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Sample records for gran vi lle

  1. LLE review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keck, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period October-December 1991, contains articles on the analysis of argon-filled target experiments, and a theoretical analysis of the impact of nonlocal heat transport in laser filamentation in plasmas. In the Advanced Technology section there is an article on mechanisms that affect thin-film conductivity, and a report on the gain characteristics of the 20-cm SSA prototype amplifier to be used in the OMEGA Upgrade. Finally, the activities of the National Laser Users Facility and the GDL and OMEGA laser facilities are summarized. Highlights of the research reported in this issue are: argon radiation from argon-filled, polymer-shell targets is used as a core-temperature diagnostic and density diagnostic of the surrounding region in a regime where the argon line radiation is strongly absorbed. A theoretical analysis of the impact of nonlocal heat transport on laser filamentation in plasmas is developed. The resulting model is compared with experimental observations and the implications for ICF are discussed. A study of thermal conductivity in thin films seeks to identify mechanisms that result in degradation of thin-film conductivity. Identifying these mechanisms can lead to changes in the thin-film manufacture that will improve their resistance to laser damage.

  2. Tritium Behavior in Lead Lithium Eutectic (LLE) at Low Tritium...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Behavior in Lead Lithium Eutectic (LLE) at Low Tritium Partial Pressure Tritium Behavior in Lead Lithium Eutectic (LLE) at Low Tritium Partial Pressure Presentation from the 33rd ...

  3. LLE Review 101 (October-December 2004)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shmayda, W. T.

    2005-03-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering October to December 2004, highlights the significance of shaped adiabats to inertial confinement fusion. Theory suggests that inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules compressed by shaped adiabats will exhibit improved hydrodynamic stability.

  4. LLE Review 83, Quarterly Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2000-12-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering April-June 2000, features an article by F. J. Marshall, T. Ohki, D. McInnis, Z. Ninkov, and J. Carbone, who detail the conversion of the OMEGA time-integrated x-ray diagnostics to electronic readout using direct-detection x-ray cameras [charge-injection devices (CID's)]. Pinhole and x-ray microscope images are shown along with inferred calibration measurements of the CID cameras. Currently, the same cameras are being used to obtain x-ray spectra in a TIM-based spectrometer, extending their use to all time-integrated imaging and spectroscopic x-ray instruments used on OMEGA. Additional highlights of the research presented in this issue are: (1) V. A. Smalyuk, B. Yaakobi, F. J. Marshall, and D. D. Meyerhofer investigate the spatial structure of the temperature and density of target-shell plasmas at peak compression (stagnation). This is accomplished by examining the energy dependence of the x-ray emission using narrow-band x-ray filters and the known absorption properties of the shell dopant (Ti). (2) F. Sequin, C. K. Ll, D. G. Hicks, J. A. Frenje, K. M. Green, R. D. Petrasso, J. M. Soures, V. Yu. Glebov, C. Stoeckl, P. B. Radha, D. D. Meyerhofer, S. Roberts, C. Sorce, T. C. Sangster, M. D. Cable, S. Padalino, and K. Fletcher detail the physics and instrumentation used to obtain and interpret secondary D-{sup 3}He proton spectra from current gas-filled-target and future cryogenic-target experiments. Through a novel extension of existing charged-particle detection techniques with track detectors, the authors demonstrate the ability to obtain secondary proton spectra with increased sensitivity. (3) M. Guardelben, L. Ning, N. Jain, D. Battaglia, and K. Marshall compare the utility of a novel liquid-crystal-based, point-diffraction interferometer (LCPDI) with the commercial standard phase-shifting interferometer and conclude that the LCPDI is a viable low-cost alternative. (4) A. B. Shorey, S. D. Jacobs, W. I. Kordonski, and R. F. Gans detail the mechanisms of glass polishing using the magnetorheological finishing (MRF) technique currently being studied in the Center for Optics Manufacturing (COM). Material-removal experiments show that the nanohardness of carbonyl iron (CI) is important in MRF with nonaqueous MR fluids with no nonmagnetic abrasives, but is relatively unimportant in aqueous MR fluids and/or when nonmagnetic abrasives are present.

  5. Gran Valle Qu mica | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gran Valle Qu mica Jump to: navigation, search Name: Gran Valle Qu-mica Place: Brazil Product: Rio de Janeiro-based biodiesel producer. References: Gran Valle Qu-mica1 This...

  6. LLE Review 120 (July-September 2009)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edgell, D.H., editor

    2001-02-19

    This issue has the following articles: (1) The Omega Laser Facility Users Group Workshop; (2) The Effect of Condensates and Inner Coatings on the Performance of Vacuum Hohlraum Targets; (3) Zirconia-Coated-Carbonyl-Iron-Particle-Based Magnetorheological Fluid for Polishing Optical Glasses and Ceramics; (4) All-Fiber Optical Magnetic Field Sensor Based on Faraday Rotation in Highly Terbium Doped Fiber; (5) Femtosecond Optical Pump-Probe Characterization of High-Pressure-Grown Al{sub 0.86}Ga{sub 0.14}N Single Crystals; (6) LLE's Summer High School Research Program; (7) Laser Facility Report; and (8) National Laser Users Facility and External Users Programs.

  7. LLE (Laboratory for Laser Energetics) review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumpan, S.A.

    1990-01-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period July--September 1990, contains articles in two main sections: the OMEGA Upgrade and Advanced Technology Developments. The first article in Section 1 describes the changes in the overall system design of the 60-beam OMEGA Upgrade since the release of the OMEGA Upgrade Preliminary Design Document in October 1989. It is followed by an article that presents results of an investigation into stimulated rotational Raman scattering as it relates to the propagation of high-fluence ultraviolet laser beams in the OMEGA Upgrade. The third article is a report on the energy-transport measurements made on the multisegmented amplifier (MSA), built as a prototype amplifier for the original OMEGA Upgrade system configuration. The final article in Section 1 describes the design of the 20-cm-clear-aperture, single-segmented amplifier (SSA), which will be the final amplifier in the current OMEGA Upgrade system configuration. Section 2 presents the results to date of an intensive in-house effort at LLE to develop the various optical coatings required for the OMEGA Upgrade.

  8. LLE Review 117 (October-December 2008)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bittle, W., editor

    2009-05-28

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering October-December 2008, features 'Demonstration of the Shock-Timing Technique for Ignition Targets at the National Ignition Facility' by T. R. Boehly, V. N. Goncharov, S. X. Hu, J. A. Marozas, T. C. Sangster, D. D. Meyerhofer (LLE), D. Munro, P. M. Celliers, D. G. Hicks, G. W. Collins, H. F. Robey, O. L. Landen (LLNL), and R. E. Olson (SNL). In this article (p. 1) the authors report on a technique to measure the velocity and timing of shock waves in a capsule contained within hohlraum targets. This technique is critical for optimizing the drive profiles for high-performance inertial-confinement-fusion capsules, which are compressed by multiple precisely timed shock waves. The shock-timing technique was demonstrated on OMEGA using surrogate hohlraum targets heated to 180 eV and fitted with a re-entrant cone and quartz window to facilitate velocity measurements using velocity interferometry. Cryogenic experiments using targets filled with liquid deuterium further demonstrated the entire timing technique in a hohlraum environment. Direct-drive cryogenic targets with multiple spherical shocks were also used to validate this technique, including convergence effects at relevant pressures (velocities) and sizes. These results provide confidence that shock velocity and timing can be measured in NIF ignition targets, thereby optimizing these critical parameters.

  9. LLE (Laboratory for Laser Energetics) review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumpan, S.A.

    1990-01-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period April--June 1990, contains articles in two main sections, Progress in Laser Fusion and Advanced Technology Developments. The first article presents the theoretical interpretation of the glass-ablator cryogenic-implosion experiments recently conducted on OMEGA. It is followed by an article describing the analysis of neutron time-of-flight data taken during DT and DD experiments; and a discussion of the improvements to laser diagnostics that now provide for precise control of the OMEGA laser is given. This paper contains a report on the development of transparent conductive coatings for KDP crystals, and a discussion of the study of the transient-surface Debye-Waller effect in materials irradiated with an ultrafast laser.

  10. LLE 2008 annual report, October 2007 - September 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-01-31

    The research program at the University of Rochester’s Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) focuses on inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research supporting the goal of achieving ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This program includes the full use of the OMEGA EP Laser System. Within the National Ignition Campaign (NIC), LLE is the lead laboratory for the validation of the performance of cryogenic target implosions, essential to all forms of ICF ignition. LLE has taken responsibility for a number of critical elements within the Integrated Experimental Teams (IET’s) supporting the demonstration of indirect-drive ignition on the NIF and is the lead laboratory for the validation of the polardrive approach to ignition on the NIF. LLE is also developing, testing, and building a number of diagnostics to be deployed on the NIF for the NIC.

  11. Tritium Behavior in Lead Lithium Eutectic (LLE) at Low Tritium...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Behavior in Lead Lithium Eutectic (LLE) at Low Tritium Partial Pressure 33 rd Tritium ... understood. - H Solubility from Lead-Lithium Eutectic (85 at.% Pb and 15 at.% Li), ...

  12. The Gran Sasso muon puzzle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernandez-Martinez, Enrique; Mahbubani, Rakhi E-mail: rakhi@cern.ch

    2012-07-01

    We carry out a time-series analysis of the combined data from three experiments measuring the cosmic muon flux at the Gran Sasso laboratory, at a depth of 3800 m.w.e. These data, taken by the MACRO, LVD and Borexino experiments, span a period of over 20 years, and correspond to muons with a threshold energy, at sea level, of around 1.3 TeV. We compare the best-fit period and phase of the full muon data set with the combined DAMA/NaI and DAMA/LIBRA data, which spans the same time period, as a test of the hypothesis that the cosmic ray muon flux is responsible for the annual modulation detected by DAMA. We find in the muon data a large-amplitude fluctuation with a period of around one year, and a phase that is incompatible with that of the DAMA modulation at 5.2?. Aside from this annual variation, the muon data also contains a further significant modulation with a period between 10 and 11 years and a power well above the 99.9% C.L threshold for noise, whose phase corresponds well with the solar cycle: a surprising observation for such high energy muons. We do not see this same period in the stratospheric temperature data.

  13. LLE 2004 annual report, October 2003-September 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2005-01-01

    This report summarizes research at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) conducted during the year, operation of the National Laser Users’ Facility (NLUF), a status report of the new OMEGA Extended Performance (EP) laser project, and programs concerning the education of high school, undergraduate, and graduate students during the year.

  14. LLE 2010 Annual Report October 2009 - September 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-01-01

    The fiscal year ending September 2010 (FY10) concluded the third year of the third five-year renewal of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC52-08NA28302 with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This annual report summarizes progress in inertial fusion research at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) during the past fiscal year including work on the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). It also reports on LLE's progress on laboratory basic science research; laser, optical materials, and advanced technology development; operation of OMEGA and OMEGA EP for the NIC and high-energy density (HED) campaigns, the National Laser Users Facility (NLUF), and for other external users; and programs focusing on the education of high school, undergraduate, and graduate students during the year.

  15. LLE review. Volume 65. Quarterly report, October--December 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boehly, T.R.

    1996-06-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period October-December 1995, contains a description of the generation and characterization of continuous, deep-surface-relief phase plates that are more efficient and versatile than previous designs. The LLE program plan has scheduled a number of enhancements to OMEGA`s performance and uniformity, the first of which is the implementation of these new distributed phase plates. Other articles in this volume include the discussion of an x-ray diagnostic method to measure shell-fuel mixing, the theoretical analysis of ablation-front stability, a description of a major subsystem in the OMEGA control system software, a study of the population inversions in intensely pumped Nd:YLF, and a description of a new ultrafast laser system and its uses.

  16. LLE 2007 Annual Report, October 2006 - September 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2008-01-31

    The laser-fusion research program at the University of Rochester’s Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) is focused on the National Nuclear Security Administration’s (NNSA’s) Campaign-10 inertial confinement fusion (ICF) ignition and experimental support technology, operation of facilities (OMEGA), and the construction of OMEGA EP -- a high energy petawatt laser system. While LLE is the lead laboratory for research into the direct-drive approach to ICF ignition, it also takes a lead role in certain indirect-drive tasks within the National Ignition Campaign. During this past year progress in the laser-fusion research program was made in three principal areas: OMEGA direct drive and indirect-drive experiments and targets; development of diagnostics for experiments on OMEGA, OMEGA EP, and the National Ignition Facility (NIF); and theoretical analysis and design efforts aimed at improving direct-drive-ignition capsule designs and advanced ignition concepts such as fast ignition and shock ignition.

  17. Laboratory for Laser Energetics LLE 1999 Annual Report, October 1998-September 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2000-01-01

    OAK-B135 Laboratory for Laser Energetics LLE 1999 Annual Report, October 1998-September 1999 Note: This report was submitted electronically even though ''PAPER'' is indicated.

  18. LLE 1997. Annual report, October 1996--September 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-01-01

    The fiscal year ending September 1997 (FY97) concluded the fifth year of the cooperative agreement (DE-FC03-92SF19460) with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This report summarizes research at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) and is the final report for the first five years of the cooperative agreement. In September 1997, the cooperative agreement was renewed for an additional five years. We summarize our research during FY97, the operation of the National Laser Users` Facility (NLUF), and the education of high school, undergraduate, and graduate students in LLE programs. A general introduction to LLE`s experimental physics program and a report on recent results are found on pp. 161-167. This article includes a useful summary of the system`s operational capabilities and system parameters after three years of operation. Direct-drive inertial confinement fusion requires precise drive uniformity, the control of hydrodynamic instabilities during the implosion of the fusion target, and accurate target fabrication and characterization. The article summarizes a wide variety of experiments relating to direct-drive laser fusion, from high-yield implosion experiments to planar and spherical Rayleigh-Taylor experiments, laser-imprinting experiments, and laser-plasma interaction experiments. A detailed analysis of the equation of motion for an electron in a plane wave is presented beginning on p. 24. A guiding center model is postulated and compared to numerical simulation of the actual particle motion. The formula is also verified analytically using the method of multiple scales. Work continues on this formalism to study the effects of the pondermotive force on laser-plasma interactions. A theoretical calculation of the dephasing time of an electron accelerated by a laser pulse is found on pp. 92-100. The trajectory of a charged particle, determined analytically for various pulse shapes, is then used to determine the dephasing time of an accelerated particle.

  19. LLE Review Quarterly Report (April-June 1996). Volume 67

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skeldon, Mark D.

    1996-06-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period April-June 1996, contains articles detailing several nonlinear processes associated with lasers and their use, as well as an article describing the computer control systems necessary to maintain and operate a large laser system such as the 60-beam OMEGA laser. The specific topics discussed in this issue include stimulated scattering in laser plasmas, power exchange between interacting laser beams, charged particles interacting with a laser pulse, thermal equilibration of optically excited states, an overview of the laser control system software in OMEGA, and a technique for cancellation of the nonlinear phase accumulation in short-pulse lasers.

  20. LLE Review quarterly report, April--June 1993. Volume 55

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hutchison, R.J.

    1993-10-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period April--June 1993, contains articles on spectral features from argon-filled target implosions on OMEGA, and on the theory of an implicit difference scheme for the Fokker-Planck equation. The advanced technology section includes reports on a novel polymer liquid-crystal wave plate and a new scheme for phase conversion of the OMEGA Upgrade beams that results in greater, smoother energy deposition on fusion targets. Finally, reports on the as-designed configuration of the OMEGA newly configured glass development laser system are summarized.

  1. LLE 2009 annual report, October 2008-September 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none, none

    2010-01-01

    The fiscal year ending September 2009 (FY2009) concluded the second year of the third five-year renewal of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC52-08NA28302 with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This annual report summarizes progress in inertial fusion research at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) during the past fiscal year. It also reports on LLE’s progress on laboratory basic science research; laser, optical materials, and advanced technology development; operation of OMEGA and OMEGA EP for the National Laser Users’ Facility (NLUF), and other external users; and programs focusingon the education of high school, undergraduate, and graduate students during the year.

  2. LLE Review Quarterly Report (July - September 2004). Volume 100

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmid, Ansgar W.

    2004-09-01

    The key article in this volume of the LLE Review, covering July-September 2004, addresses "Shock Propagation in Deuterium-Tritium-Saturated Foam" by T. J. B. Collins (LLE) and A. Poludnenko, A. Cunningham, and A. Frank (UR, Department of Physics and Astronomy) (p. 227). Testing the assumption of homogeneous mixing in fibrous foams saturated with cryogenic deuterium and tritium, shock passage in wetted-foam mixtures was simulated by the adaptive-mesh, two-dimensional hydrodynamic code AstroBEAR. For foam fibers of diameter ~1/10 m and relevant foam densities, the mixing length behind the shock is found to be of the order of microns. Transverse motion dampens out sufficiently that, at the mixing region's edge farthest from the shock, Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions are obeyed to within a few percent and shock speeds are also within a few percent of their homogeneous values. In addition, questions of feedthrough and feedout are addressed, showing that the stability of the shock front, once it leaves the wetted-foam layer, minimizes the effect of feedthrough. As a result, simulations of whole-foam-pellet implosions may model the wetted foam as a homogeneous mixture.

  3. LLE Review. Volume 68, July--September 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-07-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period of July-September 1996, includes a description of an important experiment carried out on OMEGA by researchers from LANL, LLNL, and LLE to demonstrate the feasibility of using OMEGA for indirect drive. Additional topics include tetrahedral hohlraums, the speckle properties of phase- converted laser beams, design criteria for SSD phase modulators, and the design of slab amplifiers. Highlights of the research presented in this issue are (1) Results from the proof-of-principle indirect- drive experiments in which up to 40 OMEGA beams were used to irradiate cylindrical hohlraums. Nova results were reproduced, and new capabilities not available on other lasers were demonstrated. (2) A discussion of tetrahedral hohlraums (spherical hohlraums with four laser entrance holes) as a means of achieving better capsule irradiation uniformity. Tetrahedral hohlraums also allow the use of all 60 OMEGA beams and may provide an alternate route to ignition on the NIF. (3) An analysis of the residual target irradiation nonuniformity due to the fine laser speckle remaining on the beam after being phase converted by the DPP`s. A model shows how a uniformly ablating plasma atmosphere reduces the speckle contribution to the effective time-averaged irradiation nonuniformity. (4) A discussion of the theory, design, manufacture, testing, and implementation of the microwave SSD phase modulators used on OMEGA for two-dimensional SSD. The modulators are capable of operating in the gigahertz frequency range. (5) A discussion of the design and performance of a large-aperture, high-gain Nd:glass zig-zag slab amplifier for materials testing. The design incorporates improvements from previous work in addition to improvements obtained from careful design choices guided by analytic calculations.

  4. LLE review. Quarterly report, July 1997--September 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-02-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period July--September 1997, begins with a general introduction to LLE`s experimental physics program and a report on recent results. This article includes a useful summary of the system`s operational capabilities and system parameters. Other highlights of the wide variety of research presented in this issue are: a promising method to directly observe the cold compressed shell of an imploding target. The shell is normally observed by backlighting. The proposal described here is to use a high-Z dopant that fluoresces under radiation from the hot core in the K{alpha} line. A study of the instabilities associated with near-forward stimulated Brillouin scattering. It includes a calculation of the saturation times and steady-state gain exponents. A successful program of pulse shaping for the OMEGA laser system. Examples of a variety of pulse shapes that can be programmed are presented. A description of the angular-scattering characteristics of ferroelectric liquid crystal electro-optical devices operating in transient and extended scattering modes. The possibility of applying these devices as modulators in practical IR imaging systems is evaluated. A faster method of shaping and finishing IR materials by the use of magnetorheological fluids. Detailed specifications and test results are included. An integrated circuit tester based on interferometric imaging. This technique holds promise of ultrafast noninvasive testing of the voltage states of sections of microchips. Continued success of the Laboratory`s High School Summer Research Program. The program, which started in 1989, has brought several dozen young people into intimate contact with modern science and technology. The volume concludes with a Laser Facility Report and the National Laser Users` Facility News.

  5. LLE Review Quarterly Report (October - December 2007). Volume 113

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zuegel, Jonathan D.

    2007-12-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering OctoberDecember 2007, features High-Intensity LaserPlasma Interactions in the Refluxing Limit, by P. M. Nilson, W. Theobald, J. Myatt, C. Stoeckl, M. Storm, O. V. Gotchev, J. D. Zuegel, R. Betti, D. D. Meyerhofer, and T. C. Sangster. In this article (p. 1), the authors report on target experiments using the Multi-Terawatt (MTW) Laser Facility to study isochoric heating of solid-density targets by fast electrons produced from intense, short-pulse laser irradiation. Electron refluxing occurs due to target-sheath field effects and contains most of the fast electrons within the target volume. This efficiently heats the solid-density plasma through collisions. X-ray spectroscopic measurements of absolute K? (x-radiation) photon yields and variations of the K?/K? b emission ratio both indicate that laser energy couples to fast electrons with a conversion efficiency of approximately 20%. Bulk electron temperatures of at least 200 eV are inferred for the smallest mass targets.

  6. LLE Review. Quarterly report, July 1982-September 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forsyth, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    This edition of the LLE Review contains articles which summarize progress in various uniformity experiments on OMEGA, progress in aspects of target fabrication directly related to uniformity and transport studies, and a summary of recent user experiments performed on GDL. Some highlights of the work described in this issue are: (1) achievement of 5% RMS uniformity of irradiation in long-pulse OMEGA target experiments; (2) direct measurement of final core rho R of 2.5 x 10/sup 3/g/cm/sup 2/ in Ar-DT targets; (3) improvement of OMEGA beam profile uniformity resulting from a systematic study of stress-induced briefringence in LHG-8 laser rods; (4) successful deployment of ultra low-mass stalks for support of glass microballoon targets in OMEGA experiments; (5) the use of biased magnetron sputtering to improve the uniformity of metal coatings applied to glass microballoons; and (6) the study of the interaction of high-intensity, 0.351-..mu..m radiation with long-scalelength, completely underdense plasmas by measurement of light produced by stimulated Raman scattering.

  7. LLE Review Quarterly Report (January-March 2000). Volume 82

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radha, P. B.

    2000-03-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period January-March 2000, includes a report on OMEGA cryogenic target designs for the soon-to-be-commissioned OMEGA Cryogenic Target Handling System. R. P. J. Town, J. A. Delettrez, R. Epstein, V. N. Goncharov, P. W. McKenty, P. B. Radha, and S. Skupsky use two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations in conjunction with a stability analysis model to study the performance of OMEGA cryogenic capsules. They show that these targets are energy-scaled from the NIF ignition designs and have similar 1-D behavior and stability properties. This similarity will facilitate the extrapolation of cryogenic target studies on OMEGA to ignition targets on the NIF. Other articles in this volume are: Imprint Reduction using an Intensity Spike in Omega Cryogenic Targets; Measurement of Preheat Due to Fast Electrons in Laser Implosions; Holographic Transmission Gratings for Spectral Dispersion; Laser Beam Smoothing Caused by the Small-Spatial-Scale B-Integral; Three-Dimensional Modeling of Capsule Implosions in OMEGA Tetrahedral Hohlraums; and, Nanoindentation Hardness of Particles Used in Magnetoheological finishing (MRF).

  8. LLE review. Quarterly report, October--December 1991: Volume 49

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keck, R.L.

    1991-12-31

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period October-December 1991, contains articles on the analysis of argon-filled target experiments, and a theoretical analysis of the impact of nonlocal heat transport in laser filamentation in plasmas. In the Advanced Technology section there is an article on mechanisms that affect thin-film conductivity, and a report on the gain characteristics of the 20-cm SSA prototype amplifier to be used in the OMEGA Upgrade. Finally, the activities of the National Laser Users Facility and the GDL and OMEGA laser facilities are summarized. Highlights of the research reported in this issue are: argon radiation from argon-filled, polymer-shell targets is used as a core-temperature diagnostic and density diagnostic of the surrounding region in a regime where the argon line radiation is strongly absorbed. A theoretical analysis of the impact of nonlocal heat transport on laser filamentation in plasmas is developed. The resulting model is compared with experimental observations and the implications for ICF are discussed. A study of thermal conductivity in thin films seeks to identify mechanisms that result in degradation of thin-film conductivity. Identifying these mechanisms can lead to changes in the thin-film manufacture that will improve their resistance to laser damage.

  9. LLE Review Quarterly Report (JulySeptember 1998). Volume 76

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Epstein, Reuben

    1998-09-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period JulySeptember 1998, includes reports on two of the newest subsystems in the OMEGA laser facility. A. V. Okishev, M. D. Skeldon, and W. Seka have developed a highly stable, diode-pumped Nd:YLF master oscillator for the OMEGA laser system. This new master oscillator produces either single-frequency Q-switched pulses or cw radiation for the OMEGA pulse-shaping system. The switch-over between these two regimes requires no laser realignment. The new master oscillator is completely computer controlled and has been operating continuously in OMEGA for six months without operator intervention. A. Babushkin, W. Bittle, S. A. Letzring, M. D. Skeldon, and W. Seka have designed a negative-feedbackcontrolled regenerative amplifier that has been part of the OMEGA laser system for the past two years. The negative feedback makes the energy output of the regenerative amplifier stable and insensitive to the variations in pulse energy. This amplifiers long-term output energy stability is the highest ever demonstrated for a millijoule-level laser system, either flashlamp pumped or diode pumped.

  10. LLE Review quarterly report July--September 1993. Volume 56

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hutchison, R.J.

    1993-12-31

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period July--September 1993, contains articles on self-focusing of broad-bandwidth laser light with angular dispersion, laser patterning of thin-film circuits, and construction of foam-shell fusion targets. Reports on the detailed designs of major subsystems of the OMEGA Upgrade and on the continuing activation of the upgraded Glass Development Laser system are summarized. Descriptions of research proposals for NLUF are also included in this issue. Highlights of the research reported in this issue are: Previous investigations of self-focusing behavior of broad-bandwidth laser light without angular dispersion showed only slight differences when compared to laser light with angular dispersion. A new, numerical investigation of self-focusing with applied angular dispersion shows the development of transverse amplitude modulation, which can act to enhance or impede instantaneous self-focusing. Averaging over one period of phase modulation with imposed bandwidth shows consistent smoothing of the beam, nearly replicating the original spatial profile, including smoothing of induced perturbations due to laser-system imperfections. A continuous-wave argon-ion laser beam is focused onto a Y-Ba-Cu-O thin-film circuit. The laser beam selectively heats the epitaxy, which enriches oxygen in irradiated regions alongside depleted regions. Oxygen enrichment results in the formation of superconducting regions, while oxygen depletion results in semiconducting regions. This maskless operation yields applications in microbridges,coplanar transmisson lines, field-effect transistors, and photoconductive switches. One technique to form thick fusion fuel layers is to use a low-density polymer or aerosol foam matrix to hold the liquid DT. This issue summarizes the results of a collaborative experiment conducted at the Institute for Laser Engineering (ILE) to fabricate foam-shell targets with plastic-layer overcoats.

  11. LLE Review Quarterly Report January - March 2012. Volume 130

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shvydky, Alex

    2012-03-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering JanuaryMarch 2012, features OMEGA Polar-Drive Target Designs, by P. B. Radha, J. A. Marozas, F. J. Marshall, A. Shvydky, T. J. B. Collins, V. N. Goncharov, R. L. McCrory, P. W. McKenty, D. D. Meyerhofer, T. C. Sangster, and S. Skupsky. This article (p. 57) describes low-adiabat, cryogenic-deuteriumtritium, and warm-plastic-shell polar-drive (PD)implosion designs for the OMEGA laser. The designs are at two different on-target laser intensities, each at a different in-flight aspect ratio (IFAR). The first design permits one to study implosion energetics and target performance closer to ignition-relevant intensities (7 X 1014 W/cm2 at the quarter-critical surface), where nonlocal heat conduction and laserplasma interactions can play an important role, but at lower values of IFAR (~22). The second design permits one to study implosion energetics and target performance at a lower intensity (3 X 1014 W/cm2) but at higher IFAR (~32), where the shell instability can play an important role. The higher IFAR designs are accessible on the existing OMEGA Laser System only at lower intensities. Implosions at ignition-relevant intensities can be obtained only by reducing target radius, although only at smaller values of IFAR. Polar-drive geometry requires repointing the laser beams to improve shell symmetry. The higher-intensity designs optimize target performance by repointing beams to a lesser extent and compensate for the reduced equatorial drive by increasing beam energies for the repointed beams and using custom beam profiles that improve equatorial illumination at the expense of irradiation at higher latitudes. These designs will be studied when new phase plates for the OMEGA Laser System, corresponding to the smaller target radii and custom beam profiles, are obtained. Implosion results from the combined set of high-intensity and high-IFAR implosions should yield valuable data to validate models of laser-energy deposition, heat conduction, nonuniformity growth, and fuel assembly in PD geometry.

  12. LLE Review Quarterly Report (April-June 2005). Volume 103

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myatt, Jason

    2005-06-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering April-June 2005, features the following articles. ''High-Density and High ρR Fuel Assembly for Fast-Ignition Inertial Confinement Fusion'' by R. Betti and C. Zhou. In this article (p. 117), the authors optimize implosion parameters for fast-ignition inertial confinement fusion and design fast-ignition targets relevant to direct-drive inertial fusion energy (IFE). It is shown that a 750-kJ laser can assemble fuel with VI = 1.7 X 107 cm/s, a = 0.7, t = 400 g/cc, tR = 3 g/cm2, and a hot-spot volume of less than 10% of the compressed core. If fully ignited, this fuel assembly can produce energy gains of 150. In the second article (p. 122), C. Stoeckl, T. R. Boehly, J. A. Delettrez, V. Yu. Glebov, J. Miller, V. A. Smalyuk, W. Theobald, B. Yaakobi, and T. C. Sangster, along with J. A. Frenje, C. K. Li, R. D. Petrasso, and F. H. Séguin (MIT), S. P. Hatchett (LLNL), and R. B. Stephens (GA) describe recent OMEGA experiments that have studied the fuel assembly of gas-filled, cone-in-shell, fast-ignition targets. Using both fusion products and backlit images, an areal density of ~60-70 mg/cm2 was inferred for the dense core assembly. The results are promising for successful integrated fast-ignition experiments on the OMEGA EP facility, scheduled to be completed in 2007. Other articles are titled ''Planar Cryogenic Target Hangling Capability for the OMEGA Laser-Fusion Facility''; "Fourier-Space, Nonlinear Rayleigh-Taylor Growth Measurements of 3-D Laser-Imprinted Modulations in Planar Targets''; ''Technologies for Mitigating Tritum Releases to the Environment''; ''All-Solid-State, Diode-Pumped, Multiharmonic Laser System for Timing Fiducial''; and ''EXAFS Measurement of Iron bcc-to-hcp Phase Transformation in Nanosecond-Laser Shocks''.

  13. FE(VI)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    25 July 2006 An Octahedral Iron(VI) Complex - A Novel Form of Iron summary written by Bradley Plummer, SLAC Communication Office Chemists have synthesized and characterized a new,...

  14. ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements VI (ACME VI) Science Plan (Program

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Document) | SciTech Connect ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements VI (ACME VI) Science Plan Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements VI (ACME VI) Science Plan From October 1 through September 30, 2016, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Aerial Facility will deploy the Cessna 206 aircraft over the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site, collecting observations of trace-gas mixing ratios over the ARM's SGP facility. The aircraft payload includes two Atmospheric

  15. Tritium Behavior in Lead Lithium Eutectic (LLE) at Low Tritium Partial Pressure

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Behavior in Lead Lithium Eutectic (LLE) at Low Tritium Partial Pressure 33 rd Tritium Focus Group meeting, Savannah River National Laboratory, SC Masashi Shimada, Ph.D. Fusion Safety Program, Idaho National Laboratory, STIMS # INL/MS-14-31893| Savannah River National Laboratory, SC | April 25, 2014 Outlines 1. Motivation 2. Experimental apparatus 3. TMAP modeling 4. Experimental results 5. Modeling results 6. Future work M.Shimada | Tritium Focus Group meeting | SRNL, SC | April 25, 2014 2

  16. Title VI | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    VI Title VI Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, and national origin in programs and activities that receive federal financial assistance. The law states, in part, that: No person in the United States shall, on the ground of race, color, or national origin, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance. The Office of

  17. LLE 1998 annual report, October 1997--September 1998. Inertial fusion program and National Laser Users` Facility program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes research at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE), the operation of the National Laser Users` Facility (NLUF), and programs involving the education of high school, undergraduate, and graduate students for FY98. Research summaries cover: progress in laser fusion; diagnostic development; laser and optical technology; and advanced technology for laser targets.

  18. LLE Quarterly Report (July-September 1999)[Library for Laser Energetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2000-01-07

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period July-September 1999, features a theoretical analysis of a process that generates mass perturbations of an imploding target driven by modulated laser illumination. The process, referred to as laser imprint, impacts the integrity of the shell during direct-drive implosions, potentially quenching target performance. In this article V. N. Goncharov, J. A. Delettrez, S. Skupsky, and R. P. J. Town present a model of the generation of mass perturbations and analyze the mass perturbation growth due to nonuniform ablation pressure. Stabilizing mechanisms of thermal conduction smoothing and mass ablation are shown to suppress the acceleration perturbation, and mass ablation is also shown to impact velocity perturbations. The model predicts that a direct-drive cryogenic NIF target will remain intact during the implosion when l-Thz SSD beam smoothing is used.

  19. The CUORE and CUORE-0 experiments at Gran Sasso

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giachero, A.; Artusa, D. R.; F. T. Avignone; Azzolini, O.; Balata, M.; Banks, T. I.; Bari, G.; Beeman, J.; Bellini, F.; Bersani, A.; Biassoni, M.; Brofferio, C.; Bucci, C.; Cai, X. Z.; Camacho, A.; Caminata, A.; Canonica, L.; Cao, X. G.; Capelli, S.; Cappelli, L.; Carbone, L.; Cardani, L.; Casali, N.; Cassina, L.; Chiesa, D.; Chott, N.; Clemenza, M.; Copello, S.; Cosmelli, C.; Cremonesi, O.; Creswick, R. J.; Cushman, J. S.; Dafinei, I.; Dally, A.; Datskov, V.; Dell’Oro, S.; Deninno, M. M.; Di Domizio, S.; di Vacri, M. L.; Drobizhev, A.; Ejzak, L.; Fang, D. Q.; Farach, H. A.; Faverzani, M.; Fernandes, G.; Ferri, E.; Ferroni, F.; Fiorini, E.; Franceschi, M. A.; Freedman, S. J.; Fujikawa, B. K.; Gironi, L.; Giuliani, A.; Gorla, P.; Gotti, C.; Gutierrez, T. D.; Haller, E. E.; Han, K.; Heeger, K. M.; Hennings-Yeomans, R.; Hickerson, K. P.; Huang, H. Z.; Kadel, R.; Kazkaz, K.; Keppel, G.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Li, Y. L.; Ligi, C.; Lim, K. E.; Liu, X.; Ma, Y. G.; Maiano, C.; Maino, M.; Martinez, M.; Maruyama, R. H.; Mei, Y.; Moggi, N.; Morganti, S.; Napolitano, T.; Nastasi, M.; Nisi, S.; C. Nones; Norman, E. B.; Nucciotti, A.; O’Donnell, T.; Orio, F.; Orlandi, D.; Ouellet, J. L.; Pagliarone, C. E.; Pallavicini, M.; Pattavina, L.; Pavan, M.; Pedretti, M.; Pessina, G.; Pettinacci, V.; Piperno, G.; Pira, C.; Pirro, S.; Pozzi, S.; Previtali, E.; Rampazzo, V.; Rosenfeld, C.; Rusconi, C.; Sala, E.; Sangiorgio, S.; Scielzo, N. D.; Sisti, M.; Smith, A. R.; Taffarello, L.; Tenconi, M.; Terranova, F.; Tian, W. D.; Tomei, C.; Trentalange, S.; Ventura, G.; Vignati, M.; Wang, B. S.; Wang, H. W.; Wielgus, L.; Wilson, J.; Winslow, L. A.; Wise, T.; Woodcraft, A.; Zanotti, L.; Zarra, C.; Zhang, G. Q.; Zhu, B. X.; Zucchelli, S.; Bravina, L.; Foka, Y.; Kabana, S.

    2015-05-29

    The Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events (CUORE) is an experiment to search for neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ) in 130Te and other rare processes. CUORE is a cryogenic detector composed of 988 TeO2 bolometers for a total mass of about 741 kg. The detector is being constructed at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Italy, where it will start taking data in 2015. If the target background of 0.01 counts/(keV·kg·y) will be reached, in five years of data taking CUORE will have an half life sensitivity around 1 × 1026 y at 90% C.L. As a first step towards CUORE a smaller experiment CUORE-0, constructed to test and demonstrate the performances expected for CUORE, has been assembled and is running. The detector is a single tower of 52 CUORE-like bolometers that started taking data in spring 2013. The status and perspectives of CUORE will be discussed, and the first CUORE-0 data will be presented.

  20. The CUORE and CUORE-0 experiments at Gran Sasso

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Giachero, A.; Artusa, D. R.; F. T. Avignone; Azzolini, O.; Balata, M.; Banks, T. I.; Bari, G.; Beeman, J.; Bellini, F.; Bersani, A.; et al

    2015-05-29

    The Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events (CUORE) is an experiment to search for neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ) in 130Te and other rare processes. CUORE is a cryogenic detector composed of 988 TeO2 bolometers for a total mass of about 741 kg. The detector is being constructed at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Italy, where it will start taking data in 2015. If the target background of 0.01 counts/(keV·kg·y) will be reached, in five years of data taking CUORE will have an half life sensitivity around 1 × 1026 y at 90% C.L. As a first step towardsmore » CUORE a smaller experiment CUORE-0, constructed to test and demonstrate the performances expected for CUORE, has been assembled and is running. The detector is a single tower of 52 CUORE-like bolometers that started taking data in spring 2013. The status and perspectives of CUORE will be discussed, and the first CUORE-0 data will be presented.« less

  1. Flyer, Title VI | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Flyer, Title VI Flyer, Title VI Titles VI and IX of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended prohibit discrimination in programs and activities receiving Federal financial assistance. This flyer explains this probition, and can be downloaded and displayed at your place of work. PDF icon discrimination flyer July 2011.pdf More Documents & Publications NO FEAR Act Notice DOE F 1600.5 DOE F 1600.1

  2. The Radiolysis of AmVI Solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce J. Mincher

    2013-06-01

    The reduction of bismuthate-produced AmVI by 60Co gamma-rays was measured using post-irradiation UV/Vis spectroscopy. The reduction of AmVI by radiolysis was rapid, producing AmV as the sole product. Relatively low absorbed doses in the ~0.3 kGy range quantitatively reduced a solution of 2.5 x 10-4 M AmVI. The addition of bismuthate to samples during irradiation did not appear to protect AmVI from radiolytic reduction during these experiments. It was also shown here that AmV is very stable toward radiation. The quantitative reduction of the AmVI concentration here corresponds to 1.4 hours of exposure to a process solution, however the actual americium concentrations will be higher and the expected contact times short when using centrifugal contactors. Thus, the reduction rate found in these initial experiments may not be excessive.

  3. EA-389 Greay Bay Energy VI, LLC | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Order authorizing Great Bay Energy to export electric energy to Canada. PDF icon EA-389 ... Great Bay Energy VI, LLC EA-389-A Great Bay Energy VI, LLC EA-342-A Royal Bank of Canada

  4. I.D I VI Figure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ~press - ,~,.--;~ 3.1 ,,~-.::;:.--- ~ ( 3.1 ( ;-; t\ I.D I VI Figure 9-1. Location of the original Cypress Grove Set-Aside and the Stave Island and Georgia Power replacement Areas. Set-Aside 9: Cypress Grove, Stave Island, and Georgia Power

  5. Energy balance of ENDF/B-VI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacFarlane, R.E.

    1994-06-01

    ENDF/B-VI through Release 2 has been tested for neutron-photon energy balance using the Heater module of the NJOY nuclear data procesing system. The situation is much improved over ENDF/B-V, but there are still a number of maerials that show problems.

  6. Role of Anions and Reaction Conditions in the Preparation of Uranium(VI), Neptunium(VI), and Plutonium(VI) Borates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2011-02-03

    U(VI), Np(VI), and Pu(VI) borates with the formula AnO2[B8O11(OH)4] (An = U, Np, Pu) have been prepared via the reactions of U(VI) nitrate, Np(VI) perchlorate, or Pu(IV) or Pu(VI) nitrate with molten boric acid. These compounds are all isotypic and consist of a linear actinyl(VI) cation, AnO22+, surrounded by BO3 triangles and BO4 tetrahedra to create an AnO8 hexagonal bipyramidal environment. The actinyl bond lengths are consistent with actinide contraction across this series. The borate anions bridge between actinyl units to create sheets. Additional BO3 triangles and BO4 tetrahedra extend from the polyborate layers and connect these sheets together to form a three-dimensional chiral framework structure. UV-vis-NIR absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy confirms the hexavalent oxidation state in all three compounds. Bond-valence parameters are developed for Np(VI).

  7. Molecular Interactions of Plutonium(VI) with Synthetic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Manganese-Substituted Goethite (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Molecular Interactions of Plutonium(VI) with Synthetic Manganese-Substituted Goethite Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Molecular Interactions of Plutonium(VI) with Synthetic Manganese-Substituted Goethite Plutonium(VI) sorption on the surface of well-characterized synthetic manganese-substituted goethite minerals (Fe1-xMnxOOH) was studied using X-ray absorption spectroscopy. We chose to study the influence of

  8. Molecular Interactions of Plutonium(VI) with Synthetic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Manganese-Substituted Goethite (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Molecular Interactions of Plutonium(VI) with Synthetic Manganese-Substituted Goethite Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Molecular Interactions of Plutonium(VI) with Synthetic Manganese-Substituted Goethite Plutonium(VI) sorption on the surface of well-characterized synthetic manganese-substituted goethite minerals (Fe1-xMnxOOH) was studied using X-ray absorption spectroscopy. We chose to study the

  9. Brookhaven National Laboratory - OU VI VOC | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    VI VOC Brookhaven National Laboratory - OU VI VOC January 1, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report InstallationName, State: Brookhaven National Laboratory Responsible DOE Office: Office of Science Plume Name: OU VI VOC Remediation Contractor: Brookhaven Science Associates PBS Number: 30 Report Last Updated: 2014 Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present?: No Fuel Present? No Metals Present? No Isotopes Present? No Explosives Present? No

  10. Ch. VI, The geophysical environment around Waunita Hot Springs...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    VI, The geophysical environment around Waunita Hot Springs Author A. L. Lange Editor T. G. Zacharakis Published Colorado Geological Survey in Cooperation with the U.S. Department...

  11. Development of Surface Complexation Models of Cr(VI) Adsorption...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Cr(VI) Adsorption on Soils, Sediments and Model Mixtures of Kaolinite, Montmorillonite, ... into aquifers and shallow sediments and soils via many anthropogenic activities. ...

  12. North American Standard Level VI Inspection Program Update: Ensuring...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    North American Standard Level VI Inspection Program Update: Ensuring Safe Transportation of Radioactive Material Presentation made by Carlisle Smith for the NTSF annual meeting ...

  13. Air quality VI details environmental progress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2007-12-31

    A report is given of the International Conference on Air Quality VI where key topics discussed were control of mercury, trace elements, sulphur trioxide and particulates. This year a separate track was added on greenhouse gas reduction, with panels on greenhouse gas policy and markets, CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration, and monitoring, mitigation and verification. In keynote remarks, NETL Director Carl Bauer noted that emissions have gone down since 1990 even though coal consumption has increased. The conference provided an overview of the state-of-the-science regarding key pollutants and CO{sub 2}, the corresponding regulatory environment, and the technology readiness of mitigation techniques. 1 photo.

  14. Sustainable management of the Gran Chaco of South America: Ecological promise and economic constraints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bucher, E.H.; Huszar, P.C.

    1999-10-01

    The vast plain known as the Gran Chaco is a natural region of more than 1--3 million square kilometers, the second largest natural biome in south America, with only the Amazon region being larger. It extends over parts of Argentina, Bolivia, Paraguay and, marginally, Brazil. The original landscape of the region was mostly a park land with patches of hardwoods intermingled with grasslands. Increasing human encroachment, largely by poor campesinos, with associated overgrazing, excessive timber harvesting, charcoal production and over-exploitation of wildlife, is transforming the region into a dense and unproductive shrub land and is contributing to increasing rural poverty. A management system for the sustainable use of the Chaco has been developed based on a multiple-species ranching system that includes beef, timber, charcoal and wildlife production. An evaluation of the management system finds that it is capable of protecting and enhancing the resource base, while providing higher economic returns in a sustainable manner. However, high initial costs, as well as a divergence between the best interests of campersinos and society, jeopardize the feasibility of the managed system.

  15. Regional aeolian dynamics and sand mixing in the Gran Desierto: Evidence from Landsat thematic mapper images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blount, G.; Greeley, R.; Christensen, P.R. (Arizona State Univ., Tempe (USA)); Smith, M.O.; Adams, J.B. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle (USA))

    1990-09-10

    Spatial variations in sand composition were mapped on a regional scale in a terrestrial sand sea, the Gran Desierto of Sonora, Mexico. Mesoscale mapping on a satellite image base allowed quantitative interpretation of the dynamic development of sand sheets and dunes. The results were used to interpret the Quaternary geologic history of the tectonically active region at the mouth of the Colorado River. Landsat thematic mapper multispectral images were used to predict the abundance of different mineralogies of sand grains in a mixed aeolian terrain. A spectral mixing model separated the effects of vegetation and topographically induced shading and shadow from the effects produced by different mineral and rock types. Compositions determined remotely agreed well with samples from selected areas within the spectral limitations of the thematic mapper. A simple discrimination capability for active versus inactive sand surfaces is demonstrated based upon differences in the percentage of low-albedo accessory grains occurring on dormant aeolian surfaces. A technique for discriminating between low-albedo materials and macroscopic shade is implemented by combing thermal images with the results of the spectral mixing model. The image analysis revealed important compositional variations over large areas that were not readily apparent in the field.

