Al composites exhibit excellent insensitivity and safety. Furthermore, the reaction mechanisms of W-PTFE-Al composites in argon and in air are revealed.

  20. Hyperelastic tension of graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saavedra Flores, E. I.; Ajaj, R. M.; Adhikari, S.; Dayyani, I.; Friswell, M. I.; Castro-Triguero, Rafael

    2015-02-09

    In this paper, we investigate the hyperelastic tensile behaviour of single layer graphene sheets (SLGSs). A one-term incompressible Ogden-type hyperelastic model is chosen to describe the mechanical response of C-C bonds. By establishing equality between the Ogden strain-energy and the variation of the Tersoff-Brenner interatomic potential, three different geometries of SLGSs are studied under tensile loading. We compute the Young's modulus, the finite-deformation Poisson's ratio, ultimate strains, total reactions, and the variation of the potential energy per carbon atom for large strains. Numerical simulations are compared with results obtained by molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics simulations, finite elements, continuum mechanics theory, and experiments. Our predictions are validated, revealing the potential predictive capabilities of the present hyperelastic framework for the analysis of graphene in the context of infinitesimal and large deformations. The good agreement found between our calculations and the published data suggests that graphene may be described as a hyperelastic material.

  1. Nanoscale friction properties of graphene and graphene oxide...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoscale friction properties of graphene and graphene oxide Title Nanoscale friction properties of graphene and graphene oxide Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication...

  2. Composite material reinforced with atomized quasicrystalline particles and method of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Biner, Suleyman B.; Sordelet, Daniel J.; Lograsso, Barbara K.; Anderson, Iver E.

    1998-12-22

    A composite material comprises an aluminum or aluminum alloy matrix having generally spherical, atomized quasicrystalline aluminum-transition metal alloy reinforcement particles disposed in the matrix to improve mechanical properties. A composite article can be made by consolidating generally spherical, atomized quaiscrystalline aluminum-transition metal alloy particles and aluminum or aluminum alloy particles to form a body that is cold and/or hot reduced to form composite products, such as composite plate or sheet, with interfacial bonding between the quasicrystalline particles and the aluminum or aluminum alloy matrix without damage (e.g. cracking or shape change) of the reinforcement particles. The cold and/or hot worked compositehibits substantially improved yield strength, tensile strength, Young's modulus (stiffness).

  3. Compositional analysis of biomass reference materials: Results from an interlaboratory study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Templeton, David W.; Wolfrum, Edward J.; Yen, James H.; Sharpless, Katherine E.

    2015-10-29

    Biomass compositional methods are used to compare different lignocellulosic feedstocks, to measure component balances around unit operations and to determine process yields and therefore the economic viability of biomass-to-biofuel processes. Four biomass reference materials (RMs NIST 8491–8494) were prepared and characterized, via an interlaboratory comparison exercise in the early 1990s to evaluate biomass summative compositional methods, analysts, and laboratories. Having common, uniform, and stable biomass reference materials gives the opportunity to assess compositional data compared to other analysts, to other labs, and to a known compositional value. The expiration date for the original characterization of these RMs was reached and an effort to assess their stability and recharacterize the reference values for the remaining material using more current methods of analysis was initiated. We sent samples of the four biomass RMs to 11 academic, industrial, and government laboratories, familiar with sulfuric acid compositional methods, for recharacterization of the component reference values. In this work, we have used an expanded suite of analytical methods that are more appropriate for herbaceous feedstocks, to recharacterize the RMs’ compositions. We report the median values and the expanded uncertainty values for the four RMs on a dry-mass, whole-biomass basis. The original characterization data has been recalculated using median statistics to facilitate comparisons with this data. We found improved total component closures for three out of the four RMs compared to the original characterization, and the total component closures were near 100 %, which suggests that most components were accurately measured and little double counting occurred. Here, the major components were not statistically different in the recharacterization which suggests that the biomass materials are stable during storage and that additional components, not seen in the original

  4. Compositional analysis of biomass reference materials: Results from an interlaboratory study

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Templeton, David W.; Wolfrum, Edward J.; Yen, James H.; Sharpless, Katherine E.

    2015-10-29

    Biomass compositional methods are used to compare different lignocellulosic feedstocks, to measure component balances around unit operations and to determine process yields and therefore the economic viability of biomass-to-biofuel processes. Four biomass reference materials (RMs NIST 8491–8494) were prepared and characterized, via an interlaboratory comparison exercise in the early 1990s to evaluate biomass summative compositional methods, analysts, and laboratories. Having common, uniform, and stable biomass reference materials gives the opportunity to assess compositional data compared to other analysts, to other labs, and to a known compositional value. The expiration date for the original characterization of these RMs was reached andmore » an effort to assess their stability and recharacterize the reference values for the remaining material using more current methods of analysis was initiated. We sent samples of the four biomass RMs to 11 academic, industrial, and government laboratories, familiar with sulfuric acid compositional methods, for recharacterization of the component reference values. In this work, we have used an expanded suite of analytical methods that are more appropriate for herbaceous feedstocks, to recharacterize the RMs’ compositions. We report the median values and the expanded uncertainty values for the four RMs on a dry-mass, whole-biomass basis. The original characterization data has been recalculated using median statistics to facilitate comparisons with this data. We found improved total component closures for three out of the four RMs compared to the original characterization, and the total component closures were near 100 %, which suggests that most components were accurately measured and little double counting occurred. Here, the major components were not statistically different in the recharacterization which suggests that the biomass materials are stable during storage and that additional components, not seen in the original

  5. Ceramic superconductor/metal composite materials employing the superconducting proximity effect

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcomb, Matthew J.

    2002-01-01

    Superconducting composite materials having particles of superconducting material disposed in a metal matrix material with a high electron-boson coupling coefficient (.lambda.). The superconducting particles can comprise any type of superconductor including Laves phase materials, Chevrel phase materials, A15 compounds, and perovskite cuprate ceramics. The particles preferably have dimensions of about 10-500 nanometers. The particles preferably have dimensions larger than the superconducting coherence length of the superconducting material. The metal matrix material has a .lambda. greater than 0.2, preferably the .lambda. is much higher than 0.2. The metal matrix material is a good proximity superconductor due to its high .lambda.. When cooled, the superconductor particles cause the metal matrix material to become superconducting due to the proximity effect. In cases where the particles and the metal matrix material are chemically incompatible (i.e., reactive in a way that destroys superconductivity), the particles are provided with a thin protective metal coating. The coating is chemically compatible with the particles and metal matrix material. High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) cuprate ceramic particles are reactive and therefore require a coating of a noble metal resistant to oxidation (e.g., silver, gold). The proximity effect extends through the metal coating. With certain superconductors, non-noble metals can be used for the coating.

  6. Graphene-on-semiconductor substrates for analog electronics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lagally, Max G.; Cavallo, Francesca; Rojas-Delgado, Richard

    2016-04-26

    Electrically conductive material structures, analog electronic devices incorporating the structures and methods for making the structures are provided. The structures include a layer of graphene on a semiconductor substrate. The graphene layer and the substrate are separated by an interfacial region that promotes transfer of charge carriers from the surface of the substrate to the graphene.

  7. The electrochemical performance of ordered mesoporous carbon/nickel compounds composite material for supercapacitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, Jicheng; Zhao, Jiachang; Tang, Bohejin; Liu, Ping; Xu, Jingli

    2010-12-15

    A series of high performance ordered mesoporous carbon/nickel compounds composites have been synthesized by a combination of incipient wetness impregnation and hydrothermal method for the first time. X-ray diffraction (XRD), N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption isotherms and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) are used to characterize the composites derived at the hydrothermal temperature of 125, 150, 175, 200, 250, 275 and 300 {sup o}C. The formation of nanosized nickel compounds, fully inside the mesopore system, was confirmed with XRD and TEM. An N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption isotherms measurements still revealed mesoporosity for the host/guest compounds. It is noteworthy that an OMC/nickel nitrate hydroxide hydrate composite (OMCN-150) exhibits more excellent performance. Based on the various hydrothermal temperatures of the composite, the capacitance of an OMCN-150 delivering the best electrochemical performance is about 2.4 (5 mV s{sup -1}) and 1.5 (50 mV s{sup -1}) times of the pristine OMC. The capacitance retention of an OMCN-150 is 96.1%, which indicates that the electrochemical performance of the supercapacitor is improved greatly, and represents novel research and significant advances in the field of electrode composite materials for supercapacitor. -- Graphical abstract: A series of high performance nickel compound/ordered mesoporous carbon composites were synthesized by a combination of incipient wetness impregnation and hydrothermal method for the first time. Display Omitted

  8. Method and apparatus for the application of textile treatment compositions to textile materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Argyle, M.D.; Propp, W.A.

    1998-01-20

    A system is described for applying textile treatment compositions to textile materials. A conduit member is provided which includes a passageway having a first end, a second end, and a medial portion with a constricted (narrowed) region. The passageway may include at least one baffle having an opening there through. A yarn strand is then moved through the passageway. A textile treatment composition (a sizing agent or dye) dissolved in a carrier medium (a supercritical fluid or liquefied gas) is thereafter introduced into the constricted region, preferably at an acute angle relative to the passageway. The carrier medium expands inside the passageway which causes delivery of the treatment composition to the yarn. The treated yarn then passes through the baffle (if used) which facilitates drying of the yarn. During this process, a carrier gas can be introduced into the passageway to ensure the production of a smooth, dry product. 1 fig.

  9. Method and apparatus for the application of textile treatment compositions to textile materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Argyle, Mark D.; Propp, William Alan

    1998-01-01

    A system for applying textile treatment compositions to textile materials. A conduit member is provided which includes a passageway having a first end, a second end, and a medial portion with a constricted (narrowed) region. The passageway may include at least one baffle having an opening therethrough. A yarn strand is then moved through the passageway. A textile treatment composition (a sizing agent or dye) dissolved in a carrier medium (a supercritical fluid or liquified gas) is thereafter introduced into the constricted region, preferably at an acute angle relative to the passageway. The carrier medium expands inside the passageway which causes delivery of the treatment composition to the yarn. The treated yarn then passes through the baffle (if used) which facilitates drying of the yarn. During this process, a carrier gas can be introduced into the passageway to ensure the production of a smooth, dry product.

  10. Composition and methods of preparation of target material for producing radionuclides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seropeghin, Yurii D; Zhuikov, Boris L

    2013-05-28

    A composition suitable for use as a target containing antimony to be irradiated by accelerated charged particles (e.g., by protons to produce tin-117m) comprises an intermetallic compound of antimony and titanium which is synthesized at high-temperature, for example, in an arc furnace. The formed material is powdered and melted in an induction furnace, or heated at high gas pressure in gas static camera. The obtained product has a density, temperature stability, and heat conductivity sufficient to provide an appropriate target material.

  11. Version 24 of the Composite Materials Database Now Available for Download

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    24 of the Composite Materials Database Now Available for Download - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy

  12. Clean Energy Manufacturing Innovation Institute for Composite Materials And Structures Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Slides and transcript of the webinar held on March 6th, 2014 from 3:00pm to 4:30pm EST on DE-FOA-0000977. Through this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) The Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) of EEREseeks to establish a Clean Energy Manufacturing Innovation Institute for Composites Materials and Structures that will support U.S. prosperity and security; and contribute to the creation of the pilot National Network for Manufacturing Innovation.

  13. Practical Analysis of materials with depth varying compositions using FT-IR photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.F. McClelland; R.W. Jones; Siquan Luo

    2004-09-30

    FT-IR photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is discussed as a nondestructive method to probe the molecular composition of materials versus depth on the basis of the analysis of layers of experimentally controllable thickness, which are measured from the sample surface to depths of some tens of micrometers, depending on optical and thermal properties. Computational methods are described to process photoacoustic amplitude and phase spectra for both semi-quantitative and quantitative depth analyses. These methods are demonstrated on layered and gradient samples.

  14. High surface area graphene-supported metal chalcogenide assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Kuntz, Joshua; Orme, Christine A.

    2016-04-19

    A composition comprising at least one graphene-supported assembly, which comprises a three-dimensional network of graphene sheets crosslinked by covalent carbon bonds, and at least one metal chalcogenide compound disposed on said graphene sheets, wherein the chalcogen of said metal chalcogenide compound is selected from S, Se and Te. Also disclosed are methods for making and using the graphene-supported assembly, including graphene-supported MoS.sub.2. Monoliths with high surface area and conductivity can be achieved. Lower operating temperatures in some applications can be achieved. Pore size and volume can be tuned.

  15. Electrostatic self-assembly of graphene oxide wrapped sulfur particles for lithium–sulfur batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Haiwei; Huang, Ying Zong, Meng; Ding, Xiao; Ding, Juan; Sun, Xu

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Researched graphene oxide wrapped sulfur particles for lithium–sulfur batteries. • New approach for core–shell GO/S composites by electrostatic self-assembly method. • Both core–shell structure and the GO support help to retard the diffusion of polysulfides during the electrochemical cycling process of GO/S cathode. - Abstract: A novel graphene oxide (GO)/sulfur (S) composite is developed by electrostatic self-assembly method. Remarkably, the core–shell structure of the composite and the GO support helps to retard the diffusion of polysulfides during the electrochemical cycling process. The GO/sulfur cathode presents enhanced cycling ability. Specific discharge capacities up to 494.7 mAh g{sup −1} over 200 cycles at 0.1 C is achieved with enhanced columbic efficiency around 95%, representing a good cathode material for lithium–sulfur batteries.

  16. Diamagnetic composite material structure for reducing undesired electromagnetic interference and eddy currents in dielectric wall accelerators and other devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Caporaso, George J.; Poole, Brian R.; Hawkins, Steven A.

    2015-06-30

    The devices, systems and techniques disclosed here can be used to reduce undesired effects by magnetic field induced eddy currents based on a diamagnetic composite material structure including diamagnetic composite sheets that are separated from one another to provide a high impedance composite material structure. In some implementations, each diamagnetic composite sheet includes patterned conductor layers are separated by a dielectric material and each patterned conductor layer includes voids and conductor areas. The voids in the patterned conductor layers of each diamagnetic composite sheet are arranged to be displaced in position from one patterned conductor layer to an adjacent patterned conductor layer while conductor areas of the patterned conductor layers collectively form a contiguous conductor structure in each diamagnetic composite sheet to prevent penetration by a magnetic field.

  17. Novel electronic structures of superlattice composed of graphene and silicene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, S.; Li, X.D. [Department of Physics and Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Wu, S.Q., E-mail: wsq@xmu.edu.cn [Department of Physics and Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Wen, Y.H. [Department of Physics and Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Zhou, S. [State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Zhu, Z.Z., E-mail: zzhu@xmu.edu.cn [Department of Physics and Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Xiamen 361005 (China)

    2014-02-01

    Highlights: Graphene/silicene superlattices exhibit metallic electronic properties. Dirac point of graphene is folded to the ?-point in the superlattice system. Significant changes in the transport properties of the graphene layers are expected. Small amount of charge transfer from the graphene to the silicene layers is found. - Abstract: Superlattice is a major force in providing man-made materials with unique properties. Here we report a study of the structural and electronic properties of a superlattice made with alternate stacking of graphene and hexagonal silicene. Three possible stacking models, i.e., the top-, bridge- and hollow-stacking, are considered. The top-stacking is found to be the most stable pattern. Although both the free-standing graphene and silicene are semi-metals, our results suggest that the graphene and silicene layers in the superlattice both exhibit metallic electronic properties due to a small amount of charge transfer from the graphene to the silicene layers. More importantly, the Dirac point of graphene is folded to the ?-point of the superlattice, instead of the K-point in the isolated graphene. Such a change in the Dirac point of graphene could lead to significant change in the transportation property of the graphene layer. Moreover, the band structure and the charge transfer indicate that the interaction between the stacking sheets in the graphene/silicene superlattice is more than just the van der Waals interaction.

  18. Characterization of few-layered graphene grown by carbon implantation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Kin Kiong; McCallum, Jeffrey C.; Jamieson, David N.

    2014-02-21

    Graphene is considered to be a very promising material for applications in nanotechnology. The properties of graphene are strongly dependent on defects that occur during growth and processing. These defects can be either detrimental or beneficial to device performance depending on defect type, location and device application. Here we present experimental results on formation of few-layered graphene by carbon ion implantation into nickel films and characteristics of graphene devices formed by graphene transfer and lithographic patterning. Micro-Raman spectroscopy was used to determine the number of graphene layers formed and identify defects arising from the device processing. The graphene films were cleaned by annealing in vacuum. Transport properties of cleaned graphene films were investigated by fabrication of back-gated field-effect transistors, which exhibited high hole and electron mobility of 1935 and 1905 cm2/Vs, respectively.

  19. Development of a Neural Network Simulator for Studying the Constitutive Behavior of Structural Composite Materials

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Na, Hyuntae; Lee, Seung-Yub; Üstündag, Ersan; Ross, Sarah L.; Ceylan, Halil; Gopalakrishnan, Kasthurirangan

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces a recent development and application of a noncommercial artificial neural network (ANN) simulator with graphical user interface (GUI) to assist in rapid data modeling and analysis in the engineering diffraction field. The real-time network training/simulation monitoring tool has been customized for the study of constitutive behavior of engineering materials, and it has improved data mining and forecasting capabilities of neural networks. This software has been used to train and simulate the finite element modeling (FEM) data for a fiber composite system, both forward and inverse. The forward neural network simulation precisely reduplicates FEM results several orders ofmore » magnitude faster than the slow original FEM. The inverse simulation is more challenging; yet, material parameters can be meaningfully determined with the aid of parameter sensitivity information. The simulator GUI also reveals that output node size for materials parameter and input normalization method for strain data are critical train conditions in inverse network. The successful use of ANN modeling and simulator GUI has been validated through engineering neutron diffraction experimental data by determining constitutive laws of the real fiber composite materials via a mathematically rigorous and physically meaningful parameter search process, once the networks are successfully trained from the FEM database.« less

  20. Catalytic Templating Approaches for Three-Dimensional Hollow Carbon/Graphene Oxide Nano-Architectures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moon, Gun-Hee; Shin, Yongsoon; Choi, Daiwon; Arey, Bruce W.; Exarhos, Gregory J.; Wang, Chong M.; Choi, Wonyong; Liu, Jun

    2013-01-01

    We report a catalytic templating method to synthesize well-controlled, three-dimensional (3D) nano-architectures with graphene oxide sheets. The 3D composites are prepared via self-assembly of carbon, GO, and spherical alumina-coated silica (ACS) templates during a catalytic reaction porcess. By changing the GO content, we can systematically tune the architecture from layered composites to 3D hollow structures to microporous materials. The composites show a synergistic effect with significantly superior properties than either pure carbon or r-GO prepared with a significant enhancement to its capacitance at high current density.

  1. Manufacturing process modeling for composite materials and structures, Sandia blade reliability collaborative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guest, Daniel A.; Cairns, Douglas S.

    2014-02-01

    The increased use and interest in wind energy over the last few years has necessitated an increase in the manufacturing of wind turbine blades. This increase in manufacturing has in many ways out stepped the current understanding of not only the materials used but also the manufacturing methods used to construct composite laminates. The goal of this study is to develop a list of process parameters which influence the quality of composite laminates manufactured using vacuum assisted resin transfer molding and to evaluate how they influence laminate quality. Known to be primary factors for the manufacturing process are resin flow rate and vacuum pressure. An incorrect balance of these parameters will often cause porosity or voids in laminates that ultimately degrade the strength of the composite. Fiber waviness has also been seen as a major contributor to failures in wind turbine blades and is often the effect of mishandling during the lay-up process. Based on laboratory tests conducted, a relationship between these parameters and laminate quality has been established which will be a valuable tool in developing best practices and standard procedures for the manufacture of wind turbine blade composites.

  2. Toughness and strength of nanocrystalline graphene

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shekhawat, Ashivni; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2016-01-28

    Pristine monocrystalline graphene is claimed to be the strongest material known with remarkable mechanical and electrical properties. However, graphene made with scalable fabrication techniques is polycrystalline and contains inherent nanoscale line and point defects—grain boundaries and grain-boundary triple junctions—that lead to significant statistical fluctuations in toughness and strength. These fluctuations become particularly pronounced for nanocrystalline graphene where the density of defects is high. Here we use large-scale simulation and continuum modelling to show that the statistical variation in toughness and strength can be understood with ‘weakest-link’ statistics. We develop the first statistical theory of toughness in polycrystalline graphene, and elucidatemore » the nanoscale origins of the grain-size dependence of its strength and toughness. Lastly, our results should lead to more reliable graphene device design, and provide a framework to interpret experimental results in a broad class of two-dimensional materials.« less

  3. Composit, Nanoparticle-Based Anode material for Li-ion Batteries Applied in Hybrid Electric (HEV's)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Malgorzata Gulbinska

    2009-08-24

    Lithium-ion batteries are promising energy storage devices in hybrid and electric vehicles with high specific energy values ({approx}150 Wh/kg), energy density ({approx}400 Wh/L), and long cycle life (>15 years). However, applications in hybrid and electric vehicles require increased energy density and improved low-temperature (<-10 C) performance. Silicon-based anodes are inexpensive, environmentally benign, and offer excellent theoretical capacity values ({approx}4000 mAh/g), leading to significantly less anode material and thus increasing the overall energy density value for the complete battery (>500 Wh/L). However, tremendous volume changes occur during cycling of pure silicon-based anodes. The expansion and contraction of these silicon particles causes them to fracture and lose electrical contact to the current collector ultimately severely limiting their cycle life. In Phase I of this project Yardney Technical Products, Inc. proposed development of a carbon/nano-silicon composite anode material with improved energy density and silicon's cycleability. In the carbon/nano-Si composite, silicon nanoparticles were embedded in a partially-graphitized carbonaceous matrix. The cycle life of anode material would be extended by decreasing the average particle size of active material (silicon) and by encapsulation of silicon nanoparticles in a ductile carbonaceous matrix. Decreasing the average particle size to a nano-region would also shorten Li-ion diffusion path and thus improve rate capability of the silicon-based anodes. Improved chemical inertness towards PC-based, low-temperature electrolytes was expected as an additional benefit of a thin, partially graphitized coating around the active electrode material.

  4. Effect of composition and heat treatment on MnBi magnetic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cui, Jun [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Choi, Jung-Pyung [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Polikarpov, Evgueni [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Bowden, Mark E [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Xie, Wei [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Li, Guosheng [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Nie, Zimin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Zarkevich, Nikolai [Ames Laboratory; Kramer, Matthew J [Ames Laboratory; Johnson, Duane [Ames Laboratory

    2014-10-01

    The metallic compound MnBi is a promising rare-earth-free permanent magnet material, unique among all candidates for its high intrinsic coercivity (Hci) and its large positive temperature coefficient. The Hci of MnBi in thin-film or powder form can exceed 12 and 26 kOe at 300 and 523 K, respectively. Such a steep rise in Hci with increasing temperature is unique to MnBi. Consequently, MnBi is a highly sought-after hard phase for exchange coupling nanocomposite magnets. However, the reaction between Mn and Bi is peritectic, and hence Mn tends to precipitate out of the MnBi liquid during the solidification process. As result, when the alloy is prepared using conventional induction or arc-melting casting methods, additional Mn is required to compensate the precipitation of Mn. In addition to composition, post-casting annealing plays an important role in obtaining a high content of MnBi low-temperature phase (LTP) because the annealing encourages the Mn precipitates and the unreacted Bi to react, forming the desired LTP phase. Here we report a systematic study of the effect of composition and heat treatments on the phase content and magnetic properties of MnBi alloys. In this study, 14 compositions were prepared using conventional metallurgical methods, and the compositions, crystal structures, phase content and magnetic properties of the resulting alloys were analyzed. The results show that the composition with 55 at.% Mn exhibits both the highest LTP content (93 wt.%) and magnetization (74 emu g?1 with 9 T applied field at 300 K).

  5. Method and apparatus for analyzing the internal chemistry and compositional variations of materials and devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kazmerski, Lawrence L.

    1989-01-01

    A method and apparatus is disclosed for obtaining and mapping chemical compositional data for solid devices. It includes a SIMS mass analyzer or similar system capable of being rastered over a surface of the solid to sample the material at a pattern of selected points, as the surface is being eroded away by sputtering or a similar process. The data for each point sampled in a volume of the solid is digitally processed and indexed by element or molecule type, exact spacial location within the volume, and the concentration levels of the detected element or molecule types. This data can then be recalled and displayed for any desired planar view in the volume.

  6. Method and apparatus for analyzing the internal chemistry and compositional variations of materials and devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kazmerski, L.L.

