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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "graaff confetti explosion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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1

Glossary Term - Van de Graaff Generator  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Uranus Uranus Previous Term (Uranus) Glossary Main Index Next Term (Vanadis) Vanadis Van de Graaff Generator A Van de Graaff generator discharges to a grounded metal sphere. A Van de Graaff generator is a device used to create a high voltage static charge. In this Van de Graaff generator, an electric motor pulls a latex belt over a felt covered pulley. Electrons are transferred from the felt to the belt as the belt pulls away from the pulley. The electrons ride the belt to the upper dome, where a pick-up wire transfers them from the belt to the dome. Each electron carries a negative charge and, since like charges repel, the electrons on the dome attempt to get as far away from each other as possible. At some point, too many electrons are placed on the dome. When this occurs the electrons attempt to reach the earth by leaping

2

BNL | Tandem Van de Graaff | Home  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tandem Van de Graaff Tandem Van de Graaff Tandem Home Conduct Research at the Tandem Capabilities Testing & Callibration SEU Test Facility Ion Species Ion Irradiation / Implantation Schedule Org Chart (.pdf) Contact Welcome to the Tandem The Tandem Van de Graaff Facility consists of two 15-megavolt electrostatic accelerators capable of delivering continuous, or high-intensity pulsed ion beams in a wide range of ion species at various energies to experimental chambers that are available to researchers on a full cost-recovery basis. More » Use the Tandem Follow these simple steps to determine if the Tandem meets your experimental needs, reserve beam time, and to plan for your visit. Review Capabilities Learn what ion species are available at the Tandem and at what LETs, maximum energies, and energy ranges, as well as other capabilities.

3

Research at the BNL Tandem Van de Graaff Facility, 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research programs at the Brookhaven Van de Graaff accelerators are summarized. Major accomplishments of the laboratory are discussed including quasielastic reactions, high-spin spectroscopy, yrast spectra, fusion reactions, and atomic physics. The outside user program at the Laboratory is discussed. Research proposed for 1981 is outlined. (GHT)

Not Available

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Robert Jemison Van de Graaff was born on December 20, 1901 in Tuscaloosa,  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Van de Graaff Picture Van de Graaff Picture Short Biography Of Robert Jemison Van de Graaff Robert Jemison Van de Graaff was born on December 20, 1901 in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. His mother was Minnie Cherokee Hargrove and his father was Adrian Sebastian Van de Graaff. Robert attended the Tuscaloosa public schools and then attended the University of Alabama where he received a BS degree in 1922 and an MS degree in 1923. Both degrees were in mechanical engineering. After graduating from college he worked for the Alabama Power Company for a year as a research assistant. He studied at the Sorbonne in Paris from 1924 to 1925 and while there, attended lectures by Marie Curie on radiation. In 1925 he went to Oxford University in England as a Rhodes Scholar. At Oxford he received a BS in physics in 1926 and a Ph.D. in physics in 1928. While

5

MagLab - Electrostatic Repulsion in Van de Graaff Bubbles Tutorial  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electrostatic Repulsion in Van de Graaff Bubbles This is a Java tutorial, which requires that you have Java, a free software, installed on your computer. It works best if you have...

6

The design and construction of a low cost Van de Graaff generator for nuclear research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

~ Van Atta, and Do Lo Nor thrupp "A Progress Report on the High Voltage Production of Positive Icn and 81 I;. Et hg, " P~hl 1 5II i, 57 5634, II h, 1948, Vanl AttaE Lo 0 ~ 8 Do Lo Eorthrup3 C ~ M ~ Van Atta, and R, J, Van de Graaff3 "The Des~A...

Riggs, James Willborn

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

7

Explosives Center  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Laboratory. An experimental explosive is shown igniting during small-scale impact testing. Nuclear weapons energetic materials science, technology and engineering expertise...

8

Accidental Explosions*  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... several important instances of accidental explosions on record which have occurred in the manufacture of pyrotechnic compositions and other articles of explosive nature, in consequence of a liability to the ... small quantity of an easily oxidisable oil or fat in connection with their application to pyrotechnic purposes. In one instance, some signal lights, composed of a mixture of ingredients ...

1875-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

9

DOE Explosives Safety Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual describes DOE's explosives safety requirements applicable to operations involving the development, testing, handling, and processing of explosives or assemblies containing explosives.

1996-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

10

Explosive complexes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Lead-free primary explosives of the formula [M.sup.II(A).sub.R(B.sup.X).sub.S](C.sup.Y).sub.T, where A is 1,5-diaminotetrazole, and syntheses thereof are described. Substantially stoichiometric equivalents of the reactants lead to high yields of pure compositions thereby avoiding dangerous purification steps.

Huynh, My Hang V. (Los Alamos, NM)

2009-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

11

Explosive complexes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lead-free primary explosives of the formula [M.sup.II(A).sub.R(B.sup.X).sub.S](C.sup.Y).sub.T, where A is 1,5-diaminotetrazole, and syntheses thereof are described. Substantially stoichiometric equivalents of the reactants lead to high yields of pure compositions thereby avoiding dangerous purification steps.

Huynh, My Hang V. (Los Alamos, NM)

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

12

Explosives Safety  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

212-2012 212-2012 June 2012 DOE STANDARD EXPLOSIVES SAFETY U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, DC 20585 MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1212-2012 i TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER I. PURPOSE, SCOPE and APPLICABILITY, EXEMPTIONS, WAIVERS, ABBREVIATIONS, ACRONYMS, AND DEFINITIONS .......... 1 1.0. PURPOSE ............................................................................................................. 1 1.1. Scope and Applicability.............................................................................. 1 2.0. STANDARD ADMINISTRATION AND MANAGEMENT ...................................... 3 3.0. EXEMPTIONS ....................................................................................................... 4

13

Insensitive Extrudable Explosive  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Insensitive Extrudable Explosive Insensitive Extrudable Explosive Insensitive Extrudable Explosive Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists have developed a novel explosive using a new class of materials in which an energetic binder is chemically attached to a particulate solid explosive using an innovative technique. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Insensitive Extrudable Explosive Applications: Plastic and extrudable explosive replacement Demolition Seismic prospecting Geographical mapping Oil & gas industry Quarrying Mining Construction Military and law enforcement Flexible shaped charges Shock hardening Explosive welding Sheet explosives Detonating cord (cased or bare) Benefits: Compatible with standard explosives Safer than current technology (i.e. insensitive to impact and other

14

Explosive simulants for testing explosive detection systems  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Explosives simulants that include non-explosive components are disclosed that facilitate testing of equipment designed to remotely detect explosives. The simulants are non-explosive, non-hazardous materials that can be safely handled without any significant precautions. The simulants imitate real explosives in terms of mass density, effective atomic number, x-ray transmission properties, and physical form, including moldable plastics and emulsions/gels.

Kury, John W. (Danville, CA); Anderson, Brian L. (Lodi, CA)

1999-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

15

Nuclear Explosive Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive safety (NES) elements of DOE O 452.1E, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program, for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations (NEOs).

2014-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

16

Nuclear Explosive Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Department of Energy (DOE) Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive safety (NES) elements of DOE O 452.1E, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program, or successor directive, for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations (NEOs).

2015-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

17

Coal-mining Explosives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... , or ' permitted' explosive, as it is called, is by no means a flameless explosive. If we are to learn anything about the mechanism of ignition of a ...

1928-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

18

Insensitive Extrudable Explosive  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

explosives embedded in a polymer matrix. As such, they all rely on weak forces, such as surface tension, for adhesion between the explosive particles and binder material. This...

19

Extrusion cast explosive  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Improved, multiphase, high performance, high energy, extrusion cast explosive compositions, comprising, a crystalline explosive material; an energetic liquid plasticizer; a urethane prepolymer, comprising a blend of polyvinyl formal, and polycaprolactone; a polyfunctional isocyanate; and a catalyst are disclosed. These new explosive compositions exhibit higher explosive content, a smooth detonation front, excellent stability over long periods of storage, and lower sensitivity to mechanical stimulants.

Scribner, Kenneth J. (Livermore, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Explosives going dark  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Explosives going dark Explosives going dark 1663 Los Alamos science and technology magazine Latest Issue:November 2013 All Issues » submit Explosives going dark An enhanced biomarker developed at Los Alamos can be used in the field to detect explosives and other hazardous materials. November 25, 2013 Explosives going dark This fluorescent protein, developed at Los Alamos, is unusually stable even when briefly boiled, making it useful for unconventional applications, such as sniffing out explosives and toxins. An enhanced green fluorescent protein stops glowing when explosives are present. Nitroorganic high explosives, including TNT and RDX, as well as certain other toxins, poisons, and nerve agents, have been shown to suppress an ultraviolet excitation mechanism that causes a fluorescent biomarker to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "graaff confetti explosion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Extrusion cast explosive  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Improved, multiphase, high performance, high energy, extrusion cast explosive compositions, comprising, a crystalline explosive material; an energetic liquid plasticizer; a urethane prepolymer, comprising a blend of polyvinyl formal, and polycaprolactone; a polyfunctional isocyanate; and a catalyst are disclosed. These new explosive compositions exhibit higher explosive content, a smooth detonation front, excellent stability over long periods of storage, and lower sensitivity to mechanical stimulants. 1 fig.

Scribner, K.J.

1985-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

22

Extrusion cast explosive  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is an improved, multiphase, high performance, high energy, extrusion cast explosive compositions, comprising, a crystalline explosive material; an energetic liquid plasticizer; a urethane prepolymer, comprising a blend of polyvinyl formal, and polycaprolactone; a polyfunctional isocyanate; and a catalyst. These new explosive compositions exhibit higher explosive content, a smooth detonation front, excellent stability over long periods of storage, and lower sensitivity to mechanical stimulants. 1 fig.

Scribner, K.J.

1985-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

23

Inspection tester for explosives  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An inspection tester that can be used anywhere as a primary screening tool by non-technical personnel to determine whether a surface contains explosives. It includes a body with a sample pad. First and second explosives detecting reagent holders and dispensers are operatively connected to the body and the sample pad. The first and second explosives detecting reagent holders and dispensers are positioned to deliver the explosives detecting reagents to the sample pad. A is heater operatively connected to the sample pad.

Haas, Jeffrey S. (San Ramon, CA); Simpson, Randall L. (Livermore, CA); Satcher, Joe H. (Patterson, CA)

2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

24

Inspection tester for explosives  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An inspection tester that can be used anywhere as a primary screening tool by non-technical personnel to determine whether a surface contains explosives. It includes a body with a sample pad. First and second explosives detecting reagent holders and dispensers are operatively connected to the body and the sample pad. The first and second explosives detecting reagent holders and dispensers are positioned to deliver the explosives detecting reagents to the sample pad. A is heater operatively connected to the sample pad.

Haas, Jeffrey S. (San Ramon, CA); Simpson, Randall L. (Livermore, CA); Satcher, Joe H. (Patterson, CA)

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

25

Nuclear Explosive Safety Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual provides supplemental details to support the requirements of DOE O 452.2D, Nuclear Explosive Safety.

2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

26

Detonation in Liquid Explosives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Laboratory, on the initiative of Dr. A. H. Davis, into the process of detonation in explosives, the programme including a photographic study of the ... in explosives, the programme including a photographic study of the detonation Waves in transparent liquid explosivesthe sensitivity of some of which can be varied by ...

D. CRONEY

1948-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

27

DOE Explosives Safety Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Manual describes the Departments explosive safety requirements applicable to operations involving the development, testing, handling, and processing of explosives or assemblies containing explosives. Cancels DOE M 440.1-1. Canceled by DOE O 440.1B Chg 1.

2006-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

28

Plastic explosives Mike Hopkins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plastic explosives Mike Hill Mike Hopkins Doug Ravenel What this talk is about The poster The HHRH The reduced E4 -term 1.1 Plastic explosives: A C4 analog of the Kervaire invariant calculation Conference of Virginia Mike Hopkins Harvard University Doug Ravenel University of Rochester #12;Plastic explosives Mike

Ravenel, Douglas

29

Nuclear Explosive Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Department of Energy (DOE) Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive safety (NES) elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program, for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations (NEOs). Cancels DOE O 452.2C. Admin Chg 1, dated 7-10-13, cancels DOE O 452.2D.

2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

30

Nuclear Explosive Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive safety elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program, for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations. Cancels DOE O 452.2C. Admin Chg 1, 7-10-13

2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

31

Coal dust explosibility  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reports US Bureau of Mines (USBM) research on the explosibility of coal dusts. The purpose of this work is to improve safety in mining and other industries that process or use coal. Most of the tests were conducted in the USBM 20 litre laboratory explosibility chamber. The laboratory data show relatively good agreement with those from full-scale experimental mine tests. The parameters measured included minimum explosible concentrations, maximum explosion pressures, maximum rates of pressure rise, minimum oxygen concentrations, and amounts of limestone rock dust required to inert the coals. The effects of coal volatility and particle size were evaluated, and particle size was determined to be at least as important as volatility in determining the explosion hazard. For all coals tested, the finest sizes were the most hazardous. The coal dust explosibility data are compared to those of other hydrocarbons, such as polyethylene dust and methane gas, in an attempt to understand better the basics of coal combustion.

Kenneth L. Cashdollar

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Explosives Detection, Testing, Ballistics and Armor Development...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Explosives Detection, Testing, Ballistics, and Armor Development Programs Locations: National Security Test Range, Trace Explosives Detection Facility, Bulk Explosives Detection...

33

Explosives tester with heater  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An inspection tester system for testing for explosives. The tester includes a body and a swab unit adapted to be removeably connected to the body. At least one reagent holder and dispenser is operatively connected to the body. The reagent holder and dispenser contains an explosives detecting reagent and is positioned to deliver the explosives detecting reagent to the swab unit. A heater is operatively connected to the body and the swab unit is adapted to be operatively connected to the heater.

Del Eckels, Joel (Livermore, CA); Nunes, Peter J. (Danville, CA); Simpson, Randall L. (Livermore, CA); Whipple, Richard E. (Livermore, CA); Carter, J. Chance (Livermore, CA); Reynolds, John G. (San Ramon, CA)

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

34

Nuclear Explosive Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The directive establishes specific nuclear explosive safety (NES) program requirements to implement the DOE NES standards and other NES criteria for routine and planned nuclear explosive operations. Cancels DOE O 452.2B. Canceled by DOE O 452.2D.

2006-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

35

Explosively pumped laser light  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A single shot laser pumped by detonation of an explosive in a shell casing. The shock wave from detonation of the explosive causes a rare gas to luminesce. The high intensity light from the gas enters a lasing medium, which thereafter outputs a pulse of laser light to disable optical sensors and personnel.

Piltch, Martin S. (Los Alamos, NM); Michelotti, Roy A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Non-detonable explosive simulators  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A simulator which is chemically equivalent to an explosive, but is not detonable. The simulator has particular use in the training of explosives detecting dogs and calibrating sensitive analytical instruments. The explosive simulants may be fabricated by different techniques, a first involves the use of standard slurry coatings to produce a material with a very high binder to explosive ratio without masking the explosive vapor, and the second involves coating inert beads with thin layers of explosive molecules. 5 figs.

Simpson, R.L.; Pruneda, C.O.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Non-detonable explosive simulators  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A simulator which is chemically equivalent to an explosive, but is not detonable. The simulator has particular use in the training of explosives detecting dogs and calibrating sensitive analytical instruments. The explosive simulants may be fabricated by different techniques, a first involves the use of standard slurry coatings to produce a material with a very high binder to explosive ratio without masking the explosive vapor, and the second involves coating inert beads with thin layers of explosive molecules.

Simpson, Randall L. (Livermore, CA); Pruneda, Cesar O. (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Lithium niobate explosion monitor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Monitoring explosive devices is accomplished with a substantially z-cut lithium niobate crystal in abutment with the explosive device. Upon impact by a shock wave from detonation of the explosive device, the crystal emits a current pulse prior to destruction of the crystal. The current pulse is detected by a current viewing transformer and recorded as a function of time in nanoseconds. In order to self-check the crystal, the crystal has a chromium film resistor deposited thereon which may be heated by a current pulse prior to detonation. This generates a charge which is detected by a charge amplifier. 8 figs.

Bundy, C.H.; Graham, R.A.; Kuehn, S.F.; Precit, R.R.; Rogers, M.S.

1990-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

39

Lithium niobate explosion monitor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Monitoring explosive devices is accomplished with a substantially z-cut lithium niobate crystal in abutment with the explosive device. Upon impact by a shock wave from detonation of the explosive device, the crystal emits a current pulse prior to destruction of the crystal. The current pulse is detected by a current viewing transformer and recorded as a function of time in nanoseconds. In order to self-check the crystal, the crystal has a chromium film resistor deposited thereon which may be heated by a current pulse prior to detonation. This generates a charge which is detected by a charge amplifier.

Bundy, Charles H. (Clearwater, FL); Graham, Robert A. (Los Lunas, NM); Kuehn, Stephen F. (Albuquerque, NM); Precit, Richard R. (Albuquerque, NM); Rogers, Michael S. (Albuquerque, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Idaho Explosives Detection System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho Explosives Detection System was developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to respond to threats imposed by delivery trucks potentially carrying explosives into military bases. A full-scale prototype system has been built and is currently undergoing testing. The system consists of two racks, one on each side of a subject vehicle. Each rack includes a neutron generator and an array of NaI detectors. The two neutron generators are pulsed and synchronized. A laptop computer controls the entire system. The control software is easily operable by minimally trained staff. The system was developed to detect explosives in a medium size truck within a 5-min measurement time. System performance was successfully demonstrated with explosives at the INL in June 2004 and at Andrews Air Force Base in July 2004.

Edward L. Reber; Larry G. Blackwood; Andrew J. Edwards; J. Keith Jewell; Kenneth W. Rohde; Edward H. Seabury; Jeffery B. Klinger

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "graaff confetti explosion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Explosive Detection Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To standardize and accelerate implementation of the Department of Energy (DOE) explosive detection program. DOE N 251.40, dated 5/3/01, extends this directive until 12/31/01.

2000-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

42

Idaho Explosive Detection System  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Learn how INL researchers are making the world safer by developing an explosives detection system that can inspect cargo. For more information about INL security research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory

Klinger, Jeff

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

43

Nuclear Explosive Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The directive provides supplemental details to support the requirements of DOE O 452.2C, Nuclear Explosive Safety, dated 6-12-06. Canceled by DOE M 452.2-1A.

2006-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

44

Idaho Explosive Detection System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Learn how INL researchers are making the world safer by developing an explosives detection system that can inspect cargo. For more information about INL security research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory

Klinger, Jeff

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Explosion suppression system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An explosion suppression system and triggering apparatus therefor are provided for quenching gas and dust explosions. An electrically actuated suppression mechanism which dispenses an extinguishing agent into the path ahead of the propagating flame is actuated by a triggering device which is light powered. This triggering device is located upstream of the propagating flame and converts light from the flame to an electrical actuation signal. A pressure arming device electrically connects the triggering device to the suppression device only when the explosion is sensed by a further characteristic thereof beside the flame such as the pioneer pressure wave. The light powered triggering device includes a solar panel which is disposed in the path of the explosion and oriented between horizontally downward and vertical. Testing mechanisms are also preferably provided to test the operation of the solar panel and detonator as well as the pressure arming mechanism.

Sapko, Michael J. (Finleyville, PA); Cortese, Robert A. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Non-detonable and non-explosive explosive simulators  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A simulator which is chemically equivalent to an explosive, but is not detonable or explodable is disclosed. The simulator is a combination of an explosive material with an inert material, either in a matrix or as a coating, where the explosive has a high surface ratio but small volume ratio. The simulator has particular use in the training of explosives detecting dogs, calibrating analytical instruments which are sensitive to either vapor or elemental composition, or other applications where the hazards associated with explosives is undesirable but where chemical and/or elemental equivalence is required. The explosive simulants may be fabricated by different techniques. A first method involves the use of standard slurry coatings to produce a material with a very high binder to explosive ratio without masking the explosive vapor, and a second method involves coating inert substrates with thin layers of explosive. 11 figs.

Simpson, R.L.; Pruneda, C.O.

1997-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

47

Non-detonable and non-explosive explosive simulators  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A simulator which is chemically equivalent to an explosive, but is not detonable or explodable. The simulator is a combination of an explosive material with an inert material, either in a matrix or as a coating, where the explosive has a high surface ratio but small volume ratio. The simulator has particular use in the training of explosives detecting dogs, calibrating analytical instruments which are sensitive to either vapor or elemental composition, or other applications where the hazards associated with explosives is undesirable but where chemical and/or elemental equivalence is required. The explosive simulants may be fabricated by different techniques. A first method involves the use of standard slurry coatings to produce a material with a very high binder to explosive ratio without masking the explosive vapor, and a second method involves coating inert substrates with thin layers of explosive.

Simpson, Randall L. (Livermore, CA); Pruneda, Cesar O. (Livermore, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Explosively separable casing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An explosively separable casing including a cylindrical afterbody and a circular cover for one end of the afterbody is disclosed. The afterbody has a cylindrical tongue extending longitudinally from one end which is matingly received in a corresponding groove in the cover. The groove is sized to provide a pocket between the end of the tongue and the remainder of the groove so that an explosive can be located therein. A seal is also provided between the tongue and the groove for sealing the pocket from the atmosphere. A frangible holding device is utilized to hold the cover to the afterbody. When the explosive is ignited, the increase in pressure in the pocket causes the cover to be accelerated away from the afterbody. Preferably, the inner wall of the afterbody is in the same plane as the inner wall of the tongue to provide a maximum space for storage in the afterbody and the side wall of the cover is thicker than the side wall of the afterbody so as to provide a sufficiently strong surrounding portion for the pocket in which the explosion takes place. The detonator for the explosive is also located on the cover and is carried away with the cover during separation. The seal is preferably located at the longitudinal end of the tongue and has a chevron cross section.

Jacobson, Albin K. (Albuquerque, NM); Rychnovsky, Raymond E. (Livermore, CA); Visbeck, Cornelius N. (Livermore, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Explosive Synchronization is Discontinuous  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spontaneous explosive is an abrupt transition to collective behavior taking place in heterogeneous networks when the frequencies of the nodes are positively correlated to the node degree. This explosive transition was conjectured to be discontinuous. Indeed, numerical investigations reveal a hysteresis behavior associated with the transition. Here, we analyze explosive synchronization in star graphs. We show that in the thermodynamic limit the transition to (and out) collective behavior is indeed discontinuous. The discontinuous nature of the transition is related to the nonlinear behavior of the order parameter, which in the thermodynamic limit exhibits multiple fixed points. Moreover, we unravel the hysteresis behavior in terms of the graph parameters. Our numerical results show that finite size graphs are well described by our predictions.

Vladimir Vlasov; Yong Zou; Tiago Pereira

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

50

explosion: Role of hydrogen thermonuclear explosion in support of cometary hypothesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

deuteron fusion rates and that a thermonuclear explosion may compete with a thermo-chemical explosion

Y. E. Kim

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Microcantilever detector for explosives  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and apparatus for detecting the presence of explosives by analyzing a vapor sample from the suspect vicinity utilize at least one microcantilever. Explosive gas molecules which have been adsorbed onto the microcantilever are subsequently heated to cause combustion. Heat, along with momentum transfer from combustion, causes bending and a transient resonance response of the microcantilever which may be detected by a laser diode which is focused on the microcantilever and a photodetector which detects deflection of the reflected laser beam caused by heat-induced deflection and resonance response of the microcantilever. 2 figs.

Thundat, T.G.

1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

52

Nuclear Explosive Safety Evaluation Processes  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual provides supplemental details to support the nuclear explosive safety evaluation requirement of DOE O 452.2D, Nuclear Explosive Safety. Does not cancel other directives. Admin Chg 1, 7-10-13.

2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

53

Ethylene Oxide Explosions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE occasional occurrence of ethylene oxide explosions during the fumigation of dried fruit has led us to undertake a detailed ... yielded results somewhat like those for acetaldehyde1,2.. Cool flames can be initiated in ethylene oxide air mixtures in the neighbourhood of 330 C. at atmospheric pressure. ...

J. H. BURGOYNE; F. A. BURDEN

1948-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

54

Nuclear Explosive Safety Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Department of Energy (DOE) Manual provides supplemental details on selected topics to support the requirements of DOE O 452.2D, Nuclear Explosive Safety, dated 4/14/09. Cancels DOE M 452.2-1. Admin Chg 1, dated 7-10-13, cancels DOE M 452.2-1A.

2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

55

Big Explosives Experimental Facility - BEEF  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The Big Explosives Experimental Facility or BEEF is a ten acre fenced high explosive testing facility that provides data to support stockpile stewardship and other national security programs. At BEEF conventional high explosives experiments are safely conducted providing sophisticated diagnostics such as high speed optics and x-ray radiography.

