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1

Grady Electric Membership Corp | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Grady Electric Membership Corp Grady Electric Membership Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name Grady Electric Membership Corp Place Georgia Utility Id 7450 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Net Metering Outdoor Lighting Service - High Pressure Sodium 100w Lighting Outdoor Lighting Service - High Pressure Sodium 100w decorative Lighting Outdoor Lighting Service - High Pressure Sodium 250w Lighting Outdoor Lighting Service - High Pressure Sodium 400w Lighting Outdoor Lighting Service - Mercury Vapor 175w Lighting

2

Vela | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vela Vela Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Vela Name Vela Place Dubai, United Arab Emirates Sector Oil and Gas Product marine transportation for refined products and crude oi Year founded 1984 Phone number +971 4 3123100 Website http://www.vela.ae/-History-Ve Coordinates 25.2269166031°, 55.2832889557° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":25.2269166031,"lon":55.2832889557,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

3

Highly structured wind in Vela X-1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an in-depth analysis of the spectral and temporal behavior of a long almost uninterrupted INTEGRAL observation of Vela X-1 in Nov/Dec 2003. In addition to an already high activity level, Vela X-1 exhibited several very intense flares with a maximum intensity of more than 5 Crab in the 20-40 keV band. Furthermore Vela X-1 exhibited several off states where the source became undetectable with ISGRI. We interpret flares and off states as being due to the strongly structured wind of the optical companion: when Vela X-1 encounters a cavity in the wind with strongly reduced density, the flux drops, thus potentially triggering the onset of the propeller effect which inhibits further accretion, thus giving rise to the off states. The required drop in density to trigger the propeller effect in Vela X-1 is of the same order as predicted by theoretical papers for the densities in the OB star winds. The same structured wind can give rise to the giant flares when Vela X-1 encounters a dense blob in the wind. Fu...

Kreykenbohm, I; Kretschmar, P; Torrejon, J M; Pottschmidt, K; Hanke, M; Santangelo, A; Ferrigno, C; Staubert, R

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

A Taxonomy of C-systems WALTER A. CARNIELLI CLE and IFCH, Unicamp, Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 A Taxonomy of C-systems ···· WALTER A. CARNIELLI CLE and IFCH, Unicamp, Brazil carniell@cle.unicamp.br JO?O MARCOS RUG, Ghent, Belgium, and IFCH, Unicamp, Brazil vegetal@cle.unicamp.br Abstract The logics from CNPq / Brazil and from the A. von Humboldt Foundation, and thanks colleagues from the Advanced

Lisboa, Universidade Técnica de

5

A Taxonomy of C-systems WALTER A. CARNIELLI CLE and IFCH, Unicamp, Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

15 A Taxonomy of C-systems · WALTER A. CARNIELLI CLE and IFCH, Unicamp, Brazil carniell@cle.unicamp.br JO?O MARCOS RUG, Ghent, Belgium, and IFCH, Unicamp, Brazil vegetal@cle.unicamp.br Abstract The logics from CNPq / Brazil and from the A. von Humboldt Foundation, and thanks colleagues from the Advanced

Lisboa, Universidade Técnica de

6

CLE14/CLE20 peptides may interact with CLAVATA2/CORYNE receptor-like kinases to irreversibly inhibit cell division in the root meristem of Arabidopsis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a detailed analysis of the mitotic activities in the RAM ofactivity in the RAM. Using RTPCR analysis, several CLE (

Meng, Ling; Feldman, Lewis J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Aberrant Water Homeostasis Detected by Stable Isotope Shannon P. O'Grady1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aberrant Water Homeostasis Detected by Stable Isotope Analysis Shannon P. O'Grady1 *, Adam R. Wende States of America, 5 Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States of America Abstract While isotopes are frequently used as tracers in investigations

Ehleringer, Jim

8

Gas royalty - Vela, Middleton, and Weatherford  

SciTech Connect

The evolution of gas royalties is evident in this review of oil and gas cases dating from 1926. The author describes the decisions and changes in the gas royalty clause over the years in order to determine the intent of the parties in setting the measure of the royalty payment on gas production under Texas law. The Foster, Vela, and Middleton cases were the major vehicles for the legal development. The author also examines subsequent cases involving the market value of price-regulated gas and court decisions on royalty determination in other jurisdictions. Producers need to take protective steps in anticipation of early deregulation of gas prices to make sure there is no exposure to claims of market value in excess of contract proceeds. Corrective measures include contract amendments or negotiations with both the gas purchaser and the royalty owners to secure a lease amendment.

Harmon, F.G.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Microsoft Word - CLE_2.1_Post-Mortem_2009-v9-Accepted.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with the average of 5.46 us, favoredunfavored core pairs with the average of 6.09 usec, and unfavoredunfavored core pairs with the average of 6.74 usec. Under CLE 2.1, there...

10

Ten years of Vela x-ray observations  

SciTech Connect

The Vela spacecraft, particularly Vela 5B, produced all-sky X-ray data of unprecedented length and completeness. The data led to the discovery of X-ray bursts and numerous transient outbursts. Recent re-analysis has put the data in the form of 10-day skymaps covering a 7-year period, which have led to the discovery or confirmation of a number of long-term periodicities, and have made possible a time-lapse movie of the X-ray sky.

Terrell, J.; Priedhorsky, W.C.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

The Question of the Peak Separation in the Vela Pulsar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate gamma-ray spectra of pulsars for a set of electron acceleration models within the polar-cap scenario. We discuss our results in the light of the recent analysis (Kanbach 1999) of temporal properties of the Vela pulsar in the EGRET energy range.

J. Dyks; B. Rudak; T. Bulik

1999-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

12

Underwater locomotion from oscillatory shape deformations Patricio A. Vela  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Underwater locomotion from oscillatory shape deformations Patricio A. Vela , Kristi A. Morgansen@robotics.caltech.edu Abstract: This paper considers underwater propulsion that is generated by variations in body shape. We underwater vehicles that propel and steer themselves by changes in shape (e.g. [11, 13, 15

Sontag, Eduardo

13

CLE (CLAVATA3/ESR-like) Peptides: Roles in Cell Signaling and Stem cell Homeostasis in Arabidopsis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in roots a detailed analysis of the RAM activity in roots ofRAM activity (Fig4B) caused by CLE peptides treatment appears to be dominant in all the combined analyses.

Meng, Ling

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

NNSA Commemorates 50th Anniversary of First Vela Launch | National Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commemorates 50th Anniversary of First Vela Launch | National Nuclear Commemorates 50th Anniversary of First Vela Launch | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Press Releases > NNSA Commemorates 50th Anniversary of First Vela Launch Press Release NNSA Commemorates 50th Anniversary of First Vela Launch Oct 28, 2013 Vela Launch WASHINGTON, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security

15

CONSTRAINING THE VELA PULSAR'S RADIO EMISSION REGION USING NYQUIST-LIMITED SCINTILLATION STATISTICS  

SciTech Connect

Using a novel technique, we achieve {approx}100 picoarcsec resolution and set an upper bound of less than 4 km for the characteristic size of the Vela pulsar's emission region. Specifically, we analyze flux-density statistics of the Vela pulsar at 760 MHz. Because the pulsar exhibits strong diffractive scintillation, these statistics convey information about the spatial extent of the radio emission region. We measure both a characteristic size of the emission region and the emission sizes for individual pulses. Our results imply that the radio emission altitude for the Vela pulsar at this frequency is less than 340 km.

Johnson, M. D.; Gwinn, C. R. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Demorest, P., E-mail: michaeltdh@physics.ucsb.edu, E-mail: cgwinn@physics.ucsb.edu, E-mail: pdemores@nrao.edu [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22093 (United States)

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

16

ChroniCleA weekly digest of news from ChroniCle online: www.news.cornell.edu oCtober 15, 2010 Dr. David J. Skorton, president of Cornell, and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and plant- microbe biology, on Cornell's research collaboration with the company Worm Power, which uses has made $410,000 in grants to Worm Power. roChester DeMoCrat anD ChroniCLe, oCt. 8 Future fracking- grams throughout central New York. The CLASSE and CIPT exhibits will be located in the space reserved

Keinan, Alon

17

OFF VUF-2700 FINAL REPORT VELA UNIFORM PROJECT SPONSORED BY  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

09 09 OFF VUF-2700 FINAL REPORT VELA UNIFORM PROJECT SPONSORED BY THE ADVANCED RESEARCH PROJECTS AGENCY OF THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE AND THE U.S. ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION FALLON, NEVADA OCTOBER 26, 1963 Project 9.1 U.s. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station James M. Polatty / James E. McDonald Issuance Dates May 1j 1965 IT lAS VEGAS llBiU\Rl LEG A L NOTICE '. ':" This report was prepared as an account or Government eponecred work. Neither the United States, nor the commtseton, nor any pereon acting oabahal! of the Commission: A.Makesany warranty or representation. e.xpressedor implied, with reepect to the accu- racy, completeness,orusefulnes8o! tbeinformaUoncontalned in this report, cr tbst the use of any tntormeucn, appa-ratua, method, or prcceee disclosed in this report may not infringe privately owned rights; or B. Assumes any lIabUitlea wIth respect to the use of.

18

Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility : Monthly Progress Report November 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

FISH PRODUCTION: Final shocking of eggs was finished in the incubation. Egg enumeration for the 2008 brood was completed and the eggs are being incubated in 38 degree Fahrenheit chilled water. Don Larsen of NOAA made a request of eggs for research purposes and was able to acquire supplemental line eggs 10,555. Estimated density at the time of ponding in Mid-March of 2009 is approximately 43,869 fry per raceway after calculating an average fry loss of 2%. The end of the month totals for the 2007 brood reports 773,807 juveniles on hand with an overall average of 31.4 fish per pound. Tagging continues on the 2007 brood and is on pace to wrap up in early December. FISH CULTURE: Ponds are cleaned as needed and due to the colder water temperatures, the feeding frequency has been changed to three days a week. All ponds are sampled at the end of the month. Growth for production fish are adjusted accordingly as temperature dictates feeding levels. Torrential rain on the 12th turned the Yakima River extremely turbid. Fish tagging operations were halted and the ensuing conditions at the facility intake screens became a concern. Water flow to the wet well became restricted so the decision was made to shut the surface water (river) pumps down and turn on well pumps No.1, No.4 and No.6 to run water to the facility head box. This operation continued for twenty-four hours at which point normal operations were optimal and fish tagging resumed, although the river didn't clear up enough to feed the fish until the 17th. WATER PRODUCTION: The current combined well and river water supply to the complex is 14,822 gallons/minute. Well No.2 is pumping water at a rate of 530 gallons per minute. All four river pumps are in operation and pumping 14,292 gallons/minute. ACCLIMATION SITES: Cle Elum staff has been working to prep the acclimation sites for the upcoming fish transfer before the snow falls. Thermographs at each site are changed weekly. AMB Tools performed routine maintenance on the compressor and Brown and Jackson pumped out the septic tank at the Jack Creek acclimation site. VEHICLE MAINTENANCE: Snow tires are now on all vehicles and snow blowers were installed on the John Deere tractor and lawn tractor. The snowplow was also installed on the Ford one ton. The four Snowmobiles were serviced by Yamaha Jacks of Ellensburg. MAINTENANCE BUILDING MAINTENANCE: Clean up occurs on Fridays of each week. HATCHERY BUILDING MAINTENANCE: Water has been turned on to vertical incubator islands one and two. After eggs were transferred to vertical stacks cleaning of troughs began. WDFW crew inventoried eggs from isolettes and then transferred them to the vertical incubators. RIVER PUMP STATION MAINTENANCE: All four pumps are in operation and supplying the facility with 14,292 gallons/minute of water to rearing ponds. WELL FIELD MAINTENANCE: Well pumps No.1, No.4 and No.6 were turned on to supplement water flow to the facility as mentioned previously. Well No.5 was powered up but a winterizing valve malfunction wouldn't allow operation, we are currently working on it at this time. Well No.2 is pumping 530 gallons per minute and supplies well water to incubation and chiller. The pumps meter is recorded weekly. Test holes are monitored weekly and results are faxed to CH2MHILL afterward. SAFETY AND TRAINING: Ice melt and sand bags are popular items at the facility this month as freezing temperatures cause ground to become slippery and hazardous. GROUNDS: Van Alden's Plumbing installed a new commode in resident house No.411 and also inspected a plumbing problem at resident No.1131. Cle Elum staff along with WDFW staff worked to locate the spawning channel building back to the position it was at to have Greg Wallace of Wallace Electric hook electricity back up to the spawning shed. MEETINGS AND TOURS: Charlie attended a policy meeting at Cle Elum on the 18th. The Internal projects annual review took place at Cle Elum on the 19th and 20th. Bill Bosch continues to visit monthly to incorporate data into the YKFP data base. PERSONNEL: IHS employees traveled to Cle

Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

19

Cle Elum and Supplementation Research Facility : Monthly Progress Report October 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

FISH PRODUCTION: On October 7th the 2008 spawning season was completed. 823 adults were transferred to the facility for the 2008 season. The overall adult mortality was 6.9% (1.3% pre-spawning mortality and 5.6% encountered after sorting). Wild/natural salmon collected included 278 females, 173 males, and 29 jacks for a total 480 fish for the 2008 brood. Supplemented brood stock collected included 149 adults (85 females, 35 males and 29 jacks). Hatchery control brood collected for research included 194 adults (91 females, 68 males and 35 jacks). Eggs will be inventoried in November with an actual summary of eggs numbers to be submitted for the November report. The estimated egg takes (production) for the 2008 season was 1,375,146 eggs with 1,006,063 comprising of W x W crosses and 250,755 eggs of H x H crosses with 118,328 supplement crosses. Total fish on hand for the 2007 brood is 768,751 with an average fish per pound of 30.6 f/lb. FISH CULTURE: The marking and pit-tagging operation started on October 13th. The pit-tagging portion was completed on October 23rd. A total 40,000 juveniles were pit-tagged (2,000 from each of the production ponds and 4,000 each for the hatchery juvenile ponds 9 & 10). Cle Elum staff began shocking, sorting, counting and splitting eggs in incubation. Shocking eggs will separate live eggs from dead eggs. Eggs are treated with formalin three times a week to control fungus. The focus for the culturists during the month of October entail completing the final spawn (egg take) on the 7th, pond cleaning, keeping the marking trailers supplied with fish and end of month sampling. The adult holding ponds were power washed and winterized for the shut down period. Facility crew members Greg Strom and Mike Whitefoot assisted Joe Blodgett and his crew with fish brood collection on the 22nd of October. Fall Chinook and Coho salmon were seined up and put in tanker trucks from Chandler canal and transported to holding ponds for later spawning. Charlie, Simon and Vernon assisted with sorting and spawning Summer Chinook at the Wells hatchery for the Summer Chinook reintroduction program on the lower Yakima River. WATER PRODUCTION: The current combined well and river water supply to the complex is 12,909 gallons/min. Four river pumps (12,400gpm) and one well pump No.2 (509gpm) are supplying water to the facility main head box and the egg incubation building. ACCLIMATION SITES: Easton had much activity in October, the electrical power panel that's switches commercial power operation to generator power (transfer switch) malfunctioned. Charlie called Wallace Electric as well as ASCO Services to trouble shoot the problem which has yet to be determined. Heaters have been turned on in all service buildings at the acclimation sites. Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission traveled to Easton to install a pole to mount a satellite and a new ups backup system with new monitors and computers for pit tag data recording and transmitting. Brown and Jackson pumped out the septic tanks at Easton and Clark Flat. AMB Tools performed maintenance on the compressors at the acclimation sites as well as Cle Elum (5 total). VEHICLE MAINTENANCE: Day Wireless performed maintenance on all handheld and vehicle radios. Day Wireless repaired radio communications (static noise) on the 6th also. All vehicles mileages and conditions are reported monthly to Toppenish. Cle Elum staff continues to clean and maintain all facility vehicles weekly. MAINTENANCE BUILDING MAINTENANCE: Kevin of Raincountry was called in response to repairs needed to the water chiller system. Cle Elum staff winterized all irrigation as well as shop grounds. Brown and Jackson pumped out the septic tank at the hatchery on the 22nd. HATCHERY BUILDING MAINTENANCE: The incubation room has been set up for transfer of eggs from isolation buckets to vertical stacks, temperature units are recorded daily. RESENTDENTIAL HOUSING: Residents irrigation has been winterized and fall fertilizer was applied to all grass on facility. Four Seasons performed maintenance on all heating sy

Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility

2008-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

20

Beating the spin-down limit on gravitational wave emission from the Vela pulsar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present direct upper limits on continuous gravitational wave emission from the Vela pulsar using data from the Virgo detector's second science run. These upper limits have been obtained using three independent methods that assume the gravitational wave emission follows the radio timing. Two of the methods produce frequentist upper limits for an assumed known orientation of the star's spin axis and value of the wave polarization angle of, respectively, $1.9\\ee{-24}$ and $2.2\\ee{-24}$, with 95% confidence. The third method, under the same hypothesis, produces a Bayesian upper limit of $2.1\\ee{-24}$, with 95% degree of belief. These limits are below the indirect {\\it spin-down limit} of $3.3\\ee{-24}$ for the Vela pulsar, defined by the energy loss rate inferred from observed decrease in Vela's spin frequency, and correspond to a limit on the star ellipticity of $\\sim 10^{-3}$. Slightly less stringent results, but still well below the spin-down limit, are obtained assuming the star's spin axis inclination and the wave polarization angles are unknown.

The LIGO Scientific Collaboration; the Virgo Collaboration; J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; M. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; C. Adams; R. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; B. Allen; G. S. Allen; E. Amador Ceron; D. Amariutei; R. S. Amin; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; F. Antonucci; K. Arai; M. A. Arain; M. C. Araya; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; D. Atkinson; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. Ballmer; D. Barker; S. Barnum; F. Barone; B. Barr; P. Barriga; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; M. Bastarrika; A. Basti; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M. G. Beker; A. S. Bell; A. Belletoile; I. Belopolski; M. Benacquista; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; N. Beveridge; P. T. Beyersdorf; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; S. Birindelli; R. Biswas; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; B. Bland; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; C. Bogan; R. Bondarescu; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; S. Bose; L. Bosi; B. Bouhou; M. Boyle; S. Braccini; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; A. Brummit; R. Budzy?ski; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; J. Burguet--Castell; O. Burmeister; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; J. Cain; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; E. Campagna; P. Campsie; J. Cannizzo; K. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. Capano; F. Carbognani; S. Caride; S. Caudill; M. Cavagli; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; O. Chaibi; T. Chalermsongsak; E. Chalkley; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; S. Chelkowski; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; N. Christensen; S. S. Y. Chua; C. T. Y. Chung; S. Chung; F. Clara; D. Clark; J. Clark; J. H. Clayton; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; C. N. Colacino; J. Colas; A. Colla; M. Colombini; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; D. M. Coward; D. C. Coyne; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; A. M. Cruise; R. M. Culter; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; K. Dahl; S. L. Danilishin; R. Dannenberg; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; K. Das; V. Dattilo; B. Daudert; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; G. Davies; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; R. De Rosa; D. DeBra; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; M. del Prete; T. Dent; V. Dergachev; R. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; M. Di Paolo Emilio; A. Di Virgilio; M. Daz; A. Dietz; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Dorsher; E. S. D. Douglas; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; J. -C. Dumas; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; M. Edgar; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; R. Engel; T. Etzel; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Y. Fan; B. F. Farr; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; I. Ferrante; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. Flaminio; M. Flanigan; S. Foley; E. Forsi; L. A. Forte; N. Fotopoulos; J. -D. Fournier; J. Franc; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; M. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; D. Friedrich; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; P. Fulda; M. Fyffe; M. Galimberti; L. Gammaitoni; J. Garcia; J. A. Garofoli; F. Garufi; M. E. Gspr; G. Gemme; E. Genin; A. Gennai; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; C. Gill; E. Goetz; L. M. Goggin; G. Gonzlez; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Goler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; C. Greverie; R. Grosso; H. Grote; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. Guido; R. Gupta; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; B. Hage; J. M. Hallam; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. T. Hartman; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. -F. Hayau; T. Hayler; J. Heefner; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; M. A. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; V. Herrera; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; T. Hong; S. Hooper; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; D. Huet; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; P. Jaranowski; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; G. Jones; R. Jones; L. Ju; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; J. B. Kanner; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; K. Kawabe; S. Kawamura; F. Kawazoe; W. Kells; M. Kelner; D. G. Keppel; A. Khalaidovski; F. Y. Khalili; E. A. Khazanov; H. Kim; N. Kim; P. J. King; D. L. Kinzel; J. S. Kissel; S. Klimenko; V. Kondrashov; R. Kopparapu; S. Koranda; W. Z. Korth; I. Kowalska; D. Kozak; V. Kringel; S. Krishnamurthy; B. Krishnan; A. Krlak; G. Kuehn; R. Kumar; P. Kwee; M. Landry; B. Lantz; N. Lastzka; A. Lazzarini; P. Leaci; J. Leong; I. Leonor; N. Leroy; N. Letendre; J. Li; T. G. F. Li; N. Liguori; P. E. Lindquist; N. A. Lockerbie; D. Lodhia; M. Lorenzini; V. Loriette; M. Lormand; G. Losurdo; P. Lu; J. Luan; M. Lubinski

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "grady cle vela" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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21

Beating the spin-down limit on gravitational wave emission from the Vela pulsar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present direct upper limits on continuous gravitational wave emission from the Vela pulsar using data from the Virgo detector's second science run. These upper limits have been obtained using three independent methods that assume the gravitational wave emission follows the radio timing. Two of the methods produce frequentist upper limits for an assumed known orientation of the star's spin axis and value of the wave polarization angle of, respectively, $1.9\\ee{-24}$ and $2.2\\ee{-24}$, with 95% confidence. The third method, under the same hypothesis, produces a Bayesian upper limit of $2.1\\ee{-24}$, with 95% degree of belief. These limits are below the indirect {\\it spin-down limit} of $3.3\\ee{-24}$ for the Vela pulsar, defined by the energy loss rate inferred from observed decrease in Vela's spin frequency, and correspond to a limit on the star ellipticity of $\\sim 10^{-3}$. Slightly less stringent results, but still well below the spin-down limit, are obtained assuming the star's spin axis inclination and ...

