Sample records for gran vi lle

  1. LLE review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keck, R.L. (ed.)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period October-December 1991, contains articles on the analysis of argon-filled target experiments, and a theoretical analysis of the impact of nonlocal heat transport in laser filamentation in plasmas. In the Advanced Technology section there is an article on mechanisms that affect thin-film conductivity, and a report on the gain characteristics of the 20-cm SSA prototype amplifier to be used in the OMEGA Upgrade. Finally, the activities of the National Laser Users Facility and the GDL and OMEGA laser facilities are summarized. Highlights of the research reported in this issue are: argon radiation from argon-filled, polymer-shell targets is used as a core-temperature diagnostic and density diagnostic of the surrounding region in a regime where the argon line radiation is strongly absorbed. A theoretical analysis of the impact of nonlocal heat transport on laser filamentation in plasmas is developed. The resulting model is compared with experimental observations and the implications for ICF are discussed. A study of thermal conductivity in thin films seeks to identify mechanisms that result in degradation of thin-film conductivity. Identifying these mechanisms can lead to changes in the thin-film manufacture that will improve their resistance to laser damage.

  2. LLE Review 101 (October-December 2004)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shmayda, W.T., editor

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering October to December 2004, highlights the significance of shaped adiabats to inertial confinement fusion. Theory suggests that inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules compressed by shaped adiabats will exhibit improved hydrodynamic stability.

  3. LLE Review 120 (July-September 2009)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edgell, D.H., editor

    2001-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This issue has the following articles: (1) The Omega Laser Facility Users Group Workshop; (2) The Effect of Condensates and Inner Coatings on the Performance of Vacuum Hohlraum Targets; (3) Zirconia-Coated-Carbonyl-Iron-Particle-Based Magnetorheological Fluid for Polishing Optical Glasses and Ceramics; (4) All-Fiber Optical Magnetic Field Sensor Based on Faraday Rotation in Highly Terbium Doped Fiber; (5) Femtosecond Optical Pump-Probe Characterization of High-Pressure-Grown Al{sub 0.86}Ga{sub 0.14}N Single Crystals; (6) LLE's Summer High School Research Program; (7) Laser Facility Report; and (8) National Laser Users Facility and External Users Programs.

  4. LLE Review 117 (October-December 2008)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bittle, W., editor

    2009-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering October-December 2008, features 'Demonstration of the Shock-Timing Technique for Ignition Targets at the National Ignition Facility' by T. R. Boehly, V. N. Goncharov, S. X. Hu, J. A. Marozas, T. C. Sangster, D. D. Meyerhofer (LLE), D. Munro, P. M. Celliers, D. G. Hicks, G. W. Collins, H. F. Robey, O. L. Landen (LLNL), and R. E. Olson (SNL). In this article (p. 1) the authors report on a technique to measure the velocity and timing of shock waves in a capsule contained within hohlraum targets. This technique is critical for optimizing the drive profiles for high-performance inertial-confinement-fusion capsules, which are compressed by multiple precisely timed shock waves. The shock-timing technique was demonstrated on OMEGA using surrogate hohlraum targets heated to 180 eV and fitted with a re-entrant cone and quartz window to facilitate velocity measurements using velocity interferometry. Cryogenic experiments using targets filled with liquid deuterium further demonstrated the entire timing technique in a hohlraum environment. Direct-drive cryogenic targets with multiple spherical shocks were also used to validate this technique, including convergence effects at relevant pressures (velocities) and sizes. These results provide confidence that shock velocity and timing can be measured in NIF ignition targets, thereby optimizing these critical parameters.

  5. LLE Review 116 (July-September 2008)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marozas, J.A., editor

    2010-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This issue has the following articles: (1) Optimizing Electron-Positron Pair Production on kJ-Class High-Intensity Lasers for the Purpose of Pair-Plasma Creation; (2) Neutron Yield Study of Direct-Drive, Low-Adiabat Cryogenic D2 Implosions on OMEGA; (3) Al 1s-2p Absorption Spectroscopy of Shock-Wave Heating and Compression in Laser-Driven Planar Foil; (4) A Measurable Lawson Criterion and Hydro-Equivalent Curves for Inertial Confinement Fusion; (5) Pulsed-THz Characterization of Hg-Based, High-Temperature Superconductors; (6) LLE's Summer High School Research Program; (7) FY08 Laser Facility Report; and (8) National Laser Users Facility and External Users Programs.

  6. LLE (Laboratory for Laser Energetics) review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumpan, S.A. (ed.)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period April--June 1990, contains articles in two main sections, Progress in Laser Fusion and Advanced Technology Developments. The first article presents the theoretical interpretation of the glass-ablator cryogenic-implosion experiments recently conducted on OMEGA. It is followed by an article describing the analysis of neutron time-of-flight data taken during DT and DD experiments; and a discussion of the improvements to laser diagnostics that now provide for precise control of the OMEGA laser is given. This paper contains a report on the development of transparent conductive coatings for KDP crystals, and a discussion of the study of the transient-surface Debye-Waller effect in materials irradiated with an ultrafast laser.

  7. LLE 2008 annual report, October 2007 - September 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2009-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The research program at the University of Rochester’s Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) focuses on inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research supporting the goal of achieving ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This program includes the full use of the OMEGA EP Laser System. Within the National Ignition Campaign (NIC), LLE is the lead laboratory for the validation of the performance of cryogenic target implosions, essential to all forms of ICF ignition. LLE has taken responsibility for a number of critical elements within the Integrated Experimental Teams (IET’s) supporting the demonstration of indirect-drive ignition on the NIF and is the lead laboratory for the validation of the polardrive approach to ignition on the NIF. LLE is also developing, testing, and building a number of diagnostics to be deployed on the NIF for the NIC.

  8. aunapuu lle pechter: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    USerS groUp WorkShop LLE Review, Volume 124 205 The Second Omega, with significant NNSA support already allocated for studentpostdoctoral travel expenses. 12;The Second...

  9. LLE Review 98 (January-March 2004)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goncharov, V.N.

    2004-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering January-March 2004, features ''Performance of 1-THz-Bandwidth, 2-D Smoothing by Spectral Dispersion and Polarization Smoothing of High-Power, Solid-State Laser Beams'', by S. P. Regan, J. A. Marozas, R. S. Craxton, J. H. Kelly, W. R. Donaldson, P. A. Jaanimagi, D. Jacobs-Perkins, R. L. Keck, T. J. Kessler, D. D. Meyerhofer, T. C. Sangster, W. Seka, V.A. Smalyuk, S. Skupsky, and J. D. Zuegel (p. 49). Laser-beam smoothing achieved with 1-THz-bandwidth, two-dimensional smoothing by spectral dispersion and polarization smoothing on the 60-beam, 30-kJ, 351-nm OMEGA laser system is reported. These beam-smoothing techniques are directly applicable to direct-drive ignition target designs for the 192-beam, 1.8-MJ, 351-nm National Ignition Facility. Equivalent-target-plane images for constant-intensity laser pulses of varying duration were used to determine the smoothing. The properties of the phase plates, frequency modulators, and birefringent wedges were simulated and found to be in good agreement with the measurements.

  10. LLE 2009 annual report, October 2008-September 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fiscal year ending September 2009 (FY2009) concluded the second year of the third five-year renewal of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC52-08NA28302 with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This annual report summarizes progress in inertial fusion research at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) during the past fiscal year. It also reports on LLE’s progress on laboratory basic science research; laser, optical materials, and advanced technology development; operation of OMEGA and OMEGA EP for the National Laser Users’ Facility (NLUF), and other external users; and programs focusing on the education of high school, undergraduate, and graduate students during the year.

  11. LLE 2004 annual report, October 2003-September 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes research at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) conducted during the year, operation of the National Laser Users’ Facility (NLUF), a status report of the new OMEGA Extended Performance (EP) laser project, and programs concerning the education of high school, undergraduate, and graduate students during the year.

  12. LLE 2010 Annual Report October 2009 - September 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fiscal year ending September 2010 (FY10) concluded the third year of the third five-year renewal of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC52-08NA28302 with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This annual report summarizes progress in inertial fusion research at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) during the past fiscal year including work on the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). It also reports on LLE's progress on laboratory basic science research; laser, optical materials, and advanced technology development; operation of OMEGA and OMEGA EP for the NIC and high-energy density (HED) campaigns, the National Laser Users Facility (NLUF), and for other external users; and programs focusing on the education of high school, undergraduate, and graduate students during the year.

  13. LLE 2007 Annual Report, October 2006 – September 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The laser-fusion research program at the University of Rochester’s Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) is focused on the National Nuclear Security Administration’s (NNSA’s) Campaign-10 inertial confinement fusion (ICF) ignition and experimental support technology, operation of facilities (OMEGA), and the construction of OMEGA EP—a high energy petawatt laser system. While LLE is the lead laboratory for research into the direct-drive approach to ICF ignition, it also takes a lead role in certain indirect-drive tasks within the National Ignition Campaign. During this past year progress in the laser-fusion research program was made in three principal areas: OMEGA direct drive and indirect-drive experiments and targets; development of diagnostics for experiments on OMEGA, OMEGA EP, and the National Ignition Facility (NIF); and theoretical analysis and design efforts aimed at improving direct-drive-ignition capsule designs and advanced ignition concepts such as fast ignition and shock ignition.

  14. LLE 1997. Annual report, October 1996--September 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fiscal year ending September 1997 (FY97) concluded the fifth year of the cooperative agreement (DE-FC03-92SF19460) with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This report summarizes research at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) and is the final report for the first five years of the cooperative agreement. In September 1997, the cooperative agreement was renewed for an additional five years. We summarize our research during FY97, the operation of the National Laser Users` Facility (NLUF), and the education of high school, undergraduate, and graduate students in LLE programs. A general introduction to LLE`s experimental physics program and a report on recent results are found on pp. 161-167. This article includes a useful summary of the system`s operational capabilities and system parameters after three years of operation. Direct-drive inertial confinement fusion requires precise drive uniformity, the control of hydrodynamic instabilities during the implosion of the fusion target, and accurate target fabrication and characterization. The article summarizes a wide variety of experiments relating to direct-drive laser fusion, from high-yield implosion experiments to planar and spherical Rayleigh-Taylor experiments, laser-imprinting experiments, and laser-plasma interaction experiments. A detailed analysis of the equation of motion for an electron in a plane wave is presented beginning on p. 24. A guiding center model is postulated and compared to numerical simulation of the actual particle motion. The formula is also verified analytically using the method of multiple scales. Work continues on this formalism to study the effects of the pondermotive force on laser-plasma interactions. A theoretical calculation of the dephasing time of an electron accelerated by a laser pulse is found on pp. 92-100. The trajectory of a charged particle, determined analytically for various pulse shapes, is then used to determine the dephasing time of an accelerated particle.

  15. LLE review: Quarterly report, April--June 1992. Volume 51

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Short, R.W. [ed.

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period April--June 1992, contains articles on laser-plasma interaction experiments in long-scale-length plasmas and on the theory of a new form of the stimulated Brillouin scattering instabilitity. The advanced technology section includes reports on the optical response of superconducting films, the development of high-reflectance transport mirrors for the OMEGA Upgrade, and a new high-brightness mono-mode laser oscillator. Finally, the activities of the National Laser Users Facility and the GDL and OMEGA laser systems are summarized.

  16. LLE review quarterly report, July--September 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaanimagi, P.A. (ed.)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume of the LLE Review, contains articles describing the results of imploding-target burnthrough experiments using smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD), and a practical nonlocal model for electron transport in laser plasmas. The section on advanced technology includes a report on explosion fraction measurements of water-cooled xenon flashlamps, results on perfluorinated copolymer coatings for high-power laser applications, and a time-resolved study of surface disordering of Pb(110). A brief report reviewing the projects from the high school summer student program is also included. Finally, the activities of the National Laser Users Facility and the GDL and OMEGA laser facilities are summarized.

  17. LLE review quarterly report, July--September 1991. Volume 48

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaanimagi, P.A. [ed.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume of the LLE Review, contains articles describing the results of imploding-target burnthrough experiments using smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD), and a practical nonlocal model for electron transport in laser plasmas. The section on advanced technology includes a report on explosion fraction measurements of water-cooled xenon flashlamps, results on perfluorinated copolymer coatings for high-power laser applications, and a time-resolved study of surface disordering of Pb(110). A brief report reviewing the projects from the high school summer student program is also included. Finally, the activities of the National Laser Users Facility and the GDL and OMEGA laser facilities are summarized.

  18. LLE Review quarterly report, January--March 1995. Volume 62

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume of the LLE review, covering the period of January-March 1995, contains articles on the evaluation of the mechanism for laser damage in OMEGA UV multilayer coatings using a combination of conventional laser-damage characterization methods and atomic force microscopy; a dual-amplitude, fiber-coupled waveguide integrated-optic modulation device for generating temporally shaped optical pulses in OMEGA-, a proposal for modifying the indirect-drive irradiation geometry of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to provide the additional flexibility for performing direct-drive experiments; direct measurements of terminal-level lifetime in several different Nd:YLF laser media; an overview of the materials science issues, basic mechanisms, and potential device applications for light-emitting porous silicon; and a study of the time-dependent reflection and surface temperatures for laser-irradiated dental hard tissue at two CO{sub 2} laser wavelengths.

  19. LLE Review. Volume 68, July--September 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period of July-September 1996, includes a description of an important experiment carried out on OMEGA by researchers from LANL, LLNL, and LLE to demonstrate the feasibility of using OMEGA for indirect drive. Additional topics include tetrahedral hohlraums, the speckle properties of phase- converted laser beams, design criteria for SSD phase modulators, and the design of slab amplifiers. Highlights of the research presented in this issue are (1) Results from the proof-of-principle indirect- drive experiments in which up to 40 OMEGA beams were used to irradiate cylindrical hohlraums. Nova results were reproduced, and new capabilities not available on other lasers were demonstrated. (2) A discussion of tetrahedral hohlraums (spherical hohlraums with four laser entrance holes) as a means of achieving better capsule irradiation uniformity. Tetrahedral hohlraums also allow the use of all 60 OMEGA beams and may provide an alternate route to ignition on the NIF. (3) An analysis of the residual target irradiation nonuniformity due to the fine laser speckle remaining on the beam after being phase converted by the DPP`s. A model shows how a uniformly ablating plasma atmosphere reduces the speckle contribution to the effective time-averaged irradiation nonuniformity. (4) A discussion of the theory, design, manufacture, testing, and implementation of the microwave SSD phase modulators used on OMEGA for two-dimensional SSD. The modulators are capable of operating in the gigahertz frequency range. (5) A discussion of the design and performance of a large-aperture, high-gain Nd:glass zig-zag slab amplifier for materials testing. The design incorporates improvements from previous work in addition to improvements obtained from careful design choices guided by analytic calculations.

  20. LLE review. Quarterly report, July 1997--September 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period July--September 1997, begins with a general introduction to LLE`s experimental physics program and a report on recent results. This article includes a useful summary of the system`s operational capabilities and system parameters. Other highlights of the wide variety of research presented in this issue are: a promising method to directly observe the cold compressed shell of an imploding target. The shell is normally observed by backlighting. The proposal described here is to use a high-Z dopant that fluoresces under radiation from the hot core in the K{alpha} line. A study of the instabilities associated with near-forward stimulated Brillouin scattering. It includes a calculation of the saturation times and steady-state gain exponents. A successful program of pulse shaping for the OMEGA laser system. Examples of a variety of pulse shapes that can be programmed are presented. A description of the angular-scattering characteristics of ferroelectric liquid crystal electro-optical devices operating in transient and extended scattering modes. The possibility of applying these devices as modulators in practical IR imaging systems is evaluated. A faster method of shaping and finishing IR materials by the use of magnetorheological fluids. Detailed specifications and test results are included. An integrated circuit tester based on interferometric imaging. This technique holds promise of ultrafast noninvasive testing of the voltage states of sections of microchips. Continued success of the Laboratory`s High School Summer Research Program. The program, which started in 1989, has brought several dozen young people into intimate contact with modern science and technology. The volume concludes with a Laser Facility Report and the National Laser Users` Facility News.

  1. LLE 1995 annual report, October 1994--September 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fiscal year ending September 1995 (FY95) concluded the third year of the cooperative agreement (DE-FC03-92SF19460) with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This report summarizes research at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) and reports on the successful completion of the OMEGA Upgrade. Previous annual reports describe the OMEGA Upgrade design. The preliminary design for the system was complete in October 1989 and the detailed design started in October 1990. The original 24-beam OMEGA system was decommissioned in December 1992 as construction for the OMEGA Upgrade began. We discuss the initial performance results (p. 99) of the upgraded OMEGA laser system. All acceptance tests were completed, and we demonstrated that all 60 beams can irradiate a target with more energy and better beam balance than was required by DOE`s acceptance criteria. We are most proud that all program milestones were met or exceeded, and that the system was completed on time and on budget.

  2. LLE review. Quarterly report, October--December 1991: Volume 49

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keck, R.L. [ed.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period October-December 1991, contains articles on the analysis of argon-filled target experiments, and a theoretical analysis of the impact of nonlocal heat transport in laser filamentation in plasmas. In the Advanced Technology section there is an article on mechanisms that affect thin-film conductivity, and a report on the gain characteristics of the 20-cm SSA prototype amplifier to be used in the OMEGA Upgrade. Finally, the activities of the National Laser Users Facility and the GDL and OMEGA laser facilities are summarized. Highlights of the research reported in this issue are: argon radiation from argon-filled, polymer-shell targets is used as a core-temperature diagnostic and density diagnostic of the surrounding region in a regime where the argon line radiation is strongly absorbed. A theoretical analysis of the impact of nonlocal heat transport on laser filamentation in plasmas is developed. The resulting model is compared with experimental observations and the implications for ICF are discussed. A study of thermal conductivity in thin films seeks to identify mechanisms that result in degradation of thin-film conductivity. Identifying these mechanisms can lead to changes in the thin-film manufacture that will improve their resistance to laser damage.

  3. LLE Review Quarterly Report July-September 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering July-September 2000, begins with an article by T. R. Boehly, V. N. Goncharov, O. Gotchev, J. P. Knauer, D. D. Meyerhofer, D. Oron, S. P. Regan, Y. Srebro, W. Seka, D. Shvarts, S. Skupsky, and V.A. Smalyuk, who describe measurements of the effect of beam smoothing and pulse shape on imprinting. (Imprinting is defined as the imposition of pressure perturbations on the target by spatial variations in the laser intensity.) A principal result is the observation of reduced levels of imprint with the higher beam smoothing afforded by 1-THz smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD). Additional highlights of research presented in this issue are: (1) P. W. McKenty, V. N. Goncharov, R. P. J. Town, S. Skupsky, R. Betti, and R. L. McCrory describe calculations of directly driven ignition capsule performance on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The authors detail how the various contributors to implosion disruption (laser imprint, power imbalance, and target roughness) affect target performance and final gain. The conclusions are obtained by examining the simulated target evolution with the two-dimensional hydrodynamics computer code ORCHID. (2) D. D. Meyerhofer, J. A. Delettrez, R. Epstein, V. Yu. Glebov, V. N. Goncharov, R. L. Keck, R. L. McCrory, P. W. McKenty, F. J. Marshall, P. B. Radha, S. P. Regan, S. Roberts, W. Seka, S. Skupsky, V. A. Smalyuk, C. Sorce, C. Stoeckl, J. M. Soures, R. P. J. Town, B. Yaakobi, J. D. Zuegel, J. Frenje, C. K. L1,R. D. Petrasso, F. Seguin, K. Fletcher, S. Padalino, C. Freeman, N. Izumi, R. Lerche, T. W. Phillips, and T. C. Sangster describe the results of a series of direct-drive implosions of gas-fusion-fuel-filled plastic shells performed on the OMEGA laser system. The experiments include those performed with 1-THZ SSD and high-quality power balance. (3) V. Yu. Glebov, D. D. Meyerhofer, C. Stoeckl, and J. D. Zuegel describe the technique of measuring secondary neutron yield (DT neutron yield from D{sub 2}-filled targets) using current-mode detectors (i.e., many detection events per unit time interval). They show that current-mode detectors can be configured to survey a much larger dynamic range than single-event neutron counters. (4) V. A. Smalyuk, T. R. Boehly, L. S. Iwan, T. J. Kessler, J. P. Knauer, F. J. Marshall, D. D. Meyerhofer, C. Stoeckl, B. Yaakobi, and D. K. Bradley detail a method of measuring the positional dependence of x-ray self-absorption with filtered x-ray framing cameras. They show how compressed shell nonuniformities can be measured by carefully modeling the imaging system. This volume concludes with the LLE's Summer High School Research Program, the FY00 Laser Facility Report, and the National Laser Users' Facility News.

  4. LLE Review quarterly report July--September 1993. Volume 56

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hutchison, R.J. [ed.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period July--September 1993, contains articles on self-focusing of broad-bandwidth laser light with angular dispersion, laser patterning of thin-film circuits, and construction of foam-shell fusion targets. Reports on the detailed designs of major subsystems of the OMEGA Upgrade and on the continuing activation of the upgraded Glass Development Laser system are summarized. Descriptions of research proposals for NLUF are also included in this issue. Highlights of the research reported in this issue are: Previous investigations of self-focusing behavior of broad-bandwidth laser light without angular dispersion showed only slight differences when compared to laser light with angular dispersion. A new, numerical investigation of self-focusing with applied angular dispersion shows the development of transverse amplitude modulation, which can act to enhance or impede instantaneous self-focusing. Averaging over one period of phase modulation with imposed bandwidth shows consistent smoothing of the beam, nearly replicating the original spatial profile, including smoothing of induced perturbations due to laser-system imperfections. A continuous-wave argon-ion laser beam is focused onto a Y-Ba-Cu-O thin-film circuit. The laser beam selectively heats the epitaxy, which enriches oxygen in irradiated regions alongside depleted regions. Oxygen enrichment results in the formation of superconducting regions, while oxygen depletion results in semiconducting regions. This maskless operation yields applications in microbridges,coplanar transmisson lines, field-effect transistors, and photoconductive switches. One technique to form thick fusion fuel layers is to use a low-density polymer or aerosol foam matrix to hold the liquid DT. This issue summarizes the results of a collaborative experiment conducted at the Institute for Laser Engineering (ILE) to fabricate foam-shell targets with plastic-layer overcoats.

  5. Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY The Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS experimental halls, near a highway tunnel in close proximity with hydric basin), safety and environmental improvement of the environmental performances, a necessary condition for a "sustainable development". Specific

  6. Improving GC-PPC-SAFT equation of state for LLE of hydrocarbons and oxygenated compounds with water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Improving GC-PPC-SAFT equation of state for LLE of hydrocarbons and oxygenated compounds by applying cubic equations of state (EoS) with conventional mixing and combining rules is not appropriate[3 (e.g. hydrocarbons, cyclohexanone, 1-butanol, surfactants, etc) LLE has been reported by some authors

  7. ICF Program StatusSNL Z Facility UR/LLE OMEGA Presented to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ICF Program StatusSNL Z Facility UR/LLE OMEGA Presented to: Fusion Power Associates Annual Meeting on planned path · High energy density physics is recognized as an important and emerging scientific field · NAS, OSTP reports · Budget outlook remains tight · FY2006 appropriation · Outyear plans #12

  8. The Gran Sasso Laboratory and Neutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bettini, Alessandro [University of Padua-G. Galilei Physics Department- and INFN. Via Marzolo 8 35131 Padova (Italy); Laboratorio Subterraneo de Canfranc. Canfranc, Huesca (Spain)

    2008-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    After a brief survey of the experimental programme of the INFN Gran Sasso National Laboratory, I summarize the status of neutrino physics. I then focus on two frontier challenges. 1. The possible solution of the mass spectrum hierarchy problem with the observation of neutrinos from a supernova explosion; 2. The establishment of the nature of neutrinos, whether they are Dirac or Majorana particles, with neutrino-less double-beta decay.

  9. Gran Valle Qu mica | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/Exploration <GlacialGolden SpreadGomtiofGraham CountyGran

  10. LLE 1998 annual report, October 1997--September 1998. Inertial fusion program and National Laser Users` Facility program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes research at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE), the operation of the National Laser Users` Facility (NLUF), and programs involving the education of high school, undergraduate, and graduate students for FY98. Research summaries cover: progress in laser fusion; diagnostic development; laser and optical technology; and advanced technology for laser targets.

  11. LLE Quarterly Report (July-September 1999)[Library for Laser Energetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2000-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period July-September 1999, features a theoretical analysis of a process that generates mass perturbations of an imploding target driven by modulated laser illumination. The process, referred to as laser imprint, impacts the integrity of the shell during direct-drive implosions, potentially quenching target performance. In this article V. N. Goncharov, J. A. Delettrez, S. Skupsky, and R. P. J. Town present a model of the generation of mass perturbations and analyze the mass perturbation growth due to nonuniform ablation pressure. Stabilizing mechanisms of thermal conduction smoothing and mass ablation are shown to suppress the acceleration perturbation, and mass ablation is also shown to impact velocity perturbations. The model predicts that a direct-drive cryogenic NIF target will remain intact during the implosion when l-Thz SSD beam smoothing is used.

  12. VI-1 PAPERS PUBLISHED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    148030ENAS%206038.pdf. A new detection system for very low-energy protons from -delayed p-decay, A. Spiridon, Proceedings of VI European Summer School on Experimental...

  13. LABORATORY VI ELECTRICITY FROM MAGNETISM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    LABORATORY VI ELECTRICITY FROM MAGNETISM Lab VI - 1 In the previous problems you explored by electric currents. This lab will carry that investigation one step further, determining how changing magnetic fields can give rise to electric currents. This is the effect that allows the generation

  14. LABORATORY VI ELECTRICITY FROM MAGNETISM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    LABORATORY VI ELECTRICITY FROM MAGNETISM Lab VI - 1 In the previous problems you explored the magnetic field and its effect on moving charges. You also saw how electric currents could create magnetic can give rise to electric currents. This is the effect that allows the generation of electricity

  15. CERN Neutrinos to Gran Sasso (CNGS) First Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gschwendtner, E

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CNGS, CERN Neutrinos to Gran Sasso project, aims at directly detecting muon-neutrino to tau-neutrino oscillations. An intense muon-neutrino beam (10 to the 17 muon neutrinos)is generated at CERN per day and directed towards the Gran Sasso National Laboratory, LNGS, in Italy, 732 km away from CERN. In LNGS large and complex detectors will allow to detect, in particular, the rare tau-neutrinos created by â??oscillation' from muon-neutrinos on their way between CERN and LNGS. On average around three tau-neutrino events are predicted per year in each of the ~2000 ton detectors. The construction of the CNGS beam facility started in September 2000, and the first neutrino beam has been produced in July 2006. In the presently approved physics programme, it is foreseen to run the facility for five years.

  16. Mor-Gran-Sou Electric Coop Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu anMicrogreenMoon Lake Electric Assn Inc (Utah) JumpMor-Gran-Sou

  17. Uranium(VI) Diffusion in Low-Permeability Subsurface Materials...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Uranium(VI) Diffusion in Low-Permeability Subsurface Materials. Uranium(VI) Diffusion in Low-Permeability Subsurface Materials. Abstract: Uranium(VI) diffusion was investigated in...

  18. Chapter VI Conclusion and Suggestions Chapter VIChapter VIChapter VIChapter VI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    design for low cost, short range, low data rate and dense WSN application. Because of its low-cost are presented for future works. VI.1 Conclusion This work is an attempt toward low-power mm-wave transceiver of the fabricated LNA showed that this noise model can describe the noise behaviour of the transistors with good

  19. Title VI | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you sure you wantJoin us for|Idahothe New Funding Constructs forofDOETipsVI

  20. LABORATORY VI ENERGY AND THERMAL PROCESSES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    LABORATORY VI ENERGY AND THERMAL PROCESSES Lab VI - 1 The change of the internal energy of a system temperature. In this lab you will concentrate on quantifying the changes in internal energy within the framework of conservation of energy. In the problems of this lab, you will master the relation

  1. STRUCTURE AND EMPLACEMENT MECHANISMS OF THE ROQUE NUBLO DEBRIS AVALANCHE, GRAN CANARIA (CANARY ISLANDS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belousov, Alexander

    STRUCTURE AND EMPLACEMENT MECHANISMS OF THE ROQUE NUBLO DEBRIS AVALANCHE, GRAN CANARIA (CANARY ISLANDS) Alexander Belousov (1,2), Marina Belousova (1) and Hans-Ulrich Schmincke(2) (1) - Institute

  2. Determining Individual Mineral Contributions To U(VI) Adsorption...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Individual Mineral Contributions To U(VI) Adsorption In A Contaminated Aquifer Sediment: A Fluorescence Spectroscopy Determining Individual Mineral Contributions To U(VI)...

  3. VI Congreso de CEISAL: Independencias Dependencias Interdependencias

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 VI Congreso de CEISAL: Independencias ­ Dependencias ­ Interdependencias Toulouse, 30 de Junio al avances del bloque hacia la integración. Esa tendencia no se contradice con la existencia de determinados

  4. Results on Dark Matter and beta beta decay modes by DAMA at Gran Sasso

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Bernabei

    2007-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    DAMA is an observatory for rare processes and it is operative deep underground at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory of the I.N.F.N. (LNGS). Here some arguments will be presented on the investigation on dark matter particles by annual modulation signature and on some of the realized double beta decay searches.

  5. Downstream variations in the width of bedrock channels David R. Montgomery and Karen B. Gran

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montgomery, David R.

    Downstream variations in the width of bedrock channels David R. Montgomery and Karen B. Gran the Mokelumne River show that bedrock channel width decreases substantially downstream at the contact between show systematic channel widening after flood flows and debris flow impacts. We conclude that downstream

  6. X-RAYING THE INTERGALACTIC O VI ABSORBERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Y.

    The observed intergalactic O vi absorbers at z > 0 have been regarded as a significant reservoir of the “missing

  7. April 22, 2010 Seismic Reflection VI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ito, Garrett

    4/21/2010 1 GG450 April 22, 2010 Seismic Reflection VI Data Interpretation II Today's material section Chrono- stratigraphic section Relations of strata to boundaries of a depositional sequence Seismic stratigraphic reflection terminations within an idealized seismic sequence Reflection configurations #12

  8. FINAL DRAFT VI. Application 3: Recruitment Prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Tom

    FINAL DRAFT 106 VI. Application 3: Recruitment Prediction Contributors: S. Sarah Hinckley, Bernard Megrey, Thomas Miller Definition What do we mean by recruitment prediction? The first thing to consider in defining this term is the time horizon of the prediction. Short-term predictions mean the use of individual

  9. NUREG/CR-6911 Tests of Uranium (VI) Adsorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NUREG/CR-6911 Tests of Uranium (VI) Adsorption Models in a Field Setting U.S. Geological Survey U/CR-6911 Tests of Uranium (VI) Adsorption Models in a Field Setting Manuscript Completed: August 2006 Date observations clearly demonstrated that in aquifers where U(VI) concentrations are controlled by adsorption

  10. U(VI) reduction to mononuclear U(VI) by desulfitobacterium spp.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fletcher, K. E.; Boyanov, M. I.; Thomas, S. H.; Wu, Q.; Kemner, K. M.; Loffler, F. E. (Biosciences Division); (Georgia Inst. of Tech.)

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The bioreduction of U(VI) to U(IV) affects uranium mobility and fate in contaminated subsurface environments and is best understood in Gram-negative model organisms such as Geobacter and Shewanella spp. This study demonstrates that U(VI) reduction is a common trait of Gram-positive Desulfitobacterium spp. Five different Desulfitobacterium isolates reduced 100 {mu}M U(VI) to U(IV) in <10 days, whereas U(VI) remained soluble in abiotic and heat-killed controls. U(VI) reduction in live cultures was confirmed using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) analysis. Interestingly, although bioreduction of U(VI) is almost always reported to yield the uraninite mineral (UO{sub 2}), extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis demonstrated that the U(IV) produced in the Desulfitobacterium cultures was not UO{sub 2}. The EXAFS data indicated that the U(IV) product was a phase or mineral composed of mononuclear U(IV) atoms closely surrounded by light element shells. This atomic arrangement likely results from inner-sphere bonds between U(IV) and C/N/O- or P/S-containing ligands, such as carbonate or phosphate. The formation of a distinct U(IV) phase warrants further study because the characteristics of the reduced material affect uranium stability and fate in the contaminated subsurface.

  11. Characterization of uranium(VI) in seawater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Djogic, R.; Sipos, L.; Branica, M.

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The physicochemical characterization of uranium(VI) in seawater is described on the basis of species distribution calculations and experiments using polarography and spectrophotometry in artificial seawater at elevated uranium concentrations. Various dissolved uranium(VI) species are identified under different conditions of pH and carbonate concentration. Below pH 4, the hydrated uranyl ion is present in the free state (forming labile complexes). Above pH 4, a stepwise coordination of uranyl by the carbonate ion occurs. The monocarbonate complex is formed in the pH range 4-5, the bicarbonate uranyl complex between 5 and 6. Above pH 8, uranium is present predominately as the tricarbonate and to a smaller extent as a trihydroxide complex. There is satisfactory agreement between our experiments and the theoretically computed distribution of uranium(VI) in seawater based on published stability constants. The experiments done at higher concentrations are justified by theoretical distributions showing that there is no great difference in species distribution between the uranium at concentrations of 10/sup -4/ and /sup -8/ mol dm/sup -3/.

  12. Microbial Reduction of Intragrain U(VI) in Contaminated Sediment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Chongxuan; Zachara, John M.; Zhong, Lirong; Heald, Steve M.; Wang, Zheming; Jeon, Byong Hun; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The accessibility of precipitated, intragrain U(VI) in a contaminated sediment to microbial reduction was investigated to ascertain geochemical and microscopic transport phenomena controlling U(VI) bioavailability. The sediment was collected from the US DOE Hanford site, and contained uranyl precipitates in a form of Na-boltwoodite within the mm-sized granitic lithic fragments in the sediment. Microbial reduction was investigated in a culture of a dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium (DMRB), Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1, in bicarbonate solutions at pH 6.8 buffered by PIPES. Measurements of uranium concentration, speciation, and valence in aqueous and solid phases indicated that microbial reduction of intragrain U(VI) proceeded by two mechanisms: 1) sequentially coupled dissolution of intragrain uranyl precipitates, diffusion of dissolved U(VI) out of intragrain regions, and microbial reduction of dissolved U(VI); and 2) U(VI) reduction in the intragrain regions by soluble, diffusible biogenic reductants. The bioreduction rate in the first pathway was over 3 orders of magnitude slower than that in comparable aqueous solutions containing aqueous U(VI) only. The slower bioreduction rate was attributed to: 1) the release of calcium from the desorption/dissolution of calcium-containing minerals in the sediment, which subsequently altered U(VI) aqueous speciation and slowed U(VI) bioreduction and 2) alternative electron transfer pathways that reduced U(VI) in the intragrain regions and changed its dissolution and solubility behavior. The results implied that the overall rate of microbial reduction of intragrain U(VI) will be influenced by the reactive mass transfer of U(VI) and biogenic reductants within intragrain regions, and geochemical reactions controlling major ion concentrations that affect U(VI) aqueous speciation and microbial activity.

  13. Operation and performance of the ICARUS-T600 cryogenic plant at Gran Sasso underground Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Antonello; P. Aprili; B. Baibussinov; F. Boffelli; A. Bubak; E. Calligarich; N. Canci; S. Centro; A. Cesana; K. Cie?lik; D. B. Cline; A. G. Cocco; A. Dabrowski; A. Dermenev; J. M. Disdier; A. Falcone; C. Farnese; A. Fava; A. Ferrari; D. Gibin; S. Gninenko; A. Guglielmi; M. Haranczyk; J. Holeczek; A. Ivashkin; M. Kirsanov; J. Kisiel; I. Kochanek; J. Lagoda; S. Mania; A. Menegolli; G. Meng; C. Montanari; S. Otwinowski; P. Picchi; F. Pietropaolo; P. Plonski; A. Rappoldi; G. L. Raselli; M. Rossella; C. Rubbia; P. R. Sala; A. Scaramelli; E. Segreto; F. Sergiampietri; D. Stefan; R. Sulej; M. Szarska; M. Terrani; M. Torti; F. Varanini; S. Ventura; C. Vignoli; H. G. Wang; X. Yang; A. Zalewska; A. Zani; K. Zaremba

    2015-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    ICARUS T600 liquid argon time projection chamber is the first large mass electronic detector of a new generation able to combine the imaging capabilities of the old bubble chambers with the excellent calorimetric energy measurement. After the three months demonstration run on surface in Pavia during 2001, the T600 cryogenic plant was significantly revised, in terms of reliability and safety, in view of its long-term operation in an underground environment. The T600 detector was activated in Hall B of the INFN Gran Sasso Laboratory during Spring 2010, where it was operated without interruption for about three years, taking data exposed to the CERN to Gran Sasso long baseline neutrino beam and cosmic rays. In this paper the T600 cryogenic plant is described in detail together with the commissioning procedures that lead to the successful operation of the detector shortly after the end of the filling with liquid Argon. Overall plant performance and stability during the long-term underground operation are discussed. Finally, the decommissioning procedures, carried out about six months after the end of the CNGS neutrino beam operation, are reported.

  14. Air quality VI details environmental progress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A report is given of the International Conference on Air Quality VI where key topics discussed were control of mercury, trace elements, sulphur trioxide and particulates. This year a separate track was added on greenhouse gas reduction, with panels on greenhouse gas policy and markets, CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration, and monitoring, mitigation and verification. In keynote remarks, NETL Director Carl Bauer noted that emissions have gone down since 1990 even though coal consumption has increased. The conference provided an overview of the state-of-the-science regarding key pollutants and CO{sub 2}, the corresponding regulatory environment, and the technology readiness of mitigation techniques. 1 photo.

  15. Flyer, Title VI | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 RussianBy: Thomas P. D'Agostino, Undersecretary forCITI Briefing.pdfTitles VI and

  16. Microsoft Word - FeVI.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE SWPAURTeC:8CO6 Figure 1. Proposed Fe(VI)-nitrido

  17. Blue Canyon VI | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,Belcher HomesLyonsBirchBlockVI Jump to: navigation,

  18. DarkStar VI | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE Facility Database Data and Resources11-DNADalyDanishDarajatDarien,DarkStar VI

  19. KENO-VI Primer: A Primer for Criticality Calculations with SCALE/KENO-VI Using GeeWiz

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowman, Stephen M [ORNL

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The SCALE (Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation) computer software system developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is widely used and accepted around the world for criticality safety analyses. The well-known KENO-VI three-dimensional Monte Carlo criticality computer code is one of the primary criticality safety analysis tools in SCALE. The KENO-VI primer is designed to help a new user understand and use the SCALE/KENO-VI Monte Carlo code for nuclear criticality safety analyses. It assumes that the user has a college education in a technical field. There is no assumption of familiarity with Monte Carlo codes in general or with SCALE/KENO-VI in particular. The primer is designed to teach by example, with each example illustrating two or three features of SCALE/KENO-VI that are useful in criticality analyses. The primer is based on SCALE 6, which includes the Graphically Enhanced Editing Wizard (GeeWiz) Windows user interface. Each example uses GeeWiz to provide the framework for preparing input data and viewing output results. Starting with a Quickstart section, the primer gives an overview of the basic requirements for SCALE/KENO-VI input and allows the user to quickly run a simple criticality problem with SCALE/KENO-VI. The sections that follow Quickstart include a list of basic objectives at the beginning that identifies the goal of the section and the individual SCALE/KENO-VI features that are covered in detail in the sample problems in that section. Upon completion of the primer, a new user should be comfortable using GeeWiz to set up criticality problems in SCALE/KENO-VI. The primer provides a starting point for the criticality safety analyst who uses SCALE/KENO-VI. Complete descriptions are provided in the SCALE/KENO-VI manual. Although the primer is self-contained, it is intended as a companion volume to the SCALE/KENO-VI documentation. (The SCALE manual is provided on the SCALE installation DVD.) The primer provides specific examples of using SCALE/KENO-VI for criticality analyses; the SCALE/KENO-VI manual provides information on the use of SCALE/KENO-VI and all its modules. The primer also contains an appendix with sample input files.

  20. Measurement of the energy spectrum of underground muons at Gran Sasso with a transition radiation detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The MACRO Collaboration; M. Ambrosio et al

    1998-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We have measured directly the residual energy of cosmic ray muons crossing the MACRO detector at the Gran Sasso Laboratory. For this measurement we have used a transition radiation detector consisting of three identical modules, each of about 12 m^2 area, operating in the energy region from 100 GeV to 1 TeV. The results presented here were obtained with the first module collecting data for more than two years. The average single muon energy is found to be 320 +/- 4 (stat.) +/- 11 (syst.) GeV in the rock depth range 3000-6500 hg/cm^2. The results are in agreement with calculations of the energy loss of muons in the rock above the detector.

  1. The XENON10 WIMP Direct Detection Search at the Gran Sasso Underground Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manalaysay, Aaron [Department of Physics, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States) and Physics Institute, University of Zuerich, Zuerich, CH-8057 (Switzerland)

    2009-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The direct detection search for WIMPs with the XENON10 detector has produced among the best results in the field to date. The detector is a dual-phase liquid xenon time projection chamber, capable of 3-D position reconstruction and nuclear recoil discrimination. We summarize 58.6 live-days of WIMP search data collected at the Gran Sasso Underground Laboratory (LNGS) in Italy. With this data we have been able to set stringent upper limits on the spin-dependent and spin-independent WIMP scattering cross sections, in addition to a lower limit of 2.2 TeV/c{sup 2} on the mass of the heavy Majorana neutrino.

  2. Effect of Grain Size on Uranium(VI) Surface Complexation Kinetics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Grain Size on Uranium(VI) Surface Complexation Kinetics and Adsorption Additivity. Effect of Grain Size on Uranium(VI) Surface Complexation Kinetics and Adsorption Additivity....

  3. UNA ESTTICA DE DOBLE FILO El ltimo gran xito en productos pop es Lady Gaga. La simple observacin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geffner, Hector

    UNA ESTÉTICA DE DOBLE FILO El último gran éxito en productos pop es Lady Gaga. La simple que les haya parecido más conveniente, sino de Lady Gaga como producto, personaje y obra de arte. No debemos caer en el error de confundir Lady Gaga con Stefani Germanotta, la joven rockera que le da vida y

  4. Identification of simultaneous U(VI) sorption complexes and U...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    conditions under which U (VI)-CO3-Ca complexes inhibit U reduction. Citation: Singer DM, SME Chatman, ES Ilton, KM Rosso, JF Banfield, and G Waychunas.2012."Identification of...

