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1

Granite State Electric Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric Co Electric Co Place New York Utility Id 26510 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location NPCC NERC NPCC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates No Rates Available The following table contains monthly sales and revenue data for Granite State Electric Co (New Hampshire). Month RES REV (THOUSAND $) RES SALES (MWH) RES CONS COM REV (THOUSAND $) COM SALES (MWH) COM CONS IND_REV (THOUSAND $) IND SALES (MWH) IND CONS OTH REV (THOUSAND $) OTH SALES (MWH) OTH CONS TOT REV (THOUSAND $) TOT SALES (MWH) TOT CONS

2

Clean Cities: Granite State Clean Cities coalition  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Granite State Clean Cities Coalition Granite State Clean Cities Coalition The Granite State Clean Cities coalition works with vehicle fleets, fuel providers, community leaders, and other stakeholders to reduce petroleum use in transportation. Granite State Clean Cities coalition Contact Information Dolores Rebolledo 603-271-6751 dolores.rebolledo@des.nh.gov Coalition Website Clean Cities Coordinator Dolores Rebolledo Photo of Dolores Rebolledo Dolores Rebolledo joined the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services (DES) as the Granite State Clean Cities coalition coordinator in 2009. The Granite State Clean Cities coalition is a collaboration of 85 public and private stakeholders from all regions of New Hampshire. Rebolledo has 14 years of experience in program management. Prior to joining DES, she was employed by MSB Services as a program consultant and

3

granite  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Granite City, Illinois, Site (formerly the Granite City Granite City, Illinois, Site (formerly the Granite City Steel site) is located at 1417 State Street, approxi- mately 10 miles northeast of St. Louis, Missouri. The site consists of the Betatron Building, a two-story concrete and metal building. From 1958 to 1966, General Steel Castings Cor- poration, under purchase orders from Mallinckrodt Chemical Works, X-rayed uranium ingots in the Betatron Building to detect metallurgical flaws in the uranium metal. This work was performed for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), a predecessor agency of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). At completion of the AEC activities, the site was remediated to comply with radiological protection standards in effect at the time. In 1989, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducted radiological surveys at the Granite City

4

granite  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Granite City, Illinois, Site is located at 1417 State Granite City, Illinois, Site is located at 1417 State Street, approximately 10 miles northeast of St. Louis, Missouri. The site consists of the Betatron Building, a two-story concrete and metal building. From 1958 to 1966, General Steel Castings Cor- poration, under purchase orders from Mallinckrodt Chemical Works, x-rayed uranium ingots in the Betatron Building to detect metallurgical flaws in

5

Quantum states of neutrons in the gravitational and centrifugal potentials in a new GRANIT spectrometer  

SciTech Connect

We will discuss the scientific program to be studied in a new gravitational spectrometer GRANIT in a broad context of quantum states (quantum behaviour) of ultracold neutrons (UCN) in gravitational [1] and centrifugal [2] potentials, as well as applications of these phenomena/spectrometer to various domains of physics, ranging from studies of fundamental short-range interactions and symmetries to neutron quantum optics and reflectometry using UCN. All these topics, as well as related instrumental and methodical developments have been discussed during dedicated GRANIT-2010 Workshop [3]. The GRANIT spectrometer has been recently installed at the Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble, France [4] and could become operational in near future. 1. V.V. Nesvizhevsky et al (2002), Nature 415, 297. 2. V.V. Nesvizhevsky et al (2010), Nature Physics 6, 114. 3. GRANIT-2010, Les Houches, 14-19 february 2010. 4. M. Kreuz et al (2009), NIM 611, 326.

None

2010-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

6

Isotopic Data Bearing on the Origin of Mesozoic and Tertiary Granitic Rocks in the Western United States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Granitic Rocks in the Western United States D. J...Utah, Arizona, and Colorado. The plutons, which...Utah, Arizona and Colorado. The plutons, which...California Cenozoic Colorado crust differentiation...Tertiary United States Utah Western U.S. 1983 03 23 The...

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electricity Profile 2012 Table 1. 2012 Summary statistics (Missouri) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERCSPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)...

8

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arkansas Electricity Profile 2012 Table 1. 2012 Summary Statistics (Arkansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERCSPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity...

9

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Michigan Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Michigan) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 29,831 11 Electric Utilities 21,639 10 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,192 14 Net Generation (megawatthours) 111,551,371 13 Electric Utilities 89,666,874 13 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 21,884,497 16 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 254 6 Nitrogen Oxide 89 6 Carbon Dioxide 74,480 11 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 8 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 19 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,472 20 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 103,649,219 12 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 94,565,247 11

10

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Ohio) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 33,071 8 Electric Utilities 20,179 13 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,892 7 Net Generation (megawatthours) 143,598,337 7 Electric Utilities 92,198,096 10 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 51,400,241 7 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 610 1 Nitrogen Oxide 122 3 Carbon Dioxide 121,964 4 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 9.4 1 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 17 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,872 8 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 154,145,418 4 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 105,329,797 9

11

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Wisconsin) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 17,836 23 Electric Utilities 13,098 19 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,738 20 Net Generation (megawatthours) 64,314,067 24 Electric Utilities 45,579,970 22 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,734,097 18 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 145 12 Nitrogen Oxide 49 25 Carbon Dioxide 47,238 19 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 9 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.7 20 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,619 16 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 68,752,417 22 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 68,752,417 21

12

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Tennessee Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee full report Tennessee Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee full report Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Tennessee) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,417 19 Electric Utilities 20,968 11 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 450 49 Net Generation (megawatthours) 82,348,625 19 Electric Utilities 79,816,049 15 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,532,576 45 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 138 13 Nitrogen Oxide 33 31 Carbon Dioxide 48,196 18 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.7 14 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 40 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,290 26 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 103,521,537 13 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 103,521,537 10

13

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Florida Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Florida) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) FRCC/SERC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 59,147 3 Electric Utilities 50,853 1 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,294 13 Net Generation (megawatthours) 229,095,935 3 Electric Utilities 206,062,185 1 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 23,033,750 15 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 160 11 Nitrogen Oxide 101 5 Carbon Dioxide 123,811 2 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 37 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 35 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,191 31 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 231,209,614 3 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 231,209,614 3

14

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arizona Electricity Profile 2010 Arizona profile Arizona Electricity Profile 2010 Arizona profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Arizona) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 26,392 15 Electric Utilities 20,115 14 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 6,277 16 Net Generation (megawatthours) 111,750,957 12 Electric Utilities 91,232,664 11 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 20,518,293 17 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 33 33 Nitrogen Oxide 57 17 Carbon Dioxide 55,683 15 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.7 43 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 31 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,099 35 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 72,831,737 21 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 72,831,737 20

15

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Kentucky) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 20,453 21 Electric Utilities 18,945 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,507 38 Net Generation (megawatthours) 98,217,658 17 Electric Utilities 97,472,144 7 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 745,514 48 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 249 7 Nitrogen Oxide 85 7 Carbon Dioxide 93,160 7 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.6 5 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 15 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,091 3 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 14 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 12

16

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Alabama) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 32,417 9 Electric Utilities 23,642 7 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,775 12 Net Generation (megawatthours) 152,150,512 6 Electric Utilities 122,766,490 2 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 29,384,022 12 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 218 10 Nitrogen Oxide 66 14 Carbon Dioxide 79,375 9 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.2 18 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 36 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,150 33 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 90,862,645 15 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 90,862,645 13

17

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Arkansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,981 25 Electric Utilities 11,488 23 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,493 24 Net Generation (megawatthours) 61,000,185 25 Electric Utilities 47,108,063 20 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,892,122 27 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 74 22 Nitrogen Oxide 40 29 Carbon Dioxide 34,018 28 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 22 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 24 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,229 29 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 29 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 27

18

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maryland Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Maryland) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 12,516 33 Electric Utilities 80 47 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,436 9 Net Generation (megawatthours) 43,607,264 33 Electric Utilities 2,996 48 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 43,604,268 9 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 45 28 Nitrogen Oxide 25 34 Carbon Dioxide 26,369 33 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 29 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 29 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,333 24 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 65,335,498 24 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 36,082,473 31

19

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Hawaii Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Hawaii) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) -- Primary Energy Source Petroleum Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 2,536 47 Electric Utilities 1,828 40 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 708 47 Net Generation (megawatthours) 10,836,036 45 Electric Utilities 6,416,068 38 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,419,968 38 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 17 36 Nitrogen Oxide 21 36 Carbon Dioxide 8,287 42 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 16 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 4.3 2 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,686 13 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,016,509 48 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 10,016,509 44

20

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Mexico) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,130 36 Electric Utilities 6,345 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,785 36 Net Generation (megawatthours) 36,251,542 37 Electric Utilities 30,848,406 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,403,136 37 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 15 38 Nitrogen Oxide 56 19 Carbon Dioxide 29,379 31 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 42 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 5 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,787 11 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 39 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 38

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite state electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Hampshire) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,180 43 Electric Utilities 1,132 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,048 32 Net Generation (megawatthours) 22,195,912 42 Electric Utilities 3,979,333 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,216,579 19 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 34 32 Nitrogen Oxide 6 46 Carbon Dioxide 5,551 43 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 17 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 46 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 551 47 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,890,074 47 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,712,938 45

22

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oregon Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Oregon Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Oregon) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,261 29 Electric Utilities 10,846 27 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,415 28 Net Generation (megawatthours) 55,126,999 27 Electric Utilities 41,142,684 26 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,984,316 26 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 16 37 Nitrogen Oxide 15 42 Carbon Dioxide 10,094 40 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 44 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 47 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 404 48 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 46,025,945 30 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 44,525,865 29

23

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maine Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Maine Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Maine) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,430 42 Electric Utilities 19 49 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,410 25 Net Generation (megawatthours) 17,018,660 43 Electric Utilities 1,759 49 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,016,901 22 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 12 42 Nitrogen Oxide 8 44 Carbon Dioxide 4,948 44 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 36 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 33 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 641 44 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,531,568 45 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 151,588 51 Energy-Only Provider Sales (megawatthours) 11,379,980 10

24

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mississippi Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Mississippi) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,691 26 Electric Utilities 10,858 26 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,833 18 Net Generation (megawatthours) 54,487,260 28 Electric Utilities 40,841,436 27 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,645,824 28 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 59 26 Nitrogen Oxide 31 32 Carbon Dioxide 26,845 32 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 26 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 30 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,086 36 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 49,687,166 28 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 49,687,166 26

25

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Washington Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Washington Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Washington) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 30,478 10 Electric Utilities 26,498 5 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,979 26 Net Generation (megawatthours) 103,472,729 15 Electric Utilities 88,057,219 14 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 15,415,510 23 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 39 Nitrogen Oxide 21 37 Carbon Dioxide 13,984 39 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.3 47 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 50 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 298 49 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 90,379,970 16 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 88,116,958 14

26

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Mexico) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,130 36 Electric Utilities 6,345 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,785 36 Net Generation (megawatthours) 36,251,542 37 Electric Utilities 30,848,406 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,403,136 37 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 15 38 Nitrogen Oxide 56 19 Carbon Dioxide 29,379 31 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 42 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 5 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,787 11 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 39 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 38

27

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Delaware Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Delaware Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Delaware) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,389 46 Electric Utilities 55 48 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,334 29 Net Generation (megawatthours) 5,627,645 50 Electric Utilities 30,059 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,597,586 36 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 13 41 Nitrogen Oxide 5 47 Carbon Dioxide 4,187 45 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.2 7 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 16 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,640 15 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,605,932 44 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,582,539 46

28

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Ohio) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 33,071 8 Electric Utilities 20,179 13 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,892 7 Net Generation (megawatthours) 143,598,337 7 Electric Utilities 92,198,096 10 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 51,400,241 7 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 610 1 Nitrogen Oxide 122 3 Carbon Dioxide 121,964 4 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 9.4 1 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 17 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,872 8 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 154,145,418 4 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 105,329,797 9

29

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Arkansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,981 25 Electric Utilities 11,488 23 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,493 24 Net Generation (megawatthours) 61,000,185 25 Electric Utilities 47,108,063 20 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,892,122 27 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 74 22 Nitrogen Oxide 40 29 Carbon Dioxide 34,018 28 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 22 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 24 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,229 29 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 29 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 27

30

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Oklahoma) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,022 20 Electric Utilities 16,015 18 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,006 17 Net Generation (megawatthours) 72,250,733 22 Electric Utilities 57,421,195 17 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 14,829,538 24 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 85 21 Nitrogen Oxide 71 12 Carbon Dioxide 49,536 17 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 24 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 11 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,512 17 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 57,845,980 25 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 57,845,980 23

31

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Iowa Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Iowa Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Iowa) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,592 28 Electric Utilities 11,282 24 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,310 30 Net Generation (megawatthours) 57,508,721 26 Electric Utilities 46,188,988 21 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,319,733 30 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 108 18 Nitrogen Oxide 50 22 Carbon Dioxide 47,211 20 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 4.1 11 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 14 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,810 10 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 45,445,269 31 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 45,445,269 28

32

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

West Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 West Virginia profile West Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 West Virginia profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (West Virginia) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 16,495 24 Electric Utilities 11,719 21 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,775 19 Net Generation (megawatthours) 80,788,947 20 Electric Utilities 56,719,755 18 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 24,069,192 13 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 105 20 Nitrogen Oxide 49 23 Carbon Dioxide 74,283 12 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.9 20 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 25 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,027 5 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 32,031,803 34 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 32,031,803 33

33

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vermont Electricity Profile 2010 Vermont profile Vermont Electricity Profile 2010 Vermont profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Vermont) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 1,128 50 Electric Utilities 260 45 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 868 43 Net Generation (megawatthours) 6,619,990 49 Electric Utilities 720,853 44 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,899,137 35 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide * 51 Nitrogen Oxide 1 50 Carbon Dioxide 8 51 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) * 51 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.2 51 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3 51 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 5,594,833 51 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 5,594,833 48 Direct Use (megawatthours) 19,806 47

34

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Mississippi Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Mississippi) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,691 26 Electric Utilities 10,858 26 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,833 18 Net Generation (megawatthours) 54,487,260 28 Electric Utilities 40,841,436 27 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,645,824 28 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 59 26 Nitrogen Oxide 31 32 Carbon Dioxide 26,845 32 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 26 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 30 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,086 36 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 49,687,166 28 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 49,687,166 26

35

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Wisconsin) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 17,836 23 Electric Utilities 13,098 19 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,738 20 Net Generation (megawatthours) 64,314,067 24 Electric Utilities 45,579,970 22 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,734,097 18 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 145 12 Nitrogen Oxide 49 25 Carbon Dioxide 47,238 19 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 9 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.7 20 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,619 16 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 68,752,417 22 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 68,752,417 21

36

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Colorado Electricity Profile 2010 Colorado profile Colorado Electricity Profile 2010 Colorado profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Colorado) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 13,777 30 Electric Utilities 9,114 28 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,662 22 Net Generation (megawatthours) 50,720,792 30 Electric Utilities 39,584,166 28 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,136,626 31 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 45 29 Nitrogen Oxide 55 20 Carbon Dioxide 40,499 24 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.0 32 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 10 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,760 12 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 52,917,786 27 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 52,917,786 24

37

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Hampshire) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,180 43 Electric Utilities 1,132 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,048 32 Net Generation (megawatthours) 22,195,912 42 Electric Utilities 3,979,333 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,216,579 19 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 34 32 Nitrogen Oxide 6 46 Carbon Dioxide 5,551 43 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 17 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 46 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 551 47 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,890,074 47 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,712,938 45

38

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (North Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 27,674 12 Electric Utilities 25,553 6 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,121 34 Net Generation (megawatthours) 128,678,483 10 Electric Utilities 121,251,138 3 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 7,427,345 34 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 131 14 Nitrogen Oxide 57 16 Carbon Dioxide 73,241 13 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 31 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 34 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,255 28 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 136,414,947 9 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 136,414,947 5

39

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nevada Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Nevada Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Nevada) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 11,421 34 Electric Utilities 8,713 29 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,708 33 Net Generation (megawatthours) 35,146,248 38 Electric Utilities 23,710,917 34 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,435,331 29 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 7 44 Nitrogen Oxide 15 40 Carbon Dioxide 17,020 38 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 46 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 37 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,068 37 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 33,772,595 33 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 32,348,879 32

40

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Kansas Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Kansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 12,543 32 Electric Utilities 11,732 20 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 812 45 Net Generation (megawatthours) 47,923,762 32 Electric Utilities 45,270,047 24 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,653,716 44 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 41 30 Nitrogen Oxide 46 26 Carbon Dioxide 36,321 26 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 33 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.1 13 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,671 14 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 40,420,675 32 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 40,420,675 30

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite state electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nebraska Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Nebraska) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,857 38 Electric Utilities 7,647 30 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 210 50 Net Generation (megawatthours) 36,630,006 36 Electric Utilities 36,242,921 30 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 387,085 50 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 65 24 Nitrogen Oxide 40 30 Carbon Dioxide 24,461 34 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.9 12 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 9 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,472 19 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 29,849,460 36 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 29,849,460 35

42

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Missouri Electricity Profile 2010 Missouri profile Missouri Electricity Profile 2010 Missouri profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Missouri) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,739 18 Electric Utilities 20,360 12 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,378 39 Net Generation (megawatthours) 92,312,989 18 Electric Utilities 90,176,805 12 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,136,184 46 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 233 8 Nitrogen Oxide 56 18 Carbon Dioxide 78,815 10 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.6 6 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 26 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,882 7 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 86,085,117 17 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 86,085,117 15

43

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (North Dakota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 6,188 40 Electric Utilities 4,912 34 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,276 40 Net Generation (megawatthours) 34,739,542 39 Electric Utilities 31,343,796 32 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,395,746 41 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 116 17 Nitrogen Oxide 52 21 Carbon Dioxide 31,064 30 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 7.3 3 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.3 6 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,971 6 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 12,956,263 42 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 12,956,263 41

44

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Minnesota Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Minnesota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,715 27 Electric Utilities 11,547 22 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,168 31 Net Generation (megawatthours) 53,670,227 29 Electric Utilities 45,428,599 23 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,241,628 32 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 57 27 Nitrogen Oxide 44 27 Carbon Dioxide 32,946 29 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 27 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 18 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,353 21 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 67,799,706 23 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 67,799,706 22

45

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Louisiana Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Louisiana Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Louisiana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 26,744 14 Electric Utilities 16,471 17 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 10,272 10 Net Generation (megawatthours) 102,884,940 16 Electric Utilities 51,680,682 19 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 51,204,258 8 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 126 15 Nitrogen Oxide 75 11 Carbon Dioxide 58,706 14 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 21 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 21 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,258 27 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 85,079,692 18 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 85,079,692 16

46

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Utah Electricity Profile 2010 Utah profile Utah Electricity Profile 2010 Utah profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Utah) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,497 39 Electric Utilities 6,648 32 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 849 44 Net Generation (megawatthours) 42,249,355 35 Electric Utilities 39,522,124 29 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,727,231 43 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 25 34 Nitrogen Oxide 68 13 Carbon Dioxide 35,519 27 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 38 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 4 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,853 9 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 28,044,001 37 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 28,044,001 36

47

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Virginia) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 24,109 16 Electric Utilities 19,434 15 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,676 21 Net Generation (megawatthours) 72,966,456 21 Electric Utilities 58,902,054 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 14,064,402 25 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 120 16 Nitrogen Oxide 49 24 Carbon Dioxide 39,719 25 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 15 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 23 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,200 30 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 10 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 7

48

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (North Dakota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 6,188 40 Electric Utilities 4,912 34 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,276 40 Net Generation (megawatthours) 34,739,542 39 Electric Utilities 31,343,796 32 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,395,746 41 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 116 17 Nitrogen Oxide 52 21 Carbon Dioxide 31,064 30 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 7.3 3 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.3 6 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,971 6 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 12,956,263 42 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 12,956,263 41

49

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alaska Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Alaska Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Alaska) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) -- Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 2,067 48 Electric Utilities 1,889 39 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 178 51 Net Generation (megawatthours) 6,759,576 48 Electric Utilities 6,205,050 40 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 554,526 49 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 3 46 Nitrogen Oxide 16 39 Carbon Dioxide 4,125 46 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 41 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 5.2 1 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,345 23 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 6,247,038 50 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 6,247,038 47

50

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Minnesota Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Minnesota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,715 27 Electric Utilities 11,547 22 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,168 31 Net Generation (megawatthours) 53,670,227 29 Electric Utilities 45,428,599 23 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,241,628 32 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 57 27 Nitrogen Oxide 44 27 Carbon Dioxide 32,946 29 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 27 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 18 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,353 21 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 67,799,706 23 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 67,799,706 22

51

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Maryland Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Maryland) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 12,516 33 Electric Utilities 80 47 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,436 9 Net Generation (megawatthours) 43,607,264 33 Electric Utilities 2,996 48 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 43,604,268 9 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 45 28 Nitrogen Oxide 25 34 Carbon Dioxide 26,369 33 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 29 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 29 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,333 24 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 65,335,498 24 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 36,082,473 31

52

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

York Electricity Profile 2010 New York profile York Electricity Profile 2010 New York profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New York) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 39,357 6 Electric Utilities 11,032 25 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 28,325 5 Net Generation (megawatthours) 136,961,654 9 Electric Utilities 34,633,335 31 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 102,328,319 5 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 62 25 Nitrogen Oxide 44 28 Carbon Dioxide 41,584 22 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 40 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.7 44 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 669 42 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 144,623,573 7 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 79,119,769 18

53

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (North Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 27,674 12 Electric Utilities 25,553 6 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,121 34 Net Generation (megawatthours) 128,678,483 10 Electric Utilities 121,251,138 3 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 7,427,345 34 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 131 14 Nitrogen Oxide 57 16 Carbon Dioxide 73,241 13 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 31 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 34 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,255 28 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 136,414,947 9 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 136,414,947 5

54

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Montana Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Montana Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Montana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 5,866 41 Electric Utilities 2,340 38 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,526 27 Net Generation (megawatthours) 29,791,181 41 Electric Utilities 6,271,180 39 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 23,520,001 14 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 22 35 Nitrogen Oxide 21 35 Carbon Dioxide 20,370 35 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 35 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 22 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,507 18 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 13,423,138 41 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 10,803,422 43

55

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Iowa Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Iowa Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Iowa) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,592 28 Electric Utilities 11,282 24 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,310 30 Net Generation (megawatthours) 57,508,721 26 Electric Utilities 46,188,988 21 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,319,733 30 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 108 18 Nitrogen Oxide 50 22 Carbon Dioxide 47,211 20 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 4.1 11 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 14 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,810 10 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 45,445,269 31 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 45,445,269 28

56

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Electricity Profile 2010 Illinois profile Illinois Electricity Profile 2010 Illinois profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Illinois) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 44,127 5 Electric Utilities 4,800 35 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 39,327 3 Net Generation (megawatthours) 201,351,872 5 Electric Utilities 12,418,332 35 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 188,933,540 3 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 232 9 Nitrogen Oxide 83 8 Carbon Dioxide 103,128 6 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.5 25 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 38 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,129 34 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 144,760,674 6 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 77,890,532 19

57

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Louisiana Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Louisiana Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Louisiana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 26,744 14 Electric Utilities 16,471 17 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 10,272 10 Net Generation (megawatthours) 102,884,940 16 Electric Utilities 51,680,682 19 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 51,204,258 8 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 126 15 Nitrogen Oxide 75 11 Carbon Dioxide 58,706 14 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 21 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 21 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,258 27 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 85,079,692 18 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 85,079,692 16

58

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

California Electricity Profile 2010 California profile California Electricity Profile 2010 California profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (California) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP/WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 67,328 2 Electric Utilities 28,689 2 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 38,639 4 Net Generation (megawatthours) 204,125,596 4 Electric Utilities 96,939,535 8 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 107,186,061 4 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 3 47 Nitrogen Oxide 80 9 Carbon Dioxide 55,406 16 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) * 49 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 41 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 598 46 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 258,525,414 2 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 240,948,673 2

59

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 South Dakota profile Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 South Dakota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (South Dakota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,623 45 Electric Utilities 2,994 37 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 629 48 Net Generation (megawatthours) 10,049,636 46 Electric Utilities 8,682,448 36 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,367,188 47 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 12 43 Nitrogen Oxide 12 43 Carbon Dioxide 3,611 47 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 23 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 8 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 792 41 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,356,149 46 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 11,356,149 42

60

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Jersey) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 18,424 22 Electric Utilities 460 43 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,964 6 Net Generation (megawatthours) 65,682,494 23 Electric Utilities -186,385 50 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 65,868,878 6 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 40 Nitrogen Oxide 15 41 Carbon Dioxide 19,160 37 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 45 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 48 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 643 43 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 79,179,427 20 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 50,482,035 25

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite state electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Massachusetts Electricity Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Massachusetts Electricity Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Massachusetts) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 13,697 31 Electric Utilities 937 42 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,760 8 Net Generation (megawatthours) 42,804,824 34 Electric Utilities 802,906 43 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 42,001,918 10 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 35 31 Nitrogen Oxide 17 38 Carbon Dioxide 20,291 36 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 34 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 39 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,045 38 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 57,123,422 26 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 31,822,942 34

62

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nebraska Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Nebraska) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,857 38 Electric Utilities 7,647 30 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 210 50 Net Generation (megawatthours) 36,630,006 36 Electric Utilities 36,242,921 30 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 387,085 50 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 65 24 Nitrogen Oxide 40 30 Carbon Dioxide 24,461 34 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.9 12 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 9 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,472 19 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 29,849,460 36 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 29,849,460 35

63

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Montana Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Montana Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Montana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 5,866 41 Electric Utilities 2,340 38 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,526 27 Net Generation (megawatthours) 29,791,181 41 Electric Utilities 6,271,180 39 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 23,520,001 14 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 22 35 Nitrogen Oxide 21 35 Carbon Dioxide 20,370 35 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 35 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 22 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,507 18 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 13,423,138 41 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 10,803,422 43

64

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Maine Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Maine Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Maine) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,430 42 Electric Utilities 19 49 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,410 25 Net Generation (megawatthours) 17,018,660 43 Electric Utilities 1,759 49 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,016,901 22 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 12 42 Nitrogen Oxide 8 44 Carbon Dioxide 4,948 44 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 36 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 33 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 641 44 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,531,568 45 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 151,588 51 Energy-Only Provider Sales (megawatthours) 11,379,980 10

65

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Texas Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Texas Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Texas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP/TRE/WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 108,258 1 Electric Utilities 26,533 4 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 81,724 1 Net Generation (megawatthours) 411,695,046 1 Electric Utilities 95,099,161 9 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 316,595,885 1 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 430 2 Nitrogen Oxide 204 1 Carbon Dioxide 251,409 1 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 28 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 32 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,346 22 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 358,457,550 1 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 358,457,550 1

66

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Florida Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Florida) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) FRCC/SERC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 59,147 3 Electric Utilities 50,853 1 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,294 13 Net Generation (megawatthours) 229,095,935 3 Electric Utilities 206,062,185 1 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 23,033,750 15 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 160 11 Nitrogen Oxide 101 5 Carbon Dioxide 123,811 2 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 37 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 35 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,191 31 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 231,209,614 3 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 231,209,614 3

67

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Hawaii Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Hawaii) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) -- Primary Energy Source Petroleum Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 2,536 47 Electric Utilities 1,828 40 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 708 47 Net Generation (megawatthours) 10,836,036 45 Electric Utilities 6,416,068 38 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,419,968 38 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 17 36 Nitrogen Oxide 21 36 Carbon Dioxide 8,287 42 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 16 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 4.3 2 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,686 13 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,016,509 48 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 10,016,509 44

68

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Connecticut) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,284 35 Electric Utilities 160 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,124 15 Net Generation (megawatthours) 33,349,623 40 Electric Utilities 65,570 45 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 33,284,053 11 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 2 48 Nitrogen Oxide 7 45 Carbon Dioxide 9,201 41 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.1 48 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 49 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 608 45 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 30,391,766 35 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 13,714,958 40

69

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wyoming Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Wyoming Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Wyoming) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,986 37 Electric Utilities 6,931 31 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,056 41 Net Generation (megawatthours) 48,119,254 31 Electric Utilities 44,738,543 25 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,380,711 42 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 67 23 Nitrogen Oxide 61 15 Carbon Dioxide 45,703 21 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.1 19 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.8 7 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,094 2 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 17,113,458 40 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 17,113,458 39

70

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Idaho Electricity Profile 2010 Idaho profile Idaho Electricity Profile 2010 Idaho profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Idaho) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,990 44 Electric Utilities 3,035 36 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 955 42 Net Generation (megawatthours) 12,024,564 44 Electric Utilities 8,589,208 37 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,435,356 40 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 7 45 Nitrogen Oxide 4 48 Carbon Dioxide 1,213 49 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 39 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.8 43 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 222 50 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 22,797,668 38 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 22,797,668 37

71

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

California Electricity Profile 2010 California profile California Electricity Profile 2010 California profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (California) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP/WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 67,328 2 Electric Utilities 28,689 2 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 38,639 4 Net Generation (megawatthours) 204,125,596 4 Electric Utilities 96,939,535 8 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 107,186,061 4 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 3 47 Nitrogen Oxide 80 9 Carbon Dioxide 55,406 16 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) * 49 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 41 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 598 46 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 258,525,414 2 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 240,948,673 2

72

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Tennessee Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee full report Tennessee Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee full report Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Tennessee) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,417 19 Electric Utilities 20,968 11 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 450 49 Net Generation (megawatthours) 82,348,625 19 Electric Utilities 79,816,049 15 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,532,576 45 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 138 13 Nitrogen Oxide 33 31 Carbon Dioxide 48,196 18 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.7 14 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 40 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,290 26 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 103,521,537 13 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 103,521,537 10

73

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (South Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 23,982 17 Electric Utilities 22,172 9 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,810 35 Net Generation (megawatthours) 104,153,133 14 Electric Utilities 100,610,887 6 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,542,246 39 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 106 19 Nitrogen Oxide 30 33 Carbon Dioxide 41,364 23 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 30 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 45 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 876 40 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 19 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 17

74

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Virginia) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 24,109 16 Electric Utilities 19,434 15 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,676 21 Net Generation (megawatthours) 72,966,456 21 Electric Utilities 58,902,054 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 14,064,402 25 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 120 16 Nitrogen Oxide 49 24 Carbon Dioxide 39,719 25 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 15 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 23 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,200 30 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 10 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 7

75

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Delaware Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Delaware Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Delaware) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,389 46 Electric Utilities 55 48 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,334 29 Net Generation (megawatthours) 5,627,645 50 Electric Utilities 30,059 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,597,586 36 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 13 41 Nitrogen Oxide 5 47 Carbon Dioxide 4,187 45 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.2 7 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 16 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,640 15 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,605,932 44 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,582,539 46

76

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Colorado Electricity Profile 2010 Colorado profile Colorado Electricity Profile 2010 Colorado profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Colorado) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 13,777 30 Electric Utilities 9,114 28 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,662 22 Net Generation (megawatthours) 50,720,792 30 Electric Utilities 39,584,166 28 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,136,626 31 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 45 29 Nitrogen Oxide 55 20 Carbon Dioxide 40,499 24 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.0 32 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 10 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,760 12 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 52,917,786 27 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 52,917,786 24

77

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kansas Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Kansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 12,543 32 Electric Utilities 11,732 20 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 812 45 Net Generation (megawatthours) 47,923,762 32 Electric Utilities 45,270,047 24 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,653,716 44 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 41 30 Nitrogen Oxide 46 26 Carbon Dioxide 36,321 26 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 33 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.1 13 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,671 14 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 40,420,675 32 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 40,420,675 30

78

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Pennsylvania) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 45,575 4 Electric Utilities 455 44 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 45,120 2 Net Generation (megawatthours) 229,752,306 2 Electric Utilities 1,086,500 42 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 228,665,806 2 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 387 3 Nitrogen Oxide 136 2 Carbon Dioxide 122,830 3 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.7 13 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 27 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,179 32 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 148,963,968 5 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 114,787,417 6

79

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Pennsylvania) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 45,575 4 Electric Utilities 455 44 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 45,120 2 Net Generation (megawatthours) 229,752,306 2 Electric Utilities 1,086,500 42 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 228,665,806 2 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 387 3 Nitrogen Oxide 136 2 Carbon Dioxide 122,830 3 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.7 13 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 27 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,179 32 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 148,963,968 5 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 114,787,417 6

80

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Wyoming Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Wyoming Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Wyoming) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,986 37 Electric Utilities 6,931 31 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,056 41 Net Generation (megawatthours) 48,119,254 31 Electric Utilities 44,738,543 25 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,380,711 42 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 67 23 Nitrogen Oxide 61 15 Carbon Dioxide 45,703 21 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.1 19 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.8 7 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,094 2 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 17,113,458 40 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 17,113,458 39

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite state electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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81

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Kentucky) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 20,453 21 Electric Utilities 18,945 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,507 38 Net Generation (megawatthours) 98,217,658 17 Electric Utilities 97,472,144 7 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 745,514 48 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 249 7 Nitrogen Oxide 85 7 Carbon Dioxide 93,160 7 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.6 5 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 15 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,091 3 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 14 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 12

82

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Michigan Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Michigan) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 29,831 11 Electric Utilities 21,639 10 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,192 14 Net Generation (megawatthours) 111,551,371 13 Electric Utilities 89,666,874 13 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 21,884,497 16 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 254 6 Nitrogen Oxide 89 6 Carbon Dioxide 74,480 11 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 8 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 19 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,472 20 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 103,649,219 12 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 94,565,247 11

83

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alabama Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Alabama) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 32,417 9 Electric Utilities 23,642 7 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,775 12 Net Generation (megawatthours) 152,150,512 6 Electric Utilities 122,766,490 2 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 29,384,022 12 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 218 10 Nitrogen Oxide 66 14 Carbon Dioxide 79,375 9 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.2 18 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 36 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,150 33 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 90,862,645 15 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 90,862,645 13

84

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

statistics (Georgia) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Natural gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 38,488 7 Electric Utilities 29,293 3...