Abadie, J; Abbott, R; Abernathy, M; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adhikari, R; Affeldt, C; Allen, B; Allen, G S; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Amin, R S; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Antonucci, F; Arai, K; Arain, M A; Araya, M C; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Atkinson, D; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S; Barker, D; Barnum, S; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barriga, P; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Basti, A; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Behnke, B; Beker, M BejgerM G; Bell, A S; Belletoile, A; Belopolski, I; Benacquista, M; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beveridge, N; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Birindelli, S; Biswas, R; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Bogan, C; Bondarescu, R; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bouhou, B; Boyle, M; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brummit, A; Budzy?ski, R; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burguet--Castell, J; Burmeister, O; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Cain, J; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campagna, E; Campsie, P; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavagli, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chaibi, O; Chalermsongsak, T; Chalkley, E; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Christensen, N; Chua, S S Y; Chung, C T Y; Chung, S; Clara, F; Clark, D; Clark, J; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Colacino, C N; Colas, J; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M; Coulon, J -P; Coward, D M; Coyne, D C; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cruise, A M; Culter, R M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dahl, K; Danilishin, S L; Dannenberg, R; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Das, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; del Prete, M; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Emilio, M Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A; Daz, M; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Dorsher, S; Douglas, E S D; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Dumas, J -C; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edgar, M; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Engel, R; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Farr, B F; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Flaminio, R; Flanigan, M; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Forte, L A; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franc, J; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Friedrich, D; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Galimberti, M; Gammaitoni, L; Garcia, J; Garofoli, J A; Garufi, F; Gspr, M E; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, C; Goetz, E; Goggin, L M; Gonzlez, G; Gorodetsky, M L; Goler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Greverie, C; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gupta, R; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hage, B; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Hayau, J -F; Hayler, T; Heefner, J; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hendry, M A; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Herrera, V; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Huet, D; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Jaranowski, P; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kanner, J B; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kells, W; Kelner, M; Keppel, D G; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, H; Kim, N; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kondrashov, V; Kopparapu, R; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Kringel, V; Krishnamurthy, S; Krishnan, B; Krlak, A; Kuehn, G; Kumar, R; Kwee, P; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Lastzka, N; Lazzarini, A; Leaci, P; Leong, J; Leonor, I; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Li, J; Li, T G F; Liguori, N; Lindquist, P E; Lockerbie, N A; Lodhia, D; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lu, P; Luan, J; Lubinski, M; Lck, H; Lundgren, A P; Macdonald, E; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Majorana, E; Maksimovic, I; Man, N; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Mantovani, M; Marandi, A; Marchesoni, F

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

High-resolution single-pulse studies of the Vela Pulsar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present high-resolution multi-frequency single-pulse observations of the Vela pulsar, PSR B0833-45, aimed at studying micro-structure, phase-resolved intensity fluctuations and energy distributions at 1.41 and 2.30 GHz. We show that the micro-pulse width in pulsars has a period dependence. Like individual pulses, Vela's micro-pulses are highly elliptically polarized. There is a strong correlation between Stokes parameters V and I in the micro-structure. We show that the V/I distribution is Gaussian with a narrow width and that this width appears to be constant as a function of pulse phase. The phase-resolved intensity distributions of I are best fitted with log-normal statistics. Extra emission components, i.e.``bump'' and ``giant micro-pulses'', discovered by Johnston et al.(2001) are also present at 2.3 GHz. The bump component seems to be an extra component superposed on the main pulse profile but does not appear periodically. The giant micro-pulses are time-resolved and have significant jitter in their arrival times. Their flux density distribution is best fitted by a power-law, indicating a link between these features and ``classical'' giant pulses as observed for the Crab pulsar, (PSR B0531+21), PSR B1937+21 and PSR B1821-24. We find that Vela contains a mixture of emission properties representing both ``classical'' properties of radio pulsars (e.g. micro-structure, high degree of polarization, S-like position angle swing, orthogonal modes) and features which are most likely related to high-energy emission (e.g. extra profile components, giant micro-pulses). It hence represents an ideal test case to study the relationship between radio and high-energy emission in significant detail.

M. Kramer; S. Johnston; W. van Straten

2002-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

23

Chandra Observations of the Eastern Limb of the Vela Supernova Remnant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present results from two Chandra/ACIS observations of the so-called Vela ``Bullet D'' region on the eastern limb of the Vela supernova remnant. The Bullet D region is a bright X-ray feature, identified by Aschenbach et al. (1995) from the ROSAT All-Sky Survey, which protrudes beyond the blast wave on the eastern side of the remnant. It has been suggested that this feature is a fragment of supernova ejecta which is just now pushing beyond the position of the main blast wave. An alternate explanation is that the feature is a ``break-out'' of the shock in which inhomogeneities in the ambient medium cause the shock to be non-spherical. The Chandra image shows a fragmented, filamentary morphology within this region. The Chandra spectra show strong emission lines of O, Ne, and Mg. Equilibrium ionization models indicate that the O and Ne abundances are significantly enhanced compared to solar values. However, non-equilibrium ionization models can fit the data with solar O abundances and Ne abundances enhanced by only a factor of two. The Chandra data are more consistent with the shock breakout hypothesis, although they cannot exclude the fragment of ejecta hypothesis.

P. P. Plucinsky; R. K Smith; R. J. Edgar; T. J. Gaetz; P. O. Slane; W. P. Blair; L. K. Townsley; P. S. Broos

2001-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

24

X-RAY PHOTOIONIZED BUBBLE IN THE WIND OF VELA X-1 PULSAR SUPERGIANT COMPANION  

SciTech Connect

Vela X-1 is the archetype of high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs), composed of a neutron star and a massive B supergiant. The supergiant is a source of a strong radiatively driven stellar wind. The neutron star sweeps up this wind and creates a huge amount of X-rays as a result of energy release during the process of wind accretion. Here, we provide detailed NLTE models of the Vela X-1 envelope. We study how the X-rays photoionize the wind and destroy the ions responsible for the wind acceleration. The resulting decrease of the radiative force explains the observed reduction of the wind terminal velocity in a direction to the neutron star. The X-rays create a distinct photoionized region around the neutron star filled with a stagnating flow. The existence of such photoionized bubbles is a general property of HMXBs. We unveil a new principle governing these complex objects, according to which there is an upper limit to the X-ray luminosity the compact star can have without suspending the wind due to inefficient line driving.

Krticka, Jiri; Skalicky, Jan [Ustav teoreticke fyziky a astrofyziky, Masarykova univerzita, Kotlarska 2, CZ-611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Kubat, Jiri [Astromomicky ustav Akademie ved Ceske republiky, Fricova 298, CZ-251 65 Ondrejov (Czech Republic)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Model of peak separation in the gamma lightcurve of the Vela pulsar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The separation $\\del$ between two peaks in the gamma-ray pulse profile is calculated as a function of energy for several polar cap models with curvature-radiation-induced cascades. The Monte Carlo results are interpreted with the help of analytical approximations and discussed in view of the recent data analysis for the Vela pulsar (Kanbach 1999). We find that the behaviour of $\\del$ as a function of photon energy $\\epsilon$ depends primarily on local values of the magnetic field, $B_{\\rm local}$, in the region where electromagnetic cascades develop. For low values of $B_{\\rm local}$ ($ \\et$, in hollow-column models the separation $\\del$ increases (whereas in filled-column model it decreases) rapidly with increasing $\\epsilon$, at a rate of $\\sim 0.28$ of the total phase per decade of photon energy. The existence of critical energy $\\et$ is a direct consequence of one-photon magnetic absorption effects. In general, $\\et$ is located close to the high-energy cutoff of the spectrum, thus photon statistics at $\\et$ should be very low. That will make difficult to verify the existence of $\\et$ in real gamma-ray pulsars. Spectral properties of the Vela pulsar would favour those models which use low values of magnetic field in the emission region ($B_{\\rm local} \\simless 10^{11}$ G) which in turn implies a constant value of the predicted $\\del$ within EGRET range.

J. Dyks; B. Rudak

2000-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

26

FINAL REPORT VELA UNIFORM PROJECT SPONSORED BY THE ADVANCED RESEARCH PROJECTS AGENCY OF THE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

VUF -1009 VUF -1009 FINAL REPORT - VELA UNIFORM PROJECT SPONSORED BY THE ADVANCED RESEARCH PROJECTS AGENCY OF THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE AND THE U. S. ATOMIC ENERGY COMMl SSlON FALLON, NEVADA OCTOBER 26,1963 FINAL REPORT OF OFF-SITE SURVEILLANCE Southwestern Radiological Health Laboratory September 1, 1964 Issuance Date: November 27, 1964 L E G A L N O T I C E This report war preprred a r an account of Government rponrored work. Neither the Unlted Strtor, nor the Commlerlon, nor m y perron acting on behalf of the Commlrslon: A. Maker any warranty o r reprerentition, exprerred o r Implied, wlth respect to the accu- racy, completanerr, o r urefulners of the lnfornutlon contrlned in thls report, o r that the u r e of any lnformnti~n. apparatur, method, o r procerr dlrclored in thlr report may not infringe

27

Search for gravitational waves associated with the August 2006 timing glitch of the Vela pulsar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The physical mechanisms responsible for pulsar timing glitches are thought to excite quasinormal mode oscillations in their parent neutron star that couple to gravitational-wave emission. In August 2006, a timing glitch was observed in the radio emission of PSR B0833-45, the Vela pulsar. At the time of the glitch, the two colocated Hanford gravitational-wave detectors of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave observatory (LIGO) were operational and taking data as part of the fifth LIGO science run (S5). We present the first direct search for the gravitational-wave emission associated with oscillations of the fundamental quadrupole mode excited by a pulsar timing glitch. No gravitational-wave detection candidate was found. We place Bayesian 90% confidence upper limits of 6.3x10{sup -21} to 1.4x10{sup -20} on the peak intrinsic strain amplitude of gravitational-wave ring-down signals, depending on which spherical harmonic mode is excited. The corresponding range of energy upper limits is 5.0x10{sup 44} to 1.3x10{sup 45} erg.

Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R.; Ajith, P.; Anderson, S. B.; Araya, M.; Aso, Y.; Ballmer, S.; Betzwieser, J.; Billingsley, G.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Bork, R.; Brooks, A. F.; Cannon, K. C.; Cardenas, L.; Cepeda, C.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chatterji, S. [LIGO - California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

28

A search for gravitational waves associated with the August 2006 timing glitch of the Vela pulsar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The physical mechanisms responsible for pulsar timing glitches are thought to excite quasi-normal mode oscillations in their parent neutron star that couple to gravitational wave emission. In August 2006, a timing glitch was observed in the radio emission of PSR B0833-45, the Vela pulsar. At the time of the glitch, the two co-located Hanford gravitational wave detectors of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave observatory (LIGO) were operational and taking data as part of the fifth LIGO science run (S5). We present the first direct search for the gravitational wave emission associated with oscillations of the fundamental quadrupole mode excited by a pulsar timing glitch. No gravitational wave detection candidate was found. We place Bayesian 90% confidence upper limits of 6.3e-21 to 1.4e-20 on the peak intrinsic strain amplitude of gravitational wave ring-down signals, depending on which spherical harmonic mode is excited. The corresponding range of energy upper limits is 5.0e44 to 1.3e45 erg.

The LIGO Scientific Collaboration; J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; R. Adhikari; P. Ajith; B. Allen; G. Allen; E. Amador Ceron; R. S. Amin; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; M. A. Arain; M. Araya; Y. Aso; S. Aston; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; S. Babak; P. Baker; S. Ballmer; D. Barker; B. Barr; P. Barriga; L. Barsotti; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; M. Bastarrika; B. Behnke; M. Benacquista; M. F. Bennett; J. Betzwieser; P. T. Beyersdorf; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; R. Biswas; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; B. Bland; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; R. Bondarescu; R. Bork; M. Born; S. Bose; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; D. O. Bridges; M. Brinkmann; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; S. Buchner; A. Bullington; A. Buonanno; O. Burmeister; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; J. Cain; J. B. Camp; J. Cannizzo; K. C. Cannon; J. Cao; C. Capano; L. Cardenas; S. Caudill; M. Cavagli; C. Cepeda; T. Chalermsongsak; E. Chalkley; P. Charlton; S. Chatterji; S. Chelkowski; Y. Chen; N. Christensen; S. S. Y. Chua; C. T. Y. Chung; D. Clark; J. Clark; J. H. Clayton; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. C. Corbitt; N. Cornish; D. Coward; D. C. Coyne; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; A. M. Cruise; R. M. Culter; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; K. Dahl; S. L. Danilishin; K. Danzmann; B. Daudert; G. Davies; E. J. Daw; T. Dayanga; D. DeBra; J. Degallaix; V. Dergachev; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; M. Daz; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; E. E. Doomes; R. W. P. Drever; J. Driggers; J. Dueck; I. Duke; J. -C. Dumas; M. Edgar; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; T. Etzel; M. Evans; T. Evans; S. Fairhurst; Y. Faltas; Y. Fan; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; L. S. Finn; K. Flasch; S. Foley; C. Forrest; N. Fotopoulos; M. Frede; M. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; D. Friedrich; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; P. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. A. Garofoli; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; E. Goetz; L. M. Goggin; G. Gonzlez; S. Goler; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; R. Grosso; H. Grote; S. Grunewald; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; B. Hage; J. M. Hallam; D. Hammer; G. D. Hammond; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; T. Hayler; J. Heefner; I. S. Heng; A. Heptonstall; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; E. Hirose; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. Howell; D. Hoyland; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; D. R. Ingram; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; G. Jones; R. Jones; L. Ju; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; J. Kanner; E. Katsavounidis; K. Kawabe; S. Kawamura; F. Kawazoe; W. Kells; D. G. Keppel; A. Khalaidovski; F. Y. Khalili; R. Khan; E. Khazanov; H. Kim; P. J. King; J. S. Kissel; S. Klimenko; K. Kokeyama; V. Kondrashov; R. Kopparapu; S. Koranda; D. Kozak; V. Kringel; B. Krishnan; G. Kuehn; J. Kullman; R. Kumar; P. Kwee; P. K. Lam; M. Landry; M. Lang; B. Lantz; N. Lastzka; A. Lazzarini; P. Leaci; M. Lei; N. Leindecker; I. Leonor; H. Lin; P. E. Lindquist; T. B. Littenberg; N. A. Lockerbie; D. Lodhia; M. Lormand; P. Lu; M. Lubinski; A. Lucianetti; H. Lck; A. Lundgren; B. Machenschalk; M. MacInnis; M. Mageswaran; K. Mailand; C. Mak; I. Mandel; V. Mandic; S. Mrka; Z. Mrka; A. Markosyan; J. Markowitz; E. Maros; I. W. Martin; R. M. Martin; J. N. Marx; K. Mason; F. Matichard; L. Matone; R. A. Matzner; N. Mavalvala; R. McCarthy; D. E. McClelland; S. C. McGuire; G. McIntyre; D. J. A. McKechan; M. Mehmet; A. Melatos; A. C. Melissinos; G. Mendell; D. F. Menndez; R. A. Mercer; L. Merrill; S. Meshkov; C. Messenger; M. S. Meyer; H. Miao; J. Miller; Y. Mino; S. Mitra; V. P. Mitrofanov; G. Mitselmakher; R. Mittleman; O. Miyakawa; B. Moe; S. D. Mohanty; S. R. P. Mohapatra; G. Moreno; K. Mors; K. Mossavi; C. MowLowry; G. Mueller; H. Mller-Ebhardt; S. Mukherjee; A. Mullavey; J. Munch; P. G. Murray; T. Nash; R. Nawrodt; J. Nelson; G. Newton; E. Nishida; A. Nishizawa; J. O'Dell; B. O'Reilly; R. O'Shaughnessy; E. Ochsner; G. H. Ogin; R. Oldenburg; D. J. Ottaway; R. S. Ottens; H. Overmier; B. J. Owen; A. Page; Y. Pan; C. Pankow; M. A. Papa; P. Patel; D. Pathak; M. Pedraza; L. Pekowsky; S. Penn; C. Peralta; A. Perreca; M. Pickenpack; I. M. Pinto; M. Pitkin; H. J. Pletsch; M. V. Plissi; F. Postiglione; M. Principe; R. Prix; L. Prokhorov; O. Puncken; V. Quetschke; F. J. Raab; D. S. Rabeling; H. Radkins; P. Raffai; Z. Raics; M. Rakhmanov; V. Raymond; C. M. Reed; T. Reed; H. Rehbein; S. Reid; D. H. Reitze; R. Riesen; K. Riles; P. Roberts; N. A. Robertson; C. Robinson; E. L. Robinson; S. Roddy; C. Rver; J. Rollins; J. D. Romano; J. H. Romie; S. Rowan; A. Rdiger; K. Ryan; S. Sakata; L. Sammut; L. Sancho de la Jordana; V. Sandberg; V. Sannibale; L. Santamara; G. Santostasi; S. Saraf; P. Sarin; B. S. Sathyaprakash; S. Sato; M. Satterthwaite; P. R. Saulson; R. Savage; R. Schilling

2010-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

29

VLT observations of the Central Compact Object in the Vela Jr. supernova remnant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

X-ray observations have unveiled the existence of enigmatic point-like sources at the center of young (a few kyrs) supernova remnants. These sources, known as Central Compact Objects (CCOs), are thought to be neutron stars produced by the supernova explosion, although their X-ray phenomenology makes them markedly different from all the other young neutron stars discovered so far.The aim of this work is to search for the optical/IR counterpart of the Vela Junior CCO and to understand the nature of the associated Halpha nebula discovered by Pellizzoni et al. (2002).}{We have used deep optical (R band) and IR (J,H,Ks bands) observations recently performed by our group with the ESO VLT to obtain the first deep, high resolution images of the field with the goal of resolving the nebula structure and pinpointing a point-like source possibly associated with the neutron star.Our R-band image shows that both the nebula's flux and its structure are very similar to the Halpha ones, suggesting that the nebula spectrum is dominated by pure Halpha line emission. However, the nebula is not detected in our IR observations, whick makes it impossible to to constrain its spectrum. A faint point-like object (J>22.6, H~21.6, Ks ~ 21.4) compatible with the neutron star's Chandra X-ray position is detected in our IR images (H and Ks) but not in the optical one (R > 25.6), where it is buried by the nebula background. The nebula is most likely a bow-shock produced by the neutron star motion through the ISM or, alternatively, a photo-ionization nebula powered by UV radiation from a hot neutron star.

R. P. Mignani; A. De Luca; S. Zaggia; D. Sester; A. Pellizzoni; S. Mereghetti; P. A. Caraveo

2007-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

30

SHORT-TERM VARIABILITY OF X-RAYS FROM ACCRETING NEUTRON STAR VELA X-1. I. SUZAKU OBSERVATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have analyzed the time variability of the wide-band X-ray spectrum of Vela X-1, the brightest wind-fed accreting neutron star, on a short timescale of 2 ks by using Suzaku observations with an exposure of 100 ks. During the observation, the object showed strong variability, including several flares and so-called 'low states', in which the X-ray luminosity decreases by an order of magnitude. Although the spectral hardness increases with the X-ray luminosity, the majority of the recorded flares do not show any significant changes in circumstellar absorption. However, a sign of heavy absorption was registered immediately before one short flare that showed a significant spectral hardening. In the low states, the flux level is modulated with the pulsar spin period, indicating that even at this state the accretion flow reaches the close proximity of the neutron star. Phenomenologically, the broadband X-ray spectra, which are integrated over the entire spin phase, are well represented by the 'NPEX' function (a combination of negative and positive power laws with an exponential cutoff by a common folding energy) with a cyclotron resonance scattering feature at 50 keV. Fitting of the data allowed us to infer a correlation between the photon index and X-ray luminosity. Finally, the circumstellar absorption shows a gradual increase in the orbital phase interval 0.25-0.3, which can be interpreted as an impact of a bow shock imposed by the motion of the compact object in the supersonic stellar wind.

Odaka, Hirokazu; Khangulyan, Dmitry; Watanabe, Shin; Takahashi, Tadayuki [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan)] [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Tanaka, Yasuyuki T. [Hiroshima Astrophysical Science Center, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan)] [Hiroshima Astrophysical Science Center, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Makishima, Kazuo [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)] [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

31

The Off-Site Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs: Assessing Potential Environmental Liabilities through an Examination of Proposed Nuclear Projects,High Explosive Experiments, and High Explosive Construction Activities Volume 3 of 3  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the results of nearly six years (2002-2008) of historical research and field studies concerned with evaluating potential environmental liabilities associated with U.S. Atomic Energy Commission projects from the Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs. The Plowshare Program's primary purpose was to develop peaceful uses for nuclear explosives. The Vela Uniform Program focused on improving the capability of detecting, monitoring and identifying underground nuclear detonations. As a result of the Project Chariot site restoration efforts in the early 1990s, there were concerns that there might be other project locations with potential environmental liabilities. The Desert Research Institute conducted archival research to identify projects, an analysis of project field activities, and completed field studies at locations where substantial fieldwork had been undertaken for the projects. Although the Plowshare and Vela Uniform nuclear projects are well known, the projects that are included in this research are relatively unknown. They are proposed nuclear projects that were not executed, proposed and executed high explosive experiments, and proposed and executed high explosive construction activities off the Nevada Test Site. The research identified 170 Plowshare and Vela Uniform off-site projects and many of these had little or no field activity associated with them. However, there were 27 projects that merited further investigation and field studies were conducted at 15 locations.

Beck Colleen M.,Edwards Susan R.,King Maureen L.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

The Off-Site Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs: Assessing Potential Environmental Liabilities through an Examination of Proposed Nuclear Projects,High Explosive Experiments, and High Explosive Construction Activities Volume 2 of 3  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the results of nearly six years (2002-2008) of historical research and field studies concerned with evaluating potential environmental liabilities associated with U.S. Atomic Energy Commission projects from the Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs. The Plowshare Program's primary purpose was to develop peaceful uses for nuclear explosives. The Vela Uniform Program focused on improving the capability of detecting, monitoring and identifying underground nuclear detonations. As a result of the Project Chariot site restoration efforts in the early 1990s, there were concerns that there might be other project locations with potential environmental liabilities. The Desert Research Institute conducted archival research to identify projects, an analysis of project field activities, and completed field studies at locations where substantial fieldwork had been undertaken for the projects. Although the Plowshare and Vela Uniform nuclear projects are well known, the projects that are included in this research are relatively unknown. They are proposed nuclear projects that were not executed, proposed and executed high explosive experiments, and proposed and executed high explosive construction activities off the Nevada Test Site. The research identified 170 Plowshare and Vela Uniform off-site projects and many of these had little or no field activity associated with them. However, there were 27 projects that merited further investigation and field studies were conducted at 15 locations.