  16. KENO-VI Primer: A Primer for Criticality Calculations with SCALE/KENO-VI Using GeeWiz

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowman, Stephen M

    2008-09-01

    The SCALE (Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation) computer software system developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is widely used and accepted around the world for criticality safety analyses. The well-known KENO-VI three-dimensional Monte Carlo criticality computer code is one of the primary criticality safety analysis tools in SCALE. The KENO-VI primer is designed to help a new user understand and use the SCALE/KENO-VI Monte Carlo code for nuclear criticality safety analyses. It assumes that the user has a college education in a technical field. There is no assumption of familiarity with Monte Carlo codes in general or with SCALE/KENO-VI in particular. The primer is designed to teach by example, with each example illustrating two or three features of SCALE/KENO-VI that are useful in criticality analyses. The primer is based on SCALE 6, which includes the Graphically Enhanced Editing Wizard (GeeWiz) Windows user interface. Each example uses GeeWiz to provide the framework for preparing input data and viewing output results. Starting with a Quickstart section, the primer gives an overview of the basic requirements for SCALE/KENO-VI input and allows the user to quickly run a simple criticality problem with SCALE/KENO-VI. The sections that follow Quickstart include a list of basic objectives at the beginning that identifies the goal of the section and the individual SCALE/KENO-VI features that are covered in detail in the sample problems in that section. Upon completion of the primer, a new user should be comfortable using GeeWiz to set up criticality problems in SCALE/KENO-VI. The primer provides a starting point for the criticality safety analyst who uses SCALE/KENO-VI. Complete descriptions are provided in the SCALE/KENO-VI manual. Although the primer is self-contained, it is intended as a companion volume to the SCALE/KENO-VI documentation. (The SCALE manual is provided on the SCALE installation DVD.) The primer provides specific examples of using SCALE/KENO-VI for criticality analyses; the SCALE/KENO-VI manual provides information on the use of SCALE/KENO-VI and all its modules. The primer also contains an appendix with sample input files.

  17. Procedure for plutonium determination using Pu(VI) spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, L.F.; Temer, D.J.; Jackson, D.D.

    1996-09-01

    This document describes a simple spectrophotometric method for determining total plutonium in nitric acid solutions based on the spectrum of Pu(VI). Plutonium samples in nitric acid are oxidized to Pu(VI) with Ce(IV) and the net absorbance at the 830 nm peak is measured.

  18. ALTERATION OF U(VI)-PHASES UNDER OXIDIZING CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.P. Deditius; S. Utsunomiya; R.C. Ewing

    2006-02-21

    Uranium-(VI) phases are the primary alteration products of the UO{sub 2} in spent nuclear fuel and the UO{sub 2+x}, in natural uranium deposits. The U(VI)-phases generally form sheet structures of edge-sharing UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} polyhedra. The complexity of these structures offers numerous possibilities for coupled-substitutions of trace metals and radionuclides. The incorporation of radionuclides into U(VI)-structures provides a potential barrier to their release and transport in a geologic repository that experiences oxidizing conditions. In this study, we have used natural samples of UO{sub 2+x}, to study the U(VI)-phases that form during alteration and to determine the fate of the associated trace elements.

  19. The reduction of Np(VI) and Pu(VI) by organic chelating agents.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, D.T.; Aase, S.B.; Banaszak, J.E.

    1998-03-19

    The reduction of NpO{sup 2+} and PuO{sub 2}{sup 2+} by oxalate. citrate, and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) was investigated in low ionic strength media and brines. This was done to help establish the stability of the An(VI) oxidation state in the presence of organic complexants. The stability of the An(VI) oxidation state depended on the pH and relative strength of the various oxidation state-specific complexes. At low ionic strength and pH 6, NpO{sub 2}O{sup 2+} was rapidly reduced to form NpO{sub 2}{sup +} organic complexes. At longer times, Np(IV) organic complexes were observed in the presence of citrate. PuO{sub 2}{sup 2+} was predominantly reduced to Pu{sup 4+}, resulting in the formation of organic complexes or polymeric/hydrolytic precipitates. The relative rates of reduction to the An(V) complex were EDTA > citrate > oxalate. Subsequent reduction to An(IV) complexes, however, occurred in the following order: citrate > EDTA > oxalate because of the stability of the An(V)-EDTA complex. The presence of organic complexants led to the rapid reduction of NpO{sub 2}{sup 2+} and PuO{sub 2}P{sup 2+} in G-seep brine at pHs 5 and 7. At pHs 8 and 10 in ERDA-6 brine, carbonate and hydrolytic complexes predominated and slowed down or prevented the reduction of An(VI) by the organics present.

  20. Search for neutrino oscillations by detecting UNK-1 600-GeV neutrino beams at Gran Sasso (Italy)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasil`ev, P.S.; Kuznetsov, A.E.; Kuznetsov, E.P.

    1995-12-01

    The possibility of formation of neutrino beams from the 600-GeV UNK-1 accelerator toward Gran Sasso (Italy) and of study neutrino oscillations with the ICARUS detector is demonstrated. The proposed experiment is sensitive to {Delta}m{sup 2} values down to 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2} at maximum neutrino mixing and to sin{sup 2}2{theta} values down to 6 x 10{sup -3} at {Delta}m{sup 2} {approximately} 2 x 10{sup -2} eV{sup 2}. 21 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Controlling the electronic structure in II-VI core-shell nanocrystal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in II-VI core-shell nanocrystal quantum dots toward tuned optical properties Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Controlling the electronic structure in II-VI core-shell ...

  2. Chemistry of the Colloidal Group II-VI Nanocrystal Synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Haitao

    2007-05-17

    In the last two decades, the field of nanoscience andnanotechnology has witnessed tremendous advancement in the synthesis andapplication of group II-VI colloidal nanocrystals. The synthesis based onhigh temperature decomposition of organometallic precursors has becomeone of the most successful methods of making group II-VI colloidalnanocrystals. This method is first demonstrated by Bawendi and coworkersin 1993 to prepare cadmium chalcogenide colloidal quantum dots and laterextended by others to prepare other group II-VI quantum dots as well asanisotropic shaped colloidal nanocrystals, such as nanorod and tetrapod.This dissertation focuses on the chemistry of this type of nanocrystalsynthesis. The synthesis of group II-VI nanocrystals was studied bycharacterizing the molecular structures of the precursors and productsand following their time evolution in the synthesis. Based on theseresults, a mechanism was proposed to account for the 2 reaction betweenthe precursors that presumably produces monomer for the growth ofnanocrystals. Theoretical study based on density functional theorycalculations revealed the detailed free energy landscape of the precursordecomposition and monomerformation pathway. Based on the proposedreaction mechanism, a new synthetic method was designed that uses wateras a novel reagent to control the diameter and the aspect ratio of CdSeand CdS nanorods.

  3. Chemistry of the Colloidal Group II-VI Nanocrystal Synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Haitao

    2007-05-17

    In the last two decades, the field of nanoscience andnanotechnology has witnessed tremendous advancement in the synthesis andapplication of group II-VI colloidal nanocrystals. The synthesis based onhigh temperature decomposition of organometallic precursors has becomeone of the most successful methods of making group II-VI colloidalnanocrystals. This methodis first demonstrated by Bawendi and coworkersin 1993 to prepare cadmium chalcogenide colloidal quantum dots and laterextended by others to prepare other group II-VI quantum dots as well asanisotropic shaped colloidal nanocrystals, such as nanorod and tetrapod.This dissertation focuses on the chemistry of this type of nanocrystalsynthesis. The synthesis of group II-VI nanocrystals was studied bycharacterizing the molecular structures of the precursors and productsand following their time evolution in the synthesis. Based on theseresults, a mechanism was proposed to account for the 2 reaction betweenthe precursors that presumably produces monomer for the growth ofnanocrystals. Theoretical study based on density functional theorycalculations revealed the detailed free energy landscape of the precursordecomposition and monomerformation pathway. Based on the proposedreaction mechanism, a new synthetic method was designed that uses wateras a novel reagent to control the diameter and the aspect ratio of CdSeand CdS nanorods.

  4. AM(VI) PARTITIONING STUDIES: FY14 FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce J Mincher

    2014-10-01

    The use of higher oxidation states of americium in partitioning from the lanthanides is under continued investigation by the sigma team. This is based on the hypothesis that Am(VI) can be produced and remain stable in irradiated first cycle raffinate solution long enough to perform solvent extraction for separations. The stability of Am(VI) to autoreduction was measured using millimolar americium concentrations in a 1-cm cell with a Cary 6000 UV/Vis spectrophotometer for data acquisition. At millimolar americium concentrations, Am(VI) is stable enough against its own autoreduction for separations purposes. A second major accomplishment during FY14 was the hot test. Americium oxidation and extraction was performed using a centrifugal contactor-based test bed consisting of an extraction stage and two stripping stages. Sixty-three percent americium extraction was obtained in one extraction stage, in agreement with batch contacts. Promising electrochemical oxidation results have also been obtained, using terpyridine ligand derivatized electrodes for binding of Am(III). Approximately 50 % of the Am(III) was oxidized to Am(V) over the course of 1 hour. It is believed that this is the first demonstration of the electrolytic oxidation of americium in a non-complexing solution. Finally, an initial investigation of Am(VI) extraction using diethylhexylbutyramide (DEHBA) was performed.

  5. The role of nanopores on U(VI) sorption and redox behavior in

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    U(VI)-contaminated subsurface sediments (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect The role of nanopores on U(VI) sorption and redox behavior in U(VI)-contaminated subsurface sediments Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The role of nanopores on U(VI) sorption and redox behavior in U(VI)-contaminated subsurface sediments Most reactive surfaces in clay-dominated sediments are present within nanopores (pores of nm dimension). The behavior of geological fluids and minerals in nanopores is

  6. ENDF-201: ENDF/B-VI summary documentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, P.F.

    1991-10-01

    Responsibility for oversight of the ENDF/B Evaluated Nuclear Data file lies with the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG), which is comprised of representatives from various governmental and industrial laboratories in the United States. Individual evaluations are provided by scientists at several US laboratories, including significant contributions by scientists from all over the world. In addition, ENDF/B-VI includes for the first time complete evaluations for three materials that were provided from laboratories outside the US. All data are checked and reviewed by CSEWG, and the data file is maintained and issued by the National Nuclear Data Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The previous version of the library, ENDF/B-V, was issued in 1979, and two revisions to the data file were provided in subsequent years, the latest occurring in 1981. A total of 75 new or extensively modified neutron sublibrary evaluations are included in ENDF/B-VI, and are summarized in this document. One incident proton sublibrary is described for Fe{sup 56}. The remaining evaluations in ENDF/B-VI have been carried over from earlier versions of ENDF, and have been updated to reflect the new formats. The release of ENDF/B-VI was carried out between January and June of 1990, with groups of materials being released on tapes.'' Table 1 is an index to the evaluation summaries, and includes the material identification or MAT number, the responsible laboratory, and the tape'' number. These evaluations have been released without restrictions on their distribution or use.

  7. ENDF-201: ENDF/B-VI summary documentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, P.F.

    1991-10-01

    Responsibility for oversight of the ENDF/B Evaluated Nuclear Data file lies with the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG), which is comprised of representatives from various governmental and industrial laboratories in the United States. Individual evaluations are provided by scientists at several US laboratories, including significant contributions by scientists from all over the world. In addition, ENDF/B-VI includes for the first time complete evaluations for three materials that were provided from laboratories outside the US. All data are checked and reviewed by CSEWG, and the data file is maintained and issued by the National Nuclear Data Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The previous version of the library, ENDF/B-V, was issued in 1979, and two revisions to the data file were provided in subsequent years, the latest occurring in 1981. A total of 75 new or extensively modified neutron sublibrary evaluations are included in ENDF/B-VI, and are summarized in this document. One incident proton sublibrary is described for Fe{sup 56}. The remaining evaluations in ENDF/B-VI have been carried over from earlier versions of ENDF, and have been updated to reflect the new formats. The release of ENDF/B-VI was carried out between January and June of 1990, with groups of materials being released on ``tapes.`` Table 1 is an index to the evaluation summaries, and includes the material identification or MAT number, the responsible laboratory, and the ``tape`` number. These evaluations have been released without restrictions on their distribution or use.

  8. Implementation of MP{_}Lite for the VI Architecture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiyi Chen

    2002-12-31

    MP{_}Lite is a light weight message-passing library designed to deliver the maximum performance to applications in a portable and user friendly manner. The Virtual Interface (VI) architecture is a user-level communication protocol that bypasses the operating system to provide much better performance than traditional network architectures. By combining the high efficiency of MP{_}Lite and high performance of the VI architecture, they are able to implement a high performance message-passing library that has much lower latency and better throughput. The design and implementation of MP{_}Lite for M-VIA, which is a modular implementation of the VI architecture on Linux, is discussed in this thesis. By using the eager protocol for sending short messages, MP{_}Lite M-VIA has much lower latency on both Fast Ethernet and Gigabit Ethernet. The handshake protocol and RDMA mechanism provides double the throughput that MPICH can deliver for long messages. MP{_}Lite M-VIA also has the ability to channel-bonding multiple network interface cards to increase the potential bandwidth between nodes. Using multiple Fast Ethernet cards can double or even triple the maximum throughput without increasing the cost of a PC cluster greatly.

  9. The chemistry of plutonium(VI) in aqueous carbonate solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stout, B.E.; Choppin, G.R. . Dept. of Chemistry); Sullivan, J.C. )

    1990-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of carbonate ion as a ligand that interacts with the hexavalent actinyl ions of U, Np, and Pu has been examined by {sup 13}C NMR. The first order rate parameter that describes the exchange between bulk solution and bound carbonate decreases with increasing pH. At a pH of 10.0, 25{degree}C, the respective values of k for the U(VI), Np(VI) and Pu(VI) complexes are 27.1 {plus minus} 0.3, 64.7 {plus minus} 3.3 and 706 {plus minus} 29. The variation of k with temperature was used to calculate the values of {Delta}H{sup +} = 53 and 42 kJ/M; and {Delta}S{sup +} = {minus}40 and {minus}71 J/M-K for the uranyl and neptunyl systems, respectively. A plausible reaction scheme for the exchange reaction is considered. The influence of these slow carbonate exchange reactions on selected electron transfer reactions is noted. 19 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. First results from the DarkSide-50 dark matter experiment at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Agnes, P.

    2015-03-11

    We report the first results of DarkSide-50, a direct search for dark matter operating in the underground Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) and searching for the rare nuclear recoils possibly induced by weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). The dark matter detector is a Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber with a (46.4 0.7) kg active mass, operated inside a 30 t organic liquid scintillator neutron veto, which is in turn installed at the center of a 1 kt water Cherenkov veto for the residual flux of cosmic rays. We report here the null results of a dark matter searchmorefor a (1422 67) kgd exposure with an atmospheric argon fill. This is the most sensitive dark matter search performed with an argon target, corresponding to a 90% CL upper limit on the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section of 6.110??? cm for a WIMP mass of 100 Gev/c .less

  11. Fate and Transport of Uranium (VI) in Weathered Saprolite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Young-Jin; Brooks, Scott C; Zhang, Fan; Parker, Jack C.; Moon, Ji Won; Roh, Yul

    2015-01-01

    Batch and column experiments were conducted to investigate sorption and transport of uranium (U) in the presence of saprolite derived from interbedded shale, limestone, and sandstone sequences. Sorption kinetics were measured at two initial concentrations (C0; 1, 10 mM) and three soil:solution ratios (Rs/w; 0.005, 0.25, 2 kg/L) at pH 4.5 (pH of the saprolite). The rate of U loss from solution (mmole/L/h) increased with increasing Rs/w. Uranium sorption exhibited a fast phase with 80% sorption in the first eight hours for all C0 and Rs/w values and a slow phase during which the reaction slowly approached (pseudo) equilibrium over the next seven days. The pH-dependency of U sorption was apparent in pH sorption edges. U(VI) sorption increased over the pH range 4e6, then decreased sharply at pH > 7.5. U(VI) sorption edges were well described by a surface complexation model using calibrated parameters and the reaction network proposed by Waite et al. (1994). Sorption isotherms measured using the same Rs/w and pH values showed a solids concentration effect where U(VI) sorption capacity and affinity decreased with increasing solids concentration. This effect may have been due to either particle aggregation or competition between U(VI) and exchangeable cations for sorption sites. The surface complexation model with calibrated parameters was able to predict the general sorption behavior relatively well, but failed to reproduce solid concentration effects, implying the importance of appropriate design if batch experiments are to be utilized for dynamic systems. Transport of U(VI) through the packed column was significantly retarded. Transport simulations were conducted using the reactive transport model HydroGeoChem (HGC) v5.0 that incorporated the surface complexation reaction network used to model the batch data. Model parameters reported by Waite et al. (1994) provided a better prediction of U transport than optimized parameters derived from our sorption edges. The results presented in this study highlight the challenges in defining appropriate conditions for batch-type experiments used to extrapolate parameters for transport models, and also underline a gap in our ability to transfer batch results to transport simulations.

  12. Fate and Transport of Uranium (VI) in Weathered Saprolite

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kim, Young-Jin; Brooks, Scott C; Zhang, Fan; Parker, Jack C.; Moon, Ji Won; Roh, Yul

    2015-01-01

    Batch and column experiments were conducted to investigate sorption and transport of uranium (U) in the presence of saprolite derived from interbedded shale, limestone, and sandstone sequences. Sorption kinetics were measured at two initial concentrations (C0; 1, 10 mM) and three soil:solution ratios (Rs/w; 0.005, 0.25, 2 kg/L) at pH 4.5 (pH of the saprolite). The rate of U loss from solution (mmole/L/h) increased with increasing Rs/w. Uranium sorption exhibited a fast phase with 80% sorption in the first eight hours for all C0 and Rs/w values and a slow phase during which the reaction slowly approached (pseudo) equilibrium overmore » the next seven days. The pH-dependency of U sorption was apparent in pH sorption edges. U(VI) sorption increased over the pH range 4e6, then decreased sharply at pH > 7.5. U(VI) sorption edges were well described by a surface complexation model using calibrated parameters and the reaction network proposed by Waite et al. (1994). Sorption isotherms measured using the same Rs/w and pH values showed a solids concentration effect where U(VI) sorption capacity and affinity decreased with increasing solids concentration. This effect may have been due to either particle aggregation or competition between U(VI) and exchangeable cations for sorption sites. The surface complexation model with calibrated parameters was able to predict the general sorption behavior relatively well, but failed to reproduce solid concentration effects, implying the importance of appropriate design if batch experiments are to be utilized for dynamic systems. Transport of U(VI) through the packed column was significantly retarded. Transport simulations were conducted using the reactive transport model HydroGeoChem (HGC) v5.0 that incorporated the surface complexation reaction network used to model the batch data. Model parameters reported by Waite et al. (1994) provided a better prediction of U transport than optimized parameters derived from our sorption edges. The results presented in this study highlight the challenges in defining appropriate conditions for batch-type experiments used to extrapolate parameters for transport models, and also underline a gap in our ability to transfer batch results to transport simulations.« less

  13. Method for making graded I-III-VI.sub.2 semiconductors and solar cell obtained thereby

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Devaney, Walter E.

    1987-08-04

    Improved cell photovoltaic conversion efficiencies are obtained by the simultaneous elemental reactive evaporation process of Mickelsen and Chen for making semiconductors by closer control of the evaporation rates and substrate temperature during formation of the near contact, bulk, and near junction regions of a graded I-III-VI.sub.2, thin film, semiconductor, such as CuInSe.sub.2 /(Zn,Cd)S or another I-III-VI.sub.2 /II-VI heterojunction.

  14. Group I-III-VI.sub.2 semiconductor films for solar cell application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Basol, Bulent M.; Kapur, Vijay K.

    1991-01-01

    This invention relates to an improved thin film solar cell with excellent electrical and mechanical integrity. The device comprises a substrate, a Group I-III-VI.sub.2 semiconductor absorber layer and a transparent window layer. The mechanical bond between the substrate and the Group I-III-VI.sub.2 semiconductor layer is enhanced by an intermediate layer between the substrate and the Group I-III-VI.sub.2 semiconductor film being grown. The intermediate layer contains tellurium or substitutes therefor, such as Se, Sn, or Pb. The intermediate layer improves the morphology and electrical characteristics of the Group I-III-VI.sub.2 semiconductor layer.

  15. Method of manufacturing semiconductor having group II-group VI compounds doped with nitrogen

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Compaan, Alvin D.; Price, Kent J.; Ma, Xianda; Makhratchev, Konstantin

    2005-02-08

    A method of making a semiconductor comprises depositing a group II-group VI compound onto a substrate in the presence of nitrogen using sputtering to produce a nitrogen-doped semiconductor. This method can be used for making a photovoltaic cell using sputtering to apply a back contact layer of group II-group VI compound to a substrate in the presence of nitrogen, the back coating layer being doped with nitrogen. A semiconductor comprising a group II-group VI compound doped with nitrogen, and a photovoltaic cell comprising a substrate on which is deposited a layer of a group II-group VI compound doped with nitrogen, are also included.

  16. Kinetics of Uranium(VI) Desorption from Contaminated Sediments: Effect of Geochemical Conditions and Model Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Chongxuan; Shi, Zhenqing; Zachara, John M.

    2009-09-01

    Stirred-flow cell experiments were performed to investigate the kinetics of uranyl [U(VI)] desorption from a contaminated sediment collected from the Hanford 300 Area at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, Washington. Three influent solutions of variable pH, Ca and carbonate concentrations that affected U(VI) aqueous and surface speciation were used under dynamic flow conditions to evaluate the effect of geochemical conditions on the rate of U(VI) desorption. The measured rate of U(VI) desorption varied with solution chemical composition that evolved as a result of thermodynamic and kinetic interactions between the influent solutions and sediment. The solution chemical composition that led to a lower equilibrium U(VI) sorption to the solid phase yielded a faster desorption rate. The experimental results were used to evaluate a multi-rate, surface complexation model (SCM) that has been proposed to describe U(VI) desorption kinetics in the Hanford sediment that contained complex sorbed U(VI) species in mass transfer limited domains. The model was modified and supplemented by including multi-rate, ion exchange reactions to describe the geochemical interactions between the solutions and sediment. With the same set of model parameters, the modified model reasonably well described the evolution of major ions and the rates of U(VI) desorption under variable geochemical and flow conditions, implying that the multi-rate SCM is an effective way to describe U(VI) desorption kinetics in subsurface sediments.

  17. Microsoft PowerPoint - TAB B 02-12-08 Article VI Briefing Interagency...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    United States and Article VI: A Record of Accomplishment February 6, 2008 Introduction YOUR PRESENTERS TODAY: * THOMAS P. D'AGOSTINO, Administrator, National Nuclear Security ...

  18. Controlling the electronic structure in II-VI core-shell nanocrystal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Controlling the electronic structure in II-VI core-shell nanocrystal quantum dots toward tuned optical properties Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Controlling ...

  19. Characterization of U(VI) Sorption-Desorption Processes and Model...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    U(VI) on pristine and contaminated Hanford sediments over a range of sediment facies and materials properties and to relate such characterization both to fundamental...

  20. Bistability of Cation Interstitials in II-VI Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, S. H.; Dalpian, G. M.

    2005-11-01

    The stability of cation interstitials in II-VI semiconductors is studied using ab initio methods. We find that interstitials in the neutral charge state are more stable in the tetrahedral interstitial site near the cation, whereas in the (2+) charge state, they are more stable near the anion. The diffusion energy barrier changes when the defect charge state changes. Therefore, if electrons/holes are taken from the defect level by light, changing its charge state, the interstitial atom will be able to diffuse almost spontaneously due to a reduced diffusion barrier.

  1. An Octahedral Coordination Complex of Iron(VI)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron is the most abundant transition element on earth, and is typically found in formal oxidation states of either II or III. However, high valent Fe(IV) and Fe(V) complexes are invoked in the mechanisms of both heme and non-heme enzymes; and Fe(VI) is known to exist in the mineral ferrate.[1] Ferrate is a powerful oxidant, which has been used in soil and wastewater treatment, batteries, and disinfectants; however, it is unstable and often indiscriminately reactive. This has driven chemists to

  2. Geothermal Program Review VI: proceedings. Beyond goals and objectives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    Program Review VI was comprised of six sessions, including an opening session, four technical sessions that addressed each of the major DOE research areas, and a session on special issues. The technical sessions were on Hydrothermal, Hot Dry Rock, Geopressured and Magma resources. Presenters in the technical sessions discussed their R and D activities within the context of specific GTD Programmatic Objectives for that technology, their progress toward achieving those objectives, and the value of those achievements to industry. The ''Special Issues'' presentations addressed several topics such as the interactions between government and industry on geothermal energy R and D; the origin and basis for the programmatic objectives analytical computer model; and international marketing opportunities for US geothermal equipment and services. The unique aspect of Program Review VI was that it was held in conjunction with the National Geothermal Association's Industry Round Table on Federal R and D. The Round Table provided a forum for open and lively discussions between industry and government researchers and gave industry an opportunity to convey their needs and perspectives on DOE's research programs. These discussions also provided valuable information to DOE regarding industry's priorities and directions.

  3. Uranium (VI) solubility in carbonate-free ERDA-6 brine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucchini, Jean-francois; Khaing, Hnin; Reed, Donald T

    2010-01-01

    When present, uranium is usually an element of importance in a nuclear waste repository. In the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), uranium is the most prevalent actinide component by mass, with about 647 metric tons to be placed in the repository. Therefore, the chemistry of uranium, and especially its solubility in the WIPP conditions, needs to be well determined. Long-term experiments were performed to measure the solubility of uranium (VI) in carbonate-free ERDA-6 brine, a simulated WIPP brine, at pC{sub H+} values between 8 and 12.5. These data, obtained from the over-saturation approach, were the first repository-relevant data for the VI actinide oxidation state. The solubility trends observed pointed towards low uranium solubility in WIPP brines and a lack of amphotericity. At the expected pC{sub H+} in the WIPP ({approx} 9.5), measured uranium solubility approached 10{sup -7} M. The objective of these experiments was to establish a baseline solubility to further investigate the effects of carbonate complexation on uranium solubility in WIPP brines.

  4. Data summary report for fission product release Test VI-7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osborne, M.F.; Lorentz, R.A.; Travis, J.R.; Collins, J.L.; Webster, C.S.

    1995-05-01

    Test VI-7 was the final test in the VI series conducted in the vertical furnace. The fuel specimen was a 15.2-cm-long section of a fuel rod from the Monticello boiling water reactor (BWR). The fuel had experienced a burnup of {approximately}-40 Mwd/kg U. It was heated in an induction furnace for successive 20-min periods at 2000 and 2300 K in a moist air-helium atmosphere. Integral releases were 69% for {sup 85}Kr, 52% for {sup 125}Sb, 71% for both {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs, and 0.04% for {sup 154}Eu. For the non-gamma-emitting species, release values for 42% for I, 4.1% for Ba, 5.3% for Mo, and 1.2% for Sr were determined. The total mass released from the furnace to the collection system, including fission products, fuel, and structural materials, was 0.89 g, with 37% being collected on the thermal gradient tubes and 63% downstream on filters. Posttest examination of the fuel specimen indicated that most of the cladding was completely oxidized to ZrO{sub 2}, but that oxidation was not quite complete at the upper end. The release behaviors for the most volatile elements, Kr and Cs, were in good agreement with the ORNL-Booth Model.

  5. Forensic investigation of a chromium(VI) groundwater plume in Thiva, Greece

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panagiotakis, I.; Dermatas, D.; Vatseris, C.; Chrysochoou, M.; Papassiopi, N.; Xenidis, A.; Vaxevanidou, K.

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a forensic investigation with the aim of decoupling the contribution of geogenic and anthropogenic Cr(VI) sources in the wider area of Thiva. Groundwater and topsoil samples were collected from two Cr(VI) groundwater plumes of 160 μg/L and 75 μg/L. A series of evidence support the view that the origin of Cr(VI) detected in groundwater is mainly geogenic. These are: (a) the presence of Cr in topsoil of the wider area, (b) the moderate Cr(VI) groundwater concentrations, (c) the high Ni levels within the Cr(VI) plumes, (d) the predominance of Mn(IV), which is a prerequisite for Cr(III) oxidation to Cr(VI), and (e) the absence of co-contaminants. This study also revealed that, although both Cr(VI) plumes are clearly of geogenic origin, the plume with the elevated Cr(VI) values, in the north of Thiva town, exhibits also an anthropogenic component, which can potentially be attributed to the alkaline environment associated with the old uncontrolled landfill of Thiva and the industrial cluster located in this area.

  6. Solvent impregnated resin for isolation of U(VI) from industrial wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karve, M.; Rajgor, R.V.

    2008-07-01

    A solid-phase extraction method based upon impregnation of Cyanex 302 (bis(2,4,4- trimethylpentyl)mono-thio-phosphinic acid) on Amberlite XAD-2 resin is proposed for isolation of U(VI) from uranmicrolite ore tailing samples and industrial effluent samples. U(VI) was sorbed from nitric acid media on the solvent-impregnated resin (SIR) and was recovered completely with 1.0 M HCl. Based upon sorption behavior of U(VI) with Cyanex 302, it was quantitatively sorbed on the SIR in a dynamic method, while the other metal ions were not sorbed by the modified resin. The preparation of impregnated resin is simple, based upon physical interaction of the extractant and solid support, has good sorption capacity for U(VI), and is also reliable for detection of traces of U(VI). (authors)

  7. Multi-crystalline II-VI based multijunction solar cells and modules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardin, Brian E.; Connor, Stephen T.; Groves, James R.; Peters, Craig H.

    2015-06-30

    Multi-crystalline group II-VI solar cells and methods for fabrication of same are disclosed herein. A multi-crystalline group II-VI solar cell includes a first photovoltaic sub-cell comprising silicon, a tunnel junction, and a multi-crystalline second photovoltaic sub-cell. A plurality of the multi-crystalline group II-VI solar cells can be interconnected to form low cost, high throughput flat panel, low light concentration, and/or medium light concentration photovoltaic modules or devices.

  8. EA-389-A Great Bay Energy VI, LLC | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Rescission of export authorization to export electric energy to Canada. PDF icon EA-389-A ... Energy OE Docket No. EA-389 Great Bay Energy VI, LLC EA-342-A Royal Bank of Canada

  9. In Situ Long-Term Reductive Bioimmobilization of Cr(VI) in Groundwater...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    injection into Cr(VI)-contaminated groundwater stimulates an average increase in biomass by up to 50 times, from-5105 to 2.5107 cellsmL. The results also show a...

  10. Three-Dimensional Topological Insulators in I - III - VI 2 and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and II - IV - V 2 Chalcopyrite Semiconductors Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Three-Dimensional Topological Insulators in I - III - VI 2 and II - IV - V 2 Chalcopyrite ...

  11. Characterization of U(VI) Sorption-Desorption Processes and Model...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    also performed mXRD studies of two sediment sample to identify the specific U(VI)-silicate phase present. Samples from the 300 Area were examined by mSXRF to determine the...

  12. Fate and Transport of Uranium (VI) in Weathered Saprolite (Journal Article)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Fate and Transport of Uranium (VI) in Weathered Saprolite Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Fate and Transport of Uranium (VI) in Weathered Saprolite Batch and column experiments were conducted to investigate sorption and transport of uranium (U) in the presence of saprolite derived from interbedded shale, limestone, and sandstone sequences. Sorption kinetics were measured at two initial concentrations (C0; 1, 10 mM) and three soil:solution ratios

  13. Low-level detection and quantification of Plutonium(III, IV, V,and VI)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    using a liquid core waveguide (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Low-level detection and quantification of Plutonium(III, IV, V,and VI) using a liquid core waveguide Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Low-level detection and quantification of Plutonium(III, IV, V,and VI) using a liquid core waveguide Understanding the aqueous chemistry of plutonium, in particular in environmental conditions, is often complicated by plutonium's complex redox chemistry. Because plutonium

  14. Bicarbonate Impact on U(VI) Bioreduction in a Shallow Alluvial Aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, Philip E.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Davis, James A.; Fox, Patricia M.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Fang, Yilin; Waichler, Scott R.; Berman, Elena S.; Gupta, Manish; Chandler, Darrell P.; Murray, Christopher J.; Peacock, Aaron D.; Giloteaux, L.; Handley, Kim M.; Lovley, Derek R.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2015-02-01

    Field-scale biostimulation and desorption tracer experiments conducted in a uranium (U) contaminated, shallow alluvial aquifer have provided insight into the coupling of microbiology, biogeochemistry, and hydrogeology that control U mobility in the subsurface. Initial experiments successfully tested the concept that Fe-reducing bacteria such as Geobacter sp. could enzymatically reduce soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV) during in situ electron donor amendment (Anderson et al. 2003, Williams et al. 2011). In parallel, in situ desorption tracer tests using bicarbonate amendment demonstrated rate-limited U(VI) desorption (Fox et al. 2012). These results and prior laboratory studies underscored the importance of enzymatic U(VI)-reduction and suggested the ability to combine desorption and bioreduction of U(VI). Here we report the results of a new field experiment in which bicarbonate-promoted uranium desorption and acetate amendment were combined and compared to an acetate amendment-only experiment in the same experimental plot. Results confirm that bicarbonate amendment to alluvial aquifer desorbs U(VI) and increases the abundance of Ca-uranyl-carbonato complexes. At the same time, that the rate of acetate-promoted enzymatic U(VI) reduction was greater in the presence of added bicarbonate in spite of the increased dominance of Ca-uranyl-carbonato aqueous complexes. A model-simulated peak rate of U(VI) reduction was ~3.8 times higher during acetate-bicarbonate treatment than under acetate-only conditions. Lack of consistent differences in microbial community structure between acetate-bicarbonate and acetate-only treatments suggest that a significantly higher rate of U(VI) reduction the bicarbonate-impacted sediment may be due to a higher intrinsic rate of microbial reduction induced by elevated concentrations of the bicarbonate oxyanion. The findings indicate that bicarbonate amendment may be useful in improving the engineered bioremediation of uranium in aquifers.

  15. Characterization of U(VI) Sorption-Desorption Processes and Model Upscaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zachara, John M.

    2003-06-01

    The objectives of the overall collaborative EMSP effort (with which this project is associated) are to characterize sorption and desorption processes of U(VI) on pristine and contaminated Hanford sediments over a range of sediment facies and materials properties. The research is intended to provide new insights on the mechanisms of U(VI) retardation at Hanford, and to develop approaches by which laboratory-characterized geochemical models can be upscaled for defensible predictions of uranium transport in field.

  16. Upscaling of U(VI) Desorption and Transport Using Decimeter-Scale Tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, Derrick

    2015-01-28

    Experimental work was used to validate modeling studies and develop multicontinuum models of U(VI) transport in a contaminated aquifer. At the bench scale, it has been shown that U(VI) desorption is rate-limited and that rates are dependent on the bicarbonate concentration. Two decimeter-scale experiments were conducted in order to help establish rigorous upscaling approaches that could be tested at the tracer test and plume scales.

  17. Upscaling of U(VI) Desorption and Transport Using Decimeter-Scale Tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, Derrick

    2014-12-22

    Experimental work was used to validate modeling studies and develop multicontinuum models of U(VI) transport in a contaminated aquifer. At the bench scale, it has been shown that U(VI) desorption is rate-limited and that rates are dependent on the bicarbonate concentration. Two decimeter-scale experiments were conducted in order to help establish rigorous upscaling approaches that could be tested at the tracer test and plume scales.

  18. Controlling the electronic structure in II-VI core-shell nanocrystal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    quantum dots toward tuned optical properties (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Controlling the electronic structure in II-VI core-shell nanocrystal quantum dots toward tuned optical properties Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Controlling the electronic structure in II-VI core-shell nanocrystal quantum dots toward tuned optical properties Authors: Ghosh, Yagnaseni [1] ; Mangum, Benjamin D [1] ; Park, Young - Shin [1] ; Brovelli, Sergio [1] ; Casson, Joanna L [1] ; Htoon,

  19. ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements VI (ARM-ACME V) Science Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements VI (ACME VI) Science Plan S Biraud December 2015 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe

  20. Three-Dimensional Topological Insulators in I - III - VI 2 and II -

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    IV - V 2 Chalcopyrite Semiconductors (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Three-Dimensional Topological Insulators in I - III - VI 2 and II - IV - V 2 Chalcopyrite Semiconductors Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Three-Dimensional Topological Insulators in I - III - VI 2 and II - IV - V 2 Chalcopyrite Semiconductors Authors: Feng, Wanxiang ; Xiao, Di ; Ding, Jun ; Yao, Yugui Publication Date: 2011-01-05 OSTI Identifier: 1101341 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name:

  1. Chromium Isotope Fractionation During Reduction of Cr(VI) Under Saturated Flow Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jamieson-Hanes, Julia H.; Gibson, Blair D.; Lindsay, Matthew B.J.; Kim, Yeongkyoo; Ptacek, Carol J.; Blowes, David W.

    2012-10-25

    Chromium isotopes are potentially useful indicators of Cr(VI) reduction reactions in groundwater flow systems; however, the influence of transport on Cr isotope fractionation has not been fully examined. Laboratory batch and column experiments were conducted to evaluate isotopic fractionation of Cr during Cr(VI) reduction under both static and controlled flow conditions. Organic carbon was used to reduce Cr(VI) in simulated groundwater containing 20 mg L{sup -1} Cr(VI) in both batch and column experiments. Isotope measurements were performed on dissolved Cr on samples from the batch experiments, and on effluent and profile samples from the column experiment. Analysis of the residual solid-phase materials by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and by X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy confirmed association of Cr(III) with organic carbon in the column solids. Decreases in dissolved Cr(VI) concentrations were coupled with increases in {delta}{sup 53}Cr, indicating that Cr isotope enrichment occurred during reduction of Cr(VI). The {delta}{sup 53}Cr data from the column experiment was fit by linear regression yielding a fractionation factor ({alpha}) of 0.9979, whereas the batch experiments exhibited Rayleigh-type isotope fractionation ({alpha} = 0.9965). The linear characteristic of the column {delta}{sup 53}Cr data may reflect the contribution of transport on Cr isotope fractionation.

  2. Spectroscopic confirmation of uranium(VI)-carbonato adsorption complexes on hematite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bargar, J.R. . Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lab.); Reitmeyer, R.; Davis, J.A. . Water Resources Div.)

    1999-07-15

    Evaluating societal risks posed by uranium contamination from waste management facilities, mining sites, and heavy industry requires knowledge about uranium transport in groundwater, often the most significant pathway of exposure to humans. It has been proposed that uranium mobility in aquifers may be controlled by adsorption of U(VI)-carbonato complexes on oxide minerals. The existence of such complexes has not been demonstrated, and little is known about their compositions and reaction stoichiometries. The authors have used attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopies to probe the existence, structures, and compositions of [triple bond]FeO[sub surface]-U(VI)-carbonato complexes on hematite throughout the pH range of uranyl uptake under conditions relevant to aquifers. U(VI)-carbonato complexes were found to be the predominant adsorbed U(VI) species at all pH values examined, a much wider pH range than previously postulated based on analogy to aqueous U(VI)-carbonato complexes, which are trace constituents at pH < 6. This result indicates the inadequacy of the common modeling assumption that the compositions and predominance of adsorbed species can be inferred from aqueous species. By extension, adsorbed carbonato complexes may be of major importance to the groundwater transport of similar actinide contaminants such as neptunium and plutonium.

  3. Spectroscopic Confirmation of Uranium (VI)-Carbonato Adsorption Complexes on Hematite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bargar, John R

    1999-05-04

    Evaluating societal risks posed by uranium contamination from waste management facilities, mining sites, and heavy industry requires knowledge about uranium transport in groundwater, often the most significant pathway of exposure to humans. It has been proposed that uranium mobility in aquifers may be controlled by adsorption of U(VI)-carbonato complexes on oxide minerals. The existence of such complexes has not been demonstrated, and little is known about their compositions and reaction stoichiometries. We have used Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) and Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectroscopies to probe the existence, structures, and compositions of FeO{sub surface}-U(VI)-carbonato complexes on hematite throughout the pH range of uranyl uptake under conditions relevant to aquifers. U(VI)-carbonato complexes were found to be the predominant adsorbed U(VI) species at all pH values examined, a much wider pH range than previously postulated based on analogy to aqueous U(VI)-carbonato complexes, which are trace constituents at pH < 6. This result indicates the inadequacy of the common modeling assumption that the compositions and predominance of adsorbed species can be inferred from aqueous species. By extension, adsorbed carbonato complexes may be of major importance to the groundwater transport of similar actinide contaminants such as neptunium and plutonium.

  4. Improving Memory Subsystem Performance Using ViVA: Virtual Vector Architecture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gebis, Joseph; Oliker, Leonid; Shalf, John; Williams, Samuel; Yelick, Katherine

    2009-01-12

    The disparity between microprocessor clock frequencies and memory latency is a primary reason why many demanding applications run well below peak achievable performance. Software controlled scratchpad memories, such as the Cell local store, attempt to ameliorate this discrepancy by enabling precise control over memory movement; however, scratchpad technology confronts the programmer and compiler with an unfamiliar and difficult programming model. In this work, we present the Virtual Vector Architecture (ViVA), which combines the memory semantics of vector computers with a software-controlled scratchpad memory in order to provide a more effective and practical approach to latency hiding. ViVA requires minimal changes to the core design and could thus be easily integrated with conventional processor cores. To validate our approach, we implemented ViVA on the Mambo cycle-accurate full system simulator, which was carefully calibrated to match the performance on our underlying PowerPC Apple G5 architecture. Results show that ViVA is able to deliver significant performance benefits over scalar techniques for a variety of memory access patterns as well as two important memory-bound compact kernels, corner turn and sparse matrix-vector multiplication -- achieving 2x-13x improvement compared the scalar version. Overall, our preliminary ViVA exploration points to a promising approach for improving application performance on leading microprocessors with minimal design and complexity costs, in a power efficient manner.

  5. Microbial Reductive Transformation of Phyllosilicate Fe(III) and U(VI) in Fluvial Subsurface Sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Ji-Hoon; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Boyanov, Maxim I.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Lin, Xueju; Kennedy, David W.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Konopka, Allan; Moore, Dean A.; Resch, Charles T.; Phillips, Jerry L.

    2012-04-14

    The microbial reduction of Fe(III) and U(VI) were investigated in shallow aquifer sediments collected from subsurface Pleistocene flood deposits near the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River in Washington State. Increases in 0.5 N HCl-extractable Fe(II) were observed in incubated sediments and 57Fe Mssbauer spectroscopy revealed that Fe(III) associated with phyllosilicates and pyroxene was reduced to Fe(II). Aqueous uranium(VI) concentrations decreased in incubated Hanford sediments with the rate and extent being greater in sediment amended with organic carbon. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of bioreduced sediments indicated that 67-77% of the U signal was U(VI), probably as an adsorbed species associated with a new or modified reactive mineral phase. Phylotypes within the Deltaproteobacteria were more common in Hanford sediments incubated with U(VI) than without and in U(VI)-free incubations, members of the Clostridiales were dominant with sulfate-reducing phylotypes more common in the sulfate-amended sediments. These results demonstrate the potential for anaerobic reduction phyllosilicate Fe(III) and sulfate in Hanford unconfined aquifer sediments and biotransformations involving reduction and adsorption leading to decreased aqueous U concentrations.

  6. Effect of temperature on the complexation of Uranium(VI) with fluoride in aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tian, Guoxin; Rao, Linfeng

    2009-05-18

    Complexation of U(VI) with fluoride at elevated temperatures in aqueous solutions was studied by spectrophotometry. Four successive complexes, UO{sub 2}F{sup +}, UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}(aq), UO{sub 2}F{sub 3}{sup -}, and UO{sub 2}F{sub 4}{sup 2-}, were identified, and the stability constants at 25, 40, 55, and 70 C were calculated. The stability of the complexes increased as the temperature was elevated. The enthalpies of complexation at 25 C were determined by microcalorimetry. Thermodynamic parameters indicate that the complexation of U(VI) with fluoride in aqueous solutions at 25 to 70 C is slightly endothermic and entropy-driven. The Specific Ion Interaction (SIT) approach was used to obtain the thermodynamic parameters of complexation at infinite dilution. Structural information on the U(VI)/fluoride complexes was obtained by extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy.

  7. Spectrophotometric determination of uranium(VI) with chlorophosphonazo-mN by flow injection analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Jun Ying; Chen, Xing Guo; Hu, Zhi De

    1994-07-01

    A sensitive and selective spectrophotometric flow injection analysis (FIA) method with chlorophosphonazo-mN has been developed for the determination of uranium(VI) in standard ore samples. Most interfereing ions are effectively eliminated by the masking reagent diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA). In the U(VI)-chlorophosphonazo-mN system, the maximum absorption wavelength is at 680 nm and Beer`s law is obeyed in the range of 1 to 15 {mu}g {mu}l{sup -1}. The correlation coefficient of the calibration curve is. 0.9998, the sampling frequency is 60{sup -1}, and detection limit for uranium(VI) is 0.5 {mu}g mul{sup -1}.

  8. Low-level detection and quantification of Plutonium(III, IV, V,and VI)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    using a liquid core waveguide (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Low-level detection and quantification of Plutonium(III, IV, V,and VI) using a liquid core waveguide Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Low-level detection and quantification of Plutonium(III, IV, V,and VI) using a liquid core waveguide × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and

  9. Characterization of U(VI) Sorption-Desorption Processes and Model Upscaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zachara, John M.; Brown, Gordon, E.; Lichtner, Peter C.; Ball, William

    2004-06-14

    The objectives of the overall collaborative EMSP effort (with which this project is associated) are to characterize sorption and desorption processes of U(VI) on pristine and contaminated Hanford sediments over a range of sediment facies and materials properties and to relate such characterization both to fundamental molecular-scale understanding and fieldscale models of geochemistry and mass transfer. The research is intended to provide new insights on the mechanisms of U(VI) retardation at Hanford, and to allow the development of approaches by which laboratory-developed geochemical models can be upscaled for defensible field-scale predictions of uranium transport in the environment.

  10. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction across water-ices VI/VII transformations

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    using dynamic-DAC (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Time-resolved x-ray diffraction across water-ices VI/VII transformations using dynamic-DAC Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Time-resolved x-ray diffraction across water-ices VI/VII transformations using dynamic-DAC Authors: Chen, J Y ; Kim, M ; Yoo, C ; Evans, W J Publication Date: 2013-10-15 OSTI Identifier: 1104527 Report Number(s): LLNL-PROC-645202 DOE Contract Number: W-7405-ENG-48 Resource Type: Conference Resource

  11. AFS-2 FLOWSHEET MODIFICATIONS TO ADDRESS THE INGROWTH OF PU(VI) DURING METAL DISSOLUTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crapse, K.; Rudisill, T.; O'Rourke, P.; Kyser, E.