  5. Building on lessons learned : too high hopes without HOPE VI?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Kristen J

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    By providing substantial grants to public housing authorities to demolish and rebuild distressed public housing and provide services to public housing residents, the HOPE VI program has helped transform these developments ...

  6. Chromium(VI) Reduction by Hydrogen Sulfide in Aqueous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Baolin

    experiments with excess [Cr(VI)] over [H2S]T indicated that the molar amount of sulfide required for the reduction of 1 M Cr(VI) was 1.5, suggesting the following stoichi- ometry: 2CrO4 2- + 3H2S + 4H+ f 2Cr(OH)3 of fully protonated sulfide (H2S) in the pH range of 6.5-10. The nature of buffers did not influence

  7. Remediation of chromium(VI) in the vadose zone: stoichiometry and kinetics of chromium(VI) reduction by sulfur dioxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahn, Min

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    and kinetics of chromium reduction both in aqueous solutions at pH values near neutrality and in soil. First, batch experiments and elemental analyses were conducted to characterize the stoichiometry and kinetics of Cr(VI) reduction in water...

  8. Search for double beta decay with HPGe detectors at the Gran Sasso underground laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oleg Chkvorets

    2008-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrinoless double-beta decay is practically the only way to establish the Majorana nature of the neutrino mass and its decay rate provides a probe of an effective neutrino mass. Double beta experiments are long-running underground experiments with specific challenges concerning the background reduction and the long term stability. These problems are addressed in this work for the Heidelberg-Moscow (HdM), GENIUS Test Facility (TF) and GERDA experiments. The HdM experiment collected data with enriched 76Ge high purity (HPGe) detectors from 1990 to 2003. An improved analysis of HdM data is presented, exploiting new calibration and spectral shape measurements with the HdM detectors. GENIUS-TF was a test-facility that verified the feasibility of using bare germanium detectors in liquid nitrogen. The first year results of this experiment are discussed. The GERDA experiment has been designed to further increase the sensitivity by operating bare germanium detectors in a high purity cryogenic liquid, which simultaneously serves as a shielding against background and as a cooling media. In the preparatory stage of GERDA, an external background gamma flux measurement was done at the experimental site in the Hall A of the Gran Sasso laboratory. The characterization of the enriched detectors from the HdM and IGEX experiments was performed in the underground detector laboratory for the GERDA collaboration. Long term stability measurements of a bare HPGe detector in liquid argon were carried out. Based on these measurements, the first lower limit on the half-life of neutrinoless double electron capture of 36Ar was established to be 1.85*10^18 years at 68% C.L.

  9. Interstellar O VI in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Christopher Howk

    2001-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    I summarize Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) observations of interstellar O VI absorption towards 12 early-type stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), the closest disk galaxy to the Milky Way. LMC O VI is seen towards all 12 stars with properties (average column densities, kinematics) very similar to those of the Milky Way halo, even though O/H in the LMC is lower by a factor of ~2.5. Sight lines projected onto known LMC superbubbles show little enhancement in O VI column density compared to sight lines towards quiescent regions of the LMC. The O VI absorption is displaced by \\~-30 km/sec from the corresponding low-ionization absorption associated with the bulk of the LMC gas. The LMC O VI most likely arises in a vertically-extended distribution, and I discuss the measurements in the context of a halo composed of radiatively-cooling hot gas. In this case, the mass-flow rate from one side of the LMC disk is of the order 1 solar mass/yr.

  10. Energy and momentum of Bianchi Type VI_h Universes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tripathy, S K; Pandey, G K; Singh, A K; Kumar, T; Xulu, S S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We obtain the energy and momentum of the Bianchi type VI_h universes using different prescriptions for the energy-momentum complexes in the framework of general relativity. The energy and momentum of the Bianchi VI_h universe are found to be zero for the parameter h = -1 of the metric. The vanishing of these results support the conjecture of Tryon that Universe must have a zero net value for all conserved quantities.This also supports the work of Nathan Rosen with the Robertson-Walker metric. Moreover, it raises an interesting question: "Why h=-1 case is so special?"

  11. Energy and momentum of Bianchi Type VI_h Universes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. K. Tripathy; B. Mishra; G. K. Pandey; A. K. Singh; T. Kumar; S. S. Xulu

    2015-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We obtain the energy and momentum of the Bianchi type VI_h universes using different prescriptions for the energy-momentum complexes in the framework of general relativity. The energy and momentum of the Bianchi VI_h universe are found to be zero for the parameter h = -1 of the metric. The vanishing of these results support the conjecture of Tryon that Universe must have a zero net value for all conserved quantities.This also supports the work of Nathan Rosen with the Robertson-Walker metric. Moreover, it raises an interesting question: "Why h=-1 case is so special?"

  12. Nitrate Enhanced Microbial Cr(VI) Reduction-Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John F. Stolz

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A major challenge for the bioremediation of radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium) and metals (i.e., Cr(VI), Hg) is the co-occurrence of nitrate as it can inhibit metal transformation. Denitrification (nitrate reduction to dinitrogen gas) is considered the most important ecological process. For many metal and metalloid reducing bacteria, however, ammonia is the end product through respiratory nitrate reduction (RNRA). The focus of this work was to determine how RNRA impacts Cr(VI) transformation. The goal was to elucidate the specific mechanism(s) that limits Cr(VI) reduction in the presence of nitrate and to use this information to develop strategies that enhance Cr(VI) reduction (and thus detoxification). Our central hypothesis is that nitrate impacts the biotransformation of metals and metalloids in three ways 1) as a competitive alternative electron acceptor (inhibiting transformation), 2) as a co-metabolite (i.e., concomitant reduction, stimulating transformation), and 3) as an inducer of specific proteins and pathways involved in oxidation/reduction reactions (stimulating transformation). We have identified three model organisms, Geobacter metallireducens (mechanism 1), Sulfurospirillum barnesii, (mechasism 2), and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (mechanisms 3). Our specific aims were to 1) investigate the role of Cr(VI) concentration on the kinetics of both growth and reduction of nitrate, nitrite, and Cr(VI) in these three organisms; 2) develop a profile of bacterial enzymes involved in nitrate transformation (e.g., oxidoreductases) using a proteomic approach; 3) investigate the function of periplasmic nitrite reductase (Nrf) as a chromate reductase; and 4) develop a strategy to maximize microbial chromium reduction in the presence of nitrate. We found that growth on nitrate by G. metallireducens was inhibited by Cr(VI). Over 240 proteins were identified by LC/MS-MS. Redox active proteins, outer membrane heavy metal efflux proteins, and chemotaxis sensory proteins (Gmet_2478 and Gmet_1641) were up-regulated with exposure to Cr(VI). A nine-heme cytochrome C was purified that could reduce nitrite and could be oxidized by Cr(VI). For D. desulfuricans, we found that confirmed that Cr(VI) induced a prolonged lag period when Cr(VI) was reduced. Over three hundred proteins were unequivocally identified by LC/MS-MS and a significant number of down-regulated proteins for which the levels were changed >2 fold compared to control. Sulfite reductase levels were similar, however, nitrate and nitrite reductase were down-regulated. The supernatant of spent cultures was found to contain a filterable, heat stable compound that rapidly reduced Cr(VI). In addition, desulfoviridin was purified from nitrate grown cells and shown to have nitrite reductase activity that was inhibited by Cr(VI). For S. barnesii, periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap), nitrite reductase (Nrf), and the metalloid reductase (Rar) were purified and characterized. The supernatant of spent cultures was also found to contain a filterable, heat stable compound that rapidly reduced Cr(VI) but that Rar also reduced Cr(VI). Our results from specific aims 1 through 3 indicate that for G. metallireducens, Cr(VI) inhibits nitrate respiration as it oxidizes cytochromes involved in nitrate respiration. Iron reduction is apparently not affected and the inhibitory affects of Cr(VI) may be attenuated by the addition of sufficient Fe(III) to generate Fe(II) that abiotically reduces the chromium. For S. barnesii, although the enzyme assays indicate that the components of the respiratory pathway for nitrate (e.g. Nap and Nrf) are inhibited by chromate, the organism has a mechanism to prevent this from actually occurring. Our current hypothesis is that the non-specific metalloid reductase (Rar) is providing resistance by reducing the Cr(VI). The strategy here would be to enhance its growth and metabolism in the natural setting. Lactate is a suitable electron donor for S. barnesii but other donors are possible. Although the version of the Phylochip used for monitoring the microb

  13. Realities and perceptions : HOPE VI poverty deconcentration and implications for broader neighborhood revitalization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vanderford, Carrie Ann

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HOPE VI was developed in 1992 as program to demolish and revitalize the nation's most severely distressed public housing. One element of the HOPE VI program is to move low-income households out of an environment of ...

  14. Investigation of U(VI) Adsorption in Quartz-Chlorite Mineral...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    U(VI) Adsorption in Quartz-Chlorite Mineral Mixtures. Investigation of U(VI) Adsorption in Quartz-Chlorite Mineral Mixtures. Abstract: A batch and cryogenic laser-induced...

  15. Incorporation of Np(V) and U(VI) in Carbonate and Sulfate Minerals...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Np(V) and U(VI) in Carbonate and Sulfate Minerals Crystallized from Aqueous Solution. Incorporation of Np(V) and U(VI) in Carbonate and Sulfate Minerals Crystallized from Aqueous...

  16. Reaction of U-VI with titanium-substituted magnetite: Influence...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    U-VI with titanium-substituted magnetite: Influence of Ti on U-IV speciation. Reaction of U-VI with titanium-substituted magnetite: Influence of Ti on U-IV speciation. Abstract:...

  17. Examination of Uranium(VI) Leaching During Ligand Promoted Dissolution of Waste Tank Sludge Surrogates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, Brian A.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U(VI) and citric acid on goethite, gibbsite, and kaolinite.on uranium(VI) adsorption to goethite-coated sand. Env. Sci.of phosphonates onto goethite. Env. Sci. Tech. 33, 3627-

  18. Identification of simultaneous U(VI) sorption complexes and U(IV) nanoprecipitates on the magnetite (111) surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singer, D.M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Malmström, M. E. , Removal of uranium(VI) from the aqueousMalmström, M. E. , Removal of uranium(VI) from the aqueous

  19. Probing the 5f electrons in a plutonyl(VI) cluster complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, Iain [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors report the structural, spectroscopic and preliminary magnetic characterization of a tri-metallic plutonyl(VI) polyoxometalate complex.

  20. THE HYMENOPTEROUS POISON APPARATUS. VI. CAMPONOTU8 PENNSYLYANICUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villemant, Claire

    THE HYMENOPTEROUS POISON APPARATUS. VI. CAMPONOTU8 PENNSYLYANICUS (HYMENOPTERA: FORMICIDAE:or illustrations are in millimeters. In preparation for chemical analysis, poison sacs were dissected rom workers compounds present in the poison gland secretion were re- solved by applying the .contents of fifty glands

  1. Introduc)on of lab ac)vi)es

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Po

    ·Overview of lab ac)vi)es #12;·En-Jui (En-Ray) Lee · h@p://www.gg.uwyo.edu/ggstudent/elee8 of Water · The characteris)cs of tsunamis & the early warning systems. #12 · Hydraulic gradient and its calcula)on · How to determina)on of groundwater flow

  2. AM(VI) PARTITIONING STUDIES: FY14 FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce J Mincher

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of higher oxidation states of americium in partitioning from the lanthanides is under continued investigation by the sigma team. This is based on the hypothesis that Am(VI) can be produced and remain stable in irradiated first cycle raffinate solution long enough to perform solvent extraction for separations. The stability of Am(VI) to autoreduction was measured using millimolar americium concentrations in a 1-cm cell with a Cary 6000 UV/Vis spectrophotometer for data acquisition. At millimolar americium concentrations, Am(VI) is stable enough against its own autoreduction for separations purposes. A second major accomplishment during FY14 was the hot test. Americium oxidation and extraction was performed using a centrifugal contactor-based test bed consisting of an extraction stage and two stripping stages. Sixty-three percent americium extraction was obtained in one extraction stage, in agreement with batch contacts. Promising electrochemical oxidation results have also been obtained, using terpyridine ligand derivatized electrodes for binding of Am(III). Approximately 50 % of the Am(III) was oxidized to Am(V) over the course of 1 hour. It is believed that this is the first demonstration of the electrolytic oxidation of americium in a non-complexing solution. Finally, an initial investigation of Am(VI) extraction using diethylhexylbutyramide (DEHBA) was performed.

  3. Diplomatic Metonymy and Antithesis in 3 Henry VI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craigwood, J.

    2014-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    love that leads inevitably from corporeal ‘feeble shadow’ (al corpo una debil umbra) to the soul’s immaterial and divine ‘substance’ (sustanzia).44 In other words, Camilla sceptically suspects a world like that of the Henry VI plays, a world of obscured...

  4. air pollution vi: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    air pollution vi First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Environmental Pollution Air Pollution...

  5. The effect of temperature on the speciation of U(VI) in sulfate solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rao, Linfeng; Tian, Guoxin

    2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Sulfate, one of the inorganic constituents that could be present in the nuclear waste repository, forms complexes with U(VI) and affects its migration in the environment. Results show that the complexation of U(VI) with sulfate is enhanced by the increase in temperature. The effect of temperature on the complexation and speciation of U(VI) in sulfate solutions is discussed.

  6. VI.4. SINGUL ARE KOHOMOLOGIE 313 VI.4.20. Beispiel. Aus Satz VI.4.11 und Beispiel V.4.13 bzw. Beispiel V.7.37

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, Stefan

    , 12, . . . 0 sonst Ist n m dann induziert die kanonische Inklusion : HPn HPm Isomor- phismen : Hq (HPm ; G) = - Hq (HPn ; G), f¨ur alle q 2n. VI.4.22. Beispiel. Aus Satz VI.4.11 und Proposition V

  7. ENDF-201: ENDF/B-VI summary documentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, P.F. (comp.)

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Responsibility for oversight of the ENDF/B Evaluated Nuclear Data file lies with the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG), which is comprised of representatives from various governmental and industrial laboratories in the United States. Individual evaluations are provided by scientists at several US laboratories, including significant contributions by scientists from all over the world. In addition, ENDF/B-VI includes for the first time complete evaluations for three materials that were provided from laboratories outside the US. All data are checked and reviewed by CSEWG, and the data file is maintained and issued by the National Nuclear Data Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The previous version of the library, ENDF/B-V, was issued in 1979, and two revisions to the data file were provided in subsequent years, the latest occurring in 1981. A total of 75 new or extensively modified neutron sublibrary evaluations are included in ENDF/B-VI, and are summarized in this document. One incident proton sublibrary is described for Fe{sup 56}. The remaining evaluations in ENDF/B-VI have been carried over from earlier versions of ENDF, and have been updated to reflect the new formats. The release of ENDF/B-VI was carried out between January and June of 1990, with groups of materials being released on tapes.'' Table 1 is an index to the evaluation summaries, and includes the material identification or MAT number, the responsible laboratory, and the tape'' number. These evaluations have been released without restrictions on their distribution or use.

  8. ENDF-201: ENDF/B-VI summary documentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, P.F. [comp.

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Responsibility for oversight of the ENDF/B Evaluated Nuclear Data file lies with the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG), which is comprised of representatives from various governmental and industrial laboratories in the United States. Individual evaluations are provided by scientists at several US laboratories, including significant contributions by scientists from all over the world. In addition, ENDF/B-VI includes for the first time complete evaluations for three materials that were provided from laboratories outside the US. All data are checked and reviewed by CSEWG, and the data file is maintained and issued by the National Nuclear Data Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The previous version of the library, ENDF/B-V, was issued in 1979, and two revisions to the data file were provided in subsequent years, the latest occurring in 1981. A total of 75 new or extensively modified neutron sublibrary evaluations are included in ENDF/B-VI, and are summarized in this document. One incident proton sublibrary is described for Fe{sup 56}. The remaining evaluations in ENDF/B-VI have been carried over from earlier versions of ENDF, and have been updated to reflect the new formats. The release of ENDF/B-VI was carried out between January and June of 1990, with groups of materials being released on ``tapes.`` Table 1 is an index to the evaluation summaries, and includes the material identification or MAT number, the responsible laboratory, and the ``tape`` number. These evaluations have been released without restrictions on their distribution or use.

  9. Implementation of MP{_}Lite for the VI Architecture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiyi Chen

    2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    MP{_}Lite is a light weight message-passing library designed to deliver the maximum performance to applications in a portable and user friendly manner. The Virtual Interface (VI) architecture is a user-level communication protocol that bypasses the operating system to provide much better performance than traditional network architectures. By combining the high efficiency of MP{_}Lite and high performance of the VI architecture, they are able to implement a high performance message-passing library that has much lower latency and better throughput. The design and implementation of MP{_}Lite for M-VIA, which is a modular implementation of the VI architecture on Linux, is discussed in this thesis. By using the eager protocol for sending short messages, MP{_}Lite M-VIA has much lower latency on both Fast Ethernet and Gigabit Ethernet. The handshake protocol and RDMA mechanism provides double the throughput that MPICH can deliver for long messages. MP{_}Lite M-VIA also has the ability to channel-bonding multiple network interface cards to increase the potential bandwidth between nodes. Using multiple Fast Ethernet cards can double or even triple the maximum throughput without increasing the cost of a PC cluster greatly.

  10. VI Symposium of Specialists in Electric Operational and Expansion Planning -VI SEPOPE, May 24-29,1998, Bahia, Brazil POWER SYSTEM PLANNING IN THE SOUTH AMERICA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

    -29,1998, Bahia, Brazil POWER SYSTEM PLANNING IN THE SOUTH AMERICA ELECTRIC MARKET RESTRUCTURING Hugh Rudnick for the electricity infrastructure than for the transport one. Both integrate different components (whileVI Symposium of Specialists in Electric Operational and Expansion Planning - VI SEPOPE, May 24

  11. Microstructural analyses of Cr(VI) speciation in chromite ore processing Residue (COPR)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CHRYSOCHOOU, MARIA; FAKRA, SIRINE C .; Marcus, Matthew A.; Moon, Deok Hyun; Dermatas, Dimitris

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The speciation and distribution of Cr(VI) in the solid phase was investigated for two types of chromite ore processing residue (COPR) found at two deposition sites in the United States: gray-black (GB) granular and hard brown (HB) cemented COPR. COPR chemistry and mineralogy were investigated using micro-X-ray absorption spectroscopy and micro-X-ray diffraction, complemented by laboratory analyses. GB COPR contained 30percent of its total Cr(VI) (6000 mg/kg) as large crystals(>20 ?m diameter) of a previously unreported Na-rich analog of calcium aluminum chromate hydrates. These Cr(VI)-rich phases are thought to be vulnerable to reductive and pH treatments. More than 50percent of the Cr(VI) was located within nodules, not easily accessible to dissolved reductants, and bound to Fe-rich hydrogarnet, hydrotalcite, and possibly brucite. These phases are stable over a large pH range, thus harder to dissolve. Brownmilleritewasalso likely associated with physical entrapment of Cr(VI) in the interior of nodules. HB COPR contained no Cr(VI)-rich phases; all Cr(VI) was diffuse within the nodules and absent from the cementing matrix, with hydrogarnet and hydrotalcite being the main Cr(VI) binding phases. Treatment ofHBCOPRis challenging in terms of dissolving the acidity-resistant, inaccessible Cr(VI) compounds; the same applies to ~;;50percent of Cr(VI) in GB COPR.

  12. Summary of the planning, management, and evaluation process for the Geothermal Program Review VI conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to present an overview of the planning, facilitation, and evaluation process used to conduct the Geothermal Program Review VI (PR VI) conference. This document was also prepared to highlight lessons learned from PR VI and, by utilizing the evaluation summaries and recommendations, be used as a planning tool for PR VII. The conference, entitled Beyond Goals and Objectives,'' was sponsored by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Geothermal Technology Division (GTD), PR VI was held in San Francisco, California on April 19--21, 1988 and was attended by 127 participants. PR VI was held in conjunction with the National Geothermal Association's (NGA) Industry Round Table. This document presents a brief summary of the activities, responsibilities, and resources for implementing the PR VI meeting and provides recommendations, checklists, and a proposed schedule for assisting in planning PR VII.

  13. Method for making graded I-III-VI.sub.2 semiconductors and solar cell obtained thereby

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Devaney, Walter E. (Seattle, WA)

    1987-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Improved cell photovoltaic conversion efficiencies are obtained by the simultaneous elemental reactive evaporation process of Mickelsen and Chen for making semiconductors by closer control of the evaporation rates and substrate temperature during formation of the near contact, bulk, and near junction regions of a graded I-III-VI.sub.2, thin film, semiconductor, such as CuInSe.sub.2 /(Zn,Cd)S or another I-III-VI.sub.2 /II-VI heterojunction.

  14. Effects of Phosphate on Uranium(VI) Adsorption to Goethite-Coated Sand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roden, Eric E.

    Effects of Phosphate on Uranium(VI) Adsorption to Goethite-Coated Sand T A O C H E N G , M A R K O natural and contaminated environments. We studied U(VI) adsorption on goethite-coated sand (to mimic of increase in U(VI) adsorption. Phosphate was strongly bound by the goethite surface in the low pH range

  15. Method of manufacturing semiconductor having group II-group VI compounds doped with nitrogen

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Compaan, Alvin D.; Price, Kent J.; Ma, Xianda; Makhratchev, Konstantin

    2005-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of making a semiconductor comprises depositing a group II-group VI compound onto a substrate in the presence of nitrogen using sputtering to produce a nitrogen-doped semiconductor. This method can be used for making a photovoltaic cell using sputtering to apply a back contact layer of group II-group VI compound to a substrate in the presence of nitrogen, the back coating layer being doped with nitrogen. A semiconductor comprising a group II-group VI compound doped with nitrogen, and a photovoltaic cell comprising a substrate on which is deposited a layer of a group II-group VI compound doped with nitrogen, are also included.

  16. U(VI) sorption and reduction kinetics on the magnetite (111) surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singer, D.M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    C. ; Anderson, R. T. , Uranium removal from groundwater viaMalmström, M. E. , Removal of uranium(VI) from the aqueous

  17. Integrated Ecogenomics Study for Bioremediation of Cr(VI) at Hanford 100H Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakraborty, Romy

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ecogenomics study for bioremediation of Cr(VI) at HanfordRegenesis In-situ bioremediation at Hanford 100H area ??

  18. Influence of Calcium on Microbial Reduction of Solid Phase Uranium (VI)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Chongxuan; Jeon, Byong-Hun; Zachara, John M.; Wang, Zheming

    2007-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of calcium on microbial reduction of a solid phase U(VI), sodium boltwoodite (NaUO2SiO3OH ?1.5H2O), was evaluated in a culture of a dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium (DMRB), Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1. Batch experiments were performed in a non-growth bicarbonate medium with lactate as electron donor at pH 7 buffered with PIPES. Calcium increased both the rate and extent of Na-boltwoodite dissolution by increasing its solubility through the formation of a ternary aqueous calcium-uranyl-carbonate species. The ternary species, however, decreased the rates of microbial reduction of aqueous U(VI). Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that microbial reduction of solid phase U(VI) is a sequentially coupled process of Na-boltwoodite dissolution, U(VI) aqueous speciation, and microbial reduction of dissolved U(VI) to U(IV) that accumulated on bacterial surfaces/periplasm. The overall rates of microbial reduction of solid phase U(VI) can be described by the coupled rates of dissolution and microbial reduction that were both influenced by calcium. The results demonstrated that dissolved U(VI) concentration during microbial reduction was a complex function of solid phase U(VI) dissolution kinetics, aqueous U(VI) speciation, and microbial activity.

  19. Kinetics of Uranium(VI) Desorption from Contaminated Sediments: Effect of Geochemical Conditions and Model Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Chongxuan; Shi, Zhenqing; Zachara, John M.

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stirred-flow cell experiments were performed to investigate the kinetics of uranyl [U(VI)] desorption from a contaminated sediment collected from the Hanford 300 Area at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, Washington. Three influent solutions of variable pH, Ca and carbonate concentrations that affected U(VI) aqueous and surface speciation were used under dynamic flow conditions to evaluate the effect of geochemical conditions on the rate of U(VI) desorption. The measured rate of U(VI) desorption varied with solution chemical composition that evolved as a result of thermodynamic and kinetic interactions between the influent solutions and sediment. The solution chemical composition that led to a lower equilibrium U(VI) sorption to the solid phase yielded a faster desorption rate. The experimental results were used to evaluate a multi-rate, surface complexation model (SCM) that has been proposed to describe U(VI) desorption kinetics in the Hanford sediment that contained complex sorbed U(VI) species in mass transfer limited domains. The model was modified and supplemented by including multi-rate, ion exchange reactions to describe the geochemical interactions between the solutions and sediment. With the same set of model parameters, the modified model reasonably well described the evolution of major ions and the rates of U(VI) desorption under variable geochemical and flow conditions, implying that the multi-rate SCM is an effective way to describe U(VI) desorption kinetics in subsurface sediments.

  20. Molecular Interactions of Plutonium(VI) with Synthetic Manganese-Substituted Goethite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Yung-Jin

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    VI) with the Iron Oxide Goethite, University of California,Values for Synthetic Goethite and Pyrolusite" submitted tothe two Mn-substituted goethite minerals used in this study.

  1. Nonlinear Spinor Fields in Bianchi type-$VI_0$ spacetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bijan Saha

    2015-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the scope of Bianchi type-$VI_0$ space time we study the role of spinor field on the evolution of the Universe. It is found that the presence of nontrivial non-diagonal components of energy-momentum tensor of the spinor field plays vital role on the evolution of the Universe. As a result of their mutual influence the invariants constructed from the bilinear forms of the spinor field become trivial, thus giving rise to a massless and linear spinor field Lagrangian. This result shows that the spinor field is highly sensitive to the gravitational one.

  2. First Results from the DarkSide-50 Dark Matter Experiment at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agnes, P; Alton, A; Arisaka, K; Back, H O; Baldin, B; Biery, K; Bonfini, G; Bossa, M; Brigatti, A; Brodsky, J; Budano, F; Cadonati, L; Calaprice, F; Canci, N; Candela, A; Cao, H; Cariello, M; Cavalcante, P; Chavarria, A; Chepurnov, A; Cocco, A G; Crippa, L; D'Angelo, D; D'Incecco, M; Davini, S; De Deo, M; Derbin, A; Devoto, A; Di Eusanio, F; Di Pietro, G; Edkins, E; Empl, A; Fan, A; Fiorillo, G; Fomenko, K; Forster, G; Franco, D; Gabriele, F; Galbiati, C; Goretti, A; Grandi, L; Gromov, M; Guan, M Y; Guardincerri, Y; Hackett, B; Herner, K; Hungerford, E V; Ianni, Al; Ianni, An; Jollet, C; Keeter, K; Kendziora, C; Kidner, S; Kobychev, V; Koh, G; Korablev, D; Korga, G; Kurlej, A; Li, P X; Loer, B; Lombardi, P; Love, C; Ludhova, L; Luitz, S; Ma, Y Q; Machulin, I; Mandarano, A; Mari, S; Maricic, J; Marini, L; Martoff, C J; Meregaglia, A; Meroni, E; Meyers, P D; Milincic, R; Montanari, D; Montuschi, M; Monzani, M E; Mosteiro, P; Mount, B; Muratova, V; Musico, P; Nelson, A; Odrowski, S; Okounkova, M; Orsini, M; Ortica, F; Pagani, L; Pallavicini, M; Pantic, E; Papp, L; Parmeggiano, S; Parsells, R; Pelczar, K; Pelliccia, N; Perasso, S; Pocar, A; Pordes, S; Pugachev, D; Qian, H; Randle, K; Ranucci, G; Razeto, A; Reinhold, B; Renshaw, A; Romani, A; Rossi, B; Rossi, N; Rountree, S D; Sablone, D; Saggese, P; Saldanha, R; Sands, W; Sangiorgio, S; Segreto, E; Semenov, D; Shields, E; Skorokhvatov, M; Smirnov, O; Sotnikov, A; Stanford, C; Suvorov, Y; Tartaglia, R; Tatarowicz, J; Testera, G; Tonazzo, A; Unzhakov, E; Vogelaar, R B; Wada, M; Walker, S; Wang, H; Wang, Y; Watson, A; Westerdale, S; Wojcik, M; Wright, A; Xiang, X; Xu, J; Yang, C G; Yoo, J; Zavatarelli, S; Zec, A; Zhu, C; Zuzel, G

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first results of DarkSide-50, a direct search for dark matter operating in the underground Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) and searching for the rare nuclear recoils possibly induced by weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). The dark matter detector is a Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber with a (46.4+-0.7) kg active mass, operated inside a 30 t organic liquid scintillator neutron veto, which is in turn installed at the center of a 1 kt water Cherenkov veto for the residual flux of cosmic rays. We report here the null results of a dark matter search for a (1422+-67) kg d exposure with an atmospheric argon fill. This is the most sensitive dark matter search performed with an argon target, corresponding to a 90% CL upper limit on the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section of 6.1x10^-44 cm^2 for a WIMP mass of 100 GeV/c^2.

  3. First Results from the DarkSide-50 Dark Matter Experiment at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Agnes; T. Alexander; A. Alton; K. Arisaka; H. O. Back; B. Baldin; K. Biery; G. Bonfini; M. Bossa; A. Brigatti; J. Brodsky; F. Budano; L. Cadonati; F. Calaprice; N. Canci; A. Candela; H. Cao; M. Cariello; P. Cavalcante; A. Chavarria; A. Chepurnov; A. G. Cocco; L. Crippa; D. D'Angelo; M. D'Incecco; S. Davini; M. De Deo; A. Derbin; A. Devoto; F. Di Eusanio; G. Di Pietro; E. Edkins; A. Empl; A. Fan; G. Fiorillo; K. Fomenko; G. Forster; D. Franco; F. Gabriele; C. Galbiati; A. Goretti; L. Grandi; M. Gromov; M. Y. Guan; Y. Guardincerri; B. Hackett; K. Herner; E. V. Hungerford; Al. Ianni; An. Ianni; C. Jollet; K. Keeter; C. Kendziora; S. Kidner; V. Kobychev; G. Koh; D. Korablev; G. Korga; A. Kurlej; P. X. Li; B. Loer; P. Lombardi; C. Love; L. Ludhova; S. Luitz; Y. Q. Ma; I. Machulin; A. Mandarano; S. Mari; J. Maricic; L. Marini; C. J. Martoff; A. Meregaglia; E. Meroni; P. D. Meyers; R. Milincic; D. Montanari; A. Monte; M. Montuschi; M. E. Monzani; P. Mosteiro; B. Mount; V. Muratova; P. Musico; A. Nelson; S. Odrowski; M. Okounkova; M. Orsini; F. Ortica; L. Pagani; M. Pallavicini; E. Pantic; L. Papp; S. Parmeggiano; R. Parsells; K. Pelczar; N. Pelliccia; S. Perasso; A. Pocar; S. Pordes; D. Pugachev; H. Qian; K. Randle; G. Ranucci; A. Razeto; B. Reinhold; A. Renshaw; A. Romani; B. Rossi; N. Rossi; S. D. Rountree; D. Sablone; P. Saggese; R. Saldanha; W. Sands; S. Sangiorgio; E. Segreto; D. Semenov; E. Shields; M. Skorokhvatov; O. Smirnov; A. Sotnikov; C. Stanford; Y. Suvorov; R. Tartaglia; J. Tatarowicz; G. Testera; A. Tonazzo; E. Unzhakov; R. B. Vogelaar; M. Wada; S. Walker; H. Wang; Y. Wang; A. Watson; S. Westerdale; M. Wojcik; A. Wright; X. Xiang; J. Xu; C. G. Yang; J. Yoo; S. Zavatarelli; A. Zec; C. Zhu; G. Zuzel

    2015-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first results of DarkSide-50, a direct search for dark matter operating in the underground Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) and searching for the rare nuclear recoils possibly induced by weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). The dark matter detector is a Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber with a (46.4+-0.7) kg active mass, operated inside a 30 t organic liquid scintillator neutron veto, which is in turn installed at the center of a 1 kt water Cherenkov veto for the residual flux of cosmic rays. We report here the null results of a dark matter search for a (1422+-67) kg d exposure with an atmospheric argon fill. This is the most sensitive dark matter search performed with an argon target, corresponding to a 90% CL upper limit on the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section of 6.1x10^-44 cm^2 for a WIMP mass of 100 GeV/c^2.

  4. Geothermal Program Review VI: proceedings. Beyond goals and objectives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Program Review VI was comprised of six sessions, including an opening session, four technical sessions that addressed each of the major DOE research areas, and a session on special issues. The technical sessions were on Hydrothermal, Hot Dry Rock, Geopressured and Magma resources. Presenters in the technical sessions discussed their R and D activities within the context of specific GTD Programmatic Objectives for that technology, their progress toward achieving those objectives, and the value of those achievements to industry. The ''Special Issues'' presentations addressed several topics such as the interactions between government and industry on geothermal energy R and D; the origin and basis for the programmatic objectives analytical computer model; and international marketing opportunities for US geothermal equipment and services. The unique aspect of Program Review VI was that it was held in conjunction with the National Geothermal Association's Industry Round Table on Federal R and D. The Round Table provided a forum for open and lively discussions between industry and government researchers and gave industry an opportunity to convey their needs and perspectives on DOE's research programs. These discussions also provided valuable information to DOE regarding industry's priorities and directions.

  5. Tracking the Sun VI: An Historical Summary of the Installed Price of Photovoltaics in the United States from 1998 to 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory. Tracking the Sun VI: The Installed Price ofRange ?10 kW Tracking the Sun VI: The Installed Price ofRange ?10 kW Tracking the Sun VI: The Installed Price of

  6. ORNL/TM-2008/069 KENO-VI Primer: A Primer for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    ORNL/TM-2008/069 KENO-VI Primer: A Primer for Criticality Calculations with SCALE/KENO-VI Using Gee Nuclear Information System (INIS) representatives from the following source. Office of Scientific or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof. #12;ORNL/TM-2008/069 Nuclear Science

  7. Indledning Velkommen til Microsoft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Side 4 Inspiration Vi er drevet af passion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Side 8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, Galen

    af software og it-løsninger . Siden 1990 har Microsoft været repræsenteret i Danmark, hvor vi i dag Danmark kombinerer det bedste fra to verdener: det ameri- kanske fokus på performance og talentudvikling,fleksibilitetogklaremålervoresDNA. Hos Microsoft Danmark er vi 450 medarbejdere med vidt forskellige baggrunde og kompetenc

  8. Simulation of reactive transport of uranium(VI) in groundwater with variable chemical conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    stored in poorly designed facilities or where it has been leached from U mill tailings [USDOE, 1996Simulation of reactive transport of uranium(VI) in groundwater with variable chemical conditions alluvial aquifer beneath a former U(VI) mill located near Naturita, CO, was simulated using a surface

  9. Modeling the Removal of Uranium U(VI) from Aqueous Solutions in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    include natural U deposits, mining, milling, and tailing operations and U.S. Department of Energy (DOEModeling the Removal of Uranium U(VI) from Aqueous Solutions in the Presence of Sulfate Reducing The reduction kinetics of soluble hexavalent uranium (U(VI)) to insoluble tetravalent U(IV) by both a mixed

  10. UMBC Policy on Facilities Use UMBC Policy # VI-4.10.01 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adali, Tulay

    UMBC Policy on Facilities Use UMBC Policy # VI-4.10.01 1 I. Introduction This policy is predicated on the University System of Maryland Policy 145.0 VI-4.10- POLICY ON THE USE of Regents on January 11, 1990. The policy reads: 1. The physical facilities of the University System may

  11. Effects of Solid-to-Solution Ratio on Uranium(VI) Adsorption and Its

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roden, Eric E.

    grade uranium standard (depleted uranium). Synthetic Effects of Solid-to-Solution Ratio on Uranium(VI) Adsorption and Its Implications T A O C H E N G interacting ligands. Introduction The migration of uranium(VI), as well as other radionuclides and metal

  12. The role of nanopores on U(VI) sorption and redox behavior in U(VI)-contaminated subsurface sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Huifang; Roden, Eric E.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Jung, Hun-Bok; Konishi, Hiromi; Boyanov, Maxim; Sun, Yubing; Mishra, Bhoopesh

    2013-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Most reactive surfaces in clay-dominated sediments are present within nanopores (pores of nm dimension). The behavior of geological fluids and minerals in nanopores is significantly different from those in normal non-nanoporous environments. The effect of nanopore surfaces on U(VI) sorption/desorption and reduction is likely to be significant in clay-rich subsurface environments. Our research results from both model nanopore system and natural sediments from both model system (synthetic nanopore alumina) and sediments from the ORNL Field Research Center prove that U(VI) sorption on nanopore surfaces can be greatly enhanced by nanopore confinement environments. The results from the project provide advanced mechanistic, quantitative information on the physiochemical controls on uranium sorption and redox behavior in subsurface sediments. The influence of nanopore surfaces on coupled uranium sorption/desorption and reduction processes is significant in virtually all subsurface environments, because most reactive surfaces are in fact nanopore surfaces. The results will enhance transfer of our laboratory-based research to a major field research initiative where reductive uranium immobilization is being investigated. Our results will also provide the basic science for developing in-situ colloidal barrier of nanoporous alumina in support of environmental remediation and long term stewardship of DOE sites.

  13. LLE Review 118 (January-March 2009)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bittle, W., editor

    2009-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This issue has the following articles: (1) Applied Plasma Spectroscopy: Laser-Fusion Experiments; (2) Relativistic Electron-Beam Transport Studies Using High-Resolution, Coherent Transition Radiation Imaging; (3) Pressure-Driven, Resistive Magnetohydrodynamic Interchange Instabilities in Laser-Produced, High-Energy-Density Plasmas; (4) Extended Model for Polymer Cholesteric Liquid Crystal Flake Reorientation and Relaxation; (5) Modeling the Effects of Microencapsulation on the Electro-Optic Behavior of Polymer Cholesteric Liquid Crystal Flakes; (6) Capillarity and Dielectrophoresis of Liquid Deuterium; and (7) A Stable Mid-IR, GaSb-Based Diode Laser Source for Cryogenic Target Layering at the OMEGA Laser Facility.

  14. LLE Review 121 (September-December 2009)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, K.S., editor

    2010-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This issue has the following articles: (1) Demonstration of the Highest Deuterium-Tritium Areal Density Using Triple-Picket Cryogenic Designs on OMEGA; (2) High-Precision Measurements of the Equation of State of Hydrocarbons at 1 to 10 Mbar Using Laser-Driven Shock Waves; (3) A Generalized Measurable Ignition Condition for Inertial Confinement Fusion (4) In-Situ Detection and Analysis of Laser-Induced Damage on a 1.5-m Multilayer-Dielectric Grating Compressor for High-Energy, Petawatt-Class Laser Systems; (5) Probing High-Areal-Density ({rho}R) Cryogenic-DT Implosions Using Down-Scattered Neutron Spectra Measured by the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer; (6) Strong-Coupling and Degeneracy Effects in Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions; and (7) Neutron-Induced Nucleation Inside Bubble Chambers Using Freon 115 as the Active Medium.

  15. ELECTRONIC SOLUTION SPECTRA FOR URANIUM AND NEPTUNIUM IN OXIDATION STATES (III) TO (VI) IN ANHYDROUS HYDROGEN FLUORIDE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baluka, M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    III) TO (VI) IN ANHYDROUS HYDROGEN FLUORIDE M. Baluka, N.III) TO (VI) IN ANHYDROUS HYDROGEN FLUORIDE M. Baluka(t), N.solutions in anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (AHF) of uranium

  16. Simulation of Reduction of Cr(VI) by Fe(II) Produced Electrochemically in a Parallel-Plate Electrochemical Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at the cathode, electrocoagulation uses electricity to produce a reducing agent ferrous ions from an iron anode the reduction of Cr VI by permeable reactive barriers. Gheju and Lovi7 reported that the re- duction of Cr VI

  17. Integrated Ecogenomics Study for Bioremediation of Cr(VI) at Hanford 100H Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakraborty, Romy; Chakraborty, Romy

    2008-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Hexavalent chromium is a widespread contaminant found in groundwater. In order to stimulate microbially mediated Cr(VI)-reduction, a poly-lactate compound was injected into Cr(VI)-contaminated aquifers at site 100H at Hanford. Investigation of bacterial community composition using high-density DNA microarray analysis of 16S rRNA gene products revealed a stimulation of Pseudomonas, Desulfovibrio and Geobacter species amongst others. Enrichment of these organisms coincided with continued Cr(VI) depletion. Functional gene-array analysis of DNA from monitoring well indicated high abundance of genes involved in nitrate-reduction, sulfate-reduction, iron-reduction, methanogenesis, chromium tolerance/reduction. Clone-library data revealed Psedomonas was the dominant genus in these samples. Based on above results, we conducted lab investigations to study the dominant anaerobic culturable microbial populations present at this site and their role in Cr(VI)-reduction. Enrichments using defined anaerobic media resulted in isolation of an iron-reducing, a sulfate-reducing and a nitrate-reducing isolate among several others. Preliminary 16S rDNA sequence analysis identified the isolates as Geobacter metallireducens, Pseudomonas stutzeri and Desulfovibrio vulgaris species respectively. The Pseudomonas isolate utilized acetate, lactate, glycerol and pyruvate as alternative carbon sources, and reduced Cr(VI). Anaerobic washed cell suspension of strain HLN reduced almost 95?M Cr(VI) within 4 hr. Further, with 100?M Cr(VI) as sole electron-acceptor, cells grew to 4.05 x 107 /ml over 24 h after an initial lag, demonstrating direct enzymatic Cr(VI) reduction coupled to growth. These results demonstrate that Cr(VI)-immobilization at Hanford 100H site could be mediated by direct microbial metabolism in addition to indirect chemical reduction of Cr(VI) by end-products of microbial activity.

  18. Fision product evaluations for ENDF/B-VI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, R.Q.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most of the ENDF/B-V fission-product evaluations were completed during the time period 1974--1980, and some of these were based on very limited experimental data. For short-lived fission products, there is still very little experimental data available because of the difficulty of obtaining these measurements. However, since 1980 a considerable amount of new experimental data have become available for stable and long-lived fission products. By utilizing the new data, significant improvements are now possible for some fission-product evaluations. The purpose of this paper is to report on 16 ENDF/B-VI evaluations that have been done at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The primary emphasis in this work has been placed on the resolved resonance region, but for some nuclides, new experimental data were also used to improve the evaluations for energies above the resolved resonance range.

