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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite wash producers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Depositional environment of the Middle Pennsylvanian granite wash: Lambert 1, Hryhor, and Sundance fields, northern Palo Duro basin, Oldham County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, electric logs, drill stem tests, dip logs, and seismic records. Five granite wash fields have been discovered adjacent to the Bravo Dome in Oldham County, Texas; the Lambert 'I, Hryhor, Sundance, Pond, and Brandi. The section at Lambert 1, Hryhor..., electric logs, drill stem tests, dip logs, and seismic records. Five granite wash fields have been discovered adjacent to the Bravo Dome in Oldham County, Texas; the Lambert 'I, Hryhor, Sundance, Pond, and Brandi. The section at Lambert 1, Hryhor...

Wharton, Amy Laura

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

2

Wash  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Wash ingt on, DC 20585 November 1,2010 Mr. Ron Murphree, Chair Oak Ridge Site-Specific Advisory Board P.O. Box 2001, MS-7604 Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 Dear Mr. Murphree: Thank you...

3

granite  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Granite City, Illinois, Site (formerly the Granite City Granite City, Illinois, Site (formerly the Granite City Steel site) is located at 1417 State Street, approxi- mately 10 miles northeast of St. Louis, Missouri. The site consists of the Betatron Building, a two-story concrete and metal building. From 1958 to 1966, General Steel Castings Cor- poration, under purchase orders from Mallinckrodt Chemical Works, X-rayed uranium ingots in the Betatron Building to detect metallurgical flaws in the uranium metal. This work was performed for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), a predecessor agency of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). At completion of the AEC activities, the site was remediated to comply with radiological protection standards in effect at the time. In 1989, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducted radiological surveys at the Granite City

4

granite  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Granite City, Illinois, Site is located at 1417 State Granite City, Illinois, Site is located at 1417 State Street, approximately 10 miles northeast of St. Louis, Missouri. The site consists of the Betatron Building, a two-story concrete and metal building. From 1958 to 1966, General Steel Castings Cor- poration, under purchase orders from Mallinckrodt Chemical Works, x-rayed uranium ingots in the Betatron Building to detect metallurgical flaws in

5

WASH-  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

rcc.p,anc. 01 thts arf~cle. tha rcc.p,anc. 01 thts arf~cle. tha yubl~rhe, "r ~u~~iunl riknouu~adqnS the U.S. C;ov.rnmmnf' s rayhr (0 retam l nOn*aClulive.roy~ltV (r-0 ltconso In ma IO Dny Copvrlqhl WASH- covrrm~ the wtvdo. ISADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF THE SEAWAY INDUSTRIAL PARK W . D. Cottrell, R. W . Leggett and H. W . Dickson Health Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 December 1976 CONTENTS l&t of Tab1 es - . . . List of Illustrations . . Abstract . . . . . . Introduction . . . . ............ ............ ............ ............ Radiological Survey Techniques . . . . . . 1 . . Measurement of External Gamma and Beta-Gamma Radiation Levels . . . . . . . . . . . . Measurement of Radium in the Soil . . . . . . Measurement of Radioactivity in Surface Water

6

Enhanced Inactivation of Salmonella and Pseudomonas Biofilms on Stainless Steel by Use of T-128, a Fresh-Produce Washing Aid, in Chlorinated Wash Solutions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...surface, niches of washing machines, or tanks...the presence of soil with organic matter...T-128, as a washing aid, enhances the...to low pH and the surfactant action of polyethylene...shows that the surfactant component in T-128...stainless steel during washing. The purple-stained...

Cangliang Shen; Yaguang Luo; Xiangwu Nou; Gary Bauchan; Bin Zhou; Qin Wang; Patricia Millner

2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

7

Goldendale, Wash.  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Big Eddy Substation near The Dalles, Ore., to a new substation about four miles northwest of Goldendale, Wash. BPA is currently proposing three alternative routes as well as the...

8

Solvent wash solution  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is claimed for removing diluent degradation products from a solvent extraction solution, which has been used to recover uranium and plutonium from spent nuclear fuel. A wash solution and the solvent extraction solution are combined. The wash solution contains (a) water and (b) up to about, and including, 50 vol % of at least one-polar water-miscible organic solvent based on the total volume of the water and the highly-polar organic solvent. The wash solution also preferably contains at least one inorganic salt. The diluent degradation products dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent and the organic solvent extraction solvent do not dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent. The highly-polar organic solvent and the extraction solvent are separated.

Neace, J.C.

1984-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

9

Soil washing technology evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental Restoration Engineering (ERE) continues to review innovative, efficient, and cost effective technologies for SRS soil and/or groundwater remediation. As part of this effort, this technical evaluation provides review and the latest information on the technology for SRS soil remediation. Additional technology evaluation reports will be issued periodically to update these reports. The purpose of this report is to review the soil washing technology and its potential application to SRS soil remediation. To assess whether the Soil Washing technology is a viable option for SRS soil remediation, it is necessary to review the technology/process, technology advantages/limitations, performance, applications, and cost analysis.

Suer, A.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Hand Washing vs Sanitizers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hand Washing vs Sanitizers Hand Washing vs Sanitizers Name: allison Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Which works better, antibacterial hand sanitizers, or just plain soap and water? Replies: Soap and water removes more than just bacteria. Soap and water is your best bet. Steve Sample For that answer I would direct you to a few web sites: www.cnn.com:80/health/9808/05/antibacterial.warning/index.html www.cnn.com:80/health/9909/16/killer.ap/index.html and www.microbe.org and go to the "wash up" icon. They have a whole section devoted to handwashing. Good luck Van Hoeck It depends on the need. For a surgeon hand sanitizers are essential, and they have to be applied correctly. There is a famous story of a surgeon who refused to use them because he was allergic to the substance, and he just washed his hands with soap vigorously, and of course used surgical gloves. Nevertheless, he infected several patients with Staphilocccus aureus, a bacteria that lives on the skin harmless, but that can cause severe infections in patients when it is helped entering the body through wounds. The surgeon was caught. So for serious disinfection (also when handling contaminated material) soap is not enough. It is for normal hand-cleaning.

11

Soil washing treatability study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soil washing was identified as a viable treatment process option for remediating soil at the FEMP Environmental Management Project (FEMP). Little information relative to the specific application and potential effectiveness of the soil washing process exists that applies to the types of soil at the FEMP. To properly evaluate this process option in conjunction with the ongoing FEMP Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS), a treatability testing program was necessary to provide a foundation for a detailed technical evaluation of the viability of the process. In August 1991, efforts were initiated to develop a work plan and experimental design for investigating the effectiveness of soil washing on FEMP soil. In August 1992, the final Treatability Study Work Plan for Operable Unit 5: Soil Washing (DOE 1992) was issued. This document shall be referenced throughout the remainder of this report as the Treatability Study Work Plan (TSWP). The purpose of this treatability study was to generate data to support initial screening and the detailed analysis of alternatives for the Operable Unit 5 FS.

Krstich, M.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Ultrasound enhanced soil washing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of an ultrasonic enhanced soil-washing process requires a comprehensive, well-designed experimental program, with the results carefully analyzed on the basis of known ultrasonic cleaning mechanisms. There has been no systematic work carried out to develop information on the important variables that can affect the efficacy of ultrasonic enhancement of contaminant removal from soil. The goal of this study is to examine the potential of ultrasonic energy to enhance soil washing and to optimize conditions. Ultrasonic energy potentially can be used in enhancing contaminant removal from the entire soil mix, or it can be used as a polishing operation on the fines portion of the soil mixture after traditional soil washing operations. The research study was designed to demonstrate that ultrasonic energy can: improve process performance, e.g., remove contaminants to lower residual concentrations; and improve process economics, e.g., shorter treatment (residence) times, less surfactant use. This process was demonstrated using soil contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

Meegoda, J.; Ho, W.; Bhattacharajee, M.; Wei, C.F.; Cohen, D.M.; Magee, R.S. [New Jersey Inst. of Technology, Newark, NJ (United States); Frederick, R.M. [Environmental Protection Agency, Edison, NJ (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

13

Variations ia Variscan Granites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... the compositional variations within the Caledonian belt, may both be attributed to variations in the geothermal gradient. In Nature Physical Science this week (April 2), he takes these studies ... studies a stage further by showing that the correlation within the belt between composition and geothermal gradient also applies to the Variscan granites.

1973-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

14

Uranium Mineralization and Granite Magmatism in the British Isles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...low initial Sr/ Sr ratio and high geothermal gradient. The standard deviation for...background' granite which produce hot rock districts may cause redistribution of uranium by...An extensive system of channels for heating and circulating water is necessary for...

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Comparison of alternative washing systems for heliostats  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two methods have been proposed for washing heliostat mirrors in a solar central receiver facility. One method involves truck-mounted washing mechanisms continuously traversing the heliostat field, washing mirrors sequentially on a fixed schedule. The other concept involves a washing unit affixed to each heliostat, permitting near-simultaneous washing of all heliostats on demand. The former, scheduled washing system has the advantage of lower capital costs, while the latter, responsive system has more operational flexibility. Cost-benefit evaluation of the two systems, taking into account the random nature of rainfall patterns and soiling processes, indicates that the scheduled system is preferable.

Kerstein, A.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

New methodical developments for GRANIT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New methodical developments for the GRANIT spectrometer address further improvements of the critical parameters of this experimental installation, as well as its applications to new fields of research. Keeping in mind an extremely small fraction of ultra cold neutrons (UCN) that could be bound in gravitational quantum states, we look for methods to increase statistics due to: developing UCN sources with maximum phase-space density, counting simultaneously a large fraction of neutrons using position-sensitive detectors, and decreasing detector backgrounds. Also we explore an eventual application of the GRANIT spectrometer beyond the scope of its initial goals, for instance, for reflectometry with UCN.

Baessler, Stefan [ORNL; Nesvizhevsky, V. [ Inst Max Von Laue Paul Langevin, F-38042 Grenoble 9, France; Toperverg, B [Ruhr University, Bochum, Germany; Zhernenkov, K. [Ruhr University, Bochum, Germany; Gagarski, A [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina, Russia; Lychagin, E [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Muzychka, A [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Strelkov, A [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Mietke, A [Technische Universitat Dresden

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Wash  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

September 9, 2013 September 9, 2013 DETERMINATION OF EXCEPTIONAL CIRCUMSTANCES UNDER THE BAYH-DOLE ACT FOR ENERGY EFFICIENCY, RENEWABLE ENERGY, AND ADVANCED ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES Under the Bayh-Dole Act, 35 U.S.C. §§ 200-12 ("Bayh-Dole"), Federal agencies may determine that "exceptional circumstances" exist such that a modification in the patent rights disposition provided under the Act would better promote its objectives. The Department of Energy ("DOE") has determined that exceptional circumstances exist for disposition of patent rights arising under research, development, demonstration, and market transformation projects involving energy efficiency, renewable energy, and advanced energy technologies as described in Title IX, Subtitles A through D of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (42 U.S.C. 16191

18

Wash  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

SEP 1 5" 2009 SEP 1 5" 2009 MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF DEPARTMENTAL ELEMENTS FROM: RITA R. FRANKLIN ... 111 r:-J) A:)-- ACTING CHIEF Hu~ooiTAL OFFICER SUBJECT: REVISED PERSONNEL ACCOUNTABILITY FOR NON-COOP INCIDENTS This updates the attached previous memorandum on this subject in light of current pandemic planning and reporting needs. It changes the requirement from reporting only key employees who have a serious illness, which includes pandemic influenza, to all employees who have been diagnosed as suspected or confilmed with a contagious disease, including a pandemic influenza. Human Resources Offices and Headquarters Administrative Officers are to report these incidents directly to this office while contractors are to report them through their

19

Reservoir Characterization and Waterflood Performance Evaluation of Granite Wash Formation, Anadarko Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The wells are stimulated by multi-stage hydraulic fracturing. The initial production gas-oil ratio is 1800 scf/stb and PVT reports indicate presence of an oil reservoir above bubble point pressure. PVT correlations show that the 42 API oil and potential...

Nilangekar, Akshay Anand

2014-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

20

Clean Cities: Granite State Clean Cities coalition  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Granite State Clean Cities Coalition Granite State Clean Cities Coalition The Granite State Clean Cities coalition works with vehicle fleets, fuel providers, community leaders, and other stakeholders to reduce petroleum use in transportation. Granite State Clean Cities coalition Contact Information Dolores Rebolledo 603-271-6751 dolores.rebolledo@des.nh.gov Coalition Website Clean Cities Coordinator Dolores Rebolledo Photo of Dolores Rebolledo Dolores Rebolledo joined the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services (DES) as the Granite State Clean Cities coalition coordinator in 2009. The Granite State Clean Cities coalition is a collaboration of 85 public and private stakeholders from all regions of New Hampshire. Rebolledo has 14 years of experience in program management. Prior to joining DES, she was employed by MSB Services as a program consultant and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite wash producers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Status of the GRANIT facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The GRANIT facility is a follow-up project, which is motivated by the recent discovery of gravitational quantum states of ultracold neutrons. The goal of the project is to approach the ultimate accuracy in measuring parameters of such quantum states and also to apply this phenomenon and related experimental techniques to a broad range of applications in particle physics as well as in surface and nanoscience studies. We overview the current status of this facility, the recent test measurements and the nearest prospects.

Damien Roulier; Francis Vezzu; Stefan Baessler; Benot Clment; Daniel Morton; Valery Nesvizhevsky; Guillaume Pignol; Dominique Rebreyend

2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

22

Soil washing: A preliminary assessment of its applicability to Hanford  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soil washing is being considered for treating soils at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site. As a result of over 50 years of operations to produce plutonium for the US Department of Defense and research for DOE, soils in areas within the Site are contaminated with hazardous wastes and radionuclides. In the soil washing process, contaminated soil is mixed with a liquid and then physically and/or chemically treated to dissolve the contaminants into solution and/or concentrate them in a small fraction of the soil. The purpose of this procedure is to separate the contaminants from the bulk of the soil. The key to successful application is to match the types of contaminants and soil characteristics with physical-chemical methods that perform well under the existing conditions. The applicability of soil washing to Hanford Site contaminated soils must take into account both the characteristics of the oil and the type of contamination. Hanford soils typically contain up to 90% sand, gravel, and cobbles, which generally are favorable characteristics for soil washing. For example, in soil samples from the north pond in the 300 Area, 80% to 90% of the soil particles were larger than 250 {mu}m. The principal contaminants in the soil are radionuclides, heavy metals, and nitrate and sulfate salts. For most of the sites, organic contaminants are either not present or are found in very low concentration. 28 refs., 5 figs., 10 tabs.

Gerber, M A; Freeman, H D; Baker, E G; Riemath, W F

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Inhibition Of Washed Sludge With Sodium Nitrite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the results of electrochemical tests used to determine the relationship between the concentration of the aggressive anions in washed sludge and the minimum effective inhibitor concentration. Sodium nitrate was added as the inhibitor because of its compatibility with the DWPF process. A minimum of 0.05M nitrite is required to inhibit the washed sludge simulant solution used in this study. When the worst case compositions and safety margins are considered, it is expected that a minimum operating limit of nearly 0.1M nitrite will be specified. The validity of this limit is dependent on the accuracy of the concentrations and solubility splits previously reported. Sodium nitrite additions to obtain 0.1M nitrite concentrations in washed sludge will necessitate the additional washing of washed precipitate in order to decrease its sodium nitrite inhibitor requirements sufficiently to remain below the sodium limits in the feed to the DWPF. Nitrite will be the controlling anion in "fresh" washed sludge unless the soluble chloride concentration is about ten times higher than predicted by the solubility splits. Inhibition of "aged" washed sludge will not be a problem unless significant chloride dissolution occurs during storage. It will be very important tomonitor the composition of washed sludge during processing and storage.

Congdon, J. W.; Lozier, J. S.

2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

24

Washing studies for PCP and creosote-contaminated soil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Protection Agency has conducted a series of bench-scale and pilot-scale studies to evaluate the feasibility of washing pentachlorophenol (PCP) and creosote from the soil at an abandoned wood-treatment Superfund site in Pensacola, FL. The high sand content and low silt/fines content of the soil made soil washing a promising alternative to incineration. The bench-scale tests confirmed the feasibility of washing the PCP and the carcinogenic creosote compounds from the soil using a nonionic surfactant at the pH of nine to ten and a water temperature of approximately 120 F. The target concentrations for total creosote were not achieved, but the results were sufficiently close to warrant further testing. The pilot-scale tests using the EPA's mobile Volume Reduction Unit produced residual PCP, carcinogenic creosote, and total creosote levels below the target levels. The tests also produced comparison data on the effects of surfactant concentration, pH, temperature, and liquid:solid ratio. (Copyright (c) 1994 Elsevier Science B.V.)

Tobia, R.J.; Camacho, J.M.; Augustin, P.; Griffiths, R.A.; Frederick, R.M.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

COMPILATION OF LABORATORY SCALE ALUMINUM WASH AND LEACH REPORT RESULTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report compiles and analyzes all known wash and caustic leach laboratory studies. As further data is produced, this report will be updated. Included are aluminum mineralogical analysis results as well as a summation of the wash and leach procedures and results. Of the 177 underground storage tanks at Hanford, information was only available for five individual double-shell tanks, forty-one individual single-shell tanks (e.g. thirty-nine 100 series and two 200 series tanks), and twelve grouped tank wastes. Seven of the individual single-shell tank studies provided data for the percent of aluminum removal as a function of time for various caustic concentrations and leaching temperatures. It was determined that in most cases increased leaching temperature, caustic concentration, and leaching time leads to increased dissolution of leachable aluminum solids.

HARRINGTON SJ

2011-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

26

Hand Washing - HPMC Occupational Health Services  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Awareness Cold and Flu Prevention Hand Washing Healthy Sleep Heat Stress Radon Signs of a Heart Attack Signs of a Stroke Distracted Driving Coping with Stress & Change Skin Cancer...

27

Acoustic Character Of Hydraulic Fractures In Granite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydraulic fractures in homogeneous granitic rocks were logged with conventional acoustic-transit-time, acoustic-waveform, and acoustic-televiewer logging systems. Fractured intervals ranged in depth from 45 to 570m. and ...

Paillet, Frederick I.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Laboratory measurement of hydrodynamic saline dispersion within a micro-fracture network induced in granite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laboratory measurement of hydrodynamic saline dispersion within a micro-fracture network induced plug of Ailsa Craig micro-granite by thermal stressing, to produce an isotropic network of fractures number­dispersion relationship for the micro-fracture network is very similar to that predicted for other

29

A spatially dependent model for washing wool  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We analytically model the transport of dirt in the industrial washing of wool using the advectiondiffusion equation in two dimensions. Separation of variables leads to a SturmLiouville problem where the analytic solution reveals how contamination is distributed both along and down the wool and indicates the operating parameter regimes that optimise the cleaning efficiency.

J.F. Caunce; S.I. Barry; G.N. Mercer

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Washing treatment of automotive shredder residue (ASR)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Worldwide, the amount of end-of-life vehicles (ELVs) reaches 50million units per year. Once the ELV has been processed, it may then be shredded and sorted to recover valuable metals that are recycled in iron and steelmaking processes. The residual fraction, called automotive shredder residue (ASR), represents 25% of the ELV and is usually landfilled. In order to deal with the leachable fraction of ASR that poses a potential threat to the environment, a washing treatment before landfilling was applied. To assess the potential for full-scale application of washing treatment, tests were carried out in different conditions (L/S=3 and 5L/kgTS; t=3 and 6h). Moreover, to understand whether the grain size of waste could affect the washing efficiency, the treatment was applied to ground (<4mm) and not-ground samples. The findings obtained revealed that, on average, washing treatment achieved removal rates of more than 60% for dissolved organic carbon (DOC), chemical oxygen demand (COD) and total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN). With regard to metals and chlorides, sulphates and fluoride leachable fraction, a removal efficiency of approximately 60% was obtained, as confirmed also by EC values. The comparison between the results for ground and not-ground samples did not highlight significant differences.

Raffaello Cossu; Tiziana Lai

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Soil Washing Potential of a Natural Surfactant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Soil Washing Potential of a Natural Surfactant ... The aqueous solubilities of hexachlorobenzene (HCB) and naphthalene in the natural surfactant solutions were found to vary linearly with the concentration of the surfactant showing trends comparable to that of typical com mercial surfactants. ...

D. Roy; R. R. Kommalapati; S. S. Mandava; K. T. Valsaraj; W. D. Constant

1997-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

32

Record geothermal well drilled in hot granite  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Record geothermal well drilled in hot granite ... Researchers there have completed the second of two of the deepest and hottest geothermal wells ever drilled. ... It may become the energy source for a small electrical generating power station serving nearby communities in New Mexico. ...

1981-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

33

100 Area Hanford soil washing treatability tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soil washing laboratory tests performed at Hanford in support of 100 Area Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) feasibility studies included characterization of soils, physical separation, chemical extraction, and water treatment. Results to date show that < 20 % of the soil is finer than 0.25 mm ({minus}40 mesh). The highest concentration of {sup 60}Co, {sup 152}Eu, and {sup 137}Cs contaminants is generally associated with fine soil particles. However, measurable concentrations of contaminants were found in all sizes of soil particles. In initial testing, attrition scrubbing was generally sufficient to treat soils to meet selected performance levels for {sup 60}Co and {sup 152}Eu. However, more intense attrition scrubbing, autogenous grinding, or chemical extraction was required to enhance removal of {sup 137}Cs. Additional tests and assessment of the feasibility of using soil washing techniques are in progress.

Field, J.G.; Belden, R.D. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Serne, R.J.; Mattigod, S.V.; Freeman, H.D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Scheck, R.W. [Mactec/Dames and Moore (United States); Goller, E.D. [USDOE Richland Operations Office, WA (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Mr. Thomas Mahl Granite City Steel Company  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

8&v/ 8&v/ Mr. Thomas Mahl Granite City Steel Company 20th and State Streets Granite City, IL 62040 Dear Mr. Mahl: This is to notify you that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has designated your company's facility for remedial action as a part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. Remedial activities are managed by the DOE Oak Ridge Field Office, and Ms. Teresa Perry (615-576-8956) will be the site manager. As a result of the designation decision, Ms. Perry will be the appropriate point of contact in the future. If you have any questions, please call me at 301-903-8149. W. Alexander Williams, PhD Designation and Certification Manager Division of Off-Site Programs Office of Eastern Area Programs Office of Environmental Restoration

35

Biogenesis (trade name) soil washing technology: Innovative technology evaluation report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soil washing technologies are designed to transfer contaminants from soil to a liquid phase. The BioGenesis Soil Washing Technology uses soil washing with a proprietary surfactant solution to transfer organic contaminants from soils to wastewater. The BioGenesis soil washing process was evaluated under the SITE program at a refinery where soils were contaminated with crude oil. Results of chemical analyses show that levels of total recoverable petroleum hydrocarbons (TRPH), an indicator of degraded crude oil, decreased by 65 to 73 percent in washed soils. The TRPH in residual soils were allowed to biodegrade for an additional 120 days. Results indicate that soil washing and biodegradation removed 85 to 88 percent of TRPH in treated soils. The Innovative Technology Evaluation Report provides information on the technology applicability, economic analysis, technology limitations, a technology description, process residuals, site requirements, latest performance data, the technology status, vendors claims, and the source of further information.

Bannerjee, P.

1993-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

36

Development of a mobile heliostat mirror washing system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the development, design and fabrication of an experimental system for washing heliostats. The economics of heliostat cleaning, the design requirements and the design and testing of the wash system are discussed. The heliostat wash system was designed to wash the heliostats located at the 10 MWe Central Receiver Pilot Plant located near Barstow, California. The plant, called Solar One, is a cooperative activity between the Department of Energy and the Associates: Southern California Edison, the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, and the California Energy Commission. 12 figs., 4 tabs.

Not Available

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Granite Reliable Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reliable Power Reliable Power Jump to: navigation, search Name Granite Reliable Power Facility Granite Reliable Power Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Brookfield Renewable Energy Group Developer Brookfield Renewable Energy Group Energy Purchaser Green Mountain Power / Central Vermont Public Service / New England Power Pool Location Milan NH Coordinates 44.74039314°, -71.28376007° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.74039314,"lon":-71.28376007,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

38

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Granite2_FUSRAP  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Illinois Illinois Granite City, Illinois Site FUSRAP Site Granite Map Background-The Granite City Site, located in Granite City, Illinois, was remediated under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). FUSRAP was established in 1974 to remediate sites where radioactive contamination remained from Manhattan Project and early U.S. Atomic Energy Commission operations. History-In the late 1950s and early 1960s, two federal government-owned betatron particle accelerators were used at the Granite City Site to x-ray uranium metal ingots for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission to check the quality of the metal and to detect metallurgical flaws before fabrication and machining were performed. In 1992, DOE designated the site for remediation under FUSRAP. Several

39

Simulation of soil washing with surfactants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A mathematical model of soil washing that incorporates the surfactant enhanced mobilization and solubilization of organic compounds was implemented using a finite difference compositional reservoir simulator. The primary objective of the model was identification of the contributions of the various mechanismswater displacement, surfactant mobilization and dissolutionon the removal of organic contaminants from soil. Mobilization of the organic phase was described by a reduction in the residual oil saturation caused by decreased interfacial tension. Increased aqueous solubility of organic compounds due to solubilization by surfactant micelles was modeled assuming local equilibrium. Parameters for the model were obtained from experimental measurements and literature sources. The model was implemented in a two-dimensional, two-phase system. Experimental data from surfactant flushing of columns contaminated with automatic transmission fluid and a mixture of chlorinated organics were used to evaluate the performance of the model. In most cases, the predicted organic recoveries were found to agree well with experimental results. For the surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate, mobilization of organic contaminants was the main recovery mechanism for both waste liquids modeled. The results suggest that complete dissolution of a contaminant nonaqueous phase, rather than mobilization and subsequent vertical migration, may be difficult to achieve at the surfactant concentrations studied.

Elaine P.S Cheah; Danny D Reible; Kalliat T Valsaraj; W.David Constant; Barry W Walsh; Louis J Thibodeaux

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Granite Springs Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Springs Geothermal Project Springs Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Granite Springs Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates 40.1475°, -118.64861111111° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.1475,"lon":-118.64861111111,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite wash producers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Granite Creek Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Project Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Granite Creek Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates 41.058611111111°, -117.22777777778° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.058611111111,"lon":-117.22777777778,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

42

Granite State Electric Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric Co Electric Co Place New York Utility Id 26510 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location NPCC NERC NPCC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates No Rates Available The following table contains monthly sales and revenue data for Granite State Electric Co (New Hampshire). Month RES REV (THOUSAND $) RES SALES (MWH) RES CONS COM REV (THOUSAND $) COM SALES (MWH) COM CONS IND_REV (THOUSAND $) IND SALES (MWH) IND CONS OTH REV (THOUSAND $) OTH SALES (MWH) OTH CONS TOT REV (THOUSAND $) TOT SALES (MWH) TOT CONS

43

Washing of soils spiked with various pollutants by surfactant solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, the batch-type of washing with surfactant solutions was employed for the treatment of soils artificially contaminated with various volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and heavy metals. 15 industrial grade surfactants were tested. Washing was conducing by adding surfactant solution to the soils and mixing for one hour, then centrifuging it and analyzing the supernatant. Deionized water was used for soil washing for comparison. Results indicated that deionized water performed as well as Surfactant No. 1 in washing VOC-contaminated soils. Therefore, it is concluded that the VOCs tested can be easily washed from soils by rain water. In washing PAH-contaminated soils, nonionic surfactants performed better than anionic surfactants in terms of removal efficiency. The amphoteric surfactant performed worst in washing PAH-contaminated soils. Generally, surfactants are useful in removing cadmium from soils, but are not useful for the removal of lead and copper. Amphoteric, anionic, and low pH cationic surfactants were the most effective of those tested. For PAH/heavy metals-contaminated soils, removal efficiencies were lower than that of soils containing a single contaminant.

Yang, G.C.C.; Chang, J.H. [National Sun Yat-Sen Univ., Kaohsiung (Taiwan, Province of China)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

44

Caustic washing for refining of direct coal liquefaction products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extensive research and development sponsored by the U.S. DOE/PETC over the past two decades has resulted in dramatic improvements in the quality of direct coal liquefaction products. High-quality coal-derived distillates are obtainable from catalytic two-stage liquefaction (TSL) processes, such as those developed at the Wilsonville, AL pilot plant and the Hydrocarbon Technologies Inc. (HTI) pilot plant and bench units. The products of the Wilsonville and HTI TSL operations are suitable as high quality feedstocks for producing transportation fuels in a refinery. These products have important quality advantages over crude petroleum: they are distillates boiling below about 700{degrees}F and are thus virtually free of resid and metals, and they have very low sulfur contents and low nitrogen contents. The coal liquids have carbon and hydrogen contents and Watson characterization factors within the range of crude petroleums. However, relative to crude petroleum, the crude coal products have elevated oxygen contents. This report describes the removal of phenols from coal liquids by caustic washing, and the the recovery of the cresylic acid by-product.

Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.; Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D. [CONSOL, Inc., Library, PA (United States); Zhou, P. [Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

45

Washing off intensification of cotton and wool fabrics by ultrasounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Wet textile washing processes were set up for wool and cotton fabrics to evaluate the potential of ultrasound transducers (US) in improving dirt removal. The samples were contaminated with an emulsion of carbon soot in vegetable oil and aged for three hours in fan oven. Before washing, the fabrics were soaked for 3min in a standard detergent solution and subsequently washed in a water bath. The dirt removal was evaluated through colorimetric measurements. The total color differences ?E of the samples were measured with respect to an uncontaminated fabric, before and after each washing cycle. The percentage of ?E variation obtained was calculated and correlated to the dirt removal. The results showed that the US transducers enhanced the dirt removal and temperature was the parameter most influencing the US efficiency on the cleaning process. Better results were obtained at a lower process temperature.

R. Peila; G. Actis Grande; M. Giansetti; S. Rehman; S. Sicardi; G. Rovero

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Design for dissemination of a low cost washing machine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Throughout much the developing world, laundry is done the same way today as it was thousands of years ago. The strenuous and time consuming task of clothes washing often falls on the women, who spend many hours every week ...

Raduta, Radu

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Kinetics ofin situ surfactant soil flushing at moderate washing conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Economicin situ soil flushing using common surfactants may be a good substitute for exhaustive, pressurized soil washing or bioremediation requiring high energy consumption or laborious technique. Two model surfactants

Daechul Cho; Hyun-Su Kim

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Optimizing a Washing Procedure To Mobilize Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) from a Field-Contaminated Soil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Soil washing was combined with surfactant regeneration and detoxification steps to generate innocuous products. ... Yet guidance in selecting surfactants for ex situ soil washing remains somewhat fragmentary. ...

Tao Yuan; William D. Marshall

2007-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

49

Use of antimicrobial agents in a novel cattle washing system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

USE OF ANTIMICROBIAL AGENTS IN A NOVEL CATTLE WASHING SYSTEM A Thesis by BRIAN REED COVINGTON Submitted to thc Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... August 2001 Major Subject: Animal Science USE OF ANTIMICROBIAL AGENTS IN A NOVEL CATTLE WASHING SYSTEM A Thesis by BRIAN REED COVINGTON Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requtrements for the degree of MASTER...

Covington, Brian Reed

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

50

Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam, 2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project monitored the daily passage of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon O. nerka smolts during the 2005 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. In 2005 fish management agencies released significant numbers of hatchery Chinook salmon and steelhead trout above Lower Granite Dam that were not marked with a fin clip or coded-wire tag. Generally, the age-1 and older fish were distinguishable from wild fish by the occurrence of fin erosion. Age-0 Chinook salmon are more difficult to distinguish between wild and non-adclipped hatchery fish and therefore classified as unknown rearing. The total annual hatchery spring/summer Chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 0.34 times greater in 2005 than in 2004. The wild spring/summer Chinook catch was 0.34 times less than the previous year. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 0.67 times less than in 2004. Wild steelhead trout catch was 0.72 times less than the previous year. The Snake River trap collected 1,152 age-0 Chinook salmon of unknown rearing. During 2005, the Snake River trap captured 219 hatchery and 44 wild/natural sockeye salmon and 110 coho salmon O. kisutch of unknown rearing. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with flow. Trap operations began on March 6 and were terminated on June 3. The trap was out of operation for a total of one day due to heavy debris. FPC requested that the trap be restarted on June 15 through June 22 to collect and PIT tag age-0 Chinook salmon. Hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 1.06 times greater and wild Chinook salmon catch was 1.26 times greater than in 2004. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 2005 was 1.41 times greater and wild steelhead trout collection was 1.27 times greater than the previous year. Trap operations began on March 6 and were terminated on May 17 due to high flows. There were two days when the trap was taken out of service because of mechanical failure. Travel time (d) and migration rate (km/d) through Lower Granite Reservoir for passive integrated transponder (PIT) tagged Chinook salmon and steelhead trout marked at the Snake River trap were affected by discharge. Statistical analysis of 2005 data detected a relation between migration rate and discharge for hatchery Chinook but was unable to detect a relation for wild Chinook. The inability to detect a migration rate discharge relation for wild Chinook salmon was caused by a lack of data. For hatchery Chinook salmon there was a 1.8-fold increase in migration rate between 50 and 100 kcfs. For steelhead trout tagged at the Snake River trap, statistical analysis detected a significant relation between migration rate and lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge. For hatchery and wild steelhead trout, there was a 2.2-fold and a 2.2-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. Travel time and migration rate to Lower Granite Dam for fish marked at the Salmon River trap were calculated. Statistical analysis of the 2005 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge for hatchery Chinook salmon, wild Chinook salmon, hatchery steelhead trout, and wild steelhead trout. Migration rate increased 4.2-fold for hatchery Chinook salmon, 2.9-fold for wild Chinook salmon and 2.5-fold for hatchery steelhead, and 1.7-fold for wild steelhead as discharge increased between 50 kcfs and 100 kcfs. Fish tagged with PIT tags at the Snake River and Salmon River traps were interrogated at four dams with PIT tag detection systems (Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental and McNary dams). Because of the addition of the fourth interrogation site (Lower Monumental) in 1993 and the installation of the Removable Spillway Weir at Lower Granite Dam in 2001, caution must be used in comparing cumulative interrogation data. Cumulative interrogations at the fo

Buettner, Edwin W.; Putnam, Scott A. [Idaho Department of Fish and Game

2009-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

51

Thanks, George Washington, for the Energy Efficient Washing Machine! |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Thanks, George Washington, for the Energy Efficient Washing Thanks, George Washington, for the Energy Efficient Washing Machine! Thanks, George Washington, for the Energy Efficient Washing Machine! February 20, 2012 - 5:00am Addthis Kristin Swineford Communication Specialist, Weatherization and Intergovernmental Programs For many of us, particularly those living east of the Mississippi river, President's Day weekend is not just a time to honor the birthday of our country's founding father, it's also the final escape from dreadfully cold and snowy days. However, those of us with pestering consumerist habits to feed always ensure our return to the metropolis by Monday, as the day is quickly taking on a new reputation: Second best shopping day of the year, after Black Friday. By now you're asking, "What does any of this have to do with energy

52

Thanks, George Washington, for the Energy Efficient Washing Machine! |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Thanks, George Washington, for the Energy Efficient Washing Thanks, George Washington, for the Energy Efficient Washing Machine! Thanks, George Washington, for the Energy Efficient Washing Machine! February 20, 2012 - 5:00am Addthis Kristin Swineford Communication Specialist, Weatherization and Intergovernmental Programs For many of us, particularly those living east of the Mississippi river, President's Day weekend is not just a time to honor the birthday of our country's founding father, it's also the final escape from dreadfully cold and snowy days. However, those of us with pestering consumerist habits to feed always ensure our return to the metropolis by Monday, as the day is quickly taking on a new reputation: Second best shopping day of the year, after Black Friday. By now you're asking, "What does any of this have to do with energy

53

Soil washing results for mixed waste pond soils at Hanford  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soil washing technology was assessed as a means for remediating soil contaminated with mixed wastes primarily composed of heavy metals and radionuclides. The soils at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site are considered suitable for soil washing because of their relatively low quantities of silt and clay. However, in a limited number of soil washing experiments using soils from different locations in the north pond of the 300 Area, the degree of decontamination achieved for the coarse fraction of the soil varied considerably. Part of this variation appears to be due to the presence of a discrete layer of contaminated sediment found in some of the samples. 7 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

Gerber, M.A.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Midea Washing Appliance: Proposed Penalty (2011-CE-1903) | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Proposed Penalty (2011-CE-1903) Proposed Penalty (2011-CE-1903) Midea Washing Appliance: Proposed Penalty (2011-CE-1903) April 22, 2011 DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Midea Washing Appliances Mfg. Co., Ltd. failed to certify a variety of dishwashers as compliant with the applicable water and energy conservation standards. DOE regulations require a manufacturer (which includes importers) to submit reports certifying that its products have been tested and meet the applicable water and energy conservation standards. This civil penalty notice advises the company of the potential penalties and DOE's administrative process, including the company's right to a hearing. Midea: Proposed Penalty (2011-CE-1903) More Documents & Publications Midea Washing Appliance: Order (2011-CE-1903)

55

100 Area soil washing bench-scale test procedures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes methodologies and procedures for conducting soil washing treatability tests in accordance with the 100 Area Soil Washing Treatability Test Plan (DOE-RL 1992, Draft A). The objective of this treatability study is to evaluate the use of physical separation systems and chemical extraction methods as a means of separating chemically and radioactively contaminated soil fractions from uncontaminated soil fractions. These data will be primarily used for determining feasibility of the individual unit operations and defining the requirements for a system, or systems, for pilot-scale testing.

Freeman, H.D.; Gerber, M.A.; Mattigod, S.V.; Serne, R.J.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Nuclear car wash status report, August 2005  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A large majority of US imports arrive at seaports in maritime cargo containers. The number of containers arriving is nearly 10 million per year, each with a cargo of up to 30 tons of various materials. This provides a vulnerable entry point for the importation of a nuclear weapon or its components by a terrorist group. Passive radiation sensors are being deployed at portals to detect radioactive material and portable instruments are carried by port personnel to augment detection. Those instruments can detect the neutrons and g-rays produced by {sup 240}Pu that is normally present in weapons grade plutonium in cases where cargo overburden is not too great. However, {sup 235}U produces almost no neutron output in its normal radioactive decay and its principal {gamma}-radiation is at 186 keV and is readily attenuated by small amounts of wood or packing materials. Impurities such as {sup 232}U, often present in reactor irradiated material at the 100-200 ppt level, can provide a detectable signal through significant cargo overburden but the wide variations among samples of HEU make this an unreliable means of detecting SNM. High quality radiography may be useful in determining that the majority of containers are clearly free of SNM. However, some containers will lead to ambiguous results from radiography and passive radiation sensing. For these reasons active neutron interrogation is proposed as a means to produce fission and thus greatly amplify the radiation output of fissionable material to facilitate its reliable detection even when well shielded by large cargo overburden. Historically, the fission signature utilized as the unique identifying feature of fissionable materials is the detection of delayed neutrons. However, these neutrons have very low yield {approx} 0.017 per fission in {sup 235}U, and their low energy results in very poor penetration of hydrogenous materials such as fuels, water, wood, or agricultural products. That signature alone does not provide reliable detection in thick cargos. A new signature has been identified and has been developed within the current project for the detection of well shielded SNM. This SNM signature is based on high-energy {beta}-delayed {gamma}-radiation produced by fission products following neutron or photon induced fission. These {gamma}-rays are high enough in energy (E{sub {gamma}} > 3 MeV) to be readily distinguished from any natural background radioactivity since the latter does not extend above 2.6 MeV. Their abundance is nearly a decade greater than delayed neutrons and their short half-lives deliver nearly all of the signature radiation on time scales of one minute or less and thus facilitate rapid scanning. Finally, for this {gamma}-radiation in the 3-6 MeV range attenuation occurs only by Compton scattering and is in the range where minimum attenuation occurs in all materials. Even the thickest cargos of any material attenuate these {gamma}-rays by only a factor of 10-30X so that the signature is readily detected even with the most challenging shield materials. The goals of the current program are to detect significant quantities (much less than IAEA ''significant'' amounts) of well-shielded SNM, and to do so with detection probability P{sub d} {ge} 95% and with false alarm rates P{sub fp} {le} 0.001. It is the goal to meet these requirements in a scan that requires less than one minute to complete and does so without damage to the cargo or to people who may be hidden inside. We intend to meet these requirements even when the cargo overburden is up to {rho}L {le} 150 g/cm{sup 2} of any material ranging from fuels and agricultural products to steel and lead.

Prussin, S; Slaughter, D; Pruet, J; Descalle, M; Bernstein, A; Hall, J; Accatino, M; Alford, O; Asztalos, S; Church, J; Loshak, A; Madden, N; Manatt, D; Moore, T; Norman, E; Petersen, D

2005-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

57

EA-1801: Granite Reliable Power Wind Park Project in Coos County...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

01: Granite Reliable Power Wind Park Project in Coos County, NH EA-1801: Granite Reliable Power Wind Park Project in Coos County, NH June 25, 2010 EA-1801: Final Environmental...

58

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline a-type granites Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

granites of the Lachlan Fold Belt... ) experimentally determined the stability of titanite and fluorite in the A-type Mount Scott Granite, Oklahoma... and origin of A-type...