None

2015-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

56

Big Explosives Experimental Facility - BEEF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Big Explosives Experimental Facility or BEEF is a ten acre fenced high explosive testing facility that provides data to support stockpile stewardship and other national security programs. At BEEF conventional high explosives experiments are safely conducted providing sophisticated diagnostics such as high speed optics and x-ray radiography.

None

2014-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

57

Explosive Waste Treatment Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

106 106 Environment a 1 Assessment for th.e Explosive Waste Treatment Facility at Site 300 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory MASTER November 1995 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Washington, DOC. 20585 Portions of this document maly be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. Table of Contents 1 . 0 2.0 3 . 0 4.0 5 . 0 6.0 7 . 0 8 . 0 Document Summary .............................................................. 1 Purpose and Need for Agency Action ............................................. 3 Description of the Proposed Action and Alternatives ............................ 4 3.1.1 Location ............................................................. 4

58

Zirconium hydride containing explosive composition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved explosive composition is disclosed and comprises a major portion of an explosive having a detonation velocity between about 1500 and 10,000 meters per second and a minor amount of a donor additive comprising a non-explosive compound or mixture of non-explosive compounds which when subjected to an energy fluence of 1000 calories/cm.sup.2 or less is capable of releasing free radicals each having a molecular weight between 1 and 120. Exemplary donor additives are dibasic acids, polyamines and metal hydrides.

Walker, Franklin E. (18 Shadow Oak Rd., Danville, CA 94526); Wasley, Richard J. (4290 Colgate Way, Livermore, CA 94550)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Explosive scabbling of structural materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A new approach to scabbling of surfaces of structural materials is disclosed. A layer of mildly energetic explosive composition is applied to the surface to be scabbled. The explosive composition is then detonated, rubbleizing the surface. Explosive compositions used must sustain a detonation front along the surface to which it is applied and conform closely to the surface being scabbled. Suitable explosive compositions exist which are stable under handling, easy to apply, easy to transport, have limited toxicity, and can be reliably detonated using conventional techniques.

Bickes, Jr., Robert W. (Albuquerque, NM); Bonzon, Lloyd L. (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Low voltage nonprimary explosive detonator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A low voltage, electrically actuated, nonprimary explosive detonator is disclosed wherein said detonation is achieved by means of an explosive train in which a deflagration-to-detonation transition is made to occur. The explosive train is confined within a cylindrical body and positioned adjacent to low voltage ignition means have electrical leads extending outwardly from the cylindrical confining body. Application of a low voltage current to the electrical leads ignites a self-sustained deflagration in a donor portion of the explosive train which then is made to undergo a transition to detonation further down the train.

Dinegar, Robert H. (Los Alamos, NM); Kirkham, John (Newbury, GB2)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "graaff confetti explosion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Radiography used to image thermal explosions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radiography used to image thermal explosions Radiography used to image thermal explosions Radiography used to image thermal explosions Researchers have gained an understanding of the mechanism of thermal explosions and have created a model capturing the stages of the explosion. October 9, 2012 Tabletop X-ray radiography of a thermal explosion. Tabletop X-ray radiography of a thermal explosion. Researchers have gained an understanding of the mechanism of thermal explosions and have created a model capturing the stages of the explosion. Proton radiography (pRad) at LANSCE imaged thermal explosions at high speeds to provide a real-time look at how an explosion unfolds and releases its energy. Specifically, it is important to know the range of temperature over which ignition may occur and the subsequent power of the explosion.

62

Nuclear Explosive Safety Evaluation Processes  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual provides supplemental details to support the nuclear explosive safety (NES) evaluation requirement of Department of Energy (DOE) Order (O) 452.2D, Nuclear Explosive Safety, dated 4/14/09. Admin Chg 1, dated 7-10-13, cancels DOE M 452.2-2.

2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

63

Cotton Gin Dust Explosibility Determinations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

personnel listed dust found in cotton gins, or gin dust, fueled two explosions in the past. OSHA is required by law to regulate facilities handling explosible dusts to provide a safe working environment for employees. The dust handling facilities must test...

Vanderlick, Francis Jerome

2014-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

64

( 'tams Dlvllan LSPE EXPLOSIVE PACKAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

requirement from a thermal standpoint is that the thermal battery and safe-arm timers be at 40°F minimum and thermal battery timers be at +40°F minimum operating temperature immediately at the time of treir~ ( ·'tams Dlvl·lan LSPE EXPLOSIVE PACKAGE STOWAGE THERMAL CONSTRAINTS LSPE EXPLOSIVE PACKAGE

Rathbun, Julie A.

65

Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order defines the Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program, which was established to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives.

2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

66

Shock desensitizing of solid explosive  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solid explosive can be desensitized by a shock wave too weak to initiate it promptly, and desensitized explosive does not react although its chemical composition is almost unchanged. A strong second shock does not cause reaction until it overtakes the first shock. The first shock, if it is strong enough, accelerates very slowly at first, and then more rapidly as detonation approaches. These facts suggest that there are two competing reactions. One is the usual explosive goes to products with the release of energy, and the other is explosive goes to dead explosive with no chemical change and no energy release. The first reaction rate is very sensitive to the local state, and the second is only weakly so. At low pressure very little energy is released and the change to dead explosive dominates. At high pressure, quite the other way, most of the explosive goes to products. Numerous experiments in both the initiation and the full detonation regimes are discussed and compared in testing these ideas.

Davis, William C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Donor free radical explosive composition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved explosive composition is disclosed and comprises a major portion of an explosive having a detonation velocity between about 1500 and 10,000 meters per second and a minor amount of a donor additive comprising an organic compound or mixture of organic compounds capable of releasing low molecular weight free radicals or ions under mechanical or electrical shock conditions and which is not an explosive, or an inorganic compound or mixture of inorganic compounds capable of releasing low molecular weight free radicals or ions under mechanical or electrical shock conditions and selected from ammonium or alkali metal persulfates.

Walker, Franklin E. [15 Way Points Rd., Danville, CA 94526; Wasley, Richard J. [4290 Colgate Way, Livermore, CA 94550

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Detonation probabilities of high explosives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The probability of a high explosive violent reaction (HEVR) following various events is an extremely important aspect of estimating accident-sequence frequency for nuclear weapons dismantlement. In this paper, we describe the development of response curves for insults to PBX 9404, a conventional high-performance explosive used in US weapons. The insults during dismantlement include drops of high explosive (HE), strikes of tools and components on HE, and abrasion of the explosive. In the case of drops, we combine available test data on HEVRs and the results of flooring certification tests to estimate the HEVR probability. For other insults, it was necessary to use expert opinion. We describe the expert solicitation process and the methods used to consolidate the responses. The HEVR probabilities obtained from both approaches are compared.

Eisenhawer, S.W.; Bott, T.F.; Bement, T.R.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Explosive plane-wave lens  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 4 figs.

Marsh, S.P.

1988-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

70

Explosive plane-wave lens  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

Marsh, S.P.

1987-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

71

Explosive plane-wave lens  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive.

Marsh, Stanley P. (Los Alamos, NM)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

All nuclear explosives and nuclear explosive operations require special safety, security, and use control consideration because of the potentially unacceptable consequences of an accident or unauthorized act; therefore, a Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program is established to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives.

2015-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

73

Insensitive fuze train for high explosives  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A generic insensitive fuze train to initiate insensitive high explosives, such as PBXW-124 is described. The insensitive fuze train uses a slapper foil to initiate sub-gram quantities of an explosive, such as HNS-IV or PETN. This small amount of explosive drives a larger metal slapper onto a booster charge of an insensitive explosive, such as UF-TATB. The booster charge initiates a larger charge of an explosive, such as LX-17, which in turn, initiates the insensitive high explosive, such as PBXW-124. 3 figures.

Cutting, J.L.; Lee, R.S.; Von Holle, W.G.

1994-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

74

Insensitive fuze train for high explosives  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A generic insensitive fuze train to initiate insensitive high explosives, such as PBXW-124. The insensitive fuze train uses a slapper foil to initiate sub-gram quantities of an explosive, such as HNS-IV or PETN. This small amount of explosive drives a larger metal slapper onto a booster charge of an insensitive explosive, such as UF-TATB. The booster charge initiates a larger charge of an explosive, such as LX-17, which in turn, initiates the insensitive high explosive, such as PBXW-124.

Cutting, Jack L. (Livermore, CA); Lee, Ronald S. (Livermore, CA); Von Holle, William G. (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

The physics, chemistry and dynamics of explosions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...scenarios that range from the Big Bang, to thermonuclear explosions in stars, to magnetohydrodynamic...chemical reactions or solar coronal thermonuclear reactions, they are not generally...explosions include magnetohydrodynamic and thermonuclear energy sources, mentioned previously...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

The Use of Safety Explosives in Mines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... England Institute of Mechanical Engineers in 1888, to investigate and report upon the subject of flameless explosives in relation to their degree of safety in mines. Experiments with various explosives ...

1894-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

77

Detonation Phenomena in Homogeneous Explosives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... In considering the effect of the container on the detonation of an explosive charge, the natural impulse is to look for an interpretati9n of ... is usually meant the resistance offered by the envelope to the lateral expansion of the detonation products. It is known, however, that the initial mass movement of the pro- ...

ELWYN JONES

1956-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

78

Turbulent Combustion in SDF Explosions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A heterogeneous continuum model is proposed to describe the dispersion and combustion of an aluminum particle cloud in an explosion. It combines the gas-dynamic conservation laws for the gas phase with a continuum model for the dispersed phase, as formulated by Nigmatulin. Inter-phase mass, momentum and energy exchange are prescribed by phenomenological models. It incorporates a combustion model based on the mass conservation laws for fuel, air and products; source/sink terms are treated in the fast-chemistry limit appropriate for such gasdynamic fields, along with a model for mass transfer from the particle phase to the gas. The model takes into account both the afterburning of the detonation products of the C-4 booster with air, and the combustion of the Al particles with air. The model equations were integrated by high-order Godunov schemes for both the gas and particle phases. Numerical simulations of the explosion fields from 1.5-g Shock-Dispersed-Fuel (SDF) charge in a 6.6 liter calorimeter were used to validate the combustion model. Then the model was applied to 10-kg Al-SDF explosions in a an unconfined height-of-burst explosion. Computed pressure histories are compared with measured waveforms. Differences are caused by physical-chemical kinetic effects of particle combustion which induce ignition delays in the initial reactive blast wave and quenching of reactions at late times. Current simulations give initial insights into such modeling issues.

Kuhl, A L; Bell, J B; Beckner, V E

2009-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

79

Removing High Explosives from Groundwater  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

LOS ALAMOS, N.M. In an initiative supported by EM, Los Alamos National Laboratorys Corrective Actions Program is addressing high explosive contamination in surface water and groundwater at a location this summer in the forests surrounding the laboratory.

80

Safety of Nuclear Explosive Operations  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This directive establishes responsibilities and requirements to ensure the safety of routine and planned nuclear explosive operations and associated activities and facilities. Cancels DOE O 452.2A and DOE G 452.2A-1A. Canceled by DOE O 452.2C.

2001-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "graaff confetti explosion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Geschichte der Explosivstoffe The Manufacture of Explosives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... in mining operations black powder is being gradually ousted in favour of the so-called flameless explosives.

H.

1896-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

82

Thermoelectric Bulk Materials from the Explosive Consolidation...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

explosively consolidating nanopowders to yield fully dense, consolidated, nanostructured thermoelectric material nemir.pdf More Documents & Publications Enhancing the...

83

Teleseismic observations of aftershocks immediately following an underground explosion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......at least one explosion (the Nevada Test Site explosion, Greeley) commenced...among mall magnitude events on Nevada test site, Geophys. J. R. astr. Soc...at least one explosion (the Nevada Test Site explosion, Greeley) commenced......

A. Douglas

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Spot test kit for explosives detection  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An explosion tester system comprising a body, a lateral flow membrane swab unit adapted to be removeably connected to the body, a first explosives detecting reagent, a first reagent holder and dispenser operatively connected to the body, the first reagent holder and dispenser containing the first explosives detecting reagent and positioned to deliver the first explosives detecting reagent to the lateral flow membrane swab unit when the lateral flow membrane swab unit is connected to the body, a second explosives detecting reagent, and a second reagent holder and dispenser operatively connected to the body, the second reagent holder and dispenser containing the second explosives detecting reagent and positioned to deliver the second explosives detecting reagent to the lateral flow membrane swab unit when the lateral flow membrane swab unit is connected to the body.

Pagoria, Philip F; Whipple, Richard E; Nunes, Peter J; Eckels, Joel Del; Reynolds, John G; Miles, Robin R; Chiarappa-Zucca, Marina L

2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

85

Explosives detection system and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of detecting explosives in a vehicle includes providing a first rack on one side of the vehicle, the rack including a neutron generator and a plurality of gamma ray detectors; providing a second rack on another side of the vehicle, the second rack including a neutron generator and a plurality of gamma ray detectors; providing a control system, remote from the first and second racks, coupled to the neutron generators and gamma ray detectors; using the control system, causing the neutron generators to generate neutrons; and performing gamma ray spectroscopy on spectra read by the gamma ray detectors to look for a signature indicative of presence of an explosive. Various apparatus and other methods are also provided.

Reber, Edward L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Jewell, James K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Rohde, Kenneth W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Seabury, Edward H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Blackwood, Larry G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Edwards, Andrew J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Derr, Kurt W. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

86

Seismic verification of underground explosions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first nuclear test agreement, the test moratorium, was made in 1958 and lasted until the Soviet Union unilaterally resumed testing in the atmosphere in 1961. It was followed by the Limited Test Ban Treaty of 1963, which prohibited nuclear tests in the atmosphere, in outer space, and underwater. In 1974 the Threshold Test Ban Treaty (TTBT) was signed, limiting underground tests after March 1976 to a maximum yield of 250 kt. The TTBT was followed by a treaty limiting peaceful nuclear explosions and both the United States and the Soviet Union claim to be abiding by the 150-kt yield limit. A comprehensive test ban treaty (CTBT), prohibiting all testing of nuclear weapons, has also been discussed. However, a verifiable CTBT is a contradiction in terms. No monitoring technology can offer absolute assurance that very-low-yield illicit explosions have not occurred. The verification process, evasion opportunities, and cavity decoupling are discussed in this paper.

Glenn, L.A.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Wireless sensor for detecting explosive material  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Disclosed is a sensor for detecting explosive devices. The sensor includes a ferromagnetic metal and a molecular recognition reagent coupled to the ferromagnetic metal. The molecular recognition reagent is operable to expand upon absorption of vapor from an explosive material such that the molecular recognition reagent changes a tensile stress upon the ferromagnetic metal. The explosive device is detected based on changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal caused by the tensile stress.

Lamberti, Vincent E; Howell, Jr., Layton N; Mee, David K; Sepaniak, Michael J

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

88

Air Activation Following an Atmospheric Explosion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In addition to thermal radiation and fission products, nuclear explosions result in a very high flux of unfissioned neutrons. Within an atmospheric nuclear explosion, these neutrons can activate the various elemental components of natural air, potentially adding to the radioactive signature of the event as a whole. The goal of this work is to make an order-of-magnitude estimate of the total amount of air activation products that can result from an atmospheric nuclear explosion.

Lowrey, Justin D.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Prichard, Andrew W.; Gesh, Christopher J.

2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

89

High Explosives Application Facility | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

at the micron scale in its microdetonics laboratory, and utilizing multiple firing tanks for larger scale explosives experiments. No other facility in the world supports such...

90

Method and apparatus for detecting explosives  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus is provided for detecting explosives by thermal imaging. The explosive material is subjected to a high energy wave which can be either a sound wave or an electromagnetic wave which will initiate a chemical reaction in the explosive material which chemical reaction will produce heat. The heat is then sensed by a thermal imaging device which will provide a signal to a computing device which will alert a user of the apparatus to the possibility of an explosive device being present.

Moore, David Steven (Santa Fe, NM)

2011-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

91

Explosives performance key to stockpile stewardship  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

stewardship A new video shows how researchers use scientific guns to induce shock waves into explosive materials to study their performance and properties January 1, 2015...

92

Explosives detection with a frequency modulation spectrometer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An explosives detection instrument was designed and tested at SRI International. The instrument uses frequency modulation spectroscopy with midinfrared lead-salt diode lasers to...

Riris, H; Carlisle, C B; McMillen, D F; Cooper, D E

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Nuclear Explosive Safety Study Functional Area Qualification Standard  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

A Nuclear Explosive Safety Study (NESS) is performed on all DOE Nuclear Explosive Operations (NEOs) in accordance with DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program; DOE O 452.2D, Nuclear Explosive Safety; and DOE M 452.2-2, Nuclear Explosive Safety Evaluation Processes.

2010-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

94

Explosive double salts and preparation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Applicants have discovered a new composition of matter which is an explosive addition compound of ammonium nitrate (AN) and diethylenetriamine trinitrate (DETN) in a 50:50 molar ratio. The compound is stable over extended periods of time only at temperatures higher than 46.degree. C., decomposing to a fine-grained eutectic mixture (which is also believed to be new) of AN and DETN at temperatures lower than 46.degree. C. The compound of the invention has an x-ray density of 1.61 g/cm.sup.3, explodes to form essentially only gaseous products, has higher detonation properties (i.e., detonation velocity and pressure) than those of any mechanical mixture having the same density and composition as the compound of the invention, is a quite insensitive explosive material, can be cast at temperatures attainable by high pressure steam, and is prepared from inexpensive ingredients. Methods of preparing the compound of the invention and the fine-grained eutectic composition of the invention are given.

Cady, Howard H. (Los Alamos, NM); Lee, Kien-yin (Los Alamos, NM)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

P-wave Spectra from Underground Nuclear Explosions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......three underground explosions at the Nevada Test Site and three earthquakes recorded...nuclear explosions detonated in Nevada (Jorum and Handley) and for a...spectra from two explosions at the Nevada Test Site (Jorum and Handley) and a presumed......

Peter Molnar

1971-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Policy on Firearms, Explosives, and Other Weapons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page | 1 Policy on Firearms, Explosives, and Other Weapons Responsible Administrative Unit for the Colorado School of Mines. Unregulated possession of weapons on the university campus creates forth the policy on the use and storage of firearms, explosives and other dangerous or illegal weapons

Szymczak, Andrzej

97

Fading of Detonation in Cones of Explosive  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... boundary diameter of an explosive is the smallest diameter of charge in which a stable detonation wave can be established. It is characteristic of the explosive and its physical condition, ... condition, and is a criterion of 'fading', that is, the tendency of the detonation to die out. A boundary diameter may be determined by experiments with cylindrical charges ...

D. W. WOODHEAD; R. WILSON

1951-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

98

Spread of Detonation in High Explosives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... W. C. F. Shepherd makes the interesting observation that in the initial stages of detonation in a cylindrical cartridge of high explosive initiated with a detonator, a phase, referred ... of high explosive initiated with a detonator, a phase, referred to as the pre-detonation phase, is often noticeable during which the rate of propagation of the reaction is ...

ELWYN JONES; DUGALD MITCHELL

1948-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

99

Advancing Explosives Detection Capabilities: Vapor Detection  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

A new, PNNL-developed method provides direct, real-time detection of trace amounts of explosives such as RDX, PETN and C-4. The method selectively ionizes a sample before passing the sample through a mass spectrometer to detect explosive vapors. The method could be used at airports to improve aviation security.

Atkinson, David

2014-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

100

Fire and explosion hazards of oil shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Bureau of Mines publication presents the results of investigations into the fire and explosion hazards of oil shale rocks and dust. Three areas have been examined: the explosibility and ignitability of oil shale dust clouds, the fire hazards of oil shale dust layers on hot surfaces, and the ignitability and extinguishment of oil shale rubble piles. 10 refs., 54 figs., 29 tabs.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "graaff confetti explosion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Explosive laser light initiation of propellants  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A improved initiator for artillery shell using an explosively generated laser light to uniformly initiate the propellent. A small quantity of a high explosive, when detonated, creates a high pressure and temperature, causing the surrounding noble gas to fluoresce. This fluorescence is directed into a lasing material, which lases, and directs laser light into a cavity in the propellant, uniformly initiating the propellant.

Piltch, M.S.

1993-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

102

Method for fabricating non-detonable explosive simulants  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A simulator is disclosed which is chemically equivalent to an explosive, but is not detonable. The simulator has particular use in the training of explosives detecting dogs and calibrating sensitive analytical instruments. The explosive simulants may be fabricated by different techniques, a first involves the use of standard slurry coatings to produce a material with a very high binder to explosive ratio without masking the explosive vapor, and the second involves coating inert beads with thin layers of explosive molecules. 5 figs.

Simpson, R.L.; Pruneda, C.O.

1995-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

103

Method for fabricating non-detonable explosive simulants  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A simulator which is chemically equivalent to an explosive, but is not detonable. The simulator has particular use in the training of explosives detecting dogs and calibrating sensitive analytical instruments. The explosive simulants may be fabricated by different techniques, a first involves the use of standard slurry coatings to produce a material with a very high binder to explosive ratio without masking the explosive vapor, and the second involves coating inert beads with thin layers of explosive molecules.

Simpson, Randall L. (Livermore, CA); Pruneda, Cesar O. (Livermore, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Nuclear Explosive Safety Study Process  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3015-2001 3015-2001 February 2001 Superseding DOE-STD-3015-97 January 1997 DOE STANDARD NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE SAFETY STUDY PROCESS U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-STD-3015-2001 iii CONTENTS FOREWORD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v 1. PURPOSE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2. SCOPE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

105

Detonation theory of liquid and aluminized liquid explosives.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Non-ideal behavior of condensed explosives with metal particle additives has been observed experimentally. In general, adding metal particles to a homogeneous explosive leads to a (more)

Li, Yumin, 1961-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

SciTech Connect: Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Research and Engineering...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Program Document: Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Research and Engineering Program - Strategic Plan Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Research...

107

EA-1993: Proposed High Explosive Science & Engineering Project...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

3: Proposed High Explosive Science & Engineering Project, Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas EA-1993: Proposed High Explosive Science & Engineering Project, Pantex Plant, Amarillo,...

108

Infrared near-field spectroscopy of trace explosives using an...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

spectroscopy of trace explosives using an external cavity quantum cascade laser. Infrared near-field spectroscopy of trace explosives using an external cavity quantum...

109

High Explosives Application Facility | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Explosives Application Facility | National Nuclear Security Explosives Application Facility | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration High Explosives Application Facility Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Office of Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation > Office of Research and Development >

110

The physics, chemistry and dynamics of explosions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the development of nuclear fusion as an energy source. The...range from the Big Bang, to thermonuclear explosions in stars, to...reactions or solar coronal thermonuclear reactions, they are not...include magnetohydrodynamic and thermonuclear energy sources, mentioned...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

A Hand-book of Modern Explosives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... explosives in fiery mines has a chapter to itself. The description of the tests of flameless powders is of especial interest; in fact, the official reports of the tests of ...

1890-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

112

Ammonia fiber explosion (AFEX) treatment of grass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and steam explosion (Playne, 1984), pretreatment of cane bagasse with alkaline hydrogen peroxide (Azzam, 1989), alkali treatment of soybean straw to improve digestibility (Felix, Hill, and Diarra, 14 1990), ammoniation of wheat straw to improve nutritive...

Ashok, Ganesh

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Seismic Aspects of the Heligoland Explosion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... . The explosion was initiated by means of electric detonators, each incorporating a one-second pyrotechnic delay to enable the electric circuits to complete their work before the commencement of the ...

P. L. WILLMORE

1947-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

114

Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Order provides requirements and responsibilities to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives. Cancels DOE O 452.1. Canceled by DOE O 452.1B.

1997-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

115

Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Order provides requirements and responsibilities to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives. Cancels DOE O 452.1A. Canceled by DOE O 452.1C.

2001-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

116

Thermoelectric Bulk Materials from the Explosive Consolidation of Nanopowders  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Describes technique of explosively consolidating nanopowders to yield fully dense, consolidated, nanostructured thermoelectric material

117

The physics of antimatter induced fusion and thermonuclear explosions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

triggering large scale thermonuclear explosions is investigated. The number of antiproton annihilations

Andre Gsponer; Jean-pierre Hurni

118

Spectroscopic studies of shocked and detonating explosives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Real-time observation techniques including single-pulse Raman scattering, time-resolved infrared spectral photography, emission spectroscopy and fast-framing photography have been used to study chemical and physical changes in shock-loaded and detonating explosive materials. Experiments have focused on how material variables such as density and particle size may affect emission characteristics in detonating high explosives (HEs). We have also studied effects of pressure and temperature on vibrational frequencies in shocked HEs. 14 refs., 4 figs.