Beck Colleen M.,Edwards Susan R.,King Maureen L.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

The Off-Site Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs: Assessing Potential Environmental Liabilities through an Examination of Proposed Nuclear Projects,High Explosive Experiments, and High Explosive Construction Activities Volume 1 of 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents the results of nearly six years (2002-2008) of historical research and field studies concerned with evaluating potential environmental liabilities associated with U.S. Atomic Energy Commission projects from the Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs. The Plowshare Program's primary purpose was to develop peaceful uses for nuclear explosives. The Vela Uniform Program focused on improving the capability of detecting, monitoring and identifying underground nuclear detonations. As a result of the Project Chariot site restoration efforts in the early 1990s, there were concerns that there might be other project locations with potential environmental liabilities. The Desert Research Institute conducted archival research to identify projects, an analysis of project field activities, and completed field studies at locations where substantial fieldwork had been undertaken for the projects. Although the Plowshare and Vela Uniform nuclear projects are well known, the projects that are included in this research are relatively unknown. They are proposed nuclear projects that were not executed, proposed and executed high explosive experiments, and proposed and executed high explosive construction activities off the Nevada Test Site. The research identified 170 Plowshare and Vela Uniform off-site projects and many of these had little or no field activity associated with them. However, there were 27 projects that merited further investigation and field studies were conducted at 15 locations.

Beck Colleen M,Edwards Susan R.,King Maureen L.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

REANALYSIS OF DATA TAKEN BY THE CANGAROO 3.8 METER IMAGING ATMOSPHERIC CHERENKOV TELESCOPE: PSR B1706-44, SN 1006, AND VELA  

SciTech Connect

We have reanalyzed data from observations of PSR B1706-44, SN 1006, and the Vela pulsar region made with the CANGAROO 3.8 m Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescope between 1993 and 1998 in response to the results reported for these sources by the H.E.S.S. Collaboration. Although detections of TeV gamma-ray emission from these sources were claimed by CANGAROO more than 10 years ago, upper limits to the TeV gamma-ray signals from PSR B1706-44 and SN 1006 derived by H.E.S.S. are about an order of magnitude lower. The H.E.S.S. group detected strong diffuse TeV gamma-ray emission from Vela but with a morphology differing from the CANGAROO result. In our reanalysis, in which gamma-ray selection criteria have been determined exclusively using gamma-ray simulations and OFF-source data as background samples, no significant TeV gamma-ray signals have been detected from compact regions around PSR B1706-44 or within the northeast rim of SN 1006. The upper limits to the integral gamma-ray fluxes at the 95% confidence level have been estimated for the 1993 data of PSR B1706-44 to be F(>3.2 {+-} 1.6 TeV) < 8.03 x 10{sup -13} photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, for the 1996 and 1997 data of SN 1006 to be F(>3.0 {+-} 1.5 TeV) < 1.20 x 10{sup -12} photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} and F(>1.8 {+-} 0.9 TeV) < 1.96 x 10{sup -12} photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, respectively. We discuss reasons why the original analyses gave the source detections. The reanalysis did result in a TeV gamma-ray signal from the Vela pulsar region at the 4.5{sigma} level using 1993, 1994, and 1995 data. The excess was located at the same position, 0.{sup 0}13 to the southeast of the Vela pulsar, as that reported in the original analysis. We have investigated the effect of the acceptance distribution in the field of view of the 3.8 m telescope, which rapidly decreases toward the edge of the field of the camera, on the detected gamma-ray morphology. The expected excess distribution for the 3.8 m telescope has been obtained by reweighting the distribution of HESS J0835-455 measured by H.E.S.S. with the acceptance of the 3.8 m telescope. The result is morphologically comparable to the CANGAROO excess distribution, although the profile of the acceptance-reweighted H.E.S.S. distribution is more diffuse than that of CANGAROO. The integral gamma-ray flux from HESS J0835-455 has been estimated for the same region as defined by H.E.S.S. from the 1993-1995 data of CANGAROO to be F(>4.0 {+-} 1.6 TeV) = (3.28 {+-} 0.92) x 10{sup -12} photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, which is statistically consistent with the integral flux obtained by H.E.S.S.

Yoshikoshi, T.; Mori, M. [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Edwards, P. G. [Narrabri Observatory, Australia Telescope National Facility, CSIRO, Narrabri, NSW 2390 (Australia); Gunji, S. [Department of Physics, Yamagata University, Yamagata, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Hara, S. [Ibaraki Prefectural University of Health Sciences, Ami, Ibaraki 300-0394 (Japan); Hara, T.; Naito, T. [Faculty of Management Information, Yamanashi Gakuin University, Kofu, Yamanashi 400-8575 (Japan); Kawachi, A.; Nishijima, K. [Department of Physics, Tokai University, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan); Mizumoto, Y. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Tanimori, T. [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Thornton, G. J. [School of Chemistry and Physics, University of Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Yoshida, T. [Faculty of Science, Ibaraki University, Mito, Ibaraki 310-8512 (Japan)], E-mail: tyoshiko@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

A CR-hydro-NEI Model of Multi-wavelength Emission from the Vela Jr. Supernova Remnant (SNR RX J0852.0-4622)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Based largely on energy budget considerations and the observed cosmic-ray (CR) ionic composition, supernova remnant (SNR) blast waves are the most likely sources of CR ions with energies at least up to the "knee" near 3 PeV. Shocks in young shell-type TeV-bright SNRs are surely producing TeV particles, but the emission could be dominated by ions producing neutral pion-decay emission or electrons producing inverse-Compton gamma-rays. Unambiguously identifying the GeV-TeV emission process in a particular SNR will not only help pin down the origin of CRs, it will add significantly to our understanding of the diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) mechanism and improve our understanding of supernovae and the impact SNRs have on the circumstellar medium. In this study, we investigate the Vela Jr. SNR, an example of TeV-bright non-thermal SNRs. We perform hydrodynamic simulations coupled with non-linear DSA and non-equilibrium ionization near the forward shock (FS) to confront currently available multi-wavelength data....

Lee, Shiu-Hang; Ellison, Donald C; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Patnaude, Daniel J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Fermi LAT Detection of Pulsed Gamma-Rays From the Vela-Like Pulsars PSR J1048-5832 and PSR J2229+6114  

SciTech Connect

We report the detection of {gamma}-ray pulsations ({ge}0.1 GeV) from PSR J2229+6114 and PSR J1048-5832, the latter having been detected as a low-significance pulsar by EGRET. Data in the {gamma}-ray band were acquired by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, while the radio rotational ephemerides used to fold the {gamma}-ray light curves were obtained using the Green Bank Telescope, the Lovell telescope at Jodrell Bank, and the Parkes Telescope. The two young radio pulsars, located within the error circles of the previously unidentified EGRET sources 3EG J1048-5840 and 3EG J2227+6122, present spin-down characteristics similar to the Vela pulsar. PSR J1048-5832 shows two sharp peaks at phases 0.15 {+-} 0.01 and 0.57 {+-} 0.01 relative to the radio pulse confirming the EGRET light curve, while PSR J2229+6114 presents a very broad peak at phase 0.49 {+-} 0.01. The {gamma}-ray spectra above 0.1 GeV of both pulsars are fit with power laws having exponential cutoffs near 3 GeV, leading to integral photon fluxes of (2.19 {+-} 0.22 {+-} 0.32) x 10{sup -7} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} for PSR J1048-5832 and (3.77 {+-} 0.22 {+-} 0.44) x 10{sup -7} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} for PSR J2229+6114. The first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. PSR J1048-5832 is one of the two LAT sources which were entangled together as 3EG J1048-5840. These detections add to the growing number of young {gamma}-ray pulsars that make up the dominant population of GeV {gamma}-ray sources in the Galactic plane.

Abdo, A.A.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /Federal City Coll.; Ackermann, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Ajello, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Atwood, W.B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Axelsson, M.; /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Barbiellini, G.; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Baring, M.G.; /Rice U.; Bastieri, D.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Baughman, B.M.; /Ohio State U.; Bechtol, K.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, B.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bloom, E.D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bonamente, E.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Borgland, A.W.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bregeon, J.; /INFN, Pisa; Brez, A.; /INFN, Pisa; Brigida, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Bruel, P.; /Ecole Polytechnique /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Columbia U. /IASF, Milan /Milan Polytechnic /DAPNIA, Saclay /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /George Mason U. /NASA, Goddard /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /LPCE, Orleans /Montpellier U. /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC /INFN, Trieste /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /UC, Santa Cruz /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /CENBG, Gradignan /CENBG, Gradignan /Montpellier U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /INFN, Trieste /Arecibo Observ. /Hiroshima U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /INFN, Bari /NASA, Goddard /Maryland U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; /more authors..

2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

37

Grady County, Georgia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

County, Georgia: Energy Resources County, Georgia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 30.9050079°, -84.2278796° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.9050079,"lon":-84.2278796,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

38

Grady County, Oklahoma: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2°, -97.87216° 2°, -97.87216° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.0472662,"lon":-97.87216,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

39

Critical Infrastructure Protection Project Dean Mark F. Grady ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... have taken years to solve. Eg, mass city fires; steam boiler explosions; highway traffic safety; clean air, clean water, etc. ...

2007-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

40

Patricia A . Grady, Ph .D ., R .N . Ph.D.: (Physiology)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.A.: (Human Biology) Stanford University, 1977 RESEARCH INTERESTS Optimizing the use of data from clinical's College, Notre Dame, IN, 1969 RESEARCH INTERESTS Human genetics, molecular genet- ics, genomics; ethical include more human health relevance through doctorate-level research in cellular and molecular studies

Bandettini, Peter A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "grady cle vela" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

ChroniCleA weekly digest of news from ChroniCle online: www.news.cornell.edu August 20, 2010 The freshman class at Cornell is "incredibly  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Roberts, Tyler E. 2000 Burnham, Chelsea A. 2000 Rowan, Charles A. 2000 Cooper, David A. 2000 Shell, David

Keinan, Alon

42

NNSA Commemorates 50th Anniversary of First Vela Launch | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

include the first measurements that lead to the discovery of naturally occurring gamma ray bursts, data on trapped radiation within the Earth's magnetosphere, and data on major...

43

Cle Elum Lake Anadromous Salmon Restoration Feasibility Study: Summary of Research, 1986-1999 Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The focus of this research was to study the feasibility for anadromous salmonids to recolonize the habitat above reservoirs in the Yakima River without disruption to irrigation withdrawals. A primary concern was whether anadromous fish could successfully exit reservoirs and survive downstream passage through the Yakima and Columbia Rivers to the ocean.

Dey, Douglas

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility : Monthly Progress Report : December 1, 2008 - December 31, 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

FISH PRODUCTION: Brood year 2008 production and experimental hatchery & supplemental crossed eggs continue to be incubated and chilled water at 380 Fahrenheit for the month. Temperature units are {approx}960 TU's at the end of the month. Hatching was observed at {approx}900 temperature units (TU's). The 2007 Brood year (BY) has approximately 773,477 juveniles on hand at the end of December, averaging 30.6 fish per pound. Fish tagging operations wrapped up on the 5th. Transportation of fish to acclimation sites is tentatively scheduled to begin January 12th. FISH CULTURE: Production pond cleaning continues on a weekly basis, and feeding continues to be performed two days per week due to the colder river water temperatures. Eggs in the incubation continue to be tempered in 38 degree water and temperature units recorded daily. On the 20th the river became too inclement for normal operations as the intake screens were covered with ice, at that time we shutdown two river pumps and turned on wells four and six to get 6,825 gallons of water. This was the operation at the facility for twenty-four hours at which point we were able to get back to normal operations. WATER PRODUCTION: The current combined well and river water supply to the complex is 14,756 gallons/min. The river pumps are supplying 13,571 gallons per minute. Well pumps No.2 and No.4 are operating and supplying 1,185 gallons/min. More on well pumps in the well field maintenance section of this report. ACCLIMATION SITES: Preparation of acclimation sites for fish transfer was the main focus for the month of December. Each week thermographs that record water temperature have the data disc changed at the acclimations sites. Ford Excavation with assistance from YKFP maintenance has started clearing snow out of the Easton acclimation site. VEHICLE MAINTENANCE: The snowmobiles were taken in to have annual maintenance performed. The full-size John Deere tractor needed and was taken to Barnet Implement in Yakima. The tractor needed a new clutch installed and was picked up on the 31st. SHOP BUILDING MAINTENANCE: On the 12th the facility domestic water hydro pneumatic tank and its system malfunctioned. The problem persisted and had to be dealt with multiple times; first it caused the tank to over flow and floods the shop. Wallace Electric was called and after extensive monitoring of the tank, compressor and electrical operations an electrical relay switch was replaced. Weekly cleaning and tool inventory continues to be a priority. The shop is home to our liberation truck along with fish transfer equipment, fish pump and seine nets. ELECTRICAL BUILDING MAINTENANCE: The large generator is located in the electrical building and is checked daily for routine inspections. HATCHERY BUILDING MAINTENANCE: The incubation building is being used to clean and repair isolation buckets, egg incubation baskets and troughs. An experiment involving remote site incubators (RSI's) continued through the month. Chad Stockton, WDFW, records flows and monitors emergence of fry on a daily basis. Chad is working with Steve S. and Curt K. on the RSI's research along with spawning channel fry emergence. RIVERWATER COOLING FACILITY: The one pump in operation in this building is checked daily during our routine inspections, the variable pump is supplying water to the artificial spawning channel. RIVER PUMP STATION MAINTENANCE: All four river pumps are in operation and pumping {approx}13,571 gallons/min to the facility. The building is cleaned monthly and the air burst system is cycled daily during the morning checks. The crew continued weekly changing of the graph paper on the river temperature thermograph throughout the month, continuing this activity as part of the daily checks routine. WELL FIELD MAINTENANCE: Wells No.1 and No.4 were in operation and supplying 1,185 gallons/minute to the facility and incubation building. Weekly test well readings are recorded and sent via fax to CH2MHILL. Also weekly well meter readings are recorded. Well No.5 had been determined to have a faulty drain valve while tryin

Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility

2009-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

45

ChroniCleA weekly digest of news from ChroniCle online: www.news.cornell.edu April 15, 2011 Former New York City mayor and former Repub-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and likely to heat up the planet more than mining and burning coal. the neW yorK tiMes, aPriL 11 Siphoned global warming than mining coal, according to a Cornell study published in the May issue of Climatic, conventional gas, coal (surface- mined and deep-mined) and diesel oil, taking into account direct emissions

Keinan, Alon

46

ChroniCleA weekly digest of news from ChroniCle online: www.news.cornell.edu noVeMBer 5, 2010 Achieving a sustainable world will require  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is constantly at odds over trade, interest rates and currency, won't be of much help, especially if it means Outreach and Education ... theCommunityLearningandSer- vice Partnership ­ will be incorpo- rated into other. Lang '72, George Lowery, Krishna Ramanujan, Bill Steele '54 and Joe Wilensky Address: 312 College Ave

Keinan, Alon

47

Materials Sustainability: Digital Resource Center - Guides for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 9, 2008 ... Diana Grady Posts: 163. Joined: 11/14/2007. Educational Resource Edited: 7/9/ 2008 at 10:15 AM by Diana Grady. Comment on Posting...

48

EIS-1069-SA-07: Supplement Analysis  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Yakima/Kilickitat Fisheries Project, Noxious Weed Control at Cle Elum and Jack Creek, Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility and Jack Creek Acclimation Site, Kittitas County, Washington

49

Certificateless Encryption Schemes Strongly Secure in the Standard ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

encryption (CLE) schemes that are provably secure against strong adver- ... of a number of alternative security models for CLE that are substantially weaker.

50

EIS-0169-SA-08: Supplement Analysis  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project, Boone Pond Acclimation Site, Cle Elum, Kittitas County, Washington

51

About the Cover Welcome to our Space Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a leading role. From the first nuclear nonproliferation satellites, Vela Hotel, to the modern Global

52

Designing a Large-Scale Federal Greenhouse Gas Offsets Program in the United States: Policy Choices and Lessons Learned from the Cle an Development Mechanism and Other Offsets Programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

If the United States decides to take broader action in the future to mitigate climate change, policy discussions may once again focus on development of a greenhouse gas (GHG) cap-and-trade program combined with development of a large-scale GHG emissions offsets program. The compliance flexibility offered by these programs, and the economic incentives they create to identify and implement low-cost compliance options, have the potential to reduce significantly the costs to achieve significant emissions lim...

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

53

AwardWinnersByCategoryProject_NoOrg  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bena Roland Bustos Kathleen Gruetzmacher Randy Lucero Rick Martinez Steven Myers Paul Newberry Pat O'Grady Mike Romero Lucas Trujillo Honorable Mention Award Nominated by Connie...

54

NBS TECHNICAL NOTE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... (The corresponding gradi~nts were measured in ... Therefore it was necessary to test the spatial plans for ... Because of the length of the tests, we had to ...

2008-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

55

Materials Sustainability: Digital Resource Center Text Topic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Date Posted: 6/26/2008 9:01 AM Posted By: Diana Grady. This article describes metal production from primary and secondary resources, recovering metals from ...

56

Materials Sustainability: Digital Resource Center -- Recycling ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sustainability and Nickel Wepage that describes the sustainability challenges for nickel and nickel-containing materials. 0, 557, Diana Grady, 7/2/2008 9:23 AM

57

Recycling - Nickel-based superalloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A business and technology perspective on recycling, partiularly recycling of household waste, metals and plastics. 0, 563, Diana Grady, 7/2/2008 9:55 AM

58

Step-by-Step Instructions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brantley Colquitt Grady Miller Ware Brooks Cook Jeff Davis Mitchell Wayne Windows Insulation Foundation Fenestration U-Factor Skylight U-Factor Glazed Fenestration SHGC Ceiling...

59

Managed by UT-Battelle for the Department of Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuels, Isotopes, and Nuclear Materials Bob Wham Thermal Hydraulics and Irradiation Engineering Grady Nuclear Data Mike Dunn Fuels, Isotopes, and Nuclear Materials Bob Wham Thermal Hydraulics and Irradiation

Pennycook, Steve

60

Gamma-Ray Bursts Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, 1963  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lecture 18 Gamma-Ray Bursts #12;Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, 1963 First Vela satellite pair launched and their predecessors, Vela 4, discovered the first gamma-ray bursts. The discovery was announced by Klebesadel, Strong, and Olson (ApJ, 182, 85) in 1973. #12;First Gamma-Ray Burst The Vela 5 satellites functioned from July, 1969

Harrison, Thomas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "grady cle vela" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY GEOLOGY STUDIES Volume 26, Part 4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to )/( nmn + & . This result is in agreement with experimental data of oil shale (Grady et al., 1980, 1972, p. 129-140. Grady D.E., Kipp M.E., « Continuum Modeling of Explosive Fracture in Oil Shale », Int

Seamons, Kent E.

62

The Free Radicals of Tort  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

usually both parties are free radicals, and they are jointlyTHE FREE RADICALS OF TORT Mark F. Grady * Copyright 20041970). See id. at 847. The Free Radicals of Tort can travel

Grady, Mark F.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Materials Sustainability: Digital Resource Center Text Topic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Date Posted: 7/1/2008 12:54 PM Posted By: Diana Grady. This presentation was part of a symposium on Materials and Critical Societal Issues held during the...

64

The Holarctic Hacklemesh Spider Genus Callobius (Araneae: Amaurobiidae): Morphology, Systematics, and Population Biology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Structuring. Systematic Biology, 57: 628-646. ? Bonnet, P.likelihood. Systematic Biology. 52: 696-704. ? Harden, D. R.O'Grady 2007 Drosophila Biology in the Genomic Age. Genetics

Lew, Stephen Ellis

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Contacts for the Office of Administrative Operations | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

erie.mills@hq.doe.gov Claude Barnes, Management Analyst 202-586-2957 Dorothy Cofield, Computer Technician 202-586-9525 Robert Grady, Computer Technician 202-586-9525 Diane Himes,...

66

LINGUISTIQUE Facult des arts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gardé les idiomes romans. C'est l'origine de la frontière linguistique. A partir du IXe siècle, des

Petriu, Emil M.

67

Demographic Patterns in the Missions of Central Baja California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

missionary Cle- mente Guillen, S. J. , removed the missionchanged the name to Dolores. Guillen also moved the Indiansto the new establishment (Guillen Ms. 1744). Beyond those

Jackson, Robert H

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

A Small Submarine Robot for Experiments in Underwater Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Development of Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs); AA Solar Powered Autonomous Underwater Vehi- cle System,The Phoenix Autonomous Underwater Vehicle, chapter 13, AI-

V. Bokser; C. Oberg; G. Sukhatme; A. Requicha

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

LA THEORIE LINGUISTIQUE ET LE DISCOURS ECONOMIQUE SAVAS KILIC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dans la pensée italienne, les noms tels que Verri, Solera, Tamburini et Giordiani et, au 18e siècle

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

70

70 Years of Innovations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

tests? Hydrodynamics simulations on PHERMEX. Mock nuclear explosions x x 1963 GAMMA-RAY BURSTS Designed and built to warn of banned nuclear tests, our Vela satellite...

71

Preaching Sex: Gender and Official Church Discourses in Mexico City, 1720-1875  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

his heroic resistance to same-gender sexual advances and hisaudiences accustomed to the gender-flexible discourses oftenof the Vela Perpetua: Gender, Religion, and Political

Witschorik II, Charles Arthur

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Nonproliferation through delegation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of The Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty. Washington,Considerations of a Nuclear- Test Ban. In Arms Control,The VELA Incident: nuclear test or meteoriod? : National

Brown, Robert Louis

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Radiations from nuclear weapons - signal detectors - NASA program information  

SciTech Connect

This letter is for the purpose of supplying the information that you requested at the meeting of the sub-committee on Project Vela. It is divided into three parts: (1) Radiations from nuclear weapons; (2) Backgrounds for Vela Signal Detectors; (3) Discussion of the NASA program.