59

Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam, 2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project monitored the daily passage of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon O. nerka smolts during the 2004 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. In 2004 fish management agencies released significant numbers of hatchery Chinook salmon and steelhead trout above Lower Granite Dam that were not marked with a fin clip or coded-wire tag. Generally, these fish were distinguishable from wild fish by the occurrence of fin erosion. Total annual hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 1.1 times greater in 2004 than in 2003. The wild Chinook catch was 1.1 times greater than the previous year. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 1.2 times greater than in 2003. Wild steelhead trout catch was 1.6 times greater than the previous year. The Snake River trap collected 978 age-0 Chinook salmon of unknown rearing. During 2004, the Snake River trap captured 23 hatchery and 18 wild/natural sockeye salmon and 60 coho salmon O. kisutch of unknown rearing. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with flow. Trap operations began on March 7 and were terminated on June 4. The trap was out of operation for a total of zero days due to mechanical failure or debris. Hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 10.8% less and wild Chinook salmon catch was 19.0% less than in 2003. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 2004 was 20.0% less and wild steelhead trout collection was 22.3% less than the previous year. Trap operations began on March 7 and were terminated on May 28 due to high flows. There were two days when the trap was taken out of service because wild Chinook catch was very low, hatchery Chinook catch was very high, and the weekly quota of PIT tagged hatchery Chinook had been met. Travel time (d) and migration rate (km/d) through Lower Granite Reservoir for PIT-tagged Chinook salmon and steelhead trout marked at the Snake River trap were affected by discharge. Statistical analysis of 2004 data detected a relation between migration rate and discharge for wild Chinook salmon but was unable to detect a relation for hatchery Chinook. The inability to detect a migration rate discharge relation for hatchery Chinook salmon was caused by age-0 fall Chinook being mixed in with the age 1 Chinook. Age-0 fall Chinook migrate much slower than age-1 Chinook, which would confuse the ability to detect the migration rate discharge relation. When several groups, which consisted of significant numbers of age-0 Chinook salmon, were removed from the analysis a relation was detected. For hatchery and wild Chinook salmon there was a 2.8-fold and a 2.4-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. For steelhead trout tagged at the Snake River trap, statistical analysis detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge. For hatchery and wild steelhead trout, there was a 2.3-fold and a 2.0-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. Travel time and migration rate to Lower Granite Dam for fish marked at the Salmon River trap were calculated. Statistical analysis of the 2004 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge for hatchery Chinook salmon, wild Chinook salmon and hatchery steelhead trout. Not enough data were available to perform the analysis for wild steelhead trout. Migration rate increased 7.0-fold for hatchery Chinook salmon, 4.7-fold for wild Chinook salmon and 3.8-fold for hatchery steelhead as discharge increased between 50 kcfs and 100 kcfs. Fish tagged with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags at the Snake River and Salmon River traps were interrogated at four dams with PIT tag detection systems (Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, and McNary dams). Because of the addition of the fourth interrogation site (Lower Monume

Buettner, Edwin W.; Putnam, Scott A. [Idaho Department of Fish and Game

2009-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

60

Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam, 2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project monitored the daily passage of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon smolts O. nerka during the 2002 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. In 2002 fish management agencies released significant numbers of hatchery Chinook salmon and steelhead trout above Lower Granite Dam that were not marked with a fin clip or coded-wire tag. Generally, these fish were distinguishable from wild fish by the occurrence of fin erosion. Total annual hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 11.4 times greater in 2002 than in 2001. The wild Chinook catch was 15.5 times greater than the previous year. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 2.9 times greater than in 2001. Wild steelhead trout catch was 2.8 times greater than the previous year. The Snake River trap collected 3,996 age-0 Chinook salmon of unknown rearing. During 2002, the Snake River trap captured 69 hatchery and 235 wild/natural sockeye salmon and 114 hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with flow. The significant increase in catch in 2002 was due to a 3.1 fold increase in hatchery Chinook production and a more normal spring runoff. Trap operations began on March 10 and were terminated on June 7. The trap was out of operation for a total of four days due to mechanical failure or debris. Hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 4.2 times greater and wild Chinook salmon catch was 2.4 times greater than in 2001. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 2002 was 81% of the 2001 numbers. Wild steelhead trout collection in 2002 was 81% of the previous year's catch. Trap operations began on March 10 and were terminated on May 29 due to high flows. The trap was out of operation for four days due to high flow or debris. The increase in hatchery Chinook catch in 2002 was due to a 3.1 fold increase in hatchery production and differences in flow between years. Changes in hatchery and wild steelhead catch are probably due to differences in flow between years. Travel time (d) and migration rate (km/d) through Lower Granite Reservoir for PIT-tagged Chinook salmon and steelhead trout marked at the Snake River trap were affected by discharge. Statistical analysis of 2002 data detected a relation between migration rate and discharge for hatchery and wild Chinook salmon. For hatchery and wild Chinook salmon there was a 4.7-fold and a 3.7-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. For steelhead trout tagged at the Snake River trap, statistical analysis detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge. For hatchery and wild steelhead trout, there was a 1.8-fold and a 1.7-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. Travel time and migration rate to Lower Granite Dam for fish marked at the Salmon River trap were calculated. Statistical analysis of the 2002 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge for wild Chinook salmon and hatchery steelhead trout. The analysis was unable to detect a relation between migration rate and discharge for hatchery Chinook salmon. The lack of a detectable relation was probably a result of the migration rate data being spread over a very narrow range of discharge. Not enough data were available to perform the analysis for wild steelhead trout. Migration rate increased 4.3-fold for wild Chinook salmon and 2.2-fold for hatchery steelhead between 50 kcfs and 100 kcfs. Fish tagged with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags at the Snake River trap were interrogated at four dams with PIT tag detection systems (Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, and McNary dams). Because of the addition of the fourth interrogation site (Lower Monumental) in 1993 and the installation of the Removable Spillway Weir at

Buettner, Edwin W.; Putnam, Scott A. [Idaho Department of Fish and Game

2009-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite wash producers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Am/Cm Oxalate Precipitation and Washing Demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to discuss the findings of the Am/Cm Oxalate Precipitation and Washing Demonstration carried out at TNX during December 1995. This demonstration consisted of two steps: oxalate precipitation and precipitate washing. The first step reacted Am/Cm stimulant solution with oxalic acid resulting in the formation of insoluble lanthanide oxalates and soluble metal oxalates. The second step consisted of washing the precipitate with equal volumes of a nitric acid/oxalic acid solution to remove unwanted cations (miscellaneous metals) from the slurry. Quantitative results consist of: the solubility of the metallic impurities and lanthanide oxalates under process conditions, the settling rate of the oxalates, the specific volume of the oxalate precipitate, and the minimum distance the solution transfer jet can be place from the oxalate solids to prevent entrainment. Finally, discussion of how to decrease lanthanide losses is presented in terms of transfer jet location, initial nitric acid concentration, and wash nitric acid concentration. Solubilizing the precipitate and adjusting the nitric acid concentration prior to vitrification were not performed in this demonstration.

Beck, S.B.

1996-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

62

Modeling the two stages of surfactant-aided soil washing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper provides new insights into modelling the distribution of hydrophobic compounds between soil and water phases in the presence of nonionic surfactant micelles. Experimental measurements were made of various systems comprising a non-ionic surfactant, five soils of different fractional organic carbon contents, and a hydrophobic (disperse) dye. Soil-washing performance was quantified using reciprocal surfactant-soil solubilization coefficients (1/Kd). Two stages of partitioning were identified. In stage 1, the dye concentration increased slightly with increasing surfactant dose until surfactant monomers saturated the bulk solution at the critical micelle concentration (cmc). The washing performance was 1:1 proportional to the surfactant monomer concentration. Most of the surfactant in this stage is sorbed. In stage 2, above the cmc, soil-washing performance increased linearly with increasing available surfactant micelles in the bulk solution. Reciprocal surfactant-soil solubilization coefficients (1/Kd), octanolwater partition coefficients (Kow), fractional organic carbon content of the soil (foc), and surfactant concentration were correlated for each stage in the soil-washing process using two simple equations.

W Chu; W.S So

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam, 2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project monitored the daily passage of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon O. nerka smolts during the 2003 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. In 2003 fish management agencies released significant numbers of hatchery Chinook salmon and steelhead trout above Lower Granite Dam that were not marked with a fin clip or coded-wire tag. Generally, these fish were distinguishable from wild fish by the occurrence of fin erosion. Total annual hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 2.1 times less in 2003 than in 2002. The wild Chinook catch was 1.1 times less than the previous year. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 1.7 times less than in 2002. Wild steelhead trout catch was 2.1 times less than the previous year. The Snake River trap collected 579 age-0 Chinook salmon of unknown rearing. During 2003, the Snake River trap captured five hatchery and 13 wild/natural sockeye salmon and 36 coho salmon O. kisutch of unknown rearing. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with flow. The significant differences in catch between 2003 and the previous year were due mainly to low flows during much of the trapping season and then very high flows at the end of the season, which terminated the trapping season 12 days earlier than in 2002. Trap operations began on March 9 and were terminated on May 27. The trap was out of operation for a total of zero days due to mechanical failure or debris. Hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 16.8% less and wild Chinook salmon catch was 1.7 times greater than in 2002. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 2003 was 5.6% less than in 2002. Wild steelhead trout collection was 19.2% less than the previous year. Trap operations began on March 9 and were terminated on May 24 due to high flows. There were zero days when the trap was out of operation due to high flow or debris. The decrease in hatchery Chinook catch in 2003 was partially due to differences in flow between years because there was a 5.9% increase in hatchery production in the Salmon River drainage in 2003. The decrease in hatchery steelhead catch may be partially due to a 13% decrease in hatchery production in the Salmon River drainage in 2003. Travel time (d) and migration rate (km/d) through Lower Granite Reservoir for PIT-tagged Chinook salmon and steelhead trout marked at the Snake River trap were affected by discharge. Statistical analysis of 2003 data detected a relation between migration rate and discharge for wild Chinook salmon but was unable to detect a relation for hatchery Chinook. The inability to detect a migration rate discharge relation for hatchery Chinook was probably caused by age 0 fall Chinook being mixed in with the age 1 Chinook. Age 0 fall Chinook migrate much slower than age 1 Chinook, which would confuse the ability to detect the migration rate discharge relation. For wild Chinook salmon there was a 1.4-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. For steelhead trout tagged at the Snake River trap, statistical analysis detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge. For hatchery and wild steelhead trout, there was a 1.7-fold and a 1.9-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. Travel time and migration rate to Lower Granite Dam for fish marked at the Salmon River trap were calculated. Statistical analysis of the 2003 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge for hatchery Chinook salmon, wild Chinook salmon and hatchery steelhead trout. Not enough data were available to perform the analysis for wild steelhead trout. Migration rate increased 14-fold for hatchery Chinook salmon, 8.3-fold for wild Chinook salmon and 2.4-fold for hatchery steelhead as discharge increased between 50 kcfs and

Buettner, Edwin W.; Putnam, Scott A. [Idaho Department of Fish and Game

2009-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

64

Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam, 1998 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project monitored the daily passage of chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon smolts O. nerka, during the 1998 spring outmigration at migrant traps on the Snake and Salmon rivers. All hatchery chinook salmon released above Lower Granite Dam 19 1998 were marked with a fin-clip. Total annual hatchery chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 226% of the 1997 number and 110% of the 1996 catch. The wild chinook catch was 120% of the 1997 catch but was only 93% of 1996. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 501% of 1997 numbers but only 90% of the 1996 numbers. Wild steelhead trout catch was 569% of 1997 and 125% of the 1996 numbers. The Snake River trap collected 106 age-0 chinook salmon. During 1998, for the first time, the Snake River trap captured a significant number of hatchery sockeye salmon (1,552) and hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch (166). Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with high flows. Trap operations began on March 8 and were terminated for the season due to high flows on June 12. The trap was out of operation for 34 d during the season due to high flow and debris. Hatchery chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 476% and wild chinook salmon catch was 137% of 1997 numbers and 175% and 82% of 1996 catch, respectively. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 1998 was 96% of the 1997 catch and 13% of the 1996 numbers. Wild steelhead trout collection in 1998 was 170% of the 1997 catch and 37% of the 1996 numbers. Travel time (d) and migration rate (km/d) through Lower Granite Reservoir for PIT-tagged chinook salmon and steelhead trout, marked at the head of the reservoir were affected by discharge. For fish tagged at the Snake River trap, statistical analysis of 1998 detected a significant relation between migration rate and discharge. For hatchery and wild chinook salmon there was a 2.0- and 2.6-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 thousands of cubic feet per second (kcfs). For hatchery steelhead trout there was a 2.6-fold increase in migration rate between 50 kcfs and 100 kcfs. For fish marked at the Salmon River trap, statistical analysis of the 1998 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and discharge for hatchery and wild chinook salmon hatchery and found a 3.3- and 2.6-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. A significant relation between migration rate and discharge was not detected for hatchery steelhead trout. Insufficient numbers of wild steelhead trout were PIT-tagged at the Salmon River trap to estimate travel time and migration rate to Lower Granite Dam.

Buettner, Edwin W.; Brimmer, Arnold F.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Removal of alkylphenols from polluted sites using surfactant-assisted soil washing and photocatalysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Surfactant-assisted soil washing and photocatalysis are well-known remediation processes ... concern. The application of photocatalysis to treat soil washing extracts containing 4-methylphenol, 4-ethylphenol and....

Manuela Davezza; Debora Fabbri

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Effect of Ultrasound on Surfactant-Aided Soil Washing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of ultrasound as an enhancement mechanism in the surfactant-aided soil-washing process was examined by conducting desoption tests of soils contaminated with naphthalene or diesel-oil. The experiments were conducted to elucidate the effect of ultrasound on the mass transfer from soil to the aqueous phase using naphthalene-contaminated soil. In addition, the use of ultrasound for the diesel-oil-contaminated soil was investigated under a range of conditions of surfactant concentration, sonication power, duration, soil/liquid ratio, particle size and initial diesel-oil concentration. The ultrasound used in the soil-washing process significantly enhanced the mass transfer rate from the solid phase to the aqueous phase. The removal efficiency of diesel-oil from the soil phase generally increased with longer sonication time, higher power intensity, and large particle size.

Seungmin Na; Yongwoon Park; Anna Hwang; Jeongsook Ha; Younguk Kim; Jeehyeong Khim

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Field studies of in-situ soil washing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The EPA and US Air Force conducted a research test program to demonstrate the removal of hydrocarbons and chlorinated hydrocarbons from a sandy soil by in situ soil washing using surfactants. Contaminated soil from the fire-training area of Volk Air National Guard Base, WI, was first taken to a laboratory for characterization. At the laboratory, the soil was recompacted into glass columns creating a simulated in-situ environment. Under gravity flow, 12 pore volumes of aqueous surfactant solutions were passed through each of the columns. Gas chromatograph (GC) analyses were used on the washing effluent and soil to determine removal efficiency (RE). The results of these tests were highly encouraging. Treated effluent was discharged directly to the on-base aerobic-treatment lagoons.

Nash, J.H.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

An efficient process for recovery of fine coal from tailings of coal washing plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gravity concentration of hard lignites using conventional jigs and heavy media separation equipment is prone to produce coal-rich fine tailings. This study aims to establish a fine coal recovery process of very high efficiency at reasonable capital investment and operational costs. The technical feasibility to upgrade the properties of the predeslimed fine refuse of a lignite washing plant with 35.9% ash content was investigated by employing gravity separation methods. The laboratory tests carried out with the combination of shaking table and Mozley multi-gravity separator (MGS) revealed that the clean coal with 18% ash content on dry basis could be obtained with 58.9% clean coal recovery by the shaking table stage and 4.1% clean coal recovery by MGS stage, totaling to the sum of 63.0% clean coal recovery from a predeslimed feed. The combustible recovery and the organic efficiency of the shaking table + MGS combination were 79.5% and 95.5%, respectively. Based on the results of the study, a flow sheet of a high-efficiency fine coal recovery process was proposed, which is also applicable to the coal refuse pond slurry of a lignite washing plant.

Cicek, T.; Cocen, I.; Engin, V.T.; Cengizler, H. [Dokuz Eylul University, Izmir (Turkey). Dept. for Mining Engineering

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam, 1997 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project monitored the daily passage of chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and steelhead trout O. mykiss smolts during the 1997 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. All hatchery chinook salmon released above Lower Granite Dam were marked with a fin clip in 1997. Total annual hatchery chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 49% of the 1996 number but only 6% of the 1995 catch. The wild chinook catch was 77% of the 1996 but was only 13% of 1995. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 18% of 1996 numbers but only 7% of the 1995 numbers. Wild steelhead trout catch was 22% of 1996 but only 11% of the 1995 numbers. The Snake River trap collected eight age-0 chinook salmon and one sockeye/kokanee salmon O. nerka. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with high flows. Trap operations were terminated for the season due to high flows and trap damage on May 8 and were out of operation for 23 d due to high flow and debris. Hatchery chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 37% and wild chinook salmon catch was 60% of 1996 numbers but only 5% and 11% of 1995 catch, respectively. The 1997 hatchery steelhead trout collection was 13% of the 1996 catch and 32% of the 1995 numbers. Wild steelhead trout collection in 1997 was 21% of the 1996 catch and 13% of the 1995 numbers. Trap operations were terminated for the season due to high flows and trap damage on May 7 and were out of operation for 19 d due to high flow and debris.

Buettner, Edwin W.; Nelson, William R.

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam, 1999 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project monitored the daily passage of chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon smolts O. nerka during the 1999 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. All hatchery chinook salmon released above Lower Granite Dam were marked with a fin clip in 1999. Total annual hatchery chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 440% of the 1998 number. The wild chinook catch was 603% of the previous year's catch. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 93% of 1998 numbers. Wild steelhead trout catch was 68% of 1998 numbers. The Snake River trap collected 62 age-0 chinook salmon. During 1998 the Snake River trap captured 173 hatchery and 37 wild/natural sockeye salmon and 130 hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with high flows. Trap operations began on March 14 and were terminated for the season due to high flows on May 25. The trap was out of operation for 18 d during the season due to high flow and debris. Hatchery chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 214%, and wild chinook salmon catch was 384% of 1998 numbers. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 1999 was 210% of the 1998 numbers. Wild steelhead trout collection in 1999 was 203% of the 1998 catch. Trap operations began on March 14 and were terminated for the season due to high flows on May 21. The trap was out of operation for 17 d during the season due to high flow and debris.

Buettner, Edwin W.; Brimmer, Arnold F.; Putnam, Scott A.

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Mr. Fred Steinkuehler Granite City Steel Division National Steel Corporation  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Fred Steinkuehler Fred Steinkuehler Granite City Steel Division National Steel Corporation 20th and State Streets Granite City, Illinois 62040 Dear Mr. Steinkuehler: Enclosed please find your copy of the signed consent forms for the radiological survey of the South Plant Betatron Building. In your letter to me of July 21, 1988, you identified several issues regarding the survey and the consent. I would like to address these concerns below. As noted in the consent form, the purpose of our surveys are only to determine if there is any residual radioactive material on the site that is derived from Department of Energy (DOE) predecessor operations. All data collected during the designation survey is to determine the radiological condition of the portion of the site involved in the predecessor work. No

72

Interoffice Memorandum TO File Subject Granite City PRAR Data  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

: .' . .Y-" ._ ; : .' . .Y-" ._ ; / Bechfel / / Interoffice Memorandum TO File Subject Granite City PRAR Data Copies to M. Kaye B. Stanley J. Wood The fo$lowing data packages contain the post-remedial action sampling data, waste management data, and health and safety data that were reported in the Granite City PRAR. File No. Date Frolll Of At I UOLJU 7330 September 9, 1993 S. B. Hill FUSRAP E&T .' Oak Ridge Ext. 6-5211 D-15056 6-23-93 Direct and transferable contamination survey of betatron room with map D-15055 6-23-93 Gamma exposure rate survey of backgrounds and betatron room D-15040 D-15167 6-21-93 Final report: PCb 7-12-93 93-06-038 Case narrative, report of analysis, field sample collection form; and QC information D-15057 6-17-93 Air particulate sample reporting logs

73

Town of Granite Falls, North Carolina (Utility Company) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Granite Falls Town of Granite Falls Town of Place North Carolina Utility Id 7496 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes ISO Other Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png COMMERCIAL ALL ELECTRIC - E13 Commercial COMMERCIAL ALL ELECTRIC - E14 Commercial COMMERCIAL ALL ELECTRIC - E9 Commercial COMMERCIAL ELECTRIC - E6 Commercial COMMERCIAL ELECTRIC - E8 Commercial CP 98-1C Industrial CP 98-1I Industrial CP 98-2C Industrial CP 98-2I Industrial CP 98-3C Industrial CP 98-3I Industrial CP TOU Industrial INDUSTRIAL ELECTRIC - E10 Industrial

74

Lower granite GIS data description and collection guidelines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Lower Granite Geographic Information System (GIS) was developed jointly by the US Army Corps of Engineers (USCOE) Walla Walla District and the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The goal of the project is to use GIS technology to analyze impacts of the drawdown mitigation option on the physical and biological environment of the Lower Granite Reservoir. The drawdown mitigation option is based on the hypothesis that faster juvenile salmon travel to the ocean would result in higher juvenile survival and greater smolt-to-adult return ratios; to accomplish this, reservoir elevations would be lowered to increase channel velocities. Altering the elevation of the reservoirs on the Snake River is expected to have a variety of impacts to the Physical environment including changes to water velocity, temperature, dissolved gases, and turbidity. The GIS was developed to evaluate these changes and the resulting impacts on the anadromous and resident fish of the Snake River, as well as other aquatic organisms and terrestrial wildlife residing in the adjacent riparian areas. The Lower Granite GIS was developed using commercial hardware and software and is supported by a commercial relational database. Much of the initial system development involved collecting and incorporating data describing the river channel characteristics, hydrologic properties, and aquatic ecology. Potentially meaningful data for the Lower Granite GIS were identified and an extensive data search was performed. Data were obtained from scientists who are analyzing the habitats, limnology, and hydrology of the Snake River. The next six sections of this document describe the bathymetry, fish abundance, substrate, sediment chemistry, and channel hydrology data.

Gordon, J.L.; Evans, B.J.; Perry, E.M.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Lower Granite Dam Smolt Monitoring Program; 1997 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 1997 fish collection season at Lower Granite was characterized by high spring flows, extensive spill, cool spring and early summer water temperatures and comparatively low numbers of fish, particularly yearling chinook. The Fish Passage Center's Smolt Monitoring Program is designed to provide a consistent, real-time database of fish passage and document the migrational characteristics of the many stocks of salmon and steelhead in the Columbia Basin.

Verhey, Peter; Witalis, Shirley; Morrill, Charles (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Soil remediation using soil washing followed by Fenton oxidation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Soil washing was applied to a contaminated soil with p-Cresol by using a nonionic surfactant (Tween 80). A mathematical model has also been proposed to describe both the pollutant desorption and the surfactant adsorption, taking place simultaneously. The effect of temperature (2040C) and surfactant concentration (0.110gL?1) have been analyzed on both kinetic rates. The kinetic desorption rate of p-Cresol increases as the initial solubilizer concentration. Desorption of p-Cresol was slightly greater with increasing temperature. The obtained kinetic model represents quite well the experimental results. Soil washing wastewater (20mgL?1 of p-Cresol and 0.86gL?1 of Tween 80) has been treated with Fenton Reagent to remove the pollutant extracted (p-Cresol) and to recover the surfactant solution. The pH of the soil washing wastewater was about 6.5 and did not change significantly during the Fenton Reagent treatment. Total conversions of p-Cresol were observed, at very short times, at the conditions tested for the Fenton reaction (100mgL?1 of H2O2 and 10mgL?1 of Fe2+). The hydrogen peroxide was not totally exhausted, showing conversions near 60% at 120min. Besides, the removal of Tween 80 during the Fentons reaction was lower than 10%, which suggests that the reaction is mainly selective to p-Cresol degradation. The toxicity of the liquids, measured by Microtox bioassay, was significantly reduced after the oxidation reaction, suggesting the negligible formation of degradation intermediates with higher toxicity than p-Cresol.

J.M. Rosas; F. Vicente; A. Santos; A. Romero

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Geochemical and geophysical evidence on the geothermal potential of Caledonian granites in Britain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... production with depth but there are good indications that the area is interesting from a geothermal energy viewpoint, especially where granite is overlain by low conductivity sediments.

G. C. BROWN; JANE PLANT; M. K. LEE

1979-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

78

Laboratory studies of surfactant-enhanced washing of polychlorinated biphenyl from sandy material  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Soil washing was combined with surfactant regeneration and ... ... Adsorption of Non-ionic Surfactants onto Sand and Its Importance in Naphthalene Removal ...

Abdul S. Abdul; Thomas L. Gibson

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

A Proposed New Classification Of The Granites Of Egypt | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » A Proposed New Classification Of The Granites Of Egypt Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Proposed New Classification Of The Granites Of Egypt Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Granites and granitoids constitute an important rock group that covers vast areas of the Arabian-Nubian Shield in Egypt. They range in composition from quartz diorite and tonalite, through granodiorite and quartz monzonite to true granites and alkaline-peralkaline granites. Several workers tried the identification and classification of these

80

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Granite City IL Site - IL 28  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Granite City IL Site - IL 28 Granite City IL Site - IL 28 FUSRAP Considered Sites Granite City, IL Alternate Name(s): Granite City Steel General Steel Industries General Steel Casings Corporation New Betatron Building IL.28-3 Location: 1417 State Street, Granite City, Illinois IL.28-3 Historical Operations: Under subcontract with Mallinckrodt and using a government-owned Betatron (magnetic induction electron accelerator), x-rayed natural uranium ingots and dingots to detect metallurgical flaws. Contamination from rubbing off of oxidized uranium during handling. IL.28-3 IL.28-5 Eligibility Determination: Eligible IL.28-1 IL.28-2 Radiological Survey(s): Assessment Surveys, Verification Survey IL.28-6 IL.28-7 IL.28-8 Site Status: Certified - Certification Basis, Federal Register Notice included IL.28-9

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite wash producers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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81

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Granite City Army Depot - IL 0-02  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Granite City Army Depot - IL 0-02 Granite City Army Depot - IL 0-02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: GRANITE CITY ARMY DEPOT ( IL.0-02 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DOD Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Granite City , Illinois IL.0-02-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 IL.0-02-1 Site Operations: Site was used for storage of GSA thorium residues until circa 1964. IL.0-02-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Referred to DOD IL.0-02-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Thorium IL.0-02-1 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DOD IL.0-02-1 Also see Documents Related to GRANITE CITY ARMY DEPOT IL.0-02-1 - DOE Letter; J.Fiore to C.Schafer; Information regarding

82

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Wash-Rite Co - IN 08  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Wash-Rite Co - IN 08 Wash-Rite Co - IN 08 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: WASH-RITE CO. (IN.08 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: 1410 Cornell Avenue , Indianapolis , Indiana IN.08-2 Evaluation Year: 1991 IN.08-3 IN.08-4 Site Operations: Conducted washing test to decontaminate gloves and recover uranium. IN.08-1 IN.08-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote due to the limited scope of activities at this site IN.08-3 IN.08-4 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium IN.08-2 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to WASH-RITE CO.

83

Microsoft PowerPoint - Granite-PCO-PCC-22  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

nd nd Annual Pittsburgh Coal Conference The PCO Process for Removal of Mercury from Flue Gas National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Fossil Energy Christopher R. McLarnon, Evan J. Granite, and Henry W. Pennline September 13, 2005 185199 EJG 12/11/03 GP-254 / PCO Process * Alternative to ACI Developed * Patent Issued June 2003 * Licensed for Application to Coal-Burning Power Plants (Powerspan Corporation) * Oxidation of Mercury * Irradiation of Flue Gas with 254-nm Light * 90% Oxidation Attained at Bench-Scale * Low Parasitic Power (less than 0.5%) * Potential Application for Incinerators 185199 EJG 12/11/03 * EPA Announcement March 15, 2005 * Clean Air Mercury Rule * Several States Requiring Stricter Reductions * 70-90% Removal Requirement

84

Washing of Rocky Flats Combustible Residues (Conducted March - May 1995)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The scope of this project is to determine the feasibility of washing plutonium-containing combustible residues using ultrasonic disruption as a method for dislodging particulate. Removal of plutonium particulate and, to a lesser extent, solubilized plutonium from the organic substrate should substantially reduce potential fire, explosion or radioactive release hazards due to radiolytic hydrogen generation or high flammability. Tests were conducted on polypropylene filters which were used as pre-filters in the rich-residue ion-exchange process at the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility. These filters are similar to the Ful-Flo{reg_sign} cartridges used at Rocky Flats that make up a substantial fraction of the combustible residues with the highest hazard rating. Batch experiments were run on crushed filter material in order to determine the amount of Pu removed by stirring, stirring and sonication, and stirring and sonication with the introduction of Pu-chelating water-soluble polymers or surfactants. Significantly more Pu is removed using sonication and sonication with chelators than is removed with mechanical stirring alone.

Mary E. Barr; Ann R. Schake; David A. Romero; Gordon D. Jarvinen

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Results of the radiological survey at the New Betatron Building, Granite City Steel facility, Granite City, Illinois (GSG002)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted a radiological survey at the New Betatron Building, located in the South Plant facility of Granite City Steel Division, 1417 State Street, Granite City, Illinois. The survey was performed in August 1991. The purpose of the survey was to determine whether the property was contaminated with radioactive residues, principally {sup 238}U, as a result of work done for the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) from 1958 to 1966. The survey included a surface gamma scan of the ground surface outdoors near the building, the floor and walls in all accessible areas inside the building, and the roof; measurement of beta-gamma dose rates, alpha radiation levels, and removable alpha and beta-gamma activity levels at selected locations inside the building and on the roof; and radionuclide analysis of outdoor soil samples and indoor samples of shield-wall fill material land debris. Analysis of soil, shield-wall fill material, debris, and smear samples showed no residual {sup 238}U attributable to former AEC-supported operations at this site. None of the indoor or outdoor gamma exposure rate measurements were elevated above DOE guidelines. The slight elevations in gamma levels found outdoors and on the roof over the shield wall are typical of naturally occurring radioactive substances present in coal ash and cinders in the fill material surrounding the building and in concrete and cinders used in constuction of the shield wall. The slightly elevated gamma levels measured at soil sampling locations can be attributed to the presence of naturally occurring radionuclides. In all samples, {sup 226}Ra and {sup 238}U appeared to be in equilibrium, indicating that these radionuclides were of natural origin and not derived from former AEC activities at this site.

Murray, M.E.; Uziel, M.S.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Manufacturing of a Crab Analogue to Determine the Quality of U.S. Shore-based Produced Surimi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

storage stability and chemical composition of surimi produced using an in-line washing system were of the 13th by the FlY Arctu rus and held using a flooded refrigerated seawater (RSW) system (Gwinn, 1987

87

EBR-II Primary Tank Wash-Water Alternatives Evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The EBR-II reactor at Idaho National Laboratory was a liquid sodium metal cooled reactor that operated for 30 years. It was shut down in 1994; the fuel was removed by 1996; and the bulk of sodium metal coolant was removed from the reactor by 2001. Approximately 1100 kg of residual sodium remained in the primary system after draining the bulk sodium. To stabilize the remaining sodium, both the primary and secondary systems were treated with a purge of moist carbon dioxide. Most of the residual sodium reacted with the carbon dioxide and water vapor to form a passivation layer of primarily sodium bicarbonate. The passivation treatment was stopped in 2005 and the primary system is maintained under a blanket of dry carbon dioxide. Approximately 670 kg of sodium metal remains in the primary system in locations that were inaccessible to passivation treatment or in pools of sodium that were too deep for complete penetration of the passivation treatment. The EBR-II reactor was permitted by the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) in 2002 under a RCRA permit that requires removal of all remaining sodium in the primary and secondary systems by 2022. The proposed baseline closure method would remove the large components from the primary tank, fill the primary system with water, react the remaining sodium with the water and dissolve the reaction products in the wash water. This method would generate a minimum of 100,000 gallons of caustic, liquid, low level radioactive, hazardous waste water that must be disposed of in a permitted facility. On February 19-20, 2008, a workshop was held in Idaho Falls, Idaho, to look at alternatives that could meet the RCRA permit clean closure requirements and minimize the quantity of hazardous waste generated by the cleanup process. The workshop convened a panel of national and international sodium cleanup specialists, subject matter experts from the INL, and the EBR-II Wash Water Project team that organized the workshop. The workshop was conducted by a trained facilitator using Value Engineering techniques to elicit the most technically sound solutions from the workshop participants. The path forward includes developing the OBA into a well engineered solution for achieving RCRA clean closure of the EBR-II Primary Reactor Tank system. Several high level tasks are also part of the path forward such as reassigning responsibility of the cleanup project to a dedicated project team that is funded by the DOE Office of Environmental Management, and making it a priority so that adequate funding is available to complete the project. Based on the experience of the sodium cleanup specialists, negotiations with the DEQ will be necessary to determine a risk-based de minimus quantity for acceptable amount of sodium that can be left in the reactor systems after cleanup has been completed.

Demmer, R. L.; Heintzelman, J. B.; Merservey, R. H.; Squires, L. N.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

DEGRADED TBP SOLVENT REGENERATION TECHNOLOGY USING BUTYLAMINE AS A SOLVENT WASHING TO REDUCE SOLID SALT WASTE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Normal butylamine compounds are studied as salt-free wash reagents for degraded solvent used in PUREX process in spent fuel reprocessing. The solvent wash tests were carried out with two types of butylamine compounds, n-butylamine oxalate and n-butylamine bicarbonate, by counter-current mode using a small size mixer-settler composed of two 4-stage wash steps. Di-n-butyl phosphoric acid (HDBP), the main degradation product from TBP, was removed from real degraded solvent with decontamination factor of 2.5 {approx} 7.9. The study on electrolytic decomposition of butylamine compounds was also conducted for waste treatment.

Asakura, T.; Itoh, Y.; Hotoku, S.; Morita, Y.; Uchiyama, G.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

89

E-Print Network 3.0 - a-type granitic magmatism Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Mathematics 6 NATURE |VOL 408 |7 DECEMBER 2000 |www.nature.com 669 review article Summary: . The A-type Mount Scott granite sheet: importance of crustal magma...

90

THE CONWAY GRANITE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE AS A MAJOR LOW-GRADE THORIUM RESOURCE  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Subcontract 1491 with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory...by Billings and co-workers over the years, and...be- ing studied at Oak Ridge National Laboratory...granite are estimated by workers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory...

J. A. S. Adams; M.-C. Kline; K. A. Richardson; J. J. W. Rogers

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Quantum states of neutrons in the gravitational and centrifugal potentials in a new GRANIT spectrometer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We will discuss the scientific program to be studied in a new gravitational spectrometer GRANIT in a broad context of quantum states (quantum behaviour) of ultracold neutrons (UCN) in gravitational [1] and centrifugal [2] potentials, as well as applications of these phenomena/spectrometer to various domains of physics, ranging from studies of fundamental short-range interactions and symmetries to neutron quantum optics and reflectometry using UCN. All these topics, as well as related instrumental and methodical developments have been discussed during dedicated GRANIT-2010 Workshop [3]. The GRANIT spectrometer has been recently installed at the Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble, France [4] and could become operational in near future. 1. V.V. Nesvizhevsky et al (2002), Nature 415, 297. 2. V.V. Nesvizhevsky et al (2010), Nature Physics 6, 114. 3. GRANIT-2010, Les Houches, 14-19 february 2010. 4. M. Kreuz et al (2009), NIM 611, 326.

None

2010-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

92

Be in a state of purification (e.g. ritual washing, clean clothes) Stand upright facing the direction of Mecca  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Be in a state of purification (e.g. ritual washing, clean clothes) Stand upright facing the day and night. Purification: In most cases, this is achieved through washing of the face & hands, and wiping of head & feet with water. However, at times, the body must be washed. Clothes must be clean. Call

Khambatt, Mujtaba

93

Investigation of Naturally Occurring Radio Nuclides in Shir?kuh Granites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

One of the principle natural radiation resources is Granite which can be dangerous for human because of its radiations. Based on this fact in this research we attempt to specify the activity amount of these natural radio nuclides existing in Shir?kuh Granite of Yazd state. To specify the activity amount of this natural radio nuclides it has been applied the measurement method of Gamma spectroscopy using high purity Germanium (HPGe) detector.

Mohammad Mehdi Mazarei; Mojtaba Zarei

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Release of uranium and thorium from granitic rocks during in situ weathering and initial erosion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RELEASE OF URANIUM AND THORIUM FROM GRANITIC ROCKS DURING IN SITU WEATHERING AND INITIAL EROSION A Thesis by ERNEST BROUGHTON LEDGER, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August. 1978 Major Subject: Geology RELEASE OF URANIUM AND THORIUM FROM GRANITIC ROCKS DURING IN SITU WEATHERING AND INITIAL EROSION A Thesis by ERNEST BROUGHTON LEDGER, JR. Approved as to style and content by...

Ledger, Ernest Broughton

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

95

Synthesis of super plasticizer NF-30 from coal coking by product washing oil and performance analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Super plasticizer was synthesized by using coal coking by product washing oil and industrial naphthalene....2 in exhaust (20%). Compared with NF, NF-30 have some advantages in lower cost, high water reducing rate...

Zifang Xu ???; Mingxu Zhang; Wenpei Hu

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Sandia National Laboratories: one-pot wash-free process for switchgras...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

one-pot wash-free process for switchgrass ionic liquid pretreatment and saccharification One-Pot-to-Prep Biomass for Biofuels On September 10, 2013, in Biofuels, Biomass, Energy,...

97

Effect of washing with tap and treated seawater on the quality of whole scad (Trachurus trachurus)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effects of washing whole scad (Trachurus trachurus) with fresh water and seawater were evaluated. Fish evaluations for 12 days of storage in ice included sensory (EU and the... Pseudomonas...]. The main concl...

Patrcia Incio; Fernando Bernardo

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Removal of \\{PAHs\\} with surfactant-enhanced soil washing: Influencing factors and removal effectiveness  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

PAH removal with surfactant enhanced washing was investigated through a series of laboratory tests to examine the effect of stirring speed, washing time, surfactant concentration, liquid/solid ratio, temperature, and on-and-off mode. The first four factors show significant influence on the PAH removal while the latter two do not. Total removal ratio and a new proposed parameter, solubilization percentage, are used to evaluate the effectiveness quantitatively.

Sheng Peng; Wei Wu; Jiajun Chen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

A-type granites and related rocks: Petrogenesis and classification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The problems of identification of A-type granitoids are analyzed. These rocks occur in different geodynamic settings. Owing to their mantle nature, they show distinct REE specialization. These are acid intrusive rocks, whose volcanic products are of crucial scientific and practical significance. However, neither the great number of proposed classification schemes and diagrams, including those based on expensive analytical data, nor hot scientific discussions of their identification and the ambiguity of the term A-granitoids helped to determine their classification features in full measure. A principally new discriminant diagram is proposed for the classification of igneous A-type rocks, based on the analysis of earlier obtained results and the petrochemical composition of these rocks. A comparative analysis of subdivision of granites and related felsic volcanic rocks (SiO2>67wt.%), based on the ternary (Na2O+K2O)Fe2O3*נ5(CaO+MgO)נ5 and other widely applied diagrams, has shown the advantage of the proposed discriminant diagram for the classification of A-type granitoids from different geodynamic settings.

A.V. Grebennikov

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

The integration of innovative technologies into a physical-separation-based soil washing system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An innovative system`s approach to the treatment of soils at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) has been proposed to effectively and cost competitively treat a significant mass of soil. The use of an integrated soil treatment system to decontaminate FEMP soils is a unique application of the soil washing technology. Due to the unfavorable soil particle size distribution and the ubiquitous distribution of uranium among these particle size fractions, conventional soil washing processes commonly used on predominantly sandy soils alone may not achieve the desirable waste minimization level without the inclusion of innovative technologies. This objective of this paper is to briefly describe the physical separation and chemical extraction process commonly used in soil washing operation and to present the baseline soil washing approach used on FEMP soils. Noting the successful and not-so-successful processes within the soil washing operation at the FEMP, a proposed innovative system`s approach to treating FEMP soils will be described. This system`s approach will integrate a conventional soil washing operation with proposed innovative technologies.

Krstich, M.A.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite wash producers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

The partitioning and modelling of pesticide parathion in a surfactant-assisted soil-washing system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Soil sorption of organic pollutants has long been a problematic in the soil washing process because of its durability and low water solubility. This paper discussed the soil washing phenomena over a wide range of parathion concentrations and several soil samples at various fractions of organic content (foc) levels. When parathion dosage is set below the water solubility, washing performance is stable for surfactant concentrations above critical micelle concentration (cmc) and it is observed that more than 90% of parathion can be washed out when dosage is five times lower than the solubility limit. However, such trends change when non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL) is present in the system. Parathion extraction depends very much on the surfactant dosage but is not affected by the levels of foc in the system. In between the extreme parathion dosage, a two-stage pattern is observed in these boundary regions. Washing performance is first increased with additional surfactant, but the increase slows down gradually since the sorption sites are believed to be saturated by the huge amount of surfactant in the system. A mathematical model has included foc to demonstrate such behavior and this can be used as a prediction for extraction.

W. Chu; K.H. Chan; W.K. Choy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Washing and alkaline leaching of Hanford tank sludges: A status report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because of the assumed high cost of high-level waste (HLW) immobilization and disposal, pretreatment methods are being developed to minimize the volume of HLW requiring vitrification. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is investigating several options for pretreating the radioactive wastes stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site. The pretreatment methods under study for the tank sludges include: (1) simply washing the sludges with dilute NaOH, (2) performing caustic leaching (as well as washing) to remove certain wash components, and (3) dissolving the sludges in acid and extracting key radionuclides from the dissolved sludge solutions. The data collected in this effort will be used to support the March 1998 decision on the extent of pretreatment to be performed on the Hanford tank sludges. This document describes sludge washing and caustic leaching tests conducted in FY 1994. These tests were performed using sludges from single-shell tanks (SST) B-201 and U-110. A summary is given of all the sludge washing and caustic leaching studies conducted at PNL in the last few years.

Lumetta, G.J.; Rapko, B.M.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Analysis Of Macroscopic Fractures In Granite In The Hdr Geothermal Well  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Macroscopic Fractures In Granite In The Hdr Geothermal Well Macroscopic Fractures In Granite In The Hdr Geothermal Well Eps-1, Soultz-Sous-Forets, France Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Analysis Of Macroscopic Fractures In Granite In The Hdr Geothermal Well Eps-1, Soultz-Sous-Forets, France Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: An exhaustive analysis of 3000 macroscopic fractures encountered in the geothermal Hot Dry Rock borehole, EPS-1, located inside the Rhine graben (Soultz-sous-Forets, France), was done on a continuous core section over a depth interval from 1420 to 2230 m: 97% of the macroscopic structures were successfully reorientated with a good degree of confidence by comparison between core and acoustic borehole imagery. Detailed structural analysis of the fracture population indicates that fractures are

104

Granite Creek Hot Spring Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Granite Creek Hot Spring Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Granite Creek Hot Spring Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Granite Creek Hot Spring Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Teton County, Wyoming Coordinates 43.853632°, -110.6314491° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

105

Experimental Breeder Reactor-II Primary Tank System Wash Water Workshop  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Pre-Developmental Pre-Developmental INL EBR-II Wash Water Treatment Technologies (PBS # ADSHQTD0100 (0003199)) EBR-II Wash Water Workshop - The majority of the sodium has been removed, remaining material is mostly passivated. Similar closure projects have been successfully completed. Engineering needs to be developed to apply the OBA path. Page 1 of 2 Idaho National Laboratory Idaho Experimental Breeder Reactor-II Primary Tank System Wash Water Workshop Challenge In 1994 Congress ordered the shutdown of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) and a closure project was initiated. The facility was placed in cold shutdown, engineering began on sodium removal, the sodium was drained in 2001 and the residual sodium chemically passivated to render it less reactive in 2005. Since that time, approximately 700 kg of metallic sodium and 3500 kg of sodium bicarbonate remain in the facility. The

106

Washing and Caustic Leaching of Hanford Tank Sludge: Results of FY 1998 Studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sludge washing and parametric caustic leaching tests were performed on sludge samples tiom five Hanford tanks: B-101, BX-1 10, BX-112, C-102, and S-101. These studies examined the effects of both dilute hydroxide washing and caustic leaching on the composition of the residual sludge solids. ` Dilute hydroxide washing removed from <1 to 25% of the Al, -20 to 45% of the Cr, -25 to 97% of the P, and 63 to 99% of the Na from the Hdord tank sludge samples examined. The partial removal of these elements was likely due to the presence of water-soluble sodium salts of aluminate, chromate, hydroxide, nitrate, nitrite, and phosphate, either in the interstitial liquid or as dried salts.

GJ Lumetta; BM Rapko; J Liu; DJ Temer; RD Hunt

1998-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

107

Strain rate-dependent failure of Westerly Granite at 100 MPa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is obviously increased by a decrease in the applied strain rate, it is not affected, at constant strain rate, by an increase in temoerature to failure in the at least 600'C. The activation energy estimated for temperature range 24' to 300'C is 14 kcal.... Stress-strajn rurves for Westerly granite, & = 3 x 10 s , T = 24', 200', and 300'C 29 Figure 13 Stress-strain curves for T = 300'C, c = 3 x 10 and 2. 8 x 10 s Westerly granite, x 10 , x 10 -5 , -6 30 PAGE Figure 14. Figure 15. Test...

Harris, William Joseph

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

108

Uranium in the Oatman Creek granite of Central Texas and its economic potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

granitic rocks are enriched in uranium. Although at present uranium in granites cannot b compared w1th the h1gh grade concentrat1ons of uran1um in sedimentary rocks, as these h1gh grade ore deposits become depleted, however, gr anites will become a..., however, the need to explore for new materials containing uranium will incr ease as the high grade sedimentary uranium deposits become depleted. A logical place to begin this search lies with the source rock for many of the known sedimentary uranium...

