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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite wash stuart" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Elizabeth Stuart  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Elizabeth Stuart Elizabeth Stuart Elizabeth Stuart Electricity Markets and Policy Group Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road MS 90-4000 Berkeley CA 94720 Office Location: 90-4126I (510) 495-2370 EStuart@lbl.gov Elizabeth Stuart is a Principal Research Associate in the Electricity Markets and Policy Group at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Liz conducts research and analysis on a range of policy and program issues related to Energy Efficiency and Demand Response, including Energy Services Company (ESCO) Industry and Market Trends, Evaluation, Measurement and Verification of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Programs, and Technical Assistance to States on Energy Efficiency Programs. Liz also provides technical assistance to Federal facilities on incentives for

2

granite  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Granite City, Illinois, Site (formerly the Granite City Granite City, Illinois, Site (formerly the Granite City Steel site) is located at 1417 State Street, approxi- mately 10 miles northeast of St. Louis, Missouri. The site consists of the Betatron Building, a two-story concrete and metal building. From 1958 to 1966, General Steel Castings Cor- poration, under purchase orders from Mallinckrodt Chemical Works, X-rayed uranium ingots in the Betatron Building to detect metallurgical flaws in the uranium metal. This work was performed for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), a predecessor agency of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). At completion of the AEC activities, the site was remediated to comply with radiological protection standards in effect at the time. In 1989, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducted radiological surveys at the Granite City

3

NREL: Energy Analysis - Stuart Cohen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stuart Cohen Photo of Stuart Cohen Stuart Cohen is a member of the Energy Forecasting and Modeling Group in the Strategic Energy Analysis Center. Postdoctoral Researcher On staff...

4

granite  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Granite City, Illinois, Site is located at 1417 State Granite City, Illinois, Site is located at 1417 State Street, approximately 10 miles northeast of St. Louis, Missouri. The site consists of the Betatron Building, a two-story concrete and metal building. From 1958 to 1966, General Steel Castings Cor- poration, under purchase orders from Mallinckrodt Chemical Works, x-rayed uranium ingots in the Betatron Building to detect metallurgical flaws in

5

Washing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...Following sectioning, specimens should be washed to remove foreign material that may have infiltrated the pores. Two devices used for removing contaminants from pores are an extractor-condenser and an ultrasonic cleaner....

6

WASH-  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

rcc.p,anc. 01 thts arf~cle. tha rcc.p,anc. 01 thts arf~cle. tha yubl~rhe, "r ~u~~iunl riknouu~adqnS the U.S. C;ov.rnmmnf' s rayhr (0 retam l nOn*aClulive.roy~ltV (r-0 ltconso In ma IO Dny Copvrlqhl WASH- covrrm~ the wtvdo. ISADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF THE SEAWAY INDUSTRIAL PARK W . D. Cottrell, R. W . Leggett and H. W . Dickson Health Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 December 1976 CONTENTS l&t of Tab1 es - . . . List of Illustrations . . Abstract . . . . . . Introduction . . . . ............ ............ ............ ............ Radiological Survey Techniques . . . . . . 1 . . Measurement of External Gamma and Beta-Gamma Radiation Levels . . . . . . . . . . . . Measurement of Radium in the Soil . . . . . . Measurement of Radioactivity in Surface Water

7

Cosmopolitanism - Conversation with Stuart Hall  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conversation between Stuart Hall and Pnina Werbner on the theme of Cosmopolitanism (to be shown at the Association of Social Anthropologists Silver Jubilee conference in 2006), in March 2006...

Hall, Stuart

2006-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

8

Book Review Sex Allocation. Stuart West.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Book Review Sex Allocation. Stuart West. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2009. xii þ 466 offspring. This vast literature is now elegantly sum- marized and synthesized in Stuart West's book entitled, as evident in this book, has a commanding grasp of the large body of theoretical and empirical work

West, Stuart

9

Stuart, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stuart, Florida: Energy Resources Stuart, Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 27.197548°, -80.2528257° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":27.197548,"lon":-80.2528257,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

10

Stuart Municipal Utilities Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stuart Municipal Utilities Wind Farm Stuart Municipal Utilities Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Stuart Municipal Utilities Wind Farm Facility Stuart Municipal Utilities Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Stuart Municipal Utilities Developer Stuart Municipal Utilities Energy Purchaser Stuart Municipal Utilities Location Stuart IA Coordinates 41.493988°, -94.327403° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.493988,"lon":-94.327403,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

11

City of Stuart, Nebraska (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stuart Stuart Place Nebraska Utility Id 18230 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates Residential: $0.1030/kWh Commercial: $0.0864/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=City_of_Stuart,_Nebraska_(Utility_Company)&oldid=410309" Categories: EIA Utility Companies and Aliases

12

City of Stuart, Iowa (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stuart City of Stuart City of Place Iowa Utility Id 18231 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Single Phase Commercial Commercial Three Phase CP Commercial Commercial Three Phase Demand Commercial Residential Single Phase Residential Residential Three Phase CP Residential Residential Three Phase Demand Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.1120/kWh Commercial: $0.1070/kWh

13

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY STUART ENERGY USA FOR AN ADVANCED WAIVER OF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STUART ENERGY USA FOR AN ADVANCED WAIVER OF STUART ENERGY USA FOR AN ADVANCED WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN INVENTION RIGHTS UNDER COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NO. DE-FC36-97GO10221,A001, W(A)-98-017, CH-0983 The Petitioner, Stuart Energy USA, a wholly owned subsidiary of Electrolyser Corporation Ltd. of Toronto, Canada, was awarded this cooperative agreement in response to a proposal to build and supply working models and prototypes of hydrogen fuel appliances based on water electrolysis. The initial phase of this work is being performed under DOE Contract No. DE-FC36-97GO10221. Stuart Energy USA is a large business and has requested a waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights for all subject inventions made by its employees under this agreement. As brought out in Stuart Energy USA's response to question 3, the total estimated cost of the project is

14

Granite Falls Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name Granite Falls Energy Place Granite Falls, Minnesota Zip 56241 Product Bioethanol producer using corn as feedstock References Granite Falls Energy1 LinkedIn...

15

Critical behaviour in toroidal plasma confinement Mathew McGann1, Robert Dewar1, Stuart Hudson2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Theoretical Physics / Plasma Research Laboratory (PRL), RSPE, ANU 2Theoretical Physics, Princeton Plasma, Stuart Hudson2 1Theoretical Physics / Plasma Research Laboratory (PRL), RSPE, ANU 2Theoretical Physics

Hudson, Stuart

16

An Application of Sequence Stratigraphy in Modelling Oil Yield Distribution: The Stuart Oil Shale Deposit, Queensland, Australia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Stuart Oil Shale Deposit is a major oil shale resource located near Gladstone on the central Queensland coast. It contains an estimated 3.0 billion (more)

Pope, Graham John

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Hand Washing in Emergency Situations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In an emergency, water may be contaminated, yet hand washing is even more important at these times. This publication explains how to disinfect water for washing.

Schoessow, Courtney

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

18

Solvent wash solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Process for removing diluent degradation products from a solvent extraction solution, which has been used to recover uranium and plutonium from spent nuclear fuel. A wash solution and the solvent extraction solution are combined. The wash solution contains (a) water and (b) up to about, and including, 50 volume percent of at least one-polar water-miscible organic solvent based on the total volume of the water and the highly-polar organic solvent. The wash solution also preferably contains at least one inorganic salt. The diluent degradation products dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent and the organic solvent extraction solvent do not dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent. The highly-polar organic solvent and the extraction solvent are separated.

Neace, James C. (Blackville, SC)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Solvent wash solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is claimed for removing diluent degradation products from a solvent extraction solution, which has been used to recover uranium and plutonium from spent nuclear fuel. A wash solution and the solvent extraction solution are combined. The wash solution contains (a) water and (b) up to about, and including, 50 vol % of at least one-polar water-miscible organic solvent based on the total volume of the water and the highly-polar organic solvent. The wash solution also preferably contains at least one inorganic salt. The diluent degradation products dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent and the organic solvent extraction solvent do not dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent. The highly-polar organic solvent and the extraction solvent are separated.

Neace, J.C.

1984-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

20

Hand Washing vs Sanitizers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hand Washing vs Sanitizers Hand Washing vs Sanitizers Name: allison Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Which works better, antibacterial hand sanitizers, or just plain soap and water? Replies: Soap and water removes more than just bacteria. Soap and water is your best bet. Steve Sample For that answer I would direct you to a few web sites: www.cnn.com:80/health/9808/05/antibacterial.warning/index.html www.cnn.com:80/health/9909/16/killer.ap/index.html and www.microbe.org and go to the "wash up" icon. They have a whole section devoted to handwashing. Good luck Van Hoeck It depends on the need. For a surgeon hand sanitizers are essential, and they have to be applied correctly. There is a famous story of a surgeon who refused to use them because he was allergic to the substance, and he just washed his hands with soap vigorously, and of course used surgical gloves. Nevertheless, he infected several patients with Staphilocccus aureus, a bacteria that lives on the skin harmless, but that can cause severe infections in patients when it is helped entering the body through wounds. The surgeon was caught. So for serious disinfection (also when handling contaminated material) soap is not enough. It is for normal hand-cleaning.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite wash stuart" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Granite2_FUSRAP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site FUSRAP Site Granite Map Background-The Granite City Site, located in Granite City, Illinois, was remediated under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program...

22

Marc Stuart  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of New Business Development and also headed up the firms Government and Regulatory Affairs Group, providing the firms positions within the evolving policy and regulatory...

23

Elizabeth Stuart  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

industry and also worked in the City of Berkeley Mayor's office on the Berkeley FIRST solar financing program and consulted for Environmental Defense Fund's Climate Corps...

24

3Book: A Scalable 3D Virtual Book Stuart K. Card, Lichan Hong, Jock D. Mackinlay, and Ed H. Chi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3Book: A Scalable 3D Virtual Book Stuart K. Card, Lichan Hong, Jock D. Mackinlay, and Ed H. Chi}@parc.com ABSTRACT This paper describes the 3Book, a 3D interactive visualiza- tion of a codex book as a component for digital library and information-intensive applications. The 3Book is able to represent books of almost

Chi, Ed Huai-hsin

25

3Book: A 3D Electronic Smart Book Stuart K. Card, Lichan Hong, Jock D. Mackinlay, Ed H. Chi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3Book: A 3D Electronic Smart Book Stuart K. Card, Lichan Hong, Jock D. Mackinlay, Ed H. Chi PARC This paper describes the 3Book, a 3D interactive visualiza- tion of a codex book as a component for various digital library and sensemaking systems. The book is designed to hold large books and to support

Chi, Ed Huai-hsin

26

SPP/CPM excavate bulk sample of Stuart oil shale for testing  

SciTech Connect

Southern Pacific Petroleum N.L. and Central Pacific Minerals N.L. of Australia continue to evaluate retorting technologies suitable for the processing of Stuart oil shale. A sample of 400 Kg of Kerosene Creek oil shale was shipped to UMATAC in Calgary, Alberta for bench testing of the TACIUK process. The objective of the bench scale testing program is to evaluate the process and to determine whether pilot plant tests should be undertaken in the existing 5 ton per hour plant located in Calgary. Preliminary results of the bench scale work were encouraging. In preparation for the 5 ton per hour pilot plant program a bulk sample is being extracted from a box cut in the Kerosene Creek seam. During the same period, Esso completed a series of trials of Rundle Kerosene Creek shale in the Exxon Shale Retort pilot plant at Baytown, Texas. At the Rundle site, data collection concerned with waste management studies is in progress.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Clean Cities: Granite State Clean Cities coalition  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Granite State Clean Cities Coalition Granite State Clean Cities Coalition The Granite State Clean Cities coalition works with vehicle fleets, fuel providers, community leaders, and other stakeholders to reduce petroleum use in transportation. Granite State Clean Cities coalition Contact Information Dolores Rebolledo 603-271-6751 dolores.rebolledo@des.nh.gov Coalition Website Clean Cities Coordinator Dolores Rebolledo Photo of Dolores Rebolledo Dolores Rebolledo joined the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services (DES) as the Granite State Clean Cities coalition coordinator in 2009. The Granite State Clean Cities coalition is a collaboration of 85 public and private stakeholders from all regions of New Hampshire. Rebolledo has 14 years of experience in program management. Prior to joining DES, she was employed by MSB Services as a program consultant and

28

Wash  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 9, 2013 September 9, 2013 DETERMINATION OF EXCEPTIONAL CIRCUMSTANCES UNDER THE BAYH-DOLE ACT FOR ENERGY EFFICIENCY, RENEWABLE ENERGY, AND ADVANCED ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES Under the Bayh-Dole Act, 35 U.S.C. §§ 200-12 ("Bayh-Dole"), Federal agencies may determine that "exceptional circumstances" exist such that a modification in the patent rights disposition provided under the Act would better promote its objectives. The Department of Energy ("DOE") has determined that exceptional circumstances exist for disposition of patent rights arising under research, development, demonstration, and market transformation projects involving energy efficiency, renewable energy, and advanced energy technologies as described in Title IX, Subtitles A through D of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (42 U.S.C. 16191

29

Wash  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SEP 1 5" 2009 SEP 1 5" 2009 MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF DEPARTMENTAL ELEMENTS FROM: RITA R. FRANKLIN ... 111 r:-J) A:)-- ACTING CHIEF Hu~ooiTAL OFFICER SUBJECT: REVISED PERSONNEL ACCOUNTABILITY FOR NON-COOP INCIDENTS This updates the attached previous memorandum on this subject in light of current pandemic planning and reporting needs. It changes the requirement from reporting only key employees who have a serious illness, which includes pandemic influenza, to all employees who have been diagnosed as suspected or confilmed with a contagious disease, including a pandemic influenza. Human Resources Offices and Headquarters Administrative Officers are to report these incidents directly to this office while contractors are to report them through their

30

Wash  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF FROM: SUBJECT: PROCUR.:...g.u:------ ACTING SENIOR PROCUREMENT EXECUTIVE ACTING DIRECTOR, OFFICE OF PROCUREMENT AND ASSISTANCE MANAGEMENT JOSEPH F....

31

City of Granite, Oklahoma (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Granite, Oklahoma (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Granite Place Oklahoma Utility Id 7501 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes...

32

Midea Washing Appliance: Order (2011-CE-1903)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE ordered Midea Washing Appliance Mfg. Co., Ltd. to pay a $6,000 civil penalty after finding Midea Washing Appliance had failed to certify that certain models of dishwashers comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

33

granite  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

metal building. From 1958 to 1966, General Steel Castings Cor- poration, under purchase orders from Mallinckrodt Chemical Works, x-rayed uranium ingots in the Betatron Building...

34

Sludge Batch 7 (SB7) Washing and Settling Demonstration  

Generate test slurry Wash per SB7 plan Quantify settling vs wash cycle and time Sampling and analysis. SB7 Washing and Settling Demonstration 5 ...

35

Using Weathered Granite for Ceramic Tile Production - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 1, 2007 ... Using Weathered Granite for Ceramic Tile Production by Kalayanee Kooptamond and Danupon Tonnayopas...

36

Acoustic Character Of Hydraulic Fractures In Granite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydraulic fractures in homogeneous granitic rocks were logged with conventional acoustic-transit-time, acoustic-waveform, and acoustic-televiewer logging systems. Fractured intervals ranged in depth from 45 to 570m. and ...

Paillet, Frederick I.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Neutrons and Granite: Transport and Activation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In typical ground materials, both energy deposition and radionuclide production by energetic neutrons vary with the incident particle energy in a non-monotonic way. We describe the overall balance of nuclear reactions involving neutrons impinging on granite to demonstrate these energy-dependencies. While granite is a useful surrogate for a broad range of soil and rock types, the incorporation of small amounts of water (hydrogen) does alter the balance of nuclear reactions.

Bedrossian, P J

2004-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

38

EFRT M-12 Issue Resolution: Solids Washing  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed, and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, Undemonstrated Leaching Processes. The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. Two operating scenarios were evaluated for the ultrafiltration process (UFP) and leaching operations. The first scenario has caustic leaching performed in the UFP-VSL-T01A/B ultrafiltration feed vessels, identified as Integrated Test A. The second scenario has caustic leaching conducted in the UFP-VSL-T02A ultrafiltration feed preparation vessel, identified as Integrated Test B. Washing operations in PEP Integrated Tests A and B were conducted successfully as per the approved run sheets. However, various minor instrumental problems occurred, and some of the process conditions specified in the run sheet were not met during the wash operations, such as filter-loop flow-rate targets not being met. Five analytes were selected based on full solubility and monitored in the post-caustic-leach wash as successful indicators of washing efficiency. These were aluminum, sulfate, nitrate, nitrite, and free hydroxide. Other analytes, including sodium, oxalate, phosphate, and total dissolved solids, showed indications of changing solubility; therefore, they were unsuitable for monitoring washing efficiency. In the post-oxidative-leach wash, two analytes with full solubility were selected as suitable indicators of washing efficiency. These were chromium and oxalate. Other analytes, including sodium, manganese, nitrate, and total dissolved solids, showed indications of changing solubility; therefore, they were unsuitable for monitoring washing efficiency. An overall wash efficiency of 1.00 0.01 was determined for the post-caustic-leach wash. The overall wash efficiency for the post-oxidative-leach wash was determined also to be 0.99 0.01. These wash efficiencies were based on the weighted least squares fit of the full data set for each applicable analyte and are an average of several analytes traced during the washing steps in Integrated Tests A and B. Incremental wash efficiencies as a function of wash step were also given to provide an indication of the variability during the washing process. Chemical tracer tests resulted in the major conclusion that nearly complete mixing was achieved between 2 and 4 minutes after tracer injection. With inconsistent filter-loop flow rates and other mixing parameters, future process conditions should be taken into account during further interpretation of these data. A slight decrease of 8 to 10% in the tracer concentration between 4 and 60 minutes suggests that there was a relatively small unmixed region that mixed over the course of the 1-hour test. The IW batch time interval, defined as the duration between the start of the IW wash injection for a batch to the start for the IW wash injection for the subsequent batch, was often close to or less than the required 4-minute mixing time indicated by the tracer tests. Such short batch durations did not appear to have significantly impacted the washing efficiencies.

Baldwin, David L.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Toth, James J.; Huckaby, James L.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Hanson, Brady D.; Kurath, Dean E.; Minette, Michael J.

2009-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

39

INHIBITION OF WASHED SLUDGE WITH SODIUM NITRITE  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the results of electrochemical tests used to determine the relationship between the concentration of the aggressive anions in washed sludge and the minimum effective inhibitor concentration. Sodium nitrate was added as the inhibitor because of its compatibility with the DWPF process. A minimum of 0.05M nitrite is required to inhibit the washed sludge simulant solution used in this study. When the worst case compositions and safety margins are considered, it is expected that a minimum operating limit of nearly 0.1M nitrite will be specified. The validity of this limit is dependent on the accuracy of the concentrations and solubility splits previously reported. Sodium nitrite additions to obtain 0.1M nitrite concentrations in washed sludge will necessitate the additional washing of washed precipitate in order to decrease its sodium nitrite inhibitor requirements sufficiently to remain below the sodium limits in the feed to the DWPF. Nitrite will be the controlling anion in "fresh" washed sludge unless the soluble chloride concentration is about ten times higher than predicted by the solubility splits. Inhibition of "aged" washed sludge will not be a problem unless significant chloride dissolution occurs during storage. It will be very important tomonitor the composition of washed sludge during processing and storage.

Congdon, J.; Lozier, J.

2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

40

TANK 7 CHARACTERIZATION AND WASHING STUDIES  

SciTech Connect

A 3-L PUREX sludge sample from Tank 7 was characterized and then processed through a series of inhibited water washes to remove oxalate, sodium, and other soluble ions. Current plans use Tank 7 as one of the feed sources for Sludge Batch 7 (SB7). Tank 7 is high in oxalate due to the oxalic acid cleaning of the sludge heels from Tanks 5 and 6 and subsequent transfer to Tank 7. Ten decant and nine wash cycles were performed over a 47 day period at ambient temperature. Initially, seven decants and seven washes were completed based on preliminary estimates of the number of wash cycles required to remove the oxalate in the sludge. After reviewing the composition data, SRNL recommended the completion of 2 or 3 more decant/wash cycles to ensure all of the sodium oxalate had redissolved. In the first 7 washes, the slurry oxalate concentration was 12,300 mg/kg (69.6% oxalate removal compared to 96.1% removal of the other soluble ions). After all ten decants were complete, the slurry oxalate concentration was 3,080 mg/kg (89.2% oxalate removal compared to 99.0% of the other soluble ions). The rate of dissolution of oxalate increased significantly with subsequent washes until all of the sodium oxalate had been redissolved after seven decant/wash cycles. The measured oxalate concentrations agreed very well with LWO predictions for washing of the Tank 7 sample. Highlights of the analysis and washing of the Tank 7 sample include: (1) Sodium oxalate was detected in the as-received filtered solids. 95% of the oxalate was insoluble (undissolved) in the as-received slurry. (2) No sodium oxalate was detected in the post-wash filtered solids. (3) Sodium oxalate is the last soluble species that redissolves during washing with inhibited water. In order to significantly reduce the sodium oxalate concentration, the sludge must be highly washed, leaving the other soluble anions and cations (including sodium) very low in concentration. (4) The post-wash slurry had 1% of the soluble anions and cations remaining, with the exception of sodium and oxalate, for which the percentages were 2.8% and 10.8% respectively. The post-wash sodium concentration was 9.25 wt% slurry total solids basis and 0.15 M supernate. (5) The settling rate of slurry was very fast allowing the completion of one decant/wash cycle each day. (6) The measured yield stress of as-received (6.42 wt% undissolved solids) and post-wash (7.77 wt% undissolved solids) slurry was <1 Pa. For rapidly settling slurries, it can be hard to measure the yield stress of the slurry so this result may be closer to the supernate result than the slurry. The recommended strategy for developing the oxalate target for sludge preparation for Sludge Batch 7 includes the following steps: (1) CPC simulant testing to determine the percent oxalate destruction and acid mix needed to produce a predicted redox of approximately 0.2 Fe{sup +2}/{Sigma}Fe in a SME product while meeting all DWPF processing constraints. (2) Perform a DWPF melter flammability assessment to ensure that the additional carbon in the oxalate together with other carbon sources will not lead to a flammability issue. (3) Perform a DWPF glass paper assessment to ensure the glass produced will meet all DWPF glass limits due to the sodium concentration in the sludge batch. The testing would need to be repeated if a significant CPC processing change, such as an alternative reductant to formic acid, is implemented.

Lambert, D.; Pareizs, J.; Click, D.

2010-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite wash stuart" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Ceramic wash-coat for catalyst support - Energy Innovation Portal  

A wash-coat (16) for use as a support for an active catalyst species (18) and a catalytic combustor component (10) incorporating such wash-coat. The wash-coat is a ...

42

Enhancing a Digital Book with a Reading Recommender Allison Woodruff, Rich Gossweiler, James Pitkow, Ed H. Chi, and Stuart K. Card  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Ed H. Chi, and Stuart K. Card UIR-R-2000-02 Source Work Full-text References 2nd tier references #12 recommendations. We systematically explore the application of spreading activation over text and citation data activation over text is more useful than citation data. Further, fusing text and citation data via spreading

43

Geology and Groundwater Investigation Many Devils Wash, Shiprock...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geology and Groundwater Investigation Many Devils Wash, Shiprock Site, New Mexico Geology and Groundwater Investigation Many Devils Wash, Shiprock Site, New Mexico Geology and...

44

Mr. Thomas Mahl Granite City Steel Company  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

8&v/ 8&v/ Mr. Thomas Mahl Granite City Steel Company 20th and State Streets Granite City, IL 62040 Dear Mr. Mahl: This is to notify you that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has designated your company's facility for remedial action as a part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. Remedial activities are managed by the DOE Oak Ridge Field Office, and Ms. Teresa Perry (615-576-8956) will be the site manager. As a result of the designation decision, Ms. Perry will be the appropriate point of contact in the future. If you have any questions, please call me at 301-903-8149. W. Alexander Williams, PhD Designation and Certification Manager Division of Off-Site Programs Office of Eastern Area Programs Office of Environmental Restoration

45

Granite State Electric Co (New Hampshire) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hampshire) Jump to: navigation, search Name Granite State Electric Co Place New Hampshire Utility Id 26510 References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101...

46

B36: Engineering of Amorphous Granite - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The new scheme capitalizes on the heat output from waste packages to generate a substantial zone of partial melting of the grout material or granite surrounding...

47

Granite Reliable Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reliable Power Reliable Power Jump to: navigation, search Name Granite Reliable Power Facility Granite Reliable Power Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Brookfield Renewable Energy Group Developer Brookfield Renewable Energy Group Energy Purchaser Green Mountain Power / Central Vermont Public Service / New England Power Pool Location Milan NH Coordinates 44.74039314°, -71.28376007° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.74039314,"lon":-71.28376007,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

48

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Granite2_FUSRAP  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Illinois Illinois Granite City, Illinois Site FUSRAP Site Granite Map Background-The Granite City Site, located in Granite City, Illinois, was remediated under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). FUSRAP was established in 1974 to remediate sites where radioactive contamination remained from Manhattan Project and early U.S. Atomic Energy Commission operations. History-In the late 1950s and early 1960s, two federal government-owned betatron particle accelerators were used at the Granite City Site to x-ray uranium metal ingots for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission to check the quality of the metal and to detect metallurgical flaws before fabrication and machining were performed. In 1992, DOE designated the site for remediation under FUSRAP. Several

49

Granite Creek Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Project Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Granite Creek Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates 41.058611111111°, -117.22777777778° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.058611111111,"lon":-117.22777777778,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

50

Granite State Electric Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric Co Electric Co Place New York Utility Id 26510 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location NPCC NERC NPCC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates No Rates Available The following table contains monthly sales and revenue data for Granite State Electric Co (New Hampshire). Month RES REV (THOUSAND $) RES SALES (MWH) RES CONS COM REV (THOUSAND $) COM SALES (MWH) COM CONS IND_REV (THOUSAND $) IND SALES (MWH) IND CONS OTH REV (THOUSAND $) OTH SALES (MWH) OTH CONS TOT REV (THOUSAND $) TOT SALES (MWH) TOT CONS

51

Granite Springs Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Springs Geothermal Project Springs Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Granite Springs Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates 40.1475°, -118.64861111111° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.1475,"lon":-118.64861111111,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

52

TANK 4 CHARACTERIZATION, SETTLING, AND WASHING STUDIES  

SciTech Connect

A sample of PUREX sludge from Tank 4 was characterized, and subsequently combined with a Tank 51 sample (Tank 51-E1) received following Al dissolution, but prior to a supernate decant by the Tank Farm, to perform a settling and washing study to support Sludge Batch 6 preparation. The sludge source for the majority of the Tank 51-E1 sample is Tank 12 HM sludge. The Tank 51-E1 sample was decanted by SRNL prior to use in the settling and washing study. The Tank 4 sample was analyzed for chemical composition including noble metals. The characterization of the Tank 51-E1 sample, used here in combination with the Tank 4 sample, was reported previously. SRNL analyses on Tank 4 were requested by Liquid Waste Engineering (LWE) via Technical Task Request (TTR) HLE-TTR-2009-103. The sample preparation work is governed by Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), and analyses were controlled by an Analytical Study Plan and modifications received via customer communications. Additional scope included a request for a settling study of decanted Tank 51-E1 and a blend of decanted Tank 51-E1 and Tank 4, as well as a washing study to look into the fate of undissolved sulfur observed during the Tank 4 characterization. The chemistry of the Tank 4 sample was modeled with OLI Systems, Inc. StreamAnalyzer to determine the likelihood that sulfate could exist in this sample as insoluble Burkeite (2Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} {center_dot} Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}). The OLI model was also used to predict the composition of the blended tank materials for the washing study. The following conclusions were drawn from the Tank 4 analytical results reported here: (1) Any projected blend of Tank 4 and the current Tank 51 contents will produce a SB6 composition that is lower in Ca and U than the current SB5 composition being processed by DWPF. (2) Unwashed Tank 4 has a relatively large initial S concentration of 3.68 wt% on a total solids basis, and approximately 10% of the total S is present as an insoluble or undissolved form. (3) There is 19% more S than can be accounted for by IC sulfate measurement. This additional soluble S is detected by ICP-AES analysis of the supernate. (4) Total supernate and slurry sulfur by ICP-AES should be monitored during washing in addition to supernate sulfate in order to avoid under estimating the amount of sulfur species removed or remaining in the supernate. (5) OLI simulation calculations show that the presence of undissolved Burkeite in the Tank 4 sample is reasonable, assuming a small difference in the Na concentration that is well within the analytical uncertainties of the reported value. The following conclusions were drawn from the blend studies of Tank 4 and decanted Tank 51-E1: (1) The addition of Tank 4 slurry to a decanted Tank 51-E1 sample significantly improved the degree and time for settling. (2) The addition of Tank 4 slurry to a decanted Tank 51-E1 sample significantly improved the plastic viscosity and yield stress. (3) The SRNL washing test, where nearly all of the wash solution was decanted from the solids, indicates that approximately 96% or more of the total S was removed from the blend in these tests, and the removal of the sulfur tracks closely with that of Na. Insoluble (undissolved) S remaining in the washed sludge was calculated from an estimate of the final slurry liquid fraction, the S result in the slurry digestion, and the S in the final decant (which was very close to the method detection limit). Based on this calculated result, about 4% of the initial total S remained after these washes; this amount is equivalent to about 18% of the initially undissolved S.

Bannochie, C.; Pareizs, J.; Click, D.; Zamecnik, J.

2009-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

53

Biogenesis (trade name) soil washing technology: Innovative technology evaluation report  

SciTech Connect

Soil washing technologies are designed to transfer contaminants from soil to a liquid phase. The BioGenesis Soil Washing Technology uses soil washing with a proprietary surfactant solution to transfer organic contaminants from soils to wastewater. The BioGenesis soil washing process was evaluated under the SITE program at a refinery where soils were contaminated with crude oil. Results of chemical analyses show that levels of total recoverable petroleum hydrocarbons (TRPH), an indicator of degraded crude oil, decreased by 65 to 73 percent in washed soils. The TRPH in residual soils were allowed to biodegrade for an additional 120 days. Results indicate that soil washing and biodegradation removed 85 to 88 percent of TRPH in treated soils. The Innovative Technology Evaluation Report provides information on the technology applicability, economic analysis, technology limitations, a technology description, process residuals, site requirements, latest performance data, the technology status, vendors claims, and the source of further information.

Bannerjee, P.

1993-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

54

EFRT M-12 Issue Resolution: Solids Washing  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed, and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, Undemonstrated Leaching Processes of the External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.( ) The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing.

Baldwin, David L.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Toth, James J.; Huckaby, James L.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Hanson, Brady D.; Kurath, Dean E.; Minette, Michael J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Gross Wash Project in Washers of Red Mud Filtration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2013 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Alumina and Bauxite. Presentation Title, Gross Wash Project in Washers of...

56

Determination of Matrix Diffusion Properties of Granite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rock-core column experiments were introduced to estimate the diffusion and sorption properties of Kuru Grey granite used in block-scale experiments. The objective was to examine the processes causing retention in solute transport through rock fractures, especially matrix diffusion. The objective was also to estimate the importance of retention processes during transport in different scales and flow conditions. Rock-core columns were constructed from cores drilled into the fracture and were placed inside tubes to form flow channels in the 0.5 mm gap between the cores and the tube walls. Tracer experiments were performed using uranin, HTO, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 131}I, {sup 22}Na and {sup 85}Sr at flow rates of 1-50 {mu}L.min{sup -1}. Rock matrix was characterized using {sup 14}C-PMMA method, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray micro analysis (EDX) and the B.E.T. method. Solute mass flux through a column was modelled by applying the assumption of a linear velocity profile and molecular diffusion. Coupling of the advection and diffusion processes was based on the model of generalised Taylor dispersion in the linear velocity profile. Experiments could be modelled applying a consistent parameterization and transport processes. The results provide evidence that it is possible to investigate matrix diffusion at the laboratory scale. The effects of matrix diffusion were demonstrated on the slightly-sorbing tracer breakthrough curves. Based on scoping calculations matrix diffusion begins to be clearly observable for non-sorbing tracer when the flow rate is 0.1 {mu}L.min{sup -1}. The experimental results presented here cannot be transferred directly to the spatial and temporal scales that prevail in an underground repository. However, the knowledge and understanding of transport and retention processes gained from this study is transferable to different scales from laboratory to in-situ conditions. (authors)

Holtta, Pirkko; Siitari-Kauppi, Marja; Huittinen, Nina [Laboratory of Radiochemistry, P.O. Box 55, University of Helsinki, FI-00014 (Finland); Poteri, Antti [VTT Processes, P.O. Box 1608, VTT, FI-02044 (Finland)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam, 2005 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project monitored the daily passage of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon O. nerka smolts during the 2005 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. In 2005 fish management agencies released significant numbers of hatchery Chinook salmon and steelhead trout above Lower Granite Dam that were not marked with a fin clip or coded-wire tag. Generally, the age-1 and older fish were distinguishable from wild fish by the occurrence of fin erosion. Age-0 Chinook salmon are more difficult to distinguish between wild and non-adclipped hatchery fish and therefore classified as unknown rearing. The total annual hatchery spring/summer Chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 0.34 times greater in 2005 than in 2004. The wild spring/summer Chinook catch was 0.34 times less than the previous year. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 0.67 times less than in 2004. Wild steelhead trout catch was 0.72 times less than the previous year. The Snake River trap collected 1,152 age-0 Chinook salmon of unknown rearing. During 2005, the Snake River trap captured 219 hatchery and 44 wild/natural sockeye salmon and 110 coho salmon O. kisutch of unknown rearing. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with flow. Trap operations began on March 6 and were terminated on June 3. The trap was out of operation for a total of one day due to heavy debris. FPC requested that the trap be restarted on June 15 through June 22 to collect and PIT tag age-0 Chinook salmon. Hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 1.06 times greater and wild Chinook salmon catch was 1.26 times greater than in 2004. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 2005 was 1.41 times greater and wild steelhead trout collection was 1.27 times greater than the previous year. Trap operations began on March 6 and were terminated on May 17 due to high flows. There were two days when the trap was taken out of service because of mechanical failure. Travel time (d) and migration rate (km/d) through Lower Granite Reservoir for passive integrated transponder (PIT) tagged Chinook salmon and steelhead trout marked at the Snake River trap were affected by discharge. Statistical analysis of 2005 data detected a relation between migration rate and discharge for hatchery Chinook but was unable to detect a relation for wild Chinook. The inability to detect a migration rate discharge relation for wild Chinook salmon was caused by a lack of data. For hatchery Chinook salmon there was a 1.8-fold increase in migration rate between 50 and 100 kcfs. For steelhead trout tagged at the Snake River trap, statistical analysis detected a significant relation between migration rate and lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge. For hatchery and wild steelhead trout, there was a 2.2-fold and a 2.2-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. Travel time and migration rate to Lower Granite Dam for fish marked at the Salmon River trap were calculated. Statistical analysis of the 2005 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge for hatchery Chinook salmon, wild Chinook salmon, hatchery steelhead trout, and wild steelhead trout. Migration rate increased 4.2-fold for hatchery Chinook salmon, 2.9-fold for wild Chinook salmon and 2.5-fold for hatchery steelhead, and 1.7-fold for wild steelhead as discharge increased between 50 kcfs and 100 kcfs. Fish tagged with PIT tags at the Snake River and Salmon River traps were interrogated at four dams with PIT tag detection systems (Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental and McNary dams). Because of the addition of the fourth interrogation site (Lower Monumental) in 1993 and the installation of the Removable Spillway Weir at Lower Granite Dam in 2001, caution must be used in comparing cumulative interrogation data. Cumulative interrogations at the fo

Buettner, Edwin W.; Putnam, Scott A. [Idaho Department of Fish and Game

2009-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

58

Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam, 2002 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project monitored the daily passage of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon smolts O. nerka during the 2002 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. In 2002 fish management agencies released significant numbers of hatchery Chinook salmon and steelhead trout above Lower Granite Dam that were not marked with a fin clip or coded-wire tag. Generally, these fish were distinguishable from wild fish by the occurrence of fin erosion. Total annual hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 11.4 times greater in 2002 than in 2001. The wild Chinook catch was 15.5 times greater than the previous year. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 2.9 times greater than in 2001. Wild steelhead trout catch was 2.8 times greater than the previous year. The Snake River trap collected 3,996 age-0 Chinook salmon of unknown rearing. During 2002, the Snake River trap captured 69 hatchery and 235 wild/natural sockeye salmon and 114 hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with flow. The significant increase in catch in 2002 was due to a 3.1 fold increase in hatchery Chinook production and a more normal spring runoff. Trap operations began on March 10 and were terminated on June 7. The trap was out of operation for a total of four days due to mechanical failure or debris. Hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 4.2 times greater and wild Chinook salmon catch was 2.4 times greater than in 2001. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 2002 was 81% of the 2001 numbers. Wild steelhead trout collection in 2002 was 81% of the previous year's catch. Trap operations began on March 10 and were terminated on May 29 due to high flows. The trap was out of operation for four days due to high flow or debris. The increase in hatchery Chinook catch in 2002 was due to a 3.1 fold increase in hatchery production and differences in flow between years. Changes in hatchery and wild steelhead catch are probably due to differences in flow between years. Travel time (d) and migration rate (km/d) through Lower Granite Reservoir for PIT-tagged Chinook salmon and steelhead trout marked at the Snake River trap were affected by discharge. Statistical analysis of 2002 data detected a relation between migration rate and discharge for hatchery and wild Chinook salmon. For hatchery and wild Chinook salmon there was a 4.7-fold and a 3.7-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. For steelhead trout tagged at the Snake River trap, statistical analysis detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge. For hatchery and wild steelhead trout, there was a 1.8-fold and a 1.7-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. Travel time and migration rate to Lower Granite Dam for fish marked at the Salmon River trap were calculated. Statistical analysis of the 2002 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge for wild Chinook salmon and hatchery steelhead trout. The analysis was unable to detect a relation between migration rate and discharge for hatchery Chinook salmon. The lack of a detectable relation was probably a result of the migration rate data being spread over a very narrow range of discharge. Not enough data were available to perform the analysis for wild steelhead trout. Migration rate increased 4.3-fold for wild Chinook salmon and 2.2-fold for hatchery steelhead between 50 kcfs and 100 kcfs. Fish tagged with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags at the Snake River trap were interrogated at four dams with PIT tag detection systems (Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, and McNary dams). Because of the addition of the fourth interrogation site (Lower Monumental) in 1993 and the installation of the Removable Spillway Weir at