Renlund, A.M.; Trott, W.M.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Curved detonation fronts in solid explosives 1 Curved detonation fronts in solid explosives#  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Curved detonation fronts in solid explosives 1 Curved detonation fronts in solid explosives. Aslam and D. S. Stewart TAM Department# University of Illinois Urbana# IL 61801 USA Abstract# Detonation Shock Dynamics #DSD# can be used to model the e#ects that shock curvature # has on detonation speed D n

Aslam, Tariq

120

Curved detonation fronts in solid explosives 1 Curved detonation fronts in solid explosives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Curved detonation fronts in solid explosives 1 Curved detonation fronts in solid explosives. Aslam and D. S. Stewart TAM Department, University of Illinois Urbana, IL 61801 USA Abstract: Detonation Shock Dynamics (DSD) can be used to model the eects that shock curvature has on detonation speed Dn

Aslam, Tariq

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "graaff confetti explosion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Method of digesting an explosive nitro compound  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a process wherein bleaching oxidants are used to digest explosive nitro compounds. The process has an excellent reaction rate for digesting explosives and operates under multivariate conditions. Reaction solutions may be aqueous, non-aqueous or a combination thereof, and can also be any pH, but preferably have a pH between 2 and 9. The temperature may be ambient as well as any temperature above which freezing of the solution would occur and below which any degradation of the bleaching oxidant would occur or below which any explosive reaction would be initiated. The pressure may be any pressure, but is preferably ambient or atmospheric, or a pressure above a vapor pressure of the aqueous solution to avoid boiling of the solution. Because the bleaching oxidant molecules are small, much smaller than an enzyme molecule for example, they can penetrate the microstructure of plastic explosives faster. The bleaching oxidants generate reactive hydroxyl radicals, which can destroy other organic contaminants, if necessary, along with digesting the explosive nitro compound.

Shah, Manish M. (Richland, WA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Visualizing Type Ia Supernova Explosions at NERSC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Supernova Explosions Supernova Explosions Visualizing Type Ia Supernova Explosions Childs1a-Supernovasm.png Deep inside a dying star in a galaxy far, far away, a carbon fusion flame ignites. Ignition may happen in the middle or displaced slightly to one side, but this simulation explores the consequences of central ignition. In a localized hot spot, represented here by a deformed sphere with an average radius of 100 km, carbon is assumed to have already fused to iron, producing hot ash (~10 billion K) with a density about 20% less than its surroundings. As the burning progresses, this hot buoyant ash rises up and interacts with cold fuel. Rayleigh-Taylor fingers give rise to shear and turbulence, which interacts with the flame, causing it to move faster. In about 2 seconds, the energy released blows the entire white dwarf star up,

123

Securing Infrastructure from High Explosive Threats  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is working with the Department of Homeland Security's Science and Technology Directorate, the Transportation Security Administration, and several infrastructure partners to characterize and help mitigate principal structural vulnerabilities to explosive threats. Given the importance of infrastructure to the nation's security and economy, there is a clear need for applied research and analyses (1) to improve understanding of the vulnerabilities of these systems to explosive threats and (2) to provide decision makers with time-critical technical assistance concerning countermeasure and mitigation options. Fully-coupled high performance calculations of structural response to ideal and non-ideal explosives help bound and quantify specific critical vulnerabilities, and help identify possible corrective schemes. Experimental validation of modeling approaches and methodologies builds confidence in the prediction, while advanced stochastic techniques allow for optimal use of scarce computational resources to efficiently provide infrastructure owners and decision makers with timely analyses.

Glascoe, L; Noble, C; Reynolds, J; Kuhl, A; Morris, J

2009-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

124

Experiments Upon the Explosions of Hydrocarbon Mixtures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of such experiments* B. Reference to previous experimental work. C* Object of present s e r i e s of experiments. (See plan of experiments.) a. Heat produced by explosion of H~C mixture. b. Duration of pressure. c .Rate of combustion and explosion. d. E f f e... as possible the heat produced by the explosion under c e r t a i n conditions. I t i s true that the t o t a l amount of heat / developed may be c a l c u l a t e d matematically i f s u f f i c i e n t data i s a v a i l a b l e , but i t i s also true...

Stone, Fred

1904-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

PINS Testing and Modification for Explosive Identification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The INL's Portable Isotopic Neutron Spectroscopy System (PINS)1 non-intrusively identifies the chemical fill of munitions and sealed containers. PINS is used routinely by the U.S. Army, the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, and foreign military units to determine the contents of munitions and other containers suspected to contain explosives, smoke-generating chemicals, and chemical warfare agents such as mustard and nerve gas. The objects assayed with PINS range from softball-sized M139 chemical bomblets to 200 gallon DOT 500X ton containers. INL had previously examined2 the feasibility of using a similar system for the identification of explosives, and based on this proof-of-principle test, the development of a dedicated system for the identification of explosives in an improvised nuclear device appears entirely feasible. INL has been tasked by NNSA NA-42 Render Safe Research and Development with the development of such a system.

E.H. Seabury; A.J. Caffrey

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Probing thermonuclear supernova explosions with neutrinos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aims: We present neutrino light curves and energy spectra for two representative type Ia supernova explosion models: a pure deflagration and a delayed detonation. Methods: We calculate the neutrino flux from $\\beta$ processes using nuclear statistical equilibrium abundances convoluted with approximate neutrino spectra of the individual nuclei and the thermal neutrino spectrum (pair+plasma). Results: Although the two considered thermonuclear supernova explosion scenarios are expected to produce almost identical electromagnetic output, their neutrino signatures appear vastly different, which allow an unambiguous identification of the explosion mechanism: a pure deflagration produces a single peak in the neutrino light curve, while the addition of the second maximum characterizes a delayed-detonation. We identified the following main contributors to the neutrino signal: (1) weak electron neutrino emission from electron captures (in particular on the protons Co55 and Ni56) and numerous beta-active nuclei produced by the thermonuclear flame and/or detonation front, (2) electron antineutrinos from positron captures on neutrons, and (3) the thermal emission from pair annihilation. We estimate that a pure deflagration supernova explosion at a distance of 1 kpc would trigger about 14 events in the future 50 kt liquid scintillator detector and some 19 events in a 0.5 Mt water Cherenkov-type detector. Conclusions: While in contrast to core-collapse supernovae neutrinos carry only a very small fraction of the energy produced in the thermonuclear supernova explosion, the SN Ia neutrino signal provides information that allows us to unambiguously distinguish between different possible explosion scenarios. These studies will become feasible with the next generation of proposed neutrino observatories.

A. Odrzywolek; T. Plewa

2011-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

127

Explosive-driven, high speed, arcless switch  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An explosive-actuated, fast-acting arcless switch contains a highly conductive foil to carry high currents positioned adjacent a dielectric surface within a casing. At one side of the foil opposite the dielectric surface is an explosive which, when detonated, drives the conductive foil against the dielectric surface. A pattern of grooves in the dielectric surface ruptures the foil to establish a rupture path having a pattern corresponding to the pattern of the grooves. The impedance of the ruptured foil is greater than that of the original foil to divert high current to a load. Planar and cylindrical embodiments of the switch are disclosed.

Skogmo, P.J.; Tucker, T.J.

1986-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

128

Explosive-driven, high speed, arcless switch  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An explosive-actuated, fast-acting arcless switch contains a highly conductive foil to carry high currents positioned adjacent a dielectric surface within a casing. At one side of the foil opposite the dielectric surface is an explosive which, when detonated, drives the conductive foil against the dielectric surface. A pattern of grooves in the dielectric surface ruptures the foil to establish a rupture path having a pattern corresponding to the pattern of the grooves. The impedance of the ruptured foil is greater than that of the original foil to divert high current to a load. Planar and cylindrical embodiments of the switch are disclosed. 7 figs.

Skogmo, P.J.; Tucker, T.J.

1987-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

129

Nuclear Explosive and Weapons Surety Program - DOE Directives...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

been linked to this document. Show All Cancels: DOE O 5610.10, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program on Apr 29, 1996 Canceled by: DOE O 452.1A, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon...

130

Nuclear Fusion Driven by Coulomb Explosion of Methane Clusters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear Fusion Driven by Coulomb Explosion of Methane Clusters ... However, the distributions obtained for Coulomb explosion lack the high-energy tail manifested for the thermal distribution (Figure 4), which is of considerable importance for thermonuclear reactions. ...

Isidore Last; Joshua Jortner

2002-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

131

3-D Earth model more accurately pinpoints explosions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3-D Earth model more accurately pinpoints explosions 3-D Earth model more accurately pinpoints explosions The purpose of this model is to assist the U.S. Air Force and the...

132

The Epicentres and Origin Times of Some Large Explosions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......verified by locating a number of explosions at the Nevada test site, where accurately known shot points were available...verified by locating a number of explosions at the Nevada test site, where accurately known shot points were available......

C. Blamey; P. G. Gibbs

1968-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Idaho Explosives Detection System: Development and Enhancements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho Explosives Detection System (IEDS) was developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to respond to threats imposed by delivery trucks carrying bulk explosives into military bases. The system consists of two racks, one on each side of a subject vehicle. Each rack includes a neutron generator and an array of sodium iodide (NaI) detectors. The two neutron generators are pulsed and synchronized. A computer connects to the system by Ethernet and is able to control the system remotely. The system was developed to detect bulk explosives in a medium size truck within a 5-minute measurement time. In 2004, a full-scale prototype IEDS system was built for testing and continued development. System performance was successfully tested using different types of real explosives with a variety of cargo at the INL from November 2005 through February 2006. Recently, the first deployable prototype system was constructed and shipped to Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio and will be in operation by March 2007. The capability of passively detecting radiological material within a delivery truck has also been added.

Edward L Reber; Larry G. Blackwood; Andrew J. Edwards; Ann E. Egger; Paul J. Petersen

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

EXPLOSIONS CAUSED BY COMMONLY OCCURRING SUBSTANCES  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the nature of the operations is such that these explosions...that the limit of a safe oil as fixed by the 'flashing...ignition was found in the boiler fires, which were 60...in this report to the fundamental dis-tinctions between...a fire under a steam boiler, and that this vapor...

Charles E. Munroe

1899-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

135

Type Ia Supernova Explosion: Gravitationally Confined Detonation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a new mechanism for Type Ia supernova explosions in massive white dwarfs. The scenario follows from relaxing assumptions of symmetry and involves a detonation born near the stellar surface. The explosion begins with an essentially central ignition of a deflagration that results in the formation of a buoyancy-driven bubble of hot material that reaches the stellar surface at supersonic speeds. The bubble breakout laterally accelerates fuel-rich outer stellar layers. This material, confined by gravity to the white dwarf, races along the stellar surface and is focused at the location opposite to the point of the bubble breakout. These streams of nuclear fuel carry enough mass and energy to trigger a detonation just above the stellar surface that will incinerate the white dwarf and result in an energetic explosion. The stellar expansion following the deflagration redistributes mass in a way that ensures production of intermediate-mass and iron group elements with ejecta having a strongly layered structure and a mild amount of asymmetry following from the early deflagration phase. This asymmetry, combined with the amount of stellar expansion determined by details of the evolution (principally the energetics of deflagration, timing of detonation, and structure of the progenitor), can be expected to create a family of mildly diverse Type Ia supernova explosions.

T. Plewa; A. C. Calder; D. Q. Lamb

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Spread of Detonation in High Explosives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... In a note1 on the spread of detonation in a mass of high explosive from the point of initiation, Weibull demonstrates that, ... initiation, Weibull demonstrates that, in a cylindrical cartridge of compressed T.N.T., detonation is propagated with a uniform and constant speed in all directions from the detonator. ...

DUGALD MITCHELL; STEWART PATERSON

1947-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

137

Continuous wave laser irradiation of explosives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quantitative measurements of the levels of continuous wave (CW) laser light that can be safely applied to bare explosives during contact operations were obtained at 532 nm, 785 nm, and 1550 nm wavelengths. A thermal camera was used to record the temperature of explosive pressed pellets and single crystals while they were irradiated using a measured laser power and laser spot size. A visible light image of the sample surface was obtained before and after the laser irradiation. Laser irradiation thresholds were obtained for the onset of any visible change to the explosive sample and for the onset of any visible chemical reaction. Deflagration to detonation transitions were not observed using any of these CW laser wavelengths on single crystals or pressed pellets in the unconfined geometry tested. Except for the photochemistry of DAAF, TATB and PBX 9502, all reactions appeared to be thermal using a 532 nm wavelength laser. For a 1550 nm wavelength laser, no photochemistry was evident, but the laser power thresholds for thermal damage in some of the materials were significantly lower than for the 532 nm laser wavelength. No reactions were observed in any of the studied explosives using the available 300 mW laser at 785 nm wavelength. Tables of laser irradiance damage and reaction thresholds are presented for pressed pellets of PBX9501, PBX9502, Composition B, HMX, TATB, RDX, DAAF, PETN, and TNT and single crystals of RDX, HMX, and PETN for each of the laser wavelengths.

McGrane, Shawn D.; Moore, David S.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Explosion proof vehicle for tank inspection  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An Explosion Proof Vehicle (EPV) having an interior substantially filled with an inert fluid creating an interior pressure greater than the exterior pressure. One or more flexible tubes provide the inert fluid and one or more electrical conductors from a control system to the vehicle. The vehicle is preferably used in subsurface tank inspection, whereby the vehicle is submerged in a volatile fluid.

Zollinger, William T. (Idaho Falls, ID); Klingler, Kerry M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Bauer, Scott G. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

139

NUCLEAR ASPECTS OF STELLAR AND EXPLOSIVE NUCLEOSYNTHESIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NUCLEAR ASPECTS OF STELLAR AND EXPLOSIVE NUCLEOSYNTHESIS Thomas Rauscher 1 , Friedrich. of Astron. and Astroph., Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 Abstract The majority of nuclear­Feshbach). The global parametrizations of the nuclear properties needed for predictions far off stability probe our

Rauscher, Thomas

140

Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Order provides requirements and responsibilities to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives. Cancels DOE O 452.1C. Admin Chg 1, dated 7-10-13, cancels DOE O 452.1D.

2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "graaff confetti explosion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Toward Improved Fidelity of Thermal Explosion Simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We will present results of an effort to improve the thermal/chemical/mechanical modeling of HMX based explosive like LX04 and LX10 for thermal cook-off. The original HMX model and analysis scheme were developed by Yoh et.al. for use in the ALE3D modeling framework. The current results were built to remedy the deficiencies of that original model. We concentrated our efforts in four areas. The first area was addition of porosity to the chemical material model framework in ALE3D that is used to model the HMX explosive formulation. This is needed to handle the roughly 2% porosity in solid explosives. The second area was the improvement of the HMX reaction network, which included the inclusion of a reactive phase change model base on work by Henson et.al. The third area required adding early decomposition gas species to the CHEETAH material database to develop more accurate equations of state for gaseous intermediates and products. Finally, it was necessary to improve the implicit mechanics module in ALE3D to more naturally handle the long time scales associated with thermal cook-off. The application of the resulting framework to the analysis of the Scaled Thermal Explosion (STEX) experiments will be discussed.

Nichols, A L; Becker, R; Howard, W M; Wemhoff, A

2009-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

142

Source Characteristics of Two Underground Nuclear Explosions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......detonated at Pahute Mesa of the Nevada Test Site have been used to estimate the...contributing factor. Moment tensor|Nevada Test Site|nuclear explosion| References...structure of Silent Canyon Caldera, Nevada Test Site, Bull, seism Soc. Am., 77......

Lane R. Johnson

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Explosive Cyclogenesis over the Northeast Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Data on explosively developing extratropical cyclones over the northeast portion of the Pacific Ocean have been compiled. A climatology of those events which deepened by 1 Bergeron (24 mb day?1 deepening at 60N) or more is discussed. The maximum ...

T. S. Murty; G. A. McBean; B. McKee

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Explosive transients: a time-variable sky  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Calculations of the amount of gas involved suggest around...least. The absorbing gas exists before the outburst...physics improves. What drives the explosion? Work on...objects, such as Supernova News, an early warning system...ambient medium provides a natural explanation for afterglow......

David Bersier; Mike Bode; Shiho Kobayashi; Carole Mundell; Iain Steele

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Explosive composition with group VIII metal nitroso halide getter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved explosive composition is disclosed and comprises a major portion of an explosive having a detonation velocity between about 1,500 and 10,000 meters per second and a minor amount of a getter additive comprising a non-explosive compound or mixture of non-explosive compounds capable of chemically reacting with free radicals or ions under shock initiation conditions of 2,000 calories/cm.sup.2 or less of energy fluence.

Walker, Franklin E. (18 Shadow Oak Rd., Danville, CA 94526); Wasley, Richard J. (4290 Colgate Way, Livermore, CA 94550)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Explosive composition with group VIII metal nitroso halide getter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved explosive composition is disclosed and comprises a major portion of an explosive having a detonation velocity between about 1,500 and 10,000 meters per second and a minor amount of a getter additive comprising a non-explosive compound or mixture of non-explosive compounds capable of chemically reacting with free radicals or ions under shock initiation conditions of 2,000 calories/cm[sup 2] or less of energy fluence.

Walker, F.E.; Wasley, R.J.

1982-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

147

Effects of network-average magnitude bias on yield estimates for underground nuclear explosions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......yield estimates for underground nuclear explosions R. A. Clark Department...ISC, of presumed underground nuclear explosions in Kazakhstan...on estimates for underground nuclear explosions 553 explosions...utilizing a more extensive dataset, including more sources and......

R. A. Clark

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Seismic yield determination of Soviet underground nuclear explosions at the Shagan River test site  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......1986a, Yield estimates of Nevada test site explosions obtained from seismic...Nuttli's method to estimate yield of Nevada test site explosions recorded on Lawrence...magnitude and explosion yield for Nevada Test Site explosions. He also applied......

Frode Ringdal; Peter D. Marshall; Ralph W. Alewine

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

3-D Earth model more accurately pinpoints explosions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- 1 - 3-D Earth model more accurately pinpoints explosions October 25, 2013 During the Cold War, U) have partnered to develop a 3-D model of the Earth's mantle and crust called SALSA3D (Sandia-Los Alamos of explosions. Significance of the research After an explosion, the energy travels through the Earth as waves

150

Colorimetric chemical analysis sampler for the presence of explosives  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A tester for testing for explosives comprising a body, a lateral flow swab unit operably connected to the body, a explosives detecting reagent contained in the body, and a dispenser operatively connected to the body and the lateral flow swab unit. The dispenser selectively allows the explosives detecting reagent to be delivered to the lateral flow swab unit.

Nunes, Peter J.; Eckels, Joel Del; Reynolds, John G.; Pagoria, Philip F.; Simpson, Randall L.

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Shock-Sensitive Chemicals Materials classified as explosives and chemicals that can act as explosives. If the material is maintained  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as an explosive, and Administrative Requirement (AR) 6-6, "Explosives" and the U.S. DOE Explosive Safety Manual apply. Further details may also be found in the CRC "Handbook of Chemical Safety." The following list Handbook of Laboratory Safety." Highly Reactive or Heat-Sensitive Materials (Name and CAS Number

de Lijser, Peter

152

FAQS Qualification Card - Nuclear Explosive Safety Study | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nuclear Explosive Safety Study Nuclear Explosive Safety Study FAQS Qualification Card - Nuclear Explosive Safety Study A key element for the Department's Technical Qualification Programs is a set of common Functional Area Qualification Standards (FAQS) and associated Job Task Analyses (JTA). These standards are developed for various functional areas of responsibility in the Department, including oversight of safety management programs identified as hazard controls in Documented Safety Analyses (DSA). For each functional area, the FAQS identify the minimum technical competencies and supporting knowledge and skills for a typical qualified individual working in the area. FAQC-NuclearExplosiveSafetyStudy.docx Description Nuclear Explosive Safety Study Qualification Card More Documents & Publications

153

Construction on Pantex High Explosives Pressing Facility Reaches 85% Mark |  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Media Room > Press Releases > Construction on Pantex High Explosives Media Room > Press Releases > Construction on Pantex High Explosives Pressing Facility ... Press Release Construction on Pantex High Explosives Pressing Facility Reaches 85% Mark Dec 16, 2013 Project on time, under budget and scheduled to be completed next summer WASHINGTON, D.C. - Work on the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) High Explosives Pressing Facility at its Pantex Plant, located near Amarillo, Texas, this month passed the 85 percent construction completion mark and is on schedule and under budget. The new 45,000 square-foot state-of-the-art facility will provide safer, more reliable production by consolidating high explosives operations from numerous buildings and greatly reducing the movement of high explosives within the plant. High explosives are a key component of a nuclear weapon,

154

Seismic and source characteristics of large chemical explosions. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From the very beginning of its arrangement in 1947, the Institute for Dynamics of the Geospheres RAS (former Special Sector of the Institute for physics of the Earth, RAS) was providing scientific observations of effects of nuclear explosions, as well as large-scale detonations of HE, on environment. This report presents principal results of instrumental observations obtained from various large-scale chemical explosions conducted in the Former-Soviet Union in the period of time from 1957 to 1989. Considering principal aim of the work, tamped and equivalent chemical explosions have been selected with total weights from several hundreds to several thousands ton. In particular, the selected explosions were aimed to study scaling law from excavation explosions, seismic effect of tamped explosions, and for dam construction for hydropower stations and soil melioration. Instrumental data on surface explosions of total weight in the same range aimed to test military technics and special objects are not included.

Adushkin, V.V.; Kostuchenko, V.N.; Pernik, L.M.; Sultanov, D.D.; Zcikanovsky, V.I.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Hazard Analysis Reports for Nuclear Explosive Operations  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NA-STD-3016-2006 NA-STD-3016-2006 May 2006 DOE LIMITED STANDARD HAZARD ANALYSIS REPORTS FOR NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE OPERATIONS U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE ii Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program web site at http://www.eh.doe.gov/techstds/ DOE-NA-STD-3016-2006 iii FORWARD This Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) technical standard is approved for use by the Assistant Deputy Administrator for Military Application and Stockpile Operations (NA-12), and is available for use to prepare Nuclear Explosive Operation (NEO) Hazard Analysis Reports (HARs) as required by 10 CFR 830, "Nuclear Safety Management." This Standard is

156

Method and system for detecting explosives  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of detecting explosives in a vehicle includes providing a first rack on one side of the vehicle, the rack including a neutron generator and a plurality of gamma ray detectors; providing a second rack on another side of the vehicle, the second rack including a neutron generator and a plurality of gamma ray detectors; providing a control system, remote from the first and second racks, coupled to the neutron generators and gamma ray detectors; using the control system, causing the neutron generators to generate neutrons; and performing gamma ray spectroscopy on spectra read by the gamma ray detectors to look for a signature indicative of presence of an explosive. Various apparatus and other methods are also provided.

Reber, Edward L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Jewell, James K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Rohde, Kenneth W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Seabury, Edward H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Blackwood, Larry G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Edwards, Andrew J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Derr, Kurt W. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

157

Scientists train honeybees to detect explosives  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Members of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Stealthy Insect Sensor Project team have been able to harness the honeybee's exceptional olfactory sense by using the bees' natural reaction to nectar, a proboscis extension reflex (sticking out their tongue) to record an unmistakable response to a scent. Using Pavlovian techniques, researchers were able to train the bees to give a positive detection response via the PER when exposed to vapors from TNT, C4, and TATP explosives. The Stealthy Insect Sensor Project was born out of a global threat from the growing use of improvised explosive devices or IEDs, especially those that present a critical vulnerability for American military troops in Iraq and Afghanistan, and as an emerging danger for civilians worldwide. Current strategies to detect explosives are expensive and, in the case of trained detection dogs, too obtrusive to be used very discreetly. With bees however, they are small and discreet, offering the element of surprise. They're also are inexpensive to maintain and even easier to train than dogs. As a result of this need, initial funding for the work was provided by a development grant from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.

None

2014-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

158

Explosive Detection in Aviation Applications Using CT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CT scanners are deployed world-wide to detect explosives in checked and carry-on baggage. Though very similar to single- and dual-energy multi-slice CT scanners used today in medical imaging, some recently developed explosives detection scanners employ multiple sources and detector arrays to eliminate mechanical rotation of a gantry, photon counting detectors for spectral imaging, and limited number of views to reduce cost. For each bag scanned, the resulting reconstructed images are first processed by automated threat recognition algorithms to screen for explosives and other threats. Human operators review the images only when these automated algorithms report the presence of possible threats. The US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has requirements for future scanners that include dealing with a larger number of threats, higher probability of detection, lower false alarm rates and lower operating costs. One tactic that DHS is pursuing to achieve these requirements is to augment the capabilities of the established security vendors with third-party algorithm developers. A third-party in this context refers to academics and companies other than the established vendors. DHS is particularly interested in exploring the model that has been used very successfully by the medical imaging industry, in which university researchers develop algorithms that are eventually deployed in commercial medical imaging equipment. The purpose of this paper is to discuss opportunities for third-parties to develop advanced reconstruction and threat detection algorithms.

