Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granular zero-valent iron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Demonstration of Combined Zero-Valent Iron and Electrical Resistance...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demonstration of Combined Zero-Valent Iron and Electrical Resistance Heating for In Situ Trichloroethene Remediation. Demonstration of Combined Zero-Valent Iron and Electrical...

2

Performance of a Permeable Reactive Barrier Using Granular Zero-Valent  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Performance of a Permeable Reactive Barrier Using Granular Performance of a Permeable Reactive Barrier Using Granular Zero-Valent Iron: FY 2004 Annual Report Durango, Colorado, Disposal Site Performance of a Permeable Reactive Barrier Using Granular Zero-Valent Iron: FY 2004 Annual Report Durango, Colorado, Disposal Site Performance of a Permeable Reactive Barrier Using Granular Zero-Valent Iron: FY 2004 Annual Report Durango, Colorado, Disposal Site Performance of a Permeable Reactive Barrier Using Granular Zero-Valent Iron: FY 2004 Annual Report Durango, Colorado, Disposal Site More Documents & Publications Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing

3

Zero-valent iron nanoparticles preparation  

SciTech Connect

Graphical abstract: Zero-valent iron nanoparticles were synthesized by hydrogenating [Fe[N(Si(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub 2}] at room temperature and a pressure of 3 atm. The synthesized nanoparticles were spherical and had diameters less than 5 nm. Highlights: ? Zero-valent iron nanoparticles were synthesized by hydrogenating [Fe[N(Si(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub 2}]. ? The conditions of reaction were at room temperature and a pressure of 3 atm. ? The synthesized nanoparticles were spherical and had diameters less than 5 nm. -- Abstract: Zero-valent iron nanoparticles were synthesized by hydrogenating [Fe[N(Si(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub 2}] at room temperature and a pressure of 3 atm. To monitor the reaction, a stainless steel pressure reactor lined with PTFE and mechanically stirred was designed. This design allowed the extraction of samples at different times, minimizing the perturbation in the system. In this way, the shape and the diameter of the nanoparticles produced during the reaction were also monitored. The results showed the production of zero-valent iron nanoparticles that were approximately 5 nm in diameter arranged in agglomerates. The agglomerates grew to 900 nm when the reaction time increased up to 12 h; however, the diameter of the individual nanoparticles remained almost the same. During the reaction, some byproducts constituted by amino species acted as surfactants; therefore, no other surfactants were necessary.

Oropeza, S. [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, ESIQIE, UPALM, Edificio Z-6, Primer Piso, C.P. 07738, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, México D.F. (Mexico)] [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, ESIQIE, UPALM, Edificio Z-6, Primer Piso, C.P. 07738, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, México D.F. (Mexico); Corea, M., E-mail: mcoreat@yahoo.com.mx [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, ESIQIE, UPALM, Edificio Z-6, Primer Piso, C.P. 07738, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, México D.F. (Mexico); Gómez-Yáñez, C. [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, ESIQIE, UPALM, Edificio Z-6, Primer Piso, C.P. 07738, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, México D.F. (Mexico)] [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, ESIQIE, UPALM, Edificio Z-6, Primer Piso, C.P. 07738, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, México D.F. (Mexico); Cruz-Rivera, J.J. [Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Instituto de Metalurgia, Sierra Leona 550, San Luis Potosí, C.P. 78210 (Mexico)] [Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Instituto de Metalurgia, Sierra Leona 550, San Luis Potosí, C.P. 78210 (Mexico); Navarro-Clemente, M.E., E-mail: mnavarroc@ipn.mx [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, ESIQIE, UPALM, Edificio Z-6, Primer Piso, C.P. 07738, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, México D.F. (Mexico)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

4

Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells: Monticello, Utah, November 2005 Through February 2008  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells: Monticello, Utah, November 2005 Through February 2008

5

Third (March 2006) Coring and Analysis of Zero-Valent Iron Permeable Reactive Barrier, Monticello, Utah  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Third (March 2006) Coring and Analysis of Zero-Valent Iron Permeable Reactive Barrier, Monticello, Utah

6

Injection of Zero Valent Iron into an Unconfined Aquifer Using...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Zero Valent Iron into an Unconfined Aquifer Using Shear-Thinning Fluids."Ground Water Monitoring and Remediation 31(1):50-58. Authors: MJ Truex VR Vermeul DP Mendoza BG...

7

Mineral Precipitation Upgradient from a Zero-Valent Iron Permeable...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Precipitation Upgradient from a Zero-Valent Iron Permeable Reactive Barrier."Ground Water Monitoring and Remediation 28(3):56-64. doi:10.1111j.1745-6592.2008.00203.x Authors:...

8

Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells: Monticello, Utah,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells: Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells: Monticello, Utah, November 2005 Through February 2008 Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells: Monticello, Utah, November 2005 Through February 2008 Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells: Monticello, Utah, November 2005 Through February 2008 Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells: Monticello, Utah, November 2005 Through February 2008 More Documents & Publications Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing Third (March 2006) Coring and Analysis of Zero-Valent Iron Permeable

9

Effect of reduction temperature on the preparation of zero-valent iron aerogels for trichloroethylene dechlorination  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Zero-valent iron (ZVI) aerogels have been synthesized by sol-gel method and supercritical CO2 drying, followed by H2 reduction in the temperature range of 350–500 °C. When applied to trichloroethylene (TCE) dechl...

Jihye Ryu; Dong Jin Suh; Young-Kwon Park…

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Sulfur-Modified Zero-Valent Iron for Remediation Applications at DOE Sites - 13600  

SciTech Connect

Many DOE remediation sites have chemicals of concern that are compounds in higher oxidation states, which make them both more mobile and more toxic. The chemical reduction of these compounds both prevents the migration of these chemicals and in some cases reduces the toxicity. It has also been shown that zero-valent iron is a very effective substance to use in reducing oxygenated compounds in various treatment processes. These have included the treatment of halogenated hydrocarbons in the form volatile organic compounds used as solvents and pesticides. Zero-valent iron has also been used to reduce various oxidized metals such as chromium, arsenic, and mercury in order to immobilize them, decrease their toxicity, and prevent further transport. In addition, it has been used to immobilize or break down other non-metallic species such as selenium compounds and nitrates. Of particular interest at several DOE remediation sites is the fact that zero-valent iron is very effective in immobilizing several radioactive metals which are mobile in their oxidized states. These include both technetium and uranium. The main difficulty in using zero-valent iron has been its tendency to become inactive after relatively short periods of time. While it is advantageous to have the zero-valent iron particles as porous as possible in order to provide maximum surface area for reactions to take place, these pores can become clogged when the iron is oxidized. This is due to the fact that ferric oxide has a greater volume for a given mass than metallic iron. When the surfaces of the iron particles oxidize to ferric oxide, the pores become narrower and will eventually shut. In order to minimize the degradation of the chemical activity of the iron due to this process, a modification of zero-valent iron has been developed which prevents or slows this process, which decreases its effectiveness. It is called sulfur-modified iron, and it has been produced in high purity for applications in municipal water treatment applications. Sulfur-modified iron has been found to not only be an extremely economical treatment technology for municipal water supplies, where very large quantities of water must be treated economically, but it has also been demonstrated to immobilize technetium. It has the added benefit of eliminating several other harmful chemicals in water supplies. These include arsenic and selenium. In one large-scale evaluation study an integrated system implemented chemical reduction of nitrate with sulfur-modified iron followed by filtration for arsenic removal. The sulfur-modified iron that was used was an iron-based granular medium that has been commercially developed for the removal of nitrate, co-contaminants including uranium, vanadium and chromium, and other compounds from water. The independent study concluded that 'It is foreseen that the greatest benefit of this technology (sulfur-modified iron) is that it does not produce a costly brine stream as do the currently accepted nitrate removal technologies of ion exchange and reverse osmosis. This investigation confirmed that nitrate reduction via sulfur-modified iron is independent of the hydraulic loading rate. Future sulfur-modified iron treatment systems can be designed without restriction of the reactor vessel dimensions. Future vessels can be adapted to existing site constraints without being limited to height-to-width ratios that would exist if nitrate reduction were to depend on hydraulic loading rate'. Sulfur-modified iron was studied by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for its effectiveness in the reduction and permanent sequestration of technetium. The testing was done using Hanford Site groundwater together with sediment. The report stated, 'Under reducing conditions, TcO{sub 4} is readily reduced to TcIV, which forms highly insoluble oxides such at TcO{sub 2}.nH{sub 2}O. However, (re)oxidation of TcIV oxides can lead to remobilization. Under sulfidogenic conditions, most TcIV will be reduced and immobilized as Tc{sub 2}S{sub 7}, which is less readily re-mobilized, ev

Fogwell, Thomas W. [Fogwell Consulting, P.O. Box 20221, Piedmont, CA 94620 (United States)] [Fogwell Consulting, P.O. Box 20221, Piedmont, CA 94620 (United States); Santina, Pete [SMI-PS, Inc., 2073 Prado Vista, Lincoln, CA 95648 (United States)] [SMI-PS, Inc., 2073 Prado Vista, Lincoln, CA 95648 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Chemical Reduction of PCE by Zero Valent Iron Colloids Batch and Column Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical Reduction of PCE by Zero Valent Iron Colloids ­ Batch and Column Experiments Motivation nm NAPASAN Particle - nZVI / PCE-Solution 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24H[-] PCE - Inflow PCE - Outflow TCE - Inflow TCE - Outflow Chloride - Outflow Blank Value Chloride pH Value

Cirpka, Olaf Arie

12

Zero Valent Iron: Impact of Anions Present during Synthesis on...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

iron nanoparticles was quantified by monitoring the kinetics as well as products of carbon tetrachloride reduction, and significant differences in reactivity and chloroform...

13

Experimental design to optimise colour removal of diazo dye Congo Red using Zero-Valent Iron  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two types of zero-valent iron named Iron Powder (IP) and Iron Wool (IW) were used for colour removal of Congo Red (CR) dye from aqueous solution. Strong acidic condition (pH 2?3) favoured 99% colour removal with 2454-2485 mg/g of dye removal capacity by IP and IW. Decolourization of CR followed first order kinetics. At acidic pH, COD (Chemical Oxygen Demand) removal was 14-15% probably by adsorption by various oxidised iron species and at pH 7, it increased to 85%, due to co-precipitation by iron oxide products. IW was reused for three successive cycles without compromising colour removal efficiency of CR.

Animesh Debnath; Saswati Chakraborty

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Injection of Zero Valent Iron into an Unconfined Aquifer Using Shear-Thinning Fluids  

SciTech Connect

Approximately 190 kg of two micron-diameter zero-valent iron (ZVI) particles were injected into a test zone in the top two meters of an unconfined aquifer within a trichloroethene (TCE) source area. A shear-thinning fluid was used to enhance ZVI delivery in the subsurface to a radial distance of up to four meters from a single injection well. The ZVI particles were mixed in-line with the injection water, shear-thinning fluid, and a low concentration of surfactant. ZVI was observed at each of the seven monitoring wells within the targeted radius of influence during injection. Additionally, all wells within the targeted zone showed low TCE concentrations and primarily dechlorination products present 44 days after injection. These results suggest that ZVI can be directly injected into an aquifer with shear-thinning fluids and extends the applicability of ZVI to situations where other emplacement methods may not be viable.

Truex, Michael J.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.; Fritz, Brad G.; Mackley, Rob D.; Oostrom, Martinus; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Macbeth, Tamzen

2011-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

15

Mineral Precipitation Upgradient from a Zero-Valent Iron Permeable Reactive Barrier  

SciTech Connect

Core samples taken from a zero-valent iron permeable reactive barrier (ZVI PRB) at Cornhusker Army Ammunition Plant, Nebraska, were analyzed for physical and chemical characteristics. Precipitates containing iron and sulfide were present at much higher concentrations in native aquifer materials just upgradient of the PRB than in the PRB itself. Sulfur mass balance on core solids coupled with trends in ground water sulfate concentrations indicates that the average ground water flow after 20 months of PRB operation was approximately twenty fold less than the regional ground water velocity. Transport and reaction modeling of the aquifer PRB interface suggests that, at the calculated velocity, both iron and hydrogen could diffuse upgradient against ground water flow and thereby contribute to precipitation in the native aquifer materials. The initial hydraulic conductivity (K) of the native materials is less than that of the PRB and, given the observed precipitation in the upgradient native materials, it is likely that K reduction occurred upgradient to rather than within the PRB. Although not directly implicated, guar gum used during installation of the PRB is believed to have played a role in the precipitation and flow reduction processes by enhancing microbial activity.

Johnson, R. L.; Thoms, R. B.; Johnson, R. O.; Nurmi, J. T.; Tratnyek, Paul G.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Degradation of carbon tetrachloride in the presence of zero-valent iron.  

SciTech Connect

Efforts to achieve the decomposition of carbon tetrachloride through anaerobic and aerobic bioremediation and chemical transformation have met with limited success because of the conditions required and the formation of hazardous intermediates. Recently, particles of zero-valent iron (ZVI) have been used with limited success for in situ remediation of carbon tetrachloride. We studied a modified microparticulate product that combines controlled-release carbon with ZVI for stimulation of in situ chemical reduction of persistent organic compounds in groundwater. With this product, a number of physical, chemical, and microbiological processes were combined to create very strongly reducing conditions that stimulate rapid, complete dechlorination of organic solvents. In principle, the organic component of ZVI microparticles is nutrient rich and hydrophilic and has high surface area capable of supporting the growth of bacteria in the groundwater environment. In our experiments, we found that as the bacteria grew, oxygen was consumed, and the redox potential decreased to values reaching -600 mV. The small modified ZVI particles provide substantial reactive surface area that, in these conditions, directly stimulates chemical dechlorination and cleanup of the contaminated area without accumulation of undesirable breakdown products. The objective of this work was to evaluate the effectiveness of ZVI microparticles in reducing carbon tetrachloride under laboratory and field conditions. Changes in concentrations and in chemical and physical parameters were monitored to determine the role of the organic products in the reductive dechlorination reaction. Laboratory and field studies are presented.

Alvarado, J. S.; Rose, C.; LaFreniere, L.; Environmental Science Division

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Calcite precipitation dominates the electrical signatures of zero valent iron columns under simulated field conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

iron media using Tafel analysis and Electrochemicalzerovalent iron using tafel analysis and electrochemicalAt the micro-scale, Tafel scan and electrochemical impedance

Wu, Yuxin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Electromagnetic Borehole Flowmeter Surveys at Selected In Situ Redox Manipulation Barrier Wells, Zero-Valent Iron Site, Hanford, Washington  

SciTech Connect

Ambient (i.e., static) and dynamic (i.e., pumping-induced) electromagnetic borehole flowmeter (EBF) surveys were performed in 10 selected In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) barrier wells to characterize the distribution of in-well vertical flow conditions and to infer the relative hydraulic conductivity distribution in the upper-part of the unconfined aquifer. These wells are located in two areas where the aquifer is targeted for testing of zero-valent iron injection to mend a failed portion of the ISRM barrier at the 100 D Area, Hanford Site. Each of these two areas consists of a group of five wells, one group to the southwest and one group to the northeast. The upper ~15 to 20 ft (~4.6 to 6.1 m) of the unconfined aquifer was characterized for in-well vertical flow conditions and vertical profile information regarding relative hydraulic conductivity. At some well site locations, the upper ~2 to 3 ft (~0.6 to 1 m) of the well-screen interval could not be characterized under pumping (dynamic) conditions because of the presence of the pump.

Newcomer, Darrell R.

2009-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

19

Perchlorate Reduction by Autotrophic Bacteria in the Presence of Zero-Valent Iron  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In a recent report by Shrout et al. (19), perchlorate removal was achieved using iron and a mixed culture obtained from the anaerobic digester sludge of a wastewater treatment plant in Iowa. ... Till et al. (26) studied nitrate reduction by steel wool in the presence of a denitrifier (Paracoccus) and noted that N2 was the main end product of the nitrate reduction. ...

Xueyuan Yu; Christopher Amrhein; Marc A. Deshusses; Mark R. Matsumoto

2006-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

20

Challenges in the Theoretical Description of Nanoparticle Reactivity: Nano Zero-Valent Iron  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The reactivity of iron atoms, clusters and nanoparticles (nZVI) is of increasing interest owing to their important practical applications, ranging from the steel industry to water remediation technologies. Here, we provide an overview of computational methods and models that can be applied to study nZVI reactions and discuss their benefits and limitations. We also report current progress in calculations through recent examples treating the reactivity of nZVI particles. Finally, we consider the potential use of highly accurate methods with favorable scaling (such as quantum Monte Carlo or random phase approximation), which are currently considered too computationally expensive but are expected to become more amenable in the future as computer power increases.

Karlický, František

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granular zero-valent iron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Removal of organic compounds and trace metals from oil sands process-affected water using zero valent iron enhanced by petroleum coke  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The oil production generates large volumes of oil sands process-affected water (OSPW), referring to the water that has been in contact with oil sands or released from tailings deposits. There are concerns about the environmental impacts of the release of OSPW because of its toxicity. Zero valent iron alone (ZVI) and in combination with petroleum coke (CZVI) were investigated as environmentally friendly treatment processes for the removal of naphthenic acids (NAs), acid-extractable fraction (AEF), fluorophore organic compounds, and trace metals from OSPW. While the application of 25 g/L ZVI to OSPW resulted in 58.4% removal of \\{NAs\\} in the presence of oxygen, the addition of 25 g petroleum coke (PC) as an electron conductor enhanced the \\{NAs\\} removal up to 90.9%. The increase in ZVI concentration enhanced the removals of NAs, AEF, and fluorophore compounds from OSPW. It was suggested that the electrons generated from the oxidation of ZVI were transferred to oxygen, resulting in the production of hydroxyl radicals and oxidation of NAs. When OSPW was de-oxygenated, the \\{NAs\\} removal decreased to 17.5% and 65.4% during treatment with ZVI and CZVI, respectively. The removal of metals in ZVI samples was similar to that obtained during CZVI treatment. Although an increase in ZVI concentration did not enhance the removal of metals, their concentrations effectively decreased at all ZVI loadings. The Microtox® bioassay with Vibrio fischeri showed a decrease in the toxicity of ZVI- and CZVI-treated OSPW. The results obtained in this study showed that the application of ZVI in combination with PC is a promising technology for OSPW treatment.

Parastoo Pourrezaei; Alla Alpatova; Kambiz Khosravi; Przemys?aw Drzewicz; Yuan Chen; Pamela Chelme-Ayala; Mohamed Gamal El-Din

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Trichloroethene (TCE) Degradation using Granular Activated Carbon and Zero Valent Iron Particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

+ZVI method 2 sample was tested for TCE removal. In addition, samples of GAC-NZVI prepared by a thermal complete degradation in 2 weeks TCE degradation and products: Methods TCE Removal Kinetics: The GAC, 23 mL of nitrogen headspace and 0.15 mg of TCE were employed to assess TCE removal kinetics. Leaching

Barthelat, Francois

23

Reduction of Hexavalent Chromium in Soil and Ground Water Using Zero-Valent Iron Under Batch and Semi-Batch Conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chemical remediation of soil and groundwater containing hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) was carried out under batch and semi-batch conditions using different iron species: (Fe(II) (sulphate solution); Fe0 ...

Débora V. Franco; Leonardo M. Da Silva; Wilson F. Jardim

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Degradation of organic and inorganic contaminants by zero valent iron  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/Feo. The only product observed in the reduction of 2,4-DNT was 2,4-diaminotoluene (2,4-DAT). The 2,4-DAT produced accounted for 83-100% and only 42-54% of the initial mass of 2@4.DNT under anaerobic and aerobic conditions respectively. Since no degradation of 2...

Malla, Deepak Babu

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Electrochemical deposition of green rust on zero-valent iron  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

), green rust (GR) and a mixture of both. The combination of ZVI and green rust has been reported to be more effective for degrading PCE than either of them alone. Forming green rust electrochemically has the potential for depositing GR more effectively...

Kulkarni, Dhananjay Vijay

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

26

THE EFFECT OF SMECTITE ON THE CORROSION OF IRON METAL. | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

THE EFFECT OF SMECTITE ON THE CORROSION OF IRON METAL. THE EFFECT OF SMECTITE ON THE CORROSION OF IRON METAL. Abstract: The combination of zero-valent iron and a clay-type...

27

Competition for Sorption and Degradation of Chlorinated Ethenes in Batch Zero-Valent Iron Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(12)?Burris, D. R.; Allen-King, R. M.; Manoranjan, V. S.; Campbell, T. J.; Loraine, G. A.; Deng, B. J. Environ. ... Burris, David R.; Allen-King, Richelle M.; Manoranjan, Valipuram S.; Campbell, Timothy J.; Loraine, Gregory A.; Deng, Baolin ... Loraine, G. A. Water Res. ...

Jan Dries; Leen Bastiaens; Dirk Springael; Spiros N. Agathos; Ludo Diels

2004-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

28

Aminoclay-templated nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) synthesis for efficient harvesting of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, micro- algae were successfully collected by attachment to the magnetic rods or by precipitation biodiesel production.1­3 Thanks to its utilization of barren lands and non- grain feedstocks, microalgae

Mosegaard, Klaus

29

Calcite precipitation dominates the electrical signatures of zero valent iron columns under simulated field conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the electrical signatures from magnetite/fougerite vs.electrical properties of the different mineralogies: i.e. conductive and polarizable magnetite/fougerite vs.

Wu, Yuxin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Dechlorination of PCE by mixtures of green rust and zero-valent iron  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as pH (8, 9, and 10), ZVI pretreatment, and preparation method of the mixtures (GR[S]?? synthesized in the presence of ZVI; GR[S]?? and ZVI mixed after preparation). For all the experimental conditions evaluated, the activities of these reductants...

Marchal, Fabienne

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Use of Pretreatment Zones and Zero-Valent Iron for the Remediation of Chloroalkenes in an Oxic Aquifer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(18)?Burris, D. R.; Allen-King, R. M.; Manoranjan, V. S.; Campbel, T. J.; Loraine, G. A.; Deng, B. J. Environ. ... Burris, David R.; Allen-King, Richelle M.; Manoranjan, Valipuram S.; Campbell, Timothy J.; Loraine, Gregory A.; Deng, Baolin ...

John F. Kenneke; Steven C. McCutcheon

2003-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

32

Negative permittivity and permeability spectra of Cu/yttrium iron garnet hybrid granular composite materials in the microwave frequency range  

SciTech Connect

The relative complex permittivity and permeability spectra of the coagulated copper and yttrium iron garnet (Cu/YIG) hybrid granular composite materials have been studied in the microwave range. The insulator to metal transition was observed at the percolation threshold of Cu particle content (?{sub Cu}?=?16.0 vol. %) in the electrical conductivity. In the percolation threshold, the low frequency plasmonic state caused by the metallic Cu particle networks was observed. The percolated Cu/YIG granular composites show simultaneous negative permittivity and permeability spectra under external magnetic fields.

Tsutaoka, Takanori, E-mail: tsutaok@hiroshima-u.ac.jp; Fukuyama, Koki; Kinoshita, Hideaki [Graduate School of Education, Hiroshima University, 1-1-1, Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8524 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Education, Hiroshima University, 1-1-1, Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8524 (Japan); Kasagi, Teruhiro [Tokuyama College of Technology, Gakuendai, Shunan, Yamaguchi 745-8585 (Japan)] [Tokuyama College of Technology, Gakuendai, Shunan, Yamaguchi 745-8585 (Japan); Yamamoto, Shinichiro; Hatakeyama, Kenichi [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, Syosha, Himeji 671-2201 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, Syosha, Himeji 671-2201 (Japan)

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

33

Separating the Kinetic and Sorption Parameters of Mixed Chlorinated Solvents in Contact with Granular Iron  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(KIM) in 2009, which was derived specifically for PRB settings, made it possible for the first time to assess the simultaneous contributions of sorption and reaction to contaminant degradation rates in iron PRBs, providing a new tool to improve PRB...

Huang, Bei

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

34

Sequestration of technetium | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

strategy involving the sequestration of technetium as sulfide by sulfide-transformed nano zero-valent iron. The Impact The findings suggest nano zero-valent iron can be used to...

35

Implementation of fluidized granulated iron reactors in a chromate remediation process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A new approach concerning in-situ remediation on source (‘hot-spot’) decontamination of a chromate damage in connection with an innovative pump-and-treat-technique has been developed. Iron granulates show significant higher reduction rates, using fluidized bed conditions, than a literature study with a fixed bed installation of small-sized iron granules. First results from an abandoned tannery site concerning injections of sodium dithionite as a chromate reductant for the vadose zone in combination with a pump-and-treat-method, allying the advantages of granulated zero valent iron (ZVI), are reported. Reduction amounts of chromate have been found up to 88% compared with initial values in the soil after a soil water exchange of 8 pore volumes within 2.5 months. Chromate concentrations in the pumped effluent have been reduced to under the detection limit of 0.005 mg/L by treatment with ZVI in the pilot plant.

P. Müller; K.E. Lorber; R. Mischitz; C. Weiß

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Granular Thermodynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present experimental evidence for a strong analogy between quasi-2D uniform non-equilibrium steady states (NESS) of excited granular materials and equilibrium thermodynamics. Under isochoric conditions we find that the ...

Shattuck, M. D.

37

Microsoft Word - S01394_PRB_ZVI.DOC  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GJ719-2004 GJ719-2004 ESL-RPT-2004-06 Performance of a Permeable Reactive Barrier Using Granular Zero-Valent Iron: FY 2004 Annual Report Durango, Colorado, Disposal Site September 2004 Prepared by Environmental Sciences Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction, Colorado This page intentionally blank Signature Page Document Number S0139400 PRB Using Granular ZVI-2004 Annual Report U.S. Department of Energy Page iv September 2004 End of current text Document Number S0139400 Contents U.S. Department of Energy PRB Using Granular ZVI-2004 Annual Report September 2004 Page v Contents Signature Page ...............................................................................................................................

38

In-situ remediation of nitrate-contaminated ground water by electrokinetics/iron wall processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The feasibility of using electrokinetics coupled with a zero valent iron (Fe0) treatment wall to abiotically remediate nitrate-contaminated soils was investigated. Upon completion of each test run, the contaminated soil specimen was sliced into five parts and analyzed for nitrate-nitrogen, ammonia-nitrogen and nitrite-nitrogen. Nitrogen mass balance was used to determine the major transformation products. In control experiments where only electrokinetics was used at various constant voltages, 25 to 37% of the nitrate-nitrogen was transformed. The amount of nitrate-nitrogen transformed improved when a Fe0 wall (20 g or about 8–10% by weight) was placed near the anode. For test runs at various constant voltages, the amount of nitrate-nitrogen transformed ranged from 54 to 87%. By switching to constant currents, the amount of nitrate-nitrogen — transformed was about 84 to 88%. The major transformation products were ammonia-nitrogen and nitrogen gases. Nitrite-nitrogen was less than 1% in all experimental runs. Two localized pH conditions exist in the system, a low pH region near the anode and a high pH region near the cathode. Placing of an iron wall near the anode increases the pH in that area as time increases. Movement of the acid front did not flush across the cathode. This research has demonstrated that the electrokinetics/iron wall process can be used to remediate nitrate-contaminated groundwater.

Chin F. Chew; Tian C. Zhang

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Multiscale modeling in granular flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Granular materials are common in everyday experience, but have long-resisted a complete theoretical description. Here, we consider the regime of slow, dense granular flow, for which there is no general model, representing ...

Rycroft, Christopher Harley

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells More Documents & Publications Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granular zero-valent iron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells More Documents & Publications Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium

42

Field Projects: Cañon City, Colorado  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In June 2000, Cotter Corporation installed a PRB at its uranium ore processing millsite in Cañon City, Colorado. The PRB contains zero-valent iron (ZVI) that treated molybdenum and uranium...

43

Granular fountains: Convection cascade in a compartmentalized granular gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper extends the two-compartment granular fountain [D. van der Meer, P. Reimann, K. van der Weele, and D. Lohse, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 184301 (2004)] to an arbitrary number of compartments: The tendency of a granular gas to form clusters is exploited to generate spontaneous convective currents, with particles going down in the well-filled compartments and going up in the diluted ones. We focus upon the bifurcation diagram of the general K-compartment system, which is constructed using a dynamical flux model and which proves to agree quantitatively with results from molecular dynamics simulations.

Devaraj van der Meer; Ko van der Weele; Peter Reimann

2006-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

44

3D Imaging Of Wet Granular Matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3D Imaging Of Wet Granular Matter Leonard Goff Advisor: Dr. Wolfgang Losert With Application to Penetrometer Insertion #12;3D Imaging Of Wet Granular Matter Leonard Goff, Advisor: Dr. Wolfgang Losert CoffeeSand Gravel Oops! #12;3D Imaging Of Wet Granular Matter Leonard Goff, Advisor: Dr. Wolfgang Losert

Anlage, Steven

45

Hydrodynamics of vibrated granular monolayer.  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the long-standing puzzle of phase separation in a granular monolayer vibrated from below. Although this system is three dimensional, an interesting dynamics occurs mostly in the horizontal plane, perpendicular to the direction of vibration. Experiments [Olafsen and Urbach, Phys. Rev. Lett. 81 4369 (1998)] demonstrated that for a high amplitude of vibration the system is in the gaslike phase, but when the amplitude becomes smaller than a certain threshold, a phase separation occurs: A solidlike dense condensate of particles forms in the center of the system, surrounded by particles in the gaslike phase. We explain theoretically the experimentally observed coexistence of dilute and dense phases, employing Navier-Stokes granular hydrodynamics. We show that the phase separation is associated with a negative compressibility of granular gas.

Khain, E.; Aranson, I. S. (Materials Science Division); (Oakland Univ.)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Particle deposition in granular media: Progress report  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses topics on particle deposition in granular media. The six topics discussed are: experimental determination of initial collection efficiency in granular beds - an assessment of the effect of instrument sensitivity and the extent of particle bounce-off; deposition of polydispersed aerosols in granular media; in situ observation of aerosol deposition in a two-dimensional model filter; solid velocity in cross-flow granular moving bed; aerosol deposition in granular moving bed; and aerosol deposition in a magnetically stabilized fluidized bed. (LSP)

Tien, Chi

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Field Projects: Durango, Colorado | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Long-Term Surveillance - Operations and Maintenance Long-Term Surveillance - Operations and Maintenance » Permeable Reactive Barriers » Field Projects: Durango, Colorado Field Projects: Durango, Colorado Personnel from Sandia National Laboratories in New Mexico installed four permeable reactive barriers PRBs at the Durango, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title I site in October 1995. These PRBs are managed by LM. Foamed zero-valent (ZVI) iron bricks produced by Cercona of America, steel wool, and granular iron have been used as reactive media to remove ammonium, arsenic, cadmium, chromium, manganese, molybdenum, nitrate, radium-226, selenium, uranium, vanadium, and zinc contamination from leachate exiting the uranium mill tailings disposal cell. After passing through the ZVI, the leachate contaminant levels meet the

48

Life cycles of granular materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...resisted by the slow rate at which pore water can...foundations which sit on or pass through the fill onto...from the mechanics and physics of particle interactions...behaviour can be linked to rates of pore fluid diffusion...and descriptions of the physics of the granular material...

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Why Granular Media Are, After All, Thermal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Granular media are considered "athermal", because the grains are too large to display Brownian type thermal fluctuations. Yet being macroscopic, every grain undergoes thermal expansion, possesses a temperature that may be measured with a thermometer, and consists of many, many internal degrees of freedom that in their sum do affect granular dynamics. Therefore, including them in a comprehensive approach to account for granular behavior entails crucial advantages. The pros and cons of thermal versus athermal descriptions are considered.

Yimin Jiang; Mario Liu

2014-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

50

Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Options in ISEEM Global Energy Model: 2010-2050 Scenario Analysis for Least-Cost Carbon Reduction in Iron and Steel Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2011. The World Coke & Coking Coal Markets, Global SteelSengupta, 2008. Rise of the Coal-Based Sponge Iron Sector in1999. Blast Furnace Granular Coal Injection System, Final

Karali, Nihan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

GRANULAR MATERIALS UNDER VIBRATION AND THERMAL CYCLES.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??We report flow rate measurement of granular materials from a lab size silo with and without sinusoidal vibration, and the flows from a jammed container… (more)

Chen, Ke

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Beneficial Reuse at Bodo Canyon Site | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Environmental Justice » Beneficial Reuse at Bodo Services » Environmental Justice » Beneficial Reuse at Bodo Canyon Site Beneficial Reuse at Bodo Canyon Site The George Washington University Environmental Resource Policy Graduate Program Capstone Project Beneficial Reuse at Bodo Canyon Site Feasibility and Community Support for Photovoltaic Array May 2012 The George Washington University Environmental Resource Policy Graduate Program Capstone Project was an analysis of LM's efforts to support the installation of a commercial solar photovoltaic system at the former uranium mill site near Durango, Colorado. Beneficial Reuse at Bodo Canyon Site More Documents & Publications EA-1770: Final Environmental Assessment Performance of a Permeable Reactive Barrier Using Granular Zero-Valent Iron: FY 2004 Annual Report Durango, Colorado, Disposal Site

53

Advanced hydraulic fracturing methods to create in situ reactive barriers  

SciTech Connect

This article describes the use of hydraulic fracturing to increase permeability in geologic formations where in-situ remedial action of contaminant plumes will be performed. Several in-situ treatment strategies are discussed including the use of hydraulic fracturing to create in situ redox zones for treatment of organics and inorganics. Hydraulic fracturing methods offer a mechanism for the in-situ treatment of gently dipping layers of reactive compounds. Specialized methods using real-time monitoring and a high-energy jet during fracturing allow the form of the fracture to be influenced, such as creation of assymmetric fractures beneath potential sources (i.e. tanks, pits, buildings) that should not be penetrated by boring. Some examples of field applications of this technique such as creating fractures filled with zero-valent iron to reductively dechlorinate halogenated hydrocarbons, and the use of granular activated carbon to adsorb compounds are discussed.

Murdoch, L. [FRX Inc., Cincinnati, OH (United States)]|[Clemson Univ., SC (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences; Siegrist, B.; Meiggs, T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

54

KNOWLEDGE GRANULARITY AND REPRESENTATION OF KNOWLEDGE: TOWARDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

KNOWLEDGE GRANULARITY AND REPRESENTATION OF KNOWLEDGE: TOWARDS KNOWLEDGE GRID Maria A. Mach.owoc}@ue.wroc.pl ABSTRACT. Knowledge granularity, usually identified with the size of knowledge granules, seems to be real challenge for knowledge consumers as well as for knowledge creators. In this paper, relationships between

Boyer, Edmond

55

Chaoticity of the Wet Granular Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work we derive an analytic expression for the Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy of dilute wet granular matter, valid for any spatial dimension. The grains are modelled as hard spheres and the influence of the wetting liquid is described according to the Capillary Model, in which dissipation is due to the hysteretic cohesion force of capillary bridges. The Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy is expanded in a series with respect to density. We find a rapid increase of the leading term when liquid is added. This demonstrates the sensitivity of the granular dynamics to humidity, and shows that the liquid significantly increases the chaoticity of the granular gas.

A. Fingerle; S. Herminghaus; V. Yu. Zaburdaev

2007-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

56

Granular gases under extreme driving  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study inelastic gases in two dimensions using event-driven molecular dynamics simulations. Our focus is the nature of the stationary state attained by rare injection of large amounts of energy to balance the dissipation due to collisions. We find that under such extreme driving, with the injection rate much smaller than the collision rate, the velocity distribution has a power-law high energy tail. The numerically measured exponent characterizing this tail is in excellent agreement with predictions of kinetic theory over a wide range of system parameters. We conclude that driving by rare but powerful energy injection leads to a well-mixed gas and constitutes an alternative mechanism for agitating granular matter. In this distinct nonequilibrium steady-state, energy cascades from large to small scales. Our simulations also show that when the injection rate is comparable with the collision rate, the velocity distribution has a stretched exponential tail.

W. Kang; J. Machta; E. Ben-Naim

2010-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

57

Shear dispersion in dense granular flows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We formulate and solve a model problem of dispersion of dense granular materials in rapid shear flow down an incline. The effective dispersivity of the depth-averaged concentration of the dispersing powder is shown to vary as the P\\'eclet number squared, as in classical Taylor--Aris dispersion of molecular solutes. An extensions to generic shear profiles is presented, and possible applications to industrial and geological granular flows are noted.

Christov, Ivan C

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Lack of iron | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lack of iron Lack of iron Iron-bearing minerals in sediments naturally reduce contaminant levels The Science The release of wastes associated with nuclear reprocessing from storage...

59

NETL: News Release - Clean Coal Technology Report Showcases Advanced Iron  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

April 6, 2000 April 6, 2000 Clean Coal Technology Report Showcases Advanced Iron Making Process, Benefits for the Environment Topical Report Profiles Blast Furnace Granular Coal Injection System; Now Available on DOE's Fossil Energy Web Site An advanced iron making technology demonstrated in the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Program stands out for its potential to provide major environmental and financial benefits to the United States steel industry. Bethlehem Steel Topical Report The Energy Department has profiled the project in a topical report entitled Blast Furnace Granular Coal Injection System Demonstration Project. The report describes the federal government's partnership demonstration project with Bethlehem Steel Corporation, which tested a new method for reducing

60

Microsoft Word - S04040_tracer.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells: Monticello, Utah November 2005 Through February 2008 April 2008 DOE LM/1587 2008 - - ESL RPT 2008 02 - - - Work Performed nder DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. by the S.M. Stoller Corporation u DE AM01 07LM00060 - - Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This page intentionally left blank DOE-LM/1587-2007 ESL-RPT-2008-02 Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells: Monticello, Utah, November 2005 Through February 2008 April 2008 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AM01-07LM00060 for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado This page intentionally left blank

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granular zero-valent iron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Microsoft Word - S04040_tracer.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells: Monticello, Utah November 2005 Through February 2008 April 2008 DOE LM/1587 2008 - - ESL RPT 2008 02 - - - Work Performed nder DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. by the S.M. Stoller Corporation u DE AM01 07LM00060 - - Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This page intentionally left blank DOE-LM/1587-2007 ESL-RPT-2008-02 Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells: Monticello, Utah, November 2005 Through February 2008 April 2008 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AM01-07LM00060 for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado This page intentionally left blank

62

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

51 - 10060 of 28,905 results. 51 - 10060 of 28,905 results. Download Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells: Monticello, Utah, November 2005 Through February 2008 Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells: Monticello, Utah, November 2005 Through February 2008 http://energy.gov/lm/downloads/dispersivity-testing-zero-valent-iron-treatment-cells-monticello-utah Download Microsoft Word- AL2000-05Attachment.doc http://energy.gov/management/downloads/microsoft-word-al2000-05attachmentdoc Download October 2012 APM Newsletter http://energy.gov/management/downloads/october-2012-apm-newsletter Page FAQs Topics: http://energy.gov/management/office-management/employee-services/faqs Download EA-1611: Final Environmental Assessment Interconnection Request for the Colorado Highlands Wind Project

63

Achieving progressive fine granularity scalable coding in H.26L  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fine granularity scalable (FGS) coding and progressive fine granularity scalable (PFGS) coding are novel scalable video schemes which are ideally suited for streaming multimedia over networks with varying bandwidth, network conditions and receiver...

Shanmugampillai, Muthukumar

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

64

Stochastic and deterministic models for dense granular flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Granular materials such as sand or gravel surround us everyday and yet remain poorly understood. In this thesis, two models are developed for dense granular flow, each capable of predicting flows with accuracy in multiple ...

Kamrin, Kenneth Norman

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Effective conductivity of loaded granular materials by numerical simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...studied by numerical simulation. The particles are smooth uniform spheres with...granular assemblages of frictional particles (God- dard et al. 1993, 1994) in...packed granular materials with high particle-to-medium conductivity ratio...

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

A taxonomy of granular partitions Thomas Bittner and Barry Smith  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A taxonomy of granular partitions Thomas Bittner and Barry Smith Qualitative Reasoning Group. In Smith and Brogaard (2000) the notion of granular partition was introduced as a generalization of David

Forbus, Kenneth D.

67

Fluidization, segregation and stress propagation in granular materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...measurement; granular temperature; sandpiles; convection...concept of granular temperature and its relevance to...we define granular temperature E0 as the mean kinetic...GPIB interface to a Sun IPX SPARCstation...from which velocity distribution functions can be calcu...

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Friction and dilatancy in immersed granular matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The friction of a sliding plate on a thin immersed granular layer obeys Amonton-Coulomb law. We bring to the fore a large set of experimental results which indicate that, over a few decades of values, the effective dynamical friction-coefficient depends neither on the viscosity of the interstitial fluid nor on the size of beads in the sheared layer, which bears out the analogy with the solid-solid friction in a wide range of experimental parameters. We accurately determine the granular-layer dilatancy, which dependance on the grain size and slider velocity can be qualitatively accounted by considering the rheological behaviour of the whole slurry. However, additional results, obtained after modification of the grain surface by a chemical treatment, demonstrate that the theoretical description of the flow properties of granular matter, even immersed, requires the detailed properties of the grain surface to be taken into account.

Thibaut Divoux; Jean-Christophe Géminard

2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

69

Minimal model for avalanches in granular systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A nonlinear model for the dynamics of avalanches in granular systems is presented. It is based on mean-field equations for the particle velocity and the angle of the surface of the granular system. The friction force is discontinuous at zero velocity and increases monotonically with the square of the velocity. The model explains the main features of the dynamics of avalanches in analytical detail. It also explains the logarithmic decay behavior of the angle of the pile in the presence of vibrations as found experimentally by Jaeger et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 62, 40 (1990)].