Conrad, Curtis Paul

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

109

DOE Announces Additional Tour Seats Available: Tours of B Reactor at the Hanford Site Begin and End in Richland, Wash.  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

RICHLAND, Wash. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has made additional seats available for tours of the B Reactor National Historic Landmark this July and August.

110

The potential use of surfactant and cosolvent soil washing as adjuvant for in-situ aquifer restoration.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The use of surfactant and aqueous cosolvent soil washing for the restoration of contaminated aquifers was investigated by laboratory experimentation and literature review. The effect (more)

Ziegenfuss, Philip Scott

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

C-104 high-level waste solids: Washing/leaching and solubility versus temperature studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the results of a test conducted by Battelle to assess the effects of inhibited water washing and caustic leaching on the composition of the C-104 HLW solids. The objective of this work was to determine the composition of the C-104 solids remaining after washing with 0.01 M NaOH or leaching with 3 M NaOH. Another objective of this test was to determine the solubility of the C-104 solids as a function of temperature. The work was conducted according to test plan BNFL-TP-29953-8, Rev. 0, ``Determination of the Solubility of HLW Sludge Solids.

GJ Lumetta; DJ Bates; JP Bramson; LP Darnell; OT Farmer III; SK Fiskum; LR Greenwood; FV Hoopes; CZ Soderquist; MJ Steele; RT Steele; MW Urie; JJ Wagner

2000-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

112

Soil clean-up by surfactant washing. I. Laboratory results and mathematical modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The removal of weathered-in PCBs from clayey soil by surfactant washing is demonstrated at bench scale. Spent surfactant solution was treated for recycle at bench scale by countercurrent liquid-liquid extraction for the removal of nonvolatile contaminants, and by thin film aeration in packed columns for removal of volatile organics. A correlation of micelle/water partition coefficients with octanol/water partition coefficients reported earlier by Valsaraj et al. is extended to several additional compounds. Mathematical models for batch-batch, batch-continuous flow, and countercurrent flow surfactant soil washing are described, and the effects of the model parameters are discussed.

Clarke, A.N.; Plumb, P.D.; Subramanyan (Eckenfelder, Inc., Nashville, TN (USA)); Wilson D.J. (Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (USA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Late-Stage Mafic Injection and Thermal Rejuvenation of the Vinalhaven Granite,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Late-Stage Mafic Injection and Thermal Rejuvenation of the Vinalhaven Granite, Coastal Maine R. A and reaction, indicating that the porphyry was well stirred. Thermal rejuvenation of a silicic crystal mush, along with thermal calculations, suggest that cooling and crystallization of coeval mafic magma could

Mcdonough, William F.

114

Lithium isotopic systematics of granites and pegmatites from the Black Hills, South Dakota  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lithium isotopic systematics of granites and pegmatites from the Black Hills, South Dakota Fang compositions may reflect Li isotopic fractionation resulting from extensive crystal-melt fractionation. Lithium fractionation in the near­surface environment of > 60 (Tomascak, 2004). Lithium isotopic fractionation has been

Rudnick, Roberta L.

115

Asymptotic Analysis of Cross-Hole Hydraulic Tests in Fractured Granite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Asymptotic Analysis of Cross-Hole Hydraulic Tests in Fractured Granite by Walter A. Illman1 hydraulic conductivity and specific storage. Introduction Well test analyses in porous and fractured for the interpretation of three-dimensional pneumatic well tests conducted in porous or fractured geologic media, which

Daniels, Jeffrey J.

116

GEOLOGY IN THE VICINITY OF THE HODGES COMPLEX AND THE TYLER LAKE GRANITE, WEST TORRINGTON, CONNECTICUT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, CONNECTICUT Charles Merguerian, Geology Department 114 Hofstra University, Hempstead, NY 11549 Email: Charles workers in western Connecticut have noted the abundance of Proterozoic Y gneiss and autochthonous lower Torrington, Connecticut, the Hodges mafic- ultramafic complex and the Tyler Lake granite are the products

Merguerian, Charles

117

Heat refraction and heat production in and around granite plutons in north-east England  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......be expected from radiogenic heating in the granites which intrude...important concentrations in the district. 454 References Beck, A...Pleistocene climatic variations upon geothermal gradients, Am. J. Sci...155-173 in Seminar on Geothermal Energy, Commission of the......

P. C. England; E. R. Oxburgh; S. W. Richardson

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Mapping brittle fracture zones in three dimensions: high resolution traveltime seismic tomography in a granitic pluton  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Company's Uranium mine restoration programme (ENRESA...studying the resolving power of a broad variety of...to study its resolving power we have performed several...Carmichael R.S. , 1982. Handbook of Physical Properties...prediction of the fracture system in the Albal granitic......

D. Mart; R. Carbonell; A. Tryggvason; J. Escuder; A. Prez-Estan

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Washing out of the 0-transition in Josephson junctions R. Avriller1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Washing out of the 0- transition in Josephson junctions R. Avriller1 and F. Pistolesi1 1 Univ: July 21, 2014) We consider a Josephson junction formed by a quantum dot connected to two bulk numbers: 73.23.-b, 74.25.F-, 74.50.+r, 74.45.+c Introduction.-- The Josephson junction is a fun- damental

Boyer, Edmond

120

Preliminary gravity and magnetic models across Midway Valley and Yucca Wash, Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detailed gravity and ground magnetic data collected along ten traverses across Midway Valley and Yucca Wash on the eastern flank of Yucca Mountain in southwest Nevada are interpreted. These data were collected as part of an effort to evaluate faulting in the vicinity of proposed surface facilities for a potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. Geophysical data show that Midway Valley is bounded by large gravity and magnetic anomalies associated with the Bow Ridge and Paintbrush Canyon faults, on the west side of Exile Hill and on the west flank of Fran Ridge, respectively. In addition, Midway Valley itself is characterized by a number of small-amplitude anomalies that probably reflect small-scale faulting beneath Midway Valley. Gravity and magnetic data across the northwest trending Yucca Wash and the inferred Yucca Wash fault indicate no major vertical offsets greater than 100 m using a density contrast of 0.2 to 0.3 g/cm{sup 3} along the proposed Yucca Wash fault. In addition, a broad magnetic high coincides with the approximate location of the hydrologic gradient and probably reflects moderately magnetic Topopah Spring Tuff or lavas in the Calico Hills Formation.

Ponce, D.A.; Langenheim, V.E.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite wash producers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Advanced Sediment Washing for Decontamination of New York/New Jersey Harbor Dredged Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Advanced Sediment Washing for Decontamination of New York/New Jersey Harbor Dredged Materials Sediment Issue One of the greatest drivers for maintaining access to America's intermodal ports and related of contaminated sediments dredged from our nations waterways. More than 400 million cubic yards (CY) of sediments

Brookhaven National Laboratory

122

Soil remediation using a coupled process: soil washing with surfactant followed by photo-Fenton oxidation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the present work the use of a coupled process, soil washing and photo-Fenton oxidation, was investigated for remediation of a soil contaminated with p,p?-DDT (DDT) and p,p?-DDE (DDE), and a soil artificially contaminated with diesel. In the soil washing experiments, Triton X-100 (TX-100) aqueous solutions were used at different concentrations to obtain wastewaters with different compositions. Removal efficiencies of 66% (DDT), 80% (DDE) and 100% (diesel) were achieved for three sequential washings using a TX-100 solution strength equivalent to 12 times the effective critical micelle concentration of the surfactant (12 CMCeff). The wastewater obtained was then treated using a solar photo-Fenton process. After 6h irradiation, 99, 95 and 100% degradation efficiencies were achieved for DDT, DDE and diesel, respectively. In all experiments, the concentration of dissolved organic carbon decreased by at least 95%, indicating that residual concentration of contaminants and/or TX-100 in the wastewater was very low. The co-extraction of metals was also evaluated. Among the metals analyzed (Pb, Cr, Ni, Cu, Cd, Mn and Co), only Cr and Mn were detected in the wastewater at concentrations above the maximum value permitted by current Brazilian legislation. The effective removal of contaminants from soil by the TX-100 washing process, together with the high degradation efficiency of the solar photo-Fenton process, suggests that this procedure could be a useful option for soil remediation.

Ricardo D. Villa; Alam G. Trov; Raquel F. Pupo Nogueira

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Comparison of soil washing using conventional surfactant solutions and colloidal gas aphron suspensions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Surfactants have proven to be an effective way of augmenting the removal and mobilization of organics from contaminated soil. A more recent and innovative technology to aid the removal of contaminants from soil is the use of colloidal gas aphron (CGA) suspensions. The performance of CGAs and surfactant solutions in washing soils contaminated with 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D) was investigated and compared with the process of washing soils with aqueous solutions of surfactants as in conventional surfactant flushing. In general it was observed that there was no significant difference in the performance of the two processes of soil washing for a highly soluble compound like 2,4-D. However, the surfactant consumption per gram of 2,4-D recovered from the soil was higher for conventional washing than for CGA solutions. CGAs also had a significant advantage over surfactant solutions in that at low flow rates, the pumping of CGAs showed lower pressure drops across the soil column.

Roy, D.; Valsaraj, K.T.; Tamayo, A. (Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge (United States))

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Washing of field weathered crude oil contaminated soil with an environmentally compatible surfactant, alkyl polyglucoside  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Weathered crude oil contaminated soils (COCSs), which are much more difficult to remediate than those freshly contaminated, are widespread especially at the sites of oil fields and industries. Surfactant enhanced ex situ soil washing could be used to remediate COCSs, but surfactant toxicity becomes one of the major concerns. In this study, a class of green surfactants, alkyl polyglucosides (APGs), were tested in washing the field weathered COCS with relatively high oil concentration (123mgg?1 dry soil) from Jilin Oilfield, Northeastern China. APG1214, characterized with longer alkyl chain, was more effective than APG0810 in crude oil removal. Adding inorganic sodium salts into APG1214 solution further improved the crude oil removal efficiency (CORE). Washing parameters (temperature, washing time, agitation speed and solution/soil ratio) were investigated and further optimized integratedly with an orthogonal design. At the optimum conditions, the CORE reached 97%. GC/MS analysis showed that the proportion of small n-alkanes (C16C23) in residual crude oil gradually increased, which was helpful to interpret the oil removal mechanism. Moreover, eminent effect on removal of large n-alkanes was achieved from the synergy between APG1214 and inorganic salts, which was opposite to the effect when they were added separately. This study demonstrated a promising way to remediate COCS with ecologically compatible surfactant and provided guidelines for its practical application.

Mei Han; Guodong Ji; Jinren Ni

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

FRIED SCALLOPS Prepare an egg wash by beating 1 egg in 1/2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

preference with salt and pepper. Dip scallop meats in egg wash, then coat with any prepared seafood breading and season with freshly ground pepper. *Recipe courtesy of Fresh from Florida Seafood. For more seafood recipes, visit http://www.fl-seafood.com. COLLECTING Scallops may be spotted on or near the bottom

Watson, Craig A.

126

Improvement of the Coal Ash Slagging Tendency by Coal Washing and Additive Blending with Mullite Generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Four typical coals and two pretreatment methods were investigated to prevent slagging by facilitating mullite formation in coal ash at a high temperature. ... Both security and economy in power plant can be improved substantially as long as ash deposition and slagging tendency alleviated. ... Pilot-projects about coal washing and coal blending economic benefit are looking forward to put into practice. ...

Zhenyu Huang; Yan Li; Dan Lu; Zhijun Zhou; Zhihua Wang; Junhu Zhou; Kefa Cen

2013-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

127

Method for producing catalysts from coal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for producing catalysts from coal is provided comprising mixing an aqueous alkali solution with the coal, heating the aqueous mixture to treat the coal, drying the now-heated aqueous mixture, reheating the mixture to form carbonized material, cooling the mixture, removing excess alkali from the carbonized material, and recovering the carbonized material, wherein the entire process is carried out in controlled atmospheres, and the carbonized material is a hydrocracking or hydrodehalogenation catalyst for liquid phase reactions. The invention also provides for a one-step method for producing catalysts from coal comprising mixing an aqueous alkali solution with the coal to create a mixture, heating the aqueous mixture from an ambient temperature to a predetermined temperature at a predetermined rate, cooling the mixture, and washing the mixture to remove excess alkali from the treated and carbonized material, wherein the entire process is carried out in a controlled atmosphere. 1 fig.

Farcasiu, M.; Derbyshire, F.; Kaufman, P.B.; Jagtoyen, M.

1998-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

128

Method for producing catalysis from coal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for producing catalysts from coal is provided comprising mixing an aqueous alkali solution with the coal, heating the aqueous mixture to treat the coal, drying the now-heated aqueous mixture, reheating the mixture to form carbonized material, cooling the mixture, removing excess alkali from the carbonized material, and recovering the carbonized material, wherein the entire process is carried out in controlled atmospheres, and the carbonized material is a hydrocracking or hydrodehalogenation catalyst for liquid phase reactions. The invention also provides for a one-step method for producing catalysts from coal comprising mixing an aqueous alkali solution with the coal to create a mixture, heating the aqueous mixture from an ambient temperature to a predetermined temperature at a predetermined rate, cooling the mixture, and washing the mixture to remove excess alkali from the treated and carbonized material, wherein the entire process is carried out in a controlled atmosphere.

Farcasiu, Malvina (Pittsburgh, PA); Derbyshire, Frank (Lexington, KY); Kaufman, Phillip B. (Library, PA); Jagtoyen, Marit (Lexington, KY)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

SLUDGE BATCH 7 (SB7) WASHING DEMONSTRATION TO DETERMINE SULFATE/OXALATE REMOVAL EFFICIENCY AND SETTLING BEHAVIOR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To support Sludge Batch 7 (SB7) washing, a demonstration of the proposed Tank Farm washing operation was performed utilizing a real-waste test slurry generated from Tank 4, 7, and 12 samples. The purpose of the demonstration was twofold: (1) to determine the settling time requirements and washing strategy needed to bring the SB7 slurry to the desired endpoint; and (2) to determine the impact of washing on the chemical and physical characteristics of the sludge, particularly those of sulfur content, oxalate content, and rheology. Seven wash cycles were conducted over a four month period to reduce the supernatant sodium concentration to approximately one molar. The long washing duration was due to the slow settling of the sludge and the limited compaction. Approximately 90% of the sulfur was removed through washing, and the vast majority of the sulfur was determined to be soluble from the start. In contrast, only about half of the oxalate was removed through washing, as most of the oxalate was initially insoluble and did not partition to the liquid phase until the latter washes. The final sulfur concentration was 0.45 wt% of the total solids, and the final oxalate concentration was 9,900 mg/kg slurry. More oxalate could have been removed through additional washing, although the washing would have reduced the supernatant sodium concentration.The yield stress of the final washed sludge (35 Pa) was an order of magnitude higher than that of the unwashed sludge ({approx}4 Pa) and was deemed potentially problematic. The high yield stress was related to the significant increase in insoluble solids that occurred ({approx}8 wt% to {approx}18 wt%) as soluble solids and water were removed from the slurry. Reduction of the insoluble solids concentration to {approx}14 wt% was needed to reduce the yield stress to an acceptable level. However, depending on the manner that the insoluble solids adjustment was performed, the final sodium concentration and extent of oxalate removal would be prone to change. As such, the strategy for completing the final wash cycle is integral to maintaining the proper balance of chemical and physical requirements.

Reboul, S.; Click, D.; Lambert, D.

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

130

Investigation of Rheological Impacts on Sludge Batch 3 as Insoluble Solids and Wash Endpoints are Adjusted  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is currently processing and immobilizing radioactive sludge slurry into a durable borosilicate glass. The DWPF has already processed three sludge batches (Sludge Batch 1A, Sludge Batch 1B, and Sludge Batch 2) and is currently processing the fourth sludge batch (Sludge Batch 3). A sludge batch is defined as a single tank of sludge slurry or a combination of sludge slurries from different tanks that has been or will be qualified before being transferred to DWPF. As a part of the Sludge Batch 3 (SB3) qualification task, rheology measurements of the sludge slurry were requested at different insoluble solids loadings. These measurements were requested in order to gain insight into potential processing problems that may occur as the insoluble solids are adjusted up or down (by concentration or dilution) during the process. As a part of this study, a portion of the ''as received'' SB3 sample was washed with inhibited water (0.015 M NaOH and 0.015 M NaNO2) to target 0.5M Na versus a measured 1M Na in the supernate. The purpose of the ''washing'' step was to allow a comparison of the SB3 rheological data to the rheological data collected for Sludge Batch 2 (SB2) and to determine if there was a dependence of the yield stress and consistency as a function of washing. The ''as received'' SB3 rheology data was also compared to SB3 simulants prepared by the Simulant Development Program in order to provide guidance for selecting a simulant that is more representative of the rheological properties of the radioactive sludge slurry. A summary of the observations, conclusions are: (1) The yield stress and plastic viscosity increased as the weight percent insoluble solids were increased for the ''as received'' and ''washed'' SB3 samples, at a fixed pH. (2) For the same insoluble solids loading, the yield stress for the SB2 sample is approximately a factor of three higher than the ''as received'' SB3 sample. There also appears to be small difference in the plastic viscosity. This difference is probably due to the different Na concentrations of the slurries. (3) The yield stress for the SB2 sample at 17.5 wt. % insoluble solids loading is four times higher than the ''washed'' SB3 sample at 16.5 wt. % insoluble solids. There also appears to be small difference in the plastic viscosity. The differences for the yield stress and consistency can be explained by the differences in the Fe and Na concentrations of the sludge slurry and the anion concentrations of the resulting supernates. (4) The rheological properties (i.e. yield stress and plastic viscosity), as the insoluble solids are adjusted, for the ''as received'' and ''washed'' SB3 samples are different. The plastic viscosity curve for the ''as received'' SB3 sample was higher than the plastic viscosity curve for SB3 ''washed'' sample. The yield stress curve for the ''washed'' SB3 sample is slightly lower than the ''as received'' SB3 sample up until {approx}19 wt. % insoluble solids. The ''washed'' SB3 sample then exceeds the yield stress curve for the ''as received'' SB3 sample. This rheological behavior is probably due to the difference in the Na concentration of the supernate for the samples. (5) No unusual behavior, such as air entrainment, was noted for the ''as received'' SB3 sample. (6) The observed physical properties of the SB3 sample changed after washing. The ''washed'' SB3 sample entrained air readily at higher insoluble solids loadings (i.e. 14.1, 16.5, 19.5 wt. %) as it did for SB2. The air entrainment appeared to dissipate for the SB3 sample at the lower insoluble solids loadings (i.e. 9.7 and 11.7 wt. %). (7) The physical behavior of SB3 can be influenced by controlling the Na concentration in the supernate and the wt. % insoluble solids. The cause for the air entrainment in the ''washed'' SB3 sample could be due to a change in the particle size during the washing step. (8) The SB3 simulants prepared for the Simulant Development Program were approximately a factor of 1.6 to 4 times higher for yield stress and 2.6 to 4 times higher

Fellinger, T. L.

2005-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

131

WashWise cleans up the Northwest: Lessons learned from the Northwest high-efficiency clothes washer initiative  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

WashWise is a regional market transformation program designed to promote the sale and acceptance or resource-efficient clothes washers (RECWs) in the Northwest through financial incentives, education, and marketing. The Program is sponsored by the Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance (the Alliance), a non-profit regional consortium of utilities, government, public interest groups, and private sector organizations. WashWise started in May 1997 and will continue through the end of 1999. WashWise works to transform the clothes washer market primarily at the retail level through an in-store instant rebate and a retailer bonus. In addition to financial incentives, WashWise has undertaken a collaborative marketing and promotional campaign to educate consumers about the financial savings and other benefits of RECWs. The program promotes only RECWs that meet strict energy and water savings criteria. WashWise has far exceeded initial expectations; annual program sales goals were met in the first three months. As of June 1998, 30,000 RECWs have been sold through the program (representing approximately 13 percent of the Northwest residential clothes washer market). In addition, over 540 retailers, including national and regional chains, are participating in the program. Preliminary survey results also have also provided evidence of broad customer satisfaction. This paper reviews the key elements that have contributed to the success of the WashWise program. In addition, the paper provides program results and indicates future directions for WashWise and the RECW market.

Gordon, L.M.; Banks, D.L.; Brenneke, M.E.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Investigating the effect of using granite and marble as a building material on the radiation exposure of humans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......commercial granites. Thorium, uranium and potassium concentrations...petrologic features(20-22); Uranium tends to be highly mobile near the surface, whereas thorium is relatively stable. Uranium is easily oxidised to a water-soluble......

Y. Y. Ebaid; W. F. Bakr

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Hydrothermal alteration of late-to post-tectonic Lyon Mountain Granitic Gneiss, Adirondack Mountains, New York: Origin of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that they represent partially crystallized granitic anatectites depleted in alkali elements by acidic hydrothermal- or Olympic Dam-type characterized by elevated concentrations of rare earth elements (REE), uranium, gold

Soja, Constance M.

134

Semi-Analytic Stereological Analysis of Waste Package/Fracture Intersections in a Granitic Rock Nuclear Waste Repository  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In Sweden, spent nuclear fuel is planned to be placed in copper/iron canisters and deposited at a depth of approximately 500m in granitic rock. Earthquakes may induce secondary shear movements in fractures in...

Allan Hedin

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

C-106 High-Level Waste Solids: Washing/Leaching and Solubility Versus Temperature Studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the results of a test conducted by Battelle to assess the effects of inhibited water washing and caustic leaching on the composition of the Hanford tank C-106 high-level waste (HLW) solids. The objective of this work was to determine the composition of the C-106 solids remaining after washing with 0.01M NaOH or leaching with 3M NaOH. Another objective of this test was to determine the solubility of various C-106 components as a function of temperature. The work was conducted according to test plan BNFL-TP-29953-8,Rev. 0, Determination of the Solubility of HLW Sludge Solids. The test went according to plan, with only minor deviations from the test plan. The deviations from the test plan are discussed in the experimental section.

GJ Lumetta; DJ Bates; PK Berry; JP Bramson; LP Darnell; OT Farmer III; LR Greenwood; FV Hoopes; RC Lettau; GF Piepel; CZ Soderquist; MJ Steele; RT Steele; MW Urie; JJ Wagner

2000-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

136

Extraction agents for the removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from soil in soil washing technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soil have been recognised as a serious health and environmental issue due to their carcinogenic, mutagenic and teratogenic properties. One of the commonly employed soil remediation techniques to clean up such contamination is soil washing or solvent extraction. The main factor which governs the efficiency of this process is the solubility of \\{PAHs\\} in the extraction agent. Past field-scale soil washing treatments for PAH-contaminated soil have mainly employed organic solvents or water which is either toxic and costly or inefficient in removing higher molecular weight PAHs. Thus, the present article aims to provide a review and discussion of the alternative extraction agents that have been studied, including surfactants, biosurfactants, microemulsions, natural surfactants, cyclodextrins, vegetable oil and solution with solid phase particles. These extraction agents have been found to remove \\{PAHs\\} from soil at percentages ranging from 47 to 100% for various PAHs.

Ee Von Lau; Suyin Gan; Hoon Kiat Ng; Phaik Eong Poh

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Safety evaluation of the ESP sludge washing baselines runs. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose is to provide the technical basis for evaluation of unreviewed safety question for the Extended Sludge Processing (ESP) Sludge Washing Baseline Runs, which are necessary to resolve technical questions associated with process control (sludge suspension, sludge settling, heat transfer, temperature control). The sludge is currently stored in below-ground tanks and will be prepared for processing at the Defense Waste Processing Facility as part of the Integrated Waste Removal Program for Savannah River Site.

Gupta, M.K.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

138

Extensive separations (CLEAN) processing strategy compared to TRUEX strategy and sludge wash ion exchange  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Numerous pretreatment flowsheets have been proposed for processing the radioactive wastes in Hanford`s 177 underground storage tanks. The CLEAN Option is examined along with two other flowsheet alternatives to quantify the trade-off of greater capital equipment and operating costs for aggressive separations with the reduced waste disposal costs and decreased environmental/health risks. The effect on the volume of HLW glass product and radiotoxicity of the LLW glass or grout product is predicted with current assumptions about waste characteristics and separations processes using a mass balance model. The prediction is made on three principal processing options: washing of tank wastes with removal of cesium and technetium from the supernatant, with washed solids routed directly to the glass (referred to as the Sludge Wash C processing strategy); the previous steps plus dissolution of the solids and removal of transuranic (TRU) elements, uranium, and strontium using solvent extraction processes (referred to as the Transuranic Extraction Option C (TRUEX-C) processing strategy); and an aggressive yet feasible processing strategy for separating the waste components to meet several main goals or objectives (referred to as the CLEAN Option processing strategy), such as the LLW is required to meet the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Class A limits; concentrations of technetium, iodine, and uranium are reduced as low as reasonably achievable; and HLW will be contained within 1,000 borosilicate glass canisters that meet current Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant glass specifications.

Knutson, B.J.; Jansen, G.; Zimmerman, B.D.; Seeman, S.E. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Lauerhass, L.; Hoza, M. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Crude oil contaminated soil washing in air sparging assisted stirred tank reactor using biosurfactants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study investigated the removal of crude oil from soil using air sparging assisted stirred tank reactors. Two surfactants (rhamnolipid and sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS) were tested and the effects of different parameters (i.e. temperature, surfactant concentrations, washing time, volume/mass ratio) were investigated under varying washing modes namely, stirring only, air sparging only and the combination of stirring and air sparging. The results showed that SDS removed more than 80% crude oil from non-weathered soil samples, whist rhamnolipid showed similar oil removal at the third and fourth levels of the parameters tested. The oil removal ability of the seawater prepared solutions were better than those of the distilled water solutions at the first and second levels of temperature and concentration of surfactant solutions. This approach of soil washing was noted to be effective in reducing the amount of oil in soil. Therefore we suggested that a field scale test be conducted to assess the efficiency of these surfactants.

Kingsley Urum; Turgay Pekdemir; David Ross; Steve Grigson

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Soil washing as a potential remediation technology for contaminated DOE sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Frequently detected contaminants at US Department of Energy (DOE) sites include radionuclides, heavy metals, and chlorinated hydrocarbons. Remediation of these sites requires application of several technologies used in concert with each other, because no single technology is universally applicable. Special situations, such as mixed waste, generally require innovative technology development. This paper, however, focuses on contaminated soils, for which soil washing and vitrification technologies appear to have wide ranging application potential. Because the volumes of contaminated soils around the DOE complex are so large, soil washing can offer a potentially inexpensive way to effect remediation or to attain waste volume reduction. As costs for disposal of low-level and mixed wastes continue to rise, it is likely that volume-reduction techniques and in-situ containment techniques will become increasingly important. This paper reviews the status of the soil washing technology, examines the systems that are currently available, and discusses the potential application of this technology to some DOE sites, with a focus on radionuclide contamination and, primarily, uranium-contaminated soils

Devgun, J.S.; Beskid, N.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Natsis, M.E. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Walker, J.S. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite wash producers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Soil washing as a potential remediation technology for contaminated DOE sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Frequently detected contaminants at US Department of Energy (DOE) sites include radionuclides, heavy metals, and chlorinated hydrocarbons. Remediation of these sites requires application of several technologies used in concert with each other, because no single technology is universally applicable. Special situations, such as mixed waste, generally require innovative technology development. This paper, however, focuses on contaminated soils, for which soil washing and vitrification technologies appear to have wide ranging application potential. Because the volumes of contaminated soils around the DOE complex are so large, soil washing can offer a potentially inexpensive way to effect remediation or to attain waste volume reduction. As costs for disposal of low-level and mixed wastes continue to rise, it is likely that volume-reduction techniques and in-situ containment techniques will become increasingly important. This paper reviews the status of the soil washing technology, examines the systems that are currently available, and discusses the potential application of this technology to some DOE sites, with a focus on radionuclide contamination and, primarily, uranium-contaminated soils

Devgun, J.S.; Beskid, N.J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Natsis, M.E. (Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)); Walker, J.S. (USDOE, Washington, DC (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Microsoft Word - CX-LowerGranite-HatwaiAccessRoadImprovementFY13_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

9, 2012 9, 2012 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-Bell-1 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Kristi Unholz Project Manager - TELF-TPP-3 Proposed Action: Improve the access road system in miles 4, 5, 16, 17, 18, and 30 of the Lower Granite-Hatwai transmission line PP&A Project No.: 2378 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine Maintenance. B1.13 Pathways, short access roads, and rail lines Location: As identified in table below: Lower Granite-Hatwai Access Road Project Location Township Range Section County, State mile 4 to mile 5 13N 43E 2 Whitman, WA mile 16 12N 45E 8 mile 17 12N 45E 17 mile 18 12N 45E 20 mile 30 36N 5W 19, 30 Nez Perce, ID Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA)

143

Microsoft Word - CX-SwanValley-Goshen_GraniteCreekBoxCulvert_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4 4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Joe Johnson Natural Resource Specialist - TFBV-Kalispell Proposed Action: Replace existing bridge with a concrete box culvert at Granite Creek along Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Swan Valley-Goshen 161-kV transmission line. Budget Information: Work Order # 189268-01 PP&A Project No.: PP&A 2047 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3, Routine maintenance activities for structures, rights-of-way, and infrastructures, (such as roads), that are required to maintain infrastructures in a condition suitable for a facility to be used for its designated purpose. Location: The proposed project is located on Granite Creek along BPA's Swan Valley-Goshen

144

Microsoft Word - Granite-Mt-3G-Radio-Station-CX.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0 0 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Creig Millen Project Manager - TEC-CSB-1 Proposed Action: Granite Mountain 3G Radio Station Project Budget Information: Work Order 00197218, Task 03 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.19 Siting, construction, and operation of microwave and radio communication towers and associated facilities... Location: Stevens County, Washington (T34N, R38E, Section 17) Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to install a new 100-foot radio tower, communication building, and related digital radio equipment at an existing BPA communications site on Granite Mountain in Stevens County, Washington. The new tower and building will upgrade and replace

145

Petroglyph Wash DetritalWash  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TheStrip 4mi 6km 7mi 11km 2mi 3km 7mi 11km 12mi 19km 8mi 13km 10mi 16km 33mi 53km 2mi 3km 2mi 3km 3mi 5km 8mi 13km 3mi 5km 5mi 8km 10mi 16km 14mi 22km 13mi 21km 3mi 5km1mi 2km 25mi 40km 14mi 22km 8mi 13km 4mi 6km 15mi 24km 4mi 6km 4mi 6km 36mi 58km 14mi 22km 5mi 8km 20mi 32km 26mi 42km 19mi 31km 4mi

Lachniet, Matthew S.

146

Effects of adding wash tower effluent to Ano Liossia landfill to enhance bioreaction c by Olympia Galenianou.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A theoretical study was performed on the effects of adding sulfate-rich wash tower effluent from the Athens hospital waste incinerator to the Ano Liossia landfill of Athens. The method of mass balance was used to examine ...

Galenianou, Olympia

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Volume84, number 2 FEBS LETTERS December 1977 EFFECTS OF WASHING AND OSMOTIC SHOCK ON CATALASE ACTIVITY OF INTACT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

] and described in detail [17]. Each washing of a chloroplast suspension consisted of resuspension of the pellet centrifuge. Final resuspension of each pellet in a small volume of the same medium gave a suspension

Allen, John F.

148

Opportunities for Energy Conservation and Improved Comfort From Wind Washing Retrofits in Two-Story Homes - Part I  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of wind washing found in this study. Repairs and energy monitoring were completed in six of these homes to evaluate retrofit methods and cost effectiveness of retrofit solutions. These results are discussed in Part II of this paper....

Withers, C. R. Jr.; Cummings, J. B.

149

Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam; Smolt Monitoring by Federal and Non-Federal Entities, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project monitored the daily passage of chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon smolts O. nerka during the 2001 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. In 2001 fish management agencies released significant numbers of hatchery chinook salmon and steelhead trout above Lower Granite Dam that were not marked with a fin clip or coded-wire tag. Generally, these fish were distinguishable from wild fish by the occurrence of fin erosion. Total annual hatchery chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 11% of the 2000 numbers. The wild chinook catch was 3% of the previous year's catch. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 49% of 2000 numbers. Wild steelhead trout catch was 69% of 2000 numbers. The Snake River trap collected 28 age-0 chinook salmon. During 2001 the Snake River trap captured zero hatchery and zero wild/natural sockeye salmon and six hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with flow. The significant reduction in catch during 2001 was due to a reduction in hatchery chinook production (60% of 2000 release) and due to extreme low flows. Trap operations began on March 11 and were terminated on June 29. The trap was out of operation for a total of two days due to mechanical failure or debris. Hatchery chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 47% and wild chinook salmon catch was 67% of 2000 numbers. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 2001 was 178% of the 2000 numbers. Wild steelhead trout collection in 2001 was 145% of the previous year's catch. Trap operations began on March 11 and were terminated on June 8 due to the end of the smolt monitoring season. There were no days where the trap was out of operation due to high flow or debris. The decrease in hatchery chinook catch in 2001 was due to a reduction in hatchery production (39% of 2000 releases). The increase in hatchery and wild steelhead trap catch is due to the ability to operate the trap in the thalweg for a longer period of time because of the extreme low flow condition in 2001. Travel time (d) and migration rate (km/d) through Lower Granite Reservoir for PIT-tagged chinook salmon and steelhead trout marked at the head of the reservoir were affected by discharge. There were not enough hatchery and wild chinook salmon tagged at the Snake River trap in 2001 to allow migration rate/discharge analysis. For steelhead trout tagged at the Snake River trap, statistical analysis of 2001 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge. For hatchery and wild steelhead trout, there was a 2.2-fold and a 1.5-fold increase in migration rate in, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. Travel time and migration rate to Lower Granite Dam for fish marked at the Salmon River trap were calculated. Statistical analysis of the 2001 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge for hatchery and wild chinook salmon and hatchery and wild steelhead trout. Migration rate increased 3.7-fold for hatchery chinook salmon and 2.5-fold for wild chinook salmon between 50 and 100 kcfs. For hatchery steelhead there was a 1.6-fold increase in migration rate, and for wild steelhead trout there was a 2.2-fold increase between 50 kcfs and 100 kcfs. Fish tagged with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags at the Snake River trap were interrogated at four dams with PIT tag detection systems (Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, and McNary dams). Because of the addition of the fourth interrogation site (Lower Monumental) in 1993, cumulative interrogation data is not comparable with the prior five years (1988-1992). Cumulative interrogations at the four dams for fish marked at the Snake River trap were 86% for hatchery chinook, 70% for wild chinook, 71% for hatchery steelhead, and 89% for wild steelhead. Cumulat

Buettner, Edwin W.; Putnam, Scott A.

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Washing and caustic leaching of Hanford tank sludge: Results of FY 1997 studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current plan for remediating the Hanford tank farms consists of waste retrieval, pretreatment, treatment (immobilization), and disposal. The tank wastes will be partitioned into high-level and low-level fractions. The HLW will be immobilized in a borosilicate glass matrix; the resulting glass canisters will then be disposed of in a geologic repository. Because of the expected high cost of HLW vitrification and geologic disposal, pretreatment processes will be implemented to reduce the volume of immobilized high-level waste (IHLW). Caustic leaching (sometimes referred to as enhanced sludge washing or ESW) represents the baseline method for pretreating Hanford tank sludges. Caustic leaching is expected to remove a large fraction of the Al, which is present in large quantities in Hanford tank sludges. A significant portion of the P is also expected to be removed from the sludge by metathesis of water-insoluble metal phosphates to insoluble hydroxides and soluble Na{sub 3}PO{sub 4}. Similar metathesis reactions can occur for insoluble sulfate salts, allowing the removal of sulfate from the HLW stream. This report describes the sludge washing and caustic leaching tests performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in FY 1996. The sludges used in this study were taken from Hanford tanks AN-104, BY-108, S-101, and S-111.

Lumetta, G.J.; Burgeson, I.E.; Wagner, M.J.; Liu, J.; Chen, Y.L.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

"1. Seabrook","Nuclear","NextEra Energy Seabrook LLC",1247 "2. Granite Ridge","Gas","Granite Ridge Energy LLC",678  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hampshire" Hampshire" "1. Seabrook","Nuclear","NextEra Energy Seabrook LLC",1247 "2. Granite Ridge","Gas","Granite Ridge Energy LLC",678 "3. NAEA Newington Power","Gas","NAEA Newington Energy LLC",525 "4. Merrimack","Coal","Public Service Co of NH",485 "5. Newington","Gas","Public Service Co of NH",400 "6. S C Moore","Hydroelectric","TransCanada Hydro Northeast Inc.,",194 "7. Schiller","Coal","Public Service Co of NH",156 "8. Comerford","Hydroelectric","TransCanada Hydro Northeast Inc.,",145 "9. Berlin Gorham","Hydroelectric","Great Lakes Hydro America LLC",30

152

Lithium isotopic systematics of A-type granites and their mafic enclaves: Further constraints on the Li isotopic composition of the continental crust  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lithium isotopic systematics of A-type granites and their mafic enclaves: Further constraints form 6 February 2009 Accepted 15 February 2009 Editor: D.B. Dingwell Keywords: Lithium isotopes A-type granite Mafic enclave Continental crust Lithium concentrations and isotopic compositions of 39 A

Mcdonough, William F.

153

3/14/09 10:47 AMIs that granite counter in your home emitting radon? Page 1 of 4http://www.startribune.com/41239912.html?page=4&c=y  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,000 granites being exported from about 70 countries, he noted, with some quarries within miles of uranium mines

Llope, William J.

154

SWITCH: Case Studies in the Demand Side Management of Washing Appliances  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The emergence of viable smart home technologies together with ambitious government initiatives for smart meter rollouts will provide a rich platform on which to develop demand side management strategies that aim to modify consumer's use of energy. In this work we develop such a platform that aims to SWITCH behaviour patterns and SWITCH on/off energy consuming appliances when they are not needed or when they could be utilised to benefit from on-site power generation or off-peak electricity. This platform was installed in 3 occupied domestic properties that form part of the Creative Energy Homes project at the University of Nottingham, UK. A total of 6 case studies are presented that investigate the impact of shifting the time of use of washing machines and dishwashers with varying levels of user engagement. A range of issues and user perceptions of the technology are presented and discussed.

R. Shipman; M. Gillott; E. Naghiyev

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Selective sorption of PCBs by low-cost polymers and application to soil washing processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Surfactant-assisted soil washing and soil flushing processes have shown to be a promising soil decontamination method. In these and other remediation technologies that employ surfactants to mobilize organic contaminants, large volumes of contaminated aqueous solutions are generated. An efficient process to selectively concentrate the organic contaminant from the aqueous surfactant solution, thereby allowing the recycle of the surfactant, is considered essential for cost-effective application of these remediation methods. To this end, a process was developed wherein commercial, low-cost polymers are used to selectively sorb PCBs and petroleum oils from aqueous surfactant solutions. Sorption isotherms and sorption rates were determined for a large number of polymer sorbents and several significant structure-property relationships were observed. Two classes of polymers, polyester elastomers and carbon-filled elastomer rubbers (e.g., recycled rubber tire), were found to perform superiorly in this application and a successful pilot-scale demonstration of the process was conducted.

Sivavec, T.M.; Webb, J.L.; Gascoyne, D.G. [GE Corporate Research and Development, Schenectady, NY (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Removal and degradation of aromatic compounds from a highly polluted site by coupling soil washing with photocatalysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The possible application of two environmental remediation technologies soil washing and photocatalysis to remove and decompose various aromatic pollutants present in excavated soils of a contaminated industrial site has been investigated. Aqueous solutions containing the non-ionic surfactant Brij 35 were used to extract the contaminants from the soil samples. The photocatalytic treatment of the obtained washing wastes, performed in the presence of TiO2 suspensions irradiated with simulated sunlight, showed a slow abatement of the toxic compounds due to the relevant concentrations of organics in the waste. A neat improvement of the process performances, obtained by operating in the presence of added potassium peroxydisulfate, suggests a feasible treatment route.

D. Fabbri; A. Bianco Prevot; V. Zelano; M. Ginepro; E. Pramauro

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

The effects of chlorine, washing and evisceration on microbial population and storage-life of fresh fish  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EFFECTS OF CHLORINE, WASHING AND EVISCERATION ON THE MICROBIAL POPULATION AND STORAGE-LIFE OF FRESH FISH A Thesis by CHARLES MADE NEAL Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM Univ rsity in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Augu t 1977 Major Subject: Food Technology THE EFFECTS OF CHLORINE& WASHING lQ', D EVISCEPATION ON THE MICROBIAL POPULATION AND STORAGE-LIFE OF FRESH FISH A Thesis by CHARLES WADE NEAL Approved as to style and content...

Neal, Charles Wade

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

158

Decontamination of soil washing wastewater using solar driven advanced oxidation processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Decontamination of soil washing wastewater was performed using two different solar driven advanced oxidation processes (AOPs): the photo-Fenton reaction and the cobalt/peroxymonosulfate/ultraviolet (Co/PMS/UV) process. Complete sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS), the surfactant agent used to enhance soil washing process, degradation was achieved when the Co/PMS/UV process was used. In the case of photo-Fenton reaction, almost complete SDS degradation was achieved after the use of almost four times the actual energy amount required by the Co/PMS/UV process. Initial reaction rate in the first 15min (IR15) was determined for each process in order to compare them. Highest IR15 value was determined for the Co/PMS/UV process (0.011mmol/min) followed by the photo-Fenton reaction (0.0072mmol/min) and the dark Co/PMS and Fenton processes (IR15=0.002mmol/min in both cases). Organic matter depletion in the wastewater, as the sum of surfactant and total petroleum hydrocarbons present (measured as chemical oxygen demand, COD), was also determined for both solar driven processes. It was found that, for the case of COD, the highest removal (69%) was achieved when photo-Fenton reaction was used whereas Co/PMS/UV process yielded a slightly lower removal (51%). In both cases, organic matter removal achieved was over 50%, which can be consider proper for the coupling of the tested \\{AOPs\\} with conventional wastewater treatment processes such as biodegradation.

Erick R. Bandala; Yuridia Velasco; Luis G. Torres

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam; Smolt Monitoring by Federal and Non-Federal Entities, 2000 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project monitored the daily passage of chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon smolts O. nerka during the 2000 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. In 2000 the Nez Perce Tribe released significant numbers of hatchery chinook salmon and steelhead trout above Lower Granite Dam that were not marked with a fin clip or coded-wire tag. Generally, these fish were distinguishable from wild fish by the occurrence of fin erosion. Total annual hatchery chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 36% of the 1999 number. The wild chinook catch was 34% of the previous year's catch. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 121% of 1999 numbers. Wild steelhead trout catch was 139% of 1999 numbers. The Snake River trap collected 689 age-0 chinook salmon. During 2000, the Snake River trap captured 40 hatchery and 92 wild/natural sockeye salmon and 159 hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with high flows. Trap operations began on March 13 and were terminated for the season due to high flows on June 16. There were no down days due to high flows or debris. Hatchery chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 96%, and wild chinook salmon catch was 66% of 1999 numbers. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 2000 was 90% of the 1999 numbers. Wild steelhead trout collection in 2000 was 147% of the previous years catch. Trap operations began on March 13 and were terminated for the season due to high flows on May 22. There were no days where the trap was out of operation due to high flow or debris. Travel time (d) and migration rate (km/d) through Lower Granite Reservoir for passive integrated transponder (PIT) tagged chinook salmon and steelhead trout, marked at the head of the reservoir, were affected by discharge. For fish tagged at the Snake River trap, statistical analysis of 2000 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and discharge. For hatchery and wild chinook salmon, there was a 3.0 and 16.2-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. For hatchery steelhead, there was a 2.7-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 kcfs and 100 kcfs. The statistical analysis could not detect a significant relation between migration rate and discharge for wild steelhead in 2000. For fish marked at the Salmon River trap, statistical analysis of the 2000 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and discharge for hatchery chinook salmon at the 0.05 level of significance and at the 0.1 level of significance for wild chinook salmon. Migration rate increased 3.2- and 1.9-fold, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. For hatchery steelhead there was a 1.5-fold increase in migration rate between 50 kcfs and 100 kcfs. Insufficient numbers of wild steelhead trout were PIT tagged at the Salmon River trap to estimate travel time and migration rate to Lower Granite Dam. Fish tagged with PIT tags at the Snake River trap were interrogated at four dams with PIT tag detection systems (Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, and McNary dams). Because of the addition of the fourth interrogation site (Lower Monumental) in 1993, cumulative interrogation data is not comparable with the prior five years (1988-1992). Cumulative interrogations at the four dams for fish marked at the Snake River trap were 57% for hatchery chinook, 65% for wild chinook, 73% for hatchery steelhead and 71% for wild steelhead. Cumulative interrogations at the four dams for fish marked at the Salmon River trap were 53% for hatchery chinook, 64% for wild chinook salmon, 68% for hatchery steelhead trout, and 65% for wild steelhead trout.