    2014-07-02

    In support of the Alternate Feed Stock Two (AFS-2) PuO{sub 2} production campaign, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) conducted a series of experiments concluding that dissolving Pu metal at 95°C using a 6–10 M HNO{sub 3} solution containing 0.05–0.2 M KF and 0–2 g/L B could reduce the oxidation of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI) as compared to dissolving Pu metal under the same conditions but at or near the boiling temperature. This flowsheet was demonstrated by conducting Pu metal dissolutions at 95°C to ensure that PuO{sub 2} solids were not formed during the dissolution. These dissolution parameters can be used for dissolving both Aqueous Polishing (AP) and MOX Process (MP) specification materials. Preceding the studies reported herein, two batches of Pu metal were dissolved in the H-Canyon 6.1D dissolver to prepare feed solution for the AFS-2 PuO{sub 2} production campaign. While in storage, UV-visible spectra obtained from an at-line spectrophotometer indicated the presence of Pu(VI). Analysis of the solutions also showed the presence of Fe, Ni, and Cr. Oxidation of Pu(IV) produced during metal dissolution to Pu(VI) is a concern for anion exchange purification. Anion exchange requires Pu in the +4 oxidation state for formation of the anionic plutonium(IV) hexanitrato complex which absorbs onto the resin. The presence of Pu(VI) in the anion feed solution would require a valence adjustment step to prevent losses. In addition, the presence of Cr(VI) would result in absorption of chromate ion onto the resin and could limit the purification of Pu from Cr which may challenge the purity specification of the final PuO{sub 2} product. Initial experiments were performed to quantify the rate of oxidation of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI) (presumed to be facilitated by Cr(VI)) as functions of the HNO{sub 3} concentration and temperature in simulated dissolution solutions containing Cr, Fe, and Ni. In these simulated Pu dissolutions studies, lowering the temperature from near boiling to 95 °C reduced the oxidation rate of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI). For 8.1 M HNO{sub 3} simulated dissolution solutions, at near boiling conditions >35% Pu(VI) was present in 50 h while at 95 °C <10% Pu(VI) was present at 50 h. At near boiling temperatures, eliminating the presence of Cr and varying the HNO{sub 3} concentration in the range of 7–8.5 M had little effect on the rate of conversion of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI). HNO{sub 3} oxidation of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI) in a pure solution has been reported previously. Based on simulated dissolution experiments, this study concluded that dissolving Pu metal at 95°C using a 6 to 10 M HNO{sub 3} solution 0.05–0.2 M KF and 0–2 g/L B could reduce the rate of oxidation of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI) as compared to near boiling conditions. To demonstrate this flowsheet, two small-scale experiments were performed dissolving Pu metal up to 6.75 g/L. No Pu-containing residues were observed in the solutions after cooling. Using Pu metal dissolution rates measured during the experiments and a correlation developed by Holcomb, the time required to completely dissolve a batch of Pu metal in an H-Canyon dissolver using this flowsheet was estimated to require nearly 5 days (120 h). This value is reasonably consistent with an estimate based on the Batch 2 and 3 dissolution times in the 6.1D dissolver and Pu metal dissolution rates measured in this study and by Rudisill et al. Data from the present and previous studies show that the Pu metal dissolution rate decreases by a factor of approximately two when the temperature decreased from boiling (112 to 116°C) to 95°C. Therefore, the time required to dissolve a batch of Pu metal in an H-Canyon dissolver at 95°C would likely double (from 36 to 54 h) and require 72 to 108 h depending on the surface area of the Pu metal. Based on the experimental studies, a Pu metal dissolution flowsheet utilizing 6–10 M HNO{sub 3} containing 0.05–0.2 M KF (with 0–2 g/L B) at 95°C is recommended to reduce the oxidation of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI) as compared to near boiling conditions. The time required to completely dissolve a batch of Pu metal will increase, however, by approximately a factor of two as compared to initial dissolutions at near boiling (assuming the KF concentration is maintained at nominally 0.1 M). By lowering the temperature to 95°C under otherwise the same operating parameters as previous dissolutions, the Pu(VI) concentration should not exceed 15% after a 120 h heating cycle. Increasing the HNO{sub 3} concentration and lowering Pu concentration are expected to further limit the amount of Pu(VI) formed.

  12. Characterization of U(VI) Sorption-Desorption Processes and Model Upscaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai, Jing; Dong, Wenming; Ball, William P.

    2006-10-12

    The objectives of the overall collaborative EMSP effort (with which this project is associated) were to characterize sorption and desorption processes of U(VI) on pristine and contaminated Hanford sediments over a range of sediment facies and materials properties and to relate such characterization both to fundamental molecular-scale understanding and field-scale models of geochemistry and mass transfer. The research was intended to provide new insights on the mechanisms of U(VI) retardation at Hanford, and to allow the development of approaches by which laboratory-developed geochemical models could be upscaled for defensible field-scale predictions of uranium transport in the environment. Within this broader context, objectives of the JHU-based project were to test hypotheses regarding the coupled roles of adsorption and impermeable-zone diffusion in controlling the fate and transport of U(VI) species under conditions of comparatively short-term exposure. In particular, this work tested the following hypotheses: (1) the primary adsorption processes in the Hanford sediment over the pH range of 7 to 10 are surface complexation reactions of aqueous U(VI) hydroxycarbonate and carbonate complexes with amphoteric edge sites on detrital phyllosilicates in the silt/clay size fraction; (2) macroscopic adsorption intensity (at given aqueous conditions) is a function of mineral composition and aquatic chemistry; and (3) equilibrium sorption and desorption to apply in short-term, laboratory-spiked pristine sediments; and (4) interparticle diffusion can be fully understood in terms of a model that couples molecular diffusion of uranium species in the porewater with equilibrium sorption under the relevant aqueous conditions. The primary focus of the work was on developing and applying both models and experiments to test the applicability of "local equilibrium" assumptions in the modeling interpretation of sorption retarded interparticle diffusion, as relevant to processes of U(VI) diffusion in silt/clay layers. Batch isotherm experiments were first used to confirm sorption isotherms under the intended test conditions and diffusion cell experiments were then conducted to explore the diffusion hypotheses. Important new information was obtained about the role of aqueous calcium and solid calcium carbonate in controlling sorption equilibrium with Hanford sediments. The retarded interparticle diffusion model with local sorption equilibrium was shown to very successfully simulate diffusion at high aqueous concentration of U(VI). By contrast, however, diffusion data obtained at low concentration suggested nonequilibrium of sorption even at diffusion time scales. Such nonequilibrium effects at low concentration are likely to be the result of sorption retarded intraparticle diffusion, and strong U(VI) sorption in the low concentration range.

  13. In Situ Bioreduction of Uranium (VI) to Submicromolar Levels and Reoxidation by Dissolved Oxygen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Weimin; Carley, Jack M; Luo, Jian; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew A.; Cardenas, Erick; Leigh, Mary Beth; Hwang, Chaichi; Kelly, Shelly D; Ruan, Chuanmin; Wu, Liyou; Van Nostrand, Joy; Gentry, Terry J; Lowe, Kenneth Alan; Mehlhorn, Tonia L; Carroll, Sue L; Luo, Wensui; Fields, Matthew Wayne; Gu, Baohua; Watson, David B; Kemner, Kenneth M; Marsh, Terence; Tiedje, James; Zhou, Jizhong; Fendorf, Scott; Kitanidis, Peter K.; Jardine, Philip M; Criddle, Craig

    2007-01-01

    Groundwater within Area 3 of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Remediation Sciences Program (ERSP) Field Research Center at Oak Ridge, TN (ORFRC) contains up to 135 {micro}M uranium as U(VI). Through a series of experiments at a pilot scale test facility, we explored the lower limits of groundwater U(VI) that can be achieved by in-situ biostimulation and the effects of dissolved oxygen on immobilized uranium. Weekly 2 day additions of ethanol over a 2-year period stimulated growth of denitrifying, Fe(III)-reducing, and sulfate-reducing bacteria, and immobilization of uranium as U(IV), with dissolved uranium concentrations decreasing to low levels. Following sulfite addition to remove dissolved oxygen, aqueous U(VI) concentrations fell below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency maximum contaminant limit (MCL) for drinking water (<30 {micro}g L{sup -1} or 0.126 {micro}M). Under anaerobic conditions, these low concentrations were stable, even in the absence of added ethanol. However, when sulfite additions stopped, and dissolved oxygen (4.0-5.5 mg L{sup -1}) entered the injection well, spatially variable changes in aqueous U(VI) occurred over a 60 day period, with concentrations increasing rapidly from <0.13 to 2.0 {micro}M at a multilevel sampling (MLS) well located close to the injection well, but changing little at an MLS well located further away. Resumption of ethanol addition restored reduction of Fe(III), sulfate, and U(VI) within 36 h. After 2 years of ethanol addition, X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy (XANES) analyses indicated that U(IV) comprised 60-80% of the total uranium in sediment samples. At the completion of the project (day 1260), U concentrations in MLS wells were less than 0.1 {micro}M. The microbial community at MLS wells with low U(VI) contained bacteria that are known to reduce uranium, including Desulfovibrio spp. and Geobacter spp., in both sediment and groundwater. The dominant Fe(III)-reducing species were Geothrix spp.

  14. LLE Review 119 (April-June 2009)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edgell, D.H., editor

    2009-10-22

    This issue has the following articles: (1) Shock-Ignition Experiments on OMEGA at NIF-Relevant Intensities; (2) Laser-Driven Magnetic-Flux Compression in High-Energy-Density Plasmas; (3) Lorentz Mapping of Magnetic Fields in Hot, Dense Plasmas; (4) Characterization and Optimization of Yb-Doped Photonic-Crystal Fiber Rod Amplifiers Using Spatially Resolved Spectral Interferometry; (5) Optical Differentiation and Multimillijoule {approx}150-ps Pulse Generation in a Regenerative Amplifier with a Temperature-Tuned Intracavity Volume Bragg Grating; (6) Slow Crack Growth During Radiatiave Cooling of LHG8 and BK7 Plates; and (7) Finite Element Simulation of Metal-Semiconductor-Metal Photoconductor.

  15. LLE Review 118 (January-March 2009)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bittle, W., editor

    2009-08-03

    This issue has the following articles: (1) Applied Plasma Spectroscopy: Laser-Fusion Experiments; (2) Relativistic Electron-Beam Transport Studies Using High-Resolution, Coherent Transition Radiation Imaging; (3) Pressure-Driven, Resistive Magnetohydrodynamic Interchange Instabilities in Laser-Produced, High-Energy-Density Plasmas; (4) Extended Model for Polymer Cholesteric Liquid Crystal Flake Reorientation and Relaxation; (5) Modeling the Effects of Microencapsulation on the Electro-Optic Behavior of Polymer Cholesteric Liquid Crystal Flakes; (6) Capillarity and Dielectrophoresis of Liquid Deuterium; and (7) A Stable Mid-IR, GaSb-Based Diode Laser Source for Cryogenic Target Layering at the OMEGA Laser Facility.

  16. LLE Review 121 (September-December 2009)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, K.S., editor

    2010-04-14

    This issue has the following articles: (1) Demonstration of the Highest Deuterium-Tritium Areal Density Using Triple-Picket Cryogenic Designs on OMEGA; (2) High-Precision Measurements of the Equation of State of Hydrocarbons at 1 to 10 Mbar Using Laser-Driven Shock Waves; (3) A Generalized Measurable Ignition Condition for Inertial Confinement Fusion (4) In-Situ Detection and Analysis of Laser-Induced Damage on a 1.5-m Multilayer-Dielectric Grating Compressor for High-Energy, Petawatt-Class Laser Systems; (5) Probing High-Areal-Density ({rho}R) Cryogenic-DT Implosions Using Down-Scattered Neutron Spectra Measured by the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer; (6) Strong-Coupling and Degeneracy Effects in Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions; and (7) Neutron-Induced Nucleation Inside Bubble Chambers Using Freon 115 as the Active Medium.

  17. Sputtered II-VI Alloys and Structures forTandem PV: Final Subcontract Report, 9 December 2003 - 30 July 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Compaan, A. D.; Collins, R.; Karpov, V. G.; Giolando, D.

    2008-09-01

    This report elaborates on Phase 3 and provides summaries of the first two Phases. Phase 3 research work was divided into five task areas covering different aspects of the II-VI tandem cell.

  18. Process for forming shaped group II-VI semiconductor nanocrystals, and product formed using process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Peng, Xiaogang; Manna, Liberato

    2001-01-01

    A process for the formation of shaped Group II-VI semiconductor nanocrystals comprises contacting the semiconductor nanocrystal precursors with a liquid media comprising a binary mixture of phosphorus-containing organic surfactants capable of promoting the growth of either spherical semiconductor nanocrystals or rod-like semiconductor nanocrystals, whereby the shape of the semiconductor nanocrystals formed in said binary mixture of surfactants is controlled by adjusting the ratio of the surfactants in the binary mixture.

  19. Scaling Effects of Cr(VI) Reduction Kinetics. The Role of Geochemical Heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Li; Li, Li

    2015-10-22

    The natural subsurface is highly heterogeneous with minerals distributed in different spatial patterns. Fundamental understanding of how mineral spatial distribution patterns regulate sorption process is important for predicting the transport and fate of chemicals. Existing studies about the sorption was carried out in well-mixed batch reactors or uniformly packed columns, with few data available on the effects of spatial heterogeneities. As a result, there is a lack of data and understanding on how spatial heterogeneities control sorption processes. In this project, we aim to understand and develop modeling capabilities to predict the sorption of Cr(VI), an omnipresent contaminant in natural systems due to its natural occurrence and industrial utilization. We systematically examine the role of spatial patterns of illite, a common clay, in determining the extent of transport limitation and scaling effects associated with Cr(VI) sorption capacity and kinetics using column experiments and reactive transport modeling. Our results showed that the sorbed mass and rates can differ by an order of magnitude due to of the illite spatial heterogeneities and transport limitation. With constraints from data, we also developed the capabilities of modeling Cr(VI) in heterogeneous media. The developed model is then utilized to understand the general principles that govern the relationship between sorption and connectivity, a key measure of the spatial pattern characteristics. This correlation can be used to estimate Cr(VI) sorption characteristics in heterogeneous porous media. Insights gained here bridge gaps between laboratory and field application in hydrogeology and geochemical field, and advance predictive understanding of reactive transport processes in the natural heterogeneous subsurface. We believe that these findings will be of interest to a large number of environmental geochemists and engineers, hydrogeologists, and those interested in contaminant fate and transport, water quality and water composition, and natural attenuation processes in natural systems.

  20. Tank Operations Contract No. DE-AC27-08R Vi4800

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    R Vi4800 Modification No. 077 Page 2 of 2 Continuation Page, SF30 Block 14 Purpose of Modification: This Unilateral Change Order modifies the Change Order issued under contract modification 069, by finalizing the draft version of the Corrective Action Plan (CAP), which was recently approved by the Department of Energy Headquarters with no changes. This modification also adds interim action item number 7, which provides guidance on the submission of weekly progress reports to ORP. The Not to

  1. TREATMENT TESTS FOR EX SITU REMOVAL OF CHROMATE & NITRATE & URANIUM (VI) FROM HANFORD (100-HR-3) GROUNDWATER FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BECK MA; DUNCAN JB

    1994-01-03

    This report describes batch and ion exchange column laboratory scale studies investigating ex situ methods to remove chromate (chromium [VI]), nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup -}) and uranium (present as uranium [VI]) from contaminated Hanford site groundwaters. The technologies investigated include: chemical precipitation or coprecipitation to remove chromate and uranium; and anion exchange to remove chromate, uranium and nitrate. The technologies investigated were specified in the 100-HR-3 Groundwater Treatability Test Plan. The method suggested for future study is anion exchange.

  2. Electrochemical and spectroscopic evidence on the one-electron reduction of U(VI) to U(V) on magnetite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuan, Ke; Ilton, Eugene S.; Antonio, Mark R.; Li, Zhongrui; Cook, Peter J.; Becker, Udo

    2015-05-19

    Reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) on mineral surfaces has been considered as a one-step two electron process. However, stabilized U(V), with no evidence of U(IV), found in recent studies indicates U(VI) can undergo a one electron reduction to U(V) without further progression to U(IV). We investigated the mechanisms of uranium reduction by reducing U(VI) electrochemically on a magnetite electrode at pH 3.4 . The one electron reduction of U(VI) was first confirmed using the cyclic voltammetry method. Formation of nano-size uranium precipitates on the surface of magnetite at reducing potentials and dissolution of the solids at oxidizing potentials were observed by in situ electrochemical AFM. XPS analysis of the magnetite electrodes polarized in uranium solutions at voltages from 0.1 ~ 0.9 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) showed the presence of only U(V) and U(VI). The highest amount of U(V) relative to U(VI) was prepared at 0.7 V, where the longest average UOaxial distance of 2.05 0.01 was evident in the same sample revealed by EXAFS analysis. The results demonstrate that the electrochemical reduction of U(VI) on magnetite only yields U(V), even at a potential of 0.9 V, which favors the one-electron reduction mechanism. U(V) did not disproportionate but stabilized on magnetite through precipitation of mixed-valence state U(VI)/U(V) solids.

  3. Spectroscopic studies of U(VI) sorption at the kaolinite-water interface. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, H.A.; Parks, G.A.; Brown, G.E. Jr.

    1994-06-01

    Efficient use of U as a resource and safe handling, recycling and disposal of U-containing wastes require an understanding of the factors controlling the fate of U, where fate refers to the destination of U, typically expressed as an environmental medium or a process phase. The sorption process constitutes a change in elemental fate. Partitioning of an element from solution to a solid phase, or sorption, can be divided into three broad categories: adsorption, surface precipitation, and absorption. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), a type of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), offers the possibility for distinguishing among different modes of sorption by characterizing the atomic environment of the sorbing element. In this study, the authors use EXAFS to determine the structure of U(VI) sorption complexes at the kaolinite-water interface. In Chapter One, they present an overview of selected aspects of U structural chemistry as a basis for considering the structural environment of U at the solid-water interface. To evaluate the utility of XAS for characterization of the structural environment of U(VI) at the solid-water interface, they have carried out an in-depth analysis of XAS data from U(VI)-containing solid and solution model compounds, which they describe in Chapter Two. In Chapter three, they consider sorption of U by kaolinite as a means of effecting the removal of U from surface collection pond waters on the Rocky Flats Plant site in northern Colorado.

  4. Equations of state of ice VI and ice VII at high pressure and high temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bezacier, Lucile; Hanfland, Michael; Journaux, Baptiste; Perrillat, Jean-Philippe; Cardon, Herv; Daniel, Isabelle

    2014-09-14

    High-pressure H{sub 2}O polymorphs among which ice VI and ice VII are abundant in the interiors of large icy satellites and exo-planets. Knowledge of the elastic properties of these pure H{sub 2}O ices at high-temperature and high-pressure is thus crucial to decipher the internal structure of icy bodies. In this study we assess for the first time the pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) relations of both polycrystalline pure ice VI and ice VII at high pressures and temperatures from 1 to 9 GPa and 300 to 450 K, respectively, by using in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The PVT data are adjusted to a second-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state and give V{sub 0} = 14.17(2) cm{sup 3}?mol{sup ?1}, K{sub 0} = 14.05(23) GPa, and ?{sub 0} = 14.6(14) 10{sup ?5} K{sup ?1} for ice VI and V{sub 0} = 12.49(1) cm{sup 3}?mol{sup ?1}, K{sub 0} = 20.15(16) GPa, and ?{sub 0} = 11.6(5) 10{sup ?5} K{sup ?1} for ice VII.

  5. Electrode Induced Removal and Recovery of Uranium (VI) from Acidic Subsurfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory, Kelvin

    2013-08-12

    The overarching objective of this research is to provide an improved understanding of how aqueous geochemical conditions impact the removal of U and Tc from groundwater and how engineering design may be utilized to optimize removal of these radionuclides. Experiments were designed to address the unique conditions in Area 3 of ORNL while also providing broader insight into the geochemical effectors of the removal rates and extent for U and Tc. The specific tasks of this work were to: 1) quantify the impact of common aqueous geochemical and operational conditions on the rate and extent of U removal and recovery from water, 2) investigate the removal of Tc with polarized graphite electrode, and determine the influence of geochemical and operational conditions on Tc removal and recovery, 3) determine whether U and Tc may be treated simultaneous from Area 3 groundwater, and examine the bench-scale performance of electrode-based treatment, and 4) determine the capacity of graphite electrodes for U(VI) removal and develop a mathematical, kinetic model for the removal of U(VI) from aqueous solution. Overall the body of work suggests that an electrode-based approach for the remediation of acidic subsurface environments, such as those observed in Area 3 of ORNL may be successful for the removal for both U(VI) and Tc. Carbonaceous (graphite) electrode materials are likely to be the least costly means to maximize removal rates and efficiency by maximizing the electrode surface area.

  6. Reactive oxygen species mediate Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis through PI3K/AKT-dependent activation of GSK-3β/β-catenin signaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Son, Young-Ok; Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Wang, Lei; Wang, Xin; Fan, Jia; Kim, Dong-Hern; Lee, Ju-Yeon; Zhang, Zhuo; Lee, Jeong-Chae; Shi, Xianglin

    2013-09-01

    Cr(VI) compounds are known human carcinogens that primarily target the lungs. Cr(VI) produces reactive oxygen species (ROS), but the exact effects of ROS on the signaling molecules involved in Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis have not been extensively studied. Chronic exposure of human bronchial epithelial cells to Cr(VI) at nanomolar concentrations (10–100 nM) for 3 months not only induced cell transformation, but also increased the potential of these cells to invade and migrate. Injection of Cr(VI)-stimulated cells into nude mice resulted in the formation of tumors. Chronic exposure to Cr(VI) increased levels of intracellular ROS and antiapoptotic proteins. Transfection with catalase or superoxide dismutase (SOD) prevented Cr(VI)-mediated increases in colony formation, cell invasion, migration, and xenograft tumors. While chronic Cr(VI) exposure led to activation of signaling cascades involving PI3K/AKT/GSK-3β/β-catenin and PI3K/AKT/mTOR, transfection with catalase or SOD markedly inhibited Cr(VI)-mediated activation of these signaling proteins. Inhibitors specific for AKT or β-catenin almost completely suppressed the Cr(VI)-mediated increase in total and active β-catenin proteins and colony formation. In particular, Cr(VI) suppressed autophagy of epithelial cells under nutrition deprivation. Furthermore, there was a marked induction of AKT, GSK-3β, β-catenin, mTOR, and carcinogenic markers in tumor tissues formed in mice after injection with Cr(VI)-stimulated cells. Collectively, our findings suggest that ROS is a key mediator of Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis through the activation of PI3K/AKT-dependent GSK-3β/β-catenin signaling and the promotion of cell survival mechanisms via the inhibition of apoptosis and autophagy. - Highlights: • Chronic exposure to Cr(VI) induces carcinogenic properties in BEAS-2B cells. • ROS play an important role in Cr(VI)-induced tumorigenicity of BEAS-2B cells. • PI3K/AKT/GSK-3β/β-catenin signaling involved in Cr(VI) carcinogenesis. • The inhibition of apoptosis and autophagy contributes to Cr(VI) carcinogenesis.

  7. Optimizing Cr(VI) and Tc(VII) remediation through nano-scale biomineral engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cutting, R. S.; Coker, V. S.; Telling, N. D.; Kimber, R. L.; Pearce, C. I.; Ellis, B.; Lawson, R; van der Laan, G.; Pattrick, R.A.D.; Vaughan, D.J.; Arenholz, E.; Lloyd, J. R.

    2009-09-09

    To optimize the production of biomagnetite for the bioremediation of metal oxyanion contaminated waters, the reduction of aqueous Cr(VI) to Cr(III) by two biogenic magnetites and a synthetic magnetite was evaluated under batch and continuous flow conditions. Results indicate that nano-scale biogenic magnetite produced by incubating synthetic schwertmannite powder in cell suspensions of Geobacter sulfurreducens is more efficient at reducing Cr(VI) than either biogenic nano-magnetite produced from a suspension of ferrihydrite 'gel' or synthetic nano-scale Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} powder. Although X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) measurements obtained from post-exposure magnetite samples reveal that both Cr(III) and Cr(VI) are associated with nanoparticle surfaces, X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism (XMCD) studies indicate that some Cr(III) has replaced octahedrally coordinated Fe in the lattice of the magnetite. Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) measurements of total aqueous Cr in the associated solution phase indicated that, although the majority of Cr(III) was incorporated within or adsorbed to the magnetite samples, a proportion ({approx}10-15 %) was released back into solution. Studies of Tc(VII) uptake by magnetites produced via the different synthesis routes also revealed significant differences between them as regards effectiveness for remediation. In addition, column studies using a {gamma}-camera to obtain real time images of a {sup 99m}Tc(VII) radiotracer were performed to visualize directly the relative performances of the magnetite sorbents against ultra-trace concentrations of metal oxyanion contaminants. Again, the magnetite produced from schwertmannite proved capable of retaining more ({approx}20%) {sup 99m}Tc(VII) than the magnetite produced from ferrihydrite, confirming that biomagnetite production for efficient environmental remediation can be fine-tuned through careful selection of the initial Fe(III) mineral substrate supplied to Fe(III)-reducing bacteria.

  8. CANTON LAKESHORE CANTON E BEST CON NEAUT GIDD INGS EAST N ELLSWORT

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... WAT SON -DU HRIN G EVERGREEN KELLY HILL RED BRUSH WEILER SVILLE MEAD VI LLE LAM AR TINE ROSS LEET SDALE RPD-R ICHLAND -4 CROWS RUN WAT TSVILLE S GLADE R UN WIN ESBU RG HAT CH CORN ...

  9. PART TWO PERMITTING/CLOSURE OF TSD UNITS/GROUPS ARTICLE VI. FINDINGS AND DETERMINATIONS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    16- PART TWO PERMITTING/CLOSURE OF TSD UNITS/GROUPS ARTICLE VI. FINDINGS AND DETERMINATIONS 23. The following paragraphs of this Article constitute a summary of the facts upon which EPA and Ecology are proceeding for purposes of Part Two of this Agreement. None of the facts related herein shall be considered admissions by any Party. This Article contains findings by EPA and Ecology, and shall not be used by any person related or unrelated to this Agreement for purposes other than determining the

  10. Tank Operations Contract No. DE-A C27-08R VI 4800

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A C27-08R VI 4800 Modification No. 059 Page 2 of 3 Continuation Page, SF30 Block 14 Purpose of Modification: The purpose of this modification is to revise Section J.4, Performance and Evaluation Measurement Plan (PEMP) to incorporate additional FY2010 performance measures. Description of Modification: 1. Update Section J, Table of Contents, Revision Number and Number of Pages for Attachment Number J.4. The change for Attachment JA4 is as follows: From: Attachment Title of Attachment Revision

  11. Telescope Guiding with a HyViSI H2RG Used in Guide Mode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simms, Lance M.; Figerb, Donald F.; Hanold, Brandon J.; Kahn, Steven M.; Gilmore, D.Kirk

    2010-06-04

    We report on long exposure results obtained with a Teledyne HyViSI H2RG detector operating in guide mode. The sensor simultaneously obtained nearly seeing-limited data while also guiding the Kitt Peak 2.1 m telescope. Results from unguided and guided operation are presented and used to place lower limits on flux/fluence values for accurate centroid measurements. We also report on significant noise reduction obtained in recent laboratory measurements that should further improve guiding capability with higher magnitude stars.

  12. Total Reducing Capacity in Aquifer Minerals and Sediments: Quantifying the Potential to Attenuate Cr(VI) in Groundwater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisman, S. Lara

    2015-07-20

    Hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), is present in the environment as a byproduct of industrial processes. Due to its mobility and toxicity, it is crucial to attenuate or remove Cr(VI) from the environment. The objective of this investigation was to quantify potential natural attenuation, or reduction capacity, of reactive minerals and aquifer sediments. Samples of reduced-iron containing minerals such as ilmenite, as well as Puye Formation sediments representing a contaminated aquifer in New Mexico, were reacted with chromate. The change in Cr(VI) during the reaction was used to calculate reduction capacity. This study found that minerals that contain reduced iron, such as ilmenite, have high reducing capacities. The data indicated that sample history may impact reduction capacity tests due to surface passivation. Further, this investigation identified areas for future research including: a) refining the relationships between iron content, magnetic susceptibility and reduction capacity, and b) long term kinetic testing using fresh aquifer sediments.

  13. Luteolin inhibits Cr(VI)-induced malignant cell transformation of human lung epithelial cells by targeting ROS mediated multiple cell signaling pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Son, Young-Ok; Divya, Sasidharan Padmaja; Roy, Ram Vinod; Hitron, John Andrew; Wang, Lei; Kim, Donghern; Dai, Jin; Asha, Padmaja; Zhang, Zhuo; Wang, Yitao; Shi, Xianglin

    2014-12-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is a well-known human carcinogen associated with the incidence of lung cancer. Inhibition of metal induced carcinogenesis by a dietary antioxidant is a novel approach. Luteolin, a natural dietary flavonoid found in fruits and vegetables, possesses potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity. We found that short term exposure of human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) to Cr(VI) (5 μM) showed a drastic increase in ROS generation, NADPH oxidase (NOX) activation, lipid peroxidation, and glutathione depletion, which were significantly inhibited by the treatment with luteolin in a dose dependent manner. Treatment with luteolin decreased AP-1, HIF-1α, COX-2, and iNOS promoter activity induced by Cr(VI) in BEAS-2B cells. In addition, luteolin protected BEAS-2B cells from malignant transformation induced by chronic Cr(VI) exposure. Moreover, luteolin also inhibited the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α) and VEGF in chronic Cr(VI) exposed BEAS-2B cells. Western blot analysis showed that luteolin inhibited multiple gene products linked to survival (Akt, Fak, Bcl-2, Bcl-xL), inflammation (MAPK, NF-κB, COX-2, STAT-3, iNOS, TNF-α) and angiogenesis (HIF-1α, VEGF, MMP-9) in chronic Cr(VI) exposed BEAS-2B cells. Nude mice injected with BEAS-2B cells chronically exposed to Cr(VI) in the presence of luteolin showed reduced tumor incidence compared to Cr(VI) alone treated group. Overexpression of catalase (CAT) or SOD2, eliminated Cr(VI)-induced malignant transformation. Overall, our results indicate that luteolin protects BEAS-2B cells from Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis by scavenging ROS and modulating multiple cell signaling mechanisms that are linked to ROS. Luteolin, therefore, serves as a potential chemopreventive agent against Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis. - Highlights: • Luteolin inhibited Cr(VI)-induced oxidative stress. • Luteolin inhibited chronic Cr(VI)-induced malignant transformation. • Luteolin inhibited chronic Cr(VI)-induced inflammation. • Luteolin inhibited chronic Cr(VI)-induced angiogenesis.

  14. INTENSITY ENHANCEMENT OF OVI ULTRAVIOLET EMISSION LINES IN SOLAR SPECTRA DUE TO OPACITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keenan, F. P.; Mathioudakis, M.; Doyle, J. G.; Madjarska, M. S.; Rose, S. J.; Bowler, L. A.; Britton, J.; McCrink, L.

    2014-04-01

    Opacity is a property of many plasmas. It is normally expected that if an emission line in a plasma becomes optically thick, then its intensity ratio to that of another transition that remains optically thin should decrease. However, radiative transfer calculations undertaken both by ourselves and others predict that under certain conditions the intensity ratio of an optically thick to an optically thin line can show an increase over the optically thin value, indicating an enhancement in the former. These conditions include the geometry of the emitting plasma and its orientation to the observer. A similar effect can take place between lines of differing optical depths. While previous observational studies have focused on stellar point sources, here we investigate the spatially resolved solar atmosphere using measurements of the I(1032 )/I(1038 ) intensity ratio of OVI in several regions obtained with the Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation instrument on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory satellite. We find several I(1032 )/I(1038 ) ratios observed on the disk to be significantly larger than the optically thin value of 2.0, providing the first detection (to our knowledge) of intensity enhancement in the ratio arising from opacity effects in the solar atmosphere. The agreement between observation and theory is excellent and confirms that the OVI emission originates from a slab-like geometry in the solar atmosphere, rather than from cylindrical structures.

  15. Isotopic and geochemical tracers for U(VI) reduction and U mobility at an in situ recovery U mine

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Basu, Anirban; Brown, Shaun T.; Christensen, John N.; DePaolo, Donald J.; Reimus, Paul W.; Heikoop, Jeffrey M.; Woldegabriel, Giday; Simmons, Ardyth M.; House, Brian M.; Hartmann, Matt; et al

    2015-05-19

    In situ recovery (ISR) uranium (U) mining mobilizes U in its oxidized hexavalent form (U(VI)) by oxidative dissolution of U from the roll-front U deposits. Post-mining natural attenuation of residual U(VI) at ISR mines is a potential remediation strategy. Detection and monitoring of naturally occurring reducing subsurface environments are important for successful implementation of this remediation scheme. We used the isotopic tracers ²³⁸U/²³⁵U (δ²³⁸U), ²³⁴U/²³⁸U activity ratio, and ³⁴S/³²S (δ³⁴S), and geochemical measurements of U ore and groundwater collected from 32 wells located within, upgradient, and downgradient of a roll-front U deposit to detect U(VI) reduction and U mobility atmore » an ISR mining site at Rosita, TX, USA. The δ²³⁸U in Rosita groundwater varies from 0.61‰ to -2.49‰, with a trend toward lower δ²³⁸U in downgradient wells. The concurrent decrease in U(VI) concentration and δ²³⁸U with an ε of 0.48‰ ± 0.08‰ is indicative of naturally occurring reducing environments conducive to U(VI) reduction. Additionally, characteristic ²³⁴U/²³⁸U activity ratio and δ³⁴S values may also be used to trace the mobility of the ore zone groundwater after mining has ended. These results support the use of U isotope-based detection of natural attenuation of U(VI) at Rosita and other similar ISR mining sites.« less

  16. Detection and Quantification of Pu(III, IV, V, and VI) Using a1.0-meter

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Liquid Core Waveguide (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Detection and Quantification of Pu(III, IV, V, and VI) Using a1.0-meter Liquid Core Waveguide Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Detection and Quantification of Pu(III, IV, V, and VI) Using a1.0-meter Liquid Core Waveguide Detection and quantification of the aquo ions of Pu in 1 MHClO4 was carried out using a 1-meter liquid core waveguide (LCW) coupledto a fiber optic UV-Vis spectrometer. Detection limits of 7 x 10-7 M

  17. Detection and Quantification of Pu(III, IV, V, and VI) Using a1.0-meter

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Liquid Core Waveguide (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Detection and Quantification of Pu(III, IV, V, and VI) Using a1.0-meter Liquid Core Waveguide Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Detection and Quantification of Pu(III, IV, V, and VI) Using a1.0-meter Liquid Core Waveguide × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public

  18. A modified model for calculating lattice thermal expansion of I{sub 2}-IV-VI{sub 3} and I{sub 3}-V-VI{sub 4} tetrahedral compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omar, M.S. . E-mail: dr_m_s_omar@yahoo.com

    2007-05-03

    A general empirical formula was found for calculating lattice thermal expansion for compounds having their properties extended for compound groups having different mean ionicity as well as more than one type of cation atoms with that of different numbers of them such as I{sub 2}-IV-VI{sub 3} and I{sub 3}-V-VI{sub 4}. The difference in the valence electrons for cations and anions in the compound was used to correlate the deviations caused by the compound ionicity. The ionicity effects, which are due to their different numbers for their types, were also added to the correlation equation. In general, the lattice thermal expansion for a compound semiconductor can be calculated from a relation containing melting point, mean atomic distance and number of valence electrons for the atoms forming the compound. The mean ionicity for the group compounds forming I{sub 2}-IV-VI{sub 3} was found to be 0.323 and 0.785 for the ternary group compounds of I{sub 3}-V-VI{sub 4}.

  19. All-vapor processing of p-type tellurium-containing II-VI semiconductor and ohmic contacts thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCandless, Brian E.

    2001-06-26

    An all dry method for producing solar cells is provided comprising first heat-annealing a II-VI semiconductor; enhancing the conductivity and grain size of the annealed layer; modifying the surface and depositing a tellurium layer onto the enhanced layer; and then depositing copper onto the tellurium layer so as to produce a copper tellurium compound on the layer.

  20. Influence of calcite on uranium(VI) reactive transport in the groundwaterriver mixing zone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Rui; Liu, Chongxuan; Greskowiak, Janek; Prommer, Henning; Zachara, John M.; Zheng, Chunmiao

    2014-01-23

    Calcite is an important mineral that can affect uranyl reactive transport in subsurface sediments. This study investigated the distribution of calcite and its influence on uranyl adsorption and reactive transport in the groundwater-river mixing zone at US Hanford 300A, Washington State. Simulations using a 2D reactive transport model under field-relevant hydrogeochemical conditions revealed a complex distribution of calcite concentration as a result of dynamic groundwater-river interactions. The calcite concentration distribution in turn affected the spatial and temporal changes in aqueous carbonate, calcium, and pH, which subsequently influenced U(VI) mobility and discharge rates into the river. The results implied that calcite distribution and its concentration dynamics is an important consideration for field characterization, monitoring, and reactive transport prediction.

  1. REVISED AND EXTENDED ANALYSIS OF FIVE TIMES IONIZED XENON, Xe VI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallardo, M.; Raineri, M.; Reyna Almandos, J.; Pagan, C. J. B.; Abraho, R. A. E-mail: cesarpagan@fee.unicamp.br

    2015-01-01

    A capillary discharge tube was used to record the Xe spectrum in the 400-5500 Š region. A set of 243 lines of the Xe VI spectrum was observed, and 146 of them were classified for the first time. For all known lines, we calculated the weighted oscillator strengths (gf) and weighted transition probabilities (gA) using the configuration interaction in a relativistic Hartree-Fock approach. The energy matrix was calculated using energy parameters adjusted to fit the experimental energy levels. Core polarization effects were taken into account in our calculations. Experimental energy values and calculated lifetimes are also presented for a set of 88 levels. From these levels, 32 were classified for the first time and 33 had their values revised. Our analysis of the 5s5p5d and 5s5p6s configurations was extended in order to clarify discrepancies among previous works.

  2. Halo mass dependence of H I and O VI absorption: evidence for differential kinematics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathes, Nigel L.; Churchill, Christopher W.; Nielsen, Nikole M.; Trujillo-Gomez, Sebastian; Kacprzak, Glenn G.; Charlton, Jane; Muzahid, Sowgat

    2014-09-10

    We studied a sample of 14 galaxies (0.1 < z < 0.7) using HST/WFPC2 imaging and high-resolution HST/COS or HST/STIS quasar spectroscopy of Lyα, Lyβ, and O VI λλ1031, 1037 absorption. The galaxies, having 10.8 ≤ log (M {sub h}/M {sub ☉}) ≤ 12.2, lie within D = 300 kpc of quasar sightlines, probing out to D/R {sub vir} = 3. When the full range of M {sub h} and D/R {sub vir} of the sample are examined, ∼40% of the H I absorbing clouds can be inferred to be escaping their host halo. The fraction of bound clouds decreases as D/R {sub vir} increases such that the escaping fraction is ∼15% for D/R {sub vir} < 1, ∼45% for 1 ≤ D/R {sub vir} < 2, and ∼90% for 2 ≤ D/R {sub vir} < 3. Adopting the median mass log M {sub h}/M {sub ☉} = 11.5 to divide the sample into 'higher' and 'lower' mass galaxies, we find a mass dependency for the hot circumgalactic medium kinematics. To our survey limits, O VI absorption is found in only ∼40% of the H I clouds in and around lower mass halos as compared to ∼85% around higher mass halos. For D/R {sub vir} < 1, lower mass halos have an escape fraction of ∼65%, whereas higher mass halos have an escape fraction of ∼5%. For 1 ≤ D/R {sub vir} < 2, the escape fractions are ∼55% and ∼35% for lower mass and higher mass halos, respectively. For 2 ≤ D/R {sub vir} < 3, the escape fraction for lower mass halos is ∼90%. We show that it is highly likely that the absorbing clouds reside within 4R {sub vir} of their host galaxies and that the kinematics are dominated by outflows. Our finding of 'differential kinematics' is consistent with the scenario of 'differential wind recycling' proposed by Oppenheimer et al. We discuss the implications for galaxy evolution, the stellar to halo mass function, and the mass-metallicity relationship of galaxies.

  3. CORROSION STUDY FOR THE EFFLUENT TREATMENT FACILITY (ETF) CHROME (VI) REDUCTANT SOLUTION USING 304 & 316L STAINLESS STEEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DUNCAN, J.B.

    2007-06-27

    The Effluent Treatment Facility has developed a method to regenerate spent resin from the groundwater pump and treat intercepting chrome(VI) plumes (RPP-RPT-32207, Laboratory Study on Regeneration of Spent DOWEX 21K 16-20 Mesh Ion Exchange Resin). Subsequent laboratory studies have shown that the chrome(VI) may be reduced to chrome(III) by titrating with sodium metabisulfite to an oxidation reduction potential (ORP) of +280 mV at a pH of 2. This test plan describes the use of cyclic potentiodynamic polarization and linear polarization techniques to ascertain the electrochemical corrosion and pitting propensity of the 304 and 316L stainless steel in the acidified reducing the solution that will be contained in either the secondary waste receiver tank or concentrate tank.

  4. Molecular beam epitaxial growth and characterization of Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}/II-VI semiconductor heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Zhiyi Zhao, Lukas; Krusin-Elbaum, Lia; Garcia, Thor Axtmann; Tamargo, Maria C.; Hernandez-Mainet, Luis C.; Deng, Haiming

    2014-12-15

    Surfaces of three-dimensional topological insulators (TIs) have been proposed to host quantum phases at the interfaces with other types of materials, provided that the topological properties of interfacial regions remain unperturbed. Here, we report on the molecular beam epitaxy growth of II-VI semiconductorTI heterostructures using c-plane sapphire substrates. Our studies demonstrate that Zn{sub 0.49}Cd{sub 0.51}Se and Zn{sub 0.23}Cd{sub 0.25}Mg{sub 0.52}Se layers have improved quality relative to ZnSe. The structures exhibit a large relative upward shift of the TI bulk quantum levels when the TI layers are very thin (?6nm), consistent with quantum confinement imposed by the wide bandgap II-VI layers. Our transport measurements show that the characteristic topological signatures of the Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} layers are preserved.

  5. Real-time observation of morphological transformations in II-VI semiconducting nanobelts via environmental transmission electron microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Agarwal, Rahul; Zakharov, Dmitri N.; Krook, Nadia M.; Liu, Wenjing; Berger, Jacob; Stach, Eric A.; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2015-05-01

    It has been observed that wurtzite II–VI semiconducting nanobelts transform into single-crystal, periodically branched nanostructures upon heating. The mechanism of this novel transformation has been elucidated by heating II–VI nanobelts in an environmental transmission electron microscope (ETEM) in oxidizing, reducing and inert atmospheres while observing their structural changes with high spatial resolution. The interplay of surface reconstruction of high-energy surfaces of the wurtzite phase and environment-dependent anisotropic chemical etching of certain crystal surfaces in the branching mechanism of nanobelts has been observed. Understanding of structural and chemical transformations of materials via in situ microscopy techniques and their role in designingmore » new nanostructured materials is discussed.« less

  6. Real-time observation of morphological transformations in II-VI semiconducting nanobelts via environmental transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agarwal, Rahul; Zakharov, Dmitri N.; Krook, Nadia M.; Liu, Wenjing; Berger, Jacob; Stach, Eric A.; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2015-05-01

    It has been observed that wurtzite II–VI semiconducting nanobelts transform into single-crystal, periodically branched nanostructures upon heating. The mechanism of this novel transformation has been elucidated by heating II–VI nanobelts in an environmental transmission electron microscope (ETEM) in oxidizing, reducing and inert atmospheres while observing their structural changes with high spatial resolution. The interplay of surface reconstruction of high-energy surfaces of the wurtzite phase and environment-dependent anisotropic chemical etching of certain crystal surfaces in the branching mechanism of nanobelts has been observed. Understanding of structural and chemical transformations of materials via in situ microscopy techniques and their role in designing new nanostructured materials is discussed.

  7. Co-implantation of group VI elements and N for formation of non-alloyed ohmic contacts for n-type semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw; Yu, Kin M.

    2004-07-06

    Non-alloyed, low resistivity contacts for semiconductors using Group III-V and Group II-VI compounds and methods of making are disclosed. Co-implantation techniques are disclosed.

  8. Coupled spin and valley physics in monolayer MoS2 and group-VI dichalcogenides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Di; Liu, G. B.; Feng, wanxiang; Xu, Xiaodong; Yao, Wang

    2012-01-01

    We show that inversion symmetry breaking together with spin-orbit coupling leads to coupled spin and valley physics in monolayer MoS2 and group-VI dichalcogenides, making possible controls of spin and valley in these 2D materials. The spin-valley coupling at the valence band edges suppresses spin and valley relaxation, as flip of each index alone is forbidden by the 0.1 eV valley contrasting spin splitting. Valley Hall and spin Hall effects coexist in both electron-doped and hole-doped systems. Optical interband transitions have frequency-dependent polarization selection rules which allow selective photoexcitation of carriers with various combination of valley and spin indices. Photo-induced spin Hall and valley Hall effects can generate long lived spin and valley accumulations on sample boundaries. The physics discussed here provides a route towards the integration of valleytronics and spintronics in multi-valley materials with strong spin-orbit coupling and inversion symmetry breaking.

  9. Methods for forming thin-film heterojunction solar cells from I-III-VI{sub 2}

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mickelsen, R.A.; Chen, W.S.

    1985-08-13

    An improved thin-film, large area solar cell, and methods for forming the same are disclosed, having a relatively high light-to-electrical energy conversion efficiency and characterized in that the cell comprises a p-n type heterojunction formed of: (i) a first semiconductor layer comprising a photovoltaic active material selected from the class of I-III-VI{sub 2} chalcopyrite ternary materials which is vacuum deposited in a thin ``composition-graded`` layer ranging from on the order of about 2.5 microns to about 5.0 microns ({approx_equal}2.5 {mu}m to {approx_equal}5.0 {mu}m) and wherein the lower region of the photovoltaic active material preferably comprises a low resistivity region of p-type semiconductor material having a superimposed region of relatively high resistivity, transient n-type semiconductor material defining a transient p-n homojunction; and (ii) a second semiconductor layer comprising a low resistivity n-type semiconductor material; wherein interdiffusion occurs (a) between the elemental constituents of the two discrete juxtaposed regions of the first semiconductor layer defining a transient p-n homojunction layer, and (b) between the transient n-type material in the first semiconductor layer and the second n-type semiconductor layer. 16 figs.

  10. Methods for forming thin-film heterojunction solar cells from I-III-VI.sub. 2

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mickelsen, Reid A.; Chen, Wen S.