Stefan J. Linz and Peter Hänggi

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Enhanced Organic Precursor Removals Using "Aged" Filter Media Page 1 Assessing Innovative Arsenic Adsorbents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adsorbents O b j e c t i v e s According to a 1999 study by the National Academy of Sciences, arsenic Numerous adsorbent materials were tested in this study. Some had previously been evaluated by E. Hadnagy modified iron (SMI), activated alumina (AA), zero-valent iron (ZVI) and goethite. All of the adsorbent

71

Acoustic emission before avalanches in granular media  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Avalanches of granular media are mainly characterized by the observation and the measurement of the main angles of avalanche corresponding first to the movement of isolated beads and to the whole movement of a great part of the grains. These characterisations do not give any information about the rearrangements of the grains inside the layer of granular beads. As any movement of a grain produces a deformation of the structure it is quite normal to expect for a sound that will propagate inside the granular medium. We present an experimental study of the precursors of avalanches on spherical granular glass beads and silica aerogels in powder (size of grains less than 80 micrometers). Acoustic emission has been recorded with two piezoelectric transducers placed on the lower part of the material layer. Our results show clearly that before any movement on the upper part of the beads layer so for an angle less than the first angle of avalanche movements inside the material produce pulsed sounds that can be recorded. Theses vibrating events are occurring more and more when the angle is increasing until the first angle of avalanche where acoustic emission becomes intense.

Vincent Gibiat; Eric Plazza; Pierre De Guibert

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Unified force law for granular impact cratering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, set by the 50 kHz frame rate of the line-scan camera. The position resolution is 100 nm, set by the 3 impact speed; surprisingly, deeper penetration requires less time. Evidently, granular matter is very different from ordinary solids and liquids in its resistance to penetration. We begin the analysis

Loss, Daniel

73

Fatty Change of the Granular Pneumocyte  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the sections were stained with Sudan IV. The granular pneumocyte...vacuoles which stained with Sudan IV. However, the lamellar...manuscript. 23 November 1965 Thermal Stability of Threonine in the...experimental studies on the thermal stability of amino acids in...

Enrique Valdivia; Jayashree Sonnad; James D'Amato

1966-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

74

Iron Absorption  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Iron Absorption Iron Absorption Name: Mary Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I wrote before to Steve and got a answer back. I would like more information. The cirmcustances were that I first had anaemia and then I went for a gastroscopy. The results of which were I had insufficient acid been produced in the stomach. I was told that acid was nessary for the absorbion of iron and it was because of this that I became anaemic. I was told to eat plently of red meat not too many vegetables. Is there any other information you can give me? Replies: It is very difficult to say for sure without seeing you chart and I am not your doctor. But it sounds to me like you are deficient in the vitamin B12. In your stomach you have 3 basic types of cells. One is called chief cells which secrete the precursor of the enzyme pepsin which begins the breakdown of protein. Another is called the parietal cells which secrete your stomach acid and a substance called intrinsic factor. Now-switch to your bone marrow which is where your red blood cells are made. In order for your red blood cells to mature in the bone marrow, vitamin B12 is necessary. B12 can only be obtained from animal food sources such as meat, milk and eggs. Unfortunately, B12 cannot be absorbed in the stomach without intrinsic factor. If there is sufficient B12 present in the diet, it can be stored in the liver. If you aren't eating enough animal sources your B12 will be taken from your liver until you run out. You could also be deficient in intrinsic factor. So while the outcome is anemia (not enough red blood cells) the problem could be from a few different things. Follow your doctor's recommendations and eat more sources of B12

75

Memory effect in uniformly heated granular gases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We evidence a Kovacs-like memory effect in a uniformly driven granular gas. A system of inelastic hard particles, in the low density limit, can reach a non-equilibrium steady state when properly forced. By following a certain protocol for the drive time dependence, we prepare the gas in a state where the granular temperature coincides with its long time value. The temperature subsequently does not remain constant, but exhibits a non-monotonic evolution with either a maximum or a minimum, depending on the dissipation, and on the protocol. We present a theoretical analysis of this memory effect, at Boltzmann-Fokker-Planck equation level, and show that when dissipation exceeds a threshold, the response can be coined anomalous. We find an excellent agreement between the analytical predictions and direct Monte Carlo simulations.

E. Trizac; A. Prados

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

76

Direct computation of the packing entropy of granular materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of granular materials Daniel A. Asenjo-Andrews Summary Granular materials are the second most manipulated material in industry after water and their properties are of great importance for the pharmaceutical, food, mechanosynthesis and semiconductor industries... substance is dispersed in another and may be solid, liquid or gaseous. Granular materials are of particular interest as they are the second most manipulated material in industry after water and can be found in the form of powders in pharmaceutical, food...

Asenjo-Andrews, Daniel

2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

77

Nonlinear elasto-plastic model for dense granular flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work proposes a model for granular deformation that predicts the stress and velocity profiles in well-developed dense granular flows. Recent models for granular elasticity (Jiang and Liu 2003) and rate-sensitive plastic flow (Jop et al. 2006) are reformulated and combined into one universal granular continuum law, capable of predicting flowing regions and stagnant zones simultaneously in any arbitrary 3D flow geometry. The unification is performed by justifying and implementing a Kroner-Lee elasto-plastic decomposition, with care taken to ensure certain continuum physical principles are necessarily upheld. The model is then numerically implemented in multiple geometries and results are compared to experiments and discrete simulations.

Ken Kamrin

2009-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

78

Formation of aerobic granular sludge biofilms for sustainable wastewater treatment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENAC/ Formation of aerobic granular sludge biofilms for sustainable wastewater treatment David G Research, Microbiology of Interfaces, Magdeburg (Germany) EDCE 2011 / From activated sludge flocs

79

Dynamic Behaviors of Supersonic Granular Media under Vertical Vibration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present experimental study of vibrofluidized granular materials by high speed photography. Statistical results present the averaged dynamic behaviors of granular materials in one cycle, including the variations of height, velocity and mechanical energy of the center of mass. Furthermore, time-space distribution of granular temperature which corresponds to the random kinetic energy shows that a temperature peak forms in the compression period and propagates upward with a steepened front. The Mach number in the steepened front is found to be greater than unity, indicating a shock propagating in the supersonic granular media.

Kai Huang; Peng Zhang; Guoqing Miao; Rongjue Wei

2005-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

80

Mutiscale Modeling of Segregation in Granular Flows  

SciTech Connect

Modeling and simulation of segregation phenomena in granular flows are investigated. Computational models at different scales ranging from particle level (microscale) to continuum level (macroscale) are employed in order to determine the important microscale physics relevant to macroscale modeling. The capability of a multi-fluid model to capture segregation caused by density difference is demonstrated by simulating grain-chaff biomass flows in a laboratory-scale air column and in a combine harvester. The multi-fluid model treats gas and solid phases as interpenetrating continua in an Eulerian frame. This model is further improved by incorporating particle rotation using kinetic theory for rapid granular flow of slightly frictional spheres. A simplified model is implemented without changing the current kinetic theory framework by introducing an effective coefficient of restitution to account for additional energy dissipation due to frictional collisions. The accuracy of predicting segregation rate in a gas-fluidized bed is improved by the implementation. This result indicates that particle rotation is important microscopic physics to be incorporated into the hydrodynamic model. Segregation of a large particle in a dense granular bed of small particles under vertical. vibration is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. Wall friction is identified as a necessary condition for the segregation. Large-scale force networks bearing larger-than-average forces are found with the presence of wall friction. The role of force networks in assisting rising of the large particle is analyzed. Single-point force distribution and two-point spatial force correlation are computed. The results show the heterogeneity of forces and a short-range correlation. The short correlation length implies that even dense granular flows may admit local constitutive relations. A modified minimum spanning tree (MST) algorithm is developed to asymptotically recover the force statistics in the force networks. This algorithm provides a possible route to constructing a continuum model with microstructural information supplied from it. Microstructures in gas fluidized beds are also analyzed using a hybrid method, which couples the discrete element method (DEM) for particle dynamics with the averaged two-fluid (TF) equations for the gas phase. Multi-particle contacts are found in defluidized regions away from bubbles in fluidized beds. The multi-particle contacts invalidate the binary-collision assumption made in the kinetic theory of granular flows for the defluidized regions. Large ratios of contact forces to drag forces are found in the same regions, which confirms the relative importance of contact forces in determining particle dynamics in the defluidized regions.

Jin Sun

2007-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granular zero-valent iron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Orchestration of Iron Homeostasis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...act simultaneously, and some are interrelated. Intestinal iron absorption increases with decreased iron stores, increased erythropoietic activity, anemia, or hypoxemia. Conversely, intestinal iron absorption decreases in the presence of inflammation — a process that contributes to the anemia of inflammation... The characterization of newly identified genes has led investigators to challenge previous models of the regulation of iron homeostasis in health and its dysregulation in disease. Drs. Robert Fleming and Bruce Bacon describe hepcidin and iron homeostasis.

Fleming R.E.; Bacon B.R.

2005-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

82

Uptake of Organic Pollutants by Silica-Polycation-Immobilized  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

addition to zero-valent metals) humic materials, oxides, ion- exchange resins (6), iron minerals, activated of pollutants and reduce their concentration in solution by 20-90% was demonstrated. Optimization of SPIM concentration of several herbicides was demonstrated. The partitioning of pollutants into surfactant micelles

Dubin, Paul D.

83

Influences of Amphiphiles on Dechlorination of a Trichlorobenzene by Nanoscale Pd/Fe: Adsorption, Reaction Kinetics, and Interfacial Interactions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Loraine (13) found that TX-100 at concentrations below its critical micelle concentration (CMC) enhanced PCE dechlorination rate but at above CMC exhibited a reversed effect. ... Loraine, G. A. Effects of alcohols, anionic and nonionic surfactants on the reduction of PCE and TCE by zero-valent iron Water Res. ... Loraine, G. A. ...

Bao-Wei Zhu; Teik-Thye Lim; Jing Feng

2008-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

84

Bioremediation of Uranium Plumes with Nano-scale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(IV) (UO2[s], uraninite) Anthropogenic · Release of mill tailings during uranium mining - MobilizationBioremediation of Uranium Plumes with Nano-scale Zero-valent Iron Angela Athey Advisers: Dr. Reyes Undergraduate Student Fellowship Program April 15, 2011 #12;Main Sources of Uranium Natural · Leaching from

Fay, Noah

85

Acetylene Inhibition of Trichloroethene and Vinyl Chloride  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and enhanced anaerobic remediation of chloroethenes at contaminated sites. The results also suggest that acetylene produced abiotically by reactions of chlorinated ethenes with zero-valent iron could inhibit water standard (2 µg/L) (3). A variety of biochemical tools have been used to probe the complexity

Semprini, Lewis

86

INTRODUCTION The granular mechanics of plastics within a single-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INTRODUCTION The granular mechanics of plastics within a single- screw extruder has, for the past are transported forward by the action of the extruder screw, assisted by the differ- ence in frictional forces and feed hopper of a single-screw extruder. The method considers each particle in a granular assem- bly

Thompson, Michael

87

Granular Structure Determined by Terahertz Scattering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Light-scattering in the terahertz region is demonstrated for granular matter. A quantum-cascade laser is used in a benchtop setup to determine the angle-dependent scattering of spherical grains as well as coffee powder and sugar grains. For the interpretation of the form factors for the scattering from single particles one has to go beyond the usual Rayleigh-Gans-Debye theory and apply calculations within Mie theory. In addition to single scattering also collective correlations can be identified and extracted as a static structure factor.

Philip Born; Nick Rothbart; Matthias Sperl; Heinz-Wilhelm Hübers

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

88

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic granular sludge Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sludge Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: anaerobic granular sludge...

89

Granular Matter 4(3) (2002) How good is the equipartition assumption for the transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Granular Matter 4(3) (2002) How good is the equipartition assumption for the transport properties of a granular mixture? Meheboob Alam (1) , Stefan Luding (1;2) ? Abstract Kinetic-theory, with the assumption of equipar- tition of granular energy, suggests that the pressure and viscosity of a granular mixture vary

Luding, Stefan

90

Characterization of clusters in rapid granular flows  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The clustering phenomenon within two-dimensional, rapid granular, simple shear flows is investigated. Two characterizations are developed and implemented for monodisperse systems, revealing physically meaningful insight. First, a new feature of the radial distribution function is identified for these dissipative granular systems, which is not present in molecular (nondissipative) systems. Namely, a long-scale minimum occurs at a distance representing the average distance between the center of a cluster and the center of a dilute region. Results indicate that center-to-center distances are least (i.e., clusters are most tightly packed) for systems of moderate particle concentrations and low restitution coefficients. In addition, concentration and temperature measurements of clustered and dilute regions are also obtained using a Gaussian filter that is based on this center-to-center distance and, thus, provides a means of appropriately defining local concentrations. These results confirm previous findings that cluster prevalence increases with decreasing dissipation and that clustered regions have lower temperatures than their dilute counterparts. Surprisingly, however, the results indicate that cluster prevalence, defined by normalized concentration differences between the two regions, decrease monotonically with an increase in overall particle concentration.

R. Brent Rice and Christine M. Hrenya

2009-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

91

Imaging of granular sources in high energy heavy ion collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the source imaging for a granular pion-emitting source model in high energy heavy ion collisions. The two-pion source functions of the granular sources exhibit a two-tiered structure. Using a parametrized formula of granular two-pion source function, we examine the two-tiered structure of the source functions for the imaging data of Au+Au collisions at Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) and Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). We find that the imaging technique introduced by Brown and Danielewicz is suitable for probing the granular structure of the sources. Our data-fitting results indicate that there is not visible granularity for the sources at AGS energies. However, the data for the RHIC collisions with the selections of $40 < {\\rm centrality} < 90%$ and $0.20granular emission than that of one Gaussian. The model with granular source has more parameters than the simple Gaussian, hence can describe more complicated shapes.

Zhi-Tao Yang; Wei-Ning Zhang; Lei Huo; Jing-Bo Zhang

2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

92

Unjamming Granular Materials: “Such Sweet Jams Meticulously Jarred”  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dry granular matter with infinite tangential friction is modelled as a graph of grains linked by purely repulsive contacts. Its stability (jamming) is insured by odd circuits that prevent the grains from rolling on each other. A topological dynamical matrix is associated with the graph; it has a spectrum of low?energy excitations characteristic of dry disordered granular matter. In the limit of large stiffness?to load ratio dry granular matter has two possible dynamical states dry fluid and jammed rigid but fragile solid.

Nicolas Rivier; Arnaud Hemmerlé

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Resilient modulus and permanent deformation testing of unbound granular materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerous research efforts have been devoted to characterizing the behavior of granular materials, which is one of the main concerns of pavement engineers. For better understanding of this behavior, laboratory tests where in-situ stress conditions...

Kancherla, Anuroopa

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

A Theory of Granular Partitions Thomas Bittner and Barry Smith  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHAPTER 7 A Theory of Granular Partitions Thomas Bittner and Barry Smith Institute for Formal of part and whole relations (Smith, 1998) as a framework for ontological theorizing. Mereology is better

Bittner, Thomas

95

A lattice gas model of avalanches in a granular pile  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A granular media lattice gas (GMLG) model is used to study avalanches in a two-dimensional granular pile. We demonstrate the efficiency of the algorithm by showing that several features of the non-critical behaviour of real sandpile surfaces, such as the bounded outflow statistics or the finite-size effect of the time evolution of the pile mass, can be reproduced by this simulation approach.

Antal Karolyi; Janos Kertesz

1997-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

96

Accelerated drop detachment in granular suspensions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We experimentally study the detachment of drops of granular suspensions using a density matched model suspension with varying volume fraction ({\\phi} = 15% to 55%) and grain diameter (d = 20 {\\mu}m to 140 {\\mu}m). We show that at the beginning of the detachment process, the suspensions behave as an effective fluid. The detachment dynamics in this regime can be entirely described by the shear viscosity of the suspension. At later stages of the detachment the dynamics become independent of the volume fraction and are found to be identical to the dynamics of the interstitial fluid. Surprisingly, visual observation reveals that at this stage particles are still present in the neck. We suspect rearrangements of particles to locally free the neck of grains, causing the observed dynamics. Close to the final pinch off, the detachment of the suspensions is further accelerated, compared to the dynamics of pure interstitial fluid. This acceleration might be due to the fact that the neck diameter gets of the order of magnitude of the size of the grains and a continuous thinning of the liquid thread is not possible any more. The crossover between the different detachment regimes is function of the grain size and the initial volume fraction. We characterize the overall acceleration as a function of the grain size and volume fraction.

Claire Bonnoit; Thibault Bertrand; Éric Clément; Anke Lindner

2010-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

97

Degradation and Fate of Carbon Tetrachloride in Unadapted Methanogenic Granular Sludge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Tetrachloride in Unadapted Methanogenic Granular Sludge Miriam H. A. Van Eekert Thomas J. Schroder Alfons...algemeen.mt.wau.nl. The potential of granular sludge from upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors for bioremediation of...

Miriam H. A. Van Eekert; Thomas J. Schröder; Alfons J. M. Stams; Gosse Schraa; Jim A. Field

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Location and chemical composition of microbially induced phosphorus precipitates in anaerobic and aerobic granular sludge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and aerobic granular sludge A. Mañasa,b,c,e , M. Spérandioa,b,c , F. Deckerd and B. Biscanse aINSA, UPS, INP X-ray analysis (SEM-EDX) applied to granular sludge used for biological treatment of high sludge blanket (UASB) reactors and two aerobic granular sequenced batch reactors (GSBR) were evaluated

Boyer, Edmond

99

Acoustic Probing of the Jamming Transition in an Unconsolidated Granular X. Jacob, V. Aleshin, V. Tournat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Acoustic Probing of the Jamming Transition in an Unconsolidated Granular Medium X. Jacob, V the mechanically free surface of an unconsolidated granular packed structure provide information on the elasticity in unconsolidated granular media is supported by its macroscopic manifestation in nature in the form of avalanches

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

100

Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot Granular  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot Granular Salt Consolidation, Constitutive Model and Micromechanics Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot Granular Salt Consolidation, Constitutive Model and Micromechanics The report addresses granular salt reconsolidation from three vantage points: laboratory testing, modeling, and petrofabrics. The experimental data 1) provide greater insight and understanding into the role of elevated temperature and pressure regimes on physical properties of reconsolidated crushed salt, 2) can supplement an existing database used to develop a reconsolidation constitutive model and 3) provide data for model evaluation. The constitutive model accounts for the effects of moisture through pressure solution and dislocation creep, with both terms dependent

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granular zero-valent iron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot Granular  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot Granular Salt Consolidation, Constitutive Model and Micromechanics Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot Granular Salt Consolidation, Constitutive Model and Micromechanics The report addresses granular salt reconsolidation from three vantage points: laboratory testing, modeling, and petrofabrics. The experimental data 1) provide greater insight and understanding into the role of elevated temperature and pressure regimes on physical properties of reconsolidated crushed salt, 2) can supplement an existing database used to develop a reconsolidation constitutive model and 3) provide data for model evaluation. The constitutive model accounts for the effects of moisture through pressure solution and dislocation creep, with both terms dependent

102

Runaway electrification of friable self-replicating granular matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We establish that the nonlinear dynamics of collisions between particles favors the charging of a insulating, friable, self-replicating granular material that undergoes nucleation, growth, and fission processes; we demonstrate with a minimal dynamical model that secondary nucleation produces a positive feedback in an electrification mechanism that leads to runaway charging. We discuss ice as an example of such a self-replicating granular material: We confirm with laboratory experiments in which we grow ice from the vapor phase in situ within an environmental scanning electron microscope that charging causes fast-growing and easily breakable palm-like structures to form, which when broken off may form secondary nuclei. We propose that thunderstorms, both terrestrial and on other planets, and lightning in the solar nebula are instances of such runaway charging arising from this nonlinear dynamics in self-replicating granular matter.

Cartwright, Julyan H E; Grothe, Hinrich; Piro, Oreste; Díaz, C Ignacio Sainz; Tuval, Idan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Runaway electrification of friable self-replicating granular matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We establish that the nonlinear dynamics of collisions between particles favors the charging of a insulating, friable, self-replicating granular material that undergoes nucleation, growth, and fission processes; we demonstrate with a minimal dynamical model that secondary nucleation produces a positive feedback in an electrification mechanism that leads to runaway charging. We discuss ice as an example of such a self-replicating granular material: We confirm with laboratory experiments in which we grow ice from the vapor phase in situ within an environmental scanning electron microscope that charging causes fast-growing and easily breakable palm-like structures to form, which when broken off may form secondary nuclei. We propose that thunderstorms, both terrestrial and on other planets, and lightning in the solar nebula are instances of such runaway charging arising from this nonlinear dynamics in self-replicating granular matter.

Julyan H. E. Cartwright; Bruno Escribano; Hinrich Grothe; Oreste Piro; C. Ignacio Sainz Díaz; Idan Tuval

2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

104

Friction vs Texture at the Approach of a Granular Avalanche  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We perform a novel analysis of the granular texture of a granular bed close to stability limit. Our analysis is based on a unique criterion of friction mobilisation in a simulated two-dimensional packing. In this way, we recover the bimodal character of granular texture, and the coexistence of weak and strong phases in the sense of distinct contacts populations. Moreover, we show the existence of a well-defined subset of contacts within the weak contact network. These contacts are characterized by their important friction, and form a highly coherent population in terms of fabric. They play an antagonistic role with respect to force chains. We are thus able to discriminate between incoherent contacts and coherent contacts in the weak phase, and to specify the role that the latter plays in the destabilisation process.

Lydie Staron; Farhang Radjai

2005-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

105

Inhomogeneous Cooling of the Rough Granular Gas in Two Dimensions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the inhomogeneous clustered regime of a freely cooling granular gas of rough particles in two dimensions using large-scale event driven simulations and scaling arguments. During collisions, rough particles dissipate energy in both the normal and tangential directions of collision. In the inhomogeneous regime, translational kinetic energy and the rotational energy decay with time $t$ as power-laws $t^{-\\theta_T}$ and $t^{-\\theta_R}$. We numerically determine $\\theta_T \\approx 1$ and $\\theta_R \\approx 1.6$, independent of the coefficients of restitution. The inhomogeneous regime of the granular gas has been argued to be describable by the ballistic aggregation problem, where particles coalesce on contact. Using scaling arguments, we predict $\\theta_T=1$ and $\\theta_R=1$ for ballistic aggregation, $\\theta_R$ being different from that obtained for the rough granular gas. Simulations of ballistic aggregation with rotational degrees of freedom are consistent with these exponents.

Sudhir N. Pathak; Dibyendu Das; R. Rajesh

2014-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

106

Power-law friction in closely-packed granular materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to understand the nature of friction in closely-packed granular materials, a discrete element simulation on granular layers subjected to isobaric plain shear is performed. It is found that the friction coefficient increases as the power of the shear rate, the exponent of which does not depend on the material constants. Using a nondimensional parameter that is known as the inertial number, the power-law can be cast in a generalized form so that the friction coefficients at different confining pressures collapse on the same curve. We show that the volume fraction also obeys a power-law.

Takahiro Hatano

2006-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

107

The Rusting of Iron  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... glass tubes instead of flasks, and the surface of the metal was in some cases roughened with a coarse file. After the admission of the iron, the tubes were drawn ...

J. NEWTON FRIEND

1906-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

108

Evaluation of fine-granular GPS tracking on smartphones  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Smartphones with their GPS capabilities allow tracking in numerous scenarios at low costs. Whereas most scenarios need only coarse tracking, real-time tracking of competitors in sport events require fine-granular localization with high refresh frequencies. ... Keywords: GPS performance, evaluation, mobile localization and tracking, smartphone application for GIS

Basil Hess; Armin Zamani Farahani; Fabian Tschirschnitz; Felix von Reischach

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Iron Pots and Kettles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Iron Pots and Kettles Iron Pots and Kettles Nature Bulletin No. 544-A November 16, 1974 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation IRON POTS AND KETTLES At Possum Trot Hill, on US 150 west of Danville, a huge iron kettle squats as a monument to what was once an important industry in Illinois. It is one of 80 used from 1824 to 1831 for boiling down brine from salt springs in that vicinity. Salt was a luxury then. About a bushel was produced from one kettleful (100 gallons) of brine and that was worth more than 100 bushels of oats. Those 80 monsters came from Kentucky where iron works had been established to make the utensils and implements desperately needed by pioneer families. About half of them had come up through the Cumberland Gap, on horseback, with only a rifle, an ax, a pot for cooking, some bedding and the clothes on their backs. Every family, in addition to a skillet or spider, and a Dutch oven, coveted a big kettle for making salt, soap, candles and maple syrup, butchering hogs, rendering lard, boiling clothes on wash day, and dyeing homespun material for garments.

110

It's Elemental - The Element Iron  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Manganese Manganese Previous Element (Manganese) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Cobalt) Cobalt The Element Iron [Click for Isotope Data] 26 Fe Iron 55.845 Atomic Number: 26 Atomic Weight: 55.845 Melting Point: 1811 K (1538°C or 2800°F) Boiling Point: 3134 K (2861°C or 5182°F) Density: 7.874 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 4 Group Number: 8 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the Anglo-Saxon word iron. Iron's chemical symbol comes from the Latin word for iron, ferrum. Say what? Iron is pronounced as EYE-ern. History and Uses: Archaeological evidence suggests that people have been using iron for at least 5000 years. Iron is the cheapest and one of the most abundant of all metals, comprising nearly 5.6% of the earth's crust and nearly all of the

111

Granular impact cratering by liquid drops: Understanding raindrop imprints through an analogy of asteroid strikes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When a granular material is impacted by a sphere, its surface deforms like a liquid yet it preserves a circular crater like a solid. Although the mechanism of granular impact cratering by solid spheres is well understood, our knowledge on granular impact cratering by liquid drops is still very limited. Using high-speed photography, we investigate liquid-drop impact dynamics on granular media. Surprisingly, we find that granular impact cratering by liquid drops follows the same energy scaling as that of asteroid impact cratering. Inspired by this similarity, we develop a simple model that quantitatively describes the observed crater morphologies. Our study sheds light on the mechanisms governing raindrop impacts on granular surfaces and reveals an interesting analogy between familiar phenomena of raining and catastrophic asteroid strikes.

Runchen Zhao; Qianyun Zhang; Hendro Tjugito; Xiang Cheng

2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

112

A deductive statistical mechanics approach for granular matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce a deductive statistical mechanics approach for granular materials which is formally built from few realistic physical assumptions. The main finding is an universal behavior for the distribution of the density fluctuations. Such a distribution is the equivalent of the Maxwell-Boltzmann's distribution in the kinetic theory of gasses. The comparison with a very extensive set of experimental and simulation data for packings of monosized spherical grains, reveals a remarkably good quantitative agreement with the theoretical predictions for the density fluctuations both at the grain level and at the global system level. Such agreement is robust over a broad range of packing fractions and it is observed in several distinct systems prepared by using different methods. The equilibrium distributions are characterized by only one parameter ($k$) which is a quantity very sensitive to changes in the structural organization. The thermodynamical equivalent of $k$ and its relation with the `granular temperature' are also discussed.

T. Aste; T. Di Matteo

2007-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

113

Friction and the oscillatory motion of granular flows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This contribution reports on numerical simulations of 2D granular flows on erodible beds. The broad aim is to investigate whether simple flows of model granular matter exhibits spontaneous oscillatory motion in generic flow conditions, and in this case, whether the frictional properties of the contacts between grains may affect the existence or the characteristics of this oscillatory motion. The analysis of different series of simulations show that the flow develops an oscillatory motion with a well-defined frequency which increases like the inverse of the velocity's square root. We show that the oscillation is essentially a surface phenomena. The amplitude of the oscillation is higher for lower volume fractions, and can thus be related to the flow velocity and grains friction properties. The study of the influence of the periodic geometry of the simulation cell shows no significant effect. These results are discussed in relation to sonic sands.

Lydie Staron

2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

114

Instabilities in granular binary mixtures at moderate densities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A linear stability analysis of the Navier-Stokes (NS) granular hydrodynamic equations is performed to determine the critical length scale for the onset of vortices and clusters instabilities in granular dense binary mixtures. In contrast to previous attempts, our results (which are based on the solution to the inelastic Enskog equation to NS order) are not restricted to nearly elastic systems since they take into account the complete nonlinear dependence of the NS transport coefficients on the coefficients of restitution ?ij. The theoretical predictions for the critical length scales are compared to molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in flows of strong dissipation (?ij?0.7) and moderate solid volume fractions (??0.2). We find excellent agreement between MD and kinetic theory for the onset of velocity vortices, indicating the applicability of NS hydrodynamics to polydisperse flows even for strong inelasticity, finite density, and particle dissimilarity.

Peter P. Mitrano; Vicente Garzó; Christine M. Hrenya

2014-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

115

Kovacs-like memory effect in driven granular gases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While memory effects have been reported for dense enough disordered systems such as glasses, we show here by a combination of analytical and simulation techniques that they are also intrinsic to the dynamics of dilute granular gases. By means of a certain driving protocol, we prepare the gas in a state where the granular temperature $T$ coincides with its long time limit. However, $T$ does not subsequently remain constant, but exhibits a non-monotonic evolution before reaching its non-equilibrium steady value. The corresponding so-called Kovacs hump displays a normal behavior for weak dissipation (as observed in molecular systems), but is reversed under strong dissipation, where it thus becomes anomalous.

A. Prados; E. Trizac

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

116

Microsoft Word - S03840_MNT ZVI Treat Cells_Feb08.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells January 2008 DOE LM/1560 2008 - - ESL RPT 2008-01 - - Work Performed nder DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. by the S.M. Stoller Corporation u DE AC01 02GJ79491 - - Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Environmental Sciences Laboratory Environmental Sciences Laboratory Environmental Sciences Laboratory Environmental Sciences Laboratory Environmental Sciences Laboratory This page intentionally left blank DOE-LM/1560-2007 ESL-RPT-2008-01 Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells

117

Microsoft Word - S02808.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Sciences Laboratory Sciences Laboratory Environmental Sciences Laboratory Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction, Colorado Third (March 2006) Coring and Analysis of Zero-Valent Iron Permeable Reactive Barrier, Monticello, Utah November 2006 DOE-LM/1379-2006 ESL-RPT-2006-03 Work Performed nder DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. by the S.M. Stoller Corporation u DE AC01 02GJ79491 - - Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This page intentionally left blank DOE-LM/1379-2006 ESL-RPT-2006-03 Third (March 2006) Coring and Analysis of Zero-Valent Iron Permeable Reactive Barrier, Monticello, Utah November 2006 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491

118

Microsoft Word - S02808.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sciences Laboratory Sciences Laboratory Environmental Sciences Laboratory Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction, Colorado Third (March 2006) Coring and Analysis of Zero-Valent Iron Permeable Reactive Barrier, Monticello, Utah November 2006 DOE-LM/1379-2006 ESL-RPT-2006-03 Work Performed nder DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. by the S.M. Stoller Corporation u DE AC01 02GJ79491 - - Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This page intentionally left blank DOE-LM/1379-2006 ESL-RPT-2006-03 Third (March 2006) Coring and Analysis of Zero-Valent Iron Permeable Reactive Barrier, Monticello, Utah November 2006 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491

119

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

71 - 22380 of 26,764 results. 71 - 22380 of 26,764 results. Download Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells http://energy.gov/lm/downloads/ground-water-table-and-chemical-changes-alluvial-aquifer-during Download DOE-STD-3006-2000 Planning and Conduct of Operational Readiness Reviews Replaced by DOE-STD-3006-2010 | Superseding DOE-STD-3006-95 (November 1995) DOE O 425.1B specifies the conditions and circumstances when an Operational Readiness Review (ORR) or a Readiness Assessment (RA) is required as part of a new start or restart process. This standard provides guidance on the

120

Construction Summary and As-Built Report for Ground Water Treatment System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Construction Summary and As-Built Report for Ground Water Treatment Construction Summary and As-Built Report for Ground Water Treatment System Monticello, Utah, Permeable Reactive Barrier Site Construction Summary and As-Built Report for Ground Water Treatment System Monticello, Utah, Permeable Reactive Barrier Site Construction Summary and As-Built Report for Ground Water Treatment System Monticello, Utah, Permeable Reactive Barrier Site Construction Summary and As-Built Report for Ground Water Treatment System Monticello, Utah, Permeable Reactive Barrier Site More Documents & Publications Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells: Monticello, Utah, November 2005 Through February 2008 Third (March 2006) Coring and Analysis of Zero-Valent Iron Permeable Reactive Barrier, Monticello, Utah Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granular zero-valent iron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Granular chain between asymmetric boundaries and the quasiequilibrium state  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Some 30 years have passed since we learned that any velocity perturbation develops into a propagating solitary wave in a granular chain, and over a decade has passed since we learned that these solitary waves break and reform upon collision, leaving behind small secondary solitary waves. The production of the latter eventually precipitates the quasiequilibrium state characterized by large energy fluctuations in dissipation-free granular systems. Here we present dynamical simulations on the effects of soft boundaries on solitary wave interaction in granular chains held between fixed walls. We show that at short time scales, a gradient in the distribution of kinetic energy between the boundaries is indeed sustained. At long times, however, such a gradient gets obliterated and there is no measurable difference between the average kinetic energies of the particles adjacent to walls. Our findings suggest that (i) the quasiequilibrium state can effectively erase small gradients of the average kinetic energies of the particles adjacent to walls in a system, (ii) Boltzmann distribution of grain speeds is realized in the system of interest, and (iii) time and space averages yield the same result, thus suggesting that the system is ergodic.

Edgar Ávalos and Surajit Sen

2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

122

Moving granular-bed filter development program. Topical report  

SciTech Connect

Advanced, coal-based, power plants, such as IGCC and Advanced-PFBC, are currently nearing commercial demonstration. These power plant technologies require hot gas filtration as part of their gas cleaning trains. Ceramic barrier filters are the major filter candidates being developed for these hot gas cleaning applications. While ceramic barrier filters achieve high levels of particle removal, concerns exist for their reliability and operability in these applications. An alternative hot gas filtration technology is the moving granular bed filter. An advanced, moving granular bed filter has been conceived, and early development activities performed by the Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Science and Technology Center. This document reports on the Base Contract tasks performed to resolve the barrier technical issues for this technology. The concept, the Standleg Moving Granular Bed Filter (SMGBF) has a concurrent downward, gas and bed media flow configuration that results in simplified features and improved scaleup feasibility compared to alternative designs. Two modes of bed media operation were assessed in the program: once-through using pelletized power plant waste as bed media, and recycle of bed media via standleg and pneumatic transport techniques. Cold Model testing; high-temperature, high-pressure testing; and pelletization testing using advanced power plant wastes, have been conducted in the program. A commercial, economic assessment of the SMGBF technology was performed for IGCC and Advanced-PFBC applications. The evaluation shows that the barrier technical issues can be resolved, and that the technology is potentially competitive with ceramic barrier filters.

Newby, R.A.; Yang, W.C.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Lippert, T.E.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

E-Print Network 3.0 - alternative granular media Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brett Long1 Summary: on these laboratory testing results. A media composed of expanded shale, granular activated carbon, and sphagnum peat... . In Phase I of this research,...

124

IGNITION PROCESSES AND FLAME SPREADING IN A GRANULAR SOLID PROPELLANT BED.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Understanding the detailed ignition, flame spreading, and combustion processes inside of a granular solid propellant bed is vital for accurate internal ballistic modeling and development… (more)

Colletti, Alexander

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

E-Print Network 3.0 - au-zro2 granular films Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

15 FEBRUARY 1999 Morphology of Quench Condensed Pb Films near the Insulator to Metal Transition Summary: substrates TS 4 K -- the so-called granular quench condensed (QC)...

126

Availability of iron from iron-storage proteins to marine phytoplankton  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Genes coding for iron-storage proteins are common in DNA samples from seawater. In iron-deprived marine ecosystems, iron-storage proteins may be important ...

127

A rheometer for measuring the material moduli for granular solids. Quarterly progress report, March 1, 1993--May 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the design of an orthogonal rheometer for the measuring of properties of granular materials such as coal. A section is presented on constitutive modeling of granular materials based on continuum theory.

Rajagopal, K.R.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Magnetism of iron. II  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A previously developed theory of the magnetism of iron, based upon the notion of a randomized exchange field, is modified and extended. It is shown that Coulomb fields arise in association with the randomized exchange field; the modification allows one to take into account these fields, which are found to change the details of the previous results without affecting the main conclusions. The theory has been extended to calculate the properties of the model at finite temperatures: the Curie temperature (1840 K), the magnetization curve, the paramagnetic susceptibility (a Curie-Weiss law), and the effective interatomic exchange coupling are calculated for iron. The magnitudes of the atomic spin moments were found to vary little up to 1.5 times the Curie temperature.

J. Hubbard

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

The magnetism of iron  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A type of theory capable of reconciling the localized- and itinerant-electron models of a ferromagnetic metal is discussed. This kind of theory contemplates a distribution of "exchange field" configurations which correspond very roughly to the spin configurations of the localized model. Computations involve thermal averages over these configurations, each configuration V having an effective energy E(V). Starting from the band structure for ferromagnetic iron, the E(V) have been estimated for certain configurations V. The results are reasonably consistent with the observed Curie temperature of iron, in spite of the presence of exchange fields ?1-2 eV, and give some suggestion of behavior characteristic of the Heisenberg model.

J. Hubbard

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Neurogranular Synthesis: Granular Synthesis Controlled by a Pulse-coupled Network of Spiking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Neurogranular Synthesis: Granular Synthesis Controlled by a Pulse-coupled Network of Spiking synthesis'. The artificial network can exhibit a wide variety of behaviour from loosely correlated to highly. Keywords: Spiking neurons, granular synthesis, interactive musical control systems. 1 Introduction A recent

Miranda, Eduardo Reck

131

Towards the zero-surface-tension limit in granular fingering instability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LETTERS Towards the zero-surface-tension limit in granular fingering instability XIANG CHENG*, LEI Hele­Shaw system to explore the zero-surface-tension property of granular `fluids'16 . We demonstrate-unrealizable singular hydrodynamics predicted in the zero-surface-tension limit of normal fluid fingering2,17­23 . Above

Loss, Daniel

132

Granular impact cratering by liquid drops: Understanding raindrop imprints through an analogy to asteroid strikes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When a granular material is impacted by a sphere, its surface deforms like a liquid yet it preserves a circular crater like a solid. Although the mechanism of granular impact cratering by solid spheres is well explored, our knowledge on granular impact cratering by liquid drops is still very limited. Here, by combining high-speed photography with high-precision laser profilometry, we investigate liquid-drop impact dynamics on granular surface and monitor the morphology of resulting impact craters. Surprisingly, we find that, despite the enormous energy and length difference, granular impact cratering by liquid drops follows the same energy scaling and reproduces the same crater morphology as that of asteroid impact craters. Inspired by this similarity, we integrate the physical insight from planetary sciences, the liquid marble model from fluid mechanics and the concept of jamming transition from granular physics into a simple theoretical framework that quantitatively describes all the main features of liquid-drop imprints in granular media. Our study sheds light on the mechanisms governing raindrop impacts on granular surfaces and reveals a remarkable analogy between familiar phenomena of raining and catastrophic asteroid strikes.

Runchen Zhao; Qianyun Zhang; Hendro Tjugito; Xiang Cheng

2014-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

133

Identification of Avalanche Precursors by Acoustic Probing in the Bulk of Tilted Granular Layers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Identification of Avalanche Precursors by Acoustic Probing in the Bulk of Tilted Granular Layers M simultaneously caracterize precursors on the free surface with an optical method and in the bulk with acoustic to probe rearrangements in the bulk of the granular material. A linear method can also be used provided

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

134

STCIM: a dynamic granularity oriented and stability based component identification method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Among recent developments in the field of software reuse has been the increasing reuse of coarse-grained components, and it has been proved that granularity has great impact on component's reuse performance. However, previous studies have ignored rigorous ... Keywords: business component, component identification, dynamic granularity, feature modeling, stability

Zhong-Jie Wang; De-Chen Zhan; Xiao-Fei Xu

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Friction of a slider on a granular layer: Nonmonotonic thickness dependence and effect of boundary conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Friction of a slider on a granular layer: Nonmonotonic thickness dependence and effect of boundary the effective friction encountered by a mass sliding on a granular layer as a function of bed thickness and boundary roughness conditions. The observed friction has minima for a small number of layers before

Kudrolli, Arshad

136

Granularity as an Optimal Approach to Uncertainty A General Mathematical Idea With Applications to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Mathematical Sciences New Mexico State University Las Cruces, NM 88003, USA email hunguyen@nmsu.edu Abstract viewpoint, granularity is a crude approximation. From the viewpoint of traditional prob- abilistic or fuzzy approach, this granular description is a crude approximate description of the continuous un- certainty. One

Kreinovich, Vladik

137

Granularity as an Optimal Approach to Uncertainty --A General Mathematical Idea With Applications to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Mathematical Sciences New Mexico State University Las Cruces, NM 88003, USA email hunguyen@nmsu.edu Abstract the traditional viewpoint, granularity is a crude approximation. From the viewpoint of traditional prob­ abilistic or fuzzy approach, this granular description is a crude approximate description of the continuous un

Kreinovich, Vladik

138

Microbial reduction of iron ore  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is provided for reducing iron ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of iron ore, microorganisms operable for reducing the ferric iron of the iron ore to ferrous iron, and a substrate operable as an energy source for the microbial reduction; and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the reduction of the ore. Preferably the microorganism is Pseudomonas sp. 200 and the reduction conducted anaerobically with a domestic wastewater as the substrate. An aqueous solution containing soluble ferrous iron can be separated from the reacted mixture, treated with a base to precipitate ferrous hydroxide which can then be recovered as a concentrated slurry.

Hoffmann, Michael R. (Pasadena, CA); Arnold, Robert G. (Pasadena, CA); Stephanopoulos, Gregory (Pasadena, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Microbial reduction of iron ore  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is provided for reducing iron ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of iron ore, microorganisms operable for reducing the ferric iron of the iron ore to ferrous iron, and a substrate operable as an energy source for the microbial reduction; and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the reduction of the ore. Preferably the microorganism is Pseudomonas sp. 200 and the reduction conducted anaerobically with a domestic wastewater as the substrate. An aqueous solution containing soluble ferrous iron can be separated from the reacted mixture, treated with a base to precipitate ferrous hydroxide which can then be recovered as a concentrated slurry. 11 figs.