  19. Reduction of Fe(III), Cr(VI), U(VI), and Tc(VII) by Deinococcus radiodurans R1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fredrickson, J.K.; Kostandarithes, H.M.; Li, S.W.; Plymake, A.E.; Daly, M.J.

    2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Deinococcus radiodurans is an exceptionally radiation-resistant microorganism capable of surviving acute exposures to ionizing radiation doses of 15,000 Gy and previously described as having a strictly aerobic respiratory metabolism. Under strict anaerobic conditions, D. radiodurans R1 reduced Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid coupled to the oxidation of lactate to CO{sub 2} and acetate but was unable to link this process to growth. D. radiodurans reduced the humic acid analog anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) to its dihydroquinone form, AH{sub 2}DS, which subsequently transferred electrons to the Fe(III) oxides hydrous ferric oxide and goethite via a previously described electron shuttle mechanism. D. radiodurans reduced the solid-phase Fe(III) oxides in the presence of either 0.1 mM AQDS or leonardite humic acids (2 mg ml{sup {minus}1}) but not in their absence. D. radiodurans also reduced U(VI) and Tc(VII) in the presence of AQDS. In contrast, Cr(VI) was directly reduced in anaerobic cultures with lactate although the rate of reduction was higher in the presence of AQDS. The results are the first evidence that D. radiodurans can reduce Fe(III) coupled to the oxidation of lactate or other organic compounds. Also, D. radiodurans, in combination with humic acids or synthetic electron shuttle agents, can reduce U and Tc and thus has potential applications for remediation of metal- and radionuclide-contaminated sites where ionizing radiation or other DNA-damaging agents may restrict the activity of more sensitive organisms.

  20. Reduction of U(VI) Complexes by Anthraquinone Disulfonate: Experiment and Molecular Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ainsworth, C.C.; Wang, Z.; Rosso, K.M.; Wagnon, K.; Fredrickson, J.K.

    2004-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Past studies demonstrate that complexation will limit abiotic and biotic U(VI) reduction rates and the overall extent of reduction. However, the underlying basis for this behavior is not understood and presently unpredictable across species and ligand structure. The central tenets of these investigations are: (1) reduction of U(VI) follows the electron-transfer (ET) mechanism developed by Marcus; (2) the ET rate is the rate-limiting step in U(VI) reduction and is the step that is most affected by complexation; and (3) Marcus theory can be used to unify the apparently disparate U(VI) reduction rate data and as a computational tool to construct a predictive relationship.

  1. E-Print Network 3.0 - alfa survey vi Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Paris VI pastel-00636920,version1-28Oct2011 12;11 elaboration of nitrogen-doped aerogels and xerogels Source: Paris-Sud XI, Universit de - Institut d'Optique, Laboratoire...

  2. U(VI) sorption and reduction kinetics on the magnetite (111)...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    information in real-time under batch-flow conditions. Citation: Singer DM, SME Chatman, ES Ilton, KM Rosso, JF Banfield, and G Waychunas.2012."U(VI) sorption and...

  3. Cr(VI) reduction in aqueous solutions by using copper smelter slag

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiyak, B.; Oezer, A.; Altundogan, H.S.; Erdem, M.; Tuemen, F. (Firat Univ., Elazig (Turkey))

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability of Copper Smelter Slag (CSS) to reduce Cr(VI) in aqueous solutions has been investigated. The extent of reduction if dependent on the amounts of acid and reductant, contact time, Cr(VI) concentration, temperature of the solution and particle size of CSS. The amount of acid is the most important variable affecting the reduction process. When twice the amount of acid required with respect to Cr(VI) was used, Cr(VI) in 100 ml solution (100 mg/l) was completely reduced in a contact period less than 5 min by a 10 g/l dosage of CSS. Reduction efficiency increased with increase in temperature of solution, showing that the process is endothermic. Reduced chromium, and iron and other metals dissolved from CSS were effectively precipitated by using NaOH or calcinated carbonation sludge from sugar plant.

  4. Cr(VI) reduction in aqueous solutions by using copper smelter slag

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiyak, B.; Oezer, A.; Altundogan, H.S.; Erdem, M.; Tuemen, F. [Firat Univ., Elazig (Turkey)] [Firat Univ., Elazig (Turkey)

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability of Copper Smelter Slag (CSS) to reduce Cr(VI) in aqueous solutions has been investigated. The extent of reduction if dependent on the amounts of acid and reductant, contact time, Cr(VI) concentration, temperature of the solution and particle size of CSS. The amount of acid is the most important variable affecting the reduction process. When twice the amount of acid required with respect to Cr(VI) was used, Cr(VI) in 100 ml solution (100 mg/l) was completely reduced in a contact period less than 5 min by a 10 g/l dosage of CSS. Reduction efficiency increased with increase in temperature of solution, showing that the process is endothermic. Reduced chromium, and iron and other metals dissolved from CSS were effectively precipitated by using NaOH or calcinated carbonation sludge from sugar plant.

  5. Reduction of Health Risks Due to Chromium(VI)Using Mesquite: A Potential Cr Phytoremediator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L.; Aldrich, Mary V.; Peralta-Videa, Jose R.; Parsons, Jason G.

    2004-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Chromium is a transition metal extensively used in industry. Cr mining and industrial operations account for chromium wastes at Superfund sites in the United States. A study was performed to investigate the possibility of using mesquite (Prosopis spp.), which is an indigenous desert plant species, to remove Cr from contaminated sites. In this study, mesquite plants were grown in an agar-based medium containing 75 mg L-1 and 125 mg L-1 of Cr(VI). The Cr content of leaf tissue (992 mg kg-1 of dry weight, from 125 mg L-1 of Cr(VI)) indicated that mesquite could be classified as a chromium hyperaccumulator. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies performed to experimental samples showed that mesquite roots absorbed some of the supplied Cr(VI). However, the data analyses of plant tissues demonstrated that the absorbed Cr(VI) was fully reduced to Cr(III) in the leaf tissue.

  6. Microsoft Word - ViArray_Fact_ Sheet_SAND2011-3935P_updated_format...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ng ViASIC(tm) e circuits tha operations. power and g n high-reliab D Category 1 plined ISO 9 al, analog an bility, Sandia national secu d ASIC grated Circui ASIC-like p (NRE)...

  7. A method to attenuate U(VI) mobility in acidic waste plumes using humic acids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wan, J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    base properties of a goethite surface model: A theoreticalcomplexation of U(VI) on goethite (alpha-FeOOH). Geochim.acid and humic-acid on goethite, gibbsite and imogolite. J.

  8. Regulation of Myosin VI transport, tethering to actin and cargo binding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naccache, Samia Nidal

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M. Walker, J. Trinick, F. Buss, C. Veigel and J. Kendrick-J. Kendrick-Jones and F. Buss (2005). "Optineurin linksJ. Kendrick-Jones and F. Buss (2003). "Loss of myosin VI

  9. Upscaling of U(VI) Desorption and Transport Using Decimeter-Scale Tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, Derrick [Colorado School of Mines

    2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental work was used to validate modeling studies and develop multicontinuum models of U(VI) transport in a contaminated aquifer. At the bench scale, it has been shown that U(VI) desorption is rate-limited and that rates are dependent on the bicarbonate concentration. Two decimeter-scale experiments were conducted in order to help establish rigorous upscaling approaches that could be tested at the tracer test and plume scales.

  10. Influences of Water Vapor on Cr(VI) Reduction by Gaseous Hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Baolin

    Columbia, Columbia, Missouri 65211 In Situ Gaseous Reduction (ISGR) using hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a technology the contaminants, H2S, and various soil components. In this study, Cr(VI) reduction by gaseous H2S was examined under various relative humidities (0-96.7%), concentrations of Cr(VI) (127-475 µg/g of solid), and H2S

  11. Chromium Isotope Fractionation During Reduction of Cr(VI) Under Saturated Flow Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jamieson-Hanes, Julia H.; Gibson, Blair D.; Lindsay, Matthew B.J.; Kim, Yeongkyoo; Ptacek, Carol J.; Blowes, David W. (Waterloo); (Kyungpook National University)

    2012-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Chromium isotopes are potentially useful indicators of Cr(VI) reduction reactions in groundwater flow systems; however, the influence of transport on Cr isotope fractionation has not been fully examined. Laboratory batch and column experiments were conducted to evaluate isotopic fractionation of Cr during Cr(VI) reduction under both static and controlled flow conditions. Organic carbon was used to reduce Cr(VI) in simulated groundwater containing 20 mg L{sup -1} Cr(VI) in both batch and column experiments. Isotope measurements were performed on dissolved Cr on samples from the batch experiments, and on effluent and profile samples from the column experiment. Analysis of the residual solid-phase materials by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and by X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy confirmed association of Cr(III) with organic carbon in the column solids. Decreases in dissolved Cr(VI) concentrations were coupled with increases in {delta}{sup 53}Cr, indicating that Cr isotope enrichment occurred during reduction of Cr(VI). The {delta}{sup 53}Cr data from the column experiment was fit by linear regression yielding a fractionation factor ({alpha}) of 0.9979, whereas the batch experiments exhibited Rayleigh-type isotope fractionation ({alpha} = 0.9965). The linear characteristic of the column {delta}{sup 53}Cr data may reflect the contribution of transport on Cr isotope fractionation.

  12. Thermodynamics of the Complexation of Uranium(VI) by oxalate in aqueous solution at 10-70oC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Di Bernardo, Plinio

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    O. Tochiyama in Chemical Thermodynamics of Compounds andUpdate on the Chemical Thermodynamics of Uranium, Neptunium,Thermodynamics of the Complexation of Uranium(VI) with

  13. Improving Memory Subsystem Performance Using ViVA: Virtual Vector Architecture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gebis, Joseph; Oliker, Leonid; Shalf, John; Williams, Samuel; Yelick, Katherine

    2009-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The disparity between microprocessor clock frequencies and memory latency is a primary reason why many demanding applications run well below peak achievable performance. Software controlled scratchpad memories, such as the Cell local store, attempt to ameliorate this discrepancy by enabling precise control over memory movement; however, scratchpad technology confronts the programmer and compiler with an unfamiliar and difficult programming model. In this work, we present the Virtual Vector Architecture (ViVA), which combines the memory semantics of vector computers with a software-controlled scratchpad memory in order to provide a more effective and practical approach to latency hiding. ViVA requires minimal changes to the core design and could thus be easily integrated with conventional processor cores. To validate our approach, we implemented ViVA on the Mambo cycle-accurate full system simulator, which was carefully calibrated to match the performance on our underlying PowerPC Apple G5 architecture. Results show that ViVA is able to deliver significant performance benefits over scalar techniques for a variety of memory access patterns as well as two important memory-bound compact kernels, corner turn and sparse matrix-vector multiplication -- achieving 2x-13x improvement compared the scalar version. Overall, our preliminary ViVA exploration points to a promising approach for improving application performance on leading microprocessors with minimal design and complexity costs, in a power efficient manner.

  14. Microbial Reductive Transformation of Phyllosilicate Fe(III) and U(VI) in Fluvial Subsurface Sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Ji-Hoon; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Boyanov, Maxim I.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Lin, Xueju; Kennedy, David W.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Konopka, Allan; Moore, Dean A.; Resch, Charles T.; Phillips, Jerry L.

    2012-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The microbial reduction of Fe(III) and U(VI) were investigated in shallow aquifer sediments collected from subsurface Pleistocene flood deposits near the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River in Washington State. Increases in 0.5 N HCl-extractable Fe(II) were observed in incubated sediments and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy revealed that Fe(III) associated with phyllosilicates and pyroxene was reduced to Fe(II). Aqueous uranium(VI) concentrations decreased in incubated Hanford sediments with the rate and extent being greater in sediment amended with organic carbon. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of bioreduced sediments indicated that 67-77% of the U signal was U(VI), probably as an adsorbed species associated with a new or modified reactive mineral phase. Phylotypes within the Deltaproteobacteria were more common in Hanford sediments incubated with U(VI) than without and in U(VI)-free incubations, members of the Clostridiales were dominant with sulfate-reducing phylotypes more common in the sulfate-amended sediments. These results demonstrate the potential for anaerobic reduction phyllosilicate Fe(III) and sulfate in Hanford unconfined aquifer sediments and biotransformations involving reduction and adsorption leading to decreased aqueous U concentrations.

  15. Sediment studies of the biological factors controlling the reduction of U(VI).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lovley, derek, R.

    2004-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies were conducted primarily with sediments, both in laboratory incubations and in a field experiment, with supporting studies with pure cultures. To our knowledge the sediment studies were the first on microbial U(VI) reduction in actual uranium-contaminated subsurface sediments, under conditions that mimic those found in situ. Important findings included: (1) U(VI) reduction is a biotic process in subsurface sediments. (2) U(VI) reduction can be stimulated most effectively with the addition of acetate. Although it had been speculated that microbial U(VI) reduction might be capable of this type of environmental remediation ever since the discovery of microbial U(VI) reduction, this had not been previously demonstrated under environmentally relevant conditions. (3) U(VI) is reduced concurrently with Fe(III) and prior to sulfate reduction. U(VI) and Fe(III) reduction proceeded concurrently, accompanied by a dramatic enrichment in organisms in the Geobacteraceae. Sulfate-reducing microorganisms do not appear to be important components of the microbial community reducing U(VI) in these subsurface sediments. (4) Nitrate has important influences on U(VI) reduction. Nitrate inhibits the reduction of metals until nitrate is depleted. Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms such as Geobacter metallireducens and Desulfitobacterium species can oxidize Fe(II) with the reduction of nitrate which is an important consideration because our previous studies have demonstrated that freshly precipitated Fe(III) oxides can reoxidize U(IV) to U(VI). The discovery that G. metallireducens can ''run backwards'' and oxidize U(IV) when nitrate is present reveals another mechanism preventing precipitation of U(IV) in the presence of nitrate as well as potential novel strategy for removing uranium from the subsurface after a site has been remediated. (5) Importance of understanding Fe(III) forms available for microbial reduction. Fe(III) is orders of magnitude more abundant than U(VI) as an electron acceptor to support microbial growth. It was demonstrated that poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxides and structural Fe(III) in clays are the predominant forms of microbially reducible Fe(III). Such findings are important for the development of models of Fe(III) reduction in similar aquifer environments, such as those found at many UMTRA sites. (6) Mechanisms for Fe(III) oxide reduction. It was discovered that phylogenetically distinct Fe(III) reducer have different strategies for reducing Fe(III) and the fact that Geobacter species must directly contact Fe(III) in order to reduce it may help explain its predominance over other Fe(III) reducers in the subsurface. (7) Transfer of laboratory results to the field. Results from laboratory studies were used to design a field experiment in which U(VI) reduction was successfully precipitated from the contaminated water with the injection of acetate.

  16. Differential isotopic fractionation during Cr(VI) reduction by an aquifer-derived bacterium under arobic versus denitrifying conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, R.; Qin, L.; Brown, S. T.; Christensen, J. N.; Beller, H. R.

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We studied Cr isotopic fractionation during Cr(VI) reduction by Pseudomonas stutzeri strain RCH2. Despite the fact that strain RCH2 reduces Cr(VI) co-metabolically under both aerobic and denitrifying conditions and at similar specific rates, fractionation was markedly different under these two conditions (ε ~2? aerobically and ~0.4? under denitrifying conditions).

  17. UMBC Policy VI-10.00.01 Page 1 of 5 UMBC POLICY ON POLICY FORMULATION AND MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adali, Tulay

    UMBC Policy VI-10.00.01 Page 1 of 5 UMBC POLICY ON POLICY FORMULATION AND MANAGEMENT UMBC Policy No. VI-10.00.01 I. POLICY STATEMENT The UMBC community should have access to well-articulated and understandable University Policies and related Operating Procedures. Those responsible for writing, updating

  18. From 1D Chain to 3D Network: Tuning Hybrid II-VI Nanostructures and Their Optical Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jing

    and synthesized a family of novel organic-inorganic hybrid nanocomposites based on II-VI semiconductorsFrom 1D Chain to 3D Network: Tuning Hybrid II-VI Nanostructures and Their Optical Properties of these nanocomposite materials have been characterized by single crystal and/or powder X-ray diffraction methods. [Zn

  19. Adsorption of Chromium (VI) by metal hydroxide sludge from the metal finishing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Adsorption of Chromium (VI) by metal hydroxide sludge from the metal finishing Loïc Perrin Ecole sludge (MHS) during the treatment of their liquid effluents charged with heavy metals. Generally, a small part of these sludge is valorized because of their important metal fickleness. Consequently

  20. Clostridium chromiireducens sp. nov., isolated from Cr(VI)-contaminated soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    by its ability to reduce Cr(VI) in low concentrations. Mixed acid fermentation during growth on glucose resulted in accumulation of acetate, butyrate, formate and lactate. Morphological studies indicated the presence of peritrichous flagella, pili and an S-layer. The major cellular fatty acids (.5 %) were C16 : 0

  1. Microbial reduction of iron(III)-rich nontronite and uranium(VI)1 Gengxin Zhang1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgos, William

    speciation and varied sorption affinity for sediment minerals. Poorly41 soluble U(IV) minerals and highly). Soluble U(VI) species can be43 biologically or chemically reduced to the sparingly soluble U(IV) mineral situ remediation of contaminated sites (Anderson et al., 2003; Istok et al., 2004; Wu et46 al., 2006a

  2. Dendritic Chelating Agents. 2. U(VI) Binding to Poly(amidoamine) and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    fuel rods (2). While sorption has been primarily employed in nuclear waste management to treat aqueous nitric acid solutions in spent nuclear fuel processing facilities. Although SE and IX are well streams is a key compo- nent of the uranium nuclear fuel cycle (1­4). Uranyl [U(VI)] is the most stable

  3. VI. ICRF HEATING D. B. BATCHELOR (ORNL), M. D. CARTER (ORNL), R. H. GOULDING (ORNL),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VI. ICRF HEATING D. B. BATCHELOR (ORNL), M. D. CARTER (ORNL), R. H. GOULDING (ORNL), D. J. HOFFMAN in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) has been chosen as the primary auxiliary heating technique for BPX. This decision is based on the wide successof ICRF heating in existing large-scale experiments

  4. Field Investigations of Lactate-Stimulated Bioreduction of Cr(VI) at Hanford 100H

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. C. Hazen; B. Faybishenko; D. Joyner; S. Borglin; E. Brodie; S.; K. Williams; J. Peterson; J. Wan; T. Tokunaga; M.; P. E. Long; Resch, C.T.; Newcomer, D.; Koenigsberg, S.; Willet, A.

    2005-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this paper is to carry out field investigations to assess the potential for immobilizing and detoxifying chromium-contaminated groundwater using lactate-stimulated bioreduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) at the Hanford 100H site.

  5. ViDE: A Vision-Based Approach for Deep Web Data Extraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ViDE: A Vision-Based Approach for Deep Web Data Extraction Wei Liu, Xiaofeng Meng, Member, IEEE, and Weiyi Meng, Member, IEEE Abstract--Deep Web contents are accessed by queries submitted to Web databases and the returned data records are enwrapped in dynamically generated Web pages (they will be called deep Web pages

  6. RisNyt NO2 2005 I de kommende rtier vil vi se store

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    fjerde i en se- rie, der sætter energiemner i perspektiv på globalt, regionalt og dansk niveau. Danmark har gode muligheder for at bevare førertrøjen I Danmark er vi allerede nået langt. Energi vigtigere rolle og især vindenergi er kraftigt udbygget. Samtidig kan Danmark fungere som en slags "buffer

  7. Klumme til Politikens Vid&Sans 17/12-2006 Hvad skal vi med rumforskning?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andersen, Anja C.

    investering i rumforskning til verdens fattigste, så ville det ikke batte meget. Danmark bruger omkring 250 omkanalisere. Danmark bør tværtimod satse endnu mere på rumforskning. Hvis vi valgte at etablere os mere givet konkurrencefordele. Danmark kan som medlem af den Europæiske Rumfartsorganisation (ESA) spille en

  8. Characterization of a type vi secretion system and related proteins of pseudomonas syringae 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Records, Angela Renee

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    728a genome encodes a novel secretion pathway, the type VI secretion system (T6SS), that functions to deliver at least one protein outside of the bacterial cell. Western blot analyses show that this secretion is dependent on clpV, a gene that likely...

  9. PHYS 2750, Winter 2014 page 1 of 2 General Physics VI: Modern Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quirion, Guy

    PHYS 2750, Winter 2014 page 1 of 2 General Physics VI: Modern Physics PHYS 2750 1. What is this course all about? The Golden Age of Physics is often referred to as the the period from the late 1800's up to about the mid 1900's. Physics 2750 is a course which explores many of the fundamental

  10. VI. SENSOR CALIBRATIONS One of the most important aspects of high

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    13 VI. SENSOR CALIBRATIONS One of the most important aspects of high quality solar radiation be determined (in volts/watts/meter2 ). This is done by simulta- neously comparing the measured output to an input signal must be determined. For the CR-10 data logger this means check- ing the relation between

  11. AFS-2 FLOWSHEET MODIFICATIONS TO ADDRESS THE INGROWTH OF PU(VI) DURING METAL DISSOLUTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crapse, K.; Rudisill, T.; O'Rourke, P.; Kyser, E.

    2014-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    In support of the Alternate Feed Stock Two (AFS-2) PuO{sub 2} production campaign, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) conducted a series of experiments concluding that dissolving Pu metal at 95°C using a 6–10 M HNO{sub 3} solution containing 0.05–0.2 M KF and 0–2 g/L B could reduce the oxidation of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI) as compared to dissolving Pu metal under the same conditions but at or near the boiling temperature. This flowsheet was demonstrated by conducting Pu metal dissolutions at 95°C to ensure that PuO{sub 2} solids were not formed during the dissolution. These dissolution parameters can be used for dissolving both Aqueous Polishing (AP) and MOX Process (MP) specification materials. Preceding the studies reported herein, two batches of Pu metal were dissolved in the H-Canyon 6.1D dissolver to prepare feed solution for the AFS-2 PuO{sub 2} production campaign. While in storage, UV-visible spectra obtained from an at-line spectrophotometer indicated the presence of Pu(VI). Analysis of the solutions also showed the presence of Fe, Ni, and Cr. Oxidation of Pu(IV) produced during metal dissolution to Pu(VI) is a concern for anion exchange purification. Anion exchange requires Pu in the +4 oxidation state for formation of the anionic plutonium(IV) hexanitrato complex which absorbs onto the resin. The presence of Pu(VI) in the anion feed solution would require a valence adjustment step to prevent losses. In addition, the presence of Cr(VI) would result in absorption of chromate ion onto the resin and could limit the purification of Pu from Cr which may challenge the purity specification of the final PuO{sub 2} product. Initial experiments were performed to quantify the rate of oxidation of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI) (presumed to be facilitated by Cr(VI)) as functions of the HNO{sub 3} concentration and temperature in simulated dissolution solutions containing Cr, Fe, and Ni. In these simulated Pu dissolutions studies, lowering the temperature from near boiling to 95 °C reduced the oxidation rate of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI). For 8.1 M HNO{sub 3} simulated dissolution solutions, at near boiling conditions >35% Pu(VI) was present in 50 h while at 95 °C <10% Pu(VI) was present at 50 h. At near boiling temperatures, eliminating the presence of Cr and varying the HNO{sub 3} concentration in the range of 7–8.5 M had little effect on the rate of conversion of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI). HNO{sub 3} oxidation of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI) in a pure solution has been reported previously. Based on simulated dissolution experiments, this study concluded that dissolving Pu metal at 95°C using a 6 to 10 M HNO{sub 3} solution 0.05–0.2 M KF and 0–2 g/L B could reduce the rate of oxidation of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI) as compared to near boiling conditions. To demonstrate this flowsheet, two small-scale experiments were performed dissolving Pu metal up to 6.75 g/L. No Pu-containing residues were observed in the solutions after cooling. Using Pu metal dissolution rates measured during the experiments and a correlation developed by Holcomb, the time required to completely dissolve a batch of Pu metal in an H-Canyon dissolver using this flowsheet was estimated to require nearly 5 days (120 h). This value is reasonably consistent with an estimate based on the Batch 2 and 3 dissolution times in the 6.1D dissolver and Pu metal dissolution rates measured in this study and by Rudisill et al. Data from the present and previous studies show that the Pu metal dissolution rate decreases by a factor of approximately two when the temperature decreased from boiling (112 to 116°C) to 95°C. Therefore, the time required to dissolve a batch of Pu metal in an H-Canyon dissolver at 95°C would likely double (from 36 to 54 h) and require 72 to 108 h depending on the surface area of the Pu metal. Based on the experimental studies, a Pu metal dissolution flowsheet utilizing 6–10 M HNO{sub 3} containing 0.05–0.2 M KF (with 0–2 g/L B) at 95°C is recommended to reduce the oxidation of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI) as compared to near boiling conditions. The time required to completely di

  12. Adsorption of Fe(II) and U(VI) to carboxyl-functionalized microspheres: The influence of speciation on uranyl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roden, Eric E.

    Adsorption of Fe(II) and U(VI) to carboxyl-functionalized microspheres: The influence of speciation­1912 #12;controlled by adsorption and/or precipitation reactions, which can be manipulated to cont

  13. Lord Julian Hunt FRS Meteorological Office 1990-1992 Professor VI Arnold Steklov Institute, Moscow 1990-1993

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lord Julian Hunt FRS Meteorological Office 1990-1992 Professor VI Arnold Steklov Institute, Moscow 1990-1993 Professor PG Burke FRS Queen's University, Belfast 1990-1993 Professor IG Halliday University

  14. Process for forming shaped group II-VI semiconductor nanocrystals, and product formed using process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alivisatos, A. Paul (Oakland, CA); Peng, Xiaogang (Fayetteville, AR); Manna, Liberato (Palo del Colle, IT)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the formation of shaped Group II-VI semiconductor nanocrystals comprises contacting the semiconductor nanocrystal precursors with a liquid media comprising a binary mixture of phosphorus-containing organic surfactants capable of promoting the growth of either spherical semiconductor nanocrystals or rod-like semiconductor nanocrystals, whereby the shape of the semiconductor nanocrystals formed in said binary mixture of surfactants is controlled by adjusting the ratio of the surfactants in the binary mixture.

  15. Gain measurements at 182 /angstrom/ in C VI generated by a Nd/glass laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, D.; Skinner, C.H.; Umesh, G.; Suckewer, S.

    1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present recent gain measurements in C VI at 182 A for a soft x-ray amplifier produced by a line-focused glass laser(1.053 ..mu..m) on a solid carbon target. The maximum gain measured was 8 +- 1 cm/sup /minus/1/ in the recombining plasma column with additional radiation cooling by iron impurities. 10 refs., 3 figs.

  16. TREATMENT TESTS FOR EX SITU REMOVAL OF CHROMATE & NITRATE & URANIUM (VI) FROM HANFORD (100-HR-3) GROUNDWATER FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BECK MA; DUNCAN JB

    1994-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes batch and ion exchange column laboratory scale studies investigating ex situ methods to remove chromate (chromium [VI]), nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup -}) and uranium (present as uranium [VI]) from contaminated Hanford site groundwaters. The technologies investigated include: chemical precipitation or coprecipitation to remove chromate and uranium; and anion exchange to remove chromate, uranium and nitrate. The technologies investigated were specified in the 100-HR-3 Groundwater Treatability Test Plan. The method suggested for future study is anion exchange.

  17. Electrode Induced Removal and Recovery of Uranium (VI) from Acidic Subsurfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory, Kelvin [Carnegie Mellon University

    2013-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The overarching objective of this research is to provide an improved understanding of how aqueous geochemical conditions impact the removal of U and Tc from groundwater and how engineering design may be utilized to optimize removal of these radionuclides. Experiments were designed to address the unique conditions in Area 3 of ORNL while also providing broader insight into the geochemical effectors of the removal rates and extent for U and Tc. The specific tasks of this work were to: 1) quantify the impact of common aqueous geochemical and operational conditions on the rate and extent of U removal and recovery from water, 2) investigate the removal of Tc with polarized graphite electrode, and determine the influence of geochemical and operational conditions on Tc removal and recovery, 3) determine whether U and Tc may be treated simultaneous from Area 3 groundwater, and examine the bench-scale performance of electrode-based treatment, and 4) determine the capacity of graphite electrodes for U(VI) removal and develop a mathematical, kinetic model for the removal of U(VI) from aqueous solution. Overall the body of work suggests that an electrode-based approach for the remediation of acidic subsurface environments, such as those observed in Area 3 of ORNL may be successful for the removal for both U(VI) and Tc. Carbonaceous (graphite) electrode materials are likely to be the least costly means to maximize removal rates and efficiency by maximizing the electrode surface area.

  18. Interactions of Aqueous U(VI) with Soil Minerals in Slightly Alkaline Natural Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qafoku, Nik; Icenhower, Jonathan P.

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uranium (U) is a common contaminant at numerous surface and subsurface sites around the world. This paper covers some important aspects of the aqueous hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] interactions with soil minerals that are present in contaminated soils and sediments. The retention of U via interactions with soil minerals has significant consequences for the prediction of its short – and long – term behavior in soils and geological systems. Studies of the nature and type of these interactions have provided the necessary evidence for assessing the geochemical behavior of U in natural systems under different physical, biogeochemical, hydrological, and reducing or oxidizing conditions. Over the last 20 years, aqueous U(VI):solid phase interactions have been studied by geochemists, soil chemists, soil mineralogists and soil microbiologists, and the progress in some areas is remarkable. Although a mechanistic description and understanding of the complex interactions involving U and soil minerals of natural systems is currently impossible, results from carefully designed and executed experiments with these materials have improved our understanding of the heterogeneous system’s behavior and U contaminant mobility and transport. There are, however, areas that need further exploration and study. Numerous research publications were reviewed in this paper to present important findings coming out of the research, to reveal the current level of the understanding of the U(VI) interactions with soil minerals, and to provide ideas for future needs and research directions.

  19. Equations of state of ice VI and ice VII at high pressure and high temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bezacier, Lucile; Hanfland, Michael [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, 38000 Grenoble (France); Journaux, Baptiste; Perrillat, Jean-Philippe; Cardon, Hervé; Daniel, Isabelle [Laboratoire de Géologie de Lyon, UMR 5276 CNRS, Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon – Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 2 rue Raphael Dubois, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2014-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    High-pressure H{sub 2}O polymorphs among which ice VI and ice VII are abundant in the interiors of large icy satellites and exo-planets. Knowledge of the elastic properties of these pure H{sub 2}O ices at high-temperature and high-pressure is thus crucial to decipher the internal structure of icy bodies. In this study we assess for the first time the pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) relations of both polycrystalline pure ice VI and ice VII at high pressures and temperatures from 1 to 9 GPa and 300 to 450 K, respectively, by using in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The PVT data are adjusted to a second-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state and give V{sub 0} = 14.17(2) cm{sup 3}?mol{sup ?1}, K{sub 0} = 14.05(23) GPa, and ?{sub 0} = 14.6(14) × 10{sup ?5} K{sup ?1} for ice VI and V{sub 0} = 12.49(1) cm{sup 3}?mol{sup ?1}, K{sub 0} = 20.15(16) GPa, and ?{sub 0} = 11.6(5) × 10{sup ?5} K{sup ?1} for ice VII.

  20. Selenium(IV) and (VI) sorption by soils surrounding fly ash management facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyun, S.; Burns, P.E.; Murarka, I.; Lee, L.S. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Leachate derived from unlined coal ash disposal facilities is one of the most significant anthropogenic sources of selenium to the environment. To establish a practical framework for predicting transport of selenium in ash leachate, sorption of Se(IV) and Se(VI) from 1 mM CaSO{sub 4} was measured for 18 soils obtained down-gradient from three ash landfill sites and evaluated with respect to several soil properties. Furthermore, soil attenuation from lab-generated ash leachate and the effect of Ca{sup 2+} and SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} concentrations as well as pH on both Se(IV) and Se(VI) was quantified for a subset of soils. For both Se(IV) and Se(VI), pH combined with either percentage clay or dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate (DCB)-extractable Fe described {gt} 80% of the differences in sorption across all soils, yielding an easy approach for making initial predictions regarding site-specific selenium transport to sensitive water bodies. Se(IV) consistently exhibited an order of magnitude greater sorption than Se(VI). Selenium sorption was highest at lower pH values, with Se(IV) sorption decreasing at pH values above 6, whereas Se(VI) decreased over the entire pH range (2.5-10). Using these pH adsorption envelopes, the likely effect of ash leachate-induced changes in soil pore water pH with time on selenium attenuation by down gradient soils can be predicted. Selenium sorption increased with increasing Ca{sup 2+} concentrations while SO{sub 4}2- suppressed sorption well above enhancements by Ca{sup 2+}. Soil attenuation of selenium from ash leachates agreed well with sorption measured from 1 mM CaSO{sub 4}, indicating that 1 mM CaSO{sub 4} is a reasonable synthetic leachate for assessing selenium behavior at ash landfill sites.

  1. Investigations of HRC®-Stimulated Bioreduction of Cr(VI) at Hanford 100H

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.C. Hazen; B. Faybishenko; D. Joyner; S. Borglin; E.Brodie; S. Hubbard; K. Williams; J. Peterson; J. Wan; T. Tokunaga; Long, P.E.; Newcomer, D.; Koenigsberg, S.; Willet, A.

    2005-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Hypothesis: Lactate (Hydrogen Release Compound-HRC{trademark}) injection into chromium contaminated groundwater through an injection well will cause indirect or direct bioreduction of chromate [Cr(VI)] and precipitation of insoluble species of [Cr(III)] on soil particles, probably catalyzed at oxide surfaces, at the field scale. Objective: Assess the potential for immobilizing and detoxifying chromium-contaminated groundwater using lactate-stimulated bioreduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) at the Hanford Site's 100-H Area field site. Types of Research: A three-well system (injection well and upgradient and downgradient monitoring wells) was used for conducting the in situ biostimulation and monitoring. To assess the pre- and post-injection test groundwater conditions, we used an integrated monitoring approach, involving hydraulic, geochemical, microbial, and geophysical techniques and analytical methods, as well as conducted five Br-tracer injection tests and four pumping tests (concurrently with the Br-tracer tests). Groundwater biostimulation was conducted by injection of 40 lbs of {sup 13}C-labeled HRC into the injection well (over the depth interval from 44-50 ft) on 8/3/2004, followed by low-flow pumping (1.2 to 2.5 l/min) through the downgradient well (to ensure capture of groundwater flow lines passing through the injection well) for 27 days. Main Results: Although the total microbial population in sediments is relatively low (<10{sup 5} cells g-1) under background conditions, which is likely insufficient for direct enzymatic Cr(VI) reduction, several types of bacteria, e.g., Bacillus/Arthrobacter and Geobacter, are present in the Hanford sediments, which are known to reduce or sorb hexavalent chromium. The HRC injection stimulated microbial cell counts to reach the maximum of 2 x 10{sup 7} cells g{sup -1} 13-17 days after the injection, and generated highly reducing conditions. Geochemical and isotopic observations confirmed microbial metabolism of HRC. The Cr(VI) concentration in the monitoring and pumping wells decreased below drinking water minimum contaminant limits and remained below background concentrations even after 1.5 years, when redox conditions and microbial densities had returned to background levels. Fe(II) levels have remained high and may account for the continued reduction of Cr(VI).

  2. Investigations of HRC®-Stimulated Bioreduction of Cr(VI) at Hanford 100H

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazen, T.C.; Faybishenko, B.; Joyner, D.; Borglin, S.; Brodie, E.; Hubbard, S.; Williams, K.; Peterson, J.; Wan, J.; Tokunaga, T.; Firestone, M.; Long, P.E.; Resch, C.T.; Cantrell, K.; Newcomer, D.; Koenigsberg, S.; Willet, A.

    2006-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Hypothesis: Lactate (Hydrogen Release Compound-HRC{trademark}) injection into chromium contaminated groundwater through an injection well will cause indirect or direct bioreduction of chromate [Cr(VI)] and precipitation of insoluble species of [Cr(III)] on soil particles, probably catalyzed at oxide surfaces, at the field scale. Objective: Assess the potential for immobilizing and detoxifying chromium-contaminated groundwater using lactate-stimulated bioreduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) at the Hanford Site's 100-H Area field site. Types of Research: A three-well system (injection well and upgradient and downgradient monitoring wells) was used for conducting the in situ biostimulation and monitoring. To assess the pre- and post-injection test groundwater conditions, we used an integrated monitoring approach, involving hydraulic, geochemical, microbial, and geophysical techniques and analytical methods, as well as conducted five Br-tracer injection tests and four pumping tests (concurrently with the Br-tracer tests). Groundwater biostimulation was conducted by injection of 40 lbs of {sup 13}C-labeled HRC into the injection well (over the depth interval from 44-50 ft) on 8/3/2004, followed by low-flow pumping (1.2 to 2.5 l/min) through the downgradient well (to ensure capture of groundwater flow lines passing through the injection well) for 27 days. Main Results: Although the total microbial population in sediments is relatively low (<10{sup 5} cells g{sup -1}) under background conditions, which is likely insufficient for direct enzymatic Cr(VI) reduction, several types of bacteria, e.g., Bacillus/Arthrobacter and Geobacter, are present in the Hanford sediments, which are known to reduce or sorb hexavalent chromium. The HRC injection stimulated microbial cell counts to reach the maximum of 2 x 10{sup 7} cells g{sup -1} 13-17 days after the injection, and generated highly reducing conditions. Geochemical and isotopic observations confirmed microbial metabolism of HRC. The CR(VI) concentration in the monitoring and pumping wells decreased below drinking water minimum contaminant limits and remained below background concentrations even after 1.5 years, when redox conditions and microbial densities had returned to background levels. Fe(II) levels have remained high and may account for the continued reduction of Cr(VI).

  3. Innovative Approach to Prevent Acid Drainage from Uranium Mill Tailings Based on the Application of Na-Ferrate (VI)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernandes, H.M.; Reinhart, D.; Lettie, L.; Franklin, M.R. [University of Central Florida, P.O. Box. 162450, Orlando, FL, 32816-2450 (United States); Fernandes, H.M.; Franklin, M.R. [Institute of Radiation Protection and Dosimetry (IRD), Av. Salvador Allende s/n - Recreio - Rio de Janeiro - RJ - 22795-090 (Brazil); Sharma, V. [Florida Institute of Technology, 150 West University Boulevard, Melbourne, FL 32901 (United States); Daly, L.J. [Ferrate Treatment Technologies, LLC, 6432 Pine Castle Blvd. Unit 2C, Orlando, FL, 32809 (United States)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The operation of uranium mining and milling plants gives rise to huge amounts of wastes from both mining and milling operations. When pyrite is present in these materials, the generation of acid drainage can take place and result in the contamination of underground and surface waters through the leaching of heavy metals and radionuclides. To solve this problem, many studies have been conducted to find cost-effective solutions to manage acid mine drainage; however, no adequate strategy to deal with sulfide-ric h wastes is currently available. Ferrate (VI) is a powerful oxidizing agent in aqueous media. Under acidic conditions, the redox potential of the Ferrate (VI) ion is the highest of any other oxidant used in wastewater treatment processes. The standard half cell reduction potential of ferrate (VI) has been determined as +2.20 V to + 0.72 V in acidic and basic solutions, respectively. Ferrate (VI) exhibits a multitude of advantageous properties, including higher reactivity and selectivity than traditional oxidant alternatives, as well as disinfectant, flocculating, and coagulant properties. Despite numerous beneficial properties in environmental applications, ferrate (VI) has remained commercially unavailable. Starting in 1953, different methods for producing a high purity, powdered ferrate (VI) product were developed. However, producing this dry, stabilized ferrate (VI) product required numerous process steps which led to excessive synthesis costs (over $20/lb) thereby preventing bulk industrial use. Recently a novel synthesis method for the production of a liquid ferrate (VI) based on hypochlorite oxidation of ferric ion in strongly alkaline solutions has been discovered (USPTO 6,790,428; September 14, 2004). This on-site synthesis process dramatically reduces manufacturing cost for the production of ferrate (VI) by utilizing common commodity feedstocks. This breakthrough means that for the first time ferrate (VI) can be an economical alternative to treating acid mining drainage generating materials. The objective of the present study was to investigate a methodology of preventing the generation of acid drainage by applying ferrate (VI) to acid generating materials prior to the disposal in impoundments or piles. Oxidizing the pyritic material in mining waste could diminish the potential for acid generation and its related environmental risks and long-term costs at disposal sites. The effectiveness of toxic metals removal from acid mine drainage by applying ferrate (VI) is also examined. Preliminary results presented in this paper show that the oxidation of pyrite by ferrate is a first-order rate reaction in Fe(VI) with a half-life of about six hours. The stability of Fe(VI) in water solutions will not influence the reaction rate in a significant manner. New low-cost production methods for making liquid ferrate on-site makes this technology a very attractive option to mitigate one of the most pressing environmental problems in the mining industry. (authors)

  4. Standard test method for uranium in presence of plutonium by iron(II) reduction in phosphoric acid followed by chromium(VI) titration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Standard test method for uranium in presence of plutonium by iron(II) reduction in phosphoric acid followed by chromium(VI) titration

  5. CONCERNING THE CLASSICAL CEPHEID VI{sub C} WESENHEIT FUNCTION'S STRONG METALLICITY DEPENDENCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majaess, D.; Turner, D. [Department of Astronomy and Physics, Saint Mary's University, Halifax, NS (Canada); Gieren, W., E-mail: dmajaess@cygnus.smu.ca [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Concepcion, Concepcion (Chile)

    2011-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Evidence is presented which supports findings that the classical Cepheid VI{sub C} period Wesenheit function is relatively insensitive to metallicity. The viability of a recently advocated strong metallicity dependence was evaluated by applying the proposed correction ({gamma} = -0.8 mag dex{sup -1}) to distances established for the Magellanic Clouds via a Galactic VI{sub C} Wesenheit calibration, which is anchored to 10 nearby classical Cepheids with measured Hubble Space Telescope (HST) parallaxes. The resulting {gamma}-corrected distances for the Magellanic Clouds (e.g., Small Magellanic Cloud, {mu}{sub 0,{gamma}} {approx} 18.3) are in significant disagreement with that established from a mean of >300 published estimates (NED-D), and a universal Wesenheit template featuring 11 {delta} Scuti, SX Phe, RR Lyrae, and Type II Cepheid variables with HST/Hipparcos parallaxes. Conversely, adopting a null correction (i.e., {gamma} = 0 mag dex{sup -1}) consolidates the estimates. In tandem with existing evidence, the results imply that variations in chemical composition among Cepheids are a comparatively negligible source of uncertainty for W{sub VIc}-based extragalactic distances and determinations of H{sub 0}. A new approach is described which aims to provide additional Galactic Cepheid calibrators to facilitate subsequent assessments of the VI{sub C} Wesenheit function's relative (in) sensitivity to abundance changes. VVV/UKIDSS/Two Micron All Sky Survey JHK{sub s} photometry for clusters in spiral arms shall be employed to establish a precise galactic longitude-distance relation, which can be applied in certain cases to determine the absolute Wesenheit magnitudes for younger Cepheids.