    1985-04-30

    A method and apparatus is disclosed for obtaining and mapping chemical compositional data for solid devices. It includes a SIMS mass analyzer or similar system capable of being rastered over a surface of the solid to sample the material at a pattern of selected points, as the surface is being eroded away by sputtering or a similar process. The data for each point sampled in a volume of the solid is digitally processed and indexed by element or molecule type, exact spacial location within the volume, and the concentration levels of the detected element or molecule types. This data can then be recalled and displayed for any desired planar view in the volume.

  7. A molecular dynamics study of polymer/graphene interfacial systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rissanou, Anastassia N.; Harmandaris, Vagelis

    2014-05-15

    Graphene based polymer nanocomposites are hybrid materials with a very broad range of technological applications. In this work, we study three hybrid polymer/graphene interfacial systems (polystyrene/graphene, poly(methyl methacrylate)/graphene and polyethylene/graphene) through detailed atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Density profiles, structural characteristics and mobility aspects are being examined at the molecular level for all model systems. In addition, we compare the properties of the hybrid systems to the properties of the corresponding bulk ones, as well as to theoretical predictions.

  8. Graphene Based Electrochemical Sensors and Biosensors: A Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shao, Yuyan; Wang, Jun; Wu, Hong; Liu, Jun; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Lin, Yuehe

    2010-05-01

    Graphene, emerging as a true 2-dimensional material, has received increasing attention due to its unique physicochemical properties (high surface area, excellent conductivity, high mechanical strength, and ease of functionalization and mass production). This article selectively reviews recent advances in graphene-based electrochemical sensors and biosensors. In particular, graphene for direct electrochemistry of enzyme, its electrocatalytic activity toward small biomolecules (hydrogen peroxide, NADH, dopamine, etc.), and graphene-based enzyme biosensors have been summarized in more detail; Graphene-based DNA sensing and environmental analysis have been discussed. Future perspectives in this rapidly developing field are also discussed.

  9. Ion irradiation tolerance of graphene as studied by atomistic simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahlgren, E. H.; Lehtinen, O.; Kotakoski, J.; Krasheninnikov, A. V.

    2012-06-04

    As impermeable to gas molecules and at the same time transparent to high-energy ions, graphene has been suggested as a window material for separating a high-vacuum ion beam system from targets kept at ambient conditions. However, accumulation of irradiation-induced damage in the graphene membrane may give rise to its mechanical failure. Using atomistic simulations, we demonstrate that irradiated graphene even with a high vacancy concentration does not show signs of such instability, indicating a considerable robustness of graphene windows. We further show that upper and lower estimates for the irradiation damage in graphene can be set using a simple model.

  10. ARRA Material Handling Equipment Composite Data Products: Data through Quarter 3 of 2014; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ainscough, Chris; Kurtz, Jennifer

    2015-05-01

    This document includes 23 composite data products (CDPs) produced for American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) fuel cell material handling equipment, with data through the third quarter of 2014.

  11. Use Of Superacids To Digest Chrysotile And Amosite Asbestos In Simple Mixtures Or Matrices Found In Building Materials Compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, Toshifumi; Petrakis, Leon; Webster, Ronald P.

    1999-12-21

    A composition for converting asbestos-containing material to environmentally benign components is provided. The composition comprises a flouro acid decomposing agent which can be applied to either amosite-containing thermal insulation or chrysotile-containing fire-proof material or to any asbestos-containing material which includes of chrysotile and amosite asbestos. The fluoro acid decomposing agent includes FP(O)(OH).sub.2, hexafluorophosphoric acid, a mixture of hydrofluoric and phosphoric acid and a mixture of hexafluorophosphoric acid and phosphoric acid. A method for converting asbestos-containing material to environmentally benign components is also provided

  12. Advanced Composite Materials for Cold and Cryogenic Hydrogen Storage Applications in Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles: Workshop Summary Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Cold and Cryogenic Hydrogen Storage Applications in Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles October 29, 2015 Sponsored by U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office (FCTO) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (This page intentionally left blank) Section title Unt utaerest in pos eum quo con et iii ADVANCED COMPOSITE MATERIALS FOR COLD AND CRYOGENIC HYDROGEN STORAGE APPLICATIONS IN FUEL CELL ELECTRIC VEHICLES Advanced Composite Materials for Cold and Cryogenic Hydrogen Storage

  13. Duality of the Interfacial Thermal Conductance in Graphene-based Nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Ying; Huang, Jingsong; Yang, Bao; Sumpter, Bobby G; Qiao, Rui

    2014-01-01

    The thermal conductance of graphene-matrix interfaces plays a key role in controlling the thermal transport properties of graphene-based nanocomposites. Using classical molecular dynamics simulations, we found that the interfacial thermal conductance depends strongly on the mode of heat transfer at the graphene-matrix interfaces: if heat enters graphene from one side of its basal plane and immediately leaves the graphene through the other side, the corresponding interfacial thermal conductance, G(across), is large; if heat enters graphene from both sides of its basal plane and leaves the graphene at a position far away on its basal plane, the corresponding interfacial thermal conductance, G(non-across), is small. For a single-layer graphene immersed in liquid octane, G(across) is ~150 MW/m2K while Gnon-across is ~5 MW/m2K. G(across) decreases with increasing multi-layer graphene thickness (i.e., number of layers in graphene) and approaches an asymptotic value of 100 MW/m2K for 7-layer graphenes. G(non-across) increases only marginally as the graphene sheet thickness increases. Such a duality of the interface thermal conductance for different probing methods and its dependence on graphene sheet thickness can be traced ultimately to the unique physical and chemical structure of graphene materials. The ramifications of these results in areas such as experimental measurement of thermal conductivity of graphene and the design of graphene-based thermal nanocomposites are discussed.

  14. First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in any material. The discovery may hasten the day when graphene can be used for "plasmonics" to build ultrafast computers-perhaps even room-temperature quantum computers-plus a...

  15. Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure Print Graphene, because of its unusual electron properties, reduced dimensionality, and scale, has enormous potential for use in...

  16. Thermal Charging Study of Compressed Expanded Natural Graphite/Phase Change Material Composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mallow, Anne M; Abdelaziz, Omar; Graham, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    The thermal charging performance of phase change materials, specifically paraffin wax, combined with compressed expanded natural graphite foam is studied under constant heat flux and constant temperature conditions. By varying the heat flux between 0.39 W/cm2 and 1.55 W/cm2 or maintaining a boundary temperature of 60 C for four graphite foam bulk densities, the impact on the rate of thermal energy storage is discussed. Thermal charging experiments indicate that thermal conductivity of the composite is an insufficient metric to compare the influence of graphite foam on the rate of thermal energy storage of the PCM composite. By dividing the latent heat of the composite by the time to melt for various boundary conditions and graphite foam bulk densities, it is determined that bulk density selection is dependent on the applied boundary condition. A greater bulk density is advantageous for samples exposed to a constant temperature near the melting temperature as compared to constant heat flux conditions where a lower bulk density is adequate. Furthermore, the anisotropic nature of graphite foam bulk densities greater than 50 kg/m3 is shown to have an insignificant impact on the rate of thermal charging. These experimental results are used to validate a computational model for future use in the design of thermal batteries for waste heat recovery.

  17. Graphene-based Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage: Fuel cells, Supercapacitors and Lithium Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hou, Junbo; Shao, Yuyan; Ellis, Michael A.; Moore, Robert; Yi, Baolian

    2011-09-14

    Graphene has attracted extensive research interest due to its strictly 2-dimensional (2D) structure, which results in its unique electronic, thermal, mechanical, and chemical properties and potential technical applications. These remarkable characteristics of graphene, along with the inherent benefits of a carbon material, make it a promising candidate for application in electrochemical energy devices. This article reviews the methods of graphene preparation, introduces the unique electrochemical behavior of graphene, and summarizes the recent research and development on graphene-based fuel cells, supercapacitors and lithium ion batteries. In addition, promising areas are identified for the future development of graphene-based materials in electrochemical energy conversion and storage systems.

  18. Substrate-Induced Band-Gap Opening in Epitaxial Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Substrate-Induced Band-Gap Opening in Epitaxial Graphene Substrate-Induced Band-Gap Opening in Epitaxial Graphene Print Wednesday, 26 March 2008 00:00 Prospective challengers to silicon, the long-reigning king of semiconductors for computer chips and other electronic devices, have to overcome silicon's superb collection of materials properties as well as sophisticated fabrication technologies refined by six decades of effort by materials scientists and engineers. Graphene, one of the latest

  19. Method and apparatus for producing composites of materials exhibiting thermoplastic properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garvey, Raymond E. (Knoxville, TN); Grostick, Edmund T. (Faragut, TN)

    1992-01-01

    A mobile device for the complete consolidation of layers of material which exhibit thermoplastic properties for the formation of a composite of the layers upon a complex contoured substrate. The principal of the device is to provide heating into the molten temperature range of the thermoplastic material, applying sufficient pressure to the layers to cause flow of the plastic for a time sufficient to achieve full consolidation of the layers, and quickly cooling the structure to prevent delamination or other non-consolidation action. In the preferred form, there is an element to deposit a layer of the mateiral against another layer in close proximity. The two layers are pre-heated to near the melting temperature, and then further heated into the melting temperature range as they are brought into intimate contact with sufficient pressure to cause flow of the plastic for a time sufficient to achieve the full consolidation. The structure is then cooled. The mechanism for the application of pressure is selected such that the layers can be deformed to conform to a complex contour. In the preferred form, this pressurization is produced using a compliant hood that supplies both the pressure and at least a portion of the melting temperature, as well as the cooling. The apparatus, and method of operation, are described relative to the use of fiber-reinforced PEEK in the making of fully-consolidated composites. Other applications are discussed.

  20. Multi-contrast 3D X-ray imaging of porous and composite materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarapata, Adrian; Herzen, Julia; Ruiz-Yaniz, Maite; Zanette, Irene; Rack, Alexander; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-04-13

    Grating-based X-ray computed tomography allows for simultaneous and nondestructive determination of the full X-ray complex index of refraction and the scattering coefficient distribution inside an object in three dimensions. Its multi-contrast capabilities combined with a high resolution of a few micrometers make it a suitable tool for assessing multiple phases inside porous and composite materials such as concrete. Here, we present quantitative results of a proof-of-principle experiment performed on a concrete sample. Thanks to the complementarity of the contrast channels, more concrete phases could be distinguished than in conventional attenuation-based imaging. The phase-contrast reconstruction shows high contrast between the hardened cement paste and the aggregates and thus allows easy 3D segmentation. Thanks to the dark-field image, micro-cracks inside the coarse aggregates are visible. We believe that these results are extremely interesting in the field of porous and composite materials studies because of unique information provided by grating interferometry in a non-destructive way.

  1. First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene Print An international team of scientists performing angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) experiments at ALS Beamline 7.0.1 have found that composite particles called plasmarons play a vital role in determining graphene's properties. A plasmaron consists of a charge carrier (electron or hole) coupled with a plasmon-an electron density wave. Although plasmarons were proposed theoretically in the late 1960s, and indirect evidence of them has

  2. First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene Print An international team of scientists performing angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) experiments at ALS Beamline 7.0.1 have found that composite particles called plasmarons play a vital role in determining graphene's properties. A plasmaron consists of a charge carrier (electron or hole) coupled with a plasmon-an electron density wave. Although plasmarons were proposed theoretically in the late 1960s, and indirect evidence of them has

  3. First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene Print An international team of scientists performing angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) experiments at ALS Beamline 7.0.1 have found that composite particles called plasmarons play a vital role in determining graphene's properties. A plasmaron consists of a charge carrier (electron or hole) coupled with a plasmon-an electron density wave. Although plasmarons were proposed theoretically in the late 1960s, and indirect evidence of them has

  4. First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene Print An international team of scientists performing angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) experiments at ALS Beamline 7.0.1 have found that composite particles called plasmarons play a vital role in determining graphene's properties. A plasmaron consists of a charge carrier (electron or hole) coupled with a plasmon-an electron density wave. Although plasmarons were proposed theoretically in the late 1960s, and indirect evidence of them has

  5. First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene Print An international team of scientists performing angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) experiments at ALS Beamline 7.0.1 have found that composite particles called plasmarons play a vital role in determining graphene's properties. A plasmaron consists of a charge carrier (electron or hole) coupled with a plasmon-an electron density wave. Although plasmarons were proposed theoretically in the late 1960s, and indirect evidence of them has

  6. First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene Print An international team of scientists performing angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) experiments at ALS Beamline 7.0.1 have found that composite particles called plasmarons play a vital role in determining graphene's properties. A plasmaron consists of a charge carrier (electron or hole) coupled with a plasmon-an electron density wave. Although plasmarons were proposed theoretically in the late 1960s, and indirect evidence of them has

  7. Electrostatic Graphene Loudspeaker - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search Electrostatic Graphene Loudspeaker Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Contact LBL About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary Alex Zettl and Qin Zhou of Berkeley Lab have developed a miniaturized graphene-based electrostatic audio transducer. The speaker / earphone is straightforward in design and operation and has excellent frequency response across the entire audio frequency range (20 Hz - 20k Hz) with

  8. Effect of Composition and Heat Treatment on MnBi Magnetic Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cui, Jun; Choi, Jung-Pyung; Polikarpov, Evgueni; Bowden, Mark E.; Xie, Wei; Li, Guosheng; Nie, Zimin; Zarkevich, Nikolai; Kramer, Matthew J.; Johnson, Duane D.

    2014-08-17

    The metallic compound MnBi is a promising rare-earth-free permanent magnet material. Compare to other rare-earth-free candidates, MnBi stands out for its high intrinsic coercivity (Hci) and its large positive temperature coefficient. Several groups have demonstrated that the Hci of MnBi compound in thin film or in powder form can exceed 12 kOe and 26 kOe at 300 K and 523 K, respectively. Such steep increase in Hci with increasing temperature is unique to MnBi. Consequently, MnBi is a highly sought-after hard phase for exchange coupling nanocomposite magnets. The reaction between Mn and Bi is peritectic, so Mn tends to precipitate out of the MnBi liquid during the solidification process. As result, the composition of the Mn-Bi alloy with the largest amount of the desired LTP (low temperature phase) MnBi and highest saturation magnetization will be over-stoichiometric and rich in Mn. The amount of additional Mn required to compensate the Mn precipitation depends on solidification rate: the faster the quench speed, the less Mn precipitates. Here we report a systematic study of the effect of composition and heat treatments on the phase contents and magnetic properties of Mn-Bi alloys. In this study, Mn-Bi alloys with 14 compositions were prepared using conventional metallurgical methods such as arc melting and vacuum heat treatment, and the obtained alloys were analyzed for compositions, crystal structures, phase content, and magnetic properties. The results show that the composition with 55 at.% Mn exhibits the highest LTP MnBi content and the highest magnetization. The sample with this composition shows >90 wt.% LTP MnBi content. Its measured saturation magnetization is 68 emu/g with 2.3 T applied field at 300 K; its coercivity is 13 kOe and its energy product is 12 MGOe at 300 K. A bulk magnet fabricated using this powder exhibits an energy product of 8.2 MGOe.

  9. Ultrathin Li3VO4 Nanoribbon/Graphene Sandwich-Like Nanostructures...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Ultrathin Li3VO4 NanoribbonGraphene Sandwich-Like Nanostructures with Ultrahigh Lithium ion Storage Properties Two-dimensional (2D) "graphene-like" inorganic materials, ...

  10. Preparation of silver nanoparticles/graphene nanosheets as a catalyst for electrochemical oxidation of methanol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Kun; Miao, Peng; Tang, Yuguo; Tong, Hui; Zhu, Xiaoli; Liu, Tao; Cheng, Wenbo

    2014-02-03

    In this report, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) decorated graphene nanosheets have been prepared based on the reduction of Ag ions by hydroquinone, and their catalytic performance towards the electrochemical oxidation of methanol is investigated. The synthesis of the nano-composite is confirmed by transmission electron microscope measurements and UV-vis absorption spectra. Excellent electrocatalytic performance of the material is demonstrated by cyclic voltammograms. This material also contributes to the low peak potential of methanol oxidation compared with most of the other materials.

  11. Experimental and theoretical study of organometallic radiation-protective materials adapted to radiation sources with a complex isotopic composition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russkikh, I. M.; Seleznev, E. N.; Tashlykov, O. L. Shcheklein, S. E.

    2015-12-15

    The significance of optimizing the content of components of a radiation-protective material, which is determined by the isotopic composition of radioactive contamination, depending on the reactor type, operating time, and other factors is demonstrated. The results of computational and experimental investigation of the gamma-radiation attenuation capacity of homogenous radiation-protective materials with different fillers are reported.

  12. Patterning graphene at the nanometer scale via hydrogen desorption.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sessi, P.; Guest, J. R.; Bode, M.; Guisinger, N.; Center for Nanoscale Materials; Politecnico di Milano

    2009-12-01

    We have demonstrated the reversible and local modification of the electronic properties of graphene by hydrogen passivation and subsequent electron-stimulated hydrogen desorption with an scanning tunneling microscope tip. In addition to changing the morphology, we show that the hydrogen passivation is stable at room temperature and modifies the electronic properties of graphene, opening a gap in the local density of states. This insulating state is reversed by local desorption of the hydrogen, and the unaltered electronic properties of graphene are recovered. Using this mechanism, we have 'written' graphene patterns on nanometer length scales. For patterned regions that are roughly 20 nm or greater, the inherent electronic properties of graphene are completely recovered. Below 20 nm we observe dramatic variations in the electronic properties of the graphene as a function of pattern size. This reversible and local mechanism for modifying the electronic properties of graphene has far-reaching implications for nanoscale circuitry fabricated from this revolutionary material.

  13. On the kinetic barriers of graphene homo-epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Wei; Yu, Xinke; Xie, Ya-Hong; Cahyadi, Erica; Ratsch, Christian

    2014-12-01

    The diffusion processes and kinetic barriers of individual carbon adatoms and clusters on graphene surfaces are investigated to provide fundamental understanding of the physics governing epitaxial growth of multilayer graphene. It is found that individual carbon adatoms form bonds with the underlying graphene whereas the interaction between graphene and carbon clusters, consisting of 6 atoms or more, is very weak being van der Waals in nature. Therefore, small carbon clusters are quite mobile on the graphene surfaces and the diffusion barrier is negligibly small (?6?meV). This suggests the feasibility of high-quality graphene epitaxial growth at very low growth temperatures with small carbon clusters (e.g., hexagons) as carbon source. We propose that the growth mode is totally different from 3-dimensional bulk materials with the surface mobility of carbon hexagons being the highest over graphene surfaces that gradually decreases with further increase in cluster size.

  14. Potential industrial applications for composite phase-change materials as thermal energy storage media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spanner, G.E.; Wilfert, G.L.

    1989-07-01

    Considerable effort has been spent by the US Department of Energy and its contractors over the last few years to develop composite phase-change materials (CPCMs) for thermal energy storage (TES). This patented TES medium consists of a phase-change material (typically a salt or metal alloy) that is retained within the porous structure of a supporting material (typically a ceramic). The objectives of this study were to (1) introduce CPCMs to industries that may not otherwise be aware of them, (2) identify potentially attractive applications for CPCM in industry, (3) determine technical requirements that will affect the design of CPCM's for specific applications, and (4) generate interest among industrial firms for employing CPCM TES in their processes. The approach in this study was to examine a wide variety of industries using a series of screens to select those industries that would be most likely to adopt CPCM TES in their processes. The screens used in this study were process temperature, presence of time-varying energy flows, energy intensity of the industry, and economic growth prospects over the next 5 years. After identifying industries that passed all of the screens, representatives of each industry were interviewed by telephone to introduce them to CPCM TES, assess technical requirements for CPCM TES in their industry, and determine their interest in pursuing applications for CPCM TES. 11 refs., 4 tabs.

  15. Composite structures 4; Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference, Paisley College of Technology, Scotland, July 27-29, 1987. Volume 2 - Damage assessment and material evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, I.H.

    1987-01-01

    The present collection of papers on damage assessment and material evaluation of composite structures discusses recent advancements in the dynamics of composite structures, the crush performance of composite structures, strengthening mechanisms in discontinuous SiC/Al composites, considerations for designing with metal matrix composite materials, a causal approach to the effective dynamic moduli of random composites, and failure modes for compression-loaded angle-ply plates with holes. Also discussed are the fabrication and mechanical properties of hybrid composites with braiding construction, the reprocessing of carbon fiber/PEEK laminates, rate effects on delamination fracture toughness of graphite/epoxy composites, the shear modulus testing of composites, composite materials for bone-fracture fixation, and the thermomechanical properties of three-dimensional fiber composites.

  16. Charging Graphene for Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Jun

    2014-10-06

    Since 2004, graphene, including single atomic layer graphite sheet, and chemically derived graphene sheets, has captured the imagination of researchers for energy storage because of the extremely high surface area (2630 m2/g) compared to traditional activated carbon (typically below 1500 m2/g), excellent electrical conductivity, high mechanical strength, and potential for low cost manufacturing. These properties are very desirable for achieving high activity, high capacity and energy density, and fast charge and discharge. Chemically derived graphene sheets are prepared by oxidation and reduction of graphite1 and are more suitable for energy storage because they can be made in large quantities. They still contain multiply stacked graphene sheets, structural defects such as vacancies, and oxygen containing functional groups. In the literature they are also called reduced graphene oxide, or functionalized graphene sheets, but in this article they are all referred to as graphene for easy of discussion. Two important applications, batteries and electrochemical capacitors, have been widely investigated. In a battery material, the redox reaction occurs at a constant potential (voltage) and the energy is stored in the bulk. Therefore, the energy density is high (more than 100 Wh/kg), but it is difficult to rapidly charge or discharge (low power, less than 1 kW/kg)2. In an electrochemical capacitor (also called supercapacitors or ultracapacitor in the literature), the energy is stored as absorbed ionic species at the interface between the high surface area carbon and the electrolyte, and the potential is a continuous function of the state-of-charge. The charge and discharge can happen rapidly (high power, up to 10 kW/kg) but the energy density is low, less than 10 Wh/kg2. A device that can have both high energy and high power would be ideal.

  17. Comparison of gold- and graphene-based resonant nanostructures for terahertz metamaterials and an ultrathin graphene-based modulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Nian-Hai; Tassin, Philippe; Koschny, Thomas; Soukoulis, Costas M

    2014-09-01

    Graphene exhibits unique material properties, and in electromagnetic wave technology it raises the prospect of devices miniaturized down to the atomic length scale. Here we study split-ring resonator metamaterials made from graphene and we compare them to gold-based metamaterials. We find that graphene's huge reactive response derived from its large kinetic inductance allows for deeply subwavelength resonances, although its resonance strength is reduced due to higher dissipative loss damping and smaller dipole coupling. Nevertheless, tightly stacked graphene rings may provide for negative permeability and the electric dipole resonance of graphene meta-atoms turns out to be surprisingly strong. Based on these findings, we present a terahertz modulator based on a metamaterial with a multilayer stack of alternating patterned graphene sheets separated by dielectric spacers. Neighboring graphene flakes are biased against each other, resulting in modulation depths of over 75% at a transmission level of around 90%.

  18. Multiple Layer Graphene Optical Modulator - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search Multiple Layer Graphene Optical Modulator Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Contact LBL About This Technology Publications: PDF Document Publication LBNL Commercial Analysis Report (233 KB) Technology Marketing Summary Scientists at Berkeley Lab have developed a tiny optical modulator based on graphene, potentially leading to significantly improved data transmission speeds in digital communications. The extremely

  19. Fluid flow modeling of resin transfer molding for composite material wind turbine blade structures.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cairns, Douglas S. (Montana State University, Bozeman, MT); Rossel, Scott M. (Montana State University, Bozeman, MT)

    2004-06-01

    Resin transfer molding (RTM) is a closed mold process for making composite materials. It has the potential to produce parts more cost effectively than hand lay-up or other methods. However, fluid flow tends to be unpredictable and parts the size of a wind turbine blade are difficult to engineer without some predictive method for resin flow. There were five goals of this study. The first was to determine permeabilities for three fabrics commonly used for RTM over a useful range of fiber volume fractions. Next, relations to estimate permeabilities in mixed fabric lay-ups were evaluated. Flow in blade substructures was analyzed and compared to predictions. Flow in a full-scale blade was predicted and substructure results were used to validate the accuracy of a full-scale blade prediction.

  20. Synthetic aggregate compositions derived from spent bed materials from fluidized bed combustion and fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boyle, Michael J.