White, R. S.

1960-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

74

ERCOT Wind Scraper | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » ERCOT Wind Scraper Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: ERCOT Wind Scraper Agency/Company /Organization: Prof. Mack Grady, Baylor University Sector: Energy Focus Area: Wind Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: web.ecs.baylor.edu/faculty/grady/ OpenEI Keyword(s): Community Generated ERCOT Wind Scraper Screenshot References: W. Mack Grady[1] ERCOT Wind Scraper retrieves, displays, and logs minute-by-minute system generation, load, and wind generation from ERCOT's public web site. ERCOT Wind Scraper retrieves, displays, and logs minute-by-minute system generation, load, and wind generation from ERCOT's public web site. Instructions are included in a zipped file along with the program.

75

X:\\ARM_19~1\\P397-400.WPD  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

" P cle P lay , , S S A s , P St ( ), P Cu ( ) 80 , Session Papers 397 (1) Absorption of Solar Radiation in Broken Clouds V. E. Zuev, G. A. Titov, and T. B. Zhuravleva Institute...

76

Sandia National Laboratories: About Sandia: History  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Navy subsequently contracted with Sandia for the Mark 3 reentry body for the Poseidon Missile. 1963 The Vela satellites, with Sandia-designed optical sensors as well as data...

77

shoal.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

mining provide the dominant commercial interests. The Project Shoal underground nuclear test was part of the Vela Uniform program sponsored jointly by the U.S Department of Defense...

78

Los Alamos in SPACE | National Security Science Magazine | Los...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the farthest object in the universe ever observed, thought to be a giant star. Gamma-ray bursts, also discovered by Los Alamos instruments on Vela, continue to provide deep...

79

Eclipse Distilled (Eclipse)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Eclipse DistilledDavid CarlsonForeword by Grady BoochSeries EditorsErich Gamma Lee Nackman John WiegandA Concise Introduction to Eclipse for the Productive ProgrammerOrganized for rapid access, focused on productivity, Eclipse Distilled brings together ...

David Carlson

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

EIS-0169-SA-02: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EIS-0169-SA-02: Supplement Analysis EIS-0169-SA-02: Supplement Analysis EIS-0169-SA-02: Supplement Analysis Yakima Fisheries Project-Natural Spawning Channels, Increased On-site Housing, and Upgrades to the Prosser Hatchery. Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility, Cle Elum, Washington The Yakima Fisheries Project is co-managed by the Yakama Nation (YN) and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). The project consists of the collection of salmonid broodstock, incubation of eggs and rearing of fry in hatcheries, the acclimation and release of smolts, and related ecological studies in the study of natural production. DOE/EIS-0169-SA-02: Supplement Analysis for Yakima Fisheries Project-Natural Spawning Channels, Increased On-site Housing, and Upgrades to the Prosser Hatchery. Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "grady cle vela" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

CX-006312: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Categorical Exclusion Determination 2: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006312: Categorical Exclusion Determination Small-Scale Spring Chinook and Coho Reintroduction CX(s) Applied: B1.20 Date: 07/21/2011 Location(s): Cle Elum, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to allow the use of excess Cle Elum Hatchery supplementation line (S-line) spring Chinook adults and coho adults in a reintroduction program in habitat above Cle Elum Dam. BPA currently funds the propagation of these spring Chinook and coho salmon. BPA?s Yakima Fisheries Project Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) (DOE/EIS-0169, January 1996) anticipated that excess returning hatchery adults would be culled and landfilled or used as fertilizer. Instead, the returning adult hatchery-origin spring Chinook and coho salmon would be

82

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Power  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

P Q R S P Q R S T U V W X Y Z O'Connor, Mary (Mary O'Connor) - Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia O'Donnell, Sean (Sean O'Donnell) - Department of Biology, Drexel University O'Driscoll, Michael. A. -Department of Geological Sciences, East Carolina Universit('Driscoll, Michael. A. -Department of Geological Sciences, East Carolina Universi)ty O'Driscoll, Nelson (Nelson O'Driscoll) - Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Acadia University O'Gorman, Paul (Paul O'Gorman) - Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) O'Grady, Patrick M. (Patrick M. O'Grady) - Department of Environmental Science Policy and Management, University of California at Berkeley O'Laughlin, Jay (Jay O'Laughlin) - Department of Forest Resources,

83

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Computer  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

P Q R S P Q R S T U V W X Y Z O'Brien, Eamonn (Eamonn O'Brien) - Department of Mathematics, University of Auckland O'Brien, Timothy E. (Timothy E. O'Brien) - Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Loyola University Chicago O'Bryant, Kevin (Kevin O'Bryant) - Department of Mathematics, College of Staten Island, City University of New York O'Connell, Neil (Neil O'Connell) - Mathematics Institute, University of Warwick O'Grady, Kieran G. (Kieran G. O'Grady) - Dipartimento di Matematica, Università di Roma "La Sapienza" O'Hagan, Tony (Tony O'Hagan) - Centre for Bayesian Statistics in Health Economics & Department of Probability and Statistics, University of Sheffield O'Leary, Michael (Michael O'Leary) - Department of Mathematics, Towson University

84

Prepared in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy DOE/ID-22192  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AHEZ, Ayuntamiento, Indios, Caja 1, Exp. 06. 24 John LYNCH, Las revoluciones hispanoamericanas, 1808 tableau de l'Amérique coloniale à la fin du XVIIIième siècle, John Lynch cite ainsi l'exemple de la vive

85

SWEIS Yearbook --2000 LA-UR-01-2965  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Indios, Caja 1, Exp. 06. 24 John LYNCH, Las revoluciones hispanoamericanas, 1808-1826, Barcelon, ArielAmérique coloniale à la fin du XVIIIième siècle, John Lynch cite ainsi lexemple de la vive réaction du cabildo de

86

UNIVERSIT PARIS OUEST NANTERRE LA DFENSE cole doctorale Milieux, cultures et socits du pass et du prsent  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AHEZ, Ayuntamiento, Indios, Caja 1, Exp. 06. 24 John LYNCH, Las revoluciones hispanoamericanas, 1808 tableau de l'Amérique coloniale à la fin du XVIIIième siècle, John Lynch cite ainsi l'exemple de la vive

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

87

AUTHORS AND ACKNOWLEDGMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By acceptance of thlsart!cle. thepubl!sher recognizes that the US Government retains anonexcluslve, royalty-free l)cense topubl!sh or reproduce thepublSheCl form of this contnbutton. or to allOw others to do so, for U.S Government purposes.

R. Irel; J. Ireland; J. Sapir; G. Farnum; G. Russel; W. Sommer; W. Rider; B. Krohil; W. Wilson; R. Perry; R. Labauve; P. Lisowslci; E. Arthur; L. Linford; R. Manzanares; K. Ames; G. Mirabal

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 6, 211223, 2006 www.atmos-chem-phys.org/acp/6/211/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

metal source, ferrous metal source, gasoline vehi- cle, diesel vehicle, copper smelter and volcanic). The diesel vehicle source contributed the most in the ultra-fine size range (0.070.56 µm) and was responsible of the westerly wind latitude region of northeast Asia, many studies on the influence of long-range transport (LRT

Meskhidze, Nicholas

89

generation of renewable energy tech-nologies, now coupled with market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Geller, Energy Revolution: Policies for a Sustainable Future (Island, Washington, DC, 2003). 3. PA generation of renewable energy tech- nologies, now coupled with market mechanisms that make them with the deregulation of energy markets, as well as the California energy crisis, the Enron energy deba- cle

Kammen, Daniel M.

90

InvenTcl: Interpretive 3D graphics using Open Inventor and Tcl/[incr Tcl  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

InvenTcl: Interpretive 3D graphics using Open Inventor and Tcl/[incr Tcl] Sidney Fels, Silvio Esser development consists of a program/compile/debug iteration cy- cle. This paper introduces InvenTcl which is an in- terpretive version of Open Inventor using Tcl/Tk [4] and [incr Tcl] [3]. The advantages of InvenTcl

British Columbia, University of

91

InvenTcl: Interpretive 3D graphics using Open Inventor and Tcl/[incr Tcl  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

InvenTcl: Interpretive 3D graphics using Open Inventor and Tcl/[incr Tcl] Sidney Fels, Silvio Esser development consists of a program/compile/debug iteration cy­ cle. This paper introduces InvenTcl which is an in­ terpretive version of Open Inventor using Tcl/Tk [4] and [incr Tcl] [3]. The advantages of InvenTcl

Fels, Sidney S.

92

A review of biomass integrated-gasifier/gas turbine combined cycle technology and its  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A review of biomass integrated-gasifier/gas turbine combined cycle technology and its application Copersucar, CP 162, Piracicaba, SP ­ Brazil ­ 13400-970 Biomass integrated-gasifier/gas turbine combined-from-sugarcane program. 1. Introduction The biomass integrated-gasifier/gas turbine combined cy- cle (BIG

93

An Assessment of Loop Detector and RTMS Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ec or y time i eh V cle TTR TTL OTR (B) RTMS Response on offon off time Figure 13-1, TTR/TTL, for 31,000 samples with aedge ratio Figure 13-2, TTR/TTL, for 79,000 samples with a

Coifman, Benjamin

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

BIBLIOGRAPHIC DATA SHEET (See instructions on the reverse)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.on shielding, radiography, medical physics, cri.cality safety, nuclear oil well logging, isotope produc.on, accelerator target design, fission and fusion reactor design, and decontamina.on and decommissioning of nuclear facili.es. The goal of this effort is to define a neutralpar.cle (n, ) MC package tailored

95

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Offica of the Under Secretary for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cans Lirc t j.cle i'ias too hi;ii for f'*rther search so the Ijrrrty reb,.r-rnect lo tjte Str'rcre the order of 1,he ito;r,. ACr,rir*,1 .i.o,-,rirehrrcl Lo lirite rrn it'tirortlrr;t l-el,icr go vias una'nle

96

Predicting the Volume of Comments on Online News Stories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that predicts the comment volume of news articles prior to publication using five feature sets. We address Algorithms, Theory, Experimentation, Measurement Keywords Comment volume, prediction, feature engineering 1, and attempt to predict news arti- cle comment volume prior to publication time. One might raise the question

de Rijke, Maarten

97

Between MDPs and Semi-MDPs: A Framework for Temporal Abstraction in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to a distant city, as well as primitive actions such as mus- cle twitches and joint torques. Overall, we show to a distant city. To decide whether or not to go, the benefits of the trip must be weighed against the expense this ability to work flexibly with multiple overlapping time scales? Temporal abstraction has been explored

Sutton, Richard S.

98

Nuclear Chemistry Beta decay of 71,73  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

34 Nuclear Chemistry Beta decay of 71,73 Co: probing single-parti- cle states approaching doubly of primary interest are the nuclear magnetic dipole moment and nuclear electric quadrupole moment. The dipole/or neutrons in the nucleus. The dipole moment provides information on the nuclear quantum structure

Mantica, Paul F.

99

An Artificial Compressibility Method for the Spectral Difference Solution of Unsteady Incompressible  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. An artificial compressibility method (ACM) is employed in order to treat the inviscid fluxes using added with the ACM (SD-ACM) is able to accurately simulate 2D incompressible steady and unsteady viscous, such as micro air vehi- cle, wind turbine and tidal turbine blades, high-order unstructured methods become

Jameson, Antony

100

S  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

( volume 3 80 m 3 ) - Gas s tove, v ented g as c lothes d ryer - Central f orced a ir ( fan a lmost a lways o n) * Methods - Scanning M obility P ar:cle Sizer ( SMPS) w ith r ange...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "grady cle vela" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

BOOK REVIEWS 399 sults readily accessible. I believe the book  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

systems, population dynamics, or nuclear reactor physics. At least since a pioneering arti­ cle by A two­volume work devoted to the basic theory of Lie groups and Lie al­ gebras. The present volume starts out by introducing the key concepts in Lie group and Lie algebra theory. The remaining three

Kolk, Johan A.C.

102

s033.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(Error scaled by 1.6) FRABETTI 93D E687 0.7 MAHMOOD 01 CLE2 6.1 KUSHNIR... 01 SELX 0.0 LINK 02C FOCS 1.3 2 8.1 (Confidence Level 0.043) 140 160 180 200 220 240 260 280 +...

103

Tillman Creek Mitigation Site As-Build Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This as-built report describes site conditions at the Tillman Creek mitigation site in South Cle Elum, Washington. This mitigation site was constructed in 2006-2007 to compensate for wetland impacts from the Yakama Nation hatchery. This as-built report provides information on the construction sequence, as-built survey, and establishment of baseline monitoring stations.

Gresham, Doug [Otak, Inc.

2009-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

104

DOE/EIS-0169-SA-02: Supplement Analysis for Yakima Fisheries Project --Natural Spawning Channels, Increased On-site Housing and Upgrades to the Prosser Hatchery (8/16/99)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 16, 1999 August 16, 1999 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEWI-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for Yakima Fisheries Project, DOE/EIS-0169-SA-02 David Byrnes Project Manager - KEWN-4 Proposed Action: Yakima Fisheries Project - Natural Spawning Channels, Increased On-site Housing, and Upgrades to the Prosser Hatchery PL-6: F3204 Location: Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility, Cle Elum, Washington (CESRF) and Prosser Juvenile Research Facility, Prosser, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Co-Managed by the Yakama Nation (YN) and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). 1. Introduction The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is funding ongoing studies, research, and artificial production of several salmonid species in the Yakima and Klickitat river basins. BPA analyzed

105

James M. Craw, Nicholas P. Cardo, Yun (Helen) He Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mortem of the NERSC Franklin XT Mortem of the NERSC Franklin XT Upgrade to CLE 2.1 James M. Craw, Nicholas P. Cardo, Yun (Helen) He Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA craw@nersc.gov, cardo@nersc.gov, yhe@lbl.gov And Janet M. Lebens Cray, Inc. jml@cray.com May 4, 2009 Atlanta CUG This presentation will discuss the lessons learned of the events leading up to the production deployment of CLE 2.1 and the post install issues experienced in upgrading NERSC's XT4(tm) system called Franklin CUG 2008 page 2 Introduction NERSC * NERSC is a Production Computing Facility for DOE Office of Science * NERSC serves a large scientific population * Approximately 3,000 users, * 400 projects, * 500 code instances * Focus is high end computing services CUG 2008 page 3 NERSC-5 Systems

106

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 16, 2004 January 16, 2004 EIS-0246-SA-37: Supplement Analysis Wildlife Mitigation Program, On the Spokane Indian Reservation, near Wellpinit, Stevens County, Washington November 10, 2003 EIS-0349: Record of Decision Electrical Interconnection of the BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project October 2, 2003 EA-0307-SA-01: Supplement Analysis Colville Resident Trout Hatchery Project Supplement Analysis September 5, 2003 EIS-0349: Draft Environmental Impact Statement BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project July 21, 2003 EIS-0317: Record of Decision Kangley-Echo Lake Transmission Line Project July 14, 2003 EIS-1069-SA-07: Supplement Analysis Yakima/Kilickitat Fisheries Project, Noxious Weed Control at Cle Elum and Jack Creek, Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility and Jack Creek

107

WASH-  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

rcc.p,anc. 01 thts arf~cle. tha rcc.p,anc. 01 thts arf~cle. tha yubl~rhe, "r ~u~~iunl riknouu~adqnS the U.S. C;ov.rnmmnf' s rayhr (0 retam l nOn*aClulive.roy~ltV (r-0 ltconso In ma IO Dny Copvrlqhl WASH- covrrm~ the wtvdo. ISADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF THE SEAWAY INDUSTRIAL PARK W . D. Cottrell, R. W . Leggett and H. W . Dickson Health Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 December 1976 CONTENTS l&t of Tab1 es - . . . List of Illustrations . . Abstract . . . . . . Introduction . . . . ............ ............ ............ ............ Radiological Survey Techniques . . . . . . 1 . . Measurement of External Gamma and Beta-Gamma Radiation Levels . . . . . . . . . . . . Measurement of Radium in the Soil . . . . . . Measurement of Radioactivity in Surface Water

108

Supplement Analysis for Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project, Boone Pond Acclimation Site (DOE/EIS-0169-SA-08)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

April 7, 2004 April 7, 2004 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project, Boone Pond Acclimation Site (DOE/EIS-0169-SA-08) memorandum David Byrnes Project Manager - KEWL-4 TO: Proposed Action: Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project - Under the Monitoring and Evaluation Program (M&E), the coho acclimation research task would be modified to include a new site located in the upper Yakima south of Cle Elum, WA. Project No.: F3204 Location: Cle Elum, Kittitas County, Washington. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Co-Managed by the Yakama Nation (YN) and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). 1. Introduction The Yakima Fisheries Project Final Environmental Impact Statement (YFP EIS)

109

Cray XT Documentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cray XT Documentation Cray XT Documentation Cray XT Documentation & Cray XT Documentation Search Preferences | Advanced Search Home Browse Books Man Pages Glossary Platforms Cray XC30 Cray XE and Cray XK Cray XT Cray Sonexion Cray X2 Cray X1 Knowledge Base by Category by Date by Platform by Title by User Release Announcements @Twitter Cray XT System Documentation Getting Started Cray XT System Overview Cray Linux Environment (CLE) Software Release Overview Cray Linux Environment (CLE) Software Release Overview Supplement Glossary of Terms Programming Environment Cray Application Developer's Environment User's Guide Cray Compiling Environment (CCE) Cray Fortran Reference Manual crayftn man page Cray C and C++ Reference Manual craycc man page crayCC man page Intrinsic function man pages Assign environment man pages

110

Supplement Analyses (SA) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 2, 2003 October 2, 2003 EA-0307-SA-01: Supplement Analysis Colville Resident Trout Hatchery Project Supplement Analysis August 27, 2003 EIS-0246-SA-35: Supplement Analysis Wildlife Mitigation Program, seven miles east of Juntura, Oregon, Malheur County August 22, 2003 EIS-0246-SA-34: Supplement Analysis Wildlife Mitigation Program, Flathead County, Montana July 14, 2003 EIS-1069-SA-07: Supplement Analysis Yakima/Kilickitat Fisheries Project, Noxious Weed Control at Cle Elum and Jack Creek, Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility and Jack Creek Acclimation Site, Kittitas County, Washington May 21, 2003 EIS-0246-SA-33: Supplement Analysis Wildlife Mitigation Program, Flathead County, Montana May 20, 2003 EIS-0246-SA-32: Supplement Analysis Wildlife Mitigation Program

111

Microsoft Word - Spring-Chinook_CX_6.28.11.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 21, 2011 July 21, 2011 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Patricia Smith Project Manager - KEWL-4 Proposed Action: Small-scale spring Chinook and coho reintroduction Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 1995-063-25 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.20 Small-scale activities undertaken to protect, restore, or improve fish and wildlife habitat, fish passage facilities (such as fish ladders or minor diversion channels), or fisheries. Location: Cle Elum, Yakima County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to allow the use of excess Cle Elum Hatchery supplementation line (S-line) spring Chinook adults and coho adults in a reintroduction

112

Goals:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CUG 2009 Proceedings 1 of 8 CUG 2009 Proceedings 1 of 8 User and Performance Impacts from Franklin Upgrades Yun (Helen) He National Energy Research Supercomputing Center Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720 ABSTRACT: The NERSC flagship computer Cray XT4 system "Franklin" has gone through three major upgrades: quad core upgrade, CLE 2.1 upgrade, and IO upgrade, during the past year. In this paper, we will discuss the various aspects of the user impacts such as user access, user environment, and user issues etc from these upgrades. The performance impacts on the kernel benchmarks and selected application benchmarks will also be presented. KEYWORDS: Cray XT4, Franklin, NERSC, Quad Core, CLE 2.1, Application Performance, IO Performance, User Impacts.

113

Geddes_ LPAv3.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

P P lasma A ccelerator S imula0on U sing L aser a nd Par0cle B eam D rivers C.G.R. G eddes, L BNL F.S. T sung, U CLA 27 November 2012 Office of Science Office of Science SciDAC-2&3 Compass Approach: plasma wave accelerator structure, laser & particle beam evolution excited by laser or particle beam ! λ p ~100µm at 10 17 /cc Laser or beam Trapped particles L plasma ~ mm-m Approach: plasma wave accelerator structure, laser & particle beam evolution excited by laser or particle beam ! Tajima & Dawson PRL 1979; Esarey et al. RMP 2009 λ p ~100µm at 10 17 /cc Laser or beam Trapped particles Simulation reviews :ScDAC Review 2009, Huang J. Phys C.S. 2009 FD solve Maxwell ! Weight current to grid ! Move particles ! Weight Force to particles !  Electromagne0cs + p ar0cle

114

Microsoft Word - SA-07-EIS-0169-biocontrol.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

14, 2003 14, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project, Noxious Weed Control at Cle Elum and Jack Creek (DOE/EIS-0169-SA-07) David Byrnes - KEWL-4 Fish & Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Under the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP), the Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility (CESRF) Management Plan calls for noxious weed control at the hatchery and acclimation sites. Biological control agents are being proposed for use at the hatchery and Jack Creek acclimation sites to reduce weeds along BPA-owned property, hatchery structures, roads, and wildlife preserve lands. The Kittitas County Noxious Weed Control Board has targeted the management of diffuse knapweed (Centaurea diffusa) and Dalmatian toadflax (Linaria genistifolia ssp. Dalmatica) as

115

9/7/2013 Toutes les informations donnes sur cette page sont indicatives et n'ont pas de valeur contractuelle Page 1 / 13  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, littérature et cinéma, linguistique, histoire de la langue, français langue étrangère, histoire de l siècle (3 ECTS) 6 6 UEF2 LINGUISTIQUE TD Grammaire de la phrase simple 5 5 UEF3 M?THODOLOGIE TD ECTS) 6 6 UEF2 LINGUISTIQUE CM Introduction à la linguistique (2 ECTS) 5 5 #12;9/7/2013 Toutes les

Pravda-Starov, Karel

116

21/6/2013 Toutes les informations donnes sur cette page sont indicatives et n'ont pas de valeur contractuelle LICENCE LETTRES ET ARTS PARCOURS THETRE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Littérature française du 19ème siècle (3 ECTS) 6 UE 2 Fondamentale Linguistique Grammaire de la phrase simple Fondamentale Linguistique CM Introduction à la linguistique (2 ECTS) Grammaire de la phrase complexe (3 ECTS) 5 linguistique 3 UE 3 Fondamentale Littérature francophone CM Domaines littéraires francophones (3 ECTS) TD

Pravda-Starov, Karel

117

User and Performance Impacts from Franklin Upgrades  

SciTech Connect

The NERSC flagship computer Cray XT4 system"Franklin" has gone through three major upgrades: quad core upgrade, CLE 2.1 upgrade, and IO upgrade, during the past year. In this paper, we will discuss the various aspects of the user impacts such as user access, user environment, and user issues etc from these upgrades. The performance impacts on the kernel benchmarks and selected application benchmarks will also be presented.