  6. Optimizing Cr(VI) and Tc(VII) remediation through nano-scale biomineral engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cutting, R. S.; Coker, V. S.; Telling, N. D.; Kimber, R. L.; Pearce, C. I.; Ellis, B.; Lawson, R; van der Laan, G.; Pattrick, R.A.D.; Vaughan, D.J.; Arenholz, E.; Lloyd, J. R.

    2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    To optimize the production of biomagnetite for the bioremediation of metal oxyanion contaminated waters, the reduction of aqueous Cr(VI) to Cr(III) by two biogenic magnetites and a synthetic magnetite was evaluated under batch and continuous flow conditions. Results indicate that nano-scale biogenic magnetite produced by incubating synthetic schwertmannite powder in cell suspensions of Geobacter sulfurreducens is more efficient at reducing Cr(VI) than either biogenic nano-magnetite produced from a suspension of ferrihydrite 'gel' or synthetic nano-scale Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} powder. Although X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) measurements obtained from post-exposure magnetite samples reveal that both Cr(III) and Cr(VI) are associated with nanoparticle surfaces, X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism (XMCD) studies indicate that some Cr(III) has replaced octahedrally coordinated Fe in the lattice of the magnetite. Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) measurements of total aqueous Cr in the associated solution phase indicated that, although the majority of Cr(III) was incorporated within or adsorbed to the magnetite samples, a proportion ({approx}10-15 %) was released back into solution. Studies of Tc(VII) uptake by magnetites produced via the different synthesis routes also revealed significant differences between them as regards effectiveness for remediation. In addition, column studies using a {gamma}-camera to obtain real time images of a {sup 99m}Tc(VII) radiotracer were performed to visualize directly the relative performances of the magnetite sorbents against ultra-trace concentrations of metal oxyanion contaminants. Again, the magnetite produced from schwertmannite proved capable of retaining more ({approx}20%) {sup 99m}Tc(VII) than the magnetite produced from ferrihydrite, confirming that biomagnetite production for efficient environmental remediation can be fine-tuned through careful selection of the initial Fe(III) mineral substrate supplied to Fe(III)-reducing bacteria.

  7. Rotational Augmentation Disparities in the MEXICO and UAE Phase VI Experiments: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schreck, S.; Sant, T.; Micallef, D.

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind turbine structures and components suffer excessive loads and premature failures when key aerodynamic phenomena are not well characterized, fail to be understood, or are inaccurately predicted. Turbine blade rotational augmentation remains incompletely characterized and understood, thus limiting robust prediction for design. Pertinent rotational augmentation research including experimental, theoretical, and computational work has been pursued for some time, but large scale wind tunnel testing is a relatively recent development for investigating wind turbine blade aerodynamics. Because of their large scale and complementary nature, the MEXICO and UAE Phase VI wind tunnel experiments offer unprecedented synergies to better characterize and understand rotational augmentation of blade aerodynamics.

  8. First use of a HyViSI H4RG for Astronomical Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simms, Lance M.; /SLAC; Figer, Donald F.; Hanold, Brandon J.; Kerr, Daniel J.; /Rochester Imaging Lab.; Gilmore, D.Kirk; Kahn, Steven M.; /SLAC; Tyson, J.Anthony; /UC,

    2007-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first astronomical results from a 4K2 Hybrid Visible Silicon PIN array detector (HyViSI) read out with the Teledyne Scientific and Imaging SIDECAR ASIC. These results include observations of astronomical standards and photometric measurements using the 2.1m KPNO telescope. We also report results from a test program in the Rochester Imaging Detector Laboratory (RIDL), including: read noise, dark current, linearity, gain, well depth, quantum efficiency, and substrate voltage effects. Lastly, we highlight results from operation of the detector in window read out mode and discuss its potential role for focusing, image correction, and use as a telescope guide camera.

  9. Tank Operations Contract No. DE-AC27-08R Vi4800

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesis of 2D AlloysTrails TakingR Vi4800 Modification

  10. Microbial Community Changes in Response to Ethanol or Methanol Amendments for U(VI) Reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A [ORNL; Brandt, Craig C [ORNL; Madden, Andrew [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Drake, Meghan M [ORNL; Kostka, Joel [Florida State University; Akob, Denise M. [Florida State University; Kusel, Kirsten [Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Jena Germany; Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microbial community responses to ethanol, methanol and methanol + humics amendments in relationship to uranium bioremediation were studied in laboratory microcosm experiments using sediments and ground water from a uranium-contaminated site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Ethanol addition always resulted in uranium reduction at rate of 0.8-1.0 mol l-1 d-1 while methanol addition did so occasionally at rate 0.95 mol l-1 d-1. The type of carbon source added, the duration of incubation, and the sampling site influenced the bacterial community structure upon incubation. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries indicated (1) bacterial communities found in ethanol- and methanol-amended samples with U(VI) reduction were similar due to presence of -Proteobacteria, and -Proteobacteria (members of the families Burkholderiaceae, Comamonadaceae, Oxalobacteraceae, and Rhodocyclaceae); (2) methanol-amended samples without U(VI) reduction exhibited the lowest diversity and the bacterial community contained 69.2-92.8% of the family Methylophilaceae; and (3) the addition of humics resulted in an increase of phylogenetic diversity of -Proteobacteria (Rodoferax, Polaromonas, Janthinobacterium, Methylophilales, unclassified) and Firmicutes (Desulfosporosinus, Clostridium).

  11. Microbial community changes during sustained Cr(VI) reduction at the 100H site in Hanford, WA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakraborty, Romy; Brodie, Eoin L; Faybishenko, Boris; Piceno, Yvette M; Tom, Lauren; Choudhuri, Swati; Beller, Harry R; Liu, Jenny; Torok, Tamas; Joyner, Dominique C; Joachimiak, Marcin P; Zhou, Aifen; Van Nostrand, Joy D; Zhou, Joe; Long, Phil E; Newcomer, Darrell R; Andersen, Gary L; Hazen, Terry C.

    2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Hexavalent Chromium is a widespread contaminant found in soil, sediment, and groundwater. In order to stimulate microbially-mediated reduction of Cr(VI), a poly-lactate compound (HRC) was injected into the Chromium-contaminated aquifer at the Hanford (WA) 100H site in 2004. Cr(VI) concentrations rapidly declined to below the detection limit and remained so for more than three years after injection. Based on the results of the bacterial community composition using high-density DNA 16S rRNA gene microarrays, we observed the community to transition through denitrifying, ironreducing and sulfate-reducing populations. As a result, we specifically focused isolation efforts on three bacterial species that were significant components of the community. Positive enrichments in defined anaerobic media resulted in the isolation of an iron-reducing Geobacter metallireducens-like isolate, a sulfate-reducing Desulfovibrio vukgaris-like strain and a nitrate-reducing Pseudomonas stutzeri-like isolate among several others. All of these isolates were capable of reducing Cr(VI) anoxically and have been submitted for genome sequencing to JGI. To further characterize the microbial, and geochemical mechanisms associated with in situ Cr(VI) reduction at the site, additional HRC was injected in 2008. The goal was to restimulate the indigenous microbial community and to regenerate the reducing conditions necessary for continued Cr(VI) bio-immobilization in the groundwater. Analysis of the microbial populations post-injection revealed that they recovered to a similar density as after the first injection in 2004. In this study, we present the results from our investigation into microbially-mediated Cr(VI) reduction at Hanford, and a comparison of the microbial community development following two HRC injections four years apart.

  12. Interaction of Pu(IV,VI) hydroxides/oxides with metal hydroxides/oxides in alkaline media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fedoseev, A.M.; Krot, N.N.; Budantseva, N.A.; Bessonov, A.A.; Nikonov, M.V.; Grigoriev, M.S.; Garnov, A.Y.; Perminov, V.P.; Astafurova, L.N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. of Physical Chemistry

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary goal of this investigation was to obtain data on the possibility, extent, and characteristics of interaction of Pu(IV) and (VI) with hydroxides and oxides of d-elements and other metals [Al(III), LA(III), and U(VI)] in alkaline media. Such information is important in fundamental understanding of plutonium disposition and behavior in Hanford Site radioactive tank waste sludge. These results supply essential data for determining criticality safety and in understanding transuranic waste behavior in storage, retrieval, and treatment of Hanford Site tank waste.

  13. MCNP calculations for criticality-safety benchmarks with ENDF/B-V and ENDF/B-VI libraries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iverson, J.L.; Mosteller, R.D.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MCNP Monte Carlo code, in conjunction with its continuous-energy ENDF/B-V and ENDF/B-VI cross-section libraries, has been benchmarked against results from 27 different critical experiments. The predicted values of k{sub eff} are in excellent agreement with the benchmarks, except for the ENDF/B-V results for solutions of plutonium nitrate and, to a lesser degree, for the ENDF/B-V and ENDF/B-VI results for a bare sphere of {sup 233}U.

  14. alaru lle laur: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: of stainless steel container materials is a potential problem for long-term radioactive waste storage-to-failure of relevant stainless steels in the annealed...

  15. ICF Program Status SNL Z Facility UR/LLE OMEGA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : · Continue to deliver products to DoD. · Eliminate backlog of surveillance units in FY 2007. · Accelerate dismantlement of retired weapons by 49% from FY 2006 to FY 2007. · Deliver B61-ALT357 First Production Unit (FPU existing oil/water wall (8/24/06 ­ 9/18/06) Remove existing hardware (7/27/06 ­ 8/23/06) Construct new oil

  16. LLE Review: Quarterly report, July--September 1994. Volume 60

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knauer, J.P. [ed.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains articles on efficient generation of second-harmonic radiation from short-pulse lasers; calculation of the stabilization cutoff wave numbers for the Rayleigh-Taylor instability; a high-frequency silicon optical modulator; the angular dependence of stimulated Brillouin scattering; and femtosecond dynamics of ladder polymers. Three of these articles--second-harmonic generation, Rayleigh-Taylor cutoff wave numbers, and angular dependence of Brillouin scattering--are directly related to the OMEGA Upgrade, currently under construction. A summary of the status of the OMEGA Upgrade laser facility and the NLUF News for FY94 are included in this volume.

  17. LLE 1994 annual report, October 1993--September 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the 1994 annual report for the University of Rochester, Laboratory for Laser Energetics. The report is presented as a series of research type reports. The titles emphasize the breadth of work carried out. They are: stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts; characterization of laser-produced plasma density profiles using grid image refractometry; transport and sound waves in plasmas with light and heavy ions; three-halves-harmonic radiation from long-scale-length plasmas revisited; OMEGA upgrade status report; target imaging and backlighting diagnosis; effect of electron collisions on ion-acoustic waves and heat flow; particle-in-cell code simulations of the interaction of gaussian ultrashort laser pulses with targets of varying initial scale lengths; characterization of thick cryogenic fuel layers: compensation for the lens effect using convergent beam interferometry; compact, multijoule-output, Nd:Glass, large-aperture ring amplifier; atomic force microscopy observation of water-induced morphological changes in Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} monolayer coatings; observation of longitudinal acceleration of electrons born in a high-intensity laser focus; spatial intensity nonuniformities of an OMEGA beam due to nonlinear beam propagation; calculated X-ray backlighting images of mixed imploded targets; evaluation of cosmic rays for use in the monitoring of the MEDUSA scintillator-photomultiplier diagnostic array; highly efficient second-harmonic generation of ultra-intense Nd:Glass laser pulses multiple cutoff wave numbers of the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability; ultrafast, all-silicon light modulator; angular dependence of the stimulated Brillouin scattering in homogeneous plasma; femtosecond excited-state dynamics of a conjugated ladder polymer.

  18. LLE Review, Volume 57. Quarterly report, October--December 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simon, A. [ed.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    During this quarter, the visible fruits of long design labors on the OMEGA Upgrade began to appear. The target mirror structure was put in place, along with the target chamber itself. The laser bay structures were also installed, and the bay is now being prepared to receive optomechanical, control, and laser assemblies. Further details are in the OMEGA Upgrade Status Report in this issue. Theory and analysis of previous experiments continued during this reporting period. Articles contained herein describe an improved theory of the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability; a novel proposal for characterizing plasma-density profiles by using grid image refractometry; a much-improved treatment of the damping of ion sound waves in a mixture of light and heavy ions; and, finally, a new interpretation of measurements of 3/2-harmonic radiation emitted from the long-scale-length plasmas created in earlier OMEGA experiments.

  19. LLE 2005 annual report, October 2004-September 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress in laser fusion this past year falls into five broad categories: (1) direct-drive results from OMEGA; (2) progress in the development of the cryogenic target system and experiments with cryogenic targets; (3) results for polar direct drive (the application of nonspherically disposed laser beams for direct-drive spherically symmetrically driven systems), which is of great interest for the National Ignition Facility (NIF); (4) fast ignition, which uses short-pulse (<100-ps), high-intensity (~1015-W) laser beams to ignite a compressed thermonuclear fusion capsule; and (5) high-energy-density physics results that use inertial fusion facilities to produce matter in extreme states that are central to understanding and modeling nuclear weapons phenomena important to the National Stockpile Stewardship Program.

  20. The Universal Arrow of Time V-VI: (Part V) Unpredictable dynamics (Part VI) Future of artificial intelligence - Art, not Science: Practical Application of Unpredictable Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oleg Kupervasser

    2013-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper consists of the two independent papers:(Part V) We see that exact equations of quantum and classical mechanics describe ideal dynamics which is reversible and leads to Poincare's returns. Real equations of physics describing observable dynamics, for example, hydrodynamic equations of viscous fluid, are irreversible and exclude Poincare's returns to the initial state. Besides, these equations describe systems in terms of macroparameters or phase distribution functions of microparameters. For many systems introduction of macroparameters that allow exhaustive describing of dynamics of the system is impossible. Their dynamics becomes unpredictable in principle, sometimes even unpredictable by the probabilistic way. We will refer to dynamics describing such system as unpredictable dynamics. Dynamics of unpredictable systems is not described and not predicted by scientific methods. Thus, the science itself puts boundaries for its applicability. But such systems can intuitively "understand itself" and "predict" the behavior "of its own" or even "communicate with each other" at intuitive level. (Part VI) Perspective of the future of artificial intellect (AI) is considered. It is shown that AI development in the future will be closer rather to art than to science. Complex dissipative systems whose behavior cannot be understood completely in principle will be the basis of AI. Nevertheless, it will not be a barrier for their practical use.

  1. Sequential Extraction Method for Determination of Fe(II/III) and U(IV/ VI) in Suspensions of Iron-Bearing Phyllosilicates and Uranium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgos, William

    (IV/VI) in clay mineral-U suspensions such that advanced spectroscopic techniques are required. Instead, we-times more Fe(II) than U(VI). INTRODUCTION Uranium contamination is a problem at many U.S. Department associated with phyllosilicate minerals is higher than the mass of iron associated with oxide minerals

  2. A modified model for calculating lattice thermal expansion of I{sub 2}-IV-VI{sub 3} and I{sub 3}-V-VI{sub 4} tetrahedral compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omar, M.S. [Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Salahaddin, Arbil, Kurdistan (Iraq)]. E-mail: dr_m_s_omar@yahoo.com

    2007-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A general empirical formula was found for calculating lattice thermal expansion for compounds having their properties extended for compound groups having different mean ionicity as well as more than one type of cation atoms with that of different numbers of them such as I{sub 2}-IV-VI{sub 3} and I{sub 3}-V-VI{sub 4}. The difference in the valence electrons for cations and anions in the compound was used to correlate the deviations caused by the compound ionicity. The ionicity effects, which are due to their different numbers for their types, were also added to the correlation equation. In general, the lattice thermal expansion for a compound semiconductor can be calculated from a relation containing melting point, mean atomic distance and number of valence electrons for the atoms forming the compound. The mean ionicity for the group compounds forming I{sub 2}-IV-VI{sub 3} was found to be 0.323 and 0.785 for the ternary group compounds of I{sub 3}-V-VI{sub 4}.

  3. Evidence for ice VI as an inclusion in cuboid diamonds from high P-T near infrared spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemley, Russell J.

    Evidence for ice VI as an inclusion in cuboid diamonds from high P-T near infrared spectroscopy H.W., Washington, D.C. 20015-1305, USA ABSTRACT Near infrared absorption (NIR) spectra of natural morphologically on heating to 1208C. The combination band of H2O at high pressure and temperature was measured using

  4. VI-8.00(B) UMCP POLICY ON STUDENT ALCOHOL AND OTHER DRUG ABUSE APPROVED BY PRESIDENT SEPTEMBER 9, 1992

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Teng

    VI-8.00(B) UMCP POLICY ON STUDENT ALCOHOL AND OTHER DRUG ABUSE APPROVED BY PRESIDENT SEPTEMBER 9, 1992 I. Policy The University of Maryland at College Park is dedicated to the pursuit and dissemination of drugs and alcohol. In keeping with this commitment, it is the policy of the University that the illegal

  5. Chemical modeling of arsenic(III, V) and selenium(IV, VI) adsorption by soils surrounding ash disposal facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, S.; Hyun, S.; Lee, L.S. [USDA, Riverside, CA (United States). US Salinity Laboratory

    2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Leachate derived from coal ash disposal facilities is a potential anthropogenic source of As and Se to the environment. To establish a practical framework for predicting attenuation and transport of As and Se in ash leachates, the adsorption of As(III), As(V), Se(IV), and Se(VI) had been characterized in prior studies for 18 soils obtained downgradient from ash landfill sites and representing a wide range of soil properties. The constant capacitance model was applied for the first time to describe As(III), As(V), Se(IV), and Se(VI) adsorption on soils as a function of equilibrium solution As(III), As(V), Se(IV), and Se(VI) concentrations. Prior applications of the model had been restricted to describing Se(IV) and As(V) adsorption by soils as a function of solution pH. The constant capacitance model was applied for the first time to describe As(III) and Se(VI) adsorption by soils. The model was able to describe adsorption of these ions on all soils as a function of solution ion concentration by optimizing only one adjustable parameter, the anion surface complexation constant. This chemical model represents an advancement over adsorption isotherm equation approaches that contain two empirical adjustable parameters. Incorporation of these anion surface complexation constants obtained with the constant capacitance model into chemical speciation transport models will allow simulation of soil solution anion concentrations under diverse environmental and agricultural conditions.

  6. Single-Cell Imaging and Spectroscopic Analyses of Cr(VI) Reduction on the Surface of Bacterial Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yuanmin; Sevinc, Papatya C.; Belchik, Sara M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Shi, Liang; Lu, H. Peter

    2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate single-cell reduction of toxic Cr(VI) by the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (MR-1), an important bioremediation process, using Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Our experiments indicate that the toxic and highly soluble Cr(VI) can be efficiently reduced to the less toxic and non-soluble Cr2O3 nanoparticles by MR-1. Cr2O3 is observed to emerge as nanoparticles adsorbed on the cell surface and its chemical nature is identified by EDX imaging and Raman spectroscopy. Co-localization of Cr2O3 and cytochromes by EDX imaging and Raman spectroscopy suggests a terminal reductase role for MR-1 surface-exposed cytochromes MtrC and OmcA. Our experiments revealed that the cooperation of surface proteins OmcA and MtrC makes the reduction reaction most efficient, and the sequence of the reducing reactivity of the MR-1 is: wild type > single mutant @mtrC or mutant @omcA > double mutant (@omcA-@mtrC). Moreover, our results also suggest that the direct microbial Cr(VI) reduction and Fe(II) (hematite)-mediated Cr(VI) reduction mechanisms may co-exist in the reduction processes.

  7. Model-based Analysis of Mixed Uranium(VI) Reduction by Biotic and Abiotic Pathways During in Situ Bioremediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Jiao; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan

    2013-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Uranium bioremediation has emerged as a potential strategy of cleanup of radionuclear contamination worldwide. An integrated geochemical & microbial community model is a promising approach to predict and provide insights into the bioremediation of a complicated natural subsurface. In this study, an integrated column-scale model of uranium bioremediation was developed, taking into account long-term interactions between biotic and abiotic processes. It is also combined with a comprehensive thermodynamic analysis to track the fate and cycling of biogenic species. As compared with other bioremediation models, the model increases the resolution of the connection of microbial community to geochemistry and establishes direct quantitative correlation between overall community evolution and geochemical variation, thereby accurately predicting the community dynamics under different sedimentary conditions. The thermodynamic analysis examined a recently identified homogeneous reduction of U(VI) by Fe(II) under dynamic sedimentary conditions across time and space. It shows that the biogenic Fe(II) from Geobacter metabolism can be removed rapidly by the biogenic sulphide from sulfate reducer metabolism, hence constituting one of the reasons that make the abiotic U(VI) reduction thermodynamically infeasible in the subsurface. Further analysis indicates that much higher influent concentrations of both Fe(II) and U(VI) than normal are required to for abiotic U(VI) reduction to be thermodynamically feasible, suggesting that the abiotic reduction cannot be an alternative to the biotic reduction in the remediation of uranium contaminated groundwater.

  8. Improving Soil Oklahoma State University, in compliance with Title VI and VII of the Civil Rights Act of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    Improving Soil Quality Oklahoma State University, in compliance with Title VI and VII of the Civil and June 30, 1914, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Director of Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma. This publication is printed

  9. Myosin VI is required for structural integrity of the apical surface of sensory hair cells in zebrafish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avraham, Karen

    Myosin VI is required for structural integrity of the apical surface of sensory hair cells deafness in humans and deafness in Snell's waltzer mice associated with abnormal fusion of hair cell and epithelial morphogenesis, the role of this protein in the sensory hair cells remains unclear. To investigate

  10. Influence of calcite on uranium(VI) reactive transport in the groundwater–river mixing zone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Rui; Liu, Chongxuan; Greskowiak, Janek; Prommer, Henning; Zachara, John M.; Zheng, Chunmiao

    2014-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Calcite is an important mineral that can affect uranyl reactive transport in subsurface sediments. This study investigated the distribution of calcite and its influence on uranyl adsorption and reactive transport in the groundwater-river mixing zone at US Hanford 300A, Washington State. Simulations using a 2D reactive transport model under field-relevant hydrogeochemical conditions revealed a complex distribution of calcite concentration as a result of dynamic groundwater-river interactions. The calcite concentration distribution in turn affected the spatial and temporal changes in aqueous carbonate, calcium, and pH, which subsequently influenced U(VI) mobility and discharge rates into the river. The results implied that calcite distribution and its concentration dynamics is an important consideration for field characterization, monitoring, and reactive transport prediction.

  11. Thermodynamic stabilities of U(VI) minerals: Estimated and observed relationships

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finch, R.J. [Univ. of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Gibbs free energies of formation ({Delta}G{degree}{sub f}) for several structurally related U(VI) minerals are estimated by summing the Gibbs energy contributions from component oxides. The estimated {Delta}G{degree}{sub f} values are used to construct activity-activity (stability) diagrams, and the predicted stability fields are compared with observed mineral occurrences and reaction pathways. With some exceptions, natural occurrences agree well with the mineral stability fields estimated for the systems SiO{sub 2}-CaO-UO{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2}-CaO-UO{sub 3}H{sub 2}O, providing confidence in the estimated thermodynamic values. Activity-activity diagrams are sensitive to small differences in {Delta}G{degree}{sub f} values, and mineral compositions must be known accurately, including structurally bound H{sub 2}O. The estimated {Delta}G{degree}{sub f} values are not considered reliable for a few minerals for two major reasons: (1) the structures of the minerals in question are not closely similar to those used to estimate the {Delta}G{sub f}* values of the component oxides, and/or (2) the minerals in question are exceptionally fine grained, leading to large surface energies that increase the effective mineral solubilities. The thermodynamic stabilities of uranium(VI) minerals are of interest for understanding the role of these minerals in controlling uranium concentrations in oxidizing groundwaters associated with uranium ore bodies, uranium mining and mill tailings and geological repositories for nuclear waste.

  12. Acceleration of Microbially Mediated U(VI) Reduction at a Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Colorado Plateau

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phil Long; Todd Anderson; Aaron Peacock; Steve Heald; Yun-Juan Chang; Dick Dayvault; Derek R. Lovley; C.T. Resch; Helen Vrionis; Irene Ortiz-Bernad; D.C. White

    2004-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A second field-scale electron donor amendment experiment was conducted in 2003 at the Old Rifle Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) site in Rifle, Colorado. The objective of the 2003 experiment (done in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Energy's UMTRA Groundwater Project) was to test the hypothesis that amendment of increased concentration of electron donor would result in an increased export of electron donor down gradient which in turn would create a larger zone of down-gradient U(VI) bioreduction sustained over a longer time period relative to the 2002 experiment (Anderson et al. 2003). During the first experiment (2002), {approx}3 mM acetate was amended to subsurface over a period of 3 months in a 15m by 18m by 2.5m volume comprised of 3 upgradient monitoring wells, 20 injection wells, and 15 down-gradient monitoring wells. After an initial one-month phase of metal reduction, bioavailable oxidized Fe was consumed near the injection gallery and the dominant terminal electron accepting process became sulfate reduction, rapidly consuming the injected acetate. For the 2003 experiment, we amended sufficient acetate ({approx}10 mM) to consume available sulfate and export acetate down-gradient where bioavailable oxidized Fe was still present. Data from the experiment indicate that acetate was exported further down gradient, resulting in a larger zone of microbial U(VI) reduction than for the 2002 experiment. Geohydrologic, geochemical, and microbiological data collected during the course of both experiments enable assessment of relative importance of a number of factors controlling the experimental outcomes. Companion posters by Anderson et al. and White et al. provide additional results.

  13. Complexation of Gluconate with Uranium(VI) in Acidic Solutions: Thermodynamic Study with Structural Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Zhicheng; Helms, G.; Clark, S. B.; Tian, Guoxin; Zanonato, PierLuigi; Rao, Linfeng

    2009-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the pC{sub H} range of 2.5 to 4.2, gluconate forms three uranyl complexes UO{sub 2}(GH{sub 4}){sup +}, UO{sub 2}(GH{sub 3})(aq), and UO{sub 2}(GH{sub 3})(GH{sub 4}){sup -}, through the following reactions: (1) UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} + GH{sub 4}{sup -} = UO{sub 2}(GH{sub 4}){sup +}, (2) UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} + GH{sub 4}{sup -} = UO{sub 2}(GH{sub 3})(aq) + H{sup +}, and (3) UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} + 2GH{sub 4}{sup -} = UO{sub 2}(GH{sub 3})(GH{sub 4}){sup -} + H{sup +}. Complexes were inferred from potentiometric, calorimetric, NMR, and EXAFS studies. Correspondingly, the stability constants and enthalpies were determined to be log {Beta}{sub 1} = 2.2 {+-} 0.3 and {Delta}H{sub 1} = 7.5 {+-} 1.3 kJ mol{sup -1} for reaction (1), log {Beta}{sub 2} = -(0.38 {+-} 0.05) and {Delta}H{sub 2} = 15.4 {+-} 0.3 kJ mol{sup -1} for reaction (2), and log {Beta}{sub 3} = 1.3 {+-} 0.2 and {Delta}H{sub 3} = 14.6 {+-} 0.3 kJ mol{sup -1} for reaction (3), at I = 1.0 M NaClO{sub 4} and t = 25 C. The UO{sub 2}(GH{sub 4}){sup +} complex forms through the bidentate carboxylate binding to U(VI). In the UO{sub 2}(GH{sub 3})(aq) complex, hydroxyl-deprotonated gluconate (GH{sub 3}{sup 2-}) coordinates to U(VI) through the five-membered ring chelation. For the UO{sub 2}(GH{sub 3})(GH{sub 4}){sup -} complex, multiple coordination modes are suggested. These results are discussed in the context of trivalent and pentavalent actinide complexation by gluconate.

  14. ELECTRONIC SOLUTION SPECTRA FOR URANIUM AND NEPTUNIUM IN OXIDATION STATES (III) TO (VI) IN ANHYDROUS HYDROGEN FLUORIDE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baluka, M.; Edelstein, N.; O'Donnell, T. A.

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectra have been recorded for solutions in anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (AHF) of uranium and neptunium in oxidation states (III) to (VI). The spectra for U(III), Np(III) and Np(IV) in AHF are very similar to those in acidified aqueous solution, but that for U(IV) suggests that the cationic species is UF{sub 2}{sup 2+}. The AHF spectra for the elements in oxidation states (V) and (VI) are not comparable with those of the formally analogous aqueous solutions, where the elements exist as well-defined dioxo-cations. However, the AHF spectra can be related to spectra in the gas phase, in the solid state or in non-aqueous solvents for each element in its appropriate oxidation state.

  15. Treatment tests for ex situ removal of chromate, nitrate, and uranium (VI) from Hanford (100-HR-3) groundwater. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck, M.A.; Duncan, J.B.

    1993-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes batch and anion exchange column laboratory-scale studies investigating ex situ methods to remove chromate (chromium [VI]), nitrate (NO{sub 3}), and uranium (present as uranyl (uranium [VI]) carbonato anionic species) from contaminated Hanford Site groundwaters. The technologies investigated include chemical precipitation or coprecipitation to remove chromate and uranium, and anion exchange to remove chromate, uranium, and nitrate. The technologies investigated were specified in the 100-HR-3 Groundwater Treatability Test Plan (DOE-RL 1993). The goal of these tests was to determine the best method to remove selected contaminants to below the concentration of the project performance goals. The raw data and observations made during these tests can be found in the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) laboratory notebooks (Beck 1992, Herting 1993). The method recommended for future study is anion exchange with Dowex 21K resin.

  16. O. DONY-HNAULT. 2014 Sur la radio-activit du peroxyde d'hydrogne. Travaux du laboratoire de l'Institut Physiologie. Solvay. t. VI. f 03.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    l'Institut Physiologie. Solvay. t. VI. f 03. L'eau oxygénée a la propriété d'émettre les radiations

  17. Co-implantation of group VI elements and N for formation of non-alloyed ohmic contacts for n-type semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw; Yu, Kin M.

    2004-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-alloyed, low resistivity contacts for semiconductors using Group III-V and Group II-VI compounds and methods of making are disclosed. Co-implantation techniques are disclosed.

  18. Upscaling of Long-Term U(VI) Desorption from Pore Scale Kinetics to Field-Scale Reactive Transport Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steefel, Carl I.; Li Li; Davis, J.A.; Curtis, G.P.; Honeyman, B.D.; Kent, D.B.; Kohler, M.; Rodriguez, D.R.; Johnson, K.J.; Miller, A.

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of the project is the development of scientifically defensible approaches for upscaling reactive transport models (RTM) through a detailed understanding of U(VI) desorption across several spatial scales: bench-, intermediate-, and field-scales. The central hypothesis of the project is that the development of this methodology will lead to a scientifically defensible approach for conceptual model development for multicomponent RTM at contaminated DOE sites, leading to predictive transport simulations with reduced uncertainty.

  19. Measurement of chromium VI and chromium III in stainless steel welding fumes with electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis and neutron activation analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lautner, Gerald Myron

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MEASUREMENT OF CHROMIUM VI AND CHROMIUM III IN STAINLESS STEEL WELDING FUMES WITH ELECTRON SPECTROSCOPY FOR CHEMICAL ANALYSIS AND NEUTRON ACTIVATION ANALYSIS A Thesis by GERALD MYRON LAUTNER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas Al...!M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1977 Major Subject: Industrial Hygiene MEASUREMENT OF CHROMIUM VI AND CHROMIUM III IN STAINLESS STEEL WELDING FUMES WITH ELECTRON SPECTROSCOPY...

  20. Methods for forming thin-film heterojunction solar cells from I-III-VI.sub. 2

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mickelsen, Reid A. (Bellevue, WA) [Bellevue, WA; Chen, Wen S. (Seattle, WA) [Seattle, WA

    1985-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved thin-film, large area solar cell, and methods for forming the same, having a relatively high light-to-electrical energy conversion efficiency and characterized in that the cell comprises a p-n type heterojunction formed of: (i) a first semiconductor layer comprising a photovoltaic active material selected from the class of I-III-VI.sub.2 chalcopyrite ternary materials which is vacuum deposited in a thin "composition-graded" layer ranging from on the order ot about 2.5 microns to about 5.0 microns (.congruent.2.5 .mu.m to .congruent.5.0 .mu.m) and wherein the lower region of the photovoltaic active material preferably comprises a low resistivity region of p-type semiconductor material having a superimposed region of relatively high resistivity, transient n-type semiconductor material defining a transient p-n homojunction; and (ii), a second semiconductor layer comprising a low resistivity n-type semiconductor material; wherein interdiffusion (a) between the elemental constituents of the two discrete juxtaposed regions of the first semiconductor layer defining a transient p-n homojunction layer, and (b) between the transient n-type material in the first semiconductor layer and the second n-type semiconductor layer, causes the The Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. EG-77-C-01-4042, Subcontract No. XJ-9-8021-1 awarded by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  1. Methods for forming thin-film heterojunction solar cells from I-III-VI{sub 2}

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mickelsen, R.A.; Chen, W.S.

    1985-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved thin-film, large area solar cell, and methods for forming the same are disclosed, having a relatively high light-to-electrical energy conversion efficiency and characterized in that the cell comprises a p-n type heterojunction formed of: (i) a first semiconductor layer comprising a photovoltaic active material selected from the class of I-III-VI{sub 2} chalcopyrite ternary materials which is vacuum deposited in a thin ``composition-graded`` layer ranging from on the order of about 2.5 microns to about 5.0 microns ({approx_equal}2.5 {mu}m to {approx_equal}5.0 {mu}m) and wherein the lower region of the photovoltaic active material preferably comprises a low resistivity region of p-type semiconductor material having a superimposed region of relatively high resistivity, transient n-type semiconductor material defining a transient p-n homojunction; and (ii) a second semiconductor layer comprising a low resistivity n-type semiconductor material; wherein interdiffusion occurs (a) between the elemental constituents of the two discrete juxtaposed regions of the first semiconductor layer defining a transient p-n homojunction layer, and (b) between the transient n-type material in the first semiconductor layer and the second n-type semiconductor layer. 16 figs.

  2. Methods for forming thin-film heterojunction solar cells from I-III-VI[sub 2

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mickelsen, R.A.; Chen, W.S.

    1982-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved thin-film, large area solar cell, and methods for forming the same are disclosed, having a relatively high light-to-electrical energy conversion efficiency and characterized in that the cell comprises a p-n type heterojunction formed of: (1) a first semiconductor layer comprising a photovoltaic active material selected from the class of I-III-VI[sub 2] chalcopyrite ternary materials which is vacuum deposited in a thin composition-graded'' layer ranging from on the order of about 2.5 microns to about 5.0 microns ([approx equal]2.5[mu]m to [approx equal]5.0[mu]m) and wherein the lower region of the photovoltaic active material preferably comprises a low resistivity region of p-type semiconductor material having a superimposed region of relatively high resistivity, transient n-type semiconductor material defining a transient p-n homojunction; and (2), a second semiconductor layer comprising a low resistivity n-type semiconductor material; wherein interdiffusion (a) between the elemental constituents of the two discrete juxtaposed regions of the first semiconductor layer defining a transient p-n homojunction layer, and (b) between the transient n-type material in the first semiconductor layer and the second n-type semiconductor layer, is allowed.

  3. Methods for forming thin-film heterojunction solar cells from I-III-VI.sub. 2

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mickelsen, Reid A. (Bellevue, WA); Chen, Wen S. (Seattle, WA)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved thin-film, large area solar cell, and methods for forming the same, having a relatively high light-to-electrical energy conversion efficiency and characterized in that the cell comprises a p-n type heterojunction formed of: (i) a first semiconductor layer comprising a photovoltaic active material selected from the class of I-III-VI.sub.2 chalcopyrite ternary materials which is vacuum deposited in a thin "composition-graded" layer ranging from on the order of about 2.5 microns to about 5.0 microns (.congruent.2.5.mu.m to .congruent.5.0.mu.m) and wherein the lower region of the photovoltaic active material preferably comprises a low resistivity region of p-type semiconductor material having a superimposed region of relatively high resistivity, transient n-type semiconductor material defining a transient p-n homojunction; and (ii), a second semiconductor layer comprising a low resistivity n-type semiconductor material; wherein interdiffusion (a) between the elemental constituents of the two discrete juxtaposed regions of the first semiconductor layer defining a transient p-n homojunction layer, and (b) between the transient n-type material in the first semiconductor layer and the second n-type semiconductor layer, causes the transient n-type material in The Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. EG-77-C-01-4042, Subcontract No. XJ-9-8021-1 awarded by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  4. Influence of phosphate and silica on U(VI) precipitation from acidic and neutralized wastewaters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanematsu, Masakazu; Perdrial, Nicolas; Um, Wooyong; Chorover, Jon; O'Day, Peggy A.

    2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Uranium speciation and physical-chemical characteristics were studied in solids precipitated from synthetic acidic to circumneutral wastewaters in the presence and absence of dissolved silica and phosphate to examine thermodynamic and kinetic controls on phase formation. Composition of synthetic wastewater was based on disposal sites 216-U-8 and 216-U-12 Cribs at the Hanford site (WA, USA). In the absence of dissolved silica or phosphate, crystalline or amorphous uranyl oxide hydrates, either compreignacite or meta-schoepite, precipitated at pH 5 or 7 after 30 d of reaction, in agreement with thermodynamic calculations. In the presence of 1 mM dissolved silica representative of groundwater concentrations, amorphous phases dominated by compreignacite precipitated rapidly at pH 5 or 7 as a metastable phase and formation of poorly-crystalline boltwoodite, the thermodynamically stable uranyl silicate phase, was slow. In the presence of phosphate (3 mM), meta-ankoleite initially precipitated as the primary phase at pH 3, 5, or 7 regardless of the presence of 1 mM dissolved silica. Analysis of precipitates by U LIII-edge EXAFS indicated that “autunite-type” sheets of meta-ankoleite transformed to “phosphuranylite-type” sheets after 30 d of reaction, probably due to Ca substitution in the structure. Low solubility of uranyl phosphate phases limits dissolved U(VI) concentrations but differences in particle size, crystallinity, and precipitate composition vary with pH and base cation concentration, which will influence the thermodynamic and kinetic stability of these phases.

  5. Near-Infrared Photoluminescence Enhancement in Ge/CdS and Ge/ZnS Core/Shell Nanocrystals: Utilizing IV/II-VI Semiconductor Epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Yijun [Ames Laboratory; Rowland, Clare E [Argonne National Laboratory; Schaller, Richard D [Argonne National Laboratory; Vela, Javier [Ames Laboratory

    2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Ge nanocrystals have a large Bohr radius and a small, size-tunable band gap that may engender direct character via strain or doping. Colloidal Ge nanocrystals are particularly interesting in the development of near-infrared materials for applications in bioimaging, telecommunications and energy conversion. Epitaxial growth of a passivating shell is a common strategy employed in the synthesis of highly luminescent II–VI, III–V and IV–VI semiconductor quantum dots. Here, we use relatively unexplored IV/II–VI epitaxy as a way to enhance the photoluminescence and improve the optical stability of colloidal Ge nanocrystals. Selected on the basis of their relatively small lattice mismatch compared with crystalline Ge, we explore the growth of epitaxial CdS and ZnS shells using the successive ion layer adsorption and reaction method. Powder X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy techniques, including energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and selected area electron diffraction, clearly show the controllable growth of as many as 20 epitaxial monolayers of CdS atop Ge cores. In contrast, Ge etching and/or replacement by ZnS result in relatively small Ge/ZnS nanocrystals. The presence of an epitaxial II–VI shell greatly enhances the near-infrared photoluminescence and improves the photoluminescence stability of Ge. Ge/II–VI nanocrystals are reproducibly 1–3 orders of magnitude brighter than the brightest Ge cores. Ge/4.9CdS core/shells show the highest photoluminescence quantum yield and longest radiative recombination lifetime. Thiol ligand exchange easily results in near-infrared active, water-soluble Ge/II–VI nanocrystals. We expect this synthetic IV/II–VI epitaxial approach will lead to further studies into the optoelectronic behavior and practical applications of Si and Ge-based nanomaterials.

  6. Influence of Reactive Transport on the Reduction of U(VI) in the Presence of Fe(III) and Nitrate: Implications for U(VI) Immobilization by Bioremediation / Biobarriers- Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B.D. Wood

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Subsurface contamination by metals and radionuclides represent some of the most challenging remediation problems confronting the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. In situ remediation of these contaminants by dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria (DMRB) has been proposed as a potential cost effective remediation strategy. The primary focus of this research is to determine the mechanisms by which the fluxes of electron acceptors, electron donors, and other species can be controlled to maximize the transfer of reductive equivalents to the aqueous and solid phases. The proposed research is unique in the NABIR portfolio in that it focuses on (i) the role of flow and transport in the initiation of biostimulation and the successful sequestration of metals and radionuclides [specifically U(VI)], (ii) the subsequent reductive capacity and stability of the reduced sediments produced by the biostimulation process, and (iii) the potential for altering the growth of biomass in the subsurface by the addition of specific metabolic uncoupling compounds. A scientifically-based understanding of these phenomena are critical to the ability to design successful bioremediation schemes. The laboratory research will employ Shewanella putrefaciens (CN32), a facultative DMRB that can use Fe(III) oxides as a terminal electron acceptor. Sediment-packed columns will be inoculated with this organism, and the reduction of U(VI) by the DMRB will be stimulated by the addition of a carbon and energy source in the presence of Fe(III). Separate column experiments will be conducted to independently examine: (1) the importance of the abiotic reduction of U(VI) by biogenic Fe(II); (2) the influence of the transport process on Fe(III) reduction and U(VI) immobilization, with emphasis on methods for controlling the fluxes of aqueous species to maximize uranium reduction; (3) the reductive capacity of biologically-reduced sediments (with respect to re-oxidation by convective fluxes of O2 and NO3-) and the long-term stability of immobilized uranium mineral phases after bioremediation processes are complete, and (4) the ability for metabolic uncoupling compounds to maintain microbial growth while limiting biomass production. The results of the laboratory experiments will be used to develop mathematical descriptive models for the coupled transport and reduction processes.