Buettner, Edwin W.; Putnam, Scott A. [Idaho Department of Fish and Game

2009-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

59

Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam, 2004 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project monitored the daily passage of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon O. nerka smolts during the 2004 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. In 2004 fish management agencies released significant numbers of hatchery Chinook salmon and steelhead trout above Lower Granite Dam that were not marked with a fin clip or coded-wire tag. Generally, these fish were distinguishable from wild fish by the occurrence of fin erosion. Total annual hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 1.1 times greater in 2004 than in 2003. The wild Chinook catch was 1.1 times greater than the previous year. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 1.2 times greater than in 2003. Wild steelhead trout catch was 1.6 times greater than the previous year. The Snake River trap collected 978 age-0 Chinook salmon of unknown rearing. During 2004, the Snake River trap captured 23 hatchery and 18 wild/natural sockeye salmon and 60 coho salmon O. kisutch of unknown rearing. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with flow. Trap operations began on March 7 and were terminated on June 4. The trap was out of operation for a total of zero days due to mechanical failure or debris. Hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 10.8% less and wild Chinook salmon catch was 19.0% less than in 2003. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 2004 was 20.0% less and wild steelhead trout collection was 22.3% less than the previous year. Trap operations began on March 7 and were terminated on May 28 due to high flows. There were two days when the trap was taken out of service because wild Chinook catch was very low, hatchery Chinook catch was very high, and the weekly quota of PIT tagged hatchery Chinook had been met. Travel time (d) and migration rate (km/d) through Lower Granite Reservoir for PIT-tagged Chinook salmon and steelhead trout marked at the Snake River trap were affected by discharge. Statistical analysis of 2004 data detected a relation between migration rate and discharge for wild Chinook salmon but was unable to detect a relation for hatchery Chinook. The inability to detect a migration rate discharge relation for hatchery Chinook salmon was caused by age-0 fall Chinook being mixed in with the age 1 Chinook. Age-0 fall Chinook migrate much slower than age-1 Chinook, which would confuse the ability to detect the migration rate discharge relation. When several groups, which consisted of significant numbers of age-0 Chinook salmon, were removed from the analysis a relation was detected. For hatchery and wild Chinook salmon there was a 2.8-fold and a 2.4-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. For steelhead trout tagged at the Snake River trap, statistical analysis detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge. For hatchery and wild steelhead trout, there was a 2.3-fold and a 2.0-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. Travel time and migration rate to Lower Granite Dam for fish marked at the Salmon River trap were calculated. Statistical analysis of the 2004 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge for hatchery Chinook salmon, wild Chinook salmon and hatchery steelhead trout. Not enough data were available to perform the analysis for wild steelhead trout. Migration rate increased 7.0-fold for hatchery Chinook salmon, 4.7-fold for wild Chinook salmon and 3.8-fold for hatchery steelhead as discharge increased between 50 kcfs and 100 kcfs. Fish tagged with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags at the Snake River and Salmon River traps were interrogated at four dams with PIT tag detection systems (Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, and McNary dams). Because of the addition of the fourth interrogation site (Lower Monume

Buettner, Edwin W.; Putnam, Scott A. [Idaho Department of Fish and Game

2009-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

60

Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam, 2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project monitored the daily passage of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon O. nerka smolts during the 2003 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. In 2003 fish management agencies released significant numbers of hatchery Chinook salmon and steelhead trout above Lower Granite Dam that were not marked with a fin clip or coded-wire tag. Generally, these fish were distinguishable from wild fish by the occurrence of fin erosion. Total annual hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 2.1 times less in 2003 than in 2002. The wild Chinook catch was 1.1 times less than the previous year. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 1.7 times less than in 2002. Wild steelhead trout catch was 2.1 times less than the previous year. The Snake River trap collected 579 age-0 Chinook salmon of unknown rearing. During 2003, the Snake River trap captured five hatchery and 13 wild/natural sockeye salmon and 36 coho salmon O. kisutch of unknown rearing. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with flow. The significant differences in catch between 2003 and the previous year were due mainly to low flows during much of the trapping season and then very high flows at the end of the season, which terminated the trapping season 12 days earlier than in 2002. Trap operations began on March 9 and were terminated on May 27. The trap was out of operation for a total of zero days due to mechanical failure or debris. Hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 16.8% less and wild Chinook salmon catch was 1.7 times greater than in 2002. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 2003 was 5.6% less than in 2002. Wild steelhead trout collection was 19.2% less than the previous year. Trap operations began on March 9 and were terminated on May 24 due to high flows. There were zero days when the trap was out of operation due to high flow or debris. The decrease in hatchery Chinook catch in 2003 was partially due to differences in flow between years because there was a 5.9% increase in hatchery production in the Salmon River drainage in 2003. The decrease in hatchery steelhead catch may be partially due to a 13% decrease in hatchery production in the Salmon River drainage in 2003. Travel time (d) and migration rate (km/d) through Lower Granite Reservoir for PIT-tagged Chinook salmon and steelhead trout marked at the Snake River trap were affected by discharge. Statistical analysis of 2003 data detected a relation between migration rate and discharge for wild Chinook salmon but was unable to detect a relation for hatchery Chinook. The inability to detect a migration rate discharge relation for hatchery Chinook was probably caused by age 0 fall Chinook being mixed in with the age 1 Chinook. Age 0 fall Chinook migrate much slower than age 1 Chinook, which would confuse the ability to detect the migration rate discharge relation. For wild Chinook salmon there was a 1.4-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. For steelhead trout tagged at the Snake River trap, statistical analysis detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge. For hatchery and wild steelhead trout, there was a 1.7-fold and a 1.9-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. Travel time and migration rate to Lower Granite Dam for fish marked at the Salmon River trap were calculated. Statistical analysis of the 2003 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge for hatchery Chinook salmon, wild Chinook salmon and hatchery steelhead trout. Not enough data were available to perform the analysis for wild steelhead trout. Migration rate increased 14-fold for hatchery Chinook salmon, 8.3-fold for wild Chinook salmon and 2.4-fold for hatchery steelhead as discharge increased between 50 kcfs and

Buettner, Edwin W.; Putnam, Scott A. [Idaho Department of Fish and Game

2009-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite wash stuart" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Monte Carlo simulations for generic granite repository studies  

SciTech Connect

In a collaborative study between Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for the DOE-NE Office of Fuel Cycle Technologies Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign project, we have conducted preliminary system-level analyses to support the development of a long-term strategy for geologic disposal of high-level radioactive waste. A general modeling framework consisting of a near- and a far-field submodel for a granite GDSE was developed. A representative far-field transport model for a generic granite repository was merged with an integrated systems (GoldSim) near-field model. Integrated Monte Carlo model runs with the combined near- and farfield transport models were performed, and the parameter sensitivities were evaluated for the combined system. In addition, a sub-set of radionuclides that are potentially important to repository performance were identified and evaluated for a series of model runs. The analyses were conducted with different waste inventory scenarios. Analyses were also conducted for different repository radionuelide release scenarios. While the results to date are for a generic granite repository, the work establishes the method to be used in the future to provide guidance on the development of strategy for long-term disposal of high-level radioactive waste in a granite repository.

Chu, Shaoping [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lee, Joon H [SNL; Wang, Yifeng [SNL

2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

62

Design for dissemination of a low cost washing machine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Throughout much the developing world, laundry is done the same way today as it was thousands of years ago. The strenuous and time consuming task of clothes washing often falls on the women, who spend many hours every week ...

Raduta, Radu

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Town of Granite Falls, North Carolina (Utility Company) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Granite Falls Town of Granite Falls Town of Place North Carolina Utility Id 7496 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes ISO Other Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png COMMERCIAL ALL ELECTRIC - E13 Commercial COMMERCIAL ALL ELECTRIC - E14 Commercial COMMERCIAL ALL ELECTRIC - E9 Commercial COMMERCIAL ELECTRIC - E6 Commercial COMMERCIAL ELECTRIC - E8 Commercial CP 98-1C Industrial CP 98-1I Industrial CP 98-2C Industrial CP 98-2I Industrial CP 98-3C Industrial CP 98-3I Industrial CP TOU Industrial INDUSTRIAL ELECTRIC - E10 Industrial

64

Mr. Fred Steinkuehler Granite City Steel Division National Steel Corporation  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Fred Steinkuehler Fred Steinkuehler Granite City Steel Division National Steel Corporation 20th and State Streets Granite City, Illinois 62040 Dear Mr. Steinkuehler: Enclosed please find your copy of the signed consent forms for the radiological survey of the South Plant Betatron Building. In your letter to me of July 21, 1988, you identified several issues regarding the survey and the consent. I would like to address these concerns below. As noted in the consent form, the purpose of our surveys are only to determine if there is any residual radioactive material on the site that is derived from Department of Energy (DOE) predecessor operations. All data collected during the designation survey is to determine the radiological condition of the portion of the site involved in the predecessor work. No

65

Interoffice Memorandum TO File Subject Granite City PRAR Data  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

: .' . .Y-" ._ ; : .' . .Y-" ._ ; / Bechfel / / Interoffice Memorandum TO File Subject Granite City PRAR Data Copies to M. Kaye B. Stanley J. Wood The fo$lowing data packages contain the post-remedial action sampling data, waste management data, and health and safety data that were reported in the Granite City PRAR. File No. Date Frolll Of At I UOLJU 7330 September 9, 1993 S. B. Hill FUSRAP E&T .' Oak Ridge Ext. 6-5211 D-15056 6-23-93 Direct and transferable contamination survey of betatron room with map D-15055 6-23-93 Gamma exposure rate survey of backgrounds and betatron room D-15040 D-15167 6-21-93 Final report: PCb 7-12-93 93-06-038 Case narrative, report of analysis, field sample collection form; and QC information D-15057 6-17-93 Air particulate sample reporting logs

66

Lower Granite Dam Smolt Monitoring Program, 1999 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 1999 fish collection season at Lower Granite was characterized by high spring flows and spill, low levels of debris, cool water temperatures, increased hatchery chinook numbers, and an overall decrease in numbers of smolts collected and transported. A total of 5,882,872 juvenile salmonids were collected at Lower Granite. Of these, 5,466,057 were transported to release sites below Bonneville Dam, 5,232,105 by barge and 233,952 by truck. An additional 339,398 fish were bypassed back to the river. A total of 117,609 salmonids were examined in daily samples. Nine research projects conducted by four agencies impacted a total of 440,810 smolts (7.5% of the total collected) of which 247,268 were PIT tagged and 572 were recorded as incidental mortalities.

Verhey, Peter; Morrill, Charles; Mensik, Fred

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Lower Granite Dam Smolt Monitoring Program, 1998 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 1998 fish collection season at Lower Granite was characterized by relatively moderate spring flows and spill, moderate levels of debris, cool spring, warm summer and fall water temperatures, and increased chinook numbers, particularly wild subyearling chinook collected and transported. The Fish Passage Center's Smolt Monitoring Program is designed to provide a consistent, real-time database on fish passage and document the migrational characteristics of the many stocks of salmon and steelhead in the Columbia Basin.

Verhey, Peter; Ross, Doug; Morrill, Charles (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Lower Granite Dam Smolt Monitoring Program; 1997 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 1997 fish collection season at Lower Granite was characterized by high spring flows, extensive spill, cool spring and early summer water temperatures and comparatively low numbers of fish, particularly yearling chinook. The Fish Passage Center's Smolt Monitoring Program is designed to provide a consistent, real-time database of fish passage and document the migrational characteristics of the many stocks of salmon and steelhead in the Columbia Basin.

Verhey, Peter; Witalis, Shirley; Morrill, Charles (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Thanks, George Washington, for the Energy Efficient Washing Machine! |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Thanks, George Washington, for the Energy Efficient Washing Thanks, George Washington, for the Energy Efficient Washing Machine! Thanks, George Washington, for the Energy Efficient Washing Machine! February 20, 2012 - 5:00am Addthis Kristin Swineford Communication Specialist, Weatherization and Intergovernmental Programs For many of us, particularly those living east of the Mississippi river, President's Day weekend is not just a time to honor the birthday of our country's founding father, it's also the final escape from dreadfully cold and snowy days. However, those of us with pestering consumerist habits to feed always ensure our return to the metropolis by Monday, as the day is quickly taking on a new reputation: Second best shopping day of the year, after Black Friday. By now you're asking, "What does any of this have to do with energy

70

Midea Washing Appliance: Proposed Penalty (2011-CE-1903) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Proposed Penalty (2011-CE-1903) Proposed Penalty (2011-CE-1903) Midea Washing Appliance: Proposed Penalty (2011-CE-1903) April 22, 2011 DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Midea Washing Appliances Mfg. Co., Ltd. failed to certify a variety of dishwashers as compliant with the applicable water and energy conservation standards. DOE regulations require a manufacturer (which includes importers) to submit reports certifying that its products have been tested and meet the applicable water and energy conservation standards. This civil penalty notice advises the company of the potential penalties and DOE's administrative process, including the company's right to a hearing. Midea: Proposed Penalty (2011-CE-1903) More Documents & Publications Midea Washing Appliance: Order (2011-CE-1903)

71

Thanks, George Washington, for the Energy Efficient Washing Machine! |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Thanks, George Washington, for the Energy Efficient Washing Thanks, George Washington, for the Energy Efficient Washing Machine! Thanks, George Washington, for the Energy Efficient Washing Machine! February 20, 2012 - 5:00am Addthis Kristin Swineford Communication Specialist, Weatherization and Intergovernmental Programs For many of us, particularly those living east of the Mississippi river, President's Day weekend is not just a time to honor the birthday of our country's founding father, it's also the final escape from dreadfully cold and snowy days. However, those of us with pestering consumerist habits to feed always ensure our return to the metropolis by Monday, as the day is quickly taking on a new reputation: Second best shopping day of the year, after Black Friday. By now you're asking, "What does any of this have to do with energy

72

Washing and caustic leaching of Hanford Tank C-106 sludge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the results of a laboratory-scale washing and caustic leaching test performed on sludge from Hanford Tank C-106. The purpose of this test was to determine the behavior of important sludge components when subjected to washing with dilute or concentrated sodium hydroxide solutions. The results of this laboratory-scale test were used to support the design of a bench-scale washing and leaching process used to prepare several hundred grams of high-level waste solids for vitrification tests to be done by private contractors. The laboratory-scale test was conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory in FY 1996 as part of the Hanford privatization effort. The work was funded by the US Department of Energy through the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS; EM-30).

Lumetta, G.J.; Wagner, M.J.; Hoopes, F.V.; Steele, R.T.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Review of geomechanics data from French nuclear explosions in the Hoggar granite, with some comparisons to tests in US granite  

SciTech Connect

Numerous unclassified reports on the French nuclear explosions in the Hoggar (1961-1966) were reviewed from the standpoint of geomechanics. The following aspects of the tests are summarized: spectral content of the tests compared to U.S. results; shock front positions with time; cavity radius as a function of yield, coupling, density of rock, rock shear strength, and overburden; radial pressure, tangential pressure and peak velocity as a function of distance and yield; pressure vs. time at various distances; mechanical properties of granite; scaling laws for acceleration, velocity and displacement as a function of yield and distance for all Hoggar shots; extent of tunnel damage as a function of distance and yield; time to collapse of chimney as a function of yield, or cavity radius; extent of granite crushing and disking as a function of distance and yield cavity height relation to cavity radius; faulting and jointing on the Taourirt Tan Afella massif; and influence of water content on cavity radius vs. yield. Whenever possible, these French data are compared to corresponding data obtained in the U.S. granite events Hard Hat, Shoal, and Piledriver. The following results emerge from the comparison: (1) agreement is found between the French and U.S. experience for: mechanical properties of the granites, rock damage due to the blast, and yield-scaled peak values of acceleration, velocity and displacement; and (2) lack of agreement exists for: cavity size, chminey height, and time to cavity collapse. Average spacing of rock joints also was about 5 times greater in the Hoggar.

Heuze, F.E.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Methane Recovery and Energy Generation in Spent Wash Wastewater Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The wastewater from distillation process has high organic content, which has to be treated to bring down the levels of COD and BOD to prescribed standards of environmental authorities. In this study, the organic wastewater from distillery also known ... Keywords: Methane recovery, spent wash, Greenhouse gases (GHG), upflow anaerobic slduge blanket (UASB), Clean Development Mechanism (CDM)

Wei-hua Yang; Li Wei; Sheng-nan Zhao; Jiang Dong

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Soil washing: A preliminary assessment of its applicability to Hanford  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soil washing is being considered for treating soils at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site. As a result of over 50 years of operations to produce plutonium for the US Department of Defense and research for DOE, soils in areas within the Site are contaminated with hazardous wastes and radionuclides. In the soil washing process, contaminated soil is mixed with a liquid and then physically and/or chemically treated to dissolve the contaminants into solution and/or concentrate them in a small fraction of the soil. The purpose of this procedure is to separate the contaminants from the bulk of the soil. The key to successful application is to match the types of contaminants and soil characteristics with physical-chemical methods that perform well under the existing conditions. The applicability of soil washing to Hanford Site contaminated soils must take into account both the characteristics of the oil and the type of contamination. Hanford soils typically contain up to 90% sand, gravel, and cobbles, which generally are favorable characteristics for soil washing. For example, in soil samples from the north pond in the 300 Area, 80% to 90% of the soil particles were larger than 250 {mu}m. The principal contaminants in the soil are radionuclides, heavy metals, and nitrate and sulfate salts. For most of the sites, organic contaminants are either not present or are found in very low concentration. 28 refs., 5 figs., 10 tabs.

Gerber, M A; Freeman, H D; Baker, E G; Riemath, W F

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Multivariate statistical analyses of groundwater surrounding Forty mile wash  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater chemistry data from 211 sampling locations in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, Nevada are analyzed using multivariate statistical methods in order to better understand groundwater chemical evolution, ascertain potential flow paths and determine hydrochemical facies. Correspondence analysis of the major ion chemistry is used to define relationships between and among major ions and sampling locations. A k-means cluster analysis is used to determine hydrochemical facies based on correspondence analysis dimensions. The derived dimensions and hydrochemical facies are presented as bi-plots and overlaid on a digital elevation model of the region giving a visual picture of potential interactions and flow paths. A distinct signature of the groundwater chemistry along the extended flow path of Fortymile Wash can be observed along with some potential interaction at possible fault lines near Highway I-95. The signature from Fortymile Wash is believed to represent the relict of water that infiltrated during past pluvial periods when the amount of runoff in the wash was significantly larger than during the current drier period. This hypothesis appears to be supported by hydrogen-2 and oxygen-18 data which indicate that younger groundwater is found in the upper part of the wash near Yucca Mountain and older groundwater is found in the lower region of the wash near Amargosa River. The range of the hydrogen-2 data corresponds to precipitation in a period of relatively cold climate and has a similar spatial signature to the oxygen-18 data. If the hypothesis that current groundwater chemistry primarily reflects past focused infiltration of surface runoff rather than regional groundwater migration is correct, then saturated zone transport from Yucca Mountain may be much slower than is currently anticipated. (authors)

Woocay, A.; Walton, J.C. [El Paso Univ. of Texas, Environmental Science and Engineering, TX (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Interwell tracer analyses of a hydraulically fractured granitic geothermal reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Field experiments using fluorescent dye and radioactive tracers (Br{sup 82} and I{sup 131}) have been employed to characterize a hot, low-matrix permeability, hydraulically-fractured granitic reservoir at depths of 2440 to 2960 m (8000 to 9700 ft). Tracer profiles and residence time distributions have been used to delineate changes in the fracture system, particularly in diagnosing pathological flow patterns and in identifying new injection and production zones. The effectiveness of one- and two-dimensional theoretical dispersion models utilizing single and multiple porous, fractured zones with velocity and formation dependent effects are discussed with respect to actual field data.

Tester, J.W.; Potter, R.M.; Bivins, R.L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Spent fuel test project, Climax granitic stock, Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

The Spent Fuel Test-Climax (SFT-C) is a test of dry geologic storage of spent nuclear reactor fuel. The SFT-C is located at a depth of 420 m in the Climax granitic stock at the Nevada Test Site. Eleven canisters of spent commercial PWR fuel assemblies are to be stored for 3 to 5 years. Additional heat is supplied by electrical heaters, and more than 800 channels of technical information are being recorded. The measurements include rock temperature, rock displacement and stress, joint motion, and monitoring of the ventilation air volume, temperature, and dewpoint.

Ramspott, L.D.

1980-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

79

COMPILATION OF LABORATORY SCALE ALUMINUM WASH AND LEACH REPORT RESULTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report compiles and analyzes all known wash and caustic leach laboratory studies. As further data is produced, this report will be updated. Included are aluminum mineralogical analysis results as well as a summation of the wash and leach procedures and results. Of the 177 underground storage tanks at Hanford, information was only available for five individual double-shell tanks, forty-one individual single-shell tanks (e.g. thirty-nine 100 series and two 200 series tanks), and twelve grouped tank wastes. Seven of the individual single-shell tank studies provided data for the percent of aluminum removal as a function of time for various caustic concentrations and leaching temperatures. It was determined that in most cases increased leaching temperature, caustic concentration, and leaching time leads to increased dissolution of leachable aluminum solids.

HARRINGTON SJ

2011-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

80

Field studies of in-situ soil washing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPA and US Air Force conducted a research test program to demonstrate the removal of hydrocarbons and chlorinated hydrocarbons from a sandy soil by in situ soil washing using surfactants. Contaminated soil from the fire-training area of Volk Air National Guard Base, WI, was first taken to a laboratory for characterization. At the laboratory, the soil was recompacted into glass columns creating a simulated in-situ environment. Under gravity flow, 12 pore volumes of aqueous surfactant solutions were passed through each of the columns. Gas chromatograph (GC) analyses were used on the washing effluent and soil to determine removal efficiency (RE). The results of these tests were highly encouraging. Treated effluent was discharged directly to the on-base aerobic-treatment lagoons.

Nash, J.H.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite wash stuart" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

www.elsevier.com/locate/tecto Diapiric emplacement in the upper crust of a granitic body: the La Bazana granite (SW Spain)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ascent and emplacement of granites in the upper crust is a major geological phenomenon accomplished by a number of different processes. The active processes determine the final geometry of the bodies and, in some favourable cases, the inverse problem of deducing mechanisms can be undertaken by relying on the geometry of plutons. This is the case of the La Bazana granitic pluton, a small Variscan igneous body that intruded Cambrian rocks of the Ossa-Morena Zone (SW Iberian Massif) in the core of a large late upright antiform. The granite shows no appreciable solid-state deformation, but has a late magmatic foliation whose orientation, derived from field observations, defines a gentle dome. The regional attitude of the main foliation in the country rock (parallel to the axial plane of recumbent folds) is NWSE, but just around the granite, it accommodates to the dome shape of the pluton. Flattening in the host rock on top of the granite is indicated by boudinaged and folded veins, and appears to be caused by an upward pushing of the magma during its emplacement. The dome-shaped foliation of the granite, geometrically and kinematically congruent with the flattening in the host rock, can be related in the same way to the upward pushing of the magma. The level of final emplacement was deduced from the mineral associations in the thermal aureole to be of 710 km in depth. Models of the gravity anomaly related to the granite body show that the granite has a teardroppipe shape enlarged at its top. Diapiric ascent of the magma through the lower middle crust is inferred until reaching a high viscous level, where final emplacement accompanied by lateral expansion and vertical flattening took place. This natural example suggests

Elena Galad-enrquez; Jess Galindo-zaldvar; O Simancas; Inmaculada Expsito

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Granite City Army Depot - IL 0-02  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Granite City Army Depot - IL 0-02 Granite City Army Depot - IL 0-02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: GRANITE CITY ARMY DEPOT ( IL.0-02 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DOD Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Granite City , Illinois IL.0-02-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 IL.0-02-1 Site Operations: Site was used for storage of GSA thorium residues until circa 1964. IL.0-02-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Referred to DOD IL.0-02-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Thorium IL.0-02-1 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DOD IL.0-02-1 Also see Documents Related to GRANITE CITY ARMY DEPOT IL.0-02-1 - DOE Letter; J.Fiore to C.Schafer; Information regarding

83

A Proposed New Classification Of The Granites Of Egypt | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » A Proposed New Classification Of The Granites Of Egypt Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Proposed New Classification Of The Granites Of Egypt Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Granites and granitoids constitute an important rock group that covers vast areas of the Arabian-Nubian Shield in Egypt. They range in composition from quartz diorite and tonalite, through granodiorite and quartz monzonite to true granites and alkaline-peralkaline granites. Several workers tried the identification and classification of these

84

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Granite City IL Site - IL 28  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Granite City IL Site - IL 28 Granite City IL Site - IL 28 FUSRAP Considered Sites Granite City, IL Alternate Name(s): Granite City Steel General Steel Industries General Steel Casings Corporation New Betatron Building IL.28-3 Location: 1417 State Street, Granite City, Illinois IL.28-3 Historical Operations: Under subcontract with Mallinckrodt and using a government-owned Betatron (magnetic induction electron accelerator), x-rayed natural uranium ingots and dingots to detect metallurgical flaws. Contamination from rubbing off of oxidized uranium during handling. IL.28-3 IL.28-5 Eligibility Determination: Eligible IL.28-1 IL.28-2 Radiological Survey(s): Assessment Surveys, Verification Survey IL.28-6 IL.28-7 IL.28-8 Site Status: Certified - Certification Basis, Federal Register Notice included IL.28-9

85

Apparatus for washing particulate material. [Removal of silicone oil from microspheres by trichloroethylene  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Transport of nuclear fuel microspheres through a wash liquid is facilitated by feeding a slurry containing the microspheres into the wash liquid via a column having a vibrating tubular screen located under its lower end.

Rivera, A.L.; Fowler, V.L.; Justice, G.V.

1983-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

86

Engineering Task Plan for Water Supply for RMCS Spray Wash Trailer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This ETP defines the task and deliverables associated with the design, fabrication and testing of an improved spray wash system for the Rotary Mode Core Sampling (RMCS)Spray Wash Trailer.

BOGER, R.M.

2000-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

87

Status and progress in sludge washing: A pivotal pretreatment method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Separation of the bulk soluble chemical salts from the insoluble metal hydroxides and radionuclides is central to the strategy of disposing Hanford tank waste. Sludge washing and caustic leaching have been selected as the primary methods for processing the 230 million L (61,000,000 gal) of Hanford tank waste. These processes are very similar to those selected for processing waste at the West Valley Site in New York and the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. The purpose of sludge washing is to dissolve and remove the soluble salts in the waste. Leaching of the insoluble solids with caustic will be used to dissolve aluminum hydroxide and chromium hydroxide, and convert insoluble bismuth phosphate to soluble phosphate. The waste will be separated into a high-level solids fraction and a liquid fraction that can be disposed of as low-level waste after cesium removal. The washing and leaching operations involve batchwise mixing, settling, and decanting within the existing underground storage tanks.

Barton, W.B.; MacLean, G.T.; Meng, C.D.; Winkler, C.M.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

"1. General James M Gavin","Coal","Ohio Power Co",2640 "2. J M Stuart","Coal","Dayton Power & Light Co",2317  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Ohio" Ohio" "1. General James M Gavin","Coal","Ohio Power Co",2640 "2. J M Stuart","Coal","Dayton Power & Light Co",2317 "3. W H Sammis","Coal","FirstEnergy Generation Corp",2233 "4. Cardinal","Coal","Cardinal Operating Co",1800 "5. Conesville","Coal","Columbus Southern Power Co",1695 "6. Muskingum River","Coal","Ohio Power Co",1375 "7. Walter C Beckjord","Coal","Duke Energy Ohio Inc",1304 "8. W H Zimmer","Coal","Duke Energy Ohio Inc",1300 "9. Hanging Rock Energy Facility","Gas","Duke Energy Ohio Inc",1288

89

Study for Technology of Asphalt Pavement Aggregate Washed by Cycle Limewater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technology of asphalt pavement aggregate washed by cycle limewater was put forward for the first time in this paper. Before and after the aggregate was washed by cycle limewater, aggregate mud content, aggregate asphalt adhesion and asphalt mixture water ... Keywords: energy conservation, emissions reduction, cycle limewater, wash, asphalt pavement aggregate

Jiang Tao; Sun Bin

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Directional Drilling and Equipment for Hot Granite Wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Directional drilling technology was extended and modified to drill the first well of a subsurface geothermal energy extraction system at the Fenton Hill, New Mexico, hot dry rock (HDR) experimental site. Borehole geometries, extremely hard and abrasive granite rock, and high formation temperatures combined to provide a challenging environment for directional drilling tools and instrumentation. Completing the first of the two-wellbore HDR system resulted in the definition of operation limitations of -many conventional directional drilling tools, instrumentation, and techniques. The successful completion of the first wellbore, Energy Extraction Well No. 2 (EE-21), to a measured depth of 4.7 km (15,300 ft) in granite reservoir rock with a bottomhole temperature of 320 C (610 F) required the development of a new high-temperature downhole motor and modification of existing wireline-conveyed steering tool systems. Conventional rotary-driven directional assemblies were successfully modified to accommodate the very hard and abrasive rock encountered while drilling nearly 2.6 km (8,500 ft) of directional hole to a final inclination of 35{sup o} from the vertical at the controlled azimuthal orientation. Data were collected to optimize the drilling procedures far the programmed directional drilling of well EE-3 parallel to, and 370 metres (1,200 ft) above, Drilling equipment and techniques used in drilling wellbores for extraction of geothermal energy from hot granite were generally similar to those that are standard and common to hydrocarbon drilling practices. However, it was necessary to design some new equipment for this program: some equipment was modified especially for this program and some was operated beyond normal ratings. These tools and procedures met with various degrees of success. Two types of shock subs were developed and tested during this project. However, downhole time was limited, and formations were so varied that analysis of the capabilities of these items is not conclusive. Temperature limits of the tools were exceeded. EE-2. Commercial drilling and fishing jars were improved during the drilling program. Three-cone, tungsten-carbide insert bit performance with downhole motors was limited by rapid gauge wear. Rotary drilling was optimized for wells EE-2 and EE-3 using softer (IADS 635 code) bits and provided a balance between gauge,. cutting structure, and bearing life. Problems of extreme drill string drag, drill string twist-off, and corrosion control are discussed.

Williams, R. E.; Neudecker, J. W.; Rowley, J.C.; Brittenham, T. L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Microsoft PowerPoint - Granite-PCO-PCC-22  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

nd nd Annual Pittsburgh Coal Conference The PCO Process for Removal of Mercury from Flue Gas National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Fossil Energy Christopher R. McLarnon, Evan J. Granite, and Henry W. Pennline September 13, 2005 185199 EJG 12/11/03 GP-254 / PCO Process * Alternative to ACI Developed * Patent Issued June 2003 * Licensed for Application to Coal-Burning Power Plants (Powerspan Corporation) * Oxidation of Mercury * Irradiation of Flue Gas with 254-nm Light * 90% Oxidation Attained at Bench-Scale * Low Parasitic Power (less than 0.5%) * Potential Application for Incinerators 185199 EJG 12/11/03 * EPA Announcement March 15, 2005 * Clean Air Mercury Rule * Several States Requiring Stricter Reductions * 70-90% Removal Requirement

92

Ultracold-neutron infrastructure for the gravitational spectrometer GRANIT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The gravitational spectrometer GRANIT will be set up at the Institut Laue Langevin. It will profit from the high ultracold neutron density produced by a dedicated source. A monochromator made of crystals from graphite intercalated with potassium will provide a neutron beam with 0.89 nm incident on the source. The source employs superthermal conversion of cold neutrons in superfluid helium, in a vessel made from BeO ceramics with Be windows. A special extraction technique has been tested which feeds the spectrometer only with neutrons with a vertical velocity component v < 20 cm/s, thus keeping the density in the source high. This new source is expected to provide a density of up to 800 1/cm3 for the spectrometer.

P. Schmidt-Wellenburg; K. H. Andersen; P. Courtois; M. Kreuz; S. Mironov; V. V. Nesvizhevsky; G. Pignol; K. V. Protasov; T. Soldner; F. Vezzu; O. Zimmer

2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

93

Modulation of erosion on steep granitic slopes by boulder armoring, as revealed by cosmogenic 26  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modulation of erosion on steep granitic slopes by boulder armoring, as revealed by cosmogenic 26 Al. In contrast, steep slopes lacking a boulder lag erode much more quickly than gentle slopes. Boulder armoring

Kirchner, James W.

94

LARGE SCALE PERMEABILITY TEST OF THE GRANITE IN THE STRIPA MINE AND THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY TEST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

No.2 LARGE SCALE PERMEABILITY TEST OF THE GRANITE' IN THEMINE AND, THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY TEST Lars Lundstrom and HakanSUMMARY REPORT Background TEST SITE Layout of test places

Lundstrom, L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Investigation of Naturally Occurring Radio Nuclides in Shir-kuh Granites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the principle natural radiation resources is Granite which can be dangerous for human because of its radiations. Based on this fact, in this research we attempt to specify the activity amount of these natural radio nuclides, existing in Shir-kuh Granite of Yazd state. To specify the activity amount of this natural radio nuclides, it has been applied the measurement method of Gamma spectroscopy using high purity Germanium (HPGe) detector.

Mazarei, Mohammad Mehdi; Zarei, Mojtaba [Department of Science, Bushehr Branch, Islamic Azad University, City of Aalishahr, Bushehr Province, Iran P.O.Box: 7519619555 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2011-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

96

{sup 152}Eu depths profiles granite and concrete cores exposed to the Hiroshima atomic bomb  

SciTech Connect

Two granite and two concrete core samples were obtained within 500 m from the hypocenter of the Hiroshima atomic bomb, and the depth profile of {sup 152}Eu was measured to evaluate the incident neutron spectrum. The granite cores were obtained from a pillar of the Motoyasu Bridge located 101 m from the hypocenter and from a granite rock in the Shirakami Shrine (379 m); the concrete cores were obtained from a gate in the Gokoku Shrine (398 m) and from top of the Hiroshima bank (250 m). The profiles of the specific activities of the cores were measured to a depth of 40 cm from the surface using low background germanium (Ge) spectrometers. According to the measured depth profiles, relaxation lengths of incident neutrons were derived as 13.6 cm for Motoyasu Bridge pillar (granite), 12.2 cm for Shirakami Shrine core (granite), and 9.6 cm for concrete cores of Gokoku Shrine and Hiroshima Bank. In addition, a comparison of the granite cores in Hiroshima showed good agreement with Nagasaki data. Present results indicates that the depth profile of {sup 152}Eu reflects incident neutrons not so high but in the epithermal region. 19 refs., 7 figs., 8 tabs.

Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Iwatani, Kazuo [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan); Oka, Takamitsu [Kure Univ. (Japan)] [and others

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Operation of the Lower Granite Dam Adult Trap, 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During 2008 we operated the adult salmonid trap at Lower Granite Dam from 7 March through 25 November, except during a short summer period when water temperatures were too high to safely handle fish. We collected and handled a total of 20,463 steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss and radio-tagged 34 of the hatchery steelhead. We took scale samples from 3,724 spring/summer Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha for age and genetic analysis. We collected and handled a total of 8,254 fall Chinook salmon. Of those fish, 2,520 adults and 942 jacks were transported to Lyons Ferry Hatchery on the Snake River in Washington. In addition, 961 adults and 107 jacks were transported to the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery on the Clearwater River in Idaho. The remaining 3,724 fall Chinook salmon were passed upstream. Scales samples were taken from 780 fall Chinook salmon tagged with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags and collected by the sort-by-code system.

Harmon, Jerrel R.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Directional drilling equipment and techniques for deep hot granite wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Conventional directional drilling technology has been extended and modified to drill the first well of a subsurface geothermal energy extraction system at the Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot dry Rock (HDR) experimental site. Completing the first of a two-wellbore HDR system has resulted in the definition of operational limitations of many conventional directional drilling tools, instrumentation and techniques. The successful completion of the first wellbore, Energy Extraction Well No. 2 (EE-2), to a measured depth of 15,300 ft (4.7 km) in granite reservoir rock with a bottomhole temperature of 530/sup 0/F (275/sup 0/C) required the development of a new high temperature downhole motor and modification of existing wireline-conveyed steering tool systems. Conventional rotary-driven directional assemblies were successfully modified to accommodate the very hard and abrasive rock encountered while drilling nearly 8500 ft (2.6 km) of directional hole to a final inclination of 35/sup 0/ from the vertical at a controlled azimuthal orientation.

Brittenham, T.L.; Sursen, G.; Neudecker, J.W.; Rowley, J.C.; Williams, R.E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Granite disposal of U.S. high-level radioactive waste.  

SciTech Connect

This report evaluates the feasibility of disposing U.S. high-level radioactive waste in granite several hundred meters below the surface of the earth. The U.S. has many granite formations with positive attributes for permanent disposal. Similar crystalline formations have been extensively studied by international programs, two of which, in Sweden and Finland, are the host rocks of submitted or imminent repository license applications. This report is enabled by the advanced work of the international community to establish functional and operational requirements for disposal of a range of waste forms in granite media. In this report we develop scoping performance analyses, based on the applicable features, events, and processes (FEPs) identified by international investigators, to support generic conclusions regarding post-closure safety. Unlike the safety analyses for disposal in salt, shale/clay, or deep boreholes, the safety analysis for a mined granite repository depends largely on waste package preservation. In crystalline rock, waste packages are preserved by the high mechanical stability of the excavations, the diffusive barrier of the buffer, and favorable chemical conditions. The buffer is preserved by low groundwater fluxes, favorable chemical conditions, backfill, and the rigid confines of the host rock. An added advantage of a mined granite repository is that waste packages would be fairly easy to retrieve, should retrievability be an important objective. The results of the safety analyses performed in this study are consistent with the results of comprehensive safety assessments performed for sites in Sweden, Finland, and Canada. They indicate that a granite repository would satisfy established safety criteria and suggest that a small number of FEPs would largely control the release and transport of radionuclides. In the event the U.S. decides to pursue a potential repository in granite, a detailed evaluation of these FEPs would be needed to inform site selection and safety assessment.

Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Mariner, Paul E.; Lee, Joon H.; Hardin, Ernest L.; Goldstein, Barry; Hansen, Francis D.; Price, Ronald H.; Lord, Anna Snider

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Wash-Rite Co - IN 08  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Wash-Rite Co - IN 08 Wash-Rite Co - IN 08 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: WASH-RITE CO. (IN.08 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: 1410 Cornell Avenue , Indianapolis , Indiana IN.08-2 Evaluation Year: 1991 IN.08-3 IN.08-4 Site Operations: Conducted washing test to decontaminate gloves and recover uranium. IN.08-1 IN.08-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote due to the limited scope of activities at this site IN.08-3 IN.08-4 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium IN.08-2 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to WASH-RITE CO.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite wash stuart" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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101

Analysis Of Macroscopic Fractures In Granite In The Hdr Geothermal Well  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Macroscopic Fractures In Granite In The Hdr Geothermal Well Macroscopic Fractures In Granite In The Hdr Geothermal Well Eps-1, Soultz-Sous-Forets, France Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Analysis Of Macroscopic Fractures In Granite In The Hdr Geothermal Well Eps-1, Soultz-Sous-Forets, France Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: An exhaustive analysis of 3000 macroscopic fractures encountered in the geothermal Hot Dry Rock borehole, EPS-1, located inside the Rhine graben (Soultz-sous-Forets, France), was done on a continuous core section over a depth interval from 1420 to 2230 m: 97% of the macroscopic structures were successfully reorientated with a good degree of confidence by comparison between core and acoustic borehole imagery. Detailed structural analysis of the fracture population indicates that fractures are

102

Granite Creek Hot Spring Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Granite Creek Hot Spring Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Granite Creek Hot Spring Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Granite Creek Hot Spring Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Teton County, Wyoming Coordinates 43.853632°, -110.6314491° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

103

EBR-II Primary Tank Wash-Water Alternatives Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EBR-II reactor at Idaho National Laboratory was a liquid sodium metal cooled reactor that operated for 30 years. It was shut down in 1994; the fuel was removed by 1996; and the bulk of sodium metal coolant was removed from the reactor by 2001. Approximately 1100 kg of residual sodium remained in the primary system after draining the bulk sodium. To stabilize the remaining sodium, both the primary and secondary systems were treated with a purge of moist carbon dioxide. Most of the residual sodium reacted with the carbon dioxide and water vapor to form a passivation layer of primarily sodium bicarbonate. The passivation treatment was stopped in 2005 and the primary system is maintained under a blanket of dry carbon dioxide. Approximately 670 kg of sodium metal remains in the primary system in locations that were inaccessible to passivation treatment or in pools of sodium that were too deep for complete penetration of the passivation treatment. The EBR-II reactor was permitted by the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) in 2002 under a RCRA permit that requires removal of all remaining sodium in the primary and secondary systems by 2022. The proposed baseline closure method would remove the large components from the primary tank, fill the primary system with water, react the remaining sodium with the water and dissolve the reaction products in the wash water. This method would generate a minimum of 100,000 gallons of caustic, liquid, low level radioactive, hazardous waste water that must be disposed of in a permitted facility. On February 19-20, 2008, a workshop was held in Idaho Falls, Idaho, to look at alternatives that could meet the RCRA permit clean closure requirements and minimize the quantity of hazardous waste generated by the cleanup process. The workshop convened a panel of national and international sodium cleanup specialists, subject matter experts from the INL, and the EBR-II Wash Water Project team that organized the workshop. The workshop was conducted by a trained facilitator using Value Engineering techniques to elicit the most technically sound solutions from the workshop participants. The path forward includes developing the OBA into a well engineered solution for achieving RCRA clean closure of the EBR-II Primary Reactor Tank system. Several high level tasks are also part of the path forward such as reassigning responsibility of the cleanup project to a dedicated project team that is funded by the DOE Office of Environmental Management, and making it a priority so that adequate funding is available to complete the project. Based on the experience of the sodium cleanup specialists, negotiations with the DEQ will be necessary to determine a risk-based de minimus quantity for acceptable amount of sodium that can be left in the reactor systems after cleanup has been completed.

Demmer, R. L.; Heintzelman, J. B.; Merservey, R. H.; Squires, L. N.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Lithium isotopic systematics of granites and pegmatites from the Black Hills, South Dakota  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

isotope geochemistry by documenting the Li isotopic variations in different geological reservoirsLithium isotopic systematics of granites and pegmatites from the Black Hills, South Dakota Fang. Geochemistry Laboratory, Department of Geology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, U.S.A. 2

Rudnick, Roberta L.

105

AHDC FACT SHEET 1 DL-1030 5/06 TRANSTRACHEAL WASH PROCEDURE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University In Partnership with the NYS Dept of Ag & Markets US Postal Service enough, coughing by the animal may flip the tip toward the larynx, resulting in a pharyngeal wash

Keinan, Alon

106

Laboratory development of sludge washing and alkaline leaching processes: Test plan for FY 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy plans to vitrify (as borosilicate glass) the large volumes of high-level radioactive wastes at the Hanford site. To reduce costs, pretreatment processes will be used to reduce the volume of borosilicate glass required for disposal. Several options are being considered for the pretreatment processes: (1) sludge washing with water or dilute hydroxide: designed to remove most of the Na from the sludge, thus significantly reducing the volume of waste to be vitrified; (2) sludge washing plus caustic leaching and/or metathesis (alkaline sludge leaching): designed to dissolve large quantities of certain nonradioactive elements, such as Al, Cr and P, thus reducing the volume of waste even more; (3) sludge washing, sludge dissolution, and separation of radionuclides from the dissolved sludge solutions (advanced processing): designed to remove all radionuclides for concentration into a minimum waste volume. This report describes a test plan for work that will be performed in FY 1994 under the Sludge Washing and Caustic Leaching Studies Task (WBS 0402) of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Pretreatment Project. The objectives of the work described here are to determine the effects of sludge washing and alkaline leaching on sludge composition and the physical properties of the washed sludge and to evaluate alkaline leaching methods for their impact on the volume of borosilicate glass required to dispose of certain Hanford tank sludges.

Rapko, B.M.; Lumetta, G.J.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Gravity and magnetic data of Fortymile Wash, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gravity and ground magnetic data collected along six traverses across Fortymile Wash, in the southwest quadrant of the Nevada Test Site suggest that there are no significant vertical offsets below Fortymile Wash. The largest gravity and magnetic anomaly, in the vicinity of Fortymile Wash, is produced by the Paintbrush fault, on the west flank of Fran Ridge. Inferred vertical offset is about 250 {+-} 60 m (800 {+-} 200 ft). Geophysical data indicate that the fault is about 300 m (1,000 ft) east of its mapped, but concealed location. North of Busted Butte, near Fran Ridge, geophysical data do not preclude the existence of small vertical offsets bounding Fortymile Wash. However, gravity and magnetic profiles south of Busted Butte show little correlation to those to the north and suggest that vertical offsets, comparable in size to the Paintbrush fault, are not present. Density profiling, a technique used to determine the average density of small topographic features, suggests that the density of near-surface material in the vicinity of Fortymile Wash is 1.80 to 2.00 g/cm{sup 3}.

Ponce, D.A.; Kohrn, S.B. [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Waddell, S. [Fenix and Scisson, Inc., Mercury, NV (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

108

Utilizing secondary heat to heat wash oil in the coke-oven gas desulfurization division  

SciTech Connect

Removal of hydrogen sulfide from the coke-oven gas by the vacuum-carbonate method involves significant energy costs, comprising about 47% of the total costs of the process. This is explained by the significant demand of steam for regeneration of the wash oil, the cost of which exceeds 30% of the total operating costs. The boiling point of the saturated wash oil under vacuum does not exceed 70/sup 0/C, thus the wash oil entering the regenerator can be heated either by the direct coke-oven gas or by the tar supernatant from the gas collection cycle. Utilizing the secondary heat of the direct coke-oven gas and the tar supernatant liquor (the thermal effect is approximately the same) to heat the wash oil from the gas desulfurization shops significantly improves the industrial economic indices. Heating the wash oil from gas desulfurization shops using the vacuum-carbonate method by the heat of the tar supernatant liquor may be adopted at a number of coking plants which have a scarcity of thermal resources and which have primary coolers with vertical tubes.

Volkov, E.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Determination of permeability of granitic rocks in GT-2 from hydraulic fracturing data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory is currently conducting a study to determine the feasibility to extract geothermal energy from dry hot rock. The investigated concept calls for the creation of a hydraulic fracture in hot, impermeable rock. Heat will be exchanged subsequently at the fracture surface between the rock and a circulating fluid. The successful creation of hydraulic fractures in the granitic section of exploratory holes GT-1 and GT-2 yielded sufficient data to calculate the average permeability of the rock next to a fracture by means of the mathematical model. The calculated permeabilities were found to be in the microdarcy range and proved the granitic rock penetrated by GT-1 and GT-2 to be sufficiently impermeable to test the above concept. (auth)

Delisle, G.

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Microsoft Word - Granite-Mt-3G-Radio-Station-CX.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 0 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Creig Millen Project Manager - TEC-CSB-1 Proposed Action: Granite Mountain 3G Radio Station Project Budget Information: Work Order 00197218, Task 03 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.19 Siting, construction, and operation of microwave and radio communication towers and associated facilities... Location: Stevens County, Washington (T34N, R38E, Section 17) Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to install a new 100-foot radio tower, communication building, and related digital radio equipment at an existing BPA communications site on Granite Mountain in Stevens County, Washington. The new tower and building will upgrade and replace

111

Microsoft Word - CX-LowerGranite-HatwaiAccessRoadImprovementFY13_WEB.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9, 2012 9, 2012 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-Bell-1 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Kristi Unholz Project Manager - TELF-TPP-3 Proposed Action: Improve the access road system in miles 4, 5, 16, 17, 18, and 30 of the Lower Granite-Hatwai transmission line PP&A Project No.: 2378 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine Maintenance. B1.13 Pathways, short access roads, and rail lines Location: As identified in table below: Lower Granite-Hatwai Access Road Project Location Township Range Section County, State mile 4 to mile 5 13N 43E 2 Whitman, WA mile 16 12N 45E 8 mile 17 12N 45E 17 mile 18 12N 45E 20 mile 30 36N 5W 19, 30 Nez Perce, ID Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA)

112

Microsoft Word - CX-SwanValley-Goshen_GraniteCreekBoxCulvert_WEB.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Joe Johnson Natural Resource Specialist - TFBV-Kalispell Proposed Action: Replace existing bridge with a concrete box culvert at Granite Creek along Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Swan Valley-Goshen 161-kV transmission line. Budget Information: Work Order # 189268-01 PP&A Project No.: PP&A 2047 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3, Routine maintenance activities for structures, rights-of-way, and infrastructures, (such as roads), that are required to maintain infrastructures in a condition suitable for a facility to be used for its designated purpose. Location: The proposed project is located on Granite Creek along BPA's Swan Valley-Goshen

113

Some Geotechnical Properties of Palm Biodiesel Contaminated Mining Sand and Weathered Granite Soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil-pollution due to accidental during transportation or leakage from storage not only brings large damage to the environments, but it also affects the geotechnical properties of soil. Hence, an extensive laboratory testing program was carried out to investigate the geotechnical properties on palm biodiesel contaminated weathered granite soil and mining sand. A series of laboratory experiments has been carried out by using a direct simple shear device on clean and contaminated soil samples. The contaminated soil samples were mixed with palm biodiesel in the amount 5%, 10 % and 15 % by dry weight. The objective of this study is to determine the effects of palm biodiesel contamination on the mining sand and weathered granite soil samples. The overall results indicated decrease of shear strength with increasing palm biodiesel contents.

Yue Ling

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

rencontre en quantit notable a peu de distance du granite, par consquent une profondeur relative-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

relative- ment très élevée, fait déjà constaté à Joaclumsthal. La mine de Weisser Ilirseh près de minéraux d'uranium prove- nani, de la décomposition de la pechblende : chalcolithe, zeunérite, walpurgine granite. Les minéraux d'uranium rencontrés dans le district sont la pechurane se pré- sentant en belles

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

115

Experimental Breeder Reactor-II Primary Tank System Wash Water Workshop  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pre-Developmental Pre-Developmental INL EBR-II Wash Water Treatment Technologies (PBS # ADSHQTD0100 (0003199)) EBR-II Wash Water Workshop - The majority of the sodium has been removed, remaining material is mostly passivated. Similar closure projects have been successfully completed. Engineering needs to be developed to apply the OBA path. Page 1 of 2 Idaho National Laboratory Idaho Experimental Breeder Reactor-II Primary Tank System Wash Water Workshop Challenge In 1994 Congress ordered the shutdown of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) and a closure project was initiated. The facility was placed in cold shutdown, engineering began on sodium removal, the sodium was drained in 2001 and the residual sodium chemically passivated to render it less reactive in 2005. Since that time, approximately 700 kg of metallic sodium and 3500 kg of sodium bicarbonate remain in the facility. The

116

Experimental study of variations in background radiation and the effect on Nuclear Car Wash sensitivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Error rates in a cargo screening system such as the Nuclear Car Wash [1-7] depend on the standard deviation of the background radiation count rate. Because the Nuclear Car Wash is an active interrogation technique, the radiation signal for fissile material must be detected above a background count rate consisting of cosmic, ambient, and neutron-activated radiations. It was suggested previously [1,6] that the Corresponding negative repercussions for the sensitivity of the system were shown. Therefore, to assure the most accurate estimation of the variation, experiments have been performed to quantify components of the actual variance in the background count rate, including variations in generator power, irradiation time, and container contents. The background variance is determined by these experiments to be a factor of 2 smaller than values assumed in previous analyses, resulting in substantially improved projections of system performance for the Nuclear Car Wash.

Church, J; Slaughter, D; Norman, E; Asztalos, S; Biltoft, P

2007-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

117

The studying of washing of arsenic and sulfur from coals having different ranges of arsenic contents  

SciTech Connect

To study the effectiveness of washing in removal of arsenic and sulfur from coals with different ranges of arsenic concentration, coal was divided into three groups on the basis of arsenic content: 0-5.5 mg/kg, 5.5 mg/kg-8.00 mg/kg, and over 8.00 mg/kg. The result shows that the arsenic in coals with higher arsenic content occurs mainly in an inorganic state and can be relatively easily removed. Arsenic removal is very difficult and less complete when the arsenic content is lower than 5.5 mg/kg because most of this arsenic is in an organic state. There is no relationship between washing rate of total sulfur and arsenic content, but the relationship between the washing rate of total sulfur and percent of organic sulfur is very strong.

Mingshi Wang; Dangyu Song; Baoshan Zheng; R.B. Finkelman [Institute of Geochemistry, Guiyang (China). State Key Lab of Environmental Geochemistry

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

118

DOE Announces Additional Tour Seats Available: Tours of B Reactor at the Hanford Site Begin and End in Richland, Wash.  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

RICHLAND, Wash. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has made additional seats available for tours of the B Reactor National Historic Landmark this July and August.

119

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 5): Wash King Laundry, Baldwin, MI, March 1993  

SciTech Connect

This decision document presents the selected remedial action for the Wash King Laundry Superfund site in Baldwin, Pleasant Plains Township, Michigan. The groundwater remedial action consists of the following: groundwater monitoring; deed restrictions; and groundwater extraction with physical/chemical treatment. The lagoon remedial action consists of the following: excavation of contaminated sediments and soils and off-site disposal.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Neuro-Fuzzy Controller of a Sensorless PM Motor Drive For Washing Machines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

algorithms to enable direct drive from permanent magnet (PM) synchronous motors[3]. #12;Among AC drives, the permanent magnet (PM) motors have became popular, due to its high torque to current ration, large powerNeuro-Fuzzy Controller of a Sensorless PM Motor Drive For Washing Machines Kasim M. Al

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite wash stuart" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam; Smolt Monitoring by Federal and Non-Federal Entities, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project monitored the daily passage of chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon smolts O. nerka during the 2001 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. In 2001 fish management agencies released significant numbers of hatchery chinook salmon and steelhead trout above Lower Granite Dam that were not marked with a fin clip or coded-wire tag. Generally, these fish were distinguishable from wild fish by the occurrence of fin erosion. Total annual hatchery chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 11% of the 2000 numbers. The wild chinook catch was 3% of the previous year's catch. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 49% of 2000 numbers. Wild steelhead trout catch was 69% of 2000 numbers. The Snake River trap collected 28 age-0 chinook salmon. During 2001 the Snake River trap captured zero hatchery and zero wild/natural sockeye salmon and six hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with flow. The significant reduction in catch during 2001 was due to a reduction in hatchery chinook production (60% of 2000 release) and due to extreme low flows. Trap operations began on March 11 and were terminated on June 29. The trap was out of operation for a total of two days due to mechanical failure or debris. Hatchery chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 47% and wild chinook salmon catch was 67% of 2000 numbers. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 2001 was 178% of the 2000 numbers. Wild steelhead trout collection in 2001 was 145% of the previous year's catch. Trap operations began on March 11 and were terminated on June 8 due to the end of the smolt monitoring season. There were no days where the trap was out of operation due to high flow or debris. The decrease in hatchery chinook catch in 2001 was due to a reduction in hatchery production (39% of 2000 releases). The increase in hatchery and wild steelhead trap catch is due to the ability to operate the trap in the thalweg for a longer period of time because of the extreme low flow condition in 2001. Travel time (d) and migration rate (km/d) through Lower Granite Reservoir for PIT-tagged chinook salmon and steelhead trout marked at the head of the reservoir were affected by discharge. There were not enough hatchery and wild chinook salmon tagged at the Snake River trap in 2001 to allow migration rate/discharge analysis. For steelhead trout tagged at the Snake River trap, statistical analysis of 2001 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge. For hatchery and wild steelhead trout, there was a 2.2-fold and a 1.5-fold increase in migration rate in, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. Travel time and migration rate to Lower Granite Dam for fish marked at the Salmon River trap were calculated. Statistical analysis of the 2001 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge for hatchery and wild chinook salmon and hatchery and wild steelhead trout. Migration rate increased 3.7-fold for hatchery chinook salmon and 2.5-fold for wild chinook salmon between 50 and 100 kcfs. For hatchery steelhead there was a 1.6-fold increase in migration rate, and for wild steelhead trout there was a 2.2-fold increase between 50 kcfs and 100 kcfs. Fish tagged with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags at the Snake River trap were interrogated at four dams with PIT tag detection systems (Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, and McNary dams). Because of the addition of the fourth interrogation site (Lower Monumental) in 1993, cumulative interrogation data is not comparable with the prior five years (1988-1992). Cumulative interrogations at the four dams for fish marked at the Snake River trap were 86% for hatchery chinook, 70% for wild chinook, 71% for hatchery steelhead, and 89% for wild steelhead. Cumulat

Buettner, Edwin W.; Putnam, Scott A.

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Smolt Condition and Timing of Arrival at Lower Granite Reservoir, 1984 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hatcheries released 9.3 million chinook salmon and 6.3 million steelhead smolts and presmolts upriver from Lower Granite Reservoir for migration in spring, 1984. Peak passage of yearling chinook salmon occurred the third week in April at both Whitebird and Snake River traps. Passage of steelhead was still increasing when high water stopped trapping in mid-May. Average migration rate between release sites and Snake River (the head of Lower Granite Reservoir) was 13.2 miles/day and from that point on through the reservoir to the dam, 1.9 miles/day. Salmon River discharge, when considered along with other environmental factors, had the greatest effect on migration rate of smolts branded both at hatcheries and at the Whitebird trap and migrating to the head of Lower Granite Reservoir. Migration rate for steelhead released from Dworshak Hatchery and recaptured at the Clearwater trap was 34 miles/day. Survival rates to the Snake River trap of branded chinook salmon smolts released at Hells Canyon Dam, Rapid River, South Fork Salmon and Decker Flat were 52%, 65%, 68% and 35%, respectively. Classical descaling, where at least 40% of the scales are missing from at least two of five areas on the side of a smolt, ranged from 0 to 5.3% at hatcheries for chinook salmon and was less than 1% for steelhead. Scattered descaling, where at least 10% of scales are missing from at least one side of a fish, was always more extensive than was classical descaling, ranging from 2.5 times greater for Clearwater hatchery steelhead to 6.8 times greater for Clearwater wild steelhead. Mean total length of chinook salmon yearlings was the same at all the traps, i.e., 128 mm (117 mm fork length) +- 1 mm.

Scully, Richard J.; Buettner, Edwin W.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

A damage model for rock fragmentation and comparison of calculations with blasting experiments in granite  

SciTech Connect

Early attempts at estimation of stress wave damage due to blasting by use of finite element calculations met with limited success due to numerical instabilities that prevented calculations from being carried to late times. An improved damage model allows finite element calculations which remain stable at late times. Reasonable agreement between crater profiles calculated with this model using the PRONTO finite element program and excavated crater profiles from blasting experiments in granite demonstrate a successful application of this model. Detailed instructions for use of this new damage model with the PRONTO finite element programs are included. 18 refs., 16 figs.

Thorne, B.J.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

"1. Seabrook","Nuclear","NextEra Energy Seabrook LLC",1247 "2. Granite Ridge","Gas","Granite Ridge Energy LLC",678  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hampshire" Hampshire" "1. Seabrook","Nuclear","NextEra Energy Seabrook LLC",1247 "2. Granite Ridge","Gas","Granite Ridge Energy LLC",678 "3. NAEA Newington Power","Gas","NAEA Newington Energy LLC",525 "4. Merrimack","Coal","Public Service Co of NH",485 "5. Newington","Gas","Public Service Co of NH",400 "6. S C Moore","Hydroelectric","TransCanada Hydro Northeast Inc.,",194 "7. Schiller","Coal","Public Service Co of NH",156 "8. Comerford","Hydroelectric","TransCanada Hydro Northeast Inc.,",145 "9. Berlin Gorham","Hydroelectric","Great Lakes Hydro America LLC",30

125

SLUDGE BATCH 7 (SB7) WASHING DEMONSTRATION TO DETERMINE SULFATE/OXALATE REMOVAL EFFICIENCY AND SETTLING BEHAVIOR  

SciTech Connect

To support Sludge Batch 7 (SB7) washing, a demonstration of the proposed Tank Farm washing operation was performed utilizing a real-waste test slurry generated from Tank 4, 7, and 12 samples. The purpose of the demonstration was twofold: (1) to determine the settling time requirements and washing strategy needed to bring the SB7 slurry to the desired endpoint; and (2) to determine the impact of washing on the chemical and physical characteristics of the sludge, particularly those of sulfur content, oxalate content, and rheology. Seven wash cycles were conducted over a four month period to reduce the supernatant sodium concentration to approximately one molar. The long washing duration was due to the slow settling of the sludge and the limited compaction. Approximately 90% of the sulfur was removed through washing, and the vast majority of the sulfur was determined to be soluble from the start. In contrast, only about half of the oxalate was removed through washing, as most of the oxalate was initially insoluble and did not partition to the liquid phase until the latter washes. The final sulfur concentration was 0.45 wt% of the total solids, and the final oxalate concentration was 9,900 mg/kg slurry. More oxalate could have been removed through additional washing, although the washing would have reduced the supernatant sodium concentration.The yield stress of the final washed sludge (35 Pa) was an order of magnitude higher than that of the unwashed sludge ({approx}4 Pa) and was deemed potentially problematic. The high yield stress was related to the significant increase in insoluble solids that occurred ({approx}8 wt% to {approx}18 wt%) as soluble solids and water were removed from the slurry. Reduction of the insoluble solids concentration to {approx}14 wt% was needed to reduce the yield stress to an acceptable level. However, depending on the manner that the insoluble solids adjustment was performed, the final sodium concentration and extent of oxalate removal would be prone to change. As such, the strategy for completing the final wash cycle is integral to maintaining the proper balance of chemical and physical requirements.

Reboul, S.; Click, D.; Lambert, D.

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

126

Lithium isotopic systematics of A-type granites and their mafic enclaves: Further constraints on the Li isotopic composition of the continental crust  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lithium isotopic systematics of A-type granites and their mafic enclaves: Further constraints form 6 February 2009 Accepted 15 February 2009 Editor: D.B. Dingwell Keywords: Lithium isotopes A-type granite Mafic enclave Continental crust Lithium concentrations and isotopic compositions of 39 A

Mcdonough, William F.

127

Stuart, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3213°, -94.3185737° 3213°, -94.3185737° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.5033213,"lon":-94.3185737,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

128

Stuart R Hudson | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

approach for optimizing currents in H-1NF stellarator in operation in the Plasma Research Laboratory at the ANU to control vacuum magnetic islands was introduced. After...

129

Smolt Condition and Timing of Arrival at Lower Granite Reservoir, 1987 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project monitored the daily passage of smolts during the 1988 spring outmigration at two migrant traps; one each on the Snake and Clearwater rivers. Due to the low runoff year, chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was very low. Steelhead trout catch was higher than normal, probably due to trap modifications and because the trap was moved to the east side of the river. Chinook salmon and steelhead trout catch at the Clearwater River trap was similar to 1987. Total cumulative recovery of PIT tagged fish at the three dams, with PIT tag detection systems was: 55% for chinook salmon, 73% for hatchery steelhead trout, and 75% for wild steelhead trout. Travel time through Lower Granite Reservoir for PIT tagged chinook salmon and steelhead trout, marked at the head of the reservoir, was affected by discharge. Statistical analysis showed that as discharge increased from 40 kcfs to 80 kcfs, chinook salmon travel time decreased three fold, and steelhead trout travel time decreased two fold. There was a statistical difference between estimates of travel time through Lower Granite Reservoir for PIT tagged and freeze branded steelhead trout, but not for chinook salmon. These differences may be related to the estimation techniques used for PIT tagged and freeze branded groups, rather than real differences in travel time. 10 figs, 15 tabs.

Buettner, Edwin W.; Nelson, V. Lance

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Rock physics characterization of Conway granite from a DOE borehole, Conway, New Hampshire  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Conway granite of New Hampshire is a highly radioactive intrusive into which a 1-km-deep borehole was drilled and continuously cored in 1975. There are two major granitic units, the Osceola and the Conway. The Conway is cut by three lamprophyre dikes. Elastic moduli and petrographic studies were on 14 samples from the core. These data and observations have been used to determine groupings in the rocks by characterizing microstructure. An important result is that carefully taken physical properties data (for example, velocities and strains) are sensitive indicators of microstructure. Based on velocity and strain data, three distinct groups are found: the lamprophyre dike rocks and two groups each of which contain samples from both the Osceola and Conway formations. These groups are also distinguished by petrographic observations of microcrack patterns. The groups are apparently controlled by grain size and by uniformity of the mixing of the mineral phases in the samples, and not by mineral modes or depth. This last result implies the coring of the Conway samples may have intensified the amount of cracking over that in the rocks in situ, but not the type of cracking. Coring does not apparently induce a distinct population of very thin (low aspect ratio) cracks; that is, such cracks are not needed to explain the low pressure stress and velocity data of these samples.

Warren, N.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Washing of Cloth Contaminated with Radionuclides Using A Detergent-Free Laundry System  

SciTech Connect

In this study, we describe a new laundry system to wash clothes, including those contaminated with radionuclides, without using detergent. The main part of this system is electrolytic cell that consists of a cathode with a special coating of nickel, an anode of nickel, and a cation exchange membrane between the two electrodes. The electrolyte is supplied to the anode and the tap-water to the cathode. When an electricity of 5 volts and 25 amperes is applied to the electrodes, the processed water is produced from the cathode. This processed water containing no detergent was investigated experimentally with regard to its decontamination efficiency of radionuclides and detergency of soil as compared to the conventional washing using detergent. It was found that the processed water from this system has an ability to simultaneously remove radionuclides and soil from the cloth with good efficiency.

Yim, S. P.; Ahn, B. G.; Lee, H. J.; Shon, J. S.; Chung, H.; Kim, K. J.; Kim, H. J.; Park, J. H.; Lee, W. S.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

132

Opportunities for Energy Conservation and Improved Comfort From Wind Washing Retrofits in Two-Story Homes - Part I  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind washing is a general term referring to diminished thermal control caused by air movement over or through a thermal barrier. The primary focus of this paper is towards a specific type of wind washing where wind can push attic air into the floor cavity between first and second stories of the home through ineffective (or missing) air barriers separating attic space from the floor cavity. A second type of wind washing studied in this project involved insulation batts on knee walls where space between the batts and the wall board allowed air movement against the gypsum wall board. During hot weather, the first type of wind washing pushes hot air into the floor cavity (between the first and second stories) thereby heating ceiling, floor, and interior wall surfaces (see Figures 1 and 2). Condensation may occur on cold supply duct surfaces within the floor cavity resulting in ceiling moisture damage. In cold climates, cold air from wind washing can chill surfaces within the interior floor space and result in frozen water pipes. Through the summer of 2009, a field study tested thirty-two two-story homes and found significant wind washing potential in 40% of the homes. Part I of this paper will highlight the evaluation methods used and the extent of wind washing found in this study. Repairs and energy monitoring were completed in six of these homes to evaluate retrofit methods and cost effectiveness of retrofit solutions. These results are discussed in Part II of this paper.

Withers, C. R. Jr.; Cummings, J. B.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Method of washing hydrogen sulfide from coke oven gas by the ammonium sulfide method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An improved coke oven gas washing process for removing hydrogen sulfide is proposed wherein the coke oven gas is treated in a hydrogen sulfide scrubber by counterflow with an aqueous ammonia wash water. A stream of aqueous weak ammonia liquor is cooled and sprayed through nozzles in the mid-region of the hydrogen sulfide scrubber. A quantity of aqueous ammonia liquor, corresponding to the quantity which is sprayed through the said nozzles, is withdrawn from the hydrogen sulfide scrubber at a level below the nozzles and is introduced into the top of the said hydrogen sulfide scrubber. Ammonia vapor released at the nozzles has a higher partial pressure than the ammonia partial pressure of the coke oven gas in the region of the nozzle. The aqueous ammonia liquor from the deacidifier is the source of the cooled aqueous ammonia liquor which is introduced through the nozzles. A portion of the aqueous ammonia liquor from the deacidifier is introduced directly into the top of the hydrogen sulfide scrubber as a portion of the required aqueous ammonia wash water.

Ritter, H.

1985-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

134

Nuclear criticality safety evaluation -- DWPF Late Wash Facility, Salt Process Cell and Chemical Process Cell  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) High Level Nuclear Waste will be vitrified in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for long term storage and disposal. This is a nuclear criticality safety evaluation for the Late Wash Facility (LWF), the Salt Processing Cell (SPC) and the Chemical Processing Cell (CPC). of the DWPF. Waste salt solution is processed in the Tank Farm In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) process and is then further washed in the DWPF Late Wash Facility (LWF) before it is fed to the DWPF Salt Processing Cell. In the Salt Processing Cell the precipitate slurry is processed in the Precipitate Reactor (PR) and the resultant Precipitate Hydrolysis Aqueous (PHA) produce is combined with the sludge feed and frit in the DWPF Chemical Process Cell to produce a melter feed. The waste is finally immobilized in the Melt Cell. Material in the Tank Farm and the ITP and Extended Sludge processes have been shown to be safe against a nuclear criticality by others. The precipitate slurry feed from ITP and the first six batches of sludge feed are safe against a nuclear criticality and this evaluation demonstrates that the processes in the LWF, the SPC and the CPC do not alter the characteristics of the materials to compromise safety.

Williamson, T.G.

1994-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

135

100 Area soil washing: Bench scale tests on 116-F-4 pluto crib soil  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a bench-scale treatability study on a pluto crib soil sample from 100 Area of the Hanford Site. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of physical separation (wet sieving), treatment processes (attrition scrubbing, and autogenous surface grinding), and chemical extraction methods as a means of separating radioactively-contaminated soil fractions from uncontaminated soil fractions. The soil washing treatability study was conducted on a soil sample from the 116-F-4 Pluto Crib that had been dug up as part of an excavation treatability study. Trace element analyses of this soil showed no elevated concentrations above typically uncontaminated soil background levels. Data on the distribution of radionuclide in various size fractions indicated that the soil-washing tests should be focused on the gravel and sand fractions of the 116-F-4 soil. The radionuclide data also showed that {sup 137}Cs was the only contaminant in this soil that exceeded the test performance goal (TPG). Therefore, the effectiveness of subsequent soil-washing tests for 116-F-4 soil was evaluated on the basis of activity attenuation of {sup 137}Cs in the gravel- and sand-size fractions.

Field, J.G.

1994-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

136

Soil washing as a potential remediation technology for contaminated DOE sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Frequently detected contaminants at US Department of Energy (DOE) sites include radionuclides, heavy metals, and chlorinated hydrocarbons. Remediation of these sites requires application of several technologies used in concert with each other, because no single technology is universally applicable. Special situations, such as mixed waste, generally require innovative technology development. This paper, however, focuses on contaminated soils, for which soil washing and vitrification technologies appear to have wide ranging application potential. Because the volumes of contaminated soils around the DOE complex are so large, soil washing can offer a potentially inexpensive way to effect remediation or to attain waste volume reduction. As costs for disposal of low-level and mixed wastes continue to rise, it is likely that volume-reduction techniques and in-situ containment techniques will become increasingly important. This paper reviews the status of the soil washing technology, examines the systems that are currently available, and discusses the potential application of this technology to some DOE sites, with a focus on radionuclide contamination and, primarily, uranium-contaminated soils

Devgun, J.S.; Beskid, N.J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Natsis, M.E. (Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)); Walker, J.S. (USDOE, Washington, DC (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Soil washing as a potential remediation technology for contaminated DOE sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Frequently detected contaminants at US Department of Energy (DOE) sites include radionuclides, heavy metals, and chlorinated hydrocarbons. Remediation of these sites requires application of several technologies used in concert with each other, because no single technology is universally applicable. Special situations, such as mixed waste, generally require innovative technology development. This paper, however, focuses on contaminated soils, for which soil washing and vitrification technologies appear to have wide ranging application potential. Because the volumes of contaminated soils around the DOE complex are so large, soil washing can offer a potentially inexpensive way to effect remediation or to attain waste volume reduction. As costs for disposal of low-level and mixed wastes continue to rise, it is likely that volume-reduction techniques and in-situ containment techniques will become increasingly important. This paper reviews the status of the soil washing technology, examines the systems that are currently available, and discusses the potential application of this technology to some DOE sites, with a focus on radionuclide contamination and, primarily, uranium-contaminated soils

Devgun, J.S.; Beskid, N.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Natsis, M.E. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Walker, J.S. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Revised cost savings estimate with uncertainty for enhanced sludge washing of underground storage tank waste  

SciTech Connect

Enhanced Sludge Washing (ESW) has been selected to reduce the amount of sludge-based underground storage tank (UST) high-level waste at the Hanford site. During the past several years, studies have been conducted to determine the cost savings derived from the implementation of ESW. The tank waste inventory and ESW performance continues to be revised as characterization and development efforts advance. This study provides a new cost savings estimate based upon the most recent inventory and ESW performance revisions, and includes an estimate of the associated cost uncertainty. Whereas the author`s previous cost savings estimates for ESW were compared against no sludge washing, this study assumes the baseline to be simple water washing which more accurately reflects the retrieval activity along. The revised ESW cost savings estimate for all UST waste at Hanford is $6.1 B {+-} $1.3 B within 95% confidence. This is based upon capital and operating cost savings, but does not include development costs. The development costs are assumed negligible since they should be at least an order of magnitude less than the savings. The overall cost savings uncertainty was derived from process performance uncertainties and baseline remediation cost uncertainties, as determined by the author`s engineering judgment.

DeMuth, S.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam; Smolt Monitoring by Federal and Non-Federal Entities, 2000 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project monitored the daily passage of chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon smolts O. nerka during the 2000 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. In 2000 the Nez Perce Tribe released significant numbers of hatchery chinook salmon and steelhead trout above Lower Granite Dam that were not marked with a fin clip or coded-wire tag. Generally, these fish were distinguishable from wild fish by the occurrence of fin erosion. Total annual hatchery chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 36% of the 1999 number. The wild chinook catch was 34% of the previous year's catch. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 121% of 1999 numbers. Wild steelhead trout catch was 139% of 1999 numbers. The Snake River trap collected 689 age-0 chinook salmon. During 2000, the Snake River trap captured 40 hatchery and 92 wild/natural sockeye salmon and 159 hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with high flows. Trap operations began on March 13 and were terminated for the season due to high flows on June 16. There were no down days due to high flows or debris. Hatchery chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 96%, and wild chinook salmon catch was 66% of 1999 numbers. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 2000 was 90% of the 1999 numbers. Wild steelhead trout collection in 2000 was 147% of the previous years catch. Trap operations began on March 13 and were terminated for the season due to high flows on May 22. There were no days where the trap was out of operation due to high flow or debris. Travel time (d) and migration rate (km/d) through Lower Granite Reservoir for passive integrated transponder (PIT) tagged chinook salmon and steelhead trout, marked at the head of the reservoir, were affected by discharge. For fish tagged at the Snake River trap, statistical analysis of 2000 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and discharge. For hatchery and wild chinook salmon, there was a 3.0 and 16.2-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. For hatchery steelhead, there was a 2.7-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 kcfs and 100 kcfs. The statistical analysis could not detect a significant relation between migration rate and discharge for wild steelhead in 2000. For fish marked at the Salmon River trap, statistical analysis of the 2000 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and discharge for hatchery chinook salmon at the 0.05 level of significance and at the 0.1 level of significance for wild chinook salmon. Migration rate increased 3.2- and 1.9-fold, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. For hatchery steelhead there was a 1.5-fold increase in migration rate between 50 kcfs and 100 kcfs. Insufficient numbers of wild steelhead trout were PIT tagged at the Salmon River trap to estimate travel time and migration rate to Lower Granite Dam. Fish tagged with PIT tags at the Snake River trap were interrogated at four dams with PIT tag detection systems (Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, and McNary dams). Because of the addition of the fourth interrogation site (Lower Monumental) in 1993, cumulative interrogation data is not comparable with the prior five years (1988-1992). Cumulative interrogations at the four dams for fish marked at the Snake River trap were 57% for hatchery chinook, 65% for wild chinook, 73% for hatchery steelhead and 71% for wild steelhead. Cumulative interrogations at the four dams for fish marked at the Salmon River trap were 53% for hatchery chinook, 64% for wild chinook salmon, 68% for hatchery steelhead trout, and 65% for wild steelhead trout.

Buettner, Edwin W.; Putnam, Scott A.

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Effects of adding wash tower effluent to Ano Liossia landfill to enhance bioreaction c by Olympia Galenianou.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A theoretical study was performed on the effects of adding sulfate-rich wash tower effluent from the Athens hospital waste incinerator to the Ano Liossia landfill of Athens. The method of mass balance was used to examine ...

Galenianou, Olympia

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite wash stuart" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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141

Influence of orientation on fracture toughness and tensile moduli in Berkeley granite  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fracture toughness and tensile modulus values for Berkeley granite show pronounced orientation dependence. Apparent fracture toughness values (K{sub Q}) correspond to natural strong and weak planes in the rock: cracks propagated in the head grain (strongest) plane have K{sub Q} = 1.81 MPa ..sqrt..m, those grown in the rift (weakest) plane have K{sub Q} = 1.01 MPa ..sqrt..m and those in the grain (intermediate) plane have K/sub Q/ = 1.40 MPa ..sqrt..m. These directional K/sub Q/ data also correlate with tensile modulus values, E, which are 50.7 GPa,, 21.6 GPa and 39.3 GPa, respectively. An empirical relationship between K/sub Q/ and E is demonstrated. Monitoring of acoustic emission events shows promise as a detector of onset of crack growth.

Halleck, P.M.; Kumnick, A.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Test storage of spent reactor fuel in the Climax granite at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

A test of retrievable dry geologic storage of spent fuel assemblies from an operating commercial nuclear reactor is underway at the Nevada Test Site. This generic test is located 420 m below the surface in the Climax granitic stock. Eleven canisters of spent fuel approximately 2.3 years out of reactor core (about 2 kW/canister thermal output) will be emplaced in a storage drift along with 6 electrical simulator canisters and their effects will be compared. Two adjacent drifts will contain electrical heaters, which will be operated to simulate within the test array the thermal field of a large repository. The test objectives, technical concepts and rationale, and details of the test are stated and discussed.

Ramspott, L.D.; Ballou, L.B.