He, Yun (Helen)

2009-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

118

Assessment of the Need to Chemical Clean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Operational chemical cleaning criteria for heat recovery steam generators (HRSG) are currently based on those applicable to conventional radiant boilers. However, the design and operating conditions in HRSG differ considerably from those of conventional boilers. Thus there is a need to evaluate whether the current criteria for operational cleans are suitable and to consider if alternative and/or supplemental criteria are applicable. A potentially significant issue with regard to the need for chemical cle...

2005-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

119

To: Legacy Critique From: Mark A. Million  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?d~ _~....allable to_ EERE · 1.~. B~e'Qrti~g__~~l::!!,~~.~.~~!~._.1~t.~~I!~-,~ee~,"!~-,_.~cle!:,!!!i~2~_t~e. ~c:lta must be ~ade ava~lable.to EERE ~_~__f3:ep.9!!!~~q~I![e-~!i!!TS(§1.ii~~~~~p.Qr1~.jientifi~_EERE , . ... .1L~R9

120

I N T R O D U C T I O N Serendipity is jumping into a haystack to search for a needle, and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­4 0 2 4 6 8 Figure 1.1. The first gamma-ray burst, GRB 670702, detected by the Vela 3a,b and 4a the burst is not zero due to persistent gamma-ray sources in the sky and random instrumental events second. Adapted from J. Bonnell, A Brief History of the Discovery of Cosmic Gamma-Ray Bursts. http

Landweber, Laura

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "grady cle vela" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

CARBON7510.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Author's personal copy Author's personal copy NMR a critical tool to study the production of carbon fiber from lignin Marcus Foston a , Grady A. Nunnery b , Xianzhi Meng a , Qining Sun a , Frederick S. Baker b , Arthur Ragauskas a, * a BioEnergy Science Center, School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Institute of Paper Science and Technology, Georgia Institute of Technology, 500 10th St., Atlanta, GA 30332, United States b Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6087, United States A R T I C L E I N F O Article history: Received 7 April 2012 Accepted 6 September 2012 Available online 14 September 2012 A B S T R A C T The structural changes occurring to hardwood Alcell TM lignin as a result of fiber devolatiliza- tion/extrusion, oxidative thermo-stabilization and carbonization are investigated in this study by solid-state and solution nuclear magnetic resonance

122

A method for determining equilibrium thermal expansion of glasses by a large-force vertical quartz dilatometer  

SciTech Connect

Vertical quartz dilatometers with a test load of 1-2N are fairly accurate in determining the coefficient of linear expansion (CLE) for glasses in the frozen-structure temperature range, the accuracy being {+-} 1.5 x 10{sup -7} K{sup -1}. In the high-temperature region, the test load causes the sample to reduce in volume (shrink) in a viscous fashion. Because of this, the temperature slope of the dilatometric curve is changed, and the heating curve acquires a maximum at a temperature corresponding to a glass viscosity of 10{sup 11} - 10{sup 11.5}P.

Tatarintsev, B.V. [Vavilov State Optical Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Mercury speciation in Galveston Bay, Texas: the importance of complexation by natural organic ligands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The major goal of this research is the development of a competitive ligand equilibration-solvent solvent extraction (CLE-SSE) method to determine organically complexed mercury species in estuarine water. The method was applied to estuarine surface waters of Galveston Bay and the water column of Offatts Bayou. Thermodynamic equilibrium modeling estimated organically complexed mercury species in estuarine water using the conditional stability constants of mercury-organic complexes and the concentrations of organic ligands determined by CLE-SSE. Two competing ligands, chloride and thiosalicylic acid (TSA), were used for CLE-SSE. Chloride ion competition determined conditional stability constants for 1 : 1 mercury-ligand complexes ranging from ~1023 to ~1024 with concentrations of organic ligands at low nM levels. TSA competition determined stronger mercury-binding ligands by manipulating the TSA concentration such that a higher binding strength was achieved than that for the mercury-chloride complex. TSA competition determined conditional stability constants for 1 : 1 mercury-ligand complexes ranging from ~1027 to ~1029, with ligand concentrations ranging from 10 to 100 pM. Mercury-organic binding strengths in these ranges are consistent with bidentate mercury complexation by low molecular weight organic thiols. A linear relationship was observed between log stability constants for the mercury-ligand complex and log ligand concentrations, supporting the hypothesis that there is a continuum of mercury binding site strengths associated with dissolved organic matter. In Galveston Bay, organically complexed mercury accounted for > 95 % of the total dissolved mercury in surface water. Organic complexation of mercury coupled with mercury dissolution from particulate phases controls the filter-passing mercury distribution in surface waters of Galveston Bay. The estuarine distributional features of mercury-complexing organic ligands were similar to those of glutathione, supporting mercury complexation by a thiol binding group. In Offatts Bayou, a seasonally anoxic bayou on Galveston Bay, thermodynamic equilibrium modeling suggests that the speciation of dissolved mercury in anoxic systems is dominated by sulfide complexation rather than organic complexation.

Han, Seunghee

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Category:Cleveland, OH | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cleveland, OH Cleveland, OH Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Cleveland, OH" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Cleveland OH Ohio Power Co.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 69 KB SVHospital Cleveland OH Ohio Power Co.png SVHospital Cleveland O... 60 KB SVLargeHotel Cleveland OH Ohio Power Co.png SVLargeHotel Cleveland... 61 KB SVLargeOffice Cleveland OH Ohio Power Co.png SVLargeOffice Clevelan... 59 KB SVMediumOffice Cleveland OH Ohio Power Co.png SVMediumOffice Clevela... 67 KB SVMidriseApartment Cleveland OH Ohio Power Co.png SVMidriseApartment Cle... 69 KB SVOutPatient Cleveland OH Ohio Power Co.png SVOutPatient Cleveland... 68 KB SVPrimarySchool Cleveland OH Ohio Power Co.png

125

European Wind Atlas: France | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

European Wind Atlas: France European Wind Atlas: France Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: European Wind Atlas: France Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Potentials & Scenarios Website: 130.226.17.201/extra/web_docs/windmaps/france.jpg Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/european-wind-atlas-france,http://cle Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance This wind resource map shows resources at 50 meters above ground level for four different topographic conditions, including sheltered terrain, open plain, coastal and hills and ridges. The greatest resources appear to be near the Mediterranean Sea coast, and the second greatest resources are near the English Channel and northern Atlantic coast.

126

BETWEEN RANDALL COUNTY, TEXAS AND 'I'HE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENEKGY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BETWEEN BETWEEN RANDALL COUNTY, TEXAS AND - 'I'HE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENEKGY This Memorandum of Understanding (hereinslfier callcd "MOU") is between Randall County. Texas, (hereinaner callcd "Cnunty") and thc Uni~ed States Department of Energy: (hcrcinafter called "I3ClE'' or b'l'an?ex"). 1. INTRODUCTION A. BACKGKOUN L) Both prties havc a mutual interest and responsibility for fire fighting activities tu protect penplc, propxty. and the cnvimnmcnt. B. fl RPOSE 'Ihe purpose of this Mot' is to recognize the need Tor coopemtion on certain fire lighting responsibilities of mutuaI conccrn and to provide for the mutual assistance of parties in accordance \hi tith thc Standard Opemting Pmedures (SOP) contained in Appendix A of this

127

 

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ftn ftn [-A module_name[, module_name] ...] [-b bin_obj_file] [-c] [-d disable] [-D identifier[=value]] [-e enable] [-f source_form] [-F] [-g] [-G debug_lvl] [-h arg] [-I incldir] [-J dir_name] [-K trap=opt[, opt] ...] [-l libname] [-L ldir] [-m msg_lvl] [-M msgs] [-N col] [-o out_file] [-O opt[, opt] ...] [-p module_site [,module_site ...]] [-Q path] [-r list_opt] [-R runchk] [-s size] [-S] [-T] [-U identifier[, identifier] ...] [-v] [-V] [-Wphase,"opt...",] [-x dirlist] [-X npes] [-Yphase,dirname] [--] sourcefile [sourcefile ...] IMPLEMENTATION Cray Linux Environment (CLE) DESCRIPTION The ftn command invokes the Cray Fortran Compiler. Typically, the command processes the input files named on the command line and generates a binary object file, and then loads the binary object file

128

Cray XC30 User Documentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cray XC30 Cray XC30 Documentation Cray XC30 User Documentation L Cray XC30 Documentation Search Preferences | Advanced Search Home Browse Books Man Pages Glossary Platforms Cray XC30 Cray XE and Cray XK Cray XT Cray Sonexion Cray X2 Cray X1 Knowledge Base by Category by Date by Platform by Title by User Release Announcements @Twitter Cray XC30 System Documentation This site map also contains legacy documentation. Always consult the latest version of documentation for your site-specific configuration and ask your Cray Customer Service representative for additional guidance on the latest software documents. Getting Started Cray Linux Environment (CLE) Software Release Overview Programming Environment Cray Programming Environments User Guide Cray Compiling Environment (CCE) Cray Fortran Reference Manual

129

Appendix B: CArBon dioxide CApture teChnology SheetS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sorbents sorbents B-14 Pre-Combustion sorbents u.s. DePartment of energy aDvanCeD Carbon DioxiDe CaPture r&D Program: teChnology uPDate, may 2013 aDvanCeD Carbon DioxiDe CaPture teChnology for low-rank Coal integrateD gasifiCation CombineD CyCle (igCC) systems primary project goals TDA will investigate the technical and economic advantages of using an integrated carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) sorbent and water-gas shift (WGS) catalyst system in an integrated gasifi- cation combined cycle (IGCC) power plant, fueled with low-rank coal, and designed to capture more than 90% of the CO 2 emissions. technical goals * TDA will evaluate the physical mix of the sorbent and catalyst pellets within the same

130

Improved  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improved Improved cache performance in Monte Carlo transport calculations using energy banding A. Siegel a , K. Smith b , K. Felker c,∗ , P . Romano b , B. Forget b , P . Beckman c a Argonne National Laboratory, Theory and Computing Sciences and Nuclear Engineering Division b Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering c Argonne National Laboratory, Theory and Computing Sciences Abstract We present an energy banding algorithm for Monte Carlo (MC) neutral parti- cle transport simulations which depend on large cross section lookup tables. In MC codes, read-only cross section data tables are accessed frequently, ex- hibit poor locality, and are typically much too large to fit in fast memory. Thus, performance is often limited by long latencies to RAM, or by off-node communication latencies when the data footprint is very large and must be decomposed on

131

Supplement Analysis for Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project, (DOE/EIS-0169-SA-05) 9/20/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 20, 2002 September 20, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project, (DOE/EIS-0169-SA-05) memorandum David Byrnes Project Manager - KEWL-4 TO: Proposed Action: Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project - Under the Monitoring and Evaluation Program (M&E), the domestication selection research task would be modified to include a hatchery control line, maintained entirely by spawning hatchery-origin fish. Project No.: F3204 Location: Cle Elum, Kittitas County, Washington. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Co-Managed by the Yakama Nation (YN) and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). 1. Introduction The Bonneville Power Administration is funding ongoing studies, research, and artificial production of

132

Cray XC30 User Documentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Documentation Documentation Cray XC30 User Documentation L Cray XC30 Documentation Search Preferences | Advanced Search Home Browse Books Man Pages Glossary Platforms Cray XC30 Cray XE and Cray XK Cray XT Cray Sonexion Cray X2 Cray X1 Knowledge Base by Category by Date by Platform by Title by User Release Announcements @Twitter Cray XC30 System Documentation This site map also contains legacy documentation. Always consult the latest version of documentation for your site-specific configuration and ask your Cray Customer Service representative for additional guidance on the latest software documents. Getting Started Cray Linux Environment (CLE) Software Release Overview Programming Environment Cray Programming Environments User Guide Cray Compiling Environment (CCE) Cray Fortran Reference Manual

133

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

81 - 19890 of 28,905 results. 81 - 19890 of 28,905 results. Download CX-006586: Categorical Exclusion Determination Integration of G0387 Energetics Solar Integration Project CX(s) Applied: B1.7, B4.6 Date: 09/01/2011 Location(s): Lake County, Oregon Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-006586-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-006312: Categorical Exclusion Determination Small-Scale Spring Chinook and Coho Reintroduction CX(s) Applied: B1.20 Date: 07/21/2011 Location(s): Cle Elum, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-006312-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-000007: Categorical Exclusion Determination Spirit Tap to Colville-Boundary #1 Landings and Access Roads Construction

134

C:\Annual\VENTCHAP.V8\NGA02.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2002 Glossary Aquifer Storage Field: A sub-surface facility for storing nat- ural gas consisting of water-bearing sands topped by an imper- meable cap rock. Balancing Item: Represents differences between the sum of the components of natural gas supply and the sum of the com- ponents of natural gas disposition. These differences may be due to quantities lost or to the effects of data-reporting prob- lems. Reporting problems include differences due to the net result of conversions of flow data metered at varying tempera- ture and pressure bases and converted to a standard tempera- ture and pressure base; the effect of variations in company ac- counting and billing practices; differences between billing cy- cle and calendar period time frames; and imbalances resulting from the merger of data-reporting systems that vary in scope,

135

A Comparison  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Theresa Theresa E. Hallquist Introduction The Petroleum Division (PD) of the Energy Informa- tion Administration (EIA) collects information relating to petroleum market prices and volumes on the EIA-782 survey. One way PD assesses the quality of these data is to compare the data with other sources. Large, irreconcilable differences among data series could indicate the need for improvement in survey de- sign or implementation, or may be due to conceptual differences. For more detailed information on the EIA-782 survey, refer to the notes at the end of this arti- cle. PD compares its EIA-782 series of petroleum market prices and volumes with both internal and external data sources on an ongoing basis. The sources include: * The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) Consumer Price Index (CPI) data for retail prices of motor gasoline and No. 2 fuel oil * Form EIA-821, "Annual Fuel Oil and Kerosene

136

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 2, 2004 August 2, 2004 EIS-0349: Final Environmental Impact Statement, Volume 2 BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project Volume 2 August 2, 2004 EIS-0349: Final Environmental Impact Statement, Figures BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project August 2, 2004 EIS-0349: Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendices BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project June 23, 2004 EIS-0026-SA-02: Supplement Analysis Disposal of Polychlorinated Biphenyl-Commingled Transuranic Waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant April 7, 2004 EIS-0169-SA-08: Supplement Analysis Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project, Boone Pond Acclimation Site, Cle Elum, Kittitas County, Washington March 12, 2004 EA-1486: Final Environmental Assessment East and West Diversion Screening Proposal Methow Valley Irrigation District Project

137

Wind Resource Atlas of Oaxaca | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resource Atlas of Oaxaca Resource Atlas of Oaxaca Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Wind Resource Atlas of Oaxaca Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Potentials & Scenarios Website: www.nrel.gov/wind/pdfs/34519.pdf Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/wind-resource-atlas-oaxaca,http://cle Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance This wind resource atlas identifies wind characteristics and distribution of wind resources in Oaxaca, Mexico, at a wind power density of 50 meters above ground. The detailed wind resource maps contained in the atlas facilitate the identification of prospective areas for use of wind energy technologies for utility-scale power generation, village power, and off-grid wind energy applications. The wind maps were created using a

138

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Performance Impacts from and Performance Impacts from Franklin Upgrades Yun (Helen) He National Energy Research Supercomputing Center Cray User Group Meeting May 4-7, 2009 1 Outline * Franklin Introduction * Benchmarks * Quad Core Upgrade * CLE 2.1 Upgrade * IO Upgrade * Summary 2 Franklin's Role at NERSC * NERSC is the US DOE's keystone high performance computing center. * Franklin is the "flagship" system at NERSC serving ~3,100 scientific users in different application disciplines. * Serves the needs for most NERSC users from modest to extreme concurrencies. * Expects significant percentage of time to be used for capability jobs on Franklin. 3 Kernel Benchmarks * Processor: NAS Parallel Benchmarks (NPB) - Serial: NPB 2.3 Class B * best understood code base - Parallel: NPB 2.4 Class D at 64 and 256 ways

139

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

61 - 8870 of 26,764 results. 61 - 8870 of 26,764 results. Download Electricity Advisory Committee Meeting, March 5-6, 2012- Meeting Minutes and Transcripts Meeting minutes and transcripts for the March 5-6, 2012 meeting of the Electricity Advisory Committee. http://energy.gov/oe/downloads/electricity-advisory-committee-meeting-march-5-6-2012-meeting-minutes-and-transcripts Download Transmission Planning: Institutional Issues in the West http://energy.gov/oe/downloads/transmission-planning-institutional-issues-west Download EIS-0169-SA-05: Supplement Analysis Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project, Cle Elum, Kittitas County, Washington http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0169-sa-05-supplement-analysis Download Hydride Rim Formation in Unirradiated Zircaloy The purpose of this work is to develop the means of pre-hydriding

140

Aprun MAN Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

aprun » Aprun MAN Page aprun » Aprun MAN Page Aprun MAN Page aprun [-a arch ] [-b ] [-B] [-cc cpu_list | keyword ] [-cp cpu_placement_file_name ] [-d depth ] [-D value ] [-L node_list ] [-m size[h|hs] ] [-n pes ] [-N pes_per_node ][-F access mode ] [-q ] [-r cores][-S pes_per_numa_node ] [-sl list_of_numa_nodes ] [-sn numa_nodes_per_node ] [-ss ] [-T ] [-t sec ] executable [ arguments_for_executable ] IMPLEMENTATION Cray Linux Environment (CLE) DESCRIPTION To run an application on CNL compute nodes, use the Application Level Placement Scheduler (ALPS) aprun command. The aprun command specifies application resource requirements, requests application placement, and initiates application launch. The aprun utility provides user identity and environment information as part of the application launch so that your login node session can

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "grady cle vela" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

1995 Reformulated Gasoline Market Affected Refiners Differently  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 Reformulated Gasoline Market Affected 5 Reformulated Gasoline Market Affected Refiners Differently by John Zyren, Charles Dale and Charles Riner Introduction The United States has completed its first summer driving season using reformulated gasoline (RFG). Motorists noticed price increases at the retail level, resulting from the increased cost to produce and deliver the product, as well as from the tight sup- ply/demand balance during the summer. This arti- cle focuses on the costs of producing RFG as experienced by different types of refiners and on how these refiners fared this past summer, given the prices for RFG at the refinery gate. RFG Regulatory Requirements The use of RFG is a result of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA). The CAAA cover a wide range of programs aimed at improving air qual-

142

CX-003628: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

628: Categorical Exclusion Determination 628: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003628: Categorical Exclusion Determination Kittitas County Conservation Easement Acquisition CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 07/12/2010 Location(s): Kittitas County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW?s) acquisition of a conservation easement on 5 parcels of the Hundley property totaling 432.3 acres near Cle Elum, Washington. The property has outstanding riparian and floodplain natural resource values, which provide an opportunity to enhance, restore, and manage high quality spawning and rearing habitat for Endangered Species Act-listed Mid-Columbia River steelhead (threatened) and Columbia River

143

Microsoft Word - CX-Rocky Reach-Maple Valley No1_WEB.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3, 2010 3, 2010 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Darin Bowman Project Manager - TELF-TPP-3 Proposed Action: Rocky Reach-Maple Valley No. 1 mile 47 bridge replacement project Budget Information: Work Order # 219783 PP&A Project No.: 955 Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3, Routine maintenance activities for structures, rights-of-way, and infrastructures such as roads that are required to maintain infrastructures in a condition suitable for a facility to be used for its designed purpose. Location: BPA, in coordination with the Cle Elum Ranger District of the Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest, is proposing to construct a bridge across Cold Creek. The proposed project is

144

MAGNETIC END CLOSURES FOR PLASMA CONFINING AND HEATING DEVICES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

More effective magnetic closure field regions for various open-ended containment magnetic fields used in fusion reactor devices are provided by several spaced, coaxially-aligned solenoids utilized to produce a series of nodal field regions of uniform or, preferably, of incrementally increasing intensity separated by lower intensity regions outwardly from the ends of said containment zone. Plasma sources may also be provided to inject plasma into said lower intensity areas to increase plasma density therein. Plasma may then be transported, by plasma diffusion mechanisms provided by the nodal fields, into the containment field. With correlated plasma densities and nodal field spacings approximating the mean free partl cle collision path length in the zones between the nodal fields, optimum closure effectiveness is obtained. (AEC)

Post, R.F.

1963-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

145

C:\ANNUAL\VENTCHAP.V8\NewNGA02.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Glossary Aquifer Storage Field: A sub-surface facility for storing nat- ural gas consisting of water-bearing sands topped by an imper- meable cap rock. Balancing Item: Represents differences between the sum of the components of natural gas supply and the sum of the com- ponents of natural gas disposition. These differences may be due to quantities lost or to the effects of data-reporting prob- lems. Reporting problems include differences due to the net result of conversions of flow data metered at varying tempera- ture and pressure bases and converted to a standard tempera- ture and pressure base; the effect of variations in company ac- counting and billing practices; differences between billing cy- cle and calendar period time frames; and imbalances resulting from the merger of data-reporting systems that vary in scope, format, definitions, and type of respondents. Biomass

146

 

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cc cc [-c] [-C] [-D macro[=def]] [-E] [-g] [-G level] [-h arg] [-I incldir] [-K trap=opt[,opt]...] [-l libfile] [-L ldir] [-M] [-nostdinc] [-o outfile] [-O level] [-P] [-S] [-U macro] [-V] [-W phase,"opt..."] [-X npes] [-Y phase,dirname] [-#] [-##] [-###] files ... IMPLEMENTATION Cray Linux Environment (CLE) DESCRIPTION The cc command invokes the Cray C compiler. The compiler conforms to the ISO/IEC 9899:1999 and to the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) X3.159-1989 standards. Typically, the cc command processes the source files named on the command line, generates a binary object file (sourcefile.o), links the binary object file, and generates an executable file (named a.out by default). Other files used and created by the C compiler are discussed under the FILES section.