Hoffmann, M.R.; Arnold, R.G.; Stephanopoulos, G.

1989-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

140

MECS 2006- Iron and Steel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Iron and Steel Sector (NAICS 3311, 3312) with Total Energy Input, October 2012 (MECS 2006)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granular zero-valent iron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Iron and Steel (2010 MECS)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Iron and Steel Sector (NAICS 3311, 3312) Energy use data source: 2010 EIA MECS (with adjustments) Footprint Last Revised: February 2014

142

Lack of energy equipartition in homogeneous heated binary granular mixtures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the problem of determining the granular temperatures of the components of a homogeneous binary heated mixture of inelastic hard spheres, in the framework of Enskog kinetic theory. Equations are derived for the temperatures of each species and their ratio, which is different from unity, as may be expected since the system is out of equilibrium. We focus on the particular heating mechanism where the inelastic energy loss is compensated by an injection through a random external force (``stochastic thermostat''). The influence of various parameters and their possible experimental relevance is discussed.

A. Barrat; E. Trizac

2002-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

143

Dynamical mechanism for non-locality in dense granular flows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dynamical mechanism at the origin of the non-local rheology of dense granular flows is investigated trough discrete element simulations. We show that the influence of a shear band on the mechanical behavior of a distant zone is contained in the spatial variations observed in the network of granular contacts. Using a micro-rheology technique, we establish that the exponential responses hence obtained, do not proof the validity of a mechanical activation process as previously suggested, but stem from the spatial relaxation of the shear rate as a direct consequence of a macroscopic non-local constitutive relation. Finally, by direct visualization of the local relaxation processes, we dismiss the kinetic elasto-plastic picture, where a flow is conceived as a quasi-static sequence of localized plastic events interacting through the stress field. We therefore conclude in favor of the jamming scenario, where geometrical constrains lead to coherent non-affine displacements along floppy modes, inherently non-local.

M. Bouzid; M. Trulsson; P. Claudin; E. Clement; B. Andreotti

2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

144

Transcriptional and translational regulatory responses to iron...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Candidatus Pelagibacter ubique cultures to iron limitation in natural seawater media supplemented with a siderophore to chelate iron. MethodologyPrincipal Findings:...

145

Kumba Iron Ore | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kumba Iron Ore Jump to: navigation, search Name: Kumba Iron Ore Place: Pretoria, South Africa Zip: 175 Sector: Solar Product: South Africa based mining company. The firm is...

146

Gas-Mediated Impact Dynamics in Fine-Grained Granular Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-cohesive granular media exhibit complex responses to sudden impact that often differ from those of ordinary solids and liquids. We investigate how this response is mediated by the presence of interstitial gas between the grains. Using high-speed x-ray radiography we track the motion of a steel sphere through the interior of a bed of fine, loose granular material. We find a crossover from nearly incompressible, fluid-like behavior at atmospheric pressure to a highly compressible, dissipative response once most of the gas is evacuated. We discuss these results in light of recent proposals for the drag force in granular media.

John R. Royer; Eric I. Corwin; Peter J. Eng; Heinrich M. Jaeger

2007-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

147

Dense Granular Flows Sebastian Chialvo and Sankaran Sundaresan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Refinement and Refinement of a Comprehensive Model for Dense Granular Flows Sebastian Chialvo and Sankaran Sundaresan Princeton University This work is supported by DOE-UCR grant DE-FE0006932. Logo The NETL logotype illustrated on this page is the institutional signature for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory-NETL. Its function is to be the graphic identi cation for that organization. The relationship among the elements of this logo is essential to preserve this identity. The speci cations included on these pages will assist in the proper display of this logo and should be fol- lowed exactly. Questions concerning this logo and its application may be addressed to the NETL O ce of Public A airs Coordination, Contact.PublicA airs@NETL.DOE.GOV.

148

Heating mechanism affects equipartition in a binary granular system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two species of particles in a binary granular system typically do not have the same mean kinetic energy, in contrast to the equipartition of energy required in equilibrium. We investigate the role of the heating mechanism in determining the extent of this non-equipartition of kinetic energy. In most experiments, different species of particle are unequally heated at the boundaries. We show by event-driven simulations that this differential heating at the boundary influences the level of non-equipartition even in the bulk of the system. This conclusion is fortified by studying a numerical model and a solvable stochastic model without spatial degrees of freedom. In both cases, even in the limit where heating events are rare compared to collisions, the effect of the heating mechanism persists.

Hong-Qiang Wang; Narayanan Menon

2007-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

149

Penetration depth scaling for impact into wet granular packings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present experimental measurements of penetration depths for the impact of spheres into wetted granular media. We observe that the penetration depth in the liquid saturated case scales with projectile density, size, and drop height in a fashion consistent with the scaling observed in the dry case, but that penetration depths into saturated packings tend to be smaller. This result suggests that, for the range of impact energies observed, the stopping force is set by static contact forces between grains within the bed, and that the presence of liquid serves, primarily, to enhance these contact forces. The enhancement to the stopping force has a complicated dependence on liquid fraction, accompanied by a change in the drop-height dependence, that must be the consequence of accompanying changes in the conformation of the liquid phase in the interstices.

Theodore A. Brzinski III; Jorin Schug; Kelly Mao; Douglas J. Durian

2015-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

150

Granular Gases of Rod-Shaped Grains in Microgravity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Granular gases are convenient model systems to investigate the statistical physics of nonequilibrium systems. In the literature, one finds numerous theoretical predictions, but only few experiments. We study a weakly excited dilute gas of rods, confined in a cuboid container in microgravity during a suborbital rocket flight. With respect to a gas of spherical grains at comparable filling fraction, the mean free path is considerably reduced. This guarantees a dominance of grain-grain collisions over grain-wall collisions. No clustering was observed, unlike in similar experiments with spherical grains. Rod positions and orientations were determined and tracked. Translational and rotational velocity distributions are non-Gaussian. Equipartition of kinetic energy between translations and rotations is violated.

K. Harth; U. Kornek; T. Trittel; U. Strachauer; S. Höme; K. Will; R. Stannarius

2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

151

Enskog theory for polydisperse granular mixtures. II. Sonine polynomial approximation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The linear integral equations defining the Navier-Stokes (NS) transport coefficients for polydisperse granular mixtures of smooth inelastic hard disks or spheres are solved by using the leading terms in a Sonine polynomial expansion. Explicit expressions for all the NS transport coefficients are given in terms of the sizes, masses, compositions, density, and restitution coefficients. In addition, the cooling rate is also evaluated to first order in the gradients. The results hold for arbitrary degree of inelasticity and are not limited to specific values of the parameters of the mixture. Finally, a detailed comparison between the derivation of the current theory and previous theories for mixtures is made, with attention paid to the implication of the various treatments employed to date.

Vicente Garzó; Christine M. Hrenya; James W. Dufty

2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

152

Method for reducing iron losses in an iron smelting process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of smelting iron that comprises the steps of: a) introducing a source of iron oxide, oxygen, nitrogen, and a source of carbonaceous fuel to a smelting reactor, at least some of said oxygen being continuously introduced through an overhead lance; b) maintaining conditions in said reactor to cause (i) at least some of the iron oxide to be chemically reduced, (ii) a bath of molten iron to be created and stirred in the bottom of the reactor, surmounted by a layer of slag, and (iii) carbon monoxide gas to rise through the slag; c) causing at least some of said carbon monoxide to react in the reactor with the incoming oxygen, thereby generating heat for reactions taking place in the reactor; and d) releasing from the reactor an offgas effluent, is run in a way that keeps iron losses in the offgas relatively low. After start-up of the process is complete, steps (a) and (b) are controlled so as to: e) keep the temperature of the molten iron at or below about 1550.degree. C. and f) keep the slag weight at or above about 0.8 tonne per square meter.

Sarma, Balu (Airmont, NY); Downing, Kenneth B. (Greenville, SC)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Method for reducing iron losses in an iron smelting process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of smelting iron that comprises the steps of: (a) introducing a source of iron oxide, oxygen, nitrogen, and a source of carbonaceous fuel to a smelting reactor, at least some of said oxygen being continuously introduced through an overhead lance; (b) maintaining conditions in said reactor to cause (1) at least some of the iron oxide to be chemically reduced, (2) a bath of molten iron to be created and stirred in the bottom of the reactor, surmounted by a layer of slag, and (3) carbon monoxide gas to rise through the slag; (c) causing at least some of said carbon monoxide to react in the reactor with the incoming oxygen, thereby generating heat for reactions taking place in the reactor; and (d) releasing from the reactor an offgas effluent, is run in a way that keeps iron losses in the offgas relatively low. After start-up of the process is complete, steps (a) and (b) are controlled so as to: (1) keep the temperature of the molten iron at or below about 1550 C and (2) keep the slag weight at or above about 0.8 ton per square meter. 13 figs.

Sarma, B.; Downing, K.B.

1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

154

Iron Edison Battery Company | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Iron Edison Battery Company Iron Edison Battery Company Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Iron Edison Battery Company Name Iron Edison Battery Company Place Lakewood, Colorado Sector Bioenergy, Carbon, Efficiency, Hydro, Renewable Energy, Solar, Wind energy Product Nickel Iron (Ni-Fe) battery systems Year founded 2011 Number of employees 1-10 Phone number 202-681-4766 Website http://ironedison.com Region Rockies Area References Iron Edison Battery Company[1] Nickel Iron Battery Specifications[2] About the company and the owners[3] Nickel Iron Battery Association[4] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Iron Edison Battery Company is a company based in Lakewood, Colorado. Iron Edison is redefining off-grid energy storage using advanced

155

Nonlinear Rate-Dependent Material Model with Damage and Plasticity from Granular Micromechanics Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

based and ignores the effect of microstructural changes on the overall mechanical behavior. Therefore, to overcome the limitation of phenomenological based models, we utilize granular micromechanics approach in conjunction with thermo...

Singh, Viraj

2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

156

The Effect of Slowly Biodegradable Carbon on the Morphology, Integrity and Performance of Aerobic Granular Sludge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the last two decades, a new biofilm process, aerobic granular sludge technology, has been applied by researchers for organic and nutrient removal from municipal wastewater. Most studies have been performed with high strength wastewater...

Faraj, Rasha Attwan

2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

157

Start-up of a thermophilic upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactor with mesophilic granular sludge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fast start-up of thermophilic upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactors was achieved at ... 55 and 64° C, using mesophilic granular sludge as inoculum and fatty acid mixtures as ... temperature optima for aceto...

Jules B. van Lier; Katja C. F. Grolle…

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Acoustic Probing of the Jamming Transition in an Unconsolidated Granular Medium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experiments with acoustic waves guided along the mechanically free surface of an unconsolidated granular packed structure provide information on the elasticity of granular media at very low pressures that are naturally controlled by the gravitational acceleration and the depth beneath the surface. Comparison of the determined dispersion relations for guided surface acoustic modes with a theoretical model reveals the dependencies of the elastic moduli of the granular medium on pressure. The experiments confirm recent theoretical predictions that relaxation of the disordered granular packing through non-affine motion leads to a peculiar scaling of shear rigidity with pressure near the jamming transition corresponding to zero pressure. Unexpectedly, and in disagreement with the most of the available theories, the bulk modulus depends on pressure in a very similar way to the shear modulus.

Jacob, Xavier; Tournat, Vincent; Leclaire, Philippe; Lauriks, Walter; Gusev, Vitalyi

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Theory of acoustic attenuation, dispersion, and pulse propagation in unconsolidated granular materials including  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Theory of acoustic attenuation, dispersion, and pulse propagation in unconsolidated granular of particles in contact with a new, rough-surface, random-packing model of mineral grains in unconsolidated

Buckingham, Michael

160

Acoustic Probing of the Jamming Transition in an Unconsolidated Granular Medium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experiments with acoustic waves guided along the mechanically free surface of an unconsolidated granular packed structure provide information on the elasticity of granular media at very low pressures that are naturally controlled by the gravitational acceleration and the depth beneath the surface. Comparison of the determined dispersion relations for guided surface acoustic modes with a theoretical model reveals the dependencies of the elastic moduli of the granular medium on pressure. The experiments confirm recent theoretical predictions that relaxation of the disordered granular packing through non-affine motion leads to a peculiar scaling of shear rigidity with pressure near the jamming transition corresponding to zero pressure. Unexpectedly, and in disagreement with the most of the available theories, the bulk modulus depends on pressure in a very similar way to the shear modulus.

Xavier Jacob; Vladislav Aleshin; Vincent Tournat; Philippe Leclaire; Walter Lauriks; Vitalyi Gusev

2007-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granular zero-valent iron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of velocity distributions in an ultrasonically vibrated granular bed  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Eakins, Fabrice Pierron and Clive Siviour Nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of velocity...Part 1) . We report the results of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging experiments...granular bed|ultrasonic fluidization|nuclear magnetic resonance|magnetic resonance...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Failure in shear bands for granular materials: thermo-hydro-chemo-mechanical effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Failure in shear bands for granular materials: thermo-hydro-chemo- mechanical effects M. VEVEAKIS depends on the chemical reaction characteristics and that micro-inertia due to grain translations

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

163

Process for the synthesis of iron powder  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for preparing iron powder suitable for use in preparing the iron-potassium perchlorate heat-powder fuel mixture used in thermal batteries, comprises preparing a homogeneous, dense iron oxide hydroxide precipitate by homogeneous precipitation from an aqueous mixture of a ferric salt, formic or sulfuric acid, ammonium hydroxide and urea as precipitating agent; and then reducing the dense iron oxide hydroxide by treatment with hydrogen to prepare the iron powder. 2 figs.

Welbon, W.W.

1983-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

164

Process for the synthesis of iron powder  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for preparing iron powder suitable for use in preparing the iron-potassium perchlorate heat-powder fuel mixture used in thermal batteries, comprises preparing a homogeneous, dense iron oxide hydroxide precipitate by homogeneous precipitation from an aqueous mixture of a ferric salt, formic or sulfuric acid, ammonium hydroxide and urea as precipitating agent; and then reducing the dense iron oxide hydroxide by treatment with hydrogen to prepare the iron powder.

Not Available

1982-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

165

Gulyaev–Bleustein Waves in a Layered Structure of Piezoelectric – Periodic Granular High-Temperature Superconductor Structure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Bragg's interactions of Gulyaev–Bleustein surface waves with a periodic granular high-temperature superconducting medium are studied. Dispersion equations describing the characteristics of surface acoustoelect...

V. A. Krakovskii

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Absorption of Iron from Ferritin Is Independent of Heme Iron and Ferrous Salts in Women and Rat Intestinal Segments .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Ferritin iron from food is readily bioavailable to humans and has the potential for treating iron deficiency. Whether ferritin iron absorption is mechanistically different from… (more)

Theil, Elizabeth C.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Iron supported clay as catalysts for oxidation of cyclooctane  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Iron supported bentonite clay catalysts have been prepared by the ion exchange of bentonite with iron2+ and iron3+ solution and immobilization with iron compounds using ligands: acetylacetonate, picolinate, pyraz...

W. Trakarnpruk; P. Dumrongpong

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Microsoft Word - IronCore  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

November/December 2013 November/December 2013 Percolation Explains How Earth's Iron Core Formed The formation of Earth's metallic core, which makes up a third of our planet's mass, represents the most significant differentiation event in Earth's history. Earth's present layered structure with a metallic core and an overlying silicate mantle would have required mechanisms to separate iron alloy from a silicate phase. Percolation of liquid iron alloy moving through a solid silicate matrix (much as water percolates through porous rock, or even coffee grinds) has been proposed as a possible model for core formation (Figure 1). Many previous experimental results have ruled out percolation as a major core formation mechanism for Earth at the relatively lower pressure conditions in the upper mantle, but

169

Shear Jamming in Granular Experiments without Basal Friction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jammed states of frictional granular systems can be induced by shear strain at densities below the isostatic jamming density ($\\phi_c$). It remains unclear, however, how much friction affects this so-called shear-jamming. Friction appears in two ways in this type of experiment: friction between particles, and friction between particles and the base on which they rest. Here, we study how particle-bottom friction, or basal friction, affects shear jamming in quasi-two dimensional experiments. In order to study this issue experimentally, we apply simple shear to a disordered packing of photoelastic disks. We can tune the basal friction of the particles by immersing the particles in a density matched liquid, thus removing the normal force, hence the friction, between the particles and base. We record the overall shear stress, and particle motion, and the photoelastic response of the particles. We compare the shear response of dry and immersed samples, which enables us to determine how basal friction affects shear jamming. Our findings indicate that changing the basal friction shifts the point of shear jamming, but it does not change the basic phenomenon of shear jamming.

Hu Zheng; Joshua A. Dijksman; Robert P. Behringer

2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

170

Fluid-driven deformation of a soft granular material  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Compressing a porous, fluid-filled material will drive the interstitial fluid out of the pore space, as when squeezing water out of a kitchen sponge. Inversely, injecting fluid into a porous material can deform the solid structure, as when fracturing a shale for natural gas recovery. These poromechanical interactions play an important role in geological and biological systems across a wide range of scales, from the propagation of magma through the Earth's mantle to the transport of fluid through living cells and tissues. The theory of poroelasticity has been largely successful in modeling poromechanical behavior in relatively simple systems, but this continuum theory is fundamentally limited by our understanding of the pore-scale interactions between the fluid and the solid. In growing, melting, granular, and fibrous materials, these interactions can be extremely complex. Here, we present a high-resolution measurement of poromechanical deformation driven by fluid injection. We inject fluid into a dense, confined monolayer of soft particles and use particle tracking to reveal the dynamics of the multi-scale deformation field. While a continuum model based on a modification of conventional poroelastic theory captures certain macroscopic features of the deformation, the particle-scale deformation field exhibits dramatic departures from smooth, continuum behavior. We observe novel grain-scale plasticity and hysteresis, as well as petal-like mesoscale structures that are connected to material failure through spiral shear banding.

Christopher W. MacMinn; Eric R. Dufresne; John S. Wettlaufer

2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

171

Ligand effects on bioinspired iron complexes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE HYDROPHILIC PHOSPHATRIAZAADAMANTANE LIGAND IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF H2-PRODUCTION ELECTROCATALYSTS: IRON HYDROGENASE MODEL COMPLEXES ............................................................................................. 44 Results... THE HYDROPHILIC PHOSPHATRIAZAADAMANTANE LIGAND IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF H2-PRODUCTION ELECTROCATALYSTS: IRON HYDROGENASE MODEL COMPLEXES ............................................................................................. 44 Results...

Mejia Rodriguez, Ma. del Rosario

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Rare Iron Oxide in Ancient Chinese Pottery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rare Iron Oxide in Ancient Chinese Pottery Rare Iron Oxide in Ancient Chinese Pottery Print Friday, 26 September 2014 14:37 Jian ware (or Tenmoku) ceramic bowls, famous for their...

173

Synthesis of monodisperse iron oxide nanocrystals by thermal decomposition of iron carboxylate salts{  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

's group12 recently published a study of c-Fe2O3 nanocrystals with different shapes. Iron acetylacetonateSynthesis of monodisperse iron oxide nanocrystals by thermal decomposition of iron carboxylate September 2004 Iron oxide (Fe3O4, magnetite) nanocrystals of 6 to 30 nm with narrow size distributions (s

Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

174

Two-phase modeling of deflagration-to-detonation transition in granular materials: A critical examination of modeling issues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two-phase modeling of deflagration-to-detonation transition in granular materials: A critical the deflagration-to-detonation transition DDT in granular explosives is critically reviewed. The continuum, analysis and numerical simulation of deflagration- to-detonation transition DDT in porous energetic

Kapila, Ashwani K.

175

hal-00283263,version1-29May2008 Submitted Nonlinear effects for coda-type elastic waves in stressed granular media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are presented on the nonlinear acoustic effects of multiple scattered elastic waves in unconsolidated granular modifications in the elastic response of an unconsolidated granular structure. PACS numbers: Valid PACS appear here I. INTRODUCTION Unconsolidated granular materials are known to ex- hibit a high complexity

Boyer, Edmond

176

Wastewater Ozonation Catalyzed by Iron  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Another attempt to improve ozonation removal efficiency is the use of metals or their oxides to catalyze ozonation. ... The waveforms were generated by a potentiostat BAS model Epsilon-2. ... Sreethawong, T.; Chavadej, S.Color removal of distillery wastewater by ozonation in the absence and presence of immobilized iron oxide catalyst J. Hazard. ...

Anaid Cano Quiroz; Carlos Barrera-Di?az; Gabriela Roa-Morales; Patricia Balderas Herna?ndez; Rubi? Romero; Reyna Natividad

2010-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

177

Critical Phenomena in Driven Granular Matter: Jamming and Glassy Behavior - Final Report  

SciTech Connect

Granular materials, such as powders, seeds, grains, sand, rocks, etc., are ubiquitous both in nature and in industrial processes. At the scale of individual grains, granular systems are particularly simple: particles interact only when they touch. But when viewed in the aggregate, granular systems can display complex behavior. In particular, as the volume packing fraction of the grains increases, the system undergoes a jamming transition from a flowing liquid to a disordered but rigid solid. We study the critical behavior of such systems near the jamming transition using numerical simulations of a simple model of soft-core, bidisperse, frictionless disks in two dimensions. We seek to understand the structural and transport properties of such systems under a variety of physical perturbations such as steady state shear driven flow, and finite thermal fluctuations.

Teitel, Stephen

2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

178

Collective behavior in a granular jet: Emergence of a liquid with zero surface-tension  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We perform the analog to the "water bell" experiment using non-cohesive granular material. When a jet of granular material, many particles wide, rebounds from a fixed cylindrical target, it deforms into a sharply-defined sheet or cone with a shape that mimics a liquid with zero surface tension. The particulate nature of granular material becomes apparent when the number of particles in the cross-section of the jet is decreased and the emerging sheets and cones broaden and gradually disintegrate into a broad spray. This experiment has its counterpart in the behavior of the quark-gluon plasma generated by collisions of gold ions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. There a high density of inter-particle collisions gives rise to collective behavior that has also been described as a liquid.

Xiang Cheng; German Varas; Daniel Citron; Heinrich M. Jaeger; Sidney R. Nagel

2007-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

179

A biaxial apparatus for the study of heterogeneous and intermittent strains in granular materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an experimental apparatus specifically designed to investigate the precursors of failure in granular materials. A sample of granular material is placed between a latex membrane and a glass plate. A confining effective pressure is applied by applying vacuum to the sample. Displacement-controlled compression is applied in the vertical direction, while the specimen deforms in plane strain. A Diffusing Wave Spectroscopy visualization setup gives access to the measurement of deformations near the glass plate. After describing the different parts of this experimental setup, we present a demonstration experiment where extremely small (of order $10^{-5}$) heterogeneous strains are measured during the loading process.

Antoine Le Bouil; Axelle Amon; Jean-Christophe Sangleboeuf; Hervé Orain; Pierre Bésuelle; Gioacchino Viggiani; Patrick Chasle; Jérôme Crassous

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

180

Granularity and Inhomogeneity Are the Joint Generators of Optical Rogue Waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the presence of many waves, giant events can occur with a probability higher than expected for random dynamics. By studying linear light propagation in a glass fiber, we show that optical rogue waves originate from two key ingredients: granularity, or a minimal size of the light speckles at the fiber exit, and inhomogeneity, that is, speckles clustering into separate domains with different average intensities. These two features characterize also rogue waves in nonlinear systems; thus, nonlinearity just plays the role of bringing forth the two ingredients of granularity and inhomogeneity.

F. T. Arecchi; U. Bortolozzo; A. Montina; S. Residori

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granular zero-valent iron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

High-speed tracking of rupture and clustering in freely falling granular streams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Royer1 , Daniel J. Evans1 , Loreto Oyarte1 , Qiti Guo1 , Eliot Kapit1 , Matthias E. Mo¨bius1 {, Scott RLETTERS High-speed tracking of rupture and clustering in freely falling granular streams John R James Franck Institute and Department of Physics, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637

Jaeger, Heinrich M.

182

An accurate elasto-plastic frictional tangential forcedisplacement model for granular-flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An accurate elasto-plastic frictional tangential force­displacement model for granular for both elastic and plastic deformations together with interfacial friction occurring in collisions of spherical particles. This elasto-plastic frictional TFD model, with its force-driven version presented in [L

Vu-Quoc, Loc

183

Stochastic flow rule for granular materials Ken Kamrin and Martin Z. Bazant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Mathematics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 01239, USA Received 15 September , this simple model is able to predict a variety of granular flow profiles in flat-bottom silos, annular Couette. For special cases of admissible slip lines, such as plate dragging under a heavy load or flow down an inclined

Bazant, Martin Z.

184

SHADOW STACKS { A HARDWARE-SUPPORTED DSM FOR OBJECTS OF ANY GRANULARITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SHADOW STACKS { A HARDWARE-SUPPORTED DSM FOR OBJECTS OF ANY GRANULARITY S. GROH, M. PIZKA, J,pizka,rudolphg@informatik.tu-muenchen.de This paper presents a new Distributed Shared Memory (DSM) management con- cept that is integrated;tributed environment (Distributed Shared Memory) is not very new, but since the rst DSM implementation

185

Velocity statistics in excited granular media W. Losert, D. G. W. Cooper, and J. Delour  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Velocity statistics in excited granular media W. Losert, D. G. W. Cooper, and J. Delour Department; accepted for publication 7 May 1999 We present an experimental study of velocity statistics for a partial of parameters accelerations 3­8 times the gravitational acceleration , the probability distribution P

Gollub, Jerry P.

186

A HighGranularity Scintillator Calorimeter Read Out with Silicon Photomultipliers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy of photons and measured hadronic energy of neutral hadrons. Thus, high granu­ larity is necessary Abstract We report upon the design, construction and performance of a prototype for a high­granularity tile. Detector calibration, noise, linearity and stability are discussed, and the energy response in a 1­6 Ge

187

Depletion forces drive polymer-like self-assembly in vibrofluidized granular Jennifer Galanis,*ab  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-assembly processes involving crowding in two-dimensions (2D),5,6 as in protein aggregation at cellular membranes7, entropy driven, order­disorder type phase transitions and steady-state granular experiments,17­21 even of particles. For any classical ensemble, the total energy is separable into kinetic energy that depends

Harries, Daniel

188

MICROMECHANICS BASED CONSTITUTIVE MODEL FOR GRANULAR SOLIDS AND ITS IMPLEMENTATION INTO MESHFREE NUMERICAL METHOD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, my brothers, and my husband for always being there for me. And, overall my special and deepest gratitude to God for having His strength always at my side. v Table of Contents Abstract... Theory. ................................................................................................................... 44 3.1. Idealization and kinematics of the granular system. ..................................................... 44 3.2. Inter-particle...

Lusk, Miriam Beatriz

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

189

The Impact of Test Suite Granularity on the Cost-Effectiveness of Regression Testing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Impact of Test Suite Granularity on the Cost-Effectiveness of Regression Testing Gregg,pkallakug@cse.unl.edu ABSTRACT Regression testing is an expensive testing process used to validate software following modi cations. The cost-e ective- ness of regression testing techniques varies with characteris- tics of test

Rothermel, Gregg

190

The Impact of Test Suite Granularity on the CostEffectiveness of Regression Testing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Impact of Test Suite Granularity on the Cost­Effectiveness of Regression Testing Gregg,pkallakug@cse.unl.edu ABSTRACT Regression testing is an expensive testing process used to validate software following modifications. The cost­effective­ ness of regression testing techniques varies with characteris­ tics of test

Rothermel, Gregg

191

The Impact of Test Suite Granularity on the CostEffectiveness of Regression Testing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Impact of Test Suite Granularity on the Cost­Effectiveness of Regression Testing Gregg,pkallakug@cse.unl.edu ABSTRACT Regression testing is an expensive testing process used to validate software following modi#12;cations. The cost-e#11;ective- ness of regression testing techniques varies with characteris- tics of test

Rothermel, Gregg

192

2012 IEEE International Conference on Granular Computing Generalized Infinitive Rough Sets Based on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2012 IEEE International Conference on Granular Computing Generalized Infinitive Rough Sets Based propose equivalent form of lower and upper approximations in binary relational rough set model in ways variable precision rough set model to variable precision binary relational rough set model. Index Terms-rough

Lin, Tsau Young

193

Granular computing, rough entropy and object extraction Sankar K. Pal a,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of image object extraction in the framework of rough sets and granular computing is addressed. A mea- sure of rough entropy are described. Ã? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Rough sets; Entropy in the process of prob- lem solving. Recently, rough set theory (Pawlak, 1991) has become a popular mathematical

Mitra, Pabitra

194

Dynamic fracture of granular material under quasi-static loading Amir Sagy,1,2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dynamic fracture of granular material under quasi-static loading Amir Sagy,1,2 Gil Cohen,3 Ze; published 13 April 2006. [1] The dynamics of rapid fracturing of heterogeneous grainy media are studied in laboratory experiments in which artificial rock slabs are fractured under uniaxial tension. By performing

Ze'ev, Reches

195

Reflection of Nonlinear Acoustic Waves from the Mechanically Free Surface of an Unconsolidated Granular Medium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Reflection of Nonlinear Acoustic Waves from the Mechanically Free Surface of an Unconsolidated a mechanically free surface of an unconsolidated granular layer under gravity is solved analytically using of the acoustic experiments directed to the investigation of fundamental mechanical properties of unconsolidated

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

196

A simplified model of thin layer static/flowing dynamics for granular materials with yield  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/deposition processes when a layer of particles is flowing over a static layer or near the destabilization and arrestA simplified model of thin layer static/flowing dynamics for granular materials with yield, 75005 Paris, France, 4 ANGE team, INRIA, CETMEF, Lab. J.-L. Lions, Paris, France Abstract We introduce

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

197

Granular Thermodynamics M. D. Shattuck*, R. A. Ingale* and P. M. Reis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, The City College of the City University of New York, 140th Street and Convent Avenue, New York, New York state, which relies on the fact that particle interactions conserve energy, is ho- mogeneous and steady (time-independent). However, in a granular system (collection of macroscopic particles) interactions do

Reis, Pedro Miguel

198

Shock-Wave Attenuation and Energy-Dissipation Potential of Granular Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shock-Wave Attenuation and Energy-Dissipation Potential of Granular Materials Mica Grujicic, B this approach, both compression shocks and decompression waves are treated as (stress, specific volume, particle velocity, mass-based internal energy density, temperature, and mass-based entropy density) propagating

Grujicic, Mica

199

Pion Transverse Momentum Spectrum, Elliptic Flow and Interferometry in the Granular Source Model in Ultra-Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We systematically investigate the pion transverse momentum spectrum, elliptic flow, and Hanbury-Brown-Twiss (HBT) interferometry in the granular source model of quark-gluon plasma droplets in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. The granular source model can well reproduce the experimental results of the Au-Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=$ 200 GeV and the Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} =$ 2.76 TeV with different centralities. We examine the parameters of the granular source models with an uniform and Woods-Saxon initial energy distributions in a droplet. The parameters exhibit certain regularities for collision centrality and energy.

Yang, Jing; Zhang, Wei-Ning

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Statistical mechanics of dry granular materials: Between fragile solid (jamming) and dry fluid (rheology)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dry granular matter with infinite tangential friction is modeled as a connected graph of grains linked by purely repulsive contacts. The degrees of freedom of a grain are non-slip rotation on and disconnection from another. The material stability under shear (jamming) is ensured by odd circuits of grains in contact that prevent the grains from rolling on each other. A dense hard granular material has two possible states: fragile solid blocked by odd circuits and dry fluid or bearing in the absence of odd circuits that flows under shear by creation and glide of a pair of dislocations as in plasticity of continuous media. We did introduce the notions of blob a region of the material containing only even circuits and of critical contact that closes an odd circuit. The granular material is then represented at low energies and critical applied shear as a chain of blobs connected by critical contacts. The entropy is the logarithm of the number of spanning trees constrained to go through critical links. For a vanishing tangential friction the graph description with the frustrating odd circuits is still valid because the force between grains remains a scalar and repulsive. A granular material inside a cylindrical drum rotating at constant velocity around its horizontal axis alternates intermittently between solid and fluid states. As a fragile solid it follows a limit cycle of avalanches (slip) and stuck rotations with the drum. This is the stick-slip behavior of a solid subjected to solid friction (to the driving drum) and gravity. In the fluid state the friction is viscous and the granular material flows to a fixed point with constant slope.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granular zero-valent iron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Dynamical properties of high-temperature-superconductor granular bridge junctions: Inhomogeneous Josephson-junction-array model  

SciTech Connect

As an attempt to understand the dynamical behavior of the high-temperature-superconductor (HTSC) granular bridge junction, we model the granular HTSC bridge junction consisting of many small grains inside by an inhomogeneous Josephson junction array, i.e., randomly arranged Josephson junction arrays (JJA). To describe randomly distributed critical currents between the grains inside the HTSC granular bridge junction, we chose various possible configurations in {l_brace}{ital I}{sub {ital ij}}{sup {ital c}}{r_brace} and {l_brace}{ital R}{sub {ital ij}}{r_brace} for the one-dimensional (1D) and 2D inhomogeneous Josephson junctions, and calculated the current-voltage ({ital IV}) characteristics and self-radiation spectral densities of the 1D and 2D inhomogeneous Josephson junctions. As a result, depending upon the distribution of critical currents and shunted resistances, it is found that there are large variations of {ital IV} characteristics. In contrast to the appearance of giant Shapiro steps in the regular ordered array, such Shapiro steps disappear in the case of the disordered JJA due to the increased randomness in the distribution of critical currents. On the contrary, however, when there exists a correlation between critical currents and resistances, i.e., a constant Josephson voltage, {ital I}{sub {ital ij}}{sup {ital c}}{ital R}{sub {ital ij}}={ital V}{sub {ital J}} (constant), the fundamental Shapiro step emerges despite the disordered distribution of {ital I}{sub {ital ij}}{sup {ital c}}. The relevance of this model to the HTSC granular bridge junctions is discussed. In particular, experimentally observed dynamical behaviors of the HTSC granular bridge junctions are shown to be closely related to the case of the correlated distribution with constant Josephson voltage. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

Lee, J.; Lee, S.; Yu, J.; Park, G. [Department of Physics, Sogang University, Seoul 121-742 (Korea)] [Department of Physics, Sogang University, Seoul 121-742 (Korea)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Nanostructure, Chemistry and Crystallography of Iron Nitride...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Nanostructure, Chemistry and Crystallography of Iron Nitride Magnetic Materials by Ultra-High-Resolution Electron Microscopy and Related Methods Nanostructure, Chemistry and...

203

Characterization and Reactivity of Iron Nanoparticles Prepared...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

as solute within the iron core of the HRCO particles. Kinetic batch experiments of carbon tetrachloride (CT) degradation were performed to quantitatively compare the redox...

204

Subcritical compaction and yielding of granular quartz sand Stephen L. Karner*, Frederick M. Chester, Andreas K. Kronenberg, Judith S. Chester  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Subcritical compaction and yielding of granular quartz sand Stephen L. Karner*, Frederick M October 2003 Abstract Cylindrical samples of water-saturated, initially loose, St. Peter quartz sand were

Chester, Frederick M.

205

A study of the effects of rate and frequency of loading on the stress-strain characteristics of granular soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A STUDY OF THE EFFECTS OF RATE AND FREQUENCY OF LOADING ON THE STRESS-STRAIN CHARACTERISTICS OF GRANULAR SOILS A Thesis By James Clyde Armstrong Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1962 Major Subject: Civil Engineering A STUDY OF THE EFFECTS OF RATE AND FREQUENCY OF LOADING ON THE STRESS-STRAIN CHARACTERISTICS OF GRANULAR SOILS A Thesis By James Clyde...

Armstrong, James Clyde

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Electrochemical Studies of Packed Iron Powder Electrodes: Effects...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Packed Iron Powder Electrodes: Effects of Common Constituents of Natural Waters on Corrosion Electrochemical Studies of Packed Iron Powder Electrodes: Effects of Common...

207

Bioreduction of hematite nanoparticles by the dissimilatory iron...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

nanoparticles by the dissimilatory iron reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Bioreduction of hematite nanoparticles by the dissimilatory iron reducing bacterium...

208

Formation of iron complexs from trifluoroacetic acid based liquid...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of iron complexs from trifluoroacetic acid based liquid chromatography mobile phases as interference ions in liquid Formation of iron complexs from trifluoroacetic acid based...

209

Influence of Iron Redox Transformations on Plutonium Sorption...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

state of iron in the system. Experiments were conducted to examine the effect of sediment iron mineral composition and oxidation state on plutonium sorption and oxidation...

210

Biostimulation of Iron Reduction and Subsequent Oxidation of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biostimulation of Iron Reduction and Subsequent Oxidation of Sediment Containing Fe-silicates and Fe-oxides: Effect of Redox Biostimulation of Iron Reduction and Subsequent...

211

Watermelon-like iron nanoparticles: Cr doping effect on magnetism...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Watermelon-like iron nanoparticles: Cr doping effect on magnetism and magnetization interaction reversal. Watermelon-like iron nanoparticles: Cr doping effect on magnetism and...

212

Neutron Spin Resonance in Iron-based Superconductors | The Ames...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Neutron Spin Resonance in Iron-based Superconductors The propagation of a novel magnetic excitation in the superconducting state, called a spin resonance, has been observed in iron...

213

Iron is the Key to Preserving Dinosaur Soft Tissue  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the iron associated with fossil tissues, which occurred primarily as the mineral goethite. They then employed experiments to show that iron, derived from hemoglobin lysate,...

214

Microbial Reduction of Uranium under Iron- and Sulfate-reducing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Uranium under Iron- and Sulfate-reducing Conditions: Effect of Amended Goethite on Microbial Community Microbial Reduction of Uranium under Iron- and Sulfate-reducing Conditions:...

215

Production of iron from metallurgical waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of recovering metallic iron from iron-bearing metallurgical waste in steelmaking comprising steps of providing an iron-bearing metallurgical waste containing more than 55% by weight FeO and FeO equivalent and a particle size of at least 80% less than 10 mesh, mixing the iron-bearing metallurgical waste with a carbonaceous material to form a reducible mixture where the carbonaceous material is between 80 and 110% of the stoichiometric amount needed to reduce the iron-bearing waste to metallic iron, and as needed additions to provide a silica content between 0.8 and 8% by weight and a ratio of CaO/SiO.sub.2 between 1.4 and 1.8, forming agglomerates of the reducible mixture over a hearth material layer to protect the hearth, heating the agglomerates to a higher temperature above the melting point of iron to form nodules of metallic iron and slag material from the agglomerates by melting.

Hendrickson, David W; Iwasaki, Iwao

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

216

Formation and Reactivity of Biogenic Iron Microminerals  

SciTech Connect

The overall purpose of the project is to explore and quantify the processes that control the formation and reactivity of biogenic iron microminerals and their impact on the solubility of metal contaminants. The research addresses how surface components of bacterial cells, extracellular organic material, and the aqueous geochemistry of the DIRB microenvironment impacts the mineralogy, chemical state and micromorphology of reduced iron phases.

Beveridge, Terrance J.; Glasauer, Susan; Korenevsky, Anton; Ferris, F. Grant

2000-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

217

Drinking Water Problems: Iron and Manganese  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Iron and manganese can give water an unpleasant taste, odor and color. In this publication you'll learn how to know whether your water contains iron or manganese and how to eliminate these contaminants with various treatment methods such as aeration...

Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

2004-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

218

Magnetism in iron and nickel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The fluctuating local band theory of itinerant electron ferromagnetism in nickel and iron is investigated with the use of first-principles numerical calculations. In this theory the excitations predominantly responsible for the phase transition are fluctuations in the direction of local magnetization. The free energy in the presence of a fluctuation is evaluated numerically in the approximation that this direction changes in time and space slowly enough to justify the use of the static approximation and second-order perturbation theory. The energies and wave functions used to incorporate the band and wavevector dependence of the relevant interaction matrix elements were obtained by Slater-Koster fits to earlier ab initio self-consistent energy bands. Results for nickel and iron are obtained in terms of an effective classical Heisenberg exchange. This is compared with other theoretical calculations and available experimental data. From the numerical results, it is concluded that both quantum effects (the time dependence of the exchange field) and local-field effects are important to account for the transition temperature TC.

C. S. Wang; R. E. Prange; V. Korenman

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update Hydraulic Conductivity of the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier November 2005 Update More Documents & Publications Variation in Hydraulic Conductivity Over Time at the Monticello Permeable Reactive Barrier Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium

220

The path to fracture in granular flows: dynamics of contact networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Capturing the dynamics of granular flows at intermediate length scales can often be difficult. We propose studying the dynamics of contact networks as a new tool to study fracture at intermediate scales. Using experimental three-dimensional flow fields with particle-scale resolution, we calculate the time evolving broken-links network and find that a giant component of this network is formed as shear is applied to this system. We implement a model of link breakages where the probability of a link breaking is proportional to the average rate of longitudinal strain (elongation) in the direction of the edge and find that the model demonstrates qualitative agreement with the data when studying the onset of the giant component. We note, however, that the broken-links network formed in the model is less clustered than our experimental observations, indicating that the model reflects less localized breakage events and does not fully capture the dynamics of the granular flow.

Mark Herrera; Shane McCarthy; Steven Slotterback; Emmanuel Cephas; Wolfgang Losert; Michelle Girvan

2011-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granular zero-valent iron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Evidence for Localization of Reaction Upon Reduction of Carbon...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Localization of Reaction Upon Reduction of Carbon Tetrachloride by Granular Iron. Evidence for Localization of Reaction Upon Reduction of Carbon Tetrachloride by Granular Iron....