Martz, H E; Crawford, C R

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

159

Scientists train honeybees to detect explosives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Members of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Stealthy Insect Sensor Project team have been able to harness the honeybee's exceptional olfactory sense by using the bees' natural reaction to nectar, a proboscis extension reflex (sticking out their tongue) to record an unmistakable response to a scent. Using Pavlovian techniques, researchers were able to train the bees to give a positive detection response via the PER when exposed to vapors from TNT, C4, and TATP explosives. The Stealthy Insect Sensor Project was born out of a global threat from the growing use of improvised explosive devices or IEDs, especially those that present a critical vulnerability for American military troops in Iraq and Afghanistan, and as an emerging danger for civilians worldwide. Current strategies to detect explosives are expensive and, in the case of trained detection dogs, too obtrusive to be used very discreetly. With bees however, they are small and discreet, offering the element of surprise. They're also are inexpensive to maintain and even easier to train than dogs. As a result of this need, initial funding for the work was provided by a development grant from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.

None

2008-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

160

Supernova Explosions and Neutron Star Formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The current picture of the collapse and explosion of massive stars and the formation of neutron stars is reviewed. According to the favored scenario, however by no means proven and undisputed, neutrinos deposit the energy of the explosion in the stellar medium which surrounds the nascent neutron star. Observations, in particular of Supernova~1987A, suggest that mixing processes play an important role in the expanding star, and multi-dimensional simulations show that these are linked to convective instabilities in the immediate vicinity of the neutron star. Convectively enhanced energy transport inside the neutron star can have important consequences for the neutrino emission and thus the neutrino-heating mechanism. This also holds for a suppression of the neutrino interactions at nuclear densities. Multi-dimensional hydrodynamics, general relativity, and a better understanding of the neutrino interactions in neutron star matter may be crucial to resolve the problem that state-of-the-art spherical models do not yield explosions even with a very accurate treatment of neutrino transport by solving the Boltzmann equation.

H. -Th. Janka; K. Kifonidis; M. Rampp

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "graaff confetti explosion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Initiation of weak coal-dust explosions in long galleriesand the importance of the time dependence of the explosion pressure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Weak coal-dust explosions in galleries (large horizontal tubes) are defined in the paper asthe early stages of what may eventually become a self-sustaining, steady-state situation, if the scale is large enough. An initiating explosion producing a pressure rise of at least 12 kPa is needed to start an explosion from any additional dust that lies beyond the initiating zone; entrainment of this additional dust leads to the main explosion. In long galleries, initiating explosions in the range 162 kPa are mostly used. The early stages of the main explosion resemble explosions in which combustion of a very low concentration of coal-dust particles is taking place over a considerable volume at any given time, rather than explosions in which a flame, having a more or less definable front and rear, is propagating through a preformed explosive mixture. The explosions are described in terms of the general shape of the pressure changes occurring at a point near the outermost extent of the flame that is produced by the initiation explosion alone. The initial pressure rise is determined by the form of the initiating explosion and is followed by a roughly exponential pressure increase (from atmospheric pressure), whose time constant depends on the nature of the coal-dust, its dispersion, and the dimensions and characteristics of the gallery. The effects on the development of the explosion of the presence of short dust deposits, suppressive devices, and the ignition of predispersed clouds are briefly discussed. It is concluded that, in weak explosions, propagation results from dust being swept from the floor into the zone of combustion behind the flame front. However, as pressures increase to above, say, 100 kPa, other mechanisms become responsible and, perhaps, a pre-detonation regime sets in.

D. Rae

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Recovery Act Changes Hanford Skyline with Explosive Demolitions |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Recovery Act Changes Hanford Skyline with Explosive Demolitions Recovery Act Changes Hanford Skyline with Explosive Demolitions Recovery Act Changes Hanford Skyline with Explosive Demolitions American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers at the Hanford Site recently used explosives to demolish industrial structures that supported plutonium processing for national defense. The explosive demolitions took down two 250-foot-tall exhaust chimneys, two 90-foot-fall air filter structures, and a 140-foot-tall water tower. The water tower was marked by a "Work Safely" motto that greeted workers. "Given the sheer height of the structures, explosive demolition was selected as the safer method of demolition," said Kurt Kehler, vice president and decommissioning and demolition project manager of CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, DOE's contractor at the

163

Explosive Demolitions To Change Hanford's Skyline | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Explosive Demolitions To Change Hanford's Skyline Explosive Demolitions To Change Hanford's Skyline Explosive Demolitions To Change Hanford's Skyline February 17, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis 284W Power House on the Hanford Site 284W Power House on the Hanford Site Media Contacts Cameron Hardy, DOE (509) 376-5365 Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov Andre Armstrong, CHPRC (509) 376-6773 andre_l_armstrong@rl.gov RICHLAND, WASH. - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) will use explosives to demolish several structures near the center of the Hanford Site on two separate days - February 18 and March 4. CHPRC subcontractor, Controlled Demolition Inc. (CDI), will detonate explosive charges to bring down industrial structures at central Hanford that have stood for over 50 years. On February 18, explosive demolition of the support structures of the 284

164

Recovery Act Changes Hanford Skyline with Explosive Demolitions |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Recovery Act Changes Hanford Skyline with Explosive Demolitions Recovery Act Changes Hanford Skyline with Explosive Demolitions Recovery Act Changes Hanford Skyline with Explosive Demolitions American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers at the Hanford Site recently used explosives to demolish industrial structures that supported plutonium processing for national defense. The explosive demolitions took down two 250-foot-tall exhaust chimneys, two 90-foot-fall air filter structures, and a 140-foot-tall water tower. The water tower was marked by a "Work Safely" motto that greeted workers. "Given the sheer height of the structures, explosive demolition was selected as the safer method of demolition," said Kurt Kehler, vice president and decommissioning and demolition project manager of CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, DOE's contractor at the

165

Experiment Hazard Class 6.7 - Explosive and Energetic Materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

.7 - Explosive and Energetic Materials .7 - Explosive and Energetic Materials Applicability All experiments involving the use of small quantities ( < 10 mg total) of explosive material for beamline analysis. Visiting scientists at the APS periodically perform beamline experiments involving small quantities of explosive material (ie, TATB, HMX, RDX, PETN, HNFX). The samples that are analyzed within the x-ray beam are typically encased within a Diamond Anvil Cell (DAC) that is designed to exert pressures of ~ 100 GPa as its routine function. Following a few hours of analysis within the x-ray flux, the samples degrade and must be replenished. For this purpose, up to ten 1 mg samples of the explosive material are shipped with the DAC to allow for a complete data set. Explosive material must be transported to and from ANL through Bldg. 46,

166

PINS Measurements of Explosive Simulants for Cargo Screening  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of its efforts to prevent the introduction of explosive threats on commercial flights, the Transportation Security Administration (TSL) is evaluating new explosives detection systems (EDSs) for use in air cargo inspection. The TSL has contracted Battelle to develop a new type of explosives simulant to assist in this development. These are designed to mimic the elemental profile (C, H, N, O, etc.) of explosives as well as their densities. Several neutron ingamma out (n,?) techniques have been considered to quantify the elemental profile in these new simulants and the respective explosives. The method chosen by Battelle is Portable Isotopic Neutron Spectroscopy (PINS), developed by Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Battelle wishes to validate that the simulants behave like the explosive threats with this technology. The results of the validation measurements are presented in this report.

E.H. Seabury

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Compacting Plastic-Bonded Explosive Molding Powders to Dense Solids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dense solid high explosives are made by compacting plastic-bonded explosive molding powders with high pressures and temperatures for extended periods of time. The density is influenced by manufacturing processes of the powders, compaction temperature, the magnitude of compaction pressure, pressure duration, and number of repeated applications of pressure. The internal density variation of compacted explosives depends on method of compaction and the material being compacted.

B. Olinger

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

168

Computed tomography on small explosive parts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have investigated three small explosive parts for the Pantex Plant in Amarillo, Texas using computed tomography (CT). A medium resolution, fan beam system was used to test imaging capabilities for small holes drilled into one of the parts, and to identify any inhomogeneities, cracks, voids, and inclusions if present in the other two parts. This system provides volumetric imaging. Its information is qualitative in that is allows us to see interior features but it cannot provide quantitative attenuation data. A second part of the investigation was to perform effective atomic number computed tomography on the parts using energy dispersive spectroscopy methods. We wanted to experimentally identify the {open_quotes}average{close_quotes} chemical composition of the materials in the explosive and its shell and to detect any possible inhomogeneities in composition. A single beam, nuclear spectroscopy based system was used for this work. The radiation source was a silver anode x-ray tube. By measuring x-ray attenuation at specific energies (characteristic lines and narrow bands of continuum) we are able to quantitatively determine linear attenuation coefficients. By using ratios of such measurements, density cancels out and we effectively have ratios of mass attenuation coefficients. Through a look-up scheme of mass attenuation coefficients for different elements, we can determine the weighted average chemical composition, as averaged by x-ray attenuation. We call this averaged composition the effective atomic number ({open_quotes}Z{sub eff}{close_quotes}). We thereby obtain cross sectional images of a parameter related to the averaged chemistry of the object. Such images and the underlying data can reveal, for instance, segregation of explosive and binder.

Ryon, R.W.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Surface effects of underground nuclear explosions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of nuclear explosions have been observed and studied since the first nuclear test (code named Trinity) on July 16, 1945. Since that first detonation, 1,053 nuclear tests have been conducted by the US, most of which were sited underground at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The effects of underground nuclear explosions (UNEs) on their surroundings have long been the object of much interest and study, especially for containment, engineering, and treaty verification purposes. One aspect of these explosion-induced phenomena is the disruption or alteration of the near-surface environment, also known as surface effects. This report was prepared at the request of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), to bring together, correlate, and preserve information and techniques used in the recognition and documentation of surface effects of UNEs. This report has several main sections, including pertinent background information (Section 2.0), descriptions of the different types of surface effects (Section 3.0), discussion of their application and limitations (Section 4.0), an extensive bibliography and glossary (Section 6.0 and Appendix A), and procedures used to document geologic surface effects at the NTS (Appendix C). Because a majority of US surface-effects experience is from the NTS, an overview of pertinent NTS-specific information also is provided in Appendix B. It is not within the scope of this report to explore new relationships among test parameters, physiographic setting, and the types or degree of manifestation of surface effects, but rather to compile, summarize, and capture surface-effects observations and interpretations, as well as documentation procedures and the rationale behind them.

Allen, B.M.; Drellack, S.L. Jr.; Townsend, M.J.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Method and system for detecting an explosive  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and system for detecting at least one explosive in a vehicle using a neutron generator and a plurality of NaI detectors. Spectra read from the detectors is calibrated by performing Gaussian peak fitting to define peak regions, locating a Na peak and an annihilation peak doublet, assigning a predetermined energy level to one peak in the doublet, and predicting a hydrogen peak location based on a location of at least one peak of the doublet. The spectra are gain shifted to a common calibration, summed for respective groups of NaI detectors, and nitrogen detection analysis performed on the summed spectra for each group.

Reber, Edward L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Rohde, Kenneth W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Blackwood, Larry G. (Bozeman, MT)

2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

171

Inspection Report - Management of Explosives at Selected Department Sites  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Management of Explosives at Selected Management of Explosives at Selected Department Sites INS-O-12-02 July 2012 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 July 2, 2012 MEMORANDUM FOR THE CHIEF HEALTH, SAFETY AND SECURITY OFFICER MANAGER, IDAHO OPERATIONS OFFICE MANAGER, SAVANNAH RIVER SITE MANAGER, SANDIA SITE OFFICE MANAGER, LOS ALAMOS SITE OFFICE FROM: Sandra D. Bruce Assistant Inspector General for Inspections Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Inspection Report on "Management of Explosives at Selected Department Sites" INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE In support of its research and development mission and security of its facilities, the Department of Energy maintains a significant inventory of explosives. In terms of mission, the Department

172

Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program - DOE Directives...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and use control consideration because of the potentially unacceptable consequences of an accident or unauthorized act; therefore, a Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS)...

173

Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program - DOE Directives...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Order provides requirements and responsibilities to prevent unintendedunauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives. Cancels DOE O 452.1B....

174

Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program - DOE Directives...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Order provides requirements and responsibilities to prevent unintendedunauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives. Cancels DOE O 452.1. Canceled...

175

Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program - DOE Directives...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Order provides requirements and responsibilities to prevent unintendedunauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives. Cancels DOE O 452.1A....

176

Estimating Equivalency of Explosives Through A Thermochemical Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Cheetah thermochemical computer code provides an accurate method for estimating the TNT equivalency of any explosive, evaluated either with respect to peak pressure or the quasi-static pressure at long time in a confined volume. Cheetah calculates the detonation energy and heat of combustion for virtually any explosive (pure or formulation). Comparing the detonation energy for an explosive with that of TNT allows estimation of the TNT equivalency with respect to peak pressure, while comparison of the heat of combustion allows estimation of TNT equivalency with respect to quasi-static pressure. We discuss the methodology, present results for many explosives, and show comparisons with equivalency data from other sources.

Maienschein, J L

2002-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

177

Method for digesting a nitro-bearing explosive compound  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a process wherein superoxide radicals from superoxide salt are used to break down the explosive compounds. The process has an excellent reaction rate for degrading explosives, and operates at ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure in aqueous or non-aqueous conditions. Because the superoxide molecules are small, much smaller than an enzyme molecule for example, they can penetrate the microstructure of plastic explosives faster. The superoxide salt generates reactive hydroxyl radicals, which can destroy other organic contaminants, if necessary, along with digesting the explosive nitro-bearing compound.

Shah, Manish M. (Richland, WA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Research on Characteristic Parameters of Coal-dust Explosion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The parameters of explosive characteristics of the coal-dust are assessed systematically with the test device of minimum ignition temperature of dust clouds and 20L sphere explosion test units. The minimum ignition temperature of dust is a main safety index when handling combustible dusts in industrial production, and while hazard evaluation, the maximum explosion pressure and the explosion index are key parameters. Five kinds of coal-dust with different particle diameters were tested in order to determine the temperature sensitivity and the ferocity under the given conditions, which can be used as the criteria to classify dust explosion hazards. The experiment results indicate that the minimum ignition temperature of coal-dust cloud reduces with the decrease of particle diameter under temperature of (2935) K and powder spraying pressure of 0.08MPa, and when the particle size reduces to (25-48) ?m, the minimum ignition temperature is between (793-803)K; Besides that, the results can also show that minimum explosive concentration of coal-dust cloud is between 20 gm-3 and 30 gm-3under temperature of (2935) K, powder spraying pressure of 2MPa and ignition energy of 10kJ, the maximum explosion pressure is 0.45MPa and the maximum explosion index is 11.14 MPams-1, which classifies coal-dust explosion hazards to Level I. The conclusions drawn from the experimental results are of great significance to the safe application of these combustible substances.

Weiguo Cao; Liyuan Huang; Jianxin Zhang; Sen Xu; Shanshan Qiu; Feng Pan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Title Preactivity Survey Report for Five Tonopah Test Range Explosive...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Preactivity Survey Report for Five Tonopah Test Range Explosive Ordnance Disposal Sites Pre-activity survey report to clear areas to be cleaned up. No sensitive species were...

180

Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program - DOE Directives...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program by cdornburg Functional areas: Defense Nuclear Facility Safety and Health Requirement, Defense Programs, Nuclear Weapons Programs,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "graaff confetti explosion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Surface detonation in type Ia supernova explosions?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We explore the evolution of thermonuclear supernova explosions when the progenitor white dwarf star ignites asymmetrically off-center. Several numerical simulations are carried out in two and three dimensions to test the consequences of different initial flame configurations such as spherical bubbles displaced from the center, more complex deformed configurations, and teardrop-shaped ignitions. The burning bubbles float towards the surface while releasing energy due to the nuclear reactions. If the energy release is too small to gravitationally unbind the star, the ash sweeps around it, once the burning bubble approaches the surface. Collisions in the fuel on the opposite side increase its temperature and density and may -- in some cases -- initiate a detonation wave which will then propagate inward burning the core of the star and leading to a strong explosion. However, for initial setups in two dimensions that seem realistic from pre-ignition evolution, as well as for all three-dimensional simulations the collimation of the surface material is found to be too weak to trigger a detonation.

F. K. Roepke; S. E. Woosley

2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

182

'Complete' measurement of molecular Coulomb-explosions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The multiple ionization and fragmentation of small molecules, e.g. H2, D2, H2O, and CF4, by fast H{sup +}, He{sup +}, and highly charged O{sup q+}-ions was studied utilizing a position- and time-sensitive multi-particle detector. The coincident measurement of the momenta of correlated fragment-ions yields a kinematically complete image of the molecular break-up process. Thereby, apart from relative cross-sections for specific reaction channels, the fragmentation energy as well as angular correlations can be derived for each individual event. Of special interest are 'Coulomb-explosion' processes like H2{yields}H{sup +}+H{sup +} or H2O{yields}H{sup +}+H{sup +}+O{sup n+}. Whereas the H2 and D2 data are in good agreement with a pure Coulomb-explosion model, this model is insufficient to explain the detailed behaviour of more complex systems. In case of H2O better agreement is achieved with ab initio MCSCF-calculations of the intermediate H2O{sup (n+2)+} parent-ion.

Werner, U.; Lutz, H. O. [Fakultaet fuer Physik, Universitaet Bielefeld, Universitaetsstrasse 25, D-33615 Bielefeld (Germany)

1996-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

183

Spectroscopic studies of detonating heterogeneous explosives. [HNS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The experimental objectives of this work are to use real-time spectroscopic techniques, emission spectroscopy and Raman spectra to monitor chemical and physical changes in shock-loaded or detonating high explosive (HE) samples. The investigators hope to identify chemical species including any transient intermediates. Also, they wish to determine the physical state of the material when the reactions are taking place; measure the temperature and the pressure; and study the effect of different initiation parameters and bulk properties of the explosive material. This work is just part of the effort undertaken to gain information on the detailed chemistry involved in initiation and detonation. In summary, the investigators have obtained vibrational temperatures of some small radical products of detonation, which may correlate with the detonation temperature. They have also observed that NO/sub 2/ is an early product from detonating HNS and RDX, and that other electronically excited radical species such as CN(B) are formed in HNS detonations. In the Raman work, the single-pulse spectra could be obtained even in the severe environment of a detonation, and that the rate of removal of the parent molecule could be monitored. 2 refs., 6 figs.

Renlund, A.M.; Trott, W.M.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

GRAVITATIONAL FIELD SHIELDING AND SUPERNOVA EXPLOSIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new mechanism for supernova explosions called gravitational field shielding is proposed, in accord with a five-dimensional fully covariant Kaluza-Klein theory with a scalar field that unifies the four-dimensional Einsteinian general relativity and Maxwellian electromagnetic theory. It is shown that a dense compact collapsing core of a star will suddenly turn off or completely shield its gravitational field when the core collapses to a critical density, which is inversely proportional to the square of mass of the core. As the core suddenly turns off its gravity, the extremely large pressure immediately stops the core collapse and pushes the mantle material of supernova moving outward. The work done by the pressure in the expansion can be the order of energy released in a supernova explosion. The gravity will resume and stop the core from a further expansion when the core density becomes less than the critical density. Therefore, the gravitational field shielding leads a supernova to impulsively explode and form a compact object such as a neutron star as a remnant. It works such that a compressed spring will shoot the oscillator out when the compressed force is suddenly removed.

Zhang, T. X. [Physics Department, Alabama A and M University, Normal, AL 35762 (United States)

2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

185

Use of P coda for determination of yield of nuclear explosions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......explosions in granite at the Nevada Test Site and Algeria: joint determination...receiver effects for Lg waves from Nevada Test Site explosions, Bull. seism. Soc...transverse Lg from explosions at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) provides fairly satisfactory......

I. N. Gupta; R. R. Blandford; R. A. Wagner; J. A. Burnetti; T. W. McElfresh

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Detection Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Emplacement Using Infrared Image  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a method to detect an improvised explosive device (IED) by using infrared thermography (IRT) technology. The detection of IED will be done automatically and accurately even the IED detection expert is not present. Combining the advantage ... Keywords: infrared imaging, improvised explosive device, image segmentation

Kamarul Hawari Ghazali, Mohd Shawal Jadin

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Design of a Large Explosive Ordnance Disposal Robot  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The explosive ordnance disposal robot (EOD robot) can replace man to reconnoiter, remove and deal with explosives or other dangerous articles in the dangerous environment. We design a large EOD robot which is constituted by the vehicle body, the mechanical ... Keywords: EOD robot, vehicle body, mechanical hand, vision system

Boyu Wei; Junyao Gao; Jianguo Zhu; Kejie Li

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive security and use control elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program, to ensure authorized use, when directed by proper authority, and protect against deliberate unauthorized acts/deliberate unauthorized use. Cancels DOE O 452.4A.

2010-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

189

Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive security and use control (UC) elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program, to ensure authorized use, when directed by proper authority, and protect against deliberate unauthorized acts (DUAs), deliberate unauthorized use (DUU), and denial of authorized use (DAU).

2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

190

Wave Generation from Explosions in Rock Cavities CANGLI LIU1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wave Generation from Explosions in Rock Cavities CANGLI LIU1 and THOMAS J. AHRENS1 Abstract Ð We have developed a measurement method to monitor P- and S-waves generated from laboratory diameter cavities. Stress waves generated by the explosions were recorded within a radius of 25 cm

Stewart, Sarah T.

191

High Explosives Pressing Facility on budget and on schedule | National  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Explosives Pressing Facility on budget and on schedule | National Explosives Pressing Facility on budget and on schedule | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > High Explosives Pressing Facility on budget and ... High Explosives Pressing Facility on budget and on schedule Posted By Office of Public Affairs Construction crews prepare to pour concrete at the new High Explosives

192

LANL highlights explosives work | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

explosives work | National Nuclear Security Administration explosives work | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > LANL highlights explosives work LANL highlights explosives work Posted By Office of Public Affairs For more than 70 years, Los Alamos National Laboratory has been a frontrunner in explosives research, development and applications. To

193

HYDROGEN IGNITION MECHANISM FOR EXPLOSIONS IN NUCLEAR FACILITY PIPE SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrogen and oxygen generation due to the radiolysis of water is a recognized hazard in pipe systems used in the nuclear industry, where the accumulation of hydrogen and oxygen at high points in the pipe system is expected, and explosive conditions exist. Pipe ruptures at nuclear facilities were attributed to hydrogen explosions inside pipelines, in nuclear facilities, i.e., Hamaoka, Nuclear Power Station in Japan, and Brunsbuettel in Germany. Prior to these accidents an ignition source for hydrogen was questionable, but these accidents, demonstrated that a mechanism was, in fact, available to initiate combustion and explosion. Hydrogen explosions may occur simultaneously with water hammer accidents in nuclear facilities, and a theoretical mechanism to relate water hammer to hydrogen deflagrations and explosions is presented herein.

Leishear, R

2010-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

194

Annihilation explosions in macroscopic polyelectrons. Photon detonation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Annihilation of the electron-positron pairs in macroscopic polyelectrons is considered. It is shown that very fast collapse of the spatial area occupied by macroscopic polyelectron (or dense electron-positron plasma) produces an instant annihilation of a very large number of electron-positron pairs. This phenomenon corresponds to the so-called annihilation explosion. Annihilation of each electron-positron pair is a highly exothermic process. Therefore, in dense electron-positron plasma one can observe a very interesting phenomenon of photon detonation, i.e. a self-organized formation and propagation of the detonation wave which coincides with the annihilation wave. The photon detonation can be used in many applications, including many military and astrophysical problems.

Alexei M. Frolov

2009-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

195

Antimatter induced fusion and thermonuclear explosions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The feasibility of using antihydrogen for igniting inertial confinement fusion pellets or triggering large scale thermonuclear explosions is investigated. The number of antiproton annihilations required to start a thermonuclear burn wave in either DT or Li_2DT is found to be about 10^{21}/k^2, where k is the compression factor of the fuel to be ignited. In the second part, the technologies for producing antiprotons with high energy accelerator systems and the means for manipulating and storing microgram amounts of antihydrogen are examined. While there seems to be no theoretical obstacles to the production of 10^{18} antiprotons per day (the amount required for triggering one thermonuclear bomb), the construction of such a plant involves several techniques which are between 3 and 4 orders of magnitude away from present day technology.

Gsponer, A; Gsponer, Andre; Hurni, Jean-Pierre

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

E-Print Network 3.0 - altitude nuclear explosion Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

nuclear explosion Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: altitude nuclear explosion Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Imaging of the atmosphere...