147

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 5, 2002 September 5, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-107: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program September 2, 2002 EIS-0169-SA-05: Supplement Analysis Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project, Cle Elum, Kittitas County, Washington August 30, 2002 EIS-0332: Final Environmental Impact Statement McNary-John Day Transmission Line Project August 29, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-99: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement - Olympia-Grand Coulee No.1 August 22, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-105: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program August 21, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-104: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program August 1, 2002 EIS-0344: Draft Envrionmental Impact Statement

148

Issuance Date:: February  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Issuance Issuance Date:: February 11, 1966 POST-SHOT HYDROLOGI C SAFETY 68296 VUF-1014 FINAL REPORT FALLON, NEVADA OCTOBER 26, 1963 Hazleton-Nuclear Science Corporation October 30, 1965 SPONSORED BY THE ADVANCED RESEARCH PROJECTS AGENCY OF THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE AND THE U. S.ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION VELA UNIFORM PROJECT LEG A L NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of Government sponsored work. Neither the United States, nor the Commission, nor any person acting on behalf of the Commission: A. Makes any warranty or representation, expressed or implied, with respect to the accu- racy, completeness, or usefulness of the information contained in this report, or that the use of any information. apparatus, method, or process disclosed in this report may not infringe privately owned rights; or B. Assumes any liabilities with respect to the use of, or for damages resulting from the

149

shoal.cdr  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shoal, Shoal, Nevada, Site F A C T S H E E T This fact sheet provides information about the Shoal, Nevada, Site. This site is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Shoal, Nevada, Site Site Description and History The Shoal Site is situated on 2,560 acres of withdrawn federal lands located within the north-central portion of the Sand Springs Range in Churchill County, Nevada. The town of Fallon is the largest populated area in the region and is about 30 miles northwest of the site. The region around the Shoal Site is sparsely populated; military installations, recreation, ranching, and mining provide the dominant commercial interests. The Project Shoal underground nuclear test was part of the Vela Uniform program sponsored jointly by the U.S Department of Defense and U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), a predecessor agency of the U.S. Department of Energy

150

A novel technique for wide-field polarimetry with a radiotelescope array  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the use of the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) to conduct polarimetric observations of the sky at 5 GHz. The ATCA is normally operated as an interferometer array, but these observations were conducted in a split array mode in which the antenna elements were used as single-dishes with their beams staggered to simultaneously cover a wide area of sky with a resolution of 10 arcmin. The linearly polarized sky radiation was fully characterized from measurements, made over a range of parallactic angles, of the cross correlated signals from the orthogonal linear feeds. We describe the technique and present a polarimetric image of the Vela supernova remnant made as a test of the method. The development of the techniques was motivated by the need for wide-field imaging of the foreground contamination of the polarized component of the cosmic microwave background signal.

D. McConnell; E. Carretti; R. Subrahmanyan

2005-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

151

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 447: Project Shoal Area, Nevada Subsurface Site  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) describes the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) continued environmental investigation of the subsurface Project Shoal Area (PSA) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 447. The PSA is located in the Sand Springs Mountains in Churchill County, Nevada, about 48 kilometers (km) (30 miles [mi]) southeast of Fallon, Nevada. Project Shoal was part of the Vela Uniform Program which was conducted to improve the US' ability to detect, identify, and locate underground nuclear detonations. The test consisted of detonating a 12-kiloton nuclear device deep underground in granitic rock to determine whether seismic waves produced by an underground nuclear test could be differentiated from seismic waves produced by a naturally occurring earthquake. The test was a joint effort conducted by the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and the US Department of Defense (DoD) in October 1963 (AEC, 1964).

DOE /NV

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

The Very Young Radio Pulsar J1357-6429  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the discovery of a radio pulsar with a characteristic age of 7300 years, making it one of the 10 apparently youngest Galactic pulsars known. PSR J1357-6429, with a spin period of P = 166 ms and spin-down luminosity of 3.1e36 ergs/s, was detected during the Parkes multibeam survey of the Galactic plane. We have measured a large rotational glitch in this pulsar, with Delta P/P = -2.4e-6, similar in magnitude to those experienced occasionally by the Vela pulsar. At a nominal distance of only ~ 2.5 kpc, based on the measured free electron column density of 127 pc/cc and the electron distribution model of Cordes & Lazio, this may be, after the Crab, the nearest very young pulsar known. The pulsar is located near the radio supernova remnant candidate G309.8-2.6.

F. Camilo; R. N. Manchester; A. G. Lyne; B. M. Gaensler; A. Possenti; N. D'Amico; I. H. Stairs; A. J. Faulkner; M. Kramer; D. R. Lorimer; M. A. McLaughlin; G. Hobbs

2004-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

153

Citation: D.E. Groom  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

± ± I (J P ) = 1 2 (0 - ) Quantum numbers not measured. Values shown are quark-model predictions. See also the B ± /B 0 ADMIXTURE and B ± /B 0 /B 0 s /b-baryon AD- MIXTURE sections. B ± MASS B ± MASS B ± MASS B ± MASS The fit uses m B + , (m B 0 - m B + ), and m B 0 to determine m B + , m B 0 , and the mass difference. VALUE (MeV) EVTS DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 5279.0±0.5 OUR FIT 5279.0±0.5 OUR FIT 5279.0±0.5 OUR FIT 5279.0±0.5 OUR FIT 5279.1±0.5 OUR AVERAGE 5279.1±0.5 OUR AVERAGE 5279.1±0.5 OUR AVERAGE 5279.1±0.5 OUR AVERAGE 5279.1±0.4 ±0.4 526 1 CSORNA 00 CLE2 e + e - → Υ(4S) 5279.1±1.7 ±1.4 147 ABE 96B CDF p p at 1.8 TeV * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 5278.8±0.54 ±2.0 362 ALAM 94 CLE2 e + e - → Υ(4S) 5278.3±0.4 ±2.0 BORTOLETTO92 CLEO e + e - → Υ(4S) 5280.5±1.0 ±2.0 2 ALBRECHT 90J ARG e + e - → Υ(4S) 5275.8±1.3 ±3.0 32 ALBRECHT 87C ARG e + e - → Υ(4S) 5278.2±1.8

154

s041.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

± ± I (J P ) = 1 2 (0 - ) Quantum numbers not measured. Values shown are quark-model predictions. See also the B ± /B 0 ADMIXTURE and B ± /B 0 /B 0 s /b-baryon AD- MIXTURE sections. B ± MASS B ± MASS B ± MASS B ± MASS The fit uses m B + , (m B 0 - m B + ), and m B 0 to determine m B + , m B 0 , and the mass difference. VALUE (MeV) EVTS DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 5279.13± 0.31 OUR FIT 5279.13± 0.31 OUR FIT 5279.13± 0.31 OUR FIT 5279.13± 0.31 OUR FIT 5279.1 ± 0.4 OUR AVERAGE 5279.1 ± 0.4 OUR AVERAGE 5279.1 ± 0.4 OUR AVERAGE 5279.1 ± 0.4 OUR AVERAGE 5279.10± 0.41 ± 0.36 1 ACOSTA 06 CDF p p at 1.96 TeV 5279.1 ± 0.4 ± 0.4 526 2 CSORNA 00 CLE2 e + e - → Υ(4S) 5279.1 ± 1.7 ± 1.4 147 ABE 96B CDF p p at 1.8 TeV * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 5278.8 ± 0.54± 2.0 362 ALAM 94 CLE2 e + e - → Υ(4S) 5278.3 ± 0.4 ± 2.0 BORTOLETTO92 CLEO e + e - → Υ(4S) 5280.5 ± 1.0 ± 2.0 3 ALBRECHT 90J ARG e + e - → Υ(4S)

155

s041.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

± ± I (J P ) = 1 2 (0 - ) Quantum numbers not measured. Values shown are quark-model predictions. See also the B ± /B 0 ADMIXTURE and B ± /B 0 /B 0 s /b-baryon AD- MIXTURE sections. B ± MASS B ± MASS B ± MASS B ± MASS The fit uses m B + , (m B 0 - m B + ), and m B 0 to determine m B + , m B 0 , and the mass difference. VALUE (MeV) EVTS DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 5279.0±0.5 OUR FIT 5279.0±0.5 OUR FIT 5279.0±0.5 OUR FIT 5279.0±0.5 OUR FIT 5279.1±0.5 OUR AVERAGE 5279.1±0.5 OUR AVERAGE 5279.1±0.5 OUR AVERAGE 5279.1±0.5 OUR AVERAGE 5279.1±0.4 ±0.4 526 1 CSORNA 00 CLE2 e + e - → Υ(4S) 5279.1±1.7 ±1.4 147 ABE 96B CDF p p at 1.8 TeV * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 5278.8±0.54 ±2.0 362 ALAM 94 CLE2 e + e - → Υ(4S) 5278.3±0.4 ±2.0 BORTOLETTO92 CLEO e + e - → Υ(4S) 5280.5±1.0 ±2.0 2 ALBRECHT 90J ARG e + e - → Υ(4S) 5275.8±1.3 ±3.0 32 ALBRECHT 87C ARG e + e - → Υ(4S) 5278.2±1.8

156

Two-Pole Caustic Model for High-Energy Lightcurves of Pulsars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new model of high-energy lightcurves from rotation powered pulsars. The key ingredient of the model is the gap region (i.e. the region where particle acceleration is taking place and high-energy photons originate) which satisfies the following assumptions: i) the gap region extends from each polar cap to the light cylinder; ii) the gap is thin and confined to the surface of last open magnetic-field lines; iii) photon emissivity is uniform within the gap region. The model lightcurves are dominated by strong peaks (either double or single) of caustic origin. Unlike in other pulsar models with caustic effects, the double peaks arise due to crossing two caustics, each of which is associated with a different magnetic pole. The generic features of the lightcurves are consistent with the observed characteristics of pulsar lightcurves: 1) the most natural (in terms of probability) shape consists of two peaks (separated by 0.4 to 0.5 in phase for large viewing angles); 2) the peaks posess well developed wings; 3) there is a bridge (inter-peak) emission component; 4) there is a non-vanishing off-pulse emission level; 5) the radio pulse occurs before the leading high-energy peak. The model is well suited for four gamma-ray pulsars - Crab, Vela, Geminga and B1951+32 - with double-peak lightcurves exhibiting the peak separation of 0.4 to 0.5 in phase. Hereby, we apply the model to the Vela pulsar. Moreover, we indicate the limitation of the model in accurate reproducing of the lightcurves with single pulses and narrowly separated (about 0.2 in phase) pulse peaks. We also discuss the optical polarization properties for the Crab pulsar in the context of the two-pole caustic model.

J. Dyks; B. Rudak

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Chandra Confirmation of a Pulsar Wind Nebula in DA 495  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As part of a multiwavelength study of the unusual radio supernova remnant DA 495, we present observations made with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Imaging and spectroscopic analysis confirms the previously detected X-ray source at the heart of the annular radio nebula, establishing the radiative properties of two key emission components: a soft unresolved source with a blackbody temperature of 1 MK consistent with a neutron star, surrounded by a nonthermal nebula 40'' in diameter exhibiting a power-law spectrum with photon index Gamma = 1.6+/-0.3, typical of a pulsar wind nebula. The implied spin-down luminosity of the neutron star, assuming a conversion efficiency to nebular flux appropriate to Vela-like pulsars, is ~10^{35} ergs/s, again typical of objects a few tens of kyr old. Morphologically, the nebular flux is slightly enhanced along a direction, in projection on the sky, independently demonstrated to be of significance in radio polarization observations; we argue that this represents the orientation of the pulsar spin axis. At smaller scales, a narrow X-ray feature is seen extending out 5'' from the point source, a distance consistent with the sizes of resolved wind termination shocks around many Vela-like pulsars. Finally, we argue based on synchrotron lifetimes in the estimated nebular magnetic field that DA 495 represents a rare pulsar wind nebula in which electromagnetic flux makes up a significant part, together with particle flux, of the neutron star's wind, and that this high magnetization factor may account for the nebula's low luminosity.

Z. Arzoumanian; S. Safi-Harb; T. L. Landecker; R. Kothes; F. Camilo

2008-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

158

Workshop2011Final.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Challenges Challenges a nd A pplica/on G ems on t he P ath t o Exascale Alice K oniges, N ERSC, B erkeley L ab ASCR P rogramming C hallenges W orkshop July 2 011 Path to E xascale: some examples, their discovered "gems," and implica/ons for programming models * GTS - m agne+c f usion p ar+cle---in---cell ( PIC) c ode - Already o p+mized a nd h ybrid ( MPI + O penMP) - Consider a dvanced h ybrid t echniques a nd P GAS * GPU S creening o f C arbon C apture M aterials - Op+miza+on f or G PU * PIR3D T hree---dimensional F low S olver - Hybridiza+on v ia e xpert + a pplica+on s cien+st * NBP's N AS P arallel B enchmarks i n v arious l anguages - Comparison o f M PI, H ybrid, a nd U PC * fvCAM C limate B enchmark - Hybrid f or r educing m emory * S3D - T urbulent C ombus+on - Hybridiza+on f or h eterogeneous p rocessors

159

Citation: W.-M. Yao  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(1450) (1450) I G (J PC ) = 1 + (1 - - ) See our mini-review under the ρ(1700). ρ(1450) MASS ρ(1450) MASS ρ(1450) MASS ρ(1450) MASS VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID 1459 ± 11 OUR AVERAGE 1459 ± 11 OUR AVERAGE 1459 ± 11 OUR AVERAGE 1459 ± 11 OUR AVERAGE Includes data from the 3 datablocks that follow this one. Er- ror includes scale factor of 3.4. See the ideogram below. WEIGHTED AVERAGE 1459±11 (Error scaled by 3.4) FUKUI 88 SPEC 1.7 ANTONELLI 88 DM2 0.3 AKHMETSHIN 00D CMD2 6.5 AKHMETSHIN 01B CMD2 7.3 CLEGG 94 RVUE 0.0 EDWARDS 00A CLE2 40.7 AKHMETSHIN 03B CMD2 16.5 ARMSTRONG 89E OMEG 6.5 ACHASOV 97 RVUE 4.8 ABELE 01B CBAR 0.4 χ 2 84.7 (Confidence Level 0.001) 1350 1400 1450 1500 1550 1600 1650 1700 ρ(1450) mass (MeV) η ρ 0 MODE η ρ 0 MODE η ρ 0 MODE η ρ 0 MODE VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT The data in this block is included in the average printed for a previous datablock. 1497 ± 14 1 AKHMETSHIN

160

Optimal Conventional and Semi-Natural Treatments for the Upper Yakima Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Project; Treatment Definitions and Descriptions and Biological Specifications for Facility Design, 1995-1999 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the Yakima Fisheries Project facilities (Cle Elum Hatchery and acclimation satellites) which provide the mechanism to conduct state-of-the-art research for addressing questions about spring chinook supplementation strategies. The definition, descriptions, and specifications for the Yakima spring chinook supplementation program permit evaluation of alternative fish culture techniques that should yield improved methods and procedures to produce wild-like fish with higher survival that can be used to rebuild depleted spring chinook stocks of the Columbia River Basin. The definition and description of three experimental treatments, Optimal Conventional (OCT), Semi-Natural (SNT), Limited Semi-Natural (LSNT), and the biological specifications for facilities have been completed for the upper Yakima spring chinook salmon stock of the Yakima Fisheries Project. The task was performed by the Biological Specifications Work Group (BSWG) represented by Yakama Indian Nation, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, National Marine Fisheries Service, and Bonneville Power Administration. The control and experimental variables of the experimental treatments (OCT, SNT, and LSNT) are described in sufficient detail to assure that the fish culture facilities will be designed and operated as a production scale laboratory to produce and test supplemented upper Yakima spring chinook salmon. Product specifications of the treatment groups are proposed to serve as the generic templates for developing greater specificity for measurements of product attributes. These product specifications will be used to monitor and evaluate treatment effects, with respect to the biological response variables (post release survival, long-term fitness, reproductive success and ecological interactions).

Hager, Robert C. (Hatchery Operations Consulting); Costello, Ronald J. (Mobrand Biometrics, Inc., Vashon Island, WA)

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

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161

INTEGRAL observations of TeV plerions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Amongst the sources seen in very high gamma-rays several are associated with Pulsar Wind Nebulae (``TeV plerions''). The study of hard X-ray/soft gamma-ray emission is providing an important insight into the energetic particle population present in these objects. The unpulsed emission from pulsar/pulsar wind nebula systems in the energy range accessible to the INTEGRAL satellite is mainly synchrotron emission from energetic and fast cooling electrons close to their acceleration site. Our analyses of public INTEGRAL data of known TeV plerions detected by ground based Cherenkov telescopes indicate a deeper link between these TeV plerions and INTEGRAL detected pulsar wind nebulae. The newly discovered TeV plerion in the northern wing of the Kookaburra region (G313.3+0.6 powered by the middle aged PSR J1420-6048) is found to have a previously unknown INTEGRAL counterpart which is besides the Vela pulsar the only middle aged pulsar detected with INTEGRAL. We do not find an INTEGRAL counterpart of the TeV plerion associated with the X-ray PWN ``Rabbit'' G313.3+0.1 which is possibly powered by a young pulsar.

A. I. D. Hoffmann; D. Horns; A. Santangelo

2006-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

162

Are there pulsars in the knee ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent findings indicate that the Monogem Ring supernova remnant and the associated pulsar PSR B0656+14 may be the 'Single Source' responsible for the formation of the sharp knee in the cosmic ray energy spectrum at $\\sim$3PeV. We estimate the contribution of the pulsar B0656+14 to the cosmic rays in the PeV region and conclude that the pulsar cannot contribute more than 15% to the cosmic ray intensity at the knee. Therefore it cannot be the dominant source there and an SNR is still needed. We also examine the possibility of the pulsar giving the peak of the extensive air shower intensity observed from the region inside the Monogem Ring. The estimates of the gamma-ray flux produced by cosmic ray particles from this pulsar indicate that it can be the source of the observed peak, if the particles were confined within the SNR during a considerable fraction of its total age. We also estimate the contribution of Geminga and Vela pulsars to cosmic rays at the knee.

A. D. Erlykin; A. W. Wolfendale

2004-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

163

A PAN-CARINA YOUNG STELLAR OBJECT CATALOG: INTERMEDIATE-MASS YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS IN THE CARINA NEBULA IDENTIFIED VIA MID-INFRARED EXCESS EMISSION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a catalog of 1439 young stellar objects (YSOs) spanning the 1.42 deg{sup 2} field surveyed by the Chandra Carina Complex Project (CCCP), which includes the major ionizing clusters and the most active sites of ongoing star formation within the Great Nebula in Carina. Candidate YSOs were identified via infrared (IR) excess emission from dusty circumstellar disks and envelopes, using data from the Spitzer Space Telescope (the Vela-Carina survey) and the Two-Micron All Sky Survey. We model the 1-24 {mu}m IR spectral energy distributions of the YSOs to constrain physical properties. Our Pan-Carina YSO Catalog (PCYC) is dominated by intermediate-mass (2 M{sub sun} 2 x 10{sup 4} YSOs and a present-day star formation rate (SFR) of >0.008 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}. The global SFR in the Carina Nebula, averaged over the past {approx}5 Myr, has been approximately constant.

Povich, Matthew S.; Getman, Konstantin V.; Townsley, Leisa K.; Broos, Patrick S. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Smith, Nathan [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Majewski, Steven R.; Indebetouw, Remy [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Babler, Brian L.; Meade, Marilyn R.; Whitney, Barbara A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, 475 N. Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Robitaille, Thomas P. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Stassun, Keivan G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Yonekura, Yoshinori [Department of Physical Science, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Fukui, Yasuo, E-mail: povich@astro.psu.edu [Department of Astrophysics, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Electron energy losses near pulsar polar caps: a Monte Carlo approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use Monte Carlo approach to study the energetics of electrons accelerated in a pulsar polar gap. As energy-loss mechanisms we consider magnetic Compton scattering of thermal X-ray photons and curvature radiation. The results are compared with previous calculations which assumed that changes of electron energy occurred smoothly according to approximations for the average energy loss rate due to the Compton scattering. We confirm a general dependence of efficiency of electron energy losses due to inverse Compton mechanism on the temperature and size of a thermal polar cap and on the pulsar magnetic field. However, we show that trajectories of electrons in energy-altitude space as calculated in the smooth way do not always coincide with averaged Monte Carlo behaviour. In particular, for pulsars with high magnetic field strength ($B_{pc} > 3\\times 10^{12}$ G) and low thermal polar cap temperatures ($T < 5\\times 10^6$ K) final electron Lorentz factors computed with the two methods may differ by a few orders of magnitude. We discuss consequences for particular objects with identified thermal X-ray spectral components like Geminga, Vela, and PSR B1055-52.

J. Dyks; B. Rudak

2000-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

165

Model Spectra of Rotation Powered Pulsars in the INTEGRAL Range  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The energy range of IBIS is a promising ground for testing mutual relations of distinct components expected in the spectra of high-energy radiation from rotation powered pulsars. According to some polar-cap models two such components - due to curvature and synchrotron emission - may contribute comparable amounts of power between 15 keV and 10 MeV (Rudak & Dyks 1999). Zhang & Harding (2000) argued recently for the inclusion of a third possible component, due to inverse Compton scattering (ICS) of soft thermal photons on secondary $\\epm$-pairs. Here we present the results of Monte Carlo calculations of all three spectral components within a polar-cap model which allows for interactions of relativistic particles with the soft photons coming from the pulsar surface. For teragauss pulsars with the surface temperature of a few times 10^5 K the ICS component dominates the spectrum in the energy range below 10 MeV, and thus its presence increases the ratio of X-ray to gamma-ray luminosity (in comparison to the models ignoring the ICS on secondary $\\epm$-pairs) to a level observed in the Vela pulsar.