222

Deformation-Driven Diffusion and Plastic Flow in Two-Dimensional Amorphous Granular Pillars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report a combined experimental and simulation study of deformation-induced diffusion in compacted two-dimensional amorphous granular pillars, in which thermal fluctuations play negligible role. The pillars, consisting of bidisperse cylindrical acetal plastic particles standing upright on a substrate, are deformed uniaxially and quasistatically by a rigid bar moving at a constant speed. The plastic flow and particle rearrangements in the pillars are characterized by computing the best-fit affine transformation strain and non-affine displacement associated with each particle between two stages of deformation. The non-affine displacement exhibits exponential crossover from ballistic to diffusive behavior with respect to the cumulative deviatoric strain, indicating that in athermal granular packings, the cumulative deviatoric strain plays the role of time in thermal systems and drives effective particle diffusion. We further study the size-dependent deformation of the granular pillars by simulation, and find that different-sized pillars follow self-similar shape evolution during deformation. In addition, the yield stress of the pillars increases linearly with pillar size. Formation of transient shear lines in the pillars during deformation becomes more evident as pillar size increases. The width of these elementary shear bands is about twice the diameter of a particle, and does not vary with pillar size.

Wenbin Li; Jennifer M. Rieser; Andrea J. Liu; Douglas J. Durian; Ju Li

2015-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

223

KINETIC CONDENSATION AND EVAPORATION OF METALLIC IRON AND IMPLICATIONS FOR METALLIC IRON DUST FORMATION  

SciTech Connect

Metallic iron is one of the most abundant condensing materials in systems of solar abundance. Because metallic iron is responsible for the continuum opacity of dust particles, it has a large contribution to the thermal structure of circumstellar environments and hence to dust evolution itself. In order to understand the formation processes of metallic iron in circumstellar environments, condensation and evaporation kinetics of metallic iron were studied experimentally. Metallic iron condenses at the maximum rate with the condensation coefficient (a parameter ranging from 0 to 1 to represent kinetic hindrance for surface reaction) of unity under high supersaturation conditions, and evaporates nearly ideally (evaporation coefficient of unity) in vacuum. On the other hand, evaporation of metallic iron takes place with more kinetic hindrance in the presence of metallic iron vapor. It is also found that metallic iron atoms nucleate heterogeneously on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Metallic iron does not necessarily condense homogeneously in circumstellar environments, but might condense through heterogeneous nucleation on pre-existing dust. Metallic iron formation proceeds with little kinetic hindrance for highly unequilibrated conditions, but the effects of kinetic hindrance may appear for evaporation and condensation occurring near equilibrium with a timescale of months to years in protoplanetary disks.

Tachibana, Shogo; Nagahara, Hiroko; Ozawa, Kazuhito; Ikeda, Youhei; Nomura, Ryuichi; Tatsumi, Keisuke; Joh, Yui, E-mail: tachi@eps.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

224

Iron and Steel Energy Intensities  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

If you are having trouble, call 202-586-8800 for help. Home > >Energy Users > Energy Efficiency Page > Iron and Steel Energy Intensities First Use of Energy Blue Bullet First Use/Value of Production Blue Bullet First Use/Ton of steel End Uses of Consumption Blue Bullet Total End Use/Value of Production Blue Bullet Total End Use/Ton of Steel Boiler Fuel as End Use Blue Bullet Boiler Fuel /Value of Production Blue Bullet Boiler Fuel /Ton of Steel Process Heating as End Use Blue Bullet Process Heating Fuel /Ton of Steel Blue Bullet Process Heating /Value of Production Machine Drive as End Use Blue Bullet Machine Drive Fuel/Ton of Steel Blue Bullet Machine Drive Fuel /Value of Production Expenditures Blue Bullet Purchased Fuel /Ton of Steel Blue Bullet Purchased Fuel /Value of Production

225

Why Sequence Freshwater Iron-Oxidizing Bacteria?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Freshwater Iron-Oxidizing Bacteria? Freshwater Iron-Oxidizing Bacteria? The goal of this project is to obtain complete genome sequences for six different freshwater iron (Fe)-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB). Four of these are oxygen-dependent iron-oxidizing β-proteobacteria, and three of these, Sideroxydans lithotrophicus, Gallionella capsiferriformans, and strain TW-2, are capable of chemolithoautotrophic growth (that is, obtaining energy by the oxidation of inorganic compounds) using Fe(II) as sole energy source under microaerobic (low-oxygen) conditions. The fourth organism, Leptothrix cholodnii, is a sheath-forming heterotrophic (i.e., using complex organic compounds for nutrition) organism that oxidizes both Fe(II) and Mn(II) and deposits a ferromanganic coating on its sheath. In addition,

226

Iron-air battery development program  

SciTech Connect

The progress and status of the research and development program on the iron-air advanced technology battery system at the Westinghouse Electric Corporation during the period June 1978-December 1979 are described. This advanced battery system is being developed for electric vehicle propulsion applications. Testing and evaluation of 100 cm/sup 2/ size cells was undertaken while individual iron and air electrode programs continued. Progress is reported in a number of these study areas. Results of the improvements made in the utilization of the iron electrode active material coupled with manufacturing and processing studies related to improved air electrodes continue to indicate that a fully developed iron-air battery system will be capable of fulfilling the performance requirements for commuter electric vehicles.

Buzzelli, E.S.; Liu, C.T.; Bryant, W.A.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

System and method for producing metallic iron  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of production of metallic iron nodules comprises assembling a hearth furnace having a moveable hearth comprising refractory material and having a conversion zone and a fusion zone, providing a hearth material layer comprising carbonaceous material on the refractory material, providing a layer of reducible material comprising and iron bearing material arranged in discrete portions over at least a portion of the hearth material layer, delivering oxygen gas into the hearth furnace to a ratio of at least 0.8:1 ponds of oxygen to pounds of iron in the reducible material to heat the conversion zone to a temperature sufficient to at least partially reduce the reducible material and to heat the fusion zone to a temperature sufficient to at least partially reduce the reducible material, and heating the reducible material to form one or more metallic iron nodules and slag.

Englund, David J.; Schlichting, Mark; Meehan, John; Crouch, Jeremiah; Wilson, Logan

2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

228

Iron and the ecology of marine microbes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Iron is a cofactor of a number biochemical reactions that are essential for life. In the marine environment, this micronutrient is a scarce resource that limits processes of global importance such as photosynthesis and ...

Ventouras, Laure-Anne

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

C:\Eco-SSLs\Final Guidance November 2003\Contaminant Specific\Iron\Eco-SSL for Iron.wpd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Iron Iron Interim Final OSWER Directive 9285.7-69 U. S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W. Washington, DC 20460 November 2003 This page intentionally left blank TABLE OF CONTENTS SUMMARY OF ECO-SSLs FOR IRON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ES - 1 1.0 INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 - 1 2.0 IRON GEOCHEMISTRY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 - 1 2.1 Weathering Processes Affect on Iron . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 - 3 2.2 Soil Conditions Affect on Iron . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 - 4 3.0 EFFECTS OF IRON ON PLANTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 - 1 3.1 Essentiality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 - 1 3.2 General Effects

230

Elastic moduli of nickel and iron aluminides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ELASTIC MODULI OF NICKEL AND IRON ALUMINIDES A Thesis by SREEDHAR MAN JIGANI Submitted to the Oifice of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1993... Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering ELASTIC MODULI OF NICKEL AND IRON ALUMINIDES A Thesis by SREEDHAR MAN JIGANI Submitted to Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved...

Manjigani, Sreedhar

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

231

Muon trapping at monovacancies in iron  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Positive-muon—spin-rotation experiments were performed on electron irradiated iron. A new defect-associated frequency is observed which is assigned to muons trapped at monovacancies. The hyperfine field at the vacancy site is -0.956 T at 140 K. The diffusion constant for ?+ in iron deduced from the trapping rate follows an Arrhenius law with an activation energy of 38±3 meV between 90 and 190 K.

A. Möslang; H. Graf; G. Balzer; E. Recknagel; A. Weidinger; Th. Wichert; R. I. Grynszpan

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean Print Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean Print The Southern Ocean, circling the Earth between Antarctica and the southernmost regions of Africa, South America, and Australia, is notorious for its high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll areas, which are rich in nutrients-but poor in essential iron. Sea life is less abundant in these regions because the growth of phytoplankton-the marine plants that form the base of the food chain-is suppressed. A study by scientists from South Africa's Stellenbosch University, Princeton University, and the Advanced Light Source (ALS) suggests that it is not just a lack of iron, but a lack of iron in an easy-to-use form, that is affecting the ecosystems. The researchers sampled two north-south corridors across the Southern Ocean, traveling an easterly transect between the base of the South African National Antarctic Expeditions (SANAE IV) in Queen Maud Land and Cape Town, and a westerly transect between SANAE IV and South Georgia Island. Along the way they collected particles containing solid iron from a series of ocean systems with different characteristics.

233

Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean Print Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean Print The Southern Ocean, circling the Earth between Antarctica and the southernmost regions of Africa, South America, and Australia, is notorious for its high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll areas, which are rich in nutrients-but poor in essential iron. Sea life is less abundant in these regions because the growth of phytoplankton-the marine plants that form the base of the food chain-is suppressed. A study by scientists from South Africa's Stellenbosch University, Princeton University, and the Advanced Light Source (ALS) suggests that it is not just a lack of iron, but a lack of iron in an easy-to-use form, that is affecting the ecosystems. The researchers sampled two north-south corridors across the Southern Ocean, traveling an easterly transect between the base of the South African National Antarctic Expeditions (SANAE IV) in Queen Maud Land and Cape Town, and a westerly transect between SANAE IV and South Georgia Island. Along the way they collected particles containing solid iron from a series of ocean systems with different characteristics.

234

IEA Energy conservation in the iron and steel industry. [US and Western Europe  

SciTech Connect

The NATO Committee on the Challenges of Modern Society research program, under the auspices of the IEA, had the objectives of collecting data on material requirements and energy-consumption patterns in selected energy-intensive industries in the US and Western Europe, of identifying technologies and operating practices with the potential for energy conservation in those industries, and of recommending research projects that could lead to improved energy efficiency. The steel industry was selected for analysis and ideas for an international cooperative program were developed. Representatives from various countries conducted meetings and the form of an implementing agreement for a research and development program was finalized in December, 1980. The program includes three technical areas: hot-surface inspection, heat recovery, and coal gasification. Hot-surface inspection methods to be demonstrated are: optical, induction, electromagnetic ultrasonic, electromagnetic ultrasonic surface testing methods, and eddy current method for hot surface inspection and an infrared system (possibly). Three heat-recovery projects are: ceramic heat wheel development; demonstration of granular bed/heat pipe system for heat recovery; and demonstration of tubular ceramic recuperators. Processes in coal gasification are: converter process, gas treatment, and iron treatment. Each project is described in detail. (MCW)

Tunnah, B.G.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

A theoretical model for the x-ray luminescence of granular phosphor G. E. Giakoumakis, M. C. Katsarioti, and I. E. Lagaris  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A theoretical model for the x-ray luminescence of granular phosphor screens G. E. Giakoumakis, M. C-ray luminescence of a phosphor screen is presented. The model takes into account the granular structure of the screen and the random deposition of the phosphor grains on the screen substrate. Results based

Lagaris, Isaac

236

E-Print Network 3.0 - assembly cellular iron Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: , iron storage function and cellular regulation. Biochim. Biophys. Acta Bioenerg. 1275: 161-203. HOFMANN... Availability of iron from iron-storage proteins to marine...

237

A Comparison of Iron and Steel Production Energy Intensity in China and the U.S  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Iron and Steel Production Energy Use and Energy Intensityof Iron and Steel Production Energy Intensity in China andof Iron and Steel Production Energy Intensity in China and

Price, Lynn

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Brazil nut effect and excluded volume attraction in vibrofluidized granular mixtures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A two dimensional bi-disperse vibrofluidized granular mixture is studied in the rapid flow regime, where particle interactions occur due to instantaneous collisions. Both experiments and simulations are carried out, and these show the existence of two phenomena which have been observed only in very dense granular flows or in equilibrium systems. The Brazil nut phenomenon, which involves the rise of larger particles in a granular mixture upon vibration, has been observed in dense systems due to the percolation of small particles though the interstitial spaces between the large particles, or due to convection rolls. In the present case, where neither effect is present, it is observed that the fluidization of the smaller particles by vibration results in an exponentially decaying density profile, at heights large compared to the particle diameter, and thereby a pressure field that decreases with height. The larger particles, suspended in this decaying pressure field, experience a larger pressure at the bottom and a smaller pressure on top, and they rise to a height where the net force caused by the decreasing pressure is balanced by the weight of the particle. An attractive force between the large particles, similar to the entropic attraction effect in mixtures of colloids and polymers, is also observed in this nonequilibrium system, because when the distance between the large particles is less than the small particle diameter, the pressure between the large particles is smaller than that on the outside. Analytical results are derived for each of these effects, and these are in agreement with the experimental and simulation results.

M. Bose; U. U. Kumar; P. R. Nott; V. Kumaran

2005-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

239

Effect of ozone and granular activated coal (GAC) on the bioactivity of drinking water  

SciTech Connect

In this research, the appearance of easily biodegradable organic material in ozonation and granular activated coal (GAC) filtration was studied. The amount of bioactivity was measured by conventional AOC analyses used in two different modes and also using quite a new growth potential (GP) method. GAC filtration without ozone doubled the amount of AOC of the chemically treated surface water, whereas by ozonation with GAC filtration it was possible to halve the amount of the AOC. The measurement of GP was noticeably simpler than measuring AOC, but for wider use more parallel studies are needed for the comparability of the results of the analysis.

Sallanko, J.; Iivari, P.; Heiska, E. [University of Oulu, Oulu (Finland). Water Resources and Environmental Engineering Laboratory

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Critical behavior of two freely evolving granular gases separated by an adiabatic piston  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two granular gases separated by an adiabatic piston and initially in the same macroscopic state are considered. It is found that a phase transition with an spontaneous symmetry breaking occurs. When the mass of the piston is increased beyond a critical value, the piston moves to a stationary position different from the middle of the system. The transition is accurately described by a simple kinetic model that takes into account the velocity fluctuations of the piston. Interestingly, the final state is not characterized by the equality of the temperatures of the subsystems but by the cooling rates being the same. Some relevant consequences of this feature are discussed.

J. Javier Brey; Nagi Khalil

2010-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granular zero-valent iron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Strain versus stress in a model granular material: a Devil's staircase  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The series of equilibrium states reached by disordered packings of rigid, frictionless discs in two dimensions, under gradually varying stress, are studied by numerical simulations. Statistical properties of trajectories in configuration space are found to be independent of specific assumptions ruling granular dynamics, and determined by geometry only. A monotonic increase in some macroscopic loading parameter causes a discrete sequence of rearrangements. For a biaxial compression, we show that, due to the statistical importance of such events of large magnitudes, the dependence of the resulting strain on stress direction is a Levy flight in the thermodynamic limit.

Gael Combe; Jean-Noel Roux

2000-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

242

Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors Print Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors Print In 2008, the discovery of iron-based superconductors stimulated a worldwide burst of activity, leading to about two preprints per day ever since. With a maximum superconducting transition temperature (so far) of 55 K, it is natural to wonder if studying the new materials will help uncover one of the deepest mysteries in modern physics-the mechanism of superconductivity in the copper-based "high-temperature superconductors." One clue lies in whether the electrons in the new superconductors are as highly correlated as they are in the high-temperature superconductors. A truly international North American/European/Asian collaboration working at the ALS has now reported results from a combination of x-ray absorption spectroscopy, resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, and systematic theoretical simulations of iron-based superconductors. The team was able to settle the correlations debate by showing that electrons in the iron-based families that were studied favor itinerant (delocalized) states with only moderate correlations.

243

Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors Print Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors Print In 2008, the discovery of iron-based superconductors stimulated a worldwide burst of activity, leading to about two preprints per day ever since. With a maximum superconducting transition temperature (so far) of 55 K, it is natural to wonder if studying the new materials will help uncover one of the deepest mysteries in modern physics-the mechanism of superconductivity in the copper-based "high-temperature superconductors." One clue lies in whether the electrons in the new superconductors are as highly correlated as they are in the high-temperature superconductors. A truly international North American/European/Asian collaboration working at the ALS has now reported results from a combination of x-ray absorption spectroscopy, resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, and systematic theoretical simulations of iron-based superconductors. The team was able to settle the correlations debate by showing that electrons in the iron-based families that were studied favor itinerant (delocalized) states with only moderate correlations.

244

Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors Print Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors Print In 2008, the discovery of iron-based superconductors stimulated a worldwide burst of activity, leading to about two preprints per day ever since. With a maximum superconducting transition temperature (so far) of 55 K, it is natural to wonder if studying the new materials will help uncover one of the deepest mysteries in modern physics-the mechanism of superconductivity in the copper-based "high-temperature superconductors." One clue lies in whether the electrons in the new superconductors are as highly correlated as they are in the high-temperature superconductors. A truly international North American/European/Asian collaboration working at the ALS has now reported results from a combination of x-ray absorption spectroscopy, resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, and systematic theoretical simulations of iron-based superconductors. The team was able to settle the correlations debate by showing that electrons in the iron-based families that were studied favor itinerant (delocalized) states with only moderate correlations.

245

Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors Print Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors Print In 2008, the discovery of iron-based superconductors stimulated a worldwide burst of activity, leading to about two preprints per day ever since. With a maximum superconducting transition temperature (so far) of 55 K, it is natural to wonder if studying the new materials will help uncover one of the deepest mysteries in modern physics-the mechanism of superconductivity in the copper-based "high-temperature superconductors." One clue lies in whether the electrons in the new superconductors are as highly correlated as they are in the high-temperature superconductors. A truly international North American/European/Asian collaboration working at the ALS has now reported results from a combination of x-ray absorption spectroscopy, resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, and systematic theoretical simulations of iron-based superconductors. The team was able to settle the correlations debate by showing that electrons in the iron-based families that were studied favor itinerant (delocalized) states with only moderate correlations.

246

Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors Print Electron Correlation in Iron-Based Superconductors Print In 2008, the discovery of iron-based superconductors stimulated a worldwide burst of activity, leading to about two preprints per day ever since. With a maximum superconducting transition temperature (so far) of 55 K, it is natural to wonder if studying the new materials will help uncover one of the deepest mysteries in modern physics-the mechanism of superconductivity in the copper-based "high-temperature superconductors." One clue lies in whether the electrons in the new superconductors are as highly correlated as they are in the high-temperature superconductors. A truly international North American/European/Asian collaboration working at the ALS has now reported results from a combination of x-ray absorption spectroscopy, resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, and systematic theoretical simulations of iron-based superconductors. The team was able to settle the correlations debate by showing that electrons in the iron-based families that were studied favor itinerant (delocalized) states with only moderate correlations.

247

Diverging viscosity and soft granular rheology in non-Brownian suspensions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use large scale computer simulations and finite size scaling analysis to study the shear rheology of dense three-dimensional suspensions of frictionless non-Brownian particles in the vicinity of the jamming transition. We perform simulations of soft repulsive particles at constant shear rate, constant pressure, and finite system size, and study carefully the asymptotic limits of large system sizes and infinitely hard particle repulsion. Extending earlier analysis by about two orders of magnitude, we first study the asymptotic behavior of the shear viscosity in the hard particle limit. We confirm its asymptotic power law divergence at the jamming transition, but show that a precise determination of the critical density and critical exponent is difficult due to the `multiscaling' behavior of the viscosity. Additionally, finite-size scaling analysis suggests that this divergence is accompanied by a growing correlation length scale, which also diverges algebraically. We then study the effect of soft repulsion, and propose a natural extension of the standard granular rheology to account for softness effects, which we validate from simulations. Close to the jamming transition, this `soft granular rheology' offers a detailed description of the non-linear rheology of soft particles, which differs from earlier empirical scaling forms.

Takeshi Kawasaki; Daniele Coslovich; Atsushi Ikeda; Ludovic Berthier

2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

248

Moving Bed, Granular Bed Filter Development Program: Option 1, Component Test Facility. Task 3, Test plan  

SciTech Connect

In the base contract, Combustion Power Co. developed commercial designs for a moving granular-bed filter (GBF). The proposed filter is similar to previous designs in terms of its shape and method of filtration. The commercial designs have scaled the filter from a 5 ft diameter to as large as a 20 ft diameter filter. In Task 2 of the Moving Bed-Granular Filter Development Program, all technical concerns related to the further development of the filter are identified. These issues are discussed in a Topical Report which has been issued as part of Task 2. Nineteen issues are identified in this report. Along with a discussion of these issues are the planned approaches for resolving each of these issues. These issues will be resolved in either a cold flow component test facility or in pilot scale testing at DOE`s Power System Development Facility (PSDF) located at Southem Company Services` Wilsonville facility. Task 3 presents a test plan for resolving those issues which can be addressed in component test facilities. The issues identified in Task 2 which will be addressed in the component test facilities are: GBF scale-up; effect of filter cone angle and sidewall materials on medium flow and ash segregation; maximum gas filtration rate; lift pipe wear; GBF media issues; mechanical design of the gas inlet duct; and filter pressure drop. This document describes a test program to address these issues, with testing to be performed at Combustion Power Company`s facility in Belmont, California.

Haas, J.C.; Purdhomme, J.W.; Wilson, K.B.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Analysis of Granular Flow in a Pebble-Bed Nuclear Reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pebble-bed nuclear reactor technology, which is currently being revived around the world, raises fundamental questions about dense granular flow in silos. A typical reactor core is composed of graphite fuel pebbles, which drain very slowly in a continuous refueling process. Pebble flow is poorly understood and not easily accessible to experiments, and yet it has a major impact on reactor physics. To address this problem, we perform full-scale, discrete-element simulations in realistic geometries, with up to 440,000 frictional, viscoelastic 6cm-diameter spheres draining in a cylindrical vessel of diameter 3.5m and height 10m with bottom funnels angled at 30 degrees or 60 degrees. We also simulate a bidisperse core with a dynamic central column of smaller graphite moderator pebbles and show that little mixing occurs down to a 1:2 diameter ratio. We analyze the mean velocity, diffusion and mixing, local ordering and porosity (from Voronoi volumes), the residence-time distribution, and the effects of wall friction and discuss implications for reactor design and the basic physics of granular flow.

Chris H. Rycroft; Gary S. Grest; James W. Landry; Martin Z. Bazant

2006-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

250

Analysis of granular flow in a pebble-bed nuclear reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pebble-bed nuclear reactor technology, which is currently being revived around the world, raises fundamental questions about dense granular flow in silos. A typical reactor core is composed of graphite fuel pebbles, which drain very slowly in a continuous refueling process. Pebble flow is poorly understood and not easily accessible to experiments, and yet it has a major impact on reactor physics. To address this problem, we perform full-scale, discrete-element simulations in realistic geometries, with up to 440000 frictional, viscoelastic 6-cm-diam spheres draining in a cylindrical vessel of diameter 3.5m and height 10m with bottom funnels angled at 30° or 60°. We also simulate a bidisperse core with a dynamic central column of smaller graphite moderator pebbles and show that little mixing occurs down to a 1:2 diameter ratio. We analyze the mean velocity, diffusion and mixing, local ordering and porosity (from Voronoi volumes), the residence-time distribution, and the effects of wall friction and discuss implications for reactor design and the basic physics of granular flow.

Chris H. Rycroft; Gary S. Grest; James W. Landry; Martin Z. Bazant

2006-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

251

Effective thermal conductivity for anisotropic granular porous media using fractal concepts  

SciTech Connect

The use of granular porous media in chemical processes, thermal insulation, heat exchangers, and nuclear reactor fuel rods has led to the development of correlations for thermophysical properties, such as thermal conductivity. These correlations are essential in the prediction of heat and mass transfer involving porous media. Analytical correlations are derived for the effective thermal conductivity of anisotropic, Granular Porous Media (GPM). The correlations proposed, which can be apply in general to any porous media material, are used to determine the effective thermal conductivity of GPM that are formed by semi-cylindrical ice particles. Pictures of the cross-section of GPM provide digital data for measuring local fractal dimensions. Local fractal dimensions are used to determine an equivalent three-dimensional Representative Unit Cell (RUC) for the GPM considered. A simplified analysis of heat conduction at the RUC level provide an analytical expression for the effective heat transfer coefficient. Estimates for the effective thermal conductivity by the use of the models are discussed and compared with various models known in literature. Finally, results for anisotropic thermal conductivities, which are obtained by the use of fractal correlations, are discussed.

Sabau, A.S.; Tao, Y.X.; Liu, G.; Vidhuvalavan, G.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Clustering in rapid granular flows of binary and continuous particle size distributions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The dynamic clustering phenomenon in two-dimensional simple shear flows has been investigated using molecular dynamic simulations of systems containing binary and continuous size distributions of equal-material-density particles. Particular attention has been paid to two questions: (1) Does the presence of size nonuniformities serve to enhance or attenuate the presence of clusters? (2) Do particles of a given size preferentially segregate within the clusters? With respect to the first question, the prominence of clustered regions increases with increasing deviation from the monodisperse limit in the case of both binary and continuous size distributions. With respect to the second question, the larger particles of both binary and continuous size distributions are consistently observed to segregate within the transient clustered regions. Further investigation of granular temperatures within the clustered and dilute regions reveals that this segregation is consistent with previously observed temperature-driven segregation in steady-state systems; large particles favor the lower-temperature (clustered) regions. Moreover, observation of clustering length scales suggests that large particles may favor the center of the clustered regions, where granular temperatures are expected to reach a minimum.

R. Brent Rice and Christine M. Hrenya

2010-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

253

Is Dissipative Granular Gas in Knudsen Regime Excited by Vibration Biphasic ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Compatibility between a recent model (Poudres & Grains 15, 1-17, (2005)) of vibrated granular dissipative gas and recent experimental results in micro-gravity is investigated. It is found a good agreement for the distribution of impacts, which is found to vary exponentially as P(mv) = exp-(v/vo), both experimentally and theoretically; hence it confirms the distribution f(v) of speeds varying as (1/v) exp(-v/vo). However, some discrepancy is found for the variation of the total number of impacts with the number of balls contained in the cell. This is attributed to the existence of a second phase of balls "nearly at rest". Compatibility between results from granular gas experiments in micro-gravity and experiments on Maxwell's demon in 1-g is also discussed. The main idea, which allows understanding these results is to consider the piston as playing the role of an impact generator or of a "velostat" instead of a thermostat. It is shown also that the model predicts completely different behaviours in 1g and in 0g. Pacs # : 05.45.-a, 45.50.-j, 45.70.-n, 81.70.Bt, 81.70.Ha, 83.10.Pp

P. Evesque

2005-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

254

Extraction of Force-Chain Network Architecture in Granular Materials Using Community Detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Force chains form heterogeneous physical structures that can constrain the mechanical stability and acoustic transmission of granular media. However, despite their relevance for predicting bulk properties of materials, there is no agreement on a quantitative description of force chains. Consequently, it is difficult to compare the force-chain structures in different materials or experimental conditions. To address this challenge, we treat granular materials as spatially-embedded networks in which the nodes (particles) are connected by weighted edges that represent contact forces. We use techniques from community detection, which is a type of clustering, to find groups of closely connected particles. By using a geographical null model that is constrained by the particles' contact network, we extract chain-like structures that are reminiscent of force chains. We propose three diagnostics to measure these chain-like structures, and we demonstrate the utility of these diagnostics for identifying and characterizing classes of force-chain network architectures in various materials. To illustrate our methods, we describe how force-chain architecture depends on pressure for both laboratory experiments and numerically-generated frictionless packings. By resolving individual force chains, we quantify statistical properties of force-chain shape and strength, which are potentially crucial diagnostics of bulk properties (including material stability). These methods facilitate quantitative comparisons between different particulate systems, regardless of whether they are measured experimentally or numerically.

Danielle S. Bassett; Eli T. Owens; Mason A. Porter; M. Lisa Manning; Karen E. Daniels

2014-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

255

Carbon Emissions: Iron and Steel Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Iron and Steel Industry Iron and Steel Industry Carbon Emissions in the Iron and Steel Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 3312) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 39.9 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 10.7% -- Nonfuel Emissions: 22.2 MMTC Total First Use of Energy: 1,649 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 7.6% Nonfuel Use of Energy: 886 trillion Btu (53.7%) -- Coal: 858 trillion Btu (used to make coke) Carbon Intensity: 24.19 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 39.9 Coal 22.7

256

Patterns of Iron Use in Societal Evolution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The iron stock needed to sustain people’s lives tends to saturate in industrialized countries around 8?12 tons per capita, indicating a long-term potential for the steel industry to dramatically shift resource use from primary (ore) to secondary (scrap) raw materials and thereby significantly save energy and greenhouse gas emissions. ... Figure 3. Per capita iron stocks in use versus per capita GDP PPP (1990 international dollars). ... Speculations about an absolute decoupling in steel demand, however, cannot be supported by this study: none of the analyzed countries shows a shrinking per-capita iron stock in use, which would be needed for long-term absolute decoupling of steel demand. ...

Daniel B. Müller; Tao Wang; Benjamin Duval

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Marine Diatoms Survive Iron Droughts in the Ocean by Storing Iron in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Marine Diatoms Survive Iron Droughts in Marine Diatoms Survive Iron Droughts in the Ocean by Storing Iron in Ferritin Almost all organisms require iron as a co-factor in numerous metalloproteins and enzymes. In particular, phytoplankton, which are aquatic, free-drifting, single-celled organisms that can harvest energy from the sun, have an elevated demand for iron due to the large role it plays in their photosynthetic machinery. In 30-40% of the world's oceans iron concentrations are low enough to limit the growth of phytoplankton (Martin and Fitzwater 1988; Moore et al. 2002). New sources of iron to these regions are sporadic and typically include atmospheric dust deposition or weak upwelling of deep waters. figure 1 Figure 1: A light micrograph of the marine pennate diatom Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries. Shown are one whole cell and two partial cells connected at the cell tips in a chain. The brown components of the cells are the chloroplasts. Scale bar = 5 mm. (Image courtesy of K. Holtermann)

258

Importance of Iron Mineralogy to Aerosol Solubility: Potential Effects of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Importance of Iron Mineralogy to Importance of Iron Mineralogy to Aerosol Solubility: Potential Effects of Aerosol Source on Ocean Photosynthesis figure 1 Figure 1. Dust storm blowing glacial dusts from the Copper River Basin of southeast Alaska into the North Pacific Ocean, which depends on this and other external iron sources to support its biological communities. (Image: NASA MODIS satellite image, Nov. 1, 2006. http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/IOTD/view.php?id=7094) Iron is one of the most important elements to life. Despite its paramount importance and relative abundance, dissolved iron concentrations are often very low, in part due to the formation of very stable iron minerals in most oxidizing environments. Since soluble iron is available to living organisms, iron deficiencies are widespread, and the factors that influence

259

Decoupling of Iron and Phosphate in the Global Payal Parekh  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with weaker wind stresses leads to a decrease in surface [PO4] and [Fe] in the Southern Ocean due (reviewed by Karl et al., 2002; Mills et al., 2004) have a greater iron requirement and iron availability

Follows, Mick

260

Iron oxide nanoparticles as a contrast agent for thermoacoustic tomography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

radiation. The addition of an exogenous contrast agent improves image quality by more effectively converting microwave energy to heat. The use of iron oxide nanoparticles in MRI applications has been explored but super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles...

Keho, Aaron Lopez

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granular zero-valent iron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Steam reforming utilizing iron oxide catalyst  

SciTech Connect

High activity steam reforming iron oxide catalysts are described. Such catalysts can be unsupported utilizing at least 90% by weight iron oxide and various modifiers (Ai/sub 2/O/sub 3/, K/sub 2/O, CaO, SiO/sub 2/) or unmodified and supported on such things as alumina, CaO impregnated alumina, and lanthanum stabilized alumina. When used in steam reformers such as autothermal and tubular steam reformers, these catalysts demonstrate much improved resistance to carbon plugging.

Setzer, H. T.; Bett, J. A. S.

1985-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

262

Lithium Iron Phosphate Composites for Lithium Batteries | Argonne...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lithium Iron Phosphate Composites for Lithium Batteries Technology available for licensing: Inexpensive, electrochemically active phosphate compounds with high functionality for...

263

Granular flow through an aperture: Pressure and flow rate are independent. M. A. Aguirre1,2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REV IEW CO PY N O T FO R D ISTRIBU TIO N Granular flow through an aperture: Pressure and flow rate in the Physics and Mechanics of Fluids). 3 Instituto de F´isica de L´iquidos y Sistemas Biol´ogicos (UNLP, A. Calvo has passed away during the preparation stages of this article. We simultaneously measure

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

264

Role of friction in pattern formation in oscillated granular layers Sung Joon Moon, # J. B. Swift, and Harry L. Swinney  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Role of friction in pattern formation in oscillated granular layers Sung Joon Moon, # J. B. Swift grains. Our molecular dynamics simu­ lations reveal that friction is essential for realistic modeling at a container acceleration about 30% smaller than that observed in experiments and simulations with friction

Texas at Austin. University of

265

Role of friction in pattern formation in oscillated granular layers Sung Joon Moon,* J. B. Swift, and Harry L. Swinney  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Role of friction in pattern formation in oscillated granular layers Sung Joon Moon,* J. B. Swift as there are no elastic grains. Our molecular dynamics simulations reveal that friction is essential for realistic with friction. More importantly, even though square and hexagonal patterns form for a wide range

Texas at Austin. University of

266

Dynamic fracture of granular material under quasi-static loading , The Institute of Earth Sciences, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dynamic fracture of granular material under quasi-static loading Amir Sagy1 , The Institute;Abstract The dynamics of rapid fracture in heterogeneous grainy media are studied in a series of laboratory experiments in which artificial rock slab is fractured under conditions of uniaxial tension. By performing

Fineberg, Jay

267

PHYSICAL REVIEW E 87, 032204 (2013) Energy equipartition in two-dimensional granular systems with spherical intruders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- and S-wave energy densities equilibrate in a unique way that is independent of the detailsPHYSICAL REVIEW E 87, 032204 (2013) Energy equipartition in two-dimensional granular systems, Technion City, Haifa 3200, Israel (Received 21 June 2012; published 14 March 2013) We study the effects

Daraio, Chiara

268

2, 537549, 2005 Dissolved iron input  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the semblance of a dissolved load are coagulated and settled as their freshwater carrier is mixed with seawater of the iron load from the suspended and dissolved mobile fraction to storage in the sediments was measured masses beyond the mixing zone, a process known as the "marine biological carbon pump". This export5

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

269

Synthesis and consolidation of iron nanopowders  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A microwave plasma processing technique was used to synthesize iron nanopowders. The average particle size of these powders was ~10 nm and the surface area was measured to be 42m2/g. Powder production rates as high as 50 gm/hour were achieved. Magnetic property measurements on iron nanopowders yielded coercivities as high as 60 kA/m at 4 K, which decreased to ~0 A/m (a superparamagnetic transition) at room temperature. In this paper, the microwave plasma processing technique has been compared with other nanopowder synthesis techniques. Since the successful application of nanomaterials depends highly on the processing technology, results from consolidation studies on iron nanopowders are also presented. Iron nanopowders were consolidated to study performance parameters such as density, grain growth and other morphological changes. The nanopowder was consolidated using Plasma Pressure Consolidation (P2C) technique to 95% density, at a temperature and pressure of 850 °C and 63 \\{MPa\\} respectively. Microwave plasma synthesis is capable of producing metallic and ceramic nanopowders, which will sustain interest in research areas including magnetic storage, nano-fabrication of electronic materials and nanoglass, besides the field of catalysis.

R. Kalyanaraman; Sang Yoo; M.S. Krupashankara; T.S. Sudarshan; R.J. Dowding

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Iron oxide red wastewater treatment and recycling of iron-containing sludge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The paper presents a wastewater treatment process and recycling of iron sludge from wastewater treatment for iron oxide red production. Results show that: (1) Sludge from wastewater treatment process under the operating parameters: 1.84 g/L of NaOH dosage, 10 mins of aeration with flow rate of 1 L/min and 150 mins of sediment time is potential for seed crystal preparation and excellent iron oxide red product can be obtained in the secondary oxidation under condition of 85 °C, 68 h of reaction time and 150 mL/min of airflow rate, (2) In practical engineering, the average removal rate of Fe2+ and SS and chroma of effluent is 99.75%, 86.7% and less than 40 times, respectively, and all items of product satisfy demands of industrial standards, (3) Compared with the original wastewater treatment, the new process can save the cost of wastewater treatment and earn extra 20.0 dollars for a ton of iron oxide red product and then both economic benefit and environmental protection can be realized by this process. It is proved that the novel method is reliable, economical and promising in iron oxide red industry and cleaner production of iron oxide red is feasible.

Zhenguo Chen; Xiaojun Wang; Qilong Ge; Guanchao Guo

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Competition of Brazil nut effect, buoyancy, and inelasticity induced segregation in a granular mixture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It has been recently reported that a granular mixture in which grains differ in their restitution coefficients presents segregation: the more inelastic particles sink to the bottom. When other segregation mechanisms as buoyancy and the Brazil nut effect are present, the inelasticity induced segregation can compete with them. First, a detailed analysis, based on numerical simulations of two dimensional systems, of the competition between buoyancy and the inelasticity induced segregation is presented, finding that there is a transition line in the parameter space that determines which mechanism is dominant. In the case of neutrally buoyant particles having different sizes the inelasticity induced segregation can compete with the Brazil nut effect (BNE). Reverse Brazil nut effect (RBNE) could be obtained at large inelasticities of the intruder. At intermediate values, BNE and RBNE coexist and large inelastic particles are found both near the bottom and at the top of the system.

Ricardo Brito; Rodrigo Soto

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

272

Validation of GEANT4 Monte Carlo Models with a Highly Granular Scintillator-Steel Hadron Calorimeter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Calorimeters with a high granularity are a fundamental requirement of the Particle Flow paradigm. This paper focuses on the prototype of a hadron calorimeter with analog readout, consisting of thirty-eight scintillator layers alternating with steel absorber planes. The scintillator plates are finely segmented into tiles individually read out via Silicon Photomultipliers. The presented results are based on data collected with pion beams in the energy range from 8GeV to 100GeV. The fine segmentation of the sensitive layers and the high sampling frequency allow for an excellent reconstruction of the spatial development of hadronic showers. A comparison between data and Monte Carlo simulations is presented, concerning both the longitudinal and lateral development of hadronic showers and the global response of the calorimeter. The performance of several GEANT4 physics lists with respect to these observables is evaluated.

C. Adloff; J. Blaha; J. -J. Blaising; C. Drancourt; A. Espargilière; R. Gaglione; N. Geffroy; Y. Karyotakis; J. Prast; G. Vouters; K. Francis; J. Repond; J. Schlereth; J. Smith; L. Xia; E. Baldolemar; J. Li; S. T. Park; M. Sosebee; A. P. White; J. Yu; T. Buanes; G. Eigen; Y. Mikami; N. K. Watson; G. Mavromanolakis; M. A. Thomson; D. R. Ward; W. Yan; D. Benchekroun; A. Hoummada; Y. Khoulaki; J. Apostolakis; A. Dotti; G. Folger; V. Ivantchenko; V. Uzhinskiy; M. Benyamna; C. Cârloganu; F. Fehr; P. Gay; S. Manen; L. Royer; G. C. Blazey; A. Dyshkant; J. G. R. Lima; V. Zutshi; J. -Y. Hostachy; L. Morin; U. Cornett; D. David; G. Falley; K. Gadow; P. Göttlicher; C. Günter; B. Hermberg; S. Karstensen; F. Krivan; A. -I. Lucaci-Timoce; S. Lu; B. Lutz; S. Morozov; V. Morgunov; M. Reinecke; F. Sefkow; P. Smirnov; M. Terwort; A. Vargas-Trevino; N. Feege; E. Garutti; I. Marchesinik; M. Ramilli; P. Eckert; T. Harion; A. Kaplan; H. -Ch. Schultz-Coulon; W. Shen; R. Stamen; B. Bilki; E. Norbeck; Y. Onel; G. W. Wilson; K. Kawagoe; P. D. Dauncey; A. -M. Magnan; V. Bartsch; M. Wing; F. Salvatore; E. Calvo Alamillo; M. -C. Fouz; J. Puerta-Pelayo; B. Bobchenko; M. Chadeeva; M. Danilov; A. Epifantsev; O. Markin; R. Mizuk; E. Novikov; V. Popov; V. Rusinov; E. Tarkovsky; N. Kirikova; V. Kozlov; P. Smirnov; Y. Soloviev; P. Buzhan; A. Ilyin; V. Kantserov; V. Kaplin; A. Karakash; E. Popova; V. Tikhomirov; C. Kiesling; K. Seidel; F. Simon; C. Soldner; M. Szalay; M. Tesar; L. Weuste; M. S. Amjad; J. Bonis; S. Callier; S. Conforti di Lorenzo; P. Cornebise; Ph. Doublet; F. Dulucq; J. Fleury; T. Frisson; N. van der Kolk; H. Li; G. Martin-Chassard; F. Richard; Ch. de la Taille; R. Pöschl; L. Raux; J. Rouëné; N. Seguin-Moreau; M. Anduze; V. Boudry; J-C. Brient; D. Jeans; P. Mora de Freitas; G. Musat; M. Reinhard; M. Ruan; H. Videau; B. Bulanek; J. Zacek; J. Cvach; P. Gallus; M. Havranek; M. Janata; J. Kvasnicka; D. Lednicky; M. Marcisovsky; I. Polak; J. Popule; L. Tomasek; M. Tomasek; P. Ruzicka; P. Sicho; J. Smolik; V. Vrba; J. Zalesak; B. Belhorma; H. Ghazlane; T. Takeshita; S. Uozumi; M. Götze; O. Hartbrich; J. Sauer; S. Weber; C. Zeitnitz

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

273

Non-Gaussian Resistance Noise near Electrical Breakdown in Granular Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The distribution of resistance fluctuations of conducting thin films with granular structure near electrical breakdown is studied by numerical simulations. The film is modeled as a resistor network in a steady state determined by the competition between two biased processes, breaking and recovery. Systems of different sizes and with different levels of internal disorder are considered. Sharp deviations from a Gaussian distribution are found near breakdown and the effect increases with the degree of internal disorder. However, we show that in general this non-Gaussianity is related to the finite size of the system and vanishes in the large size limit. Nevertheless, near the critical point of the conductor-insulator transition, deviations from Gaussianity persist when the size is increased and the distribution of resistance fluctuations is well fitted by the universal Bramwell-Holdsworth-Pinton distribution.