Buettner, Edwin W.; Putnam, Scott A.

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Isotopic Data Bearing on the Origin of Mesozoic and Tertiary Granitic Rocks in the Western United States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Granitic Rocks in the Western United States D. J...Utah, Arizona, and Colorado. The plutons, which...Utah, Arizona and Colorado. The plutons, which...California Cenozoic Colorado crust differentiation...Tertiary United States Utah Western U.S. 1983 03 23 The...

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite wash producers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

2.9 to 1.9 Ga paleoalterations ofArchean granitic basement of the Franceville basin (Gabon).  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 2.9 to 1.9 Ga paleoalterations ofArchean granitic basement of the Franceville basin (Gabon: Paleocirculation and Diagenesis in Archean basement, Franceville basin, Gabon3 4 Abstract The Archean granitoids in the Ki�n� area, Gabon, are overlained by the Paleoproterozoic sediments of the Franceville basin (2.1 Ga

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

162

The use of a combined process of surfactant-aided soil washing and coagulation for PAH-contaminated soils treatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) persist in soils due to their low volatility, low water solubility and low biodegradability, all of which make it difficult to remove this type of compound from soils. The work described here involved the study of a combined surfactant-aided soil washing (SASW) process and coagulation treatment, using iron and aluminium salts, to remediate a low-permeability PAH-polluted soil. Phenanthrene was selected as the model PAH and three different types of surfactants (anionic, cationic, and non-ionic) were used as washing agents. The results show that the anionic surfactant is the most effective washing fluid because efficiencies higher than 90% can be achieved. Non-ionic and cationic surfactant efficiencies were 70% and 30%, respectively. In addition, only the anionic wastewater can be satisfactorily treated with this technology, with COD removals greater than 90% achieved. Variation of pH, zeta-potential and the dose of aluminium required seem to indicate that a charge-neutralization mechanism is the main process involved in the emulsion break-up obtained in the treatment of aqueous surfactant wastes. In addition, the effects of surfactant concentration and that of the pH of the soil-washing wastewater seem to have a greater influence on the performance of the coagulation process.

R. Lpez-Vizcano; C. Sez; P. Caizares; M.A. Rodrigo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

WASHING AND DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS USING POST ALUMINUM DISSOLUTION TANK 51 SLUDGE SLURRY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The remaining contents of Tank 51 from Sludge Batch 4 will be blended with Purex sludge from Tank 7 to constitute Sludge Batch 5 (SB5). The Savannah River Site (SRS) Liquid Waste Organization (LWO) has completed caustic addition to Tank 51 to perform low temperature Al dissolution on the H-Modified (HM) sludge material to reduce the total mass of sludge solids and Al being fed to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The Savannah River National Lab (SRNL) has also completed aluminum dissolution tests using a 3-L sample of Tank 51 sludge slurry through funding by DOE EM-21. This report documents assessment of downstream impacts of the aluminum dissolved sludge, which were investigated so technical issues could be identified before the start of SB5 processing. This assessment included washing the aluminum dissolved sludge to a Tank Farm projected sodium concentration and weight percent insoluble solids content and DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) processing using the washed sludge. Based on the limited testing, the impact of aluminum dissolution on sludge settling is not clear. Settling was not predictable for the 3-L sample. Compared to the post aluminum dissolution sample, settling after the first wash was slower, but settling after the second wash was faster. For example, post aluminum dissolution sludge took six days to settle to 60% of the original sludge slurry height, while Wash 1 took nearly eight days, and Wash 2 only took two days. Aluminum dissolution did impact sludge rheology. A comparison between the as-received, post aluminum dissolution and washed samples indicate that the downstream materials were more viscous and the concentration of insoluble solids less than that of the starting material. This increase in viscosity may impact Tank 51 transfers to Tank 40. The impact of aluminum dissolution on DWPF CPC processing cannot be determined because acid addition for the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle was under-calculated and thus under-added. Although the sludge was rheologically thick throughout the SRAT and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycles, this may have been due to the under addition of acid. Aluminum dissolution did, however, impact analyses of the SRAT receipt material. Two methods for determining total base yielded significantly different results. The high hydroxide content and the relatively high soluble aluminum content of the washed post aluminum dissolution sludge likely contributed to this difference and the ultimate under addition of acid. It should be noted that the simulant used to provide input for the SRAT cycle was an inadequate representation of the waste in terms of acid demand, likely due to the differences in the form of aluminum and hydroxide in the simulant and actual waste. Based on the results of this task, it is recommended that: (1) Sludge settling and rheology during washing of the forthcoming Sludge Batch 5 qualification sample be monitored closely and communicated to the Tank Farm. (2) SRNL receive a sample of Tank 51 after all chemical additions have been made and prior to the final Sludge Batch 5 decant for rheological assessment. Rheology versus wt% insoluble solids will be performed to determine the maximum amount of decant prior to the Tank 51 to Tank 40 transfer. (3) As a result of the problem with measuring total base and subsequently under-calculating acid for the DWPF CPC processing of the post aluminum dissolution sludge; (4) Studies to develop understanding of how the sludge titrates (i.e., why different titration methods yield different results) should be performed. (5) Simulants that better match the properties of post aluminum dissolution sludge should be developed. (6) Work on developing an acid calculation less dependant on the total base measurement should be continued.

Pareizs, J; Cj Bannochie, C; Damon Click, D; Erich Hansen, E; Dan Lambert, D; Michael Stone, M

2008-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

164

Degradation of pyrene in cetylpyridinium chloride-aided soil washing wastewater by pyrite Fenton reaction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Degradation of pyrene by pyrite Fenton reaction in synthetic cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC)-aided soil washing wastewater (SWW) was investigated in a closed batch reactor. Pyrene in the presence of CPC was gradually degraded in the pyrite Fenton system by 96% in 180min at initial pH 7 showing pseudo-first-order reaction kinetics (0.0194min?1), while the concentration of pyrene in the absence of CPC decreased abruptly by 91% in 5min and then did not significantly decrease by the end of sampling time (180min). In a classic Fenton system, pyrene in the presence of CPC was degraded by 35% in 180min at initial pH 3. The sustainable reactivity of pyrite Fenton was attributed to slow but continuous dissolution of Fe(II) from the pyrite surface leading to continuous production of reactive radicals during the reaction. Pyrene in the presence of CPC was mainly degraded by OH radicals. Its product study showed that the pyrite Fenton system can successfully degrade pyrene in the CPC-aided SWW without accumulating toxic oxy-pyrenes such as 1,6-pyrenequinone and 1,8-pyrenequinone. CPC was also successfully degraded (95%) in the pyrite Fenton system, forming carbon dioxide and ammonium as main degradation products.

Kyunghoon Choi; Sungjun Bae; Woojin Lee

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Report on Produced Water  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

September 2009 Produced Water Volumes and Management Practices Page 3 Table of Contents Executive Summary ........................................................................................................................ 7 Chapter 1 - Introduction ............................................................................................................. 11 1.1 Purpose .......................................................................................................................... 11 1.2 Background ................................................................................................................... 11 1.3 Overview ....................................................................................................................... 11

166

Report on Produced Water  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

of the pond, as well as the quality of the produced water. In semiarid regions, hot, dry air moving from a land surface will result in high evaporation rates for smaller ponds. As...

167

New mud system produces solids-free, reusable water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Corpus Christi, Texas, based Cameron Equipment Co., Inc., has developed a closed-loop mud treating system that removes solids from water-based systems and leaves the separated fluid clean and chemical free enough to be re-used directly on the rig. The system has been successfully applied by a Gulf of Mexico operator in areas where zero discharge is required. The alternative mud conditions program offered by the developers is called the Cameron Fluid Recycling System. Designed for closed-loop water-based fluids, the system is a new method of removing solids from normally discharged fluids such as drilling mud, waste and wash water, or any other water-based fluid that contains undesirable solids. The patented method efficiently produces end products that are (1) dry solids; and (2) essentially 100% solids-free fluid that can be re-used in the same mud system. All excess drilling mud, and all wash water that would normally go to the reserve pit or a cuttings barge are collected in a tank. Recycled fluid is compatible with the mud system fluid, no harmful chemicals are used, and pH is not altered.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Lower Granite Dam Smolt Monitoring Program, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2005 fish collection season at Lower Granite Dam (LGR) was characterized by average water temperatures, below average flows, above average spill, low levels of debris and the record number of smolts collected compared to the previous five years. With the continued release of unclipped supplementation chinook and steelhead above LGR, we cannot accurately distinguish wild chinook, steelhead, and sockeye/kokanee in the sample. For the purposes of this report we will designate fish as clipped and unclipped. This season a total of 13,030,967 juvenile salmonids were collected at LGR. Of these, 12,099,019 were transported to release sites below Bonneville Dam, 12,032,623 by barge and 66,396 by truck. An additional 898,235 fish were bypassed to the river due to over-capacity of the raceways, barges or trucks and for research purposes. This was the first season of summer spill at LGR. Spill was initiated at 12:01am June 20 as directed by the ruling set forth by Judge James Redden of the United States District Court (Order CV 01-640-RE). In addition, the Lower Granite project also conducted a summer spill test alternating spill and spill patterns between spill to the gas cap without the removable spillway weir (RSW) and spill with up to 20 kcfs utilizing the RSW. Because of the forecast low flow this year, most hatchery reared subyearling fall chinook were released up to three weeks early. With the unexpected high flows in late May and early June, more than 90% of the subyearling chinook were collected prior to the initiation of the court ordered summer spill program. Collection number fluctuations reflect river flow and project operations for any given year. For example, low flow years (2001, 2004 and 2005) result in higher collection numbers. Court ordered spill throughout the summer migration will directly affect collection of fall subyearling chinook collection numbers. The editors of this report urge the reader to use caution when comparing fish collection numbers between years, considering both annual river flows and annual project operations, because both affect fish migration and collection.

Mensik, Fred; Rapp, Shawn; Ross, Doug (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Lower Granite Dam Smolt Monitoring Program, Annual Report 2005-2006.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2005 fish collection season at Lower Granite Dam (LGR) was characterized by average water temperatures, below average flows, above average spill, low levels of debris and the record number of smolts collected compared to the previous five years. With the continued release of unclipped supplementation chinook and steelhead above LGR, we cannot accurately distinguish wild chinook, steelhead, and sockeye/kokanee in the sample. For the purposes of this report we will designate fish as clipped and unclipped. This season a total of 13,030,967 juvenile salmonids were collected at LGR. Of these, 12,099,019 were transported to release sites below Bonneville Dam, 12,032,623 by barge and 66,396 by truck. An additional 898,235 fish were bypassed to the river due to over-capacity of the raceways, barges or trucks and for research purposes. This was the first season of summer spill at LGR. Spill was initiated at 12:01am June 20 as directed by the ruling set forth by Judge James Redden of the United States District Court (Order CV 01-640-RE). In addition, the Lower Granite project also conducted a summer spill test alternating spill and spill patterns between spill to the gas cap without the removable spillway weir (RSW) and spill with up to 20 kcfs utilizing the RSW. Because of the forecast low flow this year, most hatchery reared subyearling fall chinook were released up to three weeks early. With the unexpected high flows in late May and early June, more than 90% of the subyearling chinook were collected prior to the initiation of the court ordered summer spill program. Collection number fluctuations reflect river flow and project operations for any given year. For example, low flow years (2001, 2004 and 2005) result in higher collection numbers. Court ordered spill throughout the summer migration will directly affect collection of fall subyearling chinook collection numbers. The editors of this report urge the reader to use caution when comparing fish collection numbers between years, considering both annual river flows and annual project operations, because both affect fish migration and collection.

Menski, Fred

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Comparison of a plant based natural surfactant with SDS for washing of As(V) from Fe rich soil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study explores the possible application of a biodegradable plant based surfactant, obtained from Sapindus mukorossi, for washing low levels of arsenic (As) from an iron (Fe) rich soil. Natural association of As(V) with Fe(III) makes the process difficult. Soapnut solution was compared to anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in down-flow and a newly introduced suction mode for soil column washing. It was observed that soapnut attained up to 86% efficiency with respect to SDS in removing As. Full factorial design of experiment revealed a very good fit of data. The suction mode generated up to 83 kPa pressure inside column whilst down-flow mode generated a much higher pressure of 214 kPa, thus making the suction mode more efficient. Micellar solubilisation was found to be responsible for As desorption from the soil and it followed 1st order kinetics. Desorption rate coefficient of suction mode was found to be in the range of 0.005 to 0.01, much higher than down-flow mode values. Analysis of the FT-IR data suggested that the soapnut solution did not interact chemically with As, offering an option for reusing the surfactant. Soapnut can be considered as a soil washing agent for removing As even from soil with high Fe content.

Soumyadeep Mukhopadhyay; Mohd. Ali Hashim; Jaya Narayan Sahu; Ismail Yusoff; Bhaskar Sen Gupta

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Enhanced photodegradation of pentachlorophenol in a soil washing system under solar irradiation with TiO2 nanorods combined with municipal sewage sludge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A novel remediation method for soil contaminated with hydrophobic chlorinated aromatic pollutants (HCAPs) was developed using TiO2 nanorods combined with municipal sewage sludge in surfactant solution. The target contaminant washed into surfactant solution from polluted soil can be rapidly removed under natural sunlight irradiation. The photocatalyst synthesized by TiO2 combined with municipal sewage sludge by a hydrothermal process shows excellent ability in this situation. The TiO2 nanorods appear on the surface of municipal sewage sludge, which offers a new way of solving waste municipal sewage sludge disposal problem and of producing high-activity photocatalyst. The nanocomposite was characterized by SEM, X-ray diffraction, and UVVis DRS. Results showed that the new nanocomposite was better than the original TiO2 catalyst. Using the proposed method in this study, the target contaminant can be removed by up to 97% after 30min of irradiation in natural sunlight, whereas the surfactant loss was only 27%.

Zeyu Zhou; Yaxin Zhang; Hongtao Wang; Tan Chen; Wenjing Lu

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Results of the independent verification survey at the Old Betatron Building, Granite City, Illinois  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A team from the Measurement Applications and Development Group, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), conducted an independent verification of the radiological condition of the Old Betatron Building, Granite City, Illinois, at the request of the Department of Energy in June of 1993. The building is owned by the National Steel Corporation. The contamination present resulted from the handling of uranium slabs of metal during the time the betatron facility was used to x-ray the slabs for metallurgical defects. The designation survey did not characterize the entire floor space because of obstructing equipment and debris. Therefore, prior to remediation by Bechtel National, Incorporated (BNI), a thorough characterization of the floor was conducted, and the results were immediately conveyed to on-site staff of BNI. An independent verification assessment was also performed after the cleanup activities were performed under the direction of BNI. The process of characterization, remediation, and verification was accomplished within a five-day period. Based on results of the independent verification assessment, the Old Betatron Building was determined to meet the DOE radiological guidelines for unrestricted use.

Murray, M.E.; Brown, K.S.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Diagenesis of sandstones from the Douglas Creek member of the Green River Formation (Eocene) at Red Wash field, Uintay County, Utah  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, sandstone and some limestone and dolomite beds. The Garden Creek Member at Red Wash Field is about 550 ft (168 m) thick. The Parachute Creek Member, overlying the Garden Creek, is largely oil shale, gray shale, and limestone and dolomite beds..., sandstone and some limestone and dolomite beds. The Garden Creek Member at Red Wash Field is about 550 ft (168 m) thick. The Parachute Creek Member, overlying the Garden Creek, is largely oil shale, gray shale, and limestone and dolomite beds...

Ray, Earl Scott

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

174

Selected chemistry of primary producers, primary consumers and suspended matter from Corpus Christi Bay and the northwest Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, suspended matter (suspended sediment) samples were vacuum filtered using 0. 4 p, 47 mi. llimeter diameter Nucleopore membrane filters. All samples were subsequently washed with deionized water (to remove dissolved solids) and dried at 60 C. Once dry...SELECTED CHEMISTRY OF PRIMARY PRODUCERS, PRIMARY CONSUMERS AND SUSPENDED MATTER FROM CORPUS CHRISTI BAY AND THE NORTHWEST GULF OF MEXICO A Thesis ROBERT RUSSELL SIMS, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial...

Sims, Robert Russell

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Lower Granite Dam Smolt Monitoring Program, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2004 fish collection season at Lower Granite Dam (LGR) was characterized by above average water temperatures, below average flows and spill, low levels of debris. The number of smolts collected for all species groups (with the exception of clipped and unclipped sockeye/kokanee) exceeded all previous collection numbers. With the continued release of unclipped supplementation chinook, steelhead and sockeye above LGR, we can not accurately distinguish wild chinook, wild steelhead and wild sockeye/kokanee from hatchery reared unclipped chinook and sockeye/kokanee in the sample. Wild steelhead can be identified from hatchery steelhead by the eroded dorsal and pectoral fins exhibited on unclipped hatchery steelhead. The numbers in the wild columns beginning in 1998 include wild and unclipped hatchery origin smolts. This season a total of 11,787,539 juvenile salmonids was collected at LGR. Of these, 11,253,837 were transported to release sites below Bonneville Dam, 11,164,132 by barge and 89,705 by truck. An additional 501,395 fish were bypassed to the river due to over-capacity of the raceways and for research purposes. According to the PTAGIS database, 177,009 PIT-tagged fish were detected at LGR in 2004. Of these, 105,894 (59.8%) were bypassed through the PIT-tag diversion system, 69,130 (39.1%) were diverted to the raceways to be transported, 1,640 (0.9%) were diverted to the sample tank, sampled and then transported, 345 (0.2%) were undetected at any of the bypass, raceway or sample exit monitors.

Mensik, Fred; Rapp, Shawn; Ross Doug (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Method for producing superconductors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method for producing a V3Al superconductor is disclosed which comprises making a composite composed of a sheath portion of a copper alloy containing 1 to 15 atomic percent of germanium, 1 to 15 atomic percent of silicon or 2 to 25 atomic percent of gallium and surrounded by the sheath portion, at least one core portion of a vanadium-aluminum alloy containing 0.5 to 20 atomic percent of aluminum; elongating the composite; and then heat-treating the elongated composite thereby to form a V3(Al, Ge), V3(Al, Si) or V3(Al, Ga) layer between the sheath portion and the core portion.

Inoue, K.; Tachikawa, K.; Togano, K.

1982-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

177

Reference analysis on the use of engineered barriers for isolation of spent nuclear fuel in granite and basalt  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report evaluates the effectiveness of engineered barriers in delaying or reducing the rate of release of radionuclides from spent fuel in geologic respositories in granite and basalt. It was assumed that the major exposure pathway from the respository to humans would be the ground-water system overlying or underlying a site. Hence, this report focuses on ground-water pathways. A geosphere transport model, GETOUT, and the biosphere transport/dose models, ALLDOS and PABLM, were integrated and used to calculate the potential radiological dose that might be received by humans at various times after repository closure.

Cloninger, M.O.; Cole, C.R.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Process for producing ethanol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process is described for producing ethanol from raw materials containing a high dry solid mash level having fermentable sugars or constituents which can be converted into sugars, comprising the steps of: (a) liquefaction of the raw materials in the presence of an alpha amylase to obtain liquefied mash; (b) saccharification of the liquefied mash in the presence of a glucoamylase to obtain hydrolysed starch and sugars; (c) fermentation of the hydrolysed starch and sugars by yeast to obtain ethanol; and (d) recovering the obtained ethanol, wherein an acid fungal protease is introduced to the liquefied mash during the saccharification and/or to the hydrolysed starch and sugars during the fermentation, thereby increasing the rate of production of ethanol as compared to a substantially similar process conducted without the introduction of the protease.

Lantero, O.J.; Fish, J.J.

1993-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

179

DOE/EIS-0285-SA-139: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS - Little Goose-Lower Granite Corridor Maintenance (4/3/03)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

9-Little Goose-Lower Granite Corridor Maintenance 9-Little Goose-Lower Granite Corridor Maintenance William Erickson Natural Resource Specialist - TFP/Walla Walla Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the Little Goose-Lower Granite #1 and #2 Transmission Line Corridor from Towers 4/3 to 8/1. The right-of-way has an easement width of 258 feet and contains two 500kV Single Circuit Transmission Lines. The proposed work will be accomplished in the indicated sections of the transmission line corridor as referenced in the attached checklist. Location: The subject right-of-way is located in Columbia County, WA., being in the Walla Walla Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: The work will be accomplished by an Integrated Vegetation Management approach using a combination of manual, mechanical, herbicides and biological

180

Removal of As, Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn from a highly contaminated industrial soil using surfactant enhanced soil washing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Surfactant enhanced soil washing (SESW) was applied to an industrial contaminated soil. A preliminary characterization of the soil regarding the alkaline-earth metals, Na, K, Ca and Mg took values of 2866, 2036, 2783 and 4149mg/kg. The heavy metals As, Cd, Cu, Pb, Ni and Zn, had values of 4019, 14, 35582, 70, 2603, and 261mg/kg, respectively. When using different surfactants, high removal of Cu, Ni and Zn were found, and medium removals for Pb, As and Cd. In the case of these three metals, tap water removed more than the surfactant solutions, except for the case of As. There were surfactants with average removals (this is, the removal for all the metals studied) of 67.1% (Tween 80), 64.9% (Surfacpol 14104) and 61.2% (Emulgin W600). There were exceptional removals using Texapon N-40 (83.2%, 82.8% and 86.6% for Cu, Ni and Zn), Tween 80 (85.9, 85.4 and 81.5 for Cd, Zn and Cu), Polafix CAPB (79%, 83.2% and 49.7% for Ni, Zn and As). The worst results were obtained with POLAFIX LO with a global removal of 45%, well below of the average removal with tap water (50.2%).All removal efficiencies are reported for a one step washing using 0.5% surfactant solutions, except for the case of mezquite gum, where a 0.1% solution was employed.

Luis G. Torres; Rosario B. Lopez; Margarita Beltran

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite wash producers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Major Energy Producers  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

206(92) 206(92) Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1992 January 1994 Elk. I nergy Information dministration This publication and other Energy Information Administration (EIA) publications may be purchased from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office. All telephone orders should be directed to: U.S. Government Printing Office Superintendent of Documents McPherson Square Bookstore U.S. Government Printing Office 1510 H Street, N.W. Washington, DC 20402 Washington, DC 20005 (202)783-3238 (202)653-2050 FAX (202)512-2233 FAX (202)376-5055 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., eastern time, M-F 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., eastern time, M-F All mail orders should be directed to: U.S. Government Printing Office P.O. Box 371954 Pittsburgh, PA 15250-7954 Complimentary subscriptions and single issues are available to certain groups of subscribers, such as

182

Method for producing superconductors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a method for producing v/sub 3/Ga superconductors which comprises forming a composite of a core portion and a sheath portion surrounding said core portion, said sheath portion being composed of a gallium-containing alloy selected from the group consisting of copper-gallium and copper-silver-gallium alloys, and said core portion being composed of a vanadium metal, elongating said composite, and heat-treating the resulting elongated composite to form a v/sub 3/Ga layer between said sheath and core portions; the improvement wherein the gallium-containing alloy has a gallium content of 0.1 to 30 atomic percent and additionally contains at least one metal selected from the group consisting of 0.05 to 5 atomic percent of magnesium, 0.5 to 10 atomic percent of aluminum , 0.1 to 10 atomic percent of cerium and 0.05 to 10 atomic percent of sodium, and the vanadium metal is a vanadium alloy containing 0.1 to 15 atomic percent of gallium.

Asano, T.; Tachikawa, K.; Tanaka, Y.; Yoshida, Y.

1981-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

183

Exploration strategies based on a coalbed methane producibility model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Knowing geologic and hydrologic characteristics of a basin does not necessarily lead to a determination of its coalbed methane producibility because it is the synergy among key hydrogeologic controls that governs producibility. Detailed studies performed in the San Juan, Piceance, and Sand Wash Basins determined that the key hydrogeologic factors affecting producibility include depositional setting and coal distribution, tectonic and structural setting, coal rank and gas generation, hydrodynamics, permeability, and gas content. The conceptual model based on these factors provides a rationale for exploration and development strategies for unexplored areas or in basins having established or limited production. Exceptionally high productivity requires good permeability; thick, laterally continuous high-rank and high-gas-content coals; dynamic flow of ground water through those coals; generation of secondary biogenic gases; and migration and conventional trapping of thermogenic and biogenic gases. Higher coalbed methane producibility commonly occurs in areas of upward flow associated with permeability barriers (no-flow boundaries). Fluid migration across a large gathering area orthogonal to permeability barriers and/or in situ generation of secondary biogenic gases concentrate the coal gas, resulting in higher gas contents. Low coalbed methane production is typically associated with very low permeability systems; the absence of conventional or hydrodynamic traps; and thin, low-rank coals below the threshold of thermogenic gas generation. Production from relatively low-gas-content coals in highly permeable recharge areas may result in excessive water and limited coalbed methane production. Thus, high permeability can be as detrimental to coalbed methane producibility as is low permeability.

Scott, A.R.; Kaiser, W.R.; Hamilton, D.S.; Tyler, R.; Finley, R.J. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

184

Exploration strategies based on a coalbed methane producibility model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Knowing geologic and hydrologic characteristics of a basin does not necessarily lead to a determination of its coalbed methane producibility because it is the synergy among key hydrogeologic controls that governs producibility. Detailed studies performed in the San Juan, Piceance, and Sand Wash Basins determined that the key hydrogeologic factors affecting producibility include depositional setting and coal distribution, tectonic and structural setting, coal rank and gas generation, hydrodynamics, permeability, and gas content. The conceptual model based on these factors provides a rationale for exploration and development strategies for unexplored areas or in basins having established or limited production. Exceptionally high productivity requires good permeability; thick, laterally continuous high-rank and high-gas-content coals; dynamic flow of ground water through those coals; generation of secondary biogenic gases; and migration and conventional trapping of thermogenic and biogenic gases. Higher coalbed methane producibility commonly occurs in areas of upward flow associated with permeability barriers (no-flow boundaries). Fluid migration across a large gathering area orthogonal to permeability barriers and/or in situ generation of secondary biogenic gases concentrate the coal gas, resulting in higher gas contents. Low coalbed methane production is typically associated with very low permeability systems; the absence of conventional or hydrodynamic traps; and thin, low-rank coals below the threshold of thermogenic gas generation. Production from relatively low-gas-content coals in highly permeable recharge areas may result in excessive water and limited coalbed methane production. Thus, high permeability can be as detrimental to coalbed methane producibility as is low permeability.

Scott, A.R.; Kaiser, W.R.; Hamilton, D.S.; Tyler, R.; Finley, R.J. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Radioactivity concentrations and dose assessment for soil samples from Kestanbol granite area, Turkey  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......digital environmental radiation dosemeter which contains...measured in Kestanbol from naturally occurring radioisotopes...study. The decay of naturally occuring radionuclides in soil produces a gamma-beta radiation fields in soil that......

B. Merdanoglu; N. Altinsoy

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Spent fuel test-climax: a test of geologic storage of high-level waste in granite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A test of retrievable geologic storage of spent fuel assemblies from an operating commercial nuclear reactor is underway at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) of the US Department of Energy. This generic test is located 420 m below the surface in the Climax granitic stock. Eleven canisters of spent fuel approximately 2.5 years out of reactor core (about 1.6 kW/canister thermal output) were emplaced in a storage drift along with 6 electrical simulator canisters. Two adjacent drifts contain electrical heaters, which are operated to simulate within the test array the thermal field of a large repository. Fuel was loaded during April to May 1980 and initial results of the test will be presented.

Ramspott, L.D.; Ballou, L.B.; Patrick, W.C.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Fall Chinook Salmon Spawning Ground Surveys in the Snake River Basin Upriver of Lower Granite Dam, 2007 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Redd counts are routinely used to document the spawning distribution of fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Snake River basin upriver of Lower Granite Dam. The first reported redd counts were from aerial searches conducted intermittently between 1959 and 1978 (Irving and Bjornn 1981, Witty 1988; Groves and Chandler 1996)(Appendix 1). In 1986, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife began an annual monitoring program that, in addition to the Snake River, included aerial searches of the Grande Ronde River the first year (Seidel and Bugert 1987), and the Imnaha River in subsequent years (Seidel et al. 1988; Bugert et al. 1989-1991; Mendel et al. 1992). The U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Idaho Power Company began contributing to this effort in 1991 by increasing the number of aerial searches conducted each year and adding underwater searches in areas of the Snake River that were too deep to be searched from the air (Connor et al. 1993; Garcia et al. 1994a, 1994b, 1996-2007; Groves 1993; Groves and Chandler 1996). The Nez Perce Tribe added aerial searches in the Clearwater River basin beginning in 1988 (Arnsberg et. al 1992), and the Salmon River beginning in 1992. Currently searches are conducted cooperatively by the Nez Perce Tribe, Idaho Power Company, and U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Our objective for this report was to consolidate the findings from annual redd searches counted upstream of Lower Granite Dam into a single document, containing detailed information about the searches from the most recent spawning season, and summary information from previous years. The work conducted in 2007 was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration and Idaho Power Company.

Garcia, A.P.; Bradbury, S. [U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; Arnsberg, B.D. [Nez Perce Tribe; Groves, P.A. [Idaho Power Company

2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

188

Testa Produce | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Testa Produce Testa Produce Jump to: navigation, search Name Testa Produce Facility Testa Produce Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Testa Produce Developer Testa Produce Energy Purchaser Testa Produce Location Chicago IL Coordinates 41.81065982°, -87.65433311° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.81065982,"lon":-87.65433311,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

189

EIS-0300: Minnesota Agri-Power Project: Biomass for Rural Development, Granite Falls, Minnesota  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS analyzes DOE and the Minnesota Environmental Quality Boards' [MEQB, a Minnesota State agency] decision to support a proposal by the Minnesota Valley Alfalfa Producers (MnVAP) to construct and operate a 75103 megawatt biomass fueled gasifier and electric generating facility, known as the Minnesota Agri-Power Plant (MAPP), and associated transmission lines and alfalfa processing facilities.

190

SLUDGE WASHING AND DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS FOR SLUDGE BATCH 6 QUALIFICATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prior to initiating a new sludge batch in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is required to simulate this processing, including Chemical Process Cell (CPC) simulation, waste glass fabrication, and chemical durability testing. This report documents this simulation for the next sludge batch, Sludge Batch 6 (SB6). SB6 consists of Tank 12 material that has been transferred to Tank 51 and subjected to Low Temperature Aluminum Dissolution (LTAD), Tank 4 sludge, and H-Canyon Pu solutions. Following LTAD and the Tank 4 addition, Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) provided SRNL a 3 L sample of Tank 51 sludge for SB6 qualification. Pu solution from H Canyon was also received. SB6 qualification included washing the sample per LWO plans/projections (including the addition of Pu from H Canyon), DWPF CPC simulations, waste glass fabrication (vitrification), and waste glass characterization and chemical durability evaluation. The following are significant observations from this demonstration. Sludge settling improved slightly as the sludge was washed. SRNL recommended (and the Tank Farm implemented) one less wash based on evaluations of Tank 40 heel projections and projections of the glass composition following transfer of Tank 51 to Tank 40. Thorium was detected in significant quantities (>0.1 wt % of total solids) in the sludge. In past sludge batches, thorium has been determined by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS), seen in small quantities, and reported with the radionuclides. As a result of the high thorium, SRNL-AD has added thorium to their suite of Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES) elements. The acid stoichiometry for the DWPF Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) processing of 115%, or 1.3 mol acid per liter of SRAT receipt slurry, was adequate to accomplish some of the goals of SRAT processing: nitrite was destroyed to below 1,000 mg/kg and mercury was removed to below the DWPF target with 750 g of steam per g of mercury. However, rheological properties did not improve and were above the design basis. Hydrogen generation rates did not exceed DWPF limits during the SRAT and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycles. However, hydrogen generation during the SRAT cycle approached the DWPF limit. The glass fabricated with the Tank 51 SB6 SME product and Frit 418 was acceptable with respect to chemical durability as measured by the Product Consistency Test (PCT). The PCT response was also predictable by the current durability models of the DWPF Product Composition Control System (PCCS). It should be noted, however, that in the first attempt to make glass from the SME product, the contents of the fabrication crucible foamed over. This may be a result of the SME product's REDOX (Reduction/Oxidation - Fe{sup 2+}/{Sigma}Fe) of 0.08 (calculated from SME product analytical results). The following are recommendations drawn from this demonstration. In this demonstration, at the request of DWPF, SRNL caustic boiled the SRAT contents prior to acid addition to remove water (to increase solids concentration). During the nearly five hours of caustic boiling, 700 ppm of antifoam was required to control foaming. SRNL recommends that DWPF not caustic boil/concentrate SRAT receipt prior to acid addition until further studies can be performed to provide a better foaming control strategy or a new antifoam is developed for caustic boiling. Based on this set of runs and a recently completed demonstration with the SB6 Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) sample, it is recommended that DWPF not add formic acid at the design addition rate of two gallons per minute for this sludge batch. A longer acid addition time appears to be helpful in allowing slower reaction of formic acid with the sludge and possibly decreases the chance of a foam over during acid addition.

Pareizs, J.; Pickenheim, B.; Bannochie, C.; Billings, A.; Bibler, N.; Click, D.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Method of producing submicron size particles and product produced thereby  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Submicron size particles are produced by using a sputtering process to deposit particles into a liquid. The liquid is processed to recover the particles therefrom, and the particles have sizes in the range of twenty to two hundred Angstroms. Either metallic or non-metallic particles can be produced, and the metallic particles can be used in ''metallic inks.'' 4 figs.

Bourne, R.S.; Eichman, C.C.; Welbon, W.W.

1988-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

192

Discharge produces hydrocarbons from coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Discharge produces hydrocarbons from coal ... Studies of the reactions of coal in electric discharges by two chemists at the U.S. Bureau of Mines' Pittsburgh Coal Research Center may lead to improved ways of producing acetylene and other useful chemicals from coal. ... Other workers have produced high yields of acetylene from coal by extremely rapid pyrolysis using energy sources such as plasma jets, laser beams, arc-image reactors, and flash heaters. ...

1968-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

193

Process for selection of Oxygen-tolerant algal mutants that produce H.sub.2  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for selection of oxygen-tolerant, H.sub.2 -producing algal mutant cells comprising: (a) growing algal cells photoautotrophically under fluorescent light to mid log phase; (b) inducing algal cells grown photoautrophically under fluorescent light to mid log phase in step (a) anaerobically by (1) resuspending the cells in a buffer solution and making said suspension anaerobic with an inert gas; (2) incubating the suspension in the absence of light at ambient temperature; (c) treating the cells from step (b) with metronidazole, sodium azide, and added oxygen to controlled concentrations in the presence of white light. (d) washing off metronidazole and sodium azide to obtain final cell suspension; (e) plating said final cell suspension on a minimal medium and incubating in light at a temperature sufficient to enable colonies to appear; (f) counting the number of colonies to determine the percent of mutant survivors; and (g) testing survivors to identify oxygen-tolerant H.sub.2 -producing mutants.

Ghirardi, Maria L. (Lakewood, CO); Seibert, Michael (Lakewood, CO)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Correlation of mineralogy and trace element leaching behavior in modified in situ spent shales from Logan Wash, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oil shale retorting induces mineral and chemical reactions to occur on the macroscopic and microscopic levels in the kerogen-bearing marlstone. The nature and extent of the reactions is dependent upon process variables such as maximum temperature, time at temperature, atmosphere, and raw shale composition. This report describes the investigation of the mineral, chemical, and trace element release properties of spent shales retrieved from an experimental in situ retort at Occidental Oil Shale, Inc.'s Logan Wash site in Garfield County, Colorado. Correlation between mineralogy of the spent materials and the mobility of major, minor, and trace elements are indicated, and relationships with important process parameters are discussed. The progress of carbonate decomposition reactions and silication reactions is indicative of the processing conditions experienced by the shale materials and influences the mobility of major, minor, and trace elements when the solids are contacted by water. Shale minerals that are exposed to the extreme conditions reached in underground retorting form high temperature product phases including akermanite-gehlenite and diopside-augite solid solutions, kalsilite, monticellite, and forsterie. The persistence of relatively thermally stable phases, such as quartz, orthoclase, and albite provide insight into the extremes of processing conditions experienced by the spent shales. Leachate compositions suggest that several trace elements, including vanadium, boron, fluoride, and arsenic are not rendered immobile by the formation of the high-temperature silicate product phase akermanite-gehlenite.

Peterson, E.J.; O'Rourke, J.A.; Wagner, P.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Method for producing a borohydride  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for producing a borohydride is described and which includes the steps of providing a source of borate; providing a material which chemically reduces the source of the borate to produce a borohydride; and reacting the source of borate and the material by supplying heat at a temperature which substantially effects the production of the borohydride.

Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

196

Cellulase producing microorganism ATCC 55702  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Bacteria which produce large amounts of cellulase--containing cell-free fermentate have been identified. The original bacterium (ATCC 55703) was genetically altered using nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) treatment to produce the enhanced cellulase producing bacterium (ATCC 55702), which was identified through replicate plating. ATCC 55702 has improved characteristics and qualifies for the degradation of cellulosic waste materials for fuel production, food processing, textile processing, and other industrial applications. ATCC 55702 is an improved bacterial host for genetic manipulations using recombinant DNA techniques, and is less likely to destroy genetic manipulations using standard mutagenesis techniques.

Dees, H. Craig (Lenoir City, TN)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Microorganisms for producing organic acids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Organic acid-producing microorganisms and methods of using same. The organic acid-producing microorganisms comprise modifications that reduce or ablate AcsA activity or AcsA homolog activity. The modifications increase tolerance of the microorganisms to such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, acrylic acid, propionic acid, lactic acid, and others. Further modifications to the microorganisms increase production of such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, lactate, and others. Methods of producing such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, lactate, and others with the modified microorganisms are provided. Methods of using acsA or homologs thereof as counter-selectable markers are also provided.

Pfleger, Brian Frederick; Begemann, Matthew Brett

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

198

Cellulase producing microorganism ATCC 55702  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Bacteria which produce large amounts of cellulase--containing cell-free fermentate have been identified. The original bacterium (ATCC 55703) was genetically altered using nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) treatment to produce the enhanced cellulase producing bacterium (ATCC 55702), which was identified through replicate plating. ATCC 55702 has improved characteristics and qualifies for the degradation of cellulosic waste materials for fuel production, food processing, textile processing, and other industrial applications. ATCC 55702 is an improved bacterial host for genetic manipulations using recombinant DNA techniques, and is less likely to destroy genetic manipulations using standard mutagenesis techniques. 5 figs.

Dees, H.C.

1997-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

199

Producing hydrogen using nuclear energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The earliest means of separating hydrogen from water was by electrolysis using electrical energy that usually had been produced by low-efficiency thermodynamic processes. Substitution of thermal energy for electrical energy in high-temperature electrolysis gives a somewhat higher overall efficiency, but significantly complicates the process. Today, the vast majority of hydrogen is produced by steam methane reforming (SMR) followed by a water-shift reaction. A well-designed SMR plant will yield hydrogen having 75??80% of the energy of the methane used. Recent work in Japan has demonstrated the feasibility of substituting high-temperature heat from a gas-cooled nuclear reactor to replace the heat supplied in SMR by the combustion of methane. Using high-temperature heat from nuclear plants to drive thermochemical processes for producing hydrogen has been studied extensively. Bench-scale tests have been carried out in Japan demonstrating the sulphur-iodine (SI) process to produce hydrogen.

Robert E. Uhrig

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Methods of producing transportation fuel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one method for producing transportation fuel is described herein. The method for producing transportation fuel may include providing formation fluid having a boiling range distribution between -5.degree. C. and 350.degree. C. from a subsurface in situ heat treatment process to a subsurface treatment facility. A liquid stream may be separated from the formation fluid. The separated liquid stream may be hydrotreated and then distilled to produce a distilled stream having a boiling range distribution between 150.degree. C. and 350.degree. C. The distilled liquid stream may be combined with one or more additives to produce transportation fuel.

Nair, Vijay (Katy, TX); Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria (Houston, TX); Cherrillo, Ralph Anthony (Houston, TX); Bauldreay, Joanna M. (Chester, GB)

2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite wash producers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Stratigraphy, coal occurrence, and depositional history of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation, Sand Wash basin, northwestern Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fort Union Formation in the Sand Wash basin is divided into the massive Cretaceous and Tertiary (K/T) sandstone unit, lower coal-bearing unit, gray-green mudstone unit, basin sandy unit, and upper shaly unit. Lithofacies and coal-occurrence maps of the stratigraphic units indicate that sandstone bodies and coal beds occur along south-north oriented, intermontane fluvial systems. Net-sandstone-thickness trends of the massive K/T sandstone unit reveal laterally extensive channel-fill sandstones formed in north-flowing fluvial systems. The massive K/T sandstone unit's dominant source was in the Sawatch Range. Sandstones within the lower coal-bearing unit consist of similar north-flowing fluvial systems, but they are laterally discontinuous and have several tectonically active source areas, including the Uinta and Sierra Madre-Park uplifts, and Sawatch Range. Coal-occurrence maps of the lower coal-bearing unit indicate that maximum coal-bed thicknesses are greatest along the south-north-oriented fluvial axes. Coal beds thin and split to the east and west, confirming a direct relation between the position of thick, fluvial-sandstone bodies, which form a stable platform for peat accumulation, and the location of the thick coal beds. Above the lower coal-bearing unit, the gray-green mudstone unit forms north-trending belts centered R91W and R100W. The gray-green mudstone thins to the north and into the basin center and probably is lacustrine in origin, reflecting tectonic quiescence and cessation of coarse clastic sedimentation. The basin sandy unit is best developed in the central parts of the basin, where its fluvial depositional axis is oriented south-north. The upper shaly unit directly overlies the basin sandy unit and includes a thin Cherokee coal zone. The upper shaly unit has variable thicknesses due to erosion at the base of the Wasatch Formation and lateral facies changes.

Tyler, R. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

WASH plus infrascaping  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For many decades, various non-governmental agencies, and political entities have been working to resolve issues relating to Water, Sanitation and Hygiene within developing countries around the world. One area within the ...