J. Dyks; B. Rudak; T. Bulik

2000-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

166

Rotationally-induced asymmetry in the double-peak lightcurves of the bright EGRET pulsars?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pulsed emission from the bright EGRET pulsars - Vela, Crab, and Geminga - extends up to 10 GeV. The generic gamma lightcurve features two peaks separated by 0.4 to 0.5 in phase. According to Thompson (2001) the lightcurve becomes asymmetrical above 5 GeV in such a way that the trailing peak dominates over the leading peak. We attempt to interpret this asymmetry within a single-polar-cap scenario. We investigate the role of rotational effects on the magnetic one-photon absorption rate in inducing such asymmetry. Our Monte Carlo simulations of pulsar gamma-ray beams reveal that in the case of oblique rotators with rotation periods of a few millisecond the rotational effects lead to the asymmetry of the requested magnitude. However, the rotators relevant for the bright EGRET pulsars must not have their inclination angles too large in order to keep the two peaks at a separation of 0.4 in phase. With such a condition imposed on the model rotators the resulting effects are rather minute and can hardly be reconciled with the magnitude of the observed asymmetry.

J. Dyks; B. Rudak

2001-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

167

Rotation as a source of asymmetry in the double-peak lightcurves of the bright EGRET pulsars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the role of rotational effects in inducing asymmetry present above ~5 GeV in the double-peak lightcurves of the bright EGRET pulsars: Vela, Crab, and Geminga. According to Thompson 2001, the trailing peak dominates over the leading peak above ~5 GeV consistently for all three pulsars, even though this is not the case over the entire energy range of EGRET, i.e. above ~100 MeV. We present the results of Monte Carlo simulations of electromagnetic cascades in a pulsar magnetosphere within a single-polar-cap scenario with rotationally-induced propagation effects of the order of v/c (where v is the local corotation velocity). We find that even in the case of nearly aligned rotators with spin periods of P ~ 0.1 s rotation may lead to asymmetric (with respect to the magnetic axis) magnetic photon absorption which in turn leads to asymmetric gamma-ray pulse profiles. The resulting features - softer spectrum of the leading peak and the dominance of the trailing peak above ~5 GeV - agree qualitatively with the EGRET data of the bright gamma-ray pulsars.

J. Dyks; B. Rudak

2002-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

168

Gravitational waves from known pulsars: results from the initial detector era  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of searches for gravitational waves from a large selection of pulsars using data from the most recent science runs (S6, VSR2 and VSR4) of the initial generation of interferometric gravitational wave detectors LIGO (Laser Interferometric Gravitational-wave Observatory) and Virgo. We do not see evidence for gravitational wave emission from any of the targeted sources but produce upper limits on the emission amplitude. We highlight the results from seven young pulsars with large spin-down luminosities. We reach within a factor of five of the canonical spin-down limit for all seven of these, whilst for the Crab and Vela pulsars we further surpass their spin-down limits. We present new or updated limits for 172 other pulsars (including both young and millisecond pulsars). Now that the detectors are undergoing major upgrades, and, for completeness, we bring together all of the most up-to-date results from all pulsars searched for during the operations of the first-generation LIGO, Virgo and GEO600 detectors. This gives a total of 195 pulsars including the most recent results described in this paper.

J. Aasi; J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. Abbott; M. R. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; C. Adams; T. Adams; R. X. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; N. Aggarwal; O. D. Aguiar; P. Ajith; B. Allen; A. Allocca; E. Amador Ceron; D. Amariutei; R. A. Anderson; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. C. Araya; C. Arceneaux; J. Areeda; S. Ast; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; L. Austin; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. T. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. W. Ballmer; J. C. Barayoga; D. Barker; S. H. Barnum; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; A. Basti; J. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M. G. Beker; A. S. Bell; C. Bell; I. Belopolski; G. Bergmann; J. M. Berliner; D. Bersanetti; A. Bertolini; D. Bessis; J. Betzwieser; P. T. Beyersdorf; T. Bhadbhade; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; M. Boer; C. Bogan; C. Bond; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; S. Bose; L. Bosi; J. Bowers; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; C. A. Brannen; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; D. D. Brown; F. Brckner; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; J. Caldern Bustillo; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; K. C. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; L. Carbone; S. Caride; A. Castiglia; S. Caudill; M. Cavagli; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; R. Chakraborty; T. Chalermsongsak; S. Chao; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; X. Chen; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. S. Cho; J. Chow; N. Christensen; Q. Chu; S. S. Y. Chua; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; D. E. Clark; J. A. Clark; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; A. Colla; M. Colombini; M. Constancio Jr.; A. Conte; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. W. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; S. Countryman; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; K. Craig; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; S. G. Crowder; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; K. Dahl; T. Dal Canton; M. Damjanic; S. L. Danilishin; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; B. Daudert; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; G. S. Davies; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; R. De Rosa; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; W. Del Pozzo; E. Deleeuw; S. Delglise; T. Denker; T. Dent; H. Dereli; V. Dergachev; R. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; A. Di Virgilio; M. Daz; A. Dietz; K. Dmitry; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Doravari; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; J. -C. Dumas; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; J. Eichholz; S. S. Eikenberry; G. Endr?czi; R. Essick; T. Etzel; K. Evans; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Q. Fang; S. Farinon; B. Farr; W. Farr; M. Favata; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; I. Ferrante; F. Ferrini; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. Fisher; R. Flaminio; E. Foley; S. Foley; E. Forsi; N. Fotopoulos; J. -D. Fournier; S. Franco; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; M. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; M. -K. Fujimoto; P. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. Gair; L. Gammaitoni; J. Garcia; F. Garufi; N. Gehrels; G. Gemme; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. Gergely; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; S. Gil-Casanova; C. Gill; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; R. Goetz; L. Gondan; G. Gonzlez; N. Gordon; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Gossan; S. Goler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; C. Griffo; P. Groot; H. Grote; K. Grover; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. Guido; K. E. Gushwa; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; B. Hall; E. Hall; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; M. Hanke; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. T. Hartman; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. Heefner; A. Heidmann; M. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; G. Hemming; M. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; M. Heurs; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; M. Holtrop; T. Hong; S. Hooper; T. Horrom; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; Y. Hu; Z. Hua; V. Huang; E. A. Huerta; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; M. Huynh; T. Huynh-Dinh; J. Iafrate; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; B. R. Iyer; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; E. James; H. Jang; Y. J. Jang; P. Jaranowski; F. Jimnez-Forteza; W. W. Johnson; D. Jones; D. I. Jones; R. Jones; R. J. G. Jonker; L. Ju; Haris K; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; M. Kasprzack; R. Kasturi; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kaufman; K. Kawabe; S. Kawamura; F. Kawazoe

2013-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

169

Gravitational-waves from known pulsars: results from the initial detector era  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of searches for gravitational-waves from a large selection of pulsars using data from the most recent science runs (S6, VSR2 and VSR4) of the initial generation of interferometric gravitational-wave detectors LIGO (Laser Interferometric Gravitational-wave Observatory) and Virgo. We do not see evidence for gravitational-wave emission from any of the targeted sources but produce upper limits on the emission amplitude. We highlight the results from seven young pulsars with large spin-down luminosities. We reach within a factor of five of the canonical spin-down limit for all seven of these, whilst for the Crab and Vela pulsars we further surpass their spin-down limits. We present new or updated limits for 172 other pulsars (including both young and millisecond pulsars). Now that the detectors are undergoing major upgrades, and, for completeness, we bring together all of the most up-to-date results from all pulsars searched for during the operations of the first-generation LIGO, Virgo and G...

Aasi, J; Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T; Abernathy, M R; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adams, T; Adhikari, R X; Agathos, M; Affeldt, C; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Anderson, R A; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C; Areeda, J; Ast, S; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Austin, L; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barker, D; Barnum, S H; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Belopolski, I; Bergmann, G; Berliner, J M; Bertolini, A; Bessis, D; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bhadbhade, T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bowers, J; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brannen, C A; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Breckner, F; Bulik, T; Buonanno, A; Bulten, H J; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Bustillo, J Caldern; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K C; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Castiglia, A; Caudill, S; Cavagli, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S S Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, D E; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cuoco, E; Cunningham, L; D'Antonio, S; Dahl, K; Canton, T Dal; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Del Pozzo, W; Deleeuw, E; Delglise, S; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Daz, M; Dietz, A; Dmitry, K; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Endr?czi, G; Essick, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fang, Q; Farr, B; Farr, W; Favata, M; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R; Flaminio, R; Foley, E; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Forte, L A; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fujimoto, M -K; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Gammaitoni, L; Garcia, J; Garufi, F; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gil-Casanova, S; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; Gonzlez, G; Gordon, N; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S; Goler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Griffo, C; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gushwa, K E; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hall, B; Hall, E; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanke, M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Holtrop, M; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Horrom, T; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hu, Y; Hua, Z; Huang, V; Huerta, E A; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Iafrate, J; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, H; Jang, Y J; Jaranowski, P; Jimnez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; K, Haris; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Kasprzack, M; Kasturi, R; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kaufman, K; Kaw, P; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kflian, F; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B K; Kim, C; Kim, K; Kim, N

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Chandra Confirmation of a Pulsar Wind Nebula in DA 495  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As part of a multiwavelength study of the unusual radio supernova remnant DA 495, we present observations made with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Imaging and spectroscopic analysis confirms the previously detected X-ray source at the heart of the annular radio nebula, establishing the radiative properties of two key emission components: a soft unresolved source with a blackbody temperature of 1 MK consistent with a neutron star, surrounded by a nonthermal nebula 40'' in diameter exhibiting a power-law spectrum with photon index Gamma = 1.6+/-0.3, typical of a pulsar wind nebula. The implied spin-down luminosity of the neutron star, assuming a conversion efficiency to nebular flux appropriate to Vela-like pulsars, is ~10^{35} ergs/s, again typical of objects a few tens of kyr old. Morphologically, the nebular flux is slightly enhanced along a direction, in projection on the sky, independently demonstrated to be of significance in radio polarization observations; we argue that this represents the orientation o...

Arzoumanian, Z; Landecker, T L; Kothes, R; Camilo, F

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Linear relation for wind-blown bubble sizes of main-sequence OB stars in a molecular environment and implication for supernova progenitors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We find a linear relationship between the size of a massive star's main-sequence bubble in a molecular environment and the star's initial mass: R_b \\approx 1.21M/Msun - 8.98 pc, assuming a constant interclump pressure. Since stars in the mass range of 8 to 25-30 Msun will end their evolution in the red supergiant phase without launching a Wolf-Rayet wind, the main-sequence wind-blown bubbles are mainly responsible for the extent of molecular gas cavities, while the effect of the photoionization is comparatively small. This linear relation can thus be used to infer the masses of the massive star progenitors of supernova remnants (SNRs) that are discovered to evolve in molecular cavities, while few other means are available for inferring properties of SNR progenitors. We have used this method to estimate the initial masses of the progenitors of eight SNRs: Kes 69, Kes 75, Kes 78, 3C 396, 3C 397, HC 40, Vela, and RX J1713-3946.

Chen, Yang; Chu, You-Hua

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

s042.dvi  

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I I (J P ) = 1 2 (0 - ) Quantum numbers not measured. Values shown are quark-model predictions. See also the B ± /B 0 ADMIXTURE and B ± /B 0 /B 0 s /b-baryon AD- MIXTURE sections. See the Note "Production and Decay of b-flavored Hadrons" at the beginning of the B ± Particle Listings and the Note on "B 0 -B 0 Mixing" near the end of the B 0 Particle Listings. B 0 MASS B 0 MASS B 0 MASS B 0 MASS The fit uses m B + , (m B 0 - m B + ), and m B 0 to determine m B + , m B 0 , and the mass difference. VALUE (MeV) EVTS DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 5279.50± 0.30 OUR FIT 5279.50± 0.30 OUR FIT 5279.50± 0.30 OUR FIT 5279.50± 0.30 OUR FIT 5279.5 ± 0.5 OUR AVERAGE 5279.5 ± 0.5 OUR AVERAGE 5279.5 ± 0.5 OUR AVERAGE 5279.5 ± 0.5 OUR AVERAGE 5279.63± 0.53 ± 0.33 1 ACOSTA 06 CDF p p at 1.96 TeV 5279.1 ± 0.7 ± 0.3 135 2 CSORNA 00 CLE2 e + e - → Υ(4S) 5281.3 ± 2.2 ± 1.4 51 ABE 96B CDF p p at 1.8 TeV * * * We do not use the following data for

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0 0 I (J P ) = 1 2 (0 - ) Quantum numbers not measured. Values shown are quark-model predictions. See also the B ± /B 0 ADMIXTURE and B ± /B 0 /B 0 s /b-baryon AD- MIXTURE sections. See the Note "Production and Decay of b-flavored Hadrons" at the beginning of the B ± Particle Listings and the Note on "B 0 -B 0 Mixing" near the end of the B 0 Particle Listings. B 0 MASS B 0 MASS B 0 MASS B 0 MASS The fit uses m B + , (m B 0 - m B + ), and m B 0 to determine m B + , m B 0 , and the mass difference. VALUE (MeV) EVTS DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 5279.50± 0.33 OUR FIT 5279.50± 0.33 OUR FIT 5279.50± 0.33 OUR FIT 5279.50± 0.33 OUR FIT 5279.5 ± 0.5 OUR AVERAGE 5279.5 ± 0.5 OUR AVERAGE 5279.5 ± 0.5 OUR AVERAGE 5279.5 ± 0.5 OUR AVERAGE 5279.63± 0.53 ± 0.33 1 ACOSTA 06 CDF p p at 1.96 TeV 5279.1 ± 0.7 ± 0.3 135 2 CSORNA 00 CLE2 e + e - → Υ(4S) 5281.3 ± 2.2 ± 1.4 51 ABE 96B CDF p p at 1.8 TeV * * * We do not use the following data for

174

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7 7 χ c2 (1P) I G (J PC ) = 0 + (2 + + ) See the Review on "ψ(2S) and χ c branching ratios" before the NODE=M057 χ c0 (1P) Listings. χ c2 (1P) MASS χ c2 (1P) MASS χ c2 (1P) MASS χ c2 (1P) MASS NODE=M057M NODE=M057M VALUE (MeV) EVTS DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 3556.20 ± 0.09 OUR AVERAGE 3556.20 ± 0.09 OUR AVERAGE 3556.20 ± 0.09 OUR AVERAGE 3556.20 ± 0.09 OUR AVERAGE 3555.3 ± 0.6 ± 2.2 2.5k UEHARA 08 BELL γ γ → hadrons 3555.70 ± 0.59 ± 0.39 ABLIKIM 05G BES2 ψ(2S) → γ χ c2 3556.173 ± 0.123 ± 0.020 ANDREOTTI 05A E835 p p → e + e - γ 3559.9 ± 2.9 EISENSTEIN 01 CLE2 e + e - → e + e - χ c2 3556.4 ± 0.7 BAI 99B BES ψ(2S) → γ X 3556.22 ± 0.131 ± 0.020 585 1 ARMSTRONG 92 E760 p p → e + e - γ 3556.9 ± 0.4 ± 0.5 50 BAGLIN 86B SPEC p p → e + e - X 3557.8 ± 0.2 ± 4 2 GAISER 86 CBAL ψ(2S) → γ X 3553.4 ± 2.2 66 3 LEMOIGNE 82 GOLI 185 π - Be → γ µ + µ - A 3555.9 ± 0.7 4 OREGLIA 82 CBAL e + e - → J/ψ 2γ 3557 ± 1.5

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3 3 Page 1 NODE=S041 B ± I (J P ) = 1 2 (0 - ) Quantum numbers not measured. Values shown are quark-model NODE=S041 predictions. See also the B ± /B 0 ADMIXTURE and B ± /B 0 /B 0 s /b-baryon AD- MIXTURE sections. B ± MASS B ± MASS B ± MASS B ± MASS NODE=S041M The fit uses m B + , (m B 0 - m B + ), and m B 0 to determine m B + , m B 0 , NODE=S041M and the mass difference. NODE=S041M VALUE (MeV) EVTS DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 5279.26 ± 0.17 OUR FIT 5279.26 ± 0.17 OUR FIT 5279.26 ± 0.17 OUR FIT 5279.26 ± 0.17 OUR FIT NEW [5279.25 ± 0.17 MeV OUR 2012 FIT] 5279.25 ± 0.26 OUR AVERAGE 5279.25 ± 0.26 OUR AVERAGE 5279.25 ± 0.26 OUR AVERAGE 5279.25 ± 0.26 OUR AVERAGE 5279.38 ± 0.11 ± 0.33 1 AAIJ 12E LHCB p p at 7 TeV 5279.10 ± 0.41 ± 0.36 2 ACOSTA 06 CDF p p at 1.96 TeV 5279.1 ± 0.4 ± 0.4 526 3 CSORNA 00 CLE2 e + e - → Υ(4S) 5279.1 ± 1.7 ± 1.4 147 ABE 96B CDF p p at 1.8 TeV * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc.

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c2 c2 (1P) I G (J PC ) = 0 + (2 + + ) See the Review on "ψ(2S) and χ c branching ratios" before the χ c0 (1P) Listings. χ c2 (1P) MASS χ c2 (1P) MASS χ c2 (1P) MASS χ c2 (1P) MASS VALUE (MeV) EVTS DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 3556.20 ± 0.09 OUR AVERAGE 3556.20 ± 0.09 OUR AVERAGE 3556.20 ± 0.09 OUR AVERAGE 3556.20 ± 0.09 OUR AVERAGE 3555.70 ± 0.59 ± 0.39 ABLIKIM 05G BES2 ψ(2S) → γ χ c2 3556.173± 0.123 ± 0.020 ANDREOTTI 05A E835 p p → e + e - γ 3559.9 ± 2.9 EISENSTEIN 01 CLE2 e + e - → e + e - χ c2 3556.4 ± 0.7 BAI 99B BES ψ(2S) → γ X 3556.22 ± 0.131 ± 0.020 585 1 ARMSTRONG 92 E760 p p → e + e - γ 3556.9 ± 0.4 ± 0.5 50 BAGLIN 86B SPEC p p → e + e - X 3557.8 ± 0.2 ± 4 2 GAISER 86 CBAL ψ(2S) → γ X 3553.4 ± 2.2 66 3 LEMOIGNE 82 GOLI 185 π - Be → γ µ + µ - A 3555.9 ± 0.7 4 OREGLIA 82 CBAL e + e - → J/ψ 2γ 3557 ± 1.5 69 5 HIMEL 80 MRK2 e + e - → J/ψ 2γ 3551 ± 11 15 BRANDELIK 79B DASP e + e - → J/ψ 2γ 3553 ± 4 5 BARTEL

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NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 I (J P ) = 1 2 (0 - ) Quantum numbers not measured. Values shown are quark-model predictions. See also the B ± /B 0 ADMIXTURE and B ± /B 0 /B 0 s /b-baryon AD- MIXTURE sections. See the Note "Production and Decay of b-flavored Hadrons" at the beginning of the B ± Particle Listings and the Note on "B 0 -B 0 Mixing and CP Violation in B Decay" near the end of the B 0 Particle Listings. B 0 MASS B 0 MASS B 0 MASS B 0 MASS The fit uses m B + , (m B 0 - m B + ), and m B 0 to determine m B + , m B 0 , and the mass difference. VALUE (MeV) EVTS DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 5279.4±0.5 OUR FIT 5279.4±0.5 OUR FIT 5279.4±0.5 OUR FIT 5279.4±0.5 OUR FIT 5279.3±0.7 OUR AVERAGE 5279.3±0.7 OUR AVERAGE 5279.3±0.7 OUR AVERAGE 5279.3±0.7 OUR AVERAGE 5279.1±0.7 ±0.3 135 1 CSORNA 00 CLE2 e + e - → Υ(4S) 5281.3±2.2 ±1.4 51 ABE 96B CDF p p at 1.8 TeV * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. *

178

s042.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 I (J P ) = 1 2 (0 - ) Quantum numbers not measured. Values shown are quark-model predictions. See also the B ± /B 0 ADMIXTURE and B ± /B 0 /B 0 s /b-baryon AD- MIXTURE sections. See the Note "Production and Decay of b-flavored Hadrons" at the beginning of the B ± Particle Listings and the Note on "B 0 -B 0 Mixing and CP Violation in B Decay" near the end of the B 0 Particle Listings. B 0 MASS B 0 MASS B 0 MASS B 0 MASS The fit uses m B + , (m B 0 - m B + ), and m B 0 to determine m B + , m B 0 , and the mass difference. VALUE (MeV) EVTS DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 5279.4±0.5 OUR FIT 5279.4±0.5 OUR FIT 5279.4±0.5 OUR FIT 5279.4±0.5 OUR FIT 5279.3±0.7 OUR AVERAGE 5279.3±0.7 OUR AVERAGE 5279.3±0.7 OUR AVERAGE 5279.3±0.7 OUR AVERAGE 5279.1±0.7 ±0.3 135 1 CSORNA 00 CLE2 e + e - → Υ(4S) 5281.3±2.2 ±1.4 51 ABE 96B CDF p p at 1.8 TeV * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. *

179

Citation: W.-M. Yao  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

c0 c0 (1P) I G (J PC ) = 0 + (0 + + ) χ c0 (1P) MASS χ c0 (1P) MASS χ c0 (1P) MASS χ c0 (1P) MASS VALUE (MeV) EVTS DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 3414.76 ± 0.35 OUR AVERAGE 3414.76 ± 0.35 OUR AVERAGE 3414.76 ± 0.35 OUR AVERAGE 3414.76 ± 0.35 OUR AVERAGE Error includes scale factor of 1.2. 3414.21 ± 0.39 ± 0.27 ABLIKIM 05G BES2 ψ(2S) → γ χ c0 3414.7 + 0.7 - 0.6 ± 0.2 1 ANDREOTTI 03 E835 p p → χ c0 → π 0 π 0 3415.5 ± 0.4 ± 0.4 392 2 BAGNASCO 02 E835 p p → χ c0 → J/ψ γ 3417.4 + 1.8 - 1.9 ± 0.2 1 AMBROGIANI 99B E835 p p → e + e - γ 3414.1 ± 0.6 ± 0.8 BAI 99B BES ψ(2S) → γ X 3417.8 ± 0.4 ± 4 1 GAISER 86 CBAL ψ(2S) → γ X 3416 ± 3 ± 4 3 TANENBAUM 78 MRK1 e + e - * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 3407 ± 11 89 4 ABE 04G BELL 10.6 e + e - → J/ψ(c c) 3416.5 ± 3.0 EISENSTEIN 01 CLE2 e + e - → e + e - χ c0 3422 ± 10 3 BARTEL 78B CNTR e + e - → J/ψ 2γ 3415 ± 9 3 BIDDICK 77 CNTR e + e - → γ X 1 Using mass