197

The evolution and explosion of massive Stars II: Explosive hydrodynamics and nucleosynthesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nucleosynthetic yield of isotopes lighter than A = 66 (zinc) is determined for a grid of stellar masses and metallicities including stars of 11, 12, 13, 15, 18, 19, 20, 22, 25, 30, 35, and 40 M{sub {circle_dot}} and metallicities Z = 0, 10{sup {minus}4}, 0.01, 0.1, and 1 times solar (a slightly reduced mass grid is employed for non-solar metallicities). Altogether 78 different model supernova explosions are calculated. In each case nucleosynthesis has already been determined for 200 isotopes in each of 600 to 1200 zones of the presupernova star, including the effects of time dependent convection. Here each star is exploded using a piston to give a specified final kinetic energy at infinity (typically 1.2 {times} 10{sup 51} erg), and the explosive modifications to the nucleosynthesis, including the effects of neutrino irradiation, determined. A single value of the critical {sup 12}C({sub {alpha},{gamma}}){sup 16}O reaction rate corresponding to S(300 keV) = 170 keV barns is used in all calculations. The synthesis of each isotope is discussed along with its sensitivity to model parameters. In each case, the final mass of the collapsed remnant is also determined and often found not to correspond to the location of the piston (typically the edge of the iron core), but to a ``mass cut`` farther out. This mass cut is sensitive not only to the explosion energy, but also to the presupernova structure, stellar mass, and the metallicity. Unless the explosion mechanism, for unknown reasons, provides a much larger characteristic energy in more massive stars, it appears likely that stars larger than about 30 M{sub {center_dot}} will experience considerable reimplosion of heavy elements following the initial launch of a successful shock. While such explosions will produce a viable, bright Type II supernova light curve, lacking the radioactive tail, they will have dramatically reduced yields of heavy elements and may leave black hole remnants of up to 10 and more solar masses.

Woosley, S.E. [California Univ., Santa Cruz, CA (United States); [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Weaver, T.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1995-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

198

Atomic Energy Commission Explores Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Explosions |  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Explores Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Explosions | Explores Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Explosions | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > Atomic Energy Commission Explores Peaceful Uses of ... Atomic Energy Commission Explores Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Explosions July 06, 1962

199

An experimental study of steam explosions involving chemically reactive metal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental study of molten zirconium-water explosions was conducted. A 1-kg mass of zirconium melt was dropped into a column of water. Explosions took place only when an external trigger was used. In the triggered tests, the extent of oxidation of the zirconium melt was very extensive. However, the explosion energetics estimated were found to be very small compared to the potential chemical energy available from the oxidation reaction. Zirconium is of particular interest, since it is a component of the core materials of the current nuclear power reactors. This paper describes the test apparatus and summarizes the results of four tests conducted using pure zirconium melt.

Cho, D.H.; Armstrong, D.R.; Gunther, W.H. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Basu, S. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Thermally stable booster explosive and process for manufacture  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermally stable booster explosive and process for the manufacture of the explosive. The product explosive is 2,4,7,9-tetranitro-10H-benzo[4,5]furo[3,2-b]indole (TNBFI). A reactant/solvent such as n-methylpyrrolidone (NMP) or dimethyl formamide (DMF) is made slightly basic. The solution is heated to reduce the water content. The solution is cooled and hexanitrostilbene is added. The solution is heated to a predetermined temperature for a specific time period, cooled, and the product is collected by filtration.

Quinlin, William T. (Amarillo, TX); Thorpe, Raymond (Amarillo, TX); Lightfoot, James M. (Amarillo, TX)

2006-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "graaff confetti explosion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Method for enhancing stability of high explosives, for purposes of transport or storage, and the stabilized high explosives  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The stability of porous solid high explosives, for purposes of transport or storage, is enhanced by reducing the sensitivity to shock initiation of a reaction that leads to detonation. The pores of the explosive down to a certain size are filled under pressure with a stable, low melt temperature material in liquid form, and the combined material is cooled so the pore filling material solidifies. The stability can be increased to progressively higher levels by filling smaller pores. The pore filling material can be removed, at least partially, by reheating above its melt temperature and drained off so that the explosive is once more suitable for detonation.

Nutt, Gerald L. (Menlo Park, CA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Pantex installs new high explosives equipment | National Nuclear Security  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

high explosives equipment | National Nuclear Security high explosives equipment | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Pantex installs new high explosives equipment Pantex installs new high explosives equipment Posted By Office of Public Affairs Joel Ramos works with the lathe. Big jobs are nothing new for the Projects Division at Pantex, and the

203

Trinity Site - World's First Nuclear Explosion | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Manhattan Project » Signature Manhattan Project » Signature Facilities » Trinity Site - World's First Nuclear Explosion Trinity Site - World's First Nuclear Explosion Trinity Site - World's First Nuclear Explosion The world's first nuclear explosion occurred on July 16, 1945, when a plutonium implosion device was tested at a site located 210 miles south of Los Alamos on the barren plains of the Alamogordo Bombing Range, known as the Jornada del Muerto. Inspired by the poetry of John Donne, J. Robert Oppenheimer code-named the test Trinity. Hoisted atop a 150-foot tower, the plutonium device, or Gadget, detonated at precisely 5:30 a.m. over the New Mexico desert, releasing 18.6 kilotons of power, instantly vaporizing the tower and turning the surrounding asphalt and sand into green glass.

204

3-D Earth model more accurately pinpoints explosions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3-D Earth model more accurately pinpoints explosions 3-D Earth model more accurately pinpoints explosions 3-D Earth model more accurately pinpoints explosions The purpose of this model is to assist the U.S. Air Force and the international Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organization with more accurately locating all types of explosions. October 25, 2013 A one-dimensional velocity profile with depth plotted within a three-dimensional Earth. The colors are compressional wave velocity in km/s. The rays are examples coming from a pseudo station at the North Pole. This model is used as the starting point to calculate the full SALSA3D velocity model. A one-dimensional velocity profile with depth plotted within a three-dimensional Earth. The colors are compressional wave velocity in km/s. The rays are examples coming from a pseudo station at the North Pole.

205

Pantex installs new high explosives equipment | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

high explosives equipment | National Nuclear Security high explosives equipment | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Pantex installs new high explosives equipment Pantex installs new high explosives equipment Posted By Office of Public Affairs Joel Ramos works with the lathe. Big jobs are nothing new for the Projects Division at Pantex, and the

206

FAQS Job Task Analyses - Nuclear Explosive Safety Study  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nuclear Explosive Safety Study FAQS Nuclear Explosive Safety Study FAQS STEP 1: Job Task Analysis for Tasks Task (and Number) Source Importance Frequency (1) Serves as a member or chair of the NESSG. FAQS Duties and Responsibilities Paragraph A 5 3 (2) Provides guidance on and interpretation of nuclear explosive safety (NES) requirements and policy. FAQS Duties and Responsibilities Paragraph B 5 4 (3) Drafts policy directives for the DOE/NNSA, Nuclear Explosive Safety Operations Branch (NESB) and reviews DOE/NNSA policies on NES. FAQS Duties and Responsibilities Paragraph D 5 3 (4) Provides instruction and guidance regarding NES to individuals assigned NES responsibilities. FAQS Duties and Responsibilities Paragraph E 5 3-4 (5) Monitors ongoing NEOs to ensure compliance with NES standards and

207

Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

security and use control (UC) elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program, to ensure authorized use, when directed by proper authority,...

208

Detonation of nanosized explosive: New mechanistic model for nanodiamond formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract While nanodiamonds are synthesized by detonation of microstructured explosives since 50years ago, we developed a novel approach to synthesize these particles by using nanostructured explosives. This new synthesis method leads to novel results not only in the control of the size, but also in the understanding of the nanodiamond synthesis and the detonation mechanisms. The use of explosive particles with size down to 40nm results in the formation of detonation nanodiamonds with a mean size of 2.8nm. In the light of these experiments, a model based on the size of the material involved during the detonation process has been developed to explain the size of the obtained nanodiamond. According to hypotheses based on the number of the nanodiamond nucleation sites, the experimental results are in favor of a decrease in the size of the nanodiamonds formed when the size of the explosive particles used during detonation is decreased.

V. Pichot; M. Comet; B. Risse; D. Spitzer

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program - DOE Directives...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Surety (NEWS) Program, which was established to prevent unintendedunauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives. o452.1E-Draft-8-5-14.pdf --...

210

Explosive destruction system for disposal of chemical munitions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An explosive destruction system and method for safely destroying explosively configured chemical munitions. The system comprises a sealable, gas-tight explosive containment vessel, a fragment suppression system positioned in said vessel, and shaped charge means for accessing the interior of the munition when the munition is placed within the vessel and fragment suppression system. Also provided is a means for treatment and neutralization of the munition's chemical fills, and means for heating and agitating the contents of the vessel. The system is portable, rapidly deployable and provides the capability of explosively destroying and detoxifying chemical munitions within a gas-tight enclosure so that there is no venting of toxic or hazardous chemicals during detonation.

Tschritter, Kenneth L. (Livermore, CA); Haroldsen, Brent L. (Manteca, CA); Shepodd, Timothy J. (Livermore, CA); Stofleth, Jerome H. (Albuquerque, NM); DiBerardo, Raymond A. (Baltimore, MD)

2005-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

211

EDS V25 containment vessel explosive qualification test report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The V25 containment vessel was procured by the Project Manager, Non-Stockpile Chemical Materiel (PMNSCM) as a replacement vessel for use on the P2 Explosive Destruction Systems. It is the first EDS vessel to be fabricated under Code Case 2564 of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, which provides rules for the design of impulsively loaded vessels. The explosive rating for the vessel based on the Code Case is nine (9) pounds TNT-equivalent for up to 637 detonations. This limit is an increase from the 4.8 pounds TNT-equivalency rating for previous vessels. This report describes the explosive qualification tests that were performed in the vessel as part of the process for qualifying the vessel for explosive use. The tests consisted of a 11.25 pound TNT equivalent bare charge detonation followed by a 9 pound TNT equivalent detonation.

Rudolphi, John Joseph

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

3-D Earth model more accurately pinpoints explosions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3-D Earth model more accurately pinpoints explosions The purpose of this model is to assist the U.S. Air Force and the international Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty...

213

Ultrafast laser based coherent control methods for explosives detection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The detection of explosives is a notoriously difficult problem, especially at stand-off, due to their (generally) low vapor pressure, environmental and matrix interferences, and packaging. We are exploring Optimal Dynamic Detection of Explosives (ODD-Ex), which exploits the best capabilities of recent advances in laser technology and recent discoveries in optimal shaping of laser pulses for control of molecular processes to significantly enhance the standoff detection of explosives. The core of the ODD-Ex technique is the introduction of optimally shaped laser pulses to simultaneously enhance sensitivity to explosives signatures while dramatically improving specificity, particularly against matrix materials and background interferences. These goals are being addressed by operating in an optimal non-linear fashion, typically with a single shaped laser pulse inherently containing within it coherently locked control and probe subpulses. Recent results will be presented.

Moore, David Steven [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

214

Security and Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This directive establishes requirements and responsibilities to prevent the deliberate unauthorized use of U.S. nuclear explosives and U.S. nuclear weapons. Cancels DOE O 452.4.

2001-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

215

3-D Earth model more accurately pinpoints explosions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3-D Earth model more accurately pinpoints explosions 3-D Earth model more accurately pinpoints explosions 3-D Earth model more accurately pinpoints explosions The purpose of this model is to assist the U.S. Air Force and the international Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organization with more accurately locating all types of explosions. October 25, 2013 A one-dimensional velocity profile with depth plotted within a three-dimensional Earth. The colors are compressional wave velocity in km/s. The rays are examples coming from a pseudo station at the North Pole. This model is used as the starting point to calculate the full SALSA3D velocity model. A one-dimensional velocity profile with depth plotted within a three-dimensional Earth. The colors are compressional wave velocity in km/s. The rays are examples coming from a pseudo station at the North Pole.

216

NEW - DOE O 452.1E, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

All nuclear explosives and nuclear explosive operations require special safety, security, and use control consideration because of the potentially unacceptable consequences of an accident or unauthorized act; therefore, a Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program is established to prevent unintended/unauthorized detonation and deliberate unauthorized use of nuclear explosives.

217

Global Anisotropies in Supernova Explosions and Pulsar Recoil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show by two-dimensional and first three-dimensional simulations of neutrino-driven supernova explosions that low (l=1,2) modes can dominate the flow pattern in the convective postshock region on timescales of hundreds of milliseconds after core bounce. This can lead to large global anisotropy of the supernova explosion and pulsar kicks in excess of 500 km/s.

L. Scheck; T. Plewa; K. Kifonidis; H. -Th. Janka; E. Mller

2004-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

218

Semiconductor bridge: A plasma generator for the ignition of explosives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Small metal bridgewires are commonly used to ignite energetic powders such as pyrotechnics, propellants, and primary or secondary explosives. In this paper we describe a new means for igniting explosive materials using a semiconductor bridge (SCB). When driven with a short (20 ..mu..s), low-energy pulse (less than 3.5 mJ), the SCB produces a hot plasma that ignites explosives. The SCB, a heavily n-doped silicon film, typically 100 ..mu..m long by 380 ..mu..m wide by 2 ..mu..m thick, is 30 times smaller in volume than a conventional bridgewire. SCB devices produce a usable explosive output in a few tens of microseconds and operate at one-tenth the input energy of metal bridgewires. In spite of the low energies for ignition, SCB devices are explosively safe. We describe SCB processing and experiments evaluating SCB operation. Also discussed are the SCB vaporization process, plasma formation, optical spectra from the discharge, heat transfer mechanisms from the SCB to the explosive powders, and SCB device applications.

Benson, D.A.; Larsen, M.E.; Renlund, A.M.; Trott, W.M.; Bickes R.W. Jr.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Semiconductor bridge: A plasma generator for the ignition of explosives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Small metal bridgewires are commonly used to ignite energetic powders such as pyrotechnics propellants and primary or secondary explosives. In this paper we describe a new means for igniting explosive materials using a semiconductor bridge (SCB). When driven with a short (20 ?s) low?energy pulse (less than 3.5 mJ) the SCB produces a hot plasma that ignites explosives. The SCB a heavily n?doped silicon film typically 100 ?m long by 380 ?m wide by 2 ?m thick is 30 times smaller in volume than a conventional bridgewire. SCB devices produce a usable explosive output in a few tens of microseconds and operate at one?tenth the input energy of metal bridgewires. In spite of the low energies for ignition SCB devices are explosively safe. We describe SCB processing and experiments evaluating SCB operation. Also discussed are the SCB vaporization process plasma formation optical spectra from the discharge heat transfer mechanisms from the SCB to the explosive powders and SCB device applications.

D. A. Benson; M. E. Larsen; A. M. Renlund; W. M. Trott; R. W. Bickes Jr.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Optimization of steam explosion pretreatment. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Different operating conditions are required to optimize the yield from each of the various fractions in the substrate. Xylose recovery is maximized at short cooking times whereas maximum lignin recovery requires much longer cooking times. Peak glucose yield and rumen digestibility occur at intermediate times. If process conditions are set for maximum glucose yield we have achieved a yield of 68% of the theoretical, based on an average of a dozen substrates tested. Individual results ranged from 46 to 87%. If the process is optimized for maximum total sugars (i.e. glucose plus xylose) we have obtained an average yield of 60%, with a range of 31 to 75%. With rumen microflora, the average value of the in-vitro cellulose digestibility was 82%, with a range of 41 to 90%. The optimum operating conditions for total sugars are a pressure of 500 to 550 psig with a cooking time of 40 to 50 seconds and 35% starting moisture content. Particle size is not a significant factor, nor is pre-steaming or use of a constricting die in the gun nozzle. High quality lignin can be extracted with 80% yield. The Iotech lignin is very soluble, has a low molecular weight and is reactive. The unique properties of the lignin derive from the explosion at the end of the pretreatment. A lignin formaldehyde resin has been successfully formulated and tested. It represents a high value utilization of the lignin byproduct with immediate market potential. A detailed engineering design of the process gives an estimated operating cost of $7.50/OD ton of biomass. At this low cost, the Iotech process achieves many important pretreatment goals in a single step. The substrate has been sterilized; it has been pulverized into a powder; the cellulose has been accessible; and a highly reactive lignin fraction can be recovered and utilized.

Foody, P.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "graaff confetti explosion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Pilot-scale testing of a fuel oil-explosives cofiring process for recovering energy from waste explosives: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Army generates and stores a significant quantity of explosives and explosive-related materials that do not meet specifications for their primary use. Current explosives disposal processes do not recover any resources from these materials. The heat of combustion of these materials is typically 9 to 15 kJ/g (4000 to 6500 Btu/lb), which is 21 to 33% of the high heating value of No. 2 fuel oil. One secondary use for explosives is to cofire them with other fuels to recover their energy content. Bench-scale testing has shown that cofiring is feasible and safe within certain guidelines. To further evaluate cofiring, a proof-of-principle test was conducted in a 300-kW (10/sup 6/ Btu/h) combustion chamber. The test program was discontinued before completion because of failures largely unrelated to the explosives contained in the fuel. This report presents the results of the proof-of-principle tests, as well as design and operational changes that would eliminate problems encountered during the course of the test program. It is clearly feasible to cofire explosives and fuel oil. However, more data are needed before the process can be tested in a production boiler, furnace, or incinerator. 20 refs., 14 figs., 9 tabs.

Bradshaw, W.M.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

UNIFYING THE ZOO OF JET-DRIVEN STELLAR EXPLOSIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a set of numerical simulations of stellar explosions induced by relativistic jets emanating from a central engine sitting at the center of compact, dying stars. We explore a wide range of durations of the central engine activity, two candidate stellar progenitors, and two possible values of the total energy release. We find that even if the jets are narrowly collimated, their interaction with the star unbinds the stellar material, producing a stellar explosion. We also find that the outcome of the explosion can be very different depending on the duration of the engine activity. Only the longest-lasting engines result in successful gamma-ray bursts. Engines that power jets only for a short time result in relativistic supernova (SN) explosions, akin to observed engine-driven SNe such as SN2009bb. Engines with intermediate durations produce weak gamma-ray bursts, with properties similar to nearby bursts such as GRB 980425. Finally, we find that the engines with the shortest durations, if they exist in nature, produce stellar explosions that lack sizable amounts of relativistic ejecta and are therefore dynamically indistinguishable from ordinary core-collapse SNe.

Lazzati, Davide; Blackwell, Christopher H. [Department of Physics, NC State University, 2401 Stinson Drive, Raleigh, NC 27695-8202 (United States); Morsony, Brian J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2535 Sterling Hall, 475 N. Charter Street, Madison WI 53706-1582 (United States); Begelman, Mitchell C. [JILA, University of Colorado, 440 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309-0440 (United States)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Calculations on seismic coupling of underground explosions in salt  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report details the results of a theoretical study of seismic coupling and decoupling of underground explosions in a salt medium. A series of chemical and nuclear explosions was carried out years ago in salt domes for the Cowboy and the Dribble programs to provide experimental data on seismic coupling for both tamped explosions and explosions in cavities. The Cowboy program consisted of a series of chemical explosions, and the Dribble program consisted of the tamped nuclear Salmon event, the Sterling nuclear event in the Salmon cavity, and an associated site calibration effort. This report presents the results of extensive computer calculations, which are in satisfactory agreement with the experimental data. The calculations were extended to give general results on seismic coupling in salt. The measure of seismic coupling for most of this work was the residual reduced displacement potential (residual RDP). The decoupling associated with a shot in a cavity was expressed as the ratio of the resulting residual RDP to that of an equal-sized tamped shot.

Heusinkveld, M.E.

1981-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

224

Prediction of blast damage from vapor cloud explosions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The process industries handle a wide range of different materials and use them in different types of chemical reaction. Of particular concern is the prospect of damage and injury affecting the general public outside the boundary wall of the chemical plant. It is not wise to permit the construction of homes, schools or hospitals so close to chemical plants that they, and the people within, might be damaged or injured should there be an accidental explosion in the plant. The major hazard outside the plant is over-pressure, a consequence of an accidental explosion in a cloud of flammable gas or vapor (Vapor Cloud Explosion or VCE). It is the responsibility of plant management to ensure that any such accidental explosion is not so large as to endanger the public, and of the local planning authorities to ensure that homes, schools or hospitals are not sited so close to chemical plants that they may be endangered by accidental explosion. A vital tool for such authorities is a simple method of assessing the possible consequences of an accidental VCE. In this paper those methods of assessing the consequences are examined.

Phillips, H. [Phillips (H.), Buxton (United Kingdom)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

225

Comparison of radiation safety and nuclear explosive safety disciplines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In August 1945, U.S. Navy Captain William Parsons served as the weaponeer aboard the Enola Gay for the mission to Hiroshima (Shelton 1988). In view of the fact that four B-29s had crashed and burned on takeoff from Tinian the night before, Captain Parsons made the decision to arm the gun-type weapon after takeoff for safety reasons (15 kilotons of TNT equivalent). Although he had no control over the success of the takeoff, he could prevent the possibility of a nuclear detonation on Tinian by controlling what we now call the nuclear explosive. As head of the Ordnance Division at Los Alamos and a former gunnery officer, Captain Parsons clearly understood the role of safety in his work. The advent of the pre-assembled implosion weapon where the high explosive and nuclear materials are always in an intimate configuration meant that nuclear explosive safety became a reality at a certain point in development and production not just at the time of delivery by the military. This is the only industry where nuclear materials are intentionally put in contact with high explosives. The agency of the U.S. Government responsible for development and production of U.S. nuclear weapons is the Department of Energy (DOE) (and its predecessor agencies). This paper will be limited to nuclear explosive safety as it is currently practiced within the DOE nuclear weapons

Winstanley, J. L.

1998-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

226

High Explosives Pressing Facility on budget and on schedule | National  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Pressing Facility on budget and on schedule | National Pressing Facility on budget and on schedule | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > High Explosives Pressing Facility on budget and ... High Explosives Pressing Facility on budget and on schedule Posted By Office of Public Affairs Construction crews prepare to pour concrete at the new High Explosives

227

Recovery Act Changes Hanford Skyline with Explosive Demolitions  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers at the Hanford Site recently American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers at the Hanford Site recently used explosives to demolish industrial structures that supported plutonium processing for national defense. The explosive demolitions took down two 250-foot-tall exhaust chimneys, two 90-foot-fall air filter structures, and a 140-foot-tall water tower. The water tower was marked by a "Work Safely" motto that greeted workers. "Given the sheer height of the structures, explosive demolition was selected as the safer method of demolition," said Kurt Kehler, vice president and decommissioning and demolition project manager of CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, DOE's contractor at the Hanford Site. The structures supported the 284 West Power House, which was built in 1943 as

228

Sublimation rates of explosive materials : method development and initial results.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vapor detection of explosives continues to be a technological basis for security applications. This study began experimental work to measure the chemical emanation rates of pure explosive materials as a basis for determining emanation rates of security threats containing explosives. Sublimation rates for TNT were determined with thermo gravimetric analysis using two different techniques. Data were compared with other literature values to provide sublimation rates from 25 to 70 C. The enthalpy of sublimation for the combined data was found to be 115 kJ/mol, which corresponds well with previously reported data from vapor pressure determinations. A simple Gaussian atmospheric dispersion model was used to estimate downrange concentrations based on continuous, steady-state conditions at 20, 45 and 62 C for a nominal exposed block of TNT under low wind conditions. Recommendations are made for extension of the experimental vapor emanation rate determinations and development of turbulent flow computational fluid dynamics based atmospheric dispersion estimates of standoff vapor concentrations.

Phelan, James M.; Patton, Robert Thomas

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Method for loading explosive laterally from a borehole  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

There is provided a method for forming an in situ oil shale retort in a subterranean formation containing oil shale. At least one void is excavated in the formation, leaving zones of unfragmented formation adjacent the void. An array of main blastholes is formed in the zone of unfragmented formation and at least one explosive charge which is shaped for forming a high velocity gas jet is placed into a main blasthole with the axis of the gas jet extending transverse to the blasthole. The shaped charge is detonated for forming an auxiliary blasthole in the unfragmented formation adjacent a side wall of the main blasthole. The auxiliary blasthole extends laterally away from the main blasthole. Explosive is placed into the main blasthole and into the auxiliary blasthole and is detonated for explosively expanding formation towards the free face for forming a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles in the in situ oil shale retort.

Ricketts, Thomas E. (Grand Junction, CO)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Development of a trace explosives detection portal for personnel screening  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors discuss the development, design, and operation of a walk-through trace detection portal designed to screen personnel for explosives. Developed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) with primary funding from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and additional support from the Department of Energy office of Safeguards and Security, this portal is intended primarily for use in airport terminals and in other localities where a very high throughput of pedestrian traffic is combined with stringent security requirements. The portal is capable of detecting both vapor and particulate contamination, with the collection of explosive material being based upon the entrainment of that material in air flows over the body of the person being screened. This portal is capable of detecting most types of common high explosives of interest to the FAA. The authors discuss the results of field testing of the portal in the Albuquerque International Airport in September, 1997 and more recent steps towards commercialization of the portal.