    1994-01-01

    Cementitious compositions useful as lightweight aggregates are formed from a blend of spent bed material from fluidized bed combustion and fly ash. The proportions of the blend are chosen so that ensuing reactions eliminate undesirable constituents. The blend is then mixed with water and formed into a shaped article. The shaped article is preferably either a pellet or a "brick" shape that is later crushed. The shaped articles are cured at ambient temperature while saturated with water. It has been found that if used sufficiently, the resulting aggregate will exhibit minimal dimensional change over time. The aggregate can be certified by also forming standardized test shapes, e.g., cylinders while forming the shaped articles and measuring the properties of the test shapes using standardized techniques including X-ray diffraction.

  1. Composite materials with metal oxide attached to lead chalcogenide nanocrystal quantum dots with linkers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuke, Nobuhiro; Koposov, Alexey Y; Sykora, Milan; Hoch, Laura

    2014-12-16

    Composite materials useful for devices such as photoelectrochemical solar cells include a substrate, a metal oxide film on the substrate, nanocrystalline quantum dots (NQDs) of lead sulfide, lead selenide, and lead telluride, and linkers that attach the NQDs to the metal oxide film. Suitable linkers preserve the 1s absorption peak of the NQDs. A suitable linker has a general structure A-B-C where A is a chemical group adapted for binding to a MO.sub.x and C is a chemical group adapted for binding to a NQD and B is a divalent, rigid, or semi-rigid organic spacer moiety. Other linkers that preserve the 1s absorption peak may also be used.

  2. Gelatin/graphene systems for low cost energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landi, Giovanni; Fedi, Filippo; Sorrentino, Andrea; Iannace, Salvatore; Neitzert, Heinz C.

    2014-05-15

    In this work, we introduce the possibility to use a low cost, biodegradable material for temporary energy storage devices. Here, we report the use of biologically derived organic electrodes composed of gelatin ad graphene. The graphene was obtained by mild sonication in a mixture of volatile solvents of natural graphite flakes and subsequent centrifugation. The presence of exfoliated graphene sheets was detected by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy. The homogeneous dispersion in gelatin demonstrates a good compatibility between the gelatin molecules and the graphene particles. The electrical characterization of the resulting nanocomposites suggests the possible applications as materials for transient, low cost energy storage device.

  3. Graphene nanopore field effect transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qiu, Wanzhi; Skafidas, Efstratios

    2014-07-14

    Graphene holds great promise for replacing conventional Si material in field effect transistors (FETs) due to its high carrier mobility. Previously proposed graphene FETs either suffer from low ON-state current resulting from constrained channel width or require complex fabrication processes for edge-defecting or doping. Here, we propose an alternative graphene FET structure created on intrinsic metallic armchair-edged graphene nanoribbons with uniform width, where the channel region is made semiconducting by drilling a pore in the interior, and the two ends of the nanoribbon act naturally as connecting electrodes. The proposed GNP-FETs have high ON-state currents due to seamless atomic interface between the channel and electrodes and are able to be created with arbitrarily wide ribbons. In addition, the performance of GNP-FETs can be tuned by varying pore size and ribbon width. As a result, their performance and fabrication process are more predictable and controllable in comparison to schemes based on edge-defects and doping. Using first-principle transport calculations, we show that GNP-FETs can achieve competitive leakage current of ∼70 pA, subthreshold swing of ∼60 mV/decade, and significantly improved On/Off current ratios on the order of 10{sup 5} as compared with other forms of graphene FETs.

  4. Magnetization dynamics of cobalt grown on graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berger, A. J.; White, S. P.; Adur, R.; Pu, Y.; Hammel, P. C.; Amamou, W.; Kawakami, R. K.

    2014-05-07

    Ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spin pumping is a rapidly growing field which has demonstrated promising results in a variety of material systems. This technique utilizes the resonant precession of magnetization in a ferromagnet to inject spin into an adjacent non-magnetic material. Spin pumping into graphene is attractive on account of its exceptional spin transport properties. This article reports on FMR characterization of cobalt grown on chemical vapor deposition graphene and examines the validity of linewidth broadening as an indicator of spin pumping. In comparison to cobalt samples without graphene, direct contact cobalt-on-graphene exhibits increased FMR linewidthan often used signature of spin pumping. Similar results are obtained in Co/MgO/graphene structures, where a 1?nm MgO layer acts as a tunnel barrier. However, magnetometry, magnetic force microscopy, and Kerr microscopy measurements demonstrate increased magnetic disorder in cobalt grown on graphene, perhaps due to changes in the growth process and an increase in defects. This magnetic disorder may account for the observed linewidth enhancement due to effects such as two-magnon scattering or mosaicity. As such, it is not possible to conclude successful spin injection into graphene from FMR linewidth measurements alone.

  5. Method and apparatus for fabricating a composite structure consisting of a filamentary material in a metal matrix

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Banker, J.G.; Anderson, R.C.

    1975-10-21

    A method and apparatus are provided for preparing a composite structure consisting of filamentary material within a metal matrix. The method is practiced by the steps of confining the metal for forming the matrix in a first chamber, heating the confined metal to a temperature adequate to effect melting thereof, introducing a stream of inert gas into the chamber for pressurizing the atmosphere in the chamber to a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure, confining the filamentary material in a second chamber, heating the confined filamentary material to a temperature less than the melting temperature of the metal, evacuating the second chamber to provide an atmosphere therein at a pressure, placing the second chamber in registry with the first chamber to provide for the forced flow of the molten metal into the second chamber to effect infiltration of the filamentary material with the molten metal, and thereafter cooling the metal infiltrated-filamentary material to form said composite structure.

  6. Direct growth of graphene on Si(111)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thanh Trung, Pham Joucken, Frdric; Colomer, Jean-Franois; Robert, Sporken; Campos-Delgado, Jessica; Raskin, Jean-Pierre; Hackens, Benot; Santos, Cristiane N.

    2014-06-14

    Due to the need of integrated circuit in the current silicon technology, the formation of graphene on Si wafer is highly desirable, but is still a challenge for the scientific community. In this context, we report the direct growth of graphene on Si(111) wafer under appropriate conditions using an electron beam evaporator. The structural quality of the material is investigated in detail by reflection high energy electron diffraction, Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, high resolution scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and scanning tunneling microscopy. Our experimental results confirm that the quality of graphene is strongly dependent on the growth time during carbon atoms deposition.

  7. Microporous glass-polymer composite as a new material for solid-state dye lasers: I. Material properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldag, H R; Pacheco, D P; Dolotov, S M; Ponomarenko, E P; Reznichenko, A V; Koldunov, M F; Kravchenko, Ya V; Manenkov, Aleksandr A; Roskova, G P; Tsekhomskaya, T S

    2000-11-30

    The mechanical, optical, and thermooptical properties of a microporous glass-polymer (MPG-P) composite used as a matrix for solid-state dye lasers are studied. It is shown that the composite has a high mechanical hardness, good transparency, excellent thermooptical parameters, and high laser damage resistance, and can be also readily doped with various dyes. The analysis of physical properties of the MPG-P composite showed its advantages over other solid matrices (bulk polymers and sol-gel glasses) for applications in efficient solid-state dye lasers. (lasers, active media)

  8. New THz opportunities based on graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartnagel, Hans

    2015-04-24

    Graphene is a new material of a single or multiple layer carbon structure with impressive properties. A brief introduction is initially presented. Graphene does not have a bandwidth and is a semimetal with charge carriers of zero mass. A bandgap can be formed by confining the graphene width in nanoribbon or nanoconstricition structures. For example, the induced bandgap by a 20?nm wide nanoribbon is about 50 meV. The charge carrier mass then increases, but is still very small. This material can especially be employed for various Terahertz applications. Here several examples are to be described, namely a) a THz transistor, b) the opportunities of ballistic electron resonances for THz signal generation, c) the simultaneous optical transmission and electrical conduction up to THz frequencies and d) Cascaded THz emitters. The optical advantages of multilayer graphene can be compared to ITO (Indium Tin Oxide)

  9. New Fuel Cell Design Powered by Graphene-Wrapped Nanoparticles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Fuel Cell Design Powered by Graphene-Wrapped Nanoparticles New Fuel Cell Design Powered by Graphene-Wrapped Nanoparticles Print Tuesday, 14 June 2016 00:00 Interest in hydrogen fuel for automotive applications has been growing steadily in the scientific and automotive community over the last decade. Recently, researchers working at the ALS and the Molecular Foundry developed a promising new materials recipe based on magnesium nanocrystals and graphene for a battery-like hydrogen fuel cell

  10. Graphene Produces More Efficient Charge Transport Inside an Organic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Semiconductor | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Graphene Produces More Efficient Charge Transport Inside an Organic Semiconductor Friday, January 30, 2015 Graphene, a two dimensional semi-metal made of sp2 hybridized carbon, is an outstanding material which exhibits high mechanical and chemical stability, as well as high charge carrier mobility. Graphene has recently received considerable attention because it can be directly integrated into opto-electronic devices, enabling the

  11. Quantum Hall effect in graphene decorated with disordered multilayer patches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nam, Youngwoo; Sun, Jie Lindvall, Niclas; Kireev, Dmitry; Yurgens, August; Jae Yang, Seung; Rae Park, Chong; Woo Park, Yung

    2013-12-02

    Quantum Hall effect (QHE) is observed in graphene grown by chemical vapour deposition using platinum catalyst. The QHE is even seen in samples which are irregularly decorated with disordered multilayer graphene patches and have very low mobility (<500 cm{sup 2}V{sup −1}s{sup −1}). The effect does not seem to depend on electronic mobility and uniformity of the resulting material, which indicates the robustness of QHE in graphene.

  12. Technical report on "BES Early Career. Control Graphene Electronic Structure for Energy Technology"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Feng

    2015-07-11

    Graphene, a one-atom thick sheet of carbon, exhibits incredible structural flexibility, electrical transport, and optical responses. And remarkably, the graphene electronic structure can be varied through interlayer coupling, nanoscale patterning, and electrical gating. In this project we made significant contribution to better understand and control physical properties of graphene and other novel two-dimensional layered materials.

  13. A Virtual Test Approach to Incorporate Materials and Manufacturing Processes to Aid Design choices in High Performance Composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzalez-Murillo, C.; Price, M.

    2011-05-04

    The increasing use of fibre reinforced composites in structural components in the aerospace industry is providing many challenges to designers in understanding how they can be used more effectively to exploit their advantages. One of the main challenges is the selection of lay-ups for a given application. The difficulty lies in the variability that is achievable with composites. Each new layup or configuration is effectively a new material and requires and extensive test programme to validate the performance, from coupons which give basic material characteristics, up through the test pyramid through to large sub-component which contains basic assemblies. This variety of testing gives confidence in understanding the material behaviour and performance in structural assemblies. On the other hand, the manufacturing process is also important here with different processes sometimes needed for different materials or thicknesses. This is a time consuming and expensive process requiring many thousands of small tests leading up to a few major tests which are complex to set up and carry out. This research is attempting to address this by developing a virtual test system which will sit hand-in-hand with a physical test system. The goal of virtual tests appears reachable using the finite element analysis technique in which many experimental tests can be replaced by high fidelity simulations. The payoff in reduced cycle time and costs for designing and certifying composite structures is very attractive; and the possibility also arises of considering material configurations that are too complex to certify by purely empirical methods. The validated simulations could then be subsequently used for variants or derivatives of composites to inform design choices and establish new validation programmes where appropriate. This paper presents a series of simulations of the critical testing procedures needed to validate high performance composites materials using linear and non

  14. Final Scientific Report, New Proton Conductive Composite Materials for PEM Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lvov, Serguei

    2010-11-08

    This project covered one of the main challenges in present-day PEM fuel cell technology: to design a membrane capable of maintaining high conductivity and mechanical integrity when temperature is elevated and water vapor pressure is severely reduced. The DOE conductivity milestone of 0.1 S cm-1 at 120 degrees C and 50 % relative humidity (RH) for designed membranes addressed the target for the project. Our approach presumed to develop a composite membrane with hydrophilic proton-conductive inorganic material and the proton conductive polymeric matrix that is able to “bridge” the conduction paths in the membrane. The unique aspect of our approach was the use of highly functionalized inorganic additives to benefit from their water retention properties and high conductivity as well. A promising result turns out that highly hydrophilic phosphorsilicate gels added in Nafion matrix improved PEM fuel cell performance by over 50% compared with bare Nafion membrane at 120 degrees C and 50 % RH. This achievement realizes that the fuel cell operating pressure can be kept low, which would make the PEM fuel cell much more cost efficient and adaptable to practical operating conditions and facilitate its faster commercialization particularly in automotive and stationary applications.

  15. Efficient Heat Storage Materials: Metallic Composites Phase-Change Materials for High-Temperature Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-11-21

    HEATS Project: MIT is developing efficient heat storage materials for use in solar and nuclear power plants. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at nightwhen the suns not outto drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. MIT is designing nanostructured heat storage materials that can store a large amount of heat per unit mass and volume. To do this, MIT is using phase change materials, which absorb a large amount of latent heat to melt from solid to liquid. MITs heat storage materials are designed to melt at high temperatures and conduct heat wellthis makes them efficient at storing and releasing heat and enhances the overall efficiency of the thermal storage and energy-generation process. MITs low-cost heat storage materials also have a long life cycle, which further enhances their efficiency.

  16. Phosphorescent compositions, methods of making the compositions, and methods of using the compositions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jia, Weiyi; Wang, Xiaojun; Yen, William; Yen, Laurel C.; Jia, George D.

    2012-12-04

    Compositions, methods of making compositions, materials including compositions, crayons including compositions, paint including compositions, ink including compositions, waxes including compositions, polymers including compositions, vesicles including the compositions, methods of making each, and the like are disclosed.

  17. Phosphorescent compositions, methods of making the compositions, and methods of using the compositions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jia, Weiyi; Wang, Xiaojun; Jia, George D.; Lewis, Linda; Yen, Laurel C.

    2014-06-24

    Compositions, methods of making compositions, materials including compositions, crayons including compositions, paint including compositions, ink including compositions, waxes including compositions, polymers including compositions, vesicles including the compositions, methods of making each, and the like are disclosed.

  18. Nitrogen-Doped Graphene and its Application in Electrochemical Biosensing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Ying; Shao, Yuyan; Matson, Dean W.; Li, Jinghong; Lin, Yuehe

    2010-05-05

    Chemical doping with foreign atoms is an effective method to intrinsically modify the properties of host materials. Among them, nitrogen (N) doping plays a critical role in regulating the electronic properties of carbon materials. Recently, graphene as a true 2-dimensional carbon material has shown fascinating applications in bioelectronics and biosensors. In this paper, we report a facile strategy to prepare N-doped graphene by using plasma treatment of pristine graphene synthesized via chemical method. Meanwhile, a possible schematic diagram has been proposed to detail the structure of N-doped graphene. By controlling the exposure time, N percentage in host grapheme can be regulated ranging from 0.11% to 1.35%. Moreover, the as prepared N-doped graphene has displayed high electrocatalytic activity to hydrogen peroxide and further been used for glucose biosensing with concentration as low as 0.01 mM in the presence of interferences.

  19. Graphene diamond-like carbon films heterostructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Fang; Afandi, Abdulkareem; Jackman, Richard B.

    2015-03-09

    A limitation to the potential use of graphene as an electronic material is the lack of control over the 2D materials properties once it is deposited on a supporting substrate. Here, the use of Diamond-like Carbon (DLC) interlayers between the substrate and the graphene is shown to offer the prospect of overcoming this problem. The DLC films used here, more properly known as a-C:H with ?25% hydrogen content, have been terminated with N or F moieties prior to graphene deposition. It is found that nitrogen terminations lead to an optical band gap shrinkage in the DLC, whilst fluorine groups reduce the DLC's surface energy. CVD monolayer graphene subsequently transferred to DLC, N terminated DLC, and F terminated DLC has then been studied with AFM, Raman and XPS analysis, and correlated with Hall effect measurements that give an insight into the heterostructures electrical properties. The results show that different terminations strongly affect the electronic properties of the graphene heterostructures. G-F-DLC samples were p-type and displayed considerably higher mobility than the other heterostructures, whilst G-N-DLC samples supported higher carrier densities, being almost metallic in character. Since it would be possible to locally pattern the distribution of these differing surface terminations, this work offers the prospect for 2D lateral control of the electronic properties of graphene layers for device applications.

  20. Polyethylene composites containing a phase change material having a C14 straight chain hydrocarbon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, Ival O.

    1987-01-01

    A composite useful in thermal energy storage, said composite being formed of a polyethylene matrix having a straight chain alkyl hydrocarbon incorporated therein, said polyethylene being crosslinked to such a degree that said polyethylene matrix is form stable and said polyethylene matrix is capable of absorbing at least 10% by weight of said straight chain alkyl hydrocarbon; the composite is useful in forming pellets or sheets having thermal energy storage characteristics.

  1. Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure Print Wednesday, 25 April 2007 00:00 Graphene, because of its unusual electron properties, reduced dimensionality, and scale, has enormous potential for use in ultrafast electronic transistors. It exhibits high conductivity and an anomalous quantum Hall effect (a phenomenon exhibited by certain semiconductor devices at low temperatures and high magnetic fields). Among its novel properties, graphene's

  2. FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials- 8. Polymer Composites Research and Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lightweighting Materials focuses on the development and validation of advanced materials and manufacturing technologies to reduce automobile weight without compromising other attributes.

  3. Research & Development of Materials/Processing Methods for Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites (CFCC) Phase 2 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szweda, A.

    2001-01-01

    The Department of Energy's Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites (CFCC) Initiative that begun in 1992 has led the way for Industry, Academia, and Government to carry out a 10 year R&D plan to develop CFCCs for these industrial applications. In Phase II of this program, Dow Corning has led a team of OEM's, composite fabricators, and Government Laboratories to develop polymer derived CFCC materials and processes for selected industrial applications. During this phase, Dow Corning carried extensive process development and representative component demonstration activities on gas turbine components, chemical pump components and heat treatment furnace components.

  4. Vorbeck Materials Corp. | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vorbeck Materials Corp. America's Next Top Energy Innovator Challenge 45458 likes Vorbeck Materials Corp. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Vorbeck Materials was founded in 2006 to bring to market products using graphene, a sheet of carbon that is only a single atom thick. Graphene is the strongest material ever tested and is electrically and thermally conductive. In recent years, there has been significant interest and activity on graphene research and its potential applications. The Aksay

  5. Dynamic response of CSM composite plates - simulation using material No. 58 in LS-DYNA3D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bilkhu, S.S.; Founas, M.; Fong, W.; Agaram, V.

    1997-12-31

    The paper deals with finite element simulations of transverse impact response of plates made from continuous strand mat(CSM) glass/acrylic composite which is a potential candidate for making light weight automotive body panels. Two impact tests on the plates which result in two very different kinds of response, a drop tower test and a dart test, have been simulated using anisotropic material damage model No. 58 in LS-DYNA3D. In view of the results obtained in this study, the authors discuss the suitability of material model No. 58 for simulations of impact response in a bending environment.

  6. Silver-halide/organic-composite structures: Toward materials with multiple photographic functionalities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bringley, Joseph F. . E-mail: joseph.bringley@kodak.com; Rajeswaran, Manju; Olson, Leif P.; Liebert, Nancy M.

    2005-10-15

    We report the synthesis and structure of the novel silver-halide-based organic-inorganic hybrids Ag{sub 2}Br{sub 6}(PPD){sub 2}, Ag{sub 2}Br{sub 6}(CD-2){sub 2}.H{sub 2}O, Ag{sub 2}Br{sub 4}(TMBD), and Ag{sub 2}I{sub 6}(CD-2){sub 2}.H{sub 2}O. 1,4-phenylenediammonium hexabromodiargentate(I) [Ag{sub 2}Br{sub 6}(PPD){sub 2}] crystals are monoclinic (P2{sub 1}/n), with unit-cell dimensions, a=10.1915(3)A, b=7.7562(2)A, c=12.4340(5)A and {beta}=93.109(1){sup o}. N,N-diethyl-2-methyl-1,4-benzenediammonium hexabromodiargentate(I) monohydrate [Ag{sub 2}Br{sub 6}(CD-2){sub 2}.H{sub 2}O] crystals are monoclinic (space group P2{sub 1}/c) with a=10.8434(2)A, b=11.4293(2)A, c=14.3729(1)A, and {beta}=96.153(1){sup o}. N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-1,4-benzenediammonium tetrabromodiargentate(I) [Ag{sub 2}Br{sub 4}(TMBD)] crystals are orthorhombic (space group Pbcn) with a=17.0030(6)A, b=6.6163(2)A, and c=15.9762(6)A. N,N-diethyl-2-methyl-1,4-benzenediammonium hexaiododiargentate(I) monohydrate, [Ag{sub 2}I{sub 6}(CD-2){sub 2}.H{sub 2}O], are monoclinic (C2/c), with unit-cell dimensions, a=21.4691(4)A, b=12.1411(2)A, c=14.3102(2)A, and {beta}=98.657(1){sup o}. The novel structures are members of a class of silver-halide-based organic-inorganic hybrids based upon the assembly of [Ag{sub a}X{sub b}]{sup n-} clusters and protonated organoamines in aqueous mineral acids. The clusters display short intracluster Ag-Ag distances, and computational methods are used to evaluate intracluster Ag-Ag bonding. The diverse stoichiometries and cluster connectivities observed suggest a rich compositional and structural chemistry based upon the general assembly method. We have extended the methodology to include a silver-halide-organoamonium chemistry in which the organic moiety is chosen to serve a specific photographic function and demonstrate the first examples of such materials. The methodology allows for the direct assembly of [Ag{sub a}X{sub b}]{sup n-} clusters with commercial photographic color

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF ADVANCED DRILL COMPONENTS FOR BHA USING MICROWAVE TECHNOLOGY INCORPORATING CARBIDE, DIAMOND COMPOSITES AND FUNCTIONALLY GRADED MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dinesh Agrawal; Rustum Roy

    2003-01-01

    The microwave processing of materials is a new emerging technology with many attractive advantages over the conventional methods. The advantages of microwave technology for various ceramic systems has already been demonstrated and proven. The recent developments at Penn State have succeeded in applying the microwave technology for the commercialization of WC/Co and diamond based cutting and drilling tools, effectively sintering of metallic materials, and fabrication of transparent ceramics for advanced applications. In recent years, the Microwave Processing and Engineering Center at Penn State University in collaboration with our industrial partner, Dennis Tool Co. has succeeded in commercializing the developed microwave technology partially funded by DOE for WC/Co and diamond based cutting and drilling tools for gas and oil exploration operations. In this program we have further developed this technology to make diamond-carbide composites and metal-carbide-diamond functionally graded materials. Several actual product of diamond-carbide composites have been processed in microwave with better performance than the conventional product. The functionally graded composites with diamond as one of the components has been for the first time successfully developed. These are the highlights of the project.

  8. Bilayer Graphene Gets a Bandgap

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bilayer Graphene Gets a Bandgap Bilayer Graphene Gets a Bandgap Print Wednesday, 26 August 2009 00:00 Graphene is the two-dimensional crystalline form of carbon whose extraordinary...

  9. Electronic & magnetic materials and devices at the CNM | Argonne National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory Electronic & magnetic materials and devices at the CNM Graphene Micrograph 1 of 24 Graphene Micrograph Ultra-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy image of a point defect in graphene that has been epitaxially grown on 6H-SiC(0001) (Nathan Guisinger, EMMD Group) at Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials. Image: Photo courtesy of Argonne National Laboratory Graphene Micrograph 1 of 24 Graphene Micrograph Ultra-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy image of a point

  10. Highly compressible 3D periodic graphene aerogel microlattices

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhu, Cheng; Han, T. Yong-Jin; Duoss, Eric B.; Golobic, Alexandra M.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Worsley, Marcus A.