Dieudonne, Rudy

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Raw neutron scattering data for strain measurement of hydraulically loaded granite and marble samples in triaxial stress state  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

This entry contains raw data files from experiments performed on the Vulcan beamline at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory using a pressure cell. Cylindrical granite and marble samples were subjected to confining pressures of either 0 psi or approximately 2500 psi and internal pressures of either 0 psi, 1500 psi or 2500 psi through a blind axial hole at the center of one end of the sample. The sample diameters were 1.5" and the sample lengths were 6". The blind hole was 0.25" in diameter and 3" deep. One set of experiments measured strains at points located circumferentially around the center of the sample with identical radii to determine if there was strain variability (this would not be expected for a homogeneous material based on the symmetry of loading). Another set of experiments measured load variation across the radius of the sample at a fixed axial and circumferential location. Raw neutron diffraction intensity files and experimental parameter descriptions are included.

Yarom Polsky

204

Raw neutron scattering data for strain measurement of hydraulically loaded granite and marble samples in triaxial stress state  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This entry contains raw data files from experiments performed on the Vulcan beamline at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory using a pressure cell. Cylindrical granite and marble samples were subjected to confining pressures of either 0 psi or approximately 2500 psi and internal pressures of either 0 psi, 1500 psi or 2500 psi through a blind axial hole at the center of one end of the sample. The sample diameters were 1.5" and the sample lengths were 6". The blind hole was 0.25" in diameter and 3" deep. One set of experiments measured strains at points located circumferentially around the center of the sample with identical radii to determine if there was strain variability (this would not be expected for a homogeneous material based on the symmetry of loading). Another set of experiments measured load variation across the radius of the sample at a fixed axial and circumferential location. Raw neutron diffraction intensity files and experimental parameter descriptions are included.

Polsky, Yarom

2014-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

205

Separation of oil and water produced by micellar-solution/ polymer flooding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The phase behavior of produced fluids from a micellar/polymer project is dominated by producedsulfonate equivalent-weight distribution, total sulfonate production, and aqueous-phase salt concentration and type. Produced fluids at Marathon Oil Co.'s 219-R Project showed evidence of having passed through a salinity gradient created by reservoir brine at the leading edge of the displacement and fresh polymer water behind the micellar solution. During early production, when aqueousphase salt concentration was relatively high, highequivalent-weight sulfonates were permanently entrained in produced oil. Significant amounts of water also remained. As the salt content of produced water declined, high-equivalent-weight sulfonates moved to middle and aqueous phases. The middle and aqueous phases carried significant quantities of oil during these periods. All three problems-water in oil, oil in the middle phase, and oil in water-were corrected by treatment with demulsifying chemicals that rendered all sulfonates highly watersoluble. Water-soluble amines and alcohols were effective. Because of large quantities of sulfonate production and resulting low oil/water tensions, extended retention times were needed in separation vessels. In the absence of adequate retention (highest sulfonate production), a freshwater wash of the oil with an appropriate demulsifying chemical after initial oil/water separation removed the remaining sulfonate (and water) from the oil. All production from the 219-R Project was successfully treated and sold with strict quality control. Data from laboratory corefloods pertinent to the characterization of produced-fluid phase behavior are presented.

Dreher, K.D.; Shoppman, T.D.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Diesel exhaust treatment produces cyanide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Diesel exhaust treatment produces cyanide ... Studies at the Swiss Federal Technical Institute (ETH), Zurich, have produced results that, if confirmed by further research, could pose problems for the developers of catalytic converters that reduce emissions from diesel and leanburn gasoline engines. ... Use of low molecular weight olefins as reductants for selective removal of nitrogen oxides from exhaust gases, either by bleeding the olefins into the exhaust stream or blending them into the fuel itself, has attracted the interest of engine makers and regulatory agencies. ...

JOSEPH HAGGIN

1994-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

207

Process for producing chalcogenide semiconductors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for producing chalcogenide semiconductor material is disclosed. The process includes forming a base metal layer and then contacting this layer with a solution having a low pH and containing ions from at least one chalcogen to chalcogenize the layer and form the chalcogenide semiconductor material.

Noufi, R.; Chen, Y.W.

1985-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

208

Additive manufacturing method of producing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Additive manufacturing method of producing silver or copper tracks on polyimide film Problem/stripping) using an additive process support by a novel bio- degradable photo-initiator package. technology. Building on previous work by Hoyd- Gigg Ng et al. [1,2], Heriot-Watt has developed an additive film

Painter, Kevin

209

Acid Washed Glass Beads 1. Weigh 50 g of 0.5 mm glass beads (Sigma G-9268, 425-600 m) into a 100 ml-orange cap Pyrex  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Acid Washed Glass Beads 1. Weigh 50 g of 0.5 mm glass beads (Sigma G-9268, 425-600 µm) into a 100 ml-orange cap Pyrex bottle. The volume of glass beads should be no more than 1/5 of the volume of the bottle used for washes. To scale up, use 100 g of glass beads and a 250 ml orange cap Pyrex bottle. 2

Aris, John P.

210

Electrically Conductive Bacterial Nanowires Produced by Shewanella...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Conductive Bacterial Nanowires Produced by Shewanella Oneidensis Strain MR-1 and Other Microorganisms . Electrically Conductive Bacterial Nanowires Produced by Shewanella...

211

Fall Chinook Salmon Spawning Ground Surveys in the Snake River Basin Upriver of Lower Granite Dam, Annual Report 2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Redd counts were used to document the spawning distribution of fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Snake River basin upriver of Lower Granite Dam. The first reported redd counts were from aerial searches conducted intermittently between 1959 and 1978 (Irving and Bjornn 1981, Witty 1988; Groves and Chandler 1996)(Appendix 1). In 1986, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife began an annual monitoring program that, in addition to the Snake River, included aerial searches of the Grande Ronde River the first year (Seidel and Bugert 1987), and the Imnaha River in subsequent years (Seidel et al. 1988; Bugert et al. 1989-1991; Mendel et al. 1992). The U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Idaho Power Company began contributing to this effort in 1991 by increasing the number of aerial searches conducted each year and adding underwater searches in areas of the Snake River that were too deep to be searched from the air (Connor et al. 1993; Garcia et al. 1994a, 1994b, 1996-2003; Groves 1993; Groves and Chandler 1996). The Nez Perce Tribe added aerial searches in the Clearwater River basin beginning in 1988 (Arnsberg et. al 1992) and the Salmon River beginning in 1992. Currently searches are conducted cooperatively by the Nez Perce Tribe, Idaho Power Company, and U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Our objective for this report was to consolidate the findings from annual redd searches into a single document containing detailed information about the searches from the most recent spawning season, and summary information from previous years. The work conducted in 2003 was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (Projects 199801003, 199801004, 199403400, 198335003), Idaho Power Company, and Bureau of Land Management.

Garcia, A.P.; Bradbury, S.M.; Arnsberg, B.D.

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Fall Chinook Salmon Spawning Ground Surveys in the Snake River Basin Upriver of Lower Granite Dam, 2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Redd counts are routinely used to document the spawning distribution of fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Snake River basin upriver of Lower Granite Dam. The first reported redd counts were from aerial searches conducted intermittently between 1959 and 1978 (Irving and Bjornn 1981, Witty 1988; Groves and Chandler 1996)(Appendix 1). In 1986, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife began an annual monitoring program that, in addition to the Snake River, included aerial searches of the Grande Ronde River the first year (Seidel and Bugert 1987), and the Imnaha River in subsequent years (Seidel et al. 1988; Bugert et al. 1989-1991; Mendel et al. 1992). The U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Idaho Power Company began contributing to this effort in 1991 by increasing the number of aerial searches conducted each year and adding underwater searches in areas of the Snake River that were too deep to be searched from the air (Connor et al. 1993; Garcia et al. 1994a, 1994b, 1996-2005; Groves 1993; Groves and Chandler 1996). The Nez Perce Tribe added aerial searches in the Clearwater River basin beginning in 1988 (Arnsberg et. al 1992), and the Salmon River beginning in 1992. Currently searches are conducted cooperatively by the Nez Perce Tribe, Idaho Power Company, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Our objective for this report was to consolidate the findings from annual redd searches into a single document, containing detailed information about the searches from the most recent spawning season, and summary information from previous years. The work conducted in 2005 was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration and Idaho Power Company.

Garcia, A.P.; Bradbury, S.; Arnsberg, B.D.; Rocklage, S.J.; Groves, P.A.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Fall Chinook Salmon Spawning Ground Surveys in the Snake River Basin Upriver of Lower Granite Dam, 2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Redd counts were used to document the spawning distribution of fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Snake River basin upriver of Lower Granite Dam. The first reported redd counts were from aerial searches conducted intermittently between 1959 and 1978 (Irving and Bjornn 1981, Witty 1988; Groves and Chandler 1996)(Appendix 1). In 1986, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife began an annual monitoring program that, in addition to the Snake River, included aerial searches of the Grande Ronde River the first year (Seidel and Bugert 1987), and the Imnaha River in subsequent years (Seidel et al. 1988; Bugert et al. 1989-1991; Mendel et al. 1992). The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Idaho Power Company began contributing to this effort in 1991 by increasing the number of aerial searches conducted each year and adding underwater searches in areas of the Snake River that were too deep to be searched from the air (Connor et al. 1993; Garcia et al. 1994a, 1994b, 1996-2004; Groves 1993; Groves and Chandler 1996). The Nez Perce Tribe added aerial searches in the Clearwater River basin beginning in 1988 (Arnsberg et. al 1992), and the Salmon River beginning in 1992. Currently searches are conducted cooperatively by the Nez Perce Tribe, Idaho Power Company, and U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Our objective for this report was to consolidate the findings from annual redd searches into a single document, containing detailed information about the searches from the most recent spawning season, and summary information from previous years. The work conducted in 2004 was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration, Idaho Power Company, and Bureau of Land Management.

Garcia, A.P.; Bradbury, S.; Arnsberg, B.D.; Rocklage, S.J.; Groves, P.A.

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Fall Chinook Salmon Spawning Ground Surveys in the Snake River Basin Upriver of Lower Granite Dam, Annual Report 2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Redd counts were used to document the spawning distribution of fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Snake River basin upriver of Lower Granite Dam. The first reported redd counts were from aerial searches conducted intermittently between 1959 and 1978 (Irving and Bjornn 1981, Witty 1988; Groves and Chandler 1996)(Appendix 1). In 1986, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife began an annual monitoring program that, in addition to the Snake River, included aerial searches of the Grande Ronde River the first year (Seidel and Bugert 1987), and the Imnaha River in subsequent years (Seidel et al. 1988; Bugert et al. 1989-1991; Mendel et al. 1992). The U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Idaho Power Company began contributing to this effort in 1991 by increasing the number of aerial searches conducted each year and adding underwater searches in areas of the Snake River that were too deep to be searched from the air (Connor et al. 1993; Garcia et al. 1994a, 1994b, 1996-2001; Groves 1993; Groves and Chandler 1996). The Nez Perce Tribe added aerial searches in the Clearwater River basin beginning in 1988 (Arnsberg et. al 1992) and the Salmon River beginning in 1992. Currently searches are conducted cooperatively by the Nez Perce Tribe, Idaho Power Company, and U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Our objective for this report was to consolidate the findings from annual redd searches into a single document containing detailed information about the searches from the most recent spawning season, and summary information from previous years. The work conducted in 2002 was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (Projects 1998-01-003 and 1994-03-400) and the Idaho Power Company.

Garcia, Aaron P.; Bradbury, S.M.; Arnsberg, Billy D.

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Gas separation by pressure swing adsorption for producing hydrogen from coal: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project demonstrated the feasibility of producing high purity hydrogen from a coal gasification product gas mixture by Pressure Swing Adsorption (PSA) using a commercial 5A zeolite as the adsorbent. The major advantage of PSA over conventional hydrogen upgrading processes is associated with lower overall production costs. This is mainly due to the integration of PSA into H/sub 2/ production plants as a single unit operation by replacing the low temperature carbon monoxide shift, carbon dioxide wash and methanation steps. In this way, hydrogen production costs are typically reduced from 7 to 40%. A single bed PSA process was designed to simulate the various steps of commercial multibed PSA plants. A new and very important step, ''Vacuum Purge'', was also investigated. 45 refs., 38 figs., 50 tabs.

Kapoor, A.; Ritter, J.A.; Yang, R.T.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

On the Oscillation of Neutrinos Produced by the Annihilation of Dark Matter inside the Sun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The annihilation of dark matter particles captured by the Sun can lead to a neutrino flux observable in neutrino detectors. Considering the fact that these dark matter particles are non-relativistic, if a pair of dark matter annihilates to a neutrino pair, the spectrum of neutrinos will be monochromatic. We show that in this case, even after averaging over production point inside the Sun, the oscillatory terms of the oscillation probability do not average to zero. This leads to interesting observable features in the annual variation of the number of muon track events. We show that smearing of the spectrum due to thermal distribution of dark matter inside the Sun is too small to wash out this variation. We point out the possibility of studying the initial flavor composition of neutrinos produced by the annihilation of dark matter particles via measuring the annual variation of the number of muon-track events in neutrino telescopes.

Arman Esmaili; Yasaman Farzan

2009-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

217

Radiotracers currently produced at Brookhaven  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radiotracers currently produced at Brookhaven. Note that other radiotracers that are described in the literature can Radiotracers currently produced at Brookhaven. Note that other radiotracers that are described in the literature can also be transferred to our laboratory. Molecular Target/use Radiotracer Name Structure Chemical Name Hexokinase/glucose metabolism, cancer, brain function 18 FDG 2-deoxy-2-[ 18 F]fluoro-D-glucose Dopamine D2/D3 receptors/addiction, psychiatric disorders [ 11 C]raclopride 3,5-dichloro-N-{[(2S)-1-ethylpyrrolidin- 2-yl]methyl}-2-hydroxy-6- [ 11 C]methoxybenzamide Dopamine transporters / cocaine pharmacokinetics, addiction, neurological disorders [ 11 C]cocaine methyl (1R,2R,3S,5S)-3-s(benzoyloxy)- 8-[ 11 C]methyl-8-azabicyclo[3.2.1] octane-2-carboxylate Blood flow/nicotine pharmacokinetics [ 11 C]nicotine 3-[(2S)-1-[ 11 C]methylpyrrolidin-2-

218

Influence of solubilizing agents (cyclodextrin or surfactant) on phenanthrene degradation by electro-Fenton process Study of soil washing recycling possibilities and environmental impact  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract One of the aims in soil washing treatment is to reuse the extracting agent and to remove the pollutant in the meantime. Thus, electro-Fenton (EF) degradation of synthetic soil washing solutions heavily loaded with phenanthrene was suggested for the first time. Two solubilising agents hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HPCD) and Tween 80 (TW 80) were chosen as cyclodextrin (CD) and surfactant representatives, respectively. In order to reuse HPCD and to degrade the pollutant simultaneously, the following optimal parameters were determined: [Fe2+]=0.05mM (catalyst), I=2000mA, and natural solution pH (around 6), without any adjustment. Only 50% of TW 80 (still higher than the critical micelle concentration (CMC)) can be reused against 90% in the case of HPCD while phenanthrene is completely degraded in the meantime, after only 180min of treatment. This can be explained by the ternary complex formation (Fe2+-HPCD-organic pollutant) (equilibrium constant K=56mM?1) that allows OH to directly degrade the contaminant. This confirms that Fe2+ plays an important role as a catalyst since it can promote formation of hydroxyl radicals near the pollutant and minimize HPCD degradation. After 2h of treatment, HPCD/phenanthrene solution got better biodegradability (BOD5/COD=0.1) and lower toxicity (80% inhibition of luminescence of Vibrio fischeri bacteria) than TW 80/phenanthrene (BOD5/COD=0.08; 99% inhibition of V. fischeri bacteria). According to these data, HPCD employed in this integrated (soil washing+EF degradation) approach gave promising results in order to be reused whereas the pollutant is degraded in the meanwhile.

Emmanuel Mousset; Nihal Oturan; Eric D. van Hullebusch; Gilles Guibaud; Giovanni Esposito; Mehmet A. Oturan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Washing Effect of a LiNi0.83Co0.15Al0.02O2 Cathode in Water Jisuk Kim,a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

high capacity active materials, such as Si, Sn, or LiNi1-x-yCoxMnyO2 with a 4.2 V cutoff.1-5 OneWashing Effect of a LiNi0.83Co0.15Al0.02O2 Cathode in Water Jisuk Kim,a Youngsik Hong,b,d Kwang Sun mAh Li-ion cell was commercialized in 2004. Despite the fact that the electrode materials used were

Cho, Jaephil

220

Number of Producing Gas Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Producing Gas Wells Producing Gas Wells Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 452,945 476,652 493,100 487,627 514,637 482,822 1989-2012 Alabama 6,591 6,860 6,913 7,026 7,063 6,327 1989-2012 Alaska 239 261 261 269 277 185 1989-2012 Arizona 7 6 6 5 5 5 1989-2012 Arkansas 4,773 5,592 6,314 7,397 8,388 8,538 1989-2012 California 1,540 1,645 1,643 1,580 1,308 1,423 1989-2012 Colorado 22,949 25,716 27,021 28,813 30,101 32,000 1989-2012 Gulf of Mexico 2,552 1,527 1,984 1,852 1,559 1,474 1998-2012 Illinois 43 45 51 50 40 40 1989-2012 Indiana 2,350 525 563 620 914 819 1989-2012 Kansas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite wash producers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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221

Leucoagaricus gongylophorus Produces Diverse Enzymes for the...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Leucoagaricus gongylophorus Produces Diverse Enzymes for the Degradation of Recalcitrant Plant Polymers in Leaf-Cutter Ant Leucoagaricus gongylophorus Produces Diverse Enzymes for...

222

Characterization of uraninite nanoparticles produced by Shewanella...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

uraninite nanoparticles produced by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 . Characterization of uraninite nanoparticles produced by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 . Abstract: The reduction of...

223

Evaluate Potential Means of Rebuilding Sturgeon Populations in the Snake River between Lower Granite and Hells Canyon Dams, 2000 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The specific research goal of this project is to identify means to restore and rebuild the Snake River white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) population to support a sustainable annual subsistence harvest equivalent to 5 kg/ha/yr (CBFWA 1997). Based on data collected, a white sturgeon adaptive management plan will be developed. This 2000 annual report covers the fourth year of sampling of this multi-year study. In 2000 white sturgeon were captured, marked, and population data were collected in the Snake and Salmon rivers. The Snake River was sampled between Lower Granite Dam (rkm 174) and the mouth of the Salmon River (rkm 303), and the Salmon River was sampled from its mouth upstream to Hammer Creek (rkm 84). A total of 53,277 hours of setline effort and 630 hours of hook-and-line effort was employed in 2000. A total of 538 white sturgeon were captured and tagged in the Snake River and 25 in the Salmon River. Since 1997, 32.8 percent of the tagged white sturgeon have been recaptured. In the Snake River, white sturgeon ranged in total length from 48 cm to 271 cm and averaged 107 cm. In the Salmon River, white sturgeon ranged in total length from 103 cm to 227 cm and averaged 163 cm. Using the Jolly-Seber open population estimator, the abundance of white sturgeon <60 cm, between Lower Granite Dam and the mouth of the Salmon River, was estimated at 2,725 fish, with a 95% confidence interval of 1,668-5,783. A total of 10 white sturgeon were fitted with radio-tags. The movement of these fish ranged from 54.7 km (34 miles) downstream to 78.8 km (49 miles) upstream; however, 43.6 percent of the detected movement was less than 0.8 km (0.5 mile). Both radio-tagged fish and recaptured white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir appear to move more than fish in the free-flowing segment of the Snake River. No seasonal movement pattern was detected, and no movement pattern was detected for different size fish. Differences were detected in the length frequency distributions of white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir and the free-flowing Snake River (Chi-Square test, P<0.05). The proportion of white sturgeon greater than 92 cm (total length) in the free-flowing Snake River has shown an increase of 31 percent since the 1970's. Analysis of the length-weight relationship indicated that white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir had a higher relative weight factor than white sturgeon in the free-flowing Snake River. A von Bertalanffy growth curve was fitted to 138 aged white sturgeon. The results suggests fish are currently growing faster than fish historically inhabiting the study area, as well as other Columbia River basin white sturgeon populations. Artificial substrate mats were used to document white sturgeon spawning. A total of 34 white sturgeon eggs were recovered: 27 in the Snake River, and seven in the Salmon River.

Everett, Scott R.; Tuell, Michael A. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fishereis Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Evaluate Potenial Means of Rebuilding Sturgeon Populations in the Snake River between Lower Granite and Hells Canyon Dams, 2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The specific research goal of this project is to identify means to restore and rebuild the Snake River white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) population to support a sustainable annual subsistence harvest equivalent to 5 kg/ha/yr (CBFWA 1997). Based on data collected, a white sturgeon adaptive management plan will be developed. This report presents a summary of results from the 1997-2002 Phase II data collection and represents the end of phase II. From 1997 to 2001 white sturgeon were captured, marked, and population data were collected in the Snake and Salmon. A total of 1,785 white sturgeon were captured and tagged in the Snake River and 77 in the Salmon River. Since 1997, 25.8 percent of the tagged white sturgeon have been recaptured. Relative density of white sturgeon was highest in the free-flowing segment of the Snake River, with reduced densities of fish in Lower Granite Reservoir, and low densities the Salmon River. Differences were detected in the length frequency distributions of white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir, the free-flowing Snake River and the Salmon River (Chi-Square test, P<0.05). The proportion of white sturgeon greater than 92 cm (total length) in the free-flowing Snake River has shown an increase of 30 percent since the 1970's. Using the Jolly-Seber model, the abundance of white sturgeon <60 cm, between Lower Granite Dam and the mouth of the Salmon River, was estimated at 2,483 fish, with a 95% confidence interval of 1,208-7,477. Total annual mortality rate was estimated to be 0.14 (95% confidence interval of 0.12 to 0.17). A total of 35 white sturgeon were fitted with radio-tags during 1999-2002. The movement of these fish ranged from 53 km (33 miles) downstream to 77 km (48 miles) upstream; however, 38.8 percent of the detected movement was less than 0.8 km (0.5 mile). Both radio-tagged fish and recaptured white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir appear to move more than fish in the free-flowing segment of the Snake River. No seasonal movement pattern was detected, and no movement pattern was detected for different size fish. Analysis of the length-weight relationship indicated that white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir had a higher relative weight factor than white sturgeon in the free-flowing Snake River. The results suggest fish are currently growing faster than fish historically inhabiting the study area, as well as other Columbia River basin white sturgeon populations. Artificial substrate egg mats documented white sturgeon spawning in four consecutive years. A total of 49 white sturgeon eggs were recovered in the Snake River from 1999-2002, and seven from the Salmon River during 2000.

Everett, Scott R.; Tuell, Michael A.; Hesse, Jay A. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Management, Lapwai, ID)

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Evaluate Potential Means of Rebuilding Sturgeon Populations in the Snake River between Lower Granite and Hells Canyon Dams, 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The specific research goal of this project is to identify means to restore and rebuild the Snake River white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) population to support a sustainable annual subsistence harvest equivalent to 5 kg/ha/yr (CBFWA 1997). Based on data collected, a white sturgeon adaptive management plan will be developed. This 2001 annual report covers the fifth year of sampling of this multi-year study. In 2001 white sturgeon were captured, marked, and population data were collected in the Snake and Salmon rivers. The Snake River was sampled between Lower Granite Dam (rkm 174) and the mouth of the Salmon River (rkm 303), and the Salmon River was sampled from its mouth upstream to Hammer Creek (rkm 84). A total of 45,907 hours of setline effort and 186 hours of hook-and-line effort was employed in 2001. A total of 390 white sturgeon were captured and tagged in the Snake River and 12 in the Salmon River. Since 1997, 36.1 percent of the tagged white sturgeon have been recaptured. In the Snake River, white sturgeon ranged in total length from 42 cm to 307 cm and averaged 107 cm. In the Salmon River, white sturgeon ranged in total length from 66 cm to 235 cm and averaged 160 cm. Using the Jolly-Seber model, the abundance of white sturgeon <60 cm, between Lower Granite Dam and the mouth of the Salmon River, was estimated at 2,483 fish, with a 95% confidence interval of 1,208-7,477. An additional 10 white sturgeon were fitted with radio-tags during 2001. The locations of 17 radio-tagged white sturgeon were monitored in 2001. The movement of these fish ranged from 38.6 km (24 miles) downstream to 54.7 km (34 miles) upstream; however, 62.6 percent of the detected movement was less than 0.8 km (0.5 mile). Both radio-tagged fish and recaptured white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir appear to move more than fish in the free-flowing segment of the Snake River. No seasonal movement pattern was detected, and no movement pattern was detected for different size fish. Differences were detected in the length frequency distributions of white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir and the free-flowing Snake River (Chi-Square test, P<0.05). The proportion of white sturgeon greater than 92 cm (total length) in the free-flowing Snake River has shown an increase of 30 percent since the 1970's. Analysis of the length-weight relationship indicated that white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir had a higher relative weight factor than white sturgeon in the free-flowing Snake River. A von Bertalanffy growth curve was fitted to 309 aged white sturgeon. The results suggest fish are currently growing faster than fish historically inhabiting the study area, as well as other Columbia River basin white sturgeon populations. Artificial substrate mats were used to document white sturgeon spawning. A total of 14 white sturgeon eggs were recovered in the Snake River in 2001.

Everett, Scott R.; Tuell, Michael A. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Evaluate Potential Means of Rebuilding Sturgeon Populations in the Snake River between Lower Granite and Hells Canyon Dams, 1997 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During 1997 the first phase of the Nez Perce Tribe White Sturgeon Project was completed and the second phase was initiated. During Phase I the ''Upper Snake River White Sturgeon Biological Assessment'' was completed, successfully: (1) compiling regional white sturgeon management objectives, and (2) identifying potential mitigation actions needed to rebuild the white sturgeon population in the Snake River between Hells Canyon and Lower Granite dams. Risks and uncertainties associated with implementation of these potential mitigative actions could not be fully assessed because critical information concerning the status of the population and their habitat requirements were unknown. The biological risk assessment identified the fundamental information concerning the white sturgeon population that is needed to fully evaluate the effectiveness of alternative mitigative strategies. Accordingly, a multi-year research plan was developed to collect specific biological and environmental data needed to assess the health and status of the population and characterize habitat used for spawning and rearing. In addition, in 1997 Phase II of the project was initiated. White sturgeon were captured, marked, and population data were collected between Lower Granite Dam and the mouth of the Salmon River. During 1997, 316 white sturgeon were captured in the Snake River. Of these, 298 were marked. Differences in the fork length frequency distributions of the white sturgeon were not affected by collection method. No significant differences in length frequency distributions of sturgeon captured in Lower Granite Reservoir and the mid- and upper free-flowing reaches of the Snake River were detected. The length frequency distribution indicated that white sturgeon between 92 and 183 cm are prevalent in the reaches of the Snake River that were sampled. However, white sturgeon >183 have not changed markedly since 1970. I would speculate that some factor other than past over-fishing practices is limiting the recruitment of white sturgeon into larger size classes (>183 cm). Habitat, food resources, and migration have been severely altered by the impoundment of the Snake River and it appears that the recruitment of young may not be severely affected as recruitment of fish into size classes > 183 cm.

Hoefs, Nancy (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Requirements  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Biodiesel Producer Biodiesel Producer Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Requirements on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biodiesel Producer Requirements Biodiesel is defined as a fuel that is composed of mono-alkyl esters of long-chain fatty acids derived from plant or animal matter, meets the

228

Removal of Cu, Pb and Zn by foam fractionation and a soil washing process from contaminated industrial soils using soapberry-derived saponin: A comparative effectiveness assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The feasibility of using the eco-friendly biodegradable surfactant saponin (a plant-based surfactant) from soapberry and surfactin from Bacillus subtilis (BBK006) for the removal of heavy metals from contaminated industrial soil (6511mgkg?1 copper, 4955mgkg?1 lead, and 15090mgkg?1 zinc) by foam fractionation and a soil flushing process was evaluated under variation of fundamental factors (surfactant concentration, pH, temperature and time). The results of latter process showed that 12% Pb, 1617% Cu and 2124% Zn was removed by surfactin after 48h, whereas the removal of Pb, Cu and Zn was increased from 40% to 47%, 30% to 36% and 16% to 18% in presence of saponin with an increase from 24 to 72h at room temperature by the soil washing process at pH 4. In the foam fractionation process, the metal removal efficiencies were increased with increases in the saponin concentration (0.0750.15gL?1) and time (2472h), whereas the efficiency was decreased with increasing pH (410) and temperature (>40C). The removal efficiencies of Pb, Cu and Zn were increased significantly from 57% to 98%, 85% to 95% and 55% to 56% with an increase in the flow rate from 0.2 to 1.0Lmin?1 at 0.15gL?1 saponin (pH 4 and 30C). The present investigation indicated that the foam fractionation process is more efficient for the removal of heavy metal from contaminated industrial soil in comparison to the soil washing process. The plant-based eco-friendly biodegradable biosurfactant saponin can be used for environmental cleanup and pollution management.

Jyoti Prakash Maity; Yuh Ming Huang; Chun-Mei Hsu; Ching-I Wu; Chien-Cheng Chen; Chun-Yi Li; Jiin-Shuh Jean; Young-Fo Chang; Chen-Yen Chen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Evaluate Potential Means of Rebuilding Sturgeon Populations in the Snake River between Lower Granite and Hells Canyon Dams, 1999 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The specific research goal of this project is to identify means to restore and rebuild the Snake River white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) population to support a sustainable annual subsistence harvest equivalent to 5 kg/ha/yr (CBFWA 1997). Based on data collected, a white sturgeon adaptive management plan will be developed. This 1999 annual report covers the third year of sampling of this multi-year study. In 1999 white sturgeon were captured, marked and population data were collected in the Snake and Salmon rivers. A total of 33,943 hours of setline effort and 2,112 hours of hook-and-line effort was employed in 1999. A total of 289 white sturgeon were captured and tagged in the Snake River and 29 in the Salmon River. Since 1997, 11.1 percent of the tagged white sturgeon have been recaptured. In the Snake River, white sturgeon ranged in total length from 27 cm to 261 cm and averaged 110 cm. In the Salmon River, white sturgeon ranged in total length from 98 cm to 244 cm and averaged 183.5 cm. Using the Jolly-Seber model, the abundance of white sturgeon < 60 cm, between Lower Granite Dam and the mouth of the Salmon River, was estimated at 1,823 fish, with a 95% confidence interval of 1,052-4,221. A total of 15 white sturgeon were fitted with radio-tags. The movement of these fish ranged from 6.4 km (4 miles) downstream to 13.7 km (8.5 miles) upstream; however, 83.6 percent of the detected movement was less than 0.8 kilometers (0.5 miles). Both radio-tagged fish and recaptured white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir appear to move more than fish in the free-flowing segment of the Snake River. No seasonal movement pattern was detected, and no movement pattern was detected for different size fish. Differences were detected in the length frequency distributions of white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir and the free-flowing Snake River (Chi-Square test, P < 0.05). The proportion of white sturgeon greater than 92 cm (total length) in the free-flowing Snake River has shown an increase of 29 percent since the 1970's. Analysis of the length-weight relationship indicated that white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir were slightly larger than white sturgeon in the free-flowing Snake River. A von Bertalanffy growth curve was fitted to 49 aged white sturgeon. The results suggests the fish are currently growing faster than fish historicly inhabiting the study area, as well as other Columbia River basin white sturgeon populations. Artificial substrate mats were used to document white sturgeon spawning. Five white sturgeon eggs were recovered in the Snake River.

Tuell, Michael A.; Everett, Scott R. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Quantifying the parameters of successful agricultural producers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The primary purpose of the study was to quantify the parameters of successful agricultural producers. Through the use of the Financial and Risk Management (FARM) Assistance database, this study evaluated economic measures for row-crop producers...

Kaase, Gregory Herman

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

231

Biomass Producer or Collector Tax Credit (Oregon)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Oregon Department of Energy provides a tax credit for agricultural producers or collectors of biomass. The credit can be used for eligible biomass used to produce biofuel; biomass used in...

232

Geologic and hydrologic controls on coalbed methane producibility, Williams Fork Formation, Piceance Basin, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Structural and depositional setting, coal rank, gas content, permeability, hydrodynamics, and reservoir heterogeneity control the producibility of coalbed methane in the Piceance Basin. The coal-rich Upper Cretaceous, Williams Fork Formation is genetically defined and regionally correlated to the genetic sequences in the Sand Wash Basin, to the north. Net coal is thickest in north-south oriented belts which accumulated on a coastal plain, behind west-east prograding shoreline sequences. Face cleats of Late Cretaceous age strike E-NE and W-NW in the southern and northern parts of the basin, respectively, normal to the Grand Hogback thrust front. Parallelism between face-cleat strike and present-day maximum horizontal stresses may enhance or inhibit coal permeability in the north and south, respectively. Geopressure and hydropressure are both present in the basin with regional hydrocarbon overpressure dominant in the central part of the basin and hydropressure limited to the basin margins. The most productive gas wells in the basin are associated with structural terraces, anticlines, and/or correspond to Cameo-Wheeler-Fairfield coal-sandstone development, reflecting basement detached thrust-faulting, fracture-enhanced permeability, and reservoir heterogeneity. Depositional heterogeneties and thrusts faults isolate coal reservoirs along the Grand Hogback from the subsurface by restricting meteoric recharge and basinward flow of ground water. An evolving coalbed methane producibility model predicts that in the Piceance Basin extraordinary coalbed methane production is precluded by low permeability and by the absence of dynamic ground-water flow.

Tyler, R.; Scott, A.R.; Kaiser, W.R.; Nance, H.S.; McMurry, R.G. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

233

Geologic and hydrologic controls on coalbed methane producibility, Williams Fork Formation, Piceance Basin, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Structural and depositional setting, coal rank, gas content, permeability, hydrodynamics, and reservoir heterogeneity control the producibility of coalbed methane in the Piceance Basin. The coal-rich Upper Cretaceous, Williams Fork Formation is genetically defined and regionally correlated to the genetic sequences in the Sand Wash Basin, to the north. Net coal is thickest in north-south oriented belts which accumulated on a coastal plain, behind west-east prograding shoreline sequences. Face cleats of Late Cretaceous age strike E-NE and W-NW in the southern and northern parts of the basin, respectively, normal to the Grand Hogback thrust front. Parallelism between face-cleat strike and present-day maximum horizontal stresses may enhance or inhibit coal permeability in the north and south, respectively. Geopressure and hydropressure are both present in the basin with regional hydrocarbon overpressure dominant in the central part of the basin and hydropressure limited to the basin margins. The most productive gas wells in the basin are associated with structural terraces, anticlines, and/or correspond to Cameo-Wheeler-Fairfield coal-sandstone development, reflecting basement detached thrust-faulting, fracture-enhanced permeability, and reservoir heterogeneity. Depositional heterogeneties and thrusts faults isolate coal reservoirs along the Grand Hogback from the subsurface by restricting meteoric recharge and basinward flow of ground water. An evolving coalbed methane producibility model predicts that in the Piceance Basin extraordinary coalbed methane production is precluded by low permeability and by the absence of dynamic ground-water flow.

Tyler, R.; Scott, A.R.; Kaiser, W.R.; Nance, H.S.; McMurry, R.G. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Process for selection of oxygen-tolerant algal mutants that produce H{sub 2}  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for selection of oxygen-tolerant, H{sub 2}-producing algal mutant cells comprises: (a) growing algal cells photoautotrophically under fluorescent light to mid log phase; (b) inducing algal cells grown photoautotrophically under fluorescent light to mid log phase in step (a) anaerobically by (1) resuspending the cells in a buffer solution and making said suspension anaerobic with an inert gas and (2) incubating the suspension in the absence of light at ambient temperature; (c) treating the cells from step (b) with metronidazole, sodium azide, and added oxygen to controlled concentrations in the presence of white light; (d) washing off metronidazole and sodium azide to obtain final cell suspension; (e) plating said final cell suspension on a minimal medium and incubating in light at a temperature sufficient to enable colonies to appear; (f) counting the number of colonies to determine the percent of mutant survivors; and (g) testing survivors to identify oxygen-tolerant H{sub 2}-producing mutants. 5 figs.

Ghirardi, M.L.; Seibert, M.

1999-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

235

Experiments with Wind to Produce Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nat EXPERIMENTS WITH WIND TO PRODUCE ENERGY Curriculum: Wind Power (simple machines, weatherclimatology, aerodynamics, leverage, mechanics, atmospheric pressure, and energy...

236

PAFC fed by biogas produced by the anaerobic fermentation of the waste waters of a beet-sugar refinery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Beet-washing waters of a beet-sugar refinery carry a high COD (Chemical Oxygen Demand), and their conditioning to meet legal constraints before disposal considerably contributes to the operation costs of the refinery. Their fermentation in an anaerobic digestor could instead produce readily disposable non-polluting waters, fertilizers and biogas, useful to feed a phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) heat and power generator system. A real refinery case is considered in this work, where the electrical characteristics V = V(I) of a laboratory PAFC stack, fueled with a dry simulated reforming gas (having the same H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} content as the biogas obtainable by the above said anaerobic digestion), are determined. The encouraging results show that a possible market niche for fuel cells, in the food-industry waste partial recovery and residual disposal, deserves attention.

Ascoli, A.; Elias, G. [Univ. Diegli Studi di Milano (Italy); Bigoni, L. [CISE Tecnologie Innovative S.p.A., Segrate (Italy); Giachero, R. [Du Pont Pharma Italia, Firenze (Italy)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Northern Tool + Equipment Find the Right Fitting for Your Pressure Washer at Northern Tool! NorthernTool.com/PressureWashers Pristine Pressure Pressure/power washing in Maryland Vinyl siding cleaned, decks cleaned www.pristinepressure.com  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ability to clean while saving on our most important resources, water and energy." In recognition! NorthernTool.com/PressureWashers Pristine Pressure Pressure/power washing in Maryland Vinyl siding cleaned, decks cleaned www.pristinepressure.com Siding Cleaning Bring back the life to your siding! Estimates

Sóbester, András

238

Definition: Independent Power Producer | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Producer Producer Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Independent Power Producer Any entity that owns or operates an electricity generating facility that is not included in an electric utility's rate base. This term includes, but is not limited to, cogenerators and small power producers and all other nonutility electricity producers, such as exempt wholesale generators, who sell electricity.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition An Independent Power Producer is an entity, which is not a public utility, but which owns facilities to generate electric power for sale to utilities and end users. NUGs may be privately held facilities, corporations, cooperatives such as rural solar or wind energy producers, and non-energy industrial concerns capable of feeding excess energy into

239

Ocean Currents Produced by Evaporation and Precipitation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1 September 1933 research-article Ocean Currents Produced by Evaporation and Precipitation G. R. Goldsbrough The Royal Society is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve...

1933-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

On Ocean Currents Produced by Winds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1 January 1935 research-article On Ocean Currents Produced by Winds G. R. Goldsbrough The Royal Society is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve, and extend access...

1935-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite wash producers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Lead in Maple Syrup Produced in Connecticut  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Lead in Maple Syrup Produced in Connecticut ... Department of Analytical Chemistry, The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, P.O. ... Box 1106, New Haven, Connecticut 06504 ...

David E. Stilwell; Craig L. Musante

1996-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

242

Fracture characteristics and their relationships to producing...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

area Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Book: Fracture characteristics and their relationships to producing zones in deep wells, Raft River...

243

California: Agricultural Residues Produce Renewable Fuel | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

that validated the viability of this technology platform for producing cellulosic ethanol from corn stover at reasonable yields. The California Energy Commission has awarded...

244

Hydrogenase mimic produces hydrogen under the light  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

about Center Center Video Library Bisfuel Picture Gallery Hydrogenase mimic produces hydrogen under the light 24 Jan 2013 Researchers from the laboratory of Giovanna Ghirlanda...

245

Scientists produce transparent, light-harvesting material  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Transparent, light-harvesting material Scientists produce transparent, light-harvesting material The material could be used in development of transparent solar panels. November 3,...

246

PRODUCER -SCROUNGER GAME n-Person Game  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

size, ESS frequency of scrounging Assumptions of Producer-Scrounger Game Fix group (or population size Producer invades Scrounger n-Person Game with ESS q* : 0 ESS ** q P q S dq dW dq dW ESS frequency of scrounger

Caraco, Thomas

247

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1993  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3) 3) Distribution Category UC-950 Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1993 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Energy Information Administration/ Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1993 ii This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration/ Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1993 iii The Financial Reporting System, 1977-1993 diskette is available from the Energy Information Administration.

248

Why Sequencea Biogas-Producing Microbial Community?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a Biogas-Producing Microbial Community? a Biogas-Producing Microbial Community? The world population is steadily growing, and so is the amount of waste produced by human activity. For example, an estimated 236 million tons of municipal solid waste are produced annually in the U.S., 50% of which is biomass. At the same time, energy sources are rapidly depleting. Converting organic waste to renewable biofuel by anaerobic digestion hence represents one appealing option to mitigate this problem. Biogas is a natural by-product of the decomposition of organic matter in an oxygen-free environment and comprises primarily methane and carbon dioxide. This naturally occurring process has been known for more than a century. More recently, it has been gaining importance as more efficient anaerobic digestion technologies have been developed to treat and recover energy (in

249

California: Agricultural Residues Produce Renewable Fuel  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Logos Technologies and EERE are partnering with Edeniq of Visalia to build a plant that will produce cellulosic ethanol from switchgrass, wood chips, and corn leaves, stalks, and husks--all plentiful, nonfood feedstock sources in California.

250

Ex Parte Communications- Uranium Producers of America  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

On Thursday, February 12, 2015, representatives from the Uranium Producers of America (UPA) met with the Department of Energy (DOE) officials to discuss the management of the federal excess...

251

Producing X-rays at the APS  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

An introduction and overview of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory, the technology that produces the brightest X-ray beams in the Western Hemisphere, and the research carried out by scientists using those X-rays.

None

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

252

Methods and systems for producing syngas  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and systems are provided for producing syngas utilizing heat from thermochemical conversion of a carbonaceous fuel to support decomposition of at least one of water and carbon dioxide using one or more solid-oxide electrolysis cells. Simultaneous decomposition of carbon dioxide and water or steam by one or more solid-oxide electrolysis cells may be employed to produce hydrogen and carbon monoxide. A portion of oxygen produced from at least one of water and carbon dioxide using one or more solid-oxide electrolysis cells is fed at a controlled flow rate in a gasifier or combustor to oxidize the carbonaceous fuel to control the carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide ratio produced.

Hawkes, Grant L; O'Brien, James E; Stoots, Carl M; Herring, J. Stephen; McKellar, Michael G; Wood, Richard A; Carrington, Robert A; Boardman, Richard D

2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

253

Washing Fresh Fruits and Vegetables  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to race, color, sex, disability, religion, age, or national origin. Issued in furtherance of Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics, Acts of Congress of May 8, 1914, as amended, and June 30, 1914, in cooperation with the United...