Parmeter, J.E.; Linker, K.L.; Rhykerd, C.L. Jr.; Bouchier, F.A.; Hannum, D.W.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Construction on Pantex High Explosives Pressing Facility Reaches 85% Mark |  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Field Offices > Welcome to the NNSA Production Office > NPO Press Field Offices > Welcome to the NNSA Production Office > NPO Press Releases > Construction on Pantex High Explosives Pressing Facility ... Construction on Pantex High Explosives Pressing Facility Reaches 85% Mark January 3, 2014 Work on the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) High Explosives Pressing Facility at its Pantex Plant, located near Amarillo, Texas, this month passed the 85 percent construction completion mark and is on schedule and under budget. Download Press Release Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr General Information NPO Press Releases Public Contact Us Mission Links NEPA Reading Room NPO Press Releases January 2014 (1) March 2013 (1) January 2013 (2) October 2012 (1) September 2012 (1) July 2012 (1) June 2012 (3) April 2012 (1) March 2012 (1)

232

NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS - PEACEFUI APPLICATIONS PROJECT WUL 1 SON  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

EXPLOSIONS - PEACEFUI EXPLOSIONS - PEACEFUI APPLICATIONS PROJECT WUL 1 SON F I N A L OPERATIONAL WAB$OACTIVI TY REPORT PRODUCT1 ON TESTS FEBRUARY 1972 PEACEFUL APPLICATIONS DIVISION NEVADA OPER4TIONS OFFICE This page intentionally left blank TABLE OF CONTENTS Subject Page N o . Abstract . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i i . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Acknowledgements i i i . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I . Introduction 1 I1 . F i r s t Production Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 I11 . Second Production Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 IV . Third Production Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 V . Data Tables A . First Production Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 B . Second Production Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 C . Third Production Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Figures I . Road Map of Northwest Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 . . . . . . I1 . Total 3~ and 8

233

Radio frequency overview of the high explosive radio telemetry project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High explosive radio telemetry (HERT) is a project that is being developed jointly by Los Alamos National Laboratory and AlliedSignal Federal Manufacturing and Technologies. The ultimate goal is to develop a small, modular telemetry system capable of high-speed detection of explosive events, with an accuracy on the order of 10 nanoseconds. The reliable telemetry of this data, from a high-speed missile trajectory, is a very challenging opportunity. All captured data must be transmitted in less than 20 microseconds of time duration. This requires a high bits/Hertz microwave telemetry modulation code to insure transmission of the data with the limited time interval available.

Bracht, R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Dimsdle, J.; Rich, D.; Smith, F. [AlliedSignal Federal Manufacturing and Technologies, Kansas City, MO (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

234

Io - Are vapor explosions responsible for the 5-micron outbursts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is proposed that a vapor explosion of a submerged pool of liquid sulfur will remove the crust overlying an area of about 50-km diam. Thermal radiation from the exposed liquid sulfur pool with a surface temperature of 600 K is then presumed to be responsible for the 5-micron outbursts that have been observed. The explosive volcanoes are expected to leave black sulfur calderas, which are, indeed, found on the surface. The 5-micron outburst observed by Sinton (1980), on June 11, 1979 (UT), is identified with a new caldera found on Voyager 2 photographs but which had not been present on Voyager 1 pictures.

Sinton, W.M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Cluster Explosive Synchronization in a Power Grid model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The emergence of explosive synchronization has been reported as an abrupt transition in complex networks of first-order Kuramoto oscillators. In this Letter, we demonstrate that the nodes in a power grid model, equivalent to a second-order Kuramoto model, perform a cascade of transitions toward a synchronous macroscopic state, a novel phenomenon that we call cluster explosive synchronization. We provide a rigorous analytical treatment using a mean-field analysis in uncorrelated networks. Our findings are in good agreement with numerical simulations and fundamentally deepen the understanding of microscopic mechanisms toward synchronization.

Ji, Peng; Menck, Peter J; Rodrigues, Francisco A; Kurths, Jrgen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Design of a hypersonic waterjet apparatus driven by high explosives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design and construction of a hypersonic waterjet apparatus is described. Jet velocities from 0.5 to 5 km/s have been achieved using a high explosive charge. Images are obtained in situ on various target substrates using a high-speed framing camera. Experimental results are shown for the impact of high velocity waterjets on propellants and high explosive samples. By observing the impact of the waterjet at a wide range of velocities a safety threshold can be determined where no reaction takes place.

Weeks, Brandon L.; Klosterman, John; Worsey, Paul N.

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Thermonuclear supernova explosions and their remnants: the case of Tycho  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose to use the thermal X-ray emission from young supernova remnants (SNRs) originated in Type Ia supernovae (SNe) to extract relevant information concerning the explosion mechanism. We focus on the differences between numerical 1D and 3D explosion calculations, and the impact that these differences could have on young SNRs. We use the remnant of the Tycho supernova (SN 1572) as a test case to compare with our predictions, discussing the observational features that allow to accept or discard a given model.

Carles Badenes; Eduardo Bravo; Kazimierz J. Borkowski

2003-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

238

Observations of pP in the Short-Period Phases of NTS Explosions Recorded at Norway  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Massachusetts P waves from 11 Nevada Test Site explosions, recorded digitally...3)* Summary P waves from 11 Nevada Test Site explosions, recorded digitally...results of applying this method to Nevada Test Site (NTS) explosions recorded digitally......

C. W. Frasier

1972-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Notice of Intent to Revise DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

JM O 452.1D, Notice of Intent to Revise DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program by Angela Chambers Functional areas: Nuclear Explosive Safety, Safety and Security...

240

CONSTRAINING EXPLOSION TYPE OF YOUNG SUPERNOVA REMNANTS USING 24 ?m EMISSION MORPHOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Determination of the explosion type of supernova remnants (SNRs) can be challenging, as SNRs are hundreds to thousands of years old and supernovae are classified based on spectral properties days after explosion. Previous ...

Peters, Charee L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "graaff confetti explosion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Initial concepts on energetics and mass releases during nonnuclear explosive events in fuel cycle facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Non-nuclear explosions are one of the initiating events (accidents) considered in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission study of formal methods for estimating the airborne release of radionuclides from fuel cycle facilities. Methods currently available to estimate the energetics and mass airborne release from the four types of non-nuclear explosive events (fast and slow physical explosions and fast and slow chemical explosions) are reviewed. The likelihood that fast physical explosions will occur in fuel cycle facilities appears to be remote and this type of explosion is not considered. Methods to estimate the consequences of slow physical and fast chemical explosions are available. Methods to estimate the consequences of slow chemical explosions are less well defined.

Halverson, M.A.; Mishima, J.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Thermal cook-off of an HMX based explosive: Pressure gauge experiments and modeling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Safety issues related to thermal cook-off are important for handling and storing explosive ... to detonation of a pressure wave from a cook-off event, (2) sensitivity of changes in ... of neighboring explosive de...

P. A. Urtiew; J. W. Forbes; C. M. Tarver

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Discrimination Between Earthquakes and Underground Explosions Employing an Improved Ms Scale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......propagation, available Nevada Test Site explosion yields are...in the California-Nevada region, J. geophys...propagation, availableNevada Test Site explosion yields are...Halliday (1970) and Nevada Test Site (NTS) explo- sion......

P. D. Marshall; P. W. Basham

1972-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Radiation of Rayleigh Wave Energy from Nuclear Explosions and Collapses in Southern Nevada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Rayleighwavesgenerated by some southern Nevada nuclear explosions and cavity collapses...waves propagating from southern Nevada across the western United States...collapses Rayleigh waves from some Nevada Test Site (NTS) explosions recorded by a......

Robert P. Mass

1973-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Single-pulse Raman scattering studies of heterogeneous explosive materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Raman scattering from ambient and shock-loaded heterogeneous (compressed pure polycrystalline) explosive materials has been examined using single-pulse laser excitation. In the case of triamino-trinitrobenzene (TATB), intense nonlinear scattering at 1170 cm/sup -1/ has been observed.

Trott, W.M.; Renlund, A.M.

1985-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

246

Laser initiation of secondary explosives: Renlund paper No. 115  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several experiments were performed to investigate the effects of explosive material parameters on energy thresholds for direct laser initiation of secondary explosives. Laser energy requirements for initiation of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) were decreased for small particle size powder and low density pressings. Promptness of detonation, however, was aided by higher densities. Initiation of PETN was achieved at energies at or below 10 mJ (power densities /approximately/0.2 GW cm/sup /minus/2/) at laser wavelengths of 1.06 /mu/m, 532 nm and 355 nm and strong confinement of the explosive sample assisted build-up to detonation. At 355 and 308 nm PETN could be initiated by irradiation on the bare explosive surface. Hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-s-triazine (RDX) was initiated at 308 nm but not at 1.06 /mu/m. Hexanitrostibene (HNS) by direct irradiation at any of these wavelengths was successful. The results suggest that if sufficient energy is deposited, a fast deflagration or convective burn is achieved and that this grows to detonation via a conventional deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT). 14 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Renlund, A.M.; Stanton, P.L.; Trott, W.M.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Periodic explosions by positive feedback in a rising foam column  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...for a small outward heat flow from the foam to the containing wall. We also predict...explosions would be prevented by sufficient insulation between the foam and the surrounding wall. Such insulation could be provided by a thin film of high...

Clarence Zener; Jaime Noriega

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Silane-O/sub 2/ explosions, their characteristics and their control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prior results on the stoichiometry, upper pressure explosion limits and reaction mechanism of SiH/sub 2/-O/sub 2/ explosion reactions are discussed, and new data on the effects of added disilane on the pyrophoric and explosive characters of metastable SiH/sub 4/-O/sub 2/ mixtures are presented. The results have possible application to the prevention of serious explosions due to silane leaks into air.

Ring, M.A.; O'Neil, H.E.; Famil-Ghiriha, J.

1988-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

249

Conversion Products of Explosives During Combustion - Analysis for Risk Assessment Studies of Open-Pit Burning Areas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Compared to other hazardous chemicals and preparations, energetic materials (propellants and explosives) have explosive characteristics and the abilitiy of high-energetic reactions. To these energetic materialsbe...

G. Holl; M. Schneider

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Multiple-Excitation-Wavelength Resonance-Raman Explosives Balakishore Yellampalle*a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) is a potential candidate for stand-off detection of explosives. A key challenge for stand-off sensors is to distinguish explosives, with high confidence, from a myriad of unknown background materials that may have of the variety of available explosives, myriad of unknown background materials and the minute quantities involved

Asher, Sanford A.

251

In-Situ Silver Acetylide Silver Nitrate Explosive Deposition Measurements Using X-Ray Fluorescence.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Light Initiated High Explosive facility utilized a spray deposited coating of silver acetylide - silver nitrate explosive to impart a mechanical shock into targets of interest. A diagnostic was required to measure the explosive deposition in - situ. An X - ray fluorescence spectrometer was deployed at the facility. A measurement methodology was developed to measure the explosive quantity with sufficient accuracy. Through the use of a tin reference material under the silver based explosive, a field calibration relationship has been developed with a standard deviation of 3.2 % . The effect of the inserted tin material into the experiment configuration has been explored.

Covert, Timothy T.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Order Module--DOE O 452.1D, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE AND WEAPON SURETY PROGRAM,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Order Module--DOE O 452.1D, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE AND WEAPON SURETY Order Module--DOE O 452.1D, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE AND WEAPON SURETY PROGRAM, DOE O 452.2D, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE SAFETY Order Module--DOE O 452.1D, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE AND WEAPON SURETY PROGRAM, DOE O 452.2D, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE SAFETY "To prevent accidents and inadvertent or unauthorized use of U.S. nuclear weapons and nuclear explosives. In conjunction with the Department of Defense (DoD), to protect the public health and safety by providing dual-agency judgment and responsibility for the safety, security, and use control (surety) of nuclear weapons. To establish nuclear explosive surety standards and nuclear weapon design surety requirements. To address surety vulnerabilities during all phases of the nuclear weapon life cycle and to upgrade surety during weapon stockpile refurbishments and/or new weapon

253

New sensor technology detects chemical, biological, nuclear and explosive  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

New New sensor technology detects chemical, biological, nuclear and explosive materials Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library About Nuclear Energy Nuclear Reactors Designed by Argonne Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Opportunities within NE Division Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Celebrating the 70th Anniversary of Chicago Pile 1 (CP-1) Argonne OutLoud on Nuclear Energy Argonne Energy Showcase 2012 Highlights Bookmark and Share New sensor technology detects chemical, biological, nuclear and explosive materials Applications for homeland security, emergency planning Instruments in Argonne's Terahertz Test Facility, such as the one Sami Gopalsami is using, can detect trace chemicals at the part-per-billion level.

254

Smashing science: Livermore scientists discover how explosives respond to  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 3 For immediate release: 12/12/2013 | NR-13-12-03 High Resolution Image A schematic representation of the shock experiment. The resulting energy release pushed the shock front to the left. Image by Liam Krauss/LLNL. Smashing science: Livermore scientists discover how explosives respond to shockwaves Anne M Stark, LLNL, (925) 422-9799, stark8@llnl.gov Watch Video A laser pulse impinging on an aluminum ablation layer (which is coated on a glass substrate to the right), which generates a rapidly expanding plasma. This small explosion pushes the ablator to the left and drives a shock wave in the sample. The experiment simultaneously measures the speed of the shock wave in the sample, and the speed of the ablator expansion, which allows Livermore researchers to estimate the pressure and density of the

255

SECURITY AND CONTROL OF NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVES AND NUCLEAR WEAPONS  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

http://www.nnsa.energy.gov Office of Nuclear Weapon Surety and Quality http://www.nnsa.energy.gov Office of Nuclear Weapon Surety and Quality SUPPLEMENTAL DIRECTIVE Approved: 7-7-11 IMPLEMENTATION AND EVALUATION OF CONTROLS TO PREVENT DELIBERATE UNAUTHORIZED USE NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION Office of Defense Programs NA SD 452.4 NA SD 452.4 1 7-7-11 IMPLEMENTATION AND EVALUATION OF CONTROLS TO PREVENT DELIBERATE UNAUTHORIZED USE 1. PURPOSE. This NNSA Supplemental Directive (SD) supports the requirements of DOE O 452.4B, Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons. Specifically, this SD supports the Order's requirements to implement deliberate unauthorized use (DUU) preventive measures for nuclear explosive operations (NEO) and associated activities and to perform independent evaluations to determine if NEOs

256

Time-dependent buoyant puff model for explosive sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several models exist to predict the time dependent behavior of bouyant puffs that result from explosions. This paper presents a new model that is derived from the strong conservative form of the conservation partial differential equations that are integrated over space to yield a coupled system of time dependent nonlinear ordinary differential equations. This model permits the cloud to evolve from an intial spherical shape not an ellipsoidal shape. It ignores the Boussinesq approximation, and treats the turbulence that is generated by the puff itself and the ambient atmospheric tubulence as separate mechanisms in determining the puff history. The puff cloud rise history was found to depend no only on the mass and initial temperature of the explosion, but also upon the stability conditions of the ambient atmosphere. This model was calibrated by comparison with the Roller Coaster experiments.

Kansa, E.J.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Chemistry Resolved Kinetic Flow Modeling of TATB Based Explosives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detonation waves in insensitive, TATB based explosives are believed to have multi-time scale regimes. The initial burn rate of such explosives has a sub-microsecond time scale. However, significant late-time slow release in energy is believed to occur due to diffusion limited growth of carbon. In the intermediate time scale concentrations of product species likely change from being in equilibrium to being kinetic rate controlled. They use the thermo-chemical code CHEETAH linked to an ALE hydrodynamics code to model detonations. They term their model chemistry resolved kinetic flow as CHEETAH tracks the time dependent concentrations of individual species in the detonation wave and calculates EOS values based on the concentrations. A HE-validation suite of model simulations compared to experiments at ambient, hot, and cold temperatures has been developed. They present here a new rate model and comparison with experimental data.

Vitello, P A; Fried, L E; Howard, W M; Levesque, G; Souers, P C

2011-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

258

Project PROPA-GATOR: intermediate range explosion airblast propagation measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several hundred explosions of flaked TNT, ranging in charge weight from 2.3 kg to 1145 kg were fired at the NASA Kennedy Space Center, Florida, in March and June, 1979. Comprehensive meteorological measurements were made by rawinsonde balloons and on a nearby 150 m tower, including winds, turbulence, temperatures, and humidity. A cruciform array of airblast gages was operated, with gages at 200 m, 500 m, 1 km, 2 km, and 5 km ranges from the explosions. For some events as many as six microbarographs were operated at distances to 25 km. Airblast results have been correlated against refractive atmospheric conditions, establishing a functional relationship between overpressure decay with distance and the sound velocity gradient with height.

Reed, J.W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Laser Coulomb-explosion imaging of small molecules  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We use intense few-cycle laser pulses to ionize molecules to the point of Coulomb explosion. We use Coulomb's law or ab initio potentials to reconstruct the molecular structure of D{sub 2}O and SO{sub 2} from the correlated momenta of exploded fragments. For D{sub 2}O, a light and fast system, we observed about 0.3 A and 15 deg. deviation from the known bond length and bond angle. By simulating the Coulomb explosion for equilibrium geometry, we showed that this deviation is mainly caused by ion motion during ionization. Measuring three-dimensional structure with half bond length resolution is sufficient to observe large-scale rearrangements of small molecules such as isomerization processes.

Legare, F. [National Research Council of Canada, 100 Sussex Drive, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0R6 (Canada); Departement de Chimie, Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec, J1K 2R1 (Canada); Lee, Kevin F.; Dooley, P.W. [National Research Council of Canada, 100 Sussex Drive, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0R6 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4M1 (Canada); Litvinyuk, I.V. [Department of Physics, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas 66506 (United States); Wesolowski, S.S.; Bunker, P.R.; Villeneuve, D.M.; Corkum, P.B. [National Research Council of Canada, 100 Sussex Drive, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0R6 (Canada); Dombi, P.; Krausz, F. [Technische Universitaet Wien, Vienna (Austria); Bandrauk, A.D. [Departement de Chimie, Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec, J1K 2R1 (Canada)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Rare Isotopes in Cosmic Explosions and Accelerators on Earth  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Rare isotopes are nature?s stepping stones to produce the heavy elements, and they are produced in large quantities in stellar explosions. Despite their fleeting existence, they shape the composition of the universe and the observable features of stellar explosions. The challenge for nuclear science is to produce and study the very same rare isotopes so as to understand the origin of the elements and a range of astronomical observations. I will review the progress that has been made to date in astronomy and nuclear physics, and the prospects of finally addressing many of the outstanding issues with the future Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), which DOE will build at Michigan State University.

Hendrik Schatz

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "graaff confetti explosion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Ultraviolet Resonant Raman Enhancements in the Detection of Explosives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Raman-based spectroscopy is potentially militarily useful for standoff detection of high explosives. Normal (non-resonance) and resonance Raman spectroscopies are both light scattering techniques that use a laser to measure the vibrational spectrum of a sample. In resonance Raman, the laser is tuned to match the wavelength of a strong electronic absorbance in the molecule of interest, whereas, in normal Raman the laser is not tuned to any strong electronic absorbance bands. The selection of appropriate excitation wavelengths in resonance Raman can result in a dramatic increase in the Raman scattering efficiency of select band(s) associated with the electronic transition. Other than the excitation wavelength, however, resonance Raman is performed experimentally the same as normal Raman. In these studies, normal and resonance Raman spectral signatures of select solid high explosive (HE) samples and explosive precursors were collected at 785 nm, 244 nm and 229 nm. Solutions of PETN, TNT, and explosive precursors (DNT & PNT) in acetonitrile solvent as an internal Raman standard were quantitatively evaluated using ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) microscopy and normal Raman spectroscopy as a function of power and select excitation wavelengths. Use of an internal standard allowed resonance enhancements to be estimated at 229 nm and 244 nm. Investigations demonstrated that UVRR provided {approx}2000-fold enhancement at 244 nm and {approx}800-fold improvement at 229 nm while PETN showed a maximum of {approx}25-fold at 244 nm and {approx}190-fold enhancement at 229 nm solely from resonance effects when compared to normal Raman measurements. In addition to the observed resonance enhancements, additional Raman signal enhancements are obtained with ultraviolet excitation (i.e., Raman scattering scales as !4 for measurements based on scattered photons). A model, based partly on the resonance Raman enhancement results for HE solutions, is presented for estimating Raman enhancements for solid HE samples.

Short, B J; Carter, J C; Gunter, D; Hovland, P; Jagode, H; Karavanic, K; Marin, G; Mellor-Crummey, J; Moore, S; Norris, B; Oliker, L; Olschanowsky, C; Roth, P C; Schulz, M; Shende, S; Snavely, A; Spear, W

2009-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

262

Artificial Intelligence for Explosive Ordnance Disposal System (AI-EOD)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Based on a dynamically configurable neural net that learns in a single pass of the training data, this paper describes a system used by the military in the identification of explosive ordnance. Allowing the technician to input incomplete, contradictory, and wrong information, this system combines expert systems and neural nets to provide a state-of-the-art search, retrieval, and image and text management system.

Madrid, R.; Williams, B.; Holland, J.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Artificial Intelligence for Explosive Ordnance Disposal System (AI-EOD)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Based on a dynamically configurable neural net that learns in a single pass of the training data, this paper describes a system used by the military in the identification of explosive ordnance. Allowing the technician to input incomplete, contradictory, and wrong information, this system combines expert systems and neural nets to provide a state-of-the-art search, retrieval, and image and text management system.

Madrid, R.; Williams, B.; Holland, J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Detonating Failed Deflagration Model of Thermonuclear Supernovae I. Explosion Dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a detonating failed deflagration model of Type Ia supernovae. In this model, the thermonuclear explosion of a massive white dwarf follows an off-center deflagration. We conduct a survey of asymmetric ignition configurations initiated at various distances from the stellar center. In all cases studied, we find that only a small amount of stellar fuel is consumed during deflagration phase, no explosion is obtained, and the released energy is mostly wasted on expanding the progenitor. Products of the failed deflagration quickly reach the stellar surface, polluting and strongly disturbing it. These disturbances eventually evolve into small and isolated shock-dominated regions which are rich in fuel. We consider these regions as seeds capable of forming self-sustained detonations that, ultimately, result in the thermonuclear supernova explosion. Preliminary nucleosynthesis results indicate the model supernova ejecta are typically composed of about 0.1-0.25 Msun of silicon group elements, 0.9-1.2 Msun of iron group elements, and are essentially carbon-free. The ejecta have a composite morphology, are chemically stratified, and display a modest amount of intrinsic asymmetry. The innermost layers are slightly egg-shaped with the axis ratio ~1.2-1.3 and dominated by the products of silicon burning. This central region is surrounded by a shell of silicon-group elements. The outermost layers of ejecta are highly inhomogeneous and contain products of incomplete oxygen burning with only small admixture of unburned stellar material. The explosion energies are ~1.3-1.5 10^51 erg.

Tomasz Plewa

2006-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

265

Myth of nuclear explosions at waste disposal sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Approximately 25 years ago, an event is said to have occurred in the plains immediately west of the southern Ural mountains of the Soviet Union that is being disputed to this very day. One person says it was an explosion of nuclear wastes buried in a waste disposal site; other people say it was an above-ground test of an atomic weapon; still others suspect that an alleged contaminated area (of unknown size or even existence) is the result of a series of careless procedures. Since the event, a number of articles about the disposal-site explosion hypothesis written by a Soviet exile living in the United Kingdom have been published. Although the Soviet scientist's training and background are in the biological sciences and his knowledge of nuclear physics or chemistry is limited, people who oppose the use of nuclear energy seem to want to believe what he says without question. The work of this Soviet biologist has received wide exposure both in the United Kingdom and the United States. This report presents arguments against the disposal-site explosion hypothesis. Included are discussions of the amounts of plutonium that would be in a disposal site, the amounts of plutonium that would be needed to reach criticality in a soil-water-plutonium mixture, and experiments and theoretical calculations on the behavior of such mixtures. Our quantitative analyses show that the postulated nuclear explosion is so improbable that it is essentially impossible and can be found only in the never-never land of an active imagination. 24 references, 14 figures, 5 tables.

Stratton, W.R.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Surrogate Nuclear Explosion Debris for Measurement Validation and Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ABSTRACT There is intense interest in characterizing nuclear explosion debris following the terrorist use of a nuclear weapon or improvised nuclear device. The quality of the laboratory analyses of such samples is critical if action is to be taken based on those analyses. Thus, validating methods against well characterized nuclear debris is of interest, however, actual nuclear explosion debris is difficult to obtain. PNNL has embarked on a program to develop laboratory methods to synthesize materials which mimic nuclear explosion debris with respect to selected characteristics. Which characteristics are mimicked depends on the application. For tests of laboratory radioanalytical capabilities, materials with relatively few characteristics in common with actual debris are useful. For other applications, material properties may need to match real debris to a greater extent, e.g., for fate and transport studies the chemical behavior should match real debris in detail. We will describe methods by which these materials can be produced and highlight some of the issues associated with such operations.