    2015-04-22

    Graphene is a two-dimensional material that offers a unique combination of low density, exceptional mechanical properties, large surface area and excellent electrical conductivity. Recent progress has produced bulk 3D assemblies of graphene, such as graphene aerogels, but they possess purely stochastic porous networks, which limit their performance compared with the potential of an engineered architecture. Here we report the fabrication of periodic graphene aerogel microlattices, possessing an engineered architecture via a 3D printing technique known as direct ink writing. The 3D printed graphene aerogels are lightweight, highly conductive and exhibit supercompressibility (up to 90% compressive strain). Moreover, the Young’s modulimore » of the 3D printed graphene aerogels show an order of magnitude improvement over bulk graphene materials with comparable geometric density and possess large surface areas. Ultimately, adapting the 3D printing technique to graphene aerogels realizes the possibility of fabricating a myriad of complex aerogel architectures for a broad range of applications.« less

  11. A Study of Selected Properties and Applications of AlMgB14 and Related Composites: Ultra-Hard Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theron L. Lewis

    2002-05-28

    This research presents a study of the hardness, electrical, and thermal properties AlMgB{sub 14} containing Al{sub 2}MgO{sub 4} spinel. This research also investigated how much Al{sub 2}MgO{sub 4} spinel consistently forms with AlMgB{sub 14}, if AlMgB{sub 14} materials can be produced by hot isostatic pressing (HIP), what effects TiC and TiB{sub 2} have on this composite material, and the importance of mechanical alloying. Included also is a study of the variation in hardness measurements and how they relate to SI units. Heretofore, all ultra-hard materials (hardness > 40 GPA) have been found to be cubic in structure, electrical insulators, and expensive; the behavior of AlMgB{sub 14}, which in certain specimens and compositions can have hardness values greater than 40 GPa, is therefore quite unusual since it is non-cubic, conductive, and moderate in cost. This offers an opportunity to investigate the relationship between hardness, thermal, and electrical properties from a new perspective. The main purpose of this project was to characterize the different properties of the AlMgB{sub 14} materials and to demonstrate that this material can be made in bulk. The technologies used for this study include microhardness measurement techniques, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction spectroscopy at different temperatures, optical microscopy, thermomechanical analysis, differential thermal analysis, 4-point probe resistivity, density techniques, Seebeck Effect, and Hall Effect. This research may lead to use of this material for applications where high abrasion resistance along with electrical conduction is needed. Also this research gave more information about a material that could have a great impact on industrial applications.

  12. Bilayer Graphene Gets a Bandgap

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bilayer Graphene Gets a Bandgap Bilayer Graphene Gets a Bandgap Print Wednesday, 26 August 2009 00:00 Graphene is the two-dimensional crystalline form of carbon whose extraordinary electron mobility and other unique features hold great promise for nanoscale electronics and photonics. But without a bandgap, graphene's promise can't be realized. As with monolayer graphene, bilayer graphene also has a zero bandgap and thus behaves like a metal. But a bandgap can be introduced if an electric

  13. Relationship between feedstock characteristics and erosivity of FBC bed materials. [Effects of particle size,shape,strength and chemical composition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levy, A.V. ); Wang, B.Q.; Geng, G.Q. )

    1992-01-01

    In this paper the erosion-corrosion (E-C) metal wastage mechanisms and rates that occur in 1018 plain carbon steel used in tubular heat exchangers of fluid bed combustors (FBC) are discussed. The characteristics of FBC bed material rodent particles such as composition, shape, size, and strength were found to have a major effect on the surface degradation mechanisms and rates that occurred. A total of 16 different bed material particles from ten different FBCs were tested. It was determined that when the particles were strong enough not to shatter when they impacted the steel's surface, their shape and composition were the most important factors in determining their erosivity. The relative amounts of SiO{sub 2}, CaO, CaCo{sub 3}, CaSO{sub 4}, and alkali compounds in the bed materials were related to the metal wastage by using laboratory mixtures of the compounds as rodents. The ratio of SiO{sub 2} to CaO and CaCO{sub 3} was especially important in determining the erosivity of the bed materials. It was found that increasing this ratio increased the metal wastage. A sharp transition ratio occurred on either side of which the metal wastage were linear. The slope of the linear curve was low for the lower sand content mixtures and higher for higher sand content mixtures. The transition ratio required a higher CaO content for higher velocity particles.

  14. New Fuel Cell Design Powered by Graphene-Wrapped Nanocrystals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Fuel Cell Design Powered by Graphene-Wrapped Nanocrystals Lab researchers have developed a new materials recipe for a battery-like hydrogen fuel cell that shields the ...

  15. SciTech Connect: graphene

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    graphene Find + Advanced Search Term Search Semantic Search Advanced Search All Fields: graphene Semantic Semantic Term Title: Full Text: Bibliographic Data: Creator Author:...

  16. Bilayer Graphene Gets a Bandgap

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on the Electron Superhighway Graphene's electrical properties include electrons so mobile they travel at near light speed. But if graphene is to work as a carbon-based...

  17. Bilayer Graphene Gets a Bandgap

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bilayer Graphene Gets a Bandgap Print Graphene is the two-dimensional crystalline form of carbon whose extraordinary electron mobility and other unique features hold great promise...

  18. Use of magnetic carbon composites from renewable resource materials for oil spill clean up and recovery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Viswanathan, Tito

    2015-10-27

    A method of separating a liquid hydrocarbon material from a body of water, includes: (a) mixing magnetic carbon-metal nanocomposites with a liquid hydrocarbon material dispersed in a body of water to allow the magnetic carbon-metal nanocomposites each to be adhered by the liquid hydrocarbon material to form a mixture; (b) applying a magnetic force to the mixture to attract the magnetic carbon-metal nanocomposites each adhered by the liquid hydrocarbon material; and (c) removing the body of water from the magnetic carbon-metal nanocomposites each adhered by the liquid hydrocarbon material while maintaining the applied magnetic force. The magnetic carbon-metal nanocomposites is formed by subjecting one or more metal lignosulfonates or metal salts to microwave radiation, in presence of lignin/derivatives either in presence of alkali or a microwave absorbing material, for a period of time effective to allow the carbon-metal nanocomposites to be formed.

  19. Compositions, Functions, and Testing of Friction Brake Materials and Their Additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blau, PJ

    2001-10-22

    The purpose of this report is to present a survey of commercial brake materials and additives, and to indicate their typical properties and functions, especially as regards their use in heavy trucks. Most truck pad and shoe materials described here were designed to wear against cast iron. Brake material test methods are also briefly described. This report does not address issues associated with the fabrication and manufacturing of brake materials. Since there are literally thousands of brake material additives, and their combinations are nearly limitless, it is impractical to list them all here. Rather, an attempt has been made to capture the primary constituents and their functions. An Appendix contains thermo-physical properties of some current and potential brake materials.

  20. Graphene device and method of using graphene device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bouchiat, Vincent; Girit, Caglar; Kessler, Brian; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2015-08-11

    An embodiment of a graphene device includes a layered structure, first and second electrodes, and a dopant island. The layered structure includes a conductive layer, an insulating layer, and a graphene layer. The electrodes are coupled to the graphene layer. The dopant island is coupled to an exposed surface of the graphene layer between the electrodes. An embodiment of a method of using a graphene device includes providing the graphene device. A voltage is applied to the conductive layer of the graphene device. Another embodiment of a method of using a graphene device includes providing the graphene device without the dopant island. A dopant island is placed on an exposed surface of the graphene layer between the electrodes. A voltage is applied to the conductive layer of the graphene device. A response of the dopant island to the voltage is observed.

  1. Method for rapid fabrication of fiber preforms and structural composite materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klett, J.W.; Burchell, T.D.; Bailey, J.L.

    1998-04-28

    A densified carbon matrix carbon fiber composite preform is made by vacuum molding an aqueous slurry of carbon fibers and carbonizable organic powder to form a molded part. The molded part is dried in an oven at 50 C for 14 hours and hot pressed at 2,000 psi at 400 C for 3 hours. The hot pressed part is carbonized at 650 C under nitrogen for 3 hours and graphitized at 2,400 C to form a graphitic structure in the matrix of the densified carbon matrix carbon fiber composite preform. The densified preform has a density greater than 1.1 g/cc. 12 figs.

  2. Method for rapid fabrication of fiber preforms and structural composite materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klett, James W. (Knoxville, TN); Burchell, Timothy D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Bailey, Jeffrey L. (Clinton, TN)

    1998-01-01

    A densified carbon matrix carbon fiber composite preform is made by vacuum molding an aqueous slurry of carbon fibers and carbonizable organic powder to form a molded part. The molded part is dried in an oven at 50.degree. C. for 14 hours and hot pressed at 2000 psi at 400.degree. C. for 3 hours. The hot pressed part is carbonized at 650.degree. C. under nitrogen for 3 hours and graphitized at 2400.degree. C. to form a graphitic structure in the matrix of the densified carbon matrix carbon fiber composite preform. The densified preform has a density greater than 1.1 g/cc.

  3. Method for rapid fabrication of fiber preforms and structural composite materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klett, James W. (Knoxville, TN); Burchell, Timothy D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Bailey, Jeffrey L. (Clinton, TN)

    1999-01-01

    A densified carbon matrix carbon fiber composite preform is made by vacuum molding an aqueous slurry of carbon fibers and carbonizable organic powder to form a molded part. The molded part is dried in an oven at 50.degree. C. for 14 hours and hot pressed at 2000 psi at 400.degree. C. for 3 hours. The hot pressed part is carbonized at 650.degree. C. under nitrogen for 3 hours and graphite at 2400.degree. C. to form a graphitic structure in the matrix of the densified carbon matrix carbon fiber composite preform. The densified preform has a density greater than 1.1 g/cc.

  4. Method for rapid fabrication of fiber preforms and structural composite materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klett, J.W.; Burchell, T.D.; Bailey, J.L.

    1999-02-16

    A densified carbon matrix carbon fiber composite preform is made by vacuum molding an aqueous slurry of carbon fibers and carbonizable organic powder to form a molded part. The molded part is dried in an oven at 50 C for 14 hours and hot pressed at 2000 psi at 400 C for 3 hours. The hot pressed part is carbonized at 650 C under nitrogen for 3 hours and graphitized at 2400 C to form a graphitic structure in the matrix of the densified carbon matrix carbon fiber composite preform. The densified preform has a density greater than 1.1 g/cc. 12 figs.

  5. FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials- 8. Polymer Composites Research and Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The primary Lightweight Materials activity goal is to validate a cost-effective weight reduction in total vehicle weight while maintaining safety, performance, and reliability.

  6. Low temperature synthesis of diamond-based nano-carbon composite materials with high electron field emission properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saravanan, A.; Huang, B. R.; Yeh, C. J.; Leou, K. C.; Lin, I. N.

    2015-06-08

    A diamond-based nano-carbon composite (d/NCC) material, which contains needle-like diamond grains encased with the nano-graphite layers, was synthesized at low substrate temperature via a bias enhanced growth process using CH{sub 4}/N{sub 2} plasma. Such a unique granular structure renders the d/NCC material very conductive (??=?714.8?S/cm), along with superior electron field emission (EFE) properties (E{sub 0}?=?4.06?V/?m and J{sub e}?=?3.18?mA/cm{sup 2}) and long lifetime (??=?842?min at 2.41?mA/cm{sup 2}). Moreover, the electrical conductivity and EFE behavior of d/NCC material can be tuned in a wide range that is especially useful for different kind of applications.

  7. Substrate-Induced Band-Gap Opening in Epitaxial Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Substrate-Induced Band-Gap Opening in Epitaxial Graphene Print Prospective challengers to silicon, the long-reigning king of semiconductors for computer chips and other electronic devices, have to overcome silicon's superb collection of materials properties as well as sophisticated fabrication technologies refined by six decades of effort by materials scientists and engineers. Graphene, one of the latest contenders, has a rather impressive list of features of its own but has lacked a key

  8. Substrate-Induced Band-Gap Opening in Epitaxial Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Substrate-Induced Band-Gap Opening in Epitaxial Graphene Print Prospective challengers to silicon, the long-reigning king of semiconductors for computer chips and other electronic devices, have to overcome silicon's superb collection of materials properties as well as sophisticated fabrication technologies refined by six decades of effort by materials scientists and engineers. Graphene, one of the latest contenders, has a rather impressive list of features of its own but has lacked a key

  9. Substrate-Induced Band-Gap Opening in Epitaxial Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Substrate-Induced Band-Gap Opening in Epitaxial Graphene Print Prospective challengers to silicon, the long-reigning king of semiconductors for computer chips and other electronic devices, have to overcome silicon's superb collection of materials properties as well as sophisticated fabrication technologies refined by six decades of effort by materials scientists and engineers. Graphene, one of the latest contenders, has a rather impressive list of features of its own but has lacked a key

  10. Substrate-Induced Band-Gap Opening in Epitaxial Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Substrate-Induced Band-Gap Opening in Epitaxial Graphene Print Prospective challengers to silicon, the long-reigning king of semiconductors for computer chips and other electronic devices, have to overcome silicon's superb collection of materials properties as well as sophisticated fabrication technologies refined by six decades of effort by materials scientists and engineers. Graphene, one of the latest contenders, has a rather impressive list of features of its own but has lacked a key

  11. Substrate-Induced Band-Gap Opening in Epitaxial Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Substrate-Induced Band-Gap Opening in Epitaxial Graphene Print Prospective challengers to silicon, the long-reigning king of semiconductors for computer chips and other electronic devices, have to overcome silicon's superb collection of materials properties as well as sophisticated fabrication technologies refined by six decades of effort by materials scientists and engineers. Graphene, one of the latest contenders, has a rather impressive list of features of its own but has lacked a key

  12. Shock compression behavior of bi-material powder composites with disparate melting temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, Kyle T.; Swift, Damian; Barham, Matthew; Stlken, James; Kuntz, Joshua; Kumar, Mukul

    2014-01-14

    Laser driven experiments were used to investigate the shock compression behavior of powder processed Bismuth/Tungsten (Bi/W) composite samples. The constituents provide different functionality to the composite behavior as Bi could be shock melted at the pressures attained in this work, while the W could not. Samples were prepared by uniaxial pressing, and the relative density was measured as a function of particle size, applied pressure, and composition for both hot and cold pressing conditions. This resulted in sample densities between 73% and 99% of the theoretical maximum density, and also noticeable differences in microstructure in the hot and cold pressed samples. The compression waves were generated with a 1.3 1.3?mm square spot directly onto the surface of the sample, using irradiances between 10{sup 12} and 10{sup 13}?W/cm{sup 2}, which resulted in calculated peak pressures between 50 and 150?GPa within a few micrometers. Sample recovery and post-mortem analysis revealed the formation of a crater on the laser drive surface, and the depth of this crater corresponded to the depth to which the Bi had been melted. The melt depth was found to be primarily a function of residual porosity and composition, and ranged from 167 to 528??m. In general, a higher porosity led to a larger melt depth. Direct numerical simulations were performed, and indicated that the observed increase in melt depth for low-porosity samples could be largely attributed to increased heating associated with work done for pore collapse. However, the relative scaling was sensitive to composition, with low volume fraction Bi samples exhibiting a much stronger dependence on porosity than high Bi content samples. Select samples were repeated using an Al foil ablator, but there were no noticeable differences ensuring that the observed melting was indeed pressure-driven and was not a result of direct laser heating. The resultant microstructures and damage near the spall surface were also

  13. Trifluoromethylation of graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Lin; Zhou, Lushan; Wang, Xi; Yu, Jingwen; Yang, Mingmei; Wang, Jianbo; Peng, Hailin, E-mail: zfliu@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: hlpeng@pku.edu.cn; Liu, Zhongfan, E-mail: zfliu@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: hlpeng@pku.edu.cn [Center for Nanochemistry, Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, State Key Laboratory for Structural Chemistry of Unstable and Stable Species, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate trifluoromethylation of graphene by copper-catalyzed free radical reaction. The covalent addition of CF{sub 3} to graphene, which changes the carbon atom hybridization from sp{sup 2} to sp{sup 3}, and modifies graphene in a homogeneous and nondestructive manner, was verified with Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that CF{sub 3} groups are grafted to the basal plane of graphene, with about 4 at. % CF{sub 3} coverage. After trifluoromethylation, the average resistance increases by nearly one order of magnitude, and an energy gap of about 98 meV appears. The noninvasive and mild reaction to synthesize trifluoromethylated graphene paves the way for graphene's applications in electronics and biomedical areas.

  14. Ultrafast Probes for Dirac Materials (Technical Report) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Subject: Materials Science(36) Material Science; topological insulators, ultrafast spectroscopy, graphene Word Cloud More Like This Full Text File size NAView Full Text View Full ...

  15. Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure Print Graphene, because of its unusual electron properties, reduced dimensionality, and scale, has enormous potential for use in ultrafast electronic transistors. It exhibits high conductivity and an anomalous quantum Hall effect (a phenomenon exhibited by certain semiconductor devices at low temperatures and high magnetic fields). Among its novel properties, graphene's electrical charge carriers (electrons and holes) move through a solid with

  16. Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure Print Graphene, because of its unusual electron properties, reduced dimensionality, and scale, has enormous potential for use in ultrafast electronic transistors. It exhibits high conductivity and an anomalous quantum Hall effect (a phenomenon exhibited by certain semiconductor devices at low temperatures and high magnetic fields). Among its novel properties, graphene's electrical charge carriers (electrons and holes) move through a solid with

  17. Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure Print Graphene, because of its unusual electron properties, reduced dimensionality, and scale, has enormous potential for use in ultrafast electronic transistors. It exhibits high conductivity and an anomalous quantum Hall effect (a phenomenon exhibited by certain semiconductor devices at low temperatures and high magnetic fields). Among its novel properties, graphene's electrical charge carriers (electrons and holes) move through a solid with

  18. Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure Print Graphene, because of its unusual electron properties, reduced dimensionality, and scale, has enormous potential for use in ultrafast electronic transistors. It exhibits high conductivity and an anomalous quantum Hall effect (a phenomenon exhibited by certain semiconductor devices at low temperatures and high magnetic fields). Among its novel properties, graphene's electrical charge carriers (electrons and holes) move through a solid with

  19. Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure Print Graphene, because of its unusual electron properties, reduced dimensionality, and scale, has enormous potential for use in ultrafast electronic transistors. It exhibits high conductivity and an anomalous quantum Hall effect (a phenomenon exhibited by certain semiconductor devices at low temperatures and high magnetic fields). Among its novel properties, graphene's electrical charge carriers (electrons and holes) move through a solid with

  20. Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure Print Graphene, because of its unusual electron properties, reduced dimensionality, and scale, has enormous potential for use in ultrafast electronic transistors. It exhibits high conductivity and an anomalous quantum Hall effect (a phenomenon exhibited by certain semiconductor devices at low temperatures and high magnetic fields). Among its novel properties, graphene's electrical charge carriers (electrons and holes) move through a solid with

  1. Surface-Induced Hybridization between Graphene and Titanium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsu, Allen L.; Koch, Roland J.; Ong, Mitchell T.; Fang, Wenjing; Hofmann, Mario; Kim, Ki Kang; Seyller, Thomas; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.; Reed, Evan J.; Kong, Jing; Palacios, Tomás

    2014-08-26

    Carbon-based materials such as graphene sheets and carbon nanotubes have inspired a broad range of applications ranging from high-speed flexible electronics all the way to ultrastrong membranes. However, many of these applications are limited by the complex interactions between carbon-based materials and metals. In this work, we experimentally investigate the structural interactions between graphene and transition metals such as palladium (Pd) and titanium (Ti), which have been confirmed by density functional simulations. We find that the adsorption of titanium on graphene is more energetically favorable than in the case of most metals, and density functional theory shows that a surface induced p-d hybridization occurs between atomic carbon and titanium orbitals. This strong affinity between the two materials results in a short-range ordered crystalline deposition on top of graphene as well as chemical modifications to graphene as seen by Raman and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). This induced hybridization is interface-specific and has major consequences for contacting graphene nanoelectronic devices as well as applications toward metal-induced chemical functionalization of graphene.

  2. Experiences from the offshore installation of a composite materials firewater system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciaraldi, S.W.

    1993-12-31

    A prototype 300 m composite dry deluge firewater system was installed in December 1991 at the Valhall Field in the southern North Sea Norwegian offshore sector. This installation followed successful safety verification of the explosion and fire resistant design concept consisting of glass-fiber reinforced epoxy (GRE) piping components protected with a reinforced intumescent epoxy fire insulation. The installation was based primarily on the use of prefabricated GRE piping spools and fire insulation cast onto the piping or applied in the form of cast half shells. Significant experiences gained from the project are described. These experiences involve pre-engineering activities, detailed engineering, onshore fabrication, shipping, offshore hook-up, quality assurance, safety and economics. Although the overall installation was successful and the system is functioning as intended, areas of possible optimization and cost reduction for future composite firewater systems were identified. These findings are also briefly reviewed.

  3. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Validation of Material Models for Automotive Carbon Fiber Composite Structures

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by General Motors at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about validation of material models...

  4. Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... point in momentum space (the Dirac crossing energy). The researchers demonstrated that through selective control of the carrier concentration in the graphene layers, the band ...

  5. Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    as bandgap engineering. While bandgap engineering is the basis of semiconductor technology, it is only now being applied to graphene. Using angle-resolved photoemission...

  6. Compositions of doped, co-doped and tri-doped semiconductor materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lynn, Kelvin; Ciampi, Guido

    2011-12-06

    Semiconductor materials suitable for being used in radiation detectors are disclosed. A particular example of the semiconductor materials includes tellurium, cadmium, and zinc. Tellurium is in molar excess of cadmium and zinc. The example also includes aluminum having a concentration of about 10 to about 20,000 atomic parts per billion and erbium having a concentration of at least 10,000 atomic parts per billion.

  7. Performance Assessment and Composite Analysis Material Disposal Area G Revision 4

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) generates radioactive waste as a result of various activities. Most is low-level radioactive waste that is disposed of at Technical Area (TA) 54, Area G. U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1 requires that DOE field sites prepare and maintain site-specific radiological performance assessments and composite analyses for low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities that accept waste after September 26, 1988. This report presents the radiological performance assessment and composite analysis for TA 54, Area G. The performance assessment and composite analysis model the long-term performance of the Area G disposal facility so that the risk posed by the disposed waste to human health and safety and the environment can be determined. Rates of radionuclide release from the waste and the transport of these releases to locations accessible to humans are evaluated and used to project radiation doses that may be received by exposed persons. The release rates of radon gas from the disposal facility are also estimated. The dose and radon flux projections are compared to the performance objectives provided in DOE M 435.1 to evaluate the ability of the disposal facility to safely isolate the waste.

  8. Performance Assessment and Composit Analysis Material Disposal Area G Revision 4

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) generates radioactive waste as a result of various activities. Most is low-level radioactive waste that is disposed of at Technical Area (TA) 54, Area G. U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1 requires that DOE field sites prepare and maintain site-specific radiological performance assessments and composite analyses for lowlevel radioactive waste disposal facilities that accept waste after September 26, 1988. This report presents the radiological performance assessment and composite analysis for TA 54, Area G. The performance assessment and composite analysis model the long-term performance of the Area G disposal facility so that the risk posed by the disposed waste to human health and safety and the environment can be determined. Rates of radionuclide release from the waste and the transport of these releases to locations accessible to humans are evaluated and used to project radiation doses that may be received by exposed persons. The release rates of radon gas from the disposal facility are also estimated. The dose and radon flux projections are compared to the performance objectives provided in DOE M 435.1 to evaluate the ability of the disposal facility to safely isolate the waste.

  9. Use of magnetic carbon composites from renewable resource materials for oil spill clean up and recovery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Viswanathan, Tito

    2014-02-11

    A method for separating a liquid hydrocarbon material from a body of water. In one embodiment, the method includes the steps of mixing a plurality of magnetic carbon-metal nanocomposites with a liquid hydrocarbon material dispersed in a body of water to allow the plurality of magnetic carbon-metal nanocomposites each to be adhered by an amount of the liquid hydrocarbon material to form a mixture, applying a magnetic force to the mixture to attract the plurality of magnetic carbon-metal nanocomposites each adhered by an amount of the liquid hydrocarbon material, and removing said plurality of magnetic carbon-metal nanocomposites each adhered by an amount of the liquid hydrocarbon material from said body of water while maintaining the applied magnetic force, wherein the plurality of magnetic carbon-metal nanocomposites is formed by subjecting one or more metal lignosulfonates or metal salts to microwave radiation, in presence of lignin/derivatives either in presence of alkali or a microwave absorbing material.

  10. Graphene Monolayer Rotation on Ni(111) Facilities Bilayer Graphene Growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batzill M.; Sutter P.; Dahal, A.; Addou, R.

    2012-06-11

    Synthesis of bilayer graphene by chemical vapor deposition is of importance for graphene-based field effect devices. Here, we demonstrate that bilayer graphene preferentially grows by carbon-segregation under graphene sheets that are rotated relative to a Ni(111) substrate. Rotated graphene monolayer films can be synthesized at growth temperatures above 650 C on a Ni(111) thin-film. The segregated second graphene layer is in registry with the Ni(111) substrate and this suppresses further C-segregation, effectively self-limiting graphene formation to two layers.

  11. Use of composite materials, health monitoring and self-healing concepts to refurbish our civil and military infrastructure.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roach, Dennis Patrick; Delong, Waylon Anthony; White, Scott; Yepez, Esteban; Rackow, Kirk A.; Reedy, Earl David, Jr.