85

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

statistics (New York) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Natural Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 39,520 6 Electric Utilities 10,739 26...

86

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

statistics (Rhode Island) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Natural Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 1,781 49 Electric Utilities 8 50 Independent...

87

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Profile 2012 Table 1. 2012 Summary Statistics (Indiana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 26,837 14...

88

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electricity Profile 2012 Table 1. 2012 Summary Statistics (Arizona) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 27,587...

89

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alabama Table 1. 2012 Summary statistics (Alabama) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 32,547 9 Electric...

90

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

(South Dakota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MROWECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,057 45 Electric Utilities 3,428 36 Independent...

91

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Summary Statistics (Illinois) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRORFCSERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 45,146 5 Electric Utilities 5,274 34...

92

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Connecticut) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,284 35 Electric Utilities 160 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,124 15 Net Generation (megawatthours) 33,349,623 40 Electric Utilities 65,570 45 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 33,284,053 11 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 2 48 Nitrogen Oxide 7 45 Carbon Dioxide 9,201 41 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.1 48 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 49 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 608 45 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 30,391,766 35 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 13,714,958 40

93

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Utah Electricity Profile 2010 Utah profile Utah Electricity Profile 2010 Utah profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Utah) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,497 39 Electric Utilities 6,648 32 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 849 44 Net Generation (megawatthours) 42,249,355 35 Electric Utilities 39,522,124 29 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,727,231 43 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 25 34 Nitrogen Oxide 68 13 Carbon Dioxide 35,519 27 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 38 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 4 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,853 9 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 28,044,001 37 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 28,044,001 36

94

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (South Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 23,982 17 Electric Utilities 22,172 9 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,810 35 Net Generation (megawatthours) 104,153,133 14 Electric Utilities 100,610,887 6 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,542,246 39 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 106 19 Nitrogen Oxide 30 33 Carbon Dioxide 41,364 23 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 30 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 45 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 876 40 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 19 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 17

95

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Alaska Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Alaska) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) -- Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 2,067 48 Electric Utilities 1,889 39 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 178 51 Net Generation (megawatthours) 6,759,576 48 Electric Utilities 6,205,050 40 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 554,526 49 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 3 46 Nitrogen Oxide 16 39 Carbon Dioxide 4,125 46 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 41 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 5.2 1 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,345 23 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 6,247,038 50 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 6,247,038 47

96

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nevada Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Nevada Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Nevada) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 11,421 34 Electric Utilities 8,713 29 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,708 33 Net Generation (megawatthours) 35,146,248 38 Electric Utilities 23,710,917 34 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,435,331 29 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 7 44 Nitrogen Oxide 15 40 Carbon Dioxide 17,020 38 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 46 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 37 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,068 37 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 33,772,595 33 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 32,348,879 32

97

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Washington Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Washington Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Washington) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 30,478 10 Electric Utilities 26,498 5 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,979 26 Net Generation (megawatthours) 103,472,729 15 Electric Utilities 88,057,219 14 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 15,415,510 23 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 39 Nitrogen Oxide 21 37 Carbon Dioxide 13,984 39 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.3 47 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 50 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 298 49 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 90,379,970 16 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 88,116,958 14

98

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Oregon Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Oregon) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,261 29 Electric Utilities 10,846 27 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,415 28 Net Generation (megawatthours) 55,126,999 27 Electric Utilities 41,142,684 26 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,984,316 26 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 16 37 Nitrogen Oxide 15 42 Carbon Dioxide 10,094 40 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 44 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 47 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 404 48 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 46,025,945 30 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 44,525,865 29

99

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Texas Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Texas Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Texas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP/TRE/WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 108,258 1 Electric Utilities 26,533 4 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 81,724 1 Net Generation (megawatthours) 411,695,046 1 Electric Utilities 95,099,161 9 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 316,595,885 1 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 430 2 Nitrogen Oxide 204 1 Carbon Dioxide 251,409 1 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 28 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 32 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,346 22 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 358,457,550 1 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 358,457,550 1

100

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Indiana Electricity Profile 2010 Indiana profile Indiana Electricity Profile 2010 Indiana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Indiana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 27,638 13 Electric Utilities 23,008 8 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,630 23 Net Generation (megawatthours) 125,180,739 11 Electric Utilities 107,852,560 5 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,328,179 20 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 385 4 Nitrogen Oxide 120 4 Carbon Dioxide 116,283 5 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 6.8 4 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.1 12 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,048 4 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 105,994,376 11 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 105,994,376 8

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite state electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Oklahoma) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,022 20 Electric Utilities 16,015 18 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,006 17 Net Generation (megawatthours) 72,250,733 22 Electric Utilities 57,421,195 17 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 14,829,538 24 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 85 21 Nitrogen Oxide 71 12 Carbon Dioxide 49,536 17 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 24 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 11 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,512 17 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 57,845,980 25 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 57,845,980 23

102

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Jersey) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 18,424 22 Electric Utilities 460 43 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,964 6 Net Generation (megawatthours) 65,682,494 23 Electric Utilities -186,385 50 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 65,868,878 6 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 40 Nitrogen Oxide 15 41 Carbon Dioxide 19,160 37 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 45 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 48 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 643 43 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 79,179,427 20 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 50,482,035 25

103

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Idaho Electricity Profile 2010 Idaho profile Idaho Electricity Profile 2010 Idaho profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Idaho) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,990 44 Electric Utilities 3,035 36 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 955 42 Net Generation (megawatthours) 12,024,564 44 Electric Utilities 8,589,208 37 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,435,356 40 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 7 45 Nitrogen Oxide 4 48 Carbon Dioxide 1,213 49 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 39 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.8 43 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 222 50 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 22,797,668 38 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 22,797,668 37

104

State Renewable Electricity Profiles  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presents a summary of current and recent historical data for the renewable electric power industry. The data focuses on net summer capacity and net generation for each type of renewable generator, as well as fossil-fired and nuclear power plant types, for the period 2006 through 2010.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

District of Columbia Electricity Profile 2010 District of Columbia profile District of Columbia Electricity Profile 2010 District of Columbia profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (District of Columbia) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Petroleum Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 790 51 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 790 46 Net Generation (megawatthours) 199,858 51 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 199,858 51 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 1 49 Nitrogen Oxide * 51 Carbon Dioxide 191 50 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 8.8 2 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 4.0 3 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,104 1 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,876,995 43 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 3,388,490 50 Energy-Only Provider Sales (megawatthours) 8,488,505 12

106

Electric Power detailed State data  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Detailed State Data Detailed State Data Annual data for 2012 Release Date: November 12, 2013 Next Release Date: November 2014 Revision/Corrections Annual data format 1990 - 2012 Net Generation by State by Type of Producer by Energy Source (EIA-906, EIA-920, and EIA-923)1 XLS 1990 - 2012 Fossil Fuel Consumption for Electricity Generation by Year, Industry Type and State (EIA-906, EIA-920, and EIA-923)2 XLS 1990 - 2011 Existing Nameplate and Net Summer Capacity by Energy Source, Producer Type and State (EIA-860)1, 3 XLS 2011 - 2016 Proposed Nameplate and Net Summer Capacity by Year, Energy Source, and State (EIA-860)1 XLS 1990 - 2011 U.S. Electric Power Industry Estimated Emissions by State (EIA-767, EIA-906, EIA-920, and EIA-923)4 XLS 1990 - 2012 Average Price by State by Provider (EIA-861)5 XLS

107

Status of State Electric Industry Restructuring Activity  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presents an overview of the status of electric industry restructuring in each state. Restructuring means that a monopoly system of electric utilities has been replaced with competing sellers.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Renewable Electricity Futures for the United States  

SciTech Connect

This paper highlights the key results from the Renewable Electricity (RE) Futures Study. It is a detailed consideration of renewable electricity in the United States. The paper focuses on technical issues related to the operability of the U. S. electricity grid and provides initial answers to important questions about the integration of high penetrations of renewable electricity technologies from a national perspective. The results indicate that the future U. S. electricity system that is largely powered by renewable sources is possible and the further work is warranted to investigate this clean generation pathway. The central conclusion of the analysis is that renewable electricity generation from technologies that are commercially available today, in combination with a more flexible electric system, is more than adequate to supply 80% of the total U. S. electricity generation in 2050 while meeting electricity demand on an hourly basis in every region of the United States.

Mai, Trieu; Hand, Maureen; Baldwin, Sam F.; Wiser , Ryan; Brinkman, G.; Denholm, Paul; Arent, Doug; Porro, Gian; Sandor, Debra; Hostick, Donna J.; Milligan, Michael; DeMeo, Ed; Bazilian, Morgan

2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

109

Renewable Electricity Generation in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of the use of renewable energy sources to generate electricity in the United States and a critical analysis of the federal and state policies that have supported the deployment of renewable ...

Schmalensee, Richard

110

OE State and Regional Electricity Policy Assistance Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OE State and Regional Electricity Policy Assistance Program OE State and Regional Electricity Policy Assistance Program OE State and Regional Electricity Policy Assistance Program The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE)'s mission with regard to State and Regional Policy Assistance is to provide, on an as-requested basis, unbiased policy assistance and analysis to States and regions on State electricity policies, programs, laws, and regulations that facilitate electricity Infrastructure investment needed to deliver clean, affordable, and reliable electricity to customers. OE State and Regional Electricity Policy Assistance Program More Documents & Publications U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability: Electric Markets Technical Assistance Program

111

Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Agency Electric Vehicle Supply  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

State Agency Electric State Agency Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Agency Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Agency Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Agency Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Agency Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Agency Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Agency Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation on

112

Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Highway Electric Vehicle Supply  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

State Highway Electric State Highway Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Regulations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Highway Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Regulations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Highway Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Regulations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Highway Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Regulations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Highway Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Regulations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Highway Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Regulations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Highway Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Regulations on

113

Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Agency Electric Vehicle Supply  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

State Agency Electric State Agency Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Agency Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Agency Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Agency Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Agency Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Agency Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Agency Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation on

114

New methodical developments for GRANIT  

SciTech Connect

New methodical developments for the GRANIT spectrometer address further improvements of the critical parameters of this experimental installation, as well as its applications to new fields of research. Keeping in mind an extremely small fraction of ultra cold neutrons (UCN) that could be bound in gravitational quantum states, we look for methods to increase statistics due to: developing UCN sources with maximum phase-space density, counting simultaneously a large fraction of neutrons using position-sensitive detectors, and decreasing detector backgrounds. Also we explore an eventual application of the GRANIT spectrometer beyond the scope of its initial goals, for instance, for reflectometry with UCN.

Baessler, Stefan [ORNL; Nesvizhevsky, V. [ Inst Max Von Laue Paul Langevin, F-38042 Grenoble 9, France; Toperverg, B [Ruhr University, Bochum, Germany; Zhernenkov, K. [Ruhr University, Bochum, Germany; Gagarski, A [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina, Russia; Lychagin, E [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Muzychka, A [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Strelkov, A [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Mietke, A [Technische Universitat Dresden

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Fact #753: November 12, 2012 Sources of Electricity by State...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: November 12, 2012 Sources of Electricity by State Fact 753: November 12, 2012 Sources of Electricity by State Electric vehicles do not create emissions from a tailpipe like...

116

Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Hybrid Electric (HEV) Alternative Fuel  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

State Hybrid Electric State Hybrid Electric (HEV) Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Hybrid Electric (HEV) Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Hybrid Electric (HEV) Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Hybrid Electric (HEV) Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Hybrid Electric (HEV) Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Hybrid Electric (HEV) Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements on Digg

117

Recovery Act: State Assistance for Recovery Act Related Electricity...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

carbon capture and storage, transmission lines, energy storage, smart grid, demand response equipment, and electric and hybrid-electric vehicles. View a full list of states...

118

New Mexico State University Klipsch School of Electrical Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New Mexico State University Klipsch School of Electrical Engineering New Mexico State University Department Head #12;New Mexico State University Klipsch School of Electrical Engineering Agenda · Welcome.ece.nmsu.edu/~pdeleon/TA/ECE_TA_orientation.pdf #12;New Mexico State University Klipsch School of Electrical Engineering Course Assignments Hussein Al

Johnson, Eric E.

119

Community Readiness Project Helps State Get Ready for Electric...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Community Readiness Project Helps State Get Ready for Electric Vehicles Community Readiness Project Helps State Get Ready for Electric Vehicles April 10, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis In...

120

Raw neutron scattering data for strain measurement of hydraulically loaded granite and marble samples in triaxial stress state  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

This entry contains raw data files from experiments performed on the Vulcan beamline at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory using a pressure cell. Cylindrical granite and marble samples were subjected to confining pressures of either 0 psi or approximately 2500 psi and internal pressures of either 0 psi, 1500 psi or 2500 psi through a blind axial hole at the center of one end of the sample. The sample diameters were 1.5" and the sample lengths were 6". The blind hole was 0.25" in diameter and 3" deep. One set of experiments measured strains at points located circumferentially around the center of the sample with identical radii to determine if there was strain variability (this would not be expected for a homogeneous material based on the symmetry of loading). Another set of experiments measured load variation across the radius of the sample at a fixed axial and circumferential location. Raw neutron diffraction intensity files and experimental parameter descriptions are included.

Yarom Polsky

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite state electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Raw neutron scattering data for strain measurement of hydraulically loaded granite and marble samples in triaxial stress state  

SciTech Connect

This entry contains raw data files from experiments performed on the Vulcan beamline at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory using a pressure cell. Cylindrical granite and marble samples were subjected to confining pressures of either 0 psi or approximately 2500 psi and internal pressures of either 0 psi, 1500 psi or 2500 psi through a blind axial hole at the center of one end of the sample. The sample diameters were 1.5" and the sample lengths were 6". The blind hole was 0.25" in diameter and 3" deep. One set of experiments measured strains at points located circumferentially around the center of the sample with identical radii to determine if there was strain variability (this would not be expected for a homogeneous material based on the symmetry of loading). Another set of experiments measured load variation across the radius of the sample at a fixed axial and circumferential location. Raw neutron diffraction intensity files and experimental parameter descriptions are included.

Polsky, Yarom

2014-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

122

Record geothermal well drilled in hot granite  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Record geothermal well drilled in hot granite ... Researchers there have completed the second of two of the deepest and hottest geothermal wells ever drilled. ... It may become the energy source for a small electrical generating power station serving nearby communities in New Mexico. ...

1981-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

123

Status of the GRANIT facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The GRANIT facility is a follow-up project, which is motivated by the recent discovery of gravitational quantum states of ultracold neutrons. The goal of the project is to approach the ultimate accuracy in measuring parameters of such quantum states and also to apply this phenomenon and related experimental techniques to a broad range of applications in particle physics as well as in surface and nanoscience studies. We overview the current status of this facility, the recent test measurements and the nearest prospects.

Damien Roulier; Francis Vezzu; Stefan Baessler; Benoît Clément; Daniel Morton; Valery Nesvizhevsky; Guillaume Pignol; Dominique Rebreyend

2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

124

Recovery Act: State Assistance for Recovery Act Related Electricity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

State State Assistance for Recovery Act Related Electricity Policies Recovery Act: State Assistance for Recovery Act Related Electricity Policies $44 Million for State Public Utility Commissions State public utility commissions (PUCs), which regulate and oversee electricity projects in their states, will be receiving more than $44.2 million in Recovery Act funding to hire new staff and retrain existing employees to ensure they have the capacity to quickly and effectively review proposed electricity projects. The funds will help the individual state PUCs accelerate reviews of the large number of electric utility requests that are expected under the Recovery Act. State PUCs will be reviewing electric utility investments in projects such as energy efficiency, renewable energy, carbon capture and storage, transmission

125

United States of America Electric Energy Market Competition Task Force  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of competition within the wholesale and retail market for electric energy in the United States and to submiti United States of America Electric Energy Market Competition Task Force and the Federal Energy and Retail Markets for Electric Energy Docket No. AD05

Tesfatsion, Leigh

126

Renewable Electricity Futures: Exploration of Up to 80% Renewable Electricity Penetration in the United States (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

Hand, M.; DeMeo, E.; Hostick, D.; Mai, T.; Schlosser, C. A.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Electricity privatization : should South Korea privatize its state-owned electric utility?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The state-owned electric utility, Korea Electricity Power Cooperation (KEPCO), privatization has been a key word in South Korea since 1997, when the government received $55 billion from the International Monetary Fund in ...

Lim, Sungmin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Recovery Act: State Assistance for Recovery Act Related Electricity Policies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

State public utility commissions (PUCs), which regulate and oversee electricity projects in their states, will be receiving more than $44.2 million in Recovery Act funding to hire new staff and retrain existing employees to ensure they have the capacity to quickly and effectively review proposed electricity projects. The funds will help the individual state PUCs accelerate reviews of the large number of electric utility requests that are expected under the Recovery Act.

129

Edison Electric Institute State Generation and Transmission Siting...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: Edison Electric Institute State Generation and Transmission Siting DirectoryPermittingRegulatory...

130

ELECTRIC BIKES (E-BIKES) IN THE UNITED STATES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;What is an electric bike? Battery Motor (Hub or Chain drive) Power controls & Gear shifts #12;Come-wheeled vehicle with fully operable pedals and an electric motor of less than 750 watts (1 horse power), whoseELECTRIC BIKES (E-BIKES) IN THE UNITED STATES FRIDAY PSU TRANSPORTATION SEMINAR OCTOBER 18, 2013

Bertini, Robert L.

131

Electricity Generation and Consumption by State (2008 ) | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generation and Consumption by State (2008 ) Generation and Consumption by State (2008 ) Dataset Summary Description Provides total annual electricity consumption by sector (residential, commercial and industrial) for all states in 2008, reported in GWh, and total electricity generation by sector (e.g. wind, solar, nuclear, coal) for all states in 2008, reported in GWh. Source NREL Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords EIA Electricity Consumption Electricity Generation States Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon 2008 State Electricity Generation and Consumption (format: xls) (xlsx, 56.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below

132

State Electric Efficiency Regulatory Frameworks (July 2012 IEE Report)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report summarizes ongoing and recent policy developments that support utility investments in energy efficiency, including program cost recovery, fixed cost recovery, and performance incentives for electric utilities on a state-by-state basis.

133

EA-137-A New York State Electric and Gas Corporation | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

-A New York State Electric and Gas Corporation EA-137-A New York State Electric and Gas Corporation Order authorizing New York State Electric and Gas Corporation to export electric...

134

Variations ia Variscan Granites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... the compositional variations within the Caledonian belt, may both be attributed to variations in the geothermal gradient. In Nature Physical Science this week (April 2), he takes these studies ... studies a stage further by showing that the correlation within the belt between composition and geothermal gradient also applies to the Variscan granites.

1973-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

135

The Future of Electric Vehicles and Arizona State University's MAIL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Future of Electric Vehicles and Arizona State University's The Future of Electric Vehicles and Arizona State University's MAIL Battery The Future of Electric Vehicles and Arizona State University's MAIL Battery August 11, 2010 - 4:26pm Addthis Cody Friesen and his team at Arizona State University | Photo Credit Arizona State University Cody Friesen and his team at Arizona State University | Photo Credit Arizona State University Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs What does this mean for me? EV batteries will have the ability to recharge at least 1000 times at a low cost due to its composition of only domestically-sourced, earth abundant material Electric Vehicles are becoming a reality. Last month, the President got behind the wheel of a Chevy Volt in Michigan, and traveled to Smith

136

Electric Supply in the Irish Free State  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... the sale of electricity has been effected, and results in a surplus of income over expenditure of about £310,000. The total ... of about £310,000. The total capital ...

1936-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

137

Community Readiness Project Helps State Get Ready for Electric Vehicles  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Oregon is planning for the large-scale deployment of hybrid and all-electric vehicles to reach the state's goal of 30,000 plug-in vehicles by 2015.

138

Electrical detection of coherent 31 quantum states  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Physics Department, 115S 1400E, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112, USA 3 Abt. Silizium-Photovoltaik, Hahn energy eigenstates. Two of these states, |T+ =| and |T- =| (where the first arrow indicates the state and are independent of the strength of the spin­

Loss, Daniel

139

EA-137 NYSEG New York State Electric and Gas Corporation | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NYSEG New York State Electric and Gas Corporation EA-137 NYSEG New York State Electric and Gas Corporation Order authorizing New York State Electric and Gas Corporation to export...

140

Tri State Electric Membership Corporation Smart Grid Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric Membership Corporation Smart Grid Project Electric Membership Corporation Smart Grid Project Jump to: navigation, search Project Lead Tri State Electric Membership Corporation Country United States Headquarters Location McCaysville, Georgia Additional Benefit Places Tennessee Recovery Act Funding $1,138,060.00 Total Project Value $2,421,405.00 Coverage Area Coverage Map: Tri State Electric Membership Corporation Smart Grid Project Coordinates 34.9861914°, -84.3713117° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite state electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Electric Industry Restructuring in Five States: Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The electric industry in the United States is undergoing fundamental changes; it is transitioning from regulated monopolies to competitive markets offering customer choice. In this process, the states have been in the forefront of considering the changes in the industry structure and regulation. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) spearheaded a project on electric restructuring in the United States. This is the final report prepared under the project. The purpose of the report is to describe and compare the overall restructuring processes that took place in five states through June 30, 1996. The five states are California, Massachusetts, Michigan, New York, and Wisconsin. These are the first major states to consider restructuring or retail wheeling.

Fang, J. M.

1996-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

142

Town of Granite Falls, North Carolina (Utility Company) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Granite Falls Town of Granite Falls Town of Place North Carolina Utility Id 7496 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes ISO Other Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png COMMERCIAL ALL ELECTRIC - E13 Commercial COMMERCIAL ALL ELECTRIC - E14 Commercial COMMERCIAL ALL ELECTRIC - E9 Commercial COMMERCIAL ELECTRIC - E6 Commercial COMMERCIAL ELECTRIC - E8 Commercial CP 98-1C Industrial CP 98-1I Industrial CP 98-2C Industrial CP 98-2I Industrial CP 98-3C Industrial CP 98-3I Industrial CP TOU Industrial INDUSTRIAL ELECTRIC - E10 Industrial

143

Tri-State Electric Member Corp | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tri State Electric Membership Corporation) Tri State Electric Membership Corporation) Jump to: navigation, search Name Tri-State Electric Member Corp Place McCaysville, Georgia Utility Id 19154 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] SGIC[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Rate 1 - Residential Residential Rate 40 - Small Commercial GSA-1 (less 50 kW) Commercial Rate 50 - Commercial GSA-2 (51-1000 kW) Commercial Rate 54 - Large Commercial GSA-3 (1001-5000 kW) Commercial Rate 57 - Seasonal Demand Commercial Rate 72 - Street Lighting Lighting

144

Methodology The electricity generation and distribution network in the Western United States is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methodology The electricity generation and distribution network in the Western United States is comprised of power plants, electric utilities, electrical transformers, transmission and distribution infrastructure, etc. We conceptualize the system as a transportation network with resources (electricity

Hall, Sharon J.

145

Mr. Thomas Mahl Granite City Steel Company  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

8&v/ 8&v/ Mr. Thomas Mahl Granite City Steel Company 20th and State Streets Granite City, IL 62040 Dear Mr. Mahl: This is to notify you that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has designated your company's facility for remedial action as a part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. Remedial activities are managed by the DOE Oak Ridge Field Office, and Ms. Teresa Perry (615-576-8956) will be the site manager. As a result of the designation decision, Ms. Perry will be the appropriate point of contact in the future. If you have any questions, please call me at 301-903-8149. W. Alexander Williams, PhD Designation and Certification Manager Division of Off-Site Programs Office of Eastern Area Programs Office of Environmental Restoration

146

Electricity in the United States - Energy Explained, Your Guide To  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Secondary Sources > Electricity > Electricity in the U.S. Secondary Sources > Electricity > Electricity in the U.S. Energy Explained - Home What Is Energy? Forms of Energy Sources of Energy Laws of Energy Units and Calculators Energy Conversion Calculators British Thermal Units (Btu) Degree-Days U.S. Energy Facts State and U.S. Territory Data Use of Energy In Industry For Transportation In Homes In Commercial Buildings Efficiency and Conservation Energy and the Environment Greenhouse Gases Effect on the Climate Where Emissions Come From Outlook for Future Emissions Recycling and Energy Nonrenewable Sources Oil and Petroleum Products Refining Crude Oil Where Our Oil Comes From Imports and Exports Offshore Oil and Gas Use of Oil Prices and Outlook Oil and the Environment Gasoline Where Our Gasoline Comes From Use of Gasoline

147

Electrical detection of 31P spin quantum states  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent years, a variety of solid-state qubits has been realized, including quantum dots, superconducting tunnel junctions and point defects. Due to its potential compatibility with existing microelectronics, the proposal by Kane based on phosphorus donors in Si has also been pursued intensively. A key issue of this concept is the readout of the P quantum state. While electrical measurements of magnetic resonance have been performed on single spins, the statistical nature of these experiments based on random telegraph noise measurements has impeded the readout of single spin states. In this letter, we demonstrate the measurement of the spin state of P donor electrons in silicon and the observation of Rabi flops by purely electric means, accomplished by coherent manipulation of spin-dependent charge carrier recombination between the P donor and paramagnetic localized states at the Si/SiO2 interface via pulsed electrically detected magnetic resonance. The electron spin information is shown to be coupled through the hyperfine interaction with the P nucleus, which demonstrates the feasibility of a recombination-based readout of nuclear spins.

A. R. Stegner; C. Boehme; H. Huebl; M. Stutzmann; K. Lips; M. S. Brandt

2006-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

148

State Policies Provide Critical Support for Renewable Electricity  

SciTech Connect

Growth in renewable energy in the U.S. over the past decade has been propelled by a number of forces, including rising fossil fuel prices, environmental concerns, and policy support at the state and federal levels. In this article, we review and discuss what are arguably the two most important types of state policies for supporting electricity generation from geothermal and other forms of renewable energy: renewables portfolio standards and utility integrated resource planning requirements. Within the Western U.S., where the vast majority of the nation's readily-accessible geothermal resource potential resides, these two types of state policies have been critical to the growth of renewable energy, and both promise to continue to play a fundamental role for the foreseeable future. In its essence, a renewables portfolio standard (RPS) requires utilities and other retail electricity suppliers to produce or purchase a minimum quantity or percentage of their generation supply from renewable resources. RPS purchase obligations generally increase over time, and retail suppliers typically must demonstrate compliance on an annual basis. Mandatory RPS policies are backed by various types of compliance enforcement mechanisms, although most states have incorporated some type of cost-containment provision, such as a cost cap or a cap on retail rate impacts, which could conceivably allow utilities to avoid (full) compliance with their RPS target. Currently, 27 states and the District of Columbia have mandatory RPS requirements. Within the eleven states of the contiguous Western U.S., all but three (Idaho, Utah, and Wyoming) now have a mandatory RPS legislation (Utah has a more-voluntary renewable energy goal), covering almost 80% of retail electricity sales in the region. Although many of these state policies have only recently been established, their impact is already evident: almost 1800 MW of new renewable capacity has been installed in Western states following the implementation of RPS policies. To date, wind energy has been the primary beneficiary of state RPS policies, representing approximately 83% of RPS-driven renewable capacity growth in the West through 2007. Geothermal energy occupies a distant second place, providing 7% of RPS-driven new renewable capacity in the West since the late 1990s, though geothermal's contribution on an energy (MWh) basis is higher. Looking to the future, a sizable quantity of renewable capacity beyond pre-RPS levels will be needed to meet state RPS mandates: about 25,000 MW by 2025 within the Western U.S. Geothermal energy is beginning to provide an increasingly significant contribution, as evidenced by the spate of new projects recently announced to meet state RPS requirements. Most of this activity has been driven by the RPS policies in California and Nevada, where the Geothermal Energy Association has identified 47 new geothermal projects, totaling more than 2,100 MW, in various stages of development. Additional geothermal projects in Arizona, New Mexico, Oregon, and Washington are also under development to meet those states RPS requirements. The other major state policy driver for renewable electricity growth, particularly in the West, is integrated resource planning (IRP). IRP was first formalized as a practice in the 1980s, but the practice was suspended in some states as electricity restructuring efforts began. A renewed interest in IRP has emerged in the past several years, however, with several Western states (California, Montana, and New Mexico) reestablishing IRP and others developing new rules to strengthen their existing processes. In its barest form, IRP simply requires that utilities periodically submit long-term resource procurement plans in which they evaluate alternative strategies for meeting their resource needs over the following ten to twenty years. However, many states have developed specific requirements for the IRP process that directly or indirectly support renewable energy. The most general of these is an explicit requirement that utilities evaluate renewables, and that

Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

149

Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan : Draft Environmental Impact State.  

SciTech Connect

The Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) identifies the alternatives for solving a power system problem in the Puget Sound area. This Plan is undertaken by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Puget Sound Power Light, Seattle City Light, Snohomish Public Utility District No. 1 (PUD), and Tacoma Public Utilities. The Plan consists of potential actions in Puget Sound and other areas in the State of Washington. A specific need exists in the Puget Sound area for balance between east-west transmission capacity and the increasing demand to import power generated east of the Cascades. At certain times of the year, there is more demand for power than the electric system can supply in the Puget Sound area. This high demand, called peak demand, occurs during the winter months when unusually cold weather increases electricity use for heating. The existing power system can supply enough power if no emergencies occur. However, during emergencies, the system will not operate properly. As demand grows, the system becomes more strained. To meet demand, the rate of growth of demand must be reduced or the ability to serve the demand must be increased, or both. The plan to balance Puget Sound's power demand and supply has these purposes: The plan should define a set of actions that would accommodate ten years of load growth (1994--2003). Federal and State environmental quality requirements should be met. The plan should be consistent with the plans of the Northwest Power Planning Council. The plan should serve as a consensus guideline for coordinated utility action. The plan should be flexible to accommodate uncertainties and differing utility needs. The plan should balance environmental impacts and economic costs. The plan should provide electric system reliability consistent with customer expectations. 29 figs., 24 tabs.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

United States/Mexico electricity trade study. [Glossary included  

SciTech Connect

During energy discussions between the United States and Mexico, it was suggested that the two countries revisit the issue of enhanced electricity trade because 10 years had elapsed since this issue was first studied. Responsibility to organize the updated study was jointly assigned to the US and to the Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE). The study highlights the opportunities for increased cooperation among the electric utilities in the U.S. and Mexico. Direct benefits could include increased reliability of electric power service and cost savings through diversity of peak demand patterns and locational benefits associated with the siting of new generation sources. Indirect benefits could include improved economic and employment opportunities, especially in the border areas of both countries. While the study indicates that increased electricity trade is possible, there are significant technical and economic issues to consider. Any major increase in electricity trade would require a higher level of cooperation and coordination among utilities in both countries and would need to be preceded by a detailed analysis of associated benefits and costs (including environmental impacts) on both a short-term and a long-term basis. Whether US utilities and CFE decide to pursue specific projects will depend upon the need for and economics of those projects. The study recommends that the work begun by the two utility groups be continued. The study also recommends that regulators at all levels consider policies to increase coordination and review among all relevant parties so that unnecessary delays in planning and constructing needed facilities are avoided. 12 figs., 17 tabs.