C. Pennetta; E. Alfinito; L. Reggiani; S. Ruffo

2004-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

274

X-ray tomography system to investigate granular materials during mechanical loading  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We integrate a small and portable medical x-ray device with mechanical testing equipment to enable in-situ, non-invasive measurements of a granular material's response to mechanical loading. We employ an orthopedic C-arm as the x-ray source and detector to image samples mounted in the materials tester. We discuss the design of a custom rotation stage, which allows for sample rotation and tomographic reconstruction under applied compressive stress. We then discuss the calibration of the system for 3d computed tomography, as well as the subsequent image reconstruction process. Using this system to reconstruct packings of 3d-printed particles, we resolve packing features with 0.52 mm resolution in a (60 mm)$^3$ field of view. By analyzing the performance bounds of the system, we demonstrate that the reconstructions exhibit only moderate noise.

Athanasios G Athanassiadis; Patrick J. La Rivière; Emil Sidky; Charles Pelizzari; Xiaochuan Pan; Heinrich M. Jaeger

2014-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

275

Electrical conductivity in granular media and Branly’s coherer: A simple experiment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We show how a simple laboratory experiment can illustrate certain electrical transport properties of metallic granular media. At a low critical external voltage a transition from an insulating to a conductive state is observed. This transition comes from an electro-thermal coupling in the vicinity of the microcontacts between grains where microwelding occurs. Our apparatus allows us to obtain an implicit determination of the microcontact temperature which is analogous to the use of a resistive thermometer. The experiment also helps us explain an old problem Branly’s coherer effect which was used as a radio wavedetector for the first wireless radio transmission and is based on the sensitivity of the conductivity of metal filings to an electromagnetic wave.

Eric Falcon; Bernard Castaing

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

SUPERSONIC MAGNETIC UPFLOWS IN GRANULAR CELLS OBSERVED WITH SUNRISE/IMAX  

SciTech Connect

Using the IMaX instrument on board the SUNRISE stratospheric balloon telescope, we have detected extremely shifted polarization signals around the Fe I 5250.217 A spectral line within granules in the solar photosphere. We interpret the velocities associated with these events as corresponding to supersonic and magnetic upflows. In addition, they are also related to the appearance of opposite polarities and highly inclined magnetic fields. This suggests that they are produced by the reconnection of emerging magnetic loops through granular upflows. The events occupy an average area of 0.046 arcsec{sup 2} and last for about 80 s, with larger events having longer lifetimes. These supersonic events occur at a rate of 1.3 x 10{sup -5} occurrences per second per arcsec{sup 2}.

Borrero, J. M.; Schlichenmaier, R.; Schmidt, W., E-mail: borrero@kis.uni-freiburg.d, E-mail: schliche@kis.uni-freiburg.d, E-mail: wolfgang@kis.uni-freiburg.d [Kiepenheuer-Institut fuer Sonnenphysik, Schoeneckstr. 6, D-79110 Freiburg (Germany)

2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

277

Supersonic Magnetic Upflows in Granular Cells Observed with SUNRISE/IMAX  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using the IMaX instrument on board the SUNRISE stratospheric balloon telescope, we have detected extremely shifted polarization signals around the Fe I 5250.217 Å spectral line within granules in the solar photosphere. We interpret the velocities associated with these events as corresponding to supersonic and magnetic upflows. In addition, they are also related to the appearance of opposite polarities and highly inclined magnetic fields. This suggests that they are produced by the reconnection of emerging magnetic loops through granular upflows. The events occupy an average area of 0.046 arcsec2 and last for about 80 s, with larger events having longer lifetimes. These supersonic events occur at a rate of 1.3 ? 10–5 occurrences per second per arcsec2.

J. M. Borrero; V. Martínez-Pillet; R. Schlichenmaier; S. K. Solanki; J. A. Bonet; J. C. del Toro Iniesta; W. Schmidt; P. Barthol; A. Gandorfer; V. Domingo; M. Knölker

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Effect of storage time on the flowability of biomass-coal granular system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The influence of storage time on the flowability of biomass-coal blends is experimental and theoretical investigated. The results show that there exists exponential relationship between discharge rate and storage time in an appropriate rice straw mass fraction range (less than 10%). In addition, the mechanism of gravity discharge rate variation for biomass-coal blends is theoretically investigated by analyzing the porosity variation of particle bed. The mechanism of porosity variation in the binary granular system is theoretically analyzed on the basis of emergent gas, mutual compression and particle rearrangement, and a mathematical model has been developed which agrees well with the experimental results. Furthermore, relaxation effect is proposed, which is mainly induced by elasticity of rice straw particle and cohesion of blends. Relaxation time is the most important parameters determining this effect. The latter decreases with increasing of coal particle size and biomass mass fraction.

Zhiguo Guo; Xueli Chen; Haifeng Liu; Haifeng Lu; Xiaolei Guo; Xin Gong

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Power-law rheology and the dynamical heterogeneity in a sheared granular material  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rheology of a granular material at the jamming density is investigated using molecular dynamics simulation. It is found that shear stress exhibits power-law dependence on shear rate with a nontrivial exponent. Due to the criticality of the jamming transition point, finite-size effect is observed in smaller systems at lower shear rates. Finite-size scaling indicates the correlation length algebraically diverges in the zero shear rate limit. It is also found that the dynamical susceptibility monotonically decreases with time so that the dynamical heterogeneity is detected by a two-point correlation function. Several exponents that describe rheology, the correlation length, and the amplitude of the dynamical susceptibility are estimated.

Takahiro Hatano

2008-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

280

Dynamic synchrotron X-ray imaging study of effective temperature in a vibrated granular medium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a dynamic synchrotron X-ray imaging study of the effective temperature $T_{eff}$ in a vibrated granular medium. By tracking the directed motion and the fluctuation dynamics of the tracers inside, we obtained $T_{eff}$ of the system using Einstein relation. We found that as the system unjams with increasing vibration intensities $\\Gamma$, the structural relaxation time $\\tau$ increases substantially which can be fitted by an Arrhenius law using $T_{eff}$. And the characteristic energy scale of structural relaxation yielded by the Arrhenius fitting is $E = 0.21 \\pm 0.02$ $pd^3$, where $p$ is the pressure and $d$ is the background particle diameter, which is consistent with those from hard sphere simulations in which the structural relaxation happens via the opening up of free volume against pressure.

Yixin Cao; Xiaodan Zhang; Binquan Kou; Xiangting Li; Xianghui Xiao; Kamel Fezzaa; Yujie Wang

2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granular zero-valent iron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

EFFECT OF ENDOSPERM HARDNESS ON AN ETHANOL PROCESS USING A GRANULAR STARCH HYDROLYZING ENZYME  

SciTech Connect

Granular starch hydrolyzing enzymes (GSHE) can hydrolyze starch at low temperature (32°C). The dry grind process using GSHE (GSH process) has fewer unit operations and no changes in process conditions (pH 4.0 and 32°C) compared to the conventional process because it dispenses with the cooking and liquefaction step. In this study, the effects of endosperm hardness, protease, urea, and GSHE levels on GSH process were evaluated. Ground corn, soft endosperm, and hard endosperm were processed using two GSHE levels (0.1 and 0.4 mL per 100 g ground material) and four treatments of protease and urea addition. Soft and hard endosperm materials were obtained by grinding and sifting flaking grits from a dry milling pilot plant; classifications were confirmed using scanning electron microscopy. During 72 h of simultaneous granular starch hydrolysis and fermentation (GSHF), ethanol and glucose profiles were determined using HPLC. Soft endosperm resulted in higher final ethanol concentrations compared to ground corn or hard endosperm. Addition of urea increased final ethanol concentrations for soft and hard endosperm. Protease addition increased ethanol concentrations and fermentation rates for soft endosperm, hard endosperm, and ground corn. The effect of protease addition on ethanol concentrations and fermentation rates was most predominant for soft endosperm, less for hard endosperm, and least for ground corn. Samples (soft endosperm, hard endosperm, or corn) with protease resulted in higher (1.0% to 10.5% v/v) ethanol concentration compared to samples with urea. The GSH process with protease requires little or no urea addition. For fermentation of soft endosperm, GSHE dose can be reduced. Due to nutrients (lipids, minerals, and soluble proteins) present in corn that enhance yeast growth, ground corn fermented faster at the beginning than hard and soft endosperm.

P. Wang; W. Liu, D. B; Johnston, K. D; Rausch, S. J; Schmidt, M. E; Tumbleson, V. Singh

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Shear strength and force transmission in granular media with rolling resistance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We investigate a class of granular materials characterized by the possibility of interlocking between the particles. The interlocking is modeled by its effect through rolling resistance depending on relative rotation and normal force at the contact points and involving a single parameter analogous to the sliding friction coefficient. The model, which is introduced in the framework of the contact dynamics method, is applied to simulate the simple shear of a large granular sample. We present a detailed analysis regarding the influence of rolling and sliding friction parameters on the macroscopic response in terms of shear strength, fabric properties, and force transmission. Interestingly, two distinct regimes can be distinguished in which the steady-state shear strength is controlled by either rolling resistance or sliding friction. The relative contributions of rolling and sliding contacts to the shear strength are consistent with the same two regimes. Interlocking strongly affects the force network by enhancing the arching effect and thus increasing the relative importance of weak contact forces and torques, which is reflected in a decreasing power-law probability distribution of the contact forces and torques below the mean. Due to the combined effect of friction and interlocking, the force-carrying backbone takes an increasingly columnar aspect involving a low fraction of particles. Our data suggest that the nature of the weak contact network is strongly affected by the formation of these columns of particles which do not need to be propped laterally. In particular, in the limit of high rolling resistance and sliding friction, the role of the weak network of contacts is no longer to prop the force chains, but, like the strong contact network, to actively sustain the deviatoric load imposed on the system.

Nicolas Estrada; Alfredo Taboada; Farhang Radjaï

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Remediation of the Highland Drive South Ravine, Port Hope, Ontario: Contaminated Groundwater Discharge Management Using Permeable Reactive Barriers and Contaminated Sediment Removal - 13447  

SciTech Connect

The Highland Drive South Ravine (HDSR) is the discharge area for groundwater originating from the Highland Drive Landfill, the Pine Street North Extension (PSNE) roadbed parts of the Highland Drive roadbed and the PSNE Consolidation Site that contain historical low-level radioactive waste (LLRW). The contaminant plume from these LLRW sites contains elevated concentrations of uranium and arsenic and discharges with groundwater to shallow soils in a wet discharge area within the ravine, and directly to Hunt's Pond and Highland Drive South Creek, which are immediately to the south of the wet discharge area. Remediation and environmental management plans for HDSR have been developed within the framework of the Port Hope Project and the Port Hope Area Initiative. The LLRW sites will be fully remediated by excavation and relocation to a new Long-Term Waste Management Facility (LTWMF) as part of the Port Hope Project. It is projected, however, that the groundwater contaminant plume between the remediated LLRW sites and HDSR will persist for several hundreds of years. At the HDSR, sediment remediation within Hunt's Ponds and Highland Drive South Creek, excavation of the existing and placement of clean fill will be undertaken to remove current accumulations of solid-phase uranium and arsenic associated with the upper 0.75 m of soil in the wet discharge area, and permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) will be used for in situ treatment of contaminated groundwater to prevent the ongoing discharge of uranium and arsenic to the area in HDSR where shallow soil excavation and replacement has been undertaken. Bench-scale testing using groundwater from HDSR has confirmed excellent treatment characteristics for both uranium and arsenic using permeable reactive mixtures containing granular zero-valent iron (ZVI). A sequence of three PRBs containing ZVI and sand in backfilled trenches has been designed to intercept the groundwater flow system prior to its discharge to the ground surface and the creek and ponds in the HDSR. The first of the PRBs will be installed immediately up-gradient of the wet discharge area approximately 50 m from the creek, the other two will be installed across the area of shallow soil replacement, and all will extend from ground surface to the base of the water table aquifer through which the impacted groundwater flows. The PRBs have been designed to provide the removal of uranium and arsenic for decades, although the capacity of the treatment mixture for contaminant removal suggests that a longer period of treatment may be feasible. The environmental management plan includes an allowance for on-going monitoring, and replacement of a PRB(s) as might be required. (authors)

Smyth, David; Roos, Gillian [Golder Associates Ltd., 2390 Argentia Road, Mississauga, ON L5N 5Z7 (Canada)] [Golder Associates Ltd., 2390 Argentia Road, Mississauga, ON L5N 5Z7 (Canada); Ferguson Jones, Andrea [MMM Group Ltd., 100 Commerce Valley Drive West, Thornhill, ON L3T 0A1 (Canada)] [MMM Group Ltd., 100 Commerce Valley Drive West, Thornhill, ON L3T 0A1 (Canada); Case, Glenn [AECL Port Hope Area Initiative Management Office, 115 Toronto Road, Port Hope, ON L1A 3S4 (Canada)] [AECL Port Hope Area Initiative Management Office, 115 Toronto Road, Port Hope, ON L1A 3S4 (Canada); Yule, Adam [Public Works and Government Services Canada, 4900 Yonge Street, 11th Floor, Toronto, ON, M2N 6A6 (Canada)] [Public Works and Government Services Canada, 4900 Yonge Street, 11th Floor, Toronto, ON, M2N 6A6 (Canada)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Iron-57 nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts of hindered iron porphyrins. Ruffling as a possible mechanism for d-orbital energy level inversion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Iron-57 nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts of hindered iron porphyrins. ... Ruffling as a possible mechanism for d-orbital energy level inversion ...

Lars Baltzer; Marie Landergren

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Removal of Technetium, Carbon Tetrachloride, and Metals from DOE Properties - Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This research is a three year project involving close collaboration between chemists at Pennsylvania State University and materials scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The goal of the project is the development and characterization of supported reducing agents, and solid waste forms derived from them, which will be effective in remediation of aqueous wastes. The work follows the recent discovery that zero-valent metals, such as iron, are effective decontaminants for waste streams containing chlorinated hydrocarbons. Preliminary data, obtained at Penn State and elsewhere, have shown that the same strategy will be effective in reducing soluble compounds containing toxic metals (technetium, lead, mercury, and chromium) to insoluble forms. The Penn State group has prepared a new class of powerful reducing agents, called Ferragels, which consist of finely divided zero-valent metals on high surface area supports. Because the rate of the surface oxidation-reduction reaction depends on available surface area, Ferragels are more effective in every case tested to date than unsupported metals. The project will further develop and investigate the application of these composite materials to problems relevant to the DOE-EM mission, namely the detoxification of waste streams containing technetium, carbon tetrachloride, and toxic metal ions. The Penn State group will work closely with the PNNL group to prepare materials that are compatible with the highly corrosive liquid fraction of Hanford site tank waste, to conduct tests with waste simulants containing technetium, and to formulate and characterize vitrified waste forms derived from these materials.

Mallouk, Thomas E.

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Magnetism in Iron at High Temperatures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Magnetism in iron at high temperature is investigated by calculating the total electronic band-structure energy for four types of spin arrangements. A slow smooth spatial variation of spin direction costs relatively little energy and the atomic moment m is reduced only ? 10%. More rapid variations have considerably higher energy, which may explain the high degree of short-range order and small ?m observed at T?TC. Other aspects are also discussed.

M. V. You; V. Heine; A. J. Holden; P. J. Lin-Chung

1980-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

287

Magnetism and Superconductivity in Iron Pnictides  

SciTech Connect

The discovery of high temperature superconductivity in iron pnictides and chalcogenides has resulted in surprising new insights into high temperature superconductivity and its relationship with magnetism. Here we provide an overview of some of what is known about these materials and in particular about the interplay of magnetism and superconductivity in them. Similarities and contrasts with cuprate superconductors are emphasized and the superconducting pairing is discussed within the framework of spin fluctuation induced pairing.

Singh, David J [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

The iron abundance of the Magellanic Bridge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-resolution HST ultra-violet spectra for five B-type stars in the Magellanic Bridge and in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds have been analysed to estimate their iron abundances. Those for the Clouds are lower than estimates obtained from late-type stars or the optical lines in B-type stars by approximately 0.5 dex. This may be due to systematic errors possibly arising from non-LTE effects or from errors in the atomic data as similar low Fe abundances having previously been reported from the analysis of the ultra-violet spectra of Galactic early-type stars. The iron abundance estimates for all three Bridge targets appear to be significantly lower than those found for the SMC and LMC by approximately -0.5 dex and -0.8 dex respectively and these differential results should not be affected by any systematic errors present in the absolute abundance estimates. These differential iron abundance estimates are consistent with the underabundances for C, N, O, Mg and Si of approximately -1.1 dex relative to our Galaxy previously found in our Bridge targets. The implications of these very low metal abundances for the Magellanic Bridge are discussed in terms of metal deficient material being stripped from the SMC.

P. L. Dufton; R. S. I. Ryans; H. M. A. Thompson; R. A. Street

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Correlation effects in the iron pnictides  

SciTech Connect

One of the central questions about the iron pnictides concerns the extent to which their electrons are strongly correlated. Here we address this issue through the phenomenology of the charge transport and dynamics, single-electron excitation spectrum, and magnetic ordering and dynamics. We outline the evidence that the parent compounds, while metallic, have electron interactions that are sufficiently strong to produce incipient Mott physics. In other words, in terms of the strength of electron correlations compared to the kinetic energy, the iron pnictides are closer to intermediately-coupled systems lying at the boundary between itinerancy and localization, such as V{sub 2}O{sub 3} a or Se-doped NiS{sub 2} , rather than to simple antiferromagnetic metals like Cr. This level of electronic correlations produces a new small parameter for controlled theoretical analyses, namely the fraction of the single-electron spectral weight that lies in the coherent part. Using this expansion parameter, we construct the effective low-energy Hamiltonian and discuss its implications for the magnetic order and magnetic quantum criticality. Finally, this approach sharpens the notion of magnetic frustration for such a metallic system, and brings about a multi band matrix t-J{sub 1}-J{sub 2} model for the carrier-doped iron pnictides.

Zhu, Jian-xin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Si, Qimiao [RICE UNIV; Abrahams, Elihu [RUTGERS UNIV; Dai, Jianhui [ZHEJIANG UNIV

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Seal welded cast iron nuclear waste container  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention identifies methods and articles designed to circumvent metallurgical problems associated with hermetically closing an all cast iron nuclear waste package by welding. It involves welding nickel-carbon alloy inserts which are bonded to the mating plug and main body components of the package. The welding inserts might be bonded in place during casting of the package components. When the waste package closure weld is made, the most severe thermal effects of the process are restricted to the nickel-carbon insert material which is far better able to accommodate them than is cast iron. Use of nickel-carbon weld inserts should eliminate any need for pre-weld and post-weld heat treatments which are a problem to apply to nuclear waste packages. Although the waste package closure weld approach described results in a dissimilar metal combination, the relative surface area of nickel-to-iron, their electrochemical relationship, and the presence of graphite in both materials will act to prevent any galvanic corrosion problem.

Filippi, Arthur M. (Pittsburgh, PA); Sprecace, Richard P. (Murrysville, PA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

INVESTIGATION OF THE RATE DEPENDENCE OF LONG-ROD PENETRATION OF GRANULAR MEDIA USING AN IMPROVED DSR ALGORITHM  

SciTech Connect

Digital Speckle Radiography (DSR), a technique allowing measurement of the full field displacement maps in a plane within an opaque material, is used to follow the temporal progression of a long-rod (100 mm long, 10 mm diameter) penetrating a granular sample at a variety of rates. Quasi-static rates of 1.5 mm/min are achieved using an Instron machine, 5 m/s is achieved using a drop-weight and velocities between 10 and 200 m/s are achieved using a light gas gun. These experiments are carried out using a series of time delayed flash x-ray images analysed with an optimised Digital Image Cross Correlation algorithm (DICC). The subsequent data sheds considerable light on the response of granular materials to penetration at a variety of rates. Particularly, a large difference in the response of the material between quasi-static and dynamic rates is observed.

Addiss, John W.; Collins, Adam L.; Proud, William G. [Fracture and Shock Physics, SMF Group, Cavendish Laboratory, J. J. Thomson Ave., Cambridge, CB3 OHE (United Kingdom)

2009-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

292

Iron phosphate compositions for containment of hazardous metal waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved iron phosphate waste form for the vitrification, containment and long-term disposition of hazardous metal waste such as radioactive nuclear waste is provided. The waste form comprises a rigid iron phosphate matrix resulting from the cooling of a melt formed by heating a batch mixture comprising the metal waste and a matrix-forming component. The waste form comprises from about 30 to about 70 weight percent P.sub.2 O.sub.5 and from about 25 to about 50 weight percent iron oxide and has metals present in the metal waste chemically dissolved therein. The concentration of iron oxide in the waste form along with a high proportion of the iron in the waste form being present as Fe.sup.3+ provide a waste form exhibiting improved chemical resistance to corrosive attack. A method for preparing the improved iron phosphate waste forms is also provided.

Day, Delbert E. (Rolla, MO)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Tap Density Equations of Granular Powders Based on the Rate Process Theory and the Free Volume Concept  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tap density of a granular powder is often linked to the flowability via Carr Index that measures how tight a powder can be packed, under an assumption that more easily packed powders usually flow poorly. Understanding how particles are packed is important for revealing why a powder flows better than others. There are two types of empirical equations that were proposed to fit the experimental data of packing fractions vs. numbers of taps in literature: The inverse logarithmic and the stretched exponential. Using the rate process theory and the free volume concept, we obtain the tap density equations and they can be reducible to the two empirical equations currently widely used in literature. Our equations could potentially fit experimental data better with an additional adjustable parameter. The tapping amplitude and frequency, the weight of the granular materials, and the environment temperature are grouped into one parameter that weighs the pace of packing process. The current results, in conjunction with our previous findings, may imply that both dry(granular)and wet(colloidal and polymeric) particle systems are governed by the same physical mechanisms in term of the role of the free volume and how particles behave (a rate controlled process).

Tian Hao

2014-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

294

Role of material properties and mesostructure on dynamic deformation and shear instability in Al-W granular composites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dynamic experiments with Al-W granular/porous composites revealed qualitatively different behavior with respect to shear localization depending on bonding between Al particles. Two-dimensional numerical modeling was used to explore the mesomechanics of the large strain dynamic deformation in Al-W granular/porous composites and explain the experimentally observed differences in shear localization between composites with various mesostructures. Specifically, the bonding between the Al particles, the porosity, the roles of the relative particle sizes of Al and W, the arrangements of the W particles, and the material properties of Al were investigated using numerical calculations. It was demonstrated in simulations that the bonding between the "soft" Al particles facilitated shear localization as seen in the experiments. Numerical calculations and experiments revealed that the mechanism of the shear localization in granular composites is mainly due to the local high strain flow of "soft" Al around the "rigid" W particles causing localized damage accumulation and subsequent growth of the meso/macro shear bands/cracks. The "rigid" W particles were the major geometrical factor determining the initiation and propagation of "kinked" shear bands in the matrix of "soft" Al particles, leaving some areas free of extensive plastic deformation as observed in experiments and numerical calculations.

K. L. Olney; P. H. Chiu; C. W. Lee; V. F. Nesterenko; D. J. Benson

2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

295

On the heat flux vector for flowing granular materials--Part I: effective thermal conductivity and background  

SciTech Connect

Heat transfer plays a major role in the processing of many particulate materials. The heat flux vector is commonly modelled by the Fourier’s law of heat conduction and for complex materials such as nonlinear fluids, porous media, or granular materials, the coeffcient of thermal conductivity is generalized by assuming that it would depend on a host of material and kinematical parameters such as temperature, shear rate, porosity or concentration, etc. In Part I, we will give a brief review of the basic equations of thermodynamics and heat transfer to indicate the importance of the modelling of the heat flux vector. We will also discuss the concept of effective thermal conductivity (ETC) in granular and porous media. In Part II, we propose and subsequently derive a properly frame-invariant constitutive relationship for the heat flux vector for a (single phase) flowing granular medium. Standard methods in continuum mechanics such as representation theorems and homogenization techniques are used. It is shown that the heat flux vector in addition to being proportional to the temperature gradient (the Fourier’s law), could also depend on the gradient of density (or volume fraction), and D (the symmetric part of the velocity gradient) in an appropriate manner. The emphasis in this paper is on the idea that for complex non-linear materials it is the heat flux vector which should be studied; obtaining or proposing generalized form of the thermal conductivity is not always appropriate or suffcient.

Massoudi, Mehrdad

2006-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

296

An Investigation of X-ray Luminosity versus Crystalline Powder Granularity  

SciTech Connect

At the High-throughput Discovery of Scintillator Materials Facility at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, scintillators are synthesized by solid-state reaction or melt mixing, forming crystalline powders. These powders are formed in various granularity and the crystal grain size affects the apparent luminosity of the scintillator. To accurately predict a "full-size" scintillator's crystal luminosity, the crystal luminosity as a function of crystal granularity size has to be known. In this study, we examine Bi{sub 4}Ge{sub 3}O{sub 12} (BGO), Lu{sub 2}SiO{sub 5}:Ce (LSO), YAlO{sub 3}:Ce (YAP:Ce), and CsBa{sub 2}I{sub 5}:Eu{sup 2+} (CBI) luminosities as a function of crystalline grain size. The highest luminosities were measured for 600- to 1000-{micro}m crystal grain sizes for BGO and LSO, for 310- to 600-{micro}m crystal grain sizes for CBI, and for crystal grains larger than 165{micro}m for YAP:Ce. Crystal grains that were larger than 1 mm had a lower packing fraction, and smaller grains were affected by internal scattering. We measured a 34% decrease in luminosity for BGO when decreasing from the 600- to 1000- {micro}m crystal grain size range down to the 20- to 36-{micro}m range. The corresponding luminosity decrease for LSO was 44% for the same grain size decrease. YAP:Ce exhibited a luminosity decrease of 47% when the grain size decreased from the 165- to 310-{micro}m crystal grains to the 20- to 36-{micro}m range, and CBI exhibited a luminosity decrease of 98% when the grain size decreased from the 310- to 600-{micro}m crystal grain range to the 36- to 50-{micro}m range. We were able to very accurately estimate full-size crystal luminosities from crystalline grains that are larger than 90 {micro}m.

Borade, Ramesh; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; ,

2012-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

297

COLLOQUIUM: How Trenton Iron and Steel Innovations Reshaped America...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mr. Clifford Zink Independent Historian Iron and steel innovations in Trenton helped transform modern life with new methods of transportation, construction, and communications....

298

Iron-based Superconductor Simulations Spin Out New Possibilities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Iron-based Superconductor Simulations Spin Out New Possibilities on Titan Rutgers team develops computational model for predicting superconductivity The 15 boxes in this image show...

299

Iron Cycling and Redox Evolution in the Precambrian  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I use compilations of phosphorous and iron data in ironused upwelling dissolved phosphorous and ammonium as well asand adsorption of dissolved phosphorous onto microbial Fe

Planavsky, Noah John

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Iron(III)-doped, silica : biodegradable, self-targeting nanoparticles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of calcium and phosphorous, which can be attributed toamount of calcium and phosphorous increase. The iron(III)-composed of calcium and phosphorous were in the recovered

Mitchell, Kristina Kalani Pohaku

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granular zero-valent iron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Iron Oxide Waste Form for Stabilizing 99Tc. | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stabilizing 99Tc. Iron Oxide Waste Form for Stabilizing 99Tc. Abstract: Crystals of goethite were synthesized with reduced technetium 99Tc(IV) incorporated within the solid...

302

Ferredoxin and flavodoxin as biochemical indicators of iron ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

search Agreement RP8021-05 from the Electric Power Research. Institute ... equatorial Pacific Ocean was enriched with iron and moni- ..... The first identifi-.

1999-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

303

Comparison of gleptoferron iron compound to two commonly used iron supplements for the prevention of baby pig anemia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ig"5 Thesis H763 c. Z J COMPARISON OF GLEPTOFERRON IRON COMPOUND TO TWO COMMONLY USED IRON SUPPLEMENTS FOR THE PREVENTION OF BABY PIG ANEMIA A Professional Paper Ervin R. Homann Submitted as Partial Fulfillment of the Professional... OF LITERATURE EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE RESULTS AND DISCUSSION SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS LITERATURE CITED VITA TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 12 13 15 LIST OF TABLES Table 1. EFFECT OF IRON SOURCE AND TIME OF ADMINISTRATION ON PIG SURVIVAL AND PIG HEIGHTS...

Homann, Ervin R.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

304

Unconventional temperature enhanced magnetism in iron telluride  

SciTech Connect

Discoveries of copper and iron-based high-temperature superconductors (HTSC)1-2 have challenged our views of superconductivity and magnetism. Contrary to the pre-existing view that magnetism, which typically involves localized electrons, and superconductivity, which requires freely-propagating itinerant electrons, are mutually exclusive, antiferromagnetic phases were found in all HTSC parent materials3,4. Moreover, highly energetic magnetic fluctuations, discovered in HTSC by inelastic neutron scattering (INS) 5,6, are now widely believed to be vital for the superconductivity 7-10. In two competing scenarios, they either originate from local atomic spins11, or are a property of cooperative spin-density-wave (SDW) behavior of conduction electrons 12,13. Both assume clear partition into localized electrons, giving rise to local spins, and itinerant ones, occupying well-defined, rigid conduction bands. Here, by performing an INS study of spin dynamics in iron telluride, a parent material of one of the iron-based HTSC families, we have discovered that this very assumption fails, and that conduction and localized electrons are fundamentally entangled. In the temperature range relevant for the superconductivity we observe a remarkable redistribution of magnetism between the two groups of electrons. The effective spin per Fe at T 10 K, in the2 antiferromagnetic phase, corresponds to S 1, consistent with the recent analyses that emphasize importance of Hund s intra-atomic exchange15-16. However, it grows to S 3/2 in the disordered phase, a result that profoundly challenges the picture of rigid bands, broadly accepted for HTSC.

Zalinznyak, I. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Xu, Zhijun [ORNL; Tranquada, John M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Gu, G. D. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Tsvelik, A. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Stone, Matthew B [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

A Comparison of Iron and Steel Production Energy Intensity in China and the U.S  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pdf Association for Iron and Steel Technology (AIST). 2010a.American BOF Roundup. Iron & Steel Technology. November.for Iron and Steel Technology (AIST). 2010b. 2010 EAF

Price, Lynn

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Public good dynamics drive evolution of iron acquisition strategies in natural bacterioplankton populations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A common strategy among microbes living in iron-limited environments is the secretion of siderophores, which can bind poorly soluble iron and make it available to cells via active transport mechanisms. Such siderophore–iron ...

Cordero, Otto X.

307

Tricking Iron into Acting like a Rare-earth Element | The Ames...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tricking Iron into Acting like a Rare-earth Element By slipping iron between two nitrogen atoms in a lithium matrix, researchers are able to trick iron into having magnetic...

308

Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using Iron-oxide Coated Coal Ash. In Arsenic Contaminationwater using  iron?oxide coated coal bottom ash  Johanna L.  using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash JOHANNA L. MATHIEU

MATHIEU, JOHANNA L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Nonequilibrium phase transition for a heavy particle in a granular fluid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is shown that the homogeneous cooling state (HCS) for a heavy impurity particle in a granular fluid supports two distinct phases. The order parameter ?¯s is the mean square velocity of the impurity particle relative to that of a fluid particle, and the control parameter ?* is the fluid cooling rate relative to the impurity collision rate. For ?*1 an “ordered” phase occurs in which ?¯s is finite even for vanishingly small mass ratio, representing an extreme violation of energy equipartition. The phenomenon can be described in terms of a Landau-like free energy for a second order phase transition. The dynamics leading to the HCS is studied in detail using an asymptotic analysis of the Enskog-Lorentz kinetic equation near each phase and the critical domain. Critical slowing is observed with a divergent relaxation time at the critical point. The stationary velocity distributions are determined in each case, showing a crossover from Maxwellian in the normal phase to an exponential quartic function of the velocity that is sharply peaked about the nonzero ?¯s for the ordered phase. It is shown that the diffusion coefficient in the normal phase diverges at the critical point and remains so in the ordered phase. This is interpreted as a transition from diffusive to ballistic dynamics between the normal and ordered phases.

Andrés Santos and James W. Dufty

2001-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

310

The effects of particle dynamics on the calculation of bulk stress in granular media  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Expressions for bulk stress within a granular material in a dynamic setting are reviewed and explicitly derived for assemblies of three dimensional arbitrary shaped particles. By employing classical continuum and rigid body mechanics, the mean stress tensor for a single particle is separated into three distinct components; the familiar Love–Webber formula describing the direct effect of contacts, a component due to the net unbalanced moment arising from contact and a symmetric term due to the centripetal acceleration of material within the particle. A case is made that the latter term be ignored without exception when determining bulk stress within an assembly of particles. In the absence of this centripetal term an important observation is made regarding the nature of the symmetry in the stress tensor for certain types of particles; in the case of particles with cubic symmetry, the effects of dynamics on the bulk stress in an assembly is captured by an entirely skew-symmetric tensor. In this situation, it is recognised that the symmetric part of the Love–Webber formula is all that is required for defining the mean stress tensor within an assembly – regardless of the dynamics of the system.

A.L. Smith; C.M. Wensrich

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

(Ir)reversibility in dense granular systems driven by oscillating forces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use computer simulations to study highly dense systems of granular particles that are driven by oscillating forces. We implement different dissipation mechanisms that are used to extract the injected energy. In particular, the action of a simple local Stokes' drag is compared with non-linear and history-dependent frictional forces that act either between particle pairs or between particles and an external container wall. The Stokes' drag leads to particle motion that is periodic with the driving force, even at high densities around close packing where particles undergo frequent collisions. With the introduction of inter-particle frictional forces this "interacting absorbing state" is destroyed and particles start to diffuse around. By reducing the density of the material we go through another transition to a "non-interacting" absorbing state, where particles independently follow the force-induced oscillations without collisions. In the system with particle-wall frictional interactions this transition has signs of a discontinuous phase transition. It is accompanied by a diverging relaxation time, but not by a vanishing order parameter, which rather jumps to zero at the transition.

Ronny Moebius; Claus Heussinger

2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

312

Liquid-phase adsorption of organic compounds by granular activated carbon and activated carbon fibers  

SciTech Connect

Liquid-phase adsorption of organic compounds by granular activated carbon (GAC) and activated carbon fibers (ACFs) is investigated. Acetone, isopropyl alcohol (IPA), phenol, and tetrahydrofuran (THF) were employed as the model compounds for the present study. It is observed from the experimental results that adsorption of organic compounds by GAC and ACF is influenced by the BET (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller) surface area of adsorbent and the molecular weight, polarity, and solubility of the adsorbate. The adsorption characteristics of GAC and ACFs were found to differ rather significantly. In terms of the adsorption capacity of organic compounds, the time to reach equilibrium adsorption, and the time for complete desorption, ACFs have been observed to be considerably better than GAC. For the organic compounds tested here, the GAC adsorptions were shown to be represented well by the Langmuir isotherm while the ACF adsorption could be adequately described by the Langmuir or the Freundlich isotherm. Column adsorption tests indicated that the exhausted ACFs can be effectively regenerated by static in situ thermal desorption at 150 C, but the same regeneration conditions do not do as well for the exhausted GAC.

Lin, S.H.; Hsu, F.M. [Yuan Ze Inst. of Tech., Taoyuan (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

IS MAGNETIC RECONNECTION THE CAUSE OF SUPERSONIC UPFLOWS IN GRANULAR CELLS?  

SciTech Connect

In a previous work, we reported on the discovery of supersonic magnetic upflows on granular cells in data from the SUNRISE/IMaX instrument. In the present work, we investigate the physical origin of these events employing data from the same instrument but with higher spectral sampling. By means of the inversion of Stokes profiles we are able to recover the physical parameters (temperature, magnetic field, line-of-sight velocity, etc.) present in the solar photosphere at the time of these events. The inversion is performed in a Monte-Carlo-like fashion, that is, repeating it many times with different initializations and retaining only the best result. We find that many of the events are characterized by a reversal in the polarity of the magnetic field along the vertical direction in the photosphere, accompanied by an enhancement in the temperature and by supersonic line-of-sight velocities. In about half of the studied events, large blueshifted and redshifted line-of-sight velocities coexist above/below each other. These features can be explained in terms of magnetic reconnection, where the energy stored in the magnetic field is released in the form of kinetic and thermal energy when magnetic field lines of opposite polarities coalesce. However, the agreement with magnetic reconnection is not perfect and, therefore, other possible physical mechanisms might also play a role.

Borrero, J. M.; Schmidt, W. [Kiepenheuer-Institut fuer Sonnenphysik, Schoeneckstr. 6, D-79110, Freiburg (Germany); Martinez Pillet, V.; Quintero Noda, C.; Bonet, J. A. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, Avd. Via Lactea s/n, E-38200 La Laguna (Spain); Del Toro Iniesta, J. C.; Bellot Rubio, L. R., E-mail: borrero@kis.uni-freiburg.de, E-mail: wolfgang@kis.uni-freiburg.de, E-mail: vmp@ll.iac.es, E-mail: cqn@ll.iac.es, E-mail: jab@ll.iac.es, E-mail: jti@iaa.es, E-mail: lbellot@iaa.es [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (CSIC), Apdo. de Correos 3004, E-18080 Granada (Spain)

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Scalar conservation laws with nonconstant coefficients with application to particle size segregation in granular flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Granular materials will segregate by particle size when subjected to shear, as occurs, for example, in avalanches. The evolution of a bidisperse mixture of particles can be modeled by a nonlinear first order partial differential equation, provided the shear (or velocity) is a known function of position. While avalanche-driven shear is approximately uniform in depth, boundary-driven shear typically creates a shear band with a nonlinear velocity profile. In this paper, we measure a velocity profile from experimental data and solve initial value problems that mimic the segregation observed in the experiment, thereby verifying the value of the continuum model. To simplify the analysis, we consider only one-dimensional configurations, in which a layer of small particles is placed above a layer of large particles within an annular shear cell and is sheared for arbitrarily long times. We fit the measured velocity profile to both an exponential function of depth and a piecewise linear function which separates the shear band from the rest of the material. Each solution of the initial value problem is non-standard, involving curved characteristics in the exponential case, and a material interface with a jump in characteristic speed in the piecewise linear case.

Lindsay B. H. May; Michael Shearer; Karen E. Daniels

2010-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

315

Poroelastic measurement schemes resulting in complete data sets for granular and other anisotropic porous media  

SciTech Connect

Poroelastic analysis usually progresses from assumed knowledge of dry or drained porous media to the predicted behavior of fluid-saturated and undrained porous media. Unfortunately, the experimental situation is often incompatible with these assumptions, especially when field data (from hydrological or oil/gas reservoirs) are involved. The present work considers several different experimental scenarios typified by one in which a set of undrained poroelastic (stiffness) constants has been measured using either ultrasound or seismic wave analysis, while some or all of the dry or drained constants are normally unknown. Drained constants for such a poroelastic system can be deduced for isotropic systems from available data if a complete set of undrained compliance data for the principal stresses are available - together with a few other commonly measured quantities such as porosity, fluid bulk modulus, and grain bulk modulus. Similar results are also developed here for anisotropic systems having up to orthotropic symmetry if the system is granular (i.e., composed of solid grains assembled into a solid matrix, either by a cementation process or by applied stress) and the grains are known to be elastically homogeneous. Finally, the analysis is also fully developed for anisotropic systems with nonhomogeneous (more than one mineral type), but still isotropic, grains - as well as for uniform collections of anisotropic grains as long as their axes of symmetry are either perfectly aligned or perfectly random.

Berryman, J.G.

2009-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

316

Pertechnetate (TcO4-) reduction by reactive ferrous iron forms...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

reduction by reactive ferrous iron forms in naturally anoxic, redox transition zone sediments from the Pertechnetate (TcO4-) reduction by reactive ferrous iron forms in naturally...

317

E-Print Network 3.0 - anthropogenic iron cycles Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

iron cycle control atmospheric CO ? 12;The Global Carbon Cycle 70 times more carbon in ocean than... on ocean biological activity Iron cycle processes Modeling ... Source:...

318

Trophic status of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii influences the impact of iron deficiency on photosynthesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of iron de?ciency on photosynthesis Aimee M. Terauchi •rates by suppress- ing photosynthesis but increasing insteadal. 2007). In oxygenic photosynthesis, iron is a cofactor in

Terauchi, Aimee M.; Peers, Graham; Kobayashi, Marilyn C.; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Merchant, Sabeeha S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Neutron Scattering Studies of Cuprates and Iron Pnictides.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Presented within are neutron scattering studies of several different high temperature superconducting materials: BaFe1.9Ni0.1As2 [Barium Iron Nickel Arsenic], BaFe1.85Ni0.15As2 [Barium Iron Nickel Arsenic], Ba0.67K0.33Fe2As2 [Barium… (more)

Liu, Mengshu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Enhanced Superconducting Properties of Iron Chalcogenide Thin Films  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Among the newly discovered iron-based superconductor, FeSe with the simplest structure and a transition temperature (T_c) around 8 K arouses much research interest. Although its Tc is much lower than that of the cuprates, iron chalcogenide has low...

Chen, Li

2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granular zero-valent iron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Next Generation Metallic Iron Nodule Technology in Electric Furnace Steelmaking  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This factsheet describes a research project whose objective is to investigate reducing processing temperature, controlling the gas temperature and gas atmosphere over metalized iron nodules, and effectively using sub-bituminous coal as a reductant for producing high quality metalized iron nodules at low cost.