    2007-09-01

    An unavoidable by-product of a metallic structure's use is the appearance of crack, corrosion, erosion and other flaws. Economic barriers to the replacement of these structures have created an aging civil and military infrastructure and placed even greater demands on efficient and safe repair and inspection methods. As a result of Homeland Security issues and these aging infrastructure concerns, increased attention has been focused on the rapid repair and preemptive reinforcement of structures such as buildings and bridges. This Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program established the viability of using bonded composite patches to repair metallic structures. High modulus fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) material may be used in lieu of mechanically fastened metallic patches or welds to reinforce or repair damaged structures. Their use produces a wide array of engineering and economic advantages. Current techniques for strengthening steel structures have several drawbacks including requiring heavy equipment for installation, poor fatigue performance, and the need for ongoing maintenance due to continued corrosion attack or crack growth. The use of bonded composite doublers has the potential to correct the difficulties associated with current repair techniques and the ability to be applied where there are currently no rehabilitation options. Applications include such diverse structures as: buildings, bridges, railroad cars, trucks and other heavy machinery, steel power and communication towers, pipelines, factories, mining equipment, ships, tanks and other military vehicles. This LDRD also proved the concept of a living infrastructure by developing custom sensors and self-healing chemistry and linking this technology with the application of advanced composite materials. Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) systems and mountable, miniature sensors were designed to continuously or periodically assess structural integrity. Such systems are able to detect

  12. Methods and systems for electrophoretic deposition of energetic materials and compositions thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sullivan, Kyle T.; Gash, Alexander E.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Worsley, Marcus A.

    2015-06-23

    A product includes: a part including at least one component characterized as an energetic material, where the at least one component is at least partially characterized by physical characteristics of being deposited by an electrophoretic deposition process. A method includes: providing a plurality of particles of an energetic material suspended in a dispersion liquid to an EPD chamber or configuration; applying a voltage difference across a first pair of electrodes to generate a first electric field in the EPD chamber; and depositing at least some of the particles of the energetic material on at least one surface of a substrate, the substrate being one of the electrodes or being coupled to one of the electrodes.

  13. Graphene-containing flowable electrodes for capacitive energy storage

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Boota, M.; Hatzell, K. B.; Alhabeb, M.; Kumbur, E. C.; Gogotsi, Y.

    2015-04-10

    High conductivity and extended particle contacts are required for rapid charge percolation in flowable electrodes. In this study, carbon spheres (CS) were wrapped by highly conductive reduced graphene oxide sheets (rGO) to address these issues. We synthesized various compositions of the conductive, 3D interconnected hybrid materials (rGO@CS) using the hydrothermal method. Synergistic effects of both materials were utilized where CS served to minimize the sheet stacking for better flowability of the suspensions, and wrapped rGO sheets enabled higher conductivity for fast charge transport throughout the suspension network. When we tested as flowable electrodes, the composition with a 1:2 ratio ofmore » GO to CS exhibited the highest capacitance of 200 F/g and an improved rate performance. Moreover, the improved performance is attributed to the fast charge transport in the suspension network due to higher conductivity and enhanced connectivity of the active material particles. Optimized electrodes were also examined in a flow mode which yielded a capacitance of 45 F/g.« less

  14. Graphene-containing flowable electrodes for capacitive energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boota, M.; Hatzell, K. B.; Alhabeb, M.; Kumbur, E. C.; Gogotsi, Y.

    2015-04-10

    High conductivity and extended particle contacts are required for rapid charge percolation in flowable electrodes. In this study, carbon spheres (CS) were wrapped by highly conductive reduced graphene oxide sheets (rGO) to address these issues. We synthesized various compositions of the conductive, 3D interconnected hybrid materials (rGO@CS) using the hydrothermal method. Synergistic effects of both materials were utilized where CS served to minimize the sheet stacking for better flowability of the suspensions, and wrapped rGO sheets enabled higher conductivity for fast charge transport throughout the suspension network. When we tested as flowable electrodes, the composition with a 1:2 ratio of GO to CS exhibited the highest capacitance of 200 F/g and an improved rate performance. Moreover, the improved performance is attributed to the fast charge transport in the suspension network due to higher conductivity and enhanced connectivity of the active material particles. Optimized electrodes were also examined in a flow mode which yielded a capacitance of 45 F/g.

  15. Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Materials Access to Hopper Phase II (Cray XE6) If you are a current NERSC user, you are enabled to use Hopper Phase II. Use your SSH client to connect to Hopper II:...

  16. Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Materials Understanding and manipulating the most fundamental properties of materials can lead to major breakthroughs in solar power, reactor fuels, optical computing, telecommunications. News Releases Science Briefs Photos Picture of the Week Publications Social Media Videos Fact Sheets Yu Seung Kim (left) and Kwan-Soo Lee (right) New class of fuel cells offer increased flexibility, lower cost A new class of fuel cells based on a newly discovered polymer-based material could bridge

  17. Graphene composite for improvement in the conversion efficiency of flexible poly 3-hexyl-thiophene:[6,6]-phenyl C{sub 71} butyric acid methyl ester polymer solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chauhan, A. K., E-mail: akchau@barc.gov.in, E-mail: akc.barc@gmail.com; Gusain, Abhay; Jha, P.; Koiry, S. P.; Saxena, Vibha; Veerender, P.; Aswal, D. K.; Gupta, S. K. [Technical Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai-400085 (India)

    2014-03-31

    The solution of thin graphene-sheets obtained from a simple ultrasonic exfoliation process was found to chemically interact with [6,6]-phenyl C{sub 71} butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) molecules. The thinner graphene-sheets have significantly altered the positions of highest occupied molecular orbital and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of PCBM, which is beneficial for the enhancement of the open circuit voltage of the solar cells. Flexible bulk heterojunction solar cells fabricated using poly 3-hexylthiophene (P3HT):PCBM-graphene exhibited a power conversion efficiency of 2.51%, which is a ?2-fold increase as compared to those fabricated using P3HT:PCBM. Inclusion of graphene-sheets not only improved the open-circuit voltage but also enhanced the short-circuit current density owing to an improved electron transport.

  18. CVD growth of graphene under exfoliated hexagonal boron nitride for vertical hybrid structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Min; Jang, Sung Kyu; Song, Young Jae; Lee, Sungjoo

    2015-01-15

    Graphical abstract: We have demonstrated a novel yet simple method for fabricating graphene-based vertical hybrid structures by performing the CVD growth of graphene at an h-BN/Cu interface. Our systematic Raman measurements combined with plasma etching process indicate that a graphene film is grown under exfoliated h-BN rather than on its top surface, and that an h-BN/graphene vertical hybrid structure has been fabricated. Electrical transport measurements of this h-BN/graphene, transferred on SiO2, show the carrier mobility up to approximately 2250 cm{sup 2} V{sup ?1} s{sup ?1}. The developed method would enable the exploration of the possibility of novel hybrid structure integration with two-dimensional material systems. - Abstract: We have demonstrated a novel yet simple method for fabricating graphene-based vertical hybrid structures by performing the CVD growth of graphene at an h-BN/Cu interface. Our systematic Raman measurements combined with plasma etching process indicate that a graphene film is grown under exfoliated h-BN rather than on its top surface, and that an h-BN/graphene vertical hybrid structure has been fabricated. Electrical transport measurements of this h-BN/graphene, transferred on SiO{sub 2}, show the carrier mobility up to approximately 2250 cm{sup 2} V{sup ?1} s{sup ?1}. The developed method would enable the exploration of the possibility of novel hybrid structure integration with two-dimensional material systems.

  19. Simulation of the frequency dispersion of effective dielectric characteristics of composite materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yakovlev, V. B.; Bardushkin, V. V.; Lavrov, I. V. Yakovleva, E. N.

    2014-12-15

    The problems of calculating the effective dielectric characteristics of polycrystalline materials are considered taking into account the frequency dependence of the characteristics of individual components. The effective characteristics of ceramics such as lead zirconate-titanate with titanium and zirconium oxide, metal lead, and water inclusions are calculated in the Maxwell-Garnett and Bruggeman approximations. The dependences of the effective dielectric characteristics on the inclusion concentration and applied electromagnetic-field frequency are obtained.

  20. Effect of Graphene with Nanopores on Metal Clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Hu; Chen, Xianlang; Wang, Lei; Zhong, Xing; Zhuang, Guilin; Li, Xiaonian; Mei, Donghai; Wang, Jianguo

    2015-10-07

    Porous graphene, which is a novel type of defective graphene, shows excellent potential as a support material for metal clusters. In this work, the stability and electronic structures of metal clusters (Pd, Ir, Rh) supported on pristine graphene and graphene with different sizes of nanopore were investigated by first-principle density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Thereafter, CO adsorption and oxidation reaction on the Pd-graphene system were chosen to evaluate its catalytic performance. Graphene with nanopore can strongly stabilize the metal clusters and cause a substantial downshift of the d-band center of the metal clusters, thus decreasing CO adsorption. All binding energies, d-band centers, and adsorption energies show a linear change with the size of the nanopore: a bigger size of nanopore corresponds to a stronger metal clusters bond to the graphene, lower downshift of the d-band center, and weaker CO adsorption. By using a suitable size nanopore, supported Pd clusters on the graphene will have similar CO and O2 adsorption ability, thus leading to superior CO tolerance. The DFT calculated reaction energy barriers show that graphene with nanopore is a superior catalyst for CO oxidation reaction. These properties can play an important role in instructing graphene-supported metal catalyst preparation to prevent the diffusion or agglomeration of metal clusters and enhance catalytic performance. This work was supported by National Basic Research Program of China (973Program) (2013CB733501), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC-21176221, 21136001, 21101137, 21306169, and 91334013). D. Mei acknowledges the support from the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle. Computing time was granted by the grand challenge of computational

  1. Electrochromic Graphene Molecules

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ji, Zhiqiang; Doorn, Stephen K.; Sykora, Milan

    2015-03-13

    Polyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, also called Graphene Molecules (GMs), with chemical composition C132H36(COOH)2 were synthesized in-situ on the surface of transparent nanocrystaline indium tin oxide (nc-ITO) electrodes. Their electronic structure was studied electrochemically and spectro-electrochemically. Variations in the potential applied onto the nc-ITO/GM electrodes induce only small changes in the observed current but they produce dramatic changes in the absorption of the GMs, which are associated with their oxidation and reduction. Analysis of the absorption changes using modified Nernst equation is used to determine standard potentials associated with the individual charge transfer processes. For the GMs prepared here these were foundmore » to be E1,ox 0 = 0.77± 0.01 V and E2,ox 0 = 1.24 ± 0.02 V vs. NHE for the first and second oxidation and E1,red 0 = -1.50 ± 0.04 V for the first reduction. The charge transfer processes are found to be non-ideal. The non-ideality factors associated with the oxidation and reduction processes suggest presence of strong interactions between the GM redox centers. Under the conditions of potential cycling GMs show rapid (seconds) color change with high contrast and stability. An electrochromic application is demonstrated wherein the GMs are used as the optically active component.« less

  2. Electrochromic Graphene Molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ji, Zhiqiang; Doorn, Stephen K.; Sykora, Milan

    2015-03-13

    Polyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, also called Graphene Molecules (GMs), with chemical composition C132H36(COOH)2 were synthesized in-situ on the surface of transparent nanocrystaline indium tin oxide (nc-ITO) electrodes. Their electronic structure was studied electrochemically and spectro-electrochemically. Variations in the potential applied onto the nc-ITO/GM electrodes induce only small changes in the observed current but they produce dramatic changes in the absorption of the GMs, which are associated with their oxidation and reduction. Analysis of the absorption changes using modified Nernst equation is used to determine standard potentials associated with the individual charge transfer processes. For the GMs prepared here these were found to be E1,ox 0 = 0.77 0.01 V and E2,ox 0 = 1.24 0.02 V vs. NHE for the first and second oxidation and E1,red 0 = -1.50 0.04 V for the first reduction. The charge transfer processes are found to be non-ideal. The non-ideality factors associated with the oxidation and reduction processes suggest presence of strong interactions between the GM redox centers. Under the conditions of potential cycling GMs show rapid (seconds) color change with high contrast and stability. An electrochromic application is demonstrated wherein the GMs are used as the optically active component.

  3. Dirac Charge Dynamcs in Graphene by Infrared Spectroscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    signatures of many-body interactions in graphene and have demonstrated the potential of graphene for novel applications in optoelectronics. Infrared View of Graphene Graphene's...

  4. Uranium isotopic composition and uranium concentration in special reference material SRM A (uranium in KCl/LiCl salt matrix)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graczyk, D.G.; Essling, A.M.; Sabau, C.S.; Smith, F.P.; Bowers, D.L.; Ackerman, J.P.

    1997-07-01

    To help assure that analysis data of known quality will be produced in support of demonstration programs at the Fuel Conditioning Facility at Argonne National Laboratory-West (Idaho Falls, ID), a special reference material has been prepared and characterized. Designated SRM A, the material consists of individual units of LiCl/KCl eutectic salt containing a nominal concentration of 2.5 wt. % enriched uranium. Analyses were performed at Argonne National Laboratory-East (Argonne, IL) to determine the uniformity of the material and to establish reference values for the uranium concentration and uranium isotopic composition. Ten units from a batch of approximately 190 units were analyzed by the mass spectrometric isotope dilution technique to determine their uranium concentration. These measurements provided a mean value of 2.5058 {+-} 0.0052 wt. % U, where the uncertainty includes estimated limits to both random and systematic errors that might have affected the measurements. Evidence was found of a small, apparently random, non-uniformity in uranium content of the individual SRM A units, which exhibits a standard deviation of 0.078% of the mean uranium concentration. Isotopic analysis of the uranium from three units, by means of thermal ionization mass spectrometry with a special, internal-standard procedure, indicated that the uranium isotopy is uniform among the pellets with a composition corresponding to 0.1115 {+-} 0.0006 wt. % {sup 234}U, 19.8336 {+-} 0.0059 wt. % {sup 235}U, 0.1337 {+-} 0.0006 wt. % {sup 236}U, and 79.9171 {+-} 0.0057 wt. % {sup 238}U.

  5. Quantized beam shifts in graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Melo Kort-Kamp, Wilton Junior; Sinitsyn, Nikolai; Dalvit, Diego Alejandro Roberto

    2015-10-08

    We predict the existence of quantized Imbert-Fedorov, Goos-Hanchen, and photonic spin Hall shifts for light beams impinging on a graphene-on-substrate system in an external magnetic field. In the quantum Hall regime the Imbert-Fedorov and photonic spin Hall shifts are quantized in integer multiples of the fine structure constant α, while the Goos-Hanchen ones in multiples of α2. We investigate the influence on these shifts of magnetic field, temperature, and material dispersion and dissipation. An experimental demonstration of quantized beam shifts could be achieved at terahertz frequencies for moderate values of the magnetic field.

  6. Controlling the Electrostatic Discharge Ignition Sensitivity of Composite Energetic Materials Using Carbon Nanotube Additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kade H. Poper; Eric S. Collins; Michelle L. Pantoya; Michael Daniels

    2014-10-01

    Powder energetic materials are highly sensitive to electrostatic discharge (ESD) ignition. This study shows that small concentrations of carbon nanotubes (CNT) added to the highly reactive mixture of aluminum and copper oxide (Al + CuO) significantly reduces ESD ignition sensitivity. CNT act as a conduit for electric energy, bypassing energy buildup and desensitizing the mixture to ESD ignition. The lowest CNT concentration needed to desensitize ignition is 3.8 vol.% corresponding to percolation corresponding to an electrical conductivity of 0.04 S/cm. Conversely, added CNT increased Al + CuO thermal ignition sensitivity to a hot wire igniter.

  7. New Fuel Cell Design Powered by Graphene-Wrapped Nanoparticles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fuel Cell Design Powered by Graphene-Wrapped Nanoparticles Print Interest in hydrogen fuel for automotive applications has been growing steadily in the scientific and automotive community over the last decade. Recently, researchers working at the ALS and the Molecular Foundry developed a promising new materials recipe based on magnesium nanocrystals and graphene for a battery-like hydrogen fuel cell with improved performance in key areas. Hydrogen Cars The US market share for all electric-drive

  8. New Fuel Cell Design Powered by Graphene-Wrapped Nanoparticles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fuel Cell Design Powered by Graphene-Wrapped Nanoparticles Print Interest in hydrogen fuel for automotive applications has been growing steadily in the scientific and automotive community over the last decade. Recently, researchers working at the ALS and the Molecular Foundry developed a promising new materials recipe based on magnesium nanocrystals and graphene for a battery-like hydrogen fuel cell with improved performance in key areas. Hydrogen Cars The US market share for all electric-drive

  9. New Fuel Cell Design Powered by Graphene-Wrapped Nanoparticles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Fuel Cell Design Powered by Graphene-Wrapped Nanoparticles Print Interest in hydrogen fuel for automotive applications has been growing steadily in the scientific and automotive community over the last decade. Recently, researchers working at the ALS and the Molecular Foundry developed a promising new materials recipe based on magnesium nanocrystals and graphene for a battery-like hydrogen fuel cell with improved performance in key areas. Hydrogen Cars The US market share for all

  10. New Fuel Cell Design Powered by Graphene-Wrapped Nanoparticles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Fuel Cell Design Powered by Graphene-Wrapped Nanoparticles Print Interest in hydrogen fuel for automotive applications has been growing steadily in the scientific and automotive community over the last decade. Recently, researchers working at the ALS and the Molecular Foundry developed a promising new materials recipe based on magnesium nanocrystals and graphene for a battery-like hydrogen fuel cell with improved performance in key areas. Hydrogen Cars The US market share for all

  11. New Fuel Cell Design Powered by Graphene-Wrapped Nanoparticles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Fuel Cell Design Powered by Graphene-Wrapped Nanoparticles Print Interest in hydrogen fuel for automotive applications has been growing steadily in the scientific and automotive community over the last decade. Recently, researchers working at the ALS and the Molecular Foundry developed a promising new materials recipe based on magnesium nanocrystals and graphene for a battery-like hydrogen fuel cell with improved performance in key areas. Hydrogen Cars The US market share for all

  12. New Fuel Cell Design Powered by Graphene-Wrapped Nanoparticles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Fuel Cell Design Powered by Graphene-Wrapped Nanoparticles Print Interest in hydrogen fuel for automotive applications has been growing steadily in the scientific and automotive community over the last decade. Recently, researchers working at the ALS and the Molecular Foundry developed a promising new materials recipe based on magnesium nanocrystals and graphene for a battery-like hydrogen fuel cell with improved performance in key areas. Hydrogen Cars The US market share for all

  13. Large-scale fabrication of BN tunnel barriers for graphene spintronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, Wangyang; Makk, Péter; Maurand, Romain; Bräuninger, Matthias; Schönenberger, Christian

    2014-08-21

    We have fabricated graphene spin-valve devices utilizing scalable materials made from chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Both the spin-transporting graphene and the tunnel barrier material are CVD-grown. The tunnel barrier is realized by Hexagonal boron nitride, used either as a monolayer or bilayer and placed over the graphene. Spin transport experiments were performed using ferromagnetic contacts deposited onto the barrier. We find that spin injection is still greatly suppressed in devices with a monolayer tunneling barrier due to resistance mismatch. This is, however, not the case for devices with bilayer barriers. For those devices, a spin relaxation time of ∼260 ps intrinsic to the CVD graphene material is deduced. This time scale is comparable to those reported for exfoliated graphene, suggesting that this CVD approach is promising for spintronic applications which require scalable materials.

  14. Stabilization of graphene nanopore

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Jaekwang; Yang, Zhiqing; Zhou, Wu; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Pantelides, Sokrates T.; Chisholm, Matthew F.

    2014-05-27

    Graphene is an ultrathin, impervious membrane. The controlled introduction of nanoscale pores in graphene would lead to applications that involve water purification, chemical separation, and DNA sequencing. However, graphene nanopores are unstable against filling by carbon adatoms. Using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and density-functional calculations, we report that Si atoms stabilize graphene nanopores by bridging the dangling bonds around the perimeter of the hole. Si-passivated pores remain intact even under intense electron beam irradiation, and they were observed several months after the sample fabrication, demonstrating that these structures are intrinsically robust and stable against carbon filling. Theoretical calculations reveal the underlying mechanism for this stabilization effect: Si atoms bond strongly to the graphene edge, and their preference for tetrahedral coordination forces C adatoms to form dendrites sticking out of the graphene plane, instead of filling the nanopore. Our results provide a novel way to develop stable nanopores, which is a major step toward reliable graphene-based molecular translocation devices.

  15. Superhard composite materials including compounds of carbon and nitrogen deposited on metal and metal nitride, carbide and carbonitride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wong, Ming-Show; Li, Dong; Chung, Yip-Wah; Sproul, William D.; Chu, Xi; Barnett, Scott A.

    1998-01-01

    A composite material having high hardness comprises a carbon nitrogen compound, such as CN.sub.x where x is greater than 0.1 and up to 1.33, deposited on a metal or metal compound selected to promote deposition of substantially crystalline CN.sub.x. The carbon nitrogen compound is deposited on a crystal plane of the metal or metal compound sufficiently lattice-matched with a crystal plane of the carbon nitrogen compound that the carbon nitrogen compound is substantially crystalline. A plurality of layers of the compounds can be formed in alternating sequence to provide a multi-layered, superlattice coating having a coating hardness in the range of 45-55 GPa, which corresponds to the hardness of a BN coating and approaches that of a diamond coating.

  16. Superhard composite materials including compounds of carbon and nitrogen deposited on metal and metal nitride carbide and carbonitride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wong, Ming-Show; Li, Dong; Chung, Yin-Wah; Sproul, William D.; Chu, Xi; Barnett, Scott A.

    1998-01-01

    A composite material having high hardness comprises a carbon nitrogen compound, such as CN.sub.x where x is greater than 0.1 and up to 1.33, deposited on a metal or metal compound selected to promote deposition of substantially crystalline CN.sub.x. The carbon nitrogen compound is deposited on a crystal plane of the metal or metal compound sufficiently lattice-matched with a crystal plane of the carbon nitrogen compound that the carbon nitrogen compound is substantially crystalline. A plurality of layers of the compounds can be formed in alternating sequence to provide a multi-layered, superlattice coating having a coating hardness in the range of 45-55 GPa, which corresponds to the hardness of a BN coating and approaches that of a diamond coating.

  17. Superhard composite materials including compounds of carbon and nitrogen deposited on metal and metal nitride carbide and carbonitride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wong, M.S.; Li, D.; Chung, Y.W.; Sproul, W.D.; Xi Chu; Barnett, S.A.

    1998-03-10

    A composite material having high hardness comprises a carbon nitrogen compound, such as CN{sub x} where x is greater than 0.1 and up to 1.33, deposited on a metal or metal compound selected to promote deposition of substantially crystalline CN{sub x}. The carbon nitrogen compound is deposited on a crystal plane of the metal or metal compound sufficiently lattice-matched with a crystal plane of the carbon nitrogen compound that the carbon nitrogen compound is substantially crystalline. A plurality of layers of the compounds can be formed in alternating sequence to provide a multi-layered, superlattice coating having a coating hardness in the range of 45--55 GPa, which corresponds to the hardness of a BN coating and approaches that of a diamond coating. 10 figs.

  18. Superhard composite materials including compounds of carbon and nitrogen deposited on metal and metal nitride, carbide and carbonitride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wong, M.S.; Li, D.; Chung, Y.W.; Sproul, W.D.; Chu, X.; Barnett, S.A.

    1998-07-07

    A composite material having high hardness comprises a carbon nitrogen compound, such as CN{sub x} where x is greater than 0.1 and up to 1.33, deposited on a metal or metal compound selected to promote deposition of substantially crystalline CN{sub x}. The carbon nitrogen compound is deposited on a crystal plane of the metal or metal compound sufficiently lattice-matched with a crystal plane of the carbon nitrogen compound that the carbon nitrogen compound is substantially crystalline. A plurality of layers of the compounds can be formed in alternating sequence to provide a multi-layered, superlattice coating having a coating hardness in the range of 45--55 GPa, which corresponds to the hardness of a BN coating and approaches that of a diamond coating. 10 figs.