Not Available

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

THE ADOPTION OF STATE ELECTRICITY REGULATION: THE ROLE OF INTEREST GROUPS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE ADOPTION OF STATE ELECTRICITY REGULATION: THE ROLE OF INTEREST GROUPSÃ? Christopher R. Knittelw This paper examines the adoption of state electricity regulation around the beginning of the 20th century. I residential electricity penetration rates. These results suggest that state regulation responded to regulatory

Rothman, Daniel

152

Revenue from Retail Sales of Electricity (Thousands Dollars) by State by Provide  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Revenue from Retail Sales of Electricity (Thousands Dollars) by State by Provider, 1990-2012" Revenue from Retail Sales of Electricity (Thousands Dollars) by State by Provider, 1990-2012" "Year","State","Industry Sector Category","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation","Other","Total" 2012,"AK","Total Electric Industry",386304,429152,232325,0,"NA",1047781 2012,"AL","Total Electric Industry",3491380,2318146,2100936,0,"NA",7910462 2012,"AR","Total Electric Industry",1664696,933567,971266,52,"NA",3569581 2012,"AZ","Total Electric Industry",3718357,2829551,813094,0,"NA",7361001 2012,"CA","Total Electric Industry",13821565,16327164,4925482,49095,"NA",35123306

153

Retail Sales of Electricity (Megawatthours) by State by Sector by Provider, 1990  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Retail Sales of Electricity (Megawatthours) by State by Sector by Provider, 1990-2012" Retail Sales of Electricity (Megawatthours) by State by Sector by Provider, 1990-2012" "Year","State","Industry Sector Category","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation","Other","Total" 2012,"AK","Total Electric Industry",2160196,2875038,1381177,0,"NA",6416411 2012,"AL","Total Electric Industry",30632261,21799181,33751106,0,"NA",86182548 2012,"AR","Total Electric Industry",17909301,12102048,16847755,463,"NA",46859567 2012,"AZ","Total Electric Industry",32922970,29692256,12448117,0,"NA",75063343 2012,"CA","Total Electric Industry",90109995,121791536,46951714,684793,"NA",259538038

154

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ELECTRICITY ADVISORY COMMITTEE MEETING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Monday, June 11, 2012 Monday, June 11, 2012 PARTICIPANTS: RICHARD COWART, Chair Regulatory Assistance Project IRWIN POPOWSKY, Vice Chair Pennsylvania Consumer Advocate WILLIAM BALL Southern Company MERWIN BROWN California Institute for Energy and Environment RALPH CAVANAGH Natural Resources Defense Council PAUL CENTOLELLA Public Utilities Commission of Ohio DAVID CRANE NRG Energy, Inc. ROBERT CURRY New York State Public Service Commission JOSE DELGADO American Transmission Company ROBERT GRAMLICH American Wind Energy Association MICHAEL HEYECK American Electric Power VAL JENSEN Commonwealth Edison JOSEPH KELLIHER NextEra Energy, Inc. PARTICIPANTS (CONT'D): SUSAN KELLY

155

Pricing mechanisms for offshore wind electricity in EU member states  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of the study was to evaluate the pricing mechanisms for offshore wind electricity in those EU Member States (MS) possessing an important offshore wind resource and, on this basis, to determine the economic scenario faced by potential investors in the sector. The economic and energy policy framework of each MS was reviewed to establish the main factors determining the final price accorded to electricity generated from offshore wind, including feed-in tariffs, green certificates, subsidies, tax incentives and taking into consideration other factors such as costs and obligations related to grid connection and transmission. On the basis of the information collected, an economic analysis was conducted to compare offshore wind electricity prices across the EU, for a 20-year project duration, based on a year 2001 ''snapshot'' for a typical ''first generation'' offshore wind project. The policy review showed a variety of economic frameworks in existence across the EU, with some countries choosing fixed tariff schemes as the primary instrument and others using market-based systems such as green certificates. However, it was clear that several MS are moving away from the system based solely on fixed tariffs to incorporate more market-based schemes. The economic analysis showed that, on the basis of fixed tariffs and assuming uniform investment costs across EU waters, conditions are most favourable in Belgium (proposed legislation) and Germany. It is thought that, in future, market-oriented schemes and predictability tools will play an increasingly important role in determining the economic conditions faced by offshore wind electricity producers. It should be noted that the analyses presented in this paper are based on the economic and legislatory situations in existence at the time of writing, that is, December, 2001.

Geert Palmers; Suzanne Shaw

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Granite City IL Site - IL 28  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Granite City IL Site - IL 28 Granite City IL Site - IL 28 FUSRAP Considered Sites Granite City, IL Alternate Name(s): Granite City Steel General Steel Industries General Steel Casings Corporation New Betatron Building IL.28-3 Location: 1417 State Street, Granite City, Illinois IL.28-3 Historical Operations: Under subcontract with Mallinckrodt and using a government-owned Betatron (magnetic induction electron accelerator), x-rayed natural uranium ingots and dingots to detect metallurgical flaws. Contamination from rubbing off of oxidized uranium during handling. IL.28-3 IL.28-5 Eligibility Determination: Eligible IL.28-1 IL.28-2 Radiological Survey(s): Assessment Surveys, Verification Survey IL.28-6 IL.28-7 IL.28-8 Site Status: Certified - Certification Basis, Federal Register Notice included IL.28-9

157

Fuel Consumption for Electricity Generation, All Sectors United States  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fuel Consumption for Electricity Generation, All Sectors Fuel Consumption for Electricity Generation, All Sectors United States Coal (thousand st/d) .................... 2,361 2,207 2,586 2,287 2,421 2,237 2,720 2,365 2,391 2,174 2,622 2,286 2,361 2,437 2,369 Natural Gas (million cf/d) ............. 20,952 21,902 28,751 21,535 20,291 22,193 28,174 20,227 20,829 22,857 29,506 21,248 23,302 22,736 23,627 Petroleum (thousand b/d) ........... 128 127 144 127 135 128 135 119 131 124 134 117 131 129 127 Residual Fuel Oil ...................... 38 28 36 29 30 31 33 29 31 30 34 27 33 31 30 Distillate Fuel Oil ....................... 26 24 27 28 35 30 30 26 31 26 28 25 26 30 28 Petroleum Coke (a) .................. 59 72 78 66 63 63 66 59 62 63 67 60 69 63 63 Other Petroleum Liquids (b) ..... 5 3 4 4 7 5 5 5 7 5 5 5 4 6 6 Northeast Census Region Coal (thousand st/d) ....................

158

Tri-State Electric Member Corp | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search Name Tri-State Electric Member Corp Place McCaysville, Georgia Utility Id 19154 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] SGIC[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Rate 1 - Residential Residential Rate 40 - Small Commercial GSA-1 (less 50 kW) Commercial Rate 50 - Commercial GSA-2 (51-1000 kW) Commercial Rate 54 - Large Commercial GSA-3 (1001-5000 kW) Commercial Rate 57 - Seasonal Demand Commercial Rate 72 - Street Lighting Lighting Rate 73 - Athletic Field Lighting Lighting

159

Investigation of Naturally Occurring Radio Nuclides in Shir?kuh Granites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

One of the principle natural radiation resources is Granite which can be dangerous for human because of its radiations. Based on this fact in this research we attempt to specify the activity amount of these natural radio nuclides existing in Shir?kuh Granite of Yazd state. To specify the activity amount of this natural radio nuclides it has been applied the measurement method of Gamma spectroscopy using high purity Germanium (HPGe) detector.

Mohammad Mehdi Mazarei; Mojtaba Zarei

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

State-of-Health Aware Optimal Control of Plug-in Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

), which utilize electric motors for propulsion, differ from fossil fuel powered vehiclesState-of-Health Aware Optimal Control of Plug-in Electric Vehicles Yanzhi Wang, Siyu Yue, USA {yanzhiwa, siyuyue, pedram}@usc.edu Abstract--Plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) are key new energy

Pedram, Massoud

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite state electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

ECE 331 Electromechanical Energy Conversion Catalog Description: Energy conversion principles for electric motors. Steady-state  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Introduction to drives and power electronics in control of electric machines, including switch-mode PWM (ABET Outcomes A, C, E, j, k) Learning Resources: Electric Machines and Drives: A First Course, Ned for electric motors. Steady-state characteristics and analysis of induction, synchronous and direct current

162

Energy Storage Activities in the United States Electricity Grid. May 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Storage Activities in the United States Electricity Grid Storage Activities in the United States Electricity Grid Electricity Advisory Committee Energy Storage Technologies Subcommittee Members Ralph Masiello, Subcommittee Chair Senior Vice President, Transmission KEMA Honorable Lauren Azar Commissioner Wisconsin Public Utilities Commission Frederick Butler President & Chief Executive Officer Butler Advisory Services Richard Cowart Principal Regulatory Assistance Project and Chair, Electricity Advisory Committee Roger Duncan General Manager (Ret.) Austin Energy Robert Gramlich Senior Vice President, Public Policy American Wind Energy Association Brad Roberts Chairman Electricity Storage Association Honorable Tom Sloan Representative Kansas House of Representatives Wanda Reder Vice President

163

Fact #789: July 22, 2013 Comparison of State Incentives for Plug-In Electric Vehicle Purchases  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In addition to a Federal government tax credit up to $7,500, consumers who purchase plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) may also receive state government incentives which are different for each state....

164

Energy Storage Activities in the United States Electricity Grid. May 2011 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Storage Activities in the United States Electricity Grid. Energy Storage Activities in the United States Electricity Grid. May 2011 Energy Storage Activities in the United States Electricity Grid. May 2011 Energy storage technologies offer cost-effective flexibility and ancillary services needed by the U.S power grid. As policy reforms and decreasing technology costs facilitate market penetration, energy storage technologies offer increasingly competitive alternative means for utilities to engage these ancillary services. This report prepared by the Electricity Advisory Committee summarizes energy storage technology activities and projects in the U.S. electric power grid as of May 2011. Energy Storage Activities in the United States Electricity Grid. May 2011 More Documents & Publications Fact Sheet: Tehachapi Wind Energy Storage Project (October 2012)

165

Energy Storage Activities in the United States Electricity Grid. May 2011 |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Activities in the United States Electricity Grid. Activities in the United States Electricity Grid. May 2011 Energy Storage Activities in the United States Electricity Grid. May 2011 Energy storage technologies offer cost-effective flexibility and ancillary services needed by the U.S power grid. As policy reforms and decreasing technology costs facilitate market penetration, energy storage technologies offer increasingly competitive alternative means for utilities to engage these ancillary services. This report prepared by the Electricity Advisory Committee summarizes energy storage technology activities and projects in the U.S. electric power grid as of May 2011. Energy Storage Activities in the United States Electricity Grid. May 2011 More Documents & Publications Fact Sheet: Tehachapi Wind Energy Storage Project (October 2012)

166

Mr. Fred Steinkuehler Granite City Steel Division National Steel Corporation  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Fred Steinkuehler Fred Steinkuehler Granite City Steel Division National Steel Corporation 20th and State Streets Granite City, Illinois 62040 Dear Mr. Steinkuehler: Enclosed please find your copy of the signed consent forms for the radiological survey of the South Plant Betatron Building. In your letter to me of July 21, 1988, you identified several issues regarding the survey and the consent. I would like to address these concerns below. As noted in the consent form, the purpose of our surveys are only to determine if there is any residual radioactive material on the site that is derived from Department of Energy (DOE) predecessor operations. All data collected during the designation survey is to determine the radiological condition of the portion of the site involved in the predecessor work. No

167

Optimal State Electric Supply in Texas -- Overview and Progress  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 1988, the results of the PUCT Bulk Power Transmission Study indicated a range of potential cost savings which could result from greater coordination of power transfers among the utilities in Texas which comprise the Electric Reliability Council...

Moore, B.

168

The Outlook for Renewable Electricity in the United States  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. annual electricity generation capacity additions gigawatts Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2014 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 Other renewables Solar...

169

Energy Department Awards Will Promote Electric Vehicles in 24 States and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Will Promote Electric Vehicles in 24 Will Promote Electric Vehicles in 24 States and Train a Workforce for Advanced Vehicle Development Energy Department Awards Will Promote Electric Vehicles in 24 States and Train a Workforce for Advanced Vehicle Development September 8, 2011 - 3:17pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced 16 projects supporting activities in 24 states and the District of Columbia to accelerate the adoption of electric vehicles (EVs) in communities across the nation, and seven additional projects in seven states to help prepare college students for careers designing and building advanced vehicle technologies. "By developing the next generation of automotive engineers and preparing communities for plug-in electric vehicles, these projects will help reduce

170

Energy Department Awards Will Promote Electric Vehicles in 24 States and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Department Awards Will Promote Electric Vehicles in 24 Energy Department Awards Will Promote Electric Vehicles in 24 States and Train a Workforce for Advanced Vehicle Development Energy Department Awards Will Promote Electric Vehicles in 24 States and Train a Workforce for Advanced Vehicle Development September 8, 2011 - 3:17pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced 16 projects supporting activities in 24 states and the District of Columbia to accelerate the adoption of electric vehicles (EVs) in communities across the nation, and seven additional projects in seven states to help prepare college students for careers designing and building advanced vehicle technologies. "By developing the next generation of automotive engineers and preparing communities for plug-in electric vehicles, these projects will help reduce

171

MidAmerican Energy (Electric) - Municipal Solid-State Lighting Grant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MidAmerican Energy (Electric) - Municipal Solid-State Lighting MidAmerican Energy (Electric) - Municipal Solid-State Lighting Grant Program MidAmerican Energy (Electric) - Municipal Solid-State Lighting Grant Program < Back Eligibility Local Government Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Minimum project size for the full $5,000 grant is 20 fixtures; smaller projects will receive a $250 per-fixture grant. Program Info State Iowa Program Type Utility Grant Program Rebate Amount Up to $5,000 Provider MidAmerican Energy Company MidAmerican Energy offers grants to munipalities which implement solid-state roadway street lighting upgrades. Grants of up to $5,000 are available to participating entities who install eligible roadway lighting fixtures. Participants must be an Iowa electric governmental customer of

172

THE COUNCIL OF STATE GOVERNMENTS THE ELECTRIC TRANSMISSION LINE SITING COMPACT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COUNCIL OF STATE GOVERNMENTS COUNCIL OF STATE GOVERNMENTS THE ELECTRIC TRANSMISSION LINE SITING COMPACT LEGISLATIVE BRIEFING Background and Summary Background and Need The siting of interstate transmission lines has long been a problem that has vexed both states and the federal government. With the expected growth in electricity demand, coupled with the need to bring renewable energy to market and the necessity to enhance and secure the nation's energy infrastructure, the need for added transmission capacity has never been more apparent. National need and parochial interests, however, often do not align and have led to an underdeveloped and overstressed electricity transmission system.

173

Acoustic Character Of Hydraulic Fractures In Granite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydraulic fractures in homogeneous granitic rocks were logged with conventional acoustic-transit-time, acoustic-waveform, and acoustic-televiewer logging systems. Fractured intervals ranged in depth from 45 to 570m. and ...

Paillet, Frederick I.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

The State of the Art of Electric, Hybrid, and Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as wind and solar energy and from nuclear energy. Fuel cell vehicles (FCV) use hydrogen as fuel to produceINVITED P A P E R The State of the Art of Electric, Hybrid, and Fuel Cell Vehicles, and constraints on energy resources, the electric, hybrid, and fuel cell vehicles have attracted more and more

Leung, Ka-Cheong

175

Electricity transmission investment in the United States : an investigation of adequacy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is a prevailing sentiment that the United States is underinvested in its electric transmission infrastructure. The standard claim is that poor regulation has caused insufficient levels of capital to be devoted to the ...

Kwok, Peter Jordan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Fact #790: July 29, 2013 States Beginning to Tax Electric Vehicles for Road Use  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The maintenance of our highways has traditionally been funded from a combination or Federal and state taxes collected at the pump from the sale of motor fuels. Because electric vehicles (EVs) do...

177

Fact #790: July 29, 2013 States Beginning to Tax Electric Vehicles...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the pump from the sale of motor fuels. Because electric vehicles (EVs) do not refuel at pumps that collect state and Federal highway taxes, they do not contribute to the upkeep of...

178

AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - United States | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United States United States Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 95, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Electric Power projections United States Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - United States- Reference Case (xls, 260.9 KiB) Quality Metrics

179

Depositional environment of the Middle Pennsylvanian granite wash: Lambert 1, Hryhor, and Sundance fields, northern Palo Duro basin, Oldham County, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, electric logs, drill stem tests, dip logs, and seismic records. Five granite wash fields have been discovered adjacent to the Bravo Dome in Oldham County, Texas; the Lambert 'I, Hryhor, Sundance, Pond, and Brandi. The section at Lambert 1, Hryhor..., electric logs, drill stem tests, dip logs, and seismic records. Five granite wash fields have been discovered adjacent to the Bravo Dome in Oldham County, Texas; the Lambert 'I, Hryhor, Sundance, Pond, and Brandi. The section at Lambert 1, Hryhor...

Wharton, Amy Laura

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

180

The next gordian knot for state regulators and electric utilities: The unbundling of retail services  

SciTech Connect

Unbundling of retail electric services will accelerate competitive forces in a way that could radically change the future course of the electric power industry. Although simple in concept, unbundling raises a broad range of complex issues, many of which are fundamental to today`s concepts of regulation and utility management. This article addresses four questions: (1) What is retail unbundling? (2) What role might it play in the future electric power industry? (3) What lessons can be learned from retail unbundling in other regulated industries, specifically the natural gas industry? (4) What are the major issues associated with retail unbundling for electric utilities and state regulators?

Costello, K.W.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite state electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Notes for Presentations on Electricity for 3rd Grade The kits provided by the state for electricity do not, at all, explain anything about the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

does wall­plug electricity come from? Use coil moving in magnet and hand­cranked generators (pass' styrofoam popcorn, styrofoam footstool; hand­cranked electric generators; mas­ sive coil­in­magnet generatorNotes for Presentations on Electricity for 3rd Grade Ray Frey The kits provided by the state

Frey, Raymond E.

182

New York State Electric & Gas Corporation Smart Grid Demonstration Project  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New York State Electric & Gas Corporation Smart Grid Demonstration Project New York State Electric & Gas Corporation Smart Grid Demonstration Project Jump to: navigation, search Project Lead New York State Electric & Gas Corporation Country United States Headquarters Location Binghamton, New York Recovery Act Funding $29,561,142.00 Total Project Value $125,006,103.00 Coordinates 42.0986867°, -75.9179738° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

183

Electric field control of spin-resolved edge states in graphene quantum nanorings  

SciTech Connect

The electric-field effect on the electronic and magnetic properties of triangular and hexagonal graphene quantum rings with zigzag edge termination is investigated by means of the single-band tight-binding Hamiltonian and the mean-field Hubbard model. It is shown how the electron and spin states in the nanoring structures can be manipulated by applying an electric field. We find different spin-depolarization behaviors with variation of electric field strength due to the dependence of spin densities on the shapes and edges of this kind of nanorings. In the case of triangular quantum rings, the magnetization on the inner and outer edges can be selectively tuned and the spin states depolarize gradually as the field strength is increased, while in the case of hexagonal nanorings, the transverse electric field reduces the magnetic moments on both inner and outer edges symmetrically and rapidly.

Farghadan, R., E-mail: rfarghadan@kashanu.ac.ir [Department of Physics, University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Saffarzadeh, A. [Department of Physics, Payame Noor University, P.O. Box 19395-3697, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Physics, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia V5A 1S6 (Canada)

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

184

A study of the requirements for the electrical engineering laboratories at Lamar State College of Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

entering into a new four year technical school whioh has only the engineering build1ng available. An eleotrical engineering currioulum must be decided upon and the equipment selected to oorrelate the laboratory oourses with the theory. Wherever.... courses is as / follows& Electric and Magnetio Circuits, (3-3) Credit 4 D1rect ourrent electric and magnetic cirouits under steady state and transient ocnditions. 8. Direot Current Machinery, (3-3) Credit 4 A study of the theory and application...

Holtkamp, William Edward

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

185

Developing a tool to estimate water withdrawal and consumption in electricity generation in the United States.  

SciTech Connect

Freshwater consumption for electricity generation is projected to increase dramatically in the next couple of decades in the United States. The increased demand is likely to further strain freshwater resources in regions where water has already become scarce. Meanwhile, the automotive industry has stepped up its research, development, and deployment efforts on electric vehicles (EVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). Large-scale, escalated production of EVs and PHEVs nationwide would require increased electricity production, and so meeting the water demand becomes an even greater challenge. The goal of this study is to provide a baseline assessment of freshwater use in electricity generation in the United States and at the state level. Freshwater withdrawal and consumption requirements for power generated from fossil, nonfossil, and renewable sources via various technologies and by use of different cooling systems are examined. A data inventory has been developed that compiles data from government statistics, reports, and literature issued by major research institutes. A spreadsheet-based model has been developed to conduct the estimates by means of a transparent and interactive process. The model further allows us to project future water withdrawal and consumption in electricity production under the forecasted increases in demand. This tool is intended to provide decision makers with the means to make a quick comparison among various fuel, technology, and cooling system options. The model output can be used to address water resource sustainability when considering new projects or expansion of existing plants.

Wu, M.; Peng, J. (Energy Systems); ( NE)

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

186

MidAmerican Energy (Electric) - Municipal Solid-State Lighting Grant  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MidAmerican Energy (Electric) - Municipal Solid-State Lighting Grant MidAmerican Energy (Electric) - Municipal Solid-State Lighting Grant Program (Iowa) No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Summary Last modified on November 9, 2012. Financial Incentive Program Place Iowa Additional Place applies to MidAmerican Energy Name MidAmerican Energy (Electric) - Municipal Solid-State Lighting Grant Program Incentive Type Utility Grant Program Applicable Sector Local Government Eligible Technologies Lighting, Lighting Controls/Sensors, Induction Lighitng, LED Lighting Active Incentive Yes Implementing Sector Utility Energy Category Energy Efficiency Incentive Programs Amount Up to $5,000 Equipment Requirements Fixtures must have an efficiency rating equal to or greater than 66 lumens per watt as tested under Illuminating Engineering Society of North America LM-79-08 testing to qualify for a grant.

187

Electrical control of flying spin precession in chiral 1D edge states  

SciTech Connect

Electrical control and detection of spin precession are experimentally demonstrated by using spin-resolved edge states in the integer quantum Hall regime. Spin precession is triggered at a corner of a biased metal gate, where electron orbital motion makes a sharp turn leading to a nonadiabatic change in the effective magnetic field via spin-orbit interaction. The phase of precession is controlled by the group velocity of edge-state electrons tuned by gate bias voltage: Spin-FET-like coherent control of spin precession is thus realized by all-electrical means.

Nakajima, Takashi; Komiyama, Susumu [Department of Basic Science, University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Lin, Kuan-Ting [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

188

Toward a 20% Wind Electricity Supply in the United States: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Since the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated the Wind Powering America (WPA) program in 1999, installed wind power capacity in the United States has increased from 2,500 MW to more than 11,000 MW. In 1999, only four states had more than 100 MW of installed wind capacity; now 16 states have more than 100 MW installed. In addition to WPA's efforts to increase deployment, the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA) is building a network of support across the country. In July 2005, AWEA launched the Wind Energy Works! Coalition, which is comprised of more than 70 organizations. In February 2006, the wind deployment vision was enhanced by President George W. Bush's Advanced Energy Initiative, which refers to a wind energy contribution of up to 20% of the electricity consumption of the United States. A 20% electricity contribution over the next 20 to 25 years represents 300 to 350 gigawatts (GW) of electricity. This paper provides a background of wind energy deployment in the United States and a history of the U.S. DOE's WPA program, as well as the program's approach to increasing deployment through removal of institutional and informational barriers to a 20% wind electricity future.

Flowers, L.; Dougherty, P.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Voluntary electricity conservation of households after the Great East Japan Earthquake: A stated preference analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper examines the voluntary electricity-saving awareness of households after the Great East Japan Earthquake and the subsequent accident at the Fukushima nuclear power station. We conduct a conjoint analysis of consumer stated preferences for the settings of air conditioners, refrigerators, and the standby power of electrical appliances, based on a web questionnaire survey administered in the areas supplied by the Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) and Kansai Electric Power Company (KEPCO). The main findings of this paper are as follows. First, we observe awareness of voluntary electricity conservation among the households in both the TEPCO and KEPCO areas after the disasters. Second, awareness of voluntary power saving is higher in the TEPCO area, which has been directly affected by the electric power shortages, in comparison with the KEPCO area, where there was no such direct impact. Third, if power prices are to be further raised, the consumer responses to the price changes would be small in both areas. Furthermore, we show that the potential voluntary reduction in electric power consumption of a household in the TEPCO area is 26% more than that in the KEPCO area during the summer peak periods.

Makoto Tanaka; Takanori Ida

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Geographic Variation in Potential of Rooftop Residential Photovoltaic Electric Power Production in the United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This paper describes a geographic evaluation of Zero Energy Home (ZEH) potential, specifically an assessment of residential roof-top solar electric photovoltaic (PV) performance around the United States and how energy produced would match up with very-efficient and super-efficient home designs. We performed annual simulations for 236 TMY2 data locations throughout the United States on two highly-efficient one-story 3-bedroom homes with a generic grid-tied solar electric 2kW PV system. These annual simulations show how potential annual solar electric power generation (kWh) and potential energy savings from PV power vary geographically around the U.S. giving the user in a specific region an indication of their expected PV system performance.

191

Electric Field Modulation of the Membrane Potential in Solid-State Ion Channels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

channel. KEYWORDS: Nanochannel, membrane potential, electrofluidic gating, ion transport, salinityElectric Field Modulation of the Membrane Potential in Solid-State Ion Channels Weihua Guan a rapid flow of ions across the cell membrane. Normal physiological functions, such as generating action

Reed, Mark

192

Using Transient Electrical Measurements for Real-Time Monitoring of Battery State-of-Charge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

system. I. INTRODUCTION Future energy-storage systems are likely to use lithium- ion batteries because regulate efficiency and power availability in battery-based systems, it is important to have a robust realUsing Transient Electrical Measurements for Real-Time Monitoring of Battery State

Nasipuri, Asis

193

The Effects of Climate and Electricity Emissions on Air Quality in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Effects of Climate and Electricity Emissions on Air Quality in the United States by Steven D and Motivation 1 A. Background ­ Ozone and Fine Particulate Matter 2 B. The National Ambient Air Quality Standards 4 C. Improving Future Air Quality 6 D. Research Overview 8 Figures 10 References 15 Chapter 2

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

194

ELECTRIC  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

you nay give us will be greatly uppreckted. VPry truly your23, 9. IX. Sin0j3, Mtinager lclectronics and Nuclear Physics Dept. omh , WESTINGHOUSE-THE NAT KING IN ELECTRICITY...

195

Clean Energy State Program Guide: Mainstreaming Solar Electricity Strategies for States to Build Local Markets  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A PV mapping tool visually represents a specific site and calculates PV system size and projected electricity production. This report identifies the commercially available solar mapping tools and thoroughly summarizes the source data type and resolution, the visualization software program being used, user inputs, calculation methodology and algorithms, map outputs, and development costs for each map.

196

Prospects for plug-in hybrid electric vehicles in the United States and Japan: A general equilibrium analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prospects for plug-in hybrid electric vehicles in the United States and Japan: A general-in hybrid electric vehicles Environmental policy Emissions a b s t r a c t The plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) may offer a potential near term, low-carbon alternative to today's gasoline- and diesel-powered

197

United States-Mexico electricity transfers: Of alien electrons and the migration of undocumented environmental burdens  

SciTech Connect

This article intends to set forth the necessity for reform in the United States policy and procedures regarding approval of power transfers between the United States and Mexico. In order to do this, the article will review the history of electrical power transfers between the United States and Mexico (Part II), analyze recent regulatory changes in the United States and Mexico which may result in increased power exports to Mexico (Part III), evaluate the extent to which the present permit and authorization system in the United States considers the increased environmental burden of such power transfers (Part IV), and, where appropriate, propose some procedural and policy reforms that could take into account the environmental burdens generated by the production of power destined for transfer across the United States-Mexico border (Part V).

Gandara, A. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Supply Curves for Rooftop Solar PV-Generated Electricity for the United States  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A0-44073 A0-44073 November 2008 Supply Curves for Rooftop Solar PV-Generated Electricity for the United States Paul Denholm and Robert Margolis Supply Curves for Rooftop Solar PV-Generated Electricity for the United States Paul Denholm and Robert Margolis Prepared under Task No. PVB7.6301 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A0-44073 November 2008 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

199

Update on State Air Emission Regulations That Affect Electric Power Producers (released in AEO2005)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Several states have recently enacted air emission regulations that will affect the electricity generation sector. The regulations are intended to improve air quality in the states and assist them in complying with the revised 1997 National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for ground-level ozone and fine particulates. The affected states include Connecticut, Massachusetts, Maine, Missouri, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Oregon, Texas, and Washington. The regulations govern emissions of NOx, SO2, CO2, and mercury from power plants.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

The Economic Effects of Electricity Deregulation: An Empricial Analysis of Indian States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.eprg.group.cam.ac.uk E P R G W O R K IN G P A P E R Abstract The Economic Effects of Electricity Deregulation: An Empirical Analysis of Indian States EPRG Working Paper 1001 Cambridge Working Paper in Economics 1005 Anupama Sen... and Tooraj Jamasb As developing countries seek to improve their economic prospects, electricity reform has been widely viewed as a central part of this effort. While the focus of most research to date has been at economy or utility level; there has...

Sen, A; Jamasb, Tooraj

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite state electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Electric field control of the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface ground state  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... identified: a magnetic state and a two-dimensional superconducting condensate. Here we use the electric field effect to explore the phase diagram of the system. The electrostatic tuning of ... insulating state are consistent with weak localization and do not provide evidence for magnetism. The electric field control of superconductivity demonstrated here opens the way to the development of new mesoscopic ...

A. D. Caviglia; S. Gariglio; N. Reyren; D. Jaccard; T. Schneider; M. Gabay; S. Thiel; G. Hammerl; J. Mannhart; J.-M. Triscone

2008-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

202

Proceedings: Electric dehumidification: State-of-the-art humidity control for supermarkets seminar  

SciTech Connect

On October 9--10 1990, EPRI sponsored a conference in New Orleans, Louisiana on Electric Dehumidification: State of the Art Humidity Control for Supermarkets. The conference was attended by 124 electric utility, manufacturer, supermarket industry and consultant representatives. Attendees heard 17 speakers address efficient electric technologies for controlling relative humidity, and the importance of humidity control in the supermarket environment. Speakers addressed efficient electric technologies as well as gas desiccant systems. The management of energy use in supermarkets is a complex task. Energy costs are a major part of the supermarket operating budget, and the supermarket business is one where small differences in operating costs can make the difference between profit and loss. Energy use is dominated by refrigeration and HVAC, and the control of energy costs is dependent on the successful management of the interaction between these two systems. Humidity control in supermarkets is critical because of the presence of refrigerated display cases. Excess humidity causes display case fixture sweating and refrigeration coil and product frosting, requires frequent defrosting, and increased energy use for antisweat heaters and refrigeration. The conventional approach to dehumidification in an all-electric system is overcooling to condense moisture and reheat to bring the air to a comfortable temperature. This approach, while effective in less demanding environments, results in high electric energy costs for the humidity control necessary in supermarkets. Speakers in the introductory session of the conference explained the importance of electric energy for the supermarket; discussed modern refrigeration systems; and set the stage for more detailed discussion of specific dehumidification systems.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY NEW YORK STATE ELECTRIC & GAS CORPORATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NEW YORK STATE ELECTRIC & GAS CORPORATION NEW YORK STATE ELECTRIC & GAS CORPORATION (NYSEG) FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN INVENTION RIGHTS UNDER COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NO. DE-FC22-92PC-92642, W(A)-93-016, CH-0773 NYSEG was awarded this cooperative agreement under the fourth round of the Innovative Clean Coal Technology Program pursuant to P.L. 101-512 to demonstrate a combination of cost effective emission reduction and efficiency improvement technolo- gies including: Saarberg-Holter Umwelltechnik's (S-H-U) advanced SO2 scrubber technology which uses formic acid enhancement and cocurrent/countercurrent open spray tower absorber design; Stebbins Engineering's tile-lined split module absorber construction; NOxOUT injection and air combustion modeling technology and implementation for NOx control; and heat pipe air heater technology to increase energy

204

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF ELECTRICITY DELIVERY AND ENERGY RELIABILITY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF ELECTRICITY DELIVERY AND ENERGY RELIABILITY Improving Performance of Federal ) 78 Fed Reg. 53,436 (Aug. 29, 2013) Permitting and Review of ) FR Doc 2013 -- 21098 Infrastructure Projects ) COMMENTS OF WIRES ON THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REQUEST FOR INFORMATION WIRES 1 respectfully submits these comments in response to the Request for Information ("RFI") issued by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability ("OEDER") of the Department of Energy ("DOE" or "the Department") in conjunction with the Member Agencies of the Steering Committee under the March 22, 2013 Executive Order of the President ("EO 13604"). The RFI concerns a draft proposed Integrated Interagency Pre-Application ("IIP")

205

Northeast United States U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment of the Adequacy of Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the Northeast United States U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Energy Infrastructure Modeling and Analysis Division November 2013 Northeast U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Adequacy Assessment, 2013 2 Preface In 2005-06, the U.S. DOE Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) conducted a study on the adequacy of interstate natural gas pipeline capacity serving the northeastern United States to meet natural gas demand in the event of a pipeline disruption. The study modeled gas demand for select market areas in the Northeast under a range of different weather conditions. The study then determined how interstate pipeline flow patterns could

206
207

ELECTRIC  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ELECTRIC ELECTRIC cdrtrokArJclaeT 3 I+ &i, y$ \I &OF I*- j< t j,fci..- ir )(yiT !E-li, ( \-,v? Cl -p/4.4 RESEARCH LABORATORIES EAST PITTSBURGH, PA. 8ay 22, 1947 Mr. J. Carrel Vrilson General ?!!mager Atomic Qxzgy Commission 1901 Constitution Avenue Kashington, D. C. Dear Sir: In the course of OUT nuclenr research we are planning to study the enc:ri;y threshold anti cross section for fission. For thib program we require a s<>piAroted sample of metallic Uranium 258 of high purity. A quantity of at lezst 5 grams would probably be sufficient for our purpose, and this was included in our 3@icntion for license to the Atonic Energy Coskqission.. This license has been approved, 2nd rre would Llp!Jreciate informztion as to how to ?r*oceed to obtain thit: m2teria.l.