Eiden, Gregory C.; Liezers, Martin; Harvey, Scott D.; Zemanian, Thomas S.; Szechenyi, Scott C.; Gerlach, David C.; Eckberg, Alison D.; Garcia, Ben J.; Sweet, Lucas E.; Goodwin, Shannon M.; Farmer, Orville T.; Bachelor, Paula P.

2010-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

267

High explosive violent reaction (HEVR) from slow heating conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The high explosives (HEs) developed and used at the Los Alamos National Laboratory are designed to be insensitive to impact and thermal insults under all but the most extreme conditions. Nevertheless, violent reactions do occasionally occur when HE is involved in an accident. The HE response is closely dependent on the type of external stimulus that initiates the reaction. For example, fast heating of conventional HE will probably result in fairly benign burning, while long-term, slow heating of conventional HE is more likely to produce an HEVR that will do much more damage to the immediate surroundings. An HEVR (High Explosive Violent Reaction) can be defined as the rapid release of energy from an explosive that ranges from slightly faster than a deflagration (very rapid burning) to a reaction that approaches a detonation. A number of thermal analyses have been done to determine slow heat/cook-off conditions that produce HE self-heating that can build up to a catastrophic runaway reaction. The author specifies the conditions that control reaction violence, describes experiments that produced an HEVR, describes analyses done to determine a heating rate threshold for HEVR, and lists possible HEVR situations.

Vigil, A.S.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Experimental Study on the Influence of Initial Pressure on Explosion of Methane-coal Dust Mixtures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Methane-coal dust explosion belongs to chemical explosion which always directly causes fire disasters. When it comes to coal mine, the gas explosion easily leads to extensive burning and forms large area stereo fire finally, due to the big blast power and many combustible materials at the scene of an accident. In order to study the explosion characteristics of methane-coal dust mixture explosion as well as to reveal the effects of initial pressure on the explosion, a rectangular explosion test vessel which is 60cm long and with 10cm 10cm cross-section was used. Different initial pressures, such as 0.2MPa, 0.25MPa, 0.3MPa and 0.35MPa were considered in this paper. The explosion pressure was measured with PCB pressure transducers, and the maximum rate of explosion pressure rise was determined based on these measured data. The results show that the maximum explosion overpressure and maximum rate of overpressure rise increase with the increasing of the initial pressures and coal dust concentration.

Yuan Li; Hongli Xu; Xishi Wang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

EA-1106: Explosive Waste Treatment Facility at Site 300, Lawrence Livermore  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

106: Explosive Waste Treatment Facility at Site 300, Lawrence 106: Explosive Waste Treatment Facility at Site 300, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, San Joaquin County, California EA-1106: Explosive Waste Treatment Facility at Site 300, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, San Joaquin County, California SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to build, permit, and operate the Explosive Waste Treatment Facility to treat explosive waste at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Experimental Test Site, Site 300. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD April 16, 1996 EA-1106: Finding of No Significant Impact Explosive Waste Treatment Facility at Site 300, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory April 16, 1996

270

Gasdynamic Model of Turbulent Combustion in TNT Explosions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A model is proposed to simulate turbulent combustion in confined TNT explosions. It is based on: (i) the multi-component gasdynamic conservation laws, (ii) a fast-chemistry model for TNT-air combustion, (iii) a thermodynamic model for frozen reactants and equilibrium products, (iv) a high-order Godunov scheme providing a non-diffusive solution of the governing equations, and (v) an ILES approach whereby adaptive mesh refinement is used to capture the energy bearing scales of the turbulence on the grid. Three-dimensional numerical simulations of explosion fields from 1.5-g PETN/TNT charges were performed. Explosions in six different chambers were studied: three calorimeters (volumes of 6.6-l, 21.2-l and 40.5-l with L/D = 1), and three tunnels (L/D = 3.8, 4.65 and 12.5 with volumes of 6.3-l) - to investigate the influence of chamber volume and geometry on the combustion process. Predicted pressures histories were quite similar to measured pressure histories for all cases studied. Experimentally, mass fraction of products, Y{sub p}{sup exp}, reached a peak value of 88% at an excess air ratio of twice stoichiometric, and then decayed with increasing air dilution; mass fractions Y{sub p}{sup calc} computed from the numerical simulations followed similar trends. Based on this agreement, we conclude that the dominant effect that controls the rate of TNT combustion with air is the turbulent mixing rate; the ILES approach along with the fast-chemistry model used here adequately captures this effect.

Kuhl, A L; Bell, J B; Beckner, V E

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

271

Nuclear Explosives Safety Study Functional Area Qualification Standard  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

85-2007 85-2007 September 2007 DOE STANDARD NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE SAFETY STUDY FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DRAFT DOE-STD-1185-2007 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ DRAFT DOE-STD-1185-2007 iv INTENTIONALLY BLANK DRAFT DOE-STD-1185-2007 v TABLE OF CONTENTS ACKNOWLEDGMENT ................................................................................................................ vii PURPOSE ....................................................................................................................................1

272

Study on the Conversion of Wool Keratin by Steam Explosion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Steam explosion is a rapidly developing technique for the efficient pretreatment of renewable resources into value-added materials for bioconvertion. ... 7-8 Moreover, disposal of keratin such as wool fiber waste from the textile industry, poor quality raw wools not fit for spinning, horns, nails, and feathers from butchery,9 estimated at more than 3 million tons per year,10-12 raises environmental and economic problems. ... Botany wool, 20.3 ?m mean fiber diameter, in the form of tops (the sliver obtained from raw wool by scouring, carding, and combing processes) was supplied by The Woolmark Co., Italy. ...

Claudio Tonin; Marina Zoccola; Annalisa Aluigi; Alessio Varesano; Alessio Montarsolo; Claudia Vineis; Francesco Zimbardi

2006-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

273

Conductivity Histories Measured in Shock-Dispersed-Fuel Explosion Clouds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The notion of high ion and electron concentrations in the detonation of aluminized explosive mixtures has aroused some interest in electro-magnetic effects that the SDF charges might generate when detonated. Beside the scientific aspects at least two questions appear to be of practical interest: (1) Does the detonation of an SDF charge create electro-magnetic disturbances strong enough to affect the operation of electrical infrastructure in for example a tunnel system? (2) Does the detonation of an SDF charge in a tunnel system create an electromagnetic signature that relays information of the charge performance to the outside environment?

Kuhl, A L

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Simulation of turbulent explosion of hydrogen-air mixtures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

L = s0L ? ?L for small values of ? and the Markstein length scale L can be positive or negative [10]. The stretch rate is defined as the rate of change of flame area per unit area, A, ie., ? = (dA/dt)/A and it is given as ? = (2/rf)(drf/dt), for a spher... ]. Also, fundamental understanding of hydrogen combustion is important from safety view points, for example generation and accumulation of hydrogen in nuclear reactors [7] and rupturing of a pressurised hydrogen storage tank can lead to explosions. A...

Ahmed, I.; Swaminathan, N.

2014-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

275

The physics of antimatter induced fusion and thermonuclear explosions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The possibility of using antihydrogen for igniting inertial confinement fusion pellets or triggering large scale thermonuclear explosions is investigated. The number of antiproton annihilations required to start a thermonuclear burn wave in either D or Li_2DT is found to be about 10^{21}/k^2, where k is the compression factor of the fuel to be ignited. We conclude that the financial and energy investments needed to produce such amounts of antiprotons would confine applications of antimatter triggered thermonuclear devices to the military domain.

Gsponer, A; Gsponer, Andre; Hurni, Jean-Pierre

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Use of explosives to demolish multistory steel frame buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 2. 14 Muttifkior Firing Plan for a Typical Buikling 2. 15 Shaped Charge Placement on a Column Section . 2. 16 Column Attack, Showing Column Explosive Cuts and Kicker Charge . 2. 17 Preparation of Column Splice Plates in a Welded Connection . 2.... 18 Preparation of Column Splice Plates in a Riveted or Bolted Connection 2. 19 Column Cutting Schedule . 3. 1 Internal Cabling Showing Typical Column to Column Cabling . 3. 2 Cabling, From Corner Wall to Column 30 32 36 38 42 50 55 . 57...

Landry, Charles Vernon

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

277

Thermonuclear Explosions of Chandrasekhar-Mass White Dwarfs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a new way of modeling turbulent thermonuclear deflagration fronts in Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarfs, consisting of carbon and oxygen, undergoing a type Ia supernova explosion. Our approach is a front capturing/tracking hybrid scheme, based on a level set method, which treats the front as a mathematical discontinuity and allows for full coupling between the front geometry and the flow field. First results of the method applied to the problem of type Ia supernovae are discussed. It will be shown that even in 2-D and even with a physically motivated sub-grid model numerically ``converged'' results are difficult to obtain.

W. Hillebrandt; M. Reinecke; J. C. Niemeyer

2000-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

278

Dragon's Claws the Improvised Explosive Device (IED) as a weapon of strategic influence .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The purpose of this research is to identify how the Improvised Explosive Device (IED) is being used as a "weapon of strategic influence" by insurgent (more)

Martin, James Kennedy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Type I X-ray Bursts: How Nuclear Physics Shapes the Explosion...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

star, as well as probing the underlying nuclear physics processes during the thermonuclear explosion on the surface of the neutron star. In most cases, the rapid...

280

The Dust Explosion Characteristics of Coal Dust in an Oxygen Enriched Atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The ability to mix pulverised coal with oxygen at concentrations greater than the currently applied 21% may well provide advantages for burner design in oxy/coal fired systems. However the risk of dust explosions increases significantly with increasing oxygen concentration and temperature. In this study the influence of enriched oxygen concentrations is researched on the dust explosion characteristics of Indonesian (Sebuku) high volatile bituminous coal dust and on Pittsburgh Coal n8. Both ignition sensitivity characteristics (minimum ignition energy and minimum ignition temperatures) and explosion severity characteristics (maximum explosion pressure, Pmax, and maximum rate of pressure rise, Kst) are investigated.

Frederik Norman; Jan Berghmans; Filip Verplaetsen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "graaff confetti explosion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Recent Advances and Remaining Challenges for the Spectroscopic Detection of Explosive Threats  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In 2010, the U.S. Army initiated a program through the Edgewood Chemical Biological Center to identify viable spectroscopic signatures of explosives and ...

Fountain, Augustus W; Christesen, Steven D; Moon, Raphael P; Guicheteau, Jason A; Emmons, Erik D

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

"EOD, Up!" how explosive ordnance disposal forces can best support special operations forces .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??U.S. special operations forces (SOF) are likely to undertake missions against terrorists, insurgents, and other enemies where they will encounter explosive hazards. Identification, detection, and (more)

Draper, Stephen R.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric explosions Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

areas... . As one means of reducing the blast noise, the explosive is detonated in a pit, a space closed Source: Powers, Joseph M.- Department of Aerospace and Mechanical...

284

E-Print Network 3.0 - atomic explosions Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Within... to Coulomb explosion (Last and Jortner, 2000). Calculation of the energy absorption of atomic clusters... these results with kinetic energy of the ions coming from...

285

Explosion and combustion processes associated with the fogging of stored potatoes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An appraisal was undertaken of the key factors involved in explosion and combustion processes mainly associated with the fogging of chlorpropham...

H. J. Duncan

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Interaction of cathode plasma with the cathode surface in an electron source with explosive electron emission  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The interaction of the plasma formed at emission centers of an electron source using explosive electron emission with the cathode surface is studied....

. N. Abdullin; G. P. Bazhenov

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Literature review of the lifetime of DOE materials: Aging of plastic bonded explosives and the explosives and polymers contained therein  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are concerns about the lifetime of the nation`s stockpile of high explosives (HEs) and their components. The DOE`s Core Surveillance and Enhanced Surveillance programs specifically target degradation of HE, binders, and plastic-bonded explosives (PBXs) for determination of component lifetimes and handling procedures. The principal goal of this project is to identify the decomposition mechanisms of HEs, plasticizers, and plastic polymer binders resulting from exposure to ionizing radiation, heat, and humidity. The primary HEs of concern are 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) and 1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetraazocyclooctane (HMX). Hexahydro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) is closely related to these two compounds and is also included in the literature review. Both Kel-F 800 and Estane are polymers of interest. A stabilizer, Irganox 1010, and an energetic plasticizer that is a blend of acetaldehyde 2,2-dinitropropyl acetal, are also of interest, but the focus of this report will be on the explosives and polymers. This presents a literature review that provides background on the synthesis, degradation, and techniques to analyze TATB, HMX, RDX, Kel-F 800, Estane, and the PBXs of these compounds. As there are many factors that can influence degradation of materials, the degradation discussion will be divided into sections based on each factor and how it might affect the degradation mechanism. The factors reviewed that influence the degradation of these materials are exposure to heat, UV- and {gamma}-irradiation, and the chemistry of these compounds. The report presents a recently compiled accounting of the available literature. 80 refs., 7 figs.

Burgess, C.E.; Woodyard, J.D. [West Texas A and M Univ., Canyon, TX (United States); Rainwater, K.A. [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States); Lightfoot, J.M. [Pantex Plant, Amarillo, TX (United States); Richardson, B.R. [Engineered Carbons, Inc., Borger, TX (United States)

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

A study of explosively formed fuse (EFF) opening switch resistance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many pulsed power experiments need pulse shaping to optimize the power flow from a flux compression generator (FCG) to an experimental load. In a laboratory environment this can be a simple task where the switches are not destroyed. However, in experiments with high explosives, where a large amount of damage occurs, a single use EFF opening switch may be a good choice. In an EFF, explosives are used to thin a current carrying sheet of aluminum as it is forced into a grooved dye. The current is modified by the time dependent changes in resistance as the aluminum is stretched. We will correlate the hydrodynamic effects with resistance. The hydrodynamic profile is determined by Mesa-2D, a well proven hydrodynamics computer code, and MA THEMA TICA is used convert material contours into total resistance using the resistivity as a function of time from various sources. Experimentally, we will determine the actual resistance and compare it with the calculated values. We have used these switches for decades but still do not understand the details of the physics. The resistance change may be due to several processes but in this paper we will concentrate on stretching as the most important contribution. Also, in this paper we will compare the details of the hydrodynamics with the details of experimental and calculated resistance and hopefully generate a predictive model for future designs with other geometries and materials.

Oona, Henn [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Goforth, James H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Herrera, Dennis H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tasker, Douglas G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Torres, D. T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

289

Study of Forming of Magnesium Alloy by Explosive Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Magnesium alloy is an attractive next generation material due to its high specific strength with low weight. However, magnesium alloys has few slip lines with close-packed hexagonal lattice, and generally poor ductility at room temperature, therefore it is difficult to form this material by cold forging. It is well known that the speed of deformation of metallic materials rapidly changes at the high strain rate. For some metallic materials, it is reported that the ductility also increases at the high strain rate with this speed effect. In this study, a series of high speed impulsive compressive tests were carried. By using explosives for shock wave loading, the velocity in this experiment reached 100 m/s that can't be easily obtained in normal experiment. In this paper, the possibility of forming the AZ31 extrusion magnesium alloy using explosive-impulsive pressure is investigated. And improved ductility by the effect of high-rate deformation is observed with this alloy.

Ruan, Liqun; Hokamoto, Kazuyuki; Marumo, Yasuo [Kumamoto University Department of Mechanical Systems Engineering Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kurokami 2-39-1, Kumamoto-shi 860-8555 (Japan); Yahiro, Ititoku [Mitsui Engineering and Shipbuilding Co., Ltd. Nihonbasi 1-3-16, Toukyou 104-8439 (Japan)

2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

290

Seismic source functions for explosions in a non-spherical cavity embedded in a scattering environment: application to the regional discrimination of nuclear explosions and earthquakes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......logs, UE20f, Pahuta Mesa, Nevada Test Site. Technical Letter, Special...explosions at East Kazakh and Nevada test sites, Bull. seism. Soc. Am...logs, UEZOf, Pahuta Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Technical Letter, Special......

Ari Ben-Menahem

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Order Module--DOE O 452.1D, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE AND WEAPON SURETY PROGRAM, DOE O 452.2D, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE SAFETY  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

"To prevent accidents and inadvertent or unauthorized use of U.S. nuclear weapons and nuclear explosives. In conjunction with the Department of Defense (DoD), to protect the public health and...

292

Why not only electric discharge but even a minimum charge on the surface of highly sensitive explosives can catalyze their gradual exothermic decomposition and how a cloud of unipolar charged explosive particles turns into ball lightning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Even a single excess electron or ion migrating on the surface of sensitive explosives can catalyze their gradual exothermic decomposition. Mechanisms underlying such a charge-induced gradual thermal decomposition of highly sensitive explosives can be different. If sensitive explosive is a polar liquid, intense charge-dipole attraction between excess surface charges and surrounding explosive molecules can result in repetitive attempts of solvation of these charges by polar explosive molecules. Every attempt of such uncompleted nonequilibrium solvation causes local exothermic decomposition of thermolabile polar molecules accompanied by further thermal jumping unsolvated excess charges to new surface sites. Thus, ionized mobile hot spots emerge on charged explosive surface. Stochastic migration of ionized hot spots on explosive surface causes gradual exothermic decomposition of the whole mass of the polar explosive. The similar gradual charge-catalyzed exothermic decomposition of both polar and nonpolar highly s...

Meshcheryakov, Oleg

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Formation of attribute spaces using wavelets in automatic classification of explosives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The non-contact automatic on-line classification of explosives is a multi-aspect task. It involves choosing the method of information gathering, planning and conduction of experiments, choosing a classifier, formation of training and control samples, ... Keywords: automatic classification, explosives, piezoelectric transducer, symptoms, ultrasonic waves, wavelet transformation

Nikolai Shopov; Rajcho Ilarionov; Ivan Simeonov; Hristo Kilifarev

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Atomistic Modeling of Short Pulse Laser Ablation of Metals: Connections between Melting, Spallation, and Phase Explosion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and Phase Explosion Leonid V. Zhigilei,* Zhibin Lin, and Dmitriy S. Ivanov§ Department of Materials Science spallation to phase explosion is signified by an abrupt change in the composition of the ejected plume (from of thermodynamic stability of the target material (90% of the critical temperature) into a two-phase mixture

Zhigilei, Leonid V.

295

Impacts of the Explosive Removal of Offshore Petroleum Platforms on Sea Turtles and Dolphins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impacts of the Explosive Removal of Offshore Petroleum Platforms on Sea Turtles and Dolphins on beaches of the up per Texas coast. Ten petroleum struc tures were removed from this area when shrimping of the Endangered Species Act of 1973, for each proposed use of explosives in ABSTRACT-Strandings of 51 dead sea

296

Fire and explosion hazards of oil shale. Report of Investigations/1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This publication presents the results of investigations into the fire and explosion hazards of oil-shale rocks and dust. Three areas were examined: the explosibility and ignitability of oil-shale dust clouds, the fire hazards of oil-shale dust layers on hot surfaces, and the ignitability and extinguishment of oil shale rubble piles.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Spectral discrimination between Soviet explosions and earthquakes using short-period array data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......and from peaceful nuclear explosions (PNE...high-frequency energy than the shallow...5Hz, the Soviet nuclear explosions appear...high- frequency energy than earthquakes...US Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore...decoupling and underground nuclear test monitoring using......

Steven R. Taylor; Peter D. Marshall

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Explosive eruption of coal and basalt and the end-Permian mass extinction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...This massive coal combustion may have resulted from...surface, explosive combustion, and the atmospheric rise...sediments driving off hydrocarbons, including methane...repeatedly intrude and heat coal seams, causing...Canada suggest explosive combustion of coal by mafic intrusion...

Darcy E. Ogden; Norman H. Sleep

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Nuclear Engineering and Design 189 (1999) 757 Lower head integrity under steam explosion loads  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear Engineering and Design 189 (1999) 7­57 Lower head integrity under steam explosion loads T Engineering, Building 208, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass A6enue, Argonne, IL 60439, USA Received 24 August 1998; accepted 24 November 1998 Abstract Lower head integrity under steam explosion

Yuen, Walter W.

300

Explosive volcanic eruptions IV. The control of magma properties and conduit geometry on eruption column behaviour  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......vents in the Sabaloka Couldron, Sudan, Geol. Mag., 108, 159-176...Volcanic eruption clouds and the thermal power output of explosive eruptions...vents in the Sabaloka Couldron, Sudan, Ceol. Mag., 108,159-176...Volcanic eruption clouds and the thermal power output of explosive eruptions......

Lionel Wilson; R. Stephen J. Sparks; George P. L. Walker

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "graaff confetti explosion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Explosive eruption of coal and basalt and the end-Permian mass extinction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...This massive coal combustion may have resulted...surface, explosive combustion, and the atmospheric...sediments driving off hydrocarbons, including methane...repeatedly intrude and heat coal seams, causing...suggest explosive combustion of coal by mafic...isotopic excursion data. We provide example...

Darcy E. Ogden; Norman H. Sleep

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

The effect on teleseismic P of the zone of damage created by an explosion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Eskdalemuir (EKA) Scotland from the Nevada Test Site (NTS)explosion Pile Driver...megaton fired in tuff at the Nevada Test Site (that is similar to Boxcar...and broad-band seismogram for Nevada Test Site explosions, Commodore (67 May......

A. Douglas; J. A. Hudson

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Empirical measurements of tectonic moment release in nuclear explosions from teleseismic surface waves and body waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......23) to estimate M, for explosions at the Nevada Test Site and at Balapan, interpreting Nevada explosions...empirical approach to events at the USA nuclear test site in Nevada. Underground nuclear tests are in many ways ideally suited for analysis......

Gran Ekstrm; Paul G. Richards

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

An analysis of P times reported in the Reviewed Event Bulletin for Chinese underground explosions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......disturbance to determine if a nuclear test really took place. The Treaty states...for P times from explosions at the Nevada Test Site observed out to distances of 20...An analysis of P travel times for Nevada Test Site explosions recorded at regional......

A. Douglas; A. M. O'Mongain; D. Porter; J. B. Young

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Isotropic and Nonisotropic Components of Earthquakes and Nuclear Explosions on the Lop Nor Test Site, China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Isotropic and Nonisotropic Components of Earthquakes and Nuclear Explosions on the Lop Nor Test and 1996 following events (seven nuclear explosions, three earthquakes) that occurred on the Lop Nor test Abstract Ð We test the hypothesis that the existence of an observable non-zero isotropic component

Ritzwolle, Mike

306

STUDY OF THERMAL SENSITIVITY AND THERMAL EXPLOSION VIOLENCE OF ENERGETIC MATERIALS IN THE LLNL ODTX SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some energetic materials may explode at fairly low temperatures and the violence from thermal explosion may cause a significant damage. Thus it is important to understand the response of energetic materials to thermal insults for safe handling and storage of energetic materials. The One Dimensional Time to Explosion (ODTX) system at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory can measure times to explosion, lowest explosion temperatures, and determine kinetic parameters of energetic materials. Samples of different configurations can be tested in the system. The ODTX testing can also generate useful data for determining thermal explosion violence of energetic materials. We also performed detonation experiments of LX-10 in aluminum anvils to determine the detonation violence and validated the Zerilli Armstrong aluminum model. Results of the detonation experiments agreed well with the model prediction.

HSU, P C; Hust, G; May, C; Howard, M; Chidester, S K; Springer, H K; Maienschein, J L

2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

307

Optically-energized, emp-resistant, fast-acting, explosion initiating device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Optical energy, provided from a remote user-operated source, is utilized to initially electrically charge a capacitor in a circuit that also contains an explosion initiating transducer in contact with a small explosive train contained in an attachable housing. Additional optical energy is subsequently supplied in a preferred embodiment to an optically responsive phototransistor acting in conjunction with a silicon controlled rectifer to release the stored electrical energy through the explosion initiating transducer to set off the explosive train. All energy transfers between the user and the explosive apparatus, either for charging it up or for setting it off, are conveyed optically and may be accomplished in a single optical fiber with coding to distinguish between specific optical energy transfers and between these and any extraneous signals.

Benson, David A. (Albuquerque, NM); Kuswa, Glenn W. (Albuquerque, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Nonreactor Nuclear Safety Design Criteria and Explosive Safety Criteria Guide for Use with DOE O 420.1, Facility Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Guide provides guidance on the application of requirements for nonreactor nuclear facilities and explosives facilities of Department of Energy (DOE) O 420.1, Facility Safety, Section 4.1, Nuclear and Explosives Safety Design Criteria. No cancellation.

2000-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

309

Cavitand-Based Solid-Phase Microextraction Coating for the Selective Detection of Nitroaromatic Explosives in Air and Soil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A selective cavitand-based solid-phase microextraction coating was synthesized for the determination of nitroaromatic explosives and explosive taggants at trace levels in air and soil. A quinoxaline cavitand functionalized with a carboxylic group at the ...