  19. Thermal conductivity of graphene mediated by strain and size

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kuang, Youdi; Shi, Sanqiang; Wang, Xinjiang; Huang, Baoling; Lindsay, Lucas

    2016-06-09

    Based on first-principles calculations and full iterative solution of the linearized Boltzmann–Peierls transport equation for phonons, we systematically investigate effects of strain, size and temperature on the thermal conductivity k of suspended graphene. The calculated size-dependent and temperature-dependent k for finite samples agree well with experimental data. The results show that, contrast to the convergent room-temperature k = 5450 W/m-K of unstrained graphene at a sample size ~8 cm, k of strained graphene diverges with increasing the sample size even at high temperature. Out-of-plane acoustic phonons are responsible for the significant size effect in unstrained and strained graphene due tomore » their ultralong mean free path and acoustic phonons with wavelength smaller than 10 nm contribute 80% to the intrinsic room temperature k of unstrained graphene. Tensile strain hardens the flexural modes and increases their lifetimes, causing interesting dependence of k on sample size and strain due to the competition between boundary scattering and intrinsic phonon–phonon scattering. k of graphene can be tuned within a large range by strain for the size larger than 500 μm. These findings shed light on the nature of thermal transport in two-dimensional materials and may guide predicting and engineering k of graphene by varying strain and size.« less

  20. Photocatalytic activity of PANI loaded coordination polymer composite materials: Photoresponse region extension and quantum yields enhancement via the loading of PANI nanofibers on surface of coordination polymer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cui, Zhongping; Qi, Ji; Xu, Xinxin Liu, Lu; Wang, Yi

    2013-09-15

    To enhance photocatalytic property of coordination polymer in visible light region, polyaniline (PANI) loaded coordination polymer photocatalyst was synthesized through in-situ chemical oxidation of aniline on the surface of coordination polymer. The photocatalytic activity of PANI loaded coordination polymer composite material for degradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) was investigated. Compared with pure coordination polymer photocatalyst, which can decompose RhB merely under UV light irradiation, PANI loaded coordination polymer photocatalyst displays more excellent photocatalytic activity in visible light region. Furthermore, PANI loaded coordination polymer photocatalyst exhibits outstanding stability during the degradation of RhB. - Graphical abstract: PANI loaded coordination polymer composite material, which displays excellent photocatalytic activity under visible light was firstly synthesized through in-situ chemical oxidation of aniline on surface of coordination polymer. Display Omitted - Highlights: This PANI loaded coordination polymer composite material represents the first conductive polymer loaded coordination polymer composite material. PANI/coordination polymer composite material displays more excellent photocatalytic activity for the degradation of MO in visible light region. The combination of coordination polymer and PANI will enable us to design high-activity, high-stability and visible light driven photocatalyst in the future.

  1. Optical and morphological properties of graphene sheets decorated with ZnO nanowires via polyol enhancement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, Vinay, E-mail: winn201@gmail.com; Rajaura, Rajveer Singh, E-mail: winn201@gmail.com [Centre for Converging Technologies, University of Rajasthan, Jaipur - 302004 (India); Sharma, Preetam K.; Srivastava, Subodh; Vijay, Y. K. [Department of Physics, Thin Film and Membrane Science Lab., University of Rajasthan, Jaipur - 302004 (India); Sharma, S. S. [Department of Physics, Govt. Women Engineering College, Ajmer- 305002 (India)

    2014-04-24

    Graphene-ZnO nanocomposites have proven to be very useful materials for photovoltaic and sensor applications. Here, we report a facile, one-step in situ polymerization method for synthesis of graphene sheets randomly decorated with zinc oxide nanowires using ethylene glycol as solvent. We have used hydrothermal treatment for growth of ZnO nanowires. UV-visible spectra peak shifting around 288nm and 307 nm shows the presence of ZnO on graphene structure. Photoluminiscence spectra (PL) in 400nm-500nm region exhibits the luminescence quenching effect. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) image confirms the growth of ZnO nanowires on graphene sheets.

  2. Graphene/CdTe heterostructure solar cell and its enhancement with photo-induced doping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Shisheng Chen, Hongsheng; Li, Xiaoqiang; Zhang, Shengjiao; Wang, Peng; Xu, Zhijuan; Zhong, Huikai; Wu, Zhiqian

    2015-11-09

    We report a type of solar cell based on graphene/CdTe Schottky heterostructure, which can be improved by surface engineering as graphene is atomic thin. By coating a layer of ultrathin CdSe quantum dots onto graphene/CdTe heterostructure, the power conversion efficiency is increased from 2.08% to 3.10%. Photo-induced doping is mainly accounted for this enhancement, as evidenced by field effect transport, Raman, photoluminescence, and quantum efficiency measurements. This work demonstrates a feasible way of improving the performance of graphene/semiconductor heterostructure solar cells by combining one dimensional with two dimensional materials.

  3. Ceramic/metal and A15/metal superconducting composite materials exploiting the superconducting proximity effect and method of making the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcomb, Matthew J. (Manhattan Beach, CA)

    1999-01-01

    A composite superconducting material made of coated particles of ceramic superconducting material and a metal matrix material. The metal matrix material fills the regions between the coated particles. The coating material is a material that is chemically nonreactive with the ceramic. Preferably, it is silver. The coating serves to chemically insulate the ceramic from the metal matrix material. The metal matrix material is a metal that is susceptible to the superconducting proximity effect. Preferably, it is a NbTi alloy. The metal matrix material is induced to become superconducting by the superconducting proximity effect when the temperature of the material goes below the critical temperature of the ceramic. The material has the improved mechanical properties of the metal matrix material. Preferably, the material consists of approximately 10% NbTi, 90% coated ceramic particles (by volume). Certain aspects of the material and method will depend upon the particular ceramic superconductor employed. An alternative embodiment of the invention utilizes A15 compound superconducting particles in a metal matrix material which is preferably a NbTi alloy.

  4. The different adsorption mechanism of methane molecule onto a boron nitride and a graphene flakes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seyed-Talebi, Seyedeh Mozhgan; Neek-Amal, M.

    2014-10-21

    Graphene and single layer hexagonal boron-nitride are two newly discovered 2D materials with wonderful physical properties. Using density functional theory, we study the adsorption mechanism of a methane molecule over a hexagonal flake of single layer hexagonal boron-nitride (h-BN) and compare the results with those of graphene. We found that independent of the used functional in our ab-initio calculations, the adsorption energy in the h-BN flake is larger than that for graphene. Despite of the adsorption energy profile of methane over a graphene flake, we show that there is a long range behavior beyond minimum energy in the adsorption energy of methane over h-BN flake. This result reveals the higher sensitivity of h-BN sheet to the adsorption of a typical closed shell molecule with respect to graphene. The latter gives insight in the recent experiments of graphene over hexagonal boron nitride.

  5. Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    momentum because the electrons are restricted to motion in a two-dimensional plane. The Dirac crossing points are at energy ED. 2D Perfection in a 3D World Graphene, a perfect...

  6. Lithium ion batteries with titania/graphene anodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Jun; Choi, Daiwon; Yang, Zhenguo; Wang, Donghai; Graff, Gordon L; Nie, Zimin; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V; Zhang, Jason; Xu, Wu; Kim, Jin Yong

    2013-05-28

    Lithium ion batteries having an anode comprising at least one graphene layer in electrical communication with titania to form a nanocomposite material, a cathode comprising a lithium olivine structure, and an electrolyte. The graphene layer has a carbon to oxygen ratio of between 15 to 1 and 500 to 1 and a surface area of between 400 and 2630 m.sup.2/g. The nanocomposite material has a specific capacity at least twice that of a titania material without graphene material at a charge/discharge rate greater than about 10 C. The olivine structure of the cathode of the lithium ion battery of the present invention is LiMPO.sub.4 where M is selected from the group consisting of Fe, Mn, Co, Ni and combinations thereof.

  7. An embryo of protocells: The capsule of graphene with selective ion channels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Zhan; Wang, Chunmei; Tian, Longlong; Bai, Jing; Yao, Huijun; Zhao, Yang; Zhang, Xin; Cao, Shiwei; Qi, Wei; Wang, Suomin; Shi, Keliang; Xu, Youwen; Mingliang, Zhang; Liu, Bo; Qiu, Hongdeng; Liu, Jie; Wu, Wangsuo; Wang, Xiaoli; Wenzhen, An

    2015-05-19

    In this study, the synthesis of artificial cell is a route for searching the origin of protocell. Here, we create a novel cell model of graphene capsules with selective ion channels, indicating that graphene might be an embryo of protocell membrane. Firstly, we found that the highly oxidized graphene and phospholipid-graphene oxide composite would curl into capsules under a strongly acidic saturated solution of heavy metallic salt solution at low temperature. Secondly, L-amino acids exhibited higher reactivity than D-amino acids on graphene oxides to form peptides, and the formed peptides in the influence of graphene would be transformed into a secondary structure, promoting the formation of left-handed proteins. Lastly, monolayer nanoporous graphene, prepared by unfocused 84Kr25+, has a high selectivity for permeation of the monovalent metal ions ( Rb+ > K+ > Cs+ > Na+ > Li+, based on permeation concentration), but does not allow Cl- go through. It is similar to K+ channels, which would cause an influx of K+ into capsule of graphene with the increase of pH in the primitive ocean, creating a suitable inner condition for the origin of life. Therefore, we built a model cell of graphene, which would provide a route for reproducing the origin of life.

  8. An embryo of protocells: The capsule of graphene with selective ion channels

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Zhan; Wang, Chunmei; Tian, Longlong; Bai, Jing; Yao, Huijun; Zhao, Yang; Zhang, Xin; Cao, Shiwei; Qi, Wei; Wang, Suomin; et al

    2015-05-19

    In this study, the synthesis of artificial cell is a route for searching the origin of protocell. Here, we create a novel cell model of graphene capsules with selective ion channels, indicating that graphene might be an embryo of protocell membrane. Firstly, we found that the highly oxidized graphene and phospholipid-graphene oxide composite would curl into capsules under a strongly acidic saturated solution of heavy metallic salt solution at low temperature. Secondly, L-amino acids exhibited higher reactivity than D-amino acids on graphene oxides to form peptides, and the formed peptides in the influence of graphene would be transformed into amore » secondary structure, promoting the formation of left-handed proteins. Lastly, monolayer nanoporous graphene, prepared by unfocused 84Kr25+, has a high selectivity for permeation of the monovalent metal ions ( Rb+ > K+ > Cs+ > Na+ > Li+, based on permeation concentration), but does not allow Cl- go through. It is similar to K+ channels, which would cause an influx of K+ into capsule of graphene with the increase of pH in the primitive ocean, creating a suitable inner condition for the origin of life. Therefore, we built a model cell of graphene, which would provide a route for reproducing the origin of life.« less

  9. Electrochemical preparation of poly(methylene blue)/graphene nanocomposite thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erar?kc?, Elif; Da?c?, Kader; Topu, Ezgi; Alanyal?o?lu, Murat

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: Poly(MB)/graphene thin films are prepared by a simple electrochemical approach. Graphene layers in the film show a broad band in visible region of absorbance spectra. Morphology of composite films indicates both disordered and ordered regions. XRD reveals that nanocomposite films include rGO layers after electropolymerization process. Chemically prepared graphene is better than electrochemically prepared graphene for electrooxidation of nitrite. - Abstract: Poly(methylene blue)/graphene nanocomposite thin films were prepared by electropolymerization of methylene blue in the presence of graphene which have been synthesized by two different methods of a chemical oxidation process and an electrochemical approach. Synthesized nanocomposite thin films were characterized by using cyclic voltammetry, UVvis. absorption spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, and scanning tunneling microscopy techniques. Electrocatalytical properties of prepared poly(methylene blue)/graphene nanocomposite films were compared toward electrochemical oxidation of nitrite. Under optimized conditions, electrocatalytical effect of nanocomposite films of chemically prepared graphene through electrochemical oxidation of nitrite was better than that of electrochemically prepared graphene.

  10. Graphene folding on flat substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Xiaoming; Zhao, Yadong; Ke, Changhong; Zhang, Liuyang; Wang, Xianqiao

    2014-10-28

    We present a combined experimental-theoretical study of graphene folding on flat substrates. The structure and deformation of the folded graphene sheet are experimentally characterized by atomic force microscopy. The local graphene folding behaviors are interpreted based on nonlinear continuum mechanics modeling and molecular dynamics simulations. Our study on self-folding of a trilayer graphene sheet reports a bending stiffness of about 6.57?eV, which is about four times the reported values for monolayer graphene. Our results reveal that an intriguing free sliding phenomenon occurs at the interlayer van der Waals interfaces during the graphene folding process. This work demonstrates that it is a plausible venue to quantify the bending stiffness of graphene based on its self-folding conformation on flat substrates. The findings reported in this work are useful to a better understanding of the mechanical properties of graphene and in the pursuit of its applications.

  11. Twist Solves Bilayer Graphene Mystery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Twist Solves Bilayer Graphene Mystery Print Researchers have discovered a unique new twist to the story of graphene and, in the process, appear to have solved a mystery that has...

  12. Twist Solves Bilayer Graphene Mystery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Twist Solves Bilayer Graphene Mystery Twist Solves Bilayer Graphene Mystery Print Wednesday, 26 March 2014 00:00 Researchers have discovered a unique new twist to the story of...

  13. Twist Solves Bilayer Graphene Mystery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nor in AA and AB stacked graphenes, but is a consequence of the twist between graphene layers. The introduction of the twist generates a completely new electronic structure that...

  14. Wettability of partially suspended graphene

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ondarçuhu, Thierry; Thomas, Vincent; Nuñez, Marc; Dujardin, Erik; Rahman, Atikur; Black, Charles T.; Checco, Antonio

    2016-04-13

    Dependence on the wettability of graphene on the nature of the underlying substrate remains only partially understood. We systematically investigate the role of liquid-substrate interactions on the wettability of graphene by varying the area fraction of suspended graphene from 0 to 95% by means of nanotextured substrates. We find that completely suspended graphene exhibits the highest water contact angle (85° ± 5°) compared to partially suspended or supported graphene, regardless of the hydrophobicity (hydrophilicity) of the substrate. Moreover, 80% of the long-range water-substrate interactions are screened by the graphene monolayer, the wettability of which is primarily determined by short-range graphene-liquidmore » interactions. By its well-defined chemical and geometrical properties, supported graphene therefore provides a model system to elucidate the relative contribution of short and long range interactions to the macroscopic contact angle.« less

  15. Electrochromic Graphene Molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ji, Zhiqiang; Doorn, Stephen K.; Sykora, Milan

    2015-03-13

    Polyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, also called Graphene Molecules (GMs), with chemical composition C132H36(COOH)2 were synthesized in-situ on the surface of transparent nanocrystaline indium tin oxide (nc-ITO) electrodes. Their electronic structure was studied electrochemically and spectro-electrochemically. Variations in the potential applied onto the nc-ITO/GM electrodes induce only small changes in the observed current but they produce dramatic changes in the absorption of the GMs, which are associated with their oxidation and reduction. Analysis of the absorption changes using modified Nernst equation is used to determine standard potentials associated with the individual charge transfer processes. For the GMs prepared here these were found to be E1,ox 0 = 0.77± 0.01 V and E2,ox 0 = 1.24 ± 0.02 V vs. NHE for the first and second oxidation and E1,red 0 = -1.50 ± 0.04 V for the first reduction. The charge transfer processes are found to be non-ideal. The non-ideality factors associated with the oxidation and reduction processes suggest presence of strong interactions between the GM redox centers. Under the conditions of potential cycling GMs show rapid (seconds) color change with high contrast and stability. An electrochromic application is demonstrated wherein the GMs are used as the optically active component.

  16. Twist Solves Bilayer Graphene Mystery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Twist Solves Bilayer Graphene Mystery Print Researchers have discovered a unique new twist to the story of graphene and, in the process, appear to have solved a mystery that has held back device development. Working at ALS Beamline 7.0.1, a research team applied angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) to bilayer graphene. Through direct band-structure measurements and calculations, they discovered that in the stacking of graphene monolayers, subtle misalignments arise, creating an

  17. Twist Solves Bilayer Graphene Mystery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Twist Solves Bilayer Graphene Mystery Print Researchers have discovered a unique new twist to the story of graphene and, in the process, appear to have solved a mystery that has held back device development. Working at ALS Beamline 7.0.1, a research team applied angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) to bilayer graphene. Through direct band-structure measurements and calculations, they discovered that in the stacking of graphene monolayers, subtle misalignments arise, creating an

  18. Twist Solves Bilayer Graphene Mystery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Twist Solves Bilayer Graphene Mystery Print Researchers have discovered a unique new twist to the story of graphene and, in the process, appear to have solved a mystery that has held back device development. Working at ALS Beamline 7.0.1, a research team applied angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) to bilayer graphene. Through direct band-structure measurements and calculations, they discovered that in the stacking of graphene monolayers, subtle misalignments arise, creating an

  19. Twist Solves Bilayer Graphene Mystery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Twist Solves Bilayer Graphene Mystery Print Researchers have discovered a unique new twist to the story of graphene and, in the process, appear to have solved a mystery that has held back device development. Working at ALS Beamline 7.0.1, a research team applied angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) to bilayer graphene. Through direct band-structure measurements and calculations, they discovered that in the stacking of graphene monolayers, subtle misalignments arise, creating an

  20. Twist Solves Bilayer Graphene Mystery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Twist Solves Bilayer Graphene Mystery Twist Solves Bilayer Graphene Mystery Print Wednesday, 26 March 2014 00:00 Researchers have discovered a unique new twist to the story of graphene and, in the process, appear to have solved a mystery that has held back device development. Working at ALS Beamline 7.0.1, a research team applied angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) to bilayer graphene. Through direct band-structure measurements and calculations, they discovered that in the stacking

  1. Demonstrate Scale-up Procedure for Glass Composite Material (GCM) for Incorporation of Iodine Loaded AgZ.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nenoff, Tina M.; Garino, Terry J.; Croes, Kenneth James; Rodriguez, Mark A.

    2015-07-01

    Two large size Glass Composite Material (GCM) waste forms containing AgI-MOR were fabricated. One contained methyl iodide-loaded AgI-MOR that was received from Idaho National Laboratory (INL, Test 5, Beds 1 – 3) and the other contained iodine vapor loaded AgIMOR that was received from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL, SHB 2/9/15 ). The composition for each GCM was 20 wt% AgI-MOR and 80 wt% Ferro EG2922 low sintering temperature glass along with enough added silver flake to prevent any I2 loss during the firing process. The silver flake amounts were 1.2 wt% for the GCM with the INL AgI-MOR and 3 wt% for the GCM contained the ORNL AgI-MOR. The GCMs, nominally 100 g, were first uniaxially pressed to 6.35 cm (2.5 inch) diameter disks then cold isostatically pressed, before firing in air to 550°C for 1hr. They were cooled slowly (1°C/min) from the firing temperature to avoid any cracking due to temperature gradients. The final GCMs were ~5 cm in diameter (~2 inches) and non-porous with densities of ~4.2 g/cm³. X-ray diffraction indicated that they consisted of the amorphous glass phase with small amounts of mordenite and AgI. Furthermore, the presence of the AgI was confirmed by X-ray fluorescence. Methodology for the scaled up production of GCMs to 6 inch diameter or larger is also presented.

  2. Concrete compositions and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Irvin; Lee, Patricia Tung; Patterson, Joshua

    2015-06-23

    Provided herein are compositions, methods, and systems for cementitious compositions containing calcium carbonate compositions and aggregate. The compositions find use in a variety of applications, including use in a variety of building materials and building applications.

  3. Probing graphene defects and estimating graphene quality with optical microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lai, Shen; Kyu Jang, Sung; Jae Song, Young; Lee, Sungjoo

    2014-01-27

    We report a simple and accurate method for detecting graphene defects that utilizes the mild, dry annealing of graphene/Cu films in air. In contrast to previously reported techniques, our simple approach with optical microscopy can determine the density and degree of dislocation of defects in a graphene film without inducing water-related damage or functionalization. Scanning electron microscopy, confocal Raman and atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis were performed to demonstrate that our nondestructive approach to characterizing graphene defects with optimized thermal annealing provides rapid and comprehensive determinations of graphene quality.

  4. Clean Energy Manufacturing Innovation Institute for Composites...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Clean Energy Manufacturing Innovation Institute for Composites Materials and Structures Clean Energy Manufacturing Innovation Institute for Composites Materials and Structures ...

  5. Energetic composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Danen, W.C.; Martin, J.A.

    1993-11-30

    A method for providing chemical energy and energetic compositions of matter consisting of thin layers of substances which will exothermically react with one another. The layers of reactive substances are separated by thin layers of a buffer material which prevents the reactions from taking place until the desired time. The reactions are triggered by an external agent, such as mechanical stress or an electric spark. The compositions are known as metastable interstitial composites (MICs). This class of compositions includes materials which have not previously been capable of use as energetic materials. The speed and products of the reactions can be varied to suit the application. 3 figures.

  6. Substrate dielectric effects on graphene field effect transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Zhaoying; Prasad Sinha, Dhiraj; Ung Lee, Ji, E-mail: jlee1@albany.edu; Liehr, Michael [College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, The State University of New York at Albany, Albany, New York 12203 (United States)

    2014-05-21

    Graphene is emerging as a promising material for future electronics and optoelectronics applications due to its unique electronic structure. Understanding the graphene-dielectric interaction is of vital importance for the development of graphene field effect transistors (FETs) and other novel graphene devices. Here, we extend the exploration of substrate dielectrics from conventionally used thermally grown SiO{sub 2} and hexagonal boron nitride films to technologically relevant deposited dielectrics used in semiconductor industry. A systematic analysis of morphology and optical and electrical properties was performed to study the effects of different substrates (SiO{sub 2}, HfO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS)-oxide, and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) on the carrier transport of chemical vapor deposition-derived graphene FET devices. As baseline, we use graphene FETs fabricated on thermal SiO{sub 2} with a relatively high carrier mobility of 10?000 cm{sup 2}/(V s). Among the deposited dielectrics studied, silicon nitride showed the highest mobility, comparable to the properties of graphene fabricated on thermal SiO{sub 2}. We conclude that this result comes from lower long range scattering and short range scattering rates in the nitride compared those in the other deposited films. The carrier fluctuation caused by substrates, however, seems to be the main contributing factor for mobility degradation, as a universal mobility-disorder density product is observed for all the dielectrics examined. The extrinsic doping trend is further confirmed by Raman spectra. We also provide, for the first time, correlation between the intensity ratio of G peak and 2D peak in the Raman spectra to the carrier mobility of graphene for different substrates.

  7. An atomistic methodology of energy release rate for graphene at nanoscale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Zhen; Lee, James D.; Wang, Xianqiao

    2014-03-21

    Graphene is a single layer of carbon atoms packed into a honeycomb architecture, serving as a fundamental building block for electric devices. Understanding the fracture mechanism of graphene under various conditions is crucial for tailoring the electrical and mechanical properties of graphene-based devices at atomic scale. Although most of the fracture mechanics concepts, such as stress intensity factors, are not applicable in molecular dynamics simulation, energy release rate still remains to be a feasible and crucial physical quantity to characterize the fracture mechanical property of materials at nanoscale. This work introduces an atomistic simulation methodology, based on the energy release rate, as a tool to unveil the fracture mechanism of graphene at nanoscale. This methodology can be easily extended to any atomistic material system. We have investigated both opening mode and mixed mode at different temperatures. Simulation results show that the critical energy release rate of graphene is independent of initial crack length at low temperature. Graphene with inclined pre-crack possesses higher fracture strength and fracture deformation but smaller critical energy release rate compared with the graphene with vertical pre-crack. Owing to its anisotropy, graphene with armchair chirality always has greater critical energy release rate than graphene with zigzag chirality. The increase of temperature leads to the reduction of fracture strength, fracture deformation, and the critical energy release rate of graphene. Also, higher temperature brings higher randomness of energy release rate of graphene under a variety of predefined crack lengths. The energy release rate is independent of the strain rate as long as the strain rate is small enough.

  8. First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    tools and applications. Graphene Graphics Graphene is most familiar as single atomic layers of graphite, the pencil-lead form of carbon. Since the 1980s, graphene sheets have...

  9. Acoustoelectric photoresponse in graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poole, T.; Bandhu, L.; Nash, G. R.

    2015-03-30

    The acoustoelectric current in graphene has been investigated as a function of illumination, using blue (450?nm) and red (735?nm) light-emitting diodes (LEDs), and surface acoustic wave (SAW) intensity and frequency. The measured acoustoelectric current increases with illumination, more than the measured change in the conductivity of the graphene, whilst retaining a linear dependence on the SAW intensity. The latter is consistent with the interaction between the carriers and SAWs being described by a relatively simple classical relaxation model suggesting that the change in the acoustoelectric current is caused by the effect of the illumination on the electronic properties of the graphene. The increase in the acoustoelectric current is greatest under illumination with the blue LED, consistent with the creation of a hot electron distribution.