    1985-08-13

    An improved thin-film, large area solar cell, and methods for forming the same, having a relatively high light-to-electrical energy conversion efficiency and characterized in that the cell comprises a p-n type heterojunction formed of: (i) a first semiconductor layer comprising a photovoltaic active material selected from the class of I-III-VI.sub.2 chalcopyrite ternary materials which is vacuum deposited in a thin "composition-graded" layer ranging from on the order ot about 2.5 microns to about 5.0 microns (.congruent.2.5 .mu.m to .congruent.5.0 .mu.m) and wherein the lower region of the photovoltaic active material preferably comprises a low resistivity region of p-type semiconductor material having a superimposed region of relatively high resistivity, transient n-type semiconductor material defining a transient p-n homojunction; and (ii), a second semiconductor layer comprising a low resistivity n-type semiconductor material; wherein interdiffusion (a) between the elemental constituents of the two discrete juxtaposed regions of the first semiconductor layer defining a transient p-n homojunction layer, and (b) between the transient n-type material in the first semiconductor layer and the second n-type semiconductor layer, causes the The Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. EG-77-C-01-4042, Subcontract No. XJ-9-8021-1 awarded by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  11. Methods for forming thin-film heterojunction solar cells from I-III-VI.sub. 2

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mickelsen, Reid A.; Chen, Wen S.

    1982-01-01

    An improved thin-film, large area solar cell, and methods for forming the same, having a relatively high light-to-electrical energy conversion efficiency and characterized in that the cell comprises a p-n type heterojunction formed of: (i) a first semiconductor layer comprising a photovoltaic active material selected from the class of I-III-VI.sub.2 chalcopyrite ternary materials which is vacuum deposited in a thin "composition-graded" layer ranging from on the order of about 2.5 microns to about 5.0 microns (.congruent.2.5.mu.m to .congruent.5.0.mu.m) and wherein the lower region of the photovoltaic active material preferably comprises a low resistivity region of p-type semiconductor material having a superimposed region of relatively high resistivity, transient n-type semiconductor material defining a transient p-n homojunction; and (ii), a second semiconductor layer comprising a low resistivity n-type semiconductor material; wherein interdiffusion (a) between the elemental constituents of the two discrete juxtaposed regions of the first semiconductor layer defining a transient p-n homojunction layer, and (b) between the transient n-type material in the first semiconductor layer and the second n-type semiconductor layer, causes the transient n-type material in The Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. EG-77-C-01-4042, Subcontract No. XJ-9-8021-1 awarded by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  12. Methods for forming thin-film heterojunction solar cells from I-III-VI[sub 2

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mickelsen, R.A.; Chen, W.S.

    1982-06-15

    An improved thin-film, large area solar cell, and methods for forming the same are disclosed, having a relatively high light-to-electrical energy conversion efficiency and characterized in that the cell comprises a p-n type heterojunction formed of: (1) a first semiconductor layer comprising a photovoltaic active material selected from the class of I-III-VI[sub 2] chalcopyrite ternary materials which is vacuum deposited in a thin composition-graded'' layer ranging from on the order of about 2.5 microns to about 5.0 microns ([approx equal]2.5[mu]m to [approx equal]5.0[mu]m) and wherein the lower region of the photovoltaic active material preferably comprises a low resistivity region of p-type semiconductor material having a superimposed region of relatively high resistivity, transient n-type semiconductor material defining a transient p-n homojunction; and (2), a second semiconductor layer comprising a low resistivity n-type semiconductor material; wherein interdiffusion (a) between the elemental constituents of the two discrete juxtaposed regions of the first semiconductor layer defining a transient p-n homojunction layer, and (b) between the transient n-type material in the first semiconductor layer and the second n-type semiconductor layer, is allowed.

  13. Characterization of U(VI) Sorption-Desorption Processes and Model Upscaling: Annual Report for Johns Hopkins University (Contract No. DE-FG07-02ER63498)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ball, William P.

    2003-06-12

    The objectives of the overall collaborative EMSP effort (with which this project is associated) are to characterize sorption and desorption processes of U(VI) on pristine and contaminated Hanford sediments over a range of sediment facies and materials properties. The research is intended to provide new insights on the mechanisms of U(VI) retardation at Hanford, and to develop approaches by which laboratory-characterized geochemical models can be upscaled for defensible predictions of uranium transport in field.

  14. Role of uranium(VI) in the ThO/sub 2/-UO/sub 3/ sol-gel process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tewari, P.H.; Campbell, A.B.

    1980-11-01

    Increases in pH and temperature of U(VI) solutions enhance adsorption of uranium on ThO/sub 2/ through hydrolysis of U(VI) as evidenced by absorption spectra changes of the solution. Sols of ThO/sub 2/-UO/sub 3/ are formed by adsorption of uranium on ThO/sub 2/. At low pH's (approx. pH 3.0), the sols behave as Newtonian fluids but at higher pH's the sols (especially the concentrated ones) transform into thixotropic gels. The increased adsorption of uranium by ThO/sub 2/ and the increased viscosity of the ThO/sub 2/-UO/sub 3/ sols with pH are related. Increased adsorption of uranium produces rod-shaped UO/sub 3/.2H/sub 2/O on the ThO/sub 2/ surface. These UO/sub 3/ nuclei link ThO/sub 2/ particles to form long rodlike particles. With further increased adsorption of uranium at higher pH's (less than or equal to 3.7), the particles crosslink to produce a structured network giving a thixotropic gel. Adsorption, electron microscopic, electrophoetic mobility, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic data are presented to explain the role of U(VI) in the sol-gel process. 6 figures, 1 table.

  15. U(VI) bioreduction with emulsified vegetable oil as the electron donor-- Microcosm tests and model development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Guoping; Wu, Wei-min; Watson, David B; Parker, Jack C.; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Brooks, Scott C; Shi, Xiaoqing

    2013-01-01

    Microcosm tests were conducted to study U(VI) bioreduction in contaminated sediments with emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) as the electron donor. In the microcosms, EVO was degraded by indigenous microorganisms and stimulated Fe, U, and sulfate bioreduction, and methanogenesis. Removal of aqueous U occurred concurrently with sulfate reduction, with more reduction of total U in the case of higher initial sulfate concentrations. X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) analysis confirmed U(VI) reduction to U(IV). As the acetate concentration peaked in 10~20 days in oleate microcosms, the maximum was reached in 100~120 days in the EVO microcosms, indicating that EVO hydrolysis was rate-limiting. The acetate accumulation was sustained over 50 days longer in the oleate and EVO than in the ethanol microcosms, suggesting that acetate-utilizing methanogenesis was slower in the cases of oleate and EVO. Both slow hydrolysis and methanogenesis could contribute to potential sustained bioreduction in field application. Biogeochemical models were developed to couple degradation of EVO, production and oxidation of long-chain fatty acids, glycerol, acetate, and hydrogen, reduction of Fe(III), U(VI) and sulfate, and methanogenesis with growth and decay of microbial functional groups. The models were used to simulate the coupled processes in a field test in a companion article.

  16. Uranium(VI) reduction by nanoscale zero-valent iron in anoxic batch systems: The role of Fe(II) and Fe(III)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Sen; Chen, Yongheng; Xiang, Wu; Bao, Zhengyu; Liu, Chongxuan; Deng, Baolin

    2014-12-01

    The role of Fe(II) and Fe(III) on U(VI) reduction by nanoscale zerovalent iron (nanoFe0) was investigated using two iron chelators 1,10-phenanthroline and triethanolamine (TEA) under a CO2-free anoxic condition. The results showed U(VI) reduction was strongly inhibited by 1,10-phenanthroline and TEA in a pH range from 6.92 to 9.03. For instance, at pH 6.92 the observed U(VI) reduction rates decreased by 80.7% and 82.3% in the presence of 1,10-phenanthroline and TEA, respectively. The inhibition was attributed to the formation of stable complexes between 1,10-phenanthroline and Fe(II) or TEA and Fe(III). In the absence of iron chelators, U(VI) reduction can be enhanced by surface-bound Fe(II) on nanoFe0. Our results suggested that Fe(III) and Fe(II) probably acted as an electron shuttle to mediate the transfer of electrons from nanoFe0 to U(VI), therefore a combined system with Fe(II), Fe(III) and nanoFe0 can facilitate the U(VI) reductive immobilization in the contaminated groundwater.

  17. Microsoft Word - ViArray_Fact_ Sheet_SAND2011-3935P_updated_format.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ViA Tru Sandia N radiation ASICs e Pre-qual Manufac fabric-lik Specia  M  F s  U s  O Applica  C  I  S  O  R  H Sandia N high-con design a high-mix capabilit high-reli Array sted National Lab n-hardened, enable rapid lified base ar cturing Sour ke structure l Features Metal-via co Four Power- supplies for p Unused trans static current On-package ations incl Command & Instrumentat Sensor Moni Obsolescent Rad-hard env High-Reliabi National Lab nsequence ap and

  18. Extraction of uranium(VI) by N,N-di-(2-ethylhexyl)isobutyramide (DEHIBA): from the batch experimental data to the countercurrent process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miguirditchian, M.; Sorel, C.; Cames, B.; Bisel, I.; Baron, P.

    2008-07-01

    The selective separation of uranium(VI) in the first cycle of the GANEX process is operated by a hydrometallurgical process using a monoamide extractant DEHiBA (N,N-di-(2-ethylhexyl)isobutyramide). Distribution ratios of uranium(VI) and nitric acid in 1 M DEHiBA/HTP were determined with macro-concentrations of uranium, and the experimental data were modelled by taking into account the activity coefficients of the constituents in aqueous phases. A flowsheet was designed and tested in a countercurrent process in laboratory-scale mixer-settlers on a surrogate U(VI)/HNO 3 feed. More than 99.999% of the uranium was recovered. (authors)

  19. Effect of Co-solutes on the Products and Solubility of Uranium(VI) Precipitated with Phosphate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehta, Vrajesh; Maillot, Fabien; Wang, Zheming; Catalano, Jeffrey G.; Giammar, Daniel E.

    2014-01-22

    Uranyl phosphate solids are often found with uranium ores, and their low solubility makes them promising target phases for in situ remediation of uranium-contaminated subsurface environments. The products and solubility of uranium(VI) precipitated with phosphate can be affected by the pH, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentration, and co-solute composition (e.g. Na+/Ca2+) of the groundwater. Batch experiments were performed to study the effect of these parameters on the products and extent of uranium precipitation induced by phosphate addition. In the absence of co-solute cations, chernikovite [H3O(UO2)(PO4)3H2O] precipitated despite uranyl orthophosphate [(UO2)3(PO4)24H2O] being thermodynamically more favorable under certain conditions. As determined using X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, and laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy, the presence of Na+ or Ca2+ as a co-solute led to the precipitation of sodium autunite ([Na2(UO2)2(PO4)2] and autunite [Ca(UO2)2(PO4)2]), which are structurally similar to chernikovite. In the presence of sodium, the dissolved U(VI) concentrations were generally in agreement with equilibrium predictions of sodium autunite solubility. However, in the calcium-containing systems, the observed concentrations were below the predicted solubility of autunite, suggesting the possibility of uranium adsorption to or incorporation in a calcium phosphate precipitate in addition to the precipitation of autunite.

  20. Isotopic and geochemical tracers for U(VI) reduction and U mobility at an in situ recovery U mine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basu, Anirban; Brown, Shaun T.; Christensen, John N.; DePaolo, Donald J.; Reimus, Paul W.; Heikoop, Jeffrey M.; Woldegabriel, Giday; Simmons, Ardyth M.; House, Brian M.; Hartmann, Matt; Maher, Kate

    2015-05-19

    In situ recovery (ISR) uranium (U) mining mobilizes U in its oxidized hexavalent form (U(VI)) by oxidative dissolution of U from the roll-front U deposits. Post-mining natural attenuation of residual U(VI) at ISR mines is a potential remediation strategy. Detection and monitoring of naturally occurring reducing subsurface environments are important for successful implementation of this remediation scheme. We used the isotopic tracers ²³⁸U/²³⁵U (δ²³⁸U), ²³⁴U/²³⁸U activity ratio, and ³⁴S/³²S (δ³⁴S), and geochemical measurements of U ore and groundwater collected from 32 wells located within, upgradient, and downgradient of a roll-front U deposit to detect U(VI) reduction and U mobility at an ISR mining site at Rosita, TX, USA. The δ²³⁸U in Rosita groundwater varies from 0.61‰ to -2.49‰, with a trend toward lower δ²³⁸U in downgradient wells. The concurrent decrease in U(VI) concentration and δ²³⁸U with an ε of 0.48‰ ± 0.08‰ is indicative of naturally occurring reducing environments conducive to U(VI) reduction. Additionally, characteristic ²³⁴U/²³⁸U activity ratio and δ³⁴S values may also be used to trace the mobility of the ore zone groundwater after mining has ended. These results support the use of U isotope-based detection of natural attenuation of U(VI) at Rosita and other similar ISR mining sites.

  1. Selective extraction of U(VI) and some other metals from nitric acid media by poly-phosphine poly-oxides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nogami, M.; Sugiyama, Y.; Ikeda, Y.; Maruyama, K.

    2008-07-01

    For the selective extraction of radionuclides from nitrate media, the extractabilities of organo-poly-phosphine poly-oxides were examined in the form of impregnated resins. It was found that the extractability of 1,1,3,5,5-pentaphenyl-1,3,5-tri-phospha-pentane trioxide (PPTPT) for U(VI) is quite unusual with very high values at both low and high concentrations of nitric acid, which is not observed for other types of extractants. Thus, this extractant might be promising for the selective extraction of U(VI) in very high concentrations of HNO{sub 3}. (authors)

  2. Specifications for the development of BUGLE-93: An ENDF/B-VI multigroup cross section library for LWR shielding and pressure vessel dosimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, J.E.; Wright, R.Q.; Roussin, R.W.; Ingersoll, D.T.

    1992-11-01

    This report discusses specifications which have been developed for a new multigroup cross section library based on ENDF/B-VI data for light water reactor shielding and reactor pressure vessel dosimetry applications. The resulting broad-group library and an intermediate fine-group library are defined by the specifications provided in this report. Processing ENDF/B-VI into multigroup format for use in radiation transport codes will provide radiation shielding analysts with the most currently available nuclear data. it is expected that the general nature of the specifications will be useful in other applications such as reactor physics.

  3. Unexpected Actinyl Cation-Directed Structural Variation in Neptunyl(VI) A-Type Tri-lacunary Heteropolyoxotungstate Complexes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Berg, John M.; Gaunt, Andrew J.; May, Iain; Pugmire, Alison L.; Reilly, Sean D.; Scott, Brian L.; Wilkerson, Marianne P.

    2015-04-22

    A-type tri-lacunary heteropolyoxotungstate anions (e.g., [PW9O34]9-, [AsW9O34]9-, [SiW9O34]10- and [GeW9O34]10-) are multi-dentate oxygen donor ligands that readily form sandwich complexes with actinyl cations ({UO2}2+, {NpO2}+, {NpO2}2+ & {PuO2}2+) in near neutral/slightly alkaline aqueous solutions. Two or three actinyl cations are sandwiched between two trilacunary anions, with additional cations (Na+, K+ or NH4 +) also often held within the cluster. Studies thus far have indicated that it is these additional +I cations, rather than the specific actinyl cation, that direct the structural variation in the complexes formed. We now report the structural characterization of the neptunyl (VI) cluster complex (NH4)13 [Na(NpO2)2(A-α-more » PW9O34)2]·12H2O. The anion in this complex, [Na(NpO2)2(PW9O34)2]13-, contains one Na+ cation and two {NpO2}2+ cations held between two [PW9O34]9- anions – with an additional partial occupancy NH4 + or {NpO2}2+ cation also present. In the analogous uranium (VI) system, under similar reaction conditions that includes an excess of NH4Cl in the parent solution, it was previously shown that [(NH4)2(UVIO2)2(A-PW9O34)2]12- is the dominant species in both solution and the crystallized salt. Spectroscopic studies provide further proof of differences in the observed chemistry for the {NpO2}2+/[PW9O34]9- and {UO2}2+/[PW9O34]9- systems, both in solution and in solid state complexes crystallized from comparable salt solutions. The work revealed that varying the actinide element (Np vs. U) can indeed measurably impact structure and complex stability in the cluster chemistry of actinyl (VI) cations with A-type tri-lacunary heteropolyoxotungstate anions.« less

  4. LLE review: Quarterly report, April--June 1996. Volume 67

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skeldon, M.D.

    1996-11-01

    This volume contains articles detailing several nonlinear processes associated with lasers and their use, as well as an article describing the computer control systems necessary to maintain and operate a large laser system such as the 60-beam OMEGA laser. The specific topics discussed in this issue include stimulated scattering in laser plasmas, power exchange between interacting laser beams, charged particles interacting with a laser pulse, thermal equilibration of optically excited states, an overview of the laser control system software in OMEGA, and a technique for cancellation of the nonlinear phase accumulation in short-pulse lasers.

  5. LLE 2005 annual report, October 2004-September 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2006-01-01

    Progress in laser fusion this past year falls into five broad categories: (1) direct-drive results from OMEGA; (2) progress in the development of the cryogenic target system and experiments with cryogenic targets; (3) results for polar direct drive (the application of nonspherically disposed laser beams for direct-drive spherically symmetrically driven systems), which is of great interest for the National Ignition Facility (NIF); (4) fast ignition, which uses short-pulse (<100-ps), high-intensity (~1015-W) laser beams to ignite a compressed thermonuclear fusion capsule; and (5) high-energy-density physics results that use inertial fusion facilities to produce matter in extreme states that are central to understanding and modeling nuclear weapons phenomena important to the National Stockpile Stewardship Program.

  6. LLE review, volume 73. Quarterly report, October 1997--December 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-04-01

    This progress report contains discussion on the following topics: A high-bandwidth electrical-waveform generator based on aperture-coupled striplines for OMEGA pulse-shaping applications; sweep deflection circuit development using computer-aided circuit design for the OMEGA multichannel streak camera; D-{sup 3}He protons as a diagnostic for target {rho}R; growth rates of the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability in inertial confinement fusion; three-dimensional analysis of the power transfer between crossed laser beams; characterization of freestanding polymer films for application in 351-nm, high-peak-power laser systems; subsurface damage in microgrinding optical glasses; bound-abrasive polishers for optical glass; and color gamut of cholesteric liquid crystal films and flakes by standard colorimetry.

  7. ENDF/B-VII.0, ENDF/B-VI, JEFF-3.1, AND JENDL-3.3 RESULTS FOR UNREFLECTED PLUTONIUM SOLUTIONS AND MOX LATTICES (U)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MOSTELLER, RUSSELL D.

    2007-02-09

    Previous studies have indicated that ENDF/B-VII preliminary releases {beta}-2 and {beta}-3, predecessors to the recent initial release of ENDF/B-VII.0, produce significantly better overall agreement with criticality benchmarks than does ENDF/B-VI. However, one of those studies also suggests that improvements still may be needed for thermal plutonium cross sections. The current study substantiates that concern by examining criticality benchmarks for unreflected spheres of plutonium-nitrate solutions and for slightly and heavily borated mixed-oxide (MOX) lattices. Results are presented for the JEFF-3.1 and JENDL-3.3 nuclear data libraries as well as ENDF/B-VII.0 and ENDF/B-VI. It is shown that ENDF/B-VII.0 tends to overpredict reactivity for thermal plutonium benchmarks over at least a portion of the thermal range. In addition, it is found that additional benchmark data are needed for the deep thermal range.

  8. In pursuit of clean air: a data book of problems and strategies at the state level. Volume 3: Federal Regions IV and VI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garvey, D.B.; Streets, D.G.

    1980-02-01

    This is the third volume of a five-volume report, designed to provide useful information for policy analysis in the Department of Energy, especially for the examination of possible areas of conflict between the implementation of a national energy policy calling for the increased use of coal and the pursuit of clean air. Information is presented for each state in Federal Regions IV and VI under the following section headings: state title page (includes a summary of air quality data); revised state implementation plan outline; maps of nonattainment areas, as designated; Storage and Retrieval of Aerometric Data (SAROAD); SAROAD data maps; power plant data; power plant maps; and county maps. States in Federal Region IV include: Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee. Those in Federal Region VI include: Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas. (JGB)

  9. Stratospheric ozone protection: The Montreal Protocol and Title VI of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babst, C.R. III

    1993-08-01

    The stratospheric ozone layer protects the surface of the Earth from harmful ultraviolet (UV-B) radiation, which has been causally linked to skin cancer and cataracts, suppression of the human immune system, damage to crops and aquatic organisms, the formation of ground-level zone and the rapid weathering of outdoor plastics. In recent years, scientists have observed a significant deterioration of the ozone layer, particularly over the poles, but increasingly over populated regions as well. This deterioration has been attributed to the atmospheric release of certain man-made halocarbons, including chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), halons, methyl chloroform and carbon tetrachloride. Once used extensively as propellants for aerosol sprays (but generally banned for such purposes since 1978), CFCs are widely used today as refrigerants, foams and solvents. All of these chlorinated (CFC, methyl chloroform and carbon tetrachloride) and brominated (halon) compounds are classified for regulatory purposes as Class I substances because of their significant ozone-depleting potential. Hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), developed as alternatives to CFCs and halons for many different applications, have been classified for regulatory purposes as Class II substances because of their relatively less destructive impact on stratospheric ozone. This paper describes the following regulations to reduce destruction of the ozone layer: the Montreal Protocol; Title VI of the Clean air Act Amendments of 1990; Accelerated Phase-out schedules developed by the countries which signed the Montreal Protocol; Use restrictions; Recycling and Emission reduction requirements; Servicing of motor vehicle air conditions; ban on nonessential products; labeling requirements; safe alternatives. 6 refs.

  10. Investigating the use of bismuth(V) for the oxidation and subsequent solvent extraction of americium(VI)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, L.R.; Mincher, B.J.; Schmitt, N.C.

    2008-07-01

    The separation of Am from Cm and the lanthanides is still one of the most complex separations facing analytical chemistry, as well as any proposed advanced fuel cycle. Current research is focused on the oxidation of americium for its selective separation from the trivalent lanthanides and curium. We have already successfully demonstrated that Am oxidized to the hexavalent state using sodium bismuthate at room temperature can be extracted into 30% TBP/dodecane. Its behavior has been demonstrated to be analogous to that of hexavalent uranyl, neptunyl, and plutonyl ions. Using UV-visible spectrophotometry, the mechanism of the oxidation with sodium bismuthate has been probed to identify if it is a suitable reagent for deployment in solvent extraction systems. It has been identified that 97% of the Am is oxidized within the first 5 minutes. Significantly longer periods of time are required to obtain a solution containing greater than 50% Am(VI) limiting the use of Bi(V) for process applications. (authors)

  11. Three-Dimensional Topological Insulators in I-III-VI2 and II-IV-V2 Chalcopyrite Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, wanxiang; Ding, Jun; Yao, yugui

    2011-01-01

    The recent discovery of topological insulators with exotic metallic surface states has garnered great interest in the fields of condensed matter physics and materials science.1 A number of spectacular quantum phenomena have been predicted when the surface states are under the influence of magnetism and superconductivity,2 5 which could open up new opportunities for technological applications in spintronics and quantum computing. To achieve this goal, material realization of topological insulators with desired physical properties is of crucial importance. Based on first-principles calculations, here we show that a large number of ternary chalcopyrite compounds of composition I-III-VI2 and II-IV-V2 can realize the topological insulating phase in their native states. The crystal structure of chalcopyrites is derived from the frequently used zinc-blende structure, and many of them possess a close lattice match to important mainstream semiconductors, which is essential for a smooth integration into current semiconductor technology. The diverse optical, electrical and structural properties of chalcopyrite semiconductors,6 and particularly their ability to host room-temperature ferromagnetism,7 9 make them appealing candidates for novel spintronic devices.

  12. U(VI) bioreduction with emulsified vegetable oil as the electron donor-Model application to a field test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Guoping; Watson, David B; Wu, Wei-min; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Parker, Jack C; Brooks, Scott C

    2013-01-01

    A one-time 2-hour emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) injection in a fast flowing aquifer decreased U discharge to a stream for over a year. Using a comprehensive biogeochemical model developed in the companion article based on microcosm tests, we approximately matched the observed acetate, nitrate, Fe, U, and sulfate concentrations, and described the major evolution trends of multiple microbial functional groups in the field test. While the lab-determined parameters were generally applicable in the field-scale simulation, the EVO hydrolysis rate constant was estimated to be an order of magnitude greater in the field than in the microcosms. The model predicted substantial biomass (sulfate reducers) and U(IV) accumulation near the injection wells and along the side boundaries of the treatment zone where electron donors (long-chain fatty acids) from the injection wells met electron acceptors (sulfate) from the surrounding environment. While EVO retention and hydrolysis characteristics were expected to control treatment longevity, modeling results indicated that electron acceptors such as sulfate may not only compete for electrons but also play a conducive role in degrading complex substrates and enhancing U(VI) reduction and immobilization. As a result, the spacing of the injection wells could be optimized for effective sustainable bioremediation.

  13. Compliance with the Clean Air Act Title VI Stratospheric Ozone Protection Program requirements at U.S. DOE Oak Ridge Reservation Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Humphreys, M.P.; Atkins, E.M.

    1999-07-01

    The Title VI Stratospheric Ozone Protection Program of the Clean Air Act (CAA) requires promulgation of regulations to reduce and prevent damage to the earth's protective ozone layer. Regulations pursuant to Title VI of the CAA are promulgated in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) at Title 40 CFR, Part 822. The regulations include ambitious production phaseout schedules for ozone depleting substances (ODS) including chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), halons, carbon tetrachloride, and methyl chloroform under 40 CFR 82, Subpart A. The regulations also include requirements for recycling and emissions reduction during the servicing of refrigeration equipment and technician certification requirements under Subpart F; provisions for servicing of motor vehicle air conditioners under Subpart B; a ban on nonessential products containing Class 1 ODS under Subpart C; restrictions on Federal procurement of ODS under Subpart D; labeling of products using ODS under Subpart E; and the Significant New Alternatives Policy Program under Subpart G. This paper will provide details of initiatives undertaken at US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Facilities for implementation of requirements under the Title VI Stratospheric Ozone Protection Program. The Stratospheric Ozone Protection Plans include internal DOE requirements for: (1) maintenance of ODS inventories; (2) ODS procurement practices; (3) servicing of refrigeration and air conditioning equipment; (4) required equipment modifications or replacement; (5) technician certification training; (6) labeling of products containing ODS; (7) substitution of chlorinated solvents; and (8) replacement of halon fire protection systems. The plans also require establishment of administrative control systems which assure that compliance is achieved and maintained as the regulations continue to develop and become effective.

  14. MONOGRAFIAS DE FISICA VI

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... of a motionless (P 0) isothermal entropy flux which offers a natural explanation ... arbitrary statistics, and trace afterwards the effect of imposing a definite statistics. ...

  15. VI-1 PAPERS PUBLISHED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    -ray strength function method, H. Utsunomiya, S. Goriely, M. Kamata, H. Akimune, T. Kondo, O. Itoh, C. Iwamoto, T. Yamagata, H. Toyokawa, Y.-W. Lui, H. Harada, F. Kitatani, S....

  16. VI-1 PAPERS PUBLISHED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 - March 31, 2012 Isoscalar giant resonances in 48 Ca, Y.-W. Lui, D. H. Youngblood, S. Shlomo, X. Chen, Y. Tokimoto, Krishichayan, M. Anders, and J. Button, Phys. Rev. C 83, 044327 (2011). Experimental validation of the largest calculated isospin-symmetry-breaking effect in a superallowed Fermi decay, D. Melconian, S. Triambak, C. Bordeanu, A. Garcia, J.C. Hardy, V.E. Iacob, N. Nica, H.I. Park, G. Tabacaru, L. Trache, I.S. Towner, R.E. Tribble and Y. Zhai, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 182301 (2011).

  17. VI-1 TALKS PRESENTED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 - March 31, 2013 Low energy nuclear physics facilities in the US and opportunities for collaboration, R.E. Tribble, Invited Talk, US-Korea Workshop on International Cooperation on Particle, Nuclear and Astrophysics Research, South Korea (April, 2012). The state of affairs of present and future nucleus-nucleus collision science, R.E. Tribble, Invited Key- note Talk, the NN2012 International Conference in San Antonio, Texas (May 2012). Asymptotic normalization coefficients as an indirect

  18. VI-1 TALKS PRESENTED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 - March 31, 2014 Honoring the achievements of Joseph B. Natowitz, R.E. Tribble, International Workshop on Dynamics and Thermodynamics, College Station, Texas (August 2013). Asymptotic normalization coefficients as an indirect technique for nuclear astrophysics (and more), R.E. Tribble, Invited Presentation, Seventh European Summer School for Experimental Nuclear Astrophysics, Catania, Italy (September 2013). Radioactive ion beams for nuclear science at Texas A&M University, R.E. Tribble,

  19. Updates to the ORIGEN-S Cross-Section Libraries Using ENDF-VI, EAF-99, and FENDL-2.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, B.D.

    2004-11-04

    The standard cross-section library for light-water reactor (LWR) analyses used by the ORIGEN-S depletion and decay code has been extensively updated. This work entailed the development of broad multigroup neutron cross sections for ORIGEN-S from several sources of pointwise continuous-energy cross-section evaluations, including the U.S. Evaluated Nuclear Data Files ENDF/B-VI Release 7, the Fusion Evaluated Nuclear Data Library FENDL-2.0, and the European Activation File EAF-99. The pointwise cross sections were collapsed to a three-group structure using a continuous-energy neutron flux spectrum representative of the typical neutronic conditions of typical LWR fuel and formatted for use by ORIGEN-S. In addition, the fission-product library has been expanded to include ENDF/B-VI fission yield data for 30 fissionable actinides. The processing codes and procedures are explained. Preliminary verification studies using the updated libraries were performed using the modules of the SCALE (Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation) system. Comparisons between the previous basic ORIGEN-S libraries and the updated libraries developed in this work are presented.

  20. Photoredox degradation of different water pollutants (MO, RhB, MB, and Cr(VI)) using Fe–N–S-tri-doped TiO{sub 2} nanophotocatalyst prepared by novel chemical method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Xuyao; Zhou, Xiaosong Zhang, Lingling; Xu, Limei; Ma, Lin; Luo, Jin; Li, Mengjia; Zeng, Lihua

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • TiO{sub 2} was synthesized through simple one-step hydrothermal method. • Photocatalytic activity for degradation of organic dyes and Cr(VI) are investigated. • The synergistic effect is shown in coexistence of MB and Cr(VI). - Abstract: Fe–N–S-tri-doped TiO{sub 2} (FeNS-TiO{sub 2}) was synthesized by a simple one-step hydrothermal method. The as-synthesized samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The photocatalytic activities of as-synthesized samples were tested by the oxidation of methyl orange (MO), rhodamine B (RhB), methylene blue (MB) and the reduction of aqueous Cr(VI) under visible-light (λ > 420 nm) irradiation, and compared with N-dope P25 (N-P25) and the undoped TiO{sub 2}. Besides, the effects of the coexistence of MO, RhB, and MB on FeNS-TiO{sub 2}-mediated photocatalytic reduction of aqueous Cr(VI) were also studied. The results indicated FeNS-TiO{sub 2} displayed higher visible-light-activated photocatalytic activity than N-P25 and the undoped TiO{sub 2}. Otherwise, FeNS-TiO{sub 2} showed the coexistence of MB enhanced the photocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI), whereas the coexistence of MO and RhB retarded the photocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI) over FeNS-TiO{sub 2}. Moreover, a possible photocatalytic mechanism is discussed.

  1. Innovative Use of Cr(VI) Plume Depictions and Pump-and-Treat Capture Analysis to Estimate Risks of Contaminant Discharge to Surface Water at Hanford Reactor Areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Chuck W.; Hanson, James P.; Ivarson, Kristine A.; Tonkin, M.

    2015-01-14

    The Hanford Site nuclear reactor operations required large quantities of high-quality cooling water, which was treated with chemicals including sodium dichromate dihydrate for corrosion control. Cooling water leakage, as well as intentional discharge of cooling water to ground during upset conditions, produced extensive groundwater recharge mounds consisting largely of contaminated cooling water and resulted in wide distribution of hexavalent chromium (Cr[VI]) contamination in the unconfined aquifer. The 2013 Cr(VI) groundwater plumes in the 100 Areas cover approximately 6 km2 (1500 acres), primarily in the 100-HR-3 and 100-KR-4 groundwater operable units (OUs). The Columbia River is a groundwater discharge boundary; where the plumes are adjacent to the Columbia River there remains a potential to discharge Cr(VI) to the river at concentrations above water quality criteria. The pump-and-treat systems along the River Corridor are operating with two main goals: 1) protection of the Columbia River, and 2) recovery of contaminant mass. An evaluation of the effectiveness of the pump-and-treat systems was needed to determine if the Columbia River was protected from contamination, and also to determine where additional system modifications may be needed. In response to this need, a technique for assessing the river protection was developed which takes into consideration seasonal migration of the plume and hydraulic performance of the operating well fields. Groundwater contaminant plume maps are generated across the Hanford Site on an annual basis. The assessment technique overlays the annual plume and the capture efficiency maps for the various pump and treat systems. The river protection analysis technique was prepared for use at the Hanford site and is described in detail in M.J. Tonkin, 2013. Interpolated capture frequency maps, based on mapping dynamic water level observed in observation wells and derived water levels in the vicinity of extraction and injection wells, are developed initially. Second, simulated capture frequency maps are developed, based on transport modelling results. Both interpolated and simulated capture frequency maps are based on operation of the systems over a full year. These two capture maps are then overlaid on the plume distribution maps for inspection of the relative orientation of the contaminant plumes with the capture frequency. To quantify the relative degree of protection of the river from discharges of Cr(VI) (and conversely, the degree of threat) at any particular location, a systematic method of evaluating and mapping the plume/capture relationship was developed. By comparing the spatial relationship between contaminant plumes and hydraulic capture frequency, an index of relative protectiveness is developed and the results posted on the combined plume/capture plan view map. Areas exhibiting lesser degrees of river protection are identified for remedial process optimization actions to control plumes and prevent continuing discharge of Cr(VI) to the river.

  2. I-III-VI.sub.2 based solar cell utilizing the structure CuInGaSe.sub.2 CdZnS/ZnO

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Wen S.; Stewart, John M.

    1992-01-07

    A thin film I-III-VI.sub.2 based solar cell having a first layer of copper indium gallium selenide, a second layer of cadmium zinc sulfide, a double layer of zinc oxide, and a metallization structure comprised of a layer of nickel covered by a layer of aluminum. An optional antireflective coating may be placed on said metallization structure. The cadmium zinc sulfide layer is deposited by means of an aqueous solution growth deposition process and may actually consist of two layers: a low zinc content layer and a high zinc content layer. Photovoltaic efficiencies of 12.5% at Air Mass 1.5 illumination conditions and 10.4% under AMO illumination can be achieved.

  3. Theoretical analyses of (n,xn) reactions on sup 235 U, sup 238 U, sup 237 Np, and sup 239 Pu for ENDF/B-VI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, P.G.; Arthur, E.D.

    1991-01-01

    Theoretical analyses were performed of neutron-induced reactions on {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np, and {sup 239}Pu between 0.01 and 20 MeV in order to calculate neutron emission cross sections and spectra for ENDF/B-VI evaluations. Coupled-channel optical model potentials were obtained for each target nucleus by fitting total, elastic, and inelastic scattering cross section data, as well as low-energy average resonance data. The resulting deformed optical model potentials were used to calculate direct (n,n{prime}) cross sections and transmission coefficients for use in Hauser-Feshbach statistical theory analyses. A fission model with multiple barrier representation, width fluctuation corrections, and preequilibrium corrections were included in the analyses. Direct cross sections for higher-lying vibrational states were calculated using DWBA theory, normalized using B(E{ell}) values determined from (d,d{prime}) and Coulomb excitation data, where available, and from systematics otherwise. Initial fission barrier parameters and transition state density enhancements appropriate to the compound systems involved were obtained from previous analyses, especially fits to charged-particle fission probability data. The parameters for the fission model were adjusted for each target system to obtain optimum agreement with direct (n,f) cross section measurements, taking account of the various multichance fission channels, that is, the different compound systems involved. The results from these analyses were used to calculate most of the neutron (n,n), (n,n{prime}), and (n,xn) cross section data in the ENDF/B/VI evaluations for the above nuclei, and all of the energy-angle correlated spectra. The deformed optical model and fission model parameterizations are described. Comparisons are given between the results of these analyses and the previous ENDF/B-V evaluations as well as with the available experimental data. 14 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  4. ENDF-6 Formats Manual Data Formats and Procedures for the Evaluated Nuclear Data File ENDF/B-VI and ENDF/B-VII

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herman, M.; Members of the Cross Sections Evaluation Working Group

    2009-06-01

    In December 2006, the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) of the United States released the new ENDF/B-VII.0 library. This represented considerable achievement as it was the 1st major release since 1990 when ENDF/B-VI has been made publicly available. The two libraries have been released in the same format, ENDF-6, which has been originally developed for the ENDF/B-VI library. In the early stage of work on the VII-th generation of the library CSEWG made important decision to use the same formats. This decision was adopted even though it was argued that it would be timely to modernize the formats and several interesting ideas were proposed. After careful deliberation CSEWG concluded that actual implementation would require considerable resources needed to modify processing codes and to guarantee high quality of the files processed by these codes. In view of this the idea of format modernization has been postponed and ENDF-6 format was adopted for the new ENDF/B-VII library. In several other areas related to ENDF we made our best to move beyond established tradition and achieve maximum modernization. Thus, the 'Big Paper' on ENDF/B-VII.0 has been published, also in December 2006, as the Special Issue of Nuclear Data Sheets 107 (1996) 2931-3060. The new web retrieval and plotting system for ENDF-6 formatted data, Sigma, was developed by the NNDC and released in 2007. Extensive paper has been published on the advanced tool for nuclear reaction data evaluation, EMPIRE, in 2007. This effort was complemented with release of updated set of ENDF checking codes in 2009. As the final item on this list, major revision of ENDF-6 Formats Manual was made. This work started in 2006 and came to fruition in 2009 as documented in the present report.

  5. Raman spectra of Cu{sub 2}B{sup II}C{sup IV}X{sub 4}{sup VI} magnetic quaternary semiconductor compounds with tetragonal stannite type structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rincón, C. Quintero, M.; Power, Ch.; Moreno, E.; Quintero, E.; Morocoima, M.; Henao, J. A.; Macías, M. A.

    2015-05-28

    A comparative study of the Raman spectra of Cu{sub 2}B{sup II}C{sup IV}S{sub 4}{sup VI} and Cu{sub 2}B{sup II}C{sup IV}Se{sub 4}{sup VI}(where B = Mn or Fe) magnetic quaternary semiconductor compounds with stannite-type structure (I4{sup ¯}2m) has been done. Most of the fourteen Raman lines expected for these materials were observed in the spectra. The two strongest lines observed have been assigned to the IR inactive A{sub 1}{sup 1} and A{sub 1}{sup 2} stannite modes that originated from the motion of the S or Se anion around the Cu and C{sup IV} cations remaining at rest. The shift in the frequency of these two lines of about 150 cm{sup −1} to lower energies observed in Cu{sub 2}B{sup II}C{sup IV}Se{sub 4}{sup VI} compounds as compared to those in Cu{sub 2}B{sup II}C{sup IV}S{sub 4}{sup VI} ones, can then be explained as due to the anion mass effect. Based on the fact that values of these frequencies depend mainly on anion mass and bond-stretching forces between nearest-neighbor atoms, the vibrational frequencies v{sup ¯}(A{sub 1}{sup 2}) and v{sup ¯}(A{sub 1}{sup 2}) of both modes for several Cu{sub 2}B{sup II}C{sup IV}X{sub 4}{sup VI} stannite compounds (where X = S, Se, or Te) very close to the experimental data reported for these materials were calculated from a simple model that relates these stretching forces to the anion-cation bond-distances.

  6. The Department of Energy`s Rocky Flats Plant: A guide to record series useful for health-related research. Volume VI, workplace and environmental monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    This is the sixth in a series of seven volumes which constitute a guide to records of the Rocky Flats Plant useful for conducting health-related research. The primary purpose of Volume VI is to describe record series pertaining to workplace and environmental monitoring activities at the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Rocky Flats Plant, now named the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, near Denver, Colorado. History Associates Incorporated (HAI) prepared this guide as part of its work as the support services contractor for DOE`s Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project. This introduction briefly describes the Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project and HAI`s role in the project, provides a history of workplace and environmental monitoring practices at Rocky Flats, and identifies organizations contributing to workplace and environmental monitoring policies and activities. Other topics include the scope and arrangement of this volume and the organization to contact for access to these records. Comprehensive introductory and background information is available in Volume I. Other volumes in the guide pertain to administrative and general subjects, facilities and equipment, production and materials handling, waste management, and employee health. In addition, HAI has produced a subject-specific guide, titled The September 1957 Rocky Flats Fire. A Guide to Record Series of the Department of Energy and Its Contractors, which researchers should consult for further information about records related to this incident.

  7. Apparatus for forming thin-film heterojunction solar cells employing materials selected from the class of I-III-VI.sub.2 chalcopyrite compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mickelsen, Reid A.; Chen, Wen S.

    1983-01-01

    Apparatus for forming thin-film, large area solar cells having a relatively high light-to-electrical energy conversion efficiency and characterized in that the cell comprises a p-n-type heterojunction formed of: (i) a first semiconductor layer comprising a photovoltaic active material selected from the class of I-III-VI.sub.2 chalcopyrite ternary materials which is vacuum deposited in a thin "composition-graded" layer ranging from on the order of about 2.5 microns to about 5.0 microns (.congruent.2.5 .mu.m to .congruent.5.0 .mu.m) and wherein the lower region of the photovoltaic active material preferably comprises a low resistivity region of p-type semiconductor material having a superimposed region of relatively high resistivity, transient n-type semiconductor material defining a transient p-n homojunction; and (ii), a second semiconductor layer comprising a low resistivity n-type semiconductor material wherein interdiffusion (a) between the elemental constituents of the two discrete juxtaposed regions of the first semiconductor layer defining a transient p-n homojunction layer, and (b) between the transient n-type material in the first semiconductor layer and the second n-type semiconductor layer, causes the transient n-type material in the first semiconductor layer to evolve into p-type material, thereby defining a thin layer heterojunction device characterized by the absence of voids, vacancies and nodules which tend to reduce the energy conversion efficiency of the system.

  8. Energy levels, oscillator strengths and transition probabilities for Si-like P II, S III, Cl IV, Ar V and K VI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abou El-Maaref, A.; Uosif, M.A.M.; Allam, S.H.; El-Sherbini, Th.M.

    2012-07-15

    Fine-structure calculations of energy levels, oscillator strengths, and transition probabilities for transitions among the terms belonging to 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 2}, 3s3p{sup 3}, 3s{sup 2}3p3d, 3s{sup 2}3p4s, 3s{sup 2}3p4p, 3s{sup 2}3p4d, 3s{sup 2}3p5s and 3s{sup 2}3p5p configurations of silicon-like ions P II, S III, Cl IV, Ar V and K VI have been calculated using configuration-interaction version 3 (CIV3). We compared our data with the available experimental data and other theoretical calculations. Most of our calculations of energy levels and oscillator strengths (in length form) show good agreement with both experimental and theoretical data. Lifetimes of the excited levels are also given.

  9. ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements VI (ACME VI) Science Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biraud, S

    2015-12-01

    From October 1 through September 30, 2016, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Aerial Facility will deploy the Cessna 206 aircraft over the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site, collecting observations of trace-gas mixing ratios over the ARM’s SGP facility. The aircraft payload includes two Atmospheric Observing Systems, Inc., analyzers for continuous measurements of CO2 and a 12-flask sampler for analysis of carbon cycle gases (CO2, CO, CH4, N2O, 13CO2, 14CO2, carbonyl sulfide, and trace hydrocarbon species, including ethane). The aircraft payload also includes instrumentation for solar/infrared radiation measurements. This research is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s ARM Climate Research Facility and Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Program and builds upon previous ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements (ARM-ACME) missions. The goal of these measurements is to improve understanding of 1) the carbon exchange at the SGP site, 2) how CO2 and associated water and energy fluxes influence radiative forcing, convective processes and CO2 concentrations over the SGP site, and 3) how greenhouse gases are transported on continental scales.

  10. Appendix VI Corrective Action Strategy

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ......... 15 3.0 Underground Test Area............ 13 3-1 Underground Test Area Corrective Action ...

  11. Tritium Behavior in Lead Lithium Eutectic (LLE) at Low Tritium Partial Pressure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation from the 33rd Tritium Focus Group Meeting held in Aiken, South Carolina on April 22-24, 2014.

  12. LLNL Contribution to LLE FY09 Annual Report: NIC and HED Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heeter, R F; Landen, O L; Hsing, W W; Fournier, K B

    2009-10-01

    In FY09, LLNL led 238 target shots on the OMEGA Laser System. Approximately half of these LLNL-led shots supported the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). The remainder was dedicated to experiments for the high-energy-density stewardship experiments (HEDSE). Objectives of the LLNL led NIC campaigns at OMEGA included: (1) Laser-plasma interaction studies in physical conditions relevant for the NIF ignition targets; (2) Demonstration of Tr = 100 eV foot symmetry tuning using a reemission sphere; (3) X-ray scattering in support of conductivity measurements of solid density Be plasmas; (4) Experiments to study the physical properties (thermal conductivity) of shocked fusion fuels; (5) High-resolution measurements of velocity nonuniformities created by microscopic perturbations in NIF ablator materials; (6) Development of a novel Compton Radiography diagnostic platform for ICF experiments; and (7) Precision validation of the equation of state for quartz. The LLNL HEDSE campaigns included the following experiments: (1) Quasi-isentropic (ICE) drive used to study material properties such as strength, equation of state, phase, and phase-transition kinetics under high pressure; (2) Development of a high-energy backlighter for radiography in support of material strength experiments using Omega EP and the joint OMEGA-OMEGA-EP configuration; (3) Debris characterization from long-duration, point-apertured, point-projection x-ray backlighters for NIF radiation transport experiments; (4) Demonstration of ultrafast temperature and density measurements with x-ray Thomson scattering from short-pulse laser-heated matter; (5) The development of an experimental platform to study nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) physics using direct-drive implosions; (6) Opacity studies of high-temperature plasmas under LTE conditions; and (7) Characterization of copper (Cu) foams for HEDSE experiments.