208

Microsoft PowerPoint - Granite-PCO-PCC-22  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

nd nd Annual Pittsburgh Coal Conference The PCO Process for Removal of Mercury from Flue Gas National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Fossil Energy Christopher R. McLarnon, Evan J. Granite, and Henry W. Pennline September 13, 2005 185199 EJG 12/11/03 GP-254 / PCO Process * Alternative to ACI Developed * Patent Issued June 2003 * Licensed for Application to Coal-Burning Power Plants (Powerspan Corporation) * Oxidation of Mercury * Irradiation of Flue Gas with 254-nm Light * 90% Oxidation Attained at Bench-Scale * Low Parasitic Power (less than 0.5%) * Potential Application for Incinerators 185199 EJG 12/11/03 * EPA Announcement March 15, 2005 * Clean Air Mercury Rule * Several States Requiring Stricter Reductions * 70-90% Removal Requirement

209

The electrical conductivity of sandstone, limestone and granite  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......logs, Southern Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, US Geol. Surv. Rep. Spec...rock and soil samples from the Nevada Test Site, US Geol. Surv. Rep. Spec...Spring formation in Area 12 at the Nevada test site, ch. 5, pp. 1-10. eds......

A. Duba; A. J. Piwinskii; M. Santor; H. C. Weed

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

The Effects of Electricity Tariff Structure on Distributed Generation Adoption in New York State  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1: Disaggregated electricity costs for commercial customers1: Disaggregated electricity costs for commercial customers9 Figure 4: NYISO 2003 Day Ahead Electricity Costs, by

Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Economic Assessment of Electric-Drive Vehicle Operation in California and the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ECONOMIC ASSESSMENT OF ELECTRIC-DRIVE VEHICLE OPERATION INECONOMIC ASSESSMENT OF ELECTRIC-DRIVE VEHICLE OPERATION INconsumers to switch to electric-drive vehicles, including a

Lidicker, Jeffrey R.; Lipman, Timothy E.; Shaheen, Susan A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

The potential for avoided emissions from photovoltaic electricity in the United States  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

potential potential for avoided emissions from photovoltaic electricity in the United States Pei Zhai a, * , Peter Larsen a, b , Dev Millstein a , Surabi Menon a , Eric Masanet c a Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Department, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, USA b Management Science & Engineering Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA c McCormick School of Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 29 April 2012 Accepted 16 August 2012 Available online 29 September 2012 Keywords: Photovoltaics Emissions Energy model United States a b s t r a c t This study evaluates avoided emissions potential of CO 2 , SO 2 and NO x assuming a 10% penetration level of photovoltaics (PV) in ten selected U.S. states. We estimate avoided emissions using an hourly energy system simulation model, EnergyPLAN. Avoided

213

Search for a Neutron Electric Dipole Moment at the SNS Brad Filippone (Caltech), Martin Cooper (LANL), Paul Huffman (NC State)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Search for a Neutron Electric Dipole Moment at the SNS Brad Filippone (Caltech), Martin Cooper (LANL), Paul Huffman (NC State) for the nEDM@SNS Collaboration The discovery of a neutron EDM (Electric and the empirical fact that matter exists in our universe. Experiments have searched for a neutron EDM for over six

214

Granite Reliable Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reliable Power Reliable Power Jump to: navigation, search Name Granite Reliable Power Facility Granite Reliable Power Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Brookfield Renewable Energy Group Developer Brookfield Renewable Energy Group Energy Purchaser Green Mountain Power / Central Vermont Public Service / New England Power Pool Location Milan NH Coordinates 44.74039314°, -71.28376007° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.74039314,"lon":-71.28376007,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

215

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Granite2_FUSRAP  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Illinois Illinois Granite City, Illinois Site FUSRAP Site Granite Map Background-The Granite City Site, located in Granite City, Illinois, was remediated under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). FUSRAP was established in 1974 to remediate sites where radioactive contamination remained from Manhattan Project and early U.S. Atomic Energy Commission operations. History-In the late 1950s and early 1960s, two federal government-owned betatron particle accelerators were used at the Granite City Site to x-ray uranium metal ingots for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission to check the quality of the metal and to detect metallurgical flaws before fabrication and machining were performed. In 1992, DOE designated the site for remediation under FUSRAP. Several

216

Results of the radiological survey at the New Betatron Building, Granite City Steel facility, Granite City, Illinois (GSG002)  

SciTech Connect

At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted a radiological survey at the New Betatron Building, located in the South Plant facility of Granite City Steel Division, 1417 State Street, Granite City, Illinois. The survey was performed in August 1991. The purpose of the survey was to determine whether the property was contaminated with radioactive residues, principally {sup 238}U, as a result of work done for the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) from 1958 to 1966. The survey included a surface gamma scan of the ground surface outdoors near the building, the floor and walls in all accessible areas inside the building, and the roof; measurement of beta-gamma dose rates, alpha radiation levels, and removable alpha and beta-gamma activity levels at selected locations inside the building and on the roof; and radionuclide analysis of outdoor soil samples and indoor samples of shield-wall fill material land debris. Analysis of soil, shield-wall fill material, debris, and smear samples showed no residual {sup 238}U attributable to former AEC-supported operations at this site. None of the indoor or outdoor gamma exposure rate measurements were elevated above DOE guidelines. The slight elevations in gamma levels found outdoors and on the roof over the shield wall are typical of naturally occurring radioactive substances present in coal ash and cinders in the fill material surrounding the building and in concrete and cinders used in constuction of the shield wall. The slightly elevated gamma levels measured at soil sampling locations can be attributed to the presence of naturally occurring radionuclides. In all samples, {sup 226}Ra and {sup 238}U appeared to be in equilibrium, indicating that these radionuclides were of natural origin and not derived from former AEC activities at this site.

Murray, M.E.; Uziel, M.S.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

FORM EIA-826 MONTHLY ELECTRIC SALES AND REVENUE WITH STATE DISTRIBUTIONS REPORT  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

MONTHLY ELECTRIC SALES AND REVENUE WITH STATE DISTRIBUTIONS REPORT OMB No. 1905-0129 Approval Expires: 12/31/2016 Burden: 1.37 hours NOTICE: This report is mandatory under the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275). Failure to comply may result in criminal fines, civil penalties and other sanctions as provided by law. For further information concerning sanctions and data protections see the provision on sanctions and the provision concerning the confidentiality of information in the instructions. Title 18 USC 1001 makes it a criminal offense for any person knowingly and willingly to make to any Agency or Department of the United States any false, fictitious, or fraudulent statements as to any

218

Granite Springs Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Springs Geothermal Project Springs Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Granite Springs Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates 40.1475°, -118.64861111111° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.1475,"lon":-118.64861111111,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

219

Granite Creek Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Project Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Granite Creek Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates 41.058611111111°, -117.22777777778° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.058611111111,"lon":-117.22777777778,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

220

Microsoft Word - CX-LowerGranite-HatwaiAccessRoadImprovementFY13_WEB.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9, 2012 9, 2012 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-Bell-1 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Kristi Unholz Project Manager - TELF-TPP-3 Proposed Action: Improve the access road system in miles 4, 5, 16, 17, 18, and 30 of the Lower Granite-Hatwai transmission line PP&A Project No.: 2378 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine Maintenance. B1.13 Pathways, short access roads, and rail lines Location: As identified in table below: Lower Granite-Hatwai Access Road Project Location Township Range Section County, State mile 4 to mile 5 13N 43E 2 Whitman, WA mile 16 12N 45E 8 mile 17 12N 45E 17 mile 18 12N 45E 20 mile 30 36N 5W 19, 30 Nez Perce, ID Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite state electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Highway Vehicle Electric Drive in the United States: 2009 Status and Issues  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ANL/ESD/10-9 ANL/ESD/10-9 Highway Vehicle Electric Drive in the United States: 2009 Status and Issues Energy Systems Division About Argonne National Laboratory Argonne is a U.S. Department of Energy laboratory managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357. The Laboratory's main facility is outside Chicago, at 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439. For information about Argonne and its pioneering science and technology programs, see www.anl.gov. Availability of This Report This report is available, at no cost, at http://www.osti.gov/bridge. It is also available on paper to the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors, for a processing fee, from: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information

222

Estimated Value of Service Reliability for Electric Utility Customers in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Administration, Duke Energy, Mid America Power, Pacific Gas and Electric Company, Puget Sound Energy, Salt River

223

False Data Injection Attacks against State Estimation in Electric Power Grids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using IEEE test systems. Our results indicate that security protection of the electric power grid must@cs.unc.edu ABSTRACT A power grid is a complex system connecting electric power generators to consumers through power A power grid is a complex system connecting a variety of electric power generators to customers through

Reiter, Michael

224

Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam, 2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This project monitored the daily passage of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon O. nerka smolts during the 2005 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. In 2005 fish management agencies released significant numbers of hatchery Chinook salmon and steelhead trout above Lower Granite Dam that were not marked with a fin clip or coded-wire tag. Generally, the age-1 and older fish were distinguishable from wild fish by the occurrence of fin erosion. Age-0 Chinook salmon are more difficult to distinguish between wild and non-adclipped hatchery fish and therefore classified as unknown rearing. The total annual hatchery spring/summer Chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 0.34 times greater in 2005 than in 2004. The wild spring/summer Chinook catch was 0.34 times less than the previous year. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 0.67 times less than in 2004. Wild steelhead trout catch was 0.72 times less than the previous year. The Snake River trap collected 1,152 age-0 Chinook salmon of unknown rearing. During 2005, the Snake River trap captured 219 hatchery and 44 wild/natural sockeye salmon and 110 coho salmon O. kisutch of unknown rearing. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with flow. Trap operations began on March 6 and were terminated on June 3. The trap was out of operation for a total of one day due to heavy debris. FPC requested that the trap be restarted on June 15 through June 22 to collect and PIT tag age-0 Chinook salmon. Hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 1.06 times greater and wild Chinook salmon catch was 1.26 times greater than in 2004. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 2005 was 1.41 times greater and wild steelhead trout collection was 1.27 times greater than the previous year. Trap operations began on March 6 and were terminated on May 17 due to high flows. There were two days when the trap was taken out of service because of mechanical failure. Travel time (d) and migration rate (km/d) through Lower Granite Reservoir for passive integrated transponder (PIT) tagged Chinook salmon and steelhead trout marked at the Snake River trap were affected by discharge. Statistical analysis of 2005 data detected a relation between migration rate and discharge for hatchery Chinook but was unable to detect a relation for wild Chinook. The inability to detect a migration rate discharge relation for wild Chinook salmon was caused by a lack of data. For hatchery Chinook salmon there was a 1.8-fold increase in migration rate between 50 and 100 kcfs. For steelhead trout tagged at the Snake River trap, statistical analysis detected a significant relation between migration rate and lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge. For hatchery and wild steelhead trout, there was a 2.2-fold and a 2.2-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. Travel time and migration rate to Lower Granite Dam for fish marked at the Salmon River trap were calculated. Statistical analysis of the 2005 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge for hatchery Chinook salmon, wild Chinook salmon, hatchery steelhead trout, and wild steelhead trout. Migration rate increased 4.2-fold for hatchery Chinook salmon, 2.9-fold for wild Chinook salmon and 2.5-fold for hatchery steelhead, and 1.7-fold for wild steelhead as discharge increased between 50 kcfs and 100 kcfs. Fish tagged with PIT tags at the Snake River and Salmon River traps were interrogated at four dams with PIT tag detection systems (Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental and McNary dams). Because of the addition of the fourth interrogation site (Lower Monumental) in 1993 and the installation of the Removable Spillway Weir at Lower Granite Dam in 2001, caution must be used in comparing cumulative interrogation data. Cumulative interrogations at the fo

Buettner, Edwin W.; Putnam, Scott A. [Idaho Department of Fish and Game

2009-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

225

The state of energy storage in electric utility systems and its effect on renewable energy resources  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the state of the art of electric energy storage technologies and discusses how adding intermittent renewable energy technologies (IRETs) to a utility network affects the benefits from storage dispatch. Load leveling was the mode of storage dispatch examined in the study. However, the report recommended that other modes be examined in the future for kilowatt and kilowatt-hour optimization of storage. The motivation to install storage with IRET generation can arise from two considerations: reliability and enhancement of the value of energy. Because adding storage increases cost, reliability-related storage is attractive only if the accruing benefits exceed the cost of storage installation. The study revealed that the operation of storage should not be guided by the output of the IRET but rather by system marginal costs. Consequently, in planning studies to quantify benefits, storage should not be considered as an entity belonging to the system and not as a component of IRETS. The study also indicted that because the infusion of IRET energy tends to reduce system marginal cost, the benefits from load leveling (value of energy) would be reduced. However, if a system has storage, particularly if the storage is underutilized, its dispatch can be reoriented to enhance the benefits of IRET integration.

Rau, N.S.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

The Effects of Electricity Tariff Structure on Distributed Generation Adoption in New York State  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

State” Prepared for the New York State Energy Research andPatterns and Trends: New York State Energy Profiles: 1988-to represent New York State energy rates more accurately.

Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Future States: The Convergence of Smart Grid, Renewables, Shale Gas, and Electric Vehicles  

SciTech Connect

Dick Cirillo and Guenter Conzelmann present on research involving renewable energy sources, the use of natural gas, electric vehicles, and the SMART grid.

Dick Cirillo; Guenter Conzelmann

2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

228

The Potential for Avoided Emissions from Photovoltaic Electricity in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mix of power plants (power grid fuel mix), the emissionsolar electricity into the power grid will generally reducefor generators in the power grid of California and Colorado.

Zhai, Pei

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Future States: The Convergence of Smart Grid, Renewables, Shale Gas, and Electric Vehicles  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Dick Cirillo and Guenter Conzelmann present on research involving renewable energy sources, the use of natural gas, electric vehicles, and the SMART grid.

Dick Cirillo; Guenter Conzelmann

2013-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

230

Measurement of the natural vibration of brushless electrical machines for diagnostics of their technical state  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Determination of the nature of natural vibration of low-power brushless electrical machines and ... such determination are considered. The results of measurements of the spectral and statistical ...

V. A. Sobolev; V. M. Suslov; Yu. M. Panin; A. B. Skripnik

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Wind energy as a significant source of electricity for the United States  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses wind energy and its potential to significantly impact the generation of electricity within the US. The principles and the equipment used to convert wind energy to electricity are described, as is the status of current technology. Markets and production projections are given. There is discussion of the advances required to reduce the selling cost of electricity generated from the wind from today`s price of about $0.05 per kilowatt-hour to full cost-competitiveness with gas- and coal-based electricity.

Nix, R.G.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Electric tuning of the surface and quantum well states in Bi2Se3 films: a first-principles study  

SciTech Connect

Based on first-principles calculations in the framework of van der Waals density functional theory, we find that giant, Rashba-like spin splittings can be induced in both the surface states and quantum well states of thin Bi2Se3 films by application of an external electric field. The charge is redistributed so that the Dirac cones of the upper and lower surfaces become nondegenerate and completely gapless. Interestingly, a momentum-dependent spin texture is developed on the two surfaces of the films. Some of the quantum well states, which reside in the middle of the Bi2Se3 film under zero field, are driven to the surface by the electric field. The Rashba splitting energy has a highly non-linear dependence on the momentum and the electric field due to the large contribution of the high-order Rashba terms, which suggests complex spin dynamics in the thin films of Bi2Se3 under an electric field.

Yang, Hong [Xiangtan University, Xiangtan Hunan, China; Peng, Xiangyang [Xiangtan University, Xiangtan Hunan, China; Liu, Wenliang [Xiangtan University, Xiangtan Hunan, China; Wei, Xiaolin [Xiangtan University, Xiangtan Hunan, China; Hao, Guolin [Xiangtan University, Xiangtan Hunan, China; He, Chaoyu [Xiangtan University, Xiangtan Hunan, China; Li, Jin [Xiangtan University, Xiangtan Hunan, China; Stocks, George Malcolm [ORNL; Zhong, Jianxin [Xiangtan University, Xiangtan Hunan, China

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

EA-1801: Granite Reliable Power Wind Park Project in Coos County...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

01: Granite Reliable Power Wind Park Project in Coos County, NH EA-1801: Granite Reliable Power Wind Park Project in Coos County, NH June 25, 2010 EA-1801: Final Environmental...

234

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline a-type granites Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

granites of the Lachlan Fold Belt... ) experimentally determined the stability of titanite and fluorite in the A-type Mount Scott Granite, Oklahoma... and origin of A-type...

235

Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam, 2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This project monitored the daily passage of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon O. nerka smolts during the 2004 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. In 2004 fish management agencies released significant numbers of hatchery Chinook salmon and steelhead trout above Lower Granite Dam that were not marked with a fin clip or coded-wire tag. Generally, these fish were distinguishable from wild fish by the occurrence of fin erosion. Total annual hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 1.1 times greater in 2004 than in 2003. The wild Chinook catch was 1.1 times greater than the previous year. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 1.2 times greater than in 2003. Wild steelhead trout catch was 1.6 times greater than the previous year. The Snake River trap collected 978 age-0 Chinook salmon of unknown rearing. During 2004, the Snake River trap captured 23 hatchery and 18 wild/natural sockeye salmon and 60 coho salmon O. kisutch of unknown rearing. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with flow. Trap operations began on March 7 and were terminated on June 4. The trap was out of operation for a total of zero days due to mechanical failure or debris. Hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 10.8% less and wild Chinook salmon catch was 19.0% less than in 2003. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 2004 was 20.0% less and wild steelhead trout collection was 22.3% less than the previous year. Trap operations began on March 7 and were terminated on May 28 due to high flows. There were two days when the trap was taken out of service because wild Chinook catch was very low, hatchery Chinook catch was very high, and the weekly quota of PIT tagged hatchery Chinook had been met. Travel time (d) and migration rate (km/d) through Lower Granite Reservoir for PIT-tagged Chinook salmon and steelhead trout marked at the Snake River trap were affected by discharge. Statistical analysis of 2004 data detected a relation between migration rate and discharge for wild Chinook salmon but was unable to detect a relation for hatchery Chinook. The inability to detect a migration rate discharge relation for hatchery Chinook salmon was caused by age-0 fall Chinook being mixed in with the age 1 Chinook. Age-0 fall Chinook migrate much slower than age-1 Chinook, which would confuse the ability to detect the migration rate discharge relation. When several groups, which consisted of significant numbers of age-0 Chinook salmon, were removed from the analysis a relation was detected. For hatchery and wild Chinook salmon there was a 2.8-fold and a 2.4-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. For steelhead trout tagged at the Snake River trap, statistical analysis detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge. For hatchery and wild steelhead trout, there was a 2.3-fold and a 2.0-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. Travel time and migration rate to Lower Granite Dam for fish marked at the Salmon River trap were calculated. Statistical analysis of the 2004 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge for hatchery Chinook salmon, wild Chinook salmon and hatchery steelhead trout. Not enough data were available to perform the analysis for wild steelhead trout. Migration rate increased 7.0-fold for hatchery Chinook salmon, 4.7-fold for wild Chinook salmon and 3.8-fold for hatchery steelhead as discharge increased between 50 kcfs and 100 kcfs. Fish tagged with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags at the Snake River and Salmon River traps were interrogated at four dams with PIT tag detection systems (Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, and McNary dams). Because of the addition of the fourth interrogation site (Lower Monume

Buettner, Edwin W.; Putnam, Scott A. [Idaho Department of Fish and Game

2009-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

236

Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam, 2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This project monitored the daily passage of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon smolts O. nerka during the 2002 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. In 2002 fish management agencies released significant numbers of hatchery Chinook salmon and steelhead trout above Lower Granite Dam that were not marked with a fin clip or coded-wire tag. Generally, these fish were distinguishable from wild fish by the occurrence of fin erosion. Total annual hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 11.4 times greater in 2002 than in 2001. The wild Chinook catch was 15.5 times greater than the previous year. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 2.9 times greater than in 2001. Wild steelhead trout catch was 2.8 times greater than the previous year. The Snake River trap collected 3,996 age-0 Chinook salmon of unknown rearing. During 2002, the Snake River trap captured 69 hatchery and 235 wild/natural sockeye salmon and 114 hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with flow. The significant increase in catch in 2002 was due to a 3.1 fold increase in hatchery Chinook production and a more normal spring runoff. Trap operations began on March 10 and were terminated on June 7. The trap was out of operation for a total of four days due to mechanical failure or debris. Hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 4.2 times greater and wild Chinook salmon catch was 2.4 times greater than in 2001. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 2002 was 81% of the 2001 numbers. Wild steelhead trout collection in 2002 was 81% of the previous year's catch. Trap operations began on March 10 and were terminated on May 29 due to high flows. The trap was out of operation for four days due to high flow or debris. The increase in hatchery Chinook catch in 2002 was due to a 3.1 fold increase in hatchery production and differences in flow between years. Changes in hatchery and wild steelhead catch are probably due to differences in flow between years. Travel time (d) and migration rate (km/d) through Lower Granite Reservoir for PIT-tagged Chinook salmon and steelhead trout marked at the Snake River trap were affected by discharge. Statistical analysis of 2002 data detected a relation between migration rate and discharge for hatchery and wild Chinook salmon. For hatchery and wild Chinook salmon there was a 4.7-fold and a 3.7-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. For steelhead trout tagged at the Snake River trap, statistical analysis detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge. For hatchery and wild steelhead trout, there was a 1.8-fold and a 1.7-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. Travel time and migration rate to Lower Granite Dam for fish marked at the Salmon River trap were calculated. Statistical analysis of the 2002 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge for wild Chinook salmon and hatchery steelhead trout. The analysis was unable to detect a relation between migration rate and discharge for hatchery Chinook salmon. The lack of a detectable relation was probably a result of the migration rate data being spread over a very narrow range of discharge. Not enough data were available to perform the analysis for wild steelhead trout. Migration rate increased 4.3-fold for wild Chinook salmon and 2.2-fold for hatchery steelhead between 50 kcfs and 100 kcfs. Fish tagged with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags at the Snake River trap were interrogated at four dams with PIT tag detection systems (Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, and McNary dams). Because of the addition of the fourth interrogation site (Lower Monumental) in 1993 and the installation of the Removable Spillway Weir at

Buettner, Edwin W.; Putnam, Scott A. [Idaho Department of Fish and Game

2009-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

237

Prospects for Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles in the United States: A General Equilibrium Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for internal combustion engine (ICE)-only vehicles. Engineering cost estimates for the PHEV, as well Engineering ABSTRACT The plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) could significantly contribute to reductions, depending on the cost-competitiveness of the vehicle, the relative cost of refined fuels and electricity

238

False Data Injection Attacks against State Estimation in Electric Power Grids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using IEEE test systems. Our results indicate that security protection of the electric power grid must@cs.unc.edu ABSTRACT A power grid is a complex system connecting electric power generators to consumers through power.5 [Management of Computing and Information Systems]: Security and Protection; E.m [Data]: Miscella- This work

Ning, Peng

239

Materials use in electricity generators in wind turbines – state-of-the-art and future specifications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The European Strategic Energy Technology Plan, adopted by the European Union in 2008, is a first step to establish an energy technology policy for Europe and to support the 2020 energy and climate change targets from the technology development point of view. One of its initiatives is to assess the characteristics of the materials that will be needed in order to achieve the 2020 targets, in terms both of amounts of materials and their technical specifications, along with the way to get there for the latter. The Materials Initiative was created to foster a roadmap which is based on a scientific assessment of the current situation. This paper presents the work of the author in the (wind turbine) electricity generator part of that assessment, it includes the aspects of technology and system state-of-the-art; material supply status; on-going research and players; materials specification targets for 2020/2030 and beyond. The assessment found that the performance of permanent magnets is the single item potentially to provide the most significant improvement in component specification, but that in order to achieve this perhaps new chemical components –based on rare earths, as currently, or not-will be necessary in order to achieve these high-performance magnets. The search for these new materials is stimulated by the current dependency of the world in a nearly-monopolistic supplier of rare earth elements. The assessment also concluded that the improvement of materials specifications is challenging but achievable in most areas, and a crucial aspect for the necessary cost reductions in wind energy production.

Roberto Lacal-Arántegui

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam, 2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This project monitored the daily passage of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon O. nerka smolts during the 2003 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. In 2003 fish management agencies released significant numbers of hatchery Chinook salmon and steelhead trout above Lower Granite Dam that were not marked with a fin clip or coded-wire tag. Generally, these fish were distinguishable from wild fish by the occurrence of fin erosion. Total annual hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 2.1 times less in 2003 than in 2002. The wild Chinook catch was 1.1 times less than the previous year. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 1.7 times less than in 2002. Wild steelhead trout catch was 2.1 times less than the previous year. The Snake River trap collected 579 age-0 Chinook salmon of unknown rearing. During 2003, the Snake River trap captured five hatchery and 13 wild/natural sockeye salmon and 36 coho salmon O. kisutch of unknown rearing. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with flow. The significant differences in catch between 2003 and the previous year were due mainly to low flows during much of the trapping season and then very high flows at the end of the season, which terminated the trapping season 12 days earlier than in 2002. Trap operations began on March 9 and were terminated on May 27. The trap was out of operation for a total of zero days due to mechanical failure or debris. Hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 16.8% less and wild Chinook salmon catch was 1.7 times greater than in 2002. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 2003 was 5.6% less than in 2002. Wild steelhead trout collection was 19.2% less than the previous year. Trap operations began on March 9 and were terminated on May 24 due to high flows. There were zero days when the trap was out of operation due to high flow or debris. The decrease in hatchery Chinook catch in 2003 was partially due to differences in flow between years because there was a 5.9% increase in hatchery production in the Salmon River drainage in 2003. The decrease in hatchery steelhead catch may be partially due to a 13% decrease in hatchery production in the Salmon River drainage in 2003. Travel time (d) and migration rate (km/d) through Lower Granite Reservoir for PIT-tagged Chinook salmon and steelhead trout marked at the Snake River trap were affected by discharge. Statistical analysis of 2003 data detected a relation between migration rate and discharge for wild Chinook salmon but was unable to detect a relation for hatchery Chinook. The inability to detect a migration rate discharge relation for hatchery Chinook was probably caused by age 0 fall Chinook being mixed in with the age 1 Chinook. Age 0 fall Chinook migrate much slower than age 1 Chinook, which would confuse the ability to detect the migration rate discharge relation. For wild Chinook salmon there was a 1.4-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. For steelhead trout tagged at the Snake River trap, statistical analysis detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge. For hatchery and wild steelhead trout, there was a 1.7-fold and a 1.9-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. Travel time and migration rate to Lower Granite Dam for fish marked at the Salmon River trap were calculated. Statistical analysis of the 2003 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge for hatchery Chinook salmon, wild Chinook salmon and hatchery steelhead trout. Not enough data were available to perform the analysis for wild steelhead trout. Migration rate increased 14-fold for hatchery Chinook salmon, 8.3-fold for wild Chinook salmon and 2.4-fold for hatchery steelhead as discharge increased between 50 kcfs and

Buettner, Edwin W.; Putnam, Scott A. [Idaho Department of Fish and Game

2009-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite state electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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241

Biomass power and state renewable energy policies under electric industry restructuring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

POWER AND STATE RENEWABLE ENERGY POLICIES UNDER ELECTRICPROVISIONS IN STATE RENEWABLE ENERGY POLICIES Of the 17that have adopted renewable energy policy measures as part

Porter, Kevin; Wiser, Ryan

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Uranium Mineralization and Granite Magmatism in the British Isles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...low initial Sr/ Sr ratio and high geothermal gradient. The standard deviation for...background' granite which produce hot rock districts may cause redistribution of uranium by...An extensive system of channels for heating and circulating water is necessary for...

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam, 1998 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This project monitored the daily passage of chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon smolts O. nerka, during the 1998 spring outmigration at migrant traps on the Snake and Salmon rivers. All hatchery chinook salmon released above Lower Granite Dam 19 1998 were marked with a fin-clip. Total annual hatchery chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 226% of the 1997 number and 110% of the 1996 catch. The wild chinook catch was 120% of the 1997 catch but was only 93% of 1996. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 501% of 1997 numbers but only 90% of the 1996 numbers. Wild steelhead trout catch was 569% of 1997 and 125% of the 1996 numbers. The Snake River trap collected 106 age-0 chinook salmon. During 1998, for the first time, the Snake River trap captured a significant number of hatchery sockeye salmon (1,552) and hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch (166). Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with high flows. Trap operations began on March 8 and were terminated for the season due to high flows on June 12. The trap was out of operation for 34 d during the season due to high flow and debris. Hatchery chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 476% and wild chinook salmon catch was 137% of 1997 numbers and 175% and 82% of 1996 catch, respectively. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 1998 was 96% of the 1997 catch and 13% of the 1996 numbers. Wild steelhead trout collection in 1998 was 170% of the 1997 catch and 37% of the 1996 numbers. Travel time (d) and migration rate (km/d) through Lower Granite Reservoir for PIT-tagged chinook salmon and steelhead trout, marked at the head of the reservoir were affected by discharge. For fish tagged at the Snake River trap, statistical analysis of 1998 detected a significant relation between migration rate and discharge. For hatchery and wild chinook salmon there was a 2.0- and 2.6-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 thousands of cubic feet per second (kcfs). For hatchery steelhead trout there was a 2.6-fold increase in migration rate between 50 kcfs and 100 kcfs. For fish marked at the Salmon River trap, statistical analysis of the 1998 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and discharge for hatchery and wild chinook salmon hatchery and found a 3.3- and 2.6-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. A significant relation between migration rate and discharge was not detected for hatchery steelhead trout. Insufficient numbers of wild steelhead trout were PIT-tagged at the Salmon River trap to estimate travel time and migration rate to Lower Granite Dam.

Buettner, Edwin W.; Brimmer, Arnold F.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Cost of Power Interruptions to Electricity Consumers in the UnitedStates (U.S.)  

SciTech Connect

The massive electric power blackout in the northeastern U.S.and Canada on August 14-15, 2003 catalyzed discussions about modernizingthe U.S. electricity grid. Industry sources suggested that investments of$50 to $100 billion would be needed. This work seeks to better understandan important piece of information that has been missing from thesediscussions: What do power interruptions and fluctuations in powerquality (power-quality events) cost electricity consumers? We developed abottom-up approach for assessing the cost to U.S. electricity consumersof power interruptions and power-quality events (referred to collectivelyas "reliability events"). The approach can be used to help assess thepotential benefits of investments in improving the reliability of thegrid. We developed a new estimate based on publicly availableinformation, and assessed how uncertainties in these data affect thisestimate using sensitivity analysis.

Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina; Eto, Joseph H.

2006-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

245

A State Regulatory Perspective; New Building, Old Motors, and Marginal Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity consumption in Texas is expected to grow at 3.2 percent annually for the next ten years. Utility demand management activities, if effective, may reduce that expected rate of growth. Residential cooling, commercial lighting and cooling...