Scott, Amanda

2008-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

254

The Washing of the Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the willows in the name of flood control. LISSA And when aredeluge, downpour, or flood. You are my mugwort. LISSAarea, summer camp, and flood control basin--a floor wax and

Renner, Marcus

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

ANAEROBIC BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT OF PRODUCED WATER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the production of oil and gas, large amounts of water are brought to the surface and must be disposed of in an environmentally sensitive manner. This is an especially difficult problem in offshore production facilities where space is a major constraint. The chief regulatory criterion for produced water is oil and grease. Most facilities have little trouble meeting this criterion using conventional oil-water separation technologies. However, some operations have significant amounts of naphthenic acids in the water that behave as oil and grease but are not well removed by conventional technologies. Aerobic biological treatment of naphthenic acids in simulated-produced water has been demonstrated by others; however, the system was easily overloaded by the large amounts of low-molecular-weight organic acids often found in produced waters. The objective of this research was to determine the ability of an anaerobic biological system to treat these organic acids in a simulated produced water and to examine the potential for biodegradation of the naphthenic acids in the anaerobic environment. A small fixed-film anaerobic biological reactor was constructed and adapted to treat a simulated produced water. The bioreactor was tubular, with a low-density porous glass packing material. The inocula to the reactor was sediment from a produced-water holding pond from a municipal anaerobic digester and two salt-loving methanogenic bacteria. During start-up, the feed to the reactor contained glucose as well as typical produced-water components. When glucose was used, rapid gas production was observed. However, when glucose was eliminated and the major organic component was acetate, little gas was generated. Methane production from acetate may have been inhibited by the high salt concentrations, by sulfide, or because of the lack, despite seeding, of microbes capable of converting acetate to methane. Toluene, a minor component of the produced water (0.1 g/L) was removed in the reactor. Batch tests were conducted to examine naphthenic acid biodegradability under several conditions. The conditions used were seed from the anaerobic reactor, wetland sediments under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, and a sterile control. The naphthenic acid was from a commercial source isolated from Gulf Coast petroleum as was dosed at 2 mg/mL. The incubations were for 30 days at 30 C. The results showed that the naphthenic acids were not biodegraded under anaerobic conditions, but were degraded under aerobic conditions. Despite poor performance of the anaerobic reactor, it remains likely that anaerobic treatment of acetate, toluene, and, potentially, other produced-water components is feasible.

John R. Gallagher

2001-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

256

How is shale gas produced? | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

How is shale gas produced? How is shale gas produced? How is shale gas produced? More Documents & Publications Natural Gas from Shale: Questions and Answers Shale Gas Glossary...

257

Methods for producing reinforced carbon nanotubes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods for producing reinforced carbon nanotubes having a plurality of microparticulate carbide or oxide materials formed substantially on the surface of such reinforced carbon nanotubes composite materials are disclosed. In particular, the present invention provides reinforced carbon nanotubes (CNTs) having a plurality of boron carbide nanolumps formed substantially on a surface of the reinforced CNTs that provide a reinforcing effect on CNTs, enabling their use as effective reinforcing fillers for matrix materials to give high-strength composites. The present invention also provides methods for producing such carbide reinforced CNTs.

Ren, Zhifen (Newton, MA); Wen, Jian Guo (Newton, MA); Lao, Jing Y. (Chestnut Hill, MA); Li, Wenzhi (Brookline, MA)

2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

258

Solid fuel volatilization to produce synthesis gas  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method comprising contacting a carbon and hydrogen-containing solid fuel and a metal-based catalyst in the presence of oxygen to produce hydrogen gas and carbon monoxide gas, wherein the contacting occurs at a temperature sufficiently high to prevent char formation in an amount capable of stopping production of the hydrogen gas and the carbon monoxide gas is provided. In one embodiment, the metal-based catalyst comprises a rhodium-cerium catalyst. Embodiments further include a system for producing syngas. The systems and methods described herein provide shorter residence time and high selectivity for hydrogen and carbon monoxide.

Schmidt, Lanny D.; Dauenhauer, Paul J.; Degenstein, Nick J.; Dreyer, Brandon J.; Colby, Joshua L.

2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

259

Contribution of atom-probe tomography to a better understanding of glass alteration mechanisms: application to a nuclear glass specimen altered 25 years in a granitic environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report and discuss results of atom probe tomography (APT) and energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) applied to a borosilicate glass sample of nuclear interest altered for nearly 26 years at 90C in a confined granitic medium in order to better understand the rate-limiting mechanisms under conditions representative of a deep geological repository for vitrified radioactive waste. The APT technique allows the 3D reconstruction of the elemental distribution at the reactive interphase with sub-nanometer precision. Profiles of the B distribution at pristine glass/hydrated glass interface obtained by different techniques are compared to show the challenge of accurate measurements of diffusion profiles at this buried interface on the nanometer length scale. Our results show that 1) Alkali from the glass and hydrogen from the solution exhibit anti-correlated 15 3 nm wide gradients located between the pristine glass and the hydrated glass layer, 2) boron exhibits an unexpectedly sharp profile located just at the outside of the alkali/H interdiffusion layer; this sharp profile is more consistent with a dissolution front than a diffusion-controlled release of boron. The resulting apparent diffusion coefficients derived from the Li and H profiles are DLi = 1.5 10-22 m2.s-1 and DH = 6.8 10-23 m2.s-1. These values are around two orders of magnitude lower than those observed at the very beginning of the alteration process, which suggests that interdiffusion is slowed at high reaction progress by local conditions that could be related to the porous structure of the interphase. As a result, the accessibility of water to the pristine glass could be the rate-limiting step in these conditions. More generally, these findings strongly support the importance of interdiffusion coupled with hydrolysis reactions of the silicate network on the long-term dissolution rate, contrary to what has been suggested by recent interfacial dissolution-precipitation models for silicate minerals.

Gin, Stephane [CEA Marcoule DTCD SECM LCLT, Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); Ryan, Joseph V. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schreiber, Daniel K. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Neeway, James J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cabie, M. [Aix-Marseille Universite, CP2M, Marseille (France)

2013-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

260

FAQ 7-How is depleted uranium produced?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

How is depleted uranium produced? How is depleted uranium produced? How is depleted uranium produced? Depleted uranium is produced during the uranium enrichment process. In the United States, uranium is enriched through the gaseous diffusion process in which the compound uranium hexafluoride (UF6) is heated and converted from a solid to a gas. The gas is then forced through a series of compressors and converters that contain porous barriers. Because uranium-235 has a slightly lighter isotopic mass than uranium-238, UF6 molecules made with uranium-235 diffuse through the barriers at a slightly higher rate than the molecules containing uranium-238. At the end of the process, there are two UF6 streams, with one stream having a higher concentration of uranium-235 than the other. The stream having the greater uranium-235 concentration is referred to as enriched UF6, while the stream that is reduced in its concentration of uranium-235 is referred to as depleted UF6. The depleted UF6 can be converted to other chemical forms, such as depleted uranium oxide or depleted uranium metal.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite wash producers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Do hormonal control systems produce evolutionary inertia?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...A2006Neural crest cells and the community of plan for craniofacial development: historical...Rev. Ecol. Evol. 38, 793-817. Review. Do hormonal control systems produce evolutionary...Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S. Review | 0 Gonadal Steroid Hormones | Animals...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

6, 1006310086, 2006 Lightning-produced  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with lightning flash data from the Canadian Lightning Detection Network and Environment Canada Doppler radar measurements, the pro-15 duction of NO2 molecules per lightning flash is determined. Using these two methodsACPD 6, 10063­10086, 2006 Lightning-produced NO2 observed at Vanscoy, SK A. Fraser et al. Title

263

SOVIETS BUILD MACHINES TO PRODUCE KRILL PASTE'  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EUROPE SOVIETS BUILD MACHINES TO PRODUCE KRILL PASTE' The Soviet Federal Research Institute of Fisheries and Oceanography ( V N I R 0) has built machines for production of a protein- rich paste from protein paste from Black Sea shrimp. Each machine, operated by 2 people, has a processing capacity of 1

264

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The information and analyses in Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers is intended to provide a critical review, and promote an understanding, of the possible motivations and apparent consequences of investment decisions made by some of the largest corporations in the energy industry.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Beneficial Reuse of San Ardo Produced Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This DOE funded study was performed to evaluate the potential for treatment and beneficial reuse of produced water from the San Ardo oilfield in Monterey County, CA. The potential benefits of a successful full-scale implementation of this project include improvements in oil production efficiency and additional recoverable oil reserves as well as the addition of a new reclaimed water resource. The overall project was conducted in two Phases. Phase I identified and evaluated potential end uses for the treated produced water, established treated water quality objectives, reviewed regulations related to treatment, transport, storage and use of the treated produced water, and investigated various water treatment technology options. Phase II involved the construction and operation of a small-scale water treatment pilot facility to evaluate the process's performance on produced water from the San Ardo oilfield. Cost estimates for a potential full-scale facility were also developed. Potential end uses identified for the treated water include (1) agricultural use near the oilfield, (2) use by Monterey County Water Resources Agency (MCWRA) for the Salinas Valley Water Project or Castroville Seawater Intrusion Project, (3) industrial or power plant use in King City, and (4) use for wetlands creation in the Salinas Basin. All of these uses were found to have major obstacles that prevent full-scale implementation. An additional option for potential reuse of the treated produced water was subsequently identified. That option involves using the treated produced water to recharge groundwater in the vicinity of the oil field. The recharge option may avoid the limitations that the other reuse options face. The water treatment pilot process utilized: (1) warm precipitation softening to remove hardness and silica, (2) evaporative cooling to meet downstream temperature limitations and facilitate removal of ammonia, and (3) reverse osmosis (RO) for removal of dissolved salts, boron, and organics. Pilot study results indicate that produced water from the San Ardo oilfield can be treated to meet project water quality goals. Approximately 600 mg/l of caustic and 100 mg/l magnesium dosing were required to meet the hardness and silica goals in the warm softening unit. Approximately 30% of the ammonia was removed in the cooling tower; additional ammonia could be removed by ion exchange or other methods if necessary. A brackish water reverse osmosis membrane was effective in removing total dissolved solids and organics at all pH levels evaluated; however, the boron treatment objective was only achieved at a pH of 10.5 and above.

Robert A. Liske

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

266

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1995  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5) 5) Distribution Category UC-950 Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1995 January 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration/ Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1995 ii To download the Financial Reporting System 1977-1995 data files, access the Energy Information Center's FTP site, at ftp: //ftp.eia.doe.gov or access the Energy Information Administration's Home Page at http://www.eia.doe.gov.

267

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1996  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6) 6) Distribution Category UC-950 Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1996 January 1998 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration/ Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1996 ii The Financial Reporting System 1977-1996 data files can be downloaded from the Energy Information

268

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1997  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7) 7) Distribution Category UC-950 Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1997 January 1999 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration/ Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1997 ii The Financial Reporting System 1977-1997 data files can be downloaded from the Energy Information Administration's

269

The potential of algae blooms to produce renewable gaseous fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Ulva lactuca (commonly known as sea letuce) is a green sea weed which dominates Green Tides or algae blooms. Green Tides are caused by excess nitrogen from agriculture and sewage outfalls resulting in eutrophication in shallow estuaries. Samples of U. lactuca were taken from the Argideen estuary in West Cork on two consecutive years. In year 1 a combination of three different processes/pretreatments were carried out on the Ulva. These include washing, wilting and drying. Biomethane potential (BMP) assays were carried out on the samples. Fresh Ulva has a biomethane yield of 183LCH4/kgVS. For dried, washed and macerated Ulva a BMP of 250LCH4/kgVS was achieved. The resource from the estuary in West Cork was shown to be sufficient to provide fuel to 264 cars on a year round basis. Mono-digestion of Ulva may be problematic; the C:N ratio is low and the sulphur content is high. In year 2 co-digestion trials with dairy slurry were carried out. These indicate a potential increase in biomethane output by 17% as compared to mono-digestion of Ulva and slurry.

E. Allen; J. Browne; S. Hynes; J.D. Murphy

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Products Produced in Countries Other Than Iran  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

April 25, 2013 April 25, 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 The eighth in a series of reports required by section 1245 (d) (4) (A) of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2012 April 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Availability and Price of Petroleum and Petroleum Products Produced in Countries Other Than Iran 1 Table of Contents March - April 2013 Update ........................................................................................................................... 2 Tables ............................................................................................................................................................ 4 Figures ......................................................................................................................................................... 10

271

Producing and Marketing High-Value Calves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

carcasses. Oklahoma State University (Smith et al., 2000) and University of Arkansas (Troxel et al., 2001) researchers conducted livestock market surveys to determine factors that affect value in feeder cattle. Their data indicate that small... cattle that will produce calves with adequate muscling. Body condition. The Oklahoma study found that thin cattle received discounts of $9 to $10 per cwt when compared to cattle of average condition, and that fat cattle received discounts of $6...

Cleere, Jason; Boleman, Larry L.

2006-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

272

Process for producing furan from furfural aldehyde  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of producing furan and derivatives thereof is disclosed. The process includes generating furfural aldehyde vapors and then passing those vapors over a zeolite catalyst at a temperature and for a residence time effective to decarbonylate the furfural aldehydes to form furans and derivatives thereof. The resultant furan vapors and derivatives are then separated. In a preferred form, the furfural aldehyde vapors are generated during the process of converting biomass materials to liquid and gaseous fuels.

Diebold, James P. (Lakewood, CO); Evans, Robert J. (Lakewood, CO)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Method and apparatus for producing cryogenic targets  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved method and apparatus are given for producing cryogenic inertially driven fusion targets in the fast isothermal freezing (FIF) method. Improved coupling efficiency and greater availability of volume near the target for diagnostic purposes and for fusion driver beam propagation result. Other embodiments include a new electrical switch and a new explosive detonator, all embodiments making use of a purposeful heating by means of optical fibers.

Murphy, James T. (Los Alamos, NM); Miller, John R. (Penfield, NY)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Beneficial Reuse of San Ardo Produced Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work performed from 1 April 2003 to 30 September 2003 and recommends the tasks to be performed during Phase II (Pilot Evaluation). During this period discussions were held with various water agencies regarding use of the treated produced water either directly or indirectly through a water trading arrangement. In particular, several discussions were held with Monterey County Water Resources Agency, that has been charged with the long-term management and preservation of water resources in Monterey County. The Agency is very supportive of the program. However, they would like to see water quality/cost estimate data for the treated produced water from the pilot study prior to evaluating water use/water trade options. The agency sent a letter encouraging the project team to perform the pilot study to evaluate feasibility of the project. In addition, the regulations related to use of the treated water for various applications were updated during this period. Finally, the work plan, health and safety plan and sample analyses plan for performing pilot study to treat the oilfield produced water were developed during this period.

Robert A. Liske

2003-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

275

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin, Volume XIV; Evaluation of 2006 Prediction of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Salmon and Steelhead at Rock Island, Lower Granite, McNary, John Day and Bonneville Dams using Program Real Time, Technical Report 2006.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Program RealTime provided monitoring and forecasting of the 2006 inseason outmigrations via the internet for 32 PIT-tagged stocks of wild ESU chinook salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams, one PIT-tagged hatchery-reared ESU of sockeye salmon to Lower Granite Dam, and 20 passage-indexed runs-at-large, five each to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams. Twenty-four stocks are of wild yearling chinook salmon which were captured, PIT-tagged, and released at sites above Lower Granite Dam in 2006, and have at least one year's historical migration data previous to the 2006 migration. These stocks originate in drainages of the Salmon, Grande Ronde and Clearwater Rivers, all tributaries to the Snake River, and are subsequently detected through the tag identification and monitored at Lower Granite Dam. In addition, seven wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large of Snake or Upper Columbia River ESU salmon and steelhead were monitored at McNary Dam. Three wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large were monitored at Lower Granite Dam, consisting of the yearling and subyearling chinook salmon and the steelhead trout runs. The hatchery-reared PIT-tagged sockeye salmon stock from Redfish Lake was monitored outmigrating through Lower Granite Dam. Passage-indexed stocks (stocks monitored by FPC passage indices) included combined wild and hatchery runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead trout forecasted to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams.

Griswold, Jim

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume XV : Evaluation of the 2007 Predictions of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Salmon and Steelhead Smolts to Rock Island, Lower Granite, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams using Program RealTime.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Program RealTime provided monitoring and forecasting of the 2007 inseason outmigrations via the internet for 26 PIT-tagged stocks of wild ESU Chinook salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams, one PIT-tagged hatchery-reared ESU of sockeye salmon to Lower Granite Dam, one PIT-tagged wild stock of sockeye salmon to McNary Dam, and 20 passage-indexed runs-at-large, five each to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville dams. Nineteen stocks are of wild yearling Chinook salmon which were captured, PIT-tagged, and released at sites above Lower Granite Dam in 2007 and have at least one year's historical migration data previous to the 2007 migration. These stocks originate in 19 tributaries of the Salmon, Grande Ronde and Clearwater Rivers, all tributaries to the Snake River, and are subsequently detected through tag identification and monitored at Lower Granite Dam. Seven wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large of Snake or Upper Columbia River ESU salmon and steelhead were monitored at McNary Dam. Three wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large were monitored at Lower Granite Dam, consisting of the yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and the steelhead runs. The hatchery-reared PIT-tagged sockeye salmon stock from Redfish Lake was monitored outmigrating through Lower Granite Dam. Passage-indexed stocks (stocks monitored by FPC passage indices) included combined wild and hatchery runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling Chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead forecasted to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville dams.

Griswold, Jim; Townsend, Richard L.; Skalski, John R.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Passage Distribution and Federal Columbia River Power System Survival for Steelhead Kelts Tagged Above and at Lower Granite Dam, Year 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) populations have declined throughout their range in the last century and many populations, including those of the Snake River Basin are listed under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. The reasons for their decline are many and complex, but include habitat loss and degradation, overharvesting, and dam construction. The 2008 Biological Opinion calls for an increase in the abundance of female steelhead through an increase in iteroparity (i.e., repeat spawning) and this can be realized through a combination of reconditioning and in-river survival of migrating kelts. The goal of this study is to provide the data necessary to inform fisheries managers and dam operators of Snake River kelt migration patterns, survival, and routes of dam passage. Steelhead kelts (n = 487) were captured and implanted with acoustic transmitters and passive integrated transponder (PIT)-tags at the Lower Granite Dam (LGR) Juvenile Fish Facility and at weirs located in tributaries of the Snake and Clearwater rivers upstream of LGR. Kelts were monitored as they moved downstream through the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) by 15 autonomous and 3 cabled acoustic receiver arrays. Cabled receiver arrays deployed on the dam faces allowed for three-dimensional tracking of fish as they approached the dam face and were used to determine the route of dam passage. Overall, 27.3% of the kelts tagged in this study successfully migrated to Martin Bluff (rkm 126, as measured from the mouth of the Columbia River), which is located downstream of all FCRPS dams. Within individual river reaches, survival per kilometer estimates ranged from 0.958 to 0.999; the lowest estimates were observed in the immediate forebay of FCRPS dams. Steelhead kelts tagged in this study passed over the spillway routes (spillway weirs, traditional spill bays) in greater proportions and survived at higher rates compared to the few fish passed through powerhouse routes (turbines and juvenile bypass systems). The results of this study provide information about the route of passage and subsequent survival of steelhead kelts that migrated through the Snake and Columbia rivers from LGR to Bonneville Dam in 2013. These data may be used by fisheries managers and dam operators to identify potential ways to increase the survival of kelts during their seaward migrations.

Colotelo, Alison HA; Harnish, Ryan A.; Jones, Bryan W.; Hanson, Amanda C.; Trott, Donna M.; Greiner, Michael J.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Ham, Kenneth D.; Deng, Zhiqun; Brown, Richard S.; Weiland, Mark A.; Li, X.; Fu, Tao

2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

278

Method of producing a cellulase-containing cell-free fermentate produced from microorganism ATCC 55702  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Bacteria which produce large amounts of cellulose-containing cell-free fermentate have been identified. The original bacterium (ATCC 55703) was genetically altered using nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) treatment to produce the enhanced cellulase producing bacterium (ATCC 55702), which was identified through replicate plating. ATCC 55702 has improved characteristics and qualities for the degradation of cellulosic waste materials for fuel production, food processing, textile processing, and other industrial applications. ATCC 55702 is an improved bacterial host for genetic manipulations using recombinant DNA techniques, and is less likely to destroy genetic manipulations using standard mutagenesis techniques. 5 figs.

Dees, H.C.

1998-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

279

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1) 1) Distribution Category UC-950 Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 2001 January 2003 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts This report was prepared in the Office of Energy Markets and End Use of the Energy Information Administration

280

High ethanol producing derivatives of Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Derivatives of the newly discovered microorganism Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus which under anaerobic and thermophilic conditions continuously ferment substrates such as starch, cellobiose, glucose, xylose and other sugars to produce recoverable amounts of ethanol solving the problem of fermentations yielding low concentrations of ethanol using the parent strain of the microorganism Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus are disclosed. These new derivatives are ethanol tolerant up to 10% (v/v) ethanol during fermentation. The process includes the use of an aqueous fermentation medium, containing the substrate at a substrate concentration greater than 1% (w/v).

Ljungdahl, Lars G. (Athens, GA); Carriera, Laura H. (Athens, GA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite wash producers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

High ethanol producing derivatives of Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Derivatives of the newly discovered microorganism Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus which under anaerobic and thermophilic conditions continuously ferment substrates such as starch, cellobiose, glucose, xylose and other sugars to produce recoverable amounts of ethanol solving the problem of fermentations yielding low concentrations of ethanol using the parent strain of the microorganism Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus are disclosed. These new derivatives are ethanol tolerant up to 10% (v/v) ethanol during fermentation. The process includes the use of an aqueous fermentation medium, containing the substrate at a substrate concentration greater than 1% (w/v).

Ljungdahl, L.G.; Carriera, L.H.

1983-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

282

Performance profiles of major energy producers 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1989 is the thirteenth annual report of the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Financial Reporting System (FRS). The report examines financial and operating developments, with particular reference to the 23 major energy companies (the FRS companies'') required to report annually on Form EIA-28. Financial information is reported by major lines of business including oil and gas production, petroleum refining and marketing, and other energy operations. Domestic and international operations are examined separately in this report. It also traces key developments affecting the financial performance of major energy companies in 1989, as well as review of important trends.

Not Available

1991-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

283

Process for producing phenolic compounds from lignins  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for the production of low molecular weight phenolic compounds from lignins through the pyrolysis of the lignins in the presence of a strong base. In a preferred embodiment, potassium hydroxide is present in an amount of from about 0.1% to about 5% by weight, the pyrolysis temperature is from about 400 C to about 600 C at atmospheric pressure, and the time period for substantial completion of the reaction is from about 1--3 minutes. Examples of low molecular weight phenolic compounds produced include methoxyphenols, non-methoxylated phenols, and mixtures thereof. 16 figs.

Agblevor, F.A.

1998-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

284

Method of producing .beta.-spodumene bodies  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Beta-spodumene bodies and method of preparing the bodies that involves providing a uniform plastic batch of inorganic raw materials, organic binder, and vehicle, wherein the inorganic raw materials are composed of, in percent by weight, about 75% to 95% minerals, and about 5% to 25% glass. The batch is formed into a green body that is fired to produce a body composed substantially of beta-spodumene, and having a thermal expansion coefficient of <10.times.10.sup.-7 /.degree.C.(0-800.degree. C.), and a strength of .gtoreq.4 Ksi.

Chyung, Kenneth (Painted Post, NY); Day, J. Paul (Big Flats, NY); Holleran, Louis M. (Big Flats, NY); Olszewski, Anthony R. (Bath, NY)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Carbene reactions produced by recoil excitation methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FLUORINE REACTIONS IN THE CH2F2-OLEFIN-02 SYSTEM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ~ . ~ . ~ . . 44 V-2, RELATIVE YIELDS OF PRODUCTS FROM SCAVENGED AND NON-SCAVENGED CH2C12 SYSTEMS RELATIVE YIELDS OF PRODUCTS FROM SCAVENGED AND NON-SCAVENGED CH3C1 SYSTEMS.... and phosphorus 6 produced by recoil methods. Carbene Chemistry ~Bk d. Carbenes are 'species which have a carbon atom that is directly bonded to only two other atoms by single bonds. This divalent char- acter of carbenes was fi. rst observed by Dumas...

Lowery, Kirby

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

286

Method of producing particulate-reinforced composites and composties produced thereby  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for producing particle-reinforced composite materials through utilization of an in situ reaction to produce a uniform dispersion of a fine particulate reinforcement phase. The process includes forming a melt of a first material, and then introducing particles of a second material into the melt and subjecting the melt to high-intenisty acoustic vibration. A chemical reaction initiates between the first and second materials to produce reaction products in the melt. The reaciton products comprise a solide particulate phase, and the high-intensity acoustic vibration fragments and/or separates the reaction products into solid particles that are dispersed in the melt and are smaller than the particles of the second material. Also encompassed are particles-reinforced composite materials produced by such a process.

Han, Qingyou; Liu, Zhiwei

2013-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

287

Method for producing and treating coal gases  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of generating a de-sulphurized volatile matter and a relatively low Btu gas includes the initial step of pyrolyzing coal to produce volatile matter and a char. The volatile matter is fed to a first de-sulphurizer containing a de-sulphurizing agent to remove sulphur therefrom. At the same time, the char is gasified to produce a relatively low Btu gas. The low Btu gas is fed to a second de-sulphurizer containing the de-sulphurizing agent to remove sulphur therefrom. A regenerator is provided for removing sulphur from the de-sulphurizing agent. Portions of the de-sulphurizing agent are moved among the first de-sulphurizer, the second de-sulphurizer, and the regenerator such that the regenerator regenerates the de-sulphurizing agent. Preferably, the portions of the de-sulphurizing agent are moved from the second de-sulphurizer to the first de-sulphurizer, from the first de-sulphurizer to the regenerator, and from the regenerator to the second de-sulphurizer.

Calderon, Albert (P.O. Box 126, Bowling Green, OH 43402)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

A Laboratory Method of Producing High Potentials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Details are given of the experimental arrangement by which, using Tesla coils in oil, very high potentials have been produced and measured. Excited at the rate of 120 sparks per second Tesla coils have been operated at 3,000,000 volts in ordinary transformer oil at atmospheric pressure. In oil under a pressure of 500 pounds per square inch, voltages as high as 5,200,000 have been produced with intermittent excitation. These voltages (peak values) are measured by a simple capacity-potentiometer, in which an insulated electrode "picks up" a known fraction of the total voltage, this fractional voltage being measured by means of a sphere gap. Measurements are given of the voltage-distribution along Tesla coils. Calculations and measurements of the efficiency and power-output of such coils show that at 120 sparks per second, a coil operating at 5,000,000 volts provides sufficient power, if used to accelerate helium nuclei in a suitable vacuum-tube, to yield the equivalent of about 2,600 grams of radium.

G. Breit; M. A. Tuve; O. Dahl

1930-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Method for producing small hollow spheres  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for producing small hollow spheres of glass having an outer diameter ranging from about 100.mu. to about 500.mu. with a substantially uniform wall thickness in the range of about 0.5-20.mu.. The method involves introducing aqueous droplets of a glass-forming solution into a long vertical drop oven or furnace having varying temperature regions. In one embodiment, one of the temperature regions is lower than both the preceeding region and the subsequent region. One region utilizes a temperature of at least 200.degree. C. higher than the melting point of the glass-forming material in the solution and, for example, may be at least 3 times higher than the temperature of the preceeding region. In addition, there is a sharp temperature gradient between these regions. As each droplet of solution passes through a first region it forms into a gel membrane having a spherical shape and encapsulates the rest of the drop retained in the elastic outer surface and the water entrapped within diffuses rapidly through the thin gel membrane which causes more of the glass-forming material to go out of solution and is incorporated into the gel membrane causing it to grow in size and become hollow. thus produced hollow glass sphere has a sphericity, concentricity, and wall uniformity of better than 5%. The sphere is capable of retaining material of up to at least 100 atmospheres therein over long periods of time. In one embodiment.

Rosencwaig, Allen (Danville, CA); Koo, Jackson C. (San Ramon, CA); Dressler, John L. (Spring Valley, OH)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Granite County Secondary Data Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Infarction prevalence (Heart Attack) 3.4% 4.1% 6.0% All Sites Cancer 416.6 455.5 543.2 1 Community. Heart Disease 2. Cancer 3. CLRD* 1. Cancer 2. Heart Disease 3.CLRD* 1. Heart Disease 2. Cancer 3

Maxwell, Bruce D.

291

Granitic Rock: Properties in situ  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...depressions with ir-regular floors and opposing walls that are mirror images of each other, that is, like (), rather than the...observed limit Gmi c2r = fa2 compared to GM!c2r = 1 2 for the Schwarzschild limit. The fine struc-ture constant thus emerges from astro-nomicalimeasurements...

Arnold S. Orange; Gene Simmons; Amos Nur

1969-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

292

RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL IN GRANITE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear Haste Isolation at Battelle Memorial Institute. Lead organizations for the Swedish-American cooperative research program

Witherspoon, P.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Green method to produce propylene oxide  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Materials Materials Argonne National Laboratory Center for Nanoscale Materials U.S. Department of Energy Search CNM ... Search Argonne Home > Center for Nanoscale Materials > CNM Home About CNM Research Facilities People For Users Publications News & Highlights News Research Highlights Newsletters CNM Images on Flickr Events Jobs CNM Users Organization Contact Us Other DOE Nanoscale Science Research Centers Green method to produce propylene oxide conversion of propylene to polyene oxide via silver nanoclusters Simulation of propylene to propylene oxide conversion via silver nanoclusters supported on an alumina surface. Propylene oxide is an important chemical whose current industrial production is energy intensive and environmentally unfriendly. Attempts to solve this problem by using catalysts based on bulk silver surfaces with

294

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1994  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4) 4) Distribution Category UC-950 Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1994 January 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts This report was prepared in the Office of Energy Markets and End Use of the Energy Information Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, under the general direction of W. Calvin Kilgore. The project was directed by Mark E. Rodekohr, Director of the Energy Markets and Contingency Information Division (202) 586-1441, and Mary E. Northup, Chief of

295

Scientists produce transparent, light-harvesting material  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Transparent, light-harvesting material Transparent, light-harvesting material Scientists produce transparent, light-harvesting material The material could be used in development of transparent solar panels. November 3, 2010 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Contact James E. Rickman Communications Office (505) 665-9203

296

Integrated structural repair of a producing FPSO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The state of the art in FPSO design is advancing rapidly. The long-term reliability of FPSO systems has improved as maintenance issues, have received greater emphasis in both new-builds and conversions. Despite this new emphasis, problems will still arise and repairs will still be required. Ultimately, the ability of any FPSO to stay on location and on production will depend on the scope of repairs which can be economically performed in-situ. In 1994 and 1995, Marathon Petroleum Indonesia Limited (MPIL) performed an in-situ repair on the FPSO Kakap Natuna. The scope and complexity of this work suggests there are few, if any, limits on in-situ structural repairs which can be successfully performed on a producing FPSO. The use of an integrated execution strategy for the repairs greatly reduced their cost.

Johnson, P.R. [Marathon Oil Co., Houston, TX (United States); Smith, T.A. [Aker Omega Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

The economics of producing biodiesel from algae  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biodiesel is an alternative fuel for conventional diesel that is made from natural plant oils, animal fats, and waste cooking oils. This paper discusses the economics of producing biodiesel fuel from algae grown in open ponds. There is potential for large-scale production of biodiesel from algal farms on non-arable land; however, previous studies have failed to demonstrate an economically viable process that could be scalable to a commercialized industry. The problems include inconsistent and insufficient algal productivities, uncertain capital and operating costs, volatile market prices and unknown levels of government support. Although intensive work is being done on many technological issues, the economic studies and data are incomplete and out of date. This paper presents an updated financial analysis of the production and economic conditions that could have a profound effect on the success of this important alternative fuel production process.

Brian J. Gallagher

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

System and method for producing metallic iron  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hearth furnace for producing metallic iron material has a furnace housing having a drying/preheat zone, a conversion zone, a fusion zone, and optionally a cooling zone, the conversion zone is between the drying/preheat zone and the fusion zone. A moving hearth is positioned within the furnace housing. A hood or separation barrier within at least a portion of the conversion zone, fusion zone or both separates the fusion zone into an upper region and a lower region with the lower region adjacent the hearth and the upper region adjacent the lower region and spaced from the hearth. An injector introduces a gaseous reductant into the lower region adjacent the hearth. A combustion region may be formed above the hood or separation barrier.

Bleifuss, Rodney L; Englund, David J; Iwasaki, Iwao; Fosnacht, Donald R; Brandon, Mark M; True, Bradford G

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

299

Plasma treatment for producing electron emitters  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Plasma treatment for producing carbonaceous field emission electron emitters is disclosed. A plasma of ions is generated in a closed chamber and used to surround the exposed surface of a carbonaceous material. A voltage is applied to an electrode that is in contact with the carbonaceous material. This voltage has a negative potential relative to a second electrode in the chamber and serves to accelerate the ions toward the carbonaceous material and provide an ion energy sufficient to etch the exposed surface of the carbonaceous material but not sufficient to result in the implantation of the ions within the carbonaceous material. Preferably, the ions used are those of an inert gas or an inert gas with a small amount of added nitrogen.

Coates, Don Mayo (Santa Fe, NM); Walter, Kevin Carl (Los Alamos, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Performance profiles of major energy producers 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1993 is the seventeenth annual report of the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) Financial Reporting System (FRS). The report examines financial and operating developments in energy markets, with particular reference to the 25 major US energy companies required to report annually on Form EIA-28. Financial information is reported by major liens of business, including oil and gas production, petroleum refining and marketing, other energy operations, and nonenergy businesses. Financial and operating results are presented in the context of energy market developments with a view toward identifying changing corporate strategies and measuring the performance of ongoing operations both in the US and abroad. This year`s report analyzes financial and operating developments for 1993 (Part 1: Developments in 1993) and also reviews key developments during the 20 years following the Arab Oil Embargo of 1973--1974 (Part 2: Major Energy Company Strategies Since the Arab Oil Embargo). 49 figs., 104 tabs.

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite wash producers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Automated apparatus for producing gradient gels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus for producing a gradient gel which serves as a standard medium for a two-dimensional analysis of proteins, the gel having a density gradient along its height formed by a variation in gel composition, with the apparatus including first and second pumping means each including a plurality of pumps on a common shaft and driven by a stepping motor capable of providing small incremental changes in pump outputs for the gel ingredients, the motors being controlled, by digital signals from a digital computer, a hollow form or cassette for receiving the gel composition, means for transferring the gel composition including a filler tube extending near the bottom of the cassette, adjustable horizontal and vertical arms for automatically removing and relocating the filler tube in the next cassette, and a digital computer programmed to automatically control the stepping motors, arm movements, and associated sensing operations involving the filling operation.

Anderson, Norman L. (Clarendon Hills, IL)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Broadband microwave burst produced by electron beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Theoretical and experimental study of fast electron beams attracts a lot of attention in the astrophysics and laboratory. In the case of solar flares the problem of reliable beam detection and diagnostics is of exceptional importance. This paper explores the fact that the electron beams moving oblique to the magnetic field or along the field with some angular scatter around the beam propagation direction can generate microwave continuum bursts via gyrosynchrotron mechanism. The characteristics of the microwave bursts produced by beams differ from those in case of isotropic or loss-cone distributions, which suggests a new tool for quantitative diagnostics of the beams in the solar corona. To demonstrate the potentiality of this tool, we analyze here a radio burst occurred during an impulsive flare 1B/M6.7 on 10 March 2001 (AR 9368, N27W42). Based on detailed analysis of the spectral, temporal, and spatial relationships, we obtained firm evidence that the microwave continuum burst is produced by electron beams. For the first time we developed and applied a new forward fitting algorithm based on exact gyrosynchrotron formulae and employing both the total power and polarization measurements to solve the inverse problem of the beam diagnostics. We found that the burst is generated by a oblique beam in a region of reasonably strong magnetic field ($\\sim 200-300$ G) and the burst is observed at a quasi-transverse viewing angle. We found that the life time of the emitting electrons in the radio source is relatively short, $\\tau_l \\approx 0.5$ s, consistent with a single reflection of the electrons from a magnetic mirror at the foot point with the stronger magnetic field. We discuss the implications of these findings for the electron acceleration in flares and for beam diagnostics.

A. T. Altyntsev; G. D. Fleishman; G. -L. Huang; V. F. Melnikov

2007-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

303

Isotope production facility produces cancer-fighting actinium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cancer therapy gets a boost from new isotope Isotope production facility produces cancer-fighting actinium A new medical isotope project shows promise for rapidly producing major...

304

Biological pretreatment of produced water for reuse applications.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Co-produced water from the oil and gas industry represents a significant waste stream in the United States. Produced water is characterized by high levels of (more)

Kwon, Soondong, 1973-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Jefferson Lab's upgraded Free-Electron Laser produces first ligh...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

upgraded Free-Electron Laser produces first light June 18, 2003 Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility have produced first...

306

Neutrons Reveal New Electrocatalyst Family for Producing Hydrogen...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

systems currently in use. Summary Most renewable energy is produced in the form of electricity, which is expensive to store and transport in large quantities. Producing hydrogen...

307

Lattice Distortions and Oxygen Vacancies Produced in Au+-Irradiated...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lattice Distortions and Oxygen Vacancies Produced in Au+-Irradiated Nanocrystalline Cubic Zirconia. Lattice Distortions and Oxygen Vacancies Produced in Au+-Irradiated...

308

ASEM Green Independent Power Producers Network | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ASEM Green Independent Power Producers Network Jump to: navigation, search Name: ASEM Green Independent Power Producers Network Place: Germany Sector: Renewable Energy Product: A...

309

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Tax Refund  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Biodiesel Producer Tax Biodiesel Producer Tax Refund to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Tax Refund on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Tax Refund on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Tax Refund on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Tax Refund on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Tax Refund on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Tax Refund on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biodiesel Producer Tax Refund A biodiesel producer may apply for a refund of Iowa state sales or use taxes paid on purchases. To qualify, the producer must be registered with

310

Process for producing large grain cadmium telluride  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for producing a cadmium telluride polycrystalline film having grain sizes greater than about 20 {micro}m. The process comprises providing a substrate upon which cadmium telluride can be deposited and placing that substrate within a vacuum chamber containing a cadmium telluride effusion cell. A polycrystalline film is then deposited on the substrate through the steps of evacuating the vacuum chamber to a pressure of at least 10{sup {minus}6} torr.; heating the effusion cell to a temperature whereat the cell releases stoichiometric amounts of cadmium telluride usable as a molecular beam source for growth of grains on the substrate; heating the substrate to a temperature whereat a stoichiometric film of cadmium telluride can be deposited; and releasing cadmium telluride from the effusion cell for deposition as a film on the substrate. The substrate then is placed in a furnace having an inert gas atmosphere and heated for a sufficient period of time at an annealing temperature whereat cadmium telluride grains on the substrate grow to sizes greater than about 20 {micro}m.

Hasoon, F.S.; Nelson, A.J.

1996-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

311

Number of Producing Gas Wells (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count) Count) Data Series: Wellhead Price Imports Price Price of Imports by Pipeline Price of LNG Imports Exports Price Price of Exports by Pipeline Price of LNG Exports Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 12/31 Reserves Adjustments Reserves Revision Increases Reserves Revision Decreases Reserves Sales Reserves Acquisitions Reserves Extensions Reserves New Field Discoveries New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Number of Producing Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Natural Gas Processed NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals LNG Storage Additions LNG Storage Withdrawals LNG Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Lease Fuel Plant Fuel Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period:

312

Co-Produced Geothermal Systems | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Produced Geothermal Systems Produced Geothermal Systems Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Co-Produced Geothermal Systems Geothermal Technologies There are many types of Geothermal Technologies that take advantage of the earth's heat: Hydrothermal Systems Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) Sedimentary Geothermal Systems Co-Produced Geothermal Systems Geothermal Direct Use Ground Source Heat Pumps Dictionary.png Co-Produced Geothermal System: Co-Produced water is the water that is produced as a by-product during oil and gas production. If there is enough water produced at a high enough temperature co-produced water can be utilized for electricity production. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle General Air Cooled Co-Produced geothermal system demonstration at RMOTC oil site.

313

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Fuel Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Biodiesel Producer Biodiesel Producer Fuel Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Fuel Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Fuel Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Fuel Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Fuel Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Fuel Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Fuel Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biodiesel Producer Fuel Tax Municipalities, counties, or school districts producing biodiesel must file a return documenting their biodiesel production activities and pay $0.03 of

314

NM WAIDS: A PRODUCED WATER QUALITY AND INFRASTRUCTURE GIS DATABASE FOR NEW MEXICO OIL PRODUCERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The New Mexico Water and Infrastructure Data System (NM WAIDS) seeks to alleviate a number of produced water-related issues in southeast New Mexico. The project calls for the design and implementation of a Geographical Information System (GIS) and integral tools that will provide operators and regulators with necessary data and useful information to help them make management and regulatory decisions. The major components of this system are: (1) databases on produced water quality, cultural and groundwater data, oil pipeline and infrastructure data, and corrosion information, (2) a web site capable of displaying produced water and infrastructure data in a GIS or accessing some of the data by text-based queries, (3) a fuzzy logic-based, site risk assessment tool that can be used to assess the seriousness of a spill of produced water, and (4) a corrosion management toolkit that will provide operators with data and information on produced waters that will aid them in deciding how to address corrosion issues. The various parts of NM WAIDS will be integrated into a website with a user-friendly interface that will provide access to previously difficult-to-obtain data and information. Primary attention during the first six months of this project has been focused on creating the water quality databases for produced water and surface water, along with collection of corrosion information and building parts of the corrosion toolkit. Work on the project to date includes: (1) Creation of a water quality database for produced water analyses. The database was compiled from a variety of sources and currently has over 4000 entries for southeast New Mexico. (2) Creation of a web-based data entry system for the water quality database. This system allows a user to view, enter, or edit data from a web page rather than having to directly access the database. (3) Creation of a semi-automated data capturing system for use with standard water quality analysis forms. This system improves the accuracy and speed of water quality data entry. (4) Acquisition of ground water data from the New Mexico State Engineer's office, including chloride content and TDS (Total Dissolved Solids) for over 30,000 data points in southeast New Mexico. (5) Creation of a web-based scale prediction tool, again with a web-based interface, that uses two common scaling indices (Stiff-Davis and Oddo-Thomson) to predict the likelihood of scaling. This prediction tool can either run from user input data, or the user can select samples from the water analysis database. (6) Creation of depth-to-groundwater maps for the study area. (7) Analysis of water quality data by formation. (8) Continuation of efforts to collect produced water quality information from operators in the southeast New Mexico area. (9) Qualitative assessment of produced water from various formations regarding corrosivity. (10) Efforts at corrosion education in the region through operator visits. Future work on this project will include: (11) Development of an integrated web and GIS interface for all the information collected in this effort. (12) Continued development of a fuzzy logic spill risk assessment tool that was initially developed prior to this project. Improvements will include addition of parameters found to be significant in determining the impact of a brine spill at a specific site. (13) Cleanup and integration of water quality databases. (14) Compilation of both hard copy and online corrosion toolkit material.

Martha Cather; Robert Lee; Ibrahim Gundiler; Andrew Sung; Naomi Davidson; Ajeet Kumar Reddy; Mingzhen Wei

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

NM WAIDS: A PRODUCED WATER QUALITY AND INFRASTRUCTURE GIS DATABASE FOR NEW MEXICO OIL PRODUCERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The New Mexico Water and Infrastructure Data System (NM WAIDS) seeks to alleviate a number of produced water-related issues in southeast New Mexico. The project calls for the design and implementation of a Geographical Information System (GIS) and integral tools that will provide operators and regulators with necessary data and useful information to help them make management and regulatory decisions. The major components of this system are: (1) Databases on produced water quality, cultural and groundwater data, oil pipeline and infrastructure data, and corrosion information. (2) A web site capable of displaying produced water and infrastructure data in a GIS or accessing some of the data by text-based queries. (3) A fuzzy logic-based, site risk assessment tool that can be used to assess the seriousness of a spill of produced water. (4) A corrosion management toolkit that will provide operators with data and information on produced waters that will aid them in deciding how to address corrosion issues. The various parts of NM WAIDS will be integrated into a website with a user-friendly interface that will provide access to previously difficult-to-obtain data and information. Primary attention during the first six months of this project was focused on creating the water quality databases for produced water and surface water, along with collecting of corrosion information and building parts of the corrosion toolkit. Work on the project to date includes: (1) Creation of a water quality database for produced water analyses. The database was compiled from a variety of sources and currently has over 7000 entries for New Mexico. (2) Creation of a web-based data entry system for the water quality database. This system allows a user to view, enter, or edit data from a web page rather than having to directly access the database. (3) Creation of a semi-automated data capturing system for use with standard water quality analysis forms. This system improves the accuracy and speed of water quality data entry. (4) Acquisition of ground water data from the New Mexico State Engineer's office, including chloride content and TDS (Total Dissolved Solids) for over 30,000 data points in southeast New Mexico. (5) Creation of a web-based scale prediction tool, again with a web-based interface, that uses two common scaling indices to predict the likelihood of scaling. This prediction tool can either run from user input data, or the user can select samples from the water analysis database. (6) Creation of depth-to-groundwater maps for the study area. (7) Analysis of water quality data by formation. (8) Continuation of efforts to collect produced water quality information from operators in the southeast New Mexico area. (9) Qualitative assessment of produced water from various formations regarding corrosivity. (10) Efforts at corrosion education in the region through operator visits. Future work on this project will include: (1) Development of an integrated web and GIS interface for all the information collected in this effort. (2) Continued development of a fuzzy logic spill risk assessment tool that was initially developed prior to this project. Improvements will include addition of parameters found to be significant in determining the impact of a brine spill at a specific site. (3) Compilation of both hard copy and online corrosion toolkit material.