180

Citation: W.-M. Yao  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

B B 0 I (J P ) = 1 2 (0 - ) Quantum numbers not measured. Values shown are quark-model predictions. See also the B ± /B 0 ADMIXTURE and B ± /B 0 /B 0 s /b-baryon AD- MIXTURE sections. See the Note "Production and Decay of b-flavored Hadrons" at the beginning of the B ± Particle Listings and the Note on "B 0 -B 0 Mixing" near the end of the B 0 Particle Listings. B 0 MASS B 0 MASS B 0 MASS B 0 MASS The fit uses m B + , (m B 0 - m B + ), and m B 0 to determine m B + , m B 0 , and the mass difference. VALUE (MeV) EVTS DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 5279.4 ± 0.5 OUR FIT 5279.4 ± 0.5 OUR FIT 5279.4 ± 0.5 OUR FIT 5279.4 ± 0.5 OUR FIT 5279.3 ± 0.7 OUR AVERAGE 5279.3 ± 0.7 OUR AVERAGE 5279.3 ± 0.7 OUR AVERAGE 5279.3 ± 0.7 OUR AVERAGE 5279.1 ± 0.7 ± 0.3 135 1 CSORNA 00 CLE2 e + e - → Υ(4S) 5281.3 ± 2.2 ± 1.4 51 ABE 96B CDF p p at 1.8 TeV * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 5279.2 ± 0.54 ± 2.0 340

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181

s042.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 I (J P ) = 1 2 (0 - ) Quantum numbers not measured. Values shown are quark-model predictions. See also the B ± /B 0 ADMIXTURE and B ± /B 0 /B 0 s /b-baryon AD- MIXTURE sections. See the Note "Production and Decay of b-flavored Hadrons" at the beginning of the B ± Particle Listings and the Note on "B 0 -B 0 Mixing" near the end of the B 0 Particle Listings. B 0 MASS B 0 MASS B 0 MASS B 0 MASS The fit uses m B + , (m B 0 - m B + ), and m B 0 to determine m B + , m B 0 , and the mass difference. VALUE (MeV) EVTS DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 5279.4± 0.5 OUR FIT 5279.4± 0.5 OUR FIT 5279.4± 0.5 OUR FIT 5279.4± 0.5 OUR FIT 5279.3± 0.7 OUR AVERAGE 5279.3± 0.7 OUR AVERAGE 5279.3± 0.7 OUR AVERAGE 5279.3± 0.7 OUR AVERAGE 5279.1± 0.7 ± 0.3 135 1 CSORNA 00 CLE2 e + e - → Υ(4S) 5281.3± 2.2 ± 1.4 51 ABE 96B CDF p p at 1.8 TeV * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 5279.2± 0.54 ± 2.0 340

182

Assessment of High Rates of Precocious Male Maturation in a Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Hatchery Program, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Yakima River Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Project in Washington State is currently one of the most ambitious efforts to enhance a natural salmon population in the United States. Over the past five years we have conducted research to characterize the developmental physiology of naturally- and hatchery-reared wild progeny spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Yakima River basin. Fish were sampled at the main hatchery in Cle Elum, at remote acclimation sites and, during smolt migration, at downstream dams. Throughout these studies the maturational state of all fish was characterized using combinations of visual and histological analysis of testes, gonadosomatic index (GSI), and measurement of plasma 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT). We established that a plasma 11-KT threshold of 0.8 ng/ml could be used to designate male fish as either immature or precociously maturing approximately 8 months prior to final maturation (1-2 months prior to release as 'smolts'). Our analyses revealed that 37-49% of the hatchery-reared males from this program undergo precocious maturation at 2 years of age and a proportion of these fish appear to residualize in the upper Yakima River basin throughout the summer. An unnaturally high incidence of precocious male maturation may result in loss of potential returning anadromous adults, skewing of female: male sex ratios, ecological, and genetic impacts on wild populations and other native species. Precocious male maturation is significantly influenced by growth rate at specific times of year and future studies will be conducted to alter maturation rates through seasonal growth rate manipulations.

Larsen, Donald; Beckman, Brian; Cooper, Kathleen

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Electrochromic windows for commercial buildings: Monitored results from a full-scale testbed  

SciTech Connect

Electrochromic glazings promise to be the next major advance in energy-efficient window technology, helping to transform windows and skylights from an energy liability to an energy source for the nation's building stock. Monitored results from a full-scale demonstration of large-area electrochromic windows are given. The test consisted of two side-by-side, 3.7x4.6-m, office-like rooms. In each room, five 62x173-cm lower electrochromic windows and five 62x43-cm upper electrochromic windows formed a large window wall. The window-to-exterior-wall ratio (WWR) was 0.40. The southeast-facing electrochromic windows had an overall visible transmittance (Tv) range of Tv=0.11-0.38 and were integrated with a dimmable electric lighting system to provide constant work plane illuminance and to control direct sun. Daily lighting use from the automated electrochromic window system decreased by 6 to 24% compared to energy use with static, low-transmission (Tv =0.11), unshaded windows in overcast to cle ar sky winter conditions in Oakland, California. Daily lighting energy use increased as much as 13% compared to lighting energy use with static windows that had Tv=0.38. Even when lighting energy savings were not obtainable, the visual environment produced by the electrochromic windows, indicated by well-controlled window and room luminance levels, was significantly improved for computer-type tasks throughout the day compared to the visual environment with unshaded 38%-glazing. Cooling loads were not measured, but previous building energy simulations indicate that additional savings could be achieved. To ensure visual and thermal comfort, electrochromics require occasional use of interior or exterior shading systems when direct sun is present. Other recommendations to improve electrochromic materials and controls are noted along with some architectural constraints.

Lee, Eleanor S.; DiBartolomeo, Dennis L.; Selkowitz, Stephen E.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

A Search for Gamma-Ray Bursts and Pulsars, and the Application of Kalman Filters to Gamma-Ray Reconstruction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Part I describes the analysis of periodic and transient signals in EGRET data. A method to search for the transient flux from gamma-ray bursts independent of triggers from other gamma-ray instruments is developed. Several known gamma-ray bursts were independently detected, and there is evidence for a previously unknown gamma-ray burst candidate. Statistical methods using maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference are developed and implemented to extract periodic signals from gamma-ray sources in the presence of significant astrophysical background radiation. The analysis was performed on six pulsars and three pulsar candidates. The three brightest pulsars, Crab, Vela, and Geminga, were readily identified, and would have been detected independently in the EGRET data without knowledge of the pulse period. No significant pulsation was detected in the three pulsar candidates. Eighteen X-ray binaries were examined. None showed any evidence of periodicity. In addition, methods for calculating the detection threshold of periodic flux modulation were developed. The future hopes of gamma-ray astronomy lie in the development of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope, or GLAST. Part II describes the development and results of the particle track reconstruction software for a GLAST science prototype instrument beam test. The Kalman filtering method of track reconstruction is introduced and implemented. Monte Carlo simulations, very similar to those used for the full GLAST instrument, were performed to predict the instrumental response of the prototype. The prototype was tested in a gamma-ray beam at SLAC. The reconstruction software was used to determine the incident gamma-ray direction. It was found that the simulations did an excellent job of representing the actual instrument response.

B. B. Jones

2002-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

185

CANDIDATE X-RAY-EMITTING OB STARS IN THE CARINA NEBULA IDENTIFIED VIA INFRARED SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report the results of a new survey of massive, OB stars throughout the Carina Nebula using the X-ray point source catalog provided by the Chandra Carina Complex Project (CCCP) in conjunction with infrared (IR) photometry from the Two Micron All-Sky Survey and the Spitzer Space Telescope Vela-Carina survey. Mid-IR photometry is relatively unaffected by extinction, hence it provides strong constraints on the luminosities of OB stars, assuming that their association with the Carina Nebula, and hence their distance, is confirmed. We fit model stellar atmospheres to the optical (UBV) and IR spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 182 OB stars with known spectral types and measure the bolometric luminosity and extinction for each star. We find that the extinction law measured toward the OB stars has two components: A{sub V} = 1-1.5 mag produced by foreground dust with a ratio of total-to-selective absorption R{sub V} = 3.1 plus a contribution from local dust with R{sub V} > 4.0 in the Carina molecular clouds that increases as A{sub V} increases. Using X-ray emission as a strong indicator of association with Carina, we identify 94 candidate OB stars with L{sub bol} {approx}> 10{sup 4} L{sub sun} by fitting their IR SEDs. If the candidate OB stars are eventually confirmed by follow-up spectroscopic observations, the number of cataloged OB stars in the Carina Nebula will increase by {approx}50%. Correcting for incompleteness due to OB stars falling below the L{sub bol} cutoff or the CCCP detection limit, these results potentially double the size of the young massive stellar population.

Povich, Matthew S.; Townsley, Leisa K.; Broos, Patrick S.; Getman, Konstantin V. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Gagne, Marc [Department of Geology and Astronomy, West Chester University, West Chester, PA 19383 (United States); Babler, Brian L.; Meade, Marilyn R.; Townsend, Richard H. D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, 475 N. Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Indebetouw, Remy; Majewski, Steven R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Robitaille, Thomas P., E-mail: povich@astro.psu.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

LIFTING THE DUSTY VEIL WITH NEAR- AND MID-INFRARED PHOTOMETRY. III. TWO-DIMENSIONAL EXTINCTION MAPS OF THE GALACTIC MIDPLANE USING THE RAYLEIGH-JEANS COLOR EXCESS METHOD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We provide new, high-resolution A(K{sub s} ) extinction maps of the heavily reddened Galactic midplane based on the Rayleigh-Jeans Color Excess ({sup R}JCE{sup )} method. RJCE determines star-by-star reddening based on a combination of near- and mid-infrared photometry. The new RJCE-generated maps have 2' Multiplication-Sign 2' pixels and span some of the most severely extinguished regions of the Galaxy-those covered with Spitzer/IRAC imaging by the GLIMPSE-I, -II, -3D, and Vela-Carina surveys, from 256 Degree-Sign < l < 65 Degree-Sign and, in general, for |b| {<=} 1 Degree-Sign -1.{sup 0}5 (extending up to |b| {<=} 4 Degree-Sign in the bulge). Using RJCE extinction measurements, we generate dereddened color-magnitude diagrams and, in turn, create maps based on main sequence, red clump, and red giant star tracers, each probing different distances and thereby providing coarse three-dimensional information on the relative placement of dust cloud structures. The maps generated from red giant stars, which reach to {approx}18-20 kpc, probe beyond most of the Milky Way extinction in most directions and provide close to a 'total Galactic extinction' map-at minimum they provide high angular resolution maps of lower limits on A(K{sub s} ). Because these maps are generated directly from measurements of reddening by the very dust being mapped, rather than inferred on the basis of some less direct means, they are likely the most accurate to date for charting in detail the highly patchy differential extinction in the Galactic midplane. We provide downloadable FITS files and an IDL tool for retrieving extinction values for any line of sight within our mapped regions.

Nidever, David L.; Zasowski, Gail; Majewski, Steven R., E-mail: dln5q@virginia.edu, E-mail: gz2n@virginia.edu, E-mail: srm4n@virginia.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Minimal Cooling of Neutron Stars: A New Paradigm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new classification of neutron star cooling scenarios, involving either ``minimal'' cooling or ``enhanced'' cooling is proposed. The minimal cooling scenario replaces and extends the so-called standard cooling scenario to include neutrino emission from the Cooper pair breaking and formation process. This emission dominates that due to the modified Urca process for temperatures close to the critical temperature for superfluid pairing. Minimal cooling is distinguished from enhanced cooling by the absence of neutrino emission from any direct Urca process, due either to nucleons or to exotica. Within the minimal cooling scenario, theoretical cooling models can be considered to be a four parameter family involving the equation of state of dense matter, superfluid properties of dense matter, the composition of the neutron star envelope, and the mass of the neutron star. Consequences of minimal cooling are explored through extensive variations of these parameters. Results are compared with the inferred properties of thermally-emitting neutron stars in order to ascertain if enhanced cooling occurs in any of them. All stars for which thermal emissions have been clearly detected are at least marginally consistent with the lack of enhanced cooling. The two pulsars PSR 0833-45 (Vela) and PSR 1706-44 would require enhanced cooling in case their ages and/or temperatures are on the lower side of their estimated values whereas the four stars PSR 0656+14, PSR 1055-52, Geminga, and RX J0720.4-3125 may require some source of internal heating in case their age and/or luminosity are on the upper side of their estimated values. The new upper limits on the thermal luminosity of PSR J0205+6449 and RX J0007.0+7302 are indicative of the occurrence of some enhanced neutrino emission beyond the minimal scenario.

Dany Page; James M. Lattimer; Madappa Prakash; Andrew W. Steiner

2004-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

188

Development of a Natural Rearing System to Improve Supplemental Fish Quality, 1999-2003 Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) has been conducting Natural Rearing Enhancement System (NATURES) research since the early 1990s. NATURES studies have looked at a variety of mechanisms to enhance production of wild-like salmonids from hatcheries. The goal of NATURES research is to develop fish culture techniques that enable hatcheries to produce salmon with more wild-like characteristics and increased postrelease survival. The development of such techniques is called for in the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. This document is the draft report for the Supplemental Fish Quality Contract DE-AI79-91BP20651 Over the history of the project, the effects of seminatural raceway habitats, automated underwater feeders, exercise current velocities, live food diets, and predator avoidance training have been investigated. The findings of these studies are reported in an earlier contract report (Maynard et al. 1996a). The current report focuses on research that has been conducted between 1999 and 2002. This includes studies on the effect of exercise on salmon and steelhead trout, effects of predator avoid training, integration of NATUES protocols into production hatcheries, and the study of social behavior of steelhead grown in enriched and conventional environments. Traditionally, salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) are reared in barren concrete raceways that lack natural substrate, in-stream structure, or overhead cover. The fish are fed in an unnatural manner with artificial feeds mechanically or hand broadcast across the water surface. This traditional approach has increased the egg-to-smolt survival of hatchery-reared fish by an order of magnitude over that experienced by wild-reared salmon. However, once hatchery-reared fish are released into the wild their smolt-to-adult survival is usually much lower than wild-reared salmon. The reduced postrelease survival of hatchery-reared fish may stem from differences in their behavior and morphology compared to wild-reared salmon. After release, hatchery-reared fish are inefficient foragers and are often found with empty stomachs or stomachs filled with indigestible debris (Miller 1953, Hochachka 1961, Reimers 1963, Sosiak et al. 1979, Myers 1980, O'Grady 1983, Johnsen and Ugedal 1986). Their social behavior also differs, with hatchery-reared fish congregating at higher densities, being more aggressive, and displaying less territory fidelity than wild-reared fish (Fenderson et al. 1968, Bachman 1984, Swain and Riddell 1990). In the natural environment this results in hatchery-reared fish spending more time in high-risk aggressive behavior and less time in beneficial foraging behavior than their wild-reared counterparts. Hatchery-reared fish are also more surface oriented than wild-reared salmonids (Mason et al. 1967, Sosiak 1978). This increases their risk of being attacked by avian predators, such as kingfishers (Ceryle spp.), which search for fish near the surface. Although some of the differences between wild and hatchery-reared fish are innate (Reisenbichler and McIntyre 1977, Swain and Riddell 1990), many are conditioned and can be modified by altering the hatchery rearing environment. NATURES studies are aimed at developing a more natural salmon culture environment to prevent the development of these unnatural attributes in hatchery-reared fish. NATURES fish culture practices are already producing salmon with up to about 50% higher in-stream survival than conventionally-reared fish (Maynard et al. 1996b). When these techniques are incorporated into production releases, they should also translate into increased smolt-to-adult survival. Conservation and supplementation programs can use NATURES-reared salmonids to rebuild stocks currently listed as endangered and threatened into healthy self-sustaining runs more rapidly than traditional programs. Traditional production programs can also use high-survival NATURES-reared fish to reduce their impact on wild populations, while still meeting their adult mitigation goals.

Maynard, Desmond J.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

189

m056.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1P) 1P) I G (J PC ) = 0 + (0 + + ) χ c0 (1P) MASS χ c0 (1P) MASS χ c0 (1P) MASS χ c0 (1P) MASS VALUE (MeV) EVTS DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 3414.75± 0.31 OUR AVERAGE 3414.75± 0.31 OUR AVERAGE 3414.75± 0.31 OUR AVERAGE 3414.75± 0.31 OUR AVERAGE 3414.2 ± 0.5 ± 2.3 5.4k UEHARA 08 BELL γ γ → χ c0 → hadrons 3406 ± 7 ± 6 230 1 ABE 07 BELL e + e - → J/ψ (c c) 3414.21± 0.39± 0.27 ABLIKIM 05G BES2 ψ(2S) → γ χ c0 3414.7 + 0.7 - 0.6 ± 0.2 2 ANDREOTTI 03 E835 p p → χ c0 → π 0 π 0 3415.5 ± 0.4 ± 0.4 392 3 BAGNASCO 02 E835 p p → χ c0 → J/ψ γ 3417.4 + 1.8 - 1.9 ± 0.2 2 AMBROGIANI 99B E835 p p → e + e - γ 3414.1 ± 0.6 ± 0.8 BAI 99B BES ψ(2S) → γ X 3417.8 ± 0.4 ± 4 2 GAISER 86 CBAL ψ(2S) → γ X 3416 ± 3 ± 4 4 TANENBAUM 78 MRK1 e + e - * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 3416.5 ± 3.0 EISENSTEIN 01 CLE2 e + e - → e + e - χ c0 3422 ± 10 4 BARTEL 78B CNTR e + e - → J/ψ 2γ 3415 ± 9 4 BIDDICK 77 CNTR e

190

CONSTRAINTS ON THE COMPACT OBJECT MASS IN THE ECLIPSING HIGH-MASS X-RAY BINARY XMMU J013236.7+303228 IN M 33  

SciTech Connect

We present optical spectroscopic measurements of the eclipsing high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB) XMMU J013236.7+303228 in M 33. Based on spectra taken at multiple epochs of the 1.73 day binary orbital period we determine physical as well as orbital parameters for the donor star. We find the donor to be a B1.5IV subgiant with effective temperature T = 22, 000-23, 000 K. From the luminosity, temperature, and known distance to M 33 we derive a radius of R 8.9 {+-} 0.5 R{sub Sun }. From the radial-velocity measurements, we determine a velocity semi-amplitude of K{sub opt} = 63 {+-} 12 km s{sup -1}. Using the physical properties of the B star determined from the optical spectrum, we estimate the star's mass to be M{sub opt} = 11 {+-} 1 M{sub Sun }. Based on the X-ray spectrum, the compact companion is likely a neutron star, although no pulsations have yet been detected. Using the spectroscopically derived B star mass we find the neutron star companion mass to be M{sub X} = 2.0 {+-} 0.4 M{sub Sun }, consistent with the neutron star mass in the HMXB Vela X-1, but heavier than the canonical value of 1.4 M{sub Sun} found for many millisecond pulsars. We attempt to use as an additional constraint that the B star radius inferred from temperature, flux, and distance should equate to the Roche radius, since the system accretes by Roche lobe overflow. This leads to substantially larger masses, but by trying to apply the technique to known systems, we find that the masses are consistently overestimated. Attempting to account for that in our uncertainties, we derive M{sub X} = 2.2{sup +0.8}{sub -0.6} M{sub Sun} and M{sub opt} = 13 {+-} 4 M{sub Sun }. We conclude that precise constraints require detailed modeling of the shape of the Roche surface.

Bhalerao, Varun B.; Harrison, Fiona A. [Cahill Center for Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Van Kerkwijk, Marten H. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada)

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

191

THE PLERIONIC SUPERNOVA REMNANT G21.5-0.9 POWERED BY PSR J1833-1034: NEW SPECTROSCOPIC AND IMAGING RESULTS REVEALED WITH THE CHANDRA X-RAY OBSERVATORY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1999, the Chandra X-ray Observatory revealed a 150'' radius halo surrounding the 40'' radius pulsar wind nebula (PWN) G21.5-0.9. A 2005 imaging study of G21.5-0.9 showed that the halo is limb-brightened and suggested that this feature is a candidate for the long-sought supernova remnant (SNR) shell. We present a spectral analysis of SNR G21.5-0.9, using the longest effective observation to date (578.6 ks with the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) and 278.4 ks with the High-Resolution Camera (HRC)) to study unresolved questions about the spectral nature of remnant features, such as the limb brightening of the X-ray halo and the bright knot in the northern part of the halo. The Chandra analysis favors the non-thermal interpretation of the limb. Its spectrum is fit well with a power-law model with a photon index {Gamma} = 2.13 (1.94-2.33) and a luminosity of L{sub x} (0.5-8 keV) = (2.3 {+-} 0.6) x 10{sup 33} erg s{sup -1} (at an assumed distance of 5.0 kpc). An srcut model was also used to fit the spectrum between the radio and X-ray energies. While the absence of a shell in the radio still prohibits constraining the spectrum at radio wavelengths, we assume a range of spectral indices to infer the 1 GHz flux density and the rolloff frequency of the synchrotron spectrum in X-rays and find that the maximum energy to which electrons are accelerated at the shock ranges from {approx}60 to 130 TeV (B/10 {mu}G){sup -1/2}, where B is the magnetic field in units of {mu}G. For the northern knot, we constrain previous models and find that a two-component power-law (or srcut) + pshock model provides an adequate fit, with the pshock model requiring a very low ionization timescale and solar abundances for Mg and Si. Our spectroscopic study of PSR J1833-1034, the highly energetic pulsar powering G21.5-0.9, shows that its spectrum is dominated by hard non-thermal X-ray emission with some evidence of a thermal component that represents {approx}9% of the observed non-thermal emission and that suggests non-standard rapid cooling of the neutron star. Finally, the ACIS and HRC-I images provide the first evidence for variability in the PWN, a property observed in other PWNe such as the Crab and Vela.

Matheson, Heather [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3T 2N2 (Canada); Safi-Harb, Samar, E-mail: matheson@physics.umanitoba.c, E-mail: samar@physics.umanitoba.c [Canada Research Chair. (Canada)

2010-11-20T23:59:59.000Z