Treadway, N.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

The Potential for Avoided Emissions from Photovoltaic Electricity in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar  photovoltaics  (PV)  in  traditional  electric   power  systems.  Energ  Policy.  policy makers when considering the location of PV deployment not only focus their attention on locations which have relatively abundant solar

Zhai, Pei

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Recent trends in the production and use of electricity in the United States  

SciTech Connect

The production and consumption of electricity in the US grew rapidly from 1950 to 1973, about 7.5%/yr, and then decreased in rate of growth considerably, averaging about 2.2%/yr since 1973. Electricity's growth rate in this period was much greater than that of energy as a whole - about double. Worldwide, the rate of growth was even faster than that of the US - nearly 8%/yr. As a consequence, the US proportion of world electricity generation dropped from 40% in 1959 to 27% in 1982, based on the latest UN data. US electricity production by type of generation is principally by conventional steam turbines, and the major fuel for the generation of steam is coal. Coal use has been increasing steadily at the expense of more costly oil and gas. Fossil fuels as a group contribute more than 70% of the energy input to power plants and are likely to be the prime contributors for some time to come because of the limited growth potential of hydroelectricity and nuclear. Coal is favored by its relatively low price and large domestic reserves, but is constrained by special problems. Residential and commercial sales promoted vigorously by the electric utility industry, have grown more rapidly than industrial sales. 15 figures, 2 tables.

Parent, J.D.

1985-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

248

The Potential for Avoided Emissions from Photovoltaic Electricity in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar resources (i.e. , places with higher PV capacity factors), but also statesState and regional planners tend to focus their attention on locations which have relatively abundant solar resources (

Zhai, Pei

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Batteries for Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEVs): Goals and the State of Technology circa 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with the electric motor to maximize efficiency. 3 “Pure” EVsbattery and electric motor to increase the efficiency of thebattery and electric motor to increase the efficiency of the

Axsen, Jonn; Burke, Andy; Kurani, Kenneth S

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Feasibility of Wholesale Electricity Competition in a Developing Country: Insights from Simulating a Market in Maharashtra State, India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B. (2001). “The California Electricity Crisis: Lessons forMagic or Mayhem? ” The Electricity Journal Vol 17, No 7,a Deregulated California Electricity Industry. ” Journal of

Phadke, Amol

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

False Data Injection Attacks against State Estimation in Electric Power Grids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A power grid is a complex system connecting electric power generators to consumers through power the success of these attacks through simulation using IEEE test systems, and also discuss the practicality: K.6.5 [Management of Computing and Information Systems]: Security and Protection General Terms

Ning, Peng

252

False Data Injection Attacks against State Estimation in Electric Power Grids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A power grid is a complex system connecting electric power generators to consumers through power transmis the success of these attacks through simulation using IEEE test systems, and also discuss the practicality: K.6.5 [Management of Computing and Information Systems]: Security and Protection General Terms

Reiter, Michael

253

Batteries for Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEVs): Goals and the State of Technology circa 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a PHEV has both an electric motor and a heat engine—usuallythe vehicle only by an electric motor using electricity fromand forth with the electric motor to maximize efficiency.

Axsen, Jonn; Burke, Andy; Kurani, Kenneth S

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Electric/Gas Utility-type Vehicle Page 1 of 5 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University No. 5501 Rev.: 0  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-licensed gas- or electric-powered utility-type vehicles) that are operated on the main campus in Blacksburg, VAElectric/Gas Utility-type Vehicle Page 1 of 5 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University __________________________________________________________________________________ Subject: Electric/Gas Utility-type Vehicle

Beex, A. A. "Louis"

255

Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam, 1997 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This project monitored the daily passage of chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and steelhead trout O. mykiss smolts during the 1997 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. All hatchery chinook salmon released above Lower Granite Dam were marked with a fin clip in 1997. Total annual hatchery chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 49% of the 1996 number but only 6% of the 1995 catch. The wild chinook catch was 77% of the 1996 but was only 13% of 1995. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 18% of 1996 numbers but only 7% of the 1995 numbers. Wild steelhead trout catch was 22% of 1996 but only 11% of the 1995 numbers. The Snake River trap collected eight age-0 chinook salmon and one sockeye/kokanee salmon O. nerka. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with high flows. Trap operations were terminated for the season due to high flows and trap damage on May 8 and were out of operation for 23 d due to high flow and debris. Hatchery chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 37% and wild chinook salmon catch was 60% of 1996 numbers but only 5% and 11% of 1995 catch, respectively. The 1997 hatchery steelhead trout collection was 13% of the 1996 catch and 32% of the 1995 numbers. Wild steelhead trout collection in 1997 was 21% of the 1996 catch and 13% of the 1995 numbers. Trap operations were terminated for the season due to high flows and trap damage on May 7 and were out of operation for 19 d due to high flow and debris.

Buettner, Edwin W.; Nelson, William R.

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam, 1999 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This project monitored the daily passage of chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon smolts O. nerka during the 1999 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. All hatchery chinook salmon released above Lower Granite Dam were marked with a fin clip in 1999. Total annual hatchery chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 440% of the 1998 number. The wild chinook catch was 603% of the previous year's catch. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 93% of 1998 numbers. Wild steelhead trout catch was 68% of 1998 numbers. The Snake River trap collected 62 age-0 chinook salmon. During 1998 the Snake River trap captured 173 hatchery and 37 wild/natural sockeye salmon and 130 hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with high flows. Trap operations began on March 14 and were terminated for the season due to high flows on May 25. The trap was out of operation for 18 d during the season due to high flow and debris. Hatchery chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 214%, and wild chinook salmon catch was 384% of 1998 numbers. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 1999 was 210% of the 1998 numbers. Wild steelhead trout collection in 1999 was 203% of the 1998 catch. Trap operations began on March 14 and were terminated for the season due to high flows on May 21. The trap was out of operation for 17 d during the season due to high flow and debris.

Buettner, Edwin W.; Brimmer, Arnold F.; Putnam, Scott A.

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Batteries for Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEVs): Goals and the State of Technology circa 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sources. So where are our electric automobiles? The answeron what is an electric automobile. We have seen variations

Axsen, Jonn; Burke, Andy; Kurani, Kenneth S

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Interoffice Memorandum TO File Subject Granite City PRAR Data  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

: .' . .Y-" ._ ; : .' . .Y-" ._ ; / Bechfel / / Interoffice Memorandum TO File Subject Granite City PRAR Data Copies to M. Kaye B. Stanley J. Wood The fo$lowing data packages contain the post-remedial action sampling data, waste management data, and health and safety data that were reported in the Granite City PRAR. File No. Date Frolll Of At I UOLJU 7330 September 9, 1993 S. B. Hill FUSRAP E&T .' Oak Ridge Ext. 6-5211 D-15056 6-23-93 Direct and transferable contamination survey of betatron room with map D-15055 6-23-93 Gamma exposure rate survey of backgrounds and betatron room D-15040 D-15167 6-21-93 Final report: PCb 7-12-93 93-06-038 Case narrative, report of analysis, field sample collection form; and QC information D-15057 6-17-93 Air particulate sample reporting logs

259

Lower granite GIS data description and collection guidelines  

SciTech Connect

The Lower Granite Geographic Information System (GIS) was developed jointly by the US Army Corps of Engineers (USCOE) Walla Walla District and the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The goal of the project is to use GIS technology to analyze impacts of the drawdown mitigation option on the physical and biological environment of the Lower Granite Reservoir. The drawdown mitigation option is based on the hypothesis that faster juvenile salmon travel to the ocean would result in higher juvenile survival and greater smolt-to-adult return ratios; to accomplish this, reservoir elevations would be lowered to increase channel velocities. Altering the elevation of the reservoirs on the Snake River is expected to have a variety of impacts to the Physical environment including changes to water velocity, temperature, dissolved gases, and turbidity. The GIS was developed to evaluate these changes and the resulting impacts on the anadromous and resident fish of the Snake River, as well as other aquatic organisms and terrestrial wildlife residing in the adjacent riparian areas. The Lower Granite GIS was developed using commercial hardware and software and is supported by a commercial relational database. Much of the initial system development involved collecting and incorporating data describing the river channel characteristics, hydrologic properties, and aquatic ecology. Potentially meaningful data for the Lower Granite GIS were identified and an extensive data search was performed. Data were obtained from scientists who are analyzing the habitats, limnology, and hydrology of the Snake River. The next six sections of this document describe the bathymetry, fish abundance, substrate, sediment chemistry, and channel hydrology data.

Gordon, J.L.; Evans, B.J.; Perry, E.M.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Lower Granite Dam Smolt Monitoring Program; 1997 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The 1997 fish collection season at Lower Granite was characterized by high spring flows, extensive spill, cool spring and early summer water temperatures and comparatively low numbers of fish, particularly yearling chinook. The Fish Passage Center's Smolt Monitoring Program is designed to provide a consistent, real-time database of fish passage and document the migrational characteristics of the many stocks of salmon and steelhead in the Columbia Basin.

Verhey, Peter; Witalis, Shirley; Morrill, Charles (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite state electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Large Apparent Electric Size of Solid-State Nanopores Due to Spatially Extended Surface Conduction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The descriptions for entrance effects are based on the idea that the pore can be considered as several resistances in series(21, 22) with the resistance inside the pore Rp supplemented by the access resistances Rout on each side of the pore: R = Rp + 2Rout, so that the overall conductance verifies G = (Gp–1 + 2Gout–1)?1. ... To this end, we solved the Poisson–Nernst–Planck equations for the electric potential V and the K+/Cl– ion concentration c± using finite-element method (COMSOL). ... The corresponding equations coupling the electric potential V to the ion concentrations c± write(5)where ? is the water permittivity, e the elementary charge, and N± are the K+/Cl– fluxes:(6)with ? the ion mobility (assumed to be equal for K+ and Cl–). ...

Choongyeop Lee; Laurent Joly; Alessandro Siria; Anne-Laure Biance; Rémy Fulcrand; Lydéric Bocquet

2012-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

262

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

battery Utility electricity consumption Electricity providedis expressed in electricity consumption of the electricis expressed in electricity consumption of the electric

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Steady-state analysis of a conceptual offshore wind turbine driven electricity and thermocline energy extraction plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A system for using offshore wind energy to generate electricity and simultaneously extract thermal energy is proposed. This concept is based on an offshore wind turbine driven hydraulic pump supplying deep seawater under high pressure to a land based plant consisting of a hydroelectric power generation unit and heat exchanger. A steady-state system model is developed using empirical formulae. The mathematical model comprises the fundamental system sub-models that are categorised as the rotor, hydraulic pump, pipeline, hydroelectric turbine and heat exchanger. A means for modelling the seawater temperature field across a two-dimensional bathymetry is also discussed. These mathematical models are integrated into a computational tool and a brief parametric static analysis is undertaken. The results illustrate the effect of pipeline diameter, rotational speed of the grid connected hydroelectric turbine, and the turbine distance from shore on the overall performance of the system. Through adequate parameter selection, the total rate of energy output for such a system, consisting of both electricity and thermal energy, is shown to increase by as much as 84%, when compared to a conventional wind turbine having an identical rotor diameter but which supplies only electrical energy.

Daniel Buhagiar; Tonio Sant

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Geothermal energy in the western United States and Hawaii: Resources and projected electricity generation supplies. [Contains glossary and address list of geothermal project developers and owners  

SciTech Connect

Geothermal energy comes from the internal heat of the Earth, and has been continuously exploited for the production of electricity in the United States since 1960. Currently, geothermal power is one of the ready-to-use baseload electricity generating technologies that is competing in the western United States with fossil fuel, nuclear and hydroelectric generation technologies to provide utilities and their customers with a reliable and economic source of electric power. Furthermore, the development of domestic geothermal resources, as an alternative to fossil fuel combustion technologies, has a number of associated environmental benefits. This report serves two functions. First, it provides a description of geothermal technology and a progress report on the commercial status of geothermal electric power generation. Second, it addresses the question of how much electricity might be competitively produced from the geothermal resource base. 19 figs., 15 tabs.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Competitive procurement of retail electricity supply: recent trends in state policies and utility practices  

SciTech Connect

There is now considerable experience in designing competitive procurements of all types. However, actual experience with implementing incremental resource procurements is uneven, particularly for procurements undertaken within the regulatory frameworks currently overseen by state commissions. (author)

Tierney, Susan; Schatzki, Todd

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

266

Surface State Transport and Ambipolar Electric Field Effect in Bi2Se3 Nanodevices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electronic transport experiments involving the topologically protected states found at the surface of Bi[subscript 2]Se[subscript 3] and other topological insulators require fine control over carrier density, which is ...

Steinberg, Hadar

267

A portfolio approach to energy governance : state management of China's coal and electric power supply industries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study addresses the extent to which China's central state devolved ownership and investment levels in its energy sector to other actors during the modern reform period (1978- 2008). The project focused on China's coal ...

Cunningham, Edward A., IV (Edward Albert)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

The Potential for Avoided Emissions from Photovoltaic Electricity in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

9E2D3858A0C0.   [36]  Coal-­?wind  integration,  The  PR&C  with 1) higher share of coal plants; 2) higher emission ofin avoided emissions in a coal-intensive state by varying

Zhai, Pei

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA BEFORE THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF ELECTRICITY DELIVERY AND ENERGY RELIABILITY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OFFICE OF ELECTRICITY DELIVERY AND ENERGY RELIABILITY Northern Pass Transmission LLC OE Docket No. PP-371 Application for Presidential Permit COMMENTS OF CONSERVATION LAW FOUNDATION, APPALACHIAN MOUNTAIN CLUB, AND SOCIETY FOR THE PROTECTION OF NEW HAMPSHIRE FORESTS ON AMENDED APPLICATION In response to the Notice of Amended Application from the U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE"), dated August 19, 2013 (78 Fed. Reg. 50,405), Interveners Conservation Law Foundation, Appalachian Mountain Club, and Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests ("Environmental Interveners") file the following comments on the Amended Application ("Amended Application") of Northern Pass Transmission LLC ("Applicant") in the above-

270

Geochemical and geophysical evidence on the geothermal potential of Caledonian granites in Britain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... production with depth but there are good indications that the area is interesting from a geothermal energy viewpoint, especially where granite is overlain by low conductivity sediments.

G. C. BROWN; JANE PLANT; M. K. LEE

1979-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

271

Batteries for Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEVs): Goals and the State of Technology circa 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

chemistries. In summary, electric-drive interest groups,the present and future of electric-drive vehicles, including24 -vii- 1.0 Introduction Electric-drive continues to pique

Axsen, Jonn; Burke, Andy; Kurani, Kenneth S

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Spent fuel test-climax: a test of geologic storage of high-level waste in granite  

SciTech Connect

A test of retrievable geologic storage of spent fuel assemblies from an operating commercial nuclear reactor is underway at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) of the US Department of Energy. This generic test is located 420 m below the surface in the Climax granitic stock. Eleven canisters of spent fuel approximately 2.5 years out of reactor core (about 1.6 kW/canister thermal output) were emplaced in a storage drift along with 6 electrical simulator canisters. Two adjacent drifts contain electrical heaters, which are operated to simulate within the test array the thermal field of a large repository. Fuel was loaded during April to May 1980 and initial results of the test will be presented.

Ramspott, L.D.; Ballou, L.B.; Patrick, W.C.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

State law equation of a real gas and simulation of electrical arc/gas flow interaction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Modeling of gas movements in a circuit breaker arc chamber requires an accurate knowledge of thermodynamic functions. The proposed method gives a simplified form of the law of state, in close agreement with the tables. This law has been implemented in the NS2 code developed at Merlin Gerin, France. This code allows detailed investigation of gas flows in circuit breakers.

P Chevrier; J Maftoul

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Table ET1. Primary Energy, Electricity, and Total Energy Price and Expenditure Estimates, Selected Years, 1970-2011, United States  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

ET1. Primary Energy, Electricity, and Total Energy Price and Expenditure Estimates, Selected Years, 1970-2011, United States ET1. Primary Energy, Electricity, and Total Energy Price and Expenditure Estimates, Selected Years, 1970-2011, United States Year Primary Energy Electric Power Sector h,j Retail Electricity Total Energy g,h,i Coal Coal Coke Natural Gas a Petroleum Nuclear Fuel Biomass Total g,h,i,j Coking Coal Steam Coal Total Exports Imports Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel b LPG c Motor Gasoline d Residual Fuel Oil Other e Total Wood and Waste f,g Prices in Dollars per Million Btu 1970 0.45 0.36 0.38 1.27 0.93 0.59 1.16 0.73 1.43 2.85 0.42 1.38 1.71 0.18 1.29 1.08 0.32 4.98 1.65 1975 1.65 0.90 1.03 2.37 3.47 1.18 2.60 2.05 2.96 4.65 1.93 2.94 3.35 0.24 1.50 2.19 0.97 8.61 3.33 1980 2.10 1.38 1.46 2.54 3.19 2.86 6.70 6.36 5.64 9.84 3.88 7.04 7.40 0.43 2.26 4.57 1.77 13.95 6.89 1985 2.03 1.67 1.69 2.76 2.99 4.61 7.22 5.91 6.63 9.01 4.30 R 7.62 R 7.64 0.71 2.47 4.93 1.91 19.05

275

Assessing student reasoning in upper-division electricity and magnetism at Oregon State University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Standardized assessment tests that allow researchers to compare the performance of students under various curricula are highly desirable. There are several research-based conceptual tests that serve as instruments to assess and identify students' difficulties in lower-division courses. At the upper-division level, however, assessing students' difficulties is a more challenging task. Although several research groups are currently working on such tests, their reliability and validity are still under investigation. We analyze the results of the Colorado Upper-Division Electrostatics diagnostic from Oregon State University and compare it with data from University of Colorado. In particular, we show potential shortcomings in the Oregon State University curriculum regarding separation of variables and boundary conditions, as well as uncover weaknesses of the rubric to the free response version of the diagnostic. We also demonstrate that the diagnostic can be used to obtain information about student learning during ...

Zwolak, Justyna P

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Guide to Federal Regulation of Sales of Imported Electricity in Canada, Mexico and the United States - English Version  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GUIDE TO FEDERAL GUIDE TO FEDERAL REGULATION OF SALES OF IMPORTED ELECTRICITY IN CANADA, MEXICO, AND THE UNITED STATES A Publication of The North American Energy Working Group January 2005 1 The North American Energy Working Group The North American Energy Working Group (NAEWG) was established in spring of 2001 by the Canadian Minister of Natural Resources, the Mexican Secretary of Energy and the U.S. Secretary of Energy, to enhance North American energy cooperation. The NAEWG is led by officials from Natural Resources Canada, the Mexican Secretariat of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Energy. The goals of the NAEWG are to foster communication and cooperation among the governments and energy sectors of the three countries on energy-related matters of common interest, and to enhance North American energy trade and

277

An original method to evaluate the transport parameters and reconstruct the electric field in solid-state photodetectors  

SciTech Connect

A method for reconstructing the spatial profile of the electric field along the thickness of a generic bulk solid-state photodetector is proposed. Furthermore, the mobility and lifetime of both electrons and holes can be evaluated contextually. The method is based on a procedure of minimization built up from current transient profiles induced by laser pulses in a planar detector at different applied voltages. The procedure was tested in CdTe planar detectors for X- and Gamma rays. The devices were measured in a single-carrier transport configuration by impinging laser light on the sample cathode. This method could be suitable for many other devices provided that they are made of materials with sufficiently high resistivity, i.e., with a sufficiently low density of intrinsic carriers.

Santi, A.; Piacentini, G. [DiFeST, Department of Physics and Earth Sciences, University of Parma, Parco Area delle Scienze 7/A, 43124 Parma (Italy); Zanichelli, M.; Pavesi, M., E-mail: maura.pavesi@unipr.it [DiFeST, Department of Physics and Earth Sciences, University of Parma, Parco Area delle Scienze 7/A, 43124 Parma (Italy); IMEM-CNR, Institute of Materials for Electronics and Magnetism, Parco Area delle Scienze 37/A, 43124 Parma (Italy); Cola, A.; Farella, I. [IMM-CNR, Institute for Microelectronics and Microsystems, Via Monteroni, 73100 Lecce (Italy)

2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

278

Electricity | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Sources Electricity Electricity January 22, 2015 State of the Union Remarks on Energy in Four Charts We dive into the data behind President Obama's State of the Union statements...

279

Comparative requirements for electric energy for production of hydrogen fuel and/or recharging of battery electric automobile fleets in New Zealand and the United States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Within the current outlook for sustainable electric energy supply with concomitant reduction in emission of greenhouse gases, accelerated attention is focusing on the long-term development of hydrogen fuel cell and all-electric battery vehicles to provide alternative fuels to replace petroleum-derived fuels for automotive national fleets. The potential varies significantly between large industrially developed nations and smaller industrially developing nations. The requirement for additional electric energy supply from low-specific energy renewable resources and high-specific energy nuclear resources depends strongly on individual national economic, environmental, and political factors. Analysis of the additional electric energy supply required for the two potential large-scale technologies for fueling future national transportation sectors is compared for a large Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) nation (USA) with a small OECD nation (New Zealand), normalized on a per-capita basis.

Paul Kruger; Jonathan D. Leaver

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Bound electronic states in a statically screened electric-dipole potential  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The problem of the minimum value of the dipole moment needed to assure the existence of a bound electronic state has been addressed for the electrostatically screened Coulomb interaction of the Yukawa type. Our variational calculation demonstrates that the value of the minimum dipole moment increases as the screening parameter increases. More interestingly, we have found that the dipole’s length has a remarkable effect on the minimum dipole moment; a feature not found for the unscreened case. This effect yields a rapid increase of the value of the minimum dipole moment, particularly for large values of the screening parameter, with the increasing dipole moment’s length. © 1996 The American Physical Society.

J. M. Ugalde and C. Sarasola

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite state electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

A Proposed New Classification Of The Granites Of Egypt | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » A Proposed New Classification Of The Granites Of Egypt Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Proposed New Classification Of The Granites Of Egypt Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Granites and granitoids constitute an important rock group that covers vast areas of the Arabian-Nubian Shield in Egypt. They range in composition from quartz diorite and tonalite, through granodiorite and quartz monzonite to true granites and alkaline-peralkaline granites. Several workers tried the identification and classification of these

282

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Granite City Army Depot - IL 0-02  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Granite City Army Depot - IL 0-02 Granite City Army Depot - IL 0-02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: GRANITE CITY ARMY DEPOT ( IL.0-02 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DOD Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Granite City , Illinois IL.0-02-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 IL.0-02-1 Site Operations: Site was used for storage of GSA thorium residues until circa 1964. IL.0-02-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Referred to DOD IL.0-02-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Thorium IL.0-02-1 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DOD IL.0-02-1 Also see Documents Related to GRANITE CITY ARMY DEPOT IL.0-02-1 - DOE Letter; J.Fiore to C.Schafer; Information regarding

283

Development of an economical model to determine an appropriate feed-in tariff for grid-connected solar PV electricity in all states of Australia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Australia is a country with a vast amount of natural resources including sun and wind. Australia lies between latitude of 10–45°S and longitude of 112–152°E, with a daily solar exposure of between less than 3 MJ/(m2 day) in winter and more than 30 MJ/(m2 day) in summer. Global solar radiation in Australia varies between minimum of 3285 MJ/(m2 year) in Hobart to 8760 MJ/(m2 year) in Northern Territory. As a result of this wide range of radiation level there will be a big difference between costs of solar PV electricity in different locations. A study we have recently conducted on the solar PV electricity price in all states of Australia. For this purpose we have developed an economical model and a computer simulation to determine the accurate unit price of grid-connected roof-top solar photovoltaic (PV) electricity in A$/kWh for all state of Australia. The benefit of this computer simulation is that we can accurately determine the most appropriate feed-in tariff of grid-connected solar PV energy system. The main objective of this paper is to present the results of this study. A further objective of this paper is to present the details of the unit price of solar PV electricity in the state of Victoria in each month and then to compare with electricity price from conventional power systems, which is currently applied to this state. The state Victoria is located south of Australia and in terms of sun radiation is second lowest compared with the other Australian states. The computer simulation developed for this study makes it possible to determine the cost of grid-connected solar PV electricity at any location in any country based on availability of average daily solar exposure of each month as well as economical factors of the country.

A. Zahedi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Prospects for Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles in the United States and Japan: A General Equilibrium Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) may offer a potential near term, low carbon alternative to today's gasoline- and diesel-powered vehicles. A representative vehicle technology that runs on electricity in addition ...

Reilly, John M.

285

Feasibility of Wholesale Electricity Competition in a Developing Country: Insights from Simulating a Market in Maharashtra State, India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I assume that private firms in the MH electricity market actand private firms will play important roles in the electricityand private firms operate in the sector at the same time) on wholesale electricity

Phadke, Amol

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Driving on the Interior of Campus An increased number of vehicles and small electric/gas carts on campus, both State and private,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Driving on the Interior of Campus An increased number of vehicles and small electric/gas carts on campus, both State and private, have created an increased risk to pedestrians and has damaged walkways Director or the designee. · Private and vendor vehicles are restricted at all times. Vehicles requiring

de Lijser, Peter

287

Direct and indirect exciton states in GaAs-(Ga, Al)As double quantum wells under crossed electric and magnetic fields  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A theoretical study of the direct and indirect exciton states in GaAs/Ga1-xAlxAs coupled double quantum wells under crossed electric and magnetic fields is presented. The setup of the system under consideration consists of an ... Keywords: 71.55.Eq, 73.20.Mf, 73.21.Fg, Diamagnetic shifts, Double quantum-wells, Magnetoexcitons

L. E. Oliveira; M. de Dios-Leyva; C. A. Duque

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Advanced Electrical Characterization of Semiconductor Nanowires  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MOSFETs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Electrical Propertiesof surface states on electrical characteristics of inn andCho, and H. -Y. Cha, “Electrical properties of ingan grown

Khanal, Devesh Raj

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,705,749,796 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 4,082,889 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 2,367,431 Carbon Dioxide (thousand...

290

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

43 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,947,100 36 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 52 49 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 673 50 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric...

291

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

charging kW Utility electricity consumption Electricityis expressed in electricity consumption of the electricis expressed in electricity consumption of the electric

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

E-Print Network 3.0 - a-type granitic magmatism Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collection: Mathematics 6 NATURE |VOL 408 |7 DECEMBER 2000 |www.nature.com 669 review article Summary: . The A-type Mount Scott granite sheet: importance of crustal magma...

293

THE CONWAY GRANITE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE AS A MAJOR LOW-GRADE THORIUM RESOURCE  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Subcontract 1491 with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory...by Billings and co-workers over the years, and...be- ing studied at Oak Ridge National Laboratory...granite are estimated by workers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory...

J. A. S. Adams; M.-C. Kline; K. A. Richardson; J. J. W. Rogers

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

ELECTRICAL ENERGY SYSTEMS ELECTRICAL ENERGY SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. In its Energy Policy, the Scottish Government stated that it is Scotland's ambition to become a worldMEng ELECTRICAL ENERGY SYSTEMS #12;MEng ELECTRICAL ENERGY SYSTEMS Electrical energy is vital aspects of modern life. One of the biggest challenges facing society is the need for reliable energy

Strathclyde, University of

295

Release of uranium and thorium from granitic rocks during in situ weathering and initial erosion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RELEASE OF URANIUM AND THORIUM FROM GRANITIC ROCKS DURING IN SITU WEATHERING AND INITIAL EROSION A Thesis by ERNEST BROUGHTON LEDGER, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August. 1978 Major Subject: Geology RELEASE OF URANIUM AND THORIUM FROM GRANITIC ROCKS DURING IN SITU WEATHERING AND INITIAL EROSION A Thesis by ERNEST BROUGHTON LEDGER, JR. Approved as to style and content by...

Ledger, Ernest Broughton

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

296

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

Mai, T.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

Mai, T.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

Mai, T.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

Hand, M. M.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Lower Granite Dam Smolt Monitoring Program, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The 2005 fish collection season at Lower Granite Dam (LGR) was characterized by average water temperatures, below average flows, above average spill, low levels of debris and the record number of smolts collected compared to the previous five years. With the continued release of unclipped supplementation chinook and steelhead above LGR, we cannot accurately distinguish wild chinook, steelhead, and sockeye/kokanee in the sample. For the purposes of this report we will designate fish as clipped and unclipped. This season a total of 13,030,967 juvenile salmonids were collected at LGR. Of these, 12,099,019 were transported to release sites below Bonneville Dam, 12,032,623 by barge and 66,396 by truck. An additional 898,235 fish were bypassed to the river due to over-capacity of the raceways, barges or trucks and for research purposes. This was the first season of summer spill at LGR. Spill was initiated at 12:01am June 20 as directed by the ruling set forth by Judge James Redden of the United States District Court (Order CV 01-640-RE). In addition, the Lower Granite project also conducted a summer spill test alternating spill and spill patterns between spill to the gas cap without the removable spillway weir (RSW) and spill with up to 20 kcfs utilizing the RSW. Because of the forecast low flow this year, most hatchery reared subyearling fall chinook were released up to three weeks early. With the unexpected high flows in late May and early June, more than 90% of the subyearling chinook were collected prior to the initiation of the court ordered summer spill program. Collection number fluctuations reflect river flow and project operations for any given year. For example, low flow years (2001, 2004 and 2005) result in higher collection numbers. Court ordered spill throughout the summer migration will directly affect collection of fall subyearling chinook collection numbers. The editors of this report urge the reader to use caution when comparing fish collection numbers between years, considering both annual river flows and annual project operations, because both affect fish migration and collection.

Mensik, Fred; Rapp, Shawn; Ross, Doug (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite state electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Lower Granite Dam Smolt Monitoring Program, Annual Report 2005-2006.  

SciTech Connect

The 2005 fish collection season at Lower Granite Dam (LGR) was characterized by average water temperatures, below average flows, above average spill, low levels of debris and the record number of smolts collected compared to the previous five years. With the continued release of unclipped supplementation chinook and steelhead above LGR, we cannot accurately distinguish wild chinook, steelhead, and sockeye/kokanee in the sample. For the purposes of this report we will designate fish as clipped and unclipped. This season a total of 13,030,967 juvenile salmonids were collected at LGR. Of these, 12,099,019 were transported to release sites below Bonneville Dam, 12,032,623 by barge and 66,396 by truck. An additional 898,235 fish were bypassed to the river due to over-capacity of the raceways, barges or trucks and for research purposes. This was the first season of summer spill at LGR. Spill was initiated at 12:01am June 20 as directed by the ruling set forth by Judge James Redden of the United States District Court (Order CV 01-640-RE). In addition, the Lower Granite project also conducted a summer spill test alternating spill and spill patterns between spill to the gas cap without the removable spillway weir (RSW) and spill with up to 20 kcfs utilizing the RSW. Because of the forecast low flow this year, most hatchery reared subyearling fall chinook were released up to three weeks early. With the unexpected high flows in late May and early June, more than 90% of the subyearling chinook were collected prior to the initiation of the court ordered summer spill program. Collection number fluctuations reflect river flow and project operations for any given year. For example, low flow years (2001, 2004 and 2005) result in higher collection numbers. Court ordered spill throughout the summer migration will directly affect collection of fall subyearling chinook collection numbers. The editors of this report urge the reader to use caution when comparing fish collection numbers between years, considering both annual river flows and annual project operations, because both affect fish migration and collection.

Menski, Fred

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1334E-2009 1334E-2009 Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States Michael Stadler, Chris Marnay, Afzal Siddiqui, Judy Lai, Brian Coffey, and Hirohisa Aki Environmental Energy Technologies Division Revised March 2009 http://eetd.lbl.gov/EA/EMP/emp-pubs.html The work described in this paper was funded by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Renewable and Distributed Systems Integration Program in the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02- 05CH11231. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct

303

A-type granites and related rocks: Petrogenesis and classification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The problems of identification of A-type granitoids are analyzed. These rocks occur in different geodynamic settings. Owing to their mantle nature, they show distinct REE specialization. These are acid intrusive rocks, whose volcanic products are of crucial scientific and practical significance. However, neither the great number of proposed classification schemes and diagrams, including those based on expensive analytical data, nor hot scientific discussions of their identification and the ambiguity of the term A-granitoids helped to determine their classification features in full measure. A principally new discriminant diagram is proposed for the classification of igneous A-type rocks, based on the analysis of earlier obtained results and the petrochemical composition of these rocks. A comparative analysis of subdivision of granites and related felsic volcanic rocks (SiO2 > 67 wt.%), based on the ternary (Na2O + K2O)–Fe2O3* × 5–(CaO + MgO) × 5 and other widely applied diagrams, has shown the advantage of the proposed discriminant diagram for the classification of A-type granitoids from different geodynamic settings.