  13. COS OBSERVATIONS OF METAL LINE AND BROAD LYMAN-{alpha} ABSORPTION IN THE MULTI-PHASE O VI AND Ne VIII SYSTEM AT z = 0.20701 TOWARD HE 0226-4110

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Savage, B. D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Lehner, N. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Narayanan, A. [Indian Institute of Space Science and Technology, Thiruvananthapuram 695547, Kerala (India)

    2011-12-20

    Observations of the QSO HE 0226-4110 (z{sub em} = 0.495) with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) from 1134 to 1796 A with a resolution of {approx}17 km s{sup -1} and signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) per resolution element of 20-40 are used to study the multi-phase absorption system at z = 0.20701 containing O VI and Ne VIII. The system was previously studied with lower S/N observations with Far-Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) and Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS). The COS observations provide more reliable measures of the H I and metal lines present in the system and reveal the clear presence of broad Ly{alpha} (BLA) absorption with b = 72(+13, -6) km s{sup -1} and log N(H I) = 13.87 {+-} 0.08. Detecting BLAs associated with warm gas absorbers is crucial for determining the temperature, metallicity, and total baryonic content of the absorbers. The BLA is probably recording the trace amount of thermally broadened H I in the collisionally ionized plasma with log T {approx} 5.7 that also produces the O VI and Ne VIII absorption. The total hydrogen column in the collisionally ionized gas, log N(H) {approx} 20.1, exceeds that in the cooler photoionized gas in the system by a factor of {approx}22. The oxygen abundance in the collisionally ionized gas is [O/H] = -0.89 {+-} 0.08 {+-} 0.07. The absorber probably occurs in the circumgalactic environment (halo) of a foreground L = 0.25L{sub *} disk galaxy with an impact parameter of 109 h{sub 70}{sup -1} kpc identified by Mulchaey and Chen.

  14. Systematic approach for simultaneously correcting the band-gap andp-dseparation errors of common cation III-V or II-VI binaries in density functional theory calculations within a local density approximation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Jianwei; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2015-07-31

    We propose a systematic approach that can empirically correct three major errors typically found in a density functional theory (DFT) calculation within the local density approximation (LDA) simultaneously for a set of common cation binary semiconductors, such as III-V compounds, (Ga or In)X with X = N,P,As,Sb, and II-VI compounds, (Zn or Cd)X, with X = O,S,Se,Te. By correcting (1) the binary band gaps at high-symmetry points , L, X, (2) the separation of p-and d-orbital-derived valence bands, and (3) conduction band effective masses to experimental values and doing so simultaneously for common cation binaries, the resulting DFT-LDA-based quasi-first-principles methodmore » can be used to predict the electronic structure of complex materials involving multiple binaries with comparable accuracy but much less computational cost than a GW level theory. This approach provides an efficient way to evaluate the electronic structures and other material properties of complex systems, much needed for material discovery and design.« less

  15. Theory VI. Computational Materials Sciences Network (CMSN)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Z Y

    2008-06-25

    The Computational Materials Sciences Network (CMSN) is a virtual center consisting of scientists interested in working together, across organizational and disciplinary boundaries, to formulate and pursue projects that reflect challenging and relevant computational research in the materials sciences. The projects appropriate for this center involve those problems best pursued through broad cooperative efforts, rather than those key problems best tackled by single investigator groups. CMSN operates similarly to the DOE Center of Excellence for the Synthesis and Processing of Advanced Materials, coordinated by George Samara at Sandia. As in the Synthesis and Processing Center, the intent of the modest funding for CMSN is to foster partnering and collective activities. All CMSN proposals undergo external peer review and are judged foremost on the quality and timeliness of the science and also on criteria relevant to the objective of the center, especially concerning a strategy for partnering. More details about CMSN can be found on the CMSN webpages at: http://cmpweb.ameslab.gov/ccms/CMSN-homepage.html.

  16. Part VI: Section I - Contract Clauses

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... briefings and debriefings of employees traveling to foreign countries or interacting with ... records, records on salary and employee benefits; drug testing records, labor negotiation ...

  17. Electrolyte Solvation and Ionic Association. VI. Acetonitrile...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    different thermal phase behavior and electrochemicalphysicochemical properties. The simulation results are in full accord with a previous experimental study of these (AN)n-LiX ...

  18. Blue Canyon VI | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LLC Developer EDP Renewables North America LLC Energy Purchaser Merchant Location Lawton OK Coordinates 34.8582, -98.54752 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingserv...

  19. pVI.19-28.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  20. ppVI.1-18.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  1. Chapter VI: Integrating North American Energy Markets

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    chapter briefly discusses land-use and ecosystem issues ... resources and interstate natural gas pipelines, which can ... consider mitigation requirements that may be imposed as ...

  2. Cours-VI/Clavin2015.key

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    d d 1 Le d 2 d 2 w xd L U L U Ladia 1 cool D T R 2 Formulation (volumetric heat loss in a planar flame) L cool D T R U L 2 L D T U 2 L tube radius R ...

  3. Part VI: Section I: Contract Clause

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    under the procedures authorized in Executive Order 11246, as amended. In addition, sanctions may be imposed and remedies invoked against the Contractor as provided in Executive...

  4. VI-13 INSTITUTE COLLOQUIA AND SEMINARS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Diagram of QCD Matter December 6 Dr. Toshiki Maruyama, Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Japan First-order Phase Transitions of Nuclear Matter and...

  5. VI-9 RESEARCH PERSONNEL AND ENGINEERING STAFF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    M. Zhanov, Senior Scientist Research Staff Juha Arje, Research Scientist- To 1114 Marina Barbui, Assist. Research Scientist Henry Clark, Accelerator Physicist (50%) Grigor...

  6. VI-9 RESEARCH PERSONNEL AND ENGINEERING STAFF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Zhanov, Senior Scientist Research Staff Juha Arje, Research Scientist- From 412012 Marina Barbui, Assist. Research Scientist Henry Clark, Accelerator Physicist (50%) Grigor...

  7. VI-13 INSTITUTE COLLOQUIA AND SEMINARS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Livius Trache, National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest-Magurele, Romania Current and Future Nuclear Physics Research at IFIN-HH Bucharest, Romania ...

  8. Diluted II-VI Oxide Semiconductors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Zn 1y Mn y O x Te 1x is a material perfectly satisfying the conditions for single-junction photovoltaics with the potential for power conversion efficiencies surpassing 50%....

  9. VI-13 INSTITUTE COLLOQUIA AND SEMINARS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2-March 31, 2013 2012 April 24 Dr. Antti Saastamoninen, University of Jyvaskyla and Cyclotron Institute, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas Beta-Decay Studies for Nova Nucleosynthesis May 10 Professor Helmut Satz, Fakultaet fuer Physik, Universitaet Bielefeld, Bielefeld, Germany Quark Confinement and Hadrosythesis May 14 Dr. Daniel Abriola, Internaltional Atomic Energy Agrncy, Vienna, Austria LAEA's Research Coordinated Project (CRP) on Beta-Delayed Neutron Emission May 15 Dr. Dan

  10. VI-13 INSTITUTE COLLOQUIA AND SEMINARS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3-March 31, 2014 2013 September 25 Prof. Wilton Catford, Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, United Kingdom TIARA Detector September 25 Prof. K. A. Gridnev, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg, Russia Extreme Neutron Rich Sector of the Nuclear Chart: New Horizon September 26 Dr. Jiansong Wang, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou, China Elastic Scattering Studies at RIBLL September 26 Dr. Zhiqiang Chen, Institute of Modern Physics,

  11. VI-9 RESEARCH PERSONNEL AND ENGINEERING STAFF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 - March 31, 2013 Faculty and Research Group Leaders Aldo Bonasera, Senior Scientist Charles M. Folden III, Assist. Prof. of Nuclear Chemistry Rainer Fries, Assist. Professor of Physics Carl A. Gagliardi, Professor of Physics John C. Hardy, Professor of Physics Che Ming Ko, Professor of Physics Dan Melconian, Assist. Professor of Physics Saskia Mioduszewski, Assist. Prof. of Physics J. B. Natowitz, Professor of Chemistry, Bright Chair Ralf Rapp Associate Professor of Physics Shalom Shlomo,

  12. VI-9 RESEARCH PERSONNEL AND ENGINEERING STAFF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 - March 31, 2014 Faculty and Research Group Leaders Aldo Bonasera, Senior Scientist Charles M. Folden III, Assist. Prof. of Nuclear Chemistry Rainer Fries, Assist. Professor of Physics Carl A. Gagliardi, Professor of Physics John C. Hardy, Professor of Physics Che Ming Ko, Professor of Physics Dan Melconian, Assist. Professor of Physics Saskia Mioduszewski, Assist. Prof. of Physics J. B. Natowitz, Professor of Chemistry, Bright Chair Ralf Rapp Associate Professor of Physics Grigory Rogachev,

  13. Journal of Undergraduate Research, Volume VI, 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faletra, P.; Schuetz, A.; Cherkerzian, D.; Clark, T.

    2006-01-01

    Students who conducted research at DOE National Laboratories during 2005 were invited to include their research abstracts, and for a select few, their completed research papers in this Journal. This Journal is direct evidence of students collaborating with their mentors. Fields in which these students worked include: Biology; Chemistry; Computer Science; Engineering; Environmental Science; General Sciences; Materials Sciences; Medical and Health Sciences; Nuclear Sciences; Physics; and Science Policy.

  14. Microsoft Word - FeVI.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mineral ferrate.1 Ferrate is a powerful oxidant, which has been used in soil and wastewater treatment, batteries, and disinfectants; however, it is unstable and often...

  15. OMEGA EP - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - Laboratory for Laser Energetics Laboratory for Laser Energetics Logo Search Home Around the Lab Past Issues Past Quick Shots About Office of the Director Map to LLE LLE Tours LLE ...

  16. Omega Laser Facility - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - Laboratory for Laser Energetics Laboratory for Laser Energetics Logo Search Home Around the Lab Past Issues Past Quick Shots About Office of the Director Map to LLE LLE Tours LLE ...

  17. OMEGA Laser - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - Laboratory for Laser Energetics Laboratory for Laser Energetics Logo Search Home Around the Lab Past Issues Past Quick Shots About Office of the Director Map to LLE LLE Tours LLE ...

  18. Fiscal year 1986 Department of Energy Authorization (uranium enrichment and electric energy systems, energy storage and small-scale hydropower programs). Volume VI. Hearings before the Subcommittee on Energy Research and Production of the Committee on Science and Technology, US House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session, February 28; March 5, 7, 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    Volume VI of the hearing record covers three days of testimony on the future of US uranium enrichment and on programs involving electric power and energy storage. There were four areas of concern about uranium enrichment: the choice between atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) and the advanced gas centrifuge (AGC) technologies, cost-effective operation of gaseous diffusion plants, plans for a gas centrifuge enrichment plant, and how the DOE will make its decision. The witnesses represented major government contractors, research laboratories, and energy suppliers. The discussion on the third day focused on the impact of reductions in funding for electric energy systems and energy storage and a small budget increase to encourage small hydropower technology transfer to the private sector. Two appendices with additional statements and correspondence follow the testimony of 17 witnesses.

  19. Systematic approach for simultaneously correcting the band-gap andp-dseparation errors of common cation III-V or II-VI binaries in density functional theory calculations within a local density approximation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jianwei; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2015-07-31

    We propose a systematic approach that can empirically correct three major errors typically found in a density functional theory (DFT) calculation within the local density approximation (LDA) simultaneously for a set of common cation binary semiconductors, such as III-V compounds, (Ga or In)X with X = N,P,As,Sb, and II-VI compounds, (Zn or Cd)X, with X = O,S,Se,Te. By correcting (1) the binary band gaps at high-symmetry points , L, X, (2) the separation of p-and d-orbital-derived valence bands, and (3) conduction band effective masses to experimental values and doing so simultaneously for common cation binaries, the resulting DFT-LDA-based quasi-first-principles method can be used to predict the electronic structure of complex materials involving multiple binaries with comparable accuracy but much less computational cost than a GW level theory. This approach provides an efficient way to evaluate the electronic structures and other material properties of complex systems, much needed for material discovery and design.

  20. DOE human genome program contractor-grantee workshop VI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-10-01

    Research is presented from the workshop on the Human Genome Project. Topics include sequencing, genetic mapping, informatics, ethical and legal issues, and infrastructure.

  1. SEGS VI Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. References http:ewh.ieee.orgr6lasvegasIEEELASVEGASMAY2006.pdf Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  2. Microsoft Word - VI_9-10_Research Personnel, Engineers, Students...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Giacomo Bonasera - From 6914 Jonathan Button Paul Cammarata - To 123114 Zilong Chang Roman Chyzh Murat Dag Xiaojian Du Benjamin Fenker Kyong Choi Han Lauren Heilborn...

  3. LABORATORY STUDY FOR THE REDUCTION OF CHROME (VI) TO CHROME ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: DUNCAM JB ; GUTHRIE MD ; LUECK KJ ; AVILA M Publication Date: 2007-07-18 OSTI Identifier: 940015 Report Number(s): RPP-RPT-34083 Rev 0 TRN: US0807070 DOE Contract Number: ...

  4. ORGANIZATIONAL CHART - CYCLOTRON INSTITUTE VI-11 DIRECTOR Tribble

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tribble SEE Line Proj. Manager H. Clark Brinkley Chen Chubaryan Horvat Hyman Roeder Tabacaru Graduate Students Research Associates Research Scientists Research Group Leaders Administration/ Accounting Jeske Computer Systems Hagel Burch Student Workers Senior Accelerator Physicist May Accelerator Physicists Kim H. Clark Roeder Tabacaru Operations Chief Abegglen Building Maint. Adams Mynar Electrical Shop/Accelerator Tech. Bailey Carmona Cowden Eisenmann Foxworth Gathings LaPoint Law Morgan Peeler

  5. STUDIES IN ASTRONOMICAL TIME SERIES ANALYSIS. VI. BAYESIAN BLOCK REPRESENTATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scargle, Jeffrey D.; Norris, Jay P.; Jackson, Brad; Chiang, James

    2013-02-20

    This paper addresses the problem of detecting and characterizing local variability in time series and other forms of sequential data. The goal is to identify and characterize statistically significant variations, at the same time suppressing the inevitable corrupting observational errors. We present a simple nonparametric modeling technique and an algorithm implementing it-an improved and generalized version of Bayesian Blocks-that finds the optimal segmentation of the data in the observation interval. The structure of the algorithm allows it to be used in either a real-time trigger mode, or a retrospective mode. Maximum likelihood or marginal posterior functions to measure model fitness are presented for events, binned counts, and measurements at arbitrary times with known error distributions. Problems addressed include those connected with data gaps, variable exposure, extension to piecewise linear and piecewise exponential representations, multivariate time series data, analysis of variance, data on the circle, other data modes, and dispersed data. Simulations provide evidence that the detection efficiency for weak signals is close to a theoretical asymptotic limit derived by Arias-Castro et al. In the spirit of Reproducible Research all of the code and data necessary to reproduce all of the figures in this paper are included as supplementary material.

  6. Microsoft Word - APP VI, Rev 3 _03-19-20

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... Bowen, S.M., D.L. Finnegan, J.L. Thompson, C.M. Miller, P.L. Baca, L.F. Olivas, C.G. Geoffrion, D.K. Smith, W. Goishi, B.K. Esser, J.W. Meadows, N. Namboodiri, and J.F. Wild. 2001. ...

  7. Microsoft Word - VI-1 Papers Published 2003.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 - March 31, 2003 Determination of the S 18 astrophysical factor for 8 B(p,γ) 9 C from the breakup of 9 C at intermediate energies L. Trache, F. Carstoiu, A. M. Mukhamedzhanov and R. E. Tribble Phys. Rev. C 66, 035801 (2002). Determination of the S 17 and S 18 astrophysical factors from the breakup of 8 B and 9 C at intermediate energies L. Trache, F. Carstoiu, C. A. Gagliardi, A. M. Mukhamedzhanov and R. E. Tribble Nucl. Phys. A718, 493 (2002). New 0 + states in 158 Gd S. R. Lesher, A.

  8. Microsoft Word - VI_11_Organizational Chart.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Yennello SEE Line Proj. Manager H. Clark Brinkley Chen Chubaryan Horvat Hyman Roeder Tabacaru Graduate Students Research Associates Research Scientists Research Group Leaders Administration/ Accounting Jeske Computer Systems Hagel Burch Student Worker Senior Accelerator Physicist May Accelerator Physicists Kim H. Clark Roeder Tabacaru Operations Chief Abegglen Building Maint. Adams Mynar Student Worker Electrical Shop/Accelerator Tech. Bailey Carmona Cowden Eisenmann Foxworth Gathings LaPoint

  9. Microsoft Word - APP VI, Rev 3 _03-19-20

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nevada Test Area CR Closure Report DoD U.S. Department of Defense DOE U.S. Department of Energy DOEDP U.S. Department of EnergyDefense Program DOEEM U.S. Department of Energy...

  10. Microsoft Word - VI_12_Degrees Awarded 2015.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nuclear systems A. Bonasera Post Doc. at INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania, Italy STUDENTS WHO RECEIVED GRADUATE DEGREES FROM NON-THESIS April 1, 2014 - March 31, 2015 ...

  11. North American Standard Level VI Inspection Program Update: Ensuring Safe

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Energy America: Regulation of International Electricity Trade North America: Regulation of International Electricity Trade North America: Regulation of International Electricity Trade prepared by North American Energy Working Group on December 2002. PDF icon North America: Regulation of International Electricity Trade More Documents & Publications Regulatory Side-by-Side Governing Permitting of Cross-Border Electricity Transmission Facilities Between the United States and Canada Guide

  12. Microsoft Word - VI-1 Papers Published 2003.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    expansion J. B. Natowitz, K. Hagel, Y. Ma, M. Murray, L. Qin, S. Shlomo, R. Wada, and J. Wang Phys. Rev. C 66, 031601 (2002). Pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles...

  13. An Octahedral Coordination Complex of Iron(VI)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    John F. Berry,1* Eckhard Bill,1 Eberhard Bothe,1 Serena DeBeer George,2 Bernd Mienert,1 Frank Neese1+ and Karl Wieghardt1 1 Max-Planck-Institut für Bioanorganische Chemie, Stiftstrasse 34-36, D-45470 Mülheim an der Ruhr, Germany 2 Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, SLAC, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94309, USA * Present address: The University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Chemistry, 1101 University Ave. Madison, WI 53706-1322, USA + Present address: Institut für

  14. Precision engineering center. 1988 Annual report, Volume VI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dow, T.; Fornaro, R.; Keltie, R.; Paesler, M.

    1988-12-01

    To reverse the downward trend in the balance of trade, American companies must concentrate on increasing research into new products, boosting productivity, and improving manufacturing processes. The Precision Engineering Center at North Carolina State University is a multidisciplinary research and graduate education program dedicated to providing the new technology necessary to respond to this challenge. One extremely demanding manufacturing area is the fabrication and assembly of optical systems. These systems are at the heart of such consumer products as cameras, lenses, copy machines, laser bar-code scanners, VCRs, and compact audio discs - products that the Japanese and other East Asian countries are building dominance. A second critical area is the fabrication of VLSI and ULSI circuits. The tolerances required to produce the next generation of components for such systems have created the need for new approaches - approaches that could either make or break America`s competitive position. This report contains individual reports on research projects grouped into three broad areas: measurement and actuation; real-time control; precision fabrication. Separate abstracts for these articles have been indexed into the energy database.

  15. Elucidating the Molecular Basis and Regulation of Chromium (VI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. We have identified and characterized (in the case of DNA-binding response regulator SO2426 and a putative azoreductase SO3585) the genes and ...

  16. Elucidating the Molecular Basis and Regulation of Chromium (VI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    developed proteomic technology, in particular liquid chromatographymass spectrometry (LC-MS), in conjunction with conventional protein purification and characterization techniques. ...

  17. Molecular Interactions of Plutonium(VI) with SyntheticManganese...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    interactions of plutonium with such substituted-mineral phases is important for risk assessment purposes at radioactively contaminated sites and long-term underground ...

  18. Molecular Interactions of Plutonium(VI) with SyntheticManganese...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... interactions of plutonium with such substituted-mineral phases is important for risk assessment purposes at radioactively contaminated sites and long-term underground ...

  19. Solvent-extraction and purification of uranium(VI) and molybdenum(VI) by tertiary amines from acid leach solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    La Gamma, Ana M.G.; Becquart, Elena T.; Chocron, Mauricio

    2008-07-01

    Considering international interest in the yellow-cake price, Argentina is seeking to exploit new uranium ore bodies and processing plants. A study of similar plants would suggest that solvent- extraction with Alamine 336 is considered the best method for the purification and concentration of uranium present in leaching solutions. In order to study the purification of these leach liquors, solvent-extraction tests under different conditions were performed with simulated solutions which containing molybdenum and molybdenum-uranium mixtures. Preliminary extraction tests carried out on mill acid-leaching liquors are also presented. (authors)

  20. OMEGA EP Laser Sources - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sources - Laboratory for Laser Energetics Laboratory for Laser Energetics Logo Search Home Around the Lab Past Issues Past Quick Shots About Office of the Director Map to LLE LLE ...

  1. OMEGA Targets - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Targets - Laboratory for Laser Energetics Laboratory for Laser Energetics Logo Search Home Around the Lab Past Issues Past Quick Shots About Office of the Director Map to LLE LLE ...

  2. Omega Laser Facility Schedule - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Schedule - Laboratory for Laser Energetics Laboratory for Laser Energetics Logo Search Home Around the Lab Past Issues Past Quick Shots About Office of the Director Map to LLE LLE ...

  3. OMEGA Laser Drivers - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Drivers - Laboratory for Laser Energetics Laboratory for Laser Energetics Logo Search Home Around the Lab Past Issues Past Quick Shots About Office of the Director Map to LLE LLE ...

  4. OMEGA EP Beamlines - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beamlines - Laboratory for Laser Energetics Laboratory for Laser Energetics Logo Search Home Around the Lab Past Issues Past Quick Shots About Office of the Director Map to LLE LLE ...

  5. Arsenic-related skin lesions and glutathione S-transferase P1 A1578G (lle105Val) polymorphism in two ethnic clans exposed to indoor combustion of high arsenic coal in one village

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, G.F.; Du, H.; Chen, J.G.; Lu, H.C.; Guo, W.C.; Meng, H.; Zhang, T.B.; Zhang, X.J.; Lu, D.R.; Golka, K.; Shen, J.H. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China)

    2006-12-15

    A total of 2402 patients with arsenic-related skin lesions, such as hyperkeratosis, hyperpigmentation or hypopigmentation, or even skin cancer in a few villages in Southwest Guizhou Autonomous Prefecture, China represent a unique case of endemic arsenism related with indoor combustion of high arsenic coal. This study aimed to investigate the cluster of arsenism cases and the possible relevant factors including GSTP1 polymorphism in two clans of different ethnic origin living in one village for generations. Arsenism morbidity in Miao clan P was significantly lower than in the neighbouring Han clan G1 (5.9 vs. 32.7%, odds ratio (OR)=0.13, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.06-0.27, P < 0.0001). No sex differences were confirmed inside both clans. Analyses of the environmental samples indicated that Miao clan P members were exposed to higher amounts of arsenic via inhalation and food ingestion. Hair and urine samples also proved a higher arsenic body burden in ethnic Miao individuals. No corresponding differences by sex were found. Higher frequencies of combined mutant genotype G/G1578 and A/G1578 (OR=4.72, 95% CI: 2.34-9.54, P < 0.0001) and of mutant allele G1578 (OR=3.22, 95% CI: 2.00-5.18, P < 0.0001) were detected in diagnosed arsenism patients than in non-diseased individuals. The Miao individuals showed a lower percentage of combined mutant genotypes (30.6 vs. 52.7%, OR=0.40, 95% CI: 0.19-0.84, P=0.015) as well as of mutant allele G1578 (OR=0.46, 95% CI: 0.24-0.88, P=0.017) than their Han neighbours. Conclusions Genetic predisposition influences dermal arsenism toxicity. The GSTP1 A1578G (IIe105Val) status might be a susceptibility factor for arsenic-related skin lesions.

  6. Laser radar VI; Proceedings of the Meeting, Los Angeles, CA, Jan. 23-25, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becherer, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    Topics presented include lidar wind shear detection for commercial aircraft, centroid tracking of range-Doppler images, an analytic approach to centroid performance analysis, simultaneous active/passive IR vehicle detection, and resolution limits for high-resolution imaging lidar. Also presented are laser velocimetry applications, the application of laser radar to autonomous spacecraft landing, 3D laser radar simulation for autonomous spacecraft landing, and ground based CW atmospheric Doppler lidar performamce modeling.

  7. Microsoft Word - ViArray_Fact_ Sheet_SAND2011-3935P_updated_format...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    decoupling ude: & Control tion itoring Parts & FPG vironment op ility System boratories ha pplications. services" wi me custom ra aging, test, fa om microele Hard S tructured Ap...

  8. Liquid-metal fast-breeder reactors: Preliminary safety and environmental information document. Volume VI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Information is presented concerning LMFBR design characteristics; uranium-plutonium/uranium recycle homogeneous core; uranium-plutonium/uranium spiked recycle heterogeneous core; uranium-plutonium/uranium spiked recycle homogeneous core; uranium-plutonium/thorium spiked recycle heterogeneous core; uranium-plutonium/thorium spiked recycle homogeneous core; thorium-plutonium/thorium spiked recycle homogeneous core; denatured uranium-233/thorium cycle homogeneous core; safety consideration for the LMFBR; and environmental considerations.

  9. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction across water-ices VI/VII transformatio...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Time-resolved x-ray diffraction across water-ices VIVII transformations using dynamic-DAC Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Time-resolved x-ray diffraction ...

  10. Final Report - Low Cost, Epitaxial Growth of II-VI Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The greatest challenge in developing tandem solar cells is depositing wide band gap semiconductors that are both highly doped and have minority carrier lifetimes greater than 1 ns. ...

  11. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction across water-ices VI/VII transformatio...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    diffraction across water-ices VIVII transformations using dynamic-DAC Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Time-resolved x-ray diffraction across water-ices VIVII ...

  12. FINAL REPORT FOR THE REDUCTION OF CHROME (VI) TO CHROME (III...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    This document summarizes the work carried out at CLS and includes the electrochemical scans and associated corrosion rates for 304 and 316L stainless steel. Authors: DUNCAN JB ; ...

  13. Rational Ligand Design for U(VI) and Pu(IV)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szigethy, Geza

    2009-08-12

    Nuclear power is an attractive alternative to hydrocarbon-based energy production at a time when moving away from carbon-producing processes is widely accepted as a significant developmental need. Hence, the radioactive actinide power sources for this industry are necessarily becoming more widespread, which is accompanied by the increased risk of exposure to both biological and environmental systems. This, in turn, requires the development of technology designed to remove such radioactive threats efficiently and selectively from contaminated material, whether that be contained nuclear waste streams or the human body. Raymond and coworkers (University of California, Berkeley) have for decades investigated the interaction of biologically-inspired, hard Lewis-base ligands with high-valent, early-actinide cations. It has been established that such ligands bind strongly to the hard Lewis-acidic early actinides, and many poly-bidentate ligands have been developed and shown to be effective chelators of actinide contaminants in vivo. Work reported herein explores the effect of ligand geometry on the linear U(IV) dioxo dication (uranyl, UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}). The goal is to utilize rational ligand design to develop ligands that exhibit shape selectivity towards linear dioxo cations and provides thermodynamically favorable binding interactions. The uranyl complexes with a series of tetradentate 3-hydroxy-pyridin-2-one (3,2-HOPO) ligands were studied in both the crystalline state as well as in solution. Despite significant geometric differences, the uranyl affinities of these ligands vary only slightly but are better than DTPA, the only FDA-approved chelation therapy for actinide contamination. The terepthalamide (TAM) moiety was combined into tris-beidentate ligands with 1,2- and 3,2-HOPO moieties were combined into hexadentate ligands whose structural preferences and solution thermodynamics were measured with the uranyl cation. In addition to achieving coordinative saturation, these ligands exhibited increased uranyl affinity compared to bis-Me-3,2-HOPO ligands. This result is due in part to their increased denticity, but is primarily the result of the presence of the TAM moiety. In an effort to explore the relatively unexplored coordination chemistry of Pu(IV) with bidentate moieties, a series of Pu(IV) complexes were also crystallized using bidentate hydroxypyridinone and hydroxypyrone ligands. The geometries of these complexes are compared to that of the analogous Ce(IV) complexes. While in some cases these showed the expected structural similarities, some ligand systems led to significant coordination changes. A series of crystal structure analyses with Ce(IV) indicated that these differences are most likely the result of crystallization condition differences and solvent inclusion effects.

  14. Co-extraction of Am(VI) and the major actinides with tributyl phosphate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mincher, Bruce J.; Martin, Leigh R.; Schmitt, Nicholas C.

    2007-07-01

    Sodium bismuthate was found to be an effective oxidant for Am in nitric acid solutions up to 6 M in concentration. However, in the presence of tributyl phosphate, americium was quickly reduced to the trivalent state, resulting in low distribution ratios. Pre-equilibration of the organic phase with bismuthate at the appropriate acid concentration was not effective at preventing americium reduction by tributyl phosphate. However, when a small amount of perchloric acid was added to the acidic, bismuthate-containing aqueous phase, much higher distribution ratios for americium extraction were achieved. Data comparing the extraction of americium to hexavalent uranium, neptunium and plutonium are presented. Slope analysis was used to confirm the extraction of americium in the hexavalent state. (authors)

  15. Characterization of U9VI) Sorption-Desorption Processes and Model Upscaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon Borwn Jr.; Jeffrey Catalano; David Singer; John Zachara

    2007-05-24

    Long-term sequestration of uranium at sites within the DOE complex is a significant problem that requires molecular-level information on the speciation, phase association, and spatial distribution of uranium

  16. High detectivity short-wavelength II-VI quantum cascade detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ravikumar, Arvind P. Gmachl, Claire F.; Garcia, Thor A.; Tamargo, Maria C.; Jesus, Joel De

    2014-08-11

    We report on the experimental demonstration of a ZnCdSe/ZnCdMgSe-based short-wavelength photovoltaic Quantum Cascade Detector (QCD). The QCD operates in two spectral bands centered around 2.6??m and 3.6??m. Calibrated blackbody measurements yield a peak responsivity of 0.1?mA/W or 2400?V/W at 80?K, and a corresponding 300?K background radiation limited infrared performance detectivity (BLIP) of ?2.5??10{sup 10?}cm ?Hz/W. Comparison of background illuminated and dark current-voltage measurements demonstrates a BLIP temperature of 200?K. The device differential resistance-area product, decreases from about 10{sup 6} ? cm{sup 2} at 80?K to about 8000 ? cm{sup 2} at 300?K, indicative of the ultra-low Johnson noise in the detectors.

  17. Structure of ABC Transporter MsbA in Complex with ATP Vi and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to the outer membrane of bacteria4-7. Lipopolysaccharide potently activates the TLR-4 receptor of the mammalian innate immune system in response to bacterial infections...

  18. FINAL REPORT FOR THE REDUCTION OF CHROME (VI) TO CHROME (III...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A ... Research Org: Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA Sponsoring Org: USDOE Assistant Secretary ...

  19. Development of Modified Pag (Polyalkylene Glycol) High VI High Fuel Efficient Lubricant for LDV Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gangopadhyay, Arup; McWatt, D. G.; Zdrodowski, R. J.; Liu, Zak; Elie, Larry; Simko, S. J.; Erdemir, Ali; Ramirez, Giovanni; Cuthbert, J.; Hock, E. D.

    2015-09-30

    Engine oils play a critical role in friction reduction. Improvements in engine oil technology steadily improved fuel economy as the industry moved through ILSAC GF-1 to GF-5 specifications. These improvements were influenced by changes in base oil chemistry, development of new friction modifiers and their treat levels, and the total additive package consisting of various other components. However, the improvements are incremental and further fuel consumption reduction opportunities are becoming more challenging. Polyalkylene glycol (PAG) based engine oils are being explored as a step forward for significant fuel consumption reduction. Although PAG fluids are used in many industrial applications, its application as an engine oil has been explored in a limited way. The objective of this project is to deep dive in exploring the applicability of PAG technology in engine oil, understanding the benefits, and limitations, elucidating the mechanism(s) for friction benefits, if any, and finally recommending how to address any limitations. The project was designed in four steps, starting with selection of lubricant technology, followed by friction and wear evaluations in laboratory bench tests which are relatively simple and inexpensive and also served as a screener for further evaluation. Selected formulations were chosen for more complex engine component level tests i.e., motored valvetrain friction and wear, piston ring friction using a motored single cylinder, and motored engine tests. A couple of formulations were further selected based on component level tests for engine dyno tests i.e., Sequence VID (ASTM D6709) for fuel economy, Sequence IVA (ASTM D6891) for valvetrain wear, and Sequence VG (ASTM D6593) for sludge and varnish protection. These are some of the industry standard tests required for qualifying engine oils. Out of these tests, a single PAG oil was selected for chassis roll dynamometer tests for fuel economy and emission measurements using FTP (Federal Test Procedure) metro/highway cycles. Five different PAG chemistries were selected by varying the starting alcohol, the oxide monomers (ethylene oxide, propylene oxide, or butylene oxide), capped or uncapped, homopolymer or random copolymer. All formulations contained a proprietary additive package and one which contained additional antiwear and friction modifier additives. Laboratory bench tests (Pin-on-Disk, High Frequency Reciprocating Rig (HFRR), Block-on-Ring, Mini-Traction Machine (MTM) identified formulations having friction, wear, and load carrying characteristics similar to or better than baseline GF-5 SAE 5W-20 oil. Motored valvetrain and motored piston ring friction tests showed nearly 50% friction reduction for some of the PAG formulations compared to GF-5 SAE 5W-20 oil. Motored engine tests showed up to 15% friction benefit over GF-5 SAE 5W-20 oil. It was observed that friction benefits are more related to PAG base oil chemistry than their lower viscosity compared to GF-5 SAE 5W-20 oil. Analysis of wear surfaces from laboratory bench tests and bucket tappets from motored valvetrain tests confirmed the presence of PAG molecules. The adsorption of these polar molecules is believed to be reason for friction reduction. However, the wear surfaces also had thin tribo-film derived from additive components. The tribo-film consisting of phosphates, sulfides, and molybdenum disulfide (when molybdenum additive was present) were observed for both GF-5 SAE 5W-20 and PAG fluids. However, when using PAG fluids, motored valvetrain tests showed high initial wear, which is believed to be due to delay in protective tribo-film formation. After the initial wear, the wear rate of PAG fluids was comparable to GF-5 SAE 5W-20 oil. The PAG oil containing additional antiwear and friction reducing additives showed low initial wear as expected. However, when this oil was evaluated in Sequence IVA test, it showed initially low wear comparable to GF-5 oil but wear accelerated with oil aging indicating rapid deterioration of additive components. ASTM Sequence VG test showed good sludge protection capability but failed to meet varnish rating for GF-5 requirement. Chassis roll dynamometer tests with PAG oil 15-1 showed about 1% fuel economy benefit over GF-5 SAE 5W-20 oil in EPA city cycles only and when the oil was slightly aged (500 miles). No fuel economy benefits could be observed in combined EPA metro/highway cycles. Also, no fuel economy benefit could be observed with continued (500- 10000 miles) oil aging. However, the emission level was comparable to the reference oil and was within EPA limits. Analysis of the PAG oil following tests showed low iron content although additive components were significantly degraded. The results indicate that PAG fluids have significant friction reduction potential but there are challenges with wear and varnish protection capabilities. These limitations are primarily because the selected additive components were chosen to provide a fluid with no metal content that forms little or no sulphated ash. Significant development work is needed to identify additive components compatible with PAG chemistry including their solubility in PAG oil. Miscibility of PAG fluids with mineral base oil is another challenge for oil change service. There is PAG chemistry (oil soluble PAG, OSP) which is soluble in mineral oils but the formulation explored in this investigation did not show significant friction reduction in motored engine tests. Again, highlighting the need for additive development for specific PAG chemistry. The thermal oxidation behavior of these oils has not been explored in this investigation and needs attention.

  20. Microsoft Word - VI_1-8_Talks Presented 2014-2015.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 - March 31, 2015 Charge and long range planning process, J.C. Hardy, Invited Talk, Joint DNP Town Meeting on Nuclear Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas (August 2014). Testing CVC and CKM unitarity via superallowed nuclear beta decay, J.C. Hardy, Invited Talk, 15 th International Symposium on Capture Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy and Related Topics, CGS 15, Dresden, Germany (August 2014). Testing CVC and CKM unitarity via superallowed nuclear beta

  1. Microsoft Word - VI_13-14_Colloquia and Seminars 2015.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4-March 31, 2015 2014 April 18 Prof. Madappa Prakash, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio The Neutron Star in Cassiopeia A and What It Is Telling Us? May 20 Prof. D. Bandyopadhyay, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata, India Thermal Properties of Nuclear Surface June 24 Prof. Ushasi Datta Pramanik, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata, India Coulomb Breakup as a Noval Spectroscopic Tool to Probe Directly the Quantum Numbers of Valence Nucleon of the Exotic Nuclei September 2 Dr. Boris L.

  2. Microsoft Word - VI_9-10_Research Personnel, Engineers, Students 2015.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 - March 31, 2015 Faculty and Research Group Leaders Aldo Bonasera, Senior Scientist Charles M. Folden III, Assist. Prof. of Nuclear Chemistry Rainer Fries, Assist. Professor of Physics Carl A. Gagliardi, Professor of Physics John C. Hardy, Professor of Physics Che Ming Ko, Professor of Physics Dan Melconian, Assist. Professor of Physics Saskia Mioduszewski, Assist. Prof. of Physics J. B. Natowitz, Professor of Chemistry, Bright Chair (25%) Ralf Rapp Associate Professor of Physics Grigory

  3. Enhanced spontaneous emission of CdSe quantum dots in monolithic II-VI pillar microcavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lohmeyer, H.; Kruse, C.; Sebald, K.; Gutowski, J.; Hommel, D.

    2006-08-28

    The emission properties of CdSe/ZnSe quantum dots in ZnSe-based pillar microcavities are studied. All-epitaxial cavities made of ZnSSe and MgS/ZnCdSe superlattices with a single quantum-dot sheet embedded have been grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Pillar structures with diameters down to 500 nm have been realized by focused-ion-beam etching. A pronounced enhancement of the spontaneous emission rate of quantum dots coupling to the fundamental mode of the cavities is found as evidence for the Purcell effect. The enhancement by a factor of up to 3.8 depends systematically on the pillar diameter and thus on the Purcell factor of the individual pillars.

  4. Characterization of U(VI) Sorption-Desorption Processes and Model...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the 300 Area will be controlled by the dissolution of CaCO3 minerals. less Authors: Brown, Gordon E. Publication Date: 2003-06-01 OSTI Identifier: 835468 Report Number(s):...

  5. The role of nanopores on U(VI) sorption and redox behavior in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Xu, Huifang ; Roden, Eric E. ; Kemner, Kenneth M. ; Jung, Hun-Bok ; Konishi, Hiromi ; Boyanov, Maxim ; Sun, Yubing ; Mishra, Bhoopesh Publication Date: 2013-10-16 OSTI ...

  6. Detection and Quantification of Pu(III, IV, V, and VI) Using...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    38 RADIATION CHEMISTRY, RADIOCHEMISTRY, AND NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY; 46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY plutonium absorption spectroscopy liquid corewaveguide ...

  7. Microsoft Word - VI_13-14_Colloquia and Seminars 2015.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4-March 31, 2015 2014 April 18 Prof. Madappa Prakash, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio The Neutron Star in Cassiopeia A and What It Is Telling Us? May 20 Prof. D. Bandyopadhyay, Saha...

  8. Microsoft Word - VI_1-8_Talks Presented 2014-2015.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas (August 2014). Testing CVC and CKM unitarity via superallowed nuclear beta decay, J.C. Hardy, Invited Talk, 15 th International ...

  9. Thermophysical analysis of II-VI semiconductors by PPE calorimetry and lock-in thermography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Streza, M.; Dadarlat, D.; Strzałkowski, K.

    2013-11-13

    An accurate determination of thermophysical properties such as thermal diffusivity, thermal effusivity and thermal conductivity is extremely important for characterization and quality assurance of semiconductors. Thermal diffusivity and effusivity of some binary semiconductors have been investigated. Two experimental techniques were used: a contact technique (PPE calorimetry) and a non contact technique (lock-in thermography). When working with PPE, in the back (BPPE) configuration and in the thermally thick regim of the pyroelectric sensor, we can get the thermal diffusivity of the sample by performing a scanning of the excitation frequency of radiation. Thermal effusivity is obtained in front configuration (sensor directly irradiated and sample in back position) by performing a thickness scan of a coupling fluid. By using the lock-in thermography technique, the thermal diffusivity of the sample is obtained from the phase image. The results obtained by the two techniques are in good agreement. Nevertheless, for the determination of thermal diffusivity, lock-in thermography is preferred.

  10. Final Report- Low Cost, Epitaxial Growth of II-VI Materials for Multijunction Photovoltaic Cells

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Multijunction solar cells have theoretical power conversion efficiencies in excess of 29% under one sun illumination and could become a highly disruptive technology if fabricated using low cost processing techniques to epitaxially grow defect tolerant, thin films on silicon. The PLANT PV/Molecular Foundry team studied the feasibility of using cadmium selenide (CdSe) as the wide band-gap, top cell and Si as the bottom cell in monolithically integrated tandem architecture. The greatest challenge in developing tandem solar cells is depositing wide band gap semiconductors that are both highly doped and have minority carrier lifetimes greater than 1 ns. The proposed research was to determine whether it is possible to rapidly grow CdSe films with sufficient minority carrier lifetimes and doping levels required to produce an open-circuit voltage (Voc) greater than 1.1V using close-space sublimation (CSS).

  11. Spontaneous electromagnetic fluctuations in unmagnetized plasmas. VI. Transverse, collective mode for arbitrary distribution functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Felten, T.; Schlickeiser, R.; Research Department Plasmas with Complex Interactions, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, D-44780 Bochum

    2013-10-15

    Using the general expressions for the magnetic fluctuation spectrum from uncorrelated plasma particles, it is shown that an isotropic, unmagnetized plasma with arbitrary momentum distribution function spontaneously emits an aperiodic, collective, transverse, damped mode. The collective mode with the dispersion relation γ(k) provides the strongest contribution to the magnetic field fluctuation spectrum. Its existence has been proven before for Maxwellian and Lorentzian plasma distribution functions. Here it is demonstrated that this collective aperiodic mode exists in any isotropic unmagnetized, irrespective of the explicit form of the momentum distribution of plasma particles.

  12. Atlantic Coastal Experiment VI: R/V KNORR cruise, 23 August--11 September 1980, data report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behrens, W.; von Bock, K.

    1983-01-01

    An investigation of the influence of estuaries on the ecosystem of the Mid-Atlantic Bight was undertaken. Data were collected from excursions into the Hudson, Delaware and Chesapeake estuaries, three across-shelf and one along-shelf transects, and two time series stations. In all, 139 stations were occupied and 164 XBT soundings were taken. In addition to standard hydrographic measurements, nutrient , chlorophyll, particulate carbon and nitrogen, 14C, 15N, DNA, particle size, FTD, phytoplankton and zooplankton analyses were made.

  13. VI-12 STUDENTS WHO RECEIVED GRADUATE DEGREES FROM THESIS WORK CONDUCTED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 - March 31, 2013 Name Year Thesis Title Advisor Present Position Mike Mehlman 2012 Design of TAMUTRAP and Testing of RFQ Pressure Control System D. Melconian Continue to Ph. D. degree John Goodwin 2012 Can Environmental Factors affect Half-Life in Beta Decay? An Analysis J. C. Hardy N.A. Martin Cordrington 2012 Lon- Range Rapidity at High pT in sqrt(s) = 200 GeV Au+Au Collision with STAR S. Mioduszewski N.A. James Lucus Drachenberg 2012 Forward Di-Hadron Asymmetries from p + p at

  14. VI-12 STUDENTS WHO RECEIVED GRADUATE DEGREES FROM THESIS WORK CONDUCTED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 - March 31, 2014 Name Year Thesis Title Advisor Present Position Jonathan Button 2013 Decay Detector for the Study of Gant Monopole Resonance in Unstable Nuclei D. H. Youngblood Continue to Ph. D. degree Guangyao Chen 2013 Initial Conditions from Color Glass Condensate R. J. Fries Post. Doc. at Cyclotron Institute, Texas A&M University Ellen Nicole Simmons 2013 The β-Delayed Proton and Gamma Decay of 27 P R. E. Tribble Post. Doc. at Cyclotron Institute, Texas A&M University Andrew

  15. 3-Cylinder Turbocharged Gasoline Direct Injection: A High Value Solution for Euro VI Emissions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    3-cylindery gasoline direct injection engines offer similar value in CO2 reduction capability (Euros/% CO2 reduction) at a significantly lower on-cost.

  16. Chapter 27 -- Breast Cancer Genomics, Section VI, Pathology and Biological Markers of Invasive Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spellman, Paul T.; Heiser, Laura; Gray, Joe W.

    2009-06-18

    Breast cancer is predominantly a disease of the genome with cancers arising and progressing through accumulation of aberrations that alter the genome - by changing DNA sequence, copy number, and structure in ways that that contribute to diverse aspects of cancer pathophysiology. Classic examples of genomic events that contribute to breast cancer pathophysiology include inherited mutations in BRCA1, BRCA2, TP53, and CHK2 that contribute to the initiation of breast cancer, amplification of ERBB2 (formerly HER2) and mutations of elements of the PI3-kinase pathway that activate aspects of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling and deletion of CDKN2A/B that contributes to cell cycle deregulation and genome instability. It is now apparent that accumulation of these aberrations is a time-dependent process that accelerates with age. Although American women living to an age of 85 have a 1 in 8 chance of developing breast cancer, the incidence of cancer in women younger than 30 years is uncommon. This is consistent with a multistep cancer progression model whereby mutation and selection drive the tumor's development, analogous to traditional Darwinian evolution. In the case of cancer, the driving events are changes in sequence, copy number, and structure of DNA and alterations in chromatin structure or other epigenetic marks. Our understanding of the genetic, genomic, and epigenomic events that influence the development and progression of breast cancer is increasing at a remarkable rate through application of powerful analysis tools that enable genome-wide analysis of DNA sequence and structure, copy number, allelic loss, and epigenomic modification. Application of these techniques to elucidation of the nature and timing of these events is enriching our understanding of mechanisms that increase breast cancer susceptibility, enable tumor initiation and progression to metastatic disease, and determine therapeutic response or resistance. These studies also reveal the molecular differences between cancer and normal that may be exploited to therapeutic benefit or that provide targets for molecular assays that may enable early cancer detection, and predict individual disease progression or response to treatment. This chapter reviews current and future directions in genome analysis and summarizes studies that provide insights into breast cancer pathophysiology or that suggest strategies to improve breast cancer management.