322

Fabrication and processing of iron aluminides  

SciTech Connect

The Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys have been shown to exhibit room-temperature ductility values of 15 to 19% by the control of composition and thermomechanical processing steps. The scale-up of one of the compositions to 2270-kg (5000-lb) electroslag-remelted (ESR) round ingot and 3272-kg (7200-lb) vacuum-induction-melted (VIM) slab ingot is described. Microstructural and mechanical property data are presented on small pieces sectioned from these ingots. The effects of final rolling temperature and the final annealing treatment on room-temperature ductility were investigated for the ESR ingot. A study of iron-aluminide binary alloys revealed that the environmental effects on room-temperature ductility values were absent for {le}8.5 wt % Al. The increasing aluminum content and the development of ordered structure resulted in increased environmental effects. Applications and a brief description of their status are described. Based on the combined property and cost advantage, continued development of iron aluminide is recommended.

Sikka, V.K.; Viswanathan, S.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Fabrication and processing of iron aluminides  

SciTech Connect

The Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys have been shown to exhibit room-temperature ductility values of 15 to 19% by the control of composition and thermomechanical processing steps. The scale-up of one of the compositions to 2270-kg (5000-lb) electroslag-remelted (ESR) round ingot and 3272-kg (7200-lb) vacuum-induction-melted (VIM) slab ingot is described. Microstructural and mechanical property data are presented on small pieces sectioned from these ingots. The effects of final rolling temperature and the final annealing treatment on room-temperature ductility were investigated for the ESR ingot. A study of iron-aluminide binary alloys revealed that the environmental effects on room-temperature ductility values were absent for {le}8.5 wt % Al. The increasing aluminum content and the development of ordered structure resulted in increased environmental effects. Applications and a brief description of their status are described. Based on the combined property and cost advantage, continued development of iron aluminide is recommended.

Sikka, V.K.; Viswanathan, S.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

The iron powder test for naphthenic acid corrosion studies  

SciTech Connect

In the course of an ongoing investigation into the phenomenon of naphthenic acid corrosion, a new test method has evolved and is currently being further developed to substitute the total acid number (TAN or neutralization number) as an indicator for naphthenic acid corrosion potential. It can also be used to complement conventional autoclave corrosion tests in high temperature environments, which are based on weight loss of steel coupons. In this new method an oil sample reacts with pure iron powder within an autoclave heated to the testing temperature. The result is based on the amount of dissolved iron found in the oil sample. The oil sample can dissolve an amount of iron for a given time at a given temperature, depending on the naphthenic acid corrosion, since these acids react with iron to produce oil soluble iron naphthenates. This paper describes the method, compares it with conventional crude corrosiveness testing, and proposes it as a new way of measuring naphthenic acid corrosion potential.

Hau, J.L.; Yepez, O.; Specht, M.I.; Lorenzo, R. [PDVSA-Intevep, Caracas (Venezuela)

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Insulating state of granular superconductors in a strong-coupling regime I. S. Beloborodov,1 Ya. V. Fominov,1,2 A. V. Lopatin,1 and V. M. Vinokur1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Insulating state of granular superconductors in a strong-coupling regime I. S. Beloborodov,1 Ya. V-field-induced insulating state in a two-dimensional granular superconductor with relatively strong intergranular coupling the superconductor-insulator transi- tion, and a reentrant drop upon further increase of magnetic field. The magnetic

Fominov, Yakov

326

VOLUME 82, NUMBER 9 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 1 MARCH 1999 Ultrasound Propagation in Externally Stressed Granular Media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of granular media, in particular, in view of improving handling tech- nologies [1,2]. Owing to their efficient of the material through which they propagate. The description of sound propagation in granular materials is thus ratios of the wavelength to the size of the glass beads. Experiments.--A schematic diagram

Paris 7 - Denis Diderot, Université

327

ITP Mining: Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Mining Industry: Chapter 4: Iron  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 Iron The chemical element iron is the fourth most common element in the Earth's crust and the second most abundant metal. About five percent of the Earth's crust is composed of iron. The metal is chemically active and is found in nature combined with other elements in rocks and soils. In its natural state, iron is chemically bonded with oxygen, water, carbon dioxide, or sulfur in a variety of minerals. Forms of Iron Minerals, Ores, and Rocks Iron occurs mainly in iron-oxide ores. Some ores are a mixture of minerals rich in iron. Other iron ores are less rich and have a large number of impurities. The most important iron ore- forming minerals are: * Magnetite - Magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) forms magnetic black iron ore. There are large deposits of

328

Time series of high resolution photospheric spectra in a quiet region of the Sun. II. Analysis of the variation of physical quantities of granular structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

From the inversion of a time series of high resolution slit spectrograms obtained from the quiet sun, the spatial and temporal distribution of the thermodynamical quantities and the vertical flow velocity is derived as a function of logarithmic optical depth and geometrical height. Spatial coherence and phase shift analyzes between temperature and vertical velocity depict the height variation of these physical quantities for structures of different size. An average granular cell model is presented, showing the granule-intergranular lane stratification of temperature, vertical velocity, gas pressure and density as a function of logarithmic optical depth and geometrical height. Studies of a specific small and a specific large granular cell complement these results. A strong decay of the temperature fluctuations with increasing height together with a less efficient penetration of smaller cells is revealed. The T -T coherence at all granular scales is broken already at log tau =-1 or z~170 km. At the layers beyon...

Puschmann, K G; Vazquez, M; Bonet, J A; Hanslmeier, A; 10.1051/0004-6361:20047193

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Theoretical Investigation of Hydrogen Adsorption and Dissociation on Iron and Iron Carbide Surfaces Using the ReaxFF Reactive Force Field Method  

SciTech Connect

We have developed a ReaxFF reactive force field to describe hydrogen adsorption and dissociation on iron and iron carbide surfaces relevant for simulation of Fischer–Tropsch (FT) synthesis on iron catalysts. This force field enables large system (>>1000 atoms) simulations of hydrogen related reactions with iron. The ReaxFF force field parameters are trained against a substantial amount of structural and energetic data including the equations of state and heats of formation of iron and iron carbide related materials, as well as hydrogen interaction with iron surfaces and different phases of bulk iron. We have validated the accuracy and applicability of ReaxFF force field by carrying out molecular dynamics simulations of hydrogen adsorption, dissociation and recombination on iron and iron carbide surfaces. The barriers and reaction energies for molecular dissociation on these two types of surfaces have been compared and the effect of subsurface carbon on hydrogen interaction with iron surface is evaluated. We found that existence of carbon atoms at subsurface iron sites tends to increase the hydrogen dissociation energy barrier on the surface, and also makes the corresponding hydrogen dissociative state relatively more stable compared to that on bare iron. These properties of iron carbide will affect the dissociation rate of H{sub 2} and will retain more surface hydride species, thus influencing the dynamics of the FT synthesis process.

Zou, Chenyu; van Duin, Adri C.T.; Sorescu, Dan C.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

System and method for producing metallic iron  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hearth furnace for producing metallic iron material has a furnace housing having a drying/preheat zone, a conversion zone, a fusion zone, and optionally a cooling zone, the conversion zone is between the drying/preheat zone and the fusion zone. A moving hearth is positioned within the furnace housing. A hood or separation barrier within at least a portion of the conversion zone, fusion zone or both separates the fusion zone into an upper region and a lower region with the lower region adjacent the hearth and the upper region adjacent the lower region and spaced from the hearth. An injector introduces a gaseous reductant into the lower region adjacent the hearth. A combustion region may be formed above the hood or separation barrier.

Bleifuss, Rodney L; Englund, David J; Iwasaki, Iwao; Fosnacht, Donald R; Brandon, Mark M; True, Bradford G

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

331

Iron and steel industry process model  

SciTech Connect

The iron and steel industry process model depicts expected energy-consumption characteristics of the iron and steel industry and ancillary industries for the next 25 years by means of a process model of the major steps in steelmaking, from ore mining and scrap recycling to the final finishing of carbon, alloy, and stainless steel into steel products such as structural steel, slabs, plates, tubes, and bars. Two plant types are modeled: fully integrated mills and mini-mills. User-determined inputs into the model are as follows: projected energy and materials prices; projected costs of capacity expansion and replacement; energy-conserving options, both operating modes and investments; the internal rate of return required on investment; and projected demand for finished steel. Nominal input choices in the model for the inputs listed above are as follows: National Academy of Sciences Committee on Nuclear and Alternative Energy Systems Demand Panel nominal energy-price projections for oil, gas, distillates, residuals, and electricity and 1975 actual prices for materials; actual 1975 costs; new technologies added; 15% after taxes; and 1975 actual demand with 1.5%/y growth. The model reproduces the base-year (1975) actual performance of the industry; then, given the above nominal input choices, it projects modes of operation and capacity expansion that minimize the cost of meeting the given final demands for each of 5 years, each year being the midpoint of a 5-year interval. The output of the model includes the following: total energy use and intensity (Btu/ton) by type, by process, and by time period; energy conservation options chosen; utilization rates for existing capacity; capital-investment decisions for capacity expansion.

Sparrow, F.T.; Pilati, D.; Dougherty, T.; McBreen, E.; Juang, L.L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Performance of the SLD Warm Iron Calorimeter prototype  

SciTech Connect

A prototype hadron calorimeter, of similar design to the Warm Iron Calorimeter (WIC) planned for the SLD experiment, has been built and its performance has been studied in a test beam. The WIC is an iron sampling calorimeter whose active elements are plastic streamer tubes similar to those used for the Mont-Blanc proton decay experiment. The construction and operation of the tubes will be briefly described together with their use in an iron calorimeter - muon tracker. Efficiency, resolution and linearity have been measured in a hadron/muon beam up to 11 GeV. The measured values correspond to the SLD design goals.

Callegari, G.; Piemontese, L.; De Sangro, R.; Peruzzi, I., Piccolo, M.; Busza, W.; Friedman, J.; Johnson, A.; Kendall, H.; Kistiakowsky, V.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

The effects of copper and iron deficiencies in the chick  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). Copper and iron content of all four diets were determined and the results reported in Table 2, III. Experiment 2. This experiment was carried out to determine the effects of adding cupric oxide to the diet in place of cupric sulfate as the copper... of Copper and Iron Deficiencies on Blood, Mortality and Weights of Four Week Old Chicks Analysis of Copper and Iron Content of Purified Diet" Experiment 3 Effects of Cupric Sulfate, Cupric Oxide, Ferrous Sul- fate and Ferric Oxide on Blood, Mortality...

McGhee, Flin Cameron

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

334

Iron-carbon compacts and process for making them  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention includes iron-carbon compacts and a process for making them. The process includes preparing a slurry comprising iron powder, furfuryl alcohol, and a polymerization catalyst for initiating the polymerization of the furfuryl alcohol into a resin, and heating the slurry to convert the alcohol into the resin. The resulting mixture is pressed into a green body and heated to form the iron-carbon compact. The compact can be used as, or machined into, a magnetic flux concentrator for an induction heating apparatus.

Sheinberg, Haskell (Santa Fe, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Nickel and iron EXAFS of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase from Clostridium thermoaceticum strain DSM  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nickel and iron EXAFS of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase from Clostridium thermoaceticum strain DSM ...

Neil R. Bastian; Gabriele. Diekert; Eric C. Niederhoffer; Boon Keng. Teo; Christopher T. Walsh; William H. Orme-Johnson

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

An Application of the Electric Resistance Furnace to the Determination of Oxygen in Iron and Steel.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An Application of the Electric Resistance Furnace to the Determination of Oxygen in Iron and Steel. ...

R. H. McMillen

1913-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Giving patients granular control of personal health information: Using an ethics ‘Points to Consider’ to inform informatics system designers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractObjective There are benefits and risks of giving patients more granular control of their personal health information in electronic health record (EHR) systems. When designing EHR systems and policies, informaticists and system developers must balance these benefits and risks. Ethical considerations should be an explicit part of this balancing. Our objective was to develop a structured ethics framework to accomplish this. Methods We reviewed existing literature on the ethical and policy issues, developed an ethics framework called a “Points to Consider” (P2C) document, and convened a national expert panel to review and critique the P2C. Results We developed the P2C to aid informaticists designing an advanced query tool for an electronic health record (EHR) system in Indianapolis. The P2C consists of six questions (“Points”) that frame important ethical issues, apply accepted principles of bioethics and Fair Information Practices, comment on how questions might be answered, and address implications for patient care. Discussion The P2C is intended to clarify what is at stake when designers try to accommodate potentially competing ethical commitments and logistical realities. The P2C was developed to guide informaticists who were designing a query tool in an existing EHR that would permit patient granular control. While consideration of ethical issues is coming to the forefront of medical informatics design and development practices, more reflection is needed to facilitate optimal collaboration between designers and ethicists. This report contributes to that discussion.

Eric M. Meslin; Sheri A. Alpert; Aaron E. Carroll; Jere D. Odell; William M. Tierney; Peter H. Schwartz

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

LANSCE | Lujan Center | Highlights | Local iron displacements and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Local iron displacements and magnetoelastic coupling in a spin-ladder Local iron displacements and magnetoelastic coupling in a spin-ladder compound Hypothesis: Is magnetoelastic coupling in [FeX4]-based materials, an important ingredient in the emergence of superconductivity? Lujan Center: Combined Total Scattering and magnetic structure determination (HIPD-NPDF) The study of local, average and magnetic structure shows the existenceof highly correlated local iron (Fe) displacements in the spin-ladder iron chalcogenide BaFe2Se3. Built of ferromagnetic [Fe4] plaquettes, the magnetic ground state correlates with local displacements of the Fe atoms. Knowledge of these local displacements is essential for properly understanding the electronic structure of these systems. As with the copper oxide superconductors two decades ago, these

339

Percolation Explains How Earth's Iron Core Formed | Stanford Synchrotron  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Percolation Explains How Earth's Iron Core Formed Percolation Explains How Earth's Iron Core Formed Wednesday, November 27, 2013 The formation of Earth's metallic core, which makes up a third of our planet's mass, represents the most significant differentiation event in Earth's history. Earth's present layered structure with a metallic core and an overlying silicate mantle would have required mechanisms to separate iron alloy from a silicate phase. Percolation of liquid iron alloy moving through a solid silicate matrix (much as water percolates through porous rock, or even coffee grinds) has been proposed as a possible model for core formation (Figure 1). Many previous experimental results have ruled out percolation as a major core formation mechanism for Earth at the relatively lower pressure conditions in the upper mantle, but until now experimental

340

Regenerable Mixed Copper-Iron-Inert Support Oxygen Carriers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mixed Copper-Iron-Inert Support Oxygen Carriers Mixed Copper-Iron-Inert Support Oxygen Carriers for Solid Fuel Chemical Looping Combustion Process Contact NETL Technology Transfer Group techtransfer@netl.doe.gov December 2012 This patent-pending technology, "Regenerable Mixed Copper-Iron-Inert Support Oxygen Carriers for Solid Fuel Chemical Looping Combustion Process," provides a metal-oxide oxygen carrier for application in fuel combustion processes that use oxygen. This technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research with the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. Overview Patent Details U.S. Non-Provisional Patent Application No. 13/159,553; titled "Regenerable Mixed Copper-Iron-Inert Support Oxygen Carriers for Solid

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granular zero-valent iron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Open Ocean Iron Fertilization for Scientific Study and Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ocean Iron Fertilization for Scientific Study and Carbon Sequestration Ocean Iron Fertilization for Scientific Study and Carbon Sequestration K. Coale coale@mlml.calstate.edu (831) 632-4400 Moss Landing Marine Laboratories 8272 Moss Landing Road Moss Landing, California 95039 USA Abstract The trace element iron has been recently shown to play a critical role in nutrient utilization, phytoplankton growth and therefore the uptake of carbon dioxide from the surface waters of the global ocean. Carbon fixation in the surface waters, via phytoplankton growth, shifts the ocean/atmosphere exchange equilibrium for carbon dioxide. As a result, levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (a greenhouse gas) and iron flux to the oceans have been linked to climate change (glacial to interglacial transitions). These recent findings have led some to suggest that large scale

342

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Knoxville Iron Co - TN 07  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Knoxville Iron Co - TN 07 Knoxville Iron Co - TN 07 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: KNOXVILLE IRON CO. (TN.07 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Knoxville , Tennessee TN.07-1 Evaluation Year: 1994 TN.07-2 TN.07-3 Site Operations: Melted uranium contaminated scrap metal in order to test industrial hygiene procedures in the mid-1950s. TN.07-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - AEC license TN.07-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Limited Quantities of Uranium Contained in Slag Material TN.07-4 Radiological Survey(s): Yes - health and safety monitoring during operations only TN.07-4 Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to KNOXVILLE IRON CO.

343

The Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Iron Spin Transition in the The Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle The Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle Print Wednesday, 30 April 2008 00:00 It is now known that the iron present in minerals of the lower mantle of the Earth undergoes a pressure-induced transition with pairing of the spins of its 3d electrons. A team from the University of California, Berkeley, Tel Aviv University, and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has used x-ray diffraction at very high pressure to investigate the effects of this transition on the elastic properties of magnesiowüstite (Mg1-xFex)O, the second most abundant mineral in the Earth's lower mantle. The new results suggest that the effect of the spin-pairing transition on magnesiowüstite can be large enough to require a partial revision of the most accepted model of the lower mantle composition.

344

Decoupling of iron and phosphate in the global ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M increase in dissolved iron in deep waters. Forcing the model with weaker wind stresses leads to a decrease CO2. Additionally, nitrogen fixing organisms (reviewed by Karl et al. [2002] and Mills et al. [2004

Follows, Mick

345

Chapter 1.2 - The Direct Reduction of Iron  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract For the past 100 years, the dominant technology to produce iron from iron ores has been the blast furnace, which utilizes carbothermic reduction at elevated temperatures to make a molten iron product and a liquid slag. However, economic ironmaking in this fashion requires massive facilities for economy of scale, and is environmentally problematic with its sinter plants, coke ovens, and large production of carbon dioxide. Direct reduction (DR) is an alternate form of ironmaking that is economic at much smaller scales, generally uses natural gas as reductant instead of coke, and costs considerably less than a blast furnace facility. Worldwide production of Direct Reduced Iron has increased from less than one million tonnes per year in 1971 to over 70 million tonnes forty years later. DRI production is expected to continue this rapid increase for years to come.

Thomas Battle; Urvashi Srivastava; John Kopfle; Robert Hunter; James McClelland

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Iron and DHA in Relation to Early Cognitive Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(SF), and body iron (BI); DHA by median split. Bayley Scales of Infant Development Index II (BSID-II) Mental Developmental Index (MDI) and Psychomotor Developmental Index (PDI) at 18 months (n=191) were assessed. A priori comparisons observed MDI...

Park, Loran Marie

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

347

Surface modifications of iron oxide nanoparticles for biological applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Iron oxides magnetic nanoparticles (MPs) of high crystallinity, high magnetization, and size-monodispersity were synthesized with oleic acid as their native ligands. These hydrophobic and non-functionalized MPs have magnetic ...

Insin, Numpon

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Polymer-coated iron oxide nanoparticles for medical imaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the most versatile and safe materials used in medicine are polymer-coated iron oxide nanoparticles. This dissertation describes several formulations for in vivo imaging applications. The paramagnetic polymer-coated ...

Chen, Suelin, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Mechanism of iron catalysis of carbon monoxide decomposition in refractories  

SciTech Connect

The authors discuss the catalytic effects of selected iron phases (metals, oxides, sulfides, and carbides) on the Boudouard reaction studied in an effort to more fully understand the disintegration of refractories when exposed to CO for long periods of time. It was found that active Fe atoms generated from the reduction of the iron oxides, especially {alpha}-Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/, are the actual catalysts for the Boudouard reaction. The catalytic process confirmed by thermodynamic calculations, kinetic data, and X-ray diffraction data, consists of adsorption and decomposition of CO simultaneously forming carbides of iron. The chemisorption and subsequent decomposition of the iron carbides, rather than diffusion, constitute the rate-controlling process for carbon deposition.

Xu, M.W.P.; Brown, J.J. Jr. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (USA). Dept. of Materials Engineering)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Simulation of iron impurity gettering in crystalline silicon solar cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work discusses the Impurity-to-Efficiency (12E) simulation tool and applet. The 12E simulator models the physics of iron impurity gettering in silicon solar cells during high temperature processing. The tool also ...

Powell, Douglas M. (Douglas Michael)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Evidence for a Weak Iron Core at Earth's Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Iron Core at Earth's Center Print Seismic waves that pass through the center of the Earth travel faster going from pole to pole than along the equatorial plane-why? One theory...

352

The Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Print It is now known that the iron present in minerals of the lower mantle of the Earth undergoes a pressure-induced transition with pairing of the spins of its 3d electrons....

353

The Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2008 00:00 It is now known that the iron present in minerals of the lower mantle of the Earth undergoes a pressure-induced transition with pairing of the spins of its 3d electrons....

354

Brain Iron as an Early Predictor of Alzheimer's Disease | Advanced...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

| 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Brain Iron as an Early Predictor of Alzheimer's Disease JUNE 15, 2011 Bookmark and Share (A)...

355

Momentum Distribution of Electrons in Chromium, Iron, and Nickel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Compton profiles of the electron momentum distribution in chromium, iron, and nickel are calculated using the wave functions obtained from self-consistent linear-combination-of-atomic-orbitals energy-band calculations. The results are compared with experiment.

J. Rath, C. S. Wang, R. A. Tawil, and J. Callaway

1973-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Energy intensity in China's iron and steel sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this study, I examine the spatial and economic factors that influence energy intensity in China's iron and steel sector, namely industrial value added, renovation investment, coke consumption, and local coke supply. ...

Xu, Jingsi, M.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Magnetism and Superconductivity Compete in Iron-based Superconductors...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Magnetism and Superconductivity Compete in Iron-based Superconductors Wednesday, April 30, 2014 HTSC Figure 1 Fig. 1. Measured electronic structure of underdoped Ba1-xKxFe2As2 in...

358

Laboratory and field studies of colloidal iron oxide dissolution as ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mechanisms that mediate the conversion of iron from the refractory pool to the ... lated to the extent of dissolution of the ferrihydrite carrier phase, even for .... totals was determined on a Canberra low-energy germanium detector. Replicate ...

2000-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

359

Hepcidin Is Involved in Iron Regulation in the Ischemic Brain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oxidative stress plays an important role in neuronal injuries caused by cerebral ischemia. It is well established that free iron increases significantly during ischemia and is responsible for oxidative damage in the brain. ...

Ding, Hui; Yan, Cai-Zhen; Shi, Honglian; Zhao, Ya-Shuo; Chang, Shi-Yang; Yu, Peng; Wu, Wen_Shuang; Zhao, Chen-Yang; Chang, Yan-Zhong; Duan, Xiang-Lin

2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

360

The industrial ecology of the iron casting industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metal casting is an energy and materials intensive manufacturing process, which is an important U.S. industry. This study analyzes iron casting, in particular, for possible improvements that will result in greater efficiencies ...

Jones, Alissa J. (Alissa Jean)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granular zero-valent iron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Mixed valence of iron in minerals with cation clusters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The valence and distribution of iron in vivianite, lazulite, babingtonite, rockbridgeite, acmite, aegirine-augite, hedenbergite,...2+ and Fe3+ in neighboring sites through common edges or faces is observed in all...

Georg Amthauer; George R. Rossman

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Verification of Steelmaking Slags Iron Content Final Technical Progress Report  

SciTech Connect

The steel industry in the United States generates about 30 million tons of by-products each year, including 6 million tons of desulfurization and BOF/BOP slag. The recycling of BF (blast furnace) slag has made significant progress in past years with much of the material being utilized as construction aggregate and in cementitious applications. However, the recycling of desulfurization and BOF/BOP slags still faces many technical, economic, and environmental challenges. Previous efforts have focused on in-plant recycling of the by-products, achieving only limited success. As a result, large amounts of by-products of various qualities have been stockpiled at steel mills or disposed into landfills. After more than 50 years of stockpiling and landfilling, available mill site space has diminished and environmental constraints have increased. The prospect of conventionally landfilling of the material is a high cost option, a waste of true national resources, and an eternal material liability issue. The research effort has demonstrated that major inroads have been made in establishing the viability of recycling and reuse of the steelmaking slags. The research identified key components in the slags, developed technologies to separate the iron units and produce marketable products from the separation processes. Three products are generated from the technology developed in this research, including a high grade iron product containing about 90%Fe, a medium grade iron product containing about 60% Fe, and a low grade iron product containing less than 10% Fe. The high grade iron product contains primarily metallic iron and can be marketed as a replacement of pig iron or DRI (Direct Reduced Iron) for steel mills. The medium grade iron product contains both iron oxide and metallic iron and can be utilized as a substitute for the iron ore in the blast furnace. The low grade iron product is rich in calcium, magnesium and iron oxides and silicates. It has a sufficient lime value and can be utilized for acid mine drainage treatment. Economic analysis from this research demonstrates that the results are favorable. The strong demand and the increase of price of the DRI and pig iron in recent years are particularly beneficial to the economics. The favorable economics has brought commercial interests. ICAN Global has obtained license agreement on the technology from Michigan Tech. This right was later transferred to the Westwood Land, Inc. A demonstration pilot plant is under construction to evaluate the technology. Steel industry will benefit from the new supply of the iron units once the commercial plants are constructed. Environmental benefits to the public and the steel industry will be tremendous. Not only the old piles of the slag will be removed, but also the federal responsible abandoned mines from the old mining activities can be remediated with the favorable product generated from the process. Cost can be reduced and there will be no lime required, which can avoid the release of carbon dioxide from lime production process.

J.Y. Hwang

2006-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

363

Process for removing technetium from iron and other metals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing technetium from iron and other metals comprises the steps of converting the molten, alloyed technetium to a sulfide dissolved in manganese sulfide, and removing the sulfide from the molten metal as a slag. 4 figs.

Leitnaker, J.M.; Trowbridge, L.D.

1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

364

Arsenic Removal from Groundwater Using Iron Electrocoagulation: Effect of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Arsenic Removal from Groundwater Using Iron Electrocoagulation: Effect of Arsenic Removal from Groundwater Using Iron Electrocoagulation: Effect of Charge Dosage Rate Title Arsenic Removal from Groundwater Using Iron Electrocoagulation: Effect of Charge Dosage Rate Publication Type Journal Article Refereed Designation Refereed LBNL Report Number LBNL-6221E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Amrose, Susan, Ashok J. Gadgil, Venkat Srinivasan, Kristin Kowolik, Marc Muller, Jessica Huang, and Robert Kostecki Journal Joournal of Environmental Science and Health, Part A: Toxic/Hazardous Substances and Environmental Engineering Volume 48 Issue 9 Pagination 1019-1030 Date Published 04/2013 Keywords arsenic, bangladesh, Cambodia, dosage rate, electrocoagulation, india, water treatment Abstract We demonstrate that electrocoagulation (EC) using iron electrodes can reduce arsenic below 10 μg/L in synthetic Bangladesh groundwater and in real groundwater from Bangladesh and Cambodia while investigating the effect of operating parameters that are often overlooked, such as charge dosage rate. We measure arsenic removal performance

365

Neutron scattering study of the iron based superconductors.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In most iron-based and copper-oxide superconductors, the Tc [superconducting critical temperature] gradually increases upon charge carrier doping or isovalent doping. In the under-doped regime of… (more)

Wang, Miaoyin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Slurry Phase Iron Catalysts for Indirect Coal Liquefaction  

SciTech Connect

This report describes research conducted to support the DOE program in indirect coal liquefaction. Specifically, we have studied the attrition behavior of Iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, their interaction with the silica binder and the evolution of iron phases in a synthesis gas conversion process. The results provide significant insight into factors that should be considered in the design of catalysts for the conversion of coal-derived synthesis gas into liquid fuels.

Abhaya K. Datye

1998-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

367

Sound speed and thermophysical properties of liquid iron and nickel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An electrical-pulse-heating technique has been used to heat iron and nickel to high temperatures to measure thermophysical properties in the liquid state. A dynamic technique was used because static techniques, which are capable of greater precision, fail at a relatively low temperature. Measurements have been made, and results are shown for enthalpy, temperature, density, electrical resistivity, and sound speed up to 3950 K in iron and 4250 K in nickel.

R. S. Hixson; M. A. Winkler; M. L. Hodgdon

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

SLURRY PHASE IRON CATALYSTS FOR INDIRECT COAL LIQUEFACTION  

SciTech Connect

This report describes research conducted to support the DOE program in indirect coal liquefaction. Specifically, they have studied the attrition behavior of iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, their interaction with the silica binder and the evolution of iron phases in a synthesis gas conversion process. The results provide significant insight into factors that should be considered in the design of catalysts for converting coal based syngas into liquid fuels.

Abhaya K. Datye

1998-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

369

Polymorphous Transformations of Nanometric Iron(III) Oxide: A Review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Because of its polymorphism, iron(III) oxide (ferric oxide, Fe2O3) is one of the most interesting and potentially useful phases of the iron oxides. ... Structural and magnetic properties, methods of synthesis, and applications of seven Fe(III) oxide polymorphs, including rare beta, epsilon, amorphous, and high-pressure forms, are reviewed. ... Films of ?-Fe2O3 nanoparticles were synthesized by oxidizing Fe films rapidly in air. ...

Libor Machala; Ji?í Tu?ek; Radek Zbo?il

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

High-temperature fabricable nickel-iron aluminides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nickel-iron aluminides are described that are based on Ni.sub.3 Al, and have significant iron content, to which additions of hafnium, boron, carbon and cerium are made resulting in Ni.sub.3 Al base alloys that can be fabricated at higher temperatures than similar alloys previously developed. Further addition of molybdenum improves oxidation and cracking resistance. These alloys possess the advantages of ductility, hot fabricability, strength, and oxidation resistance.

Liu, Chain T. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1988-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

371

Granular materials such as sand, rice and coffee beans are so common that we hardly ever realize how unique their properties are. Who marvels at the fact one  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

molecules flying around, yet its properties are well understood, for more than a century already. Substances and solids, which always fly, bounce, tumble and vibrate around, the grains in a heap of granular material, it is a container with a small rotating disk at the bottom; hence the name

Hille, Sander

372

Iron chelators ICL670 and 311 inhibit HIV-1 transcription  

SciTech Connect

HIV-1 replication is induced by an excess of iron and iron chelation by desferrioxamine (DFO) inhibits viral replication by reducing proliferation of infected cells. Treatment of cells with DFO and 2-hydroxy-1-naphthylaldehyde isonicotinoyl hydrazone (311) inhibit expression of proteins that regulate cell-cycle progression, including cycle-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2). Our recent studies showed that CDK2 participates in HIV-1 transcription and viral replication suggesting that inhibition of CDK2 by iron chelators might also affect HIV-1 transcription. Here we evaluated the effect of a clinically approved orally effective iron chelator, 4-[3,5-bis-(hydroxyphenyl)-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl]-benzoic acid (ICL670) and 311 on HIV-1 transcription. Both ICL670 and 311 inhibited Tat-induced HIV-1 transcription in CEM-T cells, 293T and HeLa cells. Neither ICL670 nor 311 induced cytotoxicity at concentrations that inhibited HIV-1 transcription. The chelators decreased cellular activity of CDK2 and reduced HIV-1 Tat phosphorylation by CDK2. Neither ICL670A or 311 decreased CDK9 protein level but significantly reduced association of CDK9 with cyclin T1 and reduced phosphorylation of Ser-2 residues of RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain. In conclusion, our findings add to the evidence that iron chelators can inhibit HIV-1 transcription by deregulating CDK2 and CDK9. Further consideration should be given to the development of iron chelators for future anti-retroviral therapeutics.

Debebe, Zufan; Ammosova, Tatyana [Center for Sickle Cell Disease, Howard University College of Medicine, 520 W. St., N.W., Washington, DC 20060 (United States); Jerebtsova, Marina [Children's National Medical Center, CRI Center for Cancer and Immunology, 111 Michigan Ave., N.W., Washington, DC 20060 (United States); Kurantsin-Mills, Joseph [Department of Biophysics and Physiology, Howard University College of Medicine, 520 W. St., N.W., Washington, DC 20060 (United States); Niu, Xiaomei; Charles, Sharroya [Center for Sickle Cell Disease, Howard University College of Medicine, 520 W. St., N.W., Washington, DC 20060 (United States); Richardson, Des R. [Iron Metabolism and Chelation Program, Department of Pathology, Blackburn Building (D06), University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, 2006 Australia (Australia); Ray, Patricio E. [Children's National Medical Center, CRI Center for Cancer and Immunology, 111 Michigan Ave., N.W., Washington, DC 20060 (United States); Gordeuk, Victor R. [Center for Sickle Cell Disease, Howard University College of Medicine, 520 W. St., N.W., Washington, DC 20060 (United States); Nekhai, Sergei [Center for Sickle Cell Disease, Howard University College of Medicine, 520 W. St., N.W., Washington, DC 20060 (United States); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Howard University College of Medicine, 520 W. St., N.W., Washington, DC 20060 (United States)], E-mail: snekhai@howard.edu

2007-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

373

Electrochemical behavior of reactively sputtered iron-doped nickel oxide  

SciTech Connect

Iron-doped nickel oxide films were deposited by reactive sputtering from elemental and alloy targets in a 20% oxygen/argon atmosphere and were characterized for use as oxygen evolution catalysts. The incorporation of iron reduced the overpotential required for oxygen evolution by as much as 300 mV at a current density of 100 mA/cm{sup 2} compared to undoped nickel oxide deposited under similar conditions. Tafel slopes were reduced from 95 mV/dec in undoped NiO{sub x} films to less than 40 mV/dec for films containing 1.6 to 5.6 mole percent (m/o) iron, indicating a change in the rate-limiting step from the primary discharge of OH{sup {minus}} ions to the recombination of oxygen radicals. Resistivity, structural, and compositional measurements indicate that high oxygen content is necessary to gain the full benefit of the iron dopant. Initial tests in KOH indicate excellent long-term stability. A film deposited from the FeNi alloy target, which exhibited low oxygen overpotentials and a Tafel slope of 35 mV/dec, had not degraded appreciably following more than 7,000 h of operation at an anodic current density of 20 mA/cm{sup 2}. Taken together, the low oxygen evolution reaction overpotentials, the excellent stability in KOH, and the relative insensitivity to iron content indicative that reactively sputtered iron-doped nickel oxide is promising as an oxygen catalyst.

Miller, E.L.; Rocheleau, R.E. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Synthesis of iron oxides and the influence of organic acids on the resolubilization of iron minerals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Organ1c Acids on the Resolubi1 izat1on of Iron M1neral s. (May 1984) Er1c Thacher Clarke, B. A. , Southwestern University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Richard H. Loeppert Equilibrium Fe concentrat1ons of calcareous soil are readily... and reducing agents, buffered in 1. 0 N NH4 acetate at pH 3. 5 and 4. 75, Dissolution rate in oxalic acid decreased in the following order: ferrihydrite, lep1docroc1te, and goeth1te. Rate of Fe ox1de dissolution 1n the presence of com- plexing and reducing...

Clarke, Eric Thacher

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

375

Microsoft Word - Appendix G.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

1 are included in this appendix. 1 are included in this appendix. Appendix G, Page 1 RFLMA Contact Record 2011-01 1 of 5 ROCKY FLATS SITE REGULATORY CONTACT RECORD Purpose: Replace Mound Site Plume Treatment System (MSPTS) media and maintain/repair discharge gallery. Contact Record Approval Date: 1/14/11 Site Contact(s)/Affiliation(s): Scott Surovchak, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE); John Boylan, S.M. Stoller (Stoller); Rick DiSalvo, Stoller Regulatory Contact(s)/Affiliation(s): Carl Spreng, Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE); Vera Moritz, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Discussion: A routine maintenance activity to remove the MSPTS spent treatment media (zero valent iron [ZVI] filings) and replace it with new ZVI media is scheduled for January-February 2011. The last

376

Pilot testing of in situ chemical reduction to treat carbon tetrachloride  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pilot testing of in situ chemical reduction to treat carbon tetrachloride Pilot testing of in situ chemical reduction to treat carbon tetrachloride at a former grain storage facility in Missouri March 26, 2013 At a former grain storage facility in Missouri, EVS has initiated a pilot test of an innovative treatment using amended zero-valent iron to achieve in situ chemical reduction of carbon tetrachloride contamination. Carbon tetrachloride concentrations above regulatory levels in soil and groundwater (at 8-89 ft below ground level [BGL]) are confined to a small area of the former facility, on property that is now a county fairground. At present, the contamination poses no known risks to fairgrounds workers or visitors. The deep bedrock aquifers in the area are at minimal risk of contamination. The areas targeted for treatment in the pilot test are localized

377

Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 results: 6 results: BibTex RIS RTF XML Sort by: Author Title Type [ Year (Desc) ] Filters: Author is Donald Lucas [Clear All Filters] 2012 Holder, Amara L., Brietta J. Carter, Regine Goth-Goldstein, Donald Lucas, and Catherine P. Koshland. "Increased Cytotoxicity of Oxidized Flame Soot." Atmospheric Pollution Research 3, no. 1 (2012): 25-31. 2009 Keenan, Christina R., Regine Goth-Goldstein, Donald Lucas, and David L. Sedlak. "Oxidative Stress Induced by Zero-Valent Iron Nanoparticles and Fe(II) in Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells." Environmental Science & Technology 43, no. 12 (2009): 4555-4560. Singer, Brett C., Michael G. Apte, Douglas R. Black, Toshifumi Hotchi, Donald Lucas, Melissa M. Lunden, Anna G. Mirer, Michael Spears, and Douglas P. Sullivan. Natural Gas Variability in California: Environmental Impacts

378

Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 results: 3 results: BibTex RIS RTF XML Sort by: Author Title Type [ Year (Desc) ] Filters: Author is Regine Goth-Goldstein [Clear All Filters] 2012 Holder, Amara L., Brietta J. Carter, Regine Goth-Goldstein, Donald Lucas, and Catherine P. Koshland. "Increased Cytotoxicity of Oxidized Flame Soot." Atmospheric Pollution Research 3, no. 1 (2012): 25-31. 2010 Goth-Goldstein, Regine, Marion L. Russell, Donghui Li, Ana P. Müller, Maira Caleffi, Joao Eschiletti, Marcia Graudenz, and Michael D. Sohn. Role of CYP1B1 in PAH-DNA Adduct Formation and Breast Cancer Risk. Berkeley: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 2010. 2009 Keenan, Christina R., Regine Goth-Goldstein, Donald Lucas, and David L. Sedlak. "Oxidative Stress Induced by Zero-Valent Iron Nanoparticles and

379

Field Projects: Monticello, Utah | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Long-Term Surveillance - Operations and Maintenance Long-Term Surveillance - Operations and Maintenance » Permeable Reactive Barriers » Field Projects: Monticello, Utah Field Projects: Monticello, Utah A permeable reactive barrier (PRB) of zero-valent iron is helping to clean up groundwater at a former uranium and vanadium ore processing mill at Monticello, Utah. LM managed remediation of tailings and tailings-contaminated material at this site. Cleanup of the mill site is regulated under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. Arsenic, molybdenum, nitrate, selenium, uranium, and vanadium are contaminants of concern in groundwater at the site. An Interim Record of Decision designated emplacement of a PRB hydraulically downgradient of the mill site to remove these contaminants. Results of both laboratory and

380

Water resources and the urban environment--98  

SciTech Connect

This report contains all the papers presented at the meeting. There are 25 sessions and one poster session in the document. The Sessions are: (1) Landfill gas/groundwater interactions; (2) Urban solids management; (3) Local issues; (4) Surface water quality studies 1; (5) Reductive treatment of hazardous wastes with zero-valent iron; (6) Water reuse 1; (7) Biosolids management; (8) GIS information systems 1; (9) Drinking water distribution; (10) Anaerobic treatment; (11) Water reuse 2; (12) Municipal wastewater treatment technology; (13) GIS information systems 2; (14) Drinking water treatment 1; (15) Risk-based site remediation; (16) Small urban watersheds; (17) Disinfection; (18) Air pollution control and risk assessment; (19) Drinking water treatment 2; (20) Biological wastewater treatment; (21) Wastewater treatment; (22) Decentralized small-scale alternative wastewater management systems; (23) General environmental issues; (24) Drinking water treatment 3; and (25) Groundwater remediation. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the database.

Wilson, T.E. [ed.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granular zero-valent iron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

71 - 21880 of 28,905 results. 71 - 21880 of 28,905 results. Page Field Projects: Monticello, Utah A permeable reactive barrier (PRB) of zero-valent iron is helping to clean up groundwater at a former uranium and vanadium ore processing mill at Monticello, Utah. LM managed remediation of... http://energy.gov/lm/field-projects-monticello-utah Page Carbon Storage Monitoring, Verification and Accounting Research Reliable and cost-effective monitoring, verification and accounting (MVA) techniques are an important part of making geologic sequestration a safe, effective, and acceptable method for greenhouse... http://energy.gov/fe/science-innovation/carbon-capture-and-storage-research/carbon-storage-monitoring-verification-and Article Moab Marks 6-Million-Ton Cleanup Milestone MOAB, Utah - 6,000,000 is a big number, and it marks a significant

382

The effect of iron dilution on strength of nickel/steel and Monel/steel welds  

SciTech Connect

The weld strength, as a function of iron content, for nickel/steel and Monel/steel welds was determined. Samples were prepared using a Gas Metal Arc (GMAW) automatic process to weld steel plate together with nickel or Monel to produce a range of iron contents typical of weld compositions. Tensile specimens of each iron content were tested to obtain strength and ductility measurements for that weld composition. Data indicate that at iron contents of less than 20% iron in a nickel/steel weld, the weld fails at the weld interface, due to a lack of fusion. Between 20% and 35% iron, the highest iron dilution that could be achieved in a nickel weld, the welds were stronger than the steel base metal. This indicates that a minimum amount of iron dilution (20%) is necessary for good fusion and optimum strength. On the other hand for Monel/steel welds, test results showed that the welds had good strength and integrity between 10% and 27% iron in the weld. Above 35% iron, the welds have less strength and are more brittle. The 35% iron content also corresponds to the iron dilution in Monel welds that has been shown to produce an increase in corrosion rate. This indicates that the iron dilution in Monel welds should be kept below 35% iron to maximize both the strength and corrosion resistance. 2 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Fout, S.L.; Wamsley, S.D.