A.V. Grebennikov

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Electric Currents Electric Current  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

coefficient of resistivity Electric Power: = = = Also, = . So, = = 2 = 2 Unit of Power(P): Watt (WChapter 18 Electric Currents #12;Electric Current: Flow of electric charge Current is flow of positive charge. In reality it's the electron moves in solids- Electron current. #12;Ohm's Law : Resistance

Yu, Jaehoon

305

ELECTRICAL & COMPUTER ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ELECTRICAL & COMPUTER ENGINEERING SEMINAR "Considerations for Curriculum Planning and Computer Engineering Colorado State University Monday, Feb. 20, 2012, 11:00 a.m. Location: LSC 210 Abstract

306

Electricity Monthly Update  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wholesale Markets: October 2014 The United States has many regional wholesale electricity markets. Below we look at monthly and annual ranges of on-peak, daily wholesale...

307

Electricity Monthly Update  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wholesale Markets: September 2014 The United States has many regional wholesale electricity markets. Below we look at monthly and annual ranges of on-peak, daily wholesale...

308

Electricity Monthly Update  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wholesale Markets: August 2014 The United States has many regional wholesale electricity markets. Below we look at monthly and annual ranges of on-peak, daily wholesale...

309

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Wholesale Markets: February 2014 The United States has many regional wholesale electricity markets. Below we look at monthly and annual ranges of on-peak, daily wholesale...

310

Feasible Café Standard Increases Using Emerging Diesel and Hybrid-Electric Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

USING EMERGING DIESEL AND HYBRID-ELECTRIC TECHNOLOGIES FORusing Emerging Diesel and Hybrid- Electric Technologies forusing Emerging Diesel and Hybrid- Electric Technologies for

Burke, Andy; Abeles, Ethan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Feasible CAFE Standard Increases Using Emerging Diesel and Hybrid-Electric Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

USING EMERGING DIESEL AND HYBRID-ELECTRIC TECHNOLOGIES FORusing Emerging Diesel and Hybrid- Electric Technologies forusing Emerging Diesel and Hybrid- Electric Technologies for

Burke, Andy; Abeles, Ethan C.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ES 2. CA nursing home electricity pattern: July weekday lowJanuary and July weekday electricity and total heat (space +CA school weekday total electricity (inclusive of cooling)

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Resistance and magnetization of La0.7Ca0.3MnO3 bulk at different resistance states induced by electric pulses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electric-pulse-induced resistance (EPIR) switching behaviour was observed in bulk La0.7Ca0.3MnO3 polycrystalline. Temperature dependences of resistance and magnetic moment at different resistance states were studied. The metal–insulator phase transition temperature changed with the resistance states, which suggested that the EPIR phenomenon is related to the modulating bulk properties of perovskite manganites. The Curie temperature derived from the magnetic moment measurement did not change with the resistance states, which implied that there was no ferromagnetic–metal and antiferromagnetic–insulator transition occurring in perovskite manganite global materials. These results provided a new evidence for a filamentary mechanism in the EPIR effect.

Z H Wu; Q Wang; W D Yu; D S Shang; X M Li; L D Chen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Statement Of Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary For Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Before The United States House of Representatives Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development, March 25, 2014  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Statement Of Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary For Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, U.S. Department of Energy, Before The United States House of Representatives Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development, March 25, 2014, to discuss the President’s Fiscal Year (FY) 2015 budget for the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE).

315

Analysis Of Macroscopic Fractures In Granite In The Hdr Geothermal Well  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Macroscopic Fractures In Granite In The Hdr Geothermal Well Macroscopic Fractures In Granite In The Hdr Geothermal Well Eps-1, Soultz-Sous-Forets, France Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Analysis Of Macroscopic Fractures In Granite In The Hdr Geothermal Well Eps-1, Soultz-Sous-Forets, France Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: An exhaustive analysis of 3000 macroscopic fractures encountered in the geothermal Hot Dry Rock borehole, EPS-1, located inside the Rhine graben (Soultz-sous-Forets, France), was done on a continuous core section over a depth interval from 1420 to 2230 m: 97% of the macroscopic structures were successfully reorientated with a good degree of confidence by comparison between core and acoustic borehole imagery. Detailed structural analysis of the fracture population indicates that fractures are

316

Granite Creek Hot Spring Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Granite Creek Hot Spring Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Granite Creek Hot Spring Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Granite Creek Hot Spring Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Teton County, Wyoming Coordinates 43.853632°, -110.6314491° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

317

State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Biodiesel Producers and Production Capacity by State, September 2013 Biodiesel Producers and Production Capacity by State, September 2013 State Number of Producers Annual Production Capacity (million gallons per year) Alabama 3 47 Alaska - - Arizona 1 2 Arkansas 3 85 California

318

Strain rate-dependent failure of Westerly Granite at 100 MPa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is obviously increased by a decrease in the applied strain rate, it is not affected, at constant strain rate, by an increase in temoerature to failure in the at least 600'C. The activation energy estimated for temperature range 24' to 300'C is 14 kcal.... Stress-strajn rurves for Westerly granite, & = 3 x 10 s , T = 24', 200', and 300'C 29 Figure 13 Stress-strain curves for T = 300'C, c = 3 x 10 and 2. 8 x 10 s Westerly granite, x 10 , x 10 -5 , -6 30 PAGE Figure 14. Figure 15. Test...

Harris, William Joseph

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

319

Uranium in the Oatman Creek granite of Central Texas and its economic potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

granitic rocks are enriched in uranium. Although at present uranium in granites cannot b compared w1th the h1gh grade concentrat1ons of uran1um in sedimentary rocks, as these h1gh grade ore deposits become depleted, however, gr anites will become a..., however, the need to explore for new materials containing uranium will incr ease as the high grade sedimentary uranium deposits become depleted. A logical place to begin this search lies with the source rock for many of the known sedimentary uranium...

Conrad, Curtis Paul

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

320

Electricity Transmission, Pipelines, and National Trails. An Analysis of Current and Potential Intersections on Federal Lands in the Eastern United States, Alaska, and Hawaii  

SciTech Connect

As has been noted in many reports and publications, acquiring new or expanded rights-of-way for transmission is a challenging process, because numerous land use and land ownership constraints must be overcome to develop pathways suitable for energy transmission infrastructure. In the eastern U.S., more than twenty federally protected national trails (some of which are thousands of miles long, and cross many states) pose a potential obstacle to the development of new or expanded electricity transmission capacity. However, the scope of this potential problem is not well-documented, and there is no baseline information available that could allow all stakeholders to study routing scenarios that could mitigate impacts on national trails. This report, Electricity Transmission, Pipelines, and National Trails: An Analysis of Current and Potential Intersections on Federal Lands in the Eastern United States, was prepared by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne). Argonne was tasked by DOE to analyze the “footprint” of the current network of National Historic and Scenic Trails and the electricity transmission system in the 37 eastern contiguous states, Alaska, and Hawaii; assess the extent to which national trails are affected by electrical transmission; and investigate the extent to which national trails and other sensitive land use types may be affected in the near future by planned transmission lines. Pipelines are secondary to transmission lines for analysis, but are also within the analysis scope in connection with the overall directives of Section 368 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and because of the potential for electrical transmission lines being collocated with pipelines. Based on Platts electrical transmission line data, a total of 101 existing intersections with national trails on federal land were found, and 20 proposed intersections. Transmission lines and pipelines are proposed in Alaska; however there are no locations that intersect national trails. Source data did not indicate any planned transmission lines or pipelines in Hawaii. A map atlas provides more detailed mapping of the topics investigated in this study, and the accompanying GIS database provides the baseline information for further investigating locations of interest. In many cases the locations of proposed transmission lines are not accurately mapped (or a specific route may not yet be determined), and accordingly the specific crossing locations are speculative. However since both national trails and electrical transmission lines are long linear systems, the characteristics of the crossings reported in this study are expected to be similar to both observed characteristics of the existing infrastructure provided in this report, and of the new infrastructure if these proposed projects are built. More focused study of these siting challenges is expected to mitigate some of potential impacts by choosing routes that minimize or eliminate them. The current study primarily addresses a set of screening-level characterizations that provide insights into how the National Trail System may influence the siting of energy transport facilities in the states identified under Section 368(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 2005. As such, it initializes gathering and beginning analysis of the primary environmental and energy data, and maps the contextual relationships between an important national environmental asset and how this asset intersects with energy planning activities. Thus the current study sets the stage for more in-depth analyses and data development activities that begin to solve key transmission siting constraints. Our recommendations for future work incorporate two major areas: (1) database development and analytics and (2) modeling and scenario analysis for energy planning. These recommendations provide a path forward to address key issues originally developed under the Energy Policy Act of 2005 that are now being carried forward under the President’s Climate Action Plan.

Kuiper, James A; Krummel, John R; Hlava, Kevin J; Moore, H Robert; Orr, Andrew B; Schlueter, Scott O; Sullivan, Robert G; Zvolanek, Emily A

2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite state electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

EIS-0300: Minnesota Agri-Power Project: Biomass for Rural Development, Granite Falls, Minnesota  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EIS analyzes DOE and the Minnesota Environmental Quality Boards' [MEQB, a Minnesota State agency] decision to support a proposal by the Minnesota Valley Alfalfa Producers (MnVAP) to construct and operate a 75–103 megawatt biomass fueled gasifier and electric generating facility, known as the Minnesota Agri-Power Plant (MAPP), and associated transmission lines and alfalfa processing facilities.

322

Minimizing State-of-Health Degradation in Hybrid Electrical Energy Storage Systems with Arbitrary Source and Load Profiles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

elements and hide their weaknesses for achieving a combination of superior performance metrics. The cycle. The cycle life is directly related to the state-of-health (SoH), which is defined as the ratio of full of battery in the previous literature can only be applied to charging/discharging cycles with the same state

Pedram, Massoud

323

Spin-filtered edge states with an electrically tunable gap in a two-dimensional topological crystalline insulator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Three-dimensional topological crystalline insulators were recently predicted and observed in the SnTe class of IV–VI semiconductors, which host metallic surface states protected by crystal symmetries. In this work, we study ...

Liu, Junwei

324

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

End Use: December 2011 End Use: December 2011 Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based primarily on rates approved by state regulators. However, a number of states have allowed retail marketers to compete to serve customers and these competitive retail suppliers offer electricity at a market-based price. EIA does not directly collect retail electricity rates or prices. However, using data collected on retail sales revenues and volumes, we calculate average retail revenues per kWh as a proxy for retail rates and prices. Retail sales volumes are presented as a proxy for end-use electricity consumption. Average Revenue per kWh by State Percent Change ¢ Per KWh map showing U.S. electric industry percent change in average revenue

325

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

End Use: August 2011 End Use: August 2011 Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based primarily on rates approved by State regulators. However, a number of states have allowed retail marketers to compete to serve customers and these competitive retail suppliers offer electricity at a market-based price. EIA does not directly collect retail electricity rates or prices. However, using data on retail sales revenues and volumes, we calculate average retail revenues per kWh as a proxy for retail rates and prices. Retail sales volumes are presented as a proxy for end-use electricity consumption. Average revenue per kWh by state Percent Change ¢ Per KWh map showing U.S. electric industry percent change in average revenue

326

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

End Use: November 2011 End Use: November 2011 Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based primarily on rates approved by state regulators. However, a number of states have allowed retail marketers to compete to serve customers and these competitive retail suppliers offer electricity at a market-based price. EIA does not directly collect retail electricity rates or prices. However, using data collected on retail sales revenues and volumes, we calculate average retail revenues per kWh as a proxy for retail rates and prices. Retail sales volumes are presented as a proxy for end-use electricity consumption. Average Revenue per kWh by State Percent Change ¢ Per KWh map showing U.S. electric industry percent change in average revenue

327

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

End Use: February 2012 End Use: February 2012 Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based primarily on rates approved by State regulators. However, a number of States have allowed retail marketers to compete to serve customers and these competitive retail suppliers offer electricity at a market-based price. EIA does not directly collect retail electricity rates or prices. However, using data collected on retail sales revenues and volumes, we calculate average retail revenues per kWh as a proxy for retail rates and prices. Retail sales volumes are presented as a proxy for end-use electricity consumption. Average Revenue per kWh by State Percent Change ¢ Per KWh map showing U.S. electric industry percent change in average revenue

328

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

End Use: October 2011 End Use: October 2011 Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based primarily on rates approved by state regulators. However, a number of states have allowed retail marketers to compete to serve customers and these competitive retail suppliers offer electricity at a market-based price. EIA does not directly collect retail electricity rates or prices. However, using data collected on retail sales revenues and volumes, we calculate average retail revenues per kWh as a proxy for retail rates and prices. Retail sales volumes are presented as a proxy for end-use electricity consumption. Average Revenue per kWh by State Percent Change ¢ Per KWh map showing U.S. electric industry percent change in average revenue

329

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

End Use: March 2012 End Use: March 2012 Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based primarily on rates approved by State regulators. However, a number of States have allowed retail marketers to compete to serve customers and these competitive retail suppliers offer electricity at a market-based price. EIA does not directly collect retail electricity rates or prices. However, using data collected on retail sales revenues and volumes, we calculate average retail revenues per kWh as a proxy for retail rates and prices. Retail sales volumes are presented as a proxy for end-use electricity consumption. Average Revenue per kWh by State Percent Change ¢ Per KWh map showing U.S. electric industry percent change in average revenue

330

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

End Use: September 2011 End Use: September 2011 Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based primarily on rates approved by State regulators. However, a number of states have allowed retail marketers to compete to serve customers and these competitive retail suppliers offer electricity at a market-based price. EIA does not directly collect retail electricity rates or prices. However, using data on retail sales revenues and volumes, we calculate average retail revenues per kWh as a proxy for retail rates and prices. Retail sales volumes are presented as a proxy for end-use electricity consumption. Average Revenue per kWh by State Percent Change ¢ Per KWh map showing U.S. electric industry percent change in average revenue

331

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

End Use: October 2013 End Use: October 2013 Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based primarily on rates approved by state regulators. However, a number of states have allowed retail marketers to compete to serve customers and these competitive retail suppliers offer electricity at a market-based price. EIA does not directly collect retail electricity rates or prices. However, using data collected on retail sales revenues and volumes, we calculate average retail revenues per kWh as a proxy for retail rates and prices. Retail sales volumes are presented as a proxy for end-use electricity consumption. Average Revenue per kWh by state Percent Change ¢ Per KWh map showing U.S. electric industry percent change in average revenue

332

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

End Use: January 2012 End Use: January 2012 Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based primarily on rates approved by state regulators. However, a number of states have allowed retail marketers to compete to serve customers and these competitive retail suppliers offer electricity at a market-based price. EIA does not directly collect retail electricity rates or prices. However, using data collected on retail sales revenues and volumes, we calculate average retail revenues per kWh as a proxy for retail rates and prices. Retail sales volumes are presented as a proxy for end-use electricity consumption. Average Revenue per kWh by State Percent Change ¢ Per KWh map showing U.S. electric industry percent change in average revenue

333

Laboratory measurement of hydrodynamic saline dispersion within a micro-fracture network induced in granite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laboratory measurement of hydrodynamic saline dispersion within a micro-fracture network induced plug of Ailsa Craig micro-granite by thermal stressing, to produce an isotropic network of fractures number­dispersion relationship for the micro-fracture network is very similar to that predicted for other

334

Late-Stage Mafic Injection and Thermal Rejuvenation of the Vinalhaven Granite,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Late-Stage Mafic Injection and Thermal Rejuvenation of the Vinalhaven Granite, Coastal Maine R. A and reaction, indicating that the porphyry was well stirred. Thermal rejuvenation of a silicic crystal mush, along with thermal calculations, suggest that cooling and crystallization of coeval mafic magma could

Mcdonough, William F.

335

Lithium isotopic systematics of granites and pegmatites from the Black Hills, South Dakota  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lithium isotopic systematics of granites and pegmatites from the Black Hills, South Dakota Fang compositions may reflect Li isotopic fractionation resulting from extensive crystal-melt fractionation. Lithium fractionation in the near­surface environment of > 60 (Tomascak, 2004). Lithium isotopic fractionation has been

Rudnick, Roberta L.

336

Asymptotic Analysis of Cross-Hole Hydraulic Tests in Fractured Granite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Asymptotic Analysis of Cross-Hole Hydraulic Tests in Fractured Granite by Walter A. Illman1 hydraulic conductivity and specific storage. Introduction Well test analyses in porous and fractured for the interpretation of three-dimensional pneumatic well tests conducted in porous or fractured geologic media, which

Daniels, Jeffrey J.

337

GEOLOGY IN THE VICINITY OF THE HODGES COMPLEX AND THE TYLER LAKE GRANITE, WEST TORRINGTON, CONNECTICUT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, CONNECTICUT Charles Merguerian, Geology Department 114 Hofstra University, Hempstead, NY 11549 Email: Charles workers in western Connecticut have noted the abundance of Proterozoic Y gneiss and autochthonous lower Torrington, Connecticut, the Hodges mafic- ultramafic complex and the Tyler Lake granite are the products

Merguerian, Charles

338

Heat refraction and heat production in and around granite plutons in north-east England  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......be expected from radiogenic heating in the granites which intrude...important concentrations in the district. 454 References Beck, A...Pleistocene climatic variations upon geothermal gradients, Am. J. Sci...155-173 in Seminar on Geothermal Energy, Commission of the......

P. C. England; E. R. Oxburgh; S. W. Richardson

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Mapping brittle fracture zones in three dimensions: high resolution traveltime seismic tomography in a granitic pluton  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Company's Uranium mine restoration programme (ENRESA...studying the resolving power of a broad variety of...to study its resolving power we have performed several...Carmichael R.S. , 1982. Handbook of Physical Properties...prediction of the fracture system in the Albal granitic......

D. Martí; R. Carbonell; A. Tryggvason; J. Escuder; A. Pérez-Estaún

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Electric Utilities and Electric Cooperatives (South Carolina) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric Utilities and Electric Cooperatives (South Carolina) Electric Utilities and Electric Cooperatives (South Carolina) Electric Utilities and Electric Cooperatives (South Carolina) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State South Carolina Program Type Generating Facility Rate-Making Siting and Permitting Provider South Carolina Public Service Commission This legislation authorizes the Public Service Commission to promulgate regulations related to investor owned utilities in South Carolina, and addresses service areas, rates and charges, and operating procedures for

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite state electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

A high dynamic range data acquisition system for a solid-state electron Electric Dipole Moment experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have built a high precision (24-bit) data acquisition (DAQ) system with eight simultaneously sampling input channels for the measurement of the electric dipole moment (EDM) of the electron. The DAQ system consists of two main components, a master board and eight individual analog-to-digital converter (ADC) boards. This custom DAQ system provides galvanic isolation, with fiber optic communication, between the master board and each ADC board to reduce the possibility of ground loop pickups. In addition, each ADC board is enclosed in its own heavy-duty radio frequency shielding enclosure and powered by DC batteries, to attain the ultimate low levels of channel cross-talk. In this paper, we describe the implementation of the DAQ system and scrutinize its performance.

Young Jin Kim; Brandon Kunkler; Chen-Yu Liu; Gerard Visser

2011-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

342

Mean-field analysis of ground state and low-lying electric dipole strength in $^{22}$C  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Properties of neutron-rich $^{22}$C are studied using the mean-field approach with Skyrme energy density functionals. Its weak binding and large total reaction cross section, which are suggested by recent experiments, are simulated by modifying the central part of Skyrme potential. Calculating $E1$ strength distribution by using the random-phase approximation, we investigate developments of low-lying electric dipole ($E1$) strength and a contribution of core excitations of $^{20}$C. As the neutron Fermi level approaches the zero energy threshold ($\\varepsilon_F >\\sim -1$ MeV), we find that the low-lying $E1$ strength exceeds the energy-weighted cluster sum rule, which indicates an importance of the core excitations with the $1d_{5/2}$ orbit.

Tsunenori Inakura; W. Horiuchi; Y. Suzuki; T. Nakatsukasa

2014-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

343

Electricity price forecasting: A review of the state-of-the-art with a look into the future  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A variety of methods and ideas have been tried for electricity price forecasting (EPF) over the last 15 years, with varying degrees of success. This review article aims to explain the complexity of available solutions, their strengths and weaknesses, and the opportunities and threats that the forecasting tools offer or that may be encountered. The paper also looks ahead and speculates on the directions EPF will or should take in the next decade or so. In particular, it postulates the need for objective comparative EPF studies involving (i) the same datasets, (ii) the same robust error evaluation procedures, and (iii) statistical testing of the significance of one model’s outperformance of another.

Rafa? Weron

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

2014 Electricity Form Proposals  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electricity and Renewable (Photovoltaic) Survey Form Changes Proposed for Electricity and Renewable (Photovoltaic) Survey Form Changes Proposed for 2014 The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) is proposing changes to its electricity data collection in 2014. These changes involve the following surveys: Form EIA-63B, "Annual Photovoltaic Cell/Module Shipments Report," Form EIA-411, "Coordinated Bulk Power Supply Program Report," Form EIA-826, "Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Report with State Distributions," Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," Form EIA-860M, "Monthly Update to the Annual Electric Generator Report," Form EIA-861, "Annual Electric Power Industry Report," Form EIA-861S, "Annual Electric Power Industry Report (Short Form)," and

345

State and Local Clean Energy Policy Primer: Getting from Here to Clean Electricity with Policy (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet proposes a framework for how states and localities can build policy portfolios by first setting the stage for clean energy in the market with low cost policies, and then growing the market with successive policies until the need for financial incentives can be reduced and eventually eliminated.

Not Available

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Federal Register / Vol. 69, No. 23 / Wednesday, February 4, 2004 / Notices 5331 electric load in the states of Ohio,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the states of Ohio, Michigan, Pennsylvania, New York, Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut, and New Jersey were held on December 4, 2003, in Cleveland, Ohio, on December 5, 2003, in New York, New York­2229 Filed 2­3­04; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6450­01­P DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Energy Efficiency

347

Economic Dispatch of Electric Generation Capacity | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Economic Dispatch of Electric Generation Capacity Economic Dispatch of Electric Generation Capacity A report to congress and the states pursuant to sections 1234 and 1832 of the...

348

International Electricity Regulation | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Regulation International Electricity Regulation U.S. trade in electric energy with Canada and Mexico is rising, bringing economic and reliability benefits to the United States and...

349

EIA Electric Power Forms  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electric Power Forms Electric Power Forms EIA Electric Power Forms Listing of Publicly Available and Confidential Data EIA's statistical surveys encompass each significant electric supply and demand activity in the United States. Most of the electric power survey forms resulting data elements are published, but respondent confidentiality is required. The chart below shows the data elements for each survey form and how each data element is treated in regard to confidentiality. Data Categories Data collection forms EIA- 411 EIA- 826 EIA- 860 EIA- 860M EIA- 861 EIA- 923 Frame Information Utility identification and iocation -- -- -- -- X -- Plant identification and iocation -- -- -- X -- X Generation and fuel Latitude and longitude -- -- X -- -- --

350

Electricity 101 | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resources » Electricity 101 Resources » Electricity 101 Electricity 101 FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS: Why do other countries use different shaped plugs? Why do outlets have three holes? Why do we have AC electricity? Can we harness lightning as an energy source? Can we have wireless transmission of electricity? SYSTEM: What is electricity? Where does electricity come from? What is the "grid"? How much electricity does a typical household use? How did the electric system evolve? What does the future look like? PEOPLE: Who owns the electric system? Who runs the grid? Who uses electricity? Where can I find out more about potential careers? How can I improve my energy use? POLICY: How is electricity regulated? Where can I find out about State incentives for renewables? What is a national corridor?

351

"State","Fossil Fuels",,,,,,"Nuclear Electric Power",,"Renewable Energy",,,,,,"Total Energy Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

P2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, 2011 " P2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, 2011 " "State","Fossil Fuels",,,,,,"Nuclear Electric Power",,"Renewable Energy",,,,,,"Total Energy Production" ,"Coal a",,"Natural Gas b",,"Crude Oil c",,,,"Biofuels d",,"Other e",,"Total" ,"Trillion Btu" "Alabama",468.671,,226.821,,48.569,,411.822,,0,,245.307,,245.307,,1401.191 "Alaska",33.524,,404.72,,1188.008,,0,,0,,15.68,,15.68,,1641.933 "Arizona",174.841,,0.171,,0.215,,327.292,,7.784,,107.433,,115.217,,617.734 "Arkansas",2.985,,1090.87,,34.087,,148.531,,0,,113.532,,113.532,,1390.004 "California",0,,279.71,,1123.408,,383.644,,25.004,,812.786,,837.791,,2624.553

352

Energy Department Awards Will Promote Electric Vehicles in 24...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Will Promote Electric Vehicles in 24 States and Train a Workforce for Advanced Vehicle Development Energy Department Awards Will Promote Electric Vehicles in 24 States and Train a...

353

Southeastern Electric - Electric Equipment Loan Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Southeastern Electric - Electric Equipment Loan Program Southeastern Electric - Electric Equipment Loan Program Southeastern Electric - Electric Equipment Loan Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Maximum Rebate Heat Pumps/Electric Heat: up to $10,000 Weatherization/Insulation: $3,000 Program Info State South Dakota Program Type Utility Loan Program Rebate Amount Heat Pumps/Electric Heat: up to $10,000 Weatherization/Insulation loans: up to $3,000 Provider Southeastern Electric Cooperative Southeastern Electric Cooperative is a member-owned electric cooperative that serves customers in the southeastern part of South Dakota.

354

Investigating the effect of using granite and marble as a building material on the radiation exposure of humans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......commercial granites. Thorium, uranium and potassium concentrations...petrologic features(20-22); Uranium tends to be highly mobile near the surface, whereas thorium is relatively stable. Uranium is easily oxidised to a water-soluble......

Y. Y. Ebaid; W. F. Bakr

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Hydrothermal alteration of late-to post-tectonic Lyon Mountain Granitic Gneiss, Adirondack Mountains, New York: Origin of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that they represent partially crystallized granitic anatectites depleted in alkali elements by acidic hydrothermal- or Olympic Dam-type characterized by elevated concentrations of rare earth elements (REE), uranium, gold

Soja, Constance M.

356

Semi-Analytic Stereological Analysis of Waste Package/Fracture Intersections in a Granitic Rock Nuclear Waste Repository  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In Sweden, spent nuclear fuel is planned to be placed in copper/iron canisters and deposited at a depth of approximately 500 m in granitic rock. Earthquakes may induce secondary shear movements in fractures in...

Allan Hedin

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

EIA - Electric Power Data  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Survey-level Detail Data Files Survey-level Detail Data Files Electric power data are collected on survey instruments. Data collection is mandated by Congress to promote sound policymaking, efficient markets, and public understanding. The most widely used data are disseminated in reports, such as the Electric Power Monthly and the Electric Power Annual. Publicly available electric power data is available down to the plant level in the Electricity Data Browser and in detailed spreadsheets by survey below. Description Data availability State-level data (consolidated across forms) Contains electricity generation; fuel consumption; emissions; retail sales, revenue, number of customers, and retail prices; generating capacity; and financial data. 1990-2012 (monthly and annual) Electric power sales and revenue data - monthly (Form EIA-826)

358

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Methodology and Documentation Methodology and Documentation General The Electricity Monthly Update is prepared by the Electric Power Operations Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables and Uranium Statistics, U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy. Data published in the Electricity Monthly Update are compiled from the following sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-826,"Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenues with State Distributions Report," U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report," fuel spot prices from Bloomberg Energy, electric power prices from SNL Energy, electric system demand data from Ventyx Energy Velocity Suite, and weather data and imagery from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric

359

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Methodology and Documentation Methodology and Documentation General The Electricity Monthly Update is prepared by the Electric Power Operations Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables and Uranium Statistics, U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy. Data published in the Electricity Monthly Update are compiled from the following sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-826,"Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenues with State Distributions Report," U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report," fuel spot prices from Bloomberg Energy, electric power prices from SNL Energy, electric system demand data from Ventyx Energy Velocity Suite, and weather data and imagery from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric

360

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Methodology and Documentation Methodology and Documentation General The Electricity Monthly Update is prepared by the Electric Power Operations Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables and Uranium Statistics, U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy. Data published in the Electricity Monthly Update are compiled from the following sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-826,"Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenues with State Distributions Report," U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report," fuel spot prices from Bloomberg Energy, electric power prices from SNL Energy, electric system demand data from Ventyx Energy Velocity Suite, and weather data and imagery from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite state electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Methodology and Documentation Methodology and Documentation General The Electricity Monthly Update is prepared by the Electric Power Operations Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables and Uranium Statistics, U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy. Data published in the Electricity Monthly Update are compiled from the following sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-826,"Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenues with State Distributions Report," U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report," fuel spot prices from Bloomberg Energy, electric power prices from SNL Energy, electric system demand data from Ventyx Energy Velocity Suite, and weather data and imagery from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric

362

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Methodology and Documentation Methodology and Documentation General The Electricity Monthly Update is prepared by the Electric Power Operations Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables and Uranium Statistics, U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy. Data published in the Electricity Monthly Update are compiled from the following sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-826,"Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenues with State Distributions Report," U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report," fuel spot prices from Bloomberg Energy, electric power prices from SNL Energy, electric system demand data from Ventyx Energy Velocity Suite, and weather data and imagery from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric

363

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Methodology and Documentation Methodology and Documentation General The Electricity Monthly Update is prepared by the Electric Power Operations Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables and Uranium Statistics, U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy. Data published in the Electricity Monthly Update are compiled from the following sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-826,"Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenues with State Distributions Report," U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report," fuel spot prices from Bloomberg Energy, electric power prices from SNL Energy, electric system demand data from Ventyx Energy Velocity Suite, and weather data and imagery from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric

364

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Methodology and Documentation Methodology and Documentation General The Electricity Monthly Update is prepared by the Electric Power Operations Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables and Uranium Statistics, U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy. Data published in the Electricity Monthly Update are compiled from the following sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-826,"Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenues with State Distributions Report," U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report," fuel spot prices from Bloomberg Energy, electric power prices from SNL Energy, electric system demand data from Ventyx Energy Velocity Suite, and weather data and imagery from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric

365

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Methodology and Documentation Methodology and Documentation General The Electricity Monthly Update is prepared by the Electric Power Operations Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables and Uranium Statistics, U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy. Data published in the Electricity Monthly Update are compiled from the following sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-826,"Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenues with State Distributions Report," U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report," fuel spot prices from Bloomberg Energy, electric power prices from SNL Energy, electric system demand data from Ventyx Energy Velocity Suite, and weather data and imagery from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric

366

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Methodology and Documentation Methodology and Documentation General The Electricity Monthly Update is prepared by the Electric Power Operations Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables and Uranium Statistics, U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy. Data published in the Electricity Monthly Update are compiled from the following sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-826,"Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenues with State Distributions Report," U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report," fuel spot prices from Bloomberg Energy, electric power prices from SNL Energy, electric system demand data from Ventyx Energy Velocity Suite, and weather data and imagery from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric

367

Unimolecular Electrical Rectification in Hexadecylquinolinium Tricyanoquinodimethanide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unimolecular Electrical Rectification in Hexadecylquinolinium Tricyanoquinodimethanide Robert M Abstract: Macroscopic and nanoscopic current-voltage measurements reveal asymmetries in the DC electrical to an excited-state conformer which is probably neutral. Unimolecular electrical rectification by monolayers

Metzger, Robert M.

368

Central Hudson Gas and Electric (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Central Hudson Gas and Electric (Electric) - Residential Energy Central Hudson Gas and Electric (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Central Hudson Gas and Electric (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Manufacturing Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Air Sealing: $600 Program Info State New York Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Central AC: $400 - $600, depending on efficiency Air-source Heat Pumps: $400 - $600, depending on efficiency Electronically Commutated Motor (ECM) Furnace Fans: $200 Electric Heat Pump Water Heaters: $400 Programmable Thermostats: $25

369

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It is being presented at the Utility Variable-Generation Integration Group Fall Technical Workshop on October 24, 2012.

Hand, M.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented in a Power Systems Engineering Research Center webinar on September 4, 2012.

Mai, T.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented in an Union of Concerned Scientists webinar on June 12, 2012.

Hand, M.; Mai, T.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented in a webinar given by the California Energy Commission.

Hand, M. M.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. This presentation was presented in a Wind Powering America webinar on August 15, 2012 and is now available through the Wind Powering America website.