  17. Tritium Permeation Activity at Safety and Tritium Applied Research...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Research (STAR) Facility More Documents & Publications Tritium Behavior in Lead Lithium Eutectic (LLE) at Low Tritium Partial Pressure Tritium Plasma Experiment and Its Role ...

  18. OMEGA Amplifiers - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Amplifiers - Laboratory for Laser Energetics Laboratory for Laser Energetics Logo Search Home Around the Lab Past Issues Past Quick Shots About Office of the Director Map to LLE ...

  19. National Laser Users' Facility Grant Program | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Laser Users' Facility Grant Program The Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) at the University of Rochester (UR) was established in 1970 to investigate the interaction of ...

  20. National Laser User Facilities Program | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Laser User Facilities Program National Laser Users' Facility Grant Program Overview The Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) at the University of Rochester (UR) was ...

  1. OMEGA EP Amplifiers - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Amplifiers - Laboratory for Laser Energetics Laboratory for Laser Energetics Logo Search Home Around the Lab Past Issues Past Quick Shots About Office of the Director Map to LLE ...

  2. OMEGA EP Construction - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Construction - Laboratory for Laser Energetics Laboratory for Laser Energetics Logo Search Home Around the Lab Past Issues Past Quick Shots About Office of the Director Map to LLE ...

  3. Joint Operations - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Operations - Laboratory for Laser Energetics Laboratory for Laser Energetics Logo Search Home Around the Lab Past Issues Past Quick Shots About Office of the Director Map to LLE ...

  4. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Lens Search. VI. Constraints on Dark Energy and the Evolution of Massive Galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oguri, Masamune; et al.

    2012-05-01

    We present a statistical analysis of the final lens sample from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Lens Search (SQLS). The number distribution of a complete subsample of 19 lensed quasars selected from 50,836 source quasars is compared with theoretical expectations, with particular attention to the selection function. Assuming that the velocity function of galaxies does not evolve with redshift, the SQLS sample constrains the cosmological constant to \\Omega_\\Lambda=0.79^{+0.06}_{-0.07}(stat.)^{+0.06}_{-0.06}(syst.) for a flat universe. The dark energy equation of state is found to be consistent with w=-1 when the SQLS is combined with constraints from baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements or results from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP). We also obtain simultaneous constraints on cosmological parameters and redshift evolution of the galaxy velocity function, finding no evidence for redshift evolution at z<1 in any combinations of constraints. For instance, number density evolution quantified as \

  5. THE ACS FORNAX CLUSTER SURVEY. VI. THE NUCLEI OF EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES IN THE FORNAX CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, Monica L.; Cote, Patrick; Ferrarese, Laura; Blakeslee, John P.; Jordan, Andres; Mei, Simona; Peng, Eric W.; West, Michael J.

    2012-11-15

    The Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) Fornax Cluster Survey is a Hubble Space Telescope program to image 43 early-type galaxies in the Fornax cluster, using the F475W and F850LP bandpasses of the ACS. We employ both one-dimensional and two-dimensional techniques to characterize the properties of the stellar nuclei in these galaxies, defined as the central 'luminosity excesses', relative to a Sersic model fitted to the underlying host. We find 72% {+-} 13% of our sample (31 galaxies) to be nucleated, with only three of the nuclei offset by more than 0.''5 from their galaxy photocenter, and with the majority of nuclei having colors bluer than their hosts. The nuclei are observed to be larger, and brighter, than typical Fornax globular clusters and to follow different structural scaling relations. A comparison of our results to those from the ACS Virgo Cluster Survey reveals striking similarities in the properties of the nuclei belonging to these different environments. We briefly review a variety of proposed formation models and conclude that, for the low-mass galaxies in our sample, the most important mechanism for nucleus growth is probably infall of star clusters through dynamical friction, while for higher mass galaxies, gas accretion triggered by mergers, accretions, and tidal torques is likely to dominate, with the relative importance of these two processes varying smoothly as a function of galaxy mass. Some intermediate-mass galaxies in our sample show a complexity in their inner structure that may be the signature of the 'hybrid nuclei' that arose through parallel formation channels.

  6. CORROSION STUDY FOR THE EFFLUENT TREATMENT FACILITY CHROME (VI) REDUCTANT SOLUTION USING 304 AND 316L STAINLESS STEEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DUNCAN JB; WYRAS RB

    2007-10-08

    This report documents the laboratory testing and analyses as directed under the test plan, RPP PLAN-34065, and documented in laboratory notebooks HNF 2742 and HNF-N-473-1. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the electrochemical corrosion and pitting susceptibility of the 304 and 316L stainless steel in the acidified reducing solution that will be contained in either the secondary waste receiving tank or concentrate tank.

  7. THE HERSCHEL EXPLOITATION OF LOCAL GALAXY ANDROMEDA (HELGA). VI. THE DISTRIBUTION AND PROPERTIES OF MOLECULAR CLOUD ASSOCIATIONS IN M31

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirk, J. M. [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); Gear, W. K.; Smith, M. W. L.; Ford, G.; Eales, S. A.; Gomez, H. L. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Queens Buildings, The Parade, Cardiff, Wales CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Fritz, J.; Baes, M.; De Looze, I.; Gentile, G.; Gordon, K.; Verstappen, J.; Viaene, S. [Sterrenkundig Observatorium, Universiteit Gent, Krijgslaan 281 S9, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Bendo, G. J. [UK ALMA Regional Centre Node, Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); O'Halloran, B. [Astrophysics Group, Imperial College, Blackett Laboratory, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Madden, S. C.; Lebouteiller, V. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Universit Paris Diderot, Irfu/Service, Paris, F-91190 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Roman-Duval, J. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Boselli, A. [Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille, UMR 7326 CNRS, 38 rue F. Joliot-Curie, F-13388 Marseille (France); Cooray, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); and others

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a catalog of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) in the Andromeda (M31) galaxy extracted from the Herschel Exploitation of Local Galaxy Andromeda (HELGA) data set. GMCs are identified from the Herschel maps using a hierarchical source extraction algorithm. We present the results of this new catalog and characterize the spatial distribution and spectral energy properties of its clouds based on the radial dust/gas properties found by Smith etal. A total of 326 GMCs in the mass range 10{sup 4}-10{sup 7} M {sub ?} are identified; their cumulative mass distribution is found to be proportional to M {sup 2.34}, in agreement with earlier studies. The GMCs appear to follow the same correlation of cloud mass to L {sub CO} observed in the Milky Way. However, comparison between this catalog and interferometry studies also shows that the GMCs are substructured below the Herschel resolution limit, suggesting that we are observing associations of GMCs. Following Gordon etal., we study the spatial structure of M31 by splitting the observed structure into a set of spiral arms and offset rings. We fit radii of 10.3 and 15.5 kpc to the two most prominent rings. We then fit a logarithmic spiral with a pitch angle of 8.9 to the GMCs not associated with either ring. Last, we comment on the effects of deprojection on our results and investigate the effect different models for M31's inclination will have on the projection of an unperturbed spiral arm system.

  8. Particle Number & Particulate Mass Emissions Measurements on a 'Euro VI' Heavy-duty Engine using the PMP Methodologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

  9. Upscaling of Long-Term U9VI) Desorption from Pore Scale Kinetics to Field-Scale Reactive Transport Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andy Miller

    2009-01-25

    Environmental systems exhibit a range of complexities which exist at a range of length and mass scales. Within the realm of radionuclide fate and transport, much work has been focused on understanding pore scale processes where complexity can be reduced to a simplified system. In describing larger scale behavior, the results from these simplified systems must be combined to create a theory of the whole. This process can be quite complex, and lead to models which lack transparency. The underlying assumption of this approach is that complex systems will exhibit complex behavior, requiring a complex system of equations to describe behavior. This assumption has never been tested. The goal of the experiments presented is to ask the question: Do increasingly complex systems show increasingly complex behavior? Three experimental tanks at the intermediate scale (Tank 1: 2.4m x 1.2m x 7.6cm, Tank 2: 2.4m x 0.61m x 7.6cm, Tank 3: 2.4m x 0.61m x 0.61m (LxHxW)) have been completed. These tanks were packed with various physical orientations of different particle sizes of a uranium contaminated sediment from a former uranium mill near Naturita, Colorado. Steady state water flow was induced across the tanks using constant head boundaries. Pore water was removed from within the flow domain through sampling ports/wells; effluent samples were also taken. Each sample was analyzed for a variety of analytes relating to the solubility and transport of uranium. Flow fields were characterized using inert tracers and direct measurements of pressure head. The results show that although there is a wide range of chemical variability within the flow domain of the tank, the effluent uranium behavior is simple enough to be described using a variety of conceptual models. Thus, although there is a wide range in variability caused by pore scale behaviors, these behaviors appear to be smoothed out as uranium is transported through the tank. This smoothing of uranium transport behavior transcends many of the physical and chemical heterogeneities added to the tank experiments.

  10. T-637: VMSA-2011-0009 VMware hosted product updates, ESX patches and VI, Client update resolve multiple

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This patch provides a fix for the following three security issues in the VMware Host Guest File System (HGFS). None of these issues affect Windows based Guest Operating Systems. CVE-2011-2146 Mount.vmhgfs Information Disclosure, information disclosure via a vulnerability that allows an attacker with access to the Guest to determine if a path exists in the Host filesystem and whether it is a file or directory regardless of permissions. CVE-2011-1787 Mount.vmhgfs Race Condition, privilege escalation via a race condition that allows an attacker with access to the guest to mount on arbitrary directories in the Guest filesystem and achieve privilege escalation if they can control the contents of the mounted directory. CVE-2011-2145 Mount.vmhgfs Privilege Escalation, privilege escalation via a procedural error that allows an attacker with access to the guest operating system to gain write access to an arbitrary file in the Guest filesystem. This issue only affects Solaris and FreeBSD Guest Operating Systems. For more information on the following associated CVE details please use the provided links below. This patch provides a fix for the following three security issues in the VMware Host Guest File System (HGFS). None of these issues affect Windows based Guest Operating Systems. CVE-2011-2146 Mount.vmhgfs Information Disclosure, information disclosure via a vulnerability that allows an attacker with access to the Guest to determine if a path exists in the Host filesystem and whether it is a file or directory regardless of permissions. CVE-2011-1787 Mount.vmhgfs Race Condition, privilege escalation via a race condition that allows an attacker with access to the guest to mount on arbitrary directories in the Guest filesystem and achieve privilege escalation if they can control the contents of the mounted directory. CVE-2011-2145 Mount.vmhgfs Privilege Escalation, privilege escalation via a procedural error that allows an attacker with access to the guest operating system to gain write access to an arbitrary file in the Guest filesystem. This issue only affects Solaris and FreeBSD Guest Operating Systems. For more information on the following associated CVE details please use the provided links below. CVE-2009-4536, CVE-2010-1188, CVE-2009-3080, CVE-2010-2240, CVE-2011-2146, CVE-2011-1787, CVE-2011-2145, and CVE-2011-2217

  11. An efficient electron-beam-pumped semiconductor laser for the green spectral range based on II-VI multilayer nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zverev, M. M.; Gamov, N. A.; Peregoudov, D. V.; Studionov, V. B.; Zdanova, E. V.; Sedova, I. V. Gronin, S. V.; Sorokin, S. V.; Ivanov, S. V.; Kop'ev, P. S.

    2008-12-15

    Emission characteristics of an electron-beam-pumped Cd(Zn)Se/ZnMgSSe semiconductor laser are studied. The laser's active region consists of a set of ten equidistant ZnSe quantum wells containing fractional-monolayer CdSe quantum-dot inserts and a waveguide formed by a short-period superlattice with the net thickness of {approx}0.65 {mu}m. Lasing occurs at room temperature at a wavelength of 542 nm. Pulsed power as high as 12 W per cavity face and an unprecedentedly high efficiency of {approx}8.5% are attained for the electron-beam energy of 23 keV.

  12. Upscaling of U(VI) Desorption and Transport from Decimeter-Scale Heterogeneity to Plume-Scale Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, Gary P; Kohler, Matthias; Kannappan, Ramakrishnan; Briggs, Martin; Day-Lewis, Fred

    2015-02-24

    Reactive solute transport in aquifers is commonly affected by rate limited mass transfer. This slow mass transfer can exhibit significant control on the times required to restore contaminated aquifers to near-pristine conditions under both ambient and forced-gradient flow systems and is therefore important to understand. Both nonreactive and reactive tracer experiments provide valuable insight into the exchange of solute between mobile and immobile porosity. At the grain scale and column scale, mass transfer limitations were manifested as a concentration rebound when contaminated sediments were contacted with pristine groundwater. This behavior was successfully modeled using the multirate mass transfer model. Mass transfer observed in a 2 m long intermediate laboratory scale experiment showed significant concentration rebound in the first half meter along a flowpath through the tank and negligible rebound near the exit of the tank. Experimental observations and model simulations show that although concentration rebound was small at the end of the tank, the overall elution of uranium from of the tank was still controlled by mass transfer which was manifested by a long tail. At the field scale, mass transfer parameters inferred from geo-electrical measurements of bulk conductivity and traditional conductivity measurements of fluid samples showed significant spatial variability. Overall the improved understanding of mass transfer across multiple scales should lead to more robust reactive transport simulations and site management.

  13. Analysis of environmental issues related to small-scale hydroelectric development. VI. Dissolved oxygen concentrations below operating dams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cada, G.F.; Kumar, K.D.; Solomon, J.A.; Hildebrand, S.G.

    1982-01-01

    Results are presented of an effort aimed at determining whether or not water quality degradation, as exemplified by dissolved oxygen concentrations, is a potentially significant issue affecting small-scale hydropower development in the US. The approach was to pair operating hydroelectric sites of all sizes with dissolved oxygen measurements from nearby downstream US Geological Survey water quality stations (acquired from the WATSTORE data base). The USGS data were used to calculate probabilities of non-compliance (PNCs), i.e., the probabilities that dissolved oxygen concentrations in the discharge waters of operating hydroelectric dams will drop below 5 mg/l. PNCs were estimated for each site, season (summer vs remaining months), and capacity category (less than or equal to 30 MW vs >30 MW). Because of the low numbers of usable sites in many states, much of the subsequent analysis was conducted on a regional basis. During the winter months (November through June) all regions had low mean PNCs regardless of capacity. Most regions had higher mean PNCs in summer than in winter, and summer PNCs were greater for large-scale than for small-scale sites. Among regions, the highest mean summer PNCs were found in the Great Basin, the Southeast, and the Ohio Valley. To obtain a more comprehensive picture of the effects of season and capacity on potential dissolved oxygen problems, cumulative probability distributions of PNC were developed for selected regions. This analysis indicates that low dissolved oxygen concentrations in the tailwaters below operating hydroelectric projects are a problem largely confined to large-scale facilities.

  14. The?Spectrum?of?Data?Intensive? Compu6ng?Ac6vi6es?at?L...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    oneyoumightwanttopayaFen5on to...) StandardApproach * KalmanBucysolvedproblemsexactlyfor linearsystems,Gaussiannoise,ad...

  15. OMEGA Control Room - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Control Room - Laboratory for Laser Energetics Laboratory for Laser Energetics Logo Search Home Around the Lab Past Issues Past Quick Shots About Office of the Director Map to LLE ...

  16. Documentation - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Omega Laser Facility Documentation 3000 LFORM 6950 Incident Review and Reporting 6610 LLE ... OMEGA Laser System Volume I - System Description (S-AA-M-12) Volume II - System Operation ...

  17. OMEGA EP Control Room - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Control Room - Laboratory for Laser Energetics Laboratory for Laser Energetics Logo Search Home Around the Lab Past Issues Past Quick Shots About Office of the Director Map to LLE ...

  18. Diagnostics Implemented on NIF - Nuclear

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    These charged particles are then energy dispersed by their momentum in a magnetic field and ... Mag-PTOF Magnetic - Particle Time-of-Flight Proton Detector DIM Appendage MIT, LLE, ...

  19. Intermediate photovoltaic system application experiment operational performance report for G. N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii for October 1982. Volume VI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    Presented are the data accumulated during October 1982 at the intermediate project at G.N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii. Generated energy and environmental (weather) data are presented graphically. Explanations of irregularities not attributable to weather are provided.

  20. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Development of Modified PAG (polyalkylene glycol) High VI High Fuel Efficient Lubricant for LDV Applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Ford Motor Company at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about development of modified...

  1. Modeling of fluidized-bed combustion of coal: Phase II, final reports. Volume VI. FBC-Data Base-Management-System (FBC-DBMS) development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Louis, J.F.; Tung, S.E.

    1980-10-01

    The primary goal of the Fluidized Bed Combustor Data Base, (FBCDB), situated in MIT's Energy laboratory, is to establish a data repository for the express use of designers and research personnel involved in FBC development. DBMS is a software that provides an efficient way of storing, retrieving, updating and manipulating data using an English-like query language. It is anticipated that the FBCDB would play an active and a direct role in the development of FBC technology as well as in the FBC commercial application. After some in-house experience and after a careful and extensive review of commercially available database systems, it was determined that the Model 204 DBMS by Computer Corporation of America was the most suitable to our needs. The setup of a prototype in-house database also allowed us to investigate and understand fully the particular problems involved in coordinating FBC development with a DBMS. Various difficult aspects were encountered and solutions had been sought. For instance, we found that it was necessary to rename the variables to avoid repetition as well as to increase usefulness of our database and, hence, we had designed a classification system for which variables were classified under category to achieve standardization of variable names. The primary content of FBCDB is a collection of data points defined by the value of a number of specific FBC variables. A user may interactively access the database from a computer terminal at any location, retrieve, examine, and manipulate the data as well as produce tables or graphs of the results.

  2. RETIRED A STARS AND THEIR COMPANIONS. VI. A PAIR OF INTERACTING EXOPLANET PAIRS AROUND THE SUBGIANTS 24 SEXTANIS AND HD 200964

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, John Asher; Payne, Matthew; Ford, Eric B.; Howard, Andrew W.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Clubb, Kelsey I.; Bowler, Brendan P.; Henry, Gregory W.; Fischer, Debra A.; Brewer, John M.; Schwab, Christian; Reffert, Sabine; Lowe, Thomas B.

    2011-01-15

    We report radial velocity (RV) measurements of the G-type subgiants 24 Sextanis (= HD 90043) and HD 200964. Both are massive, evolved stars that exhibit periodic variations due to the presence of a pair of Jovian planets. Photometric monitoring with the T12 0.80 m APT at Fairborn Observatory demonstrates both stars to be constant in brightness to {<=}0.002 mag, thus strengthening the planetary interpretation of the RV variations. Based on our dynamical analysis of the RV time series, 24 Sex b, c have orbital periods of 452.8 days and 883.0 days, corresponding to semimajor axes 1.333 AU and 2.08 AU, and minimum masses 1.99 M{sub Jup} and 0.86 M{sub Jup}, assuming a stellar mass M{sub *}= 1.54 M{sub sun}. HD 200964 b, c have orbital periods of 613.8 days and 825.0 days, corresponding to semimajor axes 1.601 AU and 1.95 AU, and minimum masses 1.99 M{sub Jup} and 0.90 M{sub Jup}, assuming M{sub *}= 1.44 M{sub sun}. We also carry out dynamical simulations to properly account for gravitational interactions between the planets. Most, if not all, of the dynamically stable solutions include crossing orbits, suggesting that each system is locked in a mean-motion resonance that prevents close encounters and provides long-term stability. The planets in the 24 Sex system likely have a period ratio near 2:1, while the HD 200964 system is even more tightly packed with a period ratio close to 4:3. However, we caution that further RV observations and more detailed dynamical modeling will be required to provide definitive and unique orbital solutions for both cases, and to determine whether the two systems are truly resonant.

  3. Role of vanadium(V) in the aging of the organic phase in the extraction of uranium(VI) by Alamine 336 from acidic sulfate leach liquors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chagnes, A.; Cote, G.; Courtaud, B.; Thiry, J.

    2008-07-01

    The present work is focussed on the chemical degradation of Alamine 336-tridecanol-n-dodecane solvent which used in the recovery of uranium by solvent extraction. Degradation occurs due to the presence of vanadium(V), an oxidant, in the feed solution. After a brief overview of the chemistry of vanadium, the kinetics of degradation of the solvent when contacted with acidic sulfate leach liquor was investigated and interpreted by the Michelis-Menten mechanism. GCMS analyses evidenced the presence of tridecanoic acid and dioctylamine as degradation products. A mechanism of degradation is discussed. (authors)

  4. Synergetic effects of II-VI sensitization upon TiO{sub 2} for photoelectrochemical water splitting; a tri-layered structured scheme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mumtaz, Asad; Mohamed, Norani Muti

    2014-10-24

    World's energy demands are growing on a higher scale increasing the need of more reliable and long term renewable energy resources. Efficient photo-electrochemical (PEC) devices based on novel nano-structured designs for solar-hydrogen generation need to be developed. This study provides an insight of the tri-layered-TiO2 based nanostructures. Observing the mechanism of hydrogen production, the comparison of the structural order during the synthesis is pronounced. The sequence in the tri-layered structure affects the photogenerated electron (e{sup −}) and hole (h{sup +}) pair transfer and separation. It is also discussed that not only the semiconductors band gaps alignment is important with respect to the water redox potential but also the interfacial regions. Quasi-Fermi-level adjustment at the interfacial regions plays a key role in deciding the solar to hydrogen efficiency. More efficient multicomponent semiconductor nano-design (MCSN) could be developed with the approach given in this study.

  5. Stability of U(VI)- and Tc(VII) reducing microbial communities to environmental perturbation: a thermodynamic network model and intermediate-scale experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKinley, James P.; Liu, Chongxuan; Istok, Jack; Krumholz, Lee

    2006-06-01

    The project is a collaborative task with a larger project headed by Jack Istok at Oregon State University, which is conducted under the same title. The project was conceptualized as follows. A ''geochemical'' model of microbial communities was hypothesized, in which microbes were characterized as mineral species according to the chemical transformations they used for metabolic function. The iron-reducing bacteria, for example, would be represented by the iron reducing chemical reaction, including a specific electron donor, the fraction of the consumed donor used for biomass maintenance or growth, and a free energy for the reaction. The pseudomineral species would then be included in a standard geochemical model, and community succession could be calculated according to the thermodynamically favored microbially mediated reactions under progressive consumption of electron donors and receptors, and evolving geochemical conditions. The project includes relatively minor participation by the University of Oklahoma and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, with the major component at OSU. The PNNL project was funded to provide assistance to Dr. Istok in formulating the appropriate modeling approach and geochemical constraints on the modeling effort.

  6. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-389 Great Bay Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    VI, LLC | Department of Energy 89 Great Bay Energy VI, LLC Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-389 Great Bay Energy VI, LLC Application from Great Bay Energy to export electric energy to Canada. PDF icon EA-389 Great Bay Energy VI, (CN).pdf More Documents & Publications EA-389 Greay Bay Energy VI, LLC EA-389-A Great Bay Energy VI, LLC Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-327-A DC Energy,

  7. The Fifth Omega Laser Facility Users Group Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrasso, R. D.

    2015-10-01

    A capacity gathering of over 100 researchers from 25 universities and laboratories met at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) for the Fifth Omega Laser Facility Users Group (OLUG) workshop. The purpose of the 2.5-day workshop was to facilitate communications and exchanges among individual Omega users and between users and the LLE management; to present ongoing and proposed research; to encourage research opportunities and collaborations that could be undertaken at the Omega Laser Facility and in a complementary fashion at other facilities [such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF) or the Laboratoire pour l’Utilisation des Lasers Intenses (LULI)]; to provide an opportunity for students, postdoctoral fellows, and young researchers to present their research in an informal setting; and to provide feedback to LLE management from the users about ways to improve the facility and future experimental campaigns.

  8. The Sixth Omega Laser Facility Users Group Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrasso, R. D.

    2014-10-01

    A capacity gathering of over 100 researchers from 25 universities and laboratories met at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) for the Sixth Omega Laser Facility Users Group (OLUG) workshop. The purpose of the 2.5-day workshop was to facilitate communications and exchanges among individual OMEGA users, and between users and the LLE management; to present ongoing and proposed research; to encourage research opportunities and collaborations that could be undertaken at the Omega Laser Facility and in a complementary fashion at other facilities [such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF) or the Laboratoire pour lUtilisation des Lasers Intenses (LULI)]; to provide an opportunity for students, postdoctoral fellows, and young researchers to present their research in an informal setting; and to provide feedback from the users to LLE management about ways to improve and keep the facility and future experimental campaigns at the cutting edge.

  9. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    chemistry (5) geosciences (4) management of radioactive wastes, and ... The role of nanopores on U(VI) sorption and redox behavior in U(VI)-contaminated ...

  10. U.S. Energy Information Administration Independent Statistics & Analysis

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tight Oil Production Trends in a Low Price Environment For EIA Conference June 15, 2015 | Washington, DC by Grant Nülle, Upstream Oil & Gas Economist Office of Petroleum, Natural Gas and Biofuels Outline * Effects low prices are having on U.S. oil production * EIA's short-term outlook for production * Reasons why U.S. output may be more resilient than otherwise thought Nülle | U.S. Tight Oil Trends, June 15, 2015 2 U.S. oil supply: reasons for reduced output in the short term * Oil price

  11. Radiological Safety Training for Accelerator Facilities

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... for the senior-level radiation protection ... available. . - Program Management - Instructor's Material ... VI. RADIOACTIVE WASTE ISSUES ......

  12. Information requested in Protocol No

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and Distribution Levels ...... 10 VI. Facilitating the Deployment of Demand Response and Distributed Variable Resources......

  13. PROTON RESONANCE SPECTROSCOPY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . . . . 164 F. Applications to Nuclear Astrophysics ... . 168 v VI. SUMMARY ... 175 .. 0 * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *...

  14. Low tritium partial pressure permeation system for mass transport measurement in lead lithium eutectic

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pawelko, R. J.; Shimada, M.; Katayama, K.; Fukada, S.; Humrickhouse, P. W.; Terai, T.

    2015-11-28

    This paper describes a new experimental system designed to investigate tritium mass transfer properties in materials important to fusion technology. Experimental activities were carried out at the Safety and Tritium Applied Research (STAR) facility located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The tritium permeation measurement system was developed as part of the Japan/US TITAN collaboration to investigate tritium mass transfer properties in liquid lead lithium eutectic (LLE) alloy. The experimental system is configured to measure tritium mass transfer properties at low tritium partial pressures. Initial tritium permeation scoping tests were conducted on a 1 mm thick α-Fe plate to determinemore » operating parameters and to validate the experimental technique. A second series of permeation tests was then conducted with the α-Fe plate covered with an approximately 8.5 mm layer of liquid lead lithium eutectic alloy (α-Fe/LLE). We present preliminary tritium permeation data for α-Fe and α-Fe/LLE at temperatures between 400 and 600°C and at tritium partial pressures between 1.7E-3 and 2.5 Pa in helium. Preliminary results for the α-Fe plate and α-Fe/LLE indicate that the data spans a transition region between the diffusion-limited regime and the surface-limited regime. In conclusion, additional data is required to determine the existence and range of a surface-limited regime.« less

  15. S?. LL-UIIS WLLM

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    No. 31 12187 IEmN wffi WE ST. Lulls m ST. cows awv m S?. LL-UIIS WLLM ftl M NV 9 HIC ltRElWXDwIDloIC6IC WVCf ., sm. m buTm1Iv IJm-n Fww. DECMPIISSI 1NltEEhU 1"O'S. llE...

  16. Theory of Neutron Chain Reactions. Volume II, Part I. Homogeneous Nuclear Chain Reactions. Chapter V. Neutron Chain Reactions. Chapter VI. Pile Equations. Chapter VII. Theory of Reflectors And The Method Of Groups

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Weinberg, Alvin M.; Noderer, L. C.

    1951-08-10

    The previous section of this book deals with the general problem of neutron diffusion. In this sequel we shall apply the results obtained already to the theory of slow neutron chain reacting systems.

  17. High-Quality Draft Genome Sequence of Desulfovibrio carbinoliphilus FW-101-2B, an Organic Acid-Oxidizing Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Isolated from Uranium(VI)-Contaminated Groundwater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramsay, Bradley D.; Hwang, Chiachi; Woo, Hannah L.; Carroll, Sue L.; Lucas, Susan; Han, James; Lapidus, Alla L.; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Samuel; Peters, Lin; Chertkov, Olga; Held, Brittany; Detter, John C.; Han, Cliff S.; Tapia, Roxanne; Land, Miriam L.; Hauser, Loren J.; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pagani, Loanna; Woyke, Tanja; Arkin, Adam P.; Dehal, Paramvir; Chivian, Dylan; Criddle, Craig S.; Wu, Weimin; Chakraborty, Romy; Hazen, Terry C.; Fields, Matthew W.

    2015-03-12

    Desulfovibrio carbinoliphilus subsp. oakridgensis FW-101-2B is an anaerobic, organic acid/alcohol-oxidizing, sulfate-reducing ?-proteobacterium. FW-101-2B was isolated from contaminated groundwater at The Field Research Center at Oak Ridge National Lab after in situ stimulation for heavy metal-reducing conditions. The genome will help elucidate the metabolic potential of sulfate-reducing bacteria during uranium reduction.

  18. Solvent extraction of thorium(IV), uranium(VI), and europium(III) with lipophilic alkyl-substituted pyridinium salts. Final report for subcontract 9-XZ2-1123E-1, June 1, 1992--December 1, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ensor, D.D.

    1997-01-01

    In the treatment of high level nuclear wastes, aromatic pyridinium salts which are radiation-resistant are desired for the extraction of actinides and lanthanides. The solvent extraction of Th{sup +4}, UO{sub 2}{sup +2}, and Eu{sup +3} by three aromatic extractants, 3,5-didodecylpyridinium nitrate (35PY), 2,6-didodecylpyridinium nitrate (26PY), and 1-methyl-3,5-didodecyl-pyridinium iodide (1M35PY) has been studied in nitric acid media. The general order of extractability of the three extractants in toluene was 1M35PY>> 26PY > 35PY. The overall extraction efficiency of the metal ions was Th{sup +4} >UO{sub 2}{sup +2} > Eu{sup +3}. The extraction of HNO{sub 3}, which was competitive with the extraction of metal ions, was quantitatively investigated by NaOH titration and UV spectrometry. The loading capacity suggested that the extracted species in the organic phase for thorium was (R{sub 4}N{sup +}){sub 2}Th(NO{sub 3}{sup -}){sub 6}, where R{sub 4}N{sup +} denotes 1M35PY. A comparison of 1M35PY to the well-characterized extractant, Aliquat-336, an aliphatic ammonium salt was made. At the same extractant concentration, 1M35PY extracted thorium more efficiently than Aliquat-336 at high acidity. Thorium could be readily stripped with dilute nitric acid from 1M35PY. After irradiation of 0.1M 1M35PY with {sup 60}Co at 40R/min for 48 hours, no change in the extraction efficiency of thorium was observed.

  19. Dependence of liquefaction behavior on coal characteristics. Part VI. Relationship of liquefaction behavior of a set of high sulfur coals to chemical structural characteristics. Final technical report, March 1981 to February 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neill, P. H.; Given, P. H.

    1984-09-01

    The initial aim of this research was to use empirical mathematical relationships to formulate a better understanding of the processes involved in the liquefaction of a set of medium rank high sulfur coals. In all, just over 50 structural parameters and yields of product classes were determined. In order to gain a more complete understanding of the empirical relationships between the various properties, a number of relatively complex statistical procedures and tests were applied to the data, mostly selected from the field of multivariate analysis. These can be broken down into two groups. The first group included grouping techniques such as non-linear mapping, hierarchical and tree clustering, and linear discriminant analyses. These techniques were utilized in determining if more than one statistical population was present in the data set; it was concluded that there was not. The second group of techniques included factor analysis and stepwise multivariate linear regressions. Linear discriminant analyses were able to show that five distinct groups of coals were represented in the data set. However only seven of the properties seemed to follow this trend. The chemical property that appeared to follow the trend most closely was the aromaticity, where a series of five parallel straight lines was observed for a plot of f/sub a/ versus carbon content. The factor patterns for each of the product classes indicated that although each of the individual product classes tended to load on factors defined by specific chemical properties, the yields of the broader product classes, such as total conversion to liquids + gases and conversion to asphaltenes, tended to load largely on factors defined by rank. The variance explained and the communalities tended to be relatively low. Evidently important sources of variance have still to be found.

  20. High-Quality Draft Genome Sequence of Desulfovibrio carbinoliphilus FW-101-2B, an Organic Acid-Oxidizing Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Isolated from Uranium(VI)-Contaminated Groundwater

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ramsay, Bradley D.; Hwang, Chiachi; Woo, Hannah L.; Carroll, Sue L.; Lucas, Susan; Han, James; Lapidus, Alla L.; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Samuel; et al

    2015-03-12

    Desulfovibrio carbinoliphilus subsp. oakridgensis FW-101-2B is an anaerobic, organic acid/alcohol-oxidizing, sulfate-reducing δ-proteobacterium. FW-101-2B was isolated from contaminated groundwater at The Field Research Center at Oak Ridge National Lab after in situ stimulation for heavy metal-reducing conditions. The genome will help elucidate the metabolic potential of sulfate-reducing bacteria during uranium reduction.

  1. Method for separating actinides. [Patent application; stripping of Np from organic extractant

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Friedman, H.A.; Toth, L.M.

    1980-11-10

    An organic solution used for processing spent nuclear reactor fuels is contacted with an aqueous nitric acid solution to strip Np(VI), U(VI), and Pu(IV) from the organic solution into the acid solution. The acid solution is exposed to ultraviolet light, which reduces Np(VI) to Np(V) without reducing U(VI) and Pu(IV). Since the solubility of Np(V) in the organic solution is much lower than that of Np(VI), U(VI), and Pu(IV), a major part of the Np is stripped from the organic solution while leaving most of the U and Pu therein.

  2. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Clean Energy Center (MassCEC) offers site assessment grants of services, feasibility study gran... Eligibility: Commercial, Industrial, Local Government, Nonprofit,...

  3. Fermilab | Science | Questions for the Universe | The Particle...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IL VERITAS, Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory, Amado, Arizona Xenon 10, Gran Sasso, Italy COUPP, Fermilab, Batavia, IL ZEPLIN II Cryogenic Dark Matter Search GLAST International ...

  4. Aerogeneradores Canarios SA ACSA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    de Gran Canaria, Spain Zip: 35011 Sector: Wind energy Product: Manufacturer mini wind-turbines and wind farm developer References: Aerogeneradores Canarios SA (ACSA)1 This...

  5. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements VI (ARM-ACME VI) team inventory carbon dioxide, methane, and other greenhouse gases in the region. Building on results of previous ARM-ACME...

  6. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-389 Great...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    9 Great Bay Energy VI, LLC Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-389 Great Bay Energy VI, LLC Application from Great Bay Energy to export electric energy to...

  7. MEETING MATERIALS: JUNE 26, 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Westin Crystal CityCrystal Ballroom VI (Located on the Second Floor)1800 Jefferson Davis HighwayArlington, VA 22202

  8. Radiological Training for Accelerator Facilities

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... for the senior-level radiation protection ... 2000 format. - Program Management Guide - Instructor's ... 28 VI. RADIOACTIVE WASTE ISSUES ...

  9. I Mr. J. C. Delaney

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    FINANCIAL QUALIFICATIONS ...... 6 VI. INSURANCE ... 3. in chemical engineering and H. 5, in gas technology from Illinois Institute of ...

  10. ARM Assists Lilac Phenology Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Document) | SciTech Connect ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements VI (ACME VI) Science Plan Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements VI (ACME VI) Science Plan From October 1 through September 30, 2016, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Aerial Facility will deploy the Cessna 206 aircraft over the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site, collecting observations of trace-gas mixing ratios over the ARM's SGP facility. The aircraft payload includes two Atmospheric

  11. Microsoft Word - Cadmus_BBEE_Pilot_Evaluation_Final_Report_08APR2013...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... 16 Behavior Based Energy Efficiency Pilot Evaluation Draft Report April 8, 2013 vi Review of Measurement and...

  12. Inertial confinement fusion target component fabrication and technology development support: Annual report, October 1, 1997--September 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibson, J. [ed.

    1998-12-01

    During this period, General Atomics (GA) and their partner Schafer Corporation were assigned 17 formal tasks in support of the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program and its five laboratories. A portion of the effort on these tasks included providing direct ``On-site Support`` at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and Sandia National Laboratory Albuquerque (SNLA). They fabricated and delivered over 1,200 hohlraum mandrels and numerous other micromachined components to LLNL, LANL, and SNLA. They produced more than 1,300 glass and plastic target capsules for LLNL, LANL, SNLA, and the University of Rochester/Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE). They also delivered nearly 2,000 various target foils and films for Naval Research Lab (NRL) and UR/LLE in FY98. This report describes these target fabrication activities and the target fabrication and characterization development activities that made the deliveries possible. During FY98, great progress was made by the GA/Schafer-UR/LLE-LANL team in the design, procurement, installation, and testing of the OMEGA Cryogenic Target System (OCTS) that will field cryogenic targets on OMEGA. The design phase was concluded for all components of the OCTS and all major components were procured and nearly all were fabricated. Many of the components were assembled and tested, and some have been shipped to UR/LLE. The ICF program is anticipating experiments at the OMEGA laser and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) which will require targets containing cryogenic layered D{sub 2} or deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel. They are part of the National Cryogenic Target Program and support experiments at LLNL and LANL to generate and characterize cryogenic layers for these targets. They also contributed cryogenic support and developed concepts for NIF cryogenic targets. This report summarizes and documents the technical progress made on these tasks.

  13. Magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) needs a

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) needs a credible demonstration of the key physics principles along with validated simulation models in order to be able to adequately assess the prospects for attractive MIF energy production. SNL and the Laboratory for Laser Energetics at the University of Rochester (LLE) are working collaboratively to investigate the compression and heating of magnetized plasmas at fusion relevant conditions. This work is being conducted through a series of focused experiments

  14. Identification and quantification analysis of nonlinear dynamics properties of combustion instability in a diesel engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Li-Ping Ding, Shun-Liang; Song, En-Zhe; Ma, Xiu-Zhen; Litak, Grzegorz

    2015-01-15

    The cycling combustion instabilities in a diesel engine have been analyzed based on chaos theory. The objective was to investigate the dynamical characteristics of combustion in diesel engine. In this study, experiments were performed under the entire operating range of a diesel engine (the engine speed was changed from 600 to 1400 rpm and the engine load rate was from 0% to 100%), and acquired real-time series of in-cylinder combustion pressure using a piezoelectric transducer installed on the cylinder head. Several methods were applied to identify and quantitatively analyze the combustion process complexity in the diesel engine including delay-coordinate embedding, recurrence plot (RP), Recurrence Quantification Analysis, correlation dimension (CD), and the largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE) estimation. The results show that the combustion process exhibits some determinism. If LLE is positive, then the combustion system has a fractal dimension and CD is no more than 1.6 and within the diesel engine operating range. We have concluded that the combustion system of diesel engine is a low-dimensional chaotic system and the maximum values of CD and LLE occur at the lowest engine speed and load. This means that combustion system is more complex and sensitive to initial conditions and that poor combustion quality leads to the decrease of fuel economy and the increase of exhaust emissions.

  15. Supported metal alloy catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barrera, Joseph; Smith, David C.

    2000-01-01

    A process of preparing a Group IV, V, or VI metal carbonitride including reacting a Group IV, V, or VI metal amide complex with ammonia to obtain an intermediate product; and, heating the intermediate product to temperatures and for times sufficient to form a Group IV, V, or VI metal carbonitride is provided together with the product of the process and a process of reforming an n-alkane by use of the product.

  16. Epithelialmesenchymal transition during oncogenic transformation induced by hexavalent chromium involves reactive oxygen species-dependent mechanism in lung epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Song-Ze; Yang, Yu-Xiu; Li, Xiu-Ling; Michelli-Rivera, Audrey; Han, Shuang-Yin; Wang, Lei; Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Wang, Xin; Lu, Jian; Yin, Yuan-Qin; Budhraja, Amit; Hitron, Andrew J.

    2013-05-15

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is an important human carcinogen associated with pulmonary diseases and lung cancer. Exposure to Cr(VI) induces DNA damage, cell morphological change and malignant transformation in human lung epithelial cells. Despite extensive studies, the molecular mechanisms remain elusive, it is also not known if Cr(VI)-induced transformation might accompany with invasive properties to facilitate metastasis. We aimed to study Cr(VI)-induced epithelialmesenchymal transition (EMT) and invasion during oncogenic transformation in lung epithelial cells. The results showed that Cr(VI) at low doses represses E-cadherin mRNA and protein expression, enhances mesenchymal marker vimentin expression and transforms the epithelial cell into fibroblastoid morphology. Cr(VI) also increases cell invasion and promotes colony formation. Further studies indicated that Cr(VI) uses multiple mechanisms to repress E-cadherin expression, including activation of E-cadherin repressors such as Slug, ZEB1, KLF8 and enhancement the binding of HDAC1 in E-cadherin gene promoter, but DNA methylation is not responsible for the loss of E-cadherin. Catalase reduces Cr(VI)-induced E-cadherin and vimentin protein expression, attenuates cell invasion in matrigel and colony formation on soft agar. These results demonstrate that exposure to a common human carcinogen, Cr(VI), induces EMT and invasion during oncogenic transformation in lung epithelial cells and implicate in cancer metastasis and prevention. - Graphical abstract: Epithelialmesenchymal transition during oncogenic transformation induced by hexavalent chromium involves reactive oxygen species-dependent mechanisms in lung epithelial cells. - Highlights: We study if Cr(VI) might induce EMT and invasion in epithelial cells. Cr(VI) induces EMT by altering E-cadherin and vimentin expression. It also increases cell invasion and promotes oncogenic transformation. Catalase reduces Cr(VI)-induced EMT, invasion and transformation.

  17. Slinger Utilities | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Slinger Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name: Slinger Utilities Place: Wisconsin Phone Number: (262)644-5265 Website: www.vi.slinger.wi.govindex.as Outage Hotline: (262)...

  18. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... of product or material, or reducing the cost of carrying the same levels; vi) Reducing utility or natural resource consumption; or vii) Reducing or eliminating scrap dollarsrates. ...

  19. Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly Vol 1 Issue 4 - October...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Washington, DC, the FEMA Region IV Regional Response Coordination Center (RRCC) in Atlanta, GA, Region VI RRCC in Denton, TX, the Baton Rouge, LA Incident Management Assistance ...

  20. Uranium Biomineralization By Natural Microbial Phosphatase Activities...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    that hydrolyze exogenous organophosphate compounds and result in the non-reductive bioimmobilization of U(VI) phosphate minerals in both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. ...

  1. Structural styles of the Wilcox and Frio growth-fault trends...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... SALT DEPOSITS; ENERGY SYSTEMS; FEDERAL REGION VI; GEOLOGIC DEPOSITS; GEOLOGIC FRACTURES; NORTH AMERICA; USA Geothermal Legacy Word Cloud More Like This Full Text preview ...

  2. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Soil-free controls and biologically mediated processes. Both abiotic and biological ... A ferrihydrite-based diffuse double layer model provided a better estimation of U(VI) ...

  3. small business administration | National Nuclear Security Administrati...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    administration small business administration SBA recognizes Pantex as a leader Small Business Administration Region VI SBA District Director Calvin Davis and Regional...

  4. sba | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home sba sba SBA recognizes Pantex as a leader Small Business Administration Region VI SBA District Director Calvin Davis and Regional...

  5. LLW Notes supplement, Volume 12, Number 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-07-01

    Contents include articles related to environmental justice concerns and Title VI, entitled as follows: Civil Rights Act of 1964; Exec order on environmental justice; Applicability to states; Philosophical differences -- Environmental justice and Title VI; Ambiguities in existing Title VI guidance; Clarification of existing Title VI guidance; Federal financial assistance; Administrative complaints vs. lawsuits; Effect and disparate impact; Termination, suspension or refusal to grant federal financial assistance; DOJ guidance defines environmental justice; NEJAC meets, adopts far-reaching resolution re siting; Indigenous Peoples Resolution No. 23; and States meet, support environmental justice concept and express concerns about federal approach and composition of NEJAC.

  6. CONSULTATION WITH INDIAN TRIBES

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Handbook Page 1 II. Federal Government Consultation with Page ... Off-and-On Tribal Lands VI. Consultation Tools ... agency, that use federal funds, or that require federal ...

  7. Annual Report: Carbon Storage (30 September 2012)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... and Geographic Information System (NATCARB) as a national ... the states in relation to Class VI injection well data ... This change can lead to a range of processes, including ...

  8. ORD FWP_NRAP FY13 Annual Report

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Cover Illustration: Schematic diagram of the CO2-PENS system ... 5: Importance measures for change in a shallow sandstone ... Protection Agency (EPA) Class VI Underground Injection ...

  9. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... LABORATORY STUDY FOR THE REDUCTION OF CHROME (VI) TO CHROME (III) USING SODIUM METABISULFITE UNDER ACIDIC CONDITIONS DUNCAM JB ; GUTHRIE MD ; LUECK KJ ; AVILA M This report ...

  10. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The expected frequency dependence vastly underestimates the sharpness of this drop. Numerical simulations that assume ac response to follow dc V-I characteristics of the films ...

  11. A framework for modeling the detailed optical response of thick...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ; Paris U., VI-VII ; Claver, Chuck ; NOAO, Tucson ; Doherty, Peter ; Harvard U., Phys. ... Part. Phys. ; Stubbs, Christopher ; Harvard U., Phys. Dept. less Publication Date: ...

  12. Molecular Mechanisms of Uranium Reduction by Clostridia and its Manipulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matin, A. C.

    2006-06-01

    The objective of this grant is to examine and manipulate the molecular mechanisms in Clostridia to make them better agents for uranyl [U(VI)] bioremediation.

  13. 2013 Transmission Reliability Program Peer Review- Day 2 Presentations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Transmission Reliability Program Peer Review included six sessions over 2 days on June 27 - 28, 2013. Here are presentations from Day 2 (Sessions V and VI).

  14. Microsoft Word - 41846322_3.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of substantial additional expense to Bonneville and could further affect the amount and value of hydroelectric power from the Federal System; (vi) continued availability of the...

  15. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    U(VI) desorption; 3) however, long-term prediction and its uncertainty may be ... become vital to the quantification of prediction uncertainty in groundwater modeling, ...

  16. DOE/ID-Number

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... greatest control on chemical and physical properties of both illite and smectite clays. ... U(VI) species predominant under these chemical solution conditions, as well as the ...