Martha Cather; Robert Lee; Ibrahim Gundiler; Andrew Sung

2003-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

316

Results Of Routine Strip Effluent Hold Tank, Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank, Caustic Wash Tank And Caustic Storage Tank Samples From Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit During Macrobatch 6 Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT), Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT), Caustic Wash Tank (CWT) and Caustic Storage Tank (CST) samples from the Interim Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt Batch (Macrobatch) 6 have been analyzed for 238Pu, 90Sr, 137Cs, and by Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectroscopy (ICPES). The Pu, Sr, and Cs results from the current Macrobatch 6 samples are similar to those from comparable samples in previous Macrobatch 5. In addition the SEHT and DSSHT heel samples (i.e. preliminary) have been analyzed and reported to meet NGS Demonstration Plan requirements. From a bulk chemical point of view, the ICPES results do not vary considerably between this and the previous samples. The titanium results in the DSSHT samples continue to indicate the presence of Ti, when the feed material does not have detectable levels. This most likely indicates that leaching of Ti from MST has increased in ARP at the higher free hydroxide concentrations in the current feed.

Peters, T. B.

2014-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

317

Structural and immunological characterization of a biosurfactant produced by Bacillus licheniformis JF-2.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1 B. LICHENIFORMIS JF-2 SURFACTANT 33 96.6 uJO z 60 V l'0...deionized water 10 times; washing was followed by the addition...Since the concentration of the surfactant in the fermentation broth...0 B. LICHENIFORMIS JF-2 SURFACTANT 35 Glu Leu Fatty Fatty Acid...

S C Lin; M A Minton; M M Sharma; G Georgiou

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Second Generation Biofuel Producer Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Second Generation Second Generation Biofuel Producer Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Second Generation Biofuel Producer Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Second Generation Biofuel Producer Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Second Generation Biofuel Producer Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Second Generation Biofuel Producer Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Second Generation Biofuel Producer Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Second Generation Biofuel Producer Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Second Generation Biofuel Producer Tax Credit

319

ANALYSIS OF METHANE PRODUCING COMMUNITIES WITHIN UNDERGROUND COAL BEDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ANALYSIS OF METHANE PRODUCING COMMUNITIES WITHIN UNDERGROUND COAL BEDS by Elliott Paul Barnhart ..................................................................................14 Ability of the Consortium to Produce Methane from Coal and Metabolites ................16.............................................................................................21 Coal and Methane Production

Maxwell, Bruce D.

320

SABIC's Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Material used to Produce the...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

SABIC's Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Material used to Produce the World's First 3D-Printed Vehicle at IMTS 2014 SABIC's Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Material used to Produce the World's...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite wash producers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

EWO Meeting March 2013 Reliable Produc.on Planning of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by regions - ProducIon capacity of each plant and its producIon costs - Availability of key raw material - Inventory holding costs, inventory capacity, and ini - SaIsfy customer demand across all markets - Achieve mass balance across

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

322

Factors Affecting Cotton Producers' Choice of Marketing Outlet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In recent years, changes in government policies, supply and demand fundamentals and price patterns in the cotton market have led to several shifts in how producers market their cotton. This thesis examined producer cash marketing choices, including...

Pace, Jason 1979-

2012-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

323

Functionally gradient titanium-aluminide composites produced by laser cladding  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The laser surface cladding of Ti-Al/TiB2...composites was investigated as a means of producing a functionally gradient material on a commercially pure Ti substrate. Single and double layers were produced. The pro...

J. H. Abboud; D. R. F. West; R. D. Rawlings

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

How Much Energy Does Each State Produce? | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Much Energy Does Each State Produce? How Much Energy Does Each State Produce? Energy Production in Trillion Btu: 2012 Click on each state to learn more about how much energy it...

325

USA Biomass Power Producers Alliance | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Producers Alliance Producers Alliance Jump to: navigation, search Name USA Biomass Power Producers Alliance Place Sacramento, California Sector Biomass Product National trade association of biomass power producers in US. References USA Biomass Power Producers Alliance[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. USA Biomass Power Producers Alliance is a company located in Sacramento, California . References ↑ "USA Biomass Power Producers Alliance" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=USA_Biomass_Power_Producers_Alliance&oldid=352626" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages

326

Low-Temperature and Co-Produced Resources Fact Sheet  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Fact sheet on the U.S. Department of Energy's low-temperature and co-produced resources program area.

327

Cracking catalyst and method of producing the same  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This invention relates to exchanged ammoniated cogels having improved catalytic activity and process for producing the same.

Alafandi, H.; Stamires, D.

1980-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

328

Method for producing flame retardant porous products and products produced thereby  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for fire retarding porous products used for thermal energy storage and products produced thereby is provided. The method includes treating the surface of the phase change material-containing porous products with a urea fire-retarding agent. Upon exposure to a flame, the urea forms an adduct with the phase change material which will not sustain combustion (is self-extinguishing) in air. No halogens or metal oxides are contained in the fire retardant, so no potentially noxious halide smoke or fumes are emitted if the product is continuously exposed to a flame. 1 fig.

Salyer, I.O.

1998-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

329

Method for producing flame retardant porous products and products produced thereby  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for fire retarding porous products used for thermal energy storage and products produced thereby is provided. The method includes treating the surface of the phase change material-containing porous products with a urea fire-retarding agent. Upon exposure to a flame, the urea forms an adduct with the phase change material which will not sustain combustion (is self-extinguishing) in air. No halogens or metal oxides are contained in the fire retardant, so no potentially noxious halide smoke or fumes are emitted if the product is continuously exposed to a flame.

Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

1998-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

330

Method for Producing Flame Retardant Porous Products and Products Produced Thereby  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for fire retarding porous products used for thermal energy storage and products produced thereby is provided. The method includes treating the surface of the phase change material-containing porous products with a urea fire-retarding agent. Upon exposure to a flame, the urea forms an adduct with the phase change material which will not sustain combustion (is self-extinguishing) in air. No halogens or metal oxides are contained in the fire retardant, so no potentially noxious halide smoke or fumes are emitted if the product is continuously exposed to a flame.

Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

1998-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

331

Neutron producing target for accelerator based neutron source for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

247 Neutron producing target for accelerator based neutron source for NCT V. Belov1 , S. Fadeev1, Russia Summary Neutron producing targets for novel accelerator based neutron source [1, 2] are presented Neutron producing target is one of the main elements of proposed accelerator based facility for neutron

Taskaev, Sergey Yur'evich

332

ccsd00001732, Development behavior of liquid plasma produced by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

water with a melted NaCl is used as a test liquid. The liquid plasma is produced by the fundamental waveccsd­00001732, version 2 ­ 7 Nov 2004 Development behavior of liquid plasma produced by YAG laser the hazardous material called the environment material. Then, the plasma produced in liquid by the laser light

333

NETL: Releases & Briefs - Producing hydrogen from water, without  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Producing Hydrogen from Water, without Electrolysis Producing Hydrogen from Water, without Electrolysis Electrochemical potential difference drives the reaction Electrochemical potential difference drives the reaction Researchers at DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory and Argonne National Laboratory have patented a "Method of Generating Hydrogen by Catalytic Decomposition of Water." The invention potentially leapfrogs current capital and energy intensive processes that produce hydrogen from fossil fuels or through the electrolysis of water. According to co-inventor Arun Bose, "Hydrogen can be produced by electrolysis, but the high voltage requirements are a commercial barrier. The invention provides a new route for producing hydrogen from water by using mixed proton-electron conducting membranes." Water is

334

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Producer Excise Tax and  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Renewable Fuel Renewable Fuel Producer Excise Tax and Inspection Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Producer Excise Tax and Inspection Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Producer Excise Tax and Inspection Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Producer Excise Tax and Inspection Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Producer Excise Tax and Inspection Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Producer Excise Tax and Inspection Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Producer Excise Tax and Inspection Exemption on AddThis.com...

335

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Excise Tax Exemption for Biodiesel Produced  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Excise Tax Exemption Excise Tax Exemption for Biodiesel Produced by Schools to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Excise Tax Exemption for Biodiesel Produced by Schools on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Excise Tax Exemption for Biodiesel Produced by Schools on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Excise Tax Exemption for Biodiesel Produced by Schools on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Excise Tax Exemption for Biodiesel Produced by Schools on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Excise Tax Exemption for Biodiesel Produced by Schools on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Excise Tax Exemption for Biodiesel Produced by Schools on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State

336

Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma: Screening for gentle process conditions and antibacterial efficiency on perishable fresh produce  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Fresh fruits and vegetables, destined to be eaten raw or minimally processed only, harbor the risk of conveying pathogenic microorganisms. Factors such as weather conditions, which favor survival or growth of microorganisms, and improper handling during cultivation or in the postharvest chain, can contribute to outbreaks of food-borne illness. Application of chemical sanitizers or physical treatments often shows a limited efficiency or does not meet consumer acceptance. Availability of gentle and effective techniques for disinfection of fresh produce, therefore, is highly desirable. Non-thermal gas plasma (NTP) treatment is a promising novel technique to reduce the microbial load on fresh fruits and vegetables. However, knowledge on practical applicability of NTP for fresh fruits and vegetables is very limited. In this study, chlorophyll fluorescence imaging (CFI) was used to elucidate suitable process parameters for application of an atmospheric pressure plasma-jet (kINPen 09, INP Greifswald, Germany) on corn salad, a perishable leafy green. Keeping a distance of 17mm to the plasma-jet, corn salad leaves could be treated for up to 60s at a fixed power (8W) and 5Lmin?1 of argon mixed with 0.1% oxygen. Surface temperature on leaves did never exceed 35.2C. Antibacterial tests were performed on corn salad, cucumber, apple, and tomato and achieved an inactivation of artificially inoculated Escherichia coli DSM 1116 of 4.11.2, 4.70.4, 4.70, and 3.30.9logunits, respectively, after 60s treatment time. Additional tests with a dielectric barrier discharge plasma and indirect plasma treatment within a remote exposure reactor, fed by a microwave induced plasma torch, did not result in equivalent levels of quality retention as observed using the plasma-jet. Industrial relevance Development of gentle non-thermal disinfection methods aims to provide the industry with new tools to actively improve the microbial status of fresh produce beyond the preventive benefits of good hygiene practices and the limited efficacy of post-harvest washing. The presented study shows how cold plasma can be applied to heat-sensitive lettuce leaves without detrimental effects to product quality. The additional microbiological tests offer insights into the antibacterial capacity of cold plasma on different produce surfaces. The results contribute to prompt the development of appropriate large-scale plasma sources to establish a new plasma-based sanitation technique for fresh fruits and vegetables, which should also be implementable into running process lines.

Matthias Baier; Mandy Grgen; Jrg Ehlbeck; Dietrich Knorr; Werner B. Herppich; Oliver Schlter

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Produced Water R&D | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Shale Gas » Produced Water Shale Gas » Produced Water R&D Produced Water R&D Developed as a result of lessons learned from the NETL funded demonstration project, the Altela 600 water treatment system (shown above) treats about 25,000 gallons per day of produced and flowback water from hydraulic fracturing. [Photo courtesy of Altela Inc.] Developed as a result of lessons learned from the NETL funded demonstration project, the Altela 600 water treatment system (shown above) treats about 25,000 gallons per day of produced and flowback water from hydraulic fracturing. [Photo courtesy of Altela Inc.] Drilling and fracturing wells produce water along with the natural gas. Some of this water is returned fracture fluid and some is natural formation water. The actual water production of a particular well depends on the well

338

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #600: December 7, 2009 China Produced  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0: December 7, 0: December 7, 2009 China Produced More Vehicles than the U.S. in 2008 to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #600: December 7, 2009 China Produced More Vehicles than the U.S. in 2008 on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #600: December 7, 2009 China Produced More Vehicles than the U.S. in 2008 on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #600: December 7, 2009 China Produced More Vehicles than the U.S. in 2008 on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #600: December 7, 2009 China Produced More Vehicles than the U.S. in 2008 on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #600: December 7, 2009 China Produced More Vehicles than the U.S. in 2008 on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #600:

339

Toxic methylmercury-producing microbes more widespread than realized...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

published in Environmental Science and Technology, explains why deadly methylated mercury is produced in areas where the neurotoxin's presence has puzzled researchers for...

340

Sandia National Laboratories: wind turbines produce rated power  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

turbines produce rated power Increasing the Scaled Wind Farm Technology Facility's Power Production On April 7, 2014, in Energy, Facilities, News, News & Events, Partnership,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite wash producers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Organic Agriculture in Oklahoma: Catalysts and Roadblocks for Producers.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This study surveyed certified and non-certified Oklahoma organic producers to examine their personal and farm characteristics, the reasons cited for their extent of involvement in (more)

Mitchell, Shelley

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Electric Power Produced from Nuclear Reactor | National Nuclear...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electric Power Produced from Nuclear Reactor | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing...

343

Treatment of produced water using chemical and biological unit operations.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Water generated along with oil and gas during coal bed methane and oil shale operations is commonly known as produced water, formation water, or oilfield (more)

Li, Liang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Producing Beneficial Materials from Biomass and Biodiesel Byproducts...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biomass and Biofuels Biomass and Biofuels Find More Like This Return to Search Producing Beneficial Materials from Biomass and Biodiesel Byproducts Lawrence Berkeley National...

345

Evaluation of cirrus statistics produced by general circulation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

models for producing climatological cloud statistics by comparing them to the cirrus climatology compiled over the Southern Great Plains (SGP) ARM site. This evaluation includes...

346

Scientists propose a solution to a critical barrier to producing...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

could provide essential improvements for future tokamaks that will need to produce self-sustaining fusion reactions, or "burning plasmas," to generate electric power. Such machines...

347

Upgrading of Pitch Produced by Mild Gasification of Subbituminous Cal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Upgrading of Pitch Produced by Mild Gasification of Subbituminous Cal ... Structural Characterization of Coal Tar Pitches Obtained by Heat Treatment under Different Conditions ...

Robert L. McCormick; Mahesh C. Jha

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Geothermal Energy Production with Co-produced and Geopressured...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and Geopressured Resources (Fact Sheet), Geothermal Technologies Program (GTP) Geothermal Energy Production with Co-produced and Geopressured Resources (Fact Sheet),...

349

Making biomimetic complexes to produce hydrogen fuel | Center...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

biomimetic complexes to produce hydrogen fuel 4 Nov 2012 Souvik Roy, graduate student (Subtask 3, laboratory of Anne Jones). "I am involved mostly in mimicking Fe-hydrogenases,...

350

Compositions produced using an in situ heat treatment process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods for treating a subsurface formation and compositions produced therefrom are described herein. At least one method for producing hydrocarbons from a subsurface formation includes providing heat to the subsurface formation using an in situ heat treatment process. One or more formation particles may be formed during heating of the subsurface formation. Fluid that includes hydrocarbons and the formation particles may be produced from the subsurface formation. The formation particles in the produced fluid may include cenospheres and have an average particle size of at least 0.5 micrometers.

Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria; Nair, Vijay; Munsterman, Erwin Hunh; Van Bergen, Petrus Franciscus; Van Den Berg, Franciscus Gondulfus Antonius

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

351

RPSEA Final Report Small Producers Program Development Strategies...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Final Report Small Producers Program Development Strategies for Maximizing East Texas Oil Field Production Contract No. 08123-16 July 15, 2014 Fred P. Wang Research Scientist...

352

Results Of Routine Strip Effluent Hold Tank, Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank, And Caustic Wash Tank Samples From Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit During Macrobatch 4 Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT), Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT), and Caustic Wash Tank (CWT) samples from several of the ?microbatches? of Integrated Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt Batch (?Macrobatch?) 4 have been analyzed for {sup 238}Pu, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, and by inductively-coupled plasma emission spectroscopy (ICPES). Furthermore, samples from the CWT have been analyzed by a variety of methods to investigate a decline in the decontamination factor (DF) of the cesium observed at MCU. The results indicate good decontamination performance within process design expectations. While the data set is sparse, the results of this set and the previous set of results for Macrobatch 3 samples indicate generally consistent operations. There is no indication of a disruption in plutonium and strontium removal. The average cesium DF and concentration factor (CF) for samples obtained from Macrobatch 4 are slightly lower than for Macrobatch 3, but still well within operating parameters. The DSSHT samples show continued presence of titanium, likely from leaching of the monosodium titanate in Actinide Removal Process (ARP).

Peters, T. B.; Fink, S. D.

2012-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

353

Photoassisted degradation of pentachlorophenol in a simulated soil washing system containing nonionic surfactant Triton X-100 with LaB codoped TiO2 under visible and solar light irradiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A novel method to remediate soil washing contaminants was developed through the utilization of LaB codoped TiO2 (LaBTiO2) nanoparticle in the photocatalysis of a simulated complex system containing hydrophobic pentachlorophenol (PCP) and nonionic surfactant Triton X-100 (TX-100) under visible and solar light irradiation. The photocatalyst synthesized by the solgel hydrothermal process exhibited excellent visible light photocatalytic activity and a modified surface. The investigation of the adsorption kinetics and isotherms showed that the distribution of PCP between the catalyst surface and the bulk solution significantly depended on the initial TX-100 concentration (CTX-0). The formed superficial reactive monolayer at CTX-0 ranging from 0.023 to 0.23mM by the dramatic hydrophobic interactions between the TX-100 moiety and hydrophobic sites on the LaBTiO2 could remarkably capture the target pollutant. The PCP implanted into the hydrophobic space could be removed effectively in the photocatalysis process induced by visible and solar light, ascribing to the facile availability of PCP to the photo-yielded oxidative radicals on the LaBTiO2 surface. Additionally, the preferential decomposition of the incorporated PCP, rather than the TX-100, facilitated the removal of the target contaminant and the recycling of the surfactant, which is beneficial to the practical application of this technique under mild and natural light sources.

J.W. Liu; R. Han; H.T. Wang; Y. Zhao; Z. Chu; H.Y. Wu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Transporting Produce SafelyTransporting Produce Safely etting fresh produce from the field to the market is another step where care must be taken to keep the product safe.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

points for microorganisms that cause disease or hasten spoilage. Ice used in the transport of produceTransporting Produce SafelyTransporting Produce Safely G etting fresh produce from the field contamination of the produce with microorganisms that could cause foodborne illness and also to hold the produce

Liskiewicz, Maciej

355

Application of colloidal gas aphron suspensions produced from Sapindus mukorossi for arsenic removal from contaminated soil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Colloidal gas aphron dispersions (CGAs) can be described as a system of microbubbles suspended homogenously in a liquid matrix. This work examines the performance of \\{CGAs\\} in comparison to surfactant solutions for washing low levels of arsenic from an iron rich soil. Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS) and saponin, a biodegradable surfactant, obtained from Sapindus mukorossi or soapnut fruit were used for generating \\{CGAs\\} and solutions for soil washing. Column washing experiments were performed in down-flow and up flow modes at a soil pH of 5 and 6 using varying concentration of SDS and soapnut solutions as well as CGAs. Soapnut \\{CGAs\\} removed more than 70% arsenic while SDS \\{CGAs\\} removed up to 55% arsenic from the soil columns in the soil pH range of 56. \\{CGAs\\} and solutions showed comparable performances in all the cases. \\{CGAs\\} were more economical since it contains 35% of air by volume, thereby requiring less surfactant. Micellar solubilization and low pH of soapnut facilitated arsenic desorption from soil column. FT-IR analysis of effluent suggested that soapnut solution did not interact chemically with arsenic thereby facilitating the recovery of soapnut solution by precipitating the arsenic. Damage to soil was minimal arsenic confirmed by metal dissolution from soil surface and SEM micrograph.

Soumyadeep Mukhopadhyay; Sumona Mukherjee; Mohd. Ali Hashim; Bhaskar Sen Gupta

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Making Food, Producing Sustainability Many contemporary approaches to environmental  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Making Food, Producing Sustainability Abstract Many contemporary approaches to environmental sustainability focus on the end-consumer. In this panel, we explore lessons from small food producers for future development of HCI as an agency of sustainable ways of being. We argue that attention to the relationship

Parikh, Tapan S.

357

SaskPower Small Power Producers Program (Saskatchewan, Canada) | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

SaskPower Small Power Producers Program (Saskatchewan, Canada) SaskPower Small Power Producers Program (Saskatchewan, Canada) SaskPower Small Power Producers Program (Saskatchewan, Canada) < Back Eligibility Commercial Agricultural Industrial Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Program Info Funding Source SaskPower State Saskatchewan Program Type Performance-Based Incentive Provider SaskPower The Small Power Producers Program accommodates customers who wish to generate up to 100 kilowatts (kW) of electricity for the purpose of offsetting power that would otherwise be purchased from SaskPower or for selling all of the power generated to SaskPower. At the beginning of the application process, you need to choose between one of two options: Sell all of the power you produce to SaskPower, or sell the

358

Financial News for Major Energy Producers, Third Quarter 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Producers, Third Quarter 2010 Producers, Third Quarter 2010 Release Date: January 5, 2011 Next Release Date: To Be Determined Report Sections: Corporate and Petroleum Net Income Worldwide Oil and Gas Production Operations Worldwide Refining/Marketing Operations Worldwide Petroleum Capital Expenditures Worldwide Downstream Natural Gas and Power, and Chemicals Operations Supplemental Figures Supplemental Tables Download this Report: Full Report in PDF-Format Past Issues in PDF-Format Additional Information FRS Home Financial Terms Glossary Contacts Notes: The "Financial News for Major Energy Producers" is issued quarterly to report recent trends in the financial performance of the major energy producers. "Major energy producers" are respondents to Form EIA-28 (Financial Reporting System). All U.S.-based respondent companies that

359

Electric Power Produced from Nuclear Reactor | National Nuclear Security  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electric Power Produced from Nuclear Reactor | National Nuclear Security Electric Power Produced from Nuclear Reactor | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > Electric Power Produced from Nuclear Reactor Electric Power Produced from Nuclear Reactor December 20, 1951 Arco, ID Electric Power Produced from Nuclear Reactor

360

Nebraska shows potential to produce biofuel crops | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nebraska shows potential to produce biofuel crops Nebraska shows potential to produce biofuel crops Nebraska shows potential to produce biofuel crops December 9, 2009 - 11:12am Addthis Joshua DeLung What are the key facts? Utilizing sites in Nevada that are currently used as buffers around roads for biofuel production instead could meet up to 22 percent of the state's energy requirements. That's 11 times the energy the state currently produces from biomass. Nebraska is known for its rolling cornfields in America's heartland, and agriculture is so thick in the state that people there can smell the fresh produce in the air. Many more in the U.S. might end up tasting the hearty vegetables as well. But one concern about new technologies that use crops for fuel is that those crops, and the land on which they're grown,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite wash producers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Coal seam natural gas producing areas (Louisiana) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Coal seam natural gas producing areas (Louisiana) Coal seam natural gas producing areas (Louisiana) Coal seam natural gas producing areas (Louisiana) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Utility Program Info State Louisiana Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Louisiana Department of Natural Resources In order to prevent waste and to avoid the drilling of unnecessary wells and to encourage the development of coal seam natural gas producing areas in Louisiana, the commissioner of conservation is authorized, as provided in this law, to establish a single unit to be served by one or more wells for a coal seam natural gas producing area. Without in any way modifying the authority granted to the commissioner to establish a drilling unit or

362

Nebraska shows potential to produce biofuel crops | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nebraska shows potential to produce biofuel crops Nebraska shows potential to produce biofuel crops Nebraska shows potential to produce biofuel crops December 9, 2009 - 11:12am Addthis Joshua DeLung What are the key facts? Utilizing sites in Nevada that are currently used as buffers around roads for biofuel production instead could meet up to 22 percent of the state's energy requirements. That's 11 times the energy the state currently produces from biomass. Nebraska is known for its rolling cornfields in America's heartland, and agriculture is so thick in the state that people there can smell the fresh produce in the air. Many more in the U.S. might end up tasting the hearty vegetables as well. But one concern about new technologies that use crops for fuel is that those crops, and the land on which they're grown,

363

Methods and apparatus for producing and storing positrons and protons  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus for producing and storing positrons may include a trap that defines an interior chamber therein and that contains an electric field and a magnetic field. The trap may further include a source material that includes atoms that, when activated by photon bombardment, become positron emitters to produce positrons. The trap may also include a moderator positioned adjacent the source material. A photon source is positioned adjacent the trap so that photons produced by the photon source bombard the source material to produce the positron emitters. Positrons from the positron emitters and moderated positrons from the moderator are confined within the interior chamber of the trap by the electric and magnetic fields. Apparatus for producing and storing protons are also disclosed.

Akers, Douglas W. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2010-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

364

When fish die, bacteria or the enzymes they produce invade the flesh of fish. This process produces toxic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ABSTRACT When fish die, bacteria or the enzymes they produce invade the flesh of fish. This process produces toxic compounds in the fish and the fish becomes spoiled. Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy neural network (ANN) for the development of an ANN based FT-IR Screening System for fish

Michel, Howard E.

365

Compositions produced using an in situ heat treatment process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one method for producing hydrocarbons from a subsurface formation includes providing heat to the subsurface formation using an in situ heat treatment process. One or more formation particles may be formed during heating of the subsurface formation. Fluid that includes hydrocarbons and the formation particles may be produced from the subsurface formation. The formation particles in the produced fluid may include cenospheres and have an average particle size of at least 0.5 micrometers.

Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria (Houston, TX); Nair, Vijay (Katy, TX); Munsterman, Erwin Henh (Amsterdam, NL); Van Bergen, Petrus Franciscus (Amsterdam, NL); Van Den Berg, Franciscus Gondulfus Antonius (Amsterdam, NL)

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

366

The feasibility of producing alcohol fuels from biomass in Australia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Apart from cost, the net production of energy is the most important factor in evaluating the feasibility of producing renewable fuels from woody biomass. Unlike sugar, the effort required to make woody materials fermentable is considerable, and has been a major barrier to the use of such materials to produce renewable fuels. The Energy Profit Ratio (EPR) of fossil fuels is declining rapidly as conventional oil resources decline, but the EPR of biomass fuels is often not as high as commonly thought. I conclude that producing methanol from wood not only has a much higher yield, but is also cheaper than the more popular ethanol.

Chris Mardon

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Producing a trimethylpentanoic acid using hybrid polyketide synthases  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides for a polyketide synthase (PKS) capable of synthesizing trimethylpentanoic acid. The present invention also provides for a host cell comprising the PKS and when cultured produces the trimethylpentanoic acid. The present invention also provides for a method of producing the trimethylpentanoic acid, comprising: providing a host cell of the present invention, and culturing said host cell in a suitable culture medium such that the trimethylpentanoic acid is produced, optionally isolating the trimethylpentanoic acid, and optionally, reducing the isolated trimethylpentanoic acid into a trimethylpentanol or an iso-octane.

Katz, Leonard; Fortman, Jeffrey L; Keasling, Jay D

2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

368

Analysis of magnetic fields produced far from electric power lines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, the authors develop a simple and general method for analyzing the magnetic fields produced by power lines at far distances, that is, at distances large in comparison to the spacing between the line's phase conductors. Magnetic fields produced far from conventional power lines have remarkably simple properties. The authors present formulae for the fields produced by various conventional and unconventional power line configurations; included are line designs characterized by reduced magnetic-field levels. Errors in the formulae are less than [plus minus]10% at the edge of a typical transmission right-of-way.

Kaune, W.T. (Enertech Consultants Campbell, CA (United States)); Zaffanella, L.E. (High Voltage Transmission Research Center, Lenox, MA (United States))

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Hand Washing in Emergency Situations (Spanish)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ER-009S 10-07 Courtney J. Schoessow, Especialista de Programa de Extensi?n - Salud Sistema Universitario Texas A&M Luego de una emergencia como un hurac?n o inundaci?n, es posible que se hayan contaminado o cortado temporalmente los suministros... de agua. Sin embargo, resulta importante que usted y su familia se laven las manos con frecuencia para evitar enfermedades. ?Cu?ndo deber?a higienizarse las manos? ? Antes de preparar comidas o comer ? Luego de utilizar el ba?o ? Luego de cambiar...

Schoessow, Courtney

2007-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

370

Notes of a Surgeon: On Washing Hands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...sweating breast, most of us do little more than wipe our hands on our white coats and move on to see the next patient, to scribble a note in the chart, to eat a sandwich. This is, of course, nothing new. Sherwin Nuland's recent book, The Doctors' Plague: Germs, Childbed Fever, and the Strange Story... One afternoon last December, I took a tour of my hospital with Deborah Yokoe, an infectious-disease specialist, and Susan Marino, a medical technologist by training. They work in our infection-control unit. Their full-time job is to stop the spread of ...

Gawande A.

2004-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

371

19 May 1987 PROC. BIOL. SOC. WASH.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.-Palau, Peleliu Island, Airport Well, 26 Feb 1985, leg. Thomas M. Iliffe, Jeff Bozanic, and Dennis Williams, holo- type (USNM 232000) and 16 paratypes (USNM 232001); 2 Apr 1985, leg. Dennis Williams and Jeff Bozanic

Iliffe, Thomas M.

372

15 January 1986 PROC. ENTOMOL. SOC. WASH.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Möschler wrote three major faunal works on neotropical Lepidoptera. Two of these, treating Surinam 1876

Davis, Don R.

373

Washing Fresh Fruits and Vegetables (Spanish)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?reas de cocinar Lave sus manos con agua caliente con jab?n por 20 segundos antes y despu?s de haber manipulado alimentos y despu?s de haber tocado carne cruda, cambiado un pa?al, usado el ba?o, tocado a una mascota o tocado cualquier cosa que... cloro casero en 1 cuarto de gal?n de agua. Haga esto antes y despu?s de preparar la comida. Cuando lave productos frescos, tambi?n es importante tener un fregadero o lavaplatos limpio. Lave el fregadero con agua caliente con jab?n y despu?s enju...

Scott, Amanda

2008-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

374

Large optics inspection, tilting, and washing stand  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A large optics stand provides a risk free means of safely tilting large optics with ease and a method of safely tilting large optics with ease. The optics are supported in the horizontal position by pads. In the vertical plane the optics are supported by saddles that evenly distribute the optics weight over a large area.

Ayers, Marion Jay (Brentwood, CA); Ayers, Shannon Lee (Brentwood, CA)

2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

375

Fine Anthracite Coal Washing Using Spirals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The spiral performed well in cleaning the coarse 8 x 16 mesh size fraction, as demonstrated by the Ep ranging from 0.091 to 0.177. This is in line with typical spiral performance. In addition, the presence of the coarser size fraction did not significantly affect spiral performance on the typical 16 x 100 mesh fraction, in which the Ep ranged from 0.144 to 0.250. Changes in solids concentration and flow rate did not show a clear correlation with spiral performance. However, for difficult-to-clean coals with high near-gravity material, such as this anthracite, a single-stage spiral cleaning such a wide size fraction may not be able to achieve the clean coal ash and yield specifications required. In the first place, while the performance of the spiral on the coarse 8 x 16 mesh fraction is good with regard to Ep, the cutpoints (SG50s) are high (1.87 to 1.92), which may result in a clean coal with a higher-than-desired ash content. And second, the combination of the spiral's higher overall cutpoint (1.80) with the high near-gravity anthracite results in significant misplaced material that increases the clean coal ash error. In a case such as this, one solution may be to reclean the clean coal and middlings from the first-stage spiral in a second stage spiral.

R.P. Killmeyer; P.H. Zandhuis; M.V. Ciocco; W. Weldon; T. West; D. Petrunak

2001-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

376

flu preparations Wash your hands, cover  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and audiology. Koop currently co-leads the three-year GenomicsinLiceandSalmonprojectusing advanced genomics in Genomics and Molecular Biology. He was also part of the world-wide team of scientists who mapped the human genome. Koop's team is

Victoria, University of

377

Admittance relay helps wash out system instability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article describes how delta-current admittance relays detect severe power system disturbances and initiate a power reduction signal on the dc transmission system to help stabilize the integrated ac/HVDC transmission system. It is always desirable to transmit as much power as possible over major transmission line interconnections, and the 500 kV line linking Manitoba in Canada to Minnesota in the US is a good example. A static var system (SVS) is part of this strategy. Note the southern end of an HVDC line through which the power is delivered from northern hydro-electric generation. The ability to quickly control dc-delivered power combined with the complication of SVS switching and the installation of series capacitors has led to special circumstances requiring an unusual approach to maintenance of system stability. The availability of a new protection-oriented computing platform has made the required algorithms feasible.

Sweezy, G. [Minnesota Power, Duluth, MN (United States)] [Minnesota Power, Duluth, MN (United States); Swift, G.; Zhang, Z.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

DOE Offers Support for Innovative Manufacturing Plant That Will Produce  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Support for Innovative Manufacturing Plant That Will Support for Innovative Manufacturing Plant That Will Produce High Quality Solar Silicon at Low Cost DOE Offers Support for Innovative Manufacturing Plant That Will Produce High Quality Solar Silicon at Low Cost June 16, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis Washington D.C. - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced the offer of a conditional commitment for a $275 million loan guarantee to Calisolar Inc. to commercialize its innovative solar silicon manufacturing process. Calisolar's innovative process should produce silicon for use in solar cells at less than half the cost of traditional polysilicon purification processes, which will reduce the overall cost of solar modules and panels. At full production, the manufacturing plant is expected to produce 16,000 metric tons (MT) of solar silicon annually, equivalent to

379

Fish Producers Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fish Producers Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Fish Producers Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Fish Producers Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Fish Producers Sector Geothermal energy Type Aquaculture Location Niland, California Coordinates 33.2400366°, -115.5188756° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

380

DOE Solar Decathlon: Solar Decathlon Team-Produced Videos  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Video Walkthroughs Video Walkthroughs Animated Walkthroughs Architecture Presentations Engineering Presentations Sales Presentations Consumer Workshops Building Industry Workshops Technical Resources Sponsors Where Are the Houses Now? Quick Links Solar Decathlon Home Solar Decathlon 2011 Solar Decathlon 2009 Solar Decathlon 2007 Solar Decathlon 2005 Solar Decathlon 2002 Solar Decathlon 2011 Solar Decathlon Team-Produced Videos Watch videos produced by the teams themselves for the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2011 competition. Solar Decathlon 2011 Team Video Walkthroughs See inside the Solar Decathlon 2011 houses in these team-produced video tours. Solar Decathlon 2011 Team Computer-Animated Walkthroughs Learn about the teams' plans and concepts by watching these team-produced

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite wash producers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Timken Producing Parts for Wind Turbines | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Timken Producing Parts for Wind Turbines Timken Producing Parts for Wind Turbines Timken Producing Parts for Wind Turbines June 28, 2010 - 3:38pm Addthis Some of Timken’s bearings are so large that a small car could conceivably drive through the center. | Photo courtesy of The Timken Company Some of Timken's bearings are so large that a small car could conceivably drive through the center. | Photo courtesy of The Timken Company Lindsay Gsell The Timken Company - which will be 111-years-old this year - has a long tradition of investing in new technologies. After assessing their business in recent years, the Ohio-based, global manufacturer saw a market opportunity and decided to invest in a new manufacturing capability: producing the massive bearings for large wind turbines. "Timken has the tenacity to continue to invest into the trough of the

382

Association of Renewable Energy Producers Spain | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Producers Spain Producers Spain Jump to: navigation, search Name Association of Renewable Energy Producers (Spain) Place Barcelona, Spain Zip 8008 Sector Renewable Energy Product Spain's Association of renewable energy producers Coordinates 41.385589°, 2.168745° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.385589,"lon":2.168745,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

383

Producing bulk residual stresses in gas turbine blades  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Inhomogeneous plastic strain has been used to produce a pattern of bulk compressive stresses that counteract macrodefect formation and growth in machine components, which increases the working life. Studies ha...

V. A. Boguslaev; A. P. Lopatenko; N. B. Makarenko; N. I. Obodan

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Biodiesel-fuel: Content, production, producers, contemporary biotechnology (Review)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The necessity of expanding studies on producing renewable biofuel is reviewed. Special attention is given to biodiesel, the history of its creation, and ... fungi, yeasts, plants, photo- and heterotrophic algae.

E. P. Feofilova; Ya. E. Sergeeva

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Micro-mechanical logic for field produceable gate arrays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A paradigm of micro-mechanical gates for field produceable logic is explored. A desktop manufacturing system is sought after which is capable of printing functional logic devices in the field. A logic scheme which induces ...

Prakash, Manu

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Impacts of Biofuel Produc3on on Minnesota Agricultural  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impacts of Biofuel Produc3on on Minnesota Agricultural Transporta3on Jerry of renewable fuels that must be used each year for transportation fuel, home heating or jet fuel. The volumes

Minnesota, University of

387

Efficient steam turbines produced by the Ural Turbine Plant company  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Design features and efficiency of some steam turbines produced at present by a plant formed as a result of division of the Turbine Motor Plant Company into several enterprises are...

G. D. Barinberg; A. E. Valamin

388

Fluorination of Arc-Produced Carbon Material Containing Multiwall Nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this work we studied the fluorination process of MWNTs produced in an electric arc. ... Carbon material was synthesized by using a setup for arc-discharge graphite evaporation described elsewhere. ...

Nicolai F. Yudanov; Alexander V. Okotrub; Yuri V. Shubin; Lyudmila I. Yudanova; Lyubov G. Bulusheva; Andrew L. Chuvilin; Jean-Marc Bonard

2002-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

389

Method for Detection of Microorganisms That Produce Gaseous Nitrogen Oxides  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...with 02-free nitrogen; the tubes were...dishes to reduce water evaporation...Detection of gas producers. Culture...conductivity detector; nitrogen was used as the...Low-pressure solubility of gases in liquid water. Chem. Rev...

Gary E. Jenneman; Anne D. Montgomery; Michael J. McInerney

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

An experimental investigation of nitrogen gas produced during...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AD Peacock, M Oostrom, and TW Wietsma.2007."An experimental investigation of nitrogen gas produced during denitrification."Ground Water 45(4):461-467. Authors: JD Istok MM Park AD...

391

Biochar Produced from Anaerobically Digested Fiber Reduces Phosphorus...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

dairy lagoons. The ADF was collected from a plugged flow digester, air-dried to <8% water content, and pelletized. Biochar was produced by slow pyrolysis in a barrel retort....

392

Tearing Graphene Sheets From Adhesive Substrates Produces Tapered Nanoribbons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thin films Tearing Graphene Sheets From Adhesive Substrates Produces Tapered Nanoribbons Dipanjan Sen, Kostya S. Novoselov, Pedro M. Reis, and Markus J. Buehler* Graphene is a truly two- film materials have been studied extensively, the key mechanical properties of graphene

Entekhabi, Dara

393

Ethanol as an Energy Producing Substrate in the Liver  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The existence of more than one pathway for ethanol metabolism in the liver is becoming increasingly ... implications of this development for the utilization of ethanol as an energy-producing substance will be dis...

F. Lundquist; H. Thieden; N. Grunnet

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Treatment of produced waters by electrocoagulation and reverse osmosis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two oil field produced waters and one coal bed methane produced water from Wyoming were treated with electrocoagulation and reverse osmosis. All three produced waters would require treatment to meet the new Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality requirements for effluent discharge into a class III or IV stream. The removal of radium 226 and oil and grease was the primary focus of the study. Radium 226 and oil and grease were removed from the produced waters with electrocoagulation. The best removal of radium 226 (>84%) was achieved with use of a non-sacrificial anode (titanium). The best removal of oil and grease (>93%) was achieved using a sacrificial anode (aluminum). By comparison, reverse osmosis removed up to 87% of the total dissolved solids and up to 95% of the radium 226.

Tuggle, K.; Humenick, M.; Barker, F.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Performance profiles of major energy producers 1995, January 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This publication examines developments in the operations of the major U.S. energy-producing companies on a corporate level, by major line of business, by major function within each line of business, and by geographic area.

NONE

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Coalbed methane produced water in China: status and environmental issues  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As one of the unconventional natural gas family members, coalbed methane (CBM) receives great attention throughout the world. The major associated problem of CBM production is the management of produced water. In...

Yanjun Meng; Dazhen Tang; Hao Xu; Yong Li

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

From Processing Juice to Producing Biofuels | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

From Processing Juice to Producing Biofuels From Processing Juice to Producing Biofuels From Processing Juice to Producing Biofuels June 25, 2010 - 4:00pm Addthis Lindsay Gsell INEOS Bio -- one of the 17 global companies of the chemicals company INEOS -- is on schedule to begin construction this fall on the new Indian River BioEnergy Center near Vero Beach, Florida. The INEOS facility -- which was formerly a grapefruit processing plant for Ocean Spray -- will produce nearly eight million gallons of bioethanol per year from renewable biomass including yard, wood and vegetable waste. As part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, the Department of Energy awarded cost-share grants to 19 integrated biorefinery projects throughout the country. INEOS Bio was selected to for a matching grant of up to $50 million, which will fund the construction for the new center.

398

Modern Processes of Producing Two-Layer Filtering Materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper describes developments of the Powder Metallurgy Institute (National Academy of Sciences of Belarus) in the field of producing two-layer permeable structures with a filtering layer 0.30.4mm in thick...

P. A. Vityaz; A. F. Ilyushchenko; V. M. Kaptsevich

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Method for producing high quality thin layer films on substrates  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for producing high quality, thin layer films of inorganic compounds upon the surface of a substrate is disclosed. The method involves condensing a mixture of preselected molecular precursors on the surface of a substrate and subsequently inducing the formation of reactive species using high energy photon or charged particle irradiation. The reactive species react with one another to produce a film of the desired compound upon the surface of the substrate.

Strongin, Myron (Center Moriches, NY); Ruckman, Mark (Middle Island, NY); Strongin, Daniel (Port Jefferson, NY)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Method for producing high quality thin layer films on substrates  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for producing high quality, thin layer films of inorganic compounds upon the surface of a substrate is disclosed. The method involves condensing a mixture of preselected molecular precursors on the surface of a substrate and subsequently inducing the formation of reactive species using high energy photon or charged particle irradiation. The reactive species react with one another to produce a film of the desired compound upon the surface of the substrate. 4 figures.

Strongin, M.; Ruckman, M.; Strongin, D.