Mai, T.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

"YEAR","MONTH","STATE","UTILITY CODE","UTILITY NAME","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATIONPHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY (MWh)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","COMMERCIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","INDUSTRIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TRANSPORTATION ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITYFOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","RESIDENTIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","COMMERCIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INDUSTRIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","TRANSPORTATION INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","RESIDENTIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","COMMERCIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","INDUSTRIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","TRANSPORTATION NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TRANSPORTATIONPHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY (MWh)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","COMMERCIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","INDUSTRIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TRANSPORTATION ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITYFOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","RESIDENTIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","COMMERCIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INDUSTRIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","TRANSPORTATION INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","RESIDENTIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","COMMERCIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","INDUSTRIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","TRANSPORTATION NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED"

375

Microsoft Word - CX-SwanValley-Goshen_GraniteCreekBoxCulvert_WEB.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Joe Johnson Natural Resource Specialist - TFBV-Kalispell Proposed Action: Replace existing bridge with a concrete box culvert at Granite Creek along Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Swan Valley-Goshen 161-kV transmission line. Budget Information: Work Order # 189268-01 PP&A Project No.: PP&A 2047 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3, Routine maintenance activities for structures, rights-of-way, and infrastructures, (such as roads), that are required to maintain infrastructures in a condition suitable for a facility to be used for its designated purpose. Location: The proposed project is located on Granite Creek along BPA's Swan Valley-Goshen

376

Microsoft Word - Granite-Mt-3G-Radio-Station-CX.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 0 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Creig Millen Project Manager - TEC-CSB-1 Proposed Action: Granite Mountain 3G Radio Station Project Budget Information: Work Order 00197218, Task 03 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.19 Siting, construction, and operation of microwave and radio communication towers and associated facilities... Location: Stevens County, Washington (T34N, R38E, Section 17) Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to install a new 100-foot radio tower, communication building, and related digital radio equipment at an existing BPA communications site on Granite Mountain in Stevens County, Washington. The new tower and building will upgrade and replace

377

Electrical and Computer Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

technologies such as solar power and solid state (LED) lighting; Design sensors that measure glucose, generating and transmitting power, and designing smart sensors for robots. Circuits Communications Optics Power Sensors Signal & Image Processing #12;Electrical Engineering Develop environmentally friendly

Weber, Rodney

378

Electrical Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electrical Techniques Electrical Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Electrical Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(1) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Geophysical Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature Dictionary.png Electrical Techniques: Electrical techniques aim to image the electrical resistivity of the

379

Electricity Reliability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability High Temperature Superconductivity (HTS) Visualization in the future because they have virtually no resistance to electric current, offering the possibility of new electric power equipment with more energy efficiency and higher capacity than today's systems

380

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented at Wind Powering America States Summit. The Summit, which follows the American Wind Energy Association's (AWEA's) annual WINDPOWER Conference and Exhibition, provides state Wind Working Groups, state energy officials, U.S. Energy Department and national laboratory representatives, and professional and institutional partners an opportunity to review successes, opportunities, and challenges for wind energy and plan future collaboration.

DeMeo, E.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite state electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

State  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ment of Co ment of Co nsiderations REQUEST BY MOSSEY CREEK ENERGY FOR DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN RIGHTS IN SUBJECT INVENTIONS S-124,118 AND S-124,156 MADE IN THE COURSE OF OR UNDER UT-BATTELLE PRIME CONTRACT NO. DE-AC05-000R22725; DOE WAIVER DOCKETS: W (l) 2011-009 AND W( l) 2011 -010 (COMBINED) Mossey Creek Energy (Petitioner) has made a timely request for a waiver to worldwide undivided rights in two subject inventio ns (the subject inventions) made in the course of or under UT-Battelle, Prime Contract No . DE-AC05-000R22725. The fir st invention( S-124,118) is entitled, " Thermally Conduct ive Ele ctrically In sulating Sil icon Cc_:ntaining Epoxy Molding Co mpo und ." The second invention (S-124,156) is "Sintered Polycrystalline Silicon Based Thermo electrics,

382

Electrical insulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

n....Material with very low conductivity, which surrounds active electrical devices. Common electrical insulation chemicals are fluorine-containing polymers.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Electrical Insulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

n...Material with very low conductivity which surrounds active electrical devices. Common electrical insulation chemicals are fluorine-containing polymers (Dissado LA...

Jan W. Gooch

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Perforation patterned electrical interconnects  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This disclosure describes systems and methods for increasing the usable surface area of electrical contacts within a device, such as a thin film solid state device, through the implementation of electrically conductive interconnects. Embodiments described herein include the use of a plurality of electrically conductive interconnects that penetrate through a top contact layer, through one or more multiple layers, and into a bottom contact layer. The plurality of conductive interconnects may form horizontal and vertical cross-sectional patterns. The use of lasers to form the plurality of electrically conductive interconnects from reflowed layer material further aids in the manufacturing process of a device.

Frey, Jonathan

2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

385

Moreno Valley Electric Utility - Solar Electric Incentive Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Moreno Valley Electric Utility - Solar Electric Incentive Program Moreno Valley Electric Utility - Solar Electric Incentive Program Moreno Valley Electric Utility - Solar Electric Incentive Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate Residential systems 30 kW or less: $14,000 or 50% of cost, whichever is less Small commercial systems 30 kW or less: $50,000 or 50% of cost, whichever is less Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Systems 30 kW or less: $2.00 per W-AC Systems larger than 30 kW: $0.06 per kWh for 5 years Provider Moreno Valley Electric Utility Moreno Valley Electric Utility provides rebates to its electric customers for the purchase of photovoltaic (PV) systems. System must be on the same premises as the customer to qualify. Systems 30 kilowatts (kW) or less can

386

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

efficiency requirements - Maximum emission limits Investment constraints: - Payback period is constrained Storage constraints: - Electricity stored is limited by battery

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Reports Electricity Reports Electricity Monthly Update With Data for October 2013 | Release Date: Dec. 20, 2013 | Next Release Date: Jan. 22, 2014 Previous Issues Issue: November 2013 October 2013 September 2013 August 2013 July 2013 June 2013 May 2013 April 2013 March 2013 February 2013 January 2013 December 2012 November 2012 Previous issues Format: html xls Go Highlights: October 2013 Thirty-one states saw the average cost of electricity increase by more than two percent, with fourteen states experiencing increases of at least five percent compared to a year ago. Texas (ERCOT) and the Midwest (MISO) experienced above average wholesale electricity prices for October due to unseasonable temperatures. The New York City (Transco Zone 6 NY) natural gas price was

388

Electric Companies and Electric Transmission Lines (North Dakota) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric Companies and Electric Transmission Lines (North Dakota) Electric Companies and Electric Transmission Lines (North Dakota) Electric Companies and Electric Transmission Lines (North Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State North Dakota Program Type Line Extension Analysis The Public Service Commission has the authority to regulate the

389

VOLUME 78, NUMBER 5 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 3 FEBRUARY 1997 Steady-State Confinement of Non-neutral Plasmas by Rotating Electric Fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

]. This process is analogous to an in- duction motor, since the applied electric field both creates and couples-State Confinement of Non-neutral Plasmas by Rotating Electric Fields X.-P. Huang,* F. Anderegg, E. M. Hollmann, C. F "rotating wall" electric fields to spin up a non-neutral plasma in a Penning-Malmberg trap, resulting

California at San Diego, University of

390

Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam; Smolt Monitoring by Federal and Non-Federal Entities, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This project monitored the daily passage of chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon smolts O. nerka during the 2001 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. In 2001 fish management agencies released significant numbers of hatchery chinook salmon and steelhead trout above Lower Granite Dam that were not marked with a fin clip or coded-wire tag. Generally, these fish were distinguishable from wild fish by the occurrence of fin erosion. Total annual hatchery chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 11% of the 2000 numbers. The wild chinook catch was 3% of the previous year's catch. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 49% of 2000 numbers. Wild steelhead trout catch was 69% of 2000 numbers. The Snake River trap collected 28 age-0 chinook salmon. During 2001 the Snake River trap captured zero hatchery and zero wild/natural sockeye salmon and six hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with flow. The significant reduction in catch during 2001 was due to a reduction in hatchery chinook production (60% of 2000 release) and due to extreme low flows. Trap operations began on March 11 and were terminated on June 29. The trap was out of operation for a total of two days due to mechanical failure or debris. Hatchery chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 47% and wild chinook salmon catch was 67% of 2000 numbers. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 2001 was 178% of the 2000 numbers. Wild steelhead trout collection in 2001 was 145% of the previous year's catch. Trap operations began on March 11 and were terminated on June 8 due to the end of the smolt monitoring season. There were no days where the trap was out of operation due to high flow or debris. The decrease in hatchery chinook catch in 2001 was due to a reduction in hatchery production (39% of 2000 releases). The increase in hatchery and wild steelhead trap catch is due to the ability to operate the trap in the thalweg for a longer period of time because of the extreme low flow condition in 2001. Travel time (d) and migration rate (km/d) through Lower Granite Reservoir for PIT-tagged chinook salmon and steelhead trout marked at the head of the reservoir were affected by discharge. There were not enough hatchery and wild chinook salmon tagged at the Snake River trap in 2001 to allow migration rate/discharge analysis. For steelhead trout tagged at the Snake River trap, statistical analysis of 2001 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge. For hatchery and wild steelhead trout, there was a 2.2-fold and a 1.5-fold increase in migration rate in, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. Travel time and migration rate to Lower Granite Dam for fish marked at the Salmon River trap were calculated. Statistical analysis of the 2001 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge for hatchery and wild chinook salmon and hatchery and wild steelhead trout. Migration rate increased 3.7-fold for hatchery chinook salmon and 2.5-fold for wild chinook salmon between 50 and 100 kcfs. For hatchery steelhead there was a 1.6-fold increase in migration rate, and for wild steelhead trout there was a 2.2-fold increase between 50 kcfs and 100 kcfs. Fish tagged with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags at the Snake River trap were interrogated at four dams with PIT tag detection systems (Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, and McNary dams). Because of the addition of the fourth interrogation site (Lower Monumental) in 1993, cumulative interrogation data is not comparable with the prior five years (1988-1992). Cumulative interrogations at the four dams for fish marked at the Snake River trap were 86% for hatchery chinook, 70% for wild chinook, 71% for hatchery steelhead, and 89% for wild steelhead. Cumulat

Buettner, Edwin W.; Putnam, Scott A.

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Hawaii electric system reliability.  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses Hawaii electric system reliability issues; greater emphasis is placed on short-term reliability but resource adequacy is reviewed in reference to electric consumers' views of reliability %E2%80%9Cworth%E2%80%9D and the reserve capacity required to deliver that value. The report begins with a description of the Hawaii electric system to the extent permitted by publicly available data. Electrical engineering literature in the area of electric reliability is researched and briefly reviewed. North American Electric Reliability Corporation standards and measures for generation and transmission are reviewed and identified as to their appropriateness for various portions of the electric grid and for application in Hawaii. Analysis of frequency data supplied by the State of Hawaii Public Utilities Commission is presented together with comparison and contrast of performance of each of the systems for two years, 2010 and 2011. Literature tracing the development of reliability economics is reviewed and referenced. A method is explained for integrating system cost with outage cost to determine the optimal resource adequacy given customers' views of the value contributed by reliable electric supply. The report concludes with findings and recommendations for reliability in the State of Hawaii.

Silva Monroy, Cesar Augusto; Loose, Verne William

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Electric Transmission Line Siting Compact  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric Transmission Line Siting Compact Electric Transmission Line Siting Compact 1 ______________________________________________________________________________ 2 ARTICLE I 3 PURPOSE 4 5 Siting electric transmission lines across state borders and federal lands is an issue for states, the 6 federal government, transmission utilities, consumers, environmentalists, and other stakeholders. 7 The current, multi-year application review process by separate and equal jurisdictions constitutes 8 a sometimes inefficient and redundant process for transmission companies and complicates the 9 efforts of state and federal policy-makers and other stakeholders to develop more robust 10 economic opportunities, increase grid reliability and security, and ensure the consumers have the 11 lowest cost electricity possible. 12

393

Electric Vehicle Site Operator Program  

SciTech Connect

Kansas State University, with funding support from federal, state, public, and private companies, is participating in the Department of Energy's Electric Vehicle Site Operator Program. Through participation is this program, Kansas State is demonstrating, testing, and evaluating electric or hybrid vehicle technology. This participation will provide organizations the opportunity to examine the latest EHV prototypes under actual operating conditions. KSU proposes to purchase one (1) electric or hybrid van and four (4) electric cars during the first two years of this five year program. KSU has purchased one G-Van built by Conceptor Industries, Toronto, Canada and has initiated a procurement order to purchase two (2) Soleq 1992 Ford EVcort stationwagons.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Electric Rate Alternatives to Cogeneration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"ELECTRIC RATE ALTERNATIVES TO COGENERATION" K. R. SANDBERG, JR. INDUSTRIAL ACCOUNTS MANAGER - TEXAS GULF STATES UTILITIES COMPANY BEAUMONT, TEXAS ABSTRACT This paper discusses electric rate slternatives to cogeneration for the industrisl... PERSPECTIVE Gulf States Utilities was incorporated in 1925 and is primarily in the business of generating. transmitting and distributing electricity to 555.000 customers in southeast Texas and south Louisiana. The service area extends 350 miles westward...

Sandberg, K. R. Jr.

395

Tracking the Reliability of the U.S. Electric Power System: An Assessment of Publicly Available Information Reported to State Public Utility Commissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Use Guide for Power Distribution Reliability Indices. ISBN#Engineers (IEEE) Distribution Reliability Working Group,for Electric Power Distribution Reliability Indices, which

LaCommare, Kristina H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Electricity Markets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electricity Markets Electricity Markets Researchers in the electricity markets area conduct technical, economic, and policy analysis of energy topics centered on the U.S. electricity sector. Current research seeks to inform public and private decision-making on public-interest issues related to energy efficiency and demand response, renewable energy, electricity resource and transmission planning, electricity reliability and distributed generation resources. Research is conducted in the following areas: Energy efficiency research focused on portfolio planning and market assessment, design and implementation of a portfolio of energy efficiency programs that achieve various policy objectives, utility sector energy efficiency business models, options for administering energy efficiency

397

Electric power annual 1992  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric utility statistics at national, regional and State levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policymakers, analysts and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. The Electric Power Annual is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. ``The US Electric Power Industry at a Glance`` section presents a profile of the electric power industry ownership and performance, and a review of key statistics for the year. Subsequent sections present data on generating capability, including proposed capability additions; net generation; fossil-fuel statistics; retail sales; revenue; financial statistics; environmental statistics; electric power transactions; demand-side management; and nonutility power producers. In addition, the appendices provide supplemental data on major disturbances and unusual occurrences in US electricity power systems. Each section contains related text and tables and refers the reader to the appropriate publication that contains more detailed data on the subject matter. Monetary values in this publication are expressed in nominal terms.

Not Available

1994-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

398

"1. Seabrook","Nuclear","NextEra Energy Seabrook LLC",1247 "2. Granite Ridge","Gas","Granite Ridge Energy LLC",678  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hampshire" Hampshire" "1. Seabrook","Nuclear","NextEra Energy Seabrook LLC",1247 "2. Granite Ridge","Gas","Granite Ridge Energy LLC",678 "3. NAEA Newington Power","Gas","NAEA Newington Energy LLC",525 "4. Merrimack","Coal","Public Service Co of NH",485 "5. Newington","Gas","Public Service Co of NH",400 "6. S C Moore","Hydroelectric","TransCanada Hydro Northeast Inc.,",194 "7. Schiller","Coal","Public Service Co of NH",156 "8. Comerford","Hydroelectric","TransCanada Hydro Northeast Inc.,",145 "9. Berlin Gorham","Hydroelectric","Great Lakes Hydro America LLC",30

399

electric | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

electric electric Dataset Summary Description This dataset is part of a larger internal dataset at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) that explores various characteristics of large solar electric (both PV and CSP) facilities around the United States. This dataset focuses on the land use characteristics for solar facilities that are either under construction or currently in operation. Source Land-Use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States Date Released June 25th, 2013 (5 months ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords acres area average concentrating solar power csp Density electric hectares km2 land land requirements land use land-use mean photovoltaic photovoltaics PV solar statistics Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Master Solar Land Use Spreadsheet (xlsx, 1.5 MiB)

400

Electrical Engineer  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This position is located in the Office of Electric Reliability. The Office of Electric Reliability helps protect and improve the reliability and security of the nation's bulk power system through...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite state electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Electricity Advisory Committee  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 3, 2011 Page 1 October 3, 2011 Page 1 Electricity Advisory Committee Meeting National Rural Electric Cooperative Association Headquarters 4301 Wilson Boulevard Arlington, VA Agenda October 19, 2011 2:00 - 5:00 pm EDT 1:30 - 2:00 pm Registration 2:00 - 2:15 pm WELCOME and Introductions Richard Cowart, Chair, Electricity Advisory Committee Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) 2:15 - 3:15 pm Presentation on U.S. Department of Energy's Vision of a Future Grid Bill Parks, Senior Advisor, DOE Office Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability 3:15 - 3:30 pm Break 3:30 - 4:15 pm Response to U.S. Department of Energy's Vision of a Future Grid Honorable Robert Curry, Commissioner, New York State Public Service

402

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

capture solar radiation and convert it into thermal energy.solar thermal collector (kW) PV (kW) electric storage (kWh) flow battery - energy (solar thermal collector ( kW) PV (kW) electric storage (kWh) flow battery - energy (

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

capture solar radiation and convert it into thermal energy.solar thermal collector (kW) PV (kW) electric storage (kWh) flow battery - energy (solar thermal collector (kW) PV (kW) electric storage (kWh) flow battery - energy (

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented to the 2012 Western Conference of Public Service Commissioners, during their June, 2012, meeting. The Western Conference of Public Service Commissioners is a regional association within the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC).

Hand, M. M.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Cost of electricity difference for direct and indirect drive targets for inertial fusion energy using a diode pumped solid state laser driver  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A detailed systems analysis code has been used to compare the projected cost of electricity (COE) for inertial fusion energy for direct drive (DD) and indirect drive (ID) target scenarios, based on a diode pumped solid state laser driver with Yb:S-FAP (Yb doped Sr5(PO4)3F) gain media. Previously published target gain curves which resulted in a target gain at the optimal DD operating point that is 30% higher than that for the ID scenario have been used. This gain advantage for DD is offset by a requirement for improved beam smoothing, which was obtained via smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD) with a 1 THz bandwidth at 349 nm. Such a large SSD bandwidth has a number of effects on laser performance, including greater risk of optics damage from non-linear effects, lowered harmonic conversion efficiency, altered extraction parameters and higher front-end costs. The non-linear effects, which contribute to optical component damage by amplification of intensity non-uniformities, were parameterized through a constraint on the maximum allowable B integral (i.e. the total average phase retardation due to the non-linear indices of all materials traversed by the beam). If we constrain B to be no larger than 1.8 rad, which is the presently accepted safe value based on observations in single shot glass laser facilities, the COEs for DD and ID are predicted to be the same within the uncertainties. If technology permits the B limit to be raised, the optimized COE for DD is predicted to decrease relative to that for ID.

C.D. Orth

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Lithium isotopic systematics of A-type granites and their mafic enclaves: Further constraints on the Li isotopic composition of the continental crust  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lithium isotopic systematics of A-type granites and their mafic enclaves: Further constraints form 6 February 2009 Accepted 15 February 2009 Editor: D.B. Dingwell Keywords: Lithium isotopes A-type granite Mafic enclave Continental crust Lithium concentrations and isotopic compositions of 39 A

Mcdonough, William F.

407

Electricity Advisory Committee  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 5, 2012 June 5, 2012 Electricity Advisory Committee 2012 Membership Roster Richard Cowart Regulatory Assistance Project CHAIR Irwin Popowsky Pennsylvania Consumer Advocate VICE CHAIR William Ball Southern Company Guido Bartels IBM Rick Bowen Alcoa Merwin Brown California Institute for Energy and Environment Ralph Cavanagh Natural Resources Defense Council The Honorable Paul Centolella Public Utilities Commission of Ohio David Crane NRG Energy, Inc. The Honorable Robert Curry New York State Public Service Commission José Delgado American Transmission Company (Ret.) Clark Gellings Electric Power Research Institute Robert Gramlich American Wind Energy Association Dian Grueneich Dian Grueneich Consulting, LLC. Michael Heyeck American Electric Power

408

Electricity Advisory Committee  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 20, 2012 December 20, 2012 Electricity Advisory Committee 2012 Membership Roster Richard Cowart Regulatory Assistance Project CHAIR Irwin Popowsky Pennsylvania Consumer Advocate (Ret.) VICE CHAIR William Ball Southern Company Linda Blair ITC Holdings Corporation Rick Bowen Alcoa Merwin Brown California Institute for Energy and Environment Ralph Cavanagh Natural Resources Defense Council Paul Centolella Analysis Group The Honorable Robert Curry New York State Public Service Commission Clark Gellings Electric Power Research Institute Dian Grueneich Dian Grueneich Consulting, LLC. Michael Heyeck American Electric Power Paul Hudson Stratus Energy Group Val Jensen Commonwealth Edison Susan Kelly American Public Power Association Barry Lawson

409

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BP Energy Company BP Energy Company OE Docket No. EA- 3 14 Order Authorizing Electricity Exports to Mexico Order No. EA-3 14 February 22,2007 BP Energy Company Order No. EA-314 I. BACKGROUND Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated by the Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to sections 301(b) and 402(Q of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7 15 l(b), 7172(f)) and require authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C.S24a(e)) . On May 22,2006, BP Energy Company (BP Energy) applied to DOE for an authorization to transmit electric energy from the United States to Mexico as a power marketer. BP Energy proposes to purchase surplus electric energy from electric utilities and other suppliers within the United States and to export that energy to ~Mexico. The cnergy

410

3/14/09 10:47 AMIs that granite counter in your home emitting radon? Page 1 of 4http://www.startribune.com/41239912.html?page=4&c=y  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,000 granites being exported from about 70 countries, he noted, with some quarries within miles of uranium mines

Llope, William J.

411

The Paradox of Regulatory Development in China: The Case of the Electricity Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

zhongguo dianli chanye (China‘s Electricity Industry at themulti_page.pdf. State Electricity Regulatory Commission.The Annual Report on Electricity Regulation (2006). Beijing:

Tsai, Chung-min

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented at the 2012 RE AMP Annual Meeting. RE-AMP is an active network of 144 nonprofits and foundations across eight Midwestern states working on climate change and energy policy with the goal of reducing global warming pollution economy-wide 80% by 2050.

Mai, T.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Virginia Electric Utility Regulation Act (Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric Utility Regulation Act (Virginia) Electric Utility Regulation Act (Virginia) Virginia Electric Utility Regulation Act (Virginia) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Virginia Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider Virginia State Corporation Commission The Virginia Electric Utility Regulation Act constitutes the main legislation in Virginia that pertains to the regulation of the state's electric utilities. The Act directs the State Corporation Commission to construct regulations for electric utilities, and contains information on

414

Free Energy of Electrons in Metals with Magnetic and Electric Polarizations. II: Dielectric Constant and Spin Susceptibilities in the Ferromagnetic State  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Theoretical Physics February 1970 research-article Articles Free Energy of Electrons in Metals with Magnetic and Electric Polarizations...calculation and the Hartree-Fock approximation, the free energy of electrons in metals is expanded as a power series......

Ichiro Takahashi; Masao Shimizu

1970-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

acid batteries flow battery thermal n/a n/a xiv The Effectscapacity electrical flow battery thermal n/a n/a source:lead/acid battery) and thermal storage, capabilities, with

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

capitalcost.htm). EPRI-DOE Handbook of Energy Storage foret al. 1996, 2003, EPRI-DOE Handbook 2003, Goldstein, L. etet al. 2003, EPRI-DOE Handbook 2003 and at the Electricity

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam; Smolt Monitoring by Federal and Non-Federal Entities, 2000 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This project monitored the daily passage of chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon smolts O. nerka during the 2000 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. In 2000 the Nez Perce Tribe released significant numbers of hatchery chinook salmon and steelhead trout above Lower Granite Dam that were not marked with a fin clip or coded-wire tag. Generally, these fish were distinguishable from wild fish by the occurrence of fin erosion. Total annual hatchery chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 36% of the 1999 number. The wild chinook catch was 34% of the previous year's catch. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 121% of 1999 numbers. Wild steelhead trout catch was 139% of 1999 numbers. The Snake River trap collected 689 age-0 chinook salmon. During 2000, the Snake River trap captured 40 hatchery and 92 wild/natural sockeye salmon and 159 hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with high flows. Trap operations began on March 13 and were terminated for the season due to high flows on June 16. There were no down days due to high flows or debris. Hatchery chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 96%, and wild chinook salmon catch was 66% of 1999 numbers. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 2000 was 90% of the 1999 numbers. Wild steelhead trout collection in 2000 was 147% of the previous years catch. Trap operations began on March 13 and were terminated for the season due to high flows on May 22. There were no days where the trap was out of operation due to high flow or debris. Travel time (d) and migration rate (km/d) through Lower Granite Reservoir for passive integrated transponder (PIT) tagged chinook salmon and steelhead trout, marked at the head of the reservoir, were affected by discharge. For fish tagged at the Snake River trap, statistical analysis of 2000 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and discharge. For hatchery and wild chinook salmon, there was a 3.0 and 16.2-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. For hatchery steelhead, there was a 2.7-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 kcfs and 100 kcfs. The statistical analysis could not detect a significant relation between migration rate and discharge for wild steelhead in 2000. For fish marked at the Salmon River trap, statistical analysis of the 2000 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and discharge for hatchery chinook salmon at the 0.05 level of significance and at the 0.1 level of significance for wild chinook salmon. Migration rate increased 3.2- and 1.9-fold, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. For hatchery steelhead there was a 1.5-fold increase in migration rate between 50 kcfs and 100 kcfs. Insufficient numbers of wild steelhead trout were PIT tagged at the Salmon River trap to estimate travel time and migration rate to Lower Granite Dam. Fish tagged with PIT tags at the Snake River trap were interrogated at four dams with PIT tag detection systems (Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, and McNary dams). Because of the addition of the fourth interrogation site (Lower Monumental) in 1993, cumulative interrogation data is not comparable with the prior five years (1988-1992). Cumulative interrogations at the four dams for fish marked at the Snake River trap were 57% for hatchery chinook, 65% for wild chinook, 73% for hatchery steelhead and 71% for wild steelhead. Cumulative interrogations at the four dams for fish marked at the Salmon River trap were 53% for hatchery chinook, 64% for wild chinook salmon, 68% for hatchery steelhead trout, and 65% for wild steelhead trout.

Buettner, Edwin W.; Putnam, Scott A.

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

2.9 to 1.9 Ga paleoalterations ofArchean granitic basement of the Franceville basin (Gabon).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 2.9 to 1.9 Ga paleoalterations ofArchean granitic basement of the Franceville basin (Gabon: Paleocirculation and Diagenesis in Archean basement, Franceville basin, Gabon3 4 Abstract The Archean granitoids in the Ki�n� area, Gabon, are overlained by the Paleoproterozoic sediments of the Franceville basin (2.1 Ga

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

419

Baltimore Gas and Electric Company (Electric) - Commercial Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Baltimore Gas and Electric Company (Electric) - Commercial Energy Baltimore Gas and Electric Company (Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Program Baltimore Gas and Electric Company (Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Local Government Nonprofit State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Other Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Maximum Rebate $1,000,000/corporate tax ID/year Commercial Rebates: Contact BGE Retro-Commissioning, Operations, and Maintenance: $15,000 Program Info State Maryland Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount New Construction Performance Lighting: $0.40 - $0.80/watt reduced New Construction Green Building Incentive: $0.25 - $0.40/kWh saved first

420

Electric Vehicles  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Burak Ozpineci sees a future where electric vehicles charge while we drive them down the road, thanks in part to research under way at ORNL.

Ozpineci, Burak

2014-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite state electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Electric Vehicles  

SciTech Connect

Burak Ozpineci sees a future where electric vehicles charge while we drive them down the road, thanks in part to research under way at ORNL.

Ozpineci, Burak

2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

422

Electrical hazards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and certification by ANL prior to use. The Control of Hazardous Energy Sources - LockoutTagout (LOTO) Types of Energy Sources 1. Electricity 2. Gas, steam & pressurized...

423

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Monthly Update Explained Electricity Monthly Update Explained Highlights The Highlights page features in the center a short article about a major event or an informative topic. The left column contains bulleted highlights at the top and key indicators in a table and graphics - data you might be interested in at a glance. The right column is used for navigation. End-Use: Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption The second section presents statistics on end-use: retail rates/prices and consumption of electricity. End-use data is the first "data page" based on the assumption that information about retail electricity service is of greatest interest to a general audience. The term rates/prices is used because charges for retail service are based primarily on set rates approved by State regulators. However, a number of

424

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Resource Use: October 2013 Resource Use: October 2013 Supply and Fuel Consumption In this section, we look at the resources used to produce electricity. Generating units are chosen to run primarily on their operating costs, of which fuel costs account for the lion's share. Therefore, we present below, electricity generation output by fuel type and generator type. Since the generator/fuel mix of utilities varies significantly by region, we also present generation output by region. Generation Output by Region By fuel type By generator type Region map map showing electricity regions In October 2013, net generation in the United States increased 1.0 percent compared to the previous year. This increase in electricity generation occurred mainly in the Mid-Atlantic, Central, and Southeast regions, along

425

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Monthly Update Explained Electricity Monthly Update Explained Highlights The Highlights page features in the center a short article about a major event or an informative topic. The left column contains bulleted highlights at the top and key indicators in a table and graphics - data you might be interested in at a glance. The right column is used for navigation. End-Use: Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption The second section presents statistics on end-use: retail rates/prices and consumption of electricity. End-use data is the first "data page" based on the assumption that information about retail electricity service is of greatest interest to a general audience. The term rates/prices is used because charges for retail service are based primarily on set rates approved by State regulators. However, a number of

426

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Monthly Update Explained Electricity Monthly Update Explained Highlights The Highlights page features in the center a short article about a major event or an informative topic. The left column contains bulleted highlights at the top and key indicators in a table and graphics - data you might be interested in at a glance. The right column is used for navigation. End-Use: Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption The second section presents statistics on end-use: retail rates/prices and consumption of electricity. End-use data is the first "data page" based on the assumption that information about retail electricity service is of greatest interest to a general audience. The term rates/prices is used because charges for retail service are based primarily on set rates approved by State regulators. However, a number of

427

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electric Power Sector Coal Stocks: March 2012 Electric Power Sector Coal Stocks: March 2012 Stocks The seasonal winter drawdown of coal stocks was totally negated during the winter months this year due to low natural gas prices and unseasonably warm temperatures throughout the continental United States. In fact, March 2012 was the seventh straight month that coal stockpiles at power plants increased from the previous month. The largest driver of increasing stockpiles has been declining consumption of coal due to unseasonably warm weather and declining natural gas prices. Because much of the coal supplied to electric generators is purchased through long-term contracts, increasing coal stockpiles have proven difficult for electric power plant operators to handle. Some operators have inventories so high that they are refusing

428

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Monthly Update Explained Electricity Monthly Update Explained Highlights The Highlights page features in the center a short article about a major event or an informative topic. The left column contains bulleted highlights at the top and key indicators in a table and graphics - data you might be interested in at a glance. The right column is used for navigation. End-Use: Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption The second section presents statistics on end-use: retail rates/prices and consumption of electricity. End-use data is the first "data page" based on the assumption that information about retail electricity service is of greatest interest to a general audience. The term rates/prices is used because charges for retail service are based primarily on set rates approved by State regulators. However, a number of

429

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electric Power Sector Coal Stocks: February 2012 Electric Power Sector Coal Stocks: February 2012 Stocks The unseasonably warm temperatures that the continental United States experienced throughout the winter, coupled with low natural gas prices, caused coal stocks at power plants to increase throughout the winter of 2011 - 2012. During this period, coal stocks usually see a seasonal decline due to the added need for electricity generation from coal plants for spacing heating load. However, it was the sixth straight month that coal stocks increased from the previous month, with this trend likely to continue as the country enters into spring. Days of Burn Days of burn Coal capacity The average number of days of burn held at electric power plants is a forward looking estimate of coal supply given a power plant's current

430

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Monthly Update Explained Electricity Monthly Update Explained Highlights The Highlights page features in the center a short article about a major event or an informative topic. The left column contains bulleted highlights at the top and key indicators in a table and graphics - data you might be interested in at a glance. The right column is used for navigation. End-Use: Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption The second section presents statistics on end-use: retail rates/prices and consumption of electricity. End-use data is the first "data page" based on the assumption that information about retail electricity service is of greatest interest to a general audience. The term rates/prices is used because charges for retail service are based primarily on set rates approved by State regulators. However, a number of

431

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Monthly Update Explained Electricity Monthly Update Explained Highlights The Highlights page features in the center a short article about a major event or an informative topic. The left column contains bulleted highlights at the top and key indicators in a table and graphics - data you might be interested in at a glance. The right column is used for navigation. End-Use: Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption The second section presents statistics on end-use: retail rates/prices and consumption of electricity. End-use data is the first "data page" based on the assumption that information about retail electricity service is of greatest interest to a general audience. The term rates/prices is used because charges for retail service are based primarily on set rates approved by State regulators. However, a number of

432

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Monthly Update Explained Electricity Monthly Update Explained Highlights The Highlights page features in the center a short article about a major event or an informative topic. The left column contains bulleted highlights at the top and key indicators in a table and graphics - data you might be interested in at a glance. The right column is used for navigation. End-Use: Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption The second section presents statistics on end-use: retail rates/prices and consumption of electricity. End-use data is the first "data page" based on the assumption that information about retail electricity service is of greatest interest to a general audience. The term rates/prices is used because charges for retail service are based primarily on set rates approved by State regulators. However, a number of

433

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Monthly Update Explained Electricity Monthly Update Explained Highlights The Highlights page features in the center a short article about a major event or an informative topic. The left column contains bulleted highlights at the top and key indicators in a table and graphics - data you might be interested in at a glance. The right column is used for navigation. End-Use: Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption The second section presents statistics on end-use: retail rates/prices and consumption of electricity. End-use data is the first "data page" based on the assumption that information about retail electricity service is of greatest interest to a general audience. The term rates/prices is used because charges for retail service are based primarily on set rates approved by State regulators. However, a number of

434

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Monthly Update Explained Electricity Monthly Update Explained Highlights The Highlights page features in the center a short article about a major event or an informative topic. The left column contains bulleted highlights at the top and key indicators in a table and graphics - data you might be interested in at a glance. The right column is used for navigation. End-Use: Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption The second section presents statistics on end-use: retail rates/prices and consumption of electricity. End-use data is the first "data page" based on the assumption that information about retail electricity service is of greatest interest to a general audience. The term rates/prices is used because charges for retail service are based primarily on set rates approved by State regulators. However, a number of

435

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bangor Hydro-Electric Company Bangor Hydro-Electric Company OE Docket No. PP-89-1 Amendment to Presidential Permit Order No. PP-89-1 December 30,2005 PRESIDENTIAL PERMIT AMENDMENT Bangor Hydro-Electric Company Order No. PP-89-1 I. BACKGROUND The Department of Energy (DOE) has responsibility for implementing Executive Order (E.O.) 10485, as amended by E.O. 12038, which requires the issuance of a Presidential permit by DOE before electric trans~nission facilities may be constructed, operated, maintained, or connected at the borders of the United States. DOE may issue such a permit if it determines that the permit is in the public interest and after obtaining favorable recommendations from the U.S. Departments of State and Defense. On December 16, 1988, Bangor Hydro-Electric Company (BHE) applied to DOE

436

Electric power annual 1997. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric power industry statistics at national, regional, and State levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policy-makers, analysts, and the general public with data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. The Electric Power Annual is prepared by the Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. Volume 1 -- with a focus on US electric utilities -- contains final 1997 data on net generation and fossil fuel consumption, stocks, receipts, and cost; preliminary 1997 data on generating unit capability, and retail sales of electricity, associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold (based on a monthly sample: Form EIA-826, ``Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Report with State Distributions``). Additionally, information on net generation from renewable energy sources and on the associated generating capability is included in Volume 1 of the EPA.