1980-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

143

Experimental permeability studies at elevated temperature and pressure of granitic rocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Permeability of quartz monzonite from the Los Alamos hot-dry-rock geothermal well GT-2 was experimentally measured as a function of pressure and temperature. Permeability of the GT-2 rocks from depths of 8580 ft and 9522 ft behaves like Westerly granite for changes in effective confining pressure. However, permeability of these rocks behaves much differently with increasing temperature. As temperature is increased, the permeability of Westerly granite passes through a slight minimum and then increases exponentially above 100/sup 0/C. Upon cooling the permeability shows a permanent increase of up to four times its original value. The permeability of GT-2-9522', on the other hand, drops off exponentially with increasing temperature, reaching a minimum near 140/sup 0/C; above 150/sup 0/C, permeability rises slowly. These changes in permeability with temperature are postulated to be caused by differential thermal expansion (DTE), a phenomena related to the anisotropic and inhomogeneous coefficients of thermal expansion of the mineral grains in the rock. Scanning electron photomicrographs of unheated and heated samples of Westerly and GT-2 rocks support the DTE hypothesis. Differences in the behavior of these rocks with temperature are believed to be due to the respective temperature and pressure environments in which they became equilibrated, since both GT-2 rocks had existed at moderately high temperatures and pressures for some time. Temperature disequilibrium of the GT-2 rocks in their present in situ environments is believed to have caused the differences in the behavior between the two samples and may provide a method for determining the pre-intrusion geothermal gradient of the Jemez area. Flow channels were observed in GT-2 samples using radioactive tracer techniques. Several radioactive isotopes were tried in these experiments, including /sup 22/Na, /sup 63/Ni, and /sup 35/S.

Potter, J.M.

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Adult Salmonid PIT-TAG Returns to Columbia River`s Lower Granite Dam.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of an analysis of the returns of PIT-tagged Snake River spring chinook and steelhead detected at Lower Granite Dam are summarized. Included is theoretical work on statistical power calculations for tests of return rates. The phrase return rate will be taken to mean return and detection rate. Knowledge that a fish has returned depends upon it being detected at Lower Granite Dam. Some returns are unaccounted for because they go through the navigation lock or manage to go through the adult bypass undetected. (1) Adult PIT tag recoveries to date are informative at least from a qualitative perspective. (2) The tagging levels by geographic region, rearing type, and, for chinook, life history stage have varied considerably since PIT tagging began on the Columbia River system. Early tagging studies were directed at Juvenile problems rather than adult return rates. As a result, comparisons in adult return rates between years, regions, etc., are more difficult. Global conclusions about the effect of potential treatments and/or natural factors, such as region of origin, on adult return rates are difficult to make until a more balanced. more consistent tagging study is implemented. (3) Along the same lines, tagging levels will need to be increased considerably if experiments are to be conducted to determine factors that affect return rates. E.g., approximately 46,000 fish in both the control and the treatment groups need to be PIT-tagged to detect a statistically significant difference with 80% probability. (4) Analysis of the available data suggests that life stage (parr or smolt), rearing type (hatchery or wild), and geographic location all affect the return rates for spring chinook. The data are limited, however. (5) Return rates for Snake River steelhead are roughly an order of magnitude greater than Snake River spring chinook return rates.

Newman, Ken

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Nuclear Car Wash sensitivity in varying thicknesses of wood and steel cargo  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of incident neutron attenuation on signal strengths in the Nuclear Car Wash has been observed experimentally for both wood and steel-pipe mock cargos. Measured decay curves are presented for {beta}-delayed high-energy {gamma}-rays and thermalized neutrons following neutron-induced fission of HEU through varying irradiation lengths. Error rates are extracted for delayed-{gamma} and delayed-n signals integrated to 30 seconds, assuming Gaussian distributions for the active background. The extrapolation to a field system of 1 mA deuterium current and to a 5 kg sample size is discussed.

Church, J; Slaughter, D; Asztalos, S; Biltoft, P; Descalle, M; Hall, J; Manatt, D; Mauger, J; Norman, E; Petersen, D; Prussin, S

2006-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

146

Hydrogen generation during IDMS demonstrations of the Late Washing and Nitric Acid flowsheets  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recently, Late Washing (LW) and Nitric Acid (NA) flowsheets, developed respectively for the DWPF at Savannah River Technology Center SPC and CPC, were demonstrated in the one-fifth scale DWPF pilot facilities, PHEF and IDMS. Using the LW flowsheet, four runs in the PHEF produced enough PHA for two runs in the IDMS (denoted by PX4 and PX5). One of the objectives of these IDMS runs was to obtain peak hydrogen generation rates and compare them to the peak hydrogen generation rate design basis obtained from a previous IDMS run, based on the HAN and Formic Acid (HAN-FA) flowsheets.

Ritter, J.A.

1992-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

147

Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 1998 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery (Snake River stock) yearling fall chinook salmon that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam along with yearlings released on-station from Lyons Ferry Hatchery in 1998. The three fall chinook acclimation facilities are operated by the Nez Perce Tribe and located at Pittsburg Landing and Captain John Rapids on the Snake River and at Big Canyon Creek on the Clearwater River. Yearlings at the Big Canyon facility consisted of two size classes that are referred to in this report as 9.5 fish per pound (fpp) and 30 fpp. The Big Canyon 9.5 fpp were comparable to the yearlings at Pittsburg Landing, Captain John Rapids and Lyons Ferry Hatchery. A total of 9,942 yearlings were PIT tagged and released at Pittsburg Landing. PIT tagged yearlings had a mean fork length of 159.9 mm and mean condition factor of 1.19. Of the 9,942 PIT tagged fish released, a total of 6,836 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams (Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental and McNary). A total of 4,926 9.5 fpp and 2,532 30 fpp yearlings were PIT tagged and released at Big Canyon. PIT tagged 9.5 fpp yearlings had a mean fork length of 156.9 mm and mean condition factor of 1.13. PIT tagged 30 fpp yearlings had a mean fork length of 113.1 mm and mean condition factor of 1.18. Of the 4,926 PIT tagged 9.5 fpp yearlings released, a total of 3,042 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams. Of the 2,532 PIT tagged 30 fpp yearlings released, a total of 1,130 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams. A total of 1,253 yearlings were PIT tagged and released at Captain John Rapids. PIT tagged yearlings had a mean fork length of 147.5 mm and mean condition factor of 1.09. Of the 1,253 PIT tagged fish released, a total of 719 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams. A total of 2,420 yearlings were PIT tagged and released at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. PIT tagged yearlings had a mean fork length of 159.0 mm and mean condition factor of 1.10. Of the 2,420 PIT tagged fish released, a total of 979 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams (Lower Monumental and McNary). Median travel times, based on all detections, of PIT tagged fish released from Pittsburg Landing were 10.5 days to Lower Granite Dam, 21.7 days to McNary Dam and 29.8 days to Bonneville Dam. Median migration rates were 16.4 rkm/d to Lower Granite Dam, 18.3 rkm/d to McNary Dam and 18.9 rkm/d to Bonneville Dam. The median arrival dates were April 25 at Lower Granite Dam, May 6 at McNary Dam and May 14 at Bonneville Dam. The 90% passage dates were May 5 at Lower Granite Dam, May 20 at McNary Dam and May 25 at Bonneville Dam. Median travel times, based on all detections, of PIT tagged 9.5 fpp yearlings released from Big Canyon were 13.3 days to Lower Granite Dam, 26.0 days to McNary Dam and 30.8 days to Bonneville Dam. Median migration rates were 13.0 rkm/d to Lower Granite Dam, 15.3 rkm/d to McNary Dam and 18.3 rkm/d to Bonneville Dam. The median arrival dates were April 27 at Lower Granite Dam, May 11 at McNary Dam and May 15 at Bonneville Dam. The 90% passage dates were May 9 at Lower Granite Dam, May 24 at McNary Dam and May 25 at Bonneville Dam. Median travel times, based on all detections, of PIT tagged 30 fpp yearlings released from Big Canyon were 20.8 days to Lower Granite Dam, 37.6 days to McNary Dam and 43.5 days to Bonneville Dam. Median migration rates were 8.3 rkm/d to Lower Granite Dam, 10.6 rkm/d to McNary Dam and 12.9 rkm/d to Bonneville Dam. The median arrival dates were May 5 at Lower Granite Dam, May 23 at McNary Dam and May 28 at Bonneville Dam. The 90% passage dates were May 22 at Lower Granite Dam, May 31 at McNary Dam and June 5 at Bonneville Dam. Median arrival dates, based on all detections, of PIT tagge

Rocklage, Stephen J. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Washing and caustic leaching of Hanford tank sludge: Results of FY 1997 studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current plan for remediating the Hanford tank farms consists of waste retrieval, pretreatment, treatment (immobilization), and disposal. The tank wastes will be partitioned into high-level and low-level fractions. The HLW will be immobilized in a borosilicate glass matrix; the resulting glass canisters will then be disposed of in a geologic repository. Because of the expected high cost of HLW vitrification and geologic disposal, pretreatment processes will be implemented to reduce the volume of immobilized high-level waste (IHLW). Caustic leaching (sometimes referred to as enhanced sludge washing or ESW) represents the baseline method for pretreating Hanford tank sludges. Caustic leaching is expected to remove a large fraction of the Al, which is present in large quantities in Hanford tank sludges. A significant portion of the P is also expected to be removed from the sludge by metathesis of water-insoluble metal phosphates to insoluble hydroxides and soluble Na{sub 3}PO{sub 4}. Similar metathesis reactions can occur for insoluble sulfate salts, allowing the removal of sulfate from the HLW stream. This report describes the sludge washing and caustic leaching tests performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in FY 1996. The sludges used in this study were taken from Hanford tanks AN-104, BY-108, S-101, and S-111.

Lumetta, G.J.; Burgeson, I.E.; Wagner, M.J.; Liu, J.; Chen, Y.L.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

An efficient process for recovery of fine coal from tailings of coal washing plants  

SciTech Connect

Gravity concentration of hard lignites using conventional jigs and heavy media separation equipment is prone to produce coal-rich fine tailings. This study aims to establish a fine coal recovery process of very high efficiency at reasonable capital investment and operational costs. The technical feasibility to upgrade the properties of the predeslimed fine refuse of a lignite washing plant with 35.9% ash content was investigated by employing gravity separation methods. The laboratory tests carried out with the combination of shaking table and Mozley multi-gravity separator (MGS) revealed that the clean coal with 18% ash content on dry basis could be obtained with 58.9% clean coal recovery by the shaking table stage and 4.1% clean coal recovery by MGS stage, totaling to the sum of 63.0% clean coal recovery from a predeslimed feed. The combustible recovery and the organic efficiency of the shaking table + MGS combination were 79.5% and 95.5%, respectively. Based on the results of the study, a flow sheet of a high-efficiency fine coal recovery process was proposed, which is also applicable to the coal refuse pond slurry of a lignite washing plant.

Cicek, T.; Cocen, I.; Engin, V.T.; Cengizler, H. [Dokuz Eylul University, Izmir (Turkey). Dept. for Mining Engineering

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

The Feasibility of Using an Ultrasonic Fish Tracking System in the Tailrace of Lower Granite Dam in 2002  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a study conducted by PNNL in Spring 2002 at Lower Granite Dam on the Snake River for the US Army Corps of Engineers Portland District. Our goal was to determine the feasibility of using ultrasonic fish tracking in the untested environment of a hydroelectric dam tailrace. If fish tracking were determined to be feasible, we would track the movement of juvenile hatchery chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), juvenile hatchery steelhead (O. mykiss), and juvenile wild steelhead (O. mykiss) and relate their movement to dam operations. The majority of fish to be tracked were released as a part of a separate study conducted by the Biological Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey (BRD), which was investigating the movement of juvenile salmon in the forebay of Lower Granite Dam in relation to Removable Spillway Weir (RSW) testing. The two studies took place consecutively from April 14 to June 7, 2002.

Faber, Derrek M.; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Cash, Kenneth; Zimmerman, Shon A.

2003-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

151

Lower Granite Dam Smolt Monitoring Program, Annual Report 2005-2006.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 2005 fish collection season at Lower Granite Dam (LGR) was characterized by average water temperatures, below average flows, above average spill, low levels of debris and the record number of smolts collected compared to the previous five years. With the continued release of unclipped supplementation chinook and steelhead above LGR, we cannot accurately distinguish wild chinook, steelhead, and sockeye/kokanee in the sample. For the purposes of this report we will designate fish as clipped and unclipped. This season a total of 13,030,967 juvenile salmonids were collected at LGR. Of these, 12,099,019 were transported to release sites below Bonneville Dam, 12,032,623 by barge and 66,396 by truck. An additional 898,235 fish were bypassed to the river due to over-capacity of the raceways, barges or trucks and for research purposes. This was the first season of summer spill at LGR. Spill was initiated at 12:01am June 20 as directed by the ruling set forth by Judge James Redden of the United States District Court (Order CV 01-640-RE). In addition, the Lower Granite project also conducted a summer spill test alternating spill and spill patterns between spill to the gas cap without the removable spillway weir (RSW) and spill with up to 20 kcfs utilizing the RSW. Because of the forecast low flow this year, most hatchery reared subyearling fall chinook were released up to three weeks early. With the unexpected high flows in late May and early June, more than 90% of the subyearling chinook were collected prior to the initiation of the court ordered summer spill program. Collection number fluctuations reflect river flow and project operations for any given year. For example, low flow years (2001, 2004 and 2005) result in higher collection numbers. Court ordered spill throughout the summer migration will directly affect collection of fall subyearling chinook collection numbers. The editors of this report urge the reader to use caution when comparing fish collection numbers between years, considering both annual river flows and annual project operations, because both affect fish migration and collection.

Menski, Fred

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Laser damage by ns and sub-ps pulses on hafnia/silica anti-reflection coatings on fused silica double-sided polished using zirconia or ceria and washed with or without an alumina wash step.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia's Large Optics Coating Operation has extensive results of laser induced damage threshold (LIDT) testing of its anti-reflection (AR) and high reflection coatings on substrates pitch polished using ceria and washed in a process that includes an alumina wash step. The purpose of the alumina wash step is to remove residual polishing compound to minimize its role in laser damage. These LIDT tests are for multi longitudinal mode, ns class pulses at 1064 nm and 532 nm (NIF-MEL protocol) and mode locked, sub-ps class pulses at 1054 nm (Sandia measurements), and show reasonably high and adequate laser damage resistance for coatings in the beam trains of Sandia's Z-Backlighter terawatt and petawatt lasers. An AR coating in addition to coatings of our previous reports confirms this with LIDTs of 33.0 J/cm{sup 2} for 3.5 ns pulses and 1.8 J/cm{sup 2} for 350 fs pulses. In this paper, we investigate both ceria and zirconia in doublesided polishing (common for large flat Z-Backlighter laser optics) as they affect LIDTs of an AR coating on fused silica substrates washed with or without the alumina wash step. For these AR coated, double-sided polished surfaces, ceria polishing in general affords better resistance to laser damage than zirconia polishing and laser damage is less likely with the alumina wash step than without it. This is supported by specific results of laser damage tests with 3.5 ns, multi longitudinal mode, single shot pulses at 1064 nm and 532 nm, with 7.0 ns, single and multi longitudinal mode, single and multi shot pulses at 532 nm, and with 350 fs, mode-locked, single shot pulses at 1054 nm.

Bellum, John Curtis; Rambo, Patrick K.; Schwarz, Jens; Kletecka, Damon; Atherton, Briggs W.; Kimmel, Mark W.; Smith, Ian Craig; Smith, Douglas (Plymouth Grating Laboratory, Carver, MA); Hobbs, Zachary (Sydor Optics, Inc., Rochester, NY)

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Demonstrate use of solar energy for laundromat washing and drying. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A solar system was designed and installed to supply energy to a university laundry. The purpose of the project was to demonstrate the use of solar energy in both the washing and drying processes of laundry operations and to determine the expected gas energy savings. The limited performance data available indicate a 30% saving in gas consumption while laundry operations were running at about 35% capacity. Tt is expected that 40% or more will be saved at near capacity operation. The solar system, retrofitted to an existing building, is composed of 120 parabolic trough collectors, a 2500 gallon storage tank, and supporting pumps and heat exchangers. The system is operated with a minimum of controls and performed satisfactorily with no interruptions of laundry operations. The use of solar energy to displace gas energy in laundries appears to be practical. The amount of gas to be saved is limited by the desired temperatures of the preheated air to the dryers.

Whitacre, J.A.

1982-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

154

Hydrogen generation in SRAT with nitric acid and late washing flowsheets  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recently, SRTC recommended two process changes: (1) a final wash of the tetraphenylborate precipitate feed slurry and (2) the use of nitric acid to neutralize the sludge in the SRAT. The first change produced an aqueous hydrolysis product (PHA) with higher formic acid/formate and copper concentration, and reduced the nitrate content in the PHA by an order of magnitude. The second change is to substitute part of formic acid added to the SRAT with nitric acid, and therefore may reduce the hydrogen generated in the SRAT as well as provide nitrate as an oxidant to balance the redox state of the melter feed. The purpose of this report is to determine the pertinent variables that could affect the hydrogen generation rate with these process changes.

Hsu, C.W.

1992-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

155

Horizontal-axis washing machines offer large savings: New models entering North American market  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Long popular in Europe, new horizontal-axis clothes washers are entering the North American market, creating opportunities for government and utility conservation efforts. Unlike vertical-axis machines, which immerse the clothes in water, horizontal-axis designs use a tumbling action and require far less water, water-heating energy, and detergent. One development in this area is the recent reintroduction by the Frigidaire Company of a full-size, front-load, horizontal-axis washing machine. The new model is an improved version of an earlier design that was discontinued in mid-1991 during changes in manufacturing facilities. It is available under the Sears Kenmore, White-Westinghouse, and Gibson labels. While several European and commercial-grade front-load washers are sold in the US, they are all considerably more expensive than the Frigidaire machine, making it the most efficient clothes washer currently available in a mainstream North American consumer product line.

Shepard, M.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

156

Results of the independent verification survey at the Old Betatron Building, Granite City, Illinois  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A team from the Measurement Applications and Development Group, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), conducted an independent verification of the radiological condition of the Old Betatron Building, Granite City, Illinois, at the request of the Department of Energy in June of 1993. The building is owned by the National Steel Corporation. The contamination present resulted from the handling of uranium slabs of metal during the time the betatron facility was used to x-ray the slabs for metallurgical defects. The designation survey did not characterize the entire floor space because of obstructing equipment and debris. Therefore, prior to remediation by Bechtel National, Incorporated (BNI), a thorough characterization of the floor was conducted, and the results were immediately conveyed to on-site staff of BNI. An independent verification assessment was also performed after the cleanup activities were performed under the direction of BNI. The process of characterization, remediation, and verification was accomplished within a five-day period. Based on results of the independent verification assessment, the Old Betatron Building was determined to meet the DOE radiological guidelines for unrestricted use.

Murray, M.E.; Brown, K.S.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Juvenile Radio-Tag Study: Lower Granite Dam, 1985 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The concept of using mass releases of juvenile radio tags represents a new and potentially powerful research tool that could be effectively applied to juvenile salmonid passage problems at dams on the Columbia and Snake Rivers. A system of detector antennas, strategically located, would automatically detect and record individually tagged juvenile salmonids as they pass through the spillway, powerhouse, bypass system, or tailrace areas below the dam. Accurate measurements of spill effectiveness, fish guiding efficiency (FGE), collection efficiency (CE), spillway survival, powerhouse survival, and bypass survival would be possible without handling large numbers of unmarked fish. A prototype juvenile radio-tag system was developed and tested by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) at John Day Dam and at Lower Granite Dam. This report summarizes research to: (1) evaluate the effectiveness of the prototype juvenile radio-tag system in a field situation and (2) to test the basic assumptions inherent in using the juvenile radio tag as a research tool.

Stuehrenberg, Lowell C.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Axial strength of cement borehole plugs in granite and basalt. Topical report on rock mass sealing  

SciTech Connect

This report describes experimental and theoretical studies of the axial strength of cement plugs installed in boreholes drilled coaxially in granite and in basalt cylinders. Experimental work has consisted of loading the cement plugs to failure while measuring loads and displacements. Such tests have been performed on borehole plugs with a diameter and a length ranging from 2.5 cm to 10 cm. Results from over one hundred experiments show that the strength is high, sufficient for anticipated loads at repository depths, but very variable, complicating the design of very short plugs. Significant residual strength (thirty to fifty percent of the peak strength) is observed. A frictional model of the interface shear strength, tau = c + sigma(tan phi), in combination with the assumption of an exponential shear stress distribution or plug-rock load transfer, provides the simplest realistic model for plug strength characterization. The integrated strength thus calculated compares moderately well with experimental results. An extensive review is given of more sophisticated analysis procedures that should be of value for general plug design applications. Generic analyses and their implications for plug performance are included. Variability of experimental results complicates the assessment of their direct detailed applicability. 115 references, 70 figures, 19 tables.

Stormont, J.C.; Daemen, J.J.K.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Relationship of small washes to the distribution of Lycium andersonii and Larrea tridentata at a site in the northern Mojave Desert  

SciTech Connect

At a site near Rock Valley, Nevada, dominated by volcanic rocks, both Larrea tridentata (Sesse and Moc. ex DC.) Cov. And Lycium andersonii A. Gray were restricted in distribution. Larrea tridentata did not grow in the many small washes in the area, but L. andersonii grew only in the washes. Ambrosia dumosa (A. Gray) Payne was more dense and more dominant in wash areas than in nonwash areas.

Wallace, A.; Romney, E.M.; Hunter, R.B.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Susceptibility of Granite Rock to scCO2/Water at 200 degrees C and 250 degrees C  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Granite rock comprising anorthoclase-type albite and quartz as its major phases and biotite mica as the minor one was exposed to supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO{sub 2})/water at 250 C and 13.78 MPa pressure for 104 hours. For comparison purpose, four other rocks, albite, hornblende, diorite, and quartz, also were exposed. During the exposure of granite, ionic carbonic acid, known as the wet carbonation reactant, preferentially reacted with anorthoclase-type albite and biotite, rather than with quartz. The susceptibility of biotite to wet carbonation was higher than that of anorthoclase-type albite. All the carbonation by-products of anorthoclase-type albite were amorphous phases including Na- and K-carbonates, a kaolinite clay-like compound, and silicon dioxide, while wet carbonation converted biotite into potassium aluminum silicate, siderite, and magnesite in crystalline phases and hydrogen fluoride (HF). Three of these reaction by-products, Na- and K-carbonates and HF, were highly soluble in water. Correspondingly, the carbonated top surface layer, about 1.27 mm thick as carbonation depth, developed porous microstructure with numerous large voids, some of which have a size of {>=} 10 {mu}m, reflecting the erosion of granite by the leaching of these water-soluble reaction by-products. Comparing with this carbonation depth, its depth of other minerals was considerable lower, particularly, for hornblende and diorite with 0.07 and 0.02 mm, while no carbonate compound was detected in quartz. The major factor governing these low carbonation depths in these rocks was the formation of water-insensitive scale-like carbonate by-products such as calcite (CaCO{sub 3}), siderite (FeCO{sub 3}), and magnesite (MgCO{sub 3}). Their formation within the superficial layer of these minerals served as protective barrier layer that inhibits and retards further carbonation of fresh underlying minerals, even if the exposure time was extended. Thus, the coverage by this barrier layer of the non-carbonated surfaces of the underlying rock was reason why the hornblende and diorite exhibited a minimum depth of carbonation. Under exposure to the scCO{sub 2}/water at 200 C and 10.34 MPa pressure for up to 42 days, the ranking of the magnitude of erosion caused by wet carbonation was in the following order; granite > albite > hornblende > diorite > quartz. The eroding-caused weight loss of granite (0.88 %) was {approx}2.4, {approx}5.2, {approx}9.8, and {approx}17.6 times greater than that of albite, hornblends, diorite, and quartz, respectively.

Sugama, T.; Gill, S., Ecker, L., Butcher, T., Warren, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite wash stuart" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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161

Texas-Louisiana- Mississippi Salt Basin Greater Green River Basin  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Texas-Louisiana- Texas-Louisiana- Mississippi Salt Basin Greater Green River Basin W. Gulf Coast Basin Appalachian Basin Wind River Basin Eastern Shelf NW Shelf Abo Sussex-Shannon Muddy J Mesaverde- Lance-Lewis Medina/Clinton-Tuscarora Bradford-Venango-Elk Berea-Murrysville Piceance Basin Bossier Williston Basin Ft Worth Basin Davis Bighorn Basin Judith River- Eagle Permian Basin Anadarko Basin Denver Basin San Juan Basin North-Central Montana Area Uinta Basin Austin Chalk Codell-Niobrara Penn-Perm Carbonate Niobrara Chalk Dakota Morrow Mesaverde Thirty- One Cleveland Ozona Canyon Wasatch- Mesaverde Red Fork Mesaverde Granite Wash Stuart City-Edwards Bowdoin- Greenhorn Travis Peak Olmos Cotton Valley Vicksburg Wilcox Lobo Pictured Cliffs Cretaceous Cretaceous-Lower Tertiary Mancos- Dakota Gilmer Lime Major Tight Gas Plays, Lower 48 States

162

An investigation of cathodoluminescence in albite from the A-type Georgeville granite, Nova Scotia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cathodoluminescence (CL) reveals red and blue colors within single, non-turbid albite (Ab{sub 98-99}) grains from the Georgeville granite, Nova Scotia. A 720 nm X-ray excited optical luminescence (XEOL) peak characterizes red CL regions, while a 280 nm XEOL feature dominates blue CL regions. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence results indicate that red CL and the 720 nm XEOL peak intensities relate to total Fe concentrations. The relationship between red CL and Fe content is confirmed by electron microprobe (EMPA) and laser ablation-inductively coupled mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The XEOL technique is used to exclude the Fe K-edge as the cause of red CL. X-ray absorption spectroscopy results indicate that Fe in both the red and blue CL regions is Fe{sup 3+}, and that red CL activation may relate to the Si-Al order of the feldspar and to the distribution of Fe on tetrahedral sites. The CL textures, combined with EMPA and LA-ICPMS analyses, indicate that blue CL albite (Ab98) regions contain higher concentrations of Ca, Ti, Pb and rare earth elements, and were replaced, in part, by a more Fe-rich, trace element depleted albite (Ab99) which displays red CL. Complex diffraction contrasts and amorphous deposits identified in transmission electron microscope images suggest that aqueous fluids have reacted with both red and blue CL regions. Fluid inclusion homogenization temperatures of up to 430 C provide a lower estimate of the fluid temperature.

Dalby, Kim N.; Anderson, Alan J.; Mariano, Anthony N.; Gordon, Robert A.; Mayanovic, Robert A.; Wirth, Richard (Missouri SU); (SFX); (Simon); (GFZ)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

163

WASHING AND DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS USING POST ALUMINUM DISSOLUTION TANK 51 SLUDGE SLURRY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The remaining contents of Tank 51 from Sludge Batch 4 will be blended with Purex sludge from Tank 7 to constitute Sludge Batch 5 (SB5). The Savannah River Site (SRS) Liquid Waste Organization (LWO) has completed caustic addition to Tank 51 to perform low temperature Al dissolution on the H-Modified (HM) sludge material to reduce the total mass of sludge solids and Al being fed to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The Savannah River National Lab (SRNL) has also completed aluminum dissolution tests using a 3-L sample of Tank 51 sludge slurry through funding by DOE EM-21. This report documents assessment of downstream impacts of the aluminum dissolved sludge, which were investigated so technical issues could be identified before the start of SB5 processing. This assessment included washing the aluminum dissolved sludge to a Tank Farm projected sodium concentration and weight percent insoluble solids content and DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) processing using the washed sludge. Based on the limited testing, the impact of aluminum dissolution on sludge settling is not clear. Settling was not predictable for the 3-L sample. Compared to the post aluminum dissolution sample, settling after the first wash was slower, but settling after the second wash was faster. For example, post aluminum dissolution sludge took six days to settle to 60% of the original sludge slurry height, while Wash 1 took nearly eight days, and Wash 2 only took two days. Aluminum dissolution did impact sludge rheology. A comparison between the as-received, post aluminum dissolution and washed samples indicate that the downstream materials were more viscous and the concentration of insoluble solids less than that of the starting material. This increase in viscosity may impact Tank 51 transfers to Tank 40. The impact of aluminum dissolution on DWPF CPC processing cannot be determined because acid addition for the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle was under-calculated and thus under-added. Although the sludge was rheologically thick throughout the SRAT and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycles, this may have been due to the under addition of acid. Aluminum dissolution did, however, impact analyses of the SRAT receipt material. Two methods for determining total base yielded significantly different results. The high hydroxide content and the relatively high soluble aluminum content of the washed post aluminum dissolution sludge likely contributed to this difference and the ultimate under addition of acid. It should be noted that the simulant used to provide input for the SRAT cycle was an inadequate representation of the waste in terms of acid demand, likely due to the differences in the form of aluminum and hydroxide in the simulant and actual waste. Based on the results of this task, it is recommended that: (1) Sludge settling and rheology during washing of the forthcoming Sludge Batch 5 qualification sample be monitored closely and communicated to the Tank Farm. (2) SRNL receive a sample of Tank 51 after all chemical additions have been made and prior to the final Sludge Batch 5 decant for rheological assessment. Rheology versus wt% insoluble solids will be performed to determine the maximum amount of decant prior to the Tank 51 to Tank 40 transfer. (3) As a result of the problem with measuring total base and subsequently under-calculating acid for the DWPF CPC processing of the post aluminum dissolution sludge; (4) Studies to develop understanding of how the sludge titrates (i.e., why different titration methods yield different results) should be performed. (5) Simulants that better match the properties of post aluminum dissolution sludge should be developed. (6) Work on developing an acid calculation less dependant on the total base measurement should be continued.

Pareizs, J; Cj Bannochie, C; Damon Click, D; Erich Hansen, E; Dan Lambert, D; Michael Stone, M

2008-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

164

DOE/EIS-0285-SA-139: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS - Little Goose-Lower Granite Corridor Maintenance (4/3/03)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9-Little Goose-Lower Granite Corridor Maintenance 9-Little Goose-Lower Granite Corridor Maintenance William Erickson Natural Resource Specialist - TFP/Walla Walla Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the Little Goose-Lower Granite #1 and #2 Transmission Line Corridor from Towers 4/3 to 8/1. The right-of-way has an easement width of 258 feet and contains two 500kV Single Circuit Transmission Lines. The proposed work will be accomplished in the indicated sections of the transmission line corridor as referenced in the attached checklist. Location: The subject right-of-way is located in Columbia County, WA., being in the Walla Walla Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: The work will be accomplished by an Integrated Vegetation Management approach using a combination of manual, mechanical, herbicides and biological

165

Thermal analysis for a spent reactor fuel storage test in granite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A test is conducted in which spent fuel assemblies from an operating commercial nuclear power reactor are emplaced in the Climax granite at the US Department of Energy`s Nevada Test Site. In this generic test, 11 canisters of spent PWR fuel are emplaced vertically along with 6 electrical simulator canisters on 3 m centers, 4 m below the floor of a storage drift which is 420 m below the surface. Two adjacent parallel drifts contain electrical heaters, operated to simulate (in the vicinity of the storage drift) the temperature fields of a large repository. This test, planned for up to five years duration, uses fairly young fuel (2.5 years out of core) so that the thermal peak will occur during the time frame of the test and will not exceed the peak that would not occur until about 40 years of storage had older fuel (5 to 15 years out of core) been used. This paper describes the calculational techniques and summarizes the results of a large number of thermal calculations used in the concept, basic design and final design of the spent fuel test. The results of the preliminary calculations show the effects of spacing and spent fuel age. Either radiation or convection is sufficient to make the drifts much better thermal conductors than the rock that was removed to create them. The combination of radiation and convection causes the drift surfaces to be nearly isothermal even though the heat source is below the floor. With a nominal ventilation rate of 2 m{sup 3}/s and an ambient rock temperature of 23{sup 0}C, the maximum calculated rock temperature (near the center of the heat source) is about 100{sup 0}C while the maximum air temperature in the drift is around 40{sup 0}C. This ventilation (1 m{sup 3}/s through the main drift and 1/2 m{sup 3}/s through each of the side drifts) will remove about 1/3 of the heat generated during the first five years of storage.

Montan, D.N.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Description of ALARMA: the alarm algorithm developed for the Nuclear Car Wash  

SciTech Connect

The goal of any alarm algorithm should be that it provide the necessary tools to derive confidence limits on whether the existence of fissile materials is present in cargo containers. It should be able to extract these limits from (usually) noisy and/or weak data while maintaining a false alarm rate (FAR) that is economically suitable for port operations. It should also be able to perform its analysis within a reasonably short amount of time (i.e. {approx} seconds). To achieve this, it is essential that the algorithm be able to identify and subtract any interference signature that might otherwise be confused with a fissile signature. Lastly, the algorithm itself should be user-intuitive and user-friendly so that port operators with little or no experience with detection algorithms may use it with relative ease. In support of the Nuclear Car Wash project at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, we have developed an alarm algorithm that satisfies the above requirements. The description of the this alarm algorithm, dubbed ALARMA, is the purpose of this technical report. The experimental setup of the nuclear car wash has been well documented [1, 2, 3]. The presence of fissile materials is inferred by examining the {beta}-delayed gamma spectrum induced after a brief neutron irradiation of cargo, particularly in the high-energy region above approximately 2.5 MeV. In this region naturally occurring gamma rays are virtually non-existent. Thermal-neutron induced fission of {sup 235}U and {sup 239}P, on the other hand, leaves a unique {beta}-delayed spectrum [4]. This spectrum comes from decays of fission products having half-lives as large as 30 seconds, many of which have high Q-values. Since high-energy photons penetrate matter more freely, it is natural to look for unique fissile signatures in this energy region after neutron irradiation. The goal of this interrogation procedure is a 95% success rate of detection of as little as 5 kilograms of fissile material while retaining at most .1% false alarm rate. Plywood is used to simulate hydrogenous cargo material and steel (pipes) is used to simulate metallic cargo. The wood consists of 120 x 240 cm sheets and has approximately .65 g/cm{sup 3}. The steel pipes have approximately 10 cm diameters x 6.4 mm wall thickness are .6 g/cm{sup 3}. Fissile sources consist of a ''large'' (380 g) and ''small'' (250 g) sample of HEU (U{sub 3}O{sub 8} 94% enriched). Note that the masses of the HEU sources used in our experimental runs are at least an order of magnitude smaller than 5 kilograms. Runs are done with either wood or steel cargoes stacked at various heights and the HEU sources placed at various depths within the cargo.

Luu, T; Biltoft, P; Church, J; Descalle, M; Hall, J; Manatt, D; Mauger, J; Norman, E; Petersen, D; Pruet, J; Prussin, S; Slaughter, D

2006-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

167

Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Smolt Monitoring Program; Lower Granite Dam on the Snake River, Washington, 1996 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 1996 fish collection season at Lower Granite was characterized by high spring flows, spill, cool spring and early summer water temperatures and comparatively low numbers of fish, particularly yearling chinook, collected and transported. A total of 5,227,672 juvenile salmonids were collected at Lower Granite, the fewest since 1986. Of these, 5,117,685 were transported to release sites below Bonneville Dam, 4,990,798 by barge and 126,887 by truck. An additional 102,430 fish were bypassed back to the river, most of these being part of the National Marine Fisheries Service transportation evaluation study. New extended length submersible bar screens (ESBS) and new vertical barrier screens were installed in all units and a prototype surface collector was installed in front of units 4, 5 and 6 and operated from 23 April through 3 June. Smolt Monitoring Program and National Biologic Survey biologists examined 4,581 fish, collected at the separator, for symptoms of Gas Bubble Disease.

Verhey, Peter; Ross, Doug; Morrill, Charles (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Status Report: Pretreatment chemistry evaluation-Wash and leach factors for the single-shell tank waste inventory  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses a methodology developed to depict overall wash and leach factors for the Hanford single-shell tank (SST) inventory. The factors derived from this methodology, which is based on available partitioning data, are applicable to a composite SST inventory rather than only an assumed insoluble portion. The purpose of considering the entire inventory is to provide a more representative picture of the partitioning behavior of the analytes during envisioned waste retrieval and processing activities. The work described in this report was conducted by the Pretreatment Chemistry Evaluation task of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS). The leach factors will be used to estimate the further removal of analytes, such as sodium, aluminum, phosphate, and other minor components. Wash and leach factors are given for elements expected to drive the volume of material disposed of as high-level waste (HLW).

Colton, N.G.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Sludge Washing And Demonstration Of The DWPF Flowsheet In The SRNL Shielded Cells For Sludge Batch 8 Qualification  

SciTech Connect

The current Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) practice is to prepare sludge batches in Tank 51 by transferring sludge from other tanks to Tank 51. Tank 51 sludge is washed and transferred to Tank 40, the current Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed tank. Prior to transfer of Tank 51 to Tank 40, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) typically simulates the Tank Farm and DWPF processes using a Tank 51 sample (referred to as the qualification sample). WSE requested the SRNL to perform characterization on a Sludge Batch 8 (SB8) sample and demonstrate the DWPF flowsheet in the SRNL shielded cells for SB8 as the final qualification process required prior to SB8 transfer from Tank 51 to Tank 40. A 3-L sample from Tank 51 (the SB8 qualification sample; Tank Farm sample HTF-51-12-80) was received by SRNL on September 20, 2012. The as-received sample was characterized prior to being washed. The washed material was further characterized and used as the material for the DWPF process simulation including a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle, a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle, and glass fabrication and chemical durability measurements.

Pareizs, J. M.; Crawford, C. L.