  7. The structure of Serratia marcescens Lip, a membrane-bound component of the type VI secretion system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rao, Vincenzo A.; Shepherd, Sharon M.; English, Grant; Coulthurst, Sarah J.; Hunter, William N., E-mail: w.n.hunter@dundee.ac.uk [College of Life Sciences, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 5EH, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The high-resolution crystal structure of S. marcescens Lip reveals a new member of the transthyretin family of proteins. Lip, a core component of the type VI secretion apparatus, is localized to the outer membrane and is positioned to interact with other proteins forming this complex system. Lip is a membrane-bound lipoprotein and a core component of the type VI secretion system found in Gram-negative bacteria. The structure of a Lip construct (residues 29–176) from Serratia marcescens (SmLip) has been determined at 1.92 Å resolution. Experimental phases were derived using a single-wavelength anomalous dispersion approach on a sample cocrystallized with iodide. The membrane localization of the native protein was confirmed. The structure is that of the globular domain lacking only the lipoprotein signal peptide and the lipidated N-terminus of the mature protein. The protein fold is dominated by an eight-stranded ?-sandwich and identifies SmLip as a new member of the transthyretin family of proteins. Transthyretin and the only other member of the family fold, 5-hydroxyisourate hydrolase, form homotetramers important for their function. The asymmetric unit of SmLip is a tetramer with 222 symmetry, but the assembly is distinct from that previously noted for the transthyretin protein family. However, structural comparisons and bacterial two-hybrid data suggest that the SmLip tetramer is not relevant to its role as a core component of the type VI secretion system, but rather reflects a propensity for SmLip to participate in protein–protein interactions. A relatively low level of sequence conservation amongst Lip homologues is noted and is restricted to parts of the structure that might be involved in interactions with physiological partners.

  8. The O VI Absorbers Toward PG0953+415: High Metallicity, Cosmic-Web Gas Far From Luminous Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Todd M. Tripp; Bastien Aracil; David V. Bowen; Edward B. Jenkins

    2006-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The spectrum of the low-redshift QSO PG0953+415 shows two strong, intervening O VI absorption systems. To study the nature of these absorbers, we have used the Gemini Multiobject Spectrograph to conduct a deep spectroscopic galaxy redshift survey in the 5' x 5' field centered on the QSO. This survey is fully complete for r' web. Evidently, some regions of the web filaments are highly metal enriched. We discuss the origin of the high-metallicity gas and suggest that the enrichment might have occurred long ago (at high z).

  9. Subsurface Biogeochemical Heterogeneity (Field-scale removal of U(VI) from groundwater in an alluvial aquifer by electron donor amendment)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, Philip E.; Derek R. Lovley; A. L. N’Guessan; Kelly Nevin; C. T. Resch; Evan Arntzen; Jenny Druhan; Aaron Peacock; Brett Baldwin; Dick Dayvault; Dawn Holmes; Ken Williams; Susan Hubbard; Steve Yabusaki; Yilin Fang; D.C. White; John Komlos; Peter Jaffe

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Determine if biostimulation of alluvial aquifers by electron donor amendment can effectively remove U(VI) from groundwater at the field scale. Uranium contamination in groundwater is a significant problem at several DOE sites. In this project, the possibility of accelerating bioreduction of U(VI) to U(IV) as a means of decreasing U(VI) concentrations in groundwater is directly addressed by conducting a series of field-scale experiments. Scientific goals include demonstrating the quantitative linkage between microbial activity and U loss from groundwater and relating the dominant terminal electron accepting processes to the rate of U loss. The project is currently focused on understanding the mechanisms for unexpected long-term ({approx}2 years) removal of U after stopping electron donor amendment. Results obtained in the project successfully position DOE and others to apply biostimulation broadly to U contamination in alluvial aquifers.

  10. The MACRO Experiment at Gran Sasso

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Giacomelli; A. Margiotta

    2007-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In this overview of the MACRO experiment we recall the structure of the detector and discuss several physics topics: atmospheric neutrinos and neutrino oscillations, high energy neutrino astronomy, searches for WIMPs and for low energy stellar gravitational collapse neutrinos, stringent upper limits on GUT magnetic monopoles, high energy downgoing muons, primary cosmic ray composition and shadowing of primary cosmic rays by the Moon and the Sun.

  11. A review of "The Making of the Jacobean Regime: James VI and I and the Government of England, 1603-1605." by Diana Newton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles W. A. Prior

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    REVIEWS 189 Diana Newton. The Making of the Jacobean Regime: James VI and I and the Government of England, 1603-1605. Woodbridge: The Boydell Press, 2005. x + 164 pp. $80.00. Review by CHARLES W. A. PRIOR, UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE. King James... VI and I has tended to suffer at the hands of historians. Described by a contemporary as the wisest fool in England, the impression that has come down though the centuries is of an unprepossessing closet homosexual with horrid table manners and a...

  12. Ab initio all-electron calculation of absolute volume deformation potentials of IV-IV, III-V, and II-VI semiconductors: The chemical trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gong, Xingao

    University, Shanghai 200433, China Su-Huai Wei National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 decreases as the ionicity increases. Our calculated chemical trends of the AVDPs are explained in terms-V, and II-VI semiconductors: The chemical trends Yong-Hua Li and X. G. Gong Physics Department, Fudan

  13. A Spectroscopic Study of the effect of Ligand Complexation on the Reduction of Uranium(VI) by Anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AH2DS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Zheming; Wagnon, Ken B.; Ainsworth, Calvin C.; Liu, Chongxuan; Rosso, Kevin M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2008-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In this project, the reduction rate of uranyl complexes with hydroxide, carbonate, EDTA, and Desferriferrioxamine B (DFB) by anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AH2DS), a potential electron shuttle for microbial reduction of metal ions (Newman and Kolter 2000), is studied by stopped-flow kinetics techniques under anoxic atmosphere. The apparent reaction rates varied with ligand type, solution pH, and U(VI) concentration. For each ligand, a single largest kobs within the studied pH range was observed, suggesting the influence of pH-dependent speciation on the U(VI) reduction rate. The maximum reaction rate found in each case followed the order of OH- > CO32- > EDTA > DFB, consistent with the same trend of the thermodynamic stability of the uranyl complexes and ionic sizes of the ligands. Increasing the stability of uranyl complexes and ligand size decreased the maximum reduction rate. The pH-dependent rates were modeled using a second-order rate expression that was assumed to be dependent on a single U(VI) complex and AH2DS species. By quantitatively comparing the calculated and measured apparent rate constants as a function of pH, species AHDS3- was suggested as the primary reductant in all cases examined. Species UO2CO3(aq) , UO2HEDTA-, and (UO2)2(OH)22+ were suggested as the principal electron acceptors among the U(VI) species mixture in carbonate, EDTA, and hydroxyl systems, respectively.

  14. VI 1.50 Policy on the Reporting of Suspected Child Abuse and Neglect (Approved by the Board of Regents on December 9, 2011)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milchberg, Howard

    1 VI ­ 1.50 Policy on the Reporting of Suspected Child Abuse and Neglect (Approved by the Board of Regents on December 9, 2011) I. PURPOSE The purpose of this policy is to provide guidance to staff into contact with the USM community. II. AUTHORITY The reporting requirements addressed in this policy

  15. The Regulation of Salmonella Typhi Vi Capsular Antigen Expression in Intestinal Model Epithelia and the Bovine Ligated-Ileal Loop Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tran, Quynh Tien-Ngoc

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, a major public health concern in developing countries, continues to be a priority for the World Health Organization. S. Typhi possesses a viaB locus responsible for the biosynthesis of the Vi-capsular antigen, a...

  16. A review of "King James VI and I and his English Parliaments" by Conrad Russell, edited by Richard Cust and Andrew Thrush

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peacey, Jason

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . It is the Duke?s #23; nal speech?the one explaining why things happened the way you thought that they would probably happen?that you really want to hear. Conrad Russell, King James VI and I and his English Parliaments. Edited by Richard Cust and Andrew #22...

  17. WVU FY 2009Expanding West Virginia's Economy WE s t Vi rg i n i a U n i V E r s i t y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    WVU FY 2009Expanding West Virginia's Economy WE s t Vi rg i n i a U n i V E r s i t y: amy The opinions herein reflect those of the authors and do not reflect those of the West Virginia University Board Direct expenditures from West Virginia University led to a total economic impact of approximately $4

  18. Living Village K i o n i Vi l l a g e , I t h a c a , G r e e c e

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaferatos, Nicholas C.

    A A Western Washington University | 2010 #12;Living | Village Kioni Village Ithaca, Greece Sustainable IthacaLiving Village K i o n i Vi l l a g e , I t h a c a , G r e e c e A X Nicholas Zaferatos Zaferatos, Sustainable Ithaca Faculty Program Director, at nicholas.zaferatos@wwu.edu #12;Table of Contents

  19. PROBING THE INTERGALACTIC MEDIUM/GALAXY CONNECTION. V. ON THE ORIGIN OF Ly? AND O VI ABSORPTION AT z < 0.2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prochaska, J. Xavier

    We analyze the association of galaxies with Ly? and O VI absorption, the most commonly detected transitions of the low-z intergalactic medium (IGM), in the fields of 14 quasars with z[subscript em] = 0.06–0.57. Confirming ...

  20. Bulk Power System Dynamics and Control VI, August 22-27, 2004, Cortina D'Ampezzo, Italy A Probabilistic Approach to Evaluate Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cañizares, Claudio A.

    Bulk Power System Dynamics and Control VI, August 22-27, 2004, Cortina D'Ampezzo, Italy introduces a novel approach to security cost analysis in competitive electricity markets. Modern power investments are competing forces in modern power system operations. As numerous jurisdictions move toward

  1. Bulk Power System Dynamics and Control -VI, August 22-27, 2004, Cortina d'Ampezzo, Italy Transmission Investment in Competitive Electricity Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, George

    Bulk Power System Dynamics and Control - VI, August 22-27, 2004, Cortina d'Ampezzo, Italy Transmission Investment in Competitive Electricity Markets Javier Contreras George Gross E.T.S. de Ingenieros of the transmission network in competitive markets. To illustrate our framework, several case studies are presented

  2. AN ORIGIN FOR THE SOUTH POLE-AITKEN BASIN THORIUM. V.I. Chikmachev, S.G.Pugacheva, Sternberg State Astronomical institute. Moscow University.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chikmachov, Vadim I.

    AN ORIGIN FOR THE SOUTH POLE-AITKEN BASIN THORIUM. V.I. Chikmachev, S.G.Pugacheva, Sternberg State, that within the limits of the possible Al-Khwarizmi/King basin [3]. The SPA basin thorium map: The using data Lunar Prospector [4] the thorium distribution map demonstrated a hemisphere of the Moon which contains

  3. Growth of alternating (1OO)/(lll )-oriented II-VI regions for quasi-phase-matched nonlinear optical devices on GaAs substrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fejer, Martin M.

    ferroelectrics such as lithium nio- bate and potassium titanyl phosphate. Efficient operation is possible) nonlinear interactions. II-VI semiconductors, with transparency from the far in- frared to the visible phasematched interactions.' A powerful alternative technique, QPM, re- quires periodic patterning of the sign

  4. Band structures of II-VI semiconductors using Gaussian basis functions with separable ab initio pseudopotentials: Application to prediction of band offsets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    -74), Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering (CN9043), California Institute of Technology, Pasadena of pseudopotentials PP signifi- cantly reduces numerical errors since the energy spectra width is greatly reduced due general cases; 3 to provide an electronic structure database for II-VI semiconductors for further studies

  5. A Tungsten(VI) Nitride Having a W2(-N)2 Core Zachary J. Tonzetich, Richard R. Schrock,* Keith M. Wampler, Brad C. Bailey,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Peter

    A Tungsten(VI) Nitride Having a W2(µ-N)2 Core Zachary J. Tonzetich, Richard R. Schrock,* Keith M-331, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 Received September 27, 2007 The tungsten that the tungsten alkylidyne species W(C-t-Bu)(CH2-t-Bu)(OAr)2 (Ar ) 2,6-diisopropylphenyl) can be prepared readily

  6. Chromium Remediation or Release? Effect of Iron(II) Sulfate Addition on Chromium(VI) Leaching from Columns of Chromite Ore Processing Residue 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geelhoed, Jeanine S; Meeussen, Johannes CL; Roe, Martin J; Hillier, Stephen; Thomas, Rhodri P; Farmer, John G; Paterson, Edward

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chromite ore processing residue (COPR), derived from the so-called high lime processing of chromite ore, contains high levels of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) and has a pH between 11 and 12. Ferrous sulfate, which is used for ...

  7. Bulk Power System Dynamics and Control -VI, August 22-27, 2004, Cortina D'Ampezzo, Italy Prediction of Instability Points Using System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cañizares, Claudio A.

    Bulk Power System Dynamics and Control - VI, August 22-27, 2004, Cortina D'Ampezzo, Italy-- Determining maximum loading margins is an im- portant issue in power system operation, as system operators Power systems are very complex nonlinear systems; hence, proper modeling of such systems is an issue

  8. VI INTERNATIONAL TELECOMMUNICATIONS SYMPOSIUM (ITS2006), SEPTEMBER 3-6, 2006, FORTALEZA-CE, BRAZIL 1 Fringe Benefits of the H.264/AVC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Queiroz, Ricardo L.

    of the Motion Picture Experts Groups (MPEG) from the International Standards Organization (ISO) and of the VideoVI INTERNATIONAL TELECOMMUNICATIONS SYMPOSIUM (ITS2006), SEPTEMBER 3-6, 2006, FORTALEZA-CE, BRAZIL, and Tiago A. Fonseca Abstract-- H.264/AVC is the newest, state-of-the-art, video compression standard

  9. (CANCER RESEARCH 53. I02.VI026. March I. 1993] Benzene and Its Phenolic Metabolites Produce Oxidative DNA Damage in HL60

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    (CANCER RESEARCH 53. I02.VI026. March I. 1993] Benzene and Its Phenolic Metabolites Produce ABSTRACT Benzene, an important industrial chemical, is myelotoxic and leuke- mogenic in humans effects. Here we report the induction of oxida- tive DNA damage by benzene and its phenolic metabolites

  10. In pursuit of clean air: a data book of problems and strategies at the state level. Volume 3: Federal Regions IV and VI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garvey, D.B.; Streets, D.G.

    1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the third volume of a five-volume report, designed to provide useful information for policy analysis in the Department of Energy, especially for the examination of possible areas of conflict between the implementation of a national energy policy calling for the increased use of coal and the pursuit of clean air. Information is presented for each state in Federal Regions IV and VI under the following section headings: state title page (includes a summary of air quality data); revised state implementation plan outline; maps of nonattainment areas, as designated; Storage and Retrieval of Aerometric Data (SAROAD); SAROAD data maps; power plant data; power plant maps; and county maps. States in Federal Region IV include: Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee. Those in Federal Region VI include: Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas. (JGB)

  11. Applications of ENDF/B-VI and JENDL-3.1 iron data to reactor pressure vessel fluence analysis using continuous energy Monte Carlo code MCNP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jungo-Do; Gil, Choong-Sup [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Democratic People`s Republic of)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A comparison is made of results obtained from neutron transmissions analysis of RPV performed by MCNP with ENDF/B-VI and JENDL-3.1 iron data. At first, a one-dimensional discrete ordinates transport calculation using VITAMIN-C fine-group library based on ENDF/B-IV was performed for a cylindrical model of a PWR to generate the source spectrum at the front of the RPV. And then, the transmission of neutrons through RPV was calculated by MCNP with the moderated fission spectrum incident on the vessel face. For these ENDF/B-IV, -VI and JENDL-3.1 iron data were processed into continuous energy point data form by NJOY91.91. The fast neutron fluxes and dosimeter reaction rates through RPV using each iron data were intercompared.

  12. Btodzernlcal Pharmacolog~ V,',I 35 No 13 pp 2073-2080 1986 00062952, 86 $3 IX) + I) 00 Prmted m Great Britain Pergdmon Journ,ds Lid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammock, Bruce D.

    Btodzernlcal Pharmacolog~ V,',I 35 No 13 pp 2073-2080 1986 00062952, 86 $3 IX) + I) 00 Prmted m of trans- and cts-stilbene oxide and benzo[a]pyrene-4,5-oxlde was measured m cytosol and mlcrosomes sulfhydryls were detected in cytosol from hver (4.6 mM) and testis (1 5 mM) Glutathxone was moderately stable

  13. Identifying key controls on the behavior of an acidic-U(VI) plume in the Savannah River Site using reactive transport modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubbard, Susan

    National Lab., 1 Cyclotron Road Mail Stop 90R1116, Berkeley, CA 94720-8126, United States b Savannah RiverIdentifying key controls on the behavior of an acidic-U(VI) plume in the Savannah River Site using National Lab., Bldg. 773-42A, Aiken, SC 29808, United States a r t i c l e i n f o a b s t r a c t Article

  14. An investigation on how the Scottish teachers for V.I. pupils differentiate Mathematics curriculum through flexible and effective methods of teaching and learning and adaptations and modifications, and support to meet the needs of V.I. pupils in integrated mainstream schools, with the view to drawing implications for the situation in Botswana 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habangana-Magogodi, Neo

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study is a small scale investigation in what the teachers of V.I. pupils in Scotland consider as the problems encountered in learning Maths and the causes to those problems. Also how they view differentiation of the Mathematics curriculum...

  15. Three-Dimensional Topological Insulators in I-III-VI2 and II-IV-V2 Chalcopyrite Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, wanxiang [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Ding, Jun [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics/Chinese Academy of Scie; Xiao, Di [ORNL; Yao, yugui [Chinese Academy of Sciences

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent discovery of topological insulators with exotic metallic surface states has garnered great interest in the fields of condensed matter physics and materials science.1 A number of spectacular quantum phenomena have been predicted when the surface states are under the influence of magnetism and superconductivity,2 5 which could open up new opportunities for technological applications in spintronics and quantum computing. To achieve this goal, material realization of topological insulators with desired physical properties is of crucial importance. Based on first-principles calculations, here we show that a large number of ternary chalcopyrite compounds of composition I-III-VI2 and II-IV-V2 can realize the topological insulating phase in their native states. The crystal structure of chalcopyrites is derived from the frequently used zinc-blende structure, and many of them possess a close lattice match to important mainstream semiconductors, which is essential for a smooth integration into current semiconductor technology. The diverse optical, electrical and structural properties of chalcopyrite semiconductors,6 and particularly their ability to host room-temperature ferromagnetism,7 9 make them appealing candidates for novel spintronic devices.

  16. Three-Dimensional Topological Insulators in I-III-VI$_2$ and II-IV-V$_2$ Chalcopyrite Semiconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wanxiang Feng; Jun Ding; Di Xiao; Yugui Yao

    2010-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent discovery of topological insulators with exotic metallic surface states has garnered great interest in the fields of condensed matter physics and materials science. A number of spectacular quantum phenomena have been predicted when the surface states are under the influence of magnetism and superconductivity, which could open up new opportunities for technological applications in spintronics and quantum computing. To achieve this goal, material realization of topological insulators with desired physical properties is of crucial importance. Based on first-principles calculations, here we show that a large number of ternary chalcopyrite compounds of composition I-III-VI$_2$ and II-IV-V$_2$ can realize the topological insulating phase in their native states. The crystal structure of chalcopyrites is derived from the frequently used zinc-blende structure, and many of them possess a close lattice match to important mainstream semiconductors, which is essential for a smooth integration into current semiconductor technology. The diverse optical, electrical and structural properties of chalcopyrite semiconductors, and particularly their ability to host room-temperature ferromagnetism, make them appealing candidates for novel spintronic devices.

  17. Intrazeolite metal carbonyl phototopotaxy: From Tungsten(VI) oxide quantum dots to a zero-dimensional semiconductor quantum supralattice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozin, G.A.; Oezkar, S. (Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada))

    1990-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Attention is focused on the use of simple binary metal carbonyls for the nucleation, growth, and stabilization of intrazeolite semiconductor quantum nanostructures. The rationale for selecting this particular group of precursor molecules relates to their volatility, molecular dimensions, ease of purification, availability, and facile and quantitative conversion to the respective metal oxide materials with minimal contamination by carbon. In this study the intrazeolite photooxidation chemistry of {alpha}-cage encapsulated hexacarbonyltungsten(0) in Na{sub 56}Y and H{sub 56}Y, n(W(CO){sub 6})-Na{sub 56}Y(H{sub 56}Y), with O{sub 2} provides a novel synthetic pathway to {alpha}-cage-located tungsten(VI) oxide n(WO{sub 3})-Na{sub 56}Y(H{sub 56}Y) intrazeolite quantum dots and a zero-dimensional semiconductor quantum supralattice (where n = 0-32), which might find applications as new solid-state materials for use in quantum electronic and nonlinear optic devices.

  18. U(VI) bioreduction with emulsified vegetable oil as the electron donor-Model application to a field test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Guoping [ORNL; Watson, David B [ORNL; Wu, Wei-min [Stanford University; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL; Parker, Jack C [ORNL; Brooks, Scott C [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A one-time 2-hour emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) injection in a fast flowing aquifer decreased U discharge to a stream for over a year. Using a comprehensive biogeochemical model developed in the companion article based on microcosm tests, we approximately matched the observed acetate, nitrate, Fe, U, and sulfate concentrations, and described the major evolution trends of multiple microbial functional groups in the field test. While the lab-determined parameters were generally applicable in the field-scale simulation, the EVO hydrolysis rate constant was estimated to be an order of magnitude greater in the field than in the microcosms. The model predicted substantial biomass (sulfate reducers) and U(IV) accumulation near the injection wells and along the side boundaries of the treatment zone where electron donors (long-chain fatty acids) from the injection wells met electron acceptors (sulfate) from the surrounding environment. While EVO retention and hydrolysis characteristics were expected to control treatment longevity, modeling results indicated that electron acceptors such as sulfate may not only compete for electrons but also play a conducive role in degrading complex substrates and enhancing U(VI) reduction and immobilization. As a result, the spacing of the injection wells could be optimized for effective sustainable bioremediation.

  19. Theoretical modeling of the uranium 4f XPS for U(VI) and U(IV) oxides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bagus, Paul S.; Nelin, Constance J.; Ilton, Eugene S.

    2013-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and in particular the U4f level, has been widely used to elucidate the chemical state of uranium in various materials. In large part, previous experimental work has relied on comparing the U4f spectra of an unknown to some “standard” or using qualitative intuitive judgments on the expected behavior of the primary lines and satellite structures as a function of oxidation state and bonding environment. Such approaches are useful and can be sufficiently robust to make defensible claims. Nonetheless, there is no quantitative understanding of the chemistry and physics that control satellite structures or even the shape of the primary peaks. To address this issue, we used a rigorous, strictly ab initio theoretical approach to investigate the U(4f) XPS of U oxides with formal U(VI) and U(IV) oxidation states. Our theoretical studies are based on the electronic structures of embedded cluster models, where bonding between U and O is explicitly incorporated. We demonstrate that treatment of the many-body character of the cluster wavefunctions is essential to correctly model and interpret the U4f XPS. Here we definitively show that shake configurations, where an electron is transferred from a dominantly O2p bonding orbital into dominantly 5f or 6d antibonding orbitals, are indeed responsible for the major satellite features. Based on this rigorous theoretical framework, it is possible to establish quantitative relationships between features of the XPS spectra and the chemistry of the material.

  20. Fe(III) Reduction and U(VI) Immobilization by Paenibacillus sp. Strain 300A, Isolated from Hanford 300A Subsurface Sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmed, B.; Cao, B.; McLean, Jeffrey S.; Ica, Tuba; Dohnalkova, Alice; Istanbullu, Ozlem; Paksoy, Akin; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2012-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A facultative iron-reducing (Fe(III)-reducing) Paenibacillus sp. strain was isolated from Hanford 300A subsurface sediment biofilms that was capable of reducing soluble Fe(III) complexes (Fe(III)-NTA and Fe(III)-citrate) but unable to reduce poorly crystalline ferrihydrite (Fh). However, Paenibacillus sp. 300A was capable of reducing Fh in the presence of low concentrations (2 µM) of either of electron transfer mediators (ETMs) flavin mononucleotide (FMN) or anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS). Maximum initial Fh reduction rates were observed at catalytic concentrations (<10 µM) of either FMN or AQDS. Higher FMN concentrations inhibited Fh reduction, while increased AQDS concentrations did not. We found that Paenibacillus sp. 300A also could reduce Fh in the presence of natural ETMs from Hanford 300A subsurface sediments. In the absence of ETMs, Paenibacillus sp. 300A was capable of immobilizing U(VI) through both reduction and adsorption. The relative contributions of adsorption and microbial reduction to U(VI) removal from the aqueous phase were ~7:3 in PIPES and ~1:4 in bicarbonate buffer. Our study demonstrated that Paenibacillus sp. 300A catalyzes Fe(III) reduction and U(VI) immobilization and that these reactions benefit from externally added or naturally existing ETMs in 300A subsurface sediments.

  1. Influence of ammonium availability on expression of nifD and amtB genes during biostimulation of a U(VI) contaminated aquifer: implications for U(VI) removal and monitoring the metabolic state of Geobacteraceae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mouser, Paula J.; N'Guessan, A. Lucie; Elifantz, Hila; Holmes, Dawn E.; Williams, Kenneth H; Wilkins, Michael J.; Long, Philip E.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The influence of ammonium availability on bacterial community structure and the physiological status of Geobacter species during in situ bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater was evaluated. Ammonium concentrations varied by 2 orders of magnitude (<4 to 400 ?M) across the study site. Analysis of 16S rRNA sequences suggested that ammonium may have been one factor influencing the community composition prior to acetate amendment with Rhodoferax species predominating over Geobacter species with higher ammonium and Dechloromonas species dominating at the site with lowest ammonium. However, once acetate was added and dissimilatory metal reduction was stimulated, Geobacter species became the predominant organisms at all locations. Rates of U(VI) reduction appeared to be more related to acetate concentrations rather than ammonium levels. In situ mRNA transcript abundance of the nitrogen fixation gene, nifD, and the ammonium transporter gene, amtB, in Geobacter species indicated that ammonium was the primary source of nitrogen during uranium reduction. The abundance of amtB was inversely correlated to ammonium levels, whereas nifD transcript levels were similar across all sites examined. These results suggest that nifD and amtB expression are closely regulated in response to ammonium availability to ensure an adequate supply of nitrogen while conserving cell resources. Thus, quantifying nifD and amtB transcript expression appears to be a useful approach for monitoring the nitrogen-related physiological status of subsurface Geobacter species. This study also emphasizes the need for more detailed analysis of geochemical and physiological interactions at the field scale in order to adequately model subsurface microbial processes during bioremediation.

  2. Compliance with the Clean Air Act Title VI Stratospheric Ozone Protection Program requirements at U.S. DOE Oak Ridge Reservation Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Humphreys, M.P.; Atkins, E.M.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Title VI Stratospheric Ozone Protection Program of the Clean Air Act (CAA) requires promulgation of regulations to reduce and prevent damage to the earth's protective ozone layer. Regulations pursuant to Title VI of the CAA are promulgated in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) at Title 40 CFR, Part 822. The regulations include ambitious production phaseout schedules for ozone depleting substances (ODS) including chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), halons, carbon tetrachloride, and methyl chloroform under 40 CFR 82, Subpart A. The regulations also include requirements for recycling and emissions reduction during the servicing of refrigeration equipment and technician certification requirements under Subpart F; provisions for servicing of motor vehicle air conditioners under Subpart B; a ban on nonessential products containing Class 1 ODS under Subpart C; restrictions on Federal procurement of ODS under Subpart D; labeling of products using ODS under Subpart E; and the Significant New Alternatives Policy Program under Subpart G. This paper will provide details of initiatives undertaken at US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Facilities for implementation of requirements under the Title VI Stratospheric Ozone Protection Program. The Stratospheric Ozone Protection Plans include internal DOE requirements for: (1) maintenance of ODS inventories; (2) ODS procurement practices; (3) servicing of refrigeration and air conditioning equipment; (4) required equipment modifications or replacement; (5) technician certification training; (6) labeling of products containing ODS; (7) substitution of chlorinated solvents; and (8) replacement of halon fire protection systems. The plans also require establishment of administrative control systems which assure that compliance is achieved and maintained as the regulations continue to develop and become effective.

  3. Dynamics of Rhodobacter capsulatus [2Fe-2S] Ferredoxin VI and Aquifex aeolicus Ferredoxin 5 Via Nuclear Resonance Vibrational Spectroscopy (NRVS) and Resonance Raman Spectroscopy.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Yuming; Tan, Ming-Liang; Ichiye, Toshiko; Wang, Hongxin; Guo, Yisong; Smith, Matt C.; Meyer, Jacques; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Alp, E. E.; Zhao, Jiyong; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Cramer, Stephen P.

    2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We have used (57)Fe nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) to study the Fe(2)S(2)(Cys)(4) sites in oxidized and reduced [2Fe-2S] ferredoxins from Rhodobacter capsulatus (Rc FdVI) and Aquifex aeolicus (Aa Fd5). In the oxidized forms, nearly identical NRVS patterns are observed, with strong bands from Fe-S stretching modes peaking around 335 cm(-1), and additional features observed as high as the B(2u) mode at approximately 421 cm(-1). Both forms of Rc FdVI have also been investigated by resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy. There is good correspondence between NRVS and Raman frequencies, but because of different selection rules, intensities vary dramatically between the two kinds of spectra. For example, the B(3u) mode at approximately 288 cm(-1), attributed to an asymmetric combination of the two FeS(4) breathing modes, is often the strongest resonance Raman feature. In contrast, it is nearly invisible in the NRVS, as there is almost no Fe motion in such FeS(4) breathing. NRVS and RR analysis of isotope shifts with (36)S-substituted into bridging S(2-) ions in Rc FdVI allowed quantitation of S(2-) motion in different normal modes. We observed the symmetric Fe-Fe stretching mode at approximately 190 cm(-1) in both NRVS and RR spectra. At still lower energies, the NRVS presents a complex envelope of bending, torsion, and protein modes, with a maximum at 78 cm(-1). The (57)Fe partial vibrational densities of states (PVDOS) were interpreted by normal-mode analysis with optimization of Urey-Bradley force fields. Progressively more complex D(2h) Fe(2)S(2)S'(4), C(2h) Fe(2)S(2)(SCC)(4), and C(1) Fe(2)S(2)(Cys)(4) models were optimized by comparison with the experimental spectra. After modification of the CHARMM22 all-atom force field by the addition of refined Fe-S force constants, a simulation employing the complete protein structure was used to reproduce the PVDOS, with better results in the low frequency protein mode region. This process was then repeated for analysis of data on the reduced FdVI. Finally, the degree of collectivity was used to quantitate the delocalization of the dynamic properties of the redox-active Fe site. The NRVS technique demonstrates great promise for the observation and quantitative interpretation of the dynamical properties of Fe-S proteins.

  4. Acceleration of Field-Scale Bioreduction of U(VI) in a Shallow Alluvial Aquifer: Temporal and Spatial Evolution of Biogeochemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, Phil

    2005-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Uranium mill tailings sites provide access to uranium-contaminated groundwater at sites that are shallow and low hazard, making it possible to address the following scientific objectives: (1) Determine the dominant electron accepting processes at field sites with long-term metal/rad contamination; (2) Define the biogeochemical transformations that may be important to either natural or accelerated bioremediation under field conditions; and (3) Examine the potential for using biostimulation (electron donor addition) to accelerate reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) at the field scale.

  5. VI-1 PAPERS PUBLISHED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps to Predict4 VARIATIONS IN THEVERA Core1 - March

  6. VI-1 TALKS PRESENTED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps to Predict4 VARIATIONS IN THEVERA Core1 - March2

  7. VI-1 TALKS PRESENTED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps to Predict4 VARIATIONS IN THEVERA Core1 -

  8. FE(VI)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-lFederal Columbia River Power

  9. MONOGRAFIAS DE FISICA VI

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9November 6, InaprilU . S . D e p a r t m e n ty

  10. Updates to the ORIGEN-S Cross-Section Libraries Using ENDF-VI, EAF-99, and FENDL-2.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, B.D.

    2004-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The standard cross-section library for light-water reactor (LWR) analyses used by the ORIGEN-S depletion and decay code has been extensively updated. This work entailed the development of broad multigroup neutron cross sections for ORIGEN-S from several sources of pointwise continuous-energy cross-section evaluations, including the U.S. Evaluated Nuclear Data Files ENDF/B-VI Release 7, the Fusion Evaluated Nuclear Data Library FENDL-2.0, and the European Activation File EAF-99. The pointwise cross sections were collapsed to a three-group structure using a continuous-energy neutron flux spectrum representative of the typical neutronic conditions of typical LWR fuel and formatted for use by ORIGEN-S. In addition, the fission-product library has been expanded to include ENDF/B-VI fission yield data for 30 fissionable actinides. The processing codes and procedures are explained. Preliminary verification studies using the updated libraries were performed using the modules of the SCALE (Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation) system. Comparisons between the previous basic ORIGEN-S libraries and the updated libraries developed in this work are presented.

  11. Development of a biomarker for Geobacter activity and strain composition; Proteogenomic analysis of the citrate synthase protein during bioremediation of U(VI).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilkins, Michael J.; Callister, Stephen J.; Miletto, Marzia; Williams, Kenneth H.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Lovely, Derek R.; Long, Philip E.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monitoring the activity of target microorganisms during stimulated bioremediation is a key problem for the development of effective remediation strategies. At the U.S. Department of Energy’s Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site in Rifle, CO, the stimulation of Geobacter growth and activity via subsurface acetate addition leads to precipitation of U(VI) from groundwater as U(IV). Citrate synthase (gltA) is a key enzyme in Geobacter central metabolism that controls flux into the TCA cycle. Here, we utilize shotgun proteomic methods to demonstrate that the measurement of gltA peptides can be used to track Geobacter activity and strain evolution during in situ biostimulation. Abundances of conserved gltA peptides tracked Fe(III) reduction and changes in U(VI) concentrations during biostimulation, whereas changing patterns of unique peptide abundances between samples suggested sample-specific strain shifts within the Geobacter population. Abundances of unique peptides indicated potential differences at the strain level between Fe(III)-reducing populations stimulated during in situ biostimulation experiments conducted a year apart at the Rifle IFRC. These results offer a novel technique for the rapid screening of large numbers of proteomic samples for Geobacter species and will aid monitoring of subsurface bioremediation efforts that rely on metal reduction for desired outcomes.

  12. Development of a biomarker for Geobacter activity and strain composition: Proteogenomic analysis of the citrate synthase protein during bioremediation of U(VI)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilkins, M.J.; Callister, S.J.; Miletto, M.; Williams, K.H.; Nicora, C.D.; Lovley, D.R.; Long, P.E.; Lipton, M.S.

    2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Monitoring the activity of target microorganisms during stimulated bioremediation is a key problem for the development of effective remediation strategies. At the US Department of Energy's Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site in Rifle, CO, the stimulation of Geobacter growth and activity via subsurface acetate addition leads to precipitation of U(VI) from groundwater as U(IV). Citrate synthase (gltA) is a key enzyme in Geobacter central metabolism that controls flux into the TCA cycle. Here, we utilize shotgun proteomic methods to demonstrate that the measurement of gltA peptides can be used to track Geobacter activity and strain evolution during in situ biostimulation. Abundances of conserved gltA peptides tracked Fe(III) reduction and changes in U(VI) concentrations during biostimulation, whereas changing patterns of unique peptide abundances between samples suggested sample-specific strain shifts within the Geobacter population. Abundances of unique peptides indicated potential differences at the strain level between Fe(III)-reducing populations stimulated during in situ biostimulation experiments conducted a year apart at the Rifle IFRC. These results offer a novel technique for the rapid screening of large numbers of proteomic samples for Geobacter species and will aid monitoring of subsurface bioremediation efforts that rely on metal reduction for desired outcomes.

  13. Status of the US National Inertial Fusion ProgramSNL Z Facility UR/LLE OMEGA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    through the use of advanced laser technology #12;5 A tangible demonstration of progress is the insertion detector system Z-pinch implosion Complex hydrodynamics #12;20 Recent National Academy of Sciences reports

  14. Overview of ICF Program SNL Z Facility UR/LLE OMEGA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of ignition in the laboratory is a crucial goal for NNSA Defense Programs Mission of NNSA ICF Campaign Provide operations #12;13 Direct Drive is an important part of the NNSA ignition program A Saturn target comprising

  15. ~~s~~-TUI ~.._,_~u LLE TIN ~ALONTOLOGIE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    S ~·"'/ ----...-- SOCI~JTÉ D'ANrrHROPOLOGIE DE LYON TOME VINGT- NEUVIÈME - HHO - LES ~IOZABITES ESQUISSE ETII

  16. Plasma channel from EP beam Direct-drive ignition is the main thrust in LLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -drive ignition; this is not an optimal configuration fordirectdrivethatrequiressphericalillumination I2093 for direct-drive experiments; it is coupled to a high-power, short-pulse laser (OMEGA EP) to explore advanced 26 kJ Scale 1:70 in energy Scale 1:1 Scale 1:1 #12;Hydro-equivalentignitiononOMEGA #12;Ignition

  17. LLNL Contribution to LLE FY09 Annual Report: NIC and HED Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heeter, R F; Landen, O L; Hsing, W W; Fournier, K B

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In FY09, LLNL led 238 target shots on the OMEGA Laser System. Approximately half of these LLNL-led shots supported the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). The remainder was dedicated to experiments for the high-energy-density stewardship experiments (HEDSE). Objectives of the LLNL led NIC campaigns at OMEGA included: (1) Laser-plasma interaction studies in physical conditions relevant for the NIF ignition targets; (2) Demonstration of Tr = 100 eV foot symmetry tuning using a reemission sphere; (3) X-ray scattering in support of conductivity measurements of solid density Be plasmas; (4) Experiments to study the physical properties (thermal conductivity) of shocked fusion fuels; (5) High-resolution measurements of velocity nonuniformities created by microscopic perturbations in NIF ablator materials; (6) Development of a novel Compton Radiography diagnostic platform for ICF experiments; and (7) Precision validation of the equation of state for quartz. The LLNL HEDSE campaigns included the following experiments: (1) Quasi-isentropic (ICE) drive used to study material properties such as strength, equation of state, phase, and phase-transition kinetics under high pressure; (2) Development of a high-energy backlighter for radiography in support of material strength experiments using Omega EP and the joint OMEGA-OMEGA-EP configuration; (3) Debris characterization from long-duration, point-apertured, point-projection x-ray backlighters for NIF radiation transport experiments; (4) Demonstration of ultrafast temperature and density measurements with x-ray Thomson scattering from short-pulse laser-heated matter; (5) The development of an experimental platform to study nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) physics using direct-drive implosions; (6) Opacity studies of high-temperature plasmas under LTE conditions; and (7) Characterization of copper (Cu) foams for HEDSE experiments.

  18. Migliaccio et al 2013 Specialty Crop Block Grant Smart Apps for Smart Farmers Crane, J., E. Evans, C. Balerdi. 2007. A review of the Florida avocado industry. Proc. VI Congreso

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Migliaccio, Kati White

    ., E. Evans, C. Balerdi. 2007. A review of the Florida avocado industry. Proc. VI Congreso Mundail-laurel pathogen: a potential major problem for Florida avocado industry, HS1136. Horticultural Sciences Dept., Fla.L. Osborne. 2010. Potential economic impact of laurel wilt disease on the Florida avocado industry. Hort

  19. Oklahoma State University, in compliance with Title VI and VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Executive Order 11246 as amended, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Americans with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    Irrigation Oklahoma State University, in compliance with Title VI and VII of the Civil Rights Act, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Director of Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service, Okla- homa State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma. This publication is printed and issued by Oklahoma

  20. in Proceedings of the 1999 International Joint Conference on Neural Network (pp. 305i305vi) 305i When local isn't enough: Extracting distributed rules from networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dawson, Michael

    When local isn't enough: Extracting distributed rules from networks David A. Medler Center nature of neural networks. In this paper we discuss a technique for ex- tracting distributed symbolicin Proceedings of the 1999 International Joint Conference on Neural Network (pp. 305i­305vi) 305i

  1. High-Pressure Synthesis and Structure Determination of K6(SeO4)(SeO5), The First Potassium Orthoselenate(VI)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orosel,D.; Dinnebeier, R.; Jansen, M.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors report on the first synthesis of a potassium orthoselenate(VI), K{sub 6}(SeO{sub 4})(SeO{sub 5}), and the structure determination from synchrotron powder diffraction data. The title compound crystallizes in the tetragonal space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 with a = 8.1259(1) {angstrom}, c = 17.4953(2) {angstrom}, V = 1155.21(2) {angstrom}{sup 3}, and Z = 4. Selenium displays two different complex anions, tetrahedral SeO{sub 4}{sup 2-} and trigonal-bipyramidal SeO{sub 5}{sup 4-}. When the formula is reduced to A{sub 3}B, the spatial arrangement of the constituting building units can be derived from the Li{sub 3}Bi type of structure.

  2. ENDF-6 Formats Manual Data Formats and Procedures for the Evaluated Nuclear Data File ENDF/B-VI and ENDF/B-VII

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herman, M.; Members of the Cross Sections Evaluation Working Group

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In December 2006, the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) of the United States released the new ENDF/B-VII.0 library. This represented considerable achievement as it was the 1st major release since 1990 when ENDF/B-VI has been made publicly available. The two libraries have been released in the same format, ENDF-6, which has been originally developed for the ENDF/B-VI library. In the early stage of work on the VII-th generation of the library CSEWG made important decision to use the same formats. This decision was adopted even though it was argued that it would be timely to modernize the formats and several interesting ideas were proposed. After careful deliberation CSEWG concluded that actual implementation would require considerable resources needed to modify processing codes and to guarantee high quality of the files processed by these codes. In view of this the idea of format modernization has been postponed and ENDF-6 format was adopted for the new ENDF/B-VII library. In several other areas related to ENDF we made our best to move beyond established tradition and achieve maximum modernization. Thus, the 'Big Paper' on ENDF/B-VII.0 has been published, also in December 2006, as the Special Issue of Nuclear Data Sheets 107 (1996) 2931-3060. The new web retrieval and plotting system for ENDF-6 formatted data, Sigma, was developed by the NNDC and released in 2007. Extensive paper has been published on the advanced tool for nuclear reaction data evaluation, EMPIRE, in 2007. This effort was complemented with release of updated set of ENDF checking codes in 2009. As the final item on this list, major revision of ENDF-6 Formats Manual was made. This work started in 2006 and came to fruition in 2009 as documented in the present report.