1994-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite wash producers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Produced water radionuclide hazard/risk assessment, Phase 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Petroleum production may be accompanied by the production of saline water, called ``produced water.`` Produced water discharged into freshwater streams, estuaries, coastal and outer continental shelf waters can contained enhanced levels of radium isotopes. This document reports on the first phase of a study to estimate the risk to human health and the environment from radium discharged in produced water. The study involved five major steps: (1) evaluate the usefulness of available produced water outfall data for developing estimates of radium environmental concentrations; (2) review the literature on the bioaccumulation of radium by aquatic organism; (3) review the literature on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms; (4) review the information available concerning the human health risks associated with exposure to Ra-226 and Ra-228 and (5) perform a conservative, screening-level assessment of the health and environmental risks posed by Ra-226 and Ra-228 discharged in produced waters. A screening-level analysis was performed to determine whether radium discharged to coastal Louisiana in produced waters presents potential health or environmental risks requiring further study. This conservative assessment suggested that no detectable impact on populations of fish, molluscs or crustaceans from radium discharged in produced waters is likely. The analysis also suggested that there is a potential for risk were an individual to ingest a large amount of seafood harvested near a produced water discharge point over a lifetime. The number of excess cancers predicted per year under a conservative scenario is comparable to those expected to result from background concentrations of radium.

Hamilton, L.D.; Meinhold, A.F.; Nagy, J.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Produced water radionuclide hazard/risk assessment, Phase 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Petroleum production may be accompanied by the production of saline water, called produced water.'' Produced water discharged into freshwater streams, estuaries, coastal and outer continental shelf waters can contained enhanced levels of radium isotopes. This document reports on the first phase of a study to estimate the risk to human health and the environment from radium discharged in produced water. The study involved five major steps: (1) evaluate the usefulness of available produced water outfall data for developing estimates of radium environmental concentrations; (2) review the literature on the bioaccumulation of radium by aquatic organism; (3) review the literature on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms; (4) review the information available concerning the human health risks associated with exposure to Ra-226 and Ra-228 and (5) perform a conservative, screening-level assessment of the health and environmental risks posed by Ra-226 and Ra-228 discharged in produced waters. A screening-level analysis was performed to determine whether radium discharged to coastal Louisiana in produced waters presents potential health or environmental risks requiring further study. This conservative assessment suggested that no detectable impact on populations of fish, molluscs or crustaceans from radium discharged in produced waters is likely. The analysis also suggested that there is a potential for risk were an individual to ingest a large amount of seafood harvested near a produced water discharge point over a lifetime. The number of excess cancers predicted per year under a conservative scenario is comparable to those expected to result from background concentrations of radium.

Hamilton, L.D.; Meinhold, A.F.; Nagy, J.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Laser plasma focus produced in a ring target  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new geometry for generating a laser?produced plasma is presented. A toroidalmirror is used to focus a CO2laser beam on the inside wall of a copper ring target. The plasma produced converges at the center of the ring where an axial plasma focus is formed. High?speed photography shows details of a plasma generated at a distance from the target surface. This new geometry could have important applications in the field of x?ray lasers.

G. Saint?Hilaire; Z. Szili

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Table 4.3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","RSE" "Economic",,,"Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","Row" "Characteristic(a)","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

405

Health risk assessment for radium discharged in produced waters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Produced water generated during the production of oil and gas can contain enhanced levels of radium. This naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) is discharged into freshwater streams, estuarine, coastal and outer continental shelf waters. Large volumes of produced waters are discharged to coastal waters along the Gulf Coast of Louisiana. The Gulf of Mexico is an important producer of fish and shellfish, and there is concern that radium discharged to coastal Louisiana could contaminate fish and shellfish used by people for food, and present a significant increase in cancer risk. This paper describes a screening-level assessment of the potential cancer risks posed by radium discharged to coastal Louisiana in oil-field produced waters. This screening analysis was performed to determine if a more comprehensive and realistic assessment is necessary, and because of the conservative assumptions embedded in the analysis overestimates the risk associated with the discharge of radium in produced waters. Two isotopes of radium (Ra-226 and Ra-228) are the radionuclides of most concern in produced water in terms of potential human health effects.

Hamilton, L.D.; Meinhold, A.F.; Nagy, J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Health risk assessment for radium discharged in produced waters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Produced water generated during the production of oil and gas can contain enhanced levels of radium. This naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) is discharged into freshwater streams, estuarine, coastal and outer continental shelf waters. Large volumes of produced waters are discharged to coastal waters along the Gulf Coast of Louisiana. The Gulf of Mexico is an important producer of fish and shellfish, and there is concern that radium discharged to coastal Louisiana could contaminate fish and shellfish used by people for food, and present a significant increase in cancer risk. This paper describes a screening-level assessment of the potential cancer risks posed by radium discharged to coastal Louisiana in oil-field produced waters. This screening analysis was performed to determine if a more comprehensive and realistic assessment is necessary, and because of the conservative assumptions embedded in the analysis overestimates the risk associated with the discharge of radium in produced waters. Two isotopes of radium (Ra-226 and Ra-228) are the radionuclides of most concern in produced water in terms of potential human health effects.

Hamilton, L.D.; Meinhold, A.F.; Nagy, J.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

407

White Sturgeon Management Plan in the Snake River between Lower Granite and Hells Canyon Dams; Nez Perce Tribe, 1997-2005 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

White sturgeon in the Hells Canyon reach (HCR) of the Snake River are of cultural importance to the Nez Perce Tribe. However, subsistence and ceremonial fishing opportunities have been severely limited as a result of low numbers of white sturgeon in the HCR. Hydrosystem development in the Columbia River Basin has depressed numbers and productivity of white sturgeon in the HCR by isolating fish in impounded reaches of the basin, restricting access to optimal rearing habitats, reducing the anadromous forage base, and modifying early life-history habitats. Consequently, a proactive management plan is needed to mitigate for the loss of white sturgeon production in the HCR, and to identify and implement feasible measures that will restore and rebuild the white sturgeon population to a level that sustains viability and can support an annual harvest. This comprehensive and adaptive management plan describes the goals, objectives, strategies, actions, and expected evaluative timeframes for restoring the white sturgeon population in the HCR. The goal of this plan, which is to maintain a viable, persistent population that can support a sustainable fishery, is supported by the following objectives: (1) a natural, stable age structure comprising both juveniles and a broad spectrum of spawning age-classes; (2) stable or increasing numbers of both juveniles and adults; (3) consistent levels of average recruitment to ensure future contribution to reproductive potential; (4) stable genetic diversity comparable to current levels; (5) a minimum level of abundance of 2,500 adults to minimize extinction risk; and (6) provision of an annual sustainable harvest of 5 kg/ha. To achieve management objectives, potential mitigative actions were developed by a Biological Risk Assessment Team (BRAT). Identified strategies and actions included enhancing growth and survival rates by restoring anadromous fish runs and increasing passage opportunities for white sturgeon, reducing mortality rates of early life stages by modifying flows in the HCR, reducing mortality imposed by the catch and release fishery, augmenting natural production through translocation or hatchery releases, and assessing detrimental effects of contaminants on reproductive potential. These proposed actions were evaluated by assessing their relative potential to affect population growth rate and by determining the feasibility of their execution, including a realistic timeframe (short-term, mid-term, long-term) for their implementation and evaluation. A multi-pronged approach for management was decided upon whereby various actions will be implemented and evaluated under different timeframes. Priority management actions include: Action I- Produce juvenile white sturgeon in a hatchery and release into the management area; Action G- Collect juvenile white sturgeon from other populations in the Snake or Columbia rivers and release them into the management area; and Action D- Restore white sturgeon passage upriver and downriver at Lower Snake and Idaho Power dams. An integral part of this approach is the continual monitoring of performance measures to assess the progressive response of the population to implemented actions, to evaluate the actions efficacy toward achieving objectives, and to refine and redirect strategies if warranted.

Nez Perce Tribe Resources Management Staff, (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Review of technologies for oil and gas produced water treatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Produced water is the largest waste stream generated in oil and gas industries. It is a mixture of different organic and inorganic compounds. Due to the increasing volume of waste all over the world in the current decade, the outcome and effect of discharging produced water on the environment has lately become a significant issue of environmental concern. Produced water is conventionally treated through different physical, chemical, and biological methods. In offshore platforms because of space constraints, compact physical and chemical systems are used. However, current technologies cannot remove small-suspended oil particles and dissolved elements. Besides, many chemical treatments, whose initial and/or running cost are high and produce hazardous sludge. In onshore facilities, biological pretreatment of oily wastewater can be a cost-effective and environmental friendly method. As high salt concentration and variations of influent characteristics have direct influence on the turbidity of the effluent, it is appropriate to incorporate a physical treatment, e.g., membrane to refine the final effluent. For these reasons, major research efforts in the future could focus on the optimization of current technologies and use of combined physico-chemical and/or biological treatment of produced water in order to comply with reuse and discharge limits.

Ahmadun Fakhrul-Razi; Alireza Pendashteh; Luqman Chuah Abdullah; Dayang Radiah Awang Biak; Sayed Siavash Madaeni; Zurina Zainal Abidin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Ship-produced cloud line of 13 July 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Steaming ships can produce long linear cloud lines in regions of fog and broken stratus as well as in marine stratus layers. The lines are not always detected in 0.63 {mu}m satellite images, but are often detected in the corresponding 3.7 {mu}m images because the lines contain smaller and more numerous droplets than the stratus in which they are embedded as deduced by Coakley, et al. and measured by Radke, et al. They postulate cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) from steaming ships produced the more numerous and, hence, smaller cloud droplets. The ship-produced clouds are not always detected in 0.63 {mu}m images because this wavelength is not as sensitive to changes in droplet size as is 3.7 {mu}m. On 13 July 1991 a dramatic, ship-produced cloud line formed offshore of Baja California. The authors present satellite images of the line and corresponding photographs from the R/V EGABRAG III which passed under the line. The images and photos reveal the structure of the line. The EGABRAG was a source of CCN but did not produce a cloud line; they attempt to explain this important finding.

Hindman, E.E. [City Coll. of New York, NY (US); Porch, W.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US); Hudson, J.G. [Desert Research Inst., Reno, NV (US); Durkee, P.A. [Navel Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA (US)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

410

Ship-produced cloud line of 13 July 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Steaming ships can produce long linear cloud lines in regions of fog and broken stratus as well as in marine stratus layers. The lines are not always detected in 0.63 [mu]m satellite images, but are often detected in the corresponding 3.7 [mu]m images because the lines contain smaller and more numerous droplets than the stratus in which they are embedded as deduced by Coakley, et al. and measured by Radke, et al. They postulate cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) from steaming ships produced the more numerous and, hence, smaller cloud droplets. The ship-produced clouds are not always detected in 0.63 [mu]m images because this wavelength is not as sensitive to changes in droplet size as is 3.7 [mu]m. On 13 July 1991 a dramatic, ship-produced cloud line formed offshore of Baja California. The authors present satellite images of the line and corresponding photographs from the R/V EGABRAG III which passed under the line. The images and photos reveal the structure of the line. The EGABRAG was a source of CCN but did not produce a cloud line; they attempt to explain this important finding.

Hindman, E.E. (City Coll. of New York, NY (United States)); Porch, W.M. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Hudson, J.G. (Desert Research Inst., Reno, NV (United States)); Durkee, P.A. (Navel Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Union Helps Produce Women Workers | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Union Helps Produce Women Workers Union Helps Produce Women Workers Union Helps Produce Women Workers January 21, 2010 - 3:15pm Addthis Joshua DeLung At the Community Environmental Center in Long Island City, N.Y. - and across the country - you don't always see a lot of women in the construction business. Locating experienced female weatherization technicians to recruit had proven difficult for CEC, but 30-year-old Tahlia Williams is the beginning of a new era in the clean energy economy. "Construction is something I had wanted to do for a long time," Tahlia says. "I had no way of knowing how to get into this field because I always heard it was a man's world. I wanted in." When the Recovery Act passed, providing more funding than ever to weatherize an unprecedented number of homes, CEC needed to train and hire

412

Capacity and Energy Payments to Small Power Producers and Cogenerators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Capacity and Energy Payments to Small Power Producers and Capacity and Energy Payments to Small Power Producers and Cogenerators Under PURPA Docket (Georgia) Capacity and Energy Payments to Small Power Producers and Cogenerators Under PURPA Docket (Georgia) < Back Eligibility Commercial Developer Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Georgia Program Type Green Power Purchasing Renewables Portfolio Standards and Goals Docket No. 4822 was enacted by the Georgia Public Service Commission in accordance with The Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA)

413

Midwest Ethanol Producers Inc MEPI | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ethanol Producers Inc MEPI Ethanol Producers Inc MEPI Jump to: navigation, search Name Midwest Ethanol Producers Inc (MEPI) Place O'Neill, Nebraska Zip 68763 Product Focused on ethanol production. Coordinates 34.82186°, -97.513329° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.82186,"lon":-97.513329,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

414

Calpine: America's largest geothermal energy producer | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Calpine: America's largest geothermal energy producer Calpine: America's largest geothermal energy producer Calpine: America's largest geothermal energy producer October 6, 2010 - 12:37pm Addthis Calpine operates 15 plants at The Geysers in northwest California, which generate enough clean energy daily to power a city the size of San Francisco.| Photo Courtesy of Calpine Calpine operates 15 plants at The Geysers in northwest California, which generate enough clean energy daily to power a city the size of San Francisco.| Photo Courtesy of Calpine Paul Lester Communications Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Amid the Mayacamas Mountains in northwest California sits the world's largest geothermal field: The Geysers. Since 1960, steam from the 45 square mile field spanning Lake and Sonoma

415

Chelan County PUD - Sustainable Natural Alternative Power Producers Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sustainable Natural Alternative Power Producers Sustainable Natural Alternative Power Producers Program Chelan County PUD - Sustainable Natural Alternative Power Producers Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Local Government Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Bioenergy Buying & Making Electricity Solar Home Weatherization Water Wind Maximum Rebate $1.50/kWh Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Performance-Based Incentive Rebate Amount Varies; 2012 payment was $0.16/kWh Provider Chelan County Public Utility District The Sustainable Natural Alternative Power (SNAP) program encourages customers to install alternative power generators such as solar panels and wind turbines and connect them to the District's electrical distribution system by offering an incentive payment based on the system's production.

416

LANL researchers improve path to producing uranium compounds, candidates  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Researchers improve path to producing uranium compounds Researchers improve path to producing uranium compounds LANL researchers improve path to producing uranium compounds, candidates for advanced nuclear fuels Enhance the ability to develop advanced nuclear fuels in a safer, simpler manner. April 7, 2011 This illustration shows the structures of UI4(1,4-dioxane)2 (left) and the UI3(1,4-dioxane)1.5 complexes. This illustration shows the structures of UI4(1,4-dioxane)2 (left) and the UI3(1,4-dioxane)1.5 complexes. Contact Kevin Roark Communicatons Office (505) 665-9202 Email LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, April 7, 2010- Advances made by researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory could enhance the ability of scientists to develop advanced nuclear fuels in a safer, simpler manner. Uranium chemistry research relies heavily on a variety of uranium "starting

417

Union Helps Produce Women Workers | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Union Helps Produce Women Workers Union Helps Produce Women Workers Union Helps Produce Women Workers January 21, 2010 - 3:15pm Addthis Joshua DeLung At the Community Environmental Center in Long Island City, N.Y. - and across the country - you don't always see a lot of women in the construction business. Locating experienced female weatherization technicians to recruit had proven difficult for CEC, but 30-year-old Tahlia Williams is the beginning of a new era in the clean energy economy. "Construction is something I had wanted to do for a long time," Tahlia says. "I had no way of knowing how to get into this field because I always heard it was a man's world. I wanted in." When the Recovery Act passed, providing more funding than ever to weatherize an unprecedented number of homes, CEC needed to train and hire

418

Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at Commercial-Scale Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at Commercial-Scale July 31, 2013 - 1:37pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - The Energy Department today recognized the nation's first commercial-scale cellulosic ethanol production at INEOS Bio's Indian River BioEnergy Center in Vero Beach, Florida. Developed through a joint venture between INEOS Bio and New Planet Energy, the project uses a unique hybrid of gasification and fermentation technology - originally developed with Energy Department support starting in the 1990's - to convert wood scraps, grass clippings and other waste materials into transportation fuels as well as energy for heat and power.

419

Producing Clean, Renewable Diesel from Biomass | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Producing Clean, Renewable Diesel from Biomass Producing Clean, Renewable Diesel from Biomass Producing Clean, Renewable Diesel from Biomass November 30, 2011 - 12:08pm Addthis ThermoChem Recovery International's process demonstration unit -- where wood waste and forest residue is converted into renewable fuel. | Courtesy of TRI. ThermoChem Recovery International's process demonstration unit -- where wood waste and forest residue is converted into renewable fuel. | Courtesy of TRI. Paul Bryan Biomass Program Manager, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy After a rigorous testing process, Energy Department project partners at ThermoChem Recovery International (TRI) have validated a process that converts wood waste and forest residue into clean, renewable fuel. Pilot validation is a key milestone for biofuels companies like TRI. With

420

Nonsalt Producing Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonsalt Producing Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonsalt Producing Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonsalt Producing Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet) Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value 2006-Dec 12/29 841 2007-Jan 01/05 823 01/12 806 01/19 755 01/26 716 2007-Feb 02/02 666 02/09 613 02/16 564 02/23 538 2007-Mar 03/02 527 03/09 506 03/16 519 03/23 528 03/30 550 2007-Apr 04/06 560 04/13 556 04/20 568 04/27 590 2007-May 05/04 610 05/11 629 05/18 648 05/25 670

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite wash producers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at Commercial-Scale Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at Commercial-Scale July 31, 2013 - 1:37pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - The Energy Department today recognized the nation's first commercial-scale cellulosic ethanol production at INEOS Bio's Indian River BioEnergy Center in Vero Beach, Florida. Developed through a joint venture between INEOS Bio and New Planet Energy, the project uses a unique hybrid of gasification and fermentation technology - originally developed with Energy Department support starting in the 1990's - to convert wood scraps, grass clippings and other waste materials into transportation fuels as well as energy for heat and power.

422

Producing Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Producing Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet) Producing Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet) Producing Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet) Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value 1993-Dec 12/31 570 1994-Jan 01/07 532 01/14 504 01/21 440 01/28 414 1994-Feb 02/04 365 02/11 330 02/18 310 02/25 309 1994-Mar 03/04 281 03/11 271 03/18 284 03/25 303 1994-Apr 04/01 287 04/08 293 04/15 308 04/22 334 04/29 353 1994-May 05/06 376 05/13 399 05/20 429 05/27 443

423

Electrochemical method of producing nano-scaled graphene platelets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method of producing nano-scaled graphene platelets with an average thickness smaller than 30 nm from a layered graphite material. The method comprises (a) forming a carboxylic acid-intercalated graphite compound by an electrochemical reaction; (b) exposing the intercalated graphite compound to a thermal shock to produce exfoliated graphite; and (c) subjecting the exfoliated graphite to a mechanical shearing treatment to produce the nano-scaled graphene platelets. Preferred carboxylic acids are formic acid and acetic acid. The exfoliation step in the instant invention does not involve the evolution of undesirable species, such as NO.sub.x and SO.sub.x, which are common by-products of exfoliating conventional sulfuric or nitric acid-intercalated graphite compounds. The nano-scaled platelets are candidate reinforcement fillers for polymer nanocomposites. Nano-scaled graphene platelets are much lower-cost alternatives to carbon nano-tubes or carbon nano-fibers.

Zhamu, Aruna; Jang, Joan; Jang, Bor Z.

2013-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

424

Electrical Energy Producer's License Tax (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Producer's License Tax (Montana) Energy Producer&#039;s License Tax (Montana) Electrical Energy Producer's License Tax (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Montana Program Type Fees Provider Montana Department of Revenue Each person or other organization engaged in the generation, manufacture, or production of electricity and electrical energy in the state of Montana,

425

Producing Natural Gas From Shale | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Producing Natural Gas From Shale Producing Natural Gas From Shale Producing Natural Gas From Shale January 26, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis The Office of Fossil Energy sponsored early research that refined more cost-effective and innovative production technologies for U.S. shale gas production -- such as directional drilling. By 2035, EIA projects that shale gas production will rise to 13.6 trillion cubic feet, representing nearly half of all U.S. natural gas production. | Image courtesy of the Office of Fossil Energy. The Office of Fossil Energy sponsored early research that refined more cost-effective and innovative production technologies for U.S. shale gas production -- such as directional drilling. By 2035, EIA projects that shale gas production will rise to 13.6 trillion cubic feet, representing

426

DOE Seeks Industry Proposals for Feasibility Study to Produce Greenhouse  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Industry Proposals for Feasibility Study to Produce Industry Proposals for Feasibility Study to Produce Greenhouse Gas-Free Hydrogen at Existing Nuclear Power Plants DOE Seeks Industry Proposals for Feasibility Study to Produce Greenhouse Gas-Free Hydrogen at Existing Nuclear Power Plants April 13, 2006 - 10:19am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - In support of President Bush's Advanced Energy Initiative (AEI), Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today announced that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will allocate up to $1.6 million this year to fund industry studies on the best ways to utilize energy from existing commercial nuclear reactors for production of hydrogen in a safe and environmentally-sound manner. DOE is seeking industry proposals for these Federal Financial Assistance Awards, worth up to 80 percent of the total

427

Low-cost method for producing extreme ultraviolet lithography optics  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Spherical and non-spherical optical elements produced by standard optical figuring and polishing techniques are extremely expensive. Such surfaces can be cheaply produced by diamond turning; however, the roughness in the diamond turned surface prevent their use for EUV lithography. These ripples are smoothed with a coating of polyimide before applying a 60 period Mo/Si multilayer to reflect a wavelength of 134 .ANG. and have obtained peak reflectivities close to 63%. The savings in cost are about a factor of 100.

Folta, James A. (Livermore, CA); Montcalm, Claude (Fort Collins, CO); Taylor, John S. (Livermore, CA); Spiller, Eberhard A. (Mt. Kisco, NY)

2003-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

428

Oxidation resistant alloys, method for producing oxidation resistant alloys  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for producing oxidation-resistant austenitic alloys for use at temperatures below 800.degree. C. comprising of: providing an alloy comprising, by weight %: 14-18% chromium, 15-18% nickel, 1-3% manganese, 1-2% molybdenum, 2-4% silicon, 0% aluminum and the balance being iron; heating the alloy to 800.degree. C. for between 175-250 hours prior to use in order to form a continuous silicon oxide film and another oxide film. The method provides a means of producing stainless steels with superior oxidation resistance at temperatures above 700.degree. C. at a low cost

Dunning, John S. (Corvallis, OR); Alman, David E. (Salem, OR)

2002-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

429

Engineered microorganisms capable of producing target compounds under anaerobic conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present invention is generally provides recombinant microorganisms comprising engineered metabolic pathways capable of producing C3-C5 alcohols under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The invention further provides ketol-acid reductoisomerase enzymes which have been mutated or modified to increase their NADH-dependent activity or to switch the cofactor preference from NADPH to NADH and are expressed in the modified microorganisms. In addition, the invention provides isobutyraldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes expressed in modified microorganisms. Also provided are methods of producing beneficial metabolites under aerobic and anaerobic conditions by contacting a suitable substrate with the modified microorganisms of the present invention.

Buelter, Thomas (Denver, CO); Meinhold, Peter (Denver, CO); Feldman, Reid M. Renny (San Francisco, CA); Hawkins, Andrew C. (Parker, CO); Urano, Jun (Irvine, CA); Bastian, Sabine (Pasadena, CA); Arnold, Frances (La Canada, CA)

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

430

Methods of producing adsorption media including a metal oxide  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods of producing a metal oxide are disclosed. The method comprises dissolving a metal salt in a reaction solvent to form a metal salt/reaction solvent solution. The metal salt is converted to a metal oxide and a caustic solution is added to the metal oxide/reaction solvent solution to adjust the pH of the metal oxide/reaction solvent solution to less than approximately 7.0. The metal oxide is precipitated and recovered. A method of producing adsorption media including the metal oxide is also disclosed, as is a precursor of an active component including particles of a metal oxide.

Mann, Nicholas R; Tranter, Troy J

2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

431

Autogenous electrolyte, non-pyrolytically produced solid capacitor structure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A solid electrolytic capacitor having a solid electrolyte comprising manganese dioxide dispersed in an aromatic polyamide capable of further cure to form polyimide linkages, the solid electrolyte being disposed between a first electrode made of valve metal covered by an anodic oxide film and a second electrode opposite the first electrode. The electrolyte autogenously produces water, oxygen, and hydroxyl groups which act as healing substances and is not itself produced pyrolytically. Reduction of the manganese dioxide and the water molecules released by formation of imide linkages result in substantially improved self-healing of anodic dielectric layer defects.

Sharp, Donald J. (Albuquerque, NM); Armstrong, Pamela S. (Abingdon, MD); Panitz, Janda Kirk G. (Edgewood, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Autogenous electrolyte, non-pyrolytically produced solid capacitor structure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A solid electrolytic capacitor is described having a solid electrolyte comprising manganese dioxide dispersed in an aromatic polyamide capable of further cure to form polyimide linkages, the solid electrolyte being disposed between a first electrode made of valve metal covered by an anodic oxide film and a second electrode opposite the first electrode. The electrolyte autogenously produces water, oxygen, and hydroxyl groups which act as healing substances and is not itself produced pyrolytically. Reduction of the manganese dioxide and the water molecules released by formation of imide linkages result in substantially improved self-healing of anodic dielectric layer defects. 2 figs.

Sharp, D.J.; Armstrong, P.S.; Panitz, J.K.G.

1998-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

433

Oxidation resistant alloys, method for producing oxidation resistant alloys  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for producing oxidation-resistant austenitic alloys for use at temperatures below 800 C. comprising of: providing an alloy comprising, by weight %: 14-18% chromium, 15-18% nickel, 1-3% manganese, 1-2% molybdenum, 2-4% silicon, 0% aluminum and the balance being iron; heating the alloy to 800 C. for between 175-250 hours prior to use in order to form a continuous silicon oxide film and another oxide film. The method provides a means of producing stainless steels with superior oxidation resistance at temperatures above 700 C. at a low cost

Dunning, John S.; Alman, David E.

2002-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

434

Process for producing amorphous and crystalline silicon nitride  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for producing amorphous or crystalline silicon nitride is disclosed which comprises reacting silicon disulfide ammonia gas at elevated temperature. In a preferred embodiment silicon disulfide in the form of "whiskers" or needles is heated at temperature ranging from about 900.degree. C. to about 1200.degree. C. to produce silicon nitride which retains the whisker or needle morphological characteristics of the silicon disulfide. Silicon carbide, e.g. in the form of whiskers, also can be prepared by reacting substituted ammonia, e.g. methylamine, or a hydrocarbon containing active hydrogen-containing groups, such as ethylene, with silicon disulfide, at elevated temperature, e.g. 900.degree. C.

Morgan, Peter E. D. (Thousand Oaks, CA); Pugar, Eloise A. (Newbury Park, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Method of producing nano-scaled inorganic platelets  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides a method of exfoliating a layered material (e.g., transition metal dichalcogenide) to produce nano-scaled platelets having a thickness smaller than 100 nm, typically smaller than 10 nm. The method comprises (a) dispersing particles of a non-graphite laminar compound in a liquid medium containing therein a surfactant or dispersing agent to obtain a stable suspension or slurry; and (b) exposing the suspension or slurry to ultrasonic waves at an energy level for a sufficient length of time to produce separated nano-scaled platelets. The nano-scaled platelets are candidate reinforcement fillers for polymer nanocomposites.

Zhamu, Aruna; Jang, Bor Z.

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

436

Effect of Rhamnolipids Produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa UG2 on the Solubilization of Pesticides  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Surfactants at amounts above their critical micellar concentration (CMC) can greatly enhance the apparent aqueous solubility of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOC) and can be successfully used in conjunction with remediation technologies such as soil washing/flushing and pump-and-treat. ... For example, studies by Lunning Prak et al. (27) showed that solubilization rates (k) of n-alkanes in the micellar phase of nonionic surfactants had close correlation with the micelle-water partition coefficients (Km,w), the solute molar volume, and the surfactant HLB or ethoxylate chain length. ...

Juan C. Mata-Sandoval; Jeffrey Karns; Alba Torrents

2000-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

437

RULES FOR THE CLASSIFICATION OF ANTIBIOTIC-PRODUCING ACTINOMYCETES  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...antibiotic-producing actino- mycetes have been described recently. Investi- gators often give new species names without a strict taxonomic analysis...applied in revealing leading species criteria? Each investi- gator solves the proposed questions in his own way, in conformity...

N. A. Krasil'Nikov

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

A New Approach to Tracing Particulates from Produced Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in comparison with three suggest that the heavy metals in produced water may be more toxic than originally of buoyant particles com- prised of heavy metal precipitates sequestered onto oil droplets that were is diluted with seawater. These precipitates are more toxic than the dissolved fraction, can flocculate

Taggart, Christopher

439

Laser-produced plasma-wall interaction O. RENNER,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laser-produced plasma-wall interaction O. RENNER,1 R. LISKA,2 AND F.B. ROSMEJ3,4 1 Institute, France (RECEIVED 30 August 2009; ACCEPTED 21 September 2009) Abstract Jets of laser­generated plasma surfaces (walls). The pilot experiments carried out on the iodine laser system (5­200 J, 0.44 mm, 0

Liska, Richard

440

Optimal Bidding Strategies for Wind Power Producers with Meteorological Forecasts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimal Bidding Strategies for Wind Power Producers with Meteorological Forecasts Antonio that the inherent variability in wind power generation and the related difficulty in predicting future generation profiles, raise major challenges to wind power integration into the electricity grid. In this work we study

Giannitrapani, Antonello

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite wash producers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Nuclear interactions produced by high-energy muons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Penetrating showers produced in iron plates of a multiplate cloud chamber by muons at 148 m w.e. underground are ... and Kessler. The observed cross-sections for energy transfers in the range (1?8)...?28 cm2 per ...

N. Chaudhuri; M. S. Sinha

1968-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

442

Horizontal natural gas storage caverns and methods for producing same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention provides caverns and methods for producing caverns in bedded salt deposits for the storage of materials that are not solvents for salt. The contemplated salt deposits are of the bedded, non-domed variety, more particularly salt found in layered formations that are sufficiently thick to enable the production of commercially usefully sized caverns completely encompassed by walls of salt of the formation. In a preferred method, a first bore hole is drilled into the salt formation and a cavity for receiving insolubles is leached from the salt formation. Thereafter, at a predetermined distance away from the first bore hole, a second bore hole is drilled towards the salt formation. As this drill approaches the salt, the drill assumes a slant approach and enters the salt and drills through it in a horizontal direction until it intersects the cavity for receiving insolubles. This produces a substantially horizontal conduit from which solvent is controlledly supplied to the surrounding salt formation, leaching the salt and producing a concentrated brine which is removed through the first bore hole. Insolubles are collected in the cavity for receiving insolubles. By controlledly supplying solvent, a horizontal cavern is produced with two bore holes extending therefrom.

Russo, Anthony (Albuquerque, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Process for producing astatine-211 for radiopharmaceutical use  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for reliably and consistently producing astatine-211 in small controlled volumes of a solution, which is selected from a choice of solvents that are useful in selected radiopharmaceutical procedures in which the At-211 activities are to be applied.

Mirzadeh, Saed (East Setauket, NY); Lambrecht, Richard M. (Quogue, NY)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Searches for supersymmetric particles produced in Z-boson decay  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have searched for supersymmetric particles in 528 Z decays with the Mark II detector at the SLAC Linear Collider. We place 95%-confidence-level lower mass limits on degenerate squarks, nondegenerate up-type squarks, nondegenerate down-type squarks, charginos, pair-produced unstable neutralinos, and neutralinos from associated production.

T. Barklow et al.

1990-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

445

Two Techniques to Produce Cold Antihydrogen A thesis presented  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The second H production method utilizes a two step laser- controlled charge exchange to produce antihydrogen.2 Cold Antihydrogen Production Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 1.2.1 Three-Body Recombination to the spectroscopic comparison of antihydrogen and hydrogen -- a comparison that will require atoms both cold enough

Gabrielse, Gerald

446

A Producer-Consumer Model with Stoichiometric Elimination Mechanisms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and the efficiency of the consumer's conversion of producer biomass to its own biomass. The elimination model we, or equivalently, the stoichiometric ratio of nutrient to biomass, as well as the biomass, is of interest on the flow of a single currency, such as energy stored in carbon compounds or biomass. This point of view

Peckham, Bruce B.

447

GrowingProduce.com | 27 Tree Fruit Expert  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GrowingProduce.com | 27 Tree Fruit Expert Moving WestClemson University tree fruit specialist-time tree fruit specialist at Clemson University (and "Stone Fruit" columnist for American/Western Fruit at Washington State University (WSU) as a new endowed chair created by funding from the state's tree fruit

Duchowski, Andrew T.

448

Producer Gas Engines in Villages of Less-Developed Countries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...farmers use high-quality...petroleum and natural gas, whereas virtually...of synthesis gas. So far...950-watt, low-pressure, hot-air...fluidized-bed combustors to yield combustion...exceedingly high, $4,000...producer gas, and Stirling...

Rathin Datta; Gautam S. Dutt

1981-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

449

EVOLVING LEG CYCLES TO PRODUCE HEXAPOD GAITS GARY B. PARKER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

movement by the servos. The best means of combining these leg cycles into a gait cycle is learnedEVOLVING LEG CYCLES TO PRODUCE HEXAPOD GAITS GARY B. PARKER Computer Science, Connecticut College by dividing the prob- lem into two parts: leg cycle learning and gait cycle learning. Servo pulses required

Parker, Gary B.

450

The Challenge of Producing Oil and Gas in Deep Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...institutions (Joides). The oil industry has drilled controlled...major unexplored frontier for oil and gas. The paper emphasizes...engineering geology natural gas offshore petroleum production 1977 06...1981 The challenge of producing oil and gas in deep water van Eek...

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

OPTICAL EMISSION DIAGNOSTICS OF LASER PRODUCED PLASMA FROM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OPTICAL EMISSION DIAGNOSTICS OF LASER PRODUCED PLASMA FROM GRAPHITE AND YBa2Cu30 7 HARILAL. s irradiances, ionization occurs which leads to the plasma formation. Spectroscopic studies of optical emission and the resulting plasma. Optical emission spectroscopy is a technique which analyzes the light emitted from

Harilal, S. S.

452

Method of producing hydrogen, and rendering a contaminated biomass inert  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for rendering a contaminated biomass inert includes providing a first composition, providing a second composition, reacting the first and second compositions together to form an alkaline hydroxide, providing a contaminated biomass feedstock and reacting the alkaline hydroxide with the contaminated biomass feedstock to render the contaminated biomass feedstock inert and further producing hydrogen gas, and a byproduct that includes the first composition.

Bingham, Dennis N. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Klingler, Kerry M. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Wilding, Bruce M. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID

2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

453

Management of produced water in oil and gas operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of adsorption for oil removal from produced water............... 13 2.3 Adsorption terminologies ...................................................................... 17 2.4 Evaluation of new organoclay adsorbent for oil removal...................... 19 2... to the experimental data of percentage of oil adsorbed with time.................................................................................................53 5.4 A straight line fit to the experimental data of oil adsorption vs. oil inflow...

Patel, Chirag V.

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

454

Method for producing labeled single-stranded nucleic acid probes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a method for the introduction of unidirectional deletions in a cloned DNA segment. More specifically, the method comprises providing a recombinant DNA construct comprising a DNA segment of interest inserted in a cloning vector, the cloning vector having an f1 endonuclease recognition sequence adjacent to the insertion site of the DNA segment of interest. The recombinant DNA construct is then contacted with the protein pII encoded by gene II of phage f1 thereby generating a single-stranded nick. The nicked DNA is then contacted with E. coli Exonuclease III thereby expanding the single-stranded nick into a single-stranded gap. The single-stranded gapped DNA is then contacted with a single-strand-specific endonuclease thereby producing a linearized DNA molecule containing a double-stranded deletion corresponding in size to the single-stranded gap. The DNA treated in this manner is then incubated with DNA ligase under conditions appropriate for ligation. Also disclosed is a method for producing single-stranded DNA probes. In this embodiment, single-stranded gapped DNA, produced as described above, is contacted with a DNA polymerase in the presence of labeled nucleotides to fill in the gap. This DNA is then linearized by digestion with a restriction enzyme which cuts outside the DNA segment of interest. The product of this digestion is then denatured to produce a labeled single-stranded nucleic acid probe.

Dunn, John J. (Bellport, NY); Quesada, Mark A. (Middle Island, NY); Randesi, Matthew (Upton, NY)

1999-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

455

Certification of a weld produced by friction stir welding  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods, devices, and systems for providing certification of friction stir welds are disclosed. A sensor is used to collect information related to a friction stir weld. Data from the sensor is compared to threshold values provided by an extrinsic standard setting organizations using a certification engine. The certification engine subsequently produces a report on the certification status of the weld.

Obaditch, Chris; Grant, Glenn J

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Electroplating method for producing ultralow-mass fissionable deposits  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for producing ultralow-mass fissionable deposits for nuclear reactor dosimetry is described, including the steps of holding a radioactive parent until the radioactive parent reaches secular equilibrium with a daughter isotope, chemically separating the daughter from the parent, electroplating the daughter on a suitable substrate, and holding the electroplated daughter until the daughter decays to the fissionable deposit.

Ruddy, Francis H. (Monroeville, PA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Power systems utilizing the heat of produced formation fluid  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one method includes treating a hydrocarbon containing formation. The method may include providing heat to the formation; producing heated fluid from the formation; and generating electricity from at least a portion of the heated fluid using a Kalina cycle.

Lambirth, Gene Richard (Houston, TX)

2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

458

Process for producing ceramic nitrides anc carbonitrides and their precursors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for preparing ceramic nitrides and carbon nitrides in the form of very pure, fine particulate powder. Appropriate precursors is prepared by reaching a transition metal alkylamide with ammonia to produce a mixture of metal amide and metal imide in the form of an easily pyrolyzable precipitate.

Brown, G.M.; Maya, L.

1987-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

459

A new method for producing molybdenum-99 without the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new method for producing molybdenum-99 without the need for enriched uranium can bring an end-security nuclear facilities. Also, it is a very inefficient method: only 6% of the uranium-235 is transformed be separated from the chemically identical molybdenum isotopes in a process based on the Szilard

Langendoen, Koen

460

This Quick Guide was produced by the Colorado State Forest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This Quick Guide was produced by the Colorado State Forest Service to promote knowledge transfer Change The spruce beetle is a native species in Colorado's spruce forest ecosystem. Endemic populations between such events as insect and disease epidemics and wildfires, giving spruce forests time

Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite wash producers" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Heat Stress Creates Many Challenges for Milk Producers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heat Stress Creates Many Challenges for Milk Producers There are a variety of factors that can influence a cow's milk production. In Texas, two of these factors are heat stress and reproduction. External heat accumulates from solar radiation, high ambient air temperature, and high relative humidity

462

Hydrogen Peroxide Produced by Angiopoietin-1 Mediates Angiogenesis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Cell, Tumor, and Stem Cell Biology Hydrogen Peroxide Produced by Angiopoietin-1...Ang1-induced ROS was identified as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) using adenovirus-catalase...generation, which we identified to be mainly hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Employing adenoviral-catalase...

Young Mee Kim; Kyung Eun Kim; Gou Young Koh; Ye-Shih Ho; Kong-Joo Lee

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

463

Reaction of Aluminum with Water to Produce Hydrogen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reaction of Aluminum with Water to Produce Hydrogen A Study of Issues Related to the Use of Aluminum for On-Board Vehicular Hydrogen Storage U.S. Department of Energy Version 1.0 - 2008 Page 1 Promoters Oxide Promoters Salt Promoters Combined Oxide and Salt Promoters Aluminum Pretreatment Molten

464

Reaction of Aluminum with Water to Produce Hydrogen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reaction of Aluminum with Water to Produce Hydrogen A Study of Issues Related to the Use of Aluminum for On-Board Vehicular Hydrogen Storage U.S. Department of Energy Version 2 - 2010 1 #12 Promoters Oxide Promoters Salt Promoters Combined Oxide and Salt Promoters Aluminum Pretreatment Molten

465

August 6, 2009 Wastewater Produces Electricity and Desalinates Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

August 6, 2009 Wastewater Produces Electricity and Desalinates Water University Park, Pa. -- A process that cleans wastewater and generates electricity can also remove 90 percent of salt from brackish organic material from wastewater," said Bruce Logan, Kappe Professor of Environmental Engineering, Penn

466

Hydrogen Peroxide Produced by Angiopoietin-1 Mediates Angiogenesis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Stem Cell Biology Hydrogen Peroxide Produced...species (ROS) production plays a role in...was identified as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2...Materials and Methods Cell culture. Human...species (ROS) production plays a role in...was identified as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2...

Young Mee Kim; Kyung Eun Kim; Gou Young Koh; Ye-Shih Ho; and Kong-Joo Lee

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

467

THE POSSIBILITY OF PRODUCING THERMONUCLEAR REACTIONS IN A GASEOUS DISCHARGE*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE POSSIBILITY OF PRODUCING THERMONUCLEAR REACTIONS IN A GASEOUS DISCHARGE* I.V. Kurchatov of the energy of thermonuclear reactions. Physicists the world over are attracted by the extraordinarily interest- ing and very difficult task of controlling thermonuclear reactiom. Investigations in this field

468

Process for producing astatine-211 for radiopharmaceutical use  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for reliably and consistently producing astatine-211 in small controlled volumes of a solution, which is selected from a choice of solvents that are useful in selected radiopharmaceutical procedures in which the At-211 activities are to be applied. 4 figures, 1 table.

Mirzadeh, S.; Lambrecht, R.M.

1984-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

469

Superconducting articles of manufacture and method of producing same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Bulk coatings of Nb.sub.3 Ge with high superconducting transition temperatures bonded to metallic substrates and a chemical vapor deposition method for producing such coatings on metallic substrates are disclosed. In accordance with the method, a Nb.sub.3 Ge coating having a transition temperature in excess of 21.5 K may be tightly bonded to a copper substrate.

Newkirk, Lawrence R. (Los Alamos, NM); Valencia, Flavio A. (Santa Fe, NM)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

First report of NDM-1-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Egypt  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Summary This work reports the occurrence of New Delhi metallo-beta-lactamase 1 (NDM-1) in metallo-beta-lactamase-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Egypt for the first time, and the presence of more than one blaMBL gene in carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa.

Mai Mahmoud Zafer; Mady Amin; Hadir ElMahallawy; Mohammed Seif El-Din Ashour; Mohamed AlAgamy

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Morphological characterization of recombinant strains of Aspergillus oryzae producing alpha-amylase during batch cultivations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Three alpha-amylase producing strains of Aspergillus oryzae used for ... dense mycelium is more efficient in producing ?-amylase.

Anders Spohr; Morten Carlsen; Jens Nielsen; John Villadsen

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Fracture characteristics and their relationships to producing zones in deep  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Fracture characteristics and their relationships to producing zones in deep wells, Raft River geothermal area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Book: Fracture characteristics and their relationships to producing zones in deep wells, Raft River geothermal area Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Fracture characteristics in the sedimentary and metamorphic rocks in the Raft River KGRA of Idaho are analyzed using geological, hydrological and borehole geophysical data from five deep geothermal production wells. Particular emphasis is placed on fracture identification using borehole

473

Borrowing from Nature to Produce Highly Structured Biomimetic Materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Borrowing from Nature to Produce Highly Structured Biomimetic Materials Print Borrowing from Nature to Produce Highly Structured Biomimetic Materials Print Doing Nature One Better Biological tissues such as those that make up our organs are amazing feats of structural engineering. Even more fantastic, the tissues assemble themselves from building blocks based on the proteins that cells synthesize without any outside direction. And, if this isn't mind-boggling enough, consider how all this takes place over large distances with both precision and accuracy. Chemists and materials scientists would dearly like to lift a few pages out of nature's instruction manual and use their wisdom to construct complex structures that do human bidding. Unfortunately, that book is not yet for sale, so the would-be engineers have to find other ways to mimic nature as best they can.