2013-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

170

URANIUM-SERIES DISEQUILIBRIUM IN TUFF AND GRANITE:HYDROGEOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect

Uranium occurs naturally at trace levels in the major rock-forming minerals (quartz, feldspars, micas) in volcanic and plutonic rocks and is concentrated in accessory minerals (zircon, sphene, apatite). It may attain concentrations as high as 1000 ppm in the accessory minerals. Radiometric age determinations on zircon and sphene have shown that uranium migration from these minerals is generally negligible over prolonged periods of geologic time. Zircon grains separated from highly weathered igneous rocks have been found to retain most of their uranium. In contrast, the uranium fixed onto mineral grain boundaries or present in less-resistant minerals such as biotite or hornblende can be readily leached by groundwater. The ubiquitous presence of uranium in a rock makes it an ideal ''natural analogue'' for understanding the mobility of uranium at a potential site for nuclear fuel waste disposal and one that is easily overlooked in the search for suitable analogues for a disposal site. Several of the intermediate radionuclides in the decay series of the two long-lived isotopes of uranium ({sup 238}U and {sup 235}U) have half-lives greater than one year and are, therefore, of geological interest. In a sealed rock mass with no water-rock interactions, all intermediate radionuclides attain radioactive equilibrium with one another within a maximum 1-2 million years. Because rocks of the Yucca Mountain area and the Canadian Shield (both potential sites for nuclear waste disposal in the United States and Canadian programs, respectively) are considerably older, this condition (known as secular equilibrium) should exist in these rocks, and all daughter/parent radionuclide activity ratios should equal unity (1.000). If the ratios are found not to equal unity, then the rock has been disturbed, probably by groundwater transport of more soluble radionuclides into or away from the rock. How recently this migration has occurred can be determined from the half-life of the radionuclide involved. Depending on the analytical precision obtained, the observation of a {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratio that is less than or greater than 1.000 clearly shows that an isotope of uranium has migrated within the rock in the last 1-2 million years. Other daughter/parent activity ratios can be used to detect radionuclide migration over shorter time-scales, such as {sup 230}Th/{sup 234}U (300,000 years) and {sup 226}Ra/{sup 230}Th (8,000 years). Uranium-series disequilibrium is, therefore, a useful technique for application to site evaluation for nuclear fuel waste disposal because it can be used to: (1) show that so-called ''intact rock'' is indeed intact (i.e. radionuclides are in secular equilibrium and are immobile), (2) determine the principal flow regimes in a rock mass by analysis of rock matrix, fracture material, etc., (3) estimate the time period of recent radionuclide migration in the rock, and (4) proxy as a natural analogue for the potential mobility of uranium at the site. Several examples of these applications have been reported. This paper describes the use of uranium-series disequilibrium in the comparison of two North American sites: the water-saturated Lac du Bonnet granite batholith on the Canadian Shield and the unsaturated tuffs from the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) and Cross-Drift Tunnels at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. In particular, the fact that unfractured rock should be at secular equilibrium is applied to both sites to determine if the rock matrix is a significant flow path for groundwater.

M. Gasscoyne; N.H. Miller

2000-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

171

Impacts of the Snake River drawdown experiment on fisheries resources in Little Goose and Lower Granite Reservoirs, 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In March 1992, the US Army Corps of Engineers initiated a test to help evaluate physical and environmental impacts resulting from the proposed future drawdown of Snake River reservoirs. Drawdown would reduce water levels in Snake River reservoirs and is being proposed as a solution to decrease the time it takes for salmon and steelhead smolts to migrate to the ocean. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory evaluated impacts to specific fisheries resources during the drawdown experiment by surveying Lower Granite Reservoir to determine if fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) spawning areas and steelhead (0. mykiss) access to tributary creeks were affected. In addition, shoreline areas of Little Goose Reservoir were monitored to evaluate the suitability of these areas for spawning by fall chinook salmon. Relative abundance of fish species in nearshore areas was also determined during the drawdown, and stranded resident fish and other aquatic organisms were observed.

Dauble, D D; Geist, D R

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Planning and drilling geothermal energy extraction hole EE-2: a precisely oriented and deviated hole in hot granitic rock  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the preceding work (Phase I) of the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Geothermal Energy Project at Fenton Hill, two holes were drilled to a depth of nearly 3048 m (10,000 ft) and connected by a vertical hydraulic fracture. In this phase, water was pumped through the underground reservoir for approximately 417 days, producing an energy equivalent of 3 to 5 MW(t). Energy Extraction Hole No. 2 (EE-2) is the first of two deep holes that will be used in the Engineering-Resource Development System (Phase II) of the ongoing HDR Project of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. This phase of the work consists of drilling two parallel boreholes, inclined in their lower, open-hole sections at 35/sup 0/ to the vertical and separated by a vertical distance of 366 m (1200 ft) between the inclined parts of the drill holes. The holes will be connected by a series of vertical, hydraulically produced fractures in the Precambrian granitic rock complex. EE-2 was drilled to a depth of 4660 m (15,289 ft), where the bottom-hole temperature is approximately 320/sup 0/C (608/sup 0/F). Directional drilling techniques were used to control the azimuth and deviation of the hole. Upgrading of the temperature capability of existing hardware, and development of new equipment was necessary to complete the drilling of the hole in the extremely hot, hard, and abrasive granitic formation. The drilling history and the problems with bits, directional tools, tubular goods, cementing, and logging are described. A discussion of the problems and recommendations for overcoming them are also presented.

Helmick, C.; Koczan, S.; Pettitt, R.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Fall Chinook Salmon Spawning Ground Surveys in the Snake River Basin Upriver of Lower Granite Dam, 2007 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Redd counts are routinely used to document the spawning distribution of fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Snake River basin upriver of Lower Granite Dam. The first reported redd counts were from aerial searches conducted intermittently between 1959 and 1978 (Irving and Bjornn 1981, Witty 1988; Groves and Chandler 1996)(Appendix 1). In 1986, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife began an annual monitoring program that, in addition to the Snake River, included aerial searches of the Grande Ronde River the first year (Seidel and Bugert 1987), and the Imnaha River in subsequent years (Seidel et al. 1988; Bugert et al. 1989-1991; Mendel et al. 1992). The U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Idaho Power Company began contributing to this effort in 1991 by increasing the number of aerial searches conducted each year and adding underwater searches in areas of the Snake River that were too deep to be searched from the air (Connor et al. 1993; Garcia et al. 1994a, 1994b, 1996-2007; Groves 1993; Groves and Chandler 1996). The Nez Perce Tribe added aerial searches in the Clearwater River basin beginning in 1988 (Arnsberg et. al 1992), and the Salmon River beginning in 1992. Currently searches are conducted cooperatively by the Nez Perce Tribe, Idaho Power Company, and U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Our objective for this report was to consolidate the findings from annual redd searches counted upstream of Lower Granite Dam into a single document, containing detailed information about the searches from the most recent spawning season, and summary information from previous years. The work conducted in 2007 was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration and Idaho Power Company.

Garcia, A.P.; Bradbury, S. [U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; Arnsberg, B.D. [Nez Perce Tribe; Groves, P.A. [Idaho Power Company

2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

174

SLUDGE WASHING AND DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS FOR SLUDGE BATCH 5 QUALIFICATION  

SciTech Connect

Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) is predominantly a combination of H-modified (HM) sludge from Tank 11 that underwent aluminum dissolution in late 2007 to reduce the total mass of sludge solids and aluminum being fed to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and Purex sludge transferred from Tank 7. Following aluminum dissolution, the addition of Tank 7 sludge and excess Pu to Tank 51, Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) provided the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) a 3-L sample of Tank 51 sludge for SB5 qualification. SB5 qualification included washing the sample per LWO plans/projections (including the addition of a Pu/Be stream from H Canyon), DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) simulations, waste glass fabrication (vitrification), and waste glass chemical durability evaluation. This report documents: (1) The washing (addition of water to dilute the sludge supernatant) and concentration (decanting of supernatant) of the Tank 51 qualification sample to adjust sodium content and weight percent insoluble solids to Tank Farm projections. (2) The performance of a DWPF CPC simulation using the washed Tank 51 sample. This includes a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle, where acid is added to the sludge to destroy nitrite and remove mercury, and a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle, where glass frit is added to the sludge in preparation for vitrification. The SME cycle also included replication of five canister decontamination additions and concentrations. Processing parameters for the CPC processing were based on work with a non radioactive simulant. (3) Vitrification of a portion of the SME product and Product Consistency Test (PCT) evaluation of the resulting glass. (4) Rheology measurements of the initial slurry samples and samples after each phase of CPC processing. This work is controlled by a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) , and analyses are guided by an Analytical Study Plan. This work is Technical Baseline Research and Development (R&D) for the DWPF.

Pareizs, J; Cj Bannochie, C; Damon Click, D; Dan Lambert, D; Michael Stone, M; Bradley Pickenheim, B; Amanda Billings, A; Ned Bibler, N

2008-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

175

Status report on the Spent-Fuel Test-Climax, Nevada Test Site: a test of dry storage of spent fuel in a deep granite location  

SciTech Connect

The Spent Fuel Test-Climax (SFT-C) is located at a depth of 420 m in the Climax granite at the Nevada Test Site. The test array contains 11 canistered PWR fuel assemblies, plus associated electrical simulators and electrical heaters. There are nearly 900 channels of thermal, radiation, stress, displacement, and test control instrumentation. This paper is a general status report on the test, which started in May 1980.

Ramspott, L.D.; Ballou, L.B.; Patrick, W.C.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Evaluate Potential Means of Rebuilding Sturgeon Populations in the Snake River between Lower Granite and Hells Canyon Dams, 1998 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1998 white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) were captured, marked, and population data were collected in the Snake River between Lower Granite Dam and the mouth of the Salmon River. A total of 13,785 hours of setline effort and 389 hours of hook-and-line effort was employed in 1998. Of the 278 white sturgeon captured in the Snake River, 238 were marked for future identification. Three sturgeon were captured in the Salmon River and none were captured in the Clearwater River. Since 1997, 6.9% of the tagged fish have been recovered. Movement of recaptured white sturgeon ranged from 98.5 kilometers downstream to 60.7 kilometers upstream, however, less than 25% of the fish moved more than 16 kilometers (10 miles). In the Snake River, white sturgeon ranged in total length from 51.5 cm to 286 cm and averaged 118.9 cm. Differences were detected in the length frequency distributions of sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir and the free-flowing Snake River (Chi-Square test, P < 0.05). In addition, the proportion of white sturgeon greater than 92 cm (total length) in the free-flowing Snake River has shown an increase of 37% since the 1970's. Analysis of the length-weight relationship indicated that white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir were slightly larger than white sturgeon in the free-flowing Snake River.

Everett, Scott R.; Tuell, Michael A. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Research Plan to Determine Timing, Location, Magnitude and Cause of Mortality for Wild and Hatchery Spring/Summer Chinook Salmon Smolts Above Lower Granite Dam. Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

From 1966 to 1968, Raymond estimated an average survival rate of 89% for yearling chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) migrating from trap sites on the Salmon River to Ice Harbor Dam, which was then the uppermost dam on the Snake River. During the 1970s, the estimated survival rate declined as the proportion of hatchery fish increased and additional dams were constructed. Recent survival indices for yearling chinook salmon smolts in the Snake River Basin indicate that substantial mortalities are occurring en route to Lower Granite Dam, now the uppermost dam on the Snake River. Detection rates for wild and hatchery PIT-tagged smolts at Lower Granite Dam have been much lower than expected. However, for wild fish, there is considerable uncertainty whether overwinter mortality or smolt loss during migration is the primary cause for low survival. Efforts to rebuild these populations will have a better chance of success after the causes of mortality are identified and addressed. Information on the migrational characteristics and survival of wild fish are especially needed. The goal of this initial planning phase is to develop a research plan to outline potential investigations that will determine the timing, location, magnitude, and cause of smolt mortality above Lower Granite Dam.

Lower Granite Migration Study Steering Committee

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Preliminary evaluation of 30 potential granitic rock sites for a radioactive waste storage facility in southern Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Results of preliminary study are presented which was performed under subtask 2.7 of the NTS Terminal Waste Storage Program Plan for 1978. Subtask 2.7 examines the feasibility of locating a nuclear waste repository in a granitic stock or pluton in southern Nevada near the Nevada Test Site (NTS). It is assumed for the purposes of this study that such a repository cannot be located at NTS. This assumption may or may not be correct. This preliminary report does not identify a particular site as being a suitable location for a repository. Nor does it absolutely eliminate a particular site from further consideration. It does, however, answer the basic question of probable suitability of some of the sites and present a systematic method for site evaluation. Since the findings of this initial study have been favorable, it will be followed by more exhaustive and detailed studies of the original 30 sites and perhaps others. In future studies some of the evaluation criteria used in the preliminary study may be modified or eliminated, and new criteria may be introduced.

Boardman, C.R.; Knutson, C.F.

1978-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

179

ORIGINAL PAPER Stuart I. Cromarty Charles D. Derby  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

i e s c o n t r i b u t o r Macy Levine, MD '43 c i r c u l at i o n M a n a g e r Crystal Kubic e D

Cromarty, Stuart I.

180

UK CARBON CAPTURE AND STORAGE, WHERE IS IT ? Stuart Haszeldine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.haszeldine@ed.ac.uk SUMMARY Carbon capture and storage, to capture CO2 from power plants and big industry, remains much is seen as the ideal compliment to variable wind power, and so is critical to the UK's future electricity electricity charges or impacting significantly on personal budgets. This is important for CCS protagonists

Haszeldine, Stuart

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181

An Interview with Stuart Russell: the future of artificial intelligence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AI may not take over the world but it will provide new and powerful tools. Smart microwave ovens? No big deal. Full-size humanoid robots that walk, climb stairs, open and close doors, and pick things up? Now that gets our attention.

Ubiquity staff

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Working Safely in the Laboratory Ralph Stuart, CIH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

group that purified plutonium for the Manhattan Project in Chicago #12;Glenn Seaborg Journal Entry In the 1990's a retrospective health study of the Manhattan Project workers showed that those who worked in the plutonium labs lived slightly longer and healthier lives than the peers in the Project. Dr. Seaborg

Pawlowski, Wojtek

183

Modeling of Damage, Permeability Changes and Pressure Responses during Excavation of the TSX Tunnel in Granitic Rock at URL, Canada  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents numerical modeling of excavation-induced damage, permeability changes, and fluid-pressure responses during excavation of the TSX tunnel at the underground research laboratory (URL) in Canada. Four different numerical models were applied, using a wide range of approaches to model damage and permeability changes in the excavation disturbed zone (EDZ) around the tunnel. Using in situ calibration of model parameters the modeling could reproduce observed spatial distribution of damage and permeability changes around the tunnel, as a combination of disturbance induced by stress redistribution around the tunnel and by the drill-and-blast operation. The modeling showed that stress-induced permeability increase above the tunnel is a result of micro and macrofracturing under high deviatoric (shear) stress, whereas permeability increases alongside the tunnel as a result of opening of existing microfractures under decreased mean stress. The remaining observed fracturing and permeability changes around the periphery of the tunnel were attributed to damage from the drill-and-blast operation. Moreover, a reasonably good agreement was achieved between simulated and observed excavation-induced pressure responses around the TSX tunnel for 1 year following its excavation. The simulations showed that these pressure responses are caused by poroelastic effects as a result of increasing or decreasing mean stress, with corresponding contraction or expansion of the pore volume. The simulation results for pressure evolution were consistent with previous studies, indicating that the observed pressure responses could be captured in a Biot model using a relatively low Biot-Willis coefficient, {alpha} {approx} 0.2, a porosity of n {approx} 0.007, and a relatively low permeability of k {approx} 2 x 10{sup -22} m{sup 2}, which is consistent with the very tight, unfractured granite at the site.

Rutqvist, Jonny; Borgesson, Lennart; Chijimatsu, Masakazu; Hernelind, Jan; Jing, Lanru; Kobayashi, Akira; Nguyen, Son

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Fall Chinook Salmon Spawning Ground Surveys in the Snake River Basin Upriver of Lower Granite Dam, 2004 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Redd counts were used to document the spawning distribution of fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Snake River basin upriver of Lower Granite Dam. The first reported redd counts were from aerial searches conducted intermittently between 1959 and 1978 (Irving and Bjornn 1981, Witty 1988; Groves and Chandler 1996)(Appendix 1). In 1986, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife began an annual monitoring program that, in addition to the Snake River, included aerial searches of the Grande Ronde River the first year (Seidel and Bugert 1987), and the Imnaha River in subsequent years (Seidel et al. 1988; Bugert et al. 1989-1991; Mendel et al. 1992). The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Idaho Power Company began contributing to this effort in 1991 by increasing the number of aerial searches conducted each year and adding underwater searches in areas of the Snake River that were too deep to be searched from the air (Connor et al. 1993; Garcia et al. 1994a, 1994b, 1996-2004; Groves 1993; Groves and Chandler 1996). The Nez Perce Tribe added aerial searches in the Clearwater River basin beginning in 1988 (Arnsberg et. al 1992), and the Salmon River beginning in 1992. Currently searches are conducted cooperatively by the Nez Perce Tribe, Idaho Power Company, and U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Our objective for this report was to consolidate the findings from annual redd searches into a single document, containing detailed information about the searches from the most recent spawning season, and summary information from previous years. The work conducted in 2004 was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration, Idaho Power Company, and Bureau of Land Management.

Garcia, A.P.; Bradbury, S.; Arnsberg, B.D.; Rocklage, S.J.; Groves, P.A.

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Fall Chinook Salmon Spawning Ground Surveys in the Snake River Basin Upriver of Lower Granite Dam, 2005 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Redd counts are routinely used to document the spawning distribution of fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Snake River basin upriver of Lower Granite Dam. The first reported redd counts were from aerial searches conducted intermittently between 1959 and 1978 (Irving and Bjornn 1981, Witty 1988; Groves and Chandler 1996)(Appendix 1). In 1986, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife began an annual monitoring program that, in addition to the Snake River, included aerial searches of the Grande Ronde River the first year (Seidel and Bugert 1987), and the Imnaha River in subsequent years (Seidel et al. 1988; Bugert et al. 1989-1991; Mendel et al. 1992). The U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Idaho Power Company began contributing to this effort in 1991 by increasing the number of aerial searches conducted each year and adding underwater searches in areas of the Snake River that were too deep to be searched from the air (Connor et al. 1993; Garcia et al. 1994a, 1994b, 1996-2005; Groves 1993; Groves and Chandler 1996). The Nez Perce Tribe added aerial searches in the Clearwater River basin beginning in 1988 (Arnsberg et. al 1992), and the Salmon River beginning in 1992. Currently searches are conducted cooperatively by the Nez Perce Tribe, Idaho Power Company, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Our objective for this report was to consolidate the findings from annual redd searches into a single document, containing detailed information about the searches from the most recent spawning season, and summary information from previous years. The work conducted in 2005 was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration and Idaho Power Company.

Garcia, A.P.; Bradbury, S.; Arnsberg, B.D.; Rocklage, S.J.; Groves, P.A.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

SLUDGE WASHING AND DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS FOR SLUDGE BATCH 7A QUALIFICATION  

SciTech Connect

Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) has requested that characterization and a radioactive demonstration of the next batch of sludge slurry (Sludge Batch 7a*) be completed in the Shielded Cells Facility of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) via a Technical Task Request (TTR). This characterization and demonstration, or sludge batch qualification process, is required prior to transfer of the sludge from Tank 51 to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed tank (Tank 40). The current WSE practice is to prepare sludge batches in Tank 51 by transferring sludge from other tanks. Discharges of nuclear materials from H Canyon are often added to Tank 51 during sludge batch preparation. The sludge is washed and transferred to Tank 40, the current DWPF feed tank. Prior to transfer of Tank 51 to Tank 40, SRNL simulates the Tank Farm and DWPF processes with a Tank 51 sample (referred to as the qualification sample). Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) is composed of portions of Tanks 4, 7, and 12; the Sludge Batch 6 heel in Tank 51; and a plutonium stream from H Canyon. SRNL received the Tank 51 qualification sample (sample ID HTF-51-10-125) following sludge additions to Tank 51. This report documents: (1) The washing (addition of water to dilute the sludge supernate) and concentration (decanting of supernate) of the SB7a - Tank 51 qualification sample to adjust sodium content and weight percent insoluble solids to Tank Farm projections. (2) The performance of a DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) simulation using the washed Tank 51 sample. The simulation included a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle, where acid was added to the sludge to destroy nitrite and reduce mercury, and a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle, where glass frit was added to the sludge in preparation for vitrification. The SME cycle also included replication of five canister decontamination additions and concentrations. Processing parameters were based on work with a non-radioactive simulant. (3) Vitrification of a portion of the SME product and characterization and durability testing (as measured by the Product Consistency Test (PCT)) of the resulting glass. (4) Rheology measurements of the initial slurry samples and samples after each phase of CPC processing. This program was controlled by a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), and analyses were guided by an Analytical Study Plan. This work is Technical Baseline Research and Development (R&D) for the DWPF. It should be noted that much of the data in this document has been published in interoffice memoranda. The intent of this technical report is bring all of the SB7a related data together in a single permanent record and to discuss the overall aspects of SB7a processing.

Pareizs, J.; Billings, A.; Click, D.

2011-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

187

Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 1999 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project (FCAP) sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam along with yearlings released on-station from Lyons Ferry Hatchery in 1999. This was the fourth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 453,117 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities not only slightly exceeded the 450,000 fish quota, but a second release of 76,386 yearlings (hereafter called Surplus) were acclimated at the Big Canyon facility and released about two weeks after the primary releases. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 9,941 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 9,583 from Big Canyon, 2,511 Big Canyon Surplus and 2,494 from Captain John Rapids. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife released 983 PIT tagged yearlings from Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels could be considered relatively low and did not appear to increase after transport to the acclimation facilities. Compared to prior years, Quantitative Health Assessment Indices were relatively low at Pittsburg Landing and Lyons Ferry Hatchery and relatively high at Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the release groups ranged from 147.4 mm (146.7-148.1 mm) at Captain John Rapids to 163.7 mm (163.3-164.1 mm) at Pittsburg Landing. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.04 at Pittsburg Landing to 1.23 at Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 87.8% (82.1-93.4%) for Big Canyon Surplus to 94.1% (90.1-98.1%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to McNary Dam ranged from 58.7% (49.3-68.1%) for Big Canyon Surplus to 71.3% (60.1-82.5%) for Captain John Rapids. Median migration rates to Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearlings from the FCAP facilities, ranged from 9.3 river kilometers per day (rkm/d) for Captain John Rapids to 18.7 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median migration rates to McNary Dam ranged from 9.0 rkm/d for Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 17.3 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median travel times from the FCAP facilities were about 7-10 days to Lower Granite Dam and 21-23 days to McNary Dam. Median arrival dates at Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearling groups from the FCAP facilities, were all from April 23-25. The median arrival date for Big Canyon Surplus was May 4. Median arrival dates at McNary Dam for Pittsburg Landing, Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids groups were all from May 7-8. Median arrival dates at McNary Dam were May 17 for Big Canyon Surplus and April 26 for Lyons Ferry Hatchery.

Rocklage, Stephen J.; Kellar, Dale S. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, ID)

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 2002 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam in 2002. This was the seventh year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 479,358 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities exceeded the 450,000 fish quota. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 7,545 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 7,482 from Big Canyon and 2,487 from Captain John Rapids. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels at the acclimation facilities could be considered medium to high with 43-62% of fish sampled rating medium to very high. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the PIT tagged groups ranged from 146.7 mm (146.2-147.2 mm) at Captain John Rapids to 164.8 mm (163.5-166.1 mm) at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.06 at Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 1.14 at Pittsburg Landing and Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 88.6% (86.0-91.1%) for Pittsburg Landing to 97.0% (92.4-101.7%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to McNary Dam ranged from 54.3% (50.2-58.3%) for Big Canyon to 70.5% (65.4-75.5%) for Pittsburg Landing. Median migration rates to Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearlings from the FCAP facilities, ranged from 8.1 river kilometers per day (rkm/d) for Captain John Rapids to 14.1 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median migration rates to McNary Dam ranged from 10.9 rkm/d for Big Canyon to 15.9 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median travel times from the FCAP facilities were about 9-12 days to Lower Granite Dam and 25-30 days to McNary Dam. Median arrival dates at Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearling groups from the FCAP facilities, ranged from April 20-28. Median arrival dates at McNary Dam for the FCAP groups were all May 11. The objectives of this project are to quantify and evaluate pre-release fish health, condition and mark retention as well as post-release survival, migration timing, migration rates, travel times and movement patterns of fall Chinook salmon from supplementation releases at the FCAP facilities, then provide feedback to co-managers for project specific and basin wide management decision-making.

Rocklage, Stephen J.; Kellar, Dale S. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, ID)

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 2000 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam along with yearlings released on-station from Lyons Ferry Hatchery in 2000. This was the fifth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 397,339 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities were short of the 450,000 fish quota. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 7,477 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 7,421 from Big Canyon and 2,488 from Captain John Rapids. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife released 980 PIT tagged yearlings from Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels could be considered relatively low. Compared to prior years, Quantitative Health Assessment Indices were relatively low at Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids and about average at Pittsburg Landing and Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the PIT tagged groups ranged from 157.7 mm (157.3-158.1 mm) at Big Canyon to 172.9 mm (172.2-173.6 mm) at Captain John Rapids. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.06 at Captain John Rapids and Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 1.12 at Big Canyon. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 87.0% (84.7-89.4%) for Pittsburg Landing to 95.2% (91.5-98.9%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to McNary Dam ranged from 65.8% (58.5-73.1%) for Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 84.0% (76.2-91.8%) for Captain John Rapids. Median migration rates to Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearlings from the FCAP facilities, ranged from 10.1 river kilometers per day (rkm/d) for Captain John Rapids to 19.1 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median migration rates to McNary Dam ranged from 6.0 rkm/d for Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 17.3 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median travel times from the FCAP facilities were about 9-10 days to Lower Granite Dam and 22-25 days to McNary Dam. Median arrival dates at Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearling groups from Pittsburg Landing, Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids, were all from April 21-22. Median arrival dates at McNary Dam for Pittsburg Landing, Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids groups were all from May 5-6. The median arrival date at McNary Dam was April 24 for Lyons Ferry Hatchery yearlings.

Rocklage, Stephen J.; Kellar, Dale S. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, ID)

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 2001 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam along with yearlings released on-station from Lyons Ferry Hatchery in 2001. This was the sixth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 318,932 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities were short of the 450,000 fish quota. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 7,503 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 7,499 from Big Canyon and 2,518 from Captain John Rapids. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife released 991 PIT tagged yearlings from Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels could be considered relatively low. Compared to prior years, Quantitative Health Assessment Indices were relatively low at Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids and about average at Pittsburg Landing and Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the PIT tagged groups ranged from 155.4 mm (154.7-156.1 mm) at Captain John Rapids to 171.6 mm (170.7-172.5 mm) at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.02 at Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 1.16 at Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 74.4% (73.2-75.5%) for Big Canyon to 85.2% (83.5-87.0%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to McNary Dam ranged from 37.9% (36.0-40.0%) for Pittsburg Landing to 57.9% (53.0-62.8%) for Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Median migration rates to Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearlings from the FCAP facilities, ranged from 6.3 river kilometers per day (rkm/d) for Big Canyon to 10.8 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median migration rates to McNary Dam ranged from 5.2 rkm/d for Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 10.9 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median travel times from the FCAP facilities were about 13-17 days to Lower Granite Dam and 31-37 days to McNary Dam. Median arrival dates at Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearling groups from Pittsburg Landing, Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids, were all from April 26-27. Median arrival dates at McNary Dam for Pittsburg Landing, Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids groups were all from May 14-18. The median arrival date at McNary Dam was May 13 for Lyons Ferry Hatchery yearlings.

Rocklage, Stephen J.; Kellar, Dale S. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, ID)

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 2004 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project (FCAP) sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam in 2004. This was the ninth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 414,452 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities were short of the 450,000 fish quota. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 4,983 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 4,984 from Big Canyon and 4,982 from Captain John Rapids. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels could be considered low with 53-94% rating not detected to low. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the PIT tagged groups ranged from 154.6 mm (154.0-155.2 mm) at Pittsburg Landing to 163.0 mm (162.6-163.4 mm) at Captain John Rapids. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.06 at Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 1.16 at Big Canyon. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 74.7% (72.9-76.5%) for Big Canyon to 88.1% (85.7-90.6%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to McNary Dam ranged from 45.3% (39.2-51.5%) for Pittsburg Landing to 52.1% (42.9-61.2%) for Big Canyon. Median migration rates to Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearlings from the FCAP facilities, ranged from 5.5 river kilometers per day (rkm/d) for Captain John Rapids to 12.8 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median migration rates to McNary Dam ranged from 10.9 rkm/d for Captain John Rapids to 17.6 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median travel times from the FCAP facilities were about 13-16 days to Lower Granite Dam and 23-29 days to McNary Dam. Median arrival dates at Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearling groups from Pittsburg Landing, Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids, ranged from April 18-29. Median arrival dates at McNary Dam for Pittsburg Landing, Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids groups ranged from May 1-8.

Rocklage, Stephen J. Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapawi, ID)

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project (FCAP) sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam in 2003. This was the eighth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 437,633 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities were short of the 450,000 fish quota. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 7,492 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 7,494 from Big Canyon and 2,497 from Captain John Rapids. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels at the acclimation facilities could be considered medium with 37-83% of the fish sampled rating medium to very high. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the PIT tagged groups ranged from 153.7 mm (153.2-154.2 mm) at Captain John Rapids to 164.2 mm (163.9-164.5 mm) at Pittsburg Landing. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.06 at Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 1.22 at Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 83.1% (80.7-85.5%) for Big Canyon to 91.7% (87.7-95.7%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to McNary Dam ranged from 59.9% (54.6-65.2%) for Big Canyon to 69.4% (60.5-78.4%) for Captain John Rapids. Median migration rates to Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearlings from the FCAP facilities, ranged from 5.8 river kilometers per day (rkm/d) for Captain John Rapids to 16.2 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median migration rates to McNary Dam ranged from 11.7 rkm/d for Captain John Rapids to 17.6 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median travel times from the FCAP facilities were about 8-15 days to Lower Granite Dam and 22-27 days to McNary Dam. Median arrival dates at Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearling groups from the FCAP facilities, ranged from April 23-25. Median arrival dates at McNary Dam for Pittsburg Landing, Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids groups ranged from May 4-10.

Rocklage, Stephen J. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Late Wash/Nitric Acid flowsheet hydrogen generation bases for simulation of a deflagration/detonation in the DWPF CPC  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen generation data obtained from IDMS runs PX4 and PX5 will be used to determine a bases for a deflagration/detonation simulation in the DWPF CPC. This simulation is necessary due to the new chemistry associated with the Late Wash/ Nitric Acid flowsheet and process modifications associated with the presence of H{sub 2} in the offgas. The simulation will be performed by Professor Van Brunt from the University of South Carolina. The scenario which leads up to the deflagration/detonation simulation will be chosen such that the following conditions apply. The SRAT is filled to its maximum operating level with 9,600 gal of sludge, which corresponds to the minimum vapor space above the sludge. The SRAT is at the boiling point, producing H{sub 2} at a very low rate (about 10 % of the peak) and 15 scfm of air inleakage is entering the SRAT. Then, the H{sub 2} generation rate will be allowed to increase exponentially (catalyst activation) until it readies the peak H{sub 2} generation rate of the IDMS run, after which the H{sub 2} generation rate will be allowed to decay exponentially (catalyst deactivation) until the total amount of H2 produced is between 85 and 100% of that produced during the IDMS run.

Ritter, J.A.

1993-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

194

CHARACTERIZATION AND EVALUATION OF CAUSTIC WASH TANK AND SOLVENT HOLD TANK SAMPLES FROM MCU FROM AUGUST TO SEPTEMBER 2011  

SciTech Connect

During processing of Salt Batches 3 and 4 in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU), the decontamination efficiency for cesium declined from historical values and from expectations based on laboratory testing. This report documents efforts to analyze samples of solvent and process solutions from MCU in an attempt to understand the cause of the reduced performance and to recommend mitigations. CWT Solutions from MCU from the time period of variable decontamination factor (DF) performance which covers from April 2011 to September 2011 (during processing of Salt Batch 4) were examined for impurities using chromatography and spectroscopy. The results indicate that impurities were found to be of two types: aromatic containing impurities most likely from Modifier degradation and aliphatic type impurities most likely from Isopar{reg_sign} L and tri-n-octylamine (TOA) degradation. Caustic washing the Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) solution with 1M NaOH improved its extraction ability as determined from {sup 22}Na uptake tests. Evidence from this work showed that pH variance in the aqueous solutions within the range of 1M nitric acid to 1.91M NaOH that contacted the solvent samples does not influence the analytical determination of the TOA concentration by GC-MS.

Fondeur, F.; Fink, S.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Appraisal of the tight sands potential of the Sand Wash and Great Divide Basins. Final report, June 1989--June 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The volume of future tight gas reserve additions is difficult to estimate because of uncertainties in the characterization and extent of the resource and the performance and cost-effectiveness of stimulation and production technologies. Ongoing R&D by industry and government aims to reduce the risks and costs of producing these tight resources, increase the certainty of knowledge of their geologic characteristics and extent, and increase the efficiency of production technologies. Some basins expected to contain large volumes of tight gas are being evaluated as to their potential contribution to domestic gas supplies. This report describes the results of one such appraisal. This analysis addresses the tight portions of the Eastern Greater Green River Basin (Sand Wash and Great Divide Subbasins in Northwestern Colorado and Southwestern Wyoming, respectively), with respect to estimated gas-in-place, technical recovery, and potential reserves. Geological data were compiled from public and proprietary sources. The study estimated gas-in-place in significant (greater than 10 feet net sand thickness) tight sand intervals for six distinct vertical and 21 areal units of analysis. These units of analysis represent tight gas potential outside current areas of development. For each unit of analysis, a ``typical`` well was modeled to represent the costs, recovery and economics of near-term drilling prospects in that unit. Technically recoverable gas was calculated using reservoir properties and assumptions about current formation evaluation and extraction technology performance. Basin-specific capital and operating costs were incorporated along with taxes, royalties and current regulations to estimate the minimum required wellhead gas price required to make the typical well in each of unit of analysis economic.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Evaluate Potential Means of Rebuilding Sturgeon Populations in the Snake River between Lower Granite and Hells Canyon Dams, 2001 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The specific research goal of this project is to identify means to restore and rebuild the Snake River white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) population to support a sustainable annual subsistence harvest equivalent to 5 kg/ha/yr (CBFWA 1997). Based on data collected, a white sturgeon adaptive management plan will be developed. This 2001 annual report covers the fifth year of sampling of this multi-year study. In 2001 white sturgeon were captured, marked, and population data were collected in the Snake and Salmon rivers. The Snake River was sampled between Lower Granite Dam (rkm 174) and the mouth of the Salmon River (rkm 303), and the Salmon River was sampled from its mouth upstream to Hammer Creek (rkm 84). A total of 45,907 hours of setline effort and 186 hours of hook-and-line effort was employed in 2001. A total of 390 white sturgeon were captured and tagged in the Snake River and 12 in the Salmon River. Since 1997, 36.1 percent of the tagged white sturgeon have been recaptured. In the Snake River, white sturgeon ranged in total length from 42 cm to 307 cm and averaged 107 cm. In the Salmon River, white sturgeon ranged in total length from 66 cm to 235 cm and averaged 160 cm. Using the Jolly-Seber model, the abundance of white sturgeon <60 cm, between Lower Granite Dam and the mouth of the Salmon River, was estimated at 2,483 fish, with a 95% confidence interval of 1,208-7,477. An additional 10 white sturgeon were fitted with radio-tags during 2001. The locations of 17 radio-tagged white sturgeon were monitored in 2001. The movement of these fish ranged from 38.6 km (24 miles) downstream to 54.7 km (34 miles) upstream; however, 62.6 percent of the detected movement was less than 0.8 km (0.5 mile). Both radio-tagged fish and recaptured white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir appear to move more than fish in the free-flowing segment of the Snake River. No seasonal movement pattern was detected, and no movement pattern was detected for different size fish. Differences were detected in the length frequency distributions of white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir and the free-flowing Snake River (Chi-Square test, P<0.05). The proportion of white sturgeon greater than 92 cm (total length) in the free-flowing Snake River has shown an increase of 30 percent since the 1970's. Analysis of the length-weight relationship indicated that white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir had a higher relative weight factor than white sturgeon in the free-flowing Snake River. A von Bertalanffy growth curve was fitted to 309 aged white sturgeon. The results suggest fish are currently growing faster than fish historically inhabiting the study area, as well as other Columbia River basin white sturgeon populations. Artificial substrate mats were used to document white sturgeon spawning. A total of 14 white sturgeon eggs were recovered in the Snake River in 2001.

Everett, Scott R.; Tuell, Michael A. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Evaluate Potential Means of Rebuilding Sturgeon Populations in the Snake River between Lower Granite and Hells Canyon Dams, 2000 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The specific research goal of this project is to identify means to restore and rebuild the Snake River white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) population to support a sustainable annual subsistence harvest equivalent to 5 kg/ha/yr (CBFWA 1997). Based on data collected, a white sturgeon adaptive management plan will be developed. This 2000 annual report covers the fourth year of sampling of this multi-year study. In 2000 white sturgeon were captured, marked, and population data were collected in the Snake and Salmon rivers. The Snake River was sampled between Lower Granite Dam (rkm 174) and the mouth of the Salmon River (rkm 303), and the Salmon River was sampled from its mouth upstream to Hammer Creek (rkm 84). A total of 53,277 hours of setline effort and 630 hours of hook-and-line effort was employed in 2000. A total of 538 white sturgeon were captured and tagged in the Snake River and 25 in the Salmon River. Since 1997, 32.8 percent of the tagged white sturgeon have been recaptured. In the Snake River, white sturgeon ranged in total length from 48 cm to 271 cm and averaged 107 cm. In the Salmon River, white sturgeon ranged in total length from 103 cm to 227 cm and averaged 163 cm. Using the Jolly-Seber open population estimator, the abundance of white sturgeon <60 cm, between Lower Granite Dam and the mouth of the Salmon River, was estimated at 2,725 fish, with a 95% confidence interval of 1,668-5,783. A total of 10 white sturgeon were fitted with radio-tags. The movement of these fish ranged from 54.7 km (34 miles) downstream to 78.8 km (49 miles) upstream; however, 43.6 percent of the detected movement was less than 0.8 km (0.5 mile). Both radio-tagged fish and recaptured white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir appear to move more than fish in the free-flowing segment of the Snake River. No seasonal movement pattern was detected, and no movement pattern was detected for different size fish. Differences were detected in the length frequency distributions of white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir and the free-flowing Snake River (Chi-Square test, P<0.05). The proportion of white sturgeon greater than 92 cm (total length) in the free-flowing Snake River has shown an increase of 31 percent since the 1970's. Analysis of the length-weight relationship indicated that white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir had a higher relative weight factor than white sturgeon in the free-flowing Snake River. A von Bertalanffy growth curve was fitted to 138 aged white sturgeon. The results suggests fish are currently growing faster than fish historically inhabiting the study area, as well as other Columbia River basin white sturgeon populations. Artificial substrate mats were used to document white sturgeon spawning. A total of 34 white sturgeon eggs were recovered: 27 in the Snake River, and seven in the Salmon River.