1983-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

383

Use of high-granularity position sensing to correct response non-uniformities of CdZnTe detectors  

SciTech Connect

CdZnTe (CZT) is a promising medium for room-temperature gamma-ray detectors. However, the low production yield of acceptable quality crystals hampers the use of CZT detectors for gamma-ray spectroscopy. Significant efforts have been directed towards improving quality of CZT crystals to make them generally available for radiation detectors. Another way to address this problem is to implement detector designs that would allow for more accurate and predictable correction of the charge loss associated with crystal defects. In this work, we demonstrate that high-granularity position-sensitive detectors can significantly improve the performance of CZT detectors fabricated from CZT crystals with wider acceptance boundaries, leading to an increase of their availability and expected decrease in cost.

Bolotnikov, A. E., E-mail: bolotnik@bnl.gov; Camarda, G. S.; Cui, Y.; De Geronimo, G.; Fried, J.; Hossain, A.; Mahler, G.; Maritato, M.; Marshall, M.; Roy, U.; Vernon, E.; Yang, G.; James, R. B. [Department of Non-proliferation and National Security, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11793-5000 (United States); Lee, K. [Korea University, 161 Jeongneung-ro, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul, 136-855 (Korea, Republic of); Petryk, M. [State University of New York at Binghamton, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States)

2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

384

Friction of a slider on a granular layer: Non-monotonic thickness dependence and effect of boundary conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the effective friction encountered by a mass sliding on a granular layer as a function of bed thickness and boundary roughness conditions. The observed friction has minima for a small number of layers before it increases and saturates to a value which depends on the roughness of the sliding surface. We use an index-matched interstitial liquid to probe the internal motion of the grains with fluorescence imaging in a regime where the liquid has no significant effect on the measured friction. The shear profiles obtained as a function of depth show decrease in slip near the sliding surface as the layer thickness is increased. We propose that the friction depends on the degree of grain confinement relative to the sliding surfaces.

Saloome Siavoshi; Ashish V. Orpe; Arshad Kudrolli

2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

385

Dynamics of iron-acceptor-pair formation in co-doped silicon  

SciTech Connect

The pairing dynamics of interstitial iron and dopants in silicon co-doped with phosphorous and several acceptor types are presented. The classical picture of iron-acceptor pairing dynamics is expanded to include the thermalization of iron between different dopants. The thermalization is quantitatively described using Boltzmann statistics and different iron-acceptor binding energies. The proper understanding of the pairing dynamics of iron in co-doped silicon will provide additional information on the electronic properties of iron-acceptor pairs and may become an analytical method to quantify and differentiate acceptors in co-doped silicon.

Bartel, T.; Gibaja, F.; Graf, O.; Gross, D.; Kaes, M.; Heuer, M.; Kirscht, F. [Calisolar GmbH, Magnusstrasse 11, 12489 Berlin (Germany)] [Calisolar GmbH, Magnusstrasse 11, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Möller, C. [CiS Forschungsinstitut für Mikrosensorik und Photovoltaik GmbH, Konrad-Zuse-Str. 14, 99099 Erfurt (Germany) [CiS Forschungsinstitut für Mikrosensorik und Photovoltaik GmbH, Konrad-Zuse-Str. 14, 99099 Erfurt (Germany); TU Ilmenau, Institut für Physik, Weimarer Str. 32, 98693 Ilmenau (Germany); Lauer, K. [CiS Forschungsinstitut für Mikrosensorik und Photovoltaik GmbH, Konrad-Zuse-Str. 14, 99099 Erfurt (Germany)] [CiS Forschungsinstitut für Mikrosensorik und Photovoltaik GmbH, Konrad-Zuse-Str. 14, 99099 Erfurt (Germany)

2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

386

Millihertz QPOs and broad iron line from LMC X-1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the temporal and energy spectral characteristics of the persistent black hole X-ray binary LMC X-1 using two XMM-Newton and a Suzaku observation. We report the discovery of low frequency (~ 26-29 mHz) quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs). We also report the variablity of the broad iron K-alpha line studied earlier with Suzaku. The QPOs are found to be weak with fractional rms amplitude in the ~ 1-2 % range and quality factor Q~2-10 . They are accompanied by weak red noise or zero-centered Lorentzian components with rms variability at the ~ 1-3 % level. The energy spectra consists of three varying components - multicolour disk blackbody (kT_{in} ~ 0.7-0.9 keV), high energy power-law tail (Gamma ~ 2.4 - 3.3) and a broad iron line at 6.4-6.9 keV. The broad iron line, the QPO and the strong power-law component are not always present. The QPOs and the broad iron line appear to be clearly detected in the presence of a strong power-law component. The broad iron line is found to be weaker when the disk is like...

Alam, Md Shah; Belloni, T; Mukherjee, D; Jhingan, S

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Magnetosome-like ferrimagnetic iron oxide nanocubes for highly sensitive MRI of single cells and transplanted pancreatic islets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Contrast Agent. Ferrimagnetic iron oxide nanocubes were synthesized via thermal decomposition of iron (III) acetylacetonate in a mixture composed of oleic...PEG-phospholipid-encapsulated ferrimagnetic iron oxide nanocubes, designated as...

Nohyun Lee; Hyoungsu Kim; Seung Hong Choi; Mihyun Park; Dokyoon Kim; Hyo-Cheol Kim; Yoonseok Choi; Shunmei Lin; Byung Hyo Kim; Hye Seung Jung; Hyeonjin Kim; Kyong Soo Park; Woo Kyung Moon; Taeghwan Hyeon

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

A Comparison of Iron and Steel Production Energy Use and Energy Intensity in China and the U.S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

23 5. Comparison of Energy Intensity of Iron and Steelthe U.S. . 27 5.1. Energy Intensity of Iron and27 5.2. Energy Intensity of Iron and Steel Production in

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Response of zinc, iron and copper status parameters to supplementation with zinc or zinc and iron in women  

SciTech Connect

Supplementation with zinc at levels available over-the-counter may compromise iron or copper status. This study examined the effects of zinc(50mg/day) or zinc and iron(50 mg each/day) on 18 women aged 25-40. Subjects were matched on initial levels of serum ferritin(SF) and erythrocyte superoxide dismutase(ESOD) and randomly assigned to Group Z (zinc) or F-Z (iron and zinc). The following were measured pretreatment and after 6 and 10 weeks treatment: serum zinc (BZ), salivary sediment zinc (SSZ), hemoglobin (Hgb), hematocrit (Hct), SF, serum ceruloplasmin (Cp) and ESOD. Effects of treatment and weeks of treatment on changes from initial blood and saliva levels were analyzed using AOV. BZ increased (P=0.0144) and ESOD decreased (P=0.0001) with weeks of treatment. Differences due to treatment are presented. No effects were noted on Hgb, Hct or Cp. Intakes of zinc supplements at about 4X RDA appear to decrease copper(ESOD) and iron(SF) status. Use of iron w/zinc may be protective for FE but not Cu, and may compromise zinc (SSZ) status.

Yadrick, K.; Kenney, M.A.; Winterfeldt, E.

1986-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

390

The Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle Print The Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle Print It is now known that the iron present in minerals of the lower mantle of the Earth undergoes a pressure-induced transition with pairing of the spins of its 3d electrons. A team from the University of California, Berkeley, Tel Aviv University, and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has used x-ray diffraction at very high pressure to investigate the effects of this transition on the elastic properties of magnesiowüstite (Mg1-xFex)O, the second most abundant mineral in the Earth's lower mantle. The new results suggest that the effect of the spin-pairing transition on magnesiowüstite can be large enough to require a partial revision of the most accepted model of the lower mantle composition.

391

The Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle Print The Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle Print It is now known that the iron present in minerals of the lower mantle of the Earth undergoes a pressure-induced transition with pairing of the spins of its 3d electrons. A team from the University of California, Berkeley, Tel Aviv University, and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has used x-ray diffraction at very high pressure to investigate the effects of this transition on the elastic properties of magnesiowüstite (Mg1-xFex)O, the second most abundant mineral in the Earth's lower mantle. The new results suggest that the effect of the spin-pairing transition on magnesiowüstite can be large enough to require a partial revision of the most accepted model of the lower mantle composition.

392

The Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle Print The Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's Lower Mantle Print It is now known that the iron present in minerals of the lower mantle of the Earth undergoes a pressure-induced transition with pairing of the spins of its 3d electrons. A team from the University of California, Berkeley, Tel Aviv University, and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has used x-ray diffraction at very high pressure to investigate the effects of this transition on the elastic properties of magnesiowüstite (Mg1-xFex)O, the second most abundant mineral in the Earth's lower mantle. The new results suggest that the effect of the spin-pairing transition on magnesiowüstite can be large enough to require a partial revision of the most accepted model of the lower mantle composition.

393

Fissile sample worths in the Uranium/Iron Benchmark  

SciTech Connect

One of the long-standing problems from LMFBR critical experiments is the central worth discrepancy, the consistent overprediction of the reactivity associated with introducing a small material sample near the center of an assembly. Reactivity (sample worth) experiments in ZPR-9, assembly 34, the Uranium/Iron Benchmark (U/Fe), were aimed at investigating this discrepancy. U/Fe had a large, single-region core whose neutronics was governed almost entirely by /sup 235/U and iron. The essentially one-dimensional plate unit cell had one 1.6 mm-wide column of 93% enriched uranium (U(93)) near the center, imbedded in about 50 mm of iron and stainless steel. The neutron spectrum was roughly comparable to that of an LMFBR, but the adjoint spectrum was much flatter than an LMFBR's. The worths of four different fissile materials were measured and the worth of U(93) was measured using several different experimental techniques.

Schaefer, R.W.; Bucher, R.G.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Emerging Energy-efficiency and Carbon Dioxide Emissions-reduction Technologies for the Iron and Steel Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heat to smelt the iron. Coal gasification is the result of anew processes such as gasification, slow pyrolysis, and fastreaction ? Carbon gasification and iron ore reduction

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

A Comparison of Iron and Steel Production Energy Use and Energy Intensity in China and the U.S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Iron and Steel Production Energy Use and Energy Intensityof Iron and Steel Production Energy Use and Energy Intensitycomparisons of steel production energy efficiency and CO 2

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

How Godzilla Ate Pittsburgh: The Long Rise of the Japanese Iron and Steel Industry, 1900–1973  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

poorly endowed as Japan in coking coal and iron ore (WarrenYawata of iron ore for coking coal and the progressive in-

Bernard Elbaum

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Synthesis and characterization of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for biomedical applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Monodisperse iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) of 4 nm ... obtained through high-temperature solution phase reaction of iron (III) acetylacetonate with 1, 2-hexadecanediol in the presence ... oleic acid and oleylami...

L. A. Cano; M. V. Cagnoli; S. J. Stewart; E. D. Cabanillas; E. L. Romero…

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Synthesis and characterization of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for biomedical applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Monodisperse iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) of 4 nm ... obtained through high-temperature solution phase reaction of iron (III) acetylacetonate with 1, 2-hexadecanediol in the presence ... oleic acid and oleylami...

L. A. Cano; M. V. Cagnoli; S. J. Stewart; E. D. Cabanillas…

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Thermal Reactions of Fullerene C60 with Iron(III) Acetylacetonate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermal reaction of solid mixtures of fullerene C60 with iron(III) acetylacetonate proceeds in the combustion mode; the composition...60...ratio in the initial mixture. The magnetization of iron-fullerene complex...

V. G. Isakova; E. A. Petrakovskaya; A. D. Balaev…

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

The nonlinear optical, magnetic, and Mössbauer spectral properties of some iron(III) doped silica xerogels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Iron(III) species dispersed in silica have been ... synthesized with a sol-gel process. The iron(III) was introduced as the acetylacetonate complex into a solution of tetraethoxysilane to...Z-scan experimental st...

L. Rebbouh; V. Rosso; Y. Renotte; Y. Lion; F. Grandjean…

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granular zero-valent iron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Coal Fly Ash as a Source of Iron in Atmospheric Dust. | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Fly Ash as a Source of Iron in Atmospheric Dust. Coal Fly Ash as a Source of Iron in Atmospheric Dust. Abstract: Anthropogenic coal fly ash aerosols may represent a...

402

Characterization of the FNR Protein of Escherichid coli, an Iron-Binding Transcriptional Regulator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...coli, an Iron-Binding Transcriptional Regulator Jeffrey Green Martin Trageser Stephan...John R. Guest FNR is a transcriptional regulator mediating the activation or repression...coli, an iron-binding transcriptional regulator. | FNR is a transcriptional regulator...

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Sedimentary and mineral dust sources of dissolved iron to the world ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the tropi- cal Pacific Ocean II. Iron biogeochemistry,in the Northeast Pacific Ocean Gyre: Aerosols, iron, and theF. M. M. : The equatorial Pacific Ocean: Grazer-controlled

Moore, J. K; Braucher, O.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Direct production of light olefins from syngas over a carbon nanotube confined iron catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Iron particles confined in carbon nanotube (CNT) channels have been used as a catalyst for the direct conversion of syngas to light olefins. Compared with iron catalysts supported on other materials such as Si...

ChuanFu Wang; XiuLian Pan; XinHe Bao

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

A Radar-like Iron based Nanohybrid as an Efficient and Stable...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radar-like Iron based Nanohybrid as an Efficient and Stable Electrocatalyst for Oxygen Reduction. A Radar-like Iron based Nanohybrid as an Efficient and Stable Electrocatalyst for...

406

V-021: Cisco IronPort Web / Email Security Appliance Sophos Anti...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Cisco IronPort Web Email Security Appliance Sophos Anti-Virus Multiple Vulnerabilities V-021: Cisco IronPort Web Email Security Appliance Sophos Anti-Virus Multiple...

407

Characterization of temperature profile in furnace and solubility of iron in silicon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A better understanding of the behavior of impurities, such as iron, in silicon can lead to increases in solar cell efficiency. The purpose of this thesis was to study the behavior of iron in silicon via three sub-tasks: ...

Modi, Vrajesh Y

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Influence of Iron Redox Transformations on Plutonium Sorption to Sediments  

SciTech Connect

Plutonium subsurface mobility is primarily controlled by its oxidation state, which in turn is loosely coupled to the oxidation state of iron in the system. Experiments were conducted to examine the effect of sediment iron mineral composition and oxidation state on plutonium sorption and oxidation state. A pH 6.3 vadose zone sediment containing iron oxides and iron-containing phyllosilicates was treated with various complexants (ammonium oxalate) and reductants (dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate) to selectively leach and/or reduce iron oxide and phyllosilicate phases. Mössbauer spectroscopy was used to identify initial iron mineral composition of the sediment and monitor dissolution and reduction of iron oxides. Sorption of Pu(V) was monitored over one week for each of six treated sediment fractions. Plutonium oxidation state speciation in the aqueous and solid phases was monitored using solvent extraction, coprecipitation, and XANES. Mössbauer spectroscopy showed that the sediment contained 25-30% hematite, 60-65% Al-goethite, and <10%Fe(III) in phyllosilicate; there was no detectable Fe(II). Upon reduction with a strong chemical reductant (dithionite-citrate buffer, DCB), much of the hematite and goethite disappeared and the Fe in the phyllosilicate reduced to Fe(II). The rate of sorption was found to correlate with the 1 fraction of Fe(II) remaining within each treated sediment phase. Pu(V) was the only oxidation state measured in the aqueous phase, irrespective of treatment, whereas Pu(IV) and much smaller amounts of Pu(V) and Pu(VI) were measured in the solid phase. Surface-mediated reduction of Pu(V) to Pu(IV) occurred in treated and untreated sediment samples; Pu(V) remained on untreated sediment surface for two days before reducing to Pu(IV). Similar to the sorption kinetics, the reduction rate was correlated with sediment Fe(II) concentration. The correlation between Fe(II) concentrations and Pu(V) reduction demonstrates the potential impact of changing iron mineralogy on plutonium subsurface transport through redox transition areas. These findings should influence the conceptual models of long-term stewardship of Pu contaminated sites that have fluctuating redox conditions, such as vadose zones or riparian zones.

Hixon, Amy E.; Hu, Yung-Jin; Kaplan, Daniel I.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Nitsche, Heino; Qafoku, Odeta; Powell, Brian A.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Recovery of iron oxide from coal fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high quality iron oxide concentrate, suitable as a feed for blast and electric reduction furnaces is recovered from pulverized coal fly ash. The magnetic portion of the fly ash is separated and treated with a hot strong alkali solution which dissolves most of the silica and alumina in the fly ash, leaving a solid residue and forming a precipitate which is an acid soluble salt of aluminosilicate hydrate. The residue and precipitate are then treated with a strong mineral acid to dissolve the precipitate leaving a solid residue containing at least 90 weight percent iron oxide.

Dobbins, Michael S. (Ames, IA); Murtha, Marlyn J. (Ames, IA)

1983-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

410

Multifunctional superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: Promising tools in cancer theranostics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Iron-oxide nanoparticles of small dimensions that have superparamagnetic properties show immense potential to revolutionize the future of cancer theranostics, the combinatorial diagnosis and therapeutic approach towards cancer. Superparamagnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) have unique magnetic properties, due to which they show excellent tumor-targeting efficiency, and this paves the way for effective personalized cancer treatment. The aim of this review is to focus on the ability of \\{SPIONs\\} to perform multiple roles in the field of cancer biology, such as in diagnosis, monitoring, targeting and therapy. Also, other topics are discussed, including the synthesis of SPIONs, the challenges and recent advances.

Poornima Budime Santhosh; Nataša Poklar Ulrih

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Electrolytic photodissociation of chemical compounds by iron oxide photochemical diodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Chemical compounds can be dissociated by contacting the same with a p/n type semi-conductor photochemical diode having visible light as its sole source of energy. The photochemical diode consists of low cost, readily available materials, specifically polycrystalline iron oxide doped with silicon in the case of the n-type semi-conductor electrode, and polycrystalline iron oxide doped with magnesium in the case of the p-type electrode. So long as the light source has an energy greater than 2.2 electron volts, no added energy source is needed to achieve dissociation.

Somorjai, Gabor A. (Berkeley, CA); Leygraf, Christofer H. (Berkeley, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Electrolytic photodissociation of chemical compounds by iron oxide electrodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Chemical compounds can be dissociated by contacting the same with a p/n type semi-conductor diode having visible light as its sole source of energy. The diode consists of low cost, readily available materials, specifically polycrystalline iron oxide doped with silicon in the case of the n-type semi-conductor electrode, and polycrystalline iron oxide doped with magnesium in the case of the p-type electrode. So long as the light source has an energy greater than 2.2 electron volts, no added energy source is needed to achieve dissociation.

Somorjai, Gabor A. (Berkeley, CA); Leygraf, Christofer H. (Berkeley, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Film-forming capacity of alcoholic solutions of iron(III) chloride with acetylacetone  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Processes in which film-forming solutions based on acetylacetonate and iron(III) chloride are produced were subjected to...

S. A. Kuznetsova; I. A. Senokosova

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint- Sector: Iron and Steel (NAICS 3311, 3312), October 2012 (MECS 2006)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Iron and Steel Sector (NAICS 3311, 3312) with Total Energy Input

415

Consequence of total lepton number violation in strongly magnetized iron white dwarfs  

SciTech Connect

The influence of a neutrinoless electron to positron conversion on a cooling of strongly magnetized iron white dwarfs is studied.

Belyaev, V. B. [Bogolyubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Ricci, P. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Firenze, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Firenze) (Italy); Šimkovic, F. [Department of Nuclear Physics and Biophysics, Comenius University, Mlynská dolina F1, SK-842 15, Bratislava, Slovakia and Bogolyubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Adam, J. Jr.; Tater, M.; Truhlík, E. [Institute of Nuclear Physics ASCR, CZ-250 68 ?ež (Czech Republic)

2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

416

Interfacial Effects in Iron-Nickel Hydroxide–Platinum Nanoparticles Enhance Catalytic Oxidation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...coordinatively unsaturated iron sites for activating O 2...the catalyst. To create the iron (hydr)oxide interface...acac) 2 (where acac is acetylacetonate) in the presence of CO...showed that this layer contained iron (fig. S3). Although the...

Guangxu Chen; Yun Zhao; Gang Fu; Paul N. Duchesne; Lin Gu; Yanping Zheng; Xuefei Weng; Mingshu Chen; Peng Zhang; Chih-Wen Pao; Jyh-Fu Lee; Nanfeng Zheng

2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

417

Reduction of Sintering during Annealing of FePt Nanoparticles Coated with Iron Oxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are first obtained by reduction of iron(III) acetylacetonate and platinum(II) acetylacetonateReduction of Sintering during Annealing of FePt Nanoparticles Coated with Iron Oxide Chao LiuVised Manuscript ReceiVed October 12, 2004 FePt/iron oxide core/shell nanoparticles are synthesized by a two step

Laughlin, David E.

418

Iron Species in Argonne Premium Coal Samples:? An Investigation Using X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Iron Species in Argonne Premium Coal Samples:? An Investigation Using X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy ... Chemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, Illinois 60439 ... Iron K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to examine the iron species that are present within the Argonne Premium Coal Samples. ...

Stephen R. Wasserman; Randall E. Winans; Robert McBeth

1996-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

419

Highpressure behavior of iron carbide (Fe7C3) at inner core conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Highpressure behavior of iron carbide (Fe7C3) at inner core conditions Mainak Mookherjee,1 Yoichi at high pressures have demonstrated that Fe7C3 iron carbide is a likely candidate for the Earth's inner behavior of iron carbide (Fe7C3) at inner core conditions, J. Geophys. Res., 116, B04201, doi:10

Steinle-Neumann, Gerd

420

Mineralogical and Microbial Controls on Iron Reduction in a Contaminated Aquifer-Wetland System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

terminal electron accepting processes, iron reduction has the added complexity that its oxidized form (ferric iron) exists primarily as one of several solid phases in environments with pH greater than 3. Thus, the distribution and form of ferric iron...

Howson, Andrea Melissa

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granular zero-valent iron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Author's personal copy Hematite and iron carbonate precipitation-coexistence at the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide The hydrothermal reactivity of swelling clays has relevant implications on the geological that the carbon dioxide increased the hydrothermal reactivity of montmorillonite because the hematite and ironAuthor's personal copy Hematite and iron carbonate precipitation-coexistence at the iron

Montes-Hernandez, German

422

The Continental Margin is a Key Source of Iron to the HNLC North Pacific Ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Continental Margin is a Key Source of Iron to the HNLC North Pacific Ocean Phoebe J. Lam1 concentrations in the upper 500m of the Western Subarctic Pacific, an iron-limited High Nutrient Low Chlorophyll a key source of bioavailable Fe to the HNLC North Pacific. Keywords: iron, continental margin, HNLC 1

423

Role of Surface Precipitation in Copper Sorption by the Hydrous Oxides of Iron and Aluminum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Role of Surface Precipitation in Copper Sorption by the Hydrous Oxides of Iron and Aluminum K. G precipitation; sorption; isotherms; X-ray diffraction; hydrous iron oxide; hydrous aluminum oxide; copper. INTRODUCTION Hydrous oxides of iron (HFO) and aluminum (HAO) are important mineral components of natural

Chorover, Jon

424

HIGH TEMPERATURE SULFIDATION BEHAVIOR OF LOW Al IRON-ALUMINUM COMPOSITIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HIGH TEMPERATURE SULFIDATION BEHAVIOR OF LOW Al IRON-ALUMINUM COMPOSITIONS S.W. Banovic, J.N. Du (Received January 5, 1998) (Accepted March 23, 1998) Introduction Iron-aluminum weld overlay coatings, the application of iron-aluminum alloys is currently limited due to hydrogen cracking susceptibility subsequent

DuPont, John N.

425

Rhizosphere Microbial Community Structure in Relation to Root Location and Plant Iron Nutritional Status  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...plant iron nutritional status were compared by performing...plant iron nutritional status during the iron-sufficient...only 24 samples, allowed us to compare root locations...BARD) program grant US-2668-95 and by a grant...U.S. Department of Energy. REFERENCES B. Assmus...

Ching-Hong Yang; David E. Crowley

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Studies of anisotropy of iron based superconductors  

SciTech Connect

To study the electronic anisotropy in iron based superconductors, the temperature dependent London penetration depth, {Delta}{lambda}#1;#21;(T), have been measured in several compounds, along with the angular dependent upper critical field, H{sub c2}(T). Study was undertaken on single crystals of Ba(Fe{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}){sub 2}As{sub 2} with x=0.108 and x=0.127, in the overdoped range of the doping phase diagram, characterized by notable modulation of the superconducting gap. Heavy ion irradiation with matching field doses of 6 T and 6.5 T respectively, were used to create columnar defects and to study their effect on the temperature {Delta}{lambda}#1;#21;(T). The variation of the low-temperature penetration depth in both pristine and irradiated samples was #12;tted with a power-law function {Delta}{lambda}#1;#21;(T) = AT{sup n}. Irradiation increases the magnitude of the pre-factor A and decreases the exponent n, similar to the effect on the optimally doped samples. This finding supports the universal s{sub {+-}}#6; scenario for the whole doping range. Knowing that the s{sub {+-}}#6; gap symmetry exists across the superconducting dome for the electron doped systems, we next looked at {lambda}#21;(T), in optimally - doped, SrFe{sub 2}(As{sub 1-x}P{sub x}){sub 2}, x =0.35. Both, as-grown (T{sub c} ~ #25;25 K) and annealed (T{sub c} ~ #25;35 K) single crystals of SrFe{sub 2}(As{sub 1-x}P{sub x}){sub 2} were measured. Annealing decreases the absolute value of the London penetration depth from #21;{lambda}(0) = 300 {+-}#6; 10 nm in as-grown samples to {lambda}#21;(0) = 275{+-}#6;10 nm. At low temperatures, {lambda}#21;(T) #24;~ T indicates a superconducting gap with line nodes. Analysis of the full-temperature range superfluid density is consistent with the line nodes, but differs from the simple single-gap d-wave. The observed behavior is very similar to that of BaFe{sub 2}(As{sub 1-x}P{sub x}){sub 2}, showing that isovalently substituted pnictides are inherently different from the charge-doped materials. In-plane resistivity measurements as a function of temperature, magnetic field, and its orientation with respect to the crystallographic ab-plane were used to study the upper critical field, H{sub c2}, of two overdoped compositions of Ba(Fe{sub 1-x}Ni{sub x}){sub 2}As{sub 2}, x=0.054 and x=0.072. Measurements were performed using precise alignment (with accuracy less than 0.1{degree}) of the magnetic field with respect to the Fe-As plane. The dependence of the H{sub c2} on angle {theta}#18; between the field and the ab- plane was measured in isothermal conditions in a broad temperature range. We found that the shape of the H{sub c2} vs. {theta}#18; curve clearly deviates from the Ginzburg-Landau theory.

Murphy, Jason [Ames Laboratory

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

427

The Oxidation State of Iron at High Pressure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Fig. 3. In K vs. In P-Acetylacetonate and basic acetate. kilobars...for the basic acetate and acetylacetonate (4). Both of these ligands...molecule attaching to the iron through two oxygens. The...KFeCI4 * 323 393 0.07 Fe acetylacetonate 60 325 0.15 Fe acetylacetonate...

H. G. Drickamer; G. K. Lewis Jr.; S. C. Fung

1969-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

428

High Temperature Corrosion Behavior of Iron Aluminide Alloys and Coatings  

SciTech Connect

A multi-year effort has been focused on optimizing the long-term oxidation performance of ingot-processed (IP) and oxide-dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe{sub 3}Al and iron aluminide-based coatings. Based on results from several composition iterations, a Hf-doped alloy (Fe-28Al-2Cr-0.05at.%Hf) has been developed with significantly better high temperature oxidation resistance than other iron aluminides. The scale adhesion is not significantly better; however, the {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale grows at a slower rate, approximately a factor of 10 less than undoped iron aluminide. The benefit of Hf is greatest at 1100-1200 C. Long-term oxidation resistance of commercially fabricated ODS Fe{sub 3}Al has been determined and compared to commercially available ODS FeCrAl. Scale spallation rates for ODS Fe{sub 3}Al are higher than for ODS FeCrAl. To complement studies of iron-aluminide weld-overlay coatings, carbon steel was coated with Fe-Al-Cr by thermal spraying. These specimens were then exposed in air at 900 and 1000 C and in air-1%SO{sub 2} at 800 C. Most likely due to an inadequate aluminum concentration in the coatings, continuous protective Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} could not be maintained and, consequently, the corrosion performance was significantly worse than what is normally observed for Fe{sub 3}Al.

Pint, B.A.

2001-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

429

Nanocrystalline Iron Oxide Aerogels as Mesoporous Magnetic Architectures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have developed crystalline nanoarchitectures of iron oxide that exhibit superparamagnetic behavior while still retaining the desirable bicontinuous pore?solid networks and monolithic nature of an aerogel. ... The laser power was controlled using a series of optical density filters and kept below ?1 mW to avoid sample degradation. ...

Jeffrey W. Long; Michael S. Logan; Christopher P. Rhodes; Everett E. Carpenter; Rhonda M. Stroud; Debra R. Rolison

2004-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

430

Extracellular iron-sulfur precipitates from growth of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans  

SciTech Connect

The authors have examined extracellular iron-bearing precipitates resulting from the growth of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans in a basal medium with lactate as the carbon source and ferrous sulfate. Black precipitates were obtained when D. desulfuricans was grown with an excess of FeSO{sub 4}. When D. desulfuricans was grown under conditions with low amounts of FeSO{sub 4}, brown precipitates were obtained. The precipitates were characterized by iron K-edge XAFS (X-ray absorption fine structure), {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer-effect spectroscopy, and powder X-ray diffraction. Both were noncrystalline and nonmagnetic (at room temperature) solids containing high-spin Fe(III). The spectroscopic data for the black precipitates indicate the formation of an iron-sulfur phase with 6 nearest S neighbors about Fe at an average distance of 2.24(1) {angstrom}, whereas the brown precipitates are an iron-oxygen-sulfur phase with 6 nearest O neighbors about Fe at an average distance of 1.95(1) {angstrom}.

Antonio, M. R.; Tischler, M. L.; Witzcak, D.

1999-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

431

Versatile ferrofluids based on polyethylene glycol coated iron oxide nanoparticles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Versatile ferrofluids based on polyethylene glycol coated iron oxide nanoparticles W. Brullot a in revised form 20 December 2011 Available online 3 February 2012 Keywords: Ferrofluid Polyethylene glycol Magneto-optics Magnetite Rheology a b s t r a c t Versatile ferrofluids based on polyethylene glycol

432

Fischer-Tropsch synthesis over iron-rhodium alloy catalysts  

SciTech Connect

To investigate the nature of iron-rhodium alloy catalysts during the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, a combination of experimental techniques were applied. Infrared spectroscopy was mainly used to extract direct information on the surface of catalysts under the reaction conditions. In addition, Mossbauer spectroscopy was employed to study the iron alloy catalysts. Further characterization of the catalysts was performed by chemisorption measurements. Hydrocarbon products of the CO + H/sub 2/ synthesis reaction were analyzed by gas chromatography. The working surface of a silica-supported rhodium catalyst was found to be saturated with molecular carbon monoxide. The intensity of the linear carbonyl absorption band remained constant compared to that for room temperature CO adsorption, while that of the bridge-bonded carbonyl absorption band was drastically reduced during the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. The bridge-bonded adsorption sites are assumed to be the active sites for dissociating carbon monoxide. The hydrogenation rate of the linearly adsorbed carbon monoxide was much slower than the steady state reaction rate. The alloy catalyst did not form a bulk carbide, but the presence of surface carbon was suggested by the large shift of the linear carbonyl absorption band. On the other hand, infrared spectra on an iron catalyst showed only weak bands, indicating a high degree of CO dissociation. On a silica-supported iron-rhodium alloy catalyst, surface analysis by infrared spectroscopy presents evidence of well-mixed alloy formation. Three models of carbon monoxide adsorption were identified.

Choi, S.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Iron Phosphate Glasses for Vitrifying DOE High Priority Nuclear Wastes  

SciTech Connect

Iron phosphate glasses have been studied as an alternative glass for vitrifying Department of Energy (DOE) high priority wastes. The high priority wastes were the Low Activity Waste (LAW) and the High Level Waste (HLW) with high chrome content stored at Hanford, WA, and the Sodium Bearing Waste (SBW) stored at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. These wastes were recommended by Tanks Focus Area since they were expected to require special attention when vitrified in borosilicate glasses. All three of these wastes have been successfully vitrified in iron phosphate glasses at waste loadings ranging from a low of 32 wt% for the high sulfate LAW to 40 wt% for the SBW to a high of 75 wt% for the high chrome HLW. In addition to these desirable high waste loadings, the iron phosphate glasses were easily melted, typically between 950 and 1200 C, in less than 4 hours in commercial refractory oxide containers. It is noteworthy that the chemical durability of both glassy and deliberately crystallized iron phosphate wasteforms not only met, but significantly exceeded, all current DOE chemical durability requirements as measured by the Product Consistency Test (PCT) and Vapor Hydration Test (VHT). The high waste loading, low melting temperature, rapid furnace throughput (short melting time) and their outstanding chemical durability could significantly accelerate the clean up effort and reduce the time and cost of vitrifying these high priority wastes.

Kim, C.W.; Day, D.E.

2004-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

434

Carbonylation of (+)-2-carene induced by iron-pentacarbonyl.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(+)-2-carene heated neat with iron pentacarbonyl leads to ?-phellandrene-Fe(CO)3 complex ( ?15 % ), p. cymene ( ?15 % ), (-)-(1S)-3,8,8-trimethylbicyclo (4.1.1) oct-3-ene-7-one ( ?50 % ) and (+)-(1S,7S)-3,8,8-trimethylbicyclo (4.1.1.) oct-3-ene-7-ol ( ?20 % ).

Christiane Santelli-Rouvier; Maurice Santelli; Jean-Pierre Zahra

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

The iron man phenomenon, participatory culture, & future augmented reality technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Iron Man media franchise glorifies futuristic interfaces and devices like holographic screens, powerful mobile devices, and heads-up displays. Consequently, a mainstream audience has come to know about and discursively relate to Augmented Reality ... Keywords: augmented reality, human-centric design, social media

Isabel Pedersen; Luke Simcoe

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Reduction of Vinyl Chloride in Metallic Iron-Water Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

residence time for contaminated ground- water to degrade VC to below its maximum contamination levelReduction of Vinyl Chloride in Metallic Iron-Water Systems B A O L I N D E N G * Department). Remediation of groundwater contaminated with chlori- nated ethylenes, including vinyl chloride, has been chal

Deng, Baolin

437

Sulfur Versus Iron Oxidation in an Iron-Thiolate Model Complex  

SciTech Connect

In the absence of base, the reaction of [Fe{sup II}(TMCS)]PF{sub 6} (1, TMCS = 1-(2-mercaptoethyl)-4,8,11-trimethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane) with peracid in methanol at -20 C did not yield the oxoiron(IV) complex (2, [Fe{sup IV}(O)(TMCS)]PF{sub 6}), as previously observed in the presence of strong base (KO{sup t}Bu). Instead, the addition of 1 equiv of peracid resulted in 50% consumption of 1. The addition of a second equivalent of peracid resulted in the complete consumption of 1 and the formation of a new species 3, as monitored by UV-vis, ESI-MS, and Moessbauer spectroscopies. ESI-MS showed 3 to be formulated as [Fe{sup II}(TMCS) + 2O]{sup +}, while EXAFS analysis suggested that 3 was an O-bound iron(II)-sulfinate complex (Fe-O = 1.95 {angstrom}, Fe-S = 3.26 {angstrom}). The addition of a third equivalent of peracid resulted in the formation of yet another compound, 4, which showed electronic absorption properties typical of an oxoiron(IV) species. Moessbauer spectroscopy confirmed 4 to be a novel iron(IV) compound, different from 2, and EXAFS (Fe{double_bond}O = 1.64 {angstrom}) and resonance Raman ({nu}{sub Fe{double_bond}O} = 831 cm{sup -1}) showed that indeed an oxoiron(IV) unit had been generated in 4. Furthermore, both infrared and Raman spectroscopy gave indications that 4 contains a metal-bound sulfinate moiety ({nu}{sub s}(SO{sub 2}) {approx} 1000 cm{sup -1}, {nu}{sub as}(SO{sub 2}) {approx} 1150 cm{sup -1}). Investigations into the reactivity of 1 and 2 toward H{sup +} and oxygen atom transfer reagents have led to a mechanism for sulfur oxidation in which 2 could form even in the absence of base but is rapidly protonated to yield an oxoiron(IV) species with an uncoordinated thiol moiety that acts as both oxidant and substrate in the conversion of 2 to 3.

A McDonald; M Bukowski; E Farquhar; T Jackson; K Koehntop; M Seo; R De Hont; A Stubna; J Halfen; E Munck

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

438

Fracture toughness studies of gray and ductile cast irons using a J-integral approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and silicon in which more carbon is present than can be retained in solid solution in austenite at the eutectic temperature. In gray cast iron, the iron and carbon solidify as a eutectic structure whose two phases are graphite and iron. Gray iron usually... contains from 1. 7 to 4. 5% carbon and 1 to 3% silicon. 27 The normal microstructure of gray iron is a matrix of pearlite (ferrite and cementite) with the graphite flakes dispersed throughout. Among the properties that the flake graphite 28 in gray...

Floyd, Donna Lynne Woodall

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

439

V-021: Cisco IronPort Web / Email Security Appliance Sophos Anti-Virus  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21: Cisco IronPort Web / Email Security Appliance Sophos 21: Cisco IronPort Web / Email Security Appliance Sophos Anti-Virus Multiple Vulnerabilities V-021: Cisco IronPort Web / Email Security Appliance Sophos Anti-Virus Multiple Vulnerabilities November 12, 2012 - 6:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Cisco IronPort Web / Email Security Appliance Sophos Anti-Virus Multiple Vulnerabilities PLATFORM: Cisco IronPort Email Security Appliances (C-Series and X-Series) running Sophos Engine versions 3.2.07.352_4.80 and prior. Cisco IronPort Web Security Appliances (S-Series) running Sophos Engine versions 3.2.07.352_4.80 and prior. ABSTRACT: Cisco Ironport Appliances Sophos Anti-Virus Vulnerabilities. REFERENCE LINKS: Cisco Security Advisory ID: cisco-sa-20121108-sophos Secunia Advisory SA51197 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High DISCUSSION: Cisco has acknowledged some vulnerabilities in Cisco IronPort Web Security

440

V-021: Cisco IronPort Web / Email Security Appliance Sophos Anti-Virus  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Cisco IronPort Web / Email Security Appliance Sophos 1: Cisco IronPort Web / Email Security Appliance Sophos Anti-Virus Multiple Vulnerabilities V-021: Cisco IronPort Web / Email Security Appliance Sophos Anti-Virus Multiple Vulnerabilities November 12, 2012 - 6:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Cisco IronPort Web / Email Security Appliance Sophos Anti-Virus Multiple Vulnerabilities PLATFORM: Cisco IronPort Email Security Appliances (C-Series and X-Series) running Sophos Engine versions 3.2.07.352_4.80 and prior. Cisco IronPort Web Security Appliances (S-Series) running Sophos Engine versions 3.2.07.352_4.80 and prior. ABSTRACT: Cisco Ironport Appliances Sophos Anti-Virus Vulnerabilities. REFERENCE LINKS: Cisco Security Advisory ID: cisco-sa-20121108-sophos Secunia Advisory SA51197 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High DISCUSSION: Cisco has acknowledged some vulnerabilities in Cisco IronPort Web Security

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granular zero-valent iron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Use of bimodal carbon distribution in compacts for producing metallic iron nodules  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for use in production of metallic iron nodules comprising providing a reducible mixture into a hearth furnace for the production of metallic iron nodules, where the reducible mixture comprises a quantity of reducible iron bearing material, a quantity of first carbonaceous reducing material of a size less than about 28 mesh of an amount between about 65 percent and about 95 percent of a stoichiometric amount necessary for complete iron reduction of the reducible iron bearing material, and a quantity of second carbonaceous reducing material with an average particle size greater than average particle size of the first carbonaceous reducing material and a size between about 3 mesh and about 48 mesh of an amount between about 20 percent and about 60 percent of a stoichiometric amount of necessary for complete iron reduction of the reducible iron bearing material.

Iwasaki, Iwao

2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

442

Kinetics of the steam reforming of methane with iron, nickel, and iron-nickel alloys as catalysts  

SciTech Connect

The steam reforming of methane on iron or nickel, CH/sub 4/ + H/sub 2/O ..-->.. CO + 3H/sub 2/, can be regarded as a sequence of two reactions with adsorbed carbon as an intermediate species: CH/sub 4/ ..-->.. C(ads) + 2H/sub 2/, C(ads) + H/sub 2/O ..-->.. CO + H/sub 2/. As the first reaction is rate limiting, the following rate law can be applied to methane reforming catalysed by iron: v = k/sub 2//sup Fe/ a/sub 0//sup -n/ p/sub CH/sub 4///P/sub H/sub 2///sup 1/2/, 0.6 less than or equal to n less than or equal to 1.0. The oxygen activity a/sub 0/ on the catalyst surface is virtually determined by the ratio P/sub H/sub 2/O//P/sub H/sub 2// in the gas atmosphere. The above rate equation was confirmed by measurements in a flow apparatus for the temperature range 700 to 900/sup 0/C. In agreement with the reaction model the steady-state carbon activity on the iron surface and the steady-state carbon concentration in the iron catalyst are very low. With nickel as catalyst the reaction rate is much higher and independent of the oxygen activity on the catalyst surface. The rate equation reads: v = k/sub 2//sup Ni/ P/sub CH/sub 4//. Different partial reaction steps of the methane decomposition are rate determining on iron and nickel.