  17. Targeting Net Zero Energy at Marine Corps Air Station Miramar...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... vi MSW municipal solid waste MWh megawatt-hours MW ... the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), and the ... Despite the base's already low EUI and past energy ...

  18. TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... of Environmental Management FY 2011 Performance ... which meets the WIPP Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC), will be ... American Standard Level VI inspections and ...

  19. Final Scientific/Technical Report--In-Situ Generation of Iron-Chromium Precipitates for Long Term Immobilization of Chromium at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butler, Elizabeth C.; Krumholz, Lee R.; Madden, Andrew S.; Hansel, Colleen M.

    2013-12-13

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) is a toxic ground water contaminant widespread at the Hanford site and many other industrial facilities. A common remediation method for Cr(VI) is in situ reduction/immobilization, in which soluble Cr(VI) is reduced to the less soluble trivalent Cr (Cr(III)). If iron (Fe) minerals are present during the process, Cr(III) precipitates as a mixed Fe(III)-Cr(III) (Fe-Cr) solid. The objective of this exploratory research was to obtain preliminary evidence about the relationships among the method of Cr(VI) reduction (i.e., abiotic or microbial), the properties of the resulting Fe-Cr precipitates, and their tendencies to release soluble Cr(VI) in the presence of the common manganese oxide birnessite. The results of this exploratory research project show that the conditions of Cr(VI) reduction—specifically the ratio of Cr to Fe, and/or whether the Cr(VI) reductant is a mineral or a microorganism—can significantly affect the tendency of the resulting Fe-Cr precipitate to release Cr(VI) to the environment in the presence of birnessite. These results suggest the chosen remediation conditions have the potential to strongly influence not only the initial success of in situ Cr(VI) reduction/immobilization, but also the potential for successful long term sequestration of Cr in the form of stable soil precipitates.

  20. Complex System Method to Assess Commercial Vehicle Fuel Consumption...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    on a 'Euro VI' Heavy-duty Engine using the PMP Methodologies A High Temperature Direct Vehicle Exhaust Flowmeter for Heavy Duty Diesel Emission Measurements. Transonic ...

  1. Reoxidation of Bioreduced Uranium Under Reducing Conditions ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    2(COsub 3)sub 3 complexes (caused by the elevated carbonate concentration from microbial respiration and presence of calcium) drove the U(IV)U(VI) reduction potential...

  2. Vacuum Insulation for Window

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... 29 Highly Insulating Transparent Fenestration Testing * Ultimately need to perform ASTM standards to compare VI with other products * ASTM Standard C1199 - 12 "Standard Test ...

  3. Designs for a Linac-Ring LHeC (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Accel. Sci. Tech. ; Dainton, John ; Liverpool U. ; Klein, Max ; Liverpool U. ; Eide, Anders ; Paris U., VI-VII less Publication Date: 2012-06-21 OSTI Identifier: 1043845 ...

  4. Review of Emerging Diesel Emissions and Control | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Emerging Diesel Emissions and Control Review of Emerging Diesel Emissions and Control Criteria pollutant regulatory efforts are focused on Euro VI HD PN limits, and California LEV3 ...

  5. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Cr(VI) Adsorption on Soils, Sediments and Model Mixtures of Kaolinite, Montmorillonite, ... into aquifers and shallow sediments and soils via many anthropogenic activities. ...

  6. Illinois' 12th congressional district: Energy Resources | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Registered Energy Companies in Illinois' 12th congressional district Coaltec Energy USA Inc DarkStar VI Heartland Biodiesel Inc Mid America Advanced Power Solutions Midwest...

  7. Illinois' 19th congressional district: Energy Resources | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Companies in Illinois' 19th congressional district DarkStar VI Illinois Commerce Commission Mid America Biodiesel LLC MAB National Trail Biodiesel Retrieved from...

  8. SECTION I

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... with the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and that is ... vi) Reducing utility or natural resource consumption; or ... any existing Contract requirements such as scope, safety, ...

  9. Model Documentation Report: Macroeconomic Activity Module of...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    are covered in order to meet client needs regarding investment and financial allocation strategies. (See Table A10.) Inflation: Inflation (VI) is modeled as a...

  10. Metaproteomics Identifies the Protein Machinery Involved in Metal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    This research effort integrated current understanding of the microbiology and biochemistry of U(VI) reduction and capitalize on advances in proteomics technology made over the past ...

  11. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... This research effort integrated current understanding of the microbiology and biochemistry of U(VI) reduction and capitalize on advances in proteomics technology made over the past ...

  12. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... VI. Roundtable Participants Art Allison, Dine Development Corporation John Alloway, Forest County Potawatomi Shenan Atcitty, Holland and Knight Warren Auntim, GEO-Energy Payton ...

  13. Metaproteomics Identifies the Protein Machinery Involved in Metal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    mining, controlled laboratory studies, U(VI) reduction activity measurements, phylogenetic analyses, and gene expression studies to support the metaproteomics characterizations. ...

  14. Dr.James J.Spivey

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Books: cat Catalysis , volumes 12-21, published by the Royal Society of Chemistry (Cambridge, UK). nat Natural Gas Conversion VI, Studies in Surface Science and Catalysis , vol....

  15. Method for in situ or ex situ bioremediation of hexavalent chromium contaminated soils and/or groundwater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turick, C.E.; Apel, W.W.

    1997-10-28

    A method of reducing the concentration of Cr(VI) in a liquid aqueous residue comprises the steps of providing anaerobic Cr(VI) reducing bacteria, mixing the liquid aqueous residue with a nutrient medium to form a mixture, and contacting the mixture with the anaerobic Cr(VI) reducing bacteria such that Cr(VI) is reduced to Cr(III). The anaerobic Cr(VI) reducing bacteria appear to be ubiquitous in soil and can be selected by collecting a soil sample, diluting the soil sample with a sterile diluent to form a diluted sample, mixing the diluted sample with an effective amount of a nutrient medium and an effective amount of Cr(VI) to form a mixture, and incubating the mixture in the substantial absence of oxygen such that growth of Cr(VI) sensitive microorganisms is inhibited and growth of the anaerobic Cr(VI) reducing bacteria is stimulated. A method of in situ bioremediation of Cr(VI) contaminated soil and/or groundwater is also disclosed. 10 figs.

  16. Method for in situ or ex situ bioremediation of hexavalent chromium contaminated soils and/or groundwater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turick, Charles E.; Apel, William W.

    1997-10-28

    A method of reducing the concentration of Cr(VI) in a liquid aqueous residue comprises the steps of providing anaerobic Cr(VI) reducing bacteria, mixing the liquid aqueous residue with a nutrient medium to form a mixture, and contacting the mixture with the anaerobic Cr(VI) reducing bacteria such that Cr(VI) is reduced to Cr(III). The anaerobic Cr(VI) reducing bacteria appear to be ubiquitous in soil and can be selected by collecting a soil sample, diluting the soil sample with a sterile diluent to form a diluted sample, mixing the diluted sample with an effective amount of a nutrient medium and an effective amount of Cr(VI) to form a mixture, and incubating the mixture in the substantial absence of oxygen such that growth of Cr(VI) sensitive microorganisms is inhibited and growth of the anaerobic Cr(VI) reducing bacteria is stimulated. A method of in situ bioremediation of Cr(VI) contaminated soil and/or groundwater is also disclosed.

  17. Microsoft Word - ML103200124.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for the H-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site Executive Summary In accordance ... (vi) NRC recommends DOE evaluate plant transfer factor uncertainty in future ...

  18. Scott County, Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Duffield, Virginia Dungannon, Virginia Gate City, Virginia Nickelsville, Virginia Weber City, Virginia Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleScottCounty,Vi...

  19. --No Title--

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to Chapters IV, Compensation; Chapter V, Benefits; and Chapter VI, DOE Contractor Pension Plans of DOE Order 350.1, Contractor Human Resource Management Programs (approved on...

  20. Active DOE Technical Projects

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ID SLM ORG Author Phone Email Status Status Date P1107- 1997REV Knowledge, ... on of Documented Safety Analysis for Decommissioning and Environmental Restora on Ac vi es ...

  1. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with Continuous Parameters Over the Size Spectrum Khvorostyanov, V.I. and Curry, J.A., ... spectra and continuous integration over the size spectrum when evaluation the moments. ...

  2. A=6He (1979AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Astrophysical questions: (1976VI1A). Electromagnetic interactions: (1975VE01). Special ... The internal bremsstrahlung spectrum has been measured by (1965BI09). The ...

  3. ADDITIONAL PROTOCOL REPORTING

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Source Material Article 2.a(vi) * Possession of source material preceding the starting point of IAEA safeguards - Uranium ore concentrates - By-product from other ore processing...

  4. Plan Outline

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    end-use customers for measure installation or project implementation. BPA Action Plan for Energy Efficiency vi EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Bonneville Power Administration is a leader in...

  5. BPA-2014-00700-FOIA Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    program partners, and regional stakeholders to share ideas and best practices in energy efficiency. IV. Recovery Plan V. Reform-Based Actions VI. MeetingsEvents Northwest Food...

  6. Nationwide Analysis of U.S. Commercial Building Solar Photovoltaic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of breakeven prices than is variation in building load or solar generation profiles. vi This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory...

  7. St. Clair County, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in St. Clair County, Illinois DarkStar VI Mid America Advanced Power Solutions Midwest Biodiesel Products Energy Generation Facilities in St. Clair County, Illinois Milam Gas...

  8. Microsoft Word - NRAP-TRS-I-003-2016_Key Factors for Assessing...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... (drinking, agricultural, and industrial wells) to base discussions on monitoring and corrective action plans that are needed for the permitting of Class VI injection wells. ...

  9. SU-E-J-261: Statistical Analysis and Chaotic Dynamics of Respiratory Signal of Patients in BodyFix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michalski, D; Huq, M; Bednarz, G; Lalonde, R; Yang, Y; Heron, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify respiratory signal of patients in BodyFix undergoing 4DCT scan with and without immobilization cover. Methods: 20 pairs of respiratory tracks recorded with RPM system during 4DCT scan were analyzed. Descriptive statistic was applied to selected parameters of exhale-inhale decomposition. Standardized signals were used with the delay method to build orbits in embedded space. Nonlinear behavior was tested with surrogate data. Sample entropy SE, Lempel-Ziv complexity LZC and the largest Lyapunov exponents LLE were compared. Results: Statistical tests show difference between scans for inspiration time and its variability, which is bigger for scans without cover. The same is for variability of the end of exhalation and inhalation. Other parameters fail to show the difference. For both scans respiratory signals show determinism and nonlinear stationarity. Statistical test on surrogate data reveals their nonlinearity. LLEs show signals chaotic nature and its correlation with breathing period and its embedding delay time. SE, LZC and LLE measure respiratory signal complexity. Nonlinear characteristics do not differ between scans. Conclusion: Contrary to expectation cover applied to patients in BodyFix appears to have limited effect on signal parameters. Analysis based on trajectories of delay vectors shows respiratory system nonlinear character and its sensitive dependence on initial conditions. Reproducibility of respiratory signal can be evaluated with measures of signal complexity and its predictability window. Longer respiratory period is conducive for signal reproducibility as shown by these gauges. Statistical independence of the exhale and inhale times is also supported by the magnitude of LLE. The nonlinear parameters seem more appropriate to gauge respiratory signal complexity since its deterministic chaotic nature. It contrasts with measures based on harmonic analysis that are blind for nonlinear features. Dynamics of breathing, so crucial for 4D-based clinical technologies, can be better controlled if nonlinear-based methodology, which reflects respiration characteristic, is applied. Funding provided by Varian Medical Systems via Investigator Initiated Research Project.

  10. Neutron Interactions in the CUORE Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The site for both of these experiments is the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, an underground laboratory with 3300 meters water equivalent rock overburden and a cosmic ray muon ...

  11. Microsoft Word - MicroBooNE CD-0 appr.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    built the ICARUS experiment that is in the Gran Sasso Underground Laboratory in the Italian Alps. The purpose of the program started by this mission need statement is to develop...

  12. Fermilab | Newsroom | Press Releases | April 22, 2015: Icarus...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    JPG images. When using these images, please credit each photo as indicated. Med Res | Hi Res A view of the top of the ICARUS detector in place at INFN's Gran Sasso National...

  13. LA-UR--U2-2622

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    -U2-2622 11E83 000332 PARITY NONCONSERVATION IN PROTON-WATER SCATTERING AT 800 lleV D. E. Nagle, J. D. Bowman, R. Carlini, It. E. Ftischke Los Al~mos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 H. Frauenfelder, R. W. Harper, V. Yuan University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 A. B. McDonald Princeton University, Princeton, 7 and R. Talaga University of Marylandp College Park, MD 20742 ABSTRACT A search has been made for parity noncnnservation in the scattering of 800 IleV polarized protona from an

  14. BIG RU N INDIANA LAKESHORE RUN E LUMBER CIT Y WARSAW JOHNST

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    RU N INDIANA LAKESHORE RUN E LUMBER CIT Y WARSAW JOHNST OWN BU RNSIDE MILLSTONE FROSTBUR G JUN EAU PLU MVILLE CHERRY HILL KAN E BOSWELL MAR ION CENT ER CREEKSIDE SALTSBUR G POINT N BLAIR SVILL E COU NCIL RU N SIGEL LEWISVILLE BEAR C REEK AR MBRUST OHIOPYLE HALLT ON BR OOKVILLE MAR KTON NOL O RAT HMEL COR SICA MAR CHAND SMIC KSBU RG HOWE APOLLO SEVEN SPRIN GS YAT ESBORO MCNEES LUCIND A GEORGE PIN EY LEEPER TIMBLIN WILL ET FERGUSON CLIMAX PANIC DAVY HILL TIDIOUT E GRAMPIAN SLIGO ROC KVI LLE

  15. BIGHORN SHEEP: SUPPLEMENTAL ANALYSIS TO THE FOREST PLAN ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT-INTERDISCIPLINARY TEAM MEETING

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RU N INDIANA LAKESHORE RUN E LUMBER CIT Y WARSAW JOHNST OWN BU RNSIDE MILLSTONE FROSTBUR G JUN EAU PLU MVILLE CHERRY HILL KAN E BOSWELL MAR ION CENT ER CREEKSIDE SALTSBUR G POINT N BLAIR SVILL E COU NCIL RU N SIGEL LEWISVILLE BEAR C REEK AR MBRUST OHIOPYLE HALLT ON BR OOKVILLE MAR KTON NOL O RAT HMEL COR SICA MAR CHAND SMIC KSBU RG HOWE APOLLO SEVEN SPRIN GS YAT ESBORO MCNEES LUCIND A GEORGE PIN EY LEEPER TIMBLIN WILL ET FERGUSON CLIMAX PANIC DAVY HILL TIDIOUT E GRAMPIAN SLIGO ROC KVI LLE

  16. Mapping the formation areas of giant molybdenum blue clusters: a spectroscopic study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Botar, Bogdan; Ellern, Arkady; Kogerler, Paul

    2012-05-18

    The self-assembly of soluble molybdenum blue species from simple molybdate solutions has primarily been associated with giant mixed-valent wheel-shaped cluster anions, derived from the {MoV/VI154/176} archetypes, and a {MoV/VI368} lemon-shaped cluster. The combined use of Raman spectroscopy and kinetic precipitation as self-assembly monitoring techniques and single-crystal X-ray diffraction is key to mapping the realm of molybdenum blue species by establishing spherical {MoV/VI102}-type Keplerates as an important giant molybdenum blue-type species. We additionally rationalize the empirical effect of reducing agent concentration on the formation of all three relevant skeletal types: wheel, lemon and spheres. Whereas both wheels and the lemon-shaped {MoV/VI368} cluster are obtained from weakly reduced molybdenum blue solutions, considerably higher reduced solutions lead to {MoV/VI102}-type Keplerates.

  17. OMEGA: A NEW COLD X-RAY SIMULATION FACILITY FOR THE EVALUATION OF OPTICAL COATINGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, J H; Newlander, C D; Fournier, K B; Beutler, D E; Coverdale, C A; May, M J; Tobin, M; Davis, J F; Shiekh, D

    2007-04-27

    We report on recent progress for the development of a new cold X-ray optical test capability using the Omega Facility located at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) at the University of Rochester. These tests were done on the 30 kJ OMEGA laser at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) at the University of Rochester, Rochester, NY. We conducted a six-shot series called OMEGA II on 14 July 2006 in one eight-hour day (supported by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency). The initial testing was performed using simple protected gold optical coatings on fused silica substrates. PUFFTFT analyses were completed and the specimen's thermal lateral stress and transverse stress conditions were calculated and interpreted. No major anomalies were detected. Comparison of the pre- and posttest reflective measurements coupled with the TFCALC analyses proved invaluable in guiding the analyses and interpreting the observed damage. The Omega facility is a high quality facility for performing evaluation of optical coatings and coupons and provides experience for the development of future National Ignition Facility (NIF) testing.

  18. Searching for R-parity violation at run-II of the tevatron.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allanach, B.; Banerjee, S.; Berger, E. L.; Chertok, M.; Diaz, M. A.; Dreiner, H.; Eboli, O. J. P.; Harris, B. W.; Hewett, J.; Magro, M. B.; Mondal, N. K.; Narasimham, V. S.; Navarro, L.; Parua, N.; Porod, W.; Restrepo, D. A.; Richardson, P.; Rizzo, T.; Seymour, M. H.; Sullivan, Z.; Valle, J. W. F.; de Campos, F.

    1999-06-22

    The authors present an outlook for possible discovery of supersymmetry with broken R-parity at Run II of the Tevatron. They first present a review of the literature and an update of the experimental bounds. In turn they then discuss the following processes: (1) resonant slepton production followed by R{sub P} decay, (a) via LQD{sup c} and (b) via LLE{sup c}; (2) how to distinguish resonant slepton production from Z{prime} or W{prime} production; (3) resonant slepton production followed by the decay to neutralino LSP, which decays via LQD{sup c}; (4) resonant stop production followed by the decay to a chargino, which cascades to the neutralino LSP; (5) gluino pair production followed by the cascade decay to charm squarks which decay directly via L{sub 1}Q{sub 2}D{sub 1}{sup c}; (6) squark pair production followed by the cascade decay to the neutralino LSP which decays via L{sub 1}Q{sub 2}D{sub 1}{sup c}; (7) MSSM pair production followed by the cascade decay to the LSP which decays (a) via LLE{sup c}, (b) via LQD{sup c}, and (c) via U{sup c}D{sup c}D{sup c}, respectively; and (8) top quark and top squark decays in spontaneous R{sub P}.

  19. Plutonium (iv) complexes of mixed pyridine n-oxide and phosphinoxide f-element extractants.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matonic, J. H.; Enriquez, A. E.; Scott, B. L.; Paine, R. T.; Neu, M. P.

    2003-01-01

    Analytical and bulk scale separation and processing of aqueous acidic solution s containing f-element ions are regularly accomplished using liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) methods that employ a neutral organic donor ligand dissolved in an organic phase . 1-5 Several monofunctional ligands have been used as LLE reagents, but all display one or more deficiencies1 'S due to the chemical similarity of the tri valent lanthanides (Ln) to th e trivalent actindes (An) . Since the trivalent 4f and 5f ions have identical charges, chemical separation agents for these two groups need to differentiate among these har d cations based on their size or chemical bonding preferences . This task is not easy since, as a consequence of the lanthanide and actinide contractions, the Ln and An fission products which need to be separated have similar ionic radii . In order to develop new ligands for the separation process, we must have a fundamental understanding of how these separation agents interact with both Ln and An ions on a molecular level.

  20. Investigation of Hexavalent Chromium Flux to Groundwater at the 100-C-7:1 Excavation Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truex, Michael J.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Fritz, Brad G.; Mackley, Rob D.; Horner, Jacob A.; Johnson, Christian D.; Newcomer, Darrell R.

    2012-11-16

    Deep excavation of soil has been conducted at the 100-C-7 and 100-C-7:1 waste sites within the 100-BC Operable Unit at the Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site to remove hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) contamination with the excavations reaching to near the water table. Soil sampling showed that Cr(VI) contamination was still present at the bottom of the 100-C-7:1 excavation. In addition, Cr(VI) concentrations in a downgradient monitoring well have shown a transient spike of increased Cr(VI) concentration following initiation of excavation. Potentially, the increased Cr(VI) concentrations in the downgradient monitoring well are due to Cr(VI) from the excavation site. However, data were needed to evaluate this possibility and to quantify the overall impact of the 100-C-7:1 excavation site on groundwater. Data collected from a network of aquifer tubes installed across the floor of the 100-C-7:1 excavation and from temporary wells installed at the bottom of the entrance ramp to the excavation were used to evaluate Cr(VI) releases into the aquifer and to estimate local-scale hydraulic properties and groundwater flow velocity.

  1. Hexavalent Chromium Reduction under Fermentative Conditions with Lactate Stimulated Native Microbial Communities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Somenahally, Anil C; Mosher, Jennifer J; Yuan, Tong; Phelps, Tommy Joe; Brown, Steven D; Yang, Zamin Koo; Hazen, Terry C; Arkin, Adam; Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Van Nostrand, Dr. Joy D.; Zhou, Jizhong; Elias, Dwayne A

    2013-01-01

    Microbial reduction of toxic hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in-situ is a plausible bioremediation strategy in electron-acceptor limited environments. However, higher [Cr(VI)] may impose stress on syntrophic communities and impact community structure and function. The study objectives were to understand the impacts of Cr(VI) concentrations on community structure and on the Cr(VI)-reduction potential of groundwater communities at Hanford, WA. Steady state continuous flow bioreactors were used to grow native communities enriched with lactate (30 mM) and continuously amended with Cr(VI) at 0.0 (No-Cr), 0.1 (Low-Cr) and 3.0 (High-Cr) mg/L. Microbial growth, metabolites, Cr(VI), 16S rRNA gene sequences and GeoChip based functional gene composition were monitored for 15 weeks. Temporal trends and differences in growth, metabolite profiles, and community composition were observed, largely between Low-Cr and High-Cr bioreactors. In both High-Cr and Low-Cr bioreactors, Cr(VI) levels were below detection from week 1 until week 15. With lactate enrichment, native bacterial diversity substantially decreased as Pelosinus spp., and Sporotalea spp., became the dominant groups, but did not significantly differ between Cr concentrations. The Archaea diversity also substantially decreased after lactate enrichment from Methanosaeta (35%), Methanosarcina (17%) and others, to mostly Methanosarcina spp. (95%). Methane production was lower in High-Cr reactors suggesting some inhibition of methanogens. Several key functional genes were distinct in Low-Cr bioreactors compared to High-Cr. Among the Cr resistant microbes, Burkholderia vietnamiensis, Comamonas testosterone and Ralstonia pickettii proliferated in Cr amended bioreactors. In-situ fermentative conditions facilitated Cr(VI) reduction, and as a result 3.0 mg/L Cr(VI) did not impact the overall bacterial community structure.

  2. Process for preparing group Ib-IIIa-VIa semiconducting films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Birkmire, R.W.; Schultz, J.M.; Marudachalam, M.; Hichri, H.

    1997-10-07

    Methods are provided for the production of supported monophasic group I-III-VI semiconductor films. In the subject methods, a substrate is coated with group I and III elements and then contacted with a reactive group VI element containing atmosphere under conditions sufficient to produce a substrate coated with a composite of at least two different group I-III-IV alloys. The resultant composite coated substrate is then annealed in an inert atmosphere under conditions sufficient to convert the composite coating to a monophasic group I-III-VI semiconductor film. The resultant supported semiconductor films find use in photovoltaic applications, particularly as absorber layers in solar cells. 4 figs.

  3. Process for preparing group Ib-IIIa-VIa semiconducting films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Birkmire, Robert W.; Schultz, Jerold M.; Marudachalam, Matheswaran; Hichri, Habib

    1997-01-01

    Methods are provided for the production of supported monophasic group I-III-VI semiconductor films. In the subject methods, a substrate is coated with group I and III elements and then contacted with a reactive group VI element containing atmosphere under conditions sufficient to produce a substrate coated with a composite of at least two different group I-III-IV alloys. The resultant composite coated substrate is then annealed in an inert atmosphere under conditions sufficient to convert the composite coating to a monophasic group I-III-VI semiconductor film. The resultant supported semiconductor films find use in photovoltaic applications, particularly as absorber layers in solar cells.

  4. Final Report DOE Award # DE-FG02-04ER63923

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOE Award # DE-FG02-04ER63923 Title: Exploring the Genome and Proteome of Desulfitobacterium hafniense DCB2 for its Protein Complexes Involved in Metal Reduction and Dechlorination Abstract: Desulfitobacteria are of interest to DOE mission because of their ability to reduce many electron acceptors including Fe(III), U(VI), Cr(VI), As(V), Mn(IV), Se(VI), NO3- and well as CO2, sulfite, fumarate and humates, their ability to colonize more stressful environments because they form spores, fix

  5. Carbon black and carbon black-conducting polymer composites for environmental applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rajeshwar, K.; Wampler, W.A.; Goeringer, S.; Gerspacher, M.; Richardson, S.

    1996-10-01

    The preparation and use of the title materials for the treatment of Cr(VI) in aqueous media will be described. The carcinogenic Cr(VI) will be shown to be efficiently reduced to the less toxic specie Cr(III). The preparation and process variables will be described using a furnace black (N135) and polypyrrole as model candidates. Other aspects to be discussed include reaction kinetics, mechanism and thermodynamics. Finally, the practical implications of this new Cr(VI) pollution abatement approach are discussed.

  6. Methods for synthesis of semiconductor nanocrystals and thermoelectric compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ren, Zhifeng; Chen, Gang; Poudel, Bed; Kumar, Shankar; Wang, Wenzhong; Dresselhaus, Mildred

    2007-08-14

    The present invention provides methods for synthesis of IV VI nanostructures, and thermoelectric compositions formed of such structures. In one aspect, the method includes forming a solution of a Group IV reagent, a Group VI reagent and a surfactant. A reducing agent can be added to the solution, and the resultant solution can be maintained at an elevated temperature, e.g., in a range of about 20.degree. C. to about 360.degree. C., for a duration sufficient for generating nanoparticles as binary alloys of the IV VI elements.

  7. An Elastic Plastic Contact Model with Strain Hardening for the LAMMPS Granular Package

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuhr, Bryan; Brake, Matthew Robert; Lechman, Jeremy B.

    2015-03-01

    The following details the implementation of an analytical elastic plastic contact model with strain hardening for normal im pacts into the LAMMPS granular package. The model assumes that, upon impact, the co llision has a period of elastic loading followed by a period of mixed elastic plas tic loading, with contributions to each mechanism estimated by a hyperbolic seca nt weight function. This function is implemented in the LAMMPS source code as the pair style gran/ep/history. Preliminary tests, simulating the pouring of pure nickel spheres, showed the elastic/plastic model took 1.66x as long as similar runs using gran/hertz/history.

  8. Partnership Agreement between the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this flash is to advise you that pursuant to Section VI of the Partnership Agreement (PA) between the SBA and the DOE subject agreement is effective until September 30, 2012

  9. Nanocrystals Research for Energy Efficient and Clean Energy Technologies:

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenthal, Sandra J

    2013-12-17

    Efforts centered on: nanocrystal photovoltaic fabrication, ultrafast dynamics and aberration-corrected STEM characterization of II-VI core, core/shell and alloyed nanocrystals, and fundamental investigation and applications of ultrasmall white light-emitting CdSe nanocrystal.

  10. CAU_529_ADD_F.book

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... U.S. Department of Defense; and U.S. Department of Energy, Legacy Management. Appendix VI, which contains the Industrial Sites Strategy, was last modified May 2011, Revision ...

  11. Shelby Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    www.shelbyelectric.coop Twitter: @YourCoop Facebook: https:www.facebook.comYourCoop?refts Outage Hotline: (800) 677-2612 Outage Map: ebill.shelbyelectric.coopwoVi...

  12. Long-lived nanosecond spin relaxation and spin coherence of electrons...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    In contrast with conventional III-V or II-VI semiconductors, spin relaxation accelerates rapidly in small transverse magnetic fields. Supported by a model of coupled spin-valley ...

  13. Department of Energy Kicks Off the State of Environmental Justice...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Secretary Tom Vilsack, U.S. Department of Agriculture U.S. Congressman James E. Clyburn (SC-6) Delegate to Congress Donna M. Christensen (VI) Nancy Helen Sutley, Chair, White House ...

  14. DOE-STD-1165-2003; Aviation Manager Functional Area Qualification...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... AND LEVELS OF KNOWLEDGE ...... 19 DOE-STD-1165-2003 vi INTENTIONALLY BLANK DOE-STD-1165-2003 vii ACKNOWLEDGMENT The Office of Aviation Management (ME-2.4) and the ...

  15. Inverse Design of High-Absorption Thin-Film Photovoltaic Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Center for Inverse Design scientists identified some potential Cu-V-VI thin-film photovoltaic (PV) absorber materials that have stronger solar absorption than CuInSe 2 -one of the ...

  16. Nano Particles - Supercritical Fluid Process - Energy Innovation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    materials comprising a I-III-VI.sub.2 material. Devices such as, for example, thin-film solar cells may be fabricated using such methods. Oak Ridge National Laboratory 02022011...

  17. Richard King: Principal Scientist, Spectrolab, Inc. | Center...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Recent experimental results on high-efficiency solar cells with 3-, 4-, and 5- junctions will be ... vacuum level, and that some defect energy levels in chalcopyrite I-III-VI ...

  18. Neil Schuldenfrei

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Neil Schuldenfrei is the Deputy Director of the Department of Energy’s Office of Civil Rights.  In this capacity, he oversees the Department’s efforts with respect to Title VI and...

  19. Ll

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... stntutcs of 15mitation,1f ARTICLE II - Term The Subcontractor shall proceed :vi.th ths sa+vics hereti provided fcr until 'June 30, 1944 -", or untii such lntcr ratc z.s ;nr.y ...

  20. Uncertainty analysis of multi-rate kinetics of uranium desorption...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in the multi-rate model to simualte U(VI) desorption; 3) however, long-term prediction and its uncertainty may be significantly biased by the lognormal assumption for the ...

  1. I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    &Cfcy Procest or ma to metBli vi&o ll&LnfCctur.?.? cacpmy "I% iorrss;lro,, ?annsylia .&AsW lCAtlOW CANCIELLED &?- - Prawssir; ol ltcdhzxie ore 22 canotits d.hes to 29...

  2. Curry_AMS_Final.cdr

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Unified Treatment for Liquid and Ice Particle Size Spectra Derived from the Stochastic Kinetic Equations V.I. Khvorostyanov and J.A. Curry Georgia Institute of Technology The...

  3. DOE/EIS-0099-F

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    REMEDIAL ACTIONS AT THE FORMER VITRO CHEMICAL COMPANY SITE SOUTH SALT LAKE, SALT LAKE ... e s idues wer e produced b y the Vi tr o Chemical Company of Amer ica wh ich proce s s ed ...

  4. Federal Acquisition Circular 2005-52 Item Subject FAR...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2009-039 V Oversight of Contractor Ethics Programs 2010-017 VI Technical Amendments ... Item V--Oversight of Contractor Ethics Programs (FAR Case 2010-017) This final rule ...

  5. Cost Effectiveness of Technology Solutions for Future Vehicle...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Explores the economics of CO2 emission reductions by added engine technology to ... High Value Solution for Euro VI Emissions Light-Duty Diesel Market Potential in North America

  6. http://www.epa.gov/iris/subst/0642.htm

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... J Aerosol Med 4:79-115. VI.C. Carcinogenicity Assessment References Bhatia, R; Lopipero, P; Smith, A. (1998) Diesel exhaust exposure and lung cancer. Epidemiology 9(1):84-91. ...

  7. Chief, SF Eaterials

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    c. Yolmge, Jr., Chief, SF Eaterials January i0, 39501 Aooountability B.-oh, (Bk Ridge J. P. Morgan, Assistant Mreotor, Produotion DiViEiOn, New York Operations Office...

  8. Local Option- Energy Efficiency & Clean Energy Districts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing typically allows property owners to borrow money from a local government to pay for energy improvements. The amount borrowed is typically repaid vi...

  9. Photophysics and Charge Separation Dynamics in Two-Dimensional Semiconductor Nanoparticle Junctions and Heterojunctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelley, David F.

    2011-02-14

    The work on this grant can be divided into two categories: spectroscopy and dynamics of GaSe nanoparticles, and synthesis and exciton dynamics of II-VI nanoparticles and nanostructures.

  10. Nicaragua Canal Template

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Figure 1.3-1: FirstNet PEIS Regions of Analysis ......Title VI of the Middle Class Tax Relief and Job Creation Act of 2012 (Public Law Pub. ...

  11. Plutonium Disposition Program | National Nuclear Security Administrati...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Denying access to plutonium and HEU is the best way to prevent nuclear proliferation to ... under Article VI of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty by ensuring that excess ...

  12. Ferroelectric PLZT thick films grown by poly(1-vinylpyrrolidone...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PLZT thick films grown by poly(1-vinylpyrrolidone-co-vinyl acetate) (PVPVA)-modified sol-gel process Title Ferroelectric PLZT thick films grown by poly(1-vinylpyrrolidone-co-vi...

  13. HEN YOi?K OPERATIONS OFFICE ANKUAL REPORT, FISCAL YEAX 1950

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    HEN YOi?K OPERATIONS OFFICE ANKUAL REPORT, FISCAL YEAX 1950 HEALTH A;iD S:FETY OIVISIOH being -sde for exm.ination.of &VI Exnsxick Iaborato:y eqloyees. ILscelleneous In adction to...

  14. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    role in providing a long-term source of U(VI) as it slowly leaches out of the Hanford sediment. Rapid fluctuations in the Columbia River stage on hourly, weekly and seasonal time...

  15. Federal Acquisition Circular 2005-60

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2012-007 IV DARPA-New Mexico Tax Agreement 2012-019 V Clarification of Standards for Computer Generation of Forms 2011-022 VI Technical Amendments Item I Reporting Executive...

  16. Your First Program on Edison

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    successfully log in you will land in your HOME directory. First Program Code: Parallel Hello World Open a new file called helloWorld.f90 with a text editor such as emacs or vi....

  17. Your First Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    successfully log in you will land in your HOME directory. First Program Code: Parallel Hello World Open a new file called helloWorld.f90 with a text editor such as emacs or vi....

  18. Your First Program on Hopper

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    successfully log in you will land in your HOME directory. First Program Code: Parallel Hello World Open a new file called helloWorld.f90 with a text editor such as emacs or vi....

  19. 08-2-SharingDataWeb-Cholia.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    www - cd globalprojectprojectdirswww - vi index.html Hello W orld * Make s ure a ll t he a bove fi les a nd d irectories a re w orld...

  20. Douglas Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Oregon Phone Number: 541-673-6616 or 1-800-233-2733 Website: www.douglaselectric.com Outage Hotline: 541-673-6616 or 1-800-233-2733 Outage Map: ebill.douglaselectric.comwoVi...

  1. Douglas Electric Coop, Inc (South Dakota) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Coop, Inc Place: South Dakota Phone Number: 541.673.6616 Website: douglaselectric.com Outage Hotline: 1.800.233.2733 Outage Map: ebill.douglaselectric.comwoVi References: EIA...

  2. ARM - Field Campaign - ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements (ARM...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsARM Airborne Carbon Measurements (ARM-ACME) ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Related Campaigns ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements (ARM-ACME VI) 2015.10.01, Biraud, AAF ARM...

  3. ABSTRACTS FOR PAPERS PUBLISHED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... F. Carstoiu VI-2 In Proc.Intern.Symposium Advances in Nuclear Physics, Bucharest, Romania, 9-10 December, 1999, D. Poenaru, S. Stoica, Eds., World Scientific, Singapore, p. 153 ...

  4. Doubling Geothermal Generation Capacity by 2020: A Strategic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... https:www.whitehouse.govthe-press-office...anning-federal-sustainability-next- decade vi ... Each project must meet certain criteria to be ... within agency processes (i.e., NEPA) as ...

  5. RPP-RPT-34083, Rev.

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Abstract: This report describes the results from ... During the course of the experiments, Cr(VI) and total Cr ... During the first titration, the pH was not controlled and ...

  6. Environmental Protection, Safety, and Health Protection Program for DOE Operations

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1981-08-13

    To transmit revised chapters to the subject Order. The following chapter, revised by the Acting Under Secretary's Task Force, supersede previously published chapters as indicated: Chapter I; Chapter V, which now includes former Chapter IV, also superseded; and Chapter VI.

  7. Your First Program on Hopper

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    log in you will land in your HOME directory. First Program Code: Parallel Hello World Open a new file called helloWorld.f90 with a text editor such as emacs or vi. Paste...

  8. BPA-2011-01103-FOIA Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    meet 85 percent of regional electricity load growth over the next 20 years through energy efficiency. IV. Recovery Plan V. Reform-Based Actions VI. MeetingsEvents VII. Issues for...

  9. TRU TeamWorks

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stern for his years of service as the director of the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance Level VI Program. At the CVSA annual meeting in Portland, Maine, DOE Carlsbad Field Office...

  10. Northern New Mexico Citizens' Advisory Board 2 Combined Committee...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    guests. 43 44 NNMCAB Combined Committee Meeting Minutes for July 8, 2015 4 VI. Old Business 1 Mr. Pacheco opened the floor for discussion on old business. 2 3 Mr. Sayre...

  11. Human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells, an appropriate in vitro model to study heavy metals induced carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Youn-hee; Kim, Donghern; Dai, Jin; Zhang, Zhuo

    2015-09-15

    Occupational and environmental exposure to arsenic (III) and chromium VI (Cr(VI)) have been confirmed to cause lung cancer. Mechanisms of these metals carcinogenesis are still under investigation. Selection of cell lines to be used is essential for the studies. Human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells are the cells to be utilized by most of scientists. However, due to p53 missense mutation (CCG → TCG) at codon 47 and the codon 72 polymorphism (CGC → CCC) in BEAS-2B cells, its usage has frequently been questioned. The present study has examined activity and expression of 53 and its downstream target protein p21 upon acute or chronic exposure of BEAS-2B cells to arsenic and Cr(VI). The results show that short-term exposure of BEAS-2B cells to arsenic or Cr(VI) was able to activate both p53 and p21. Chronic exposure of BEAS-2B cells to these two metals caused malignant cell transformation and tumorigenesis. In arsenic-transformed BEAS-2B cells reductions in p53 promoter activity, mRNA expression, and phosphorylation of p53 at Ser392 were observed, while the total p53 protein level remained the same compared to those in passage-matched parent ones. p21 promoter activity and expression were decreased in arsenic-transformed cells. Cr(VI)-transformed cells exhibit elevated p53 promoter activity, mRNA expression, and phosphorylation at Ser15, but reduced phosphorylation at Ser392 and total p53 protein level compared to passage-matched parent ones. p21 promoter activity and expression were elevated in Cr(VI)-transformed cells. These results demonstrate that p53 is able to respond to exposure of arsenic or Cr(VI), suggesting that BEAS-2B cells are an appropriate in vitro model to investigate arsenic or Cr(VI) induced lung cancer. - Highlights: • Short-term exposure of BEAS-2B cells to arsenic or Cr(VI) activates p53 and p21. • Chronic exposure of BEAS-2B cells to arsenic or Cr(VI) causes cell transformation and tumorigenesis. • Arsenic-transformed cells exhibit reduced activities of p53 and p21. • Cr(VI)-transformed cells exhibit increased activities of p53 and p21.

  12. Graded core/shell semiconductor nanorods and nanorod barcodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Scher, Erik C.; Manna, Liberato

    2009-05-19

    Disclosed herein is a graded core/shell semiconductor nanorod having at least a first segment of a core of a Group II-VI, Group III-V or a Group IV semiconductor, a graded shell overlying the core, wherein the graded shell comprises at least two monolayers, wherein the at least two monolayers each independently comprise a Group II-VI, Group III-V or a Group IV semiconductor.

  13. Microsoft Word - Nanopore-techinical-report_2013_Oct-16

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DE-SC0002150 PI: Huifang Xu Department of Geoscience, University of Wisconsin - Madison (e-mail: hfxu@geology.wisc.edu) Title: The role of nanopores on U(VI) sorption and redox behavior in U(VI)-contaminated subsurface sediments co-PIs: Eric E. Roden, Department of Geoscience, University of Wisconsin - Madison; Kenneth M. Kemner, Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory Participants: Hun-Bok Jung, Yubing Sun, and Hiromi Konishi (Department of Geoscience, University of Wisconsin -

  14. 2012 Advanced Applications Research & Development Peer Review - Day 2

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Presentations | Department of Energy 2 Presentations 2012 Advanced Applications Research & Development Peer Review - Day 2 Presentations The Advanced Applications Research & Development Peer Review included seven sessions over 2 days on June 12 - 13, 2012. Presentations from Day 2 (Sessions VI and VII) are available below. Session VI: Yuri Makarov, Henry Huang, Jim McCalley Session VII: Carlos Martinez, Pete Sauer, Gil Tam PDF icon 2012 Advanced Applications R&D Peer Review -

  15. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wa l l : 2x4 ca vi ty Add R-21 6.11 Duct: Add R-11 4.39 Wa l l : No i ns ul a ti on - fi l l wR-13 2.68 Knee Wa l l : 2x4 ca vi ty Add R-15 4.68 Wa l l : No i ns ul a ti on -...

  16. 2013 Reliability & Markets Peer Review - Day 2 Presentations | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy 2 Presentations 2013 Reliability & Markets Peer Review - Day 2 Presentations The Transmission Reliability R&D Reliability & Markets Peer Review included 6 sessions over 2 days on August 6 - 7, 2013. Presentations from Day 2 (Sessions V and VI) are available below. Session V: Tim Mount (Cornell), Bill Schulze (Cornell), Lang Tong (Cornell) Session VI: Max Zhang (Cornell) PDF icon 2013 R&M Peer Review - Evaluating the Effects of Managing Controllable Demand and

  17. 2014 Transmission Reliability Program Peer Review - Day 2 Presentations |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy 2 Presentations 2014 Transmission Reliability Program Peer Review - Day 2 Presentations The Transmission Reliability Program Peer Review included 6 sessions over 2 days on June 3- 4, 2014. Presentations from Day 2 (Sessions V and VI) are available below. Session V: Simon Mo (Electric Power Group), Jim Thorp (VA Tech), Scott Ghiocel (RPI), Dave Schoenwald (Sandia) Session VI: Bharat Bhargava (Electric Power Group), Brett Amidan (PNNL), Philip Irminger (ORNL) PDF icon 2014

  18. Influence of hexavalent chromium on lactate-enriched Hanford groundwater microbial communities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Somenahally, Anil C; Mosher, Jennifer J; Yuan, Tong; Podar, Mircea; Phelps, Tommy Joe; Brown, Steven D; Yang, Zamin Koo; Hazen, Terry C; Arkin, Adam; Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Zhou, Jizhong; Elias, Dwayne A

    2013-01-01

    Microbial reduction and immobilization of chromate (Cr(VI)) is a plausible bioremediation strategy. However, higher Cr(VI) concentrations may impose stress on native Cr-reducing communities. We sought to determine if Cr(VI) would influence the lactate enriched native microbial community structure and function in groundwater from the Cr contaminated site at Hanford, WA. Steady state continuous flow bioreactors were amended with lactate and Cr(VI) (0.0, 0.1 and 3.0 mg/L). Microbial growth, metabolites, Cr(VI) concentrations, 16S rRNA gene sequences and GeoChip based functional gene composition in bioreactors were monitored for 15 weeks. Temporal trends and some differences in growth, metabolite profiles, and community composition were observed, largely between Low-Cr and High-Cr bioreactors. In both High-Cr and Low-Cr bioreactors, Cr(VI) was reduced in the bioreactors. With lactate enrichment, the native communities did not significantly differ between Cr concentrations. Native bacterial communities were diverse, whereas after lactate enrichment, Pelosinus spp., and Sporotalea spp., were the most predominant groups in all bioreactors. Similarly, the Archaea diversity significantly decreased from Methanosaeta (35%), Methanosarcina (17%), Halobacteriales (12%), Methanoregula (8%) and others, to mostly Methanosarcina spp. (95%) after lactate enrichment. Composition of several key functional genes was distinct in Low-Cr bioreactors compared to High-Cr. Among the Cr resistant probes (chrA), Burkholderia vietnamiensis, Comamonas testosterone and Ralstonia pickettii proliferated in Cr amended bioreactors. In-situ fermentative conditions facilitated Cr(VI) reduction, and as a result the 3.0 mg/L Cr(VI) did not appear to give chromate reducing strains a competitive advantage for proliferation or for increasing Cr-reduction.

  19. Metaproteomics Identifies the Protein Machinery Involved in Metal and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Radionuclide Reduction in Subsurface Microbiomes and Elucidates Mechanisms and U(VI) Reduction Immobilization (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Metaproteomics Identifies the Protein Machinery Involved in Metal and Radionuclide Reduction in Subsurface Microbiomes and Elucidates Mechanisms and U(VI) Reduction Immobilization Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Metaproteomics Identifies the Protein Machinery Involved in Metal and Radionuclide Reduction in Subsurface

  20. CASL Plan of Record 2 (1/11-6/11)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1-000 MCNPX and KENO-VI Simulations of WBNP Unit 1 with Keno Comparisons Benchmark Results VERA Core Physics Progression Problems 1 - 5 William Gurecky Erich Schneider The University of Texas at Austin February 20, 2015 MCNPX and KENO-VI Benchmark Results Consortium for Advanced Simulation of LWRs ii CASL-U-2015-0221-000 REVISION LOG Revision Date Affected Pages Revision Description Document pages that are: Export Controlled _____________None___________________________ IP/Proprietary/NDA

  1. Bringing simulation and observation together to better understand the intergalactic medium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egan, Hilary; Smith, Britton D.; O'Shea, Brian W.; Shull, J. Michael

    2014-08-10

    The methods by which one characterizes the distribution of matter in cosmological simulations is intrinsically different from how one performs the same task observationally. In this paper, we make substantial steps toward comparing simulations and observations of the intergalactic medium (IGM) in a more sensible way. We present a pipeline that generates and fits synthetic QSO absorption spectra using sight lines cast through a cosmological simulation, and simultaneously identifies structure by directly analyzing the variations in H I and O VI number density. We compare synthetic absorption spectra with a less observationally motivated, but more straightforward density threshold-based method for finding absorbers. Our efforts focus on H I and O VI to better characterize the warm/hot IGM, a subset of the IGM that is challenging to conclusively identify observationally. We find that the two methods trace roughly the same quantities of H I and O VI above observable column density limits, but the synthetic spectra typically identify more substructure in absorbers. We use both methods to characterize H I and O VI absorber properties. We find that both integrated and differential column density distributions from both methods generally agree with observations. The distribution of Doppler parameters between the two methods are similar for Ly? and compare reasonably with observational results, but while the two methods agree with each other with O VI systems, they both are systematically different from observations. We find a strong correlation between O VI baryon fraction and O VI column density. We also discuss a possible bimodality in the temperature distribution of the gas traced by O VI.