Everett, Scott R.; Tuell, Michael A. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fishereis Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Evaluate Potenial Means of Rebuilding Sturgeon Populations in the Snake River between Lower Granite and Hells Canyon Dams, 2002 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The specific research goal of this project is to identify means to restore and rebuild the Snake River white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) population to support a sustainable annual subsistence harvest equivalent to 5 kg/ha/yr (CBFWA 1997). Based on data collected, a white sturgeon adaptive management plan will be developed. This report presents a summary of results from the 1997-2002 Phase II data collection and represents the end of phase II. From 1997 to 2001 white sturgeon were captured, marked, and population data were collected in the Snake and Salmon. A total of 1,785 white sturgeon were captured and tagged in the Snake River and 77 in the Salmon River. Since 1997, 25.8 percent of the tagged white sturgeon have been recaptured. Relative density of white sturgeon was highest in the free-flowing segment of the Snake River, with reduced densities of fish in Lower Granite Reservoir, and low densities the Salmon River. Differences were detected in the length frequency distributions of white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir, the free-flowing Snake River and the Salmon River (Chi-Square test, P<0.05). The proportion of white sturgeon greater than 92 cm (total length) in the free-flowing Snake River has shown an increase of 30 percent since the 1970's. Using the Jolly-Seber model, the abundance of white sturgeon <60 cm, between Lower Granite Dam and the mouth of the Salmon River, was estimated at 2,483 fish, with a 95% confidence interval of 1,208-7,477. Total annual mortality rate was estimated to be 0.14 (95% confidence interval of 0.12 to 0.17). A total of 35 white sturgeon were fitted with radio-tags during 1999-2002. The movement of these fish ranged from 53 km (33 miles) downstream to 77 km (48 miles) upstream; however, 38.8 percent of the detected movement was less than 0.8 km (0.5 mile). Both radio-tagged fish and recaptured white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir appear to move more than fish in the free-flowing segment of the Snake River. No seasonal movement pattern was detected, and no movement pattern was detected for different size fish. Analysis of the length-weight relationship indicated that white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir had a higher relative weight factor than white sturgeon in the free-flowing Snake River. The results suggest fish are currently growing faster than fish historically inhabiting the study area, as well as other Columbia River basin white sturgeon populations. Artificial substrate egg mats documented white sturgeon spawning in four consecutive years. A total of 49 white sturgeon eggs were recovered in the Snake River from 1999-2002, and seven from the Salmon River during 2000.

Everett, Scott R.; Tuell, Michael A.; Hesse, Jay A. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Management, Lapwai, ID)

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Evaluate Potential Means of Rebuilding Sturgeon Populations in the Snake River between Lower Granite and Hells Canyon Dams, 1997 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During 1997 the first phase of the Nez Perce Tribe White Sturgeon Project was completed and the second phase was initiated. During Phase I the ''Upper Snake River White Sturgeon Biological Assessment'' was completed, successfully: (1) compiling regional white sturgeon management objectives, and (2) identifying potential mitigation actions needed to rebuild the white sturgeon population in the Snake River between Hells Canyon and Lower Granite dams. Risks and uncertainties associated with implementation of these potential mitigative actions could not be fully assessed because critical information concerning the status of the population and their habitat requirements were unknown. The biological risk assessment identified the fundamental information concerning the white sturgeon population that is needed to fully evaluate the effectiveness of alternative mitigative strategies. Accordingly, a multi-year research plan was developed to collect specific biological and environmental data needed to assess the health and status of the population and characterize habitat used for spawning and rearing. In addition, in 1997 Phase II of the project was initiated. White sturgeon were captured, marked, and population data were collected between Lower Granite Dam and the mouth of the Salmon River. During 1997, 316 white sturgeon were captured in the Snake River. Of these, 298 were marked. Differences in the fork length frequency distributions of the white sturgeon were not affected by collection method. No significant differences in length frequency distributions of sturgeon captured in Lower Granite Reservoir and the mid- and upper free-flowing reaches of the Snake River were detected. The length frequency distribution indicated that white sturgeon between 92 and 183 cm are prevalent in the reaches of the Snake River that were sampled. However, white sturgeon >183 have not changed markedly since 1970. I would speculate that some factor other than past over-fishing practices is limiting the recruitment of white sturgeon into larger size classes (>183 cm). Habitat, food resources, and migration have been severely altered by the impoundment of the Snake River and it appears that the recruitment of young may not be severely affected as recruitment of fish into size classes > 183 cm.

Hoefs, Nancy (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Evaluate Potential Means of Rebuilding Sturgeon Populations in the Snake River between Lower Granite and Hells Canyon Dams, 1999 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The specific research goal of this project is to identify means to restore and rebuild the Snake River white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) population to support a sustainable annual subsistence harvest equivalent to 5 kg/ha/yr (CBFWA 1997). Based on data collected, a white sturgeon adaptive management plan will be developed. This 1999 annual report covers the third year of sampling of this multi-year study. In 1999 white sturgeon were captured, marked and population data were collected in the Snake and Salmon rivers. A total of 33,943 hours of setline effort and 2,112 hours of hook-and-line effort was employed in 1999. A total of 289 white sturgeon were captured and tagged in the Snake River and 29 in the Salmon River. Since 1997, 11.1 percent of the tagged white sturgeon have been recaptured. In the Snake River, white sturgeon ranged in total length from 27 cm to 261 cm and averaged 110 cm. In the Salmon River, white sturgeon ranged in total length from 98 cm to 244 cm and averaged 183.5 cm. Using the Jolly-Seber model, the abundance of white sturgeon < 60 cm, between Lower Granite Dam and the mouth of the Salmon River, was estimated at 1,823 fish, with a 95% confidence interval of 1,052-4,221. A total of 15 white sturgeon were fitted with radio-tags. The movement of these fish ranged from 6.4 km (4 miles) downstream to 13.7 km (8.5 miles) upstream; however, 83.6 percent of the detected movement was less than 0.8 kilometers (0.5 miles). Both radio-tagged fish and recaptured white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir appear to move more than fish in the free-flowing segment of the Snake River. No seasonal movement pattern was detected, and no movement pattern was detected for different size fish. Differences were detected in the length frequency distributions of white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir and the free-flowing Snake River (Chi-Square test, P < 0.05). The proportion of white sturgeon greater than 92 cm (total length) in the free-flowing Snake River has shown an increase of 29 percent since the 1970's. Analysis of the length-weight relationship indicated that white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir were slightly larger than white sturgeon in the free-flowing Snake River. A von Bertalanffy growth curve was fitted to 49 aged white sturgeon. The results suggests the fish are currently growing faster than fish historicly inhabiting the study area, as well as other Columbia River basin white sturgeon populations. Artificial substrate mats were used to document white sturgeon spawning. Five white sturgeon eggs were recovered in the Snake River.

Tuell, Michael A.; Everett, Scott R. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite wash stuart" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Evaluation of a Prototype Surface Flow Bypass for Juvenile Salmon and Steelhead at the Powerhouse of Lower Granite Dam, Snake River, Washington, 1996-2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A surface flow bypass provides a route in the upper water column for naturally, surface-oriented juvenile salmonids to safely migrate through a hydroelectric dam. Surface flow bypasses were recommended in several regional salmon recovery plans as a means to increase passage survival of juvenile salmonids at Columbia and Snake River dams. A prototype surface flow bypass, called the SBC, was retrofit on Lower Granite Dam and evaluated from 1996 to 2000 using biotelemetry and hydroacoustic techniques. In terms of passage efficiency, the best SBC configurations were a surface skimmer (99 m3/s [3,500 cfs], three entrances 5 m wide, 5 m deep and one entrance 5 m wide, 15 m deep) and a single chute (99 m3/s, one entrance 5 m wide, 8.5 m deep). They each passed 62 ? 3% (95% confidence interval) of the total juvenile fish population that entered the section of the dam with the SBC entrances (Turbine Units 4-5). Smooth entrance shape and concentrated surface flow characteristics of these configurations are worth pursuing in designs for future surface flow bypasses. In addition, a guidance wall in the Lower Granite Dam forebay diverted the following percentages of juvenile salmonids away from Turbine Units 1-3 toward other passage routes, including the SBC: run-at-large 79 ? 18%; hatchery steelhead 86%; wild steelhead 65%; and yearling chinook salmon 66%. When used in combination with spill or turbine intake screens, a surface flow bypass with a guidance wall can produce a high level (> 90% of total project passage) of non-turbine passage and provide operational flexibility to fisheries managers and dam operators responsible for enhancing juvenile salmonid survival.

Johnson, Gary E.; Anglea, Steven M.; Adams, Noah S.; Wik, Timothy O.

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

202

Maps: Exploration, Resources, Reserves, and Production - Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Granite Wash Play, Texas and Oklahoma: United States Shale Oil Maps: Bakken Shale Play, Williston Basin, North Dakota, Montana, Saskatchewan & Manitoba Updated 3/20/2011:

203

Proposed procedure for exemption from the requirement for segregated ballast tanks (SBT), dedicated clean ballast tanks (CBT), or a crude oil washing (COW) system for existing tank vessels  

SciTech Connect

A proposed procedure for exemption from the requirement for segregated ballast tanks (SBT), dedicated clean ballast tanks (CBT), or a crude oil washing (COW) system for existing tank vessels of 40,000 dwt and over, in domestic trade has been issued by the US Coast Guard under the Port and Tanker Safety Act. Exemption would be allowed if shore-based reception facilities are a preferred method of handling dirty ballast and if such facilities are adequate and readily available. Adoption of the proposal would recognize that in certain trades where existing tank vessels have set loading locations, it is as effective to use shore-based reception facilities for the treatment of oil residues as it is to use SBT, CBT, or COW. The proposal requires, among others, National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permits for the reception facilities, and contains a provision for revocation of exemptions upon noncompliance with regulations. Comments must be received by 7/7/80.

1980-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

204

Microfracturing in Westerly granite experimentally extended wet and dry at temperatures to 800/degree/C and pressures to 200 MPa  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Microfracturing in Westerly granite specimens, extended wet and dry, at temperatures to 800/degree/C and confining pressures to 200 MPa, is analyzed with a view toward understanding why, in the brittle field, rock strengths decrease with increasing temperature. Intragranular (IGC) and grain-boundary cracks (GBC) are mapped in two dimensions on either side of the tensile macrofracture, using optical microscopy, to determine, quantitatively, crack lengths and densities and, qualitatively, crack widths and orientations are visually examined to aid in interpretation. Temperature and confining pressure tend to favor the development of different microfracture fabrics. Thermal stresses produce a random orientation of cracks while stresses resulting from the external differential loading of a specimen produce a preferred orientation of cracks parallel to the direction of sigma/sub 1/. In dry experiments, between 600/degree/ and 800/degree/C, both GBC and IGC densities increase with increasing temperature. The increase in crack abundance is responsible for the thermal weakening of the rock. With increasing temperature, GBC play a greater role in the deformational history leading to rock failure. 27 refs., 24 figs.

Hopkins, T.W.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Process for the elimination of waste water produced upon the desulfurization of coking oven gas by means of wash solution containing organic oxygen-carrier, with simultaneous recovery of elemental sulfur  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for the elimination of waste water falling out with the desulfurization of coking oven gas by means of an organic oxygen carrier-containing washing solution with simultaneous recovery of elemental sulfur. The waste water is decomposed in a combustion chamber in a reducing atmosphere at temperatures between about 1000/sup 0/ and 1100/sup 0/ C. under such conditions that the mole ratio of H/sub 2/S:SO/sub 2/ in the exhaust gas of the combustion chamber amounts to at least 2:1. Sulfur falling out is separated and the sensible heat of the exhaust gas is utilized for steam generation. The cooled and desulfurized exhaust gas is added to the coking oven gas before the pre-cooling. Sulfur falling out from the washing solution in the oxidizer is separated out and lead into the combustion chamber together with the part of the washing solution discharged as waste water from the washing solution circulation. Preferred embodiments include that the sulfur loading of the waste water can amount to up to about 370 kg sulfur per m/sup 3/ waste water; having the cooling of sulfur-containing exhaust gas leaving the combustion chamber follow in a waste heat boiler and a sulfur condenser heated by pre-heated boiler feed water, from which condenser sulfur is discharged in liquid state.

Diemer, P.; Brake, W.; Dittmer, R.

1985-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

206

Application of solar energy to the supply of industrial process hot water. Aerotherm final report, 77-235. [Can washing in Campbell Soup plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of the Solar Industrial Process Hot Water Program are to design, test, and evaluate the application of solar energy to the generation and supply of industrial process hot water, and to provide an assessment of the economic and resource benefits to be gained. Other objectives are to stimulate and give impetus to the use of solar energy for supplying significant amounts of industrial process heat requirements. The plant selected for the design of a solar industrial process hot water system was the Campbell Soup facility in Sacramento, California. The total hot water demand for this plant varies between 500 and 800 gpm during regular production shifts, and hits a peak of over 1,000 gpm for approximately one hour during the cleanup shift. Most of the hot water is heated in the boiler room by a combination of waste heat recovery and low pressure (5 psi) steam-water heat exchangers. The hot water emerges from the boiler room at a temperature between 160/sup 0/F and 180/sup 0/F and is transported to the various process areas. Booster heaters in the process areas then use low pressure (5 psi) or medium pressure (20 psi) steam to raise the temperature of the water to the level required for each process. Hot water is used in several processes at the Campbell Soup plant, but the can washing process was selected to demonstrate the feasibility of a solar hot water system. A detailed design and economic analysis of the system is given. (WHK)

None

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume XV : Evaluation of the 2007 Predictions of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Salmon and Steelhead Smolts to Rock Island, Lower Granite, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams using Program RealTime.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Program RealTime provided monitoring and forecasting of the 2007 inseason outmigrations via the internet for 26 PIT-tagged stocks of wild ESU Chinook salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams, one PIT-tagged hatchery-reared ESU of sockeye salmon to Lower Granite Dam, one PIT-tagged wild stock of sockeye salmon to McNary Dam, and 20 passage-indexed runs-at-large, five each to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville dams. Nineteen stocks are of wild yearling Chinook salmon which were captured, PIT-tagged, and released at sites above Lower Granite Dam in 2007 and have at least one year's historical migration data previous to the 2007 migration. These stocks originate in 19 tributaries of the Salmon, Grande Ronde and Clearwater Rivers, all tributaries to the Snake River, and are subsequently detected through tag identification and monitored at Lower Granite Dam. Seven wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large of Snake or Upper Columbia River ESU salmon and steelhead were monitored at McNary Dam. Three wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large were monitored at Lower Granite Dam, consisting of the yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and the steelhead runs. The hatchery-reared PIT-tagged sockeye salmon stock from Redfish Lake was monitored outmigrating through Lower Granite Dam. Passage-indexed stocks (stocks monitored by FPC passage indices) included combined wild and hatchery runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling Chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead forecasted to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville dams.

Griswold, Jim; Townsend, Richard L.; Skalski, John R.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin, Volume XIV; Evaluation of 2006 Prediction of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Salmon and Steelhead at Rock Island, Lower Granite, McNary, John Day and Bonneville Dams using Program Real Time, Technical Report 2006.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Program RealTime provided monitoring and forecasting of the 2006 inseason outmigrations via the internet for 32 PIT-tagged stocks of wild ESU chinook salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams, one PIT-tagged hatchery-reared ESU of sockeye salmon to Lower Granite Dam, and 20 passage-indexed runs-at-large, five each to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams. Twenty-four stocks are of wild yearling chinook salmon which were captured, PIT-tagged, and released at sites above Lower Granite Dam in 2006, and have at least one year's historical migration data previous to the 2006 migration. These stocks originate in drainages of the Salmon, Grande Ronde and Clearwater Rivers, all tributaries to the Snake River, and are subsequently detected through the tag identification and monitored at Lower Granite Dam. In addition, seven wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large of Snake or Upper Columbia River ESU salmon and steelhead were monitored at McNary Dam. Three wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large were monitored at Lower Granite Dam, consisting of the yearling and subyearling chinook salmon and the steelhead trout runs. The hatchery-reared PIT-tagged sockeye salmon stock from Redfish Lake was monitored outmigrating through Lower Granite Dam. Passage-indexed stocks (stocks monitored by FPC passage indices) included combined wild and hatchery runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead trout forecasted to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams.

Griswold, Jim

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Application of solar energy to the supply of industrial process hot water. Energy reduction and economic analysis report. Aerotherm report TR-76-220. [Can washing at Campbell Soup Company in California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A discussion is provided of the following aspects of the solar process hot water program: criteria and rationale used in process selection, expected fuel savings to be provided by widespread use of the solar energy system in the industry, and economic evaluation of the system. The design, construction, operation, and evaluation of a solar water heating system for application to the can washing process at the Campbell Soup Company's plant located in Sacramento, California are included.

None

1976-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

210

Application of solar energy to the supply of industrial process hot water: preliminary design and performance report. Volume I. Technical report. Aerotherm report TR-76-219. [For can washing at Campbell Soup Plant in Sacramento  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design and performance of a solar hot water system for can washing at the Campbell Soup Plant in Sacramento, California, are presented. The collector field is located on the roof of the finished products warehouse of the Campbell Soup Sacramento plant. Water is supplied from a 3.8 cm (1/sup 1///sub 2/ in.) supply line which is located directly below an existing roof access hatch. A supply pipe will be brought up through that hatch. The water flow will then be split into two manifold lines which supply the dual rows of flat plate collectors. The preheated water from the flat plates is then passed into six sets of parallel connected concentrators. Each set consist of eight 1.83 x 3.05 m (6 x 10 foot) modules connected in series. The water from these units is gathered in a 3.8 cm (1/sup 1///sub 2/ in.) insulated pipe which transports it to the storage tank. This pipe will be attached to an existing pipe run until it reaches the can washing building. From there the pipe will follow the can washing building around to the storage tank. The storage tank is a 75,200 1 (20,000 gal) steel tank which is coated internally with a USDA approved phenolic liner. The outside of the tank is insulated. A 2.2 kw (3 hp) motor is used to pump the stored water for the tank into the can washing line. Detail drawings and descriptions of the collector field, installation, piping, controls, data acquisition equipment, and roof structure are included. Furthermore, a program schedule with equipment and manpower costs for successfully completing Phase II of this contract is included. Also included is an organization chart of the Phase II program personnel. (WHK)

None

1976-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

211

Stuart Michael Cohen The Implications of Flexible CO2 Capture on the ERCOT Electric Grid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from US EPA's Emissions and Generation Resource Integrated Database (eGRID). Forecasted marginal carbon

Rochelle, Gary T.

212

Painting a theoretical world : Stuart Davis and the politics of common experience in the 1930s  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont.) relationship with American Scene painting. His engagement with these themes suggests that the pictorial reorganization of spatial experience that anchored his practice as a socially engaged artist is inextricably ...

Christ, John X., 1974-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

NEWTON, Ask a Scientist at Argonne National Labs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

apart. In some cases, what is left of the rock is washed away by rain or streams. In granite, the feldspars are changed to clays and the rock falls apart leaving quartz (sand)...

214

Results Of Routine Strip Effluent Hold Tank, Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank, And Caustic Wash Tank Samples From Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit During Macrobatch 4 Operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT), Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT), and Caustic Wash Tank (CWT) samples from several of the ?microbatches? of Integrated Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt Batch (?Macrobatch?) 4 have been analyzed for {sup 238}Pu, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, and by inductively-coupled plasma emission spectroscopy (ICPES). Furthermore, samples from the CWT have been analyzed by a variety of methods to investigate a decline in the decontamination factor (DF) of the cesium observed at MCU. The results indicate good decontamination performance within process design expectations. While the data set is sparse, the results of this set and the previous set of results for Macrobatch 3 samples indicate generally consistent operations. There is no indication of a disruption in plutonium and strontium removal. The average cesium DF and concentration factor (CF) for samples obtained from Macrobatch 4 are slightly lower than for Macrobatch 3, but still well within operating parameters. The DSSHT samples show continued presence of titanium, likely from leaching of the monosodium titanate in Actinide Removal Process (ARP).

Peters, T. B.; Fink, S. D.

2012-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

215

Fine Anthracite Coal Washing Using Spirals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spiral performed well in cleaning the coarse 8 x 16 mesh size fraction, as demonstrated by the Ep ranging from 0.091 to 0.177. This is in line with typical spiral performance. In addition, the presence of the coarser size fraction did not significantly affect spiral performance on the typical 16 x 100 mesh fraction, in which the Ep ranged from 0.144 to 0.250. Changes in solids concentration and flow rate did not show a clear correlation with spiral performance. However, for difficult-to-clean coals with high near-gravity material, such as this anthracite, a single-stage spiral cleaning such a wide size fraction may not be able to achieve the clean coal ash and yield specifications required. In the first place, while the performance of the spiral on the coarse 8 x 16 mesh fraction is good with regard to Ep, the cutpoints (SG50s) are high (1.87 to 1.92), which may result in a clean coal with a higher-than-desired ash content. And second, the combination of the spiral's higher overall cutpoint (1.80) with the high near-gravity anthracite results in significant misplaced material that increases the clean coal ash error. In a case such as this, one solution may be to reclean the clean coal and middlings from the first-stage spiral in a second stage spiral.

R.P. Killmeyer; P.H. Zandhuis; M.V. Ciocco; W. Weldon; T. West; D. Petrunak

2001-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

216

13 September 198 8 BIOL . SOC. WASH .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Effective Dispute Resolution ("CEDR") to appoint a Mediator. (b) The Parties shall within 14 days, the Parties may at any stage seek assistance from CEDR to provide guidance on a suitable procedure. (c) Unless

Prestwich, Ken

217

17 October 2000 PROC. ENTOMOL. SOC. WASH.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Solera (9 USNM ENT 00037961 USNM); Belen, San Antonio, 950 m, LN 218800 516175, 8 Aug 1996, M. A. Zumbado

Mathis, Wayne N.

218

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume IX : Evaluation of the 2001 Predictions of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Migrant Salmon and Steelhead Trout Migrating to Lower Granite, Rock Island, McNary, and John Day Dams using Program RealTime.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Program RealTime provided tracking and forecasting of the 2001 inseason outmigration via the internet for eighteen PIT-tagged stocks of wild salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams and eleven passage-indexed stocks to Rock Island, McNary, or John Day dams. Nine of the PIT-tagged stocks tracked this year were new to the project. Thirteen ESUs of wild subyearling and yearling chinook salmon and steelhead, and one ESU of hatchery-reared sockeye salmon were tracked and forecasted to Lower Granite Dam. Eight wild ESUs of subyearling and yearling chinook salmon, sockeye salmon and steelhead were tracked to McNary Dam for the first time this year. Wild PIT-tagged ESUs tracked to Lower Granite Dam included yearling spring/summer chinook salmon release-recovery stocks (from Bear Valley Creek, Catherine Creek, Herd Creek, Imnaha River, Johnson Creek, Lostine River, Minam River, South Fork Salmon River, Secesh River, and Valley Creek), PIT-tagged wild runs-at-large of yearling chinook salmon and steelhead, and a PIT-tagged stock of subyearling fall chinook salmon. The stock of hatchery-reared PIT-tagged summer-run sockeye salmon smolts outmigrating to Lower Granite Dam, consisted this year of a new stock of fish from Alturas Lake Creek, Redfish Lake Creek Trap and Sawtooth Trap. The passage-indexed stocks, counted using FPC passage indices, included combined wild- and hatchery-reared runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead migrating to Rock Island and McNary dams, and, new this year, combined wild and hatchery subyearling chinook salmon to John Day Dam. Unusual run-timing and fish passage characteristics were observed in this low-flow, negligible-spill migration year. The period for the middle 80% of fish passage (i.e., progress from the 10th to the 90th percentiles) was unusually short for nine out of ten PIT-tagged yearling spring/summer chinook salmon stocks tracked to Lower Granite Dam. It was the shortest on record for seven of these ten stocks. The nine stocks recording unusually short middle 80% periods also recorded higher-than-average recovery percentages. However the opposite trend was observed for the PIT-tagged wild subyearling chinook salmon and hatchery sockeye salmon stocks whose middle 80% period of passage to Lower Granite Dam was average to above average. Recovery percentages for these two stocks were average, compared to historical recoveries. The performance results of Program RealTime to make accurate predictions of percentiles of fish passage at an index site were mixed this year. The release-recovery stocks of wild PIT-tagged spring/summer chinook salmon tracked to Lower Granite Dam were predicted less accurately than usual, on average, with two exceptions. One of these exceptions was a stock that had its best prediction (first-half, last-half, and season-wide) ever to occur. On average, however, performance was down for predicting these stocks. The RealTime Select composite season-wide MAD was 4.3%, larger than the historical average of 2.1%. Passage percentiles for PIT-tagged runs-at-large of wild Snake River yearling and subyearling chinook salmon and of wild steelhead outmigrating to Lower Granite Dam were predicted very well this year, their second year of inclusion in the project, with season-wide MADs of 3.6%, 4.7%, and 1.8% respectively. These results, too, were mixed with respect to comparison with last year's performance. The yearling chinook stock was predicted somewhat better last year (up from 1.7% last year to 3.6% this year) but the subyearling chinook salmon and steelhead stocks were predicted better this year than last, season-wide. The steelhead stock, in particular, was predicted much better this year than last year, down to 1.8% this year from 4.8% last year. The PIT-tagged runs-at-large of wild salmon and steelhead tracked to McNary Dam in 2001 for the first time, were also well-predicted. In particular, the Snake River stocks were well-predicted, with season-wide MADs of 4.7% for subyearling chinook salmon, 3.3% for year

Burgess, Caitlin; Skalski, John R.

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Granite Wind LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind, LLC Wind, LLC Place Redlands, California Zip 92373 Sector Wind energy Product An Apple Valley, California based wind developer. Coordinates 34.055282°, -117.18258° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.055282,"lon":-117.18258,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

220

STRESS MEASUREMENTS IN THE STRIPA GRANITE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

KBS) (Swedish Nuclear Fuel Safety Program) August, 1977 ithrough the Swedish Nuclear Fuel Supply Company (SKBF), andorganized fall 1976. Nuclear Fuel Safety (KBS) in late Some

Carlsson, H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite wash stuart" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

THE MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF STRIPA GRANITE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy and/or the Swedish. Nuclear Fuel $upply Company. Anyof Energy, or the Swedish Nuclear Fuel Supply Company.Joint Project of Swedish Nuclear Fuel Supply Co. Fack 10240

Swan, G.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Biology...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Haszeldine, Stuart (Stuart Haszeldine) - School of GeoSciences, University of Edinburgh Hossain, M. Enamul (M. Enamul Hossain) - Department of Petroleum Engineering, King Fahd...

223

Microsoft Word - Longview-WashWay Acquisition CX.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4, 2012 4, 2012 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Joan Kendall Project Manager - TERR-3 Proposed Action: Acquisition of Cowlitz County Public Utility District's (CCPUD) 115-kV transmission line from BPA's Longview Substation to CCPUD's Washington Way Substation Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.24 Property Transfers Location: Township 8 North, Range 3 West, Section 36, and Township 8 North, Range 2 West, Sections 31 and 32 in Cowlitz County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to acquire a 1.5 mile portion of CCPUD's existing Longview-Washington Way 115-kV transmission line in order to provide a parallel

224

Interventions on Pacoima Wash: Repurposing Linear Infrastructure into Park Spaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

State University of New York at Albany, 2007. Varnelis,State University of New York at Albany, 2007) 5. Examples of

McManama, Brigid Erin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Study on Utilization of Cyclic Heat Stewed Steel Slag Washing ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cellulose Acetate Membranes for CO2 Separation from Water-gas-shift Reaction ... Thermodynamic Phase Stability in Gasification Carbon Feedstock Slags...

226

Granite Hills, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2.803107°, -116.9047476° 2.803107°, -116.9047476° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.803107,"lon":-116.9047476,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

227

Anomalous fracture-extension pressure in granitic rocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fracture-extension pressures appreciably higher than the least principal earth-stress were observed in hydraulic fractures formed in a pair of 3 km (9600 ft) deep boreholes drilled near the Valles Caldera in northern New Mexico. Pressurization of open wellbores in rock containing preexisting fractures may open these fractures, instead of creating new fractures at right angles to the least principal stress. The pressure necessary to flow into these fractures may be appreciably higher than the least principal stress. Upon sand-propping one such pre-existing fracture, a lower fracture extension pressure was observed. A second fracture in a parallel well-bore 92 m (300 ft) away, at the same depth of 2 km (6500 ft) exhibited the lower fracture extension pressure without propping, but with about 90/sup 0/ difference in fracture direction. Fractures created through perforations at a depth of 3 km (9600 ft) not only exhibited breakdown pressures upon initial pressurization, but sometimes even higher ''breakdown'' pressures upon repressurization. These phenomena may be of interest in the interpretation of earth stress measurements made by hydraulic fracturing.

Aamodt, R.L.; Potter, R.M.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Granite County, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

374643°, -113.4647823° 374643°, -113.4647823° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.3374643,"lon":-113.4647823,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

229

City of Granite Falls, Minnesota (Utility Company) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

City of City of Place Minnesota Utility Id 7494 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Single Phase Commercial Commercial Single Phase-City Commercial Commercial Three Phase Commercial Commercial Three Phase-City Commercial Residential Residential Residential- City Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.0971/kWh

230

Baldrige Award Recipients--Granite Rock Company (1992)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 1980, the regional supplier to commercial and residential ... It also retails building materials made by ... area extending from San Francisco southward to ...

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

231

Analysis Of Macroscopic Fractures In Granite In The Hdr Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

nearly parallel to the maximum horizontal stress. In this favorable situation, hydraulic injections will tend both to reactivate natural fractures at low pressures, and to...

232

Directional drilling and equipment for hot granite wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following drilling equipment and experience gained in drilling to date are discussed: positive displacement motors, turbodrills, motor performance experience, rotary-build and rotary-hold results, steering devices and surveying tools, shock absorbers, drilling and fishing jars, drilling bits, control of drill string drag, and control of drill string degradation. (MHR)

Williams, R.E.; Neudecker, J.W.; Rowley, J.C.; Brittenham, T.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

HEAT TRANSFER IN UNDERGROUND HEATING EXPERIMENTS IN GRANITE, STRIPA, SWEDEN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

law of similitude for linear heat conduction was utilized tothe analogy between heat conduction and fluid flow in porthe effects of heat conduction through the vermiculite heat

Chan, T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

HEAT TRANSFER IN UNDERGROUND HEATING EXPERIMENTS IN GRANITE, STRIPA, SWEDEN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CLOSED-FORM INTEGRAL SOLUTIONS FOR LINEAR HEAT CONDUCTION.For linear heat conduction in a homogeneous, isotropiclaw of similitude for linear heat conduction was utilized to

Chan, T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

WASTE DISPOSAL IN GRANITE: PRELIMINARY RESULTS FROM STRIPA, SWEDEN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

it appears linear heat conduction accounts well for changeslinear theory of heat conduction. Geologic discontinuitiesThe diffusion of heat by conduction causes the temperature

Cook, N.G.W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

HEAT TRANSFER IN UNDERGROUND HEATING EXPERIMENTS IN GRANITE, STRIPA, SWEDEN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis of. Nonlinear Heat Transfer Problems." Report no.Berkeley, Ca. , APPENDIX A. HEAT TRANSFER BY CONDUCTION ANDMeeting, Technical Session on Heat Transfer in Nuclear Waste

Chan, T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

A PILOT HEATER TEST IN THE STRIPA GRANITE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Energy, or the Swedish Nuclear Fuel Supply Company.Division, Ext. 6782 Swedish Nuclear Fuel S;! lpply Co. Fackfinanced by the Swedish Nuclear Fuel Safety Program operated

Carlsson, H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

HEAT TRANSFER IN UNDERGROUND HEATING EXPERIMENTS IN GRANITE, STRIPA, SWEDEN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

standing of the heat transfer processes associated withto investigate the heat transfer and related processes in an

Chan, T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

ROCK MASS CHARACTERIZATION FOR STORAGE OF NUCLEAR WASTE IN GRANITE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

effect of pressure on electrical resistivity of rocks. J..exceptionally high electrical resistivity and low waterwater content is the electrical resistivity which in igneous

Witherspoon, P.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE 25 A Model for Belief Revision  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mecanica, Instituto Superior Tdcnico, 1000 Lisboa, Portugal Stuart C. Shapiro Department of Computer

Shapiro, Stuart C.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite wash stuart" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

File:EIA-shaleusa10.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search File Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » File:EIA-shaleusa10.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Granite Wash Play, Texas and Oklahoma Size of this preview: 776 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,650 × 1,275 pixels, file size: 582 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Granite Wash Play, Texas and Oklahoma Sources Energy Information Administration Related Technologies Natural Gas Creation Date 2010-11-09 Extent Regional Countries United States UN Region Northern America States Oklahoma, Texas File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time.

242

Water Conservation Tips When washing dishes by hand, don't let the water run while rinsing. Fill one sink with wash water and the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

when they are full and you could save 1000 gallons a month. Use the garbage disposal sparingly. Compost trimmings and peelings from fruits and vegetables into your yard compost to prevent from using the garbage

243

ANL/APS/TB-47 XFD Progress Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Gaston KJ, Hoffmann M, Long JS, Marquet PA, Pilgrim JD, Pressey RL, Schipper J, Sechrest W, Stuart SN

Kemner, Ken

244

Nanomagnetic Imaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NVE Corporation Joe Davies IBM David Abraham Stuart Parkin Intel George Bourianoff Hitachi Global Jordan Katine University of Paris - Sud ...

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

245

Characterization and Modeling of Microstructural Evolution in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 13, 2012... Commission; Elaine West, Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory; Stuart Maloy, Los Alamos National Laboratory; Osman Anderoglu, LANL

246

Update on Tribal Issues- Mapping Tool, Policy Statement, and Protocol Manual  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation made by Stuart Easson for the NTSF annual meeting held from May 14-16, 2013 in Buffalo, NY.

247

AmericanLifelinesAlliance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... risk to utility and transportation systems from natural hazards and ... Stuart Nishenko, Pacific Gas and Electric Company, San Francisco, California ...

248

Microsoft Word - Longview-WashWay Acquisition REVISED CX.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

22, 2012 22, 2012 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Joan Kendall Project Manager - TERR-3 Proposed Action: AMENDED: Acquisition of a portion of Cowlitz County Public Utility District's (CCPUD) 115-kV transmission line from BPA's Longview Substation to CCPUD's Washington Way Substation Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.24 Property Transfers Location: Township 8 North, Range 3 West, Section 36, and Township 8 North, Range 2 West, Sections 31 and 32 in Cowlitz County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to acquire a 1.5 mile portion of CCPUD's existing Longview-Washington Way 115-kV transmission line in order to provide a parallel

249

SCR Catalyst Disposal, Recycle, and On-Site Washing/Rejuvenation Options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Selective catalytic reduction SCR technology has enjoyed widespread implementation within the fossil fuel utility industry. The rate of spent SCR catalyst being generated is increasing proportional to the implementation of the technology, as well as the aging of the SCR fleet as a whole. Current projections estimate that nearly 30,000 tons per year of spent catalyst will be generated by 2020. This report addresses several topics associated with spent SCR catalyst, including catalyst disposal, recycle, an...

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

250

Clothing that is brought back home should be washed several times before packing to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

disinfectant at least twice, and dry on the hot setting. 5. Ways you can help keep foreign animal diseases away as listed on back page. 2. Remove any organic matter (dirt, manure) from luggage, cameras, cell phones

Bolding, M. Chad

251

Extended abstracts. Volume 78-1. [Seattle, Wash. , May 21--26, 1978  

SciTech Connect

Extended abstracts (2 or 3 pages in length) are presented for 581 papers presented at this meeting. Sessions of the following divisions are included: Corrosion, Dielectrics and Insulation, Electronics, Electrothermics and Metallurgy, Energy Technology Group, Industrial Electrolytic, Organic and Biological Electrochemistry, and Physical Electrochemistry. (RWR)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Feature: Washing Your Laundry in Public - An Analysis of Recent High-Publicity Security Incidents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is, reportedly, a significant rise in the frequency of information security incidents. Quite obviously, there is a very significant rise in the public reporting of such incidents. Whereas all of us are more or less experienced in protecting our ...

Matthew Pemble

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

SCR Catalyst Disposal, Recycle, and On-site Washing Options and Experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology becomes more widespread and the catalyst fleet ages, cost-effective and environmentally friendly approaches are need to handle the increasing volumes of spent catalyst or extend its life through simple on-site processing. This report addresses various issues related to catalyst rejuvenation, cleaning, recycling, and disposal.

2008-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

254

Experimental Breeder Reactor-II Primary Tank System Wash Water Workshop  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In 1994 Congress ordered the shutdown of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) and a closure project was initiated.

255

GEOCHEMISTRY AND ISOTOPE HYDROLOGY OF GROUNDWATERS IN THE STRIPA GRANITE RESULTS AND PRELIMINARY INTERPRETATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

samples of local uranium enrichments in fractures and/or therather significant uranium enrichments. The 222Rn activityextent. Local enrichments in uranium minerals (0. Brotzen,

Fritz, P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

GEOCHEMISTRY AND ISOTOPE HYDROLOGY OF GROUNDWATERS IN THE STRIPA GRANITE RESULTS AND PRELIMINARY INTERPRETATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3 in time-scale room Drilling fluid in time-scale room 410-reduced. When drilling fluids are for some time. used~still polluted, possibly with drilling fluid. Discus ion The

Fritz, P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

LARGE SCALE PERMEABILITY TEST OF THE GRANITE IN THE STRIPA MINE AND THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY TEST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

KBS (Swedish Nuclear Fuel Safety Program) -"~ __- L_ _ _ ~-.DOCUMENTS SSCTION Swedish Nuclear Fuel Supply Co. Fack 10240~nsles'clkerhet, KBS (SWe:1ish Nuclear Fuel Safety Program)

Lundstrom, L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Juvenile Radio-Tag Study: Lower Granite Dam, 1985-1986 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A prototype juvenile radio-tag system was developed and tested by the National Marine Fisheries Services (NMFS) and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) at John Day Dam in 1984. Results indicated that the system could provide acceptable estimates of powerhouse and spillway passage. Research in 1986 continued testing of the tag system to further define its application and limitations. Field work included releases in the forebay and tailrace under a no-spill environment and testing of new systems to improve tag detection. Laboratory tests included the response of the tag in hostile environmental conditions (spillway passage) and the effects of the radio tag on fish buoyancy compensation. This report provides results of the work along with a summarization of the combined 1985--86 field and assumption testing. 12 refs., 10 figs., 8 tabs.

Giorgi, Albert E.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

II  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

LIST OF FIGURES LIST OF FIGURES 1 General location of Granite City, Illinois . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 2 General location of the South Plant facility, Granite City Steel Division, Granite City, Illinois . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ' . . . . . . . . . . 7 3 Diagram of the New Betatron Building, Granite City Steel facility, Granite City, Illinois. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 4 View looking north northwest at the New Betatron Building, Granite City Steel facility, Granite City, Illinois . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 5 View looking east at entrance to the New Betatron Building, Granite City Steel facility, Granite City, Illinois . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

260

II  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

LIST OF FIGURES 1 General location of Granite City, Illinois . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 2 General location of the South Plant facility, Granite City Steel Division, Granite City, Illinois . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ' . . . . . . . . . . 7 3 Diagram of the New Betatron Building, Granite City Steel facility, Granite City, Illinois. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 4 View looking north northwest at the New Betatron Building, Granite City Steel facility, Granite City, Illinois . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 5 View looking east at entrance to the New Betatron Building, Granite City Steel facility, Granite City, Illinois . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite wash stuart" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Soil Resource Inventory of Sequoia National Park, Central Part, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

colluvium from granitic rock sources that has accumulated inmaterial, from granitic rock sources, veneered on the canyonderived from granitic rock sources that have accumulated in

Huntington, Gordon L.; Akeson, Mark A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Neutron Data Analysis and Visualization Thomas Proffen, Director  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diffraction Software Peter Peterson Wenduo Zhou Vickie Lynch (1) Marat Mustyakimov (2) Dennis Mikkelson (3) Ruth Mikkelson (3) Inelastic Software Stuart Campbell Michael Reuter...