  3. Theoretical analyses of (n,xn) reactions on sup 235 U, sup 238 U, sup 237 Np, and sup 239 Pu for ENDF/B-VI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, P.G.; Arthur, E.D.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Theoretical analyses were performed of neutron-induced reactions on {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np, and {sup 239}Pu between 0.01 and 20 MeV in order to calculate neutron emission cross sections and spectra for ENDF/B-VI evaluations. Coupled-channel optical model potentials were obtained for each target nucleus by fitting total, elastic, and inelastic scattering cross section data, as well as low-energy average resonance data. The resulting deformed optical model potentials were used to calculate direct (n,n{prime}) cross sections and transmission coefficients for use in Hauser-Feshbach statistical theory analyses. A fission model with multiple barrier representation, width fluctuation corrections, and preequilibrium corrections were included in the analyses. Direct cross sections for higher-lying vibrational states were calculated using DWBA theory, normalized using B(E{ell}) values determined from (d,d{prime}) and Coulomb excitation data, where available, and from systematics otherwise. Initial fission barrier parameters and transition state density enhancements appropriate to the compound systems involved were obtained from previous analyses, especially fits to charged-particle fission probability data. The parameters for the fission model were adjusted for each target system to obtain optimum agreement with direct (n,f) cross section measurements, taking account of the various multichance fission channels, that is, the different compound systems involved. The results from these analyses were used to calculate most of the neutron (n,n), (n,n{prime}), and (n,xn) cross section data in the ENDF/B/VI evaluations for the above nuclei, and all of the energy-angle correlated spectra. The deformed optical model and fission model parameterizations are described. Comparisons are given between the results of these analyses and the previous ENDF/B-V evaluations as well as with the available experimental data. 14 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  4. anaerobios gran negativos: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    de Marseille, Universite de Provence Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 284 Academic team formation as evolving hypergraphs Carla Taramasco , , Physics Websites Summary: ENSTA, 45...

  5. The CUORE and CUORE-0 Experiments at Gran Sasso

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giachero, A; Avignone, F T; Azzolini, O; Balata, M; Banks, T I; Bari, G; Beeman, J; Bellini, F; Bersani, A; Biassoni, M; Brofferio, C; Bucci, C; Cai, X Z; Camacho, A; Caminata, A; Canonica, L; Cao, X G; Capelli, S; Cappelli, L; Carbone, L; Cardani, L; Casali, N; Cassina, L; Chiesa, D; Chott, N; Clemenza, M; Copello, S; Cosmelli, C; Cremonesi, O; Creswick, R J; Cushman, J S; Dafinei, I; Dally, A; Datskov, V; Dell'Oro, S; Deninno, M M; Di Domizio, S; di Vacri, M L; Drobizhev, A; Ejzak, L; Fang, D Q; Farach, H A; Faverzani, M; Fernandes, G; Ferri, E; Ferroni, F; Fiorini, E; Franceschi, M A; Freedman, S J; Fujikawa, B K; Gironi, L; Giuliani, A; Gorla, P; Gotti, C; Gutierrez, T D; Haller, E E; Han, K; Heeger, K M; Hennings-Yeomans, R; Hickerson, K P; Huang, H Z; Kadel, R; Kazkaz, K; Keppel, G; Kolomensky, Yu G; Li, Y L; Ligi, C; Lim, K E; Liu, X; Ma, Y G; Maiano, C; Maino, M; Martinez, M; Maruyama, R H; Mei, Y; Moggi, N; Morganti, S; Napolitano, T; Nastasi, M; Nisi, S; Nones, C; Norman, E B; Nucciotti, A; O'Donnell, T; Orio, F; Orlandi, D; Ouellet, J L; Pagliarone, C E; Pallavicini, M; Pattavina, L; Pavan, M; Pedretti, M; Pessina, G; Pettinacci, V; Piperno, G; Pira, C; Pirro, S; Pozzi, S; Previtali, E; Rampazzo, V; Rosenfeld, C; Rusconi, C; Sala, E; Sangiorgio, S; Scielzo, N D; Sisti, M; Smith, A R; Taffarello, L; Tenconi, M; Terranova, F; Tian, W D; Tomei, C; Trentalange, S; Ventura, G; Vignati, M; Wang, B S; Wang, H W; Wielgus, L; Wilson, J; Winslow, L A; Wise, T; Woodcraft, A; Zanotti, L; Zarra, C; Zhang, G Q; Zhu, B X; Zucchelli, S

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events (CUORE) is an experiment to search for neutrinoless double beta decay ($0\

  6. agudo por gran: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    por la investigacin cient-fica. El programa La Ciudad' intenta acercar la ciencia a la sociedad a travs de encuentros con escolares, profesores, o exposiciones que...

  7. The Department of Energy`s Rocky Flats Plant: A guide to record series useful for health-related research. Volume VI, workplace and environmental monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the sixth in a series of seven volumes which constitute a guide to records of the Rocky Flats Plant useful for conducting health-related research. The primary purpose of Volume VI is to describe record series pertaining to workplace and environmental monitoring activities at the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Rocky Flats Plant, now named the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, near Denver, Colorado. History Associates Incorporated (HAI) prepared this guide as part of its work as the support services contractor for DOE`s Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project. This introduction briefly describes the Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project and HAI`s role in the project, provides a history of workplace and environmental monitoring practices at Rocky Flats, and identifies organizations contributing to workplace and environmental monitoring policies and activities. Other topics include the scope and arrangement of this volume and the organization to contact for access to these records. Comprehensive introductory and background information is available in Volume I. Other volumes in the guide pertain to administrative and general subjects, facilities and equipment, production and materials handling, waste management, and employee health. In addition, HAI has produced a subject-specific guide, titled The September 1957 Rocky Flats Fire. A Guide to Record Series of the Department of Energy and Its Contractors, which researchers should consult for further information about records related to this incident.

  8. Energy levels, oscillator strengths and transition probabilities for Si-like P II, S III, Cl IV, Ar V and K VI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abou El-Maaref, A., E-mail: aahmh@hotmail.com [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Al-Azhar University, Assuit (Egypt); Uosif, M.A.M. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Al-Azhar University, Assuit (Egypt)] [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Al-Azhar University, Assuit (Egypt); Allam, S.H.; El-Sherbini, Th.M. [Laboratory of Lasers and New Materials, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt)] [Laboratory of Lasers and New Materials, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt)

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Fine-structure calculations of energy levels, oscillator strengths, and transition probabilities for transitions among the terms belonging to 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 2}, 3s3p{sup 3}, 3s{sup 2}3p3d, 3s{sup 2}3p4s, 3s{sup 2}3p4p, 3s{sup 2}3p4d, 3s{sup 2}3p5s and 3s{sup 2}3p5p configurations of silicon-like ions P II, S III, Cl IV, Ar V and K VI have been calculated using configuration-interaction version 3 (CIV3). We compared our data with the available experimental data and other theoretical calculations. Most of our calculations of energy levels and oscillator strengths (in length form) show good agreement with both experimental and theoretical data. Lifetimes of the excited levels are also given.

  9. ENDF/B-V, ENDF/B-VI, AND ENDF/B-VII.0 RESULTS FOR THE DOPPLER-DEFECT BENCHMARK (U)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MOSTELLER, RUSSELL D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A set of computational benchmarks for the Doppler reactivity defect has been specified for an infinite array of identical fuel pin cells containing normal or enriched UO{sub 2} fuel, reactor-recycle mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel, or weapons-grade MOX fuel. The Doppler coefficient of reactivity, as well as the Doppler defect, can be computed for each of the cells. The MCNP5 Monte Carlo code was used to perform calculations for these benchmarks using cross sections derived from the ENDF/B-V, ENDF/B-VI, and ENDF/B-VII.0 nuclear data sets. The Doppler coefficients obtained from the three data sets exhibit very similar behavior. The Doppler coefficient for UO{sub 2} fuel becomes less negative with increasing enrichment, with a generally asymptotic shape. The Doppler coefficient for the reactor-recycle MOX becomes less negative with increasing PuO{sub 2} content but exhibits less curvature than that for UO{sub 2} fuel. The Doppler coefficient for weapons-grade MOX shows a pronounced shoulder between 1 wt.% and 2 wt.% PuO{sub 2}, with a nearly constant value thereafter. The Doppler coefficient for heavily loaded MOX fuel, whether reactor-recycle or weapons-grade, is significantly more negative than that for highly enriched UO{sub 2} fuel.

  10. Apparatus for forming thin-film heterojunction solar cells employing materials selected from the class of I-III-VI.sub.2 chalcopyrite compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mickelsen, Reid A. (Bellevue, WA); Chen, Wen S. (Seattle, WA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for forming thin-film, large area solar cells having a relatively high light-to-electrical energy conversion efficiency and characterized in that the cell comprises a p-n-type heterojunction formed of: (i) a first semiconductor layer comprising a photovoltaic active material selected from the class of I-III-VI.sub.2 chalcopyrite ternary materials which is vacuum deposited in a thin "composition-graded" layer ranging from on the order of about 2.5 microns to about 5.0 microns (.congruent.2.5 .mu.m to .congruent.5.0 .mu.m) and wherein the lower region of the photovoltaic active material preferably comprises a low resistivity region of p-type semiconductor material having a superimposed region of relatively high resistivity, transient n-type semiconductor material defining a transient p-n homojunction; and (ii), a second semiconductor layer comprising a low resistivity n-type semiconductor material wherein interdiffusion (a) between the elemental constituents of the two discrete juxtaposed regions of the first semiconductor layer defining a transient p-n homojunction layer, and (b) between the transient n-type material in the first semiconductor layer and the second n-type semiconductor layer, causes the transient n-type material in the first semiconductor layer to evolve into p-type material, thereby defining a thin layer heterojunction device characterized by the absence of voids, vacancies and nodules which tend to reduce the energy conversion efficiency of the system.

  11. VI. Required Appendices Appendix A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a successful academic with proficiency in biomedical sciences research. PREREQUISITES All students must of information (articles, books, videos, internet sites, etc.) that will provide the interested student. By continuing your enrollment in the course you acknowledge your understanding of this policy. ACADEMIC

  12. Sammen lfter vi Peter sikrer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michelsen, Claus

    langt vestpå, som man næsten kan komme i Danmark. Men de ville bare begge to. Og i dag har de overvundet, som ikke findes bedre i Danmark. Universiteterne er genboer på Niels Bohrs Vej ­ et navn, der for

  13. VI. , 3 3. 4 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaplan, Alexander

    Planescape Torment Sacrifice Star Wars: Knight of the Old Republic The Elder Scrolls X-COM: UFO Defense (UFO

  14. Appendix VI Corrective Action Strategy

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysisDarby/%2AO 474.2 Chg 1KANSASVisit toCDEFIVVI

  15. Barber, Whitesides I Redut'tiLleClearage of Carhon-Halogen Bonds ReductiveCleavageof Carbon-HalogenBondsby

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prentiss, Mara

    halogenatom abstractionfrom thc alkyl halideby a nragnesiumatom (eq 2). c R -X * Ms, [R-X]-. sfcr + Me(l)- R

  16. The Third Omega Laser FaciLiTy Users'grOUp WOrkshOp LLE Review, Volume 128250

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the National Users' Facility Organization, which in turn promotes science education and outreach throughout from these updates. The overview sci- ence talks, given by leading world authorities, described

  17. The Omega Laser FaciLiTy Users grOUp WOrkshOp LLE Review, Volume 120 161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (NNSA) already allocated for student/postdoctoral travel expenses. #12;The Omega Laser FaciLiTy Users gr Administration (NNSA) mission. The next section of this article contains a summary of the range of presentations-two students and postdoctoral fellows (Fig. 120.2), 27 of whom were supported by travel grants from NNSA

  18. Production and testing of the VITAMIN-B6 fine-group and the BUGLE-93 broad-group neutron/photon cross-section libraries derived from ENDF/B-VI nuclear data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ingersoll, D.T.; White, J.E.; Wright, R.Q.; Hunter, H.T.; Slater, C.O.; Greene, N.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); MacFarlane, R.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new multigroup cross-section library based on ENDF/B-VI data has been produced and tested for light water reactor shielding and reactor pressure vessel dosimetry applications. The broad-group library is designated BUGLE-93. The processing methodology is consistent with ANSI/ANS 6.1.2, since the ENDF data were first processed into a fine-group, ``pseudo problem-independent`` format and then collapsed into the final broad-group format. The fine-group library is designated VITAMIN-B6. An extensive integral data testing effort was also performed. In general, results using the new data show significant improvements relative to earlier ENDF data.

  19. Radiative rates for E1, E2, M1, and M2 transitions in the Br-like ions Sr IV, Y V, Zr VI, Nb VII, and Mo VIII

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aggarwal, K M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energies and lifetimes are reported for the lowest 375 levels of five Br-like ions, namely Sr~IV, Y~V, Zr~VI, Nb~VII, and Mo~VIII, mostly belonging to the 4s$^2$4p$^5$, 4s$^2$4p$^4$4$\\ell$, 4s4p$^6$, 4s$^2$4p$^4$5$\\ell$, 4s$^2$4p$^3$4d$^2$, 4s4p$^5$4$\\ell$, and 4s4p$^5$5$\\ell$ configurations. Extensive configuration interaction has been included and the general-purpose relativistic atomic structure package ({\\sc grasp}) has been adopted for the calculations. Additionally, radiative rates are listed among these levels for all E1, E2, M1, and M2 transitions. From a comparison with the measurements, the majority of our energy levels are assessed to be accurate to better than 2\\%, although discrepancies between theory and experiment for a few are up to 6\\%. An accuracy assessment of the calculated radiative rates (and lifetimes) is more difficult, because no prior results exist for these ions.

  20. VI-13 INSTITUTE COLLOQUIA AND SEMINARS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10 Professor Helmut Satz, Fakultaet fuer Physik, Universitaet Bielefeld, Bielefeld, Germany Quark Confinement and Hadrosythesis May 14 Dr. Daniel Abriola, Internaltional Atomic...

  1. Texas Rice, Volume VI, Number 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a large number of questions from the audience. The biofuels topic is so critical to Texas agriculture that it is likely that I will be discussing it from time to time during the next several issues. In many states, the biofuels boat is rapidly... gaining speed. Some states are providing monetary incentives for businesses to establish production plants. Some states see tremendous value in biofuels research, and are providing broad-based funding to foster research focusing on increasing ethanol...

  2. Texas Rice, Volume VI, Number 8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    an interesting history that is very regional within the U.S. rice industry. At one extreme, brown-bagging in the Texas conventional long-grain market is almost non- existent. In contrast, an estimated 30-40% of Arkansas and Missouri farmers brown-bag rice seed... ..............................................................12 Sincerely, L.T. Wilson Professor and Center Director Jack B. Wendt Endowed Chair in Rice Research Welcome to the Octo- ber issue of Texas Rice. The U.S. long grain rice market has at least partially recov- ered from the impact...

  3. Texas Rice, Volume VI, Number 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . 14.5%, with current world production of ethanol at ca. 10 billion gallons/yr. The largest producers of ethanol worldwide are Brazil (44.6%) and the U.S. (43.9%). In comparison, the global biodiesel production has reached ca. 0.8 billion gallons... ethanol and biodiesel production are but a small part of total world gasoline and diesel production, there is tremendous potential for increased sales. The Worldwatch report goes on to state that when “petroleum prices are above (U.S. $50) per barrel...

  4. Texas Rice, Volume VI, Number 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -level data only from this survey, ensur- ing that no individual operation or grower can be identified. Micro Reactor Pumps Out Biodiesel A tiny chemical reactor that can convert vegetable oil directly into biodiesel could help farmers turn some of their crops.... The device, about the size of a credit card, pumps vegetable oil and alcohol through tiny parallel channels, each smaller than a hu- man hair, to convert the oil into biodiesel almost instantly. By com- parison, it takes more than a day to produce biodiesel...

  5. Texas Rice, Volume VI, Number 6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    wading in rice fields to collect and examine aquatic pests of rice using their new digital microscopes. Some, if not all, of these activities will be carried back to the classroom to spark the imagination of their students. The focus of the Future... Cockrell and Brandy Morace, with additional support by Jim Medley. Information is taken from sources believed to be reliable, but we cannot guarantee accuracy or completeness. Suggestions, story ideas and comments are encouraged. Sincerely, L.T. Wilson...

  6. Texas Rice, Volume VI, Number 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; Rick Norman, Univer- sity of Arkansas; and Brian Ottis, University of Missouri. For more information email twalker@drec.msstate.edu Photo by Mike Jund Rice seedlings at the 4 and 5 leaf stage, with urea applied, just prior to permanent flood. Achieving...’s Nutrition Research Center Researcher in the News... Growing up a carpenter’s son with a love for science, Mike debated on which would be his career, and which would be his hobby. In the end, he decided on career in plant science, but his skill for building...

  7. Planck 2015 results. VI. LFI mapmaking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ade, P A R; Ashdown, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartolo, N; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bonaldi, A; Bonavera, L; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Butler, R C; Calabrese, E; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Chamballu, A; Chary, R -R; Christensen, P R; Colombi, S; Colombo, L P L; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Ducout, A; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Elsner, F; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Fergusson, J; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Franceschi, E; Frejsel, A; Galeotta, S; Galli, S; Ganga, K; Giard, M; Giraud-Héraud, Y; Gjerløw, E; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Hansen, F K; Hanson, D; Harrison, D L; Henrot-Versillé, S; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hornstrup, A; Hovest, W; Huffenberger, K M; Hurier, G; Jaffe, A H; Jaffe, T R; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kiiveri, K; Kisner, T S; Knoche, J; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lähteenmäki, A; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Lattanzi, M; Lawrence, C R; Leahy, J P; Leonardi, R; Lesgourgues, J; Levrier, F; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; Lindholm, V; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maggio, G; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Mangilli, A; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Mazzotta, P; McGehee, P; Meinhold, P R; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Mitra, S; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Moss, A; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Paci, F; Pagano, L; Paoletti, D; Partridge, B; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Pearson, T J; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Pettorino, V; Pierpaoli, E; Pietrobon, D; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Pratt, G W; Prézeau, G; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renzi, A; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Rossetti, M; Roudier, G; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Savelainen, M; Scott, D; Seiffert, M D; Shellard, E P S; Spencer, L D; Stolyarov, V; Stompor, R; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Tuovinen, J; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vassallo, T; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Watson, R; Wehus, I K; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the mapmaking procedure applied to Planck LFI (Low Frequency Instrument) data. The mapmaking step takes as input the calibrated timelines and pointing information. The main products are sky maps of $I,Q$, and $U$ Stokes components. For the first time, we present polarization maps at LFI frequencies. The mapmaking algorithm is based on a destriping technique, enhanced with a noise prior. The Galactic region is masked to reduce errors arising from bandpass mismatch and high signal gradients. We apply horn-uniform radiometer weights to reduce effects of beam shape mismatch. The algorithm is the same as used for the 2013 release, apart from small changes in parameter settings. We validate the procedure through simulations. Special emphasis is put on the control of systematics, which is particularly important for accurate polarization analysis. We also produce low-resolution versions of the maps, and corresponding noise covariance matrices. These serve as input in later analysis steps and para...

  8. Texas Rice, Volume VI, Number 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    process to create trans- genic crops is the biolistic method, commonly referred to as the ‘gene gun’. As the name implies, genetic material coated over gold or tung- sten is shot into target cells. Scientists have learned how to ‘program’ DNA to make... and denitrification. Studies were conducted on clay soil near Beau- mont, TX in 2003, 2004, and 2005 and on sandy loam soil near Eagle Lake, TX in 2004 and 2005. The fluid treatments received 75 or 100% of the 150 lbs N/A at planting, with the remainder be- ing...

  9. VI-9 RESEARCH PERSONNEL AND ENGINEERING STAFF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 - March 31, 2013 Faculty and Research Group Leaders Aldo Bonasera, Senior Scientist Charles M. Folden III, Assist. Prof. of Nuclear Chemistry Rainer Fries, Assist. Professor of...

  10. VI-9 RESEARCH PERSONNEL AND ENGINEERING STAFF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 - March 31, 2014 Faculty and Research Group Leaders Aldo Bonasera, Senior Scientist Charles M. Folden III, Assist. Prof. of Nuclear Chemistry Rainer Fries, Assist. Professor of...

  11. Theory VI. Computational Materials Sciences Network (CMSN)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Z Y

    2008-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Computational Materials Sciences Network (CMSN) is a virtual center consisting of scientists interested in working together, across organizational and disciplinary boundaries, to formulate and pursue projects that reflect challenging and relevant computational research in the materials sciences. The projects appropriate for this center involve those problems best pursued through broad cooperative efforts, rather than those key problems best tackled by single investigator groups. CMSN operates similarly to the DOE Center of Excellence for the Synthesis and Processing of Advanced Materials, coordinated by George Samara at Sandia. As in the Synthesis and Processing Center, the intent of the modest funding for CMSN is to foster partnering and collective activities. All CMSN proposals undergo external peer review and are judged foremost on the quality and timeliness of the science and also on criteria relevant to the objective of the center, especially concerning a strategy for partnering. More details about CMSN can be found on the CMSN webpages at: http://cmpweb.ameslab.gov/ccms/CMSN-homepage.html.

  12. Texas Rice, Volume VI, Number 5 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by processing these crops is produced more efficiently than the ethanol produced by corn. Water hyacinth, a weed that chokes waterways if left to grow uncontrolled, is even more energy efficient as a biomass feedstock,” Holtzapple said. In the MixAlco process..., the biomass feedstock, with added mi- croorganisms from sources such as dirt, compost piles and swamps, is treated with lime and then fer- mented to form organic salts. Wa- ter is removed and then the mixture is heated to form ketones, such as acetone, which...

  13. Journal of Undergraduate Research, Volume VI, 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faletra, P.; Schuetz, A.; Cherkerzian, D.; Clark, T.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Students who conducted research at DOE National Laboratories during 2005 were invited to include their research abstracts, and for a select few, their completed research papers in this Journal. This Journal is direct evidence of students collaborating with their mentors. Fields in which these students worked include: Biology; Chemistry; Computer Science; Engineering; Environmental Science; General Sciences; Materials Sciences; Medical and Health Sciences; Nuclear Sciences; Physics; and Science Policy.

  14. Texas Rice, Volume VI, Number 7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    elementary education. Julio Castillo was born in the Republic of Panama, the oldest of 8 children. His father farmed rice, corn and vegetables, both for sale and the family table. The high school Julio attended was a technical school specializing... to venture out and expand his horizons beyond the family farm. After high school, he enrolled at the University of Panama to pursue a BS in Agronomy. After completing his degree, he continued to work at the university in the weed science project...

  15. Cours-VI/Clavin2015.key

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ( ) , + () 0, external solutions : w 0 up to first order O(1 ) a small heat loss can quench the flame Zoom slope : 0, 1, + : 0, 0 ...

  16. VI-13 INSTITUTE COLLOQUIA AND SEMINARS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sector of the Nuclear Chart: New Horizon September 26 Dr. Jiansong Wang, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou, China Elastic Scattering Studies at...

  17. Chapter VI: Integrating North American Energy Markets

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'sEnergyTexas1. Feedstock & ProductionChapter 6 --30 QERQER-26 QER

  18. Diluted II-VI Oxide Semiconductors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management FermiDavidDiesel pricesDiesel28, 2007, 4:15pm toDiluted

  19. VI-13 INSTITUTE COLLOQUIA AND SEMINARS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps to Predict4 VARIATIONS IN THEVERA Core1 -2 -3

  20. VI-13 INSTITUTE COLLOQUIA AND SEMINARS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps to Predict4 VARIATIONS IN THEVERA Core1 -2

  1. VI-9 RESEARCH PERSONNEL AND ENGINEERING STAFF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps to Predict4 VARIATIONS IN THEVERA Core1 -22 -

  2. VI-9 RESEARCH PERSONNEL AND ENGINEERING STAFF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps to Predict4 VARIATIONS IN THEVERA Core1 -22 -3 -

  3. Part VI: Section I: Contract Clause

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in235-1 Termoelectrica U.SPRESS FACTBiofuels1ofHannoPAa. Part B 1C79DFGII

  4. Cours-VI/Clavin2015.key

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution AndControllingCoolCorrectiveCosts ofCountingIVIXVVI

  5. I.D I VI Figure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School footballHydrogen andHypernuclei in Hall C High2 -I-5165Physics

  6. ScholarShipSandGranTS/TUiTionandFEES Scholarships (continued)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elsherbeni, Atef Z.

    these awards. Additional details can be found on the financial aid web- page of each regional campus site application, sub- mit a 300-word (or two-page) essay, file the FAFSA, and maintain involvement in the First offers a wide array of financial aid opportunities, including scholarships, grants, loans and work

  7. ENERGIA E`OLICA La font d'energia amb el creixement mes gran

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Batiste, Oriol

    .lada: 48.000 MW Web World Wind energy Association http://www.wwindea.org Web Associaci´o danesa de la ind = 1 2 mv2 Pot`encia P = dEk dt = 1 2 dm dt v2 dm dt = Sv P = 1 2 Sv3 #12;RECURSOS EOLICS 1-2% de l L'ENERGIA E`OLICA #12;MERCAT PER FABRICANTS #12;PARCS E`OLICS MARINS #12;

  8. La Universidad de Alicante mide el gran impacto de las marcas en Espaa como motor econmico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escolano, Francisco

    comercio, en la proyección exterior del país, en el impulso de la I+D, en la contribución al empleo, en su participación en el comercio electrónico en España. El análisis de su impacto sobre el empleo es considerado por redactores de informe como uno de sus elementos fundamentales. Según estadísticas de 2010, las

  9. Prof. Dr. Gran Andersson, Director of Studies 03/10/14MEST 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    || Prof. Dr. Göran Andersson, Director of Studies 03/10/14MEST 1 Master in Energy Science* Switzerland,*10* S.Korea,*1* Egypt,*1* China,*1* Austria, 1 Finland, 1 Germany, 5 Greece, 4 Italy, 1 Spain, 1 in the MEST? § Head of studies: Prof. Göran Andersson § Energy Science Center (ESC): Content Dr. Christian

  10. Double {beta} experiments with the help of scintillation and HPGe detectors at Gran Sasso

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barabash, A.; Konovalov, S. I.; Umatov, V. I. [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Belli, P.; D'Angelo, S.; Di Marco, A. [INFN, Sezione di Roma ''Tor Vergata'', Rome (Italy); Bernabei, R. [INFN, Sezione di Roma ''Tor Vergata '', Rome (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma ''Tor Vergata'', Rome (Italy); Boiko, R. S.; Chernyak, D. M.; Danevich, F. A.; Kobychev, V. V.; Kropivyansky, B. N.; Kudovbenko, V. M.; Nagorny, S. S.; Podviyanuk, R. B.; Polischuk, O. G.; Tretyak, V. I.; Vyshnevskyi, I. M.; Yurchenko, S. S. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Kyiv (Ukraine); Brudanin, V. B. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); and others

    2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for double beta decay of {sup 64,70}Zn, {sup 180,186}W was carried out by using low background ZnWO{sub 4} crystal scintillators, while a CeCl{sub 3} scintillation detector was applied to investigate 2{beta} processes in {sup 136,138,142}Ce. A search for 2{beta} decay of {sup 96,104}Ru, {sup 156,158}Dy, {sup 190,198}Pt and study of 2{nu}2{beta} decay of {sup 100}Mo to the first excited 0{sup +} level of {sup 100}Ru were realized by ultra-low background HPGe {gamma} spectrometry. Moreover, CdWO{sub 4} crystal scintillators from enriched {sup 106}Cd and {sup 116}Cd isotopes were developed to search for 2{beta} decay of {sup 106}Cd and {sup 116}Cd. Finally, experiments aimed to investigate {sup 96,104}Ru and {sup 116}Cd are in progress and a new phase of the experiment to search for 2{beta} processes in {sup 106}Cd is in preparation.

  11. Sustainable vector control and management of Chagas disease in the Gran Chaco, Argentina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Joel E.

    and economic development in Latin America, especially for the rural poor. We report the long-term effects cruzi In Latin America, the burden of Chagas disease was estimated as 2.7 times the joint burden in 1985, transmission resurged in 2­3 years. Renewed interventions in 1992 followed by sustained

  12. Role of U(VI) Adsorption in U(VI) Reduction by Geobacter Species.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2009-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous work had suggested that Acholeplasma palmae has a higher capacity for uranium sorption than other bacteria studied. Sorption studies were performed with cells in suspension in various solutions containing uranium and results were used to generate uranium-biosorption isotherms.

  13. First breeding population of Bulwer's Petrel Bulweria bulwerii recorded on Gran Canaria (Canary Islands) - population size and morphometric data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LUZARDO, J., LÓPEZ-DARIAS, M., SUÁREZ, V., CALABUIG, P., GARCÍA, E.A. & MARTÍN, C. Journal:  Marine Ornithology ...

  14. Bibliografa recomanada Hi ha una gran quantitat de llibres de text dedicats al tema de les Comunicacions ptiques, i tamb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colet, Pere

    of Photonics, Wiley 1991. - A. Yariv, Optical Electronics, Holt, Rinehart & Winston Inc., 1991 (4rth ed.) Mireu, Fiber Optics Communications, Prentice Hall 1984. - B. E. A. Saleh i M. C. Teich, Fundamentals

  15. César Rengifo y el teatro venezolano

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paternina Rí os, Zoila

    1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    local, con un marcado afán por encontrar una forma expresiva que lo identifique con lo nacional. VI. Teatro criollo Descendiente directo del teatro costumbrista, se ubica en las primeras cuatro décadas del presente siglo. Recibe la influencia de los... muralismo" (T. VI. p. 450). Llegó al país con la intención de sacar el arte del museo y dirigirlo al pueblo, esto es, de la pintura de salón pasar al mural. Pero las condiciones no se dieron hasta 1954-1955, cuando realizó su gran mural-mosaico Amalivaca...

  16. Analysis of High-Dimensional Signal Data by Manifold Learning and Convolutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iske, Armin

    techniques are including Isomap and LLE meth- ods [4, 7] Local Tangent Space Alignment (LTSA) [6], Sample

  17. Inverting Paradigms and Identifying Monstrosities in Juvenal's "Satire VI"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gould, Matthew James

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    autocratic response. Shadi Bartsch prefers libertas as freethe Audience, Shadi Bartsch chooses the term “doublespeak”

  18. National Aeronautics and Space Administration SpaceMathVI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -8 7 Solar Storms ­ Fractions and Percentages 6-8 8 Energy at Home 6-8 9 Carbon Dioxide Increases 6) LRO/NASA This booklet was created through an education grant NNH06ZDA001N- EPO from NASA's Science-11 31 The Most Important Equation in Astronomy 9-11 32 Solar Insolation Changes and the Sunspot Cycle 9

  19. Surface-Catalyzed Chromium(VI) Reduction: Reactivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Baolin

    - oxylic acid and pyruvic acid), with oxalic acid, and with substituted phenols (salicylic acid, 4 with R-hydroxyl carboxylic acids (glycolic acid, lactic acid, mandelic acid, and tartaric acid) and their esters (methyl glycolate, methyl lactate, and methyl mandelate), with R-carbonyl carboxylic acids (gly

  20. assessment methods vi: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chapter five: The effect of flight speed on the risk of collision between birds and wind turbines......

  1. Universit Paris VI Pierre et Marie Curie Thse de doctorat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    DURAND RECHERCHE MULTIDISCIPLINAIRE POUR CARACTERISER DEUX AQUIFERES FRACTURES : LES EAUX MINERALES DE

  2. Abiotic Reductive Immobilization of U(VI) by Biogenic Mackinawite...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ferric iron and sulfate that could lead to the formation of various biogenic minerals in-situ. Sulfides, as well as structural and adsorbed Fe(II) associated with biogenic...

  3. Molecular Interactions of Plutonium(VI) with SyntheticManganese...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on the surface of well-characterized synthetic manganese-substituted goethite minerals (Fe1-xMnxOOH) was studied using X-ray absorption spectroscopy. We chose to study the...

  4. Texas Adapted Genetic Strategies for Beef Cattle VI: Creating Breeds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammack, Stephen P.

    2009-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    the breed. The first such registry for cattle began in England in 1822 for Shorthorns; the Hereford registry started in England in 1846; and the Angus, actually Aberdeen-Angus, began in Scotland in 1862. European breeds in the United States.... A few came as early as 1783, and significant numbers arrived around 1817. A few Herefords also entered the country in 1817, but the first meaningful numbers came in about 1840. The first few Angus came in 1873. Other breeds imported before 1900...

  5. Volume VI, Chapter 2 Run Reconstructions of Select

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Coweeman tule fall chinook, East Fork Lewis tule fall chinook, North Fork Lewis bright fall chinook, Wind, Wind summer steelhead, and Grays chum. These populations were selected because they represent a mixture of the ratio of recruits to spawners, in the absence of density dependent mortality (Neave 1953). Run

  6. New insights into uranium (VI) sol-gel processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, C.M.; Thompson, M.C.; Buchanan, B.R. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (USA)); King, R.B. (Georgia Univ., Athens, GA (USA). Dept. of Chemistry); Garber, A.R. (South Carolina Univ., Columbia, SC (USA). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) investigations on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory process for sol-gel synthesis of microspherical nuclear fuel (UO{sub 2}), has been extremely useful in sorting out the chemical mechanism in the sol-gel steps. {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N, and {sup 1}H NMR studies on the HMTA gelation agent (Hexamethylene tetramine, C{sub 6}H{sub 12}N{sub 4}) has revealed near quantitative stability of this adamantane-like compound in the sol-gel process, contrary to its historical role as an ammonia source for gelation from the worldwide technical literature. {sup 17}O NMR of uranyl (UO{sub 2}{sup ++}) hydrolysis fragments produced in colloidal sols has revealed the selective formation of a uranyl trimer, ((UO{sub 2}){sub 3}({mu}{sub 3}-O)({mu}{sub 2}-OH){sub 3}){sup +}, induced by basic hydrolysis with the HMTA gelation agent. Spectroscopic results will be presented to illustrate that trimer condensation occurs during sol-gel processing leading to layered polyanionic hydrous uranium oxides in which HMTAH{sup +} is occluded as an intercalation'' cation. Subsequent sol-gel processing of microspheres by ammonia washing results in in-situ exchange and formation of a layered hydrous ammonium uranate with a proposed structural formula of (NH{sub 4}){sub 2} ((UO{sub 2}){sub 8} O{sub 4} (OH){sub 10}) {center dot} 8H{sub 2}O. This compound is the precursor to sintered UO{sub 2} ceramic fuel. 23 refs., 10 figs.

  7. North American Standard Level VI Inspection Program Update: Ensuring...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Ensuring Safe Transportation of Radioactive Material Presentation made by Carlisle Smith for the NTSF annual meeting held from May 14-16, 2013 in Buffalo, NY North American...

  8. Task-level parallelism Vi/orio Zaccaria, June 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silvano, Cristina

    ;Concurrency: Flynn Taxonomy (1st part) · Kinds of concurrency in compuLng (which execuLng the same program in lock-step (GPUs) #12;Concurrency: Flynn Taxonomy Available Transistors MOORE'S LAW Frequency #12;Scalar performance Olukotun

  9. JOURNAL DE CHIMIE-PHYSIQUE; T. VI; 1908.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    distillations fraction- nées dans un appareil tout en verre, entre la température ordinaire et celles du mélange carbonique ou de l'air liquide. Lé criterium de la pureté était la constance de la pression pendant une distillation et aussi la constance des densités trouvées, après de nouvelles distilla- tions. Les données

  10. VI International SAUM Conference on Systems, Automatic Control and Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gajic, Zoran

    and filtering tasks into pure­slow and pure­fast time scales. The presented methodol­ ogy eliminates numerical into the design procedures, allows independent parallel processing of informa­ tion in slow and fast time scales, aircrafts, robots, electrical cir­ cuits, power systems, nuclear reactors, chemical reactors, dc

  11. DOE human genome program contractor-grantee workshop VI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research is presented from the workshop on the Human Genome Project. Topics include sequencing, genetic mapping, informatics, ethical and legal issues, and infrastructure.

  12. Universit Paris VI LG301 2008-2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubin, David

    Kepler pour qu'il dérive ses trois lois ? a) Ptolémée. b) Galilée. c) Tycho Brahe. d) Johann Stöffler. e expliquer les mouvements des planètes autour du Soleil ? a) Newton. b) Tycho Brahe. c) Johannes Kepler. d) Tycho Brahé c) Nicolas Copernic. d) Johannes Kepler. e) Aucune de ces réponses. #12;5) Où apparaissent

  13. ENDF/VI six-group delayed neutron data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    England, T.R.; Brady, M.C. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA); Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In addition to individual precursor data (emission probabilities (Pn) and neutron spectra), the ENDF system requires {bar {nu}}(E), and its time-dependence and spectra using a few time groups. These data have been greatly extended, tested, and recently (June 1989) compared with new measurements of pulse spectra. 7 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Microsoft Word - VI-1 Papers Published 2003.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the S 17 and S 18 astrophysical factors from the breakup of 8 B and 9 C at intermediate energies L. Trache, F. Carstoiu, C. A. Gagliardi, A. M. Mukhamedzhanov and R. E. Tribble...

  15. Studies of Gymnomyzinae (Diptera: Ephydridae), VI: A Revision of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathis, Wayne N.

    (Belize. Stann Creek District: Wee Wee Cay), G. salina (United States. Missouri: Howard Co., Boonslick.V. Mansilla, Salina, Route 60). OFFICIAL PUBLICATION DATE is handstamped in a limited number of initial copies

  16. THE CARINA PROJECT. VI. THE HELIUM-BURNING VARIABLE STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coppola, G.; Marconi, M.; Ripepi, V.; Dall'Ora, M.; Musella, I. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte, Via Moiariello 16, I-80131 Napoli (Italy); Stetson, P. B. [Dominion Astrophysical Observatory, NRC-Herzberg, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Bono, G.; Buonanno, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica-Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Fabrizio, M. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Collurania, via M. Maggini, I-64100 Teramo (Italy); Ferraro, I.; Iannicola, G.; Pulone, L. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, Via Frascati 33, I-00040 Monte Porzio Catone (Italy); Fiorentino, G. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Monelli, M. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, Calle Via Lactea s/n, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Nonino, M. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, via G. B. Tiepolo 11, I-40131 Trieste (Italy); Thevenin, F. [Universite de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, Lab. Lagrange, UMR 7293, Observatoire de la Cote dAzur, BP 4229, F-06304 Nice (France); Walker, A. R., E-mail: coppola@na.astro.it [Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile)

    2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new optical (BVI) time-series data for the evolved variable stars in the Carina dwarf spheroidal galaxy. The quality of the data and the observing strategy allowed us to identify 14 new variable stars. Eight out of the 14 are RR Lyrae (RRL) stars, 4 are Anomalous Cepheids (ACs), and 2 are geometrical variables. Comparison of the period distribution for the entire sample of RRLs with similar distributions in nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxies and in the Large Magellanic Cloud indicates that the old stellar populations in these systems share similar properties. This finding is also supported by the RRL distribution in the Bailey diagram. On the other hand, the period distribution and the Bailey diagram of ACs display significant differences among the above stellar systems. This evidence suggests that the properties of intermediate-age stellar populations might be affected both by environmental effects and structural parameters. We use the BV Period-Wesenheit (PW) relation of RRLs together with evolutionary prescriptions and find a true distance modulus of 20.09 {+-} 0.07 (intrinsic) {+-} 0.1 (statistical) mag that agrees quite well with similar estimates available in the literature. We identified four peculiar variables. Taking into account their position in the Bailey diagram and in the BV PW relation, two of them (V14 and V149) appear to be candidate ACs, while two (V158 and V182) might be peculiar RRLs. In particular, the variable V158 has a period and a V-band amplitude very similar to the low-mass RRL-RRLR-02792-recently identified by Pietrzynski et al. in the Galactic bulge.

  17. Abiotic Reductive Immobilization of U(VI) by Biogenic Mackinawite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veeramani, Harish; Scheinost, Andreas; Monsegue, Niven; Qafoku, Nikolla; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Newville, Mathew; Lanzirotti, Anthony; Pruden, Amy; Murayama, Mitsuhiro; Hochella, Michael F.

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During subsurface bioremediation of uranium-contaminated sites, indigenous metal and sulfate-reducing bacteria may utilize a variety of electron acceptors, including ferric iron and sulfate that could lead to the formation of various biogenic minerals in-situ. Sulfides, as well as structural and adsorbed Fe(II) associated with biogenic Fe(II)-sulfide phases, can potentially catalyze abiotic U6+ reduction via direct electron transfer processes. In the present work, the propensity of biogenic mackinawite (Fe1+xS, x = 0 to 0.11) to reduce U6+ abiotically was investigated. The biogenic mackinawite produced by Shewanella putrefaciens strain CN32 was characterized by employing a suite of analytical techniques including TEM, SEM, XAS and Mössbauer analyses. Nanoscale and bulk analyses (microscopic and spectroscopic techniques, respectively) of biogenic mackinawite after exposure to U6+ indicate the formation of nanoparticulate UO2. This study suggests the relevance of Fe(II) and sulfide bearing biogenic minerals in mediating abiotic U6+ reduction, an alternative pathway in addition to direct enzymatic U6+ reduction.

  18. Texas Adapted Genetic Strategies for Beef Cattle VI: Creating Breeds 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammack, Stephen P.

    2009-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    and Maine-Anjou Corriente? ?pool of Criollo-type Mexican cattle Durham Reds? ?? to ? Shorthorn, remainder Red Angus Florida Cracker/Pineywoods? ?pool of Criollo-type Florida cattle Gelbray? ?5/8 Gelbvieh, 3/8 Brahman Lim? -Flex?? to ? Limousin...