  10. Graphene/ferroelectrics/graphene hybrid structure: Asymmetric doping of graphene layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duong, Dinh Loc; Lee, Si Young; Kim, Seong Kyu; Lee, Young Hee

    2015-06-15

    We report graphene/ferroelectric/graphene hybrid structure to demonstrate an asymmetrical doping in two graphene layers, one side with electrons and another side with holes. Two ferroelectrics, a poly(vinylidenefluoride) (PVDF) and a hydrofluorinated graphene, were used to demonstrate the concept with density functional calculations, revealing the Fermi level shift of 0.35 and 0.75 eV, respectively. This concept was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy using graphene/poly(vinylidenefluoride-co-trifluoroethylene) (P(VDF-TrFE))/graphene hybrid, which can easily form β-phase close to our simulation model. G-band peak position was downshifted for electron doping and upshifted for hole doping. This hybrid structure opens an opportunity to study bilayer graphene system with a controllable thickness for a wide range of high carrier concentration.

  11. First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene Print Wednesday, 30 June 2010 00:00 An international team of scientists performing...

  12. Macroscale superlubricity enabled by graphene nanoscroll formation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Macroscale superlubricity enabled by graphene nanoscroll formation Title Macroscale superlubricity enabled by graphene nanoscroll formation Publication Type Journal Article Year of...

  13. Nonlocal Thermal Transport across Embedded Few-Layer Graphene Sheets

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, Ying; Huxtable, Scott T; Yang, Bao; Sumpter, Bobby G; Qiao, Rui

    2014-01-01

    Thermal transport across the interfaces between few-layer graphene sheets and soft materials exhibits intriguing anomalies when interpreted using the classical Kapitza model, e.g., the conductance of the same interface differs greatly for different modes of interfacial thermal transport. Using atomistic simulations, we show that such thermal transport follows a nonlocal flux-temperature drop constitutive law and is characterized jointly by a quasi-local conductance and a nonlocal conductance instead of the classical Kapitza conductance. The nonlocal model enables rationalization of many anomalies of the thermal transport across embedded few-layer graphene sheets and should be used in studies of interfacial thermal transport involvingmore » few-layer graphene sheets or other ultra-thin layered materials.« less

  14. Application of high performance computing to automotive design and manufacturing: Composite materials modeling task technical manual for constitutive models for glass fiber-polymer matrix composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simunovic, S; Zacharia, T

    1997-11-01

    This report provides a theoretical background for three constitutive models for a continuous strand mat (CSM) glass fiber-thermoset polymer matrix composite. The models were developed during fiscal years 1994 through 1997 as a part of the Cooperative Research and Development Agreement, "Application of High-Performance Computing to Automotive Design and Manufacturing." The full derivation of constitutive relations in the framework of the continuum program DYNA3D and have been used for the simulation and impact analysis of CSM composite tubes. The analysis of simulation and experimental results show that the model based on strain tensor split yields the most accurate results of the three implemented models. The parameters used in the models and their derivation from the physical tests are documented.

  15. Crown ethers in graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Junjie; Lee, Jaekwang; Contescu, Cristian I; Gallego, Nidia C; Pantelides, Sokrates T.; Pennycook, Stephen J; Moyer, Bruce A; Chisholm, Matthew F

    2014-01-01

    Crown ethers, introduced by Pedersen1, are at their most basic level neutral rings constructed of oxygen atoms linked by two- or three-carbon chains. They have attracted special attention for their ability to selectively incorporate various atoms2 or molecules within the cavity formed by the ring3-6. This property has led to the use of crown ethers and their compounds in a wide range of chemical and biological applications7,8. However, crown ethers are typically highly flexible, frustrating efforts to rigidify them for many uses that demand higher binding affinity and selectivity9,10. In this Letter, we report atomic-resolution images of the same basic structures of the original crown ethers embedded in graphene. This arrangement constrains the crown ethers to be rigid and planar and thus uniquely suited for the many applications that crown ethers are known for. First-principles calculations show that the close similarity of the structures seen in graphene with those of crown ether molecules also extends to their selectivity towards specific metal cations depending on the ring size. Atoms (or molecules) incorporated within the crown ethers in graphene offer a simple environment that can be easily and systematically probed and modeled. Thus, we expect that this discovery will introduce a new wave of investigations and applications of chemically functionalized graphene.

  16. Specific heat of twisted bilayer graphene: Engineering phonons by atomic plane rotations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nika, Denis L. [E. Pokatilov Laboratory of Physics and Engineering of Nanomaterials, Department of Physics and Engineering, Moldova State University, Chisinau MD-2009, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); Nano-Device Laboratory, Department of Electrical Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering Program, Bourns College of Engineering, University of CaliforniaRiverside, Riverside, California, 92521 (United States); Cocemasov, Alexandr I. [E. Pokatilov Laboratory of Physics and Engineering of Nanomaterials, Department of Physics and Engineering, Moldova State University, Chisinau MD-2009, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); Balandin, Alexander A., E-mail: balandin@ee.ucr.edu [Nano-Device Laboratory, Department of Electrical Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering Program, Bourns College of Engineering, University of CaliforniaRiverside, Riverside, California, 92521 (United States)

    2014-07-21

    We have studied the phonon specific heat in single-layer, bilayer, and twisted bilayer graphene. The calculations were performed using the Born-von Karman model of lattice dynamics for intralayer atomic interactions and spherically symmetric interatomic potential for interlayer interactions. We found that at temperature T?graphene, n?=?1.6 for bilayer graphene, and n?=?1.3 for the twisted bilayer graphene. The phonon specific heat reveals an intriguing dependence on the twist angle in bilayer graphene, which is particularly pronounced at low temperature. The results suggest a possibility of phonon engineering of thermal properties of layered materials by twisting the atomic planes.

  17. Charge transport mechanisms of graphene/semiconductor Schottky barriers: A theoretical and experimental study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhong, Haijian; Liu, Zhenghui; Xu, Gengzhao; Shi, Lin; Fan, Yingmin; Yang, Hui [Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, CAS, Suzhou 215123 (China); Xu, Ke, E-mail: kxu2006@sinano.ac.cn; Wang, Jianfeng; Ren, Guoqiang [Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, CAS, Suzhou 215123 (China); Suzhou Nanowin Science and Technology Co., Ltd., Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2014-01-07

    Graphene has been proposed as a material for semiconductor electronic and optoelectronic devices. Understanding the charge transport mechanisms of graphene/semiconductor Schottky barriers will be crucial for future applications. Here, we report a theoretical model to describe the transport mechanisms at the interface of graphene and semiconductors based on conventional semiconductor Schottky theory and a floating Fermi level of graphene. The contact barrier heights can be estimated through this model and be close to the values obtained from the experiments, which are lower than those of the metal/semiconductor contacts. A detailed analysis reveals that the barrier heights are as the function of the interface separations and dielectric constants, and are influenced by the interfacial states of semiconductors. Our calculations show how this behavior of lowering barrier heights arises from the Fermi level shift of graphene induced by the charge transfer owing to the unique linear electronic structure.

  18. Rendering graphene supports hydrophilic with non-covalent aromatic functionalization for transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pantelic, Radosav S., E-mail: pantelic@imbb.forth.gr [National Cancer Institute, 50 South Drive, Building 50, Room 4306, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States); Fu, Wangyang; Schoenenberger, Christian [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, Basel CH-4056 (Switzerland); Stahlberg, Henning [Center for Cellular Imaging and NanoAnalytics, Biozentrum, University of Basel, Mattenstrasse 26, WRO-1058, Basel CH-4058 (Switzerland)

    2014-03-31

    Amorphous carbon films have been routinely used to enhance the preparation of frozen-hydrated samples for transmission electron microscopy (TEM), either in retaining protein concentration, providing mechanical stability or dissipating sample charge. However, strong background signal from the amorphous carbon support obstructs that of the sample, and the insulating properties of thin amorphous carbon films preclude any efficiency in dispersing charge. Graphene addresses the limitations of amorphous carbon. Graphene is a crystalline material with virtually no phase or amplitude contrast and unparalleled, high electrical carrier mobility. However, the hydrophobic properties of graphene have prevented its routine application in Cryo-TEM. This Letter reports a method for rendering graphene TEM supports hydrophilica convenient approach maintaining graphene's structural and electrical properties based on non-covalent, aromatic functionalization.

  19. COMPOSITE ELEMENT

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schaner, B.E.; Wolfe, R.A.

    1962-12-18

    Composite fuel eiements of the sandwich type are reported. The invention resides in the use of a layer of graphite on the interfaces of the flssile material and the cladding to prevent interdiffusion of the fissile material and the ciadding material. (AEC)

  20. Liquid-phase exfoliation of chemical vapor deposition-grown single layer graphene and its application in solution-processed transparent electrodes for flexible organic light-emitting devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Chaoxing; Li, Fushan E-mail: gtl-fzu@hotmail.com; Wu, Wei; Chen, Wei; Guo, Tailiang E-mail: gtl-fzu@hotmail.com

    2014-12-15

    Efficient and low-cost methods for obtaining high performance flexible transparent electrodes based on chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-grown graphene are highly desirable. In this work, the graphene grown on copper foil was exfoliated into micron-size sheets through controllable ultrasonication. We developed a clean technique by blending the exfoliated single layer graphene sheets with conducting polymer to form graphene-based composite solution, which can be spin-coated on flexible substrate, forming flexible transparent conducting film with high conductivity (?8 ?/?), high transmittance (?81% at 550?nm), and excellent mechanical robustness. In addition, CVD-grown-graphene-based polymer light emitting diodes with excellent bendable performances were demonstrated.

  1. Thermal property and assessment of biocompatibility of poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid/graphene nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adhikari, Ananta R., E-mail: aa8381@gmail.com [Texas Center for Superconductivity, University of Houston, Houston, Texas-77204 (United States); Rusakova, Irene; Chu, Wei-Kan [Texas Center for Superconductivity, University of Houston, Houston, Texas-77204 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Houston, Texas-77204 (United States); Haleh, Ardebili [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Houston, Texas, Texas-77204 (United States); Luisi, Jonathan; Panova, Neli I.; Laezza, Fernanda [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas-77555 (United States)

    2014-02-07

    Polymer-matrix nanocomposites based on Poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) and Graphene platelets (GNPs) were studied. GNPs, nanomaterials with a 2D flat surface, were chosen with or without chemical modification in PLGA/GNP nanocomposites and their microstructure, thermal property, and their compatibility as scaffolds for cell growth were investigated. PLGA/GNP nanocomposites (0, 1, and 5?wt.?% of GNPs) were prepared using a solution based technique. Transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Differential scanning calorimeter, and Thermogravimetric analyzer were used to analyze morphology and thermal properties. This work demonstrated the role of GNPs flat surface to provide a favorable platform resulting in an enhanced PLGA crystallization. Functionalized GNPs suppress both the thermal stability and the crystallization of PLGA. Finally, to determine the potential usefulness of these scaffolds for biomedical applications, mammalian cells were cultured on various PLGA/GNP nanocomposites (0, 1, and 5?wt.?% GNPs). 1?wt.?% PLGA/GNP nanocomposites showed better biocompatibility for cell growth with/without graphenes functionalization compared to pure PLGA and 5?wt.?% PLGA/GNP. The function of GNPs in PLGA/GNPs (1?wt.?%) composites is to provide a stage for PLGA crystallization where cell growth is favored. These results provide strong evidence for a new class of materials that could be important for biomedical applications.

  2. Spectroscopic ellipsometry on Si/SiO{sub 2}/graphene tri-layer system exposed to downstream hydrogen plasma: Effects of hydrogenation and chemical sputtering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eren, Baran; Fu, Wangyang; Marot, Laurent Calame, Michel; Steiner, Roland; Meyer, Ernst

    2015-01-05

    In this work, the optical response of graphene to hydrogen plasma treatment is investigated with spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements. Although the electronic transport properties and Raman spectrum of graphene change after plasma hydrogenation, ellipsometric parameters of the Si/SiO2/graphene tri-layer system do not change. This is attributed to plasma hydrogenated graphene still being electrically conductive, since the light absorption of conducting 2D materials does not depend on the electronic band structure. A change in the light transmission can only be observed when higher energy hydrogen ions (30?eV) are employed, which chemically sputter the graphene layer. An optical contrast is still apparent after sputtering due to the remaining traces of graphene and hydrocarbons on the surface. In brief, plasma treatment does not change the light transmission of graphene; and when it does, this is actually due to plasma damage rather than plasma hydrogenation.

  3. Dry-cleaning of graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Algara-Siller, Gerardo; Lehtinen, Ossi; Kaiser, Ute; Turchanin, Andrey

    2014-04-14

    Studies of the structural and electronic properties of graphene in its pristine state are hindered by hydrocarbon contamination on the surfaces. Also, in many applications, contamination reduces the performance of graphene. Contamination is introduced during sample preparation and is adsorbed also directly from air. Here, we report on the development of a simple dry-cleaning method for producing large atomically clean areas in free-standing graphene. The cleanness of graphene is proven using aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and electron spectroscopy.

  4. Surprising Quasiparticle Interactions in Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    graphene offers a new regime to study relativistic particle physics, not in large high-energy accelerators, but rather under ambient conditions in a solid. The atomic...

  5. Surprising Quasiparticle Interactions in Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Surprising Quasiparticle Interactions in Graphene Print Until now, the world's electronics have been dominated by silicon, whose properties, while excellent, significantly limit...

  6. Bilayer Graphene Gets a Bandgap

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    extraordinary electron mobility and other unique features hold great promise for nanoscale electronics and photonics. But without a bandgap, graphene's promise can't be realized. ...

  7. Bilayer Graphene Gets a Bandgap

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    metal atoms. But such chemical doping is uncontrolled and not compatible with device applications. Researchers then tried to tune the bilayer graphene bandgap by doping the...

  8. Deformation sensor based on polymer-supported discontinuous graphene multi-layer coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carotenuto, G.; Schiavo, L.; Romeo, V.; Nicolais, L. [Institute for Composite and Biomedical Materials, National Research Council, Piazzale E. Fermi, 1, 80055 Portici (Italy)

    2014-05-15

    Graphene can be conveniently used in the modification of polymer surfaces. Graphene macromolecules are perfectly transparent to the visible light and electrically conductive, consequently these two properties can be simultaneously provided to polymeric substrates by surface coating with thin graphene layers. In addition, such coating process provides the substrates of: water-repellence, higher surface hardness, low-friction, self-lubrication, gas-barrier properties, and many other functionalities. Polyolefins have a non-polar nature and therefore graphene strongly sticks on their surface. Nano-crystalline graphite can be used as graphene precursor in some chemical processes (e.g., graphite oxide synthesis by the Hummer method), in addition it can be directly applied to the surface of a polyolefin substrate (e.g., polyethylene) to cover it by a thin graphene multilayer. In particular, the nano-crystalline graphite perfectly exfoliate under the application of a combination of shear and friction forces and the produced graphene single-layers perfectly spread and adhere on the polyethylene substrate surface. Such polymeric materials can be used as ITO (indium-tin oxide) substitute and in the fabrication of different electronic devices. Here the fabrication of transparent resistive deformation sensors based on low-density polyethylene films coated by graphene multilayers is described. Such devices are very sensible and show a high reversible and reproducible behavior.

  9. Electronic and mechanical properties of graphene-germanium interfaces grown by chemical vapor deposition

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kiraly, Brian T.; Jacobberger, Robert M.; Mannix, Andrew J.; Campbell, Gavin P.; Bedzyk, Michael J.; Arnold, Michael S.; Hersam, Mark C.; Guisinger, Nathan P.

    2015-10-27

    Epitaxially oriented wafer-scale graphene grown directly on semiconducting Ge substrates is of high interest for both fundamental science and electronic device applications. To date, however, this material system remains relatively unexplored structurally and electronically, particularly at the atomic scale. To further understand the nature of the interface between graphene and Ge, we utilize ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) along with Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to probe interfacial atomic structure and chemistry. STS reveals significant differences in electronic interactions between graphene and Ge(110)/Ge(111), which is consistent with a model of stronger interaction on Ge(110)more » leading to epitaxial growth. Raman spectra indicate that the graphene is considerably strained after growth, with more point-to-point variation on Ge(111). Furthermore, this native strain influences the atomic structure of the interface by inducing metastable and previously unobserved Ge surface reconstructions following annealing. These nonequilibrium reconstructions cover >90% of the surface and, in turn, modify both the electronic and mechanical properties of the graphene overlayer. Finally, graphene on Ge(001) represents the extreme strain case, where graphene drives the reorganization of the Ge surface into [107] facets. From this study, it is clear that the interaction between graphene and the underlying Ge is not only dependent on the substrate crystallographic orientation, but is also tunable and strongly related to the atomic reconfiguration of the graphene–Ge interface.« less

  10. Direct chemical vapor deposition of graphene on dielectric surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yuegang; Ismach, Ariel

    2014-04-29

    A substrate is provided that has a metallic layer on a substrate surface of a substrate. A film made of a two dimensional (2-D) material, such as graphene, is deposited on a metallic surface of the metallic layer. The metallic layer is dewet and/or removed to provide the film on the substrate surface.

  11. Comparative electron paramagnetic resonance investigation of reduced graphene oxide and carbon nanotubes with different chemical functionalities for quantum dot attachment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pham, Chuyen V.; Krueger, Michael E-mail: emre.erdem@physchem.uni-freiburg.de; Eck, Michael; Weber, Stefan; Erdem, Emre E-mail: emre.erdem@physchem.uni-freiburg.de

    2014-03-31

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy has been applied to different chemically treated reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A narrow EPR signal is visible at g?=?2.0029 in both GO and CNT-Oxide from carbon-related dangling bonds. EPR signals became broader and of lower intensity after oxygen-containing functionalities were reduced and partially transformed into thiol groups to obtain thiol-functionalized reduced GO (TrGO) and thiol-functionalized CNT (CNT-SH), respectively. Additionally, EPR investigation of CdSe quantum dot-TrGO hybrid material reveals complete quenching of the TrGO EPR signal due to direct chemical attachment and electronic coupling. Our work confirms that EPR is a suitable tool to detect spin density changes in different functionalized nanocarbon materials and can contribute to improved understanding of electronic coupling effects in nanocarbon-nanoparticle hybrid nano-composites promising for various electronic and optoelectronic applications.

  12. Graphene oxide/metal nanocrystal multilaminates as the atomic limit for safe and selective hydrogen storage

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cho, Eun Seon; Ruminski, Anne M.; Aloni, Shaul; Liu, Yi-Sheng; Guo, Jinghua; Urban, Jeffrey J.

    2016-02-23

    Interest in hydrogen fuel is growing for automotive applications; however, safe, dense, solid-state hydrogen storage remains a formidable scientific challenge. Metal hydrides offer ample storage capacity and do not require cryogens or exceedingly high pressures for operation. However, hydrides have largely been abandoned because of oxidative instability and sluggish kinetics. We report a new, environmentally stable hydrogen storage material constructed of Mg nanocrystals encapsulated by atomically thin and gas-selective reduced graphene oxide (rGO) sheets. This material, protected from oxygen and moisture by the rGO layers, exhibits exceptionally dense hydrogen storage (6.5 wt% and 0.105 kg H2 per litre in themore » total composite). As rGO is atomically thin, this approach minimizes inactive mass in the composite, while also providing a kinetic enhancement to hydrogen sorption performance. In conclusion, these multilaminates of rGO-Mg are able to deliver exceptionally dense hydrogen storage and provide a material platform for harnessing the attributes of sensitive nanomaterials in demanding environments.« less

  13. Spontaneous and strong multi-layer graphene n-doping on soda-lime glass and its application in graphene-semiconductor junctions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dissanayake, D. M. N. M.; Ashraf, A.; Dwyer, D.; Kisslinger, K.; Zhang, L.; Pang, Y.; Efstathiadis, H.; Eisaman, M. D.

    2016-02-12

    Scalable and low-cost doping of graphene could improve technologies in a wide range of fields such as microelectronics, optoelectronics, and energy storage. While achieving strong p-doping is relatively straightforward, non-electrostatic approaches to n-dope graphene, such as chemical doping, have yielded electron densities of 9.5 × 1012 e/cm2 or below. Furthermore, chemical doping is susceptible to degradation and can adversely affect intrinsic graphene’s properties. Here we demonstrate strong (1.33 × 1013 e/cm2), robust, and spontaneous graphene n-doping on a soda-lime-glass substrate via surface-transfer doping from Na without any external chemical, high-temperature, or vacuum processes. Remarkably, the n-doping reaches 2.11 × 1013more » e/cm2 when graphene is transferred onto a p-type copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) semiconductor that itself has been deposited onto soda-lime-glass, via surface-transfer doping from Na atoms that diffuse to the CIGS surface. Using this effect, we demonstrate an n-graphene/p-semiconductor Schottky junction with ideality factor of 1.21 and strong photo-response. As a result, the ability to achieve strong and persistent graphene n-doping on low-cost, industry-standard materials paves the way toward an entirely new class of graphene-based devices such as photodetectors, photovoltaics, sensors, batteries, and supercapacitors.« less

  14. Ferromagnetic tunnel contacts to graphene: Contact resistance and spin signal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cubukcu, M.; Laczkowski, P.; Vergnaud, C.; Marty, A.; Attan, J.-P.; Notin, L.; Vila, L. Jamet, M.; Martin, M.-B.; Seneor, P.; Anane, A.; Deranlot, C.; Fert, A.; Auffret, S.; Ducruet, C.

    2015-02-28

    We report spin transport in CVD graphene-based lateral spin valves using different magnetic contacts. We compared the spin signal amplitude measured on devices where the cobalt layer is directly in contact with the graphene to the one obtained using tunnel contacts. Although a sizeable spin signal (up to ?2 ?) is obtained with direct contacts, the signal is strongly enhanced (?400 ?) by inserting a tunnel barrier. In addition, we studied the resistance-area product (R.A) of a variety of contacts on CVD graphene. In particular, we compared the R.A products of alumina and magnesium oxide tunnel barriers grown by sputtering deposition of aluminum or magnesium and subsequent natural oxidation under pure oxygen atmosphere or by plasma. When using an alumina tunnel barrier on CVD graphene, the R.A product is high and exhibits a large dispersion. This dispersion can be highly reduced by using a magnesium oxide tunnel barrier, as for the R.A value. This study gives insight in the material quest for reproducible and efficient spin injection in CVD graphene.

  15. Thermal transport across graphene and single layer hexagonal boron nitride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jingchao E-mail: yyue@whu.edu.cn; Hong, Yang; Yue, Yanan E-mail: yyue@whu.edu.cn

    2015-04-07

    As the dimensions of nanocircuits and nanoelectronics shrink, thermal energies are being generated in more confined spaces, making it extremely important and urgent to explore for efficient heat dissipation pathways. In this work, the phonon energy transport across graphene and hexagonal boron-nitride (h-BN) interface is studied using classic molecular dynamics simulations. Effects of temperature, interatomic bond strength, heat flux direction, and functionalization on interfacial thermal transport are investigated. It is found out that by hydrogenating graphene in the hybrid structure, the interfacial thermal resistance (R) between graphene and h-BN can be reduced by 76.3%, indicating an effective approach to manipulate the interfacial thermal transport. Improved in-plane/out-of-plane phonon couplings and broadened phonon channels are observed in the hydrogenated graphene system by analyzing its phonon power spectra. The reported R results monotonically decrease with temperature and interatomic bond strengths. No thermal rectification phenomenon is observed in this interfacial thermal transport. Results reported in this work give the fundamental knowledge on graphene and h-BN thermal transport and provide rational guidelines for next generation thermal interface material designs.

  16. Electrochemical method of producing nano-scaled graphene platelets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhamu, Aruna; Jang, Joan; Jang, Bor Z.

    2013-09-03

    A method of producing nano-scaled graphene platelets with an average thickness smaller than 30 nm from a layered graphite material. The method comprises (a) forming a carboxylic acid-intercalated graphite compound by an electrochemical reaction; (b) exposing the intercalated graphite compound to a thermal shock to produce exfoliated graphite; and (c) subjecting the exfoliated graphite to a mechanical shearing treatment to produce the nano-scaled graphene platelets. Preferred carboxylic acids are formic acid and acetic acid. The exfoliation step in the instant invention does not involve the evolution of undesirable species, such as NO.sub.x and SO.sub.x, which are common by-products of exfoliating conventional sulfuric or nitric acid-intercalated graphite compounds. The nano-scaled platelets are candidate reinforcement fillers for polymer nanocomposites. Nano-scaled graphene platelets are much lower-cost alternatives to carbon nano-tubes or carbon nano-fibers.

  17. Magnetoelectric effect in sputtered composites (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Subject: 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; COBALT ALLOYS; COMPOSITE MATERIALS; DEPOSITION; ELECTRIC POTENTIAL; FERROMAGNETIC MATERIALS; IRON ALLOYS; LAYERS; LEAD COMPOUNDS; MINIATURIZATION; ...