263

Northerly surface wind events over the eastern North Pacific Ocean : spatial distribution, seasonality, atmospheric circulation, and forcing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D. (2005), California Wind Resources, CEC publication # CEC-level inversions with surface wind and temperature at PointD. W. Stuart (1986), Mesoscale wind variability near Point

Taylor, Stephen V.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Polymer and Composite Materials Used in Hydrogen Service - Meeting...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Laboratory Stuart Chambers Powertech Labs Inc. Clemence Devilliers Air Liquide Peter Ehlers CSA Group Jim Fekete National Institute of Standards and Technology Aaron...

265

February 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Environmental Sciences...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Nakicenovic, Nebojsa; Alcamo, Joseph; Davis, Gerald; de Vries, Bert; Fenhann, Joergen; Gaffin, Stuart; Gregory, Kenneth;...

266

June 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Environmental Sciences |...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Nakicenovic, Nebojsa; Alcamo, Joseph; Davis, Gerald; de Vries, Bert; Fenhann, Joergen; Gaffin, Stuart; Gregory, Kenneth;...

267

April 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Environmental Sciences ...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Nakicenovic, Nebojsa; Alcamo, Joseph; Davis, Gerald; de Vries, Bert; Fenhann, Joergen; Gaffin, Stuart; Gregory, Kenneth;...

268

NISTIR 7251 CONTAM User Guide and Program ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. NISTIR 7251 CONTAM User Guide and Program Documentation George N. Walton W. Stuart Dols Page 2. NISTIR 7251 CONTAM ...

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

269

Workshop on Emerging Scientific Opportunities using X-ray Imaging  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wah Keat Lee (Advanced Photon Source) Gabrielle Long (Advanced Photon Source) Stuart Stock (Northwestern Medical School) Workshop on Emerging Scientific Opportunities using...

270

NREL: Awards and Honors - Sinton QSSPC Silicon Evaluation System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LLC; Stuart Bowden of Institute of Energy Conversion, University of Delaware. The solar-electric cell and module industry is growing. Given the already tight supply of...

271

Energy Systems Integration: A Convergence of Ideas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bobi Garrett, Stuart Macmillan, Brent Rice, and Connie Komomua National Renewable Energy Laboratory Mark O'Malley University College Dublin Dan Zimmerle Colorado State...

272

Advanced Cladding Materials for Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuel Cycle Research and Development. Advanced Cladding Materials for. Fuels. Stuart A. Maloy. M. Nastasi, A. Misra. Los Alamos National Laboratory.

273

Vehicle Technologies Office: 2003 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3: Fuels and Lubrication, Part 2 Emissions from Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine with Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) using Oil Sands Derived Fuels Stuart Neill National Research...

274

AmericanLifelinesAlliance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Stuart Nishenko, PhD, Pacific Gas and Electric ... ALA Natural Disaster Data Collection Workshop ... Zealand, England, Greece, Russia, Turkey, and the ...

2008-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

275

Investigation of I-WASH's community-led total sanitation and alternative decentralized sanitation models in rural Ghana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2.5 billion people worldwide do not have access to improved sanitation and Sub-Saharan Africa is not on track to meet the MDG sanitation target. As of 2010, Ghana has achieved 14% national improved sanitation coverage and ...

Questad, Adam (Adam David)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Program on Technology Innovation: Biomass Leaching/Washing Laboratory-Scale Pilot Plant Equipment Selection and Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Leaching of biomass to remove troublesome constituents such as alkali metals, chlorine, sulfur, and phosphorus is an opportunity to solve the many problems facing the ability of firing and/or cofiring low-cost and low-grade agricultural biomass and waste materials for the production of energy and biofuels. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is interested in fostering the development of this potential game-changing biomass preteatment technology. As part of this endeavor, EPRI sponsored through ...

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

277

Why Is It Washing Away? Advocacy Groups and the Framing of Louisiana's Coastal Wetlands Loss in Local Newspapers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Louisianas coastal wetlands provide a habitat for diverse wildlife, recreational opportunities for Louisiana residents and tourists, and an important natural buffer between communities and powerful (more)

Harang, Paul

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Modeling of Damage, Permeability Changes and Pressure Responses during Excavation of the TSX Tunnel in Granitic Rock at URL, Canada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laboratories, Pinawa, Manitoba, Canada. Bckblom G, MartinLaboratories, Pinawa, Manitoba, AECL-12127. Chijimatsu M and

Rutqvist, Jonny

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Petrography and genetic history of coffinite and uraninite from the Liueryiqi granite-hosted uranium deposit, SE China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-hosted uranium deposit, SE China Maozhong Mina,b,*, Changquan Fanga , Mostafa Fayekc a Department of Earth-hosted uranium deposit, SE China, form a unique bbull's-eyeQ texture. These aggregates consist of concentric% at temperatures between 126 and 178 8C and a lithostatic pressure of 500 to 800 bars. Uranium was likely

Fayek, Mostafa

280

Modeling of Damage, Permeability Changes and Pressure Responses during Excavation of the TSX Tunnel in Granitic Rock at URL, Canada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rock: implications for nuclear fuel waste disposal, Int Jdisposal for spent nuclear fuel requires consideration ofof the EDZ at a spent nuclear fuel repository. 2 Relevant

Rutqvist, Jonny

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite wash stuart" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

EIA Drilling Productivity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Drilling Productivity Report Drilling Productivity Report For Center on Global Energy Policy, Columbia University October 29, 2013 | New York, NY By Adam Sieminski, Administrator The U.S. has experienced a rapid increase in natural gas and oil production from shale and other tight resources Adam Sieminski, EIA Drilling Productivity Report October 29, 2013 2 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 2012 Rest of US Marcellus (PA and WV) Haynesville (LA and TX) Eagle Ford (TX) Bakken (ND) Woodford (OK) Fayetteville (AR) Barnett (TX) Antrim (MI, IN, and OH) 0.0 0.4 0.8 1.2 1.6 2.0 2.4 2.8 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 2012 Eagle Ford (TX) Bakken (MT & ND) Granite Wash (OK & TX) Bonespring (TX Permian) Wolfcamp (TX Permian) Spraberry (TX Permian) Niobrara-Codell (CO) Woodford (OK)

282

United States Goveinment *  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

for Remedial Action at Granite City Steel Site, Granite City, Illinois lo: Manager, DOE Oak Ridge Field Office This is to notify you that the Granite City Steel site in...

283

untitled  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

BETATRON BUILDING Granite City Site M:LTS111000110000S08243S0824300-15.mxd coatesc 03082012 11:46:01 AM Granite City Site Granite City, Illinois, Site 2011 Aerial Photo...

284

Quantitative Rietveld XRD Mineralogy of Copper and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Mylar Standard analyzed daily on NIR ? AXN Ore Standard (Granite) analyzed daily on each XRD ... Page 22. AXN XRD Granite Ore Standard ...

2013-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

285

NETL: Onsite Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

phase Cold vapor atomic absorption spectrophotometer analyzes spent sorbent Operating temperature: ambient to 750F For more information, contact Evan Granite Evan Granite in Lab...

286

DENSITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Table 2: Principal mineral phases found in the granite rock. Mineral phase. ... Table 4. Average density of 12 granite rocks by Archimedes and CT. ...

2007-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

287

1 The Gauge Block Handbook by Ted Doiron and John Beers ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 8.4 Granite 6.3 ... Zerodur Fused Silica Invar Tungsten Carbide Oak Granite Chrome Carbide Steel GB (500mm) Steel GB (25mm) Aluminum Brass ...

2007-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

288

Basis for Identification of Disposal Options for R and D for...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

on the design of the repository, the engineered barrier, and the waste. Salt, clayshale, and granitic rocks represent a reasonable cross-section of behavior. Granitic rocks...

289

The Struggle between States and the Federal Government on the Siting of LNG Import Terminals: Has a Red Tide Washed Ashore in the Blue States?  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Policy Act of 2005 transfers, in some circumstances, implementation of the public trust doctrine from the state to the federal government. Implicit in the public trust doctrine is the issue of public safety and environmental concerns. Proponents of such facilities are challenged with weighing such factors to make a successful proposal to federal and state agencies.

Desautels, Denise; Ray, Peter

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

290
291

CLOSURE REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT165: AREA 25 AND 26 DRY WELL AND WASH DOWN AREAS, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA  

SciTech Connect

This Closure Report (CR) documents the closure activities for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 165, Area 25 and 26 Dry Well and Washdown Areas, according to the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996. CAU 165 consists of 8 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 25 and 26 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is located approximately 105 kilometers (65 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, nevada. Site closure activities were performed according to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP)-approved Corrective Action Plan (CAP) for CAU 165. CAU 165 consists of the following CASs: (1) CAS 25-07-06, Train Decontamination Area; (2) CAS 25-07-07, Vehicle Washdown; (3) CAS 25-20-01, Lab Drain Dry Well; (4) CAS 25-47-01, Reservoir and French Drain; (5) CAS 25-51-02, Drywell; (6) CAS 25-59-01, Septic System; (7) CAS 26-07-01, Vehicle Washdown Station; and (8) CAS 26-59-01, Septic System. CAU 165, Area 25 and 26 Dry Well and Washdown Areas, consists of eight CASs located in Areas 25 and 26 of the NTS. The approved closure alternatives included No Further Action, Clean Closure, and Closure in Place with Administrative Controls.

BECHTEL NEVADA

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

A case study on the influence of THM coupling on the near field safety of a spent fuel repository in sparsely fractured granite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research Laboratory (URL) in Manitoba, Canada (Rutqvist etTSX tunnel of the URL in Manitoba, outside of the excavationLaboratory (URL) in Manitoba, Canada. The constitutive

Nguyen, T.S.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

A case study on the influence of THM coupling on the near field safety of a spent fuel repository in sparsely fractured granite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to demonstrate the feasibility of geological disposal of spent CANDU fuel in Canada, a safety assessment was performed for a hypothetical repository in the Canadian Shield. The assessment shows that such repository would meet international criteria for dose rate; however, uncertainties in the assumed evolution of the repository were identified. Such uncertainties could be resolved by the consideration of coupled Thermal-Hydro-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC) processes. In Task A of the DECOVALEX-THMC project, THM models were developed within the framework of the theory of poroelasticity. Such model development was performed in an iterative manner, using experimental data from laboratory and field tests. The models were used to perform near-field simulations of the evolution of the repository in order to address the above uncertainties. This paper presents the definition and rationale of task A and the results of the simulations. From a repository safety point of view, the simulations predict that the maximum temperature would be well below the design target of 100 C, however the load on the container can marginally exceed the design value of 15 MPa. However, the most important finding from the simulations is that a rock damage zone could form around the emplacement borehole. Such damage zone can extend a few metres from the walls of the emplacement holes, with permeability values that are orders of magnitude higher than the initial values. The damage zone has the potential to increase the radionuclide transport flux from the geosphere; the effect of such an increase should be taken into account in the safety assessment and mitigated if necessary by the provision of sealing systems.

Nguyen, T.S.; Borgesson, L.; Chijimatsu, M.; Hernelind, J.; Jing, L.; Kobayashi, A.; Rutqvist, J.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

A case study on the influence of THM coupling on the near field safety of a spent fuel repository in sparsely fractured granite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

geological disposal of spent CANDU fuel in Canada, a safetyhypothetical repository for spent CANDU fuel in the Canadianbuffer. The waste form: CANDU reactors in Canada are fuelled

Nguyen, T.S.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

White Sturgeon Management Plan in the Snake River between Lower Granite and Hells Canyon Dams; Nez Perce Tribe, 1997-2005 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

White sturgeon in the Hells Canyon reach (HCR) of the Snake River are of cultural importance to the Nez Perce Tribe. However, subsistence and ceremonial fishing opportunities have been severely limited as a result of low numbers of white sturgeon in the HCR. Hydrosystem development in the Columbia River Basin has depressed numbers and productivity of white sturgeon in the HCR by isolating fish in impounded reaches of the basin, restricting access to optimal rearing habitats, reducing the anadromous forage base, and modifying early life-history habitats. Consequently, a proactive management plan is needed to mitigate for the loss of white sturgeon production in the HCR, and to identify and implement feasible measures that will restore and rebuild the white sturgeon population to a level that sustains viability and can support an annual harvest. This comprehensive and adaptive management plan describes the goals, objectives, strategies, actions, and expected evaluative timeframes for restoring the white sturgeon population in the HCR. The goal of this plan, which is to maintain a viable, persistent population that can support a sustainable fishery, is supported by the following objectives: (1) a natural, stable age structure comprising both juveniles and a broad spectrum of spawning age-classes; (2) stable or increasing numbers of both juveniles and adults; (3) consistent levels of average recruitment to ensure future contribution to reproductive potential; (4) stable genetic diversity comparable to current levels; (5) a minimum level of abundance of 2,500 adults to minimize extinction risk; and (6) provision of an annual sustainable harvest of 5 kg/ha. To achieve management objectives, potential mitigative actions were developed by a Biological Risk Assessment Team (BRAT). Identified strategies and actions included enhancing growth and survival rates by restoring anadromous fish runs and increasing passage opportunities for white sturgeon, reducing mortality rates of early life stages by modifying flows in the HCR, reducing mortality imposed by the catch and release fishery, augmenting natural production through translocation or hatchery releases, and assessing detrimental effects of contaminants on reproductive potential. These proposed actions were evaluated by assessing their relative potential to affect population growth rate and by determining the feasibility of their execution, including a realistic timeframe (short-term, mid-term, long-term) for their implementation and evaluation. A multi-pronged approach for management was decided upon whereby various actions will be implemented and evaluated under different timeframes. Priority management actions include: Action I- Produce juvenile white sturgeon in a hatchery and release into the management area; Action G- Collect juvenile white sturgeon from other populations in the Snake or Columbia rivers and release them into the management area; and Action D- Restore white sturgeon passage upriver and downriver at Lower Snake and Idaho Power dams. An integral part of this approach is the continual monitoring of performance measures to assess the progressive response of the population to implemented actions, to evaluate the actions efficacy toward achieving objectives, and to refine and redirect strategies if warranted.

Nez Perce Tribe Resources Management Staff, (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Comparison of Intake Gate Closure Methods At Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, And McNary Dams Using Risk-Based Analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to compare the benefits and costs of modifications proposed for intake gate closure systems at four hydroelectric stations on the Lower Snake and Upper Columbia Rivers in the Walla Walla District that are unable to meet the COE 10-minute closure rule due to the installation of fish screens. The primary benefit of the proposed modifications is to reduce the risk of damage to the station and environs when emergency intake gate closure is required. Consequently, this report presents the results and methodology of an extensive risk analysis performed to assess the reliability of powerhouse systems and the costs and timing of potential damages resulting from events requiring emergency intake gate closure. As part of this analysis, the level of protection provided by the nitrogen emergency closure system was also evaluated. The nitrogen system was the basis for the original recommendation to partially disable the intake gate systems. The risk analysis quantifies this protection level.

Gore, Bryan F; Blackburn, Tye R; Heasler, Patrick G; Mara, Neil L

2001-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

297

First Day Second Day Third Day Fourth Day Monday, April 19 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 8:30 13:30 Advanced Materials--spintronics and q-dots: Stuart Parkin (confirmed) 14:30 9:30 11:00 Overview Lecture: Lukas Novotny (confirmed)

2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

298

ARM - ARM Engineering and Operations Contacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data Processing 509.372.4704 Matt.Macduff@pnnl.gov Giri Palanisamy Data Archival and Distribution 865.241.5926 palanisamyg@ornl.gov Cory Stuart Data Collection and...

299

MINUTES OF MEETING BOARD OF TRUSTEES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Technology Dan Mandl, Stuart Frye1 , Bruce Trout2 , Jerry Hengemihle2 , Jeff D'Agostino3 , Seth Shulman4 Pell, and Brian Williams. Artificial Intelligence 103(1-2):5-48, August 1998 14. The PROBA Onboard

Lee, Dongwon

300

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

SEPT02OH 1. General James M Gavin Coal Ohio Power Co 2. J M Stuart Dayton Power & Light Co 3. W H Sammis FirstEnergy Generation Corp 4. Cardinal Cardinal Operating Co

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301

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

J.K. Smith C Spurlock Stuart / Zimmer Lemoyne Troy Energy CTs North Medina ... Bates South McAllen Loma Alta Ranch N Edinburg Pawnee Coleto Creek Rio Hondo Ckt 74 Tomball

302

September 2004 NREL/MP-560-36734 Summary of Electrolytic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

focuses on five companies' electrolysis units: Stuart IMET; Teledyne HM and EC; Proton HOGEN; Norsk Hydro,900 cars, 2.3 MW of electricity would be required. This electricity demand would likely preclude

303

R&D for a Soft X-Ray Free Electron Laser Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S.H. Kim, D. Mangra, ORNL-SNS; D. Barni, C. Pagani, P.for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project, 50. StuartSpallation Neutron Source (SNS) cavities operate. This may

Staples, John

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

ECLOUD04 workshop (Napa, California, April 19-23, 2004)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by LBNL, CERN, ORNL and SNS, in addition to the ICFA Beamby Stuart Henderson (ORNL/SNS); the design of the poster wasas the fabrication of the SNS storage ring vacuum chamber is

Furman, Miguel A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

THEORETICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF WASTE TRANS -PORT IN SELECTED ROCKS: 1977 ANNUAL REPORT OF LBL CONTRACT NO. 45901AK. Waste Isolation Safety Assessment Program-Collection and Generation of Transport Data.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

experiment. Wash: Hanford, Works, Report BW-61476. crib.Richland, Wash. : Hanford Works, Report BW-71573. Noshkin,soil, Richland, Wash. : Hanford Works, Report HW-24548, 21

Apps, J.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

An interpretation of potential scale dependence of the effective matrix diffusion coefficient  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, calcium bentonite, shale, clay, silica sand, and crushed granite. Natural Barriers Natural barriers

Zhou, Quanlin

307

No Slide Title  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... yellow (?) window glass broken orange (?) granite and underlying truss damage red (?) damage to exterior structural steel ...

2011-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

308

Baldrige Award Recipients' Contacts and Profiles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Small Business. Granite Rock Company contacts, profile. 1991. Small Business. Manufacturing. Marlow Industries, Inc. contacts, profile. ...

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

309

Baldrige Award Recipients 19882012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Marriott International); Granite Rock Co. (now Graniterock); Eastman Chemical Company; Ames Rubber Corporation; AT&T ...

2013-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

310

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Description SIC group SIC code Description SIC group 14230 Granite - crushed Crushed Stone 13111 Oil shale

Texas at Austin, University of

311

REVIEW DRAFT MOTOR-VEHICLE INFRASTRUCTURE AND SERVICES PROVIDED  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Description SIC group SIC code Description SIC group 14230 Granite - crushed Crushed Stone 13111 Oil shale

Delucchi, Mark

312

\\-%ooS\\ i--1 INTOR FIRST WALL/BLANKET/SHIELD ACTIVITY CONF-860391 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Term Expert Rev Group Wash DC Steam Explosions, DCH Jan 87 NUREG-1150 Cont Loads Panel Wash DC Steam

Harilal, S. S.

313

Energy Consumption, Efficiency, Conservation, and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation in Japan's Building Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Washing Machines Dishwashers Televisions and Videocassettewashing machines, dishwashers, televisions and videocassetteJapanese washing machines Dishwashers Dishwashers circulate

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Biotechnology --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

X Y Z X Y Z Wagener, Thorsten (Thorsten Wagener) - Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Pennsylvania State University Waggoner, Ben (Ben Waggoner) - Department of Biology, University of Central Arkansas Wakabayashi, John (John Wakabayashi) - Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, California State University, Fresno Wake, Cameron P. (Cameron P. Wake) - Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space, University of New Hampshire Wakeham, Stuart (Stuart Wakeham) - Skidaway Institute of Oceanography Walden, Von P. (Von P. Walden) - Department of Geography, University of Idaho Waldhauser, Felix (Felix Waldhauser) - Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University Waliser, Duane E. (Duane E. Waliser) - Water and Carbon Cycles Group, Jet Propulsion Laboratory

315

PowerPoint Presentation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

High and Rising Oil Prices, Despite the US High and Rising Oil Prices, Despite the US Oil Production Boom EIA Annual Conference, 17-18 June 2013 Jan Stuart Head of Energy, Commodities Research FID +1 212 325 1013 jan.stuart@credit-suisse.com ANALYST CERTIFICATIONS AND IMPORTANT DISCLOSURES ARE IN THE DISCLOSURE APPENDIX. FOR OTHER IMPORTANT DISCLOSURES, PLEASE REFER TO https://firesearchdisclosure.credit-suisse.com. CREDIT SUISSE SECURITIES RESEARCH & ANALYTICS BEYOND INFORMATION ® Client-Driven Solutions, Insights, and Access Commodities Group - 2 What do markets tell us Source: the BLOOMBERG PROFESSIONAL(tm) service, Credit Suisse Global Commodities Research, IEA Brent 1-2 futures and front month price

316

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Power  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

X Y Z X Y Z Wagenius, Stuart (Stuart Wagenius) - Chicago Botanic Garden Waggoner, Ben (Ben Waggoner) - Department of Biology, University of Central Arkansas Wagner Jr., William E. (William E. Wagner Jr.) - School of Biological Sciences, University of Nebraska-Lincoln Wagner, Diane (Diane Wagner) - Institute of Arctic Biology, Department of Biology and Wildlife, University of Alaska Fairbanks Wagner, Günter (Günter Wagner) - Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Yale University Wagner, Robert G. (Robert G. Wagner) - Department of Forest Ecosystem Science, University of Maine Wahlberg, Niklas (Niklas Wahlberg) - Department of Biology, University of Turku Wainwright, Peter C. (Peter C. Wainwright) - Section of Evolution and Ecology, University of California, Davis

317

Department of Energy Finalizes Loan Guarantee of Nearly $170...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Nearly 170 Million to Granite Reliable Power Department of Energy Finalizes Loan Guarantee of Nearly 170 Million to Granite Reliable Power September 23, 2011 - 3:31pm Addthis...

318

NETL: News Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EngineerPhysical Scientist, GS-8011301-9111213" has been posted. 09.09.2008 News Granite Winner of R&D 100 Award PDF-27KB Dr. Evan Granite, a chemical engineer and research...

319

NETL: Releases & Briefs - Photochemical removal of mercury from...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photochemical Removal of Mercury from Flue Gas Scientist Evan Granite explains that UV-C light drives the reaction Scientist Evan Granite explains that UV-C light drives the...

320

L L I I  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

._"-l"__- ._"-l"__- .- '- .- 1 Applicable guidelines for protection against radiation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2 Grid locations containing contamination levels above DOE guidelines at the Old Betatron Building, Granite City, Illinois . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 3 Results of analysis of smears from the Old Betatron Building, Granite City, Illinois . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 4 Results of detailed characterization at random locations at the Old Betatron Building, Granite City, Illinois . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 5 Post-remedial action survey results at the Old Betatron Building, Granite City,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite wash stuart" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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321

The Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... (2010); Globe Metallurgical Inc. (1988); Granite Rock Company (1992); K&N Management (2010); Los Alamos National Bank (2000); ...

2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

322

Baldrige Award Recipient Contacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 1992 Small Business Graniterock Company (formerly Granite Rock Company) Public Affairs Contact Graniterock 330 Technology Drive Watsonville ...

323

EMICONDUCTORS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Second, the CDPBD has been reconstructed on a granite base, further enhancing structural stability for high resolution, high accuracy XRR ...

2012-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

324

Photoluminescence of P-Type CdTe Thin Films  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Incorporation of Granite Waste Diamond Wire in Cementitious Matrices Indium Extraction Process from Sulfuric Pressure Leaching Solution for Vacuum...

325

Baldrige Award Recipients 19882012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company, LLC (now part of Marriott International) Granite Rock Co. (now Graniterock) Eastman Chemical Company ...

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

326

Environmental and Materials Considerations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...waste repositories in the world are clay and granite (Table 1). The containers are intended to be located

327

PubTeX output 2001.01.17:0914  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The instrument consists of a heavy granite structure supporting a microscope/CCD (charge- coupled-device) camera system. ...

2010-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

328

Program Impacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... (2010); Globe Metallurgical Inc. (1988); Granite Rock Company (1992); K&N Management (2010); Los Alamos National Bank (2000); ...

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

NIST Stone Test Wall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... purposes. There are many varieties of the common types used in building, such as marble, limestone, sandstone, and granite. ...

2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

330

PubTeX output 1999.01.18:1544  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The microscope is mounted on a granite support structure. A single- level stage, with and movement on the same plane ...

2010-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

331

Stone Test Wall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... purposes. There are many varieties of the common types used in building, such as marble, limestone, sandstone, and granite. ...

2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

332

A REVIEW OF LIGHT-WATER REACTOR SAFETY STUDIES. VOLUME 3 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commission Report WASH-1400 (NUREG-75/014), in 9 volumes,Commission Report WASH-1400 (NUREG-75/014), in 9 volumes,Commission Report WASH-1400 (NUREG-75/014), in 9 volumes,

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Solar fusion cross sections Eric G. Adelberger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar fusion cross sections Eric G. Adelberger Nuclear Physics Laboratory, University of Washington of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 Stuart J. Freedman Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 Moshe Gai Department of Physics U46, University of Connecticut, Storrs

Bahcall, John

334

The future of carbon capture and storage in Europe www.sccs.org.uk s.haszeldine@ed.ac.uk p 1 The future of carbon capture and storage in Europe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The future of carbon capture and storage in Europe www.sccs.org.uk s.haszeldine@ed.ac.uk p 1 The future of carbon capture and storage in Europe Response to COM (2013) 180 final Professor Stuart Haszeldine Dr Vivian Scott Mr Chris Littlecott 1 July 2013 SCCS (Scottish carbon capture

Haszeldine, Stuart

335

Turbulent heating of the corona and solar wind: the heliospheric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of telegraph services - Once per 500 years (ice cores) - Solar-terrestrial connection - Interplanetary space of radiators - Dust environment - Cp/Cg problems - Solar panels and power #12;Solar Probe Plus 2018 launch 35Turbulent heating of the corona and solar wind: the heliospheric dark energy problem Stuart D. Bale

336

Delta Energy & Environment Ltd Registered in Scotland: No SC259964  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy & Environment Scene setting: Challenges for heat pumps penetrating the gas grid Europe: 770k HPs Stuart Street, Edinburgh, EH3 7TS Heat Pumps in the Building Sector: Hybrid Heat Pumps opening UK DECC IEA Heat Pump Workshop 13th November 2012 Contact: lindsay.sugden@delta-ee.com, +44(0)131 625 1006

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

337

6. Fracture mechanics lead author: J, R. Rice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

6. Fracture mechanics lead author: J, R. Rice Division of Applied Sciences, Harvard University. F. Shih, and the ASME/AMD Technical Committee on Fracture Mechanics, pro- vided by A. S. Argon, S. N, W. D. Stuart, and R. Thomson. 6.0 ABSTRACT Fracture mechanics is an active research field

338

Technology Brief: Analysis of Current-Day Commercial Electrolyzers  

SciTech Connect

This factsheet provides an overview of the current state of electrolytic hydrogen production technologies and an economic analysis of the processes and systems available as of December 2003. The operating specifications and hydrogen production costs of commercially available electrolyzers from five manufacturers, i.e., Stuart, Teledyne, Proton, Norsk Hydro, and Avalence, are compared.

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

UNDERGRADUATE OldDominionUniversity2011-2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

's personal copy Sustainable gasification­biochar systems? A case-study of rice-husk gasification in Cambodia a , Stuart Haszeldine a a UK Biochar Research Centre, Crew Building, King's Buildings, University: Received 12 August 2010 Accepted 8 November 2011 Available online 12 December 2011 Keywords: Biochar

340

Favorable conditions noted for Australia shale oil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

After brief descriptions of the Rundle, Condor, and Stuart/Kerosene Creek oil shale projects in Queensland, the competitive advantages of oil shale development and the state and federal governments' attitudes towards an oil shale industry in Australia are discussed. It is concluded that Australia is the ideal country in which to start an oil shale industry.

Not Available

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite wash stuart" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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341

Aruna Ravinagarajan System Energy Efficiency Lab  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aruna Ravinagarajan System Energy Efficiency Lab Aruna Ravinagarajan Advisor : Prof. Tajana Simunic of monitoring a structure over time and identifying damage System Energy Efficiency Lab damage A wireless sensor Efficiency Lab #12;SHM ­ How is it done?SHM ­ How is it done? System Energy Efficiency Lab Stuart G Taylor

342

Degradation of monoethanolamine in soil Anne W. Ndegwa, Ron C.K. Wong, Angus Chu, Laurence R. Bentley, and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Geology and Geophysics, The University of Calgary, Al- berta, AB T2N 1N4, Canada. S.R.D. Lunn. Imperial137 Degradation of monoethanolamine in soil Anne W. Ndegwa, Ron C.K. Wong, Angus Chu, Laurence R. Bentley, and Stuart R.D. Lunn Abstract: Monoethanolamines (MEA) are commonly used by the natural gas

343

Malm Hydrogen and CNG/Hydrogen filling station and Hythane bus project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by Vandenborre Hydrogen Systems in Belgium, a subsidiary of Stuart Energy, Canada now owned by Hydrogenics ltd % Fig 1. Hydrogen storage pressure tanks Fig 2. Hydrogen storage The above pictures show the compressed hydrogen storage at the site. The hydrogen storage is placed closed to the electrolyser unit. The pressure

344

BOOK REVIEW doi:10.1111/j.1558-5646.2010.01072.x  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BOOK REVIEW doi:10.1111/j.1558-5646.2010.01072.x IS THERE A UNIFYING THEORY OF SEX ALLOCATION, but I was personally hoping for the latter as I sat down to read Stuart West's recent book titled "Sex Allocation" (2009). I also could not help but compare it with Charnov's (1982) book on "The Theory of Sex

West, Stuart

345

Department of Nuclear Engineering The University of Tennessee  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;2009 Annual Report 9 Lee P. Tschaepe Evaluation of HFIR LEU Fuel Using The COMSOL Multiphysics Platform Robert G. Taylor Validation of KENO V.a Code for High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) Stuart A. Walker Low Regression Initialization Module David Chandler Design of Advanced HEU Fuel to Support Conversion of HFIR

Tennessee, University of

346

Energy Efficiency Services Sector: W kf Si E t ti f G thWorkforce Size, Expectations for Growth,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

& greenhouse gas reduction goals Are there adequately trained people to design, manage, and install and training organizations (n=33) ­ Other subject-area experts (n~50) · Literature review; analysis, and Training Needs Charles A. Goldman*, Jane S. Peters**, Nathaniel Albers**, Elizabeth Stuart* and Merrian C

347

Solubility trapping in formation water as dominant CO2 sink in natural gas fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LETTERS Solubility trapping in formation water as dominant CO2 sink in natural gas fields Stuart M removal in nine natural gas fields in North America, China and Europe, using noble gas and carbon isotope tracers. The natural gas fields investigated in our study are dominated by a CO2 phase and provide

Haszeldine, Stuart

348

How safe is CO2 storage? Natural analogues for CO2 storage sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How safe is CO2 storage? Natural analogues for CO2 storage sites Johannes Miocic, Stuart Gilfillan. Introduction Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is the only technology available to reduce greenhouse gas and analysed a global dataset of natural CO2 reservoirs as analogues for CO2 storage sites. Initial results

349

EHS Subject Matter Expert List 9/27/2013 https://sharepoint.rmps.cornell.edu:8445/ehs/ehs/Shared Documents/ALL_STAFF_SME  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-254-4733 Centrifuge Stuart, Ralph 802-316-9571 Coolbaugh, Brenda 607-254-5085 CERCLA/EPCRA Herbold-Miller, Ilene 607-316-9571 Sweet, Ellen 315-730-8896 Compost English, Barb 607-254-4733 Murphy, Andrew 607-254-8519 Compressed Gas

Pawlowski, Wojtek

350

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Many Devils Wash, Shiprock Site, New Mexico http:energy.govlmdownloadsgeology-and-groundwater-investigation-many-devils-wash-shiprock-site Article T-682:Double free...

351

Clarification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 5, 2013 ... An automatic preparation control of the caustic wash solution, used to wash filter cloth at the end of filtration cycle, was also done. The useful...

352

Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

appliances such as dishwashers I and washing machines, forenergy savings are: and dishwashers with full loads and onfor washing machines and dishwashers, and reducing water

Benenson, P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

PREPARED FORTHE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DEAC0276CH03073  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laboratory, Alamos, i Univ. of Washington, Seattle, Wash. j Hiroshima Univ., Hiroshima, Japan k Johns Hopkins

354

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. of Washington, Seattle, Wash. j Hiroshima Univ., Hiroshima, Japan k Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md. l

355

Energy Efficiency Indicators Methodology Booklet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

washing machine, dishwashers and TV) Unit consumptionelectric and gas ranges, dishwasher water heating Floor

Sathaye, Jayant

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Microsoft PowerPoint - 12-05 REBOUL-EM2010rev.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 (SB7) 7 (SB7) Washing and Settling Demonstration Scott Reboul, John Pareizs, Damon Click, Dan Lambert November 18, 2010 EM Waste Processing Technical Exchange Supernatant Constituent Concentrations as a Function of Wash Cycle 1 2 3 4 5 6 Wash Cycle Number Print Close 2 SB7 Washing and Settling Demonstration Impetus SB7 blend: Tank 12 - slow settling Tank 7 - high oxalate Tank 4 - high sulfate Print Close 3 SB7 Washing and Settling Demonstration Objectives Identify washing/settling trends Oxalate & sulfate removal Settling rates Sludge compaction Composition & properties Print Close 4 SB7 Washing and Settling Demonstration Methodology Generate test slurry Wash per SB7 plan Quantify settling vs wash cycle and time Sampling and analysis Print Close 5 SB7 Washing and Settling Demonstration Settling Behavior

357

DATE: REPLY TO Al-l' N OF: SUBJECT: TO:  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

oy&$= IL4 2%?5- oy&$= IL4 2%?5- EFG (07.90) ' Uni,ted bates Government memorandum Department of Energy /Em 7:3/ (5 2L-e DATE: REPLY TO Al-l' N OF: SUBJECT: TO: - MAR 1 1 1991 EM-421 Authority Determination-- Granite City Steel Site, Granite City, Illinois The File The attached review documents the basis for determining whether DOE has authority for taking remedial action at the Granite City Steel Site in Granite City, Illinois, under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The Betatron Building at the Granite City facility was used by the Mallinckrodt Chemical Works as a subcontractor for uranium metal quality control work from 1958 to 1966. The services furnished at the Granite City Steel site under a series of purchase orders consisted of

358

1:pierson s twin lakes marina  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 1190:birth certificate. 1191:diy roll roofing. 1192:scrabble players. 1193:gokarts. ... 6457:oakridges fcat score. 6458:do it yourself granite. 6459:italy doors ...

359

This  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

contribu- tions of Jared Ciferno, Bruce Lani, Sara Pletcher, Pierina Noceti, Barbara Carney, William Aljoe, Evan Granite, and Henry Pennline. The authors would also like to...

360

PLEASE SCROLL DOWN FOR ARTICLE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Lynn Brickett, Charles Miller, Bruce Lani, Sara Pletcher, Pierina Noceti, Barbara Carney, William Aljoe, Evan Granite and Henry Pennline. Also they acknowledge the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite wash stuart" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Naturita  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Fairfield Site Falls City Site Fernald Preserve Gasbuggy Site General Atomics Geothermal Gnome-Coach Site Grand Junction Sites Granite City Site Green River Site Gunnison...

362

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Sherwood  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Fairfield Site Falls City Site Fernald Preserve Gasbuggy Site General Atomics Geothermal Gnome-Coach Site Grand Junction Sites Granite City Site Green River Site Gunnison...

363

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Slick Rock  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Fairfield Site Falls City Site Fernald Preserve Gasbuggy Site General Atomics Geothermal Gnome-Coach Site Grand Junction Sites Granite City Site Green River Site Gunnison...

364

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Pennsylvania  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Fairfield Site Falls City Site Fernald Preserve Gasbuggy Site General Atomics Geothermal Gnome-Coach Site Grand Junction Sites Granite City Site Green River Site Gunnison...

365

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Grand Junction Sites  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Fairfield Site Falls City Site Fernald Preserve Gasbuggy Site General Atomics Geothermal Gnome-Coach Site Grand Junction Sites Granite City Site Green River Site Gunnison...

366

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Amchitka  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Fairfield Site Falls City Site Fernald Preserve Gasbuggy Site General Atomics Geothermal Gnome-Coach Site Grand Junction Sites Granite City Site Green River Site Gunnison...

367

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- New York  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Fairfield Site Falls City Site Fernald Preserve Gasbuggy Site General Atomics Geothermal Gnome-Coach Site Grand Junction Sites Granite City Site Green River Site Gunnison...

368

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Arizona  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Fairfield Site Falls City Site Fernald Preserve Gasbuggy Site General Atomics Geothermal Gnome-Coach Site Grand Junction Sites Granite City Site Green River Site Gunnison...

369

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Oxford OH Site - OH 22  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Fairfield Site Falls City Site Fernald Preserve Gasbuggy Site General Atomics Geothermal Gnome-Coach Site Grand Junction Sites Granite City Site Green River Site Gunnison...

370

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Colorado  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Fairfield Site Falls City Site Fernald Preserve Gasbuggy Site General Atomics Geothermal Gnome-Coach Site Grand Junction Sites Granite City Site Green River Site Gunnison...

371

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Rifle  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Fairfield Site Falls City Site Fernald Preserve Gasbuggy Site General Atomics Geothermal Gnome-Coach Site Grand Junction Sites Granite City Site Green River Site Gunnison...

372

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Alaska  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Fairfield Site Falls City Site Fernald Preserve Gasbuggy Site General Atomics Geothermal Gnome-Coach Site Grand Junction Sites Granite City Site Green River Site Gunnison...

373

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Wyoming  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Fairfield Site Falls City Site Fernald Preserve Gasbuggy Site General Atomics Geothermal Gnome-Coach Site Grand Junction Sites Granite City Site Green River Site Gunnison...

374

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Pinellas  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Fairfield Site Falls City Site Fernald Preserve Gasbuggy Site General Atomics Geothermal Gnome-Coach Site Grand Junction Sites Granite City Site Green River Site Gunnison...

375

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Colonie_FUSRAP  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Fairfield Site Falls City Site Fernald Preserve Gasbuggy Site General Atomics Geothermal Gnome-Coach Site Grand Junction Sites Granite City Site Green River Site Gunnison...

376

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Durango  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Fairfield Site Falls City Site Fernald Preserve Gasbuggy Site General Atomics Geothermal Gnome-Coach Site Grand Junction Sites Granite City Site Green River Site Gunnison...