  19. Precision engineering center. 1988 Annual report, Volume VI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dow, T. [ed.; Fornaro, R.; Keltie, R.; Paesler, M. [and others

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To reverse the downward trend in the balance of trade, American companies must concentrate on increasing research into new products, boosting productivity, and improving manufacturing processes. The Precision Engineering Center at North Carolina State University is a multidisciplinary research and graduate education program dedicated to providing the new technology necessary to respond to this challenge. One extremely demanding manufacturing area is the fabrication and assembly of optical systems. These systems are at the heart of such consumer products as cameras, lenses, copy machines, laser bar-code scanners, VCRs, and compact audio discs - products that the Japanese and other East Asian countries are building dominance. A second critical area is the fabrication of VLSI and ULSI circuits. The tolerances required to produce the next generation of components for such systems have created the need for new approaches - approaches that could either make or break America`s competitive position. This report contains individual reports on research projects grouped into three broad areas: measurement and actuation; real-time control; precision fabrication. Separate abstracts for these articles have been indexed into the energy database.

  20. Chemistry of the Colloidal Group II-VI Nanocrystal Synthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Haitao

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    D. ; Micheel, C. M. ; Alivisatos, A. P. J. Am. Chem. Soc.U. ; Bjork, M. T. ; Alivisatos, A. P. Nano Lett. 2005, 5,N. A. ; Geier, M. L. ; Alivisatos, A. P. Science 2005, 310,

  1. Universit Paris VI Pierre & Marie Curie THESE DE DOCTORAT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glück, Olivier

    Dreyfus qui a travaillé sur le portage sous LINUX de la couche PUT, Laurent Valeyre qui a travaillé sur la

  2. Ch. VI, The geophysical environment around Waunita Hot Springs | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.Telluric Survey asWest,CEI Jump to:Cerion Energy

  3. Microsoft Word - APP VI, Rev 3 _03-19-20

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch Project Lead

  4. ORGANIZATIONAL CHART - CYCLOTRON INSTITUTE VI-11 DIRECTOR Tribble

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627 FederalTransformers

  5. Microsoft Word - VI-1 Papers Published 2003.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE625 FINALOptimizationFor Immediate Release2 -

  6. Microsoft Word - VI_11_Organizational Chart.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE625 FINALOptimizationFor Immediate Release24

  7. Microsoft Word - VI_12_Degrees Awarded 2015.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE625 FINALOptimizationFor Immediate Release244 -

  8. EA-389 Greay Bay Energy VI, LLC | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No53197EFindingEA-257-CEA-296-B22441Department of Energy

  9. Brookhaven National Laboratory - OU VI VOC | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesville Energy ResearchAchievingHydraulic Institute StandardsHFBRI/IVVVI

  10. EA-389 Greay Bay Energy VI, LLC | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015 Business42.1Energy |Final Site-WideBPAPowerEEauthorizongCargillDepartment

  11. North American Standard Level VI Inspection Program Update: Ensuring Safe

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR - T en Y ear RHost RemediationDepartmentTransportation of

  12. An Octahedral Coordination Complex of Iron(VI)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternative FuelsSanta FeAuthorization| Iron is the most abundant

  13. An Octahedral Coordination Complex of Iron(VI)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWPAlumni Alumni PARC/I-CARES CERTIFICATEnationalAmyAn InsideAnAnAn

  14. SEGS VI Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to:RoscommonSBY Solutions Jump to: navigation, searchSDEMSEEWECIIIVVI

  15. William J. Keese Commissioners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ................................................................................................................. vi ... Natural Gas ........................................................................................................... vii ... Natural Gas.............................................................................................................. vi ... Transportation Energy

  16. R. Winther, B.A. Gran, and G. Dahll (Eds.): SAFECOMP 2005, LNCS 3688, pp. 136 150, 2005. Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Tim

    . © Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2005 Using Safety Critical Artificial Neural Networks in Gas Turbine Aero networks. This paper examines the practicalities of using the SCANN and SLANN for Gas Turbine Aero arguments. Results illustrating the benefits and safety of the SCANN in a Gas Turbine Engine Model

  17. En Medio De Un Gran Circo: La Ciudad De México A Tráves De Las Crónicas Musicales De Maldita Vecindad Y Los Hijos Del 5º Patio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lujan, Soledad

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    y económicos causados por el sismo: “Se habló de un númeropasadas dos semanas del sismo; entre cien y ciento cincuentadel terremoto declara que “El sismo reveló que de todos los

  18. Determination of Free Acid by Standard Addition with Potassium Thiocyanate as Complexant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baumann, E.W.

    2001-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for determination of free acid in solutions containing the hydrolyzable ions Al (III), Cr(III), Fe(III), Hg(II), Ni(II), Th(IV), and U(VI). The concentration of the sample is calculated either by solving three simultaneous Nernst equations, by the Gran plot procedure, or by means of a microprocessor pH meter. Molar concentrations of metal ion up to 2.5 times that of the acid can be tolerated. The method has been applied to analysis of nuclear processing solutions that contain Pu(III), in addition to the ions listed above.

  19. Semi-Supervised Nonlinear Dimensionality Reduction Xin Yang xinyang@cse.psu.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zha, Hongyuan

    Linear Embedding (LLE), Isometric feature map- ping (ISOMAP), and Local Tangent Space Alignment (LTSA pairs of data points. The Lo- cal Tangent Space Alignment (LTSA) (Zhang & Zha, 2004),(Zha & Zhang, 2005, such as LLE, ISOMAP, and LTSA are all unsupervised learning algorithms, that is, they assume no prior

  20. Chapter 27 -- Breast Cancer Genomics, Section VI, Pathology and Biological Markers of Invasive Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spellman, Paul T.; Heiser, Laura; Gray, Joe W.

    2009-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Breast cancer is predominantly a disease of the genome with cancers arising and progressing through accumulation of aberrations that alter the genome - by changing DNA sequence, copy number, and structure in ways that that contribute to diverse aspects of cancer pathophysiology. Classic examples of genomic events that contribute to breast cancer pathophysiology include inherited mutations in BRCA1, BRCA2, TP53, and CHK2 that contribute to the initiation of breast cancer, amplification of ERBB2 (formerly HER2) and mutations of elements of the PI3-kinase pathway that activate aspects of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling and deletion of CDKN2A/B that contributes to cell cycle deregulation and genome instability. It is now apparent that accumulation of these aberrations is a time-dependent process that accelerates with age. Although American women living to an age of 85 have a 1 in 8 chance of developing breast cancer, the incidence of cancer in women younger than 30 years is uncommon. This is consistent with a multistep cancer progression model whereby mutation and selection drive the tumor's development, analogous to traditional Darwinian evolution. In the case of cancer, the driving events are changes in sequence, copy number, and structure of DNA and alterations in chromatin structure or other epigenetic marks. Our understanding of the genetic, genomic, and epigenomic events that influence the development and progression of breast cancer is increasing at a remarkable rate through application of powerful analysis tools that enable genome-wide analysis of DNA sequence and structure, copy number, allelic loss, and epigenomic modification. Application of these techniques to elucidation of the nature and timing of these events is enriching our understanding of mechanisms that increase breast cancer susceptibility, enable tumor initiation and progression to metastatic disease, and determine therapeutic response or resistance. These studies also reveal the molecular differences between cancer and normal that may be exploited to therapeutic benefit or that provide targets for molecular assays that may enable early cancer detection, and predict individual disease progression or response to treatment. This chapter reviews current and future directions in genome analysis and summarizes studies that provide insights into breast cancer pathophysiology or that suggest strategies to improve breast cancer management.

  1. ORIGINAL PAPER Automated determination of uranium(VI) at ultra trace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sánchez, David

    -distribution of uranium [2]. Some of these activities have ceased, such as testing of nuclear weapons in the atmosphere, and some are continuing, for example electrical energy generation by nuclear reactors and use for a variety. Effluent discharges into the environment, use of phosphate fertilizers in agriculture, and use of by

  2. Behavior of Uranium(VI) during HEDPA Leaching for Aluminum Dissolution in Tank Waste Sludges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, Brian A.; Rao, Linfeng; Nash, Kenneth L.; Martin, Leigh

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dissolution in Tank Waste Sludges Brian A. Powell 1 ,to produce a clay-like sludge layer, a slurry phase, and anto be concentrated in the sludge phase, which is primarily

  3. Examination of Uranium(VI) Leaching During Ligand Promoted Dissolution of Waste Tank Sludge Surrogates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, Brian A.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Hanford waste tank sludge simulants. J. Nucl. Sci.from simulated tank waste sludges. Sep. Sci. Tech. 38(2),Dissolution of Waste Tank Sludge Surrogates. In preparation,

  4. Fe(III) Reduction and U(VI) Immobilization by Paenibacillus sp...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of either of electron transfer mediators (ETMs) flavin mononucleotide (FMN) or anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS). Maximum initial Fh reduction rates were observed at...

  5. Microbial Reduction of U(VI) at the Solid-Water Interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roden, Eric E.

    . Addition of the electron shuttling agent anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS; 0.1 mM) enhanced the rate

  6. Rational Ligand Design for U(VI) and Pu(IV)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szigethy, Geza

    2009-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear power is an attractive alternative to hydrocarbon-based energy production at a time when moving away from carbon-producing processes is widely accepted as a significant developmental need. Hence, the radioactive actinide power sources for this industry are necessarily becoming more widespread, which is accompanied by the increased risk of exposure to both biological and environmental systems. This, in turn, requires the development of technology designed to remove such radioactive threats efficiently and selectively from contaminated material, whether that be contained nuclear waste streams or the human body. Raymond and coworkers (University of California, Berkeley) have for decades investigated the interaction of biologically-inspired, hard Lewis-base ligands with high-valent, early-actinide cations. It has been established that such ligands bind strongly to the hard Lewis-acidic early actinides, and many poly-bidentate ligands have been developed and shown to be effective chelators of actinide contaminants in vivo. Work reported herein explores the effect of ligand geometry on the linear U(IV) dioxo dication (uranyl, UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}). The goal is to utilize rational ligand design to develop ligands that exhibit shape selectivity towards linear dioxo cations and provides thermodynamically favorable binding interactions. The uranyl complexes with a series of tetradentate 3-hydroxy-pyridin-2-one (3,2-HOPO) ligands were studied in both the crystalline state as well as in solution. Despite significant geometric differences, the uranyl affinities of these ligands vary only slightly but are better than DTPA, the only FDA-approved chelation therapy for actinide contamination. The terepthalamide (TAM) moiety was combined into tris-beidentate ligands with 1,2- and 3,2-HOPO moieties were combined into hexadentate ligands whose structural preferences and solution thermodynamics were measured with the uranyl cation. In addition to achieving coordinative saturation, these ligands exhibited increased uranyl affinity compared to bis-Me-3,2-HOPO ligands. This result is due in part to their increased denticity, but is primarily the result of the presence of the TAM moiety. In an effort to explore the relatively unexplored coordination chemistry of Pu(IV) with bidentate moieties, a series of Pu(IV) complexes were also crystallized using bidentate hydroxypyridinone and hydroxypyrone ligands. The geometries of these complexes are compared to that of the analogous Ce(IV) complexes. While in some cases these showed the expected structural similarities, some ligand systems led to significant coordination changes. A series of crystal structure analyses with Ce(IV) indicated that these differences are most likely the result of crystallization condition differences and solvent inclusion effects.

  7. screw, which serves as a point on which the scale vi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    object is at the level of the battery, it is necessary to employ an angle of ?re equal to the angle of arrival which we wish to attain. But let us suppose that the angle ...

  8. Mesoporous magnetic carbon nanocomposite fabrics for highly efficient Cr(VI) removal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, John Zhanhu

    -up production a Integrated Composites Laboratory (ICL), Dan F Smith Department of Chemical Engineering, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX 77710, USA. E-mail: zhanhu.guo@ lamar.edu; suying.wei@lamar.edu; Tel: +1 (409) 8

  9. Hanford Tank Farms Waste Feed Flow Loop Phase VI: PulseEcho System Performance Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denslow, Kayte M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Adkins, Harold E.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Hopkins, Derek F.

    2012-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the visual and ultrasonic PulseEcho critical velocity test results obtained from the System Performance test campaign that was completed in September 2012 with the Remote Sampler Demonstration (RSD)/Waste Feed Flow Loop cold-test platform located at the Monarch test facility in Pasco, Washington. This report is intended to complement and accompany the report that will be developed by WRPS on the design of the System Performance simulant matrix, the analysis of the slurry test sample concentration and particle size distribution (PSD) data, and the design and construction of the RSD/Waste Feed Flow Loop cold-test platform.

  10. THESE DE DOCTORAT DE L'UNIVERSITE PARIS VI Spcialit : Ocanographie et Environnement Marin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , en matières organiques, en hydrocarbures et présentant des conditions extrêmes par l'impact des caractériser l'abondance et la diversité des bactéries et des hydrocarbures présents dans la SML de la baie. L'origine des hydrocarbures a été analysée par des marqueurs chimiques par chromatographie en phase gazeuse. Sur

  11. Rational Ligand Design for U(VI) and Pu(IV)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szigethy, Geza

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    solutions into appropriate fractions and physical forms can be illustrated by the nuclear waste forms found at the Savannah River

  12. The WARPS Survey: VI. Galaxy Cluster and Source Identifications from Phase I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. S. Perlman; D. J. Horner; L. R. Jones; C. A. Scharf; H. Ebeling; G. Wegner; M. Malkan

    2002-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We present in catalog form the optical identifications for objects from the first phase of the Wide Angle ROSAT Pointed Survey (WARPS). WARPS is a serendipitous survey of relatively deep, pointed ROSAT observations for clusters of galaxies. The X-ray source detection algorithm used by WARPS is Voronoi Tessellation and Percolation (VTP), a technique which is equally sensitive to point sources and extended sources of low surface brightness. WARPS-I is based on the central regions of 86 ROSAT PSPC fields, covering an area of 16.2 square degrees. We describe here the X-ray source screening and optical identification process for WARPS-I, which yielded 34 clusters at 0.06

  13. .-4 Ijcie;we _SOi-ViCq h t U t . 9 Released upon receipt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WINDS-- me task of docking o r undocking an airship--- the operations of putting the vessel into her' and they are found to be vary complox. logical officer of the U.S. naval airship %os Angel.ss, Liout. h m c i s WO

  14. Petrographic characterization of Kentucky coals. Final report. Part VI. The nature of pseudovitrinites in Kentucky coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trinkle, E.J.; Hower, J.C.

    1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Overall average pseudovitrinite content for 1055 eastern Kentucky coal samples is nearly 9% while average percentage of pseudovitrinite for 551 western Kentucky coals is approximately 4%. Examination of variation in pseudovitrinite content relative to rank changes shows uniformity in pseudovitrinite percentages within the 4 to 7 V-type interval for eastern Kentucky coals but a gradual increase in pseudovitrinite content for western Kentucky coals over the same rank interval. Coals from both coal fields show similar, distinct increases in pseudovitrinite percentage in the highest V-type categories. However, it is suggested here that these supposed increases in pseudovitrinite percentages are not real but rather, indicate distinct increase in the brightness of nitrinite resulting from increased alteration of vitrinite beginning at this stage of coalification and continuing into the higher rank stages. This conclusion is reached when it is found that differences between pseudovitrinite and vitrinite reflectance are least in coals at these high rank intervals of Kentucky and, also, when vitrinite particles are often visually observed having brightness equal to that of pseudovitrinite particles. Relation of pseudovitrinite to other sulfur forms and total sulfur in general shows no significant trends, although the relatively high pyritic sulfur content in western Kentucky coals, coupled with relatively low inert percentages suggest the existence of predominantly reducing, or at least non-oxidizing conditions in the Pennsylvanian peat swamps of western Kentucky. Initial work involving Vicker's microhardness testing of coals indicates that microhardness values for pseudovitrinite are higher than those for vitrinite within the same sample regardless of coal rank or coal field from which the sample was collected. 15 references, 9 figures, 9 tables.

  15. VI CONGRESO DEL CEISAL Toulouse, del 30 de junio al 3 de Julio de 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . Universidad Popular Autónoma del Estado de Puebla Posgrado en Negocios Internacionales y actual Candidato a Doctor en Negocios Internacionales Líneas de investigación: la globalización y el ambiente de los negocios internacionales 21 sur 1103 Colonia Santiago, C.P. 72160, Puebla, México Teléfono (222

  16. Rational Ligand Design for U(VI) and Pu(IV)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szigethy, Geza

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Murali, M. S. ; Nash, K. L. Solv. Extr. Ion Exch. 2001, 19,D. C. ; Raymond, K. N. Solv. Extr. Ion Exch. 2004, 22, (22)DMF) and UO 2 (bis-Me-3,2-HOPO)(solv) tabulated in Table 2-

  17. Ac#vi#es of the US Burning Plasma Organiza#on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    =ons · USBPO ­ Coordinates US burning plasma research, to advance scien=fic understanding USBPO organizes the US Fusion Energy Science community to support burning plasma research 5 Charles Greenfield (Director) Amanda Hubbard (Deputy Director) Nermin

  18. Sustainable Practices Policy Sections II, III.I. and V.I. Sustainable Water Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    consumption because it contains objectionable pollution, contamination minerals or infective agents, including, bathtubs, showers, bathroom sinks, or any other source that has a low likelihood of fecal contamination that have a high likelihood of fecal contamination (e.g., toilets). Potable Water: Water that meets state

  19. Real-Time Characterization of Biogeochemical Reduction of Cr(VI) on Basalt Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -FTIR Imaging HOI-YING N. HOLMAN DALE L. PERRY Center for Environmental Biotechnology E. O. Lawrence Berkeley C. HUNTER-CEVERA Center for Environmental Biotechnology E. O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory for Environmental Biotechnology, E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA. E

  20. U(VI) sorption and reduction kinetics on the magnetite (111) surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singer, D.M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to solution and surface topography changes. Redox reactionschanges in the surface topography based on AFM. Uponroughening of the surface topography typically reached

  1. RADIATION-INDUCED DECOMPOSITION OF U(VI) ALTERATION PHASES OF UO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Utsunomiya; R.C. Ewing

    2005-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    U{sup 6+}-phases are common alteration products of spent nuclear fuel under oxidizing conditions, and they may potentially incorporate actinides, such as long-lived {sup 239}Pu and {sup 237}Np, delaying their transport to the biosphere. In order to evaluate the ballistic effects of {alpha}-decay events on the stability of the U{sup 6+}-phases, we report, for the first time, the results of ion beam irradiations (1.0 MeV Kr{sup 2+}) for six different structures of U{sup 6+}-phases: uranophane, kasolite, boltwoodite, saleeite, carnotite, and liebigite. The target uranyl-minerals were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction and identification confirmed by SAED (selected area electron diffraction) in TEM (transmission electron microscopy). The TEM observation revealed no initial contamination of uraninite in these U{sup 6+} phases. All of the samples were irradiated with in situ TEM observation using 1.0 MeV Kr{sup 2+} in the IVEM (intermediate-voltage electron microscope) at the IVEM-Tandem Facility of Argonne National Laboratory. The ion flux was 6.3 x 10{sup 11} ions/cm{sup 2}/sec. The specimen temperatures during irradiation were 298 and 673 K, respectively. The Kr{sup 2+}-irradiation decomposed the U{sup 6+}-phases to nanocrystals of UO{sub 2} at doses as low as 0.006 dpa. The cumulative doses for the pure U{sup 6+}-phases, e.g., uranophane, at 0.1 and 1 million years (m.y.) are calculated to be 0.009 and 0.09 dpa using SRIM2003. However, with the incorporation of 1 wt.% {sup 239}Pu, the calculated doses reach 0.27 and {approx}1.00 dpa in ten thousand and one hundred thousand years, respectively. Under oxidizing conditions, multiple cycles of radiation-induced decomposition to UO{sub 2} followed by alteration to U{sup 6+}-phases should be further investigated to determine the fate of trace elements that may have been incorporated in the U{sup 6+}-phases.

  2. Radiation-Induced Decomposition of U(VI) Phase to Nanocrystals of UO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Utsunomiya; R.C. Ewing; L. Wang

    2005-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    U{sup 6+}-phases are common alteration products, under oxidizing conditions, of uraninite and the UO{sub 2} in spent nuclear fuel. These U{sup 6+}-phases are subjected to a radiation field caused by the {alpha}-decay of U, or in the case of spent nuclear fuel, incorporated actinides, such as {sup 239}Pu and {sup 237}Np. In order to evaluate the effects of {alpha}-decay events on the stability of the U{sup 6+}-phases, we report, for the first time, the results of ion beam irradiations (1.0 MeV Kr{sup 2+}) of U{sup 6+}-phases. The heavy-particle irradiations are used to simulate the ballistic interactions of the recoil-nucleus of an {alpha}-decay event with the surrounding structure. The Kr{sup 2+}-irradiation decomposed the U{sup 6+}-phases to UO{sub 2} nanocrystals at doses as low as 0.006 displacements per atom (dpa). U{sup 6+}-phases accumulate substantial radiation doses ({approx}1.0 displacement per atom) within 100,000 years if the concentration of incorporated {sup 239}Pu is as high as 1 wt%. Similar nanocrystals of UO{sub 2} were observed in samples from the natural fission reactors at Oklo, Gabon. Multiple cycles of radiation-induced decomposition to UO{sub 2} followed by alteration to U{sup 6+}-phases provide a mechanism for the remobilization of incorporated radionuclides.

  3. SULPHATE/MOLYBDATE INTERACTIONS : IN VIVO AND IN VITRO STUDIES ON THE GROUP VI OXYANION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    « dépassement » a été observé en présence d'un gradient de Na+ (au début 100 mM de Na+ à l'extérieur contre 0 m on copper metabolism (Suttle 1980, Mason 1981),there is at least one report of bene- ficial effects

  4. RSONANCE ET RELAXATION DES FLUORS DANS DES FLUORURES COMPLEXES D'URANIUM VI PULVRULENTS (1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    lev6e (par exemple pour UF 6' Ámol 2- 110 X 10-6 cgs) ; un important paramagnetisme de Van Vleck va de temperature ambiante. NaF, soigneusement d6shydrat6, est mis dans un reci- pient de Kel-F et UF6 est introduit

  5. Reduction of U(VI) and Toxic Metals by Desulfovibrio Cytochrome C3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wall, Judy D

    2013-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The central objective of our proposed research was twofold: 1) to investigate the structure-function relationship of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (now Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20) cytochrome c3 with uranium and 2) to elucidate the mechanism for uranium reduction in vitro and in vivo. Physiological analysis of a mutant of D. desulfuricans with a mutation of the gene encoding the type 1 tetraheme cytochrome c3 had demonstrated that uranium reduction was negatively impacted while sulfate reduction was not if lactate were the electron donor. This was thought to be due to the presence of a branched pathway of electron flow from lactate leading to sulfate reduction. Our experimental plan was to elucidate the structural and mechanistic details of uranium reduction involving cytochrome c3.

  6. Release of U(VI) from spent biosorbent immobilized in cement concrete blocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venkobachar, C.; Iyengar, L.; Mishra, U.K.; Chauhan, M.S. [Indian Inst. of Tech., Kanpur (India)] [Indian Inst. of Tech., Kanpur (India)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper deals with cementation as the method for the disposal of spent biosorbent, Ganoderma lucidum (a wood rotting macrofungi) after it is used for the removal of Uranium. Results on the uranium release during the curing of cement-concrete (CC) blocks indicated that placing the spent sorbent at the center of the blocks during their casting yields better immobilization of uranium as compared to the homogeneous mixing of the spent sorbent with the cement. Short term leach tests indicated that the uranium release was negligible in simulated seawater, 1.8% in 0.2 N sodium carbonate and 6.0% in 0.2 N HCl. The latter two leachates were used to represent the extreme environmental conditions. It was observed that the presence of the spent biosorbent up to 5% by weight did not affect the compressive strength of CC blocks. Thus cementation technique is suitable for the immobilization of uranium loaded biosorbent for its ultimate disposal.

  7. Magnetic resonance as a structural probe of a uranium (VI) sol-gel process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, C.M.; Thompson, M.C.; Buchanan, B.R. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)); King, R.B. (Georgia Univ., Athens, GA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry); Garber, A.R. (South Carolina Univ., Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NMR investigations on the ORNL process for sol-gel synthesis of microspherical nuclear fuel (UO{sub 2}), has been useful in sorting out the chemical mechanism in the sol-gel steps. {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N, and {sup 1}H NMR studies on the HMTA gelation agent (Hexamethylene tetramine, C{sub 6}H{sub l2}N{sub 4}) has revealed near quantitative stability of this adamantane-like compound in the sol-Gel process, contrary to its historical role as an ammonia source for gelation from the worldwide technical literature. {sub 17}0 NMR of uranyl (UO{sub 2}{sup ++}) hydrolysis fragments produced in colloidal sols has revealed the selective formation of a uranyl trimer, ((UO{sub 2}){sub 3}({mu}{sub 3}-O)({mu}{sub 2}-OH){sub 3}){sup +}, induced by basic hydrolysis with the HMTA gelation agent. Spectroscopic results show that trimer condensation occurs during sol-gel processing leading to layered polyanionic hydrous uranium oxides in which HMTAH{sup +} is occluded as an intercalation'' cation. Subsequent sol-gel processing of microspheres by ammonia washing results in in-situ ion exchange and formation of a layered hydrous ammonium uranate with a proposed structural formula of (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}((UO{sub 2}){sub 8}O{sub 4}(OH){sub 10}) {center dot} 8H{sub 2}0. This compound is the precursor to sintered U0{sub 2} ceramic fuel.

  8. Magnetic resonance as a structural probe of a uranium (VI) sol-gel process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, C.M.; Thompson, M.C.; Buchanan, B.R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); King, R.B. [Georgia Univ., Athens, GA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Garber, A.R. [South Carolina Univ., Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    NMR investigations on the ORNL process for sol-gel synthesis of microspherical nuclear fuel (UO{sub 2}), has been useful in sorting out the chemical mechanism in the sol-gel steps. {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N, and {sup 1}H NMR studies on the HMTA gelation agent (Hexamethylene tetramine, C{sub 6}H{sub l2}N{sub 4}) has revealed near quantitative stability of this adamantane-like compound in the sol-Gel process, contrary to its historical role as an ammonia source for gelation from the worldwide technical literature. {sub 17}0 NMR of uranyl (UO{sub 2}{sup ++}) hydrolysis fragments produced in colloidal sols has revealed the selective formation of a uranyl trimer, [(UO{sub 2}){sub 3}({mu}{sub 3}-O)({mu}{sub 2}-OH){sub 3}]{sup +}, induced by basic hydrolysis with the HMTA gelation agent. Spectroscopic results show that trimer condensation occurs during sol-gel processing leading to layered polyanionic hydrous uranium oxides in which HMTAH{sup +} is occluded as an ``intercalation`` cation. Subsequent sol-gel processing of microspheres by ammonia washing results in in-situ ion exchange and formation of a layered hydrous ammonium uranate with a proposed structural formula of (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 8}O{sub 4}(OH){sub 10}] {center_dot} 8H{sub 2}0. This compound is the precursor to sintered U0{sub 2} ceramic fuel.

  9. A method to attenuate U(VI) mobility in acidic waste plumes using humic acids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wan, J.; Dong, W.; Tokunaga, T.K.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Acidic uranium (U) contaminated plumes have resulted from acid-extraction of plutonium during the Cold War and from U mining and milling operations. A sustainable method for in-situ immobilization of U under acidic conditions is not yet available. Here, we propose to use humic acids (HAs) for in-situ U immobilization in acidic waste plumes. Our laboratory batch experiments show that HA can adsorb onto aquifer sediments rapidly, strongly and practically irreversibly. Adding HA greatly enhanced U adsorption capacity to sediments at pH below 5.0. Our column experiments using historically contaminated sediments from the Savannah River Site under slow flow rates (120 and 12 m/y) show that desorption of U and HA were non-detectable over 100 pore-volumes of leaching with simulated acidic groundwaters. Upon HA-treatment, 99% of the contaminant [U] was immobilized at pH < 4.5, compared to 5% and 58% immobilized in the control columns at pH 3.5 and 4.5, respectively. These results demonstrated that HA-treatment is a promising in-situ remediation method for acidic U waste plumes. As a remediation reagent, HAs are resistant to biodegradation, cost effective, nontoxic, and easily introducible to the subsurface.

  10. Thse de Doctorat de l'Universit Pierre et Marie Curie -Paris VI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . Boubakar DIAWARA Examinateur M. Vincent MAURICE Examinateur Préparée à l'École Nationale Supérieure de Messieurs : Philippe Marcus, Boubakar Diawara et Vincent Maurice. En premier lieu, je tiens à remercier voudrais exprimer ma profonde reconnaissance à Monsieur Boubakar Diawara, Maître de conférences à L

  11. TRANSIT TIMING OBSERVATIONS FROM KEPLER. VI. POTENTIALLY INTERESTING CANDIDATE SYSTEMS FROM FOURIER-BASED STATISTICAL TESTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steffen, Jason H. [Fermilab Center for Particle Astrophysics, P.O. Box 500, MS 127, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Ford, Eric B. [Astronomy Department, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Sciences Center, Gainesville, FL 32111 (United States); Rowe, Jason F.; Borucki, William J.; Bryson, Steve; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Koch, David G.; Sanderfer, Dwight T.; Seader, Shawn; Twicken, Joseph D. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Fabrycky, Daniel C. [UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Holman, Matthew J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Welsh, William F. [Astronomy Department, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182-1221 (United States); Batalha, Natalie M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, San Jose State University, San Jose, CA 95192 (United States); Ciardi, David R. [NASA Exoplanet Science Institute/California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Kjeldsen, Hans [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Prsa, Andrej, E-mail: jsteffen@fnal.gov [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Villanova University, 800 East Lancaster Avenue, Villanova, PA 19085 (United States)

    2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the deviations of transit times from a linear ephemeris for the Kepler Objects of Interest (KOI) through quarter six of science data. We conduct two statistical tests for all KOIs and a related statistical test for all pairs of KOIs in multi-transiting systems. These tests identify several systems which show potentially interesting transit timing variations (TTVs). Strong TTV systems have been valuable for the confirmation of planets and their mass measurements. Many of the systems identified in this study should prove fruitful for detailed TTV studies.

  12. Microsoft Word - VI_1-8_Talks Presented 2014-2015.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    beta decay, J.C. Hardy, Invited Talk, 15 th International Symposium on Capture Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy and Related Topics, CGS 15, Dresden, Germany (August 2014). Testing CVC...

  13. Molecular Interactions of Plutonium(VI) with Synthetic Manganese-Substituted Goethite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Yung-Jin

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    WA 99352 Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SCWork at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was

  14. Duty Hours Language VI. Resident Duty Hours in the Learning and Working Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    -house call. E. On-call Activities 1. In-house call must occur no more frequently than every third night

  15. Aerobic uranium (VI) bioprecipitation by metal-resistant bacteria isolated from radionuclide-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skolnick, Jeff

    and other countries. The dis- posal of radioactive waste has traditionally involved underground storage- ment of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge Field Research Center (ORFRC), were determined. The ORFRC repre- sents

  16. I. ASCRC General Education Form Group VI: Historical and Cultural Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vonessen, Nikolaus

    the U.S. Southwest and Northwest Mexico, often encapsulated as Durango, Colorado to Durango, Mexico, Las Vegas, Nevada to Las Vegas, New Mexico). This course covers this long "prehistory" (in the sense, a highly accurate technique), and rich interconnections between this record and contemporary Native

  17. Use of nafion as a solid polymer electrolyte for the electroreduction of tungsten (VI) fluoride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bettelheim, A.; Raven, A.; Polak, M.; Ozer, D. (Nuclear Research Center, Beer-Sheva 84190 (IL))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper a new method is described in which WF{sub 6} is electroreduced in a solid-state cell configuration with a Nafion membrane serving as a solid polymer electrolyte. Cyclic voltammetry indicates a behavior similar to that of metallic tungsten for coatings obtained at dry conditions and similar to that of tungsten oxide species when water vapor is not totally expelled. Surface analysis using Auger electroscope and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows that solid-state electro-reduction of WF{sub 6} in dry conditions yields coatings free of fluorine, which contain much less oxygen than electrodeposits obtained from aqueous solutions. However, due to possible oxidation and reduction reactions occurring before and during the surface-analysis process, it is not possible at this state to determine the exact content of metallic and oxide species in the deposits obtained by the present method.

  18. Characterization of a type vi secretion system and related proteins of pseudomonas syringae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Records, Angela Renee

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    secreted effectors and toxins, to develop a pathogenic interaction with its host. The B728a genome was recently sequenced, revealing the presence of 1,297 genes with unknown function. This dissertation demonstrates that a 29.9-kb cluster of genes in the B...

  19. Statistical Visualization Environmental Data the Web Using nViZn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Symanzik, Jürgen

    the continental United States obtained from U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Cumulative Exposure collected improvements access speed memory space databases. Hence, ability interpret relay information about are necessary tools process of relaying information. They can successfully describe in a informs a knowledgeable

  20. Statistical Visualization of Environmental Data on the Web Using nViZn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Symanzik, Jürgen

    .S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Cumulative Exposure Project (CEP). Keywords Graphics Production Library, our ability to interpret and relay information about such data sets must also improve. Statistical of relaying information. They can successfully describe the data in a way that informs a knowledgeable

  1. Laser radar VI; Proceedings of the Meeting, Los Angeles, CA, Jan. 23-25, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becherer, R.J.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Topics presented include lidar wind shear detection for commercial aircraft, centroid tracking of range-Doppler images, an analytic approach to centroid performance analysis, simultaneous active/passive IR vehicle detection, and resolution limits for high-resolution imaging lidar. Also presented are laser velocimetry applications, the application of laser radar to autonomous spacecraft landing, 3D laser radar simulation for autonomous spacecraft landing, and ground based CW atmospheric Doppler lidar performamce modeling.

  2. Liquid-metal fast-breeder reactors: Preliminary safety and environmental information document. Volume VI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information is presented concerning LMFBR design characteristics; uranium-plutonium/uranium recycle homogeneous core; uranium-plutonium/uranium spiked recycle heterogeneous core; uranium-plutonium/uranium spiked recycle homogeneous core; uranium-plutonium/thorium spiked recycle heterogeneous core; uranium-plutonium/thorium spiked recycle homogeneous core; thorium-plutonium/thorium spiked recycle homogeneous core; denatured uranium-233/thorium cycle homogeneous core; safety consideration for the LMFBR; and environmental considerations.

  3. Th`ese de doctorat de l'universite Paris VI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ´et´e num´eriques. Je suis recon- naissant `a Florent Calvo de m'avoir donn´e go^ut aux m´ethodes num

  4. Microwave-Assisted Synthesis of II-VI Semiconductor Micro- and Nanoparticles towards Sensor Applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Majithia, Ravish

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    and biological sensing,[22-24] optical multiplexing device design,[25] and as non-radiative probes for labeling and imaging.[26,27] While notable advancements in synthesis of semiconductor nanostructures have been made in recent years, significant roadblocks... and advanced their application as field emission devices, energy harvesting devices,[35,36] and most notably as chemical gas sensors.[18] Amongst various 1-D ZnO nanostructures, ones having ultra-small dimensions, defined as having at least one dimension...

  5. ng ot Bo Cuoc i--Ban Hay Nhe Nhang Vi Trai Tim Mnh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    ? Huùt thuoác khoâng mang laïi söùc maïnh, maø chæ laøm cho chuùng ta yeáu ñuoái vaø beänh taät. Khoùi's in Your Cigarette? Smoking does not give us power. It makes us weak and sick. Cigarette smoke contains

  6. Synthesis of cationic allyl carbonyl complexes of group VI metals and iron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krivykh, V.V.; Gusev, O.V.; Petrovskii, P.V.; Rybinskaya, M.I.

    1986-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A method was developed for the direct, one-step synthesis of allyl carbonyl complexes of iron, molybdenum, and tungsten, and the limits of the applicability of this method were determined. The tendency to form cationic allyl complexes increases with increasing acidity of the medium and basicity of the complex and of the organic substrate.

  7. High detectivity short-wavelength II-VI quantum cascade detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ravikumar, Arvind P., E-mail: aravikum@princeton.edu; Gmachl, Claire F. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Garcia, Thor A.; Tamargo, Maria C. [Department of Chemistry, The Graduate Center and The City College of New York, CUNY, New York, New York 10031 (United States); Jesus, Joel De [Department of Physics, The Graduate Center and The City College of New York, CUNY, New York, New York 10031 (United States)

    2014-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the experimental demonstration of a ZnCdSe/ZnCdMgSe-based short-wavelength photovoltaic Quantum Cascade Detector (QCD). The QCD operates in two spectral bands centered around 2.6??m and 3.6??m. Calibrated blackbody measurements yield a peak responsivity of 0.1?mA/W or 2400?V/W at 80?K, and a corresponding 300?K background radiation limited infrared performance detectivity (BLIP) of ?2.5?×?10{sup 10?}cm ?Hz/W. Comparison of background illuminated and dark current-voltage measurements demonstrates a BLIP temperature of 200?K. The device differential resistance-area product, decreases from about 10{sup 6} ? cm{sup 2} at 80?K to about 8000 ? cm{sup 2} at 300?K, indicative of the ultra-low Johnson noise in the detectors.

  8. VI International Conference on Forest Fire Research D. X. Viegas (Ed.), 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mustakerov, Ivan

    Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model is a next-generation mesoscale numerical weather prediction system to the research community. The widely-used, established mesoscale models such as MM5 have recently begun

  9. Changes in U(VI) speciation upon sorption onto montmorillonite from aqueous and organic solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chisholm-Brause, C.; Morris, D.E.; Eller, P.G.; Buscher, T.; Conradson, S.D.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The speciation of UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} and UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} Tributylphosphate (TBP) mixtures has been investigated in solution and intercalated with the reference smectite clay SAz-1 using x-ray absorption, Raman, and luminescence spectroscopies. Neither aquated UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} nor its TBP complex undergoes any detectable changes in uranium oxidation state on intercalation. Further, at the pH values employed in this work, there is no evidence for hydrolysis of the uranium species to generate dimeric or higher order uranium oligomers. However, we do find indications that the structures of the solution complexes are altered on intercalation, particularly for the UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}/TBP system. In addition, several lines of evidence suggest that, at the loading levels used in this study, the uranyl species may be interacting with two or more spectroscopically distinguishable sites on SAz-1. 29 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. LISA VI, Pune, India, February 2010 -Holl: Small Data Archives & Libraries 1 Small Data Archives & Libraries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holl, András

    & photo/microfilm) budget yearly report Regulation what to archive? proprietary period operational rules & science ready data + documents, etc. raw data: archiving by data acquisition pipeline science ready data 2010 - Holl: Small Data Archives & Libraries 10 Metadata Images fix the data acquisition pipeline

  11. Studies of the Di-iron(VI) Intermediate in Ferrate-Dependent Oxygen Evolution from Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roth, Justine P.

    Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21218, United States *S Supporting for the fixation of CO2.1 The promise of "solar hydrogen" as a clean-burning fuel has made "artificial that can effect light to energy transduction, as in photosynthetic organisms that subsist in aerobic

  12. Microsoft Word - U(VI)andSr(II)BatchSorption bh

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and mesoporous silica reacted with (B) 10 M Sr, (C) 10 M U at pH 4.0 with no carbonate and no calcium present, and (D) 10 M U at pH 9.8 with no carbonate and no...

  13. Genogroup IV and VI Canine Noroviruses Interact with Histo-Blood Group Antigens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caddy, Sarah; Breiman, Adrien; le Pendu, Jacques; Goodfellow, Ian

    2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    production. VLPs of three strains of CNV and human norovirus GI.1 (Norwalk virus) were generated using a previously describedmethod (18). Recombinant baculoviruses containing VP1 protein from either a CNV strain or GI.1 were generated, and then, VLPs were... purified through a 30% (wt/vol) sucrose cushion in TNC buffer (50 mM Tris-HCl, pH 7.4, 150 mM NaCl, 10 mM CaCl2) containing the protease inhibitor leupeptin at 150,000 #5; g for 2 h. The pelleted VLPs were resuspended in TNC and further purified by isopynic...

  14. ENDF/B-VI (Evaluated Nuclear Data File) six-group delayed neutron data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    England, T.R. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (USA)); Brady, M.C. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (USA))

    1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In addition to individual precursor data (emission probabilities (P{sub n}) and neutron spectra), the Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF) system requires {bar {nu}}(E) and its time dependence and spectra using a few time groups. These data have been greatly extended, tested, and recently (June 1989) compared with new measurements of pulse spectra.

  15. The High Time Resolution Universe Survey VI: An Artificial Neural Network and Timing of 75 Pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bates, S D; Barsdell, B R; Bhat, N D R; Burgay, M; Burke-Spolaor, S; Champion, D J; Coster, P; D'Amico, N; Jameson, A; Johnston, S; Keith, M J; Kramer, M; Levin, L; Lyne, A; Milia, S; Ng, C; Nietner, C; Possenti, A; Stappers, B; Thornton, D; van Straten, W

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present 75 pulsars discovered in the mid-latitude portion of the High Time Resolution Universe survey, 54 of which have full timing solutions. All the pulsars have spin periods greater than 100 ms, and none of those with timing solutions are in binaries. Two display particularly interesting behaviour; PSR J1054-5944 is found to be an intermittent pulsar, and PSR J1809-0119 has glitched twice since its discovery. In the second half of the paper we discuss the development and application of an artificial neural network in the data-processing pipeline for the survey. We discuss the tests that were used to generate scores and find that our neural network was able to reject over 99% of the candidates produced in the data processing, and able to blindly detect 85% of pulsars. We suggest that improvements to the accuracy should be possible if further care is taken when training an artificial neural network; for example ensuring that a representative sample of the pulsar population is used during the training proc...