  18. Paradoxical roles of hydrogen in electrochemical performance of graphene: High rate capacity and atomistic origins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ye, Jianchao C.; Ong, Mitchell T.; Heo, Tae Wook; Campbell, Patrick G.; Worsley, Marcus A.; Liu, Yuanyue Y.; Charnvanichborikarn, Supakit; Matthews, Manyalibo J.; Bagge-Hansen, Michael; Lee, Jonathan R. I.; Wood, Brandon C.; Wang, Y. Morris; Shin, Swanee J.

    2015-11-05

    Atomic hydrogen exists ubiquitously in graphene materials made by chemical methods. Yet determining the effect of hydrogen on the electrochemical performance of graphene remains a significant challenge. Here we report the experimental observations of high rate capacity in hydrogen-treated 3-dimensional (3D) graphene nanofoam electrodes for lithium ion batteries. Structural and electronic characterization suggests that defect sites and hydrogen play synergistic roles in disrupting sp2 graphene to facilitate fast lithium transport and reversible surface binding, as evidenced by the fast charge-transfer kinetics and increased capacitive contribution in hydrogen-treated 3D graphene. In concert with experiments, multiscale calculations reveal that defect complexes in graphene are prerequisite for low-temperature hydrogenation, and that the hydrogenation of defective or functionalized sites at strained domain boundaries plays a beneficial role in improving rate capacity by opening gaps to facilitate easier Li penetration. Additional reversible capacity is provided by enhanced lithium binding near hydrogen-terminated edge sites. Furthermore, these findings provide qualitative insights in helping the design of graphene-based materials for high-power electrodes.

  19. Paradoxical roles of hydrogen in electrochemical performance of graphene: High rate capacity and atomistic origins

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ye, Jianchao C.; Ong, Mitchell T.; Heo, Tae Wook; Campbell, Patrick G.; Worsley, Marcus A.; Liu, Yuanyue Y.; Charnvanichborikarn, Supakit; Matthews, Manyalibo J.; Bagge-Hansen, Michael; Lee, Jonathan R. I.; et al

    2015-11-05

    Atomic hydrogen exists ubiquitously in graphene materials made by chemical methods. Yet determining the effect of hydrogen on the electrochemical performance of graphene remains a significant challenge. Here we report the experimental observations of high rate capacity in hydrogen-treated 3-dimensional (3D) graphene nanofoam electrodes for lithium ion batteries. Structural and electronic characterization suggests that defect sites and hydrogen play synergistic roles in disrupting sp2 graphene to facilitate fast lithium transport and reversible surface binding, as evidenced by the fast charge-transfer kinetics and increased capacitive contribution in hydrogen-treated 3D graphene. In concert with experiments, multiscale calculations reveal that defect complexes inmore » graphene are prerequisite for low-temperature hydrogenation, and that the hydrogenation of defective or functionalized sites at strained domain boundaries plays a beneficial role in improving rate capacity by opening gaps to facilitate easier Li penetration. Additional reversible capacity is provided by enhanced lithium binding near hydrogen-terminated edge sites. Furthermore, these findings provide qualitative insights in helping the design of graphene-based materials for high-power electrodes.« less

  20. Spin caloritronics in graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghosh, Angsula; Frota, H. O.

    2015-06-14

    Spin caloritronics, the combination of spintronics with thermoelectrics, exploiting both the intrinsic spin of the electron and its associated magnetic moment in addition to its fundamental electronic charge and temperature, is an emerging technology mainly in the development of low-power-consumption technology. In this work, we study the thermoelectric properties of a Rashba dot attached to two single layer/bilayer graphene sheets as leads. The temperature difference on the two graphene leads induces a spin current, which depends on the temperature and chemical potential. We demonstrate that the Rashba dot behaves as a spin filter for selected values of the chemical potential and is able to filter electrons by their spin orientation. The spin thermopower has also been studied where the effects of the chemical potential, temperature, and also the Rashba term have been observed.

  1. Approaching total absorption at near infrared in a large area monolayer graphene by critical coupling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Yonghao; Chadha, Arvinder; Zhao, Deyin; Shuai, Yichen; Menon, Laxmy; Yang, Hongjun; Zhou, Weidong; Piper, Jessica R.; Fan, Shanhui; Jia, Yichen; Xia, Fengnian; Ma, Zhenqiang

    2014-11-03

    We demonstrate experimentally close to total absorption in monolayer graphene based on critical coupling with guided resonances in transfer printed photonic crystal Fano resonance filters at near infrared. Measured peak absorptions of 35% and 85% were obtained from cavity coupled monolayer graphene for the structures without and with back reflectors, respectively. These measured values agree very well with the theoretical values predicted with the coupled mode theory based critical coupling design. Such strong light-matter interactions can lead to extremely compact and high performance photonic devices based on large area monolayer graphene and other twodimensional materials.

  2. Fabrication and electrical properties of single wall carbon nanotube channel and graphene electrode based transistors arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seo, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, Y. H.; Yun, H.; McAllister, K.; Lee, S. W.; Na, J.; Kim, G. T.; Lee, B. J.; Kim, J. J.; Jeong, G. H.; Lee, I.; Kim, K. S.

    2015-07-20

    A transistor structure composed of an individual single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) channel with a graphene electrode was demonstrated. The integrated arrays of transistor devices were prepared by transferring patterned graphene electrode patterns on top of the aligned SWNT along one direction. Both single and multi layer graphene were used for the electrode materials; typical p-type transistor and Schottky diode behavior were observed, respectively. Based on our fabrication method and device performances, several issues are suggested and discussed to improve the device reliability and finally to realize all carbon based future electronic systems.

  3. Glucose Biosensor Based on Immobilization of Glucose Oxidase in Platinum Nanoparticles/Graphene/Chitosan Nanocomposite Film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Hong; Wang, Jun; Kang, Xinhuang; Wang, Chong M.; Wang, Donghai; Liu, Jun; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Lin, Yuehe

    2009-09-01

    The bionanocomposite film consisting of glucose oxidase/Pt/functional graphene sheets/chitosan (GOD/Pt/FGS/chitosan) for glucose sensing was described. With the electrocatalytic synergy of FGS and Pt nanoparticles to hydrogen peroxide, a sensitive biosensor with detection limit of 0.6 µM glucose was achieved. The biosensor also had good reproducibility, long term stability and negligible interfering signals from ascorbic acid and uric acid comparing to the response to glucose. The large surface area and good conductivity of graphene suggests that graphene is a potential candidate for sensor material. The hybrid nanocomposite glucose sensor provides new opportunity for clinical diagnosis and point-of-care applications.

  4. Graphene electron cannon: High-current edge emission from aligned graphene sheets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Jianlong; Li, Nannan; Guo, Jing; Fang, Yong; Deng, Jiang; Zeng, Baoqing; Wang, Wenzhong; Li, Jiangnan; Hao, Chenchun

    2014-01-13

    High-current field emitters are made by graphene paper consist of aligned graphene sheets. Field emission luminance pattern shows that their electron beams can be controlled by rolling the graphene paper from sheet to cylinder. These specific electron beams would be useful to vacuum devices and electron beam lithograph. To get high-current emission, the graphene paper is rolled to array and form graphene cannon. Due to aligned emission array, graphene cannon have high emission current. Besides high emission current, the graphene cannon is also tolerable with excellent emission stability. With good field emission properties, these aligned graphene emitters bring application insight.

  5. Spin caloritronics in graphene with Mn

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torres, Alberto Lima, Matheus P. Fazzio, A.; Silva, Antnio J. R. da

    2014-02-17

    We show that graphene with Mn adatoms trapped at single vacancies features spin-dependent Seebeck effect, thus enabling the use of this material for spin caloritronics. A gate potential can be used to tune its thermoelectric properties in a way it presents either a total spin polarized current, flowing in one given direction, or currents for both spins flowing in opposite directions without net charge transport. Moreover, we show that the thermal magnetoresistance can be tuned between ?100% and +100% by varying a gate potential.

  6. Infrared spectroscopy of large scale single layer graphene on self assembled organic monolayer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woo Kim, Nak; Youn Kim, Joo; Lee, Chul; Choi, E. J.; Jin Kim, Sang; Hee Hong, Byung

    2014-01-27

    We study the effect of self-assembled monolayer (SAM) organic molecule substrate on large scale single layer graphene using infrared transmission measurement on Graphene/SAM/SiO{sub 2}/Si composite samples. From the Drude weight of the chemically inert CH{sub 3}-SAM, the electron-donating NH{sub 2}-SAM, and the SAM-less graphene, we determine the carrier density doped into graphene by the three sources—the SiO{sub 2} substrate, the gas-adsorption, and the functional group of the SAM's—separately. The SAM-treatment leads to the low carrier density N ∼ 4 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup −2} by blocking the dominant SiO{sub 2}- driven doping. The carrier scattering increases by the SAM-treatment rather than decreases. However, the transport mobility is nevertheless improved due to the reduced carrier doping.

  7. Synthesis of ZnO decorated graphene nanocomposite for enhanced photocatalytic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gayathri, S.; Jayabal, P.; Kottaisamy, M.; Ramakrishnan, V.

    2014-05-07

    Zinc oxide/Graphene (GZ) composites with different concentrations of ZnO were successfully synthesized through simple chemical precipitation method. The X-ray diffraction pattern and the micro-Raman spectroscopic technique revealed the formation of GZ composite, and the energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry analysis showed the purity of the prepared samples. The ZnO nanoparticles decorated graphene sheets were clearly visible in the field emission scanning electron micrograph. Raman mapping was employed to analyze the homogeneity of the prepared samples. The diffuse-reflectance spectra clearly indicated that the formation of GZ composites promoted the absorption in the visible region also. The photocatalytic activity of ZnO and GZ composites was studied by the photodegradation of Methylene blue dye. The results revealed that the GZ composites exhibited a higher photocatalytic activity than pristine ZnO. Hence, we proposed a simple wet chemical method to synthesize GZ composite and its application on photocatalysis was demonstrated.

  8. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Validation of Material Models for Crash Simulation of Automotive Carbon Fiber Composite Structures (VMM)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Ford Motor Company at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about validation of material...

  9. First-principles prediction of phononic thermal conductivity of silicene: A comparison with graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gu, Xiaokun; Yang, Ronggui

    2015-01-14

    There has been great interest in two-dimensional materials, beyond graphene, for both fundamental sciences and technological applications. Silicene, a silicon counterpart of graphene, has been shown to possess some better electronic properties than graphene. However, its thermal transport properties have not been fully studied. In this paper, we apply the first-principles-based phonon Boltzmann transport equation to investigate the thermal conductivity of silicene as well as the phonon scattering mechanisms. Although both graphene and silicene are two-dimensional crystals with similar crystal structure, we find that phonon transport in silicene is quite different from that in graphene. The thermal conductivity of silicene shows a logarithmic increase with respect to the sample size due to the small scattering rates of acoustic in-plane phonon modes, while that of graphene is finite. Detailed analysis of phonon scattering channels shows that the linear dispersion of the acoustic out-of-plane (ZA) phonon modes, which is induced by the buckled structure, makes the long-wavelength longitudinal acoustic phonon modes in silicene not as efficiently scattered as that in graphene. Compared with graphene, where most of the heat is carried by the acoustic out-of-plane (ZA) phonon modes, the ZA phonon modes in silicene only have ?10% contribution to the total thermal conductivity, which can also be attributed to the buckled structure. This systematic comparison of phonon transport and thermal conductivity of silicene and graphene using the first-principle-based calculations shed some light on other two-dimensional materials, such as two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides.

  10. Advanced Composite Materials for Cold and Cryogenic Hydrogen Storage Applications in Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles Workshop Attendee List

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FIRST NAME LAST NAME ORGANIZATION Jesse Adams U.S. DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Kyle Alvine Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Gene Berry Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Ravi Deo U.S. DOE Advanced Manufacturing Office John Gangloff U.S. DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Allan Goldberg That Video Guy David Gotthold Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Patrick Hipp Composite Technology Development, Inc. Thanh Hua Argonne National Laboratory Justin Jackson National Aeronautics and

  11. Preparation and characterization of Ni(111)/graphene/Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}(111) heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahal, Arjun; Coy-Diaz, Horacio; Addou, Rafik; Lallo, James; Batzill, Matthias; Sutter, Eli

    2013-05-21

    Integration of graphene with other materials by direct growth, i.e., not using mechanical transfer procedures, is investigated on the example of metal/graphene/dielectric heterostructures. Such structures may become useful in spintronics applications using graphene as a spin-filter. Here, we systematically discuss the optimization of synthesis procedures for every layer of the heterostructure and characterize the material by imaging and diffraction methods. 300 nm thick contiguous (111) Ni-films are grown by physical vapor deposition on YSZ(111) or Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001) substrates. Subsequently, chemical vapor deposition growth of graphene in ultra-high vacuum (UHV) is compared to tube-furnace synthesis. Only under UHV conditions, monolayer graphene in registry with Ni(111) has been obtained. In the tube furnace, mono- and bilayer graphene is obtained at growth temperatures of {approx}800 Degree-Sign C, while at 900 Degree-Sign C, non-uniform thick graphene multilayers are formed. Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} films grown by reactive molecular beam epitaxy in UHV covers the graphene/Ni(111) surface uniformly. Annealing to 500 Degree-Sign C results in crystallization of the yttria with a (111) surface orientation.

  12. Femtosecond laser induced periodic surface structures on multi-layer graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beltaos, Angela Kova?evi?, Aleksander G.; Matkovi?, Aleksandar; Ralevi?, Uro; Savi?-evi?, Svetlana; Jovanovi?, Djordje; Jelenkovi?, Branislav M.; Gaji?, Rado

    2014-11-28

    In this work, we present an observation of laser induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on graphene. LIPSS on other materials have been observed for nearly 50 years, but until now, not on graphene. Our findings for LIPSS on multi-layer graphene were consistent with previous reports of LIPSS on other materials, thus classifying them as high spatial frequency LIPSS. LIPSS on multi-layer graphene were generated in an air environment by a linearly polarized femtosecond laser with excitation wavelength ? of 840?nm, pulse duration ? of ?150 fs, and a fluence F of ?4.34.4 mJ/cm{sup 2}. The observed LIPSS were perpendicular to the laser polarization and had dimensions of width w of ?3040?nm and length l of ?0.51.5??m, and spatial periods ? of ?70100?nm (??/8?/12), amongst the smallest of spatial periods reported for LIPSS on other materials. The spatial period and width of the LIPSS were shown to decrease for an increased number of laser shots. The experimental results support the leading theory behind high spatial frequency LIPSS formation, implying the involvement of surface plasmon polaritons. This work demonstrates a new way to pattern multi-layer graphene in a controllable manner, promising for a variety of emerging graphene/LIPSS applications.

  13. Interaction of hydrogen with palladium clusters deposited on graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alonso, Julio A.; Granja, Alejandra; Cabria, Iván; López, María J.

    2015-12-31

    Hydrogen adsorption on nanoporous carbon materials is a promising technology for hydrogen storage. However, pure carbon materials do not meet the technological requirements due to the week binding of hydrogen to the pore walls. Experimental work has shown that doping with Pd atoms and clusters enhances the storage capacity of porous carbons. Therefore, we have investigated the role played by the Pd dopant on the enhancement mechanisms. By performing density functional calculations, we have found that hydrogen adsorbs on Pd clusters deposited on graphene following two channels, molecular adsorption and dissociative chemisorption. However, desorption of Pd-H complexes competes with desorption of hydrogen, and consequently desorption of Pd-H complexes would spoil the beneficial effect of the dopant. As a way to overcome this difficulty, Pd atoms and clusters can be anchored to defects of the graphene layer, like graphene vacancies. The competition between molecular adsorption and dissociative chemisorption of H{sub 2} on Pd{sub 6} anchored on a graphene vacancy has been studied in detail.

  14. Suppressing Manganese Dissolution from Lithium Manganese Oxide Spinel Cathodes with Single-Layer Graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaber-Ansari, Laila; Puntambekar, Kanan P.; Kim, Soo; Aykol, Muratahan; Luo, Langli; Wu, Jinsong; Myers, Benjamin D.; Iddir, Hakim; Russell, John T.; Saldana, Spencer J.; Kumar, Rajan; Thackeray, Michael M.; Curtiss, Larry A.; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Wolverton, Christopher M.; Hersam, Mark C.

    2015-06-24

    Spinel-structured LiMn 2 O 4 (LMO) is a desirable cathode material for Li-ion batteries due to its low cost, abundance, and high power capability. However, LMO suffers from limited cycle life that is triggered by manganese dissolution into the electrolyte during electrochemical cycling. Here, it is shown that single-layer graphene coatings suppress manganese dissolution, thus enhancing the performance and lifetime of LMO cathodes. Relative to lithium cells with uncoated LMO cathodes, cells with graphene-coated LMO cathodes provide improved capacity retention with enhanced cycling stability. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that graphene coatings inhibit manganese depletion from the LMO surface. Additionally, transmission electron microscopy demonstrates that a stable solid electrolyte interphase is formed on graphene, which screens the LMO from direct contact with the electrolyte. Density functional theory calculations provide two mechanisms for the role of graphene in the suppression of manganese dissolution. First, common defects in single-layer graphene are found to allow the transport of lithium while concurrently acting as barriers for manganese diffusion. Second, graphene can chemically interact with Mn 3+ at the LMO electrode surface, promoting an oxidation state change to Mn 4+ , which suppresses dissolution.

  15. Interlayer coupling enhancement in graphene/hexagonal boron nitride heterostructures by intercalated defects or vacancies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Sohee [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Changwon [Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)] [Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Kim, Gunn, E-mail: gunnkim@sejong.ac.kr [Department of Physics and Graphene Research Institute, Sejong University, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Physics and Graphene Research Institute, Sejong University, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-07

    Hexagonal boron nitride (hBN), a remarkable material with a two-dimensional atomic crystal structure, has the potential to fabricate heterostructures with unusual properties. We perform first-principles calculations to determine whether intercalated metal atoms and vacancies can mediate interfacial coupling and influence the structural and electronic properties of the graphene/hBN heterostructure. Metal impurity atoms (Li, K, Cr, Mn, Co, and Cu), acting as extrinsic defects between the graphene and hBN sheets, produce n-doped graphene. We also consider intrinsic vacancy defects and find that a boron monovacancy in hBN acts as a magnetic dopant for graphene, whereas a nitrogen monovacancy in hBN serves as a nonmagnetic dopant for graphene. In contrast, the smallest triangular vacancy defects in hBN are unlikely to result in significant changes in the electronic transport of graphene. Our findings reveal that a hBN layer with some vacancies or metal impurities enhances the interlayer coupling in the graphene/hBN heterostructure with respect to charge doping and electron scattering.

  16. Studying the sintering behavior of BeO{sub x}-SiC{sub 1-x} Composite ceramic Material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Issa, Tarik Talib

    2011-12-26

    The sintering behavior for BeO-SiC compacts composite ceramic at different sintering temperatures in air were conducted, resulting data indicated that the percentage of SiC (Wt% 5) sintered at 800 C deg. lead to higher sintering density of (1.80 gm/cm3). The x-ray diffraction pattern analysis indicated nothing change concerning the crystal structure. Microstructure development has been studied as a function SiC content. Silicon carbide found to be suppressed the sinter ability of the matrix BeO powder.

  17. Smart antennas based on graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldrigo, Martino; Dragoman, Mircea; Dragoman, Daniela

    2014-09-21

    We report two configurations of smart graphene antennas, in which either the radiation pattern of the antenna or the backscattering of the periodic metallic arrays is controlled by DC biases that induce metal-insulator reversible transitions of graphene monolayers. Such a transition from a high surface resistance (no bias) to a low surface resistance state (finite bias voltage) causes the radiation pattern of metallic antennas backed with graphene to change dramatically, from omnidirectional to broadside. Moreover, reflectarrays enhance the backscattered field due to the same metal-dielectric transition.

  18. Method for the production of .sup.99m Tc compositions from .sup.99 Mo-containing materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennett, Ralph G.; Christian, Jerry D.; Grover, S. Blaine; Petti, David A.; Terry, William K.; Yoon, Woo Y.

    1998-01-01

    An improved method for producing .sup.99m Tc compositions from .sup.99 Mo compounds. .sup.100 Mo metal or .sup.100 MoO.sub.3 is irradiated with photons in a particle (electron) accelerator to ultimately produce .sup.99 MoO.sub.3. This composition is then heated in a reaction chamber to form a pool of molten .sup.99 MoO.sub.3 with an optimum depth of 0.5-5 mm. A gaseous mixture thereafter evolves from the molten .sup.99 MoO.sub.3 which contains vaporized .sup.99 MoO.sub.3, vaporized .sup.99m TcO.sub.3, and vaporized .sup.99m TcO.sub.2. This mixture is then combined with an oxidizing gas (O.sub.2(g)) to generate a gaseous stream containing vaporized .sup.99m Tc.sub.2 O.sub.7 and vaporized .sup.99 MoO.sub.3. Next, the gaseous stream is cooled in a primary condensation stage in the reaction chamber to remove vaporized .sup.99 MoO.sub.3. Cooling is undertaken at a specially-controlled rate to achieve maximum separation efficiency. The gaseous stream is then cooled in a sequential secondary condensation stage to convert vaporized .sup.99m Tc.sub.2 O.sub.7 into a condensed .sup.99m Tc-containing reaction product which is collected.

  19. Method for the production of {sup 99m}Tc compositions from {sup 99}Mo-containing materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennett, R.G.; Christian, J.D.; Grover, S.B.; Petti, D.A.; Terry, W.K.; Yoon, W.Y.

    1998-09-01

    An improved method is described for producing {sup 99m}Tc compositions from {sup 99}Mo compounds. {sup 100}Mo metal or {sup 100}MoO{sub 3} is irradiated with photons in a particle (electron) accelerator to ultimately produce {sup 99}MoO{sub 3}. This composition is then heated in a reaction chamber to form a pool of molten {sup 99}MoO{sub 3} with an optimum depth of 0.5--5 mm. A gaseous mixture thereafter evolves from the molten {sup 99}MoO{sub 3} which contains vaporized {sup 99}MoO{sub 3}, vaporized {sup 99m}TcO{sub 3}, and vaporized {sup 99m}TcO{sub 2}. This mixture is then combined with an oxidizing gas (O{sub 2(g)}) to generate a gaseous stream containing vaporized {sup 99m}Tc{sub 2}O{sub 7} and vaporized {sup 99}MoO{sub 3}. Next, the gaseous stream is cooled in a primary condensation stage in the reaction chamber to remove vaporized {sup 99}MoO{sub 3}. Cooling is undertaken at a specially-controlled rate to achieve maximum separation efficiency. The gaseous stream is then cooled in a sequential secondary condensation stage to convert vaporized {sup 99m}Tc{sub 2}O{sub 7} into a condensed {sup 99m}Tc-containing reaction product which is collected. 1 fig.

  20. SU-C-213-05: Evaluation of a Composite Copper-Plastic Material for a 3D Printed Radiation Therapy Bolus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vitzthum, L; Ehler, E; Sterling, D; Reynolds, T; Higgins, P; Dusenbery, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate a novel 3D printed bolus fabricated from a copper-plastic composite as a thin flexible, custom fitting device that can replicate doses achieved with conventional bolus techniques. Methods: Two models of bolus were created on a 3D printer using a composite copper-PLA/PHA. Firstly, boluses were constructed at thicknesses of 0.4, 0.6 and 0.8 mm. Relative dose measurements were performed under the bolus with an Attix Chamber as well as with radiochromic film. Results were compared to superficial Attix Chamber measurements in a water equivalent material to determine the dosimetric water equivalence of the copper-PLA/PHA plastic. Secondly, CT images of a RANDO phantom were used to create a custom fitting bolus across the anterolateral scalp. Surface dose with the bolus placed on the RANDO phantom was measured with radiochromic film at tangential angles with 6, 10, 10 flattening filter free (FFF) and 18 MV photon beams. Results: Mean surface doses for 6, 10, 10FFF and 18 MV were measured as a percent of Dmax for the flat bolus devices of each thickness. The 0.4 mm thickness bolus was determined to be near equivalent to 2.5 mm depth in water for all four energies. Surface doses ranged from 59–63% without bolus and 85–90% with the custom 0.4 mm copper-plastic bolus relative to the prescribed dose for an oblique tangential beam arrangement on the RANDO phantom. Conclusion: Sub-millimeter thickness, 3D printed composite copper-PLA/PHA bolus can provide a build-up effect equivalent to conventional bolus. At this thickness, the 3D printed bolus allows a level of flexure that may provide more patient comfort than current 3D printing materials used in bolus fabrication while still retaining the CT based custom patient shape. Funding provided by an intra-department grant of the University of Minnesota Department of Radiation Oncology.