377

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Maywood_FUSRAP  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Fairfield Site Falls City Site Fernald Preserve Gasbuggy Site General Atomics Geothermal Gnome-Coach Site Grand Junction Sites Granite City Site Green River Site Gunnison...

378

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Illinois  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Fairfield Site Falls City Site Fernald Preserve Gasbuggy Site General Atomics Geothermal Gnome-Coach Site Grand Junction Sites Granite City Site Green River Site Gunnison...

379

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Massachuetts  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Fairfield Site Falls City Site Fernald Preserve Gasbuggy Site General Atomics Geothermal Gnome-Coach Site Grand Junction Sites Granite City Site Green River Site Gunnison...

380

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Geothermal Test Facility...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Fairfield Site Falls City Site Fernald Preserve Gasbuggy Site General Atomics Geothermal Gnome-Coach Site Grand Junction Sites Granite City Site Green River Site Gunnison...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite wash stuart" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Hallam  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Fairfield Site Falls City Site Fernald Preserve Gasbuggy Site General Atomics Geothermal Gnome-Coach Site Grand Junction Sites Granite City Site Green River Site Gunnison...

382

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Niagarass_FUSRAP  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Fairfield Site Falls City Site Fernald Preserve Gasbuggy Site General Atomics Geothermal Gnome-Coach Site Grand Junction Sites Granite City Site Green River Site Gunnison...

383

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Gunnison  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Fairfield Site Falls City Site Fernald Preserve Gasbuggy Site General Atomics Geothermal Gnome-Coach Site Grand Junction Sites Granite City Site Green River Site Gunnison...

384

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Maywood Site - NJ 10  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Fairfield Site Falls City Site Fernald Preserve Gasbuggy Site General Atomics Geothermal Gnome-Coach Site Grand Junction Sites Granite City Site Green River Site Gunnison...

385

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Utah  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Fairfield Site Falls City Site Fernald Preserve Gasbuggy Site General Atomics Geothermal Gnome-Coach Site Grand Junction Sites Granite City Site Green River Site Gunnison...

386

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Central  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Fairfield Site Falls City Site Fernald Preserve Gasbuggy Site General Atomics Geothermal Gnome-Coach Site Grand Junction Sites Granite City Site Green River Site Gunnison...

387

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Middlesex Sampling Plant...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Fairfield Site Falls City Site Fernald Preserve Gasbuggy Site General Atomics Geothermal Gnome-Coach Site Grand Junction Sites Granite City Site Green River Site Gunnison...

388

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Oxnard  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Fairfield Site Falls City Site Fernald Preserve Gasbuggy Site General Atomics Geothermal Gnome-Coach Site Grand Junction Sites Granite City Site Green River Site Gunnison...

389

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Seymour CT Site - CT 02  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Fairfield Site Falls City Site Fernald Preserve Gasbuggy Site General Atomics Geothermal Gnome-Coach Site Grand Junction Sites Granite City Site Green River Site Gunnison...

390

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Oregon  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Fairfield Site Falls City Site Fernald Preserve Gasbuggy Site General Atomics Geothermal Gnome-Coach Site Grand Junction Sites Granite City Site Green River Site Gunnison...

391

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Missouri  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Fairfield Site Falls City Site Fernald Preserve Gasbuggy Site General Atomics Geothermal Gnome-Coach Site Grand Junction Sites Granite City Site Green River Site Gunnison...

392

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Albany - OR 01  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Fairfield Site Falls City Site Fernald Preserve Gasbuggy Site General Atomics Geothermal Gnome-Coach Site Grand Junction Sites Granite City Site Green River Site Gunnison...

393

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- California  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Fairfield Site Falls City Site Fernald Preserve Gasbuggy Site General Atomics Geothermal Gnome-Coach Site Grand Junction Sites Granite City Site Green River Site Gunnison...

394

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Mound Site  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Fairfield Site Falls City Site Fernald Preserve Gasbuggy Site General Atomics Geothermal Gnome-Coach Site Grand Junction Sites Granite City Site Green River Site Gunnison...

395

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Niagara Falls Storage Site...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Fairfield Site Falls City Site Fernald Preserve Gasbuggy Site General Atomics Geothermal Gnome-Coach Site Grand Junction Sites Granite City Site Green River Site Gunnison...

396

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Middlesexsp_FUSRAP  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Fairfield Site Falls City Site Fernald Preserve Gasbuggy Site General Atomics Geothermal Gnome-Coach Site Grand Junction Sites Granite City Site Green River Site Gunnison...

397

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- New Jersey  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Fairfield Site Falls City Site Fernald Preserve Gasbuggy Site General Atomics Geothermal Gnome-Coach Site Grand Junction Sites Granite City Site Green River Site Gunnison...

398

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Nevada  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Fairfield Site Falls City Site Fernald Preserve Gasbuggy Site General Atomics Geothermal Gnome-Coach Site Grand Junction Sites Granite City Site Green River Site Gunnison...

399

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Maybell_West(2)  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Fairfield Site Falls City Site Fernald Preserve Gasbuggy Site General Atomics Geothermal Gnome-Coach Site Grand Junction Sites Granite City Site Green River Site Gunnison...

400

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Interpretive Center and...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Fairfield Site Falls City Site Fernald Preserve Gasbuggy Site General Atomics Geothermal Gnome-Coach Site Grand Junction Sites Granite City Site Green River Site Gunnison...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite wash stuart" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Salt_Lake  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Fairfield Site Falls City Site Fernald Preserve Gasbuggy Site General Atomics Geothermal Gnome-Coach Site Grand Junction Sites Granite City Site Green River Site Gunnison...

402

DOE - Office of Legacy Management --  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Fairfield Site Falls City Site Fernald Preserve Gasbuggy Site General Atomics Geothermal Gnome-Coach Site Grand Junction Sites Granite City Site Green River Site Gunnison...

403

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- New Mexico  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Fairfield Site Falls City Site Fernald Preserve Gasbuggy Site General Atomics Geothermal Gnome-Coach Site Grand Junction Sites Granite City Site Green River Site Gunnison...

404

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Ohio  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Fairfield Site Falls City Site Fernald Preserve Gasbuggy Site General Atomics Geothermal Gnome-Coach Site Grand Junction Sites Granite City Site Green River Site Gunnison...

405

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Colonie - NY 06  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Fairfield Site Falls City Site Fernald Preserve Gasbuggy Site General Atomics Geothermal Gnome-Coach Site Grand Junction Sites Granite City Site Green River Site Gunnison...

406

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- LEHR  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Fairfield Site Falls City Site Fernald Preserve Gasbuggy Site General Atomics Geothermal Gnome-Coach Site Grand Junction Sites Granite City Site Green River Site Gunnison...

407

In situ weathering rind erosion Steven J. Gordona,*, Ronald I. Dornb  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-scattered electron microscopy reveals that ignimbrite, andesite, basalt, and granitic clasts experience WR erosion; Glacial; Organ Pipe; Quaternary; Sierra Nevada; Weathering 1. Introduction When it comes to presenting

Dorn, Ron

408

NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NA University of Pittsburgh FE SCCGasification Division 2012 October 15-18, 2012 Evan Granite Pittsburgh, PA 29th Annual International Pittsburgh Coal Conference at the David...

409

EIS-0285-SA-139: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Analysis EIS-0285-SA-139: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program - Little Goose-Lower Granite Corridor Maintenance Vegetation Management for...

410

Materials for Nuclear Power: Digital Resource Center - ABSTRACT ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 27, 2007 ... Topic Title: ABSTRACT: Radiation Damage and Alteration of Zircon from a 3.3 Ga Porphyritic Granite Topic Summary: J. Valley, et. al.,...

411

Three-dimensional shape analysis of coarse aggregates ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... particle volume (V), which can both be computed from the spherical harmonic analysis [1]. Figure 6 shows these plots for the granite (GR) and ...

2005-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

412

Test Procedure for 170.306 (d)(1) Electronic Copy of Health ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Vendor-supplied (eg, Medical Record Number) Vendor-supplied (eg, 540 Granite Street, Blanchard, Oklahoma 73010 405-228-7744) ...

2010-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

413

Resistance switching properties and mechanism of switching in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simplex Network Modeling for Press-Molded Ceramic Bodies Incorporated with Granite Waste Solidification mechanisms of carbon as graphene, graphite and...

414

ShakeMap and ShakeCast - Revolutionizing Informatics for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 46.5? 47? 47.5? 48? Seattle Skykomish Hyak Goat Rocks Mount Rainier Granite Falls Monroe Enumclaw Poulsbo Olympia Centralia ...

2007-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

415

NIST Manuscript Publication Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Our measurements make it clear that the granite rock added to fill about half the volume of modern concrete also reduces its electromagnetic ...

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

NIST's New Scanning Probe Microscope is Supercool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The microscope is mounted on a 6-ton granite table (4), also supported by pneumatic isolators. The cryostat (5) is mounted ...

2011-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

417

ANALYSIS OF BUILDING AND FIRE CODE AND PRACTICES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Page 76. Structural Integrity Inspection Space usage identify possible overloading Distribute granite slabs on floor106 over a larger area (1995) ...

418

U.S. Energy Information Administration - EIA - Independent ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Granite State Gas Transmission Inc., Maritimes/Northeast Pipeline Co., Portland Gas Transmission Co. Fueling Stations: Maine: Share of U.S. Period: Motor Gasoline

419

PRESS RELEASEContact Mike Benjamin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In attendance from NETL are left to right: Larry Headley, Associate Director; Evan Granite, Research Chemical Engineer and technology co-inventor; Henry Pennline, Research Team...

420

Clean Cities Coalitions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capital District Columbia-Willamette Central New York Vermont Maine Genesee Region Granite State Twin Cities Yellowstone-Teton Rogue Valley Treasure Valley Western New York...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite wash stuart" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

NIST CNST Document  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... For more information, contact Mike Hernandez. Elemental spatial distribution map on a granite sample: ? C ? Na ? Al ? Ca ? K ? Si ? S ? Fe ...

2013-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

422

NCNR NG7-SANS Instrument Schedule P. Butler Tel: (301) ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Amherst) Transition (DOT) in Nov 19 1 M Bhatt+ L Jin+ S 14740 Porosity Development in SE Mildner Brantley (Penn S25-69 Granite and Diabase ...

423

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The microscope is mounted on a 6-ton granite table (4), also supported by pneumatic isolators. The cryostat (5) is mounted ...

424

National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... DIMENSIONAL ANGULAR (20/D01) Angle Measuring Equipment 0 to 75 5.4 Angle Blocks 90 1.1 Granite Square LENGTH ...

2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

425

Structural, optical and transport properties of room temperature ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simplex Network Modeling for Press-Molded Ceramic Bodies Incorporated with Granite Waste Solidification mechanisms of carbon as graphene, graphite and...

426

Thin Film X-Ray Reflectometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Spherical air bearing base for CDPBD. Second, the CDPBD has been reconstructed on a granite base, further enhancing structural stability for high ...

2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

427

Test Procedure for 170.306 (d)(1) Electronic Copy of Health ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Phillip Jones 03/08/1962 14:25:50 Male 998777349 Medical Record Number 540 Granite Street, Blanchard, Oklahoma 73010 405-228-7744 ...

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

428

NIST Manuscript Publication Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... There are many varieties of the common types used in building such as types used in building such as marble, limestone, sandstone, and granite. ...

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

University of Pittsburgh FE NA 2011 Donald MartelloEvan Granite 9122011 - 12112011 Pittsburgh, PA Clean Coal Conference Clean Coal Conference in Pittsburgh, PA. 09 09 2011...

430

Department of Energy Finalizes $102 Million Loan Guarantee to...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Project Department of Energy Finalizes Loan Guarantee of Nearly 170 Million to Granite Reliable Power Department of Energy Conditional Loan Guarantee Commitment to Support...

431

Energy Crossroads: Utility Energy Efficiency Programs New Hampshire...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Index Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Index Suggest a Listing NationalGrid (formerly Granite State Electric) Information for Businesses Public Service of New Hampshire (PSNH...

432

Oklahoma City Bombing 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The east end wall suffered significant damage. The blast removed some of the granite panels of the infill walls from the third through the sixth floor. ...

2013-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

433

OOF.File.Save.Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... discussed in Section 2.6. The materials parameter is a Python list of names of Materials , eg, ['granite', 'schist', 'pumice'] . ...

2013-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

434

NETL: News Release - Technology Transfer Award To Be Presented...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NETL research group leader Henry Pennline and research chemical engineer Evan Granite will receive the award for the transfer of a palladium-based sorbent for the capture...

435

Simplex Network Modeling for Press-Molded Ceramic Bodies ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work were added different proportions of the sticky residue granite, comprising diamond wire on concrete for evaluation of mechanical properties,...

436

NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0190 NETL ORD FE ORD 2012; June 2011 to June 2016 Dr. Evan Granite Pittsburgh, PA B83 Room 334 Sorbent, Catalyst, Photochemical - Analytical Methods Development Laboratory Purpose:...

437

National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NVLAP Code: 20/D12 SURFACE TEXTURE Field calibrations available Note 4 Granite Surface Plates Up to 12 ft 50 in per ft Rhan and ...

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

438

USGS Mid-America NEHRP Activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... After Keradeniz, 2007 Preliminary results for pilot study area covering 3 of 29 quadrangles: Columbia Bottom, Granite City, and Monks Mound. ...

2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

439

Modelling the influence of the interfacial zone on the DC ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... hydroxide [19,20]. This is the case for aggregate that is much less porous than the cement paste, like quartz or granite. In the ...

2004-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

440

Energy Department Announces New Private Sector Partnership to...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Guarantee for 852 Million Loan to Support California Concentrating Solar Power Plant Department of Energy Finalizes Loan Guarantee of Nearly 170 Million to Granite Reliable Power...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite wash stuart" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

INTRODUCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The 12 test rocks consisted of a sample from a fully crushed granite material taken from a commercial quarry that was prepared in sizes ranging ...

2007-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

442

Validated 140-1 and 140-2 Cryptographic Modules  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 785, Siemens PLM Software Inc. 5800 Granite Parkway Suite 600 Plano, TX 75024 USA -Kevin White TEL: 515-956-6849. ...

2013-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

443

NCNR BT5-USANS Instrument Schedule D. Mildner Tel: (301) ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 22 for drug delivery Murugara Nov 20 2 M Bhatt+ L Jin+ S 14741 Porosity development in SE Mildner Brantley (PSU)+ D U25-10 granite & diabase ...

444

Processing, Product Metallurgy and Quality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 9, 2012... steel ladle was performed to evaluate argon plug placement locations for United States Steel Corporation's Granite City Works ladle design.

445

Optimization on Compression Strength of Resin Mineral Composite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Using natural granite particles as aggregate and organic resin as binder, resin mineral composite (RMC) has good vibration damping properties...

446

OPERATING PROCEDURE:  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 5. Carefully slide out write-head. 6. Protect lens area and place upside down on granite platform with the other write-heads. ...

2013-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

447

U  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

May 23, 2008 NETL Researcher Presented with Prestigious Technology Transfer Award Evan Granite Awarded for Commercialization of Innovative Mercury-control Technology Dr. Evan...

448

NIST Aperture area measurement facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The optical and mechanical components are supported on a granite base and vertical bridge structure mounted on a vibration-isolated optical table ...

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

449

2.8-Ma Ash-Flow Caldera At Chegem River In The Northern Caucasus...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

.8-Ma Ash-Flow Caldera At Chegem River In The Northern Caucasus Mountains (Russia), Contemporaneous Granites, And Associated Ore Deposits Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL...

450

L L I I  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Granite City, Illinois (GSGOOl) M . E. Murray K S. Brown MANAGED BY MARTIN MARIETTA ENERGY SYSTEMS, INC. FOR THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT Of ENERGY - .-.-- -- .,ie --.......

451

C:\\EUDORA\\attach\\NIST SP 260_130.WPD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... was averaged from five measurements taken on a granite flat table with a ... Water-Vapor Measurements of Low-Slope Roofing Materials, NISTIR ...

2011-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

452

Fagen Engineering LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Engineering LLC Place Granite Falls, Minnesota Zip 56241 Product Designs and builds ethanol production plants and other engineering projects. References Fagen Engineering LLC1...

453

Microsoft PowerPoint - Proceedings Cover Sheets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kentucky Illinois Basin outline 0 30 60 15 Miles Glacial deposits Limestone Sandstone Shale Dolomite Precambrian granite and ryolite Enhanced Oil Recovery Enhanced oil recovery...

454

ASSESSMENT OF ABORIGINAL SMALLHOLDER SOILS FOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

interbed- ded shales, and granitic intrusions. Tointerbedded tuffs and shales of the same age. The Mendoi-terraces, the quartzite and shale-derived soils on the high

Kurt A. Schwabe

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

WCM Decisionmakers Forum  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Drill new injection well into granite bedrock beneath Mt. Simon Sandstone (8,000 feet) Corn processing plant CO 2 source is ethanol production facility Two injection zone...

456

Clean Cities: Coalition Locations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Southwestern Area New Haven Norwich Red River Valley (Grand Forks, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada) Silicon Valley (San Jose) East Bay (Oakland) San Francisco Sacramento Granite State...

457

Update Sustainable Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Transportation Vol.4, No.2 * August 2013 ORNL researchers Andreas Malikopoulos (right) and Stuart Daw Intelligent transportation vehicle subsystems will continue to grow exponentially, Andreas added. Developing control systems that are able to mimic the efficient learning and decision-making processes of biological organisms without resorting to on-board supercomputers could revolutionize transportation, he said. Stuart suggested, in the long-term, that "smart" vehicles need to mimic the ability of humans to efficiently perceive, filter, and rapidly respond to the flood of information available from the local environment, as well as from their own internal parts. He added that the idea of "intelligence" can also be extended to groups of vehicles.

458

Energy Systems Integration: A Convergence of Ideas  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Integration Integration A Convergence of Ideas July 2012 Ben Kroposki, Bobi Garrett, Stuart Macmillan, Brent Rice, and Connie Komomua National Renewable Energy Laboratory Mark O'Malley University College Dublin Dan Zimmerle Colorado State University NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. 1 Energy Systems Integration A Convergence of Ideas Benjamin Kroposki, Bobi Garrett, Stuart Macmillan, Brent Rice, Connie Komomua National Renewable Energy Laboratory Mark O'Malley University College Dublin Dan Zimmerle Colorado State University Prepared under Task No. 2940.5017 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency

459

A model for the shallow thermal regime at Dixie Valley geothermal field |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A model for the shallow thermal regime at Dixie Valley geothermal field A model for the shallow thermal regime at Dixie Valley geothermal field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A model for the shallow thermal regime at Dixie Valley geothermal field Authors R. G. Allis, Stuart D. Johnson, Gregory D. Nash and Dick Benoit Published Journal TRANSACTIONS-GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES COUNCIL, 1999 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for A model for the shallow thermal regime at Dixie Valley geothermal field Citation R. G. Allis,Stuart D. Johnson,Gregory D. Nash,Dick Benoit. 1999. A model for the shallow thermal regime at Dixie Valley geothermal field. TRANSACTIONS-GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES COUNCIL. 23:493-498. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=A_model_for_the_shallow_thermal_regime_at_Dixie_Valley_geothermal_field&oldid=682587"

460

Exploration and Development Techniques for Basin and Range Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Techniques for Basin and Range Geothermal Techniques for Basin and Range Geothermal Systems: Examples from Dixie Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Exploration and Development Techniques for Basin and Range Geothermal Systems: Examples from Dixie Valley, Nevada Abstract Abstract unavailable. Authors David D. Blackwell, Mark Leidig, Richard P. Smith, Stuart D. Johnson and Kenneth W. Wisian Conference GRC Annual Meeting; Reno, NV; 2002/09/22 Published Geothermal Resources Council, 2002 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Exploration and Development Techniques for Basin and Range Geothermal Systems: Examples from Dixie Valley, Nevada Citation David D. Blackwell,Mark Leidig,Richard P. Smith,Stuart D. Johnson,Kenneth

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite wash stuart" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Microsoft Outlook - Memo Style  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Goza, Stuart L Goza, Stuart L <slgoza@tva.gov> Sent: Monday, May 06, 2013 3:31 PM To: ERS2014 Subject: TVA Comments regarding Form EIA-930 Attachments: TVA Comments EIA-930 050613.docx General Comments TVA appreciates the opportunity to comment on the Form EIA-930 report, ''Balancing Authority Operations Report''. Because many DOE reporting obligations carry both civil and criminal sanctions for failure to provide data or for providing incorrect data, there must be an understanding that DOE is seeking hourly information within minutes of the time that it becomes available to the Balancing Authority (BA) in very raw form. There will be many cases during the day where the BA Operator will not be able to review the data appropriately before it is posted to the public

462

Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

552 results: 552 results: BibTex RIS RTF XML Sort by: Author Title Type [ Year (Desc) ] Filters: Keyword is electricity markets and policy group [Clear All Filters] 2013 Zimring, Mark, Merrian Borgeson, Annika Todd, and Charles A. Goldman. Getting the Biggest Bang for the Buck: Exploring the Rationales and Design Options for Energy Efficiency Financing Programs., 2013. Hoen, Ben, Geoffrey T. Klise, Joshua Graff-Zivin, Mark Thayer, Joachim Seel, and Ryan H. Wiser. Exploring California PV Home Premiums., 2013. Stuart, Elizabeth, Peter H. Larsen, Charles A. Goldman, and Donald Gilligan. Current Size and Remaining Market Potential of the U.S. Energy Service Company Industry. LBNL, 2013. Hoffman, Ian M., Megan A. Billingsley, Steven R. Schiller, Charles A. Goldman, and Elizabeth Stuart. Energy Efficiency Program Typology and Data

463

Project 259  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kwang Y. Lee, Stuart S. Yin, Kwang Y. Lee, Stuart S. Yin, and Andre Boheman The Pennsylvania State University Department of Electrical Engineering University Park, PA 16802 814-865-2621 kwanglee@psu.edu INTELLIGENT MONITORING SYSTEM WITH HIGH TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTED FIBEROPTIC SENSOR FOR POWER PLANT COMBUSTION PROCESSES Description The objective of the proposed work is to develop an intelligent distributed fiber optic-based sensor system for real-time monitoring of temperature in a boiler furnace in power plants. Of particular interest is the estimation of spatial and temporal distributions of high temperatures within a boiler furnace, which will be essential in assessing and controlling the mechanisms that form and remove pollutants at the source, such as NO X . The basic approach in developing the proposed sensor system is three-fold:

464

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: -- Energy,  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

N O P Q R S N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z M'Gonigle, Leithen (Leithen M'Gonigle) - Department of Environmental Science Policy and Management, University of California at Berkeley Ma, Dalong (Dalong Ma) - Center for Human Disease Genomics, Peking University Maad, Johanne (Johanne Maad) - Institutt for biologi, Norwegian University of Science and Technology Maass, Wolfgang (Wolfgang Maass) - Institute for Theoretical Computer Science, Technische Universität Graz MacCallum, Bob (Bob MacCallum) - Stockholm Bioinformatics Center, Stockholms Universitet MacDonald, Andrew (Andrew MacDonald) - Institute of Immunology and Infection Research, School of Biological Sciences, University of Edinburgh Macdonald, Stuart (Stuart Macdonald) - Department of Molecular Biosciences, University of Kansas

465

Helping STEM Take Root: EM Tribal Partnership Looks To the Future of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Helping STEM Take Root: EM Tribal Partnership Looks To the Future Helping STEM Take Root: EM Tribal Partnership Looks To the Future of Science Education Helping STEM Take Root: EM Tribal Partnership Looks To the Future of Science Education November 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Umatilla Tribes Department of Science and Engineering Director Stuart Harris, far right, explains the purpose of the Tribes’ greenhouses to Senior Advisor for Environmental Management David Huizenga, center, and Richland Operations Office Manager Matt McCormick. Umatilla Tribes Department of Science and Engineering Director Stuart Harris, far right, explains the purpose of the Tribes' greenhouses to Senior Advisor for Environmental Management David Huizenga, center, and Richland Operations Office Manager Matt McCormick. EM and Tribal leaders join in the celebration of the opening of the Umatilla Tribes' new field station and greenhouses funded in part by EM.

466

Central Pacific Minerals and Southern Pacific Petroleum detail oil shale activities  

SciTech Connect

These two affiliated companies have their major assets in Queensland. Brief summaries are given of the activities of the Rundle, Condor, and Yaamba oil shale projects and brief descriptions are given of the resources found in the Stuart, Nagoorin, Nagoorin South, Lowmead, and Duaringa oil shale deposits of Queensland. The companies also have, or are planning, oil shale projects in the US, Luxembourg, France, and the Federal Republic of Germany, and these are briefly described.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Geologic setting and mineralization of the Kougarok Sn(Ta-Nb) deposit, seaward peninsula, Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Kougarok tin (tantalum-niobium) deposit is located in the north-central Seward Peninsula, roughly 130 kilometers north of Nome, Alaska. Tin and tantalum-niobium mineralization occur within granitic dikes, subhorizontal sheets, plugs, and in schists adjacent to the granite bodies. Rb/Sr and K/Ar age determinations indicate the granites at Kougarok are late Cretaceous in age and coeval with other tin granites of the Seward Peninsula. The host rock to the granites at Kougarok is polydeformed pelitic schists of possible Precambrian age. Known mineralization occurs in four geologic settings: 1) within steep cylindrical pipes of greisenized granite; 2) in greisenized dikes; 3) in greisen along the roof zone of a subhorizontal granite sheet; and 4) as stringer zones in schists. Tin mineralization is known in all the above geologic environments and occurs dominantly as disseminated cassiterite in quartz+/-tourmaline+/-topaz greisen. Grades of significant tin mineralization range from 0.1 to 15 percent tin and average approximately 0.5 percent tin. Tantalum-niobium mineralization is confined to the roof greisen environment. Tantalite-columbite occurs as disseminated grains in white mica altered granite lateral to tin-bearing quartz-tourmaline greisen. Grades for both tantalum and niobium range from 0.02 to 0.05 percent.

Puchner, C.C.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Igneous and metamorphic rocks of the Serpentine Hot Springs area, Seward Peninsula, Alaska  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the geology of the Serpentine Hot Springs area of the Seward Peninsula, Alaska, emphasizing the petrology, petrography, and mapped relations of lithologic units within a composite, epizonal biotite granite stock and the regionally metamorphosed metasedimentary rocks that surround it. Geologic relations are combined with reconnaissance geochemical data to define mineralized zones and their spatial relations to the granite stock.

Hudson, T.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Headers will be added later Deriving groundwater estimates in Australia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Steelhead Trout at Lower Granite Dam GENE M. MATTHEWS, GEORGE A. SWAN, and JIM ROSS SMITH ABSTRACT-A new trout, Salmo Gairdneri, at Lower Granite Dam on the lower Snake River is described. Major changes from area totally supplied by gravity-flow. The system is currently being evaluated by the National Marine

Tregoning, Paul

470

EA-1801: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Finding of No Significant Impact 1: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1801: Finding of No Significant Impact Granite Reliable Power Wind Project, Coos County, New Hampshire The Department of Energy is adopting an environmental assessment completed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in June 2010 that analyzed the potential environmental impacts associated with the construction and operation by Granite Reliable Power, LLC of the Granite Reliable Power Wind Park located in central Coos County, New Hampshire. Finding of No Significant Impact Department of Energy Loan Guarentee for Granite Reliable Power LLC's Granite Reliable Power Wind Park Project in Coos County, New Hampshire, DOE/EA-1801 (July 2010) More Documents & Publications EA-1801: Final Environmental Impact EA-1784: Finding of No Significant Impact

471

Tips: Laundry | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Laundry Laundry Tips: Laundry April 24, 2012 - 8:12pm Addthis Save Energy and More with ENERGY STAR. ENERGY STAR clothes washers use 50% less energy to wash clothes than standard washing machines. Save Energy and More with ENERGY STAR. ENERGY STAR clothes washers use 50% less energy to wash clothes than standard washing machines. There are two ways to reduce the amount of energy used for washing clothes-use less water and use cooler water. Unless you're dealing with oily stains, the warm or cold water setting on your machine will generally do a good job of cleaning your clothes. Switching your temperature setting from hot to warm can cut a load's energy use in half. Laundry Tips Wash your clothes in cold water using cold-water detergents whenever possible. Wash and dry full loads. If you are washing a small load, use the

472

Drain Water Heat Recovery | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to shower, wash dishes, or wash clothing) to preheat cold water entering the water heater or going to other water fixtures. This reduces the amount of energy needed for water...

473

Safe Frozen Turkey Preparation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to the dog. 4. Save time and dirty dishes, just prepare the meal. A. True why wash so many dishes? B. False wash the cutting board frequently in hot soapy water; same...

474

Improvement on the Operation Management System of Vertical ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An automatic preparation control of the caustic wash solution, used to wash filter cloth at the end of filtration cycle, was also done. The useful life of filter cloth...

475

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plants", Report WASH-1400 (NUREG-75/0l4), October 1975. u ICooled Reactors (GESMO), NUREG -0002,ES, August 1976. W. B.Plants", report WASH-1400 (NUREG-75/014), October 1975. See

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power Plants. WASH~1400 (NUREG 75/014). October 1975. S.Power Plants -LWR Edison." NUREG-75! 094, October 1975. NRCof Fixed Nuclear Facilities, NUREG-75/l1l (Reprint of WASH-

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - Stanford-SLAC Team Uses...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

it, wash away the electrolyte and then analyze it with X-ray diffraction or an electron microscope. But when you do that, you also wash away all of the polysulfides that...

478

Key China Energy Statistics 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

coal, washed coal, briquettes) and derived fuels (coke,coke oven gas, and other coking products). Crude oilWashed Coal Mt Briquettes Mt Coke Mt Coke Oven Gas Billion m

Levine, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

DVIPS: A T E X Driver Tomas Rokicki, rokicki@cs.stanford.edu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of paints, mediums, solvents · Don't do solvent washes · Reuse solvent: Used solvent can be reclaimed

Coster, David

480

Two Experts Named to Earthquake Advisory Board  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Pasadena, Calif., and Peter May, distinguished professor and chair, Department of Political Science, University of Washington, Seattle, Wash. ...

2013-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite wash stuart" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Distribution Category: Magnetic Fuaion Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Burns & Roe,Inc., Oradell, N.J. H. K. Forsen, Exxon Nuclear Co., Inc., Bellevue, Wash. M. J. Lubin

Abdou, Mohamed

482

Distribution Category: Magnetic Fusion Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: S. Baron, Burns & Roe, Inc., Oradell, N.J. H. K. Forsen, Exxon Nuclear Co., Inc., Bellevue, Wash. M

Harilal, S. S.

483

Results from tests of DuPont crossflow filter  

SciTech Connect

Crossflow filtration will be used to filter radioactive waste slurry as part of the Late Wash Process.

Steimke, J.L.

2000-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

484

Coming Soon! Baldrige Awardees Share Successes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... conferences in Cleveland, Ohio, on Sept. 20, 2007, and Seattle, Wash., on Oct. 5, 2007. Participants can network with the ...

2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

485

NEW JERSEY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Wash load means seven pounds of laundry by dry weight. ... pound, pint 17. Detergents, soap, laundry products ..... ...

2011-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

486

Sep/Oct Working 9/23  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... For example, the mechanical and electronic timers found in parking meters, coin- operated laundries, car washes, taxicab meters, and other ...

2001-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

487

INTRODUCTION Goals of the Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

linking acorns to gypsy moth outbreaks and Lyme disease risk. Science (Wash). 279: 1023Ð1026. Liebhold, A

Delaware, University of

488

DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

boilers Ranges & ovens Pool heaters Direct heating equipmentOvens Standby Washing Machines Televisions Space Cooling Electric Water Heating

McNeil, MIchael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

The Fifth Northwest Electric Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the usage of major appliances, such as stoves, dishwashers, washing ma- chines, and dryers. All these major

490

Climate Change and Water Resources in California: The Cost of Conservation versus Supply Augmentation for the East Bay Municipal Utility District  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

more efficient washers, dishwashers, and toilets; incentivestoilets, showerheads, dishwashers, and washing machines (showerheads, washers, and dishwashers; and 2. Services, such

Mourad, Bessma

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

PROGRESS IN RESIDENTIAL ENERGY CONSERVATION - A MULTI COUNTRY PERSPECTIVE -  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

much as four fold; dishwashers, clothes washers, freezers,as washing machines, dishwashers, or *The latter refers to

Schipper, Lee

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Behavioral Perspectives on Home Energy Audits: The Role of Auditors, Labels, Reports, and Audit Tools on Homeowner Decision Making  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STAR washing machine. Replace dishwasher with a high efficiency dishwasher. Install photovoltaic machine. Replace dishwasher with a high efficiency

Ingle, Aaron

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Subunit interactions and protein-DNA interactions of the Drosophila melanogaster small nuclear RNA activating protein complex  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fusion protein, prepare 20ml of HEMG wash buffer and store it in the refrigerator so it will be cold

Titus, Mitchell

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Sampling and Interpretation of Drill Cuttings from Geothermal Wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Drill cuttings from geothermal and mineral exploration boreholes, by contrast with those from most petroleum wells, commonly are derived highly fractured and faulted, hydrothermally altered igneous and metamorphic rock sequences, and are likely to be severely contaminated. Characterization of a subsurface resource from cuttings thus requires not only especially careful sample collection, preparation, storage and examination, but also a thorough knowledge of drilling technology, local geology and the full range of potential borehole contaminants. Accurate identification of lithology from cuttings is critical for recognition and correlation of rock types likely to selectively host the desired commodity. However, many of the rocks encountered in geothermal and mineral exploration boreholes (such as gneisses and granitic rocks) can resemble one another closely as cuttings even though dissimilar in outcrop or core. In such cases, the actual rock type(s) in a cuttings sample generally can be determined by comparison with simulated cuttings of representative surface rocks, and with various geophysical and other well logs. Many other clues in cuttings, such as diagnostic metamorphic mineralogy, or sedimentary rounding and sorting, may help identify subsurface lithologies. Faults and fractures commonly are the dominant physical controls on geothermal and mineral resources. Faults occasionally can be recognized directly in cuttings by the presence of slickensiding, gouge, or other crushed material. More commonly, however, the ''gouge'' observed in cuttings actually is pseudo-gouge created beneath a bit during drilling. Since most faults and all fractures produce no direct evidence apparent in cuttings, they are best recognized indirectly, either by commonly associated hydrothermal alteration, or by responses on appropriate geophysical well logs. Hydrothermal alteration, useful for locating and defining a geothermal or mineral resource, is far more difficult to recognize and interpret in cuttings than in core or outcrop. Alteration textures and paragenetic relationships can be obscured or obliterated as cuttings are produced. Less resistant alteration (and rock-forming) minerals can be disaggregated during drilling and lost from cuttings during sampling or washing. Relict and contemporary alteration can be indistinguishable, and a wide variety of borehole contaminants can closely resemble natural alteration products encountered during drilling. These contaminants also can produce confusing geochemical signatures.

Hulen, Jeffrey B.; Sibbett, Bruce S.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Washer with electrolytic water dissociation. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The development of a washing machine with turbo-electrolytic pre-wash facility is described. This process involves a preliminary electro-chemical process which is characterized by an overall reduction in energy consumption during the wash cycle. Comparative studies between the turbo-electrolytic washing machine and a standard washing machine have been carried out. Although the production cost of the turbo-electrolytic machine is greater, savings on energy costs will give rise to a net reduction in costs over the lifetime of the machine.

Morello, M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

California Energy Incentive Programs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

California Energy California Energy Incentive Programs: An Annual Update on Key Energy Issues and Financial Opportunities for Federal Sites in California Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program December 2011 i Contacts Utility Acquisitions, ESPCs, PPAs Tracy Logan U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program EE-2L 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585-0121 Phone: (202) 586-9973 E-mail: tracy.logan@ee.doe.gov Principal Research Associate Elizabeth Stuart Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory One Cyclotron Road Berkeley, CA 94720 Phone: (510)495-2370 E-mail: estuart@lbl.gov ii Contents Overview ...................................................................................................................................................... 1

497

NREL: Energy Analysis - Energy Forecasting and Modeling Staff  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Forecasting and Modeling Energy Forecasting and Modeling The following includes summary bios of staff expertise and interests in analysis relating to energy economics, energy system planning, risk and uncertainty modeling, and energy infrastructure planning. Team Lead: Nate Blair Administrative Support: Geraly Amador Clayton Barrows Greg Brinkman Brian W Bush Stuart Cohen Carolyn Davidson Paul Denholm Victor Diakov Aron Dobos Easan Drury Kelly Eurek Janine Freeman Marissa Hummon Jennie Jorganson Jordan Macknick Trieu Mai David Mulcahy David Palchak Ben Sigrin Daniel Steinberg Patrick Sullivan Aaron Townsend Laura Vimmerstedt Andrew Weekley Owen Zinaman Photo of Clayton Barrows. Clayton Barrows Postdoctoral Researcher Areas of expertise Power system modeling Primary research interests Power and energy systems

498

EMAT Development Tech Progress Report 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

an EMAT In-Line Inspection System an EMAT In-Line Inspection System For Detection, Discrimination, and Grading of Stress Corrosion Cracking In Pipelines Final Report (Phase I) Reporting Period Start Date: 10/1/2001 Reporting Period End Date: 9/30/2004 Principal Contributors: Jeff Aron, Jeff Jia, Bruce Vance, Wen Chang, Raymond Pohler, Jon Gore, Stuart Eaton, Adrian Bowles, Tim Jarman Issue Date: February 2005 DOE Award Number: DE-FC26-01NT41154 Submitted by: Contractor Tuboscope Pipeline Services 2835 Holmes Road Houston, TX 77051 Subcontractor QinetiQ ltd. Cody Technology Park Ively Road, Farnborough Hants GU14 0LX UK DOE Project Officer:

499

Distinguished Lecturers Series  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Videos Videos Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Environmental Energy Technologies Division Distinguished Lecture Series Environmental Energy Technologies Division Distinguished Lecture Series Videos Long Fuse, Big Bang: Thomas Edison, Electricity, and the Locus of Innovation Andrew Hargadon, October 22, 2012 Climate Change Hits Home: Impacts on the Built Environment and Health John Spengler, June 18, 2012 High Comfort-Low Impact, From Buildings to Cities Matthias Schuler, April 30, 2012 Emissions Trading and Climate Finance: Is 2012 the Dead End or the Crossroads? Marc Stuart, January 27, 2012 Advances in Global Climate Modeling for Scientific Understanding and Predictability V. Ramaswamy, October 7, 2011 How is Building Energy Use Related to Occupant Behaviors and Building Usage

500

Summary of Electrolytic Hydrogen Production: Milestone Completion Report  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an overview of the current state of electrolytic hydrogen production technologies and an economic analysis of the processes and systems available as of December 2003. The operating specifications of commercially available electrolyzers from five manufacturers, i.e., Stuart, Teledyne, Proton, Norsk Hydro, and Avalence, are summarized. Detailed economic analyses of three systems for which cost and economic data were available were completed. The contributions of the cost of electricity, system efficiency, and capital costs to the total cost of electrolysis are discussed.

Ivy, J.

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z