  16. Portable leD ViDeo light SyStem USER'S GUIDE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobs, Laurence J.

    first use. Beyond the initial charge, no additional battery conditioning is required. a. PlugD lighting system 2 Package Contents 2 Miniburst Controllers & Connectors 4 Charging the battery 5 operatingBurst lights can be plugged directly into a standard AC outlet to power the unit for longer shoots. b. Battery

  17. cole normale suprieure Universit Paris VI Pierre et Marie Curie Dpartement d'Informatique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    différentielle sur C . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 4 PMI et PMI+ 31 4.1 PMI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 4.2 PMI et les attaques algébriques de déchiffrement . . . . . . . . . . 32 4.3 Un biais-Granboulan-Stern . . . . 35 4.3.2 Une attaque alternative . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 4.4 PMI

  18. A Search for "Dwarf" Seyfert Nuclei. VI. Properties of Emission-Line Nuclei in Nearby Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luis C. Ho; Alexei V. Filippenko; Wallace L. W. Sargent

    2002-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We use the database from Paper III to quantify the global and nuclear properties of emission-line nuclei in the Palomar spectroscopic survey of nearby galaxies. We show that the host galaxies of Seyferts, LINERs, and transition objects share remarkably similar large-scale properties and local environments. The distinguishing traits emerge on nuclear scales. Compared with LINERs, Seyfert nuclei are an order of magnitude more luminous and exhibit higher electron densities and internal extinction. We suggest that Seyfert galaxies possess characteristically more gas-rich circumnuclear regions, and hence a more abundant fuel reservoir and plausibly higher accretion rates. The differences between the ionization state of the narrow emission-line regions of Seyferts and LINERs can be partly explained by the differences in their nebular properties. Transition-type objects are consistent with being composite (LINER/\\hii) systems. With very few exceptions, the stellar population within the central few hundred parsecs of the host galaxies is uniformly old, a finding that presents a serious challenge to starburst or post-starburst models for these objects. Seyferts and LINERs have virtually indistinguishable velocity fields as inferred from their line widths and line asymmetries. All three classes of objects obey a strong correlation between line width and line luminosity. We argue that the angular momentum content of circumnuclear gas may be an important factor in determining whether a nucleus becomes active. Finally, we discuss some possible complications for the unification model of Seyfert galaxies posed by our observations. (Abridged)

  19. TAG ARCHIVES: DARPA ROBOTICS CHALLENGE Team ViGIR at DARPA Robotics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stryk, Oskar von

    . This is in response to the difficulties faced by robots deployed during the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear incident

  20. UNIVERSITE PARIS VI Memoire en vue d'obtenir l'habilitation `a diriger des

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Straten, Duco

    d'approche purement topologique : celle de la m´ethode BKW complexe. On gagnerait certainement beaucoup a reformuler cette analyse BKW dans notre contexte. Mais c'est un point que je n'ai pas en- core

  1. Rational Ligand Design for U(VI) and Pu(IV)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szigethy, Geza

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    V.4.024; Siemens Industrial Automation, Inc, Madison, WI,V.4.024; Siemens Industrial Automation, Inc, Madison, WI,

  2. Deformation Expression for Elements of Algebras (VI) --Vacuum representation of Heisenberg algebra--

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hideki Omori; Yoshiaki Maeda; Naoya Miyazaki; Akira Yoshioka

    2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Weyl algebra (W_{2m}[h]; *) is the algebra generated by u=(u_1,...,u_m,v_1,.....,v_m) over C with the fundamental commutation relation [u_i,v_j]=-ih\\delta_{ij}, where h is a positive constant. The Heisenberg algebra (\\Cal H_{2m}[nu];*) is the algebra given by regarding the scalar parameter h in the Weyl algebra W_{2m}[h] to be a generator nu which commutes with all others.

  3. Microwave-Assisted Synthesis of II-VI Semiconductor Micro- and Nanoparticles towards Sensor Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Majithia, Ravish

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Engineering particles at the nanoscale demands a high degree of control over process parameters during synthesis. For nanocrystal synthesis, solution-based techniques typically include application of external convective heat. This process often...

  4. A Stepping Stone In addition to opening doors to industry, the VI-A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Brian C.

    Devices, Booz Allen Hamilton, The Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, Linear Technology, Maxim, Microsoft

  5. A Stepping Stone In addition to opening doors to industry, the VI-A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Brian C.

    Devices, Booz Allen Hamilton, The Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, Intersil, Linear Technology, Maxim

  6. National Energy Board Act Part VI (Oil and Gas) Regulations (Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations from the National Energy Board cover licensing for oil and gas, including the exportation and importation of natural gas. The regulations also cover inspections, reporting...

  7. Complexation of Gluconate with Uranium(VI) in Acidic Solutions: Thermodynamic Study with Structural Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Zhicheng

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    uranium is approximately one order of magnitude lower than expected, suggesting that the coordination chemistry

  8. Infrared reflectance and transmission spectra in II-VI alloys and superlattices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talwar, Devki N.

    Room temperature measurements of the far-infrared (FIR) reflectance spectra are reported for the polar optical phonons in a series of bulk Cd[subscript x]Zn[subscript 1?x]Te (0 ? x ? 1) and CdSe[subscript x]Te[subscript ...

  9. 50 CFR Ch. VI (10110 Edition) 600.345 (iii) The extent to which the fishery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    measures should not im- pose unnecessary burdens on the econ- omy, on individuals, on private or pub- lic should be designed to give fishermen the greatest possible freedom of action in conducting business of the private sec- tor to another, or from the government to the private sector. Redistribution of costs through

  10. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER, RHIC SPIN COLLABORATION MEETING VI, VOLUME 36.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BLAND,L.; SAITO,N.

    2001-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The sixth meeting of the RHIC Spin Collaboration (RSC) took place on October 1, 2001 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. RHIC is now in its second year of operation for physics production and the first polarized proton collision run at {radical}s=200 GeV is expected to start in eight weeks. The RSC has developed a plan for this coming run through two previous meetings, RHIC Spin Physics III (August 3, 2000) and IV (October 13-14, 2000). We requested the following: two weeks of polarized proton studies in AGS, three weeks of polarized collider commissioning, and five weeks of polarized proton physics run. As a result, we have obtained all we asked and the above plans are implemented in the current operation schedule. The focus of the present meeting was to bring all involved in the RHIC Spin activities up-to-date on the progress of machine development, theory issues, and experimental issues. This meeting was right after the Program Advisory Committee (PAC) meeting and it started with the comments on the PAC discussion by Gerry Bunce, who was informed about the PAC deliberations by Tom Kirk. The PAC was fully supportive to complete the proposed spin program within the currently available budget for RHIC run 2 operations. Gerry further explained the expected luminosity to be {integral} Ldt = 0.5 pb{sup -1} per week, reflecting the current machine status. The introductory session also had a talk from Werner Vogelsang that reviewed the progress in perturbative QCD theory focused on spin effects.

  11. VIVA vi ! 21 September 1995 entering and leaving a file . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waterloo, University of

    COMMAND . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 ENTERING TEXT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 switching between command mode and text mode . . 2 some default parameter settings . . . . . . . . . 2 MOVES changing the case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 joining two lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

  12. A method to attenuate U(VI) mobility in acidic waste plumes using humic acids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wan, J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Soil HA (Elliott) and a reference Peat HA (Pahokee) from theHA after we found that the Peat HA has similar effect. HAof total 50 mg/L Soil HA and Peat HA separately. (4) Testing

  13. Electrodeposited doped II-VI semiconductor films and devices incorporating such films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ondris, M.; Picher, M.A.; Brownfield, R.E.

    1990-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a photovoltaic device. It comprises: a first thin film of a compound semiconductor of a first conductivity type including tellurium and a metal selected from Group IIB of the Periodic Table of Elements and containing as a dopant impurity in a concentration not exceeding 10{sup 20} atoms per cubic centimeter a metal selected from Group IB, a second semiconductor thin film in contact with the first semiconductor thin film and having a second conductivity type opposite that of the first conductivity type and electrical contacts to each of the first and second semiconductor thin films. Also described is the device wherein the first thin film is p-type cadmium telluride.

  14. Making Routers Last Longer with ViAggre Hitesh Ballani, Paul Francis, Tuan Cao and Jia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenberg, Albert

    Problem Space [MapEncap'96] [GSE, ID'97] [Atoms, '04] [CRIO, ICNP'06] [LISP, ID'07] [SIRA, ID'07] [TRRP;Routing Scalability Problem Space [MapEncap'96] [GSE, ID'97] [Atoms, '04] [CRIO, ICNP'06] [LISP, ID'07] [GSE, ID'97] [Atoms, '04] [CRIO, ICNP'06] [LISP, ID'07] [SIRA, ID'07] [TRRP, '07] [APT, ID'07] [Six

  15. UNIVERSITE PIERRE ET INSTITUT FRANCAIS MARIE CURIE -PARIS VI DU PETROLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    : MODELISATION DE L'AUTO-INFLAMMATION ET DE LA COMBUSTION POUR LES MOTEURS DIESEL soutenue le 9 decembre 1997 COMBUSTION POUR LES MOTEURS DIESEL Antonio Pires da Cruz - Institut Francais du Petrole 1 et 4 Av. Bois Preau- teurs Diesel. L'accent est mis sur la prise en compte des e ets induits par la turbulence. Seule l

  16. QUASARS PROBING QUASARS. VI. EXCESS H I ABSORPTION WITHIN ONE PROPER Mpc OF z ? 2 QUASARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prochaska, J. Xavier; Cantalupo, Sebastiano; Lau, Marie Wingyee [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Hennawi, Joseph F.; Lee, Khee-Gan; Myers, Adam; Rubin, Kate H. R. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69115 Heidelberg (Germany); Bovy, Jo [Institute for Advanced Study, Einstein Drive, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Djorgovski, S. G. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Ellison, Sara L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Finnerty Road, Victoria, British Columbia V8P 1A1 (Canada); Martin, Crystal L. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Simcoe, Robert A. [MIT-Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    With close pairs of quasars at different redshifts, a background quasar sightline can be used to study a foreground quasar's environment in absorption. We use a sample of 650 projected quasar pairs to study the H I Ly? absorption transverse to luminous, z ? 2 quasars at proper separations of 30 kpc < R < 1 Mpc. In contrast to measurements along the line-of-sight, regions transverse to quasars exhibit enhanced H I Ly? absorption and a larger variance than the ambient intergalactic medium, with increasing absorption and variance toward smaller scales. Analysis of composite spectra reveals excess absorption characterized by a Ly? equivalent width profile W = 2.3 Å (R /100 kpc){sup –0.46}. We also observe a high (? 60%) covering factor of strong, optically thick H I absorbers (H I column N{sub H{sub I}}>10{sup 17.3} cm{sup -2}) at separations R < 200 kpc, which decreases to ?20% at R ? 1 Mpc, but still represents a significant excess over the cosmic average. This excess of optically thick absorption can be described by a quasar-absorber cross-correlation function ?{sub QA}(r) = (r/r{sub 0}){sup ?} with a large correlation length r{sub 0} = 12.5{sup +2.7}{sub -1.4} h{sup -1} Mpc (comoving) and ?=1.68{sup +0.14}{sub -0.30}. The H I absorption measured around quasars exceeds that of any previously studied population, consistent with quasars being hosted by massive dark matter halos M{sub halo} ? 10{sup 12.5} M{sub ?} at z ? 2.5. The environments of these massive halos are highly biased toward producing optically thick gas, and may even dominate the cosmic abundance of Lyman limit systems and hence the intergalactic opacity to ionizing photons at z ? 2.5. The anisotropic absorption around quasars implies the transverse direction is much less likely to be illuminated by ionizing radiation than the line-of-sight.

  17. Molecular Interactions of Plutonium(VI) with Synthetic Manganese-Substituted Goethite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Yung-Jin

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mn-Substituted Goethite Synthesis Manganese substituted (Mn-The laboratory synthesis of Mn-substituted goethite requiresgoethite existed as Mn(III), even though Mn was added during mineral synthesis

  18. Reaction of Plutonium(VI) with the Manganese-Substituted Iron Oxide Mineral Goethite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Yung-Jin Hu

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    level. Goethite Synthesis Goethite (table 4.1) wasThe laboratory synthesis of goethite requires relativelyindicating that the goethite synthesis was successful. SEM

  19. Reaction of Plutonium(VI) with the Manganese-Substituted Iron Oxide Mineral Goethite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Yung-Jin Hu

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    4.2 Goethite . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .on Manganese-Substituted Goethite . . . . . . . . . 7.4.14.3 Manganese-Substituted Goethite . . 4.3.1

  20. Optimizing Cr(VI) and Tc(VII) remediation through nano-scale biomineral engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cutting, R. S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fe(II) associated with goethite. Environ Sci Technol 2000,Fe(II): Reactions on goethite and iron oxide nanoparticles.byproducts by synthetic goethite and magnetite. Environ Sci

  1. Microstructural analyses of Cr(VI) speciation in chromite ore processing Residue (COPR)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHRYSOCHOOU, MARIA

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    hydrogarnet, brucite, and goethite (R-FeOOH). The µXRF map1 spot hydrogarnet, brucite, goethite cluster 4 3 spots with0.3-0.4 brucite in all spots goethite brownmillerite barite

  2. Spring 199 2. Volume VI, Number 2. Nota Bene News from the Yale Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    gazelle musicale in Sterling J"lemorial Library, manuscripts and first editions of operas by Meyerbeer adherents #12;engineered the decline of Meyerbeer's reputation. \\Xlagner was an obscure and impoverished

  3. Standard test method for plutonium by Iron (II)/Chromium (VI) amperometric titration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of plutonium in unirradiated nuclear-grade plutonium dioxide, uranium-plutonium mixed oxides with uranium (U)/plutonium (Pu) ratios up to 21, plutonium metal, and plutonium nitrate solutions. Optimum quantities of plutonium to measure are 7 to 15 mg. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  4. The European Large Area ISO Survey VI - Discovery of a new hyperluminous infrared galaxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Morel; A. Efstathiou; S. Serjeant; I. Marquez; J. Masegosa; P. Heraudeau; C. Surace; A. Verma; S. Oliver; M. Rowan-Robinson; I. Georgantopoulos; D. Farrah; D. M. Alexander; I. Perez-Fournon; C. J. Willott; F. Cabrera-Guerra; E. A. Gonzalez-Solares; A. Cabrera-Lavers; J. I. Gonzalez-Serrano; P. Ciliegi; F. Pozzi; I. Matute; H. Flores

    2001-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the discovery of the first hyperluminous infrared galaxy (HyLIG) in the course of the European Large Area ISO Survey (ELAIS). This object has been detected by ISO at 6.7, 15, and 90 microns, and is found to be a broad-line, radio-quiet quasar at a redshift: z = 1.099. From a detailed multi-component model fit of the spectral energy distribution, we derive a total infrared luminosity: L_IR (1-1000 microns) ~ 1.0 x 10E13 h_65^-2 L_sun (q_0 = 0.5), and discuss the possible existence of a starburst contributing to the far-IR output. Observations to date present no evidence for lens magnification. This galaxy is one of the very few HyLIGs with an X-ray detection. On the basis of its soft X-ray properties, we suggest that this broad-line object may be the face-on analogue of narrow-line, Seyfert-like HyLIGs.

  5. ETAG European Technology Assessment ITAS DBT viWTA POST Rathenau

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are concentrated in a few countries. The Rising gas and oil prices along with demands on lower emissions of CO2: Technologies for wind energy, wave energy, geothermal energy, bioenergy, solar energy, hydropower and fuel

  6. ARM - Field Campaign - ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements (ARM-ACME VI)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006Observations of the Madden(ARM-ACME III)

  7. Microsoft PowerPoint - TAB B 02-12-08 Article VI Briefing Interagency Ford Comments

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTubahq.na.govSecurityMaintaining theSan Jose-San Francisco-Oakland,

  8. T-637: VMSA-2011-0009 VMware hosted product updates, ESX patches and VI ,

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014,Zaleski -BlueprintThisVulnerabilities |Vulnerability | Department

  9. VI-12 STUDENTS WHO RECEIVED GRADUATE DEGREES FROM THESIS WORK CONDUCTED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps to Predict4 VARIATIONS IN THEVERA Core1 -2 -

  10. VI-12 STUDENTS WHO RECEIVED GRADUATE DEGREES FROM THESIS WORK CONDUCTED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps to Predict4 VARIATIONS IN THEVERA Core1 -2 -3 -

  11. Microsoft Word - VI_1-8_Talks Presented 2014-2015.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE625 FINALOptimizationFor Immediate Release24 -

  12. Microsoft Word - VI_13-14_Colloquia and Seminars 2015.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE625 FINALOptimizationFor Immediate Release244

  13. Microsoft Word - VI_9-10_Research Personnel, Engineers, Students 2015.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE625 FINALOptimizationFor Immediate Release2444 -

  14. Structure of ABC Transporter MsbA in Complex with ATP Vi and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary900SteepStrengtheningFunctionsLipopolysaccharide:

  15. PART TWO PERMITTING/CLOSURE OF TSD UNITS/GROUPS ARTICLE VI. FINDINGS AND DETERMINATIONS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding access toTest andOptimize832 2.860 2.864 2.867039 J - 1 PART

  16. Particle Number & Particulate Mass Emissions Measurements on a 'Euro VI'

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in235-1 Termoelectrica U.SPRESSHeavy-duty Engine using the PMP

  17. Tank Operations Contract No. DE-A C27-08R VI 4800

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesis of 2D AlloysTrails Taking CareNEPAProjectsRVJA

  18. Microsoft Word - U(VI)andSr(II)BatchSorption bh

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your1 SECTION A. Revised: April 3,  T T r r a a v v

  19. Prdidas de insercin en diferentes tipos de materiales y rboles El gran avance que se est produciendo en los sistemas WiFi y WiMAX, y su habitual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Autonoma de Madrid, Universidad

    trabajo que operan estos sistemas. Debido a la escasa información que existe con respecto a estas pérdidas escenarios, tanto interiores como exteriores, para las bandas de trabajo de 2.4 GHz, 3.3 GHz y 5.5 GHz. Este estudio se realizará a partir de enlaces de corta distancia, donde el obstáculo se interponga directamente

  20. UCLUniversit catholique de Louvainfondation LoUvain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nesterov, Yurii

    -suez / L'oréaL / sas institute/ soLiDarité cistercienne / soLvay / ucB. faMiLLe BertranD-ackerMans / Mr

  1. Clustering and Dimensionality Reduction on Riemannian Manifolds Alvina Goh Rene Vidal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - tors. When the structure of these features is simple enough, central clustering methods such as K-means. For instance, [15] combines Isomap [17] with EM, and [12, 8] combine LLE [14] with K-means. Unfortunately, all

  2. Desertion of the colonists of New Mexico 1601: 3d part

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlin, A. Roberta; De Marco, Barbara; Craddock, Jerry R; Polt, John H. R.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    caminaron lle- garon al Rio del Norte a veinte de abril deldoze leguas antes del Rio del Norte qu’es tierra sin agua dealli caminaron el rrio arriva del norte tres dias como ocho

  3. High-School Projects at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (2012) Emily Armstrong (Mercy) demonstrated the effectiveness of a design for a Hartmann wavefront sensor for use with UV portions of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Portman, Douglas

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of emerging "Semantic Web" technology with existing information storage systems at LLE. She focused of different hydrogen isotopes in hydrogen gas mixtures. He showed that the GC responds linearly

  4. PROCES-VERBAL DU CONSEIL Sance du 2 novembre 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeanjean, Louis

    Sophie FONQUERNIE M. Anthony JEANBOURQUIN Mme Joëlle SCHIRRER M. Patrick BONTEMPS M Franck BERGER dossier sera discuté jeudi 3 novembre en réunion des Directeurs d'UFR. Monsieur KADMIRI fait une

  5. The `Skyline' Distance 46km

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VOTEDINTOP10OF WORLDTRAILS2004 Croeso i Afan, lleoliad beicio mynydd heb ei ail. Mae gan y lle yma bopeth - o swooping singletrack threading through beautiful forest to exposed rocky doubletrack on wide open hills

  6. Low Latency Stochastic Filtering Software Firewall Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghoshal, Pritha

    2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 V METHODOLOGY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 VI RESULTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 v VI-A. Incremental Cleared Bloom Filter . . . . . . . . . . . 37 VI-A.1. Latency... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 VI-A.2. Bandwidth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 VI-A.3. Reduction in Dropped Packets . . . . . . . . . 40 VI-A.4. False Positive Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 VI-B. Cold Cleared Bloom Filter...

  7. First-principles study on the effective masses of zinc-blend-derived Cu2Zn-IV-VI4 (IV=Sn, Ge, Si and VI=S, Se)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gong, Xingao

    and Department of Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433, China 2 Key Laboratory of Polar Materials and Devices (MOE), East China Normal University, Shanghai 200241, China 3 National Renewable Energy Laboratory atten- tion as potential solar cell absorber materials. The reported band gaps of these materials

  8. In the Beginnings: The Apotropaic Use of Scriptural Incipits in Late Antique Egypt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanzo, Joseph Emanuel

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    VI CE. b. Provenance: Egypt (Oxyrhynchus). c. Material:V-VI CE. b. Provenance: Egypt (Hermopolis? ). c. Material:VI CE. b. Provenance: Egypt (unknown). c. Material: papyrus.

  9. Thermodynamics of the Complexation of Uranium(VI) by oxalate in aqueous solution at 10-70oC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Di Bernardo, Plinio

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cell was introduced in the measuring compartment of a Varian Cary-5G spectrophotometer equipped with a Peltier

  10. FATE AND TRANSPORT OF RADIONUCLIDES [U(VI), Sr, Cs] IN VADOSE ZONE SEDIMENTS AT THE HANFORD SITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flury, Markus

    weapons development and has significant subsurface contamination. Specific objectives were: 1. Investigate the influence of secondary precipitate formation on strontium and cesium fate and transport in sand under. To investigate uranium release rates from contaminated Hanford sediments reacted with Columbia River water. 4

  11. Laboratoire Kastler Brossel Universite Pierre et Marie Curie Th`ese de doctorat de l'Universite Paris VI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    'Amplification Param´etrique en Optique Quantique Soutenue le 25 juin 2007 devant le jury compos´e de : M. Daniel BLOCH compression des fluctuations du vide au sein de dispositifs du type Amplificateur Param´etrique Optique (APO'analogie `a l'aide d'un micro-APO monolithique, permettant d'esp´erer un rayonnement largement sup´erieur `a

  12. Inorganic-Organic Hybrid Composites Containing MQ (II-VI) Slabs: A New Class of Nanostructures with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jing

    .565(1) Å. For 4: a ) 19.9731(18), b ) 6.6268(7), c ) 6.4394(6) Å. The optical absorption experiments show

  13. Ionisation in atmospheres of brown dwarfs and extrasolar planets VI: Properties of large-scale discharge events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, R L; Hodos, G; Bilger, C; Stark, C R

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mineral clouds in substellar atmospheres play a special role as a catalyst for a variety of charge processes. If clouds are charged, the surrounding environment becomes electrically activated, and ensembles of charged grains are electrically discharging (e.g. by lightning), which significantly infuences the local chemistry creating conditions similar to those thought responsible for life in early planetary atmospheres. We note that such lightning discharges contribute also to the ionisation state of the atmosphere. We apply scaling laws for electrical discharge processes from laboratory measurements and numerical experiments to Drift-Phoenix model atmosphere results to model the discharge's propagation downwards (as lightning) and upwards (as sprites) through the atmospheric clouds. We evaluate the spatial extent and energetics of lightning discharges. The atmospheric volume affected (e.g. by increase of temperature or electron number) is larger in a brown dwarf atmosphere ($10^8 -~10^{10}$m$^3$) than in a gi...

  14. C. Freksa et al. (Eds.): Spatial Cognition VI, LNAI 5248, pp. 171187, 2008. Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kastens, Kim Anne

    in mental rotation (2D figure rotation), spatial visualization (paper folding), and spatial perception range of disciplines as diverse as epidemiology, geology, geography, and ecology; they are used

  15. Aegean Seals of the Late Bronze Age: Stylistic Groups, VI. Fourteenth Century Mainland and Later Fourteenth Century Cretan Workshops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Younger, John G.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    : Masters and Workshops. The First-Generation Minoan Mastets," I(admos 22, 1983, 109-136. Masters, III : John G. Younget, 'negean Seals of the Late Bronze Age: Masters and Workshops. The First-Generation Mycenaean Masters," I{admos 23, 1984, 38-64. Masters... illustrations are reproduced , ithcr from their primary publications or from other publications cited in the text. (.()rri1lcn(lum: Mastcrs/Groups, IV p.70, "1,3. Dot,F,ye Mumps" should read "11. l)ot I,)yc Munrps"; antl, p. 73, "14. Miscellaneous Serls" should...

  16. MONTE CARLO SIMULATIONS OF GLOBULAR CLUSTER EVOLUTION. VI. THE INFLUENCE OF AN INTERMEDIATE-MASS BLACK HOLE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Umbreit, Stefan; Rasio, Frederic A. [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Rd., Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Fregeau, John M. [Kavli Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Chatterjee, Sourav, E-mail: s-umbreit@northwestern.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Science Center, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results from a series of Monte Carlo (MC) simulations investigating the imprint of a central intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH) on the structure of a globular cluster. We investigate the three-dimensional and projected density profiles, and stellar disruption rates for idealized as well as realistic cluster models, taking into account a stellar mass spectrum and stellar evolution, and allowing for a larger, more realistic number of stars than was previously possible with direct N-body methods. We compare our results to other N-body and Fokker-Planck simulations published previously. We find, in general, very good agreement for the overall cluster structure and dynamical evolution between direct N-body simulations and our MC simulations. Significant differences exist in the number of stars that are tidally disrupted by the IMBH, and this is most likely caused by the wandering motion of the IMBH, not included in the MC scheme. These differences, however, are negligible for the final IMBH masses in realistic cluster models, as the disruption rates are generally much lower than for single-mass clusters. As a direct comparison to observations we construct a detailed model for the cluster NGC 5694, which is known to possess a central surface brightness cusp consistent with the presence of an IMBH. We find that not only the inner slope but also the outer part of the surface brightness profile agree well with observations. However, there is only a slight preference for models harboring an IMBH compared to models without.

  17. A search for stars of very low metal abundance. VI. Detailed abundances of 313 metal-poor stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roederer, Ian U.; Preston, George W.; Thompson, Ian B.; Shectman, Stephen A.; Burley, Gregory S.; Kelson, Daniel D. [Carnegie Observatories, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Sneden, Christopher, E-mail: iur@umich.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, C1400, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present radial velocities, equivalent widths, model atmosphere parameters, and abundances or upper limits for 53 species of 48 elements derived from high resolution optical spectroscopy of 313 metal-poor stars. A majority of these stars were selected from the metal-poor candidates of the HK Survey of Beers, Preston, and Shectman. We derive detailed abundances for 61% of these stars for the first time. Spectra were obtained during a 10 yr observing campaign using the Magellan Inamori Kyocera Echelle spectrograph on the Magellan Telescopes at Las Campanas Observatory, the Robert G. Tull Coudé Spectrograph on the Harlan J. Smith Telescope at McDonald Observatory, and the High Resolution Spectrograph on the Hobby-Eberly Telescope at McDonald Observatory. We perform a standard LTE abundance analysis using MARCS model atmospheres, and we apply line-by-line statistical corrections to minimize systematic abundance differences arising when different sets of lines are available for analysis. We identify several abundance correlations with effective temperature. A comparison with previous abundance analyses reveals significant differences in stellar parameters, which we investigate in detail. Our metallicities are, on average, lower by ?0.25 dex for red giants and ?0.04 dex for subgiants. Our sample contains 19 stars with [Fe/H] ?–3.5, 84 stars with [Fe/H] ?–3.0, and 210 stars with [Fe/H] ?–2.5. Detailed abundances are presented here or elsewhere for 91% of the 209 stars with [Fe/H] ?–2.5 as estimated from medium resolution spectroscopy by Beers, Preston, and Shectman. We will discuss the interpretation of these abundances in subsequent papers.

  18. 178 VI. CLASSICAL PROBABILITY AND ITS RENAISSANCE 11. M. Tribus, Rational Descriptions, Decisions and Designs, p. 130. Oxford: Pergamon,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitelson, Branden

    . However, the classical theory lacked guidelines for the identifica- tion of a balance of evidence gives us few guidelines for the actual determination of logical probability. Finally, we consider Carnap, quantitative logical relation, called degree of confirmation (d.c.), to measure the support one statement lends

  19. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Lens Search. VI. Constraints on Dark Energy and the Evolution of Massive Galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oguri, Masamune [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); et al.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a statistical analysis of the final lens sample from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Lens Search (SQLS). The number distribution of a complete subsample of 19 lensed quasars selected from 50,836 source quasars is compared with theoretical expectations, with particular attention to the selection function. Assuming that the velocity function of galaxies does not evolve with redshift, the SQLS sample constrains the cosmological constant to \\Omega_\\Lambda=0.79^{+0.06}_{-0.07}(stat.)^{+0.06}_{-0.06}(syst.) for a flat universe. The dark energy equation of state is found to be consistent with w=-1 when the SQLS is combined with constraints from baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements or results from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP). We also obtain simultaneous constraints on cosmological parameters and redshift evolution of the galaxy velocity function, finding no evidence for redshift evolution at z<1 in any combinations of constraints. For instance, number density evolution quantified as \

  20. Intrazeolite metal carbonyl topotaxy. A comprehensive structural and spectroscopic study of intrazeolite group VI metal hexacarbonyls and subcarbonyls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oezkar, S.; Ozin, G.A. (Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)); Moller, K.; Bein, T. (Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque (United States))

    1990-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper focuses attention on the intrazeolite anchoring, thermal decarbonylation, ligand exchange, and addition chemistry of M(CO){sub 6}-M{prime}{sub 56}Y, where M = Cr, Mo, W; M{prime} = H, Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs. The key points to emerge from this study include the following. (1) M(CO){sub 6}-M{prime}{sub 56}Y samples have the hexacarbonylmetal(0) molecule associated with two {alpha}-cage extraframework cations (or Broensted protons), via the oxygen end of two trans bonded carbonyls with a saturation loading of 2M(CO){sub 6}/{alpha}-cage. (2) M(CO){sub 6}-M{prime}{sub 56}Y samples have the hexacarbonylmetal(0) guest confined to the internal surface of the zeolite with a homogeneous distribution throughout the zeolite crystals. (3) A Mo and Rb EXAFS structure analysis of 8{l brace}Mo(CO){sub 6}{r brace}-Rb{sub 56}Y shows that the {alpha}-cage encapsulated Mo(CO){sub 6} guest maintains its structural integrity, with some evidence for anchoring via extraframework Rb+ cations. (4) A rapid {sup 13}CO intrazeolite ligand exchange occurs for M({sup 12}CO){sub 6}-M{prime}{sub 56}Y to yield M({sup 12}CO){sub m}({sup 13}CO){sub 6-m}-M{prime}{sub 56}Y, the extent of which depends on the {sup 13}CO intrazeolite ligand exchange occurs for M({sup 12}CO){sub 6}-M{prime}{sub 56}Y to yield M({sup 12}CO){sub m}({sup 13}CO){sub 6-m}-M{prime}{sub 56}Y, the extent of which depends on the {sup 13}CO loading. (5) M(CO){sub 3}-M{prime}{sub 56}Y can be cleanly generated via the mild vacuum thermal decarbonylation of M(CO){sub 6}-M{prime}{sub 56}Y, the tricarbonyl stoichiometry of which is unequivocally established from its observed ad calculated diagnostic M({sup 12}CO){sub n}({sup 13}CO){sub 3-n}-M{prime}{sub 56}Y vibrational isotope pattern and from EXAFS structural data.

  1. UDC 519.856 V.I. NORKIN , A.I. KIBZUN and A.V. NAUMOV ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PAPA

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    stage variables may describe energy production by mobile facilities, which have ... (under fixed energy prices) one can take average energy production costs on ...

  2. Module VI: 2/22/10 -4/2/10 Course 142:216: Chromatin structure and Disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in chromatin proteins associated with human disease. Lectures will be based on primary research articles arrangements may be made. Please contact the course director as soon as possible. Academic Fraud: Plagiarism and any other activities when students present work that is not their own are academic fraud. Academic

  3. THE ADVANCED CAMERA FOR SURVEYS NEARBY GALAXY SURVEY TREASURY. VI. THE ANCIENT STAR-FORMING DISK OF NGC 404

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Benjamin F.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Stilp, Adrienne [Department of Astronomy, Box 351580, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew [Raytheon, 1151 E. Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85706 (United States); Seth, Anil C. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Weisz, Daniel; Skillman, Evan, E-mail: ben@astro.washington.ed, E-mail: jd@astro.washington.ed, E-mail: stephanie@astro.washington.ed, E-mail: roskar@astro.washington.ed, E-mail: dolphin@raytheon.co, E-mail: aseth@cfa.harvard.ed, E-mail: dweisz@astro.umn.ed, E-mail: skillman@astro.umn.ed [Department of Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2010-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present HST/WFPC2 observations across the disk of the nearby isolated dwarf S0 galaxy NGC 404, which hosts an extended gas disk. The locations of our fields contain a roughly equal mixture of bulge and disk stars. All of our resolved stellar photometry reaches m {sub F814W} = 26 (M {sub F814W} = -1.4), which covers 2.5 mag of the red giant branch and main-sequence stars with ages <300 Myr. Our deepest field reaches m {sub F814W} = 27.2 (M {sub F814W} = -0.2), sufficient to resolve the red clump and main-sequence stars with ages <500 Myr. Although we detect trace amounts of star formation at times more recent than 10 Gyr ago for all fields, the proportion of red giant stars to asymptotic giants and main-sequence stars suggests that the disk is dominated by an ancient (>10 Gyr) population. Detailed modeling of the color-magnitude diagram suggests that {approx}70% of the stellar mass in the NGC 404 disk formed by z {approx} 2 (10 Gyr ago) and at least {approx}90% formed prior to z {approx} 1 (8 Gyr ago). These results indicate that the stellar populations of the NGC 404 disk are on average significantly older than those of other nearby disk galaxies, suggesting that early- and late-type disks may have different long-term evolutionary histories, not simply differences in their recent star formation rates. Comparisons of the spatial distribution of the young stellar mass and FUV emission in Galaxy Evolution Explorer images show that the brightest FUV regions contain the youngest stars, but that some young stars (<160 Myr) lie outside of these regions. FUV luminosity appears to be strongly affected by both age and stellar mass within individual regions. Finally, we use our measurements to infer the relationship between the star formation rate and the gas density of the disk at previous epochs. We find that most of the history of the NGC 404 disk is consistent with star formation that has decreased with the gas density according to the Schmidt law. However, {approx} 0.5-1 Gyr ago, the star formation rate was unusually low for the inferred gas density, consistent with the possibility that there was a gas accretion event that reignited star formation {approx}0.5 Gyr ago. Such an event could explain why this S0 galaxy hosts an extended gas disk.

  4. POUR L'OBTENTION DU GRADE DE DOCTEUR S SCIENCES DEA d'Intelligence artificielle, Universit de Paris VI, France

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    with them. Keywords: Behavioral Animation, Real-time, Virtual Humans, Action selection, Motiva- tions for autonomous virtual humans in persistent worlds Etienne de SEVIN THÈSE NO 3468 (2006) ÉCOLE POLYTECHNIQUE réalité virtuelle SECTION D'INFORmATIQUE #12;#12;Abstract Nowadays, virtual humans such as non

  5. Rate-limited U(VI) desorption during a small-scale tracer test in a hetereogeneous uranium contaminated aquifer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, P.M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Work Plan for the UMTRA project Old Rifle site, GrandMill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) sites and the Savannahof the contamination at the UMTRA sites lies within shallow

  6. The Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey. VI. The Kinematics of Ultra-compact Dwarfs and Globular Clusters in M87

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Hong-Xin; Cote, Patrick; Liu, Chengze; Ferrarese, Laura; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Caldwell, Nelson; Gwyn, Stephen D J; Jordan, Andres; Lancon, Ariane; Li, Biao; Munoz, Roberto P; Puzia, Thomas H; Bekki, Kenji; Blakeslee, John; Boselli, Alessandro; Drinkwater, Michael J; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Durrell, Patrick; Emsellem, Eric; Firth, Peter; Sanchez-Janssen, Ruben

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The origin of ultra-compact dwarfs (UCDs)--objects larger and more massive than typical globular clusters (GCs), but more compact than typical dwarf galaxies--has been hotly debated in the 15 years since their discovery. Even whether UCDs should be considered galactic in origin, or simply the most extreme GCs, is not yet settled. We present the dynamical properties of 97 spectroscopically confirmed UCDs (rh >~10 pc) and 911 GCs associated with central cD galaxy of the Virgo cluster, M87. Our UCDs, of which 89% have M_star > ~2X10^6 M_sun and 92% are as blue as the classic blue GCs, nearly triple the sample of previous confirmed Virgo UCDs, providing by far the best opportunity for studying the global dynamics of a UCD system. We found that (1) UCDs have a surface number density profile that is shallower than that of the blue GCs in the inner ~ 70 kpc and as steep as that of the red GCs at larger radii; (2) UCDs exhibit a significantly stronger rotation than the GCs, and the blue GCs seem to have a velocity fi...

  7. STRUCTURE OF PENTAKIS (UREA) DIOXOURANIUM(VI)NITRATE LUO2 (OC (NH2)2)5 (NO3) 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zalkin, Allan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2(OC(NH 2 )2)5](N0 3 )2 by Allan Zalkin*, Helena Ruben andU0 2 (OC(NH 2)2)5](N0 3)2 by Allan Zalkin, Hel~na Ruben and

  8. STRUCTURE OF PENTAKIS (UREA) DIOXOURANIUM(VI)NITRATE LUO2 (OC (NH2)2)5 (NO3) 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zalkin, Allan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemistry University of California Berkeley, California 94720 AUGUST 1978 In our ongoing studies of uranium

  9. 1993 Annual PCB Document for Los Alamos National Laboratory EPA Region VI, January 1, 1993 through December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wechsler, R.J.; Sandoval, T.M.; Bryant, D.E.; Hupke, L.; Esquibel, L.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document, the {open_quotes}1993 Annual PCB Document for Los Alamos National Laboratory{close_quotes} was prepared to fulffill the requirements of the federal PCB (Polychlorinated Biphenyl) regulation: 40 CFR 761 Subpart J General Records and Reports. The PCB Management Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Environmental Protection Group, compiled this 1993 Annual PCB Document. The overall format generally follows the sequence of the applicable regulations. Subsection 1.2 cross references those regulatory requirements with the applicable Document Section. The scope of this document also includes status summaries of various aspects of LANL`s PCB Management Program. The intent of this approach to the Annual Document is to provide an overview of LANL`s PCB Management Program and to increase the usefulness of this document as a management tool. Section 2.0, {open_quotes}Status of the PCB Management Program{close_quotes}, discusses the use, generation of waste, and storage of PCBs at LANL. Section 3.0 is the 1993 Annual Document Log required by 761.180(a). This Section also discusses the PCB Management Program`s policies for reporting under those regulatory requirements. Sections 4.0 and 5.0 contain the 1993 Annual Records for off-site and on-site disposal as required by 761.180(b). There is a tab for each manifest and its associated continuation sheets, receipt letters, and certificates of disposal.

  10. Hvis det stod til forskerne p Ris, skul-le vi allerede i dag kunne fylde tanken

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for at forske inden for udvikling af biodiesel, endsige at producere det. Biodiesel er ellers både miljøvenligt ellers benytter. "I andre lande er man langt fremme med udvikling af biodiesel," fortæller Jens Kossmann dag laves der biodiesel af frø fra både raps, hør, palmeolie og sojabønner." Produktionen af biodiesel

  11. III International Conference of CABERNET 2012, Managing Urban Land VI International Conference Innovative Solutions for Revitalization of Degraded Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    OF THE FRENCH SOIL MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORK ABSTRACT Following the revision and transposition of the EU Waste for sustainable reuse of excavated soils which would ensure human health and environmental protection. One://www.developpement-durable.gouv.fr/Guide-de-reutilisation-hors- site.html). After a short presentation on the French Soil management framework, its aims

  12. VI-19.00(A) UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND POLICY ON PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT PROGRAM APPROVED BY THE PRESIDENT, January 19, 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    could result in injury or illness. Personal Protective Equipment (PPE): Devices worn by the employees, January 19, 1999 I. POLICY STATEMENT A. Purpose The Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Program has been OSHA Regulation 29 CFR Part 1910 Subpart I - Personal Protective Equipment. D. Department

  13. Microsoft Word - ViArray_Fact_ Sheet_SAND2011-3935P_updated_format.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE625 FINALOptimizationFor

  14. 1999 Summer Research Program for High School Juniors at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2002-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    oak-B202--During the summer of 1999, 12 students from Rochester-area high schools participated in the Laboratory for Laser Energetics' Summer High School Research Program. The goal of this program is to excite a group of high school students about careers in the areas of science and technology by exposing them to research in a state-of-the-art environment. Too often, students are exposed to ''research'' only through classroom laboratories that have prescribed procedures and predictable results. In LLE's summer program, the students experience all of the trials, tribulations, and rewards of scientific research. By participating in research in a real environment, the students often become more enthusiastic about careers in science and technology. In addition, LLE gains from the contributions of the many highly talented students who are attracted to the program. The students spent most of their time working on their individual research projects with members of LLE's technical staff. The projects were related to current research activities at LLE and covered a broad range of areas of interest including laser modeling, diagnostic development, chemistry, liquid crystal devices, and opacity data visualization. The students, their high schools, their LLE supervisors and their project titles are listed in the table. Their written reports are collected in this volume. The students attended weekly seminars on technical topics associated with LLE's research. Topics this year included lasers, fusion, holography, optical materials, global warming, measurement errors, and scientific ethics. The students also received safety training, learned how to give scientific presentations, and were introduced to LLE's resources, especially the computational facilities. The program culminated with the High School Student Summer Research Symposium on 25 August at which the students presented the results of their research to an audience that included parents, teachers, and members of LIX. Each student spoke for approximately ten minutes and answered questions.

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -A2 Heat exchanger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 VI-A3 in Liquid Propellant Motor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 VI-A5 Remote control

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brogan, Luna Kestrel Schwaiger

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and W. Jingsong. Removal of uranium(VI) from aqueousfor prediction of uranium(VI) removal from groundwater by

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Las Palmas de Gran Canaria Apdo. 550, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria Canary Islands, Spain E and May 1999, from catches of the small-scale fishery off the island of Gran Canaria (The Canary Islands

  18. VI Simpsio Brasileiro de Solos No Saturados 2007/ Salvador-Bahia 421 Relao Entre a Resistncia a Trao Obtida via Ensaio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    the diametrical compression test or the Brazilian test as described by Krishnayya & Eisenstein (1974), Maciel (1991); Das et al. (1995) e Favaretti (1995). The Brazilian test is performed applying a compression content and the obtained results could be related to the samples index properties and suction. It was used

  19. Tracking the Sun VI: An Historical Summary of the Installed Price of Photovoltaics in the United States from 1998 to 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Golden, CO: National Renewable Energy Laboratory. NREL/CP-2012. Latham, NY: Interstate Renewable Energy Council, Inc.Golden, CO: National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Goodrich,

  20. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Development of Modified PAG (polyalkylene glycol) High VI High Fuel Efficient Lubricant for LDV Applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Ford Motor Company at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about development of modified...