  2. Tuning and synthesis of semiconductor nanostructures by mechanical compression

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fan, Hongyou; Li, Binsong

    2015-11-17

    A mechanical compression method can be used to tune semiconductor nanoparticle lattice structure and synthesize new semiconductor nanostructures including nanorods, nanowires, nanosheets, and other three-dimensional interconnected structures. II-VI or IV-VI compound semiconductor nanoparticle assemblies can be used as starting materials, including CdSe, CdTe, ZnSe, ZnS, PbSe, and PbS.

  3. Ion chromatographic method for insoluble chromates in paint aerosol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molina, D.; Abell, M.T.

    1987-10-01

    Potential exposure to Cr(VI) extends to over a million US workers in the plating, paint, steel, tanning and chrome ore processing industries. Historically, Cr(VI) exposure has been monitored using a colorimetric method. This colorimetric method requires acidification of the sample for color development, a step that could cause reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III), thus underestimating the Cr(VI) content of the sample. A new method of analysis has been developed that uses ion chromatography (IC) for the measurement and which does not require acidification of the sample. In this method, for the same extraction solution of hot 2% NaOH and 3% Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ as used in the earlier methods is used to dissolve both soluble and insoluble chromates, but it can be carried through the method with only a dilution step before sample injection. Therefore, this method has the advantage of minimizing the potential for Cr(VI) loss by reduction. Another advantage is provided by the IC measurement step, which is not interfered with by colored samples that may affect the colorimetric method. The new method was tested with filter samples of pain aerosol containing PbCrO/sub 4/ and ZnCrO/sub 4/. Complete extraction of Cr(VI) from the filter samples were verified by comparison to an independent method in which the filter was completely ashed and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy method. Nothing in the paint samples interfered with the Cr(VI) measurement, nor did five common anions used in a separate test. The method had the sensitivity needed for monitoring at the ACGIH TLV of 0.05 mg Cr(VI)/m/sup 3/.

  4. Uncertainty analysis of multi-rate kinetics of uranium desorption from

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    sediments (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Uncertainty analysis of multi-rate kinetics of uranium desorption from sediments Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Uncertainty analysis of multi-rate kinetics of uranium desorption from sediments A multi-rate expression for uranyl [U(VI)] surface complexation reactions has been proposed to describe diffusion-limited U(VI) sorption/desorption in heterogeneous subsurface sediments. An

  5. Radiological Survey Data for 38 Grove Avenue, Rochelle Park, l'lew Jersey

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    sEP 4 1984 l,lE-24 Radiological Survey Data for 38 Grove Avenue, Rochelle Park, l'lew Jersey E . L . K e l l e r , D i r e c t o r T e c h n i c a l S e r v i c e s D i v i s i o n 0ak Ridge Operations 0ffice The radiological survey data for the subject vicinity property has been reviewed by-the Divislbn of Remedial Action Proiects personnel. . Based on these data and the reasons stated ln your memorandum to DeLaney/ldhitman dated 8l?7184, we concur in the proposed remedial action at the subiect

  6. GeoChip-based analysis of functional microbial communities in a bioreduced uranium-contaminated aquifer during reoxidation by oxygen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Nostrand, J.D.; Wu, W.-M.; Wu, L.; Deng, Y.; Carley, J.; Carroll, S.; He, Z.; Gu, B.; Luo, J.; Criddle, C. S.; Watson, D. B.; Jardine, P. M.; Tiedje, J. M.; Hazen, T. C.; Zhou, J.

    2009-07-15

    A pilot-scale system was established for in situ biostimulation of U(VI) reduction by ethanol addition at the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Field Research Center (Oak Ridge, TN). After achieving U(VI) reduction, stability of the bioreduced U(IV) was evaluated under conditions of (i) resting (no ethanol injection), (ii) reoxidation by introducing dissolved oxygen (DO), and (iii) reinjection of ethanol. GeoChip, a functional gene array with probes for N, S and C cycling, metal resistance and contaminant degradation genes, was used for monitoring groundwater microbial communities. High diversity of all major functional groups was observed during all experimental phases. The microbial community was extremely responsive to ethanol, showing a substantial change in community structure with increased gene number and diversity after ethanol injections resumed. While gene numbers showed considerable variations, the relative abundance (i.e. percentage of each gene category) of most gene groups changed little. During the reoxidation period, U(VI) increased, suggesting reoxidation of reduced U(IV). However, when introduction of DO was stopped, U(VI) reduction resumed and returned to pre-reoxidation levels. These findings suggest that the community in this system can be stimulated and that the ability to reduce U(VI) can be maintained by the addition of electron donors. This biostimulation approach may potentially offer an effective means for the bioremediation of U(VI)-contaminated sites.

  7. GeoChip-based analysis of functional microbial communities during the reoxidation of a bioreduced uranium-contaminated aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Nostrand, Joy; Wu, Weimin; Wu, Liyou; Deng, Ye; Carley, Jack M; Carroll, Sue L; He, Zhili; Gu, Baohua; Luo, Jian; Criddle, Craig; Watson, David B; Jardine, Philip M; Marsh, Terence; Tiedje, James; Hazen, T. C.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2009-01-01

    A pilot-scale system was established for in situ biostimulation of U(VI) reduction by ethanol addition at the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Field Research Center (Oak Ridge, TN). After achieving U(VI) reduction, stability of the bioreduced U(IV) was evaluated under conditions of (i) resting (no ethanol injection), (ii) reoxidation by introducing dissolved oxygen (DO), and (iii) reinjection of ethanol. GeoChip, a functional gene array with probes for N, S and C cycling, metal resistance and contaminant degradation genes, was used for monitoring groundwater microbial communities. High diversity of all major functional groups was observed during all experimental phases. The microbial community was extremely responsive to ethanol, showing a substantial change in community structure with increased gene number and diversity after ethanol injections resumed. While gene numbers showed considerable variations, the relative abundance (i.e. percentage of each gene category) of most gene groups changed little. During the reoxidation period, U(VI) increased, suggesting reoxidation of reduced U(IV). However, when introduction of DO was stopped, U(VI) reduction resumed and returned to pre-reoxidation levels. These findings suggest that the community in this system can be stimulated and that the ability to reduce U(VI) can be maintained by the addition of electron donors. This biostimulation approach may potentially offer an effective means for the bioremediation of U(VI)-contaminated sites.

  8. Spectroscopic evidence of uranium immobilization in acidic wetlands by natural organic matter and plant roots

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Dien; Kaplan, Daniel I.; Chang, Hyun-Shik; Seaman, John C.; Jaffé, Peter R.; Koster van Groos, Paul; Scheckel, Kirk G.; Segre, Carlo U.; Chen, Ning; Jiang, De-Tong; et al

    2015-03-03

    Biogeochemistry of uranium in wetlands plays important roles in U immobilization in storage ponds of U mining and processing facilities but has not been well understood. The objective of this work was to study molecular mechanisms responsible for high U retention by Savannah River Site (SRS) wetland sediments under varying redox and acidic (pH = 2.6–5.8) conditions using U L₃-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Uranium in the SRS wetland sediments existed primarily as U(VI) bonded as a bidentate to carboxylic sites (U–C bond distance at ~2.88 Å), rather than phenolic or other sites of natural organic matter (NOM). In microcosms simulatingmore » the SRS wetland processes, U immobilization on roots was two orders of magnitude higher than on the adjacent brown or more distant white sands in which U was U(VI). Uranium on the roots were both U(IV) and U(VI), which were bonded as a bidentate to carbon, but the U(VI) may also form a U phosphate mineral. After 140 days of air exposure, all U(IV) was re-oxidized to U(VI) but remained as a bidentate bonding to carbon. This study demonstrated NOM and plant roots can highly immobilize U(VI) in the SRS acidic sediments, which has significant implication for the long-term stewardship of U-contaminated wetlands.« less

  9. Spectroscopic evidence of uranium immobilization in acidic wetlands by natural organic matter and plant roots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Dien; Kaplan, Daniel I.; Chang, Hyun-Shik; Seaman, John C.; Jaff, Peter R.; Koster van Groos, Paul; Scheckel, Kirk G.; Segre, Carlo U.; Chen, Ning; Jiang, De-Tong; Newville, Matthew; Lanzirotti, Antonio

    2015-03-03

    Biogeochemistry of uranium in wetlands plays important roles in U immobilization in storage ponds of U mining and processing facilities but has not been well understood. The objective of this work was to study molecular mechanisms responsible for high U retention by Savannah River Site (SRS) wetland sediments under varying redox and acidic (pH = 2.65.8) conditions using U L?-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Uranium in the SRS wetland sediments existed primarily as U(VI) bonded as a bidentate to carboxylic sites (UC bond distance at ~2.88 ), rather than phenolic or other sites of natural organic matter (NOM). In microcosms simulating the SRS wetland processes, U immobilization on roots was two orders of magnitude higher than on the adjacent brown or more distant white sands in which U was U(VI). Uranium on the roots were both U(IV) and U(VI), which were bonded as a bidentate to carbon, but the U(VI) may also form a U phosphate mineral. After 140 days of air exposure, all U(IV) was re-oxidized to U(VI) but remained as a bidentate bonding to carbon. This study demonstrated NOM and plant roots can highly immobilize U(VI) in the SRS acidic sediments, which has significant implication for the long-term stewardship of U-contaminated wetlands.

  10. Environmental Controls on the Activity of Aquifer Microbial Communities in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konopka, Allan; Plymale, Andrew E.; Carvajal, Denny A.; Lin, Xueju; McKinley, James P.

    2013-11-06

    Aquifer microbes in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State, USA are periodically exposed to U(VI) concentrations that can range up to 10 ?M in small sediment fractures. Assays of 35 H-leucine incorporation indicated that both sediment-associated and planktonic microbes were metabolically active, and that organic C was growth-limiting in the sediments. Although bacteria suspended in native groundwater retained high activity when exposed to 100 ?M U(VI), they were inhibited by U(VI) < 1 ?M in synthetic groundwater that lacked added bicarbonate. Chemical speciation modeling suggested that positively-charged species and particularly (UO2)3(OH)5+ rose in concentration as more U(VI) was added to synthetic groundwater, but that carbonate complexes dominated U(VI) speciation in natural groundwater. U toxicity was relieved when increasing amounts of bicarbonate were added to synthetic groundwater containing 4.5 ?M U(VI). Pertechnetate, an oxyanion that is another contaminant of concern at the Hanford Site, was not toxic to groundwater microbes at concentrations up to 125 ?M.

  11. Incorporation of oxidized uranium into Fe (hydr)oxides during Fe(II) catalyzed remineralization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nico, Peter S.; Stewart, Brandy D.; Fendorf, Scott

    2009-07-01

    The form of solid phase U after Fe(II) induced anaerobic remineralization of ferrihydrite in the presence of aqueous and absorbed U(VI) was investigated under both abiotic batch and biotic flow conditions. Experiments were conducted with synthetic ground waters containing 0.168 mM U(VI), 3.8 mM carbonate, and 3.0 mM Ca{sup 2+}. In spite of the high solubility of U(VI) under these conditions, appreciable removal of U(VI) from solution was observed in both the abiotic and biotic systems. The majority of the removed U was determined to be substituted as oxidized U (U(VI) or U(V)) into the octahedral position of the goethite and magnetite formed during ferrihydrite remineralization. It is estimated that between 3% and 6% of octahedral Fe(III) centers in the new Fe minerals were occupied by U(VI). This site specific substitution is distinct from the non-specific U co-precipitation processes in which uranyl compounds, e.g. uranyl hydroxide or carbonate, are entrapped with newly formed Fe oxides. The prevalence of site specific U incorporation under both abiotic and biotic conditions and the fact that the produced solids were shown to be resistant to both extraction (30 mM KHCO{sub 3}) and oxidation (air for 5 days) suggest the potential importance of sequestration in Fe oxides as a stable and immobile form of U in the environment.

  12. Reaction-Based Reactive Transport Modeling of Fe(III) and U(V) Reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burgos, William D.; Roden, Eric E.; Yeh, Gour-Tsyh

    2005-06-01

    Our new research project (started Fall 2004) was funded by a grant to The Pennsylvania State University, University of Central Florida, and The University of Alabama in the Integrative Studies Element of the NABIR Program (DE-FG04-ER63914/63915/63196). Our previous NABIR project (DE-FG02-01ER63180/63181/63182, funded within the Biotransformation Element) focused on (1) microbial reduction of Fe(III) and U(VI) individually, and concomitantly in natural sediments, (2) Fe(III) oxide surface chemistry, specifically with respect to reactions with Fe(II) and U(VI), (3) the influence of humic substances on Fe(III) and U(VI) bioreduction, and on U(VI) complexation, and (4) the development of reaction-based reactive transport biogeochemical models to numerically simulate our experimental results. The new project focuses on the development of a mechanistic understanding and quantitative models of coupled Fe(III)/U(VI) reduction in FRC Area 2 sediments. This work builds on our previous studies of microbial Fe(III) and U(VI) reduction, and is directly aligned with the Scheibe et al. NABIR FRC Field Project at Area 2.

  13. Spectroscopic evidence of uranium immobilization in acidic wetlands by natural organic matter and plant roots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Dien; Kaplan, Daniel I.; Chang, Hyun-Shik; Seaman, John C.; Jaffé, Peter R.; Koster van Groos, Paul; Scheckel, Kirk G.; Segre, Carlo U.; Chen, Ning; Jiang, De-Tong; Newville, Matthew; Lanzirotti, Antonio

    2015-03-03

    Biogeochemistry of uranium in wetlands plays important roles in U immobilization in storage ponds of U mining and processing facilities but has not been well understood. The objective of this work was to study molecular mechanisms responsible for high U retention by Savannah River Site (SRS) wetland sediments under varying redox and acidic (pH = 2.6–5.8) conditions using U L₃-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Uranium in the SRS wetland sediments existed primarily as U(VI) bonded as a bidentate to carboxylic sites (U–C bond distance at ~2.88 Å), rather than phenolic or other sites of natural organic matter (NOM). In microcosms simulating the SRS wetland processes, U immobilization on roots was two orders of magnitude higher than on the adjacent brown or more distant white sands in which U was U(VI). Uranium on the roots were both U(IV) and U(VI), which were bonded as a bidentate to carbon, but the U(VI) may also form a U phosphate mineral. After 140 days of air exposure, all U(IV) was re-oxidized to U(VI) but remained as a bidentate bonding to carbon. This study demonstrated NOM and plant roots can highly immobilize U(VI) in the SRS acidic sediments, which has significant implication for the long-term stewardship of U-contaminated wetlands.

  14. Inertial Confinement Fusion Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development Support

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinman, D.

    1993-03-01

    On December 31, 1990, the US Department of Energy entered into a contract with General Atomics (GA) to be the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development Support contractor. This report documents the technical activities of the period January 1, 1991 through September 30, 1992. During this period, GA was assigned 15 tasks in support of the Inertial Confinement Fusion program and its laboratories. These tasks included Facilities Activation, Staff Development, and Capabilities Validation to establish facilities and equipment, and demonstrate capability to perform ICF target fabrication research, development and production activities. The capabilities developed and demonstrated are those needed for fabrication and precise characterization of polymer shells and polymer coatings. We made progress toward production capability for glass shells, barrier layer coatings, and gas idling of shells. We fabricated over 1000 beam diagnostic foil targets for Sandia National Laboratory Albuquerque and provided full-time on-site engineering support for target fabrication and characterization. We initiated development of methods to fabricate polymer shells by a controlled mass microencapsulation technique, and performed chemical syntheses of several chlorine- and silicon-doped polymer materials for the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE). We performed the conceptual design of a cryogenic target handling system for UR/LLE that will fill, transport, layer, and characterize targets filled with cryogenic deuterium or deuterium-tritium fuel, and insert these cryogenic targets into the OMEGA-Upgrade target chamber for laser implosion experiments. This report summarizes and documents the technical progress made on these tasks.

  15. Inertial Confinement Fusion Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development Support. Annual report, January 1, 1991--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinman, D.

    1993-03-01

    On December 31, 1990, the US Department of Energy entered into a contract with General Atomics (GA) to be the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development Support contractor. This report documents the technical activities of the period January 1, 1991 through September 30, 1992. During this period, GA was assigned 15 tasks in support of the Inertial Confinement Fusion program and its laboratories. These tasks included Facilities Activation, Staff Development, and Capabilities Validation to establish facilities and equipment, and demonstrate capability to perform ICF target fabrication research, development and production activities. The capabilities developed and demonstrated are those needed for fabrication and precise characterization of polymer shells and polymer coatings. We made progress toward production capability for glass shells, barrier layer coatings, and gas idling of shells. We fabricated over 1000 beam diagnostic foil targets for Sandia National Laboratory Albuquerque and provided full-time on-site engineering support for target fabrication and characterization. We initiated development of methods to fabricate polymer shells by a controlled mass microencapsulation technique, and performed chemical syntheses of several chlorine- and silicon-doped polymer materials for the University of Rochester`s Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE). We performed the conceptual design of a cryogenic target handling system for UR/LLE that will fill, transport, layer, and characterize targets filled with cryogenic deuterium or deuterium-tritium fuel, and insert these cryogenic targets into the OMEGA-Upgrade target chamber for laser implosion experiments. This report summarizes and documents the technical progress made on these tasks.

  16. Inertial confinement fusion target component fabrication and technology development support. Annual report, October 1, 1996--September 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibson, J. [ed.

    1998-03-01

    This report documents the technical activities of the period October 1, 1996 through September 30, 1997. During this period, GA and their partner Schafer Corporation were assigned 13 formal tasks in support of the ICF program and its five laboratories. A portion of the effort on these tasks included providing direct {open_quotes}Onsite Support{close_quotes} at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and Sandia National Laboratory Albuquerque (SNLA). Over 700 gold-plated hohlraum mandrels were fabricated and delivered to LLNL, LANL and SNLA. More than 1600 glass and plastic target capsules were produced for LLNL, LANL, SNLA and University of Rochester/Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE). Nearly 2000 various target foils and films were delivered for Naval Research Lab (NRL) and UR/LLE in FY97. This report describes these target fabrication activities and the target fabrication and characterization development activities that made the deliveries possible. The ICF program is anticipating experiments at the OMEGA laser and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) which will require targets containing cryogenic layered D{sub 2} or deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel. This project is part of the National Cryogenic Target Program and support experiments at LLNL and LANL to generate and characterize cryogenic layers for these targets. During FY97, significant progress was made in the design and component testing of the OMEGA Cryogenic Target System that will field cryogenic targets on OMEGA. This included major design changes, reduction in equipment, and process simplifications. This report summarizes and documents the technical progress made on these tasks.

  17. Windows beyond the Standard Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernabei, R.

    2007-10-12

    DAMA is an observatory for rare processes at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory of the I.N.F.N. (LNGS). Here some arguments will be shortly summarised on the investigation on dark matter (DM) particles by annual modulation signature and on some of the performed searches for double beta decay modes.

  18. Final Project Report, DE-SC0001280, Characterizing the Combined Roles of Iron and Transverse Mixing on Uranium Bioremediation in Groundwater using Microfluidic Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finneran, Kevin; Werth, Charles; Strathmann, Timothy

    2015-01-10

    In situ bioremediation of U(VI) involves amending groundwater with an appropriate electron donor and limiting nutrients to promote biological reduction to the less soluble and mobile U(IV) oxidation state. Groundwater flow is laminar; mixing is controlled by hydrodynamic dispersion. Recent studies indicate that transverse dispersion along plume margins can limit mixing of the amended electron donor and accepter (such as U(VI) in remediation applications). As a result, microbial growth, and subsequently contaminant reaction, may be limited to these transverse mixing zones during bioremediation. The primary objective of this work was to characterize the combined effects of hydrology, geochemistry, and biology on the (bio)remediation of U(VI). Our underlying hypothesis was that U(VI) reaction in groundwater is controlled by transverse mixing with an electron donor along plume margins, and that iron bioavailability in these zones affects U(VI) reduction kinetics and U(IV) re-oxidation. Our specific objectives were to a) quantify reaction kinetics mediated by biological versus geochemical reactions leading to U(VI) reduction and U(IV) re-oxidation, b) understand the influence of bioavailable iron on U(VI) reduction and U(IV) re-oxidation along the transverse mixing zones, c) determine how transverse mixing limitations and the presence of biomass in pores affects these reactions, and d) identify how microbial populations that develop along transverse mixing zones are influenced by the presence of iron and the concentration of electron donor. In the completed work, transverse mixing zones along plume margins were re-created in microfluidic pore networks, referred to as micromodels. We conducted a series of experiments that allowed us to distinguish among the hydraulic, biological, and geochemical mechanisms that contribute to U(VI) reduction, U(IV) re-oxidation, and U(VI) abiotic reaction with the limiting biological nutrient HP042-. This systematic approach may lead to a better understanding of U(VI) remediation, and better strategies for groundwater amendments to maximize remediation efficiency.

  19. Evidence for Multiple Modes of Uranium Immobilization by an Anaerobic Bacterium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allison E. Ray; John R. Bargar; Alice C. Dohnalkova; Vaidee Sivaswamy; Yoshiko Fujita; Timothy S. Magnuson

    2011-05-01

    ABSTRACT Microbial reduction of hexavalent uranium has been studied widely for its potential role in bioremediation and removal of soluble U(VI) from contaminated groundwater. More recently, some microorganisms have been examined for their role in immobilization of U(VI) via precipitation of uranyl phosphate minerals mediated by microbial phosphate release, alleviating the requirement for long-term redox control. Here, we investigated the mechanism of U(VI) removal mediated by an environmental isolate, strain UFO1, that is indigenous to the Field Research Center (FRC) in Oak Ridge, TN and has been detected in U(VI)-contaminated sediments. U(VI) removal was examined in the presence and absence of the electron-shuttling moiety, anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS). Cell suspensions were capable of the near complete removal of 100 uM U(VI) from solution within 48 hours; U(VI) removal was not dependent on the presence of an exogenous electron donor or AQDS, although AQDS increased the rate of U(VI) removal. Profiles of ortho-phosphate concentration over time suggested phosphate liberation from cells. However, X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopic measurements indicated that U(IV) was the predominant oxidation state of uranium in cell suspensions in both the absence and presence of 100 uM AQDS. Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) measurements indicated that 20% of the cell-associated precipitates in a U(VI)-treated suspension that lacked AQDS had spectral characteristics consistent with a uranyl phosphate solid phase. EXAFS fits further show that that U(IV) is present dominantly as a monomeric sorbed complex. TEM-EDS confirmed the presence of uranyl phosphate with a U:P ratio consistent with autunite (1:1). These results suggest that strain UFO1 has the ability to mediate U(VI) removal from solution via both reductive and phosphate precipitation mechanisms, and may potentially be useful for the remediation of U-contaminated sediments at the FRC.

  20. Evidence for Multiple Modes of Uranium Immobilization by an Anaerobic Bacterium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray, Allison; Bargar, John R.; Sivaswamy, Vaideeswaran; Dohnalkova, Alice; Fujita, Yoshiko; Peyton, Brent M.; Magnuson, Timothy S.

    2011-05-15

    Microbial reduction of hexavalent uranium has been studied widely for its potential role in bioremediation and immobilization of soluble U(VI) in contaminated groundwater. More recently, some microorganisms have been examined for their role in immobilization of U(VI) via precipitation of uranyl phosphate minerals mediated by microbial phosphate release, alleviating the requirement for long-term redox control. Here, we investigated the mechanism of U(VI) removal mediated by an environmental isolate, strain UFO1, that is indigenous to the Field Research Center (FRC) in Oak Ridge, TN and has been detected in U(VI)-contaminated sediments. Changes in U(VI) speciation were examined in the presence and absence of the electron-shuttling moiety, anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS). Cell suspensions were capable of nearly complete removal of 100 M U(VI) from solution within 48 hours; U(VI) removal was not dependent on the presence of an exogenous electron donor or AQDS, although AQDS increased the rate of U(VI) removal. X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopic measurements indicated that U(IV) was the predominant oxidation state of uranium in cell suspensions in both the absence and presence of 100 M AQDS. However, extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) measurements indicated that 17% of the cell-associated precipitates in a U(VI)-treated suspension that lacked AQDS had spectral characteristics consistent with a uranyl phosphate solid phase. The potential involvement of phosphate was consistent with observed increases in soluble phosphate concentrations over time in UFO1 cell suspensions, which suggested phosphate liberation from the cells. TEM-EDS confirmed the presence of uranyl phosphate with a U:P ratio consistent with autunite (1:1). EXAFS analyses further showed that U(IV) was present predominantly as a monomeric complex sorbed to carboxylate functional groups on biomass and also suggested that a fraction of the U(IV) was coordinated to phosphoryl ligands. These results suggest that strain UFO1 has the ability to facilitate U(VI) removal from solution via both reductive and phosphate precipitation mechanisms, and may potentially be useful for the remediation of U-contaminated sediments at the FRC or elsewhere.

  1. Dynamics of Microbial Community Composition and Function during In Situ Bioremediation of a Uranium-Contaminated Aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Nostrand, Dr. Joy D.; Wu, Liyou; Wu, Weimin; Huang, Zhijian; Gentry, Terry J; Deng, Ye; Carley, Jack M; Carroll, Sue L; He, Zhili; Gu, Baohua; Luo, Jian; Criddle, Craig; Watson, David B; Jardine, Philip M; Marsh, Terence; Tiedje, James; Hazen, Terry; Zhou, Jizhong

    2011-01-01

    A pilot-scale system was established to examine the feasibility of in situ U(VI) immobilization at a highly contaminated aquifer (U.S. DOE Integrated Field Research Challenge site, Oak Ridge, TN). Ethanol was injected intermittently as an electron donor to stimulate microbial U(VI) reduction, and U(VI) concentrations fell to below the Environmental Protection Agency drinking water standard (0.03 mg liter 1). Microbial communities from three monitoring wells were examined during active U(VI) reduction and maintenance phases with GeoChip, a high-density, comprehensive functional gene array. The overall microbial community structure exhibited a considerable shift over the remediation phases examined. GeoChip-based analysis revealed that Fe(III)-reducing bacterial (FeRB), nitrate-reducing bacterial (NRB), and sulfate-reducing bacterial (SRB) functional populations reached their highest levels during the active U(VI) reduction phase (days 137 to 370), in which denitrification and Fe(III) and sulfate reduction occurred sequentially. A gradual decrease in these functional populations occurred when reduction reactions stabilized, suggesting that these functional populations could play an important role in both active U(VI) reduction and maintenance of the stability of reduced U(IV). These results suggest that addition of electron donors stimulated the microbial community to create biogeochemical conditions favorable to U(VI) reduction and prevent the reduced U(IV) from reoxidation and that functional FeRB, SRB, and NRB populations within this system played key roles in this process.

  2. Dynamics of microbial community composition and function during in-situ bioremediation of a uranium-contaminated aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nostrand, J.D. Van; Wu, L.; Wu, W.M.; Huang, A.; Gentry, T.J.; Deng, Y.; Carley, J.; Carrol, S.; He, Z.; Gu, B.; Luo, J.; Criddle, C.S.; Watson, D.B.; Jardine, P.M.; Marsh, T.L.; Tiedje, J.M.; Hazen, T.C.; Zhou, J.

    2010-08-15

    A pilot-scale system was established to examine the feasibility of in situ U(VI) immobilization at a highly contaminated aquifer (U.S. DOE Integrated Field Research Challenge site, Oak Ridge, TN). Ethanol was injected intermittently as an electron donor to stimulate microbial U(VI) reduction, and U(VI) concentrations fell to below the Environmental Protection Agency drinking water standard (0.03 mg liter{sup -1}). Microbial communities from three monitoring wells were examined during active U(VI) reduction and maintenance phases with GeoChip, a high-density, comprehensive functional gene array. The overall microbial community structure exhibited a considerable shift over the remediation phases examined. GeoChip-based analysis revealed that Fe(III)-reducing bacterial (FeRB), nitrate-reducing bacterial (NRB), and sulfate-reducing bacterial (SRB) functional populations reached their highest levels during the active U(VI) reduction phase (days 137 to 370), in which denitrification and Fe(III) and sulfate reduction occurred sequentially. A gradual decrease in these functional populations occurred when reduction reactions stabilized, suggesting that these functional populations could play an important role in both active U(VI) reduction and maintenance of the stability of reduced U(IV). These results suggest that addition of electron donors stimulated the microbial community to create biogeochemical conditions favorable to U(VI) reduction and prevent the reduced U(IV) from reoxidation and that functional FeRB, SRB, and NRB populations within this system played key roles in this process.

  3. A revised model of ex-vivo reduction of hexavalent chromium in human and rodent gastric juices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlosser, Paul M. Sasso, Alan F.

    2014-10-15

    Chronic oral exposure to hexavalent chromium (Cr-VI) in drinking water has been shown to induce tumors in the mouse gastrointestinal (GI) tract and rat oral cavity. The same is not true for trivalent chromium (Cr-III). Thus reduction of Cr-VI to Cr-III in gastric juices is considered a protective mechanism, and it has been suggested that the difference between the rate of reduction among mice, rats, and humans could explain or predict differences in sensitivity to Cr-VI. We evaluated previously published models of gastric reduction and believe that they do not fully describe the data on reduction as a function of Cr-VI concentration, time, and (in humans) pH. The previous models are parsimonious in assuming only a single reducing agent in rodents and describing pH-dependence using a simple function. We present a revised model that assumes three pools of reducing agents in rats and mice with pH-dependence based on known speciation chemistry. While the revised model uses more fitted parameters than the original model, they are adequately identifiable given the available data, and the fit of the revised model to the full range of data is shown to be significantly improved. Hence the revised model should provide better predictions of Cr-VI reduction when integrated into a corresponding PBPK model. - Highlights: • Hexavalent chromium (Cr-VI) reduction in gastric juices is a key detoxifying step. • pH-dependent Cr-VI reduction rates are explained using known chemical speciation. • Reduction in rodents appears to involve multiple pools of electron donors. • Reduction appears to continue after 60 min, although more slowly than initial rates.

  4. In Situ Microbial Community Control of the Stability of Bio-reduced Uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldwin, Brett, R.; Peacock, Aaron, D.; Resch, Charles, T.; Arntzen, Evan; Smithgall, Amanda, N.; Pfiffner, Susan; Gan, M.; McKinley, James, P.; Long, Philip, E.; White, David, C.

    2008-03-28

    In aerobic aquifers typical of many Department of Energy (DOE) legacy waste sites, uranium is present in the oxidized U(VI) form which is more soluble and thus more mobile. Field experiments at the Old Rifle UMTRA site have demonstrated that biostimulation by electron donor addition (acetate) promotes biological U(VI) reduction (2). However, U(VI) reduction is reversible and oxidative dissolution of precipitated U(IV) after the cessation of electron donor addition remains a critical issue for the application of biostimulation as a treatment technology. Despite the potential for oxidative dissolution, field experiments at the Old Rifle site have shown that rapid reoxidation of bio-reduced uranium does not occur and U(VI) concentrations can remain at approximately 20% of background levels for more than one year. The extent of post-amendment U(VI) removal and the maintenance of bioreduced uranium may result from many factors including U(VI) sorption to iron-containing mineral phases, generation of H2S or FeS0.9, or the preferential sorption of U(VI) by microbial cells or biopolymers, but the processes controlling the reduction and in situ reoxidation rates are not known. To investigate the role of microbial community composition in the maintenance of bioreduced uranium, in-well sediment incubators (ISIs) were developed allowing field deployment of amended and native sediments during on-going experiments at the site. Field deployment of the ISIs allows expedient interrogation of microbial community response to field environmental perturbations and varying geochemical conditions.

  5. The application of N,N-dimethyl-3-oxa-glutaramic acid (DOGA) in the PUREX process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jianchen, Wang; Jing, Chen

    2007-07-01

    The new salt-free complexant, DOGA for separating trace Pu(IV) and Np(IV) from U(VI) nitric acid solution was studied. DOGA has stronger complexing abilities to Pu(IV) and Np(IV), but complexing ability of DOGA to U(VI) was weaker. The DOGA can be used in the PUREX process to separate Pu(IV) and Np(IV) from U(VI) nitric solution. On one hand, U(IV) in the nitric acid solution containing trace Pu(IV) and Np(IV) was extracted by 30%TBP - kerosene(v/v) in the presence of DOGA, but Pu(IV) and Np(IV) were kept in the aqueous phase. On the other hand, Pu(IV) and Np(IV) loading in 30% TBP - kerosene were effectively stripped by DOGA into the aqueous phase, but U(VI) loading in 30% TBP - kerosene was remained in 30% TBP - kerosene. DOGA is a promising complexant to separate Pu(IV) and Np(IV) from U(VI) solution in the U-cycle of the PUREX process. (authors)

  6. Reductive Capacity Measurement of Waste Forms for Secondary Radioactive Wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Um, Wooyong; Yang, Jungseok; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Westsik, Joseph H.

    2015-09-28

    The reductive capacities of dry ingredients and final solid waste forms were measured using both the Cr(VI) and Ce(IV) methods and the results were compared. Blast furnace slag (BFS), sodium sulfide, SnF2, and SnCl2 used as dry ingredients to make various waste forms showed significantly higher reductive capacities compared to other ingredients regardless of which method was used. Although the BFS exhibits appreciable reductive capacity, it requires greater amounts of time to fully react. In almost all cases, the Ce(IV) method yielded larger reductive capacity values than those from the Cr(VI) method and can be used as an upper bound for the reductive capacity of the dry ingredients and waste forms, because the Ce(IV) method subjects the solids to a strong acid (low pH) condition that dissolves much more of the solids. Because the Cr(VI) method relies on a neutral pH condition, the Cr(VI) method can be used to estimate primarily the waste form surface-related and readily dissolvable reductive capacity. However, the Cr(VI) method does not measure the total reductive capacity of the waste form, the long-term reductive capacity afforded by very slowly dissolving solids, or the reductive capacity present in the interior pores and internal locations of the solids.

  7. DE FG02-06ER64193: Final Technical Report Nucleation and Precipitation Processes in the Vadose Zone during Contaminant Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn L. Nagy

    2012-07-06

    The report describes results of experiments to synthesize and characterize uranium(VI)-silicates from solutions containing dissolved U(VI), Si, Na, and nitrate as a function of solution pH and Si:U ratio under ambient conditions. Solids characterization was accomplished by X-ray diffraction, attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), and high-energy X-ray scattering (HEXS) analysis. The purpose was to develop a framework for describing the formation of U(VI)-silicate solids that might form in contaminated soils and sediments under oxidizing conditions in the presence of aqueous uranium, and are known to exist naturally in geologic uranium deposits.

  8. FERRATES: SYNTHESIS, PROPERTIES AND APPLICATIONS IN WATER AND WASTEWATER TREATMENT.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CABELLI, D.E.; SHARMA, V.K.

    2006-05-19

    The higher oxidation states of iron (Fe(VI) and Fe(V) in particular) have been shown to be strongly oxidizing in enzymatic systems, where they can carry out aliphatic hydrogen abstraction. In addition, they have been postulated as intermediates in Fenton-type systems. Fe(VI) itself is relatively stable and has been shown to have potential as an oxidant in the so-called ''green'' treatment of polluted waters. By contrast, Fe(V) is a relatively short-lived transient when produced in aqueous solution in the absence of strongly bonding ligands other than hydroxide, a feature that has limited studies of its reactivity. Fe(VI) has been proposed to be useful in battery design and a very interesting study suggested that ferrate may be able to oxidize insoluble chromium to chromate and thus serve to remove chromium contamination in the Hanford radioactive waste tanks.

  9. Use of separate ZnTe interface layers to form ohmic contacts to p-CdTe films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gessert, T.A.

    1999-06-01

    A method of is disclosed improving electrical contact to a thin film of a p-type tellurium-containing II-VI semiconductor comprising: depositing a first undoped layer of ZnTe on a thin film of p-type tellurium containing II-VI semiconductor with material properties selected to limit the formation of potential barriers at the interface between the p-CdTe and the undoped layer, to a thickness sufficient to control diffusion of the metallic-doped ZnTe into the p-type tellurium-containing II-VI semiconductor, but thin enough to minimize affects of series resistance; depositing a second heavy doped p-type ZnTe layer to the first layer using an appropriate dopant; and depositing an appropriate metal onto the outer-most surface of the doped ZnTe layer for connecting an external electrical conductor to an ohmic contact. 11 figs.

  10. Use of separate ZnTe interface layers to form OHMIC contacts to p-CdTe films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gessert, Timothy A.

    1999-01-01

    A method of improving electrical contact to a thin film of a p-type tellurium-containing II-VI semiconductor comprising: depositing a first undoped layer of ZnTe on a thin film of p-type tellurium containing II-VI semiconductor with material properties selected to limit the formation of potential barriers at the interface between the p-CdTe and the undoped layer, to a thickness sufficient to control diffusion of the metallic-doped ZnTe into the p-type tellurim-containing II-VI semiconductor, but thin enough to minimize affects of series resistance; depositing a second heavy doped p-type ZnTe layer to the first layer using an appropriate dopant; and depositing an appropriate metal onto the outer-most surface of the doped ZnTe layer for connecting an external electrical conductor to an ohmic contact.

  11. Validation and Simplification of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Recursive Partitioning Analysis Classification for Glioblastoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Jing; Wang Meihua; Won, Minhee; Shaw, Edward G.; Coughlin, Christopher; Curran, Walter J.; Mehta, Minesh P.

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: Previous recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) of patients with malignant glioma (glioblastoma multiforme [GBM] and anaplastic astrocytoma [AA]) produced six prognostic groups (I-VI) classified by six factors. We sought here to determine whether the classification for GBM could be improved by using an updated Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) GBM database excluding AA and by considering additional baseline variables. Methods and Materials: The new analysis considered 42 baseline variables and 1,672 GBM patients from the expanded RTOG glioma database. Patients receiving radiation only were excluded such that all patients received radiation+carmustine. 'Radiation dose received' was replaced with 'radiation dose assigned.' The new RPA models were compared with the original model by applying them to a test dataset comprising 488 patients from six other RTOG trials. Fitness of the original and new models was evaluated using explained variation. Results: The original RPA model explained more variations in survival in the test dataset than did the new models (20% vs. 15%) and was therefore chosen for further analysis. It was reduced by combining Classes V and VI to produce three prognostic classes (Classes III, IV, and V+VI), as Classes V and VI had indistinguishable survival in the test dataset. The simplified model did not further improve performance (explained variation 18% vs. 20%) but is easier to apply because it involves only four variables: age, performance status, extent of resection, and neurologic function. Applying this simplified model to the updated GBM database resulted in three distinct classes with median survival times of 17.1, 11.2, and 7.5 months for Classes III, IV, and V+VI, respectively. Conclusions: The final model, the simplified original RPA model combining Classes V and VI, resulted in three distinct prognostic groups defined by age, performance status, extent of resection, and neurologic function. This classification will be used in future RTOG GBM trials.

  12. Scale-Dependent Rates of Uranyl Surface Complexation Reaction in Sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Chongxuan; Shang, Jianying; Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Zachara, John M.; Zhu, Weihuang

    2013-03-15

    Scale-dependency of uranyl[U(VI)] surface complexation rates was investigated in stirred flow-cell and column systems using a U(VI)-contaminated sediment from the US Department of Energy, Hanford site, WA. The experimental results were used to estimate the apparent rate of U(VI) surface complexation at the grain-scale and in porous media. Numerical simulations using molecular, pore-scale, and continuum models were performed to provide insights into and to estimate the rate constants of U(VI) surface complexation at the different scales. The results showed that the grain-scale rate constant of U(VI) surface complexation was over 3 to 10 orders of magnitude smaller, dependent on the temporal scale, than the rate constant calculated using the molecular simulations. The grain-scale rate was faster initially and slower with time, showing the temporal scale-dependency. The largest rate constant at the grain-scale decreased additional 2 orders of magnitude when the rate was scaled to the porous media in the column. The scaling effect from the grain-scale to the porous media became less important for the slower sorption sites. Pore-scale simulations revealed the importance of coupled mass transport and reactions in both intragranular and inter-granular domains, which caused both spatial and temporal dependence of U(VI) surface complexation rates in the sediment. Pore-scale simulations also revealed a new rate-limiting mechanism in the intragranular porous domains that the rate of coupled diffusion and surface complexation reaction was slower than either process alone. The results provided important implications for developing models to scale geochemical/biogeochemical reactions.

  13. Assessment of Controlling Processes for Field-Scale Uranium Reactive Transport under Highly Transient Flow Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Rui; Zheng, Chunmiao; Liu, Chongxuan; Greskowiak, Janek; Prommer, Henning; Zachara, John M.

    2014-02-13

    This paper presents the results of a comprehensive model-based analysis of a uranium tracer test conducted at the U.S Department of Energy Hanford 300 Area (300A) IFRC site. A three-dimensional multi-component reactive transport model was employed to assess the key factors and processes that control the field-scale uranium reactive transport. Taking into consideration of relevant physical and chemical processes, the selected conceptual/numerical model replicates the spatial and temporal variations of the observed U(VI) concentrations reasonably well in spite of the highly complex field conditions. A sensitivity analysis was performed to interrogate the relative importance of various processes and factors for reactive transport of U(VI) at the field-scale. The results indicate that multi-rate U(VI) sorption/desorption, U(VI) surface complexation reactions, and initial U(VI) concentrations were the most important processes and factors controlling U(VI) migration. On the other hand, cation exchange reactions, the choice of the surface complexation model, and dual-domain mass transfer processes, which were previously identified to be important in laboratory experiments, played less important roles under the field-scale experimental condition at the 300A site. However, the model simulations also revealed that the groundwater chemistry was relatively stable during the uranium tracer experiment and therefore presumably not dynamic enough to appropriately assess the effects of ion exchange reaction and the choice of surface complexation models on U(VI) sorption and desorption. Furthermore, it also showed that the field experimental duration (16 days) was not sufficiently long to precisely assess the role of a majority of the sorption sites that were accessed by slow kinetic processes within the dual domain model. The sensitivity analysis revealed the crucial role of the intraborehole flow that occurred within the long-screened monitoring wells and thus significantly affected both field-scale measurements and simulated U(VI) concentrations as a combined effect of aquifer heterogeneity and highly dynamic flow conditions. Overall, this study, which provides one of the few detailed and highly data-constrained uranium transport simulations, highlights the difference in controlling processes between laboratory and field scale that prevent a simple direct upscaling of laboratory-scale models.

  14. Mixed ternary heterojunction solar cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Wen S.; Stewart, John M.

    1992-08-25

    A thin film heterojunction solar cell and a method of making it has a p-type layer of mixed ternary I-III-VI.sub.2 semiconductor material in contact with an n-type layer of mixed binary II-VI semiconductor material. The p-type semiconductor material includes a low resistivity copper-rich region adjacent the back metal contact of the cell and a composition gradient providing a minority carrier mirror that improves the photovoltaic performance of the cell. The p-type semiconductor material preferably is CuInGaSe.sub.2 or CuIn(SSe).sub.2.

  15. 2014 Reliability & Markets Peer Review - Day 2 Presentations | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy 2 Presentations 2014 Reliability & Markets Peer Review - Day 2 Presentations The Transmission Reliability R&D Reliability & Markets Peer Review included 6 sessions over 2 days on August 5 - 6, 2014. Presentations from Day 2 (Sessions V and VI) are available below. Session V: Shmuel Oren, HyungSeon Oh, Tom Overbye Session VI: Dan Tylavsky, Eilyan Bitar PDF icon 2014 R&M Peer Review - Business Model for Retail Aggregation of Responsive Load - Shmuel Oren PDF icon 2014

  16. 2015 Reliability & Markets Peer Review - Day 2 Presentations | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy 2 Presentations 2015 Reliability & Markets Peer Review - Day 2 Presentations The Transmission Reliability R&D Reliability & Markets Peer Review included 6 sessions over 2 days on August 4 - 5, 2015. Presentations from Day 2 (Sessions V through VI) are available below. Session V: Ray Zimmerman, Hsiao-Dong Chiang, Lindsay Anderson Session VI: HyungSeon Oh, Dan Tylavsky PDF icon 2015 R&M Peer Review - Development and testing of tools - Ray Zimmerman PDF icon 2015

  17. Method of passivating semiconductor surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wanlass, M.W.

    1990-06-19

    A method is described for passivating Group III-V or II-VI semiconductor compound surfaces. The method includes selecting a passivating material having a lattice constant substantially mismatched to the lattice constant of the semiconductor compound. The passivating material is then grown as an ultrathin layer of passivating material on the surface of the Group III-V or II-VI semiconductor compound. The passivating material is grown to a thickness sufficient to maintain a coherent interface between the ultrathin passivating material and the semiconductor compound. In addition, a device formed from such method is also disclosed.

  18. Method of passivating semiconductor surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wanlass, Mark W.

    1990-01-01

    A method of passivating Group III-V or II-VI semiconductor compound surfaces. The method includes selecting a passivating material having a lattice constant substantially mismatched to the lattice constant of the semiconductor compound. The passivating material is then grown as an ultrathin layer of passivating material on the surface of the Group III-V or II-VI semiconductor compound. The passivating material is grown to a thickness sufficient to maintain a coherent interface between the ultrathin passivating material and the semiconductor compound. In addition, a device formed from such method is also disclosed.

  19. Final Report-4-30-13

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DELIVERABLE ID NO: 2 GEORGIA TECH PROJECT #: 3206663 DOE NABIR AWARD #: DE-FG02-01ER63178 PROJECT TITLE: U(VI) Reduction-Specific Nucleic Acid and Antibody Probes PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Thomas J. DiChristina AWARD PERIOD: 8/15/01 -to- 8/14/05 Technetium Reduction. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 respires anaerobically on a wide range of terminal electron acceptors, including oxidized forms of the radionuclides uranium [U(VI)] and technetium [Tc(VII)]. Microbial reduction of soluble Tc(VII) results

  20. LUNA: Nuclear astrophysics underground

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Best, A.

    2015-02-24

    Underground nuclear astrophysics with LUNA at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso spans a history of 20 years. By using the rock overburden of the Gran Sasso mountain chain as a natural cosmic-ray shield very low signal rates compared to an experiment on the surface can be tolerated. The cross sectons of important astrophysical reactions directly in the stellar energy range have been successfully measured. In this proceeding we give an overview over the key accomplishments of the experiment and an outlook on its future with the expected addition of an additional accelerator to the underground facilities, enabling the coverage of a wider energy range and the measurement of previously inaccessible reactions.