Muenster, P.; Grabke, H.J.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Effect of thermal treatment on coke reactivity and catalytic iron mineralogy  

SciTech Connect

Iron minerals in coke can catalyze its gasification and may affect coke behavior in the blast furnace. The catalytic behavior of iron depends largely upon the nature of the iron-bearing minerals. To determine the mineralogical changes that iron could undergo in the blast furnace, cokes made from three coals containing iron present in different mineral forms (clays, carbonates, and pyrite) were examined. All coke samples were heat-treated in a horizontal furnace at 1373, 1573, and 1773 K and then gasified with CO{sub 2} at 1173 K in a fixed bed reactor (FBR). Coke mineralogy was characterized using quantitative X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of coke mineral matter prepared by low-temperature ashing (LTA) and field emission scanning electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (FESEM/EDS). The mineralogy of the three cokes was most notably distinguished by differing proportions of iron-bearing phases. During heat treatment and subsequent gasification, iron-containing minerals transformed to a range of minerals but predominantly iron-silicides and iron oxides, the relative amounts of which varied with heat treatment temperature and gasification conditions. The relationship between initial apparent reaction rate and the amount of catalytic iron minerals - pyrrhotite, metallic iron, and iron oxides - was linear and independent of heat treatment temperature at total catalyst levels below 1 wt %. The study showed that the coke reactivity decreased with increasing temperature of heat treatment due to decreased levels of catalytic iron minerals (largely due to formation of iron silicides) as well as increased ordering of the carbon structure. The study also showed that the importance of catalytic mineral matter in determining reactivity declines as gasification proceeds. 37 refs., 13 figs., 7 tabs.

Byong-chul Kim; Sushil Gupta; David French; Richard Sakurovs; Veena Sahajwalla [University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia). Centre for Sustainable Materials Research and Technology

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

444

The effect of water temperature on the adsorption equilibrium of dissolved organic matter and atrazine on granular activated carbon  

SciTech Connect

The influence of water temperature on the adsorption of natural dissolved organic matter (DOM) on activated carbon has not been investigated intensively yet. In this study, batch experiments with granular activated carbon (GAC) F300, from bituminous coal, have been carried out at three temperatures (5, 20, 35{sup o} C) using a humic acid model water and different types of surface water (lake, river, canal). Furthermore, the adsorption of an anthropogenic contaminant, atrazine, was quantified in the absence and presence of DOM. The results indicate a significant influence of water temperature on the adsorption equilibrium of DOM and atrazine. Contrary to expectations, DOM and atrazine adsorption in surface water tends to be increased with increasing water temperature, whereas the extent of this effect is dependent on the type and concentration of DOM. Furthermore, the temperature effect on atrazine adsorption is controlled by competition of DOM and atrazine on adsorption sites. Some assumptions are proposed and discussed for explaining the temperature effects observed in the batch studies. 39 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Bernd Schreiber; Viktor Schmalz; Thomas Brinkmann; Eckhard Worch [Dresden University of Technology, Dresden (Germany). Institute of Water Chemistry

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

445

Solid-solid phase transition measurements in iron  

SciTech Connect

Previously, dynamic experiments on iron have observed a non-zero transition time and width in the solid-solid {alpha}-{var_epsilon} phase transition. Using Proton Radiography at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, we have performed plate impact experiments on iron to further study the {alpha}-{var_epsilon} phase transition which occurs at 13GPa. A 40mm bore powder gun was coupled to a proton radiography beam line and imaging system and synchronized to the impact of the projectile on the target sample with the proton beam pattern. A typical experimental configuration for the iron study, as shown below in 3 color-enhanced radiographs, is a 40mm diameter aluminum sabot impacting a 40mm diameter of polycrystalline ARMCO iron. The iron is backed by a sapphire optical window for velocimetry measurements. The aluminum flyer on the left of the iron is barely visible for visual display purposes. Direct density jumps were measured which corresponded to calculations to within 1% using a Wondy mUlti-phase equation of state model. In addition, shock velocities were measured using an edge fitting technique and followed that edge movement from radiograph to radiograph, where radiographs are separated in time by 500 ns. Preliminary measurements give a shock velocity (P1 wave) of 5.251 km/s. The projectile velocity was 0.725 km/s which translate to a peak stress of 17.5 GPa. Assuming the P1 wave is instantaneous, we are able to calibrate the chromatic, motion, object and camera blur by measuring the width of the P1 wave. This approximation works in this case since each of the two density jumps are small compared to the density of the object. Subtracting the measured width of the P1 wave in quadrature from the width of the P2 wave gives a preliminary measurement of the transition length of 265 {mu}m. Therefore, a preliminary measured phase transition relaxation time {tau} = transition length/u{sub s} = 265 {mu}m/5.251 km/s = 50 ns. Both Boettger and Jensen conclude that the transition rate and likely the transition mechanisms depend on the impact stress and the sample thickness. Since Proton Radiography can measure directly the transition length as well as the shock velocity, a transition time can be directly calculated. With higher higher energy protons we have better resolution of the measured width and edge locations. This will allow a more precise measurement of phase transition relaxation time. We propose to perform a series of experiments to measure the phase transition relaxation time, {tau}, as a function of drive and sample size.

Schwartz, Cynthia Louise [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Arsenic Removal by Photochemical Methods: Nanoparticulate Zerovalent Iron  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Arsenic Removal by Photochemical Methods: Nanoparticulate Zerovalent Iron Arsenic Removal by Photochemical Methods: Nanoparticulate Zerovalent Iron and Heterogeneous Photocatalysis with TiO2 Speaker(s): Marta Litter Date: November 19, 2010 - 11:00am Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Hugo Destaillats Arsenic in groundwater is a dramatic global problem due to the high incidence of arsenicosis or HACRE (Chronic Endemic Regional Hydro-arsenicism, Hidroarsenicismo Crónico Regional Endémico in Spanish), a severe illness causing skin lesions and cancer in extended regions of the world. For this reason, research on low-cost technologies for As removal to be applied in isolated, poor, rural locations is mandatory. This seminar will present a brief overview of arsenic pollution issues and mitigation needs in Latin America. It will also present results on As(V) removal using

447

Parkers-Iron Springs, Arkansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Parkers-Iron Springs, Arkansas: Energy Resources Parkers-Iron Springs, Arkansas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 34.6081427°, -92.3320235° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.6081427,"lon":-92.3320235,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

448

What's in the Cage Matters in Iron Antimonide Thermoelectric Materials |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Novel Experiments on Cement Yield Concrete Results Novel Experiments on Cement Yield Concrete Results Watching a Glycine Riboswitch "Switch" Polyamorphism in a Metallic Glass Under Pressure, Vanadium Won't Turn Down the Volume New Nanoscale Engineering Breakthrough Points to Hydrogen-Powered Vehicles Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed What's in the Cage Matters in Iron Antimonide Thermoelectric Materials MARCH 29, 2007 Bookmark and Share Crystal structure of EuFe4Sb12 showing the cage confined Eu atoms (red) and Fe atoms (brown) surrounded by Sb tilted octahedral (Sb atoms are not shown). Thermoelectric materials such as iron antimonide have drawn intense interest because they offer a pollution-free source of electricity and a

449

IRON-PHOSPHATE GLASS FOR IMMOBILIZATION OF RADIOACTIVE TECHNETIUM  

SciTech Connect

Technetium-99 (Tc-99) can bring a serious environmental threat because of its high fission yield, long half-life, and high solubility and mobility in the ground water. The present work investigated the immobilization of Tc-99 (surrogated by Re) by heat-treating mixtures of an iron-phosphate glass with 1.5 to 6 wt.% KReO{sub 4} at {approx}1000 C. The Re retention in the glass was as high as {approx}1.2 wt. % while the loss of Re by evaporation during melting was {approx}50%. Re was uniformly distributed within the glass. The normalized Re release by the 7-day Product Consistency Test was {approx}0.39 g/m{sup 2}, comparable with that in phosphate-bonded ceramics and borosilicate glasses. These results suggest that iron-phosphate glass can provide a good matrix for immobilizing Tc-99.

KRUGER AA; HRMA PR; XU K; CHOI J; UM W; HEO J

2012-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

450

Iron beam acceleration using direct plasma injection scheme  

SciTech Connect

A new set of vanes of radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator was commissioned using highly charged iron beam. To supply high intensity heavy ion beams to the RFQ, direct plasma injection scheme (DPIS) with a confinement solenoid was adopted. One of the difficulties to utilize the combination of DPIS and a solenoid field is a complexity of electro magnetic field at the beam extraction region, since biasing high static electric field for ion extraction, RFQ focusing field, and the solenoid magnetic field fill the same space simultaneously. To mitigate the complexity, a newly designed magnetic field clamps were used. The intense iron beam was observed with bunched structure and the total accelerated current reached 2.5 nC.

Okamura, M., E-mail: okamura@bnl.gov [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); RIKEN-BNL Research Center, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Kanesue, T. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)] [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Yamamoto, T. [Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)] [Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Fuwa, Y. [Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan) [Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

451

Iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, .ltoreq.1% Cr and either .gtoreq.0.05% Zr or ZrO.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or .gtoreq.0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, .ltoreq.3% Cu, balance Fe.

Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Deevi, Seetharama C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Fleischhauer, Grier S. (Midlothian, VA); Hajaligol, Mohammad R. (Richmond, VA); Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton (Chesterfield, VA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, .ltoreq.1% Cr and either .gtoreq.0.05% Zr or ZrO.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or .gtoreq.0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, .ltoreq.3% Cu, balance Fe.

Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Deevi, Seetharama C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Fleischhauer, Grier S. (Midlothian, VA); Hajaligol, Mohammad R. (Richmond, VA); Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton (Chesterfield, VA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Coal Fly Ash as a Source of Iron in Atmospheric Dust  

SciTech Connect

Anthropogenic coal fly ash aerosols may represent a significant source of bioavailable iron in the open ocean. Few measurements have been made to compare the solubility of atmospheric iron from anthropogenic aerosols and other sources. We report an investigation of the iron dissolution of three fly ash samples in acidic aqueous solutions and compare the solubilities with that of Arizona test dust, a reference material of mineral dust. The effects of pH, cloud processing, and solar irradiation on Fe solubility were explored. Similar to previously reported results on mineral dust, iron in aluminosilicate phases provide predominant dissolved iron compared with iron in oxides. Iron solubility of fly ash is higher than Arizona test dust, especially at the higher pH conditions investigated. Simulated atmospheric processing elevates iron solubility due to significant changes in the morphology aluminosilicate glass, a dominantly material in fly ash particle. Iron continuously releases into the aqueous solution as fly ash particles break up into smaller fragments. The assessment of dissolved atmospheric iron deposition fluxes, and their effect on the biogeochemistry at ocean surface should be constrained by taking into account the source, environment pH, Fe speciation, and solar radiation.

Chen, Haihan; Laskin, Alexander; Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Gorski, Christopher A.; Scherer, Michelle; Grassian, Vicki H.

2012-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

454

Chapter 12 - Coal use in iron and steel metallurgy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: This chapter discusses the role of coal in iron and steel metallurgy. The chapter first gives information about routes for steel manufacture, current levels of steel production and forecasts for the future. It then discusses the use of coal in different metallurgical processes with emphasis on various ironmaking technologies as the most energy consuming step of the process chain. Alternatives to coal like biomass, hydrogen or waste plastics are discussed from the point of view of CO2 reduction.

A. Babich; D. Senk

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Zinc sorption by iron oxides and soil samples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Head of Department) May 1989 ABSTRACT Zinc Sorption by Iron Oxides and Soil Samples. (May 1989) Markku Juhani Yli-Halla, M. S. University of Helsinki, Finland Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Richard H. Loeppert Zn sorption by synthetic Fe oxide... and soil samples was studied. The purpose was to examine the effect of crystallinity and adsorbed silica on Zn adsorption by synthetic Fe oxide using goethite and ferrihydrite as test materials. Zn sorption by acid soil samples from Finland and a...

Yli-Halla, Markku Juhani

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Low resistivity contact to iron-pnictide superconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method of making a low resistivity electrical connection between an electrical conductor and an iron pnictide superconductor involves connecting the electrical conductor and superconductor using a tin or tin-based material therebetween, such as using a tin or tin-based solder. The superconductor can be based on doped AFe.sub.2As.sub.2, where A can be Ca, Sr, Ba, Eu or combinations thereof for purposes of illustration only.

Tanatar, Makariy; Prozorov, Ruslan; Ni, Ni; Bud'ko, Sergey; Canfield, Paul

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

457

Fouling of carbon steel heat exchanger caused by iron bacteria  

SciTech Connect

A carbon steel heat exchanger installed in a reverse osmosis unit failed after 1 1/2 years from start-up as a result of tubes, lids, tube sheets, and connection pipes clogging from rust deposits. Chemical analysis of cooling water and scraped precipitates, as well laboratory screening of the deposits for bacteria, revealed that activity of iron-oxidizing bacteria present in cooling water could lead to heat exchanger blockage.

Starosvetsky, J.; Armon, R.; Starosvetsky, D. (Technion-Israel Inst. of Tech. (Israel)); Groysman, A.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Technology development for iron F-T catalysts. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this work were twofold. The first objective was to design and construct a pilot plant for preparing precipitated iron oxide F-T precursors and demonstrate that the rate of production from this plant is equivalent to 100 lbs/day of dried metal oxide. Secondly, these precipitates were to be used to prepare catalysts capable of achieving 88% CO + H{sub 2} conversion with {le} 5 mole percent selectivity to methane + ethane.

Frame, R.R.; Gala, H.B.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Performance and cycling of the iron-ion/hydrogen redox flow cell with  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Performance and cycling of the iron-ion/hydrogen redox flow cell with Performance and cycling of the iron-ion/hydrogen redox flow cell with various catholyte salts Title Performance and cycling of the iron-ion/hydrogen redox flow cell with various catholyte salts Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Tucker, Michael C., Venkat Srinivasan, Philip N. Ross, and Adam Z. Weber Journal Journal of Applied Electrochemistry Volume 43 Issue 7 Pagination 637 - 644 Date Published 7/2013 ISSN 0021-891X Keywords battery, Flow battery, iron hydrogen cell, progress, redox flow cell Abstract A redox flow cell utilizing the Fe2+/Fe3+ and H-2/H+ couples is investigated as an energy storage device. A conventional polymer electrolyte fuel cell anode and membrane design is employed, with a cathode chamber containing a carbon felt flooded with aqueous acidic solution of iron salt. The maximum power densities achieved for iron sulfate, iron chloride, and iron nitrate are 148, 207, and 234 mW cm(-2), respectively. It is found that the capacity of the iron nitrate solution decreases rapidly during cycling. Stable cycling is observed for more than 100 h with iron chloride and iron sulfate solutions. Both iron sulfate and iron chloride solutions display moderate discharge polarization and poor charge polarization; therefore, voltage efficiency decreases dramatically with increasing current density. A small self-discharge current occurs when catholyte is circulating through the cathode chamber. As a result, a current density above 100 mA cm(-2) is required to achieve high Coulombic efficiency (> 0.9).

460

An Atomistic study of Helium Resolution in bcc Iron  

SciTech Connect

The evolution of gas-stabilized bubbles in irradiated materials can be a significant factor in the microstructural processes that lead to mechanical property and dimensional changes in structural materials exposed to high-energy neutrons. Helium generation and accumulation is particularly important under DT fusion irradiation conditions. Although the process of ballistic resolutioning of gas from bubbles has been long-discussed in the literature, there have been few computational studies of this mechanism. Resolutioning could limit bubble growth by ejecting gas atoms back into the metal matrix. A detailed atomistic study of ballistic He resolutioning from bubbles in bcc iron has been carried out using molecular dynamics. A newly-developed Fe-He interatomic potential was employed, with the iron matrix described by the potential of Ackland and co-workers from 1997. The primary variables examined were: irradiation temperature (100 and 600K), iron knock-on atom energy (5 and 20 keV), bubble radius (~0.5 and 1.0 nm), and He-to-vacancy ratio in the bubble (0.25, 0.5 and 1.0) in order to obtain an assessment of this dynamic resolutioning mechanism. The results presented here focus on the 5 keV cascades which indicate a modest, but potentially significant level of He removal by this process.

Stoller, Roger E [ORNL; Stewart, David M [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granular zero-valent iron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Corrosion of iron in acid solutions with hydrogen sulfide  

SciTech Connect

The influence of pH and the concentration of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) on corrosion of iron in acid solutions was studied using a potentiostatic polarization method. The alternating current (AC) impedance technique also was used to characterize the active dissolution process of iron. Results showed the dissolution process was accelerated by H{sub 2}S. The anodic dissolution current (i{sub a}) increased with pH and H{sub 2}S concentration with reaction orders of about n{sub pH} = n{sub H{sub 2}s} = 0.25 when the ratio of H{sub 2}S concentration and hydrogen ion (H{sub 3}O{sup +}) concentration was <10{sup 1.5} i{sub a} reached a maximum and became independent of pH and [H{sub 2}S] when [H{sub 2}S]/H{sub 3}O{sup +} > 10{sup 1.5}. The Nyquist diagram corresponding to the active dissolution process in the Tafel range exhibited two capacitive loops in addition to the well-known, high-frequency capacitive loop. A mechanism was proposed to explain the results in which H{sub 2}S chemisorbed first on the electrode surface and then catalyzed the anodic dissolution of iron in two discharging steps.

Cheng, X.L.; Ma, H.Y.; Zhang, J.P.; Chen, X.; Chen, S.H. [Shandong Univ., Jinan (China). Dept. of Chemistry; Yang, H.Q. [Peking Univ. (China). Dept. of Chemistry

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Iron phosphate glass for immobilization of 99Tc  

SciTech Connect

Technetium-99 (99Tc) can bring serious environmental threats because of its long half-life (t1/2 = ~2.1 x 105 years), high fission yield (~6%), and high solubility and mobility in the ground water. The high volatility makes it difficult to immobilize 99Tc in continuous melters vitrifying 99Tc-containing nuclear wastes in borosilicate glasses. This work explores a possibility of incorporating a high concentration of 99Tc, surrogated by the non-radioactive Re, in an iron phosphate glass by melting mixtures of iron phosphate glass frits with 1.5-6 mass% KReO4 at ~1000 C. The retention of Re achieved was ~1.1 mass%. The normalized Re release by the 7-day Product Consistency Test was <10*2 g/m2. Surprisingly, the Re escaped from the melt within a short time of heating, especially when the temperature was increased. Therefore, 99Tc volatilization would still be a challenging task for its immobilization in iron phosphate glasses.

Xu, Kai; Hrma, Pavel R.; Um, Wooyong; Heo, Jong

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

463

Economic analysis of transportation directly reduced iron (DRI) through ship  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Directly reduced iron (DRI) is a major source of iron units in cases of low scrap availability and/or hot metal. Its main advantage is it is low content of phosphorus and sulphur. Removal of phosphorus and sulphur demands high energy consumption in steel making process. With fast depleting sources of cooking coal, the availability of hot metal will decrease in the coming years. Also, scrap availability is already on the declining trend. Hence, DRI is going to be the main source of iron units in the future, especially in electric arc furnace (EAF steel making). The disadvantage of DRI usages lies in it is high reactivity. Freshly produced DRI possesses high susceptibility to oxidation whenever it comes in contact with air. The generated heat in the oxidation reaction increases the tendency to oxidation, thereby, starting a short of chain reaction and ultimately leading to the burning of DRI. This phenomenon makes storage and handling of DRI a concern. The problem caused loss of one cargo in Delta steel company, Nigeria. The authors of this dissertation were given the responsibility to work out the solution in the minimum possible time for implementing it to the next shipments. It is heartening that the problem could be successfully solved and implemented in the next shipments in November '06. Hence, after above work implementation of the recommendations for a $45 risk/ton of DRI, only $1 is to be spent for protection against the risk.

Manikant K. Paswan; Chinmoy Mukherjee

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Kinetics of chromium(VI) reduction by ferrous iron  

SciTech Connect

Chromium is a primary inorganic contaminant of concern at the Pantex Plant. Chromium concentrations have been found to be two orders of magnitude higher than the drinking water standards, particularly in certain wells in the perched aquifer below Zone 12. In situ reduction of a mobile form of chromium, Cr(VI) to an immobile form, Cr(III), was examined as a viable option to active soil restoration. Successfully immobilizing chromium in the vadose zone as Cr(III) will reduce the amount of chromium that reaches the groundwater table. The results from the solution experiments indicated that chromium was rapidly and stoichiometrically reduced by Fe(II) in solution. Also, the slurry experiments showed that the aquifer solids removed Fe(II) from solution, but a portion of the iron removed remained available for reaction with Cr(VI), but at a slower rate. A model to predict different amounts of iron pseudo-components was developed, which allowed prediction of iron amounts required to reduce chromium under in situ conditions.

Batchelor, B.; Schlautman, M.; Hwang, I.; Wang, R. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Multilayer route to iron nanoparticle formation in an insulating matrix  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Well-protected isolated bcc-iron nanoparticles embedded in silicon dioxide were prepared by e-beam evaporation and postannealing of multilayers in an ultrahigh vacuum system. The spherical shape and isolation of the particles were confirmed by plan-view and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy.Oxidation was evaluated from the electron energy-loss near edge structure. In this technique a postedge peak of 40 eV above the iron L 3 threshold originating from backscattering of oxygen atoms provides a clear indication of iron oxide. The white-line ratio (WLR) measuring the 3 d -orbital occupancy is used to estimate the oxidation-layer thickness. In the samples of large ironnanoparticles (with average diameter larger than 10 nm ) a very thin surface layer appears to be the oxide maghemite approximately one atomic layer according to the WLR evaluations. The evolution of the coercivity with particle size as measured by the magneto-optical Kerr effect shows that the reversal process is dominated by the surfaceanisotropy and is also affected by the dipole interaction particularly in samples with large volume-filling factor.

Feng Wang; Marek Malac; Ray F. Egerton; Alkiviathes Meldrum; Xiaobin Zhu; Zhigang Liu; Nicole Macdonald; Peng Li; Mark R. Freeman

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Solvent Tuning of Properties of Iron-Sulfur Clusters in Proteins  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solvent Tuning of Properties of Solvent Tuning of Properties of Iron-Sulfur Clusters in Proteins Figure 1. Schematic repre-sentation of the common active-site iron-sulfur cluster structural motif. Proteins containing Fe4S4 iron-sulfur clusters are ubiquitous in nature and catalyze one-electron transfer processes. These proteins have evolved into two classes that have large differences in their electrochemical potentials: high potential iron-sulfur proteins (HiPIPs) and bacterial ferredoxins (Fds). The role of the surrounding protein environment in tuning the redox potential of these iron sulfur clusters has been a persistent puzzle in biological electron transfer [1]. Although HiPIPs and Fds have the same iron sulfur structural motif - a cubane-type structure - (Figure 1), there are large differences in their electrochemical

467

Method for the production of hydrocarbons using iron-carbon-based catalysts  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a process for producing C/sub 2/+ aliphatic hydrocarbons from a CO and H/sub 2/ mixture comprising the step of contacting the mixture with a catalyst comprising finely divided nonpyrophoric iron-carbon catalyst particles comprising iron and carbon, in the substantial absence of silicon, a substantial portion of which is dementite, which was produced in a reaction zone in the presence of laser radiation under such conditions of laser flux density, power adsorption, concentration of iron compound reactants selected from the group consisting of iron carbonyls, iron acetylacetonate, and ferrocene, and pressure sufficient to produce non-pyrophoric iron-carbon particles having average diameters between 1 and 100 nm.

Rice, G.W.; Fiato, R.A.; Soled, S.L.

1988-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

468

A classical approach in simple nuclear fusion reaction {sub 1}H{sup 2}+{sub 1}H{sup 3} using two-dimension granular molecular dynamics model  

SciTech Connect

Molecular dynamics in 2-D accompanied by granular model provides an opportunity to investigate binding between nuclei particles and its properties that arises during collision in a fusion reaction. A fully classical approach is used to observe the influence of initial angle of nucleus orientation to the product yielded by the reaction. As an example, a simplest fusion reaction between {sub 1}H{sup 2} and {sub 1}H{sup 3} is observed. Several products of the fusion reaction have been obtained, even the unreported ones, including temporary {sub 2}He{sup 4} nucleus.

Viridi, S.; Kurniadi, R.; Waris, A.; Perkasa, Y. S. [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Division, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Doctoral Program in Physics, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Bandung 40132 Physics Department, Universitas Islam Negeri Sunan Gunung Djati, Bandung 40614 (Indonesia)

2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

469

Temperature dependence of magnetotransport behavior and its correlation with inter-particle interaction in Cu{sub 100-x}Co{sub x} granular films  

SciTech Connect

Granular Cu{sub 100-x}Co{sub x} (x=15.1-30.9) films were deposited by magnetron co-sputtering and their magnetotransport properties were investigated as a function of temperature. We observed that with increasing cobalt content the room temperature magnetoresistance (MR) shows a maximum at x=20.9. With decreasing temperature, it is observed that the cobalt concentration at which the maximum MR occurs shifts progressively towards lower Co concentration. This behavior has been discussed in terms of the inter-particle magnetic interactions.

Kumar, Dinesh; Chaudhary, Sujeet; Pandya, Dinesh K. [Thin Film Laboratory, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi-110016 (India)

2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

470

Testing and verification of granular-bed filters for the removal of particulate and alkalis. Eleventh quarterly project report, April 1, 1983-June 30, 1983  

SciTech Connect

The Westinghouse Electric Corporation with Ducon, Inc. and Burns and Roe, Inc. are conducting a test and evaluation program of a Granular-Bed Filter (GBF) for gas-cleaning applications in pressurized fluidized-bed combustion processes. This work is funded by DOE PRDA for Exploratory Research, Development, Testing and Evaluation of Systems or Devices for Hot Gas Clean-up. This report describes the status of the testing of the subpilot scale GBF unit under simulated Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Combustion (PFBC) conditions through Phase IV and the design of a bench-scale, single-bed cylindrical element that will be utilized in Test Phase V.

None

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic rich iron Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Processes conducive to the release and transport of arsenic into aquifers of Bangladesh Summary: then by reductive dissolution of iron and arsenic during the ensuing...

472

Arsenic Removal from Groundwater Using Iron Electrocoagulation: Effect of Charge Dosage Rate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

iron-­? containing   adsorbents   for   arsenic   removal.  arsenate-selective adsorbent. [29] Electrochemical Reactorsof pre-synthesized HFO adsorbent (ps-HFO; i.e. HFO that was

Amrose, Susan E.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced iron aluminide-clad Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Molecular to Field Scale Uranium... , Arsenic, and Iron Biogeochemistry at Abandoned Mining Sites Abandoned Uranium Mine Tailings in Harding Source: Borch, Thomas - Department...

474

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing iron stores Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

stored iron in the cells was utilized and its concentration decreased (Fig. 6). By late exponential phase... was assessed (Supplemental Table II). Figure 6. ... Source: Pakrasi,...

475

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobically corroding iron Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

This publication provides a general overview of anaero- Summary: . Scrubbing the biogas with iron-impregnated wood chips has been used in anaerobic digesters in municipal......

476

Layer-By-Layer Assembled Hybrid Film of Carbon Nanotubes/Iron...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

By-Layer Assembled Hybrid Film of Carbon NanotubesIron Oxide Nanocrystals for Reagentless Electrochemical Detection of Layer-By-Layer Assembled Hybrid Film of Carbon Nanotubes...

477

Synthesis of the H-Cluster Framework of Iron-Only Hydrogenase...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for hydrogen production or uptake, pertinent to energy transduction technology and a hydrogen economy. Herein we report the assembly of the first materials with di-iron...

478

Promotion of atherogenesis by copper or iron-Which is more likely?  

SciTech Connect

Iron levels increase in atherosclerotic lesions in cholesterol fed-rabbits and play a role in atherosclerosis. We investigated whether copper also rises. Male New Zealand White rabbits were fed high-cholesterol diets for 8 weeks. After sacrifice, lesion sizes were determined, and elemental analyses of the lesion and unaffected artery wall performed using nuclear microscopy. Unlike iron, lesion copper is decreased by about half compared with the unaffected artery wall, and much less copper than iron is present. Our data suggest that iron may be more likely to play a role in the promotion of atherosclerosis than copper.

Rajendran, Reshmi [Centre for Ion Beam Applications, Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, MD7, 8 Medical Drive, Singapore 117597 (Singapore); Department of Biochemistry, National University of Singapore, MD7, 8 Medical Drive, Singapore 117597 (Singapore); Ren, Minqin [Centre for Ion Beam Applications, Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, MD7, 8 Medical Drive, Singapore 117597 (Singapore); Ning, Pan [Department of Biochemistry, National University of Singapore, MD7, 8 Medical Drive, Singapore 117597 (Singapore); Tan Kwong Huat, Benny [Department of Pharmacology, National University of Singapore, MD7, 8 Medical Drive, Singapore 117597 (Singapore); Halliwell, Barry [Department of Biochemistry, National University of Singapore, MD7, 8 Medical Drive, Singapore 117597 (Singapore)]. E-mail: bchbh@nus.edu.sg; Watt, Frank [Centre for Ion Beam Applications, Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, MD7, 8 Medical Drive, Singapore 117597 (Singapore)

2007-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

479

Contribution of Iron-Reducing Bacteria to Mercury Methylation in Marine Sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in continental margin sediments off central Chile. Limnologyof microbial iron reduction in sediments of the Baltic-Northreducing bacteria from sediments of an acid stressed lake.

Fleming, Emily J.; Nelson, D C

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

E-Print Network 3.0 - approved iron nanoparticles Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Standards and Technology (NIST), Materials Reliability Division Collection: Materials Science 2 Synthesis of Monodisperse Biotinylated p(NIPAAm)-Coated Iron Oxide Magnetic...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granular zero-valent iron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

ORNL scientists uncover clues to role of magnetism in iron-based...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Media Relations (865) 574-7308 ORNL scientists uncover clues to role of magnetism in iron-based superconductors Oak Ridge National Laboratory scientists used scanning...

482

Quantification of liver iron content with CT—added value of dual-energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To evaluate the value of dual-energy CT (DECT) with use of an ... decomposition algorithm for the quantification of liver iron content (LIC).

Michael A. Fischer; Caecilia S. Reiner; Dimitri Raptis; Olivio Donati…

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

FACTORS CONTROLLING SYNTHESIS OF IRON OXIDE NANOPARTICLES AND THE EFFECT OF SURFACE CHARGE ON MAGNETIC HYPERTHERMIA.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??ABSTRACT Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) have been widely studied in the theranostics application due to their promising magnetic properties, low cytotoxicity and attractive biocompatibility. Despite… (more)

Qi, Bin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Iron oxide nanoparticle-based theranostics for cancer imaging and therapy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Theranostic platform, which is equipped with both diagnostic and therapeutic functions, is a promising approach in cancer treatment. From various nanotheranostics studied, iron oxide nanoparticles have advantages...

Xiaoqing Ren; Hongwei Chen; Victor Yang…

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Preservation of iron(II) by carbon-rich matrices in a hydrothermal plume  

SciTech Connect

Hydrothermal venting associated with mid-ocean ridge volcanism is globally widespread. This venting is responsible for a dissolved iron flux to the ocean that is approximately equal to that associated with continental riverine runoff. For hydrothermal fluxes, it has long been assumed that most of the iron entering the oceans is precipitated in inorganic forms. However, the possibility of globally significant fluxes of iron escaping these mass precipitation events and entering open-ocean cycles is now being debated, and two recent studies suggest that dissolved organic ligands might influence the fate of hydrothermally vented metals. Here we present spectromicroscopic measurements of iron and carbon in hydrothermal plume particles at the East Pacific Rise mid-ocean ridge. We show that organic carbon-rich matrices, containing evenly dispersed iron(II)-rich materials, are pervasive in hydrothermal plume particles. The absence of discrete iron(II) particles suggests that the carbon and iron associate through sorption or complexation. We suggest that these carbon matrices stabilize iron(II) released from hydrothermal vents in the region, preventing its oxidation and/or precipitation as insoluble minerals. Our findings have implications for deep-sea biogeochemical cycling of iron, a widely recognized limiting nutrient in the oceans.

Toner, Brandy M.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Manganini, Steven J.; Santelli, Cara M.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Moffett, James W.; Rouxel, Olivier; German, Christopher R.; Edwards, Katrina J.

2008-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

486

Effect of PCI blending on combustion characteristics for iron-making.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The PCI technology is well established for reducing the consumption of economic and environmentally expensive coke in blast furnace iron-making. Often, coal blends show unexpected… (more)

Gill, Trilochan Singh

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Effect of copper and iron on the oxidative flavor deterioration of ice cream  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the degree of "ASTER CP SCIENCE Jhnuary I~ Nc )or Sub)catt Dairy &~actures EFFECT GF COFFER ARD IRON CR Tlm OXIDATIVE FLAVOR DETKRI/Z'TJ ' CF ICE CRE//P A Thesis Pi? Pbdul Hasid 'Pish Approved as to style and content by: I /'i'I /' ' / , r... Archihald (2? 3) reported results cf cariiar studies on the effect oi' feed and added coppex' or iron or. the coppex' and iron content of milk. Cn tne lamia of these earlier ?tudiss the effect of feeding supplemental copper and iron on the copper...

Miah, Md. Abdul Hamid

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Chemical classification of iron meteorites—IX. A new group (IIF), revision of IAB and IIICD, and data on 57 additional irons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Structural observations and concentrations of Ni, Ga, Ge and Ir allow the classification of 57 iron meteorites in addition to those described in the previous papers in this series; the number of classified independent iron meteorites is now 535. INAA for an additional six elements indicates that five previously studied irons having very high GeGa ratios are compositionally closely related and can be gathered together as group IIF. A previously unstudied iron, Dehesa, has the highest GeGa ratio known in an iron meteorite, a ratio 18 × higher than that in CI chondrites. Although such high GeGa ratios are found in the metal grains of oxidized unequilibrated chondrites, their preservation during core formation requires disequilibrium melting or significant compositional and temperature effects on metal/silicate distribution constants and/or activity coefficients. In terms of GeGa ratios and various other properties group IIF shows genetic links to the Eagle Station pallasites and COCV chondrites. Klamath Falls is a new high-Ni, low-Ir member of group IIIF that extends the concentration ranges in this group and makes these comparable to the ranges in large igneous groups such as IIIAB. Groups IAB and IIICD have been revised to extend the lower Ni boundary of group IIICD down to 62 mg/g. The iron having by far the highest known Ni concentration (585 mg/g), Oktibbeha County, is a member of group IAB and extends the concentration ranges of all elements in this nonmagmatic group. Morasko, a IAB iron associated with a crater field in Poland, is paired with the Seeläsgen iron discovered 100 km away. All explosion craters from which meteorites have been recovered were produced by IAB and IIIAB irons.

Alfred Kracher; John Willis; John T Wasson

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Phosphate influences cycling of iron and carbon in the environment |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Science Computing, Environment & Life Sciences Energy Engineering & Systems Analysis Photon Sciences Physical Sciences & Engineering Energy Frontier Research Centers Science Highlights Postdoctoral Researchers Phosphate influences cycling of iron and carbon in the environment August 30, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint Aquatic and terrestrial environments are dynamic systems where coupled microbiological, geochemical, and hydrological processes define the complex interactions that drive the biogeochemical cycling of water and the major and minor elements. Therefore, a thorough understanding of these complex interactions is critical for predicting the biogeochemical cycling of carbon, nutrients, heavy metals, radionuclides, and other contaminants; managing water quality; and understanding the interactions between

490

Iron catalyst for preparation of polymethylene from synthesis gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a process for synthesizing hydrocarbons; more particularly, the invention relates to a process for synthesizing long-chain hydrocarbons known as polymethylene from carbon monoxide and hydrogen or from carbon monoxide and water or mixtures thereof in the presence of a catalyst comprising iron and platinum or palladium or mixtures thereof which may be supported on a solid material, preferably an inorganic refractory oxide. This process may be used to convert a cabon monoxide containing gas to a product which could substitute for high density polyethylene.

Sapienza, Richard S. (Shoreham, NY); Slegeir, William A. (Hampton Bays, NY)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Corrosion of Iron Stainless Steels in Molten Nitrate Salt  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Energy storage for concentrating solar power (CSP) is a major area of research that seeks to lower the levelized cost of electricity within the aggressive SunShot goals of 6¢/kW-hrth[1–3]. One viable approach is sensible thermal energy storage (TES), which currently utilizes molten nitrate binary salt, stored at 575 °C in the hot tank of a two tank system [4,5]. Increasing the temperature limit within the hot tank requires a detailed understanding of materials corrosion behavior, in addition to salt thermal stability properties. High temperature nickel based alloys are the logical choice for strength and corrosion resistance as elevated temperatures will increase corrosion kinetics, however, the cost of nickel based alloys are nearly four times more expensive than iron based steels [6]. For this reason iron based stainless steels, specifically 321SS and 347SS (nominally Fe-17Cr-9Ni), were chosen for investigation at several temperatures in nitrate salt. 316SS, an elementally similar alloy, was susceptible to stress corrosion cracking while tested at Solar Two [4]. It was suggested that alloys with stabilizing additions of niobium (347SS) or titanium (321SS) would mitigate this deleterious behavior. Flat coupon samples were immersed in binary nitrate salts at temperatures of 400, 500, 600, and 680 °C, with air sparging on all tests. Samples were nominally removed at intervals of 500, 1000, 2000, and 3000 hours to acquire data on time varying weight gain information while simultaneously employing metallography to identify corrosion mechanisms occurring within the melt. Corrosion rates varied dramatically with temperature according to an Arrhenius-type behavior. 347SS and 321SS had very little oxidation for 400 and 500 °C, indicative of a protective corrosion scale and low corrosion kinetics. Data at 600 °C showed that 321SS tended toward linear oxidation behavior based on oxide spallation which was observed on the samples upon removal. Corrosion products at 500 °C had phases of iron oxide, with obvious chromium depletion as observed in energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) scans. 600 °C corrosion layers were primarily iron oxide with obvious phases of sodium ferrite on the outer surface. 680 °C marked an excessive rate of corrosion with metal loss in both alloys.

Alan Kruizenga; David Gill

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

New iron catalyst for preparation of polymethylene from synthesis gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a process for synthesizing hydrocarbons; more particularly, the invention relates to a process for synthesizing long-chain hydrocarbons known as polymethylene from carbon monoxide and hydrogen or from carbon monoxide and water or mixtures thereof in the presence of a catalyst comprising iron and platinum or palladium or mixtures thereof which may be supported on a solid material, preferably an inorganic refractory oxide. This process may be used to convert a carbon monoxide containing gas to a product which could substitute for high density polyethylene.

Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.

1988-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

493

Degradation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) using palladized iron  

SciTech Connect

Contamination from polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) is a persistent problem within the Department of Energy complex, as well as in numerous industrial sites around the US. To date, commercially available technologies for destroying these highly stable compounds involve degradation at elevated temperatures either through incineration or base-catalyzed dehalogenation at 300{degrees}C. Since the heating required with these processes substantially increases the costs for treatment of PCB-contaminated wastes, there is a need for finding an alternative approach where PCB can be degraded at ambient temperatures. This report describes the degradation of PCB`s utilizing the bimetallic substrate of iron/palladium.

West, O.R.; Liang, L.; Holden, W.L. [and others

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Chemistry and Electronic Structure of Iron-Based Superconductors  

SciTech Connect

The solid state provides a richly varied fabric for intertwining chemical bonding, electronic structure, and magnetism. The discovery of superconductivity in iron pnictides and chalcogenides has revealed new aspects of this interplay, especially involving magnetism and superconductivity. Moreover, it has challenged prior thinking about high-temperature superconductivity by providing a set of materials that differ in many crucial aspects from the previously known cuprate superconductors. Here we review some of what is known about the superconductivity and its interplay with magnetism, chemistry, and electronic structure in Fe-based superconductors.

Safa-Sefat, Athena [ORNL; Singh, David J [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

The iron reduction ability of various rose rootstocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

's (Hoagland and Amon 1950) solution, without iron and with NO3 as the nitrogen source (see Appendix 2 for recipe). Solution pH was adjusted with 1N NaOH to 6. 3. All solutions were well aerated with a powerhead air/circulation pump (venturi type Rolf C... with six different Fe +EDTA solutions at the following concentrations: 0, 0. 05, 1, 4, 8, and 48 pM Fe +EDTA (0 to 2. 78 mg liter ). Plants were aerated with a powerhead venturi type air/circulation pump (Rolf C. Hagen Corp, Mansfield MA) to insure...

McDonald, Garry Vernon

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

496

Synthesis and properties of Fe3O4 nanoparticles by sol-vothermal method using iron(III) acetylacetonate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Well dispersed Fe3O4...nanoparticles were synthesized at 180°C by sol-vothermal method, using iron (III) acetylacetonate as iron source and poly-vinilpyrrolidone (PVP) as ... reaction temperature and time, the am...

Xiaojuan Liang; Guoyuan Ji; Liping Zhang; Yuxiang Yang…

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Effect of iron acetylacetonate on physico-chemical properties of waterglass based aerogels by ambient pressure drying  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of iron acetylacetonate on the physico-chemical properties of waterglass ... has been investigated. Doping the gels with iron acetylacetonat (FeAA) facilitates in the diminution...2SiO3 molar ratio fro...

A. Venkateswara Rao; Uzma K. H. Bangi…

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Water Gas Shift Catalysis Using Iron Aerogels Doped with Palladium by the Gas-Phase Incorporation Method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The WGS activity of 2% Pd iron aerogel was higher by 50% than that of 1% Pd incorporated iron aerogel. ... (30) The reactors were charged with 100 mg of fresh catalysts held in place with Whatman QMA quartz fiber filters. ...

Sumit Bali; Gregory C. Turpin; Richard D. Ernst; Ronald J. Pugmire; Vivek Singh; Mohindar S. Seehra; Edward M. Eyring

2008-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

499

Technology and form : iron construction and transformation of architectural ideals in nineteenth century France, 1830-1889.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation investigates the transformation of architectural ideals brought about by the development of iron construction during the nineteenth century in France. The emergence of iron construction paralleled the ...

Lee, Sanghun

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Emerging Energy-efficiency and Carbon Dioxide Emissions-reduction Technologies for the Iron and Steel Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

effective use of non-coking coal and iron-bearing dust andfrom iron ore and non-coking coal. The process was developedBF production in using non-coking coal as reducing agent and

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z