NONE

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Ch 16 Electric Charge &Ch 16. Electric Charge & Electric Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ch 16 Electric Charge &Ch 16. Electric Charge & Electric Field Liu UCD Phy1B 2012 #12;I Basic ConceptsI. Basic Concepts Static electricity: charges at rest Electric charge Like charges repel Unlike charges attract Liu UCD Phy1B 2012 #12;Electric ChargeElectric Charge Electron charge: -eElectron charge

Yoo, S. J. Ben

438

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights: October 2011 Highlights: October 2011 Mixed temperatures led to flat retail sales of electricity during October 2011. Coal-fired generation decreased or was flat across the United States except for the Central region when compared to October 2010. October's electric system load remained in the mid-to-low section of the annual range in many electric systems across the United States. Key Indicators Oct. 2011 % Change from Oct. 2010 Total Net Generation (Thousand MWh) 309,400 0.5% Residential Retail Price (cents/kWh) 12.12 2.2% Retail Sales (Thousand MWh) 285,156 -0.9% Heating Degree-Days 259 8.8% Natural Gas Price, Henry Hub ($/MMBtu) 3.68 4.0% Coal Stocks (Thousand Tons) 156,880 -10.7% Coal Consumption (Thousand Tons) 69,627 -1.8% Natural Gas Consumption (Mcf) 603,724 1.6%

439

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

October 2011 | Release Date: Dec. 21, October 2011 | Release Date: Dec. 21, 2011 | Next Release Date: Jan. 30, 2012 | Re-Release Date: November 28, 2012 (correction) Previous Issues Issue: November 2013 October 2013 September 2013 August 2013 July 2013 June 2013 May 2013 April 2013 March 2013 February 2013 January 2013 December 2012 November 2012 Previous issues Format: html xls Go Highlights: October 2011 Mixed temperatures led to flat retail sales of electricity during October 2011. Coal-fired generation decreased or was flat across the United States except for the Central region when compared to October 2010. October's electric system load remained in the mid-to-low section of the annual range in many electric systems across the United States. Key Indicators Oct. 2011 % Change from Oct. 2010

440

Electric machine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An interior permanent magnet electric machine is disclosed. The interior permanent magnet electric machine comprises a rotor comprising a plurality of radially placed magnets each having a proximal end and a distal end, wherein each magnet comprises a plurality of magnetic segments and at least one magnetic segment towards the distal end comprises a high resistivity magnetic material.

El-Refaie, Ayman Mohamed Fawzi (Niskayuna, NY); Reddy, Patel Bhageerath (Madison, WI)

2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite state electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Geothermal electric power plant status  

SciTech Connect

A status summary of the activity for the 44 proposed geothermal electric power plants in the United States as of March 31, 1981 is presented, as well as the power on-line electric plants to date. The information comes from the Department of Energy Geothermal Progress Monitor System (DOE, 1981).

Murphy, M.; Entingh, D.J.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Distributed Energy Alternatives to Electrical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Distributed Energy Alternatives to Electrical Distribution Grid Expansion in Consolidated Edison.www.gastechnology.org 2 #12;Distributed Energy Alternatives to Electrical Distribution Grid Expansion in Consolidated-Battelle for the Department of Energy Subcontract Number: 4000052360 GTI Project Number: 20441 New York State Energy Research

Pennycook, Steve

443

Regulations For Electric Companies (Tennessee) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regulations For Electric Companies (Tennessee) Regulations For Electric Companies (Tennessee) Regulations For Electric Companies (Tennessee) < Back Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Transportation Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Tennessee Program Type Generating Facility Rate-Making Net Metering Provider Tennessee Regulatory Authority The Regulations for Electric Companies are under the Authority of the Tennessee Regulatory Authority, which is the public service branch of the state government. These regulations establish the records electricity providers are required to keep and submit. It requires that all electricity

444

Electricity Policy Technical Assistance Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Since 2003, the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) has been providing independent and unbiased technical support to states, regions, and Tribes...

445

Electric Dipole Moment of HD  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The electric dipole moment of HD in its ground vibrational and electronic state has been obtained from the intensity of the pure rotational spectrum. Its value is (5.85±0.17) × 10-4 D.

M. Trefler and H. P. Gush

1968-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Firelands Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Firelands Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Firelands Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Firelands Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Ohio Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Geothermal Heat Pump: $800 Air Source Heat Pump: $500 Dual Fuel Heat Pump: $250 Electric Water Heater: $100-$300 HVAC Controls: $100 Provider Firelands Electric Cooperative Firelands Electric Cooperative (FEC) is offering rebates on energy efficient equipment to residential customers receiving electric service from FEC. Eligible equipment includes new Geothermal Heat Pumps, Air-Source

447

Engineering Electrical &  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computer Engineering Electrical & Electronic Engineering Mechatronics Engineering Mechanical Engineering Civil Engineering Natural Resources Engineering Forest Engineering Chemical & Process Engineering ELECTIVE 2 Required Engineering Intermediate Year 2012 Eight Required Courses Chart: 120 points College

Hickman, Mark

448

Engineering Electrical &  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computer Engineering Electrical & Electronic Engineering Mechatronics Engineering Mechanical Engineering Civil Engineering Natural Resources Engineering Forest Engineering Chemical & Process Engineering ELECTIVE 2 Required Engineering Intermediate Year 2011 Eight Required Courses Chart: 120 points College

Hickman, Mark

449

Powering Electric Cooperatives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Research Network Research Network DOE Electricity Distribution System Workshop Forward Looking Panel September 2012 NRECA's Technical Focus * Over 900 Electric Cooperatives * Serve 42 million Americans in 47 States * Cover >70% of Nation's land mass * Own 42% of all Distribution Line * Totals 2.4 Million Line Miles Not for Profit, Consumer Owned, Consumer Controlled 2 Timely Energy Innovations Identify and Adopt Beneficial Technologies: * Improve Productivity * Enhance Service * Control Cost Choosing the Right Technologies Motivations & Methods Uncovering Smart Grid ROI Technology Investments Hinge on Cost Benefit Accelerate Beneficial Adoption Rate Precision Modular Evaluation Tool * Run cost-benefit analyses on smart grid investments, either

450

Electricity Advisory Committee  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 17, 2010 1 September 17, 2010 1 Electricity Advisory Committee 2010 Membership Roster Richard Cowart Regulatory Assistance Project CHAIR Honorable Lauren Azar Wisconsin Public Utilities Commission VICE CHAIR Guido Bartels IBM Rick Bowen Alcoa Fred Butler Salmon Ventures Ltd. and New Jersey Board of Public Utilities (Ret.) Ralph Cavanagh Natural Resources Defense Council Lisa Crutchfield National Grid USA Honorable Robert Curry New York State Public Service Commission José Delgado American Transmission Company (Ret.) Roger Duncan Austin Energy (Ret.) Robert Gramlich American Wind Energy Association Honorable Dian Grueneich California Public Utilities Commission Michael Heyeck American Electric Power Joseph Kelliher NextEra Energy, Inc.

451

Solar electric systems  

SciTech Connect

Electricity from solar sources is the subject. The state-of-the-art of photovoltaics, wind energy and solar thermal electric systems is presented and also a broad range of solar energy activities throughout the Arab world is covered. Contents, abridged: Solar radiation fundamentals. Basic theory solar cells. Solar thermal power plants. Solar energy activities at the scientific research council in Iraq. Solar energy program at Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research. Prospects of solar energy for Egypt. Non-conventional energy in Syria. Wind and solar energies in Sudan. Index.

Warfield, G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Power Electonics & Electric Machinery | Clean Energy | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

has dramatically advanced the technology of state-of-the-art inverters, DC-DC converters, motor control techniques, efficient compact electric machines, and high voltage, high...

453

Electricity Policy Coordination and Implementation | Department...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Policy Technical Assistance Get Assistance Recovery Act: State Assistance for Recovery Act Related Electricity Policies Ratepayer-Funded Energy Efficiency Demand Response - Policy...

454

Electricity Transmission, A Primer | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A Primer Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Electricity Transmission, A Primer Authors Matthew H. Brown, National Conference of State...

455

Electric power monthly, June 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Baltimore Gas and Electric Company (Electric) - Residential Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Baltimore Gas and Electric Company (Electric) - Residential Energy Baltimore Gas and Electric Company (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Baltimore Gas and Electric Company (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Ventilation Manufacturing Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Maximum Rebate Contact BGE Program Info State Maryland Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Central A/C: $150 - $500 Air Source Heat Pump: $200 - $500 Ductless Mini-Split Heat Pump: $300 Geothermal Heat Pump (Closed Loop): $500 Duct Sealing: $250 Tune-ups: $100 Heat Pump Water Heater: $350 Room A/C: $25

457

US motor giants fail to quell enthusiasm for electric cars  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... regulation that will require all car companies operating in the state to develop and sell electric cars by 1998.

Colin Macilwain

1994-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

458

Integrating Electricity Subsector Failure Scenarios into a Risk...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2013) More Documents & Publications "Cybersecurity for State Regulators" - NARUC Primer (June 2012) Electricity Advisory Committee Meeting Presentations June 2013 -...

459

Small Solar Electric Systems | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Small Solar Electric Systems Small Solar Electric Systems Small Solar Electric Systems July 15, 2012 - 4:11pm Addthis A small solar electric or photovoltaic system can be a reliable and pollution-free producer of electricity for your home or office. What are the key facts? Because PV technologies use both direct and scattered sunlight to create electricity, the solar resource across the United States is ample for home solar electric systems. Solar cells-the basic building blocks of a PV system -- consist of semiconductor materials. A typical home solar electric, or PV, system consists solar cells, modules or panels (which consist of solar cells), arrays (which consist of modules), and balance-of-system parts. A small solar electric or photovoltaic (PV) system can be a reliable and pollution-free producer of electricity for your home or office. Small PV

460

Small Solar Electric Systems | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Small Solar Electric Systems Small Solar Electric Systems Small Solar Electric Systems July 15, 2012 - 4:11pm Addthis A small solar electric or photovoltaic system can be a reliable and pollution-free producer of electricity for your home or office. What are the key facts? Because PV technologies use both direct and scattered sunlight to create electricity, the solar resource across the United States is ample for home solar electric systems. Solar cells-the basic building blocks of a PV system -- consist of semiconductor materials. A typical home solar electric, or PV, system consists solar cells, modules or panels (which consist of solar cells), arrays (which consist of modules), and balance-of-system parts. A small solar electric or photovoltaic (PV) system can be a reliable and pollution-free producer of electricity for your home or office. Small PV

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite state electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Regional Wholesale Markets: November 2011 Regional Wholesale Markets: November 2011 The United States has many regional wholesale electricity markets. Below we look at monthly and annual ranges of on-peak, daily wholesale prices at selected pricing locations and daily peak demand for selected electricity systems in the U.S. The range of daily prices and demand data is shown for the report month and for the year ending with the report month. Prices and demand are shown for six Regional Transmission Operator (RTO) markets: ISO New England (ISO-NE), New York ISO (NYISO), PJM Interconnection (PJM), Midwest ISO (MISO), Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT), and two locations in the California ISO (CAISO). Also shown are wholesale prices at trading hubs in Louisiana (into Entergy), Southwest

462

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Regional Wholesale Markets: December 2011 Regional Wholesale Markets: December 2011 The United States has many regional wholesale electricity markets. Below we look at monthly and annual ranges of on-peak, daily wholesale prices at selected pricing locations and daily peak demand for selected electricity systems in the nation. The range of daily prices and demand data is shown for the report month and for the year ending with the report month. Prices and demand are shown for six Regional Transmission Operator (RTO) markets: ISO New England (ISO-NE), New York ISO (NYISO), PJM Interconnection (PJM), Midwest ISO (MISO), Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT), and two locations in the California ISO (CAISO). Also shown are wholesale prices at trading hubs in Louisiana (into Entergy), Southwest

463

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Regional Wholesale Markets: January 2012 Regional Wholesale Markets: January 2012 The United States has many regional wholesale electricity markets. Below we look at monthly and annual ranges of on-peak, daily wholesale prices at selected pricing locations and daily peak demand for selected electricity systems in the nation. The range of daily prices and demand data is shown for the report month and for the year ending with the report month. Prices and demand are shown for six Regional Transmission Operator (RTO) markets: ISO New England (ISO-NE), New York ISO (NYISO), PJM Interconnection (PJM), Midwest ISO (MISO), Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT), and two locations in the California ISO (CAISO). Also shown are wholesale prices at trading hubs in Louisiana (into Entergy), Southwest

464

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Regional Wholesale Markets: October 2011 Regional Wholesale Markets: October 2011 The United States has many regional wholesale electricity markets. Below we look at monthly and annual ranges of on-peak, daily wholesale prices at selected pricing locations and daily peak demand for selected electricity systems in the U.S. The range of daily prices and demand data is shown for the report month and for the year ending with the report month. Prices and demand are shown for six Regional Transmission Operator (RTO) markets: ISO New England (ISO-NE), New York ISO (NYISO), PJM Interconnection (PJM), Midwest ISO (MISO), Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT), and two locations in the California ISO (CAISO). Also shown are wholesale prices at trading hubs in Louisiana (into Entergy), Southwest

465

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Regional Wholesale Markets: September 2011 Regional Wholesale Markets: September 2011 The United States. has many regional wholesale electricity markets. Below we look at monthly and annual ranges of on-peak, daily wholesale prices at selected pricing locations and daily peak demand for selected electricity systems in the U.S. The range of daily price and demand data is shown for the month of September 2011 and for the year ending on September 30, 2011. Prices and demand are shown for six Regional Transmission Operator (RTO) markets: ISO New England (ISO-NE), New York ISO (NYISO), PJM Interconnection (PJM), Midwest ISO (MISO), Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT), and California ISO (CAISO). Also shown are wholesale prices at trading hubs in Louisiana (into Entergy), Southwest (Palo Verde) and

466

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Regional Wholesale Markets: March 2012 Regional Wholesale Markets: March 2012 The United States has many regional wholesale electricity markets. Below we look at monthly and annual ranges of on-peak, daily wholesale prices at selected pricing locations and daily peak demand for selected electricity systems in the Nation. The range of daily prices and demand data is shown for the report month and for the year ending with the report month. Prices and demand are shown for six Regional Transmission Operator (RTO) markets: ISO New England (ISO-NE), New York ISO (NYISO), PJM Interconnection (PJM), Midwest ISO (MISO), Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT), and two locations in the California ISO (CAISO). Also shown are wholesale prices at trading hubs in Louisiana (into Entergy), Southwest

467

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Regional Wholesale Markets: February 2012 Regional Wholesale Markets: February 2012 The United States has many regional wholesale electricity markets. Below we look at monthly and annual ranges of on-peak, daily wholesale prices at selected pricing locations and daily peak demand for selected electricity systems in the Nation. The range of daily prices and demand data is shown for the report month and for the year ending with the report month. Prices and demand are shown for six Regional Transmission Operator (RTO) markets: ISO New England (ISO-NE), New York ISO (NYISO), PJM Interconnection (PJM), Midwest ISO (MISO), Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT), and two locations in the California ISO (CAISO). Also shown are wholesale prices at trading hubs in Louisiana (into Entergy), Southwest

468

Electricity 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electricity > Soliciting comments on EIA-111 Electricity > Soliciting comments on EIA-111 EIA announces the proposal of Form EIA-111, Quarterly Electricity Imports and Exports Report Released: August 15, 2011 Background On August 11, 2011, a Federal Register Notice was published soliciting comments for the new EIA-111 survey form. The EIA-111, Quarterly Electricity Imports and Exports Report will replace the OE-781R, Monthly Electricity Imports and Exports Report. The OE-781R has been suspended and will be terminated upon the approval of the EIA-111. The OE-781R administered from July 2010 through May 2011, proved complex and confusing for the repondents. As a result, the EIA-111 was developed to more effectively and efficiently collect more accurate and meaningful data. The Paperwork Reduction Act (PRA) of 1995 requires that each Federal agency obtains approval from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) before undertaking to collect information from ten or more persons, or continuing a collection for which the OMB approval and the OMB control number are about to expire. The approval process, which is popularly known as the "OMB clearance process," is extensive. It requires two Federal Register notices and a detailed application ("supporting statement") to OMB. The first Federal Register Notice was published on August 11, 2011. EIA is prepared to address the comments submitted by each individual.

469

Electric power annual 1995. Volume I  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric power industry statistics at national, regional, and State levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policymakers, analysts, and the general public with data that may be used in understanding U.S. electricity markets. The Electric Power Annual is prepared by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); U.S. Department of Energy. In the private sector, the majority of the users of the Electric Power Annual are researchers and analysts and, ultimately, individuals with policy- and decisionmaking responsibilities in electric utility companies. Financial and investment institutions, economic development organizations interested in new power plant construction, special interest groups, lobbyists, electric power associations, and the news media will find data in the Electric Power Annual useful. In the public sector, users include analysts, researchers, statisticians, and other professionals with regulatory, policy, and program responsibilities for Federal, State, and local governments. The Congress and other legislative bodies may also be interested in general trends related to electricity at State and national levels. Much of the data in these reports can be used in analytic studies to evaluate new legislation. Public service commissions and other special government groups share an interest in State-level statistics. These groups can also compare the statistics for their States with those of other jurisdictions.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Xiaohan Kang School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Xiaohan Kang School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering Arizona State University.D. in Electrical Engineering Jun. 2015 (expected) Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ Advisor: Professor Lei Ying M.S. in Electrical Engineering Dec. 2012 Iowa State University, Ames, IA Advisor: Professor Lei Ying B

Zhang, Junshan

471

NAFTA opportunities: Electrical equipment and power generation  

SciTech Connect

The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) provides significant commercial opportunities in Mexico and Canada for the United States electric equipment and power generation industries, through increased goods and services exports to the Federal Electricity Commission (CFE) and through new U.S. investment in electricity generation facilities in Mexico. Canada and Mexico are the United States' two largest export markets for electrical equipment with exports of $1.53 billion and $1.51 billion, respectively, in 1992. Canadian and Mexican markets represent approximately 47 percent of total U.S. exports of electric equipment. The report presents an economic analysis of the section.

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Results of the independent verification survey at the Old Betatron Building, Granite City, Illinois  

SciTech Connect

A team from the Measurement Applications and Development Group, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), conducted an independent verification of the radiological condition of the Old Betatron Building, Granite City, Illinois, at the request of the Department of Energy in June of 1993. The building is owned by the National Steel Corporation. The contamination present resulted from the handling of uranium slabs of metal during the time the betatron facility was used to x-ray the slabs for metallurgical defects. The designation survey did not characterize the entire floor space because of obstructing equipment and debris. Therefore, prior to remediation by Bechtel National, Incorporated (BNI), a thorough characterization of the floor was conducted, and the results were immediately conveyed to on-site staff of BNI. An independent verification assessment was also performed after the cleanup activities were performed under the direction of BNI. The process of characterization, remediation, and verification was accomplished within a five-day period. Based on results of the independent verification assessment, the Old Betatron Building was determined to meet the DOE radiological guidelines for unrestricted use.

Murray, M.E.; Brown, K.S.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Monthly Flash Estimates of Electric Power Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

January 2011 January 2011 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data The contiguous United States as a whole experienced temperatures that were below normal in January 2011. Accordingly, the total population-weighted heating degree days for the United States were 4.3 percent above the January normal. Retail sales of electricity increased 1.8 percent from January 2010. Over the same period, the average U.S. retail price of electricity increased 2.9 percent. For the 12-month period ending January 2011, the average U.S. retail price of electricity increased 1.1 percent over the previous 12-month period ending January 2010. In January 2011, total electric power generation in the United States increased 0.5 percent compared to January 2010 (the change in electric power generation does not necessarily coincide with the change in retail sales of electricity

474

Joint Electrical Utilities (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Joint Electrical Utilities (Iowa) Joint Electrical Utilities (Iowa) Joint Electrical Utilities (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Iowa Utilities Board Cities may establish utilities to acquire existing electric generating facilities or distribution systems. Acquisition, in this statute, is defined as city involvement, and includes purchase, lease, construction, reconstruction, extension, remodeling, improvement, repair, and equipping of the facility. This chapter does not limit the powers or authority of

475

Cullman Electric Cooperative - Energy Conservation Loan Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cullman Electric Cooperative - Energy Conservation Loan Program Cullman Electric Cooperative - Energy Conservation Loan Program Cullman Electric Cooperative - Energy Conservation Loan Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Heat Pump Rate: not specified Energy Conservation Rate: $2,000 Program Info State Alabama Program Type Utility Loan Program Provider Cullman Electric Cooperative Cullman Electric Cooperative, a Touchstone Electric Cooperative, has two loan programs. One is the [http://www.cullmanec.com/default.aspx?id=144 Energy Conservation Loan Program], which provides members a loan for insulation or storm windows. Maximum loan is $2,000, payable up to 60

476

Verdigris Valley Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Verdigris Valley Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Verdigris Valley Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Verdigris Valley Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Oklahoma Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Room Air Conditioner: $50 Electric Water Heaters: $50 - $199 Geothermal Heat Pumps (new): $300/ton Geothermal Heat Pumps (replacement): $150/ton Air-source/Dual Fuel Heat Pumps: $150/ton Provider Verdigris Valley Electric Cooperative Verdigris Valley Electric Cooperative (VVEC) offers rebates for residential customers who purchase energy efficient home equipment. Rebates are

477

Minnesota Valley Electric Cooperative -Residential Energy Resource  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Minnesota Valley Electric Cooperative -Residential Energy Resource Minnesota Valley Electric Cooperative -Residential Energy Resource Conservation Loan Program Minnesota Valley Electric Cooperative -Residential Energy Resource Conservation Loan Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Manufacturing Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Loan Program Rebate Amount Heat Pump Installation: up to $5,000 Electric Water Heater and Installation: up to $5,000 Electric Heating Equipment: up to $5,000 Heat Pump Installation: up to $5,000 Weatherization: up to $1,500 Provider Minnesota Valley Electric Cooperative

478

Competitive Bidding Process for Electric Distribution Companies'  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Competitive Bidding Process for Electric Distribution Companies' Competitive Bidding Process for Electric Distribution Companies' Procurement of Default and Back-up Electric Generation Services (Connecticut) Competitive Bidding Process for Electric Distribution Companies' Procurement of Default and Back-up Electric Generation Services (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells

479

ELECTRIC RAILWAYS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...candidate. It is safe to say that the...education in the fundamental facts and methods...Steam-engine, boilers and dynamos...road in successful operation upon or-dinary...been in successful operation for several years...now in successful operation electric rail-ways...

W. D. Marks

1886-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

480

Electric Propulsion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...is clear. The long-t?me continuous operation is required for electric propulsion pri-marily...travel against a small voltage to the cold element. The cell thereby produces an...concentrate and focus the solar rays on a heater. Little, if any, decrease in specific...

W. E. Moeckel

1963-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "granite state electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Electricity costs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... index is used to correct for inflation. The short answer is given by the Central Electricity Generating Board's (CEGB's) 1980-81 report, paragraph 168. "The ... Generating Board's (CEGB's) 1980-81 report, paragraph 168. "The cost per kWh of fuel. . . rose by 18.6 per cent (between 1979 ...

J.W. JEFFERY

1982-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

482

electrical, engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in groundbreaking community solar project PMC-based technology products enter the market Expanding our capacity: new learning educational gaming energy-efficient data storage and computing health informatics haptic education K-12 STEM electrical energy storage thermal energy storage and conversion energy production

Zhang, Junshan

483

State and Local Clean Energy Policy Primer: Getting from Here to Clean Electricity with Policy (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Single policies do not create market transformation for a Single policies do not create market transformation for a clean energy economy in states and localities. To reap the economic, environmental, and security benefits of clean energy development, suites of policies applied in succession are often the most cost-effective way to move toward transformation. This also allows for states and localities to target the lowest cost strategies first, increasing consumer comfort with innovative clean energy technologies later on. This factsheet proposes a framework for how states and localities can build policy portfolios by first setting the stage for clean energy in the market with low cost policies, and then growing the market with successive policies until the need for financial incentives can be reduced and eventually eliminated.

484

State and Local Clean Energy Policy Primer: Getting from Here to Clean Electricity with Policy (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Single policies do not create market transformation for a Single policies do not create market transformation for a clean energy economy in states and localities. To reap the economic, environmental, and security benefits of clean energy development, suites of policies applied in succession are often the most cost-effective way to move toward transformation. This also allows for states and localities to target the lowest cost strategies first, increasing consumer comfort with innovative clean energy technologies later on. This factsheet proposes a framework for how states and localities can build policy portfolios by first setting the stage for clean energy in the market with low cost policies, and then growing the market with successive policies until the need for financial incentives can be reduced and eventually eliminated.

485

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle (EV) Insurance Regulation  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Electric Vehicle (EV) Electric Vehicle (EV) Insurance Regulation to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle (EV) Insurance Regulation on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle (EV) Insurance Regulation on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle (EV) Insurance Regulation on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle (EV) Insurance Regulation on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle (EV) Insurance Regulation on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle (EV) Insurance Regulation on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Electric Vehicle (EV) Insurance Regulation

486

Electric Power | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Power Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 95, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Electric Power projections United States Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - United States- Reference Case (xls, 260.9 KiB) Quality Metrics

487

LABORATORY II ELECTRIC FIELDS AND ELECTRIC POTENTIALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lab II - 1 LABORATORY II ELECTRIC FIELDS AND ELECTRIC POTENTIALS In this lab you will continue to investigate the abstract concept of electric field. If you know the electric field at a point in space, you). With this simulation you can construct a complicated charge configuration and read out the resulting electric field

Minnesota, University of

488

Electrical and Computer Engineering Electrical Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electrical and Computer Engineering Electrical Engineering Department Website: www.iit.edu/engineering/ece Electrical engineering is concerned with the generation, transmission, and utilization of electrical energy and with the transmitting and processing of information. Electrical engineers are involved in the analysis, design, and pro

Heller, Barbara

489

NREL: Learning - Geothermal Electricity Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electricity Production Electricity Production Photo of a geothermal power plant. This geothermal power plant generates electricity for the Imperial Valley in California. Geothermal power plants use steam produced from reservoirs of hot water found a few miles or more below the Earth's surface to produce electricity. The steam rotates a turbine that activates a generator, which produces electricity. There are three types of geothermal power plants: dry steam, flash steam, and binary cycle. Dry Steam Dry steam power plants draw from underground resources of steam. The steam is piped directly from underground wells to the power plant where it is directed into a turbine/generator unit. There are only two known underground resources of steam in the United States: The Geysers in northern California and Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming, where there's

490

Lower Granite Dam Smolt Monitoring Program, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The 2004 fish collection season at Lower Granite Dam (LGR) was characterized by above average water temperatures, below average flows and spill, low levels of debris. The number of smolts collected for all species groups (with the exception of clipped and unclipped sockeye/kokanee) exceeded all previous collection numbers. With the continued release of unclipped supplementation chinook, steelhead and sockeye above LGR, we can not accurately distinguish wild chinook, wild steelhead and wild sockeye/kokanee from hatchery reared unclipped chinook and sockeye/kokanee in the sample. Wild steelhead can be identified from hatchery steelhead by the eroded dorsal and pectoral fins exhibited on unclipped hatchery steelhead. The numbers in the wild columns beginning in 1998 include wild and unclipped hatchery origin smolts. This season a total of 11,787,539 juvenile salmonids was collected at LGR. Of these, 11,253,837 were transported to release sites below Bonneville Dam, 11,164,132 by barge and 89,705 by truck. An additional 501,395 fish were bypassed to the river due to over-capacity of the raceways and for research purposes. According to the PTAGIS database, 177,009 PIT-tagged fish were detected at LGR in 2004. Of these, 105,894 (59.8%) were bypassed through the PIT-tag diversion system, 69,130 (39.1%) were diverted to the raceways to be transported, 1,640 (0.9%) were diverted to the sample tank, sampled and then transported, 345 (0.2%) were undetected at any of the bypass, raceway or sample exit monitors.

Mensik, Fred; Rapp, Shawn; Ross Doug (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Electric power monthly, July 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended. The EPM is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on the capability of new generating units, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fossil fuels. Data on quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels lag data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, electricity sales, and average revenue per kilowatthour by 1 month. This difference in reporting appears in the US, Census division, and State level tables. However, for purposes of comparison, plant-level data are presented for the earlier month.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

E-T Global Energy, LLC E-T Global Energy, LLC OE Docket No. EA-381 Order Authorizing Electricity Exports to Mexico Order No. EA-381 June 10, 2011 I. BACKGROUND E-T Global Energy, LLC Order No. EA-381 Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated by the Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to sections 301(b) and 402(f) of the Department ofEnergy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7151(b), 7172(f)) and require authorization under section 202(e) ofthe Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C.824a(e)) 1 * On May 10,2011, DOE received an application from E-T Global Energy, LLC (E-T Global) for authority to transmit electric energy from the United States to Mexico for five years as a power marketer using existing international transmission facilities. E-

493

High Temperatures & Electricity Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High Temperatures & Electricity Demand An Assessment of Supply Adequacy in California Trends.......................................................................................................1 HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND.....................................................................................................................7 SECTION I: HIGH T