Federica Bianchi; Alessandro Bedini; Nicol Riboni; Roberta Pinalli; Adolfo Gregori; Leonard Sidisky; Enrico Dalcanale; Maria Careri

2014-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

310

Analysis of historical seismogramsroot mean square Lg magnitudes, yields and depths of explosions at the Semipalatinsk Test Range  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Geology of NRDC Seismic Station Sites in Eastern Kazakhstan, USSR US...1986b. Yield estimates of Nevada test site explosions obtained from seismic...I9Xhb. Yield estimates o l Nevada test site explosions obtained from seismic......

Hans Israelsson

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Nuclear Explosive Safety Study Functional Area Qualification Standard  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1185-2007 CHANGE NOTICE No.1 April 2010 DOE STANDARD NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE SAFETY STUDY FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1185-2007 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds DOE-STD-1185-2007 iii APPROVAL The Federal Technical Capability Panel consists of senior U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) managers responsible for overseeing the Federal Technical Capability Program. This Panel is

312

Experimental results of USSR nuclear explosion decoupling measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report was presented at the 14th annual PL/DARPA Seismic Research Symposium on September 16, 1992. In it, we describe a decoupling experiment undertaken by the former Soviet Union at Azghir, north of the Caspian Sea. The properties of the cavity are given, including a rough description of the geology (salt-dome overlain by 275 m radius sphere, 987 m deep), velocities, densities, etc. These shots had larger yields than the Salmon-Sterling decoupling experiments undertaken by the U.S. in the mid-sixties. Like the U.S. experiment, this Soviet experiment did not achieve full decoupling. The energy decoupling factor (computed from statistical relationships between the yield and amplitude-distance curves rather than spectra) increased to a maximum of 30 as distance increase. Based on our observations and theoretical limits to decoupling, we conclude that a fully decoupled 1 kt explosion could be observed at a distance of 2,500 km.

Adushkin, V.V.; Kitov, I.O.; Sultanov, D.D.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Explosive hydrogen burning during type I X-ray bursts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Explosive hydrogen burning in type I X-ray bursts (XRBs) is driven by charged particle reactions creating isotopes with masses up to A {approx} 100. Since charged particle reactions in a stellar environment are very temperature sensitive, we use a realistic time-dependent general relativistic and self-consistent model of type I X-ray bursts to provide accurate values of the burst temperatures and densities. This allows a detailed and accurate time-dependent identification of the reaction flow from the surface layers through the convective region and the ignition region to the neutron star ocean. Using this, we determine the relative importance of specific nuclear reactions in the X-ray burst.

Fisker, J L; Schatz, H; Thielemann, F

2007-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

314

A mathematical simulation of earth satellite explosion debris orbital elements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i then& again dropping the i subscript hV = hVT T + hVN N + hVS S, where (6) hVT = I hV cos e cos p hVN = I hVI sin e cos p hVs = I hVI sin p $ and e being defined as above. Transformation of Coordinates Equations (5) and (6) provide... dimensioned pieces. Iet the explosion be caused by the spontaneous combustion and/or expansion of gases within the shell. Assume, in the first case, that the time period over which the force acts allows us to classify it as an impulse in velocity. Then hV...

Mabrey, Wayne Edward

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Influence of insulating coating on aluminum wire explosions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Single wire explosions are widely used in understanding the early stages of z-pinch experiments. This paper presents a serial of experiments conducted on the pulse power generator with ?1?kA peak current and ?10?ns rising time in Xi'an Jiao Tong University. Polyimide coated aluminum wires and uncoated ones were tested under three different voltages to analyze the effect of insulating coating. Experimental results showed that insulating coating can increase the energy deposition 10%?30% in aluminum wires by delaying the voltage collapse and raising the maximum load resistance. The substantial energy deposition resulted in about 20% faster expansion rates for coated wires. Experimental evidence that plasma channel shunts the current from the wire core was observed by streak camera and schlieren graphs. This paper also briefly discussed the influence of nonuniform coating on the morphology of wire expansion.

Li, Yang; Wu, Jian, E-mail: jxjawj@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China); State Key Laboratory of Intense Pulse Radiation of Simulation and Effect, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an 710024 (China); Sheng, Liang; Zhao, Jizhen; Zhang, Mei; Yuan, Yuan; Peng, Bodong [State Key Laboratory of Intense Pulse Radiation of Simulation and Effect, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an 710024 (China); Li, Xingwen [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China)

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

316

Moderate Velocity Ball Impact of a Mock High-Explosive  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Modeling of thermal and mechanical events in high-explosive materials is complicated by the composite nature of the material, which experiences viscoelastic and plastic deformations and sustains damage in the form of microcracks that can dominate its overall behavior. A mechanical event of interest is projectile interaction with the material, which leads to extreme local deformation and adiabatic heating, which can potentially lead to adverse outcomes in an energetic material. Simulations of such an event predicted large local temperature rises near the path of a spherical projectile, but these were experimentally unconfirmed and hence potentially non-physical. This work concerns the experimental verification of local temperatures both at the surface and in the wake of a spherical projectile penetrating a mock (unreactive) high-explosive at {approx}700 m/s. Fast response thermocouples were embedded radially in a mid-plane of a cylindrical target, which was bonded around the thermocouples with epoxy and recorded by an oscilloscope through a low-pass filter with a bandwidth of 500 Hz. A peak temperature rise of 70 K was measured both at the equator of the projectile and in its wake, in good agreement with the temperature predicted in the minimally distorted elements at those locations by a finite element model in ABAQUS employing the ViscoSCRAM constitutive model. Further work is needed to elucidate the extreme temperature rises in material undergoing crushing or fragmentation, which is difficult to predict with meshed finite element methods due to element distortion, and also challenging to quantify experimentally.

Furmanski, Jevan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rae, Philip [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Clements, Bradford E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

317

A new 40 MA ranchero explosive pulsed power system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We are developing a new high explosive pulsed power (HEPP) system based on the 1.4 m long Ranchero generator which was developed in 1999 for driving solid density z-pinch loads. The new application requires approximately 40 MA to implode similar liners, but the liners cannot tolerate the 65 {micro}s, 3 MA current pulse associated with delivering the initial magnetic flux to the 200 nH generator. To circumvent this problem, we have designed a system with an internal start switch and four explosively formed fuse (EFF) opening switches. The integral start switch is installed between the output glide plane and the armature. It functions in the same manner as a standard input crowbar switch when armature motion begins, but initially isolates the load. The circuit is completed during the flux loading phase using post hole convolutes. Each convolute attaches the inner (coaxial) output transmission line to the outside of the outer coax through a penetration of the outer coaxial line. The attachment is made with the conductor of an EFF at each location. The EFFs conduct 0.75 MA each, and are actuated just after the internal start switch connects to the load. EFFs operating at these parameters have been tested in the past. The post hole convolutes must withstand as much as 80 kV at peak dl/dt during the Ranchero load current pulse. We describe the design of this new HEPP system in detail, and give the experimental results available at conference time. In addition, we discuss the work we are doing to test the upper current limits of a single standard size Ranchero module. Calculations have suggested that the generator could function at up to {approx}120 MA, the rule of thumb we follow (1 MA/cm) suggests 90 MA, and simple flux compression calculations, along with the {approx}4 MA seed current available from our capacitor bank, suggests 118 MA is the currently available upper limit.

Goforth, James [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Herrera, Dennis [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oona, Hank [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Torres, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Atchison, W L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Colgate, S A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Griego, J R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Guzik, J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Holtkamp, D B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Idzorek, G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kaul, A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kirkpatrick, R C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Menikoff, R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reardon, P T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reinovsky, R E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rousculp, C L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sgro, A G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tabaka, L J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tierney, T E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Watt, R G [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

The Soviet program for peaceful uses of nuclear explosions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The concept of utilizing the weapons of war to serve the peaceful pursuits of mankind is as old as civilization itself. Perhaps the most famous reference to this basic desire is recorded in the Book of Micah where the great prophet Isiah called upon his people `to turn your spears into pitchforks and your swords into plowshares.` As the scientists at Los Alamos worked on developing the world`s first atomic bomb, thoughts of how this tremendous new source of energy could be used for peaceful purposes generally focused on using the thermal energy generated by the slow fission of uranium in a reactor, such as those being used to produce Plutonium to drive electric power stations. However, being scientists in a new, exciting field, it was impossible to avoid letting their minds wander from the task at hand to other scientific or non-military uses for the bombs themselves. During the Manhattan Project, Otto Frisch, one of the pioneers in the development of nuclear fission process in the 1930s, first suggested using an atomic explosion as a source for a large quantities of neutrons which could used in scientific experiments designed to expand their understanding of nuclear physics. After the war was over, many grandiose ideas appeared in the popular press on how this new source of energy should be to serve mankind. Not to be left out of the growing enthusiasm for peaceful uses of atomic energy, the Soviet Union added their visions to the public record. This document details the Soviet program for using nuclear explosions in peacetime pursuits.

Nordyke, M.D.

1996-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

319

On the mechanism of aluminum ignition in steam explosions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An available theory [Epstein, M., Fauske, H.K., 1994. A crystallization theory of underwater aluminum ignition. Nucl. Eng. Des. 146, 147164] of the ignition of aluminum melt drops under water, which is based on the assumption that the aluminum oxide (Al2O3) drop-surface skin first appears in a metastable molten state, is compared with existing experimental data on the ignition of aluminum drops behind shock waves in water [Theofanous, T.G., Chen, X., DiPiazza, P., Epstein, M., Fauske, H.K., 1994. Ignition of aluminum droplets behind shock waves in water, Phys. Fluids 6, 35133515]. The predicted and measured ignition temperature of about 1770 K coincides approximately with the spontaneous nucleation temperature of supercooled liquid Al2O3 (1760 K). This suggests that the crystallization of the oxide layer represents a strong barrier to aluminum drop ignition under water. Apparently a similar interpretation is applicable to aluminum drop ignition in gaseous oxidizing atmospheres. We conclude from the theory that the low-temperature aluminum ignitions (in the range 11001600 K) that have been observed during steam explosions are a consequence of the short aluminum drop oxidation times in this environment relative to the characteristic time for Al2O3 crystallization. Several aspects of the aluminum drop/shock interaction experiments besides ignition are discussed in the paper. In particular, the experiments provide strong evidence that during the course of a vapor explosion metal fragmentation occurs via a thermal mechanism at low pressure and precedes the development of a high-pressure shock.

M Epstein; H.K Fauske; T.G Theofanous

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Modelling of the Effects of Friction and Compression on Explosives ESGI80 Modelling of the Effects of Friction and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modelling of the Effects of Friction and Compression on Explosives ESGI80 Modelling of the Effects of Friction and Compression on Explosives Problem presented by John Curtis Atomic Weapons Establishment, based on the compression of a sample of the explosive. The study group identified frictional heating

Purvis, Richard

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321

CH3? Interaction of Explosives with Cavity of a TPE Macrocycle: The Key Cause for Highly Selective Detection of TNT  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The identification of explosives is critical for analyzing the background of terrorism activities and the origin of pollution aroused by the explosives, but it is a challenge to discriminate the explosives with a very similar structure. ... As soon as the test paper was air-dried, it was observed under a 365 nm UV lamp by the naked eye. ...

Hai-Tao Feng; Jin-Hua Wang; Yan-Song Zheng

2014-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

322

Method for explosive expansion toward horizontal free faces for forming an in situ oil shale retort  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Formation is excavated from within a retort site in formation containing oil shale for forming a plurality of vertically spaced apart voids extending horizontally across different levels of the retort site, leaving a separate zone of unfragmented formation between each pair of adjacent voids. Explosive is placed in each zone, and such explosive is detonated in a single round for forming an in situ retort containing a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale. The same amount of formation is explosively expanded upwardly and downwardly toward each void. A horizontal void excavated at a production level has a smaller horizontal cross-sectional area than a void excavated at a lower level of the retort site immediately above the production level void. Explosive in a first group of vertical blast holes is detonated for explosively expanding formation downwardly toward the lower void, and explosive in a second group of vertical blast holes is detonated in the same round for explosively expanding formation upwardly toward the lower void and downwardly toward the production level void for forming a generally T-shaped bottom of the fragmented mass.

Ricketts, Thomas E. (Bakersfield, CA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Quantification of reaction violence and combustion enthalpy of plastic bonded explosive 9501 under strong confinement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The confinement experienced by an explosive during thermal self-initiation can substantially affect performance in terms of deflagrationtodetonation characteristics and explosion/detonation violence. To this end we have developed an experiment to quantitatively observe enthalpy change and reaction violence in thermally initiated plastic bonded explosive (PBX) 9501. Traditionally researchers attempt to quantify violence using terminal observations of fragment size fragment velocity and through subjective observations. In the work presented here the explosive was loaded into a heated gun assembly where we subjected a 300 mg charge to a cook-off schedule and a range of static and inertial confinements. Static confinement was controlled using rupture disks calibrated at 34.5 and 138 MPa. The use of 3.15 and 6.3 g projectile masses provided a variation in inertial confinement. This was a regime of strong confinement; a significant fraction of the explosive energy was required to rupture the disk and the projectile mass was large compared to the charge mass. The state variables pressure and volume were measured in the breech. From these data we quantified both the reactionenthalpy change and energy release rate of the explosive on a microsecond time scale using a thermodynamic analyisis. We used these values to unambiguously quantify explosion violence as a function of confinement at a fixed cook-off schedule of 190 C for 1 h. P 2 ? a measure of critical shock energy required for shock ignition of an adjacent explosive was also computed. We found variations in this confinement regime to have a weak effect on enthalpy change power violence and shock energy. Violence was approximately 100 times lower than detonating trinitrotoluene but the measured shock energy approached the critical shock energy for initiating secondary high explosives.

W. Lee Perry; Peter M. Dickson; Gary R. Parker; B. W. Asay

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Why not only electric discharge but even a minimum charge on the surface of highly sensitive explosives can catalyze their gradual exothermic decomposition and how a cloud of unipolar charged explosive particles turns into ball lightning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Even a single excess electron or ion migrating on the surface of sensitive explosives can catalyze their gradual exothermic decomposition. Mechanisms underlying such a charge-induced gradual thermal decomposition of highly sensitive explosives can be different. If sensitive explosive is a polar liquid, intense charge-dipole attraction between excess surface charges and surrounding explosive molecules can result in repetitive attempts of solvation of these charges by polar explosive molecules. Every attempt of such uncompleted nonequilibrium solvation causes local exothermic decomposition of thermolabile polar molecules accompanied by further thermal jumping unsolvated excess charges to new surface sites. Thus, ionized mobile hot spots emerge on charged explosive surface. Stochastic migration of ionized hot spots on explosive surface causes gradual exothermic decomposition of the whole mass of the polar explosive. The similar gradual charge-catalyzed exothermic decomposition of both polar and nonpolar highly sensitive explosives can be also caused by intense charge-dipole attacks of surrounding water vapor molecules electrostatically attracted from ambient humid air and strongly accelerated towards charged sites on explosive surfaces. Emission of electrons, photons and heat from ionized hot spots randomly migrating on charged surface of highly sensitive explosive aerosol nanoparticles converts such particles into the form of short-circuited thermionic nanobatteries.

Oleg Meshcheryakov

2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

325

A Model-Based Signal Processing Approach to Nuclear Explosion Monitoring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes research performed under Laboratory Research and Development Project 05-ERD-019, entitled ''A New Capability for Regional High-Frequency Seismic Wave Simulation in Realistic Three-Dimensional Earth Models to Improve Nuclear Explosion Monitoring''. A more appropriate title for this project is ''A Model-Based Signal Processing Approach to Nuclear Explosion Monitoring''. This project supported research for a radically new approach to nuclear explosion monitoring as well as allowed the development new capabilities in computational seismology that can contribute to NNSA/NA-22 Programs.

Rodgers, A; Harris, D; Pasyanos, M

2007-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

326

Pressure Wave Measurements from Thermal Cook-Off of an HMX Based High Explosive PBX 9501  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A better understanding of thermal cook-off is important for safe handling and storing explosive devices. A number of safety issues exist about what occurs when a cased explosive thermally cooks off. For example, violence of the events as a function of confinement are important for predictions of collateral damage. This paper demonstrates how adjacent materials can be gauged to measure the resulting pressure wave and how this wave propagates in this adjacent material. The output pulse from the thermal cook-off explosive containing fixture is of obvious interest for assessing many scenarios.

Garcia, F; Forbes, J W; Tarver, C M; Urtiew, P A; Greenwood, D W; Vandersall, K S

2001-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

327

Pressure wave measurements from thermal cook-off of an HMX based high explosive  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A better understanding of thermal cook-off is important for safe handling and storing explosive devices. A number of safety issues exist about what occurs when a cased explosive thermally cooks off. For example, violence of the events as a function of confinement are important for predictions of collateral damage. This paper demonstrates how adjacent materials can be gauged to measure the resulting pressure wave and how this wave propagates in this adjacent material. The output pulse from the thermal cook-off explosive containing fixture is of obvious interest for assessing many scenarios.

Forbes, J W; Tarver, C M; Urtiew, P A; Garcia, F; Greenwood, D W; Vandersall, K S

2000-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

328

Pressure Wave Measurements from Thermal Cook-off of an HMX Based Explosive  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A better understanding of thermal cook-off is important for safe handling and storing explosive devices. A number of safety issues exist about what occurs when a cased explosive thermally cooks off. For example, violence of the events as a function of confinement are important for predictions of collateral damage. This paper demonstrates how adjacent materials can be gauged to measure the resulting pressure wave and how this wave propagates in this adjacent material. The output pulse from the thermal cook-off explosive containing fixture is of obvious interest for assessing many scenarios.

Forbes, J W; Tarver, C M; Urtiew, P A; Garcia, F; Greenwood, D W; Vandersall, K S

2001-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

329

Double-detonation explosions as progenitors of type Iax supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It has recently been proposed that one sub-class of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) is sufficiently both distinct and common to be classified separately from the bulk of SNe Ia, with a suggested class name of "type Iax supernovae" (SNe Iax), after SN 2002cx. We show that the population properties of this class can be understood if the events originate from helium double-detonation sub-Chandrasekhar mass explosions, in which a carbon--oxygen white dwarf (CO WD) accumulates a helium layer from a non-degenerate helium star. We have incorporated detailed binary evolution calculations for the progenitor systems into a binary population synthesis model to obtain birthrates and delay times for such events. The predicted Galactic event rate is $\\sim$$0.6-1.8\\times 10^{-3}\\,{\\rm yr}^{-1}$, in good agreement with the measured rates of SNe Iax. In addition, predicted delay times are $\\sim$70\\,Myr$-$710\\,Myr, consistent with the fact that SNe Iax have so far only been discovered in late-type galaxies. Based on the CO WD mass...

Wang, Bo; Han, Zhanwen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Response of simulated propellants and explosives to projectile impact  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This dissertation deals with experimental, analytical and numerical investigations into the response of two types of simulated propellants and explosives, known as Propergol, to projectile impact. The targets consisted of a polymeric mixture composed of potassium chloride, plaster of Paris and a polyurethane binder. Following the determination of the constitutive behavior of Propergol, experiments were conducted to study their penetration, perforation and fragmentation by projectiles. Both pneumatic and powder guns were employed in the tests, perfragmentation by projectiles. Both pneumatic and powder guns were employed in the tests, permitting impact velocities ranging from 40 to 1100 m/s, for flat- and conically-tipped as well as armor-piercing projectiles. The specimens include monolithic, composite and constrained Propergol circular disks and cylinders of 140 mm diameter with thicknesses ranging from 9 to 90 mm. Penetration tests were also conducted on model warheads loaded with the simulant material. Ballistic limit velocities for various target/projectile combinations were determined. Damage modes, such as cracking and fragmentation, were examined using experimental evidence including high-speed film data and microscopic photographs. Two types of fragments, Propergol clusters and crystalline particles, were recognized, and their size distributions were found to fit exponential functions. The dependent of fragment number and volume on initial projectile velocity was also studied. 103 refs., 172 figs., 19 tabs.

Yuan, W.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Detailed study of nuclear fusion from femtosecond laser-driven explosions of deuterium clusters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Detailed study of nuclear fusion from femtosecond laser-driven explosions of deuterium clusters J that these clusters can explode with sufficient kinetic energy to drive nuclear fusion. Irradiating deuterium clusters

Ditmire, Todd

332

Computer Graphics Proceedings, Annual Conference Series, 2003 Animating Suspended Particle Explosions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computer Graphics Proceedings, Annual Conference Series, 2003 Animating Suspended Particle products. Par- ticles immersed in the fluid track the motion of particulate fuel and soot.8 [Simulation and Modeling]: Types of Simulation--Animation 1 Introduction Although explosions are thankfully

O'Brien, James F.

333

Astrophysical explosions: from solar flares to cosmic gamma-ray bursts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...astrophysical shocks. Thermonuclear bombs have their parallels in thermonuclear explosions of white dwarf...Teller-Ulam design of a thermonuclear device such as the W88...principle of laser implosion fusion. A primary example of...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

An assessment of the flammability and explosion potential of transuranic waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The explosion potential of transuranic (TRU) waste, destined for the Waste Isolation Pilot (WIPP), was recently examined in EEG-45. That investigation focused on the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the waste, particularly acetone, and concluded that an explosion due to the VOCs was unlikely. Recent evidence raises serious concerns about drums containing mixed radioactive hazardous waste bound for the WIPP. Static electricity generated by the plastic bags represents a potential ignition source for other fuels, such as methane gas or hydrogen gas, during transportation and during the test phase. The potential danger of explosion due to hydrogen gas or methane gas generation has not yet been resolved. This report investigates that potential hazard and examines documented ignitions, fires, explosions and incidents of overpressurization of containers at generating and storage sites planning to send transuranic waste to the WIPP for disposal. 68 refs., 6 figs.

Silva, M.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

MODELLING OF EXPLOSIVE EVENTS IN THE SOLAR TRANSITION REGION: IMPORTANCE OF RADIATIVE LOSSES AND THERMAL CONDUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

taken with the NRL High Resolution Telescope and Spectrograph (HRTS) (Brueckner & Bartoe 1983) show,b). The most complete statistical description to­date of explosive events can be found in Brueckner & Bartoe

336

Safety First Safety Last Safety Always Here is a partial list of safeguards for explosive actuated  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Safety First Safety Last Safety Always Here is a partial list of safeguards for explosive actuated welding equipment. · If you are a tool operator or assistant, safeguard your eyes with eye protection

Minnesota, University of

337

The time-frequency characteristics of quarry blasts and calibration explosions recorded in Kazakhstan, USSR  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......T. J., Jr & Orcutt, J. A., 1985b. Synthesis of realistic oceanic Pn wave trains, J. geophys. Res., 90, 12755-12776. Sharpe, J. A., 1942. The production of elastic waves by explosion pressures, I. Theory and empirical field observations......

Michael A. H. Hedlin; J. Bernard Minster; John A. Orcutt

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Environmental Protection Problems Connected to the Disposal of Ammunition and Explosives by Open Pit Burning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

At the end of its functional life time, in service ammunition has to be disposed, as welt as the war time ammunition and explosives which are still beiing recovered. Formerly the conventional way of disposing amm...

Drs N. H. A. van Ham; A. Verweij

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Hyperspectral microscopy using an external cavity quantum cascade laser and its applications for explosives detection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A hyperspectral infrared microscope using external cavity quantum cascade laser illumination and a microbolometer focal plane array is used to characterize nanogram-scale particles of the explosives RDX, tetryl, and PETN at fast acquisition rates.

Phillips, Mark C.; Suter, Jonathan D.; Bernacki, Bruce E.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Tectonic Strain Release by Underground Nuclear Explosions and its Effect on Seismic Discrimination  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......patterns to geologic structure in Yucca Flats Nevada Test Site, in Nevada Test Site, ed. Eckel E. B., Geol. Soc. Am. Mem...of the Benham underground nuclear explosion, Nevada Test Site, Bull. seism. Soc. Am., 59, 2209-2220......

M. Nafi Toksz; Harold H. Kehrer

1972-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "graaff confetti explosion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Strategies for the disposition of high explosives resulting from dismantlement of nuclear weapons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many thousands of pounds of high quality main-charge explosives will result as surplus from the dismantlement of returns from the US nuclear weapons stockpile. The method most often employed for dealing with this surplus explosive is destruction by open burning. However, open burning as a means of treating excess explosives is losing favor because of environmental concerns associated with such an uncontrolled thermal destruction process. Thus, alternative processes for treatment of excess explosives from weapon dismantlement is discussed. These alternatives include: reformulation, crystalline component recovery, chemical conversion of the crystalline component to higher value products which may have civilian or military applications and, when necessary, treatment as waste in an environmentally benign fashion.

Pruneda, C.; Humphrey, J.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Magnetohydrodynamic Vapor Explosions: A Study with Potential Interest to the Safety of Fusion Reactor Project  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, the possibility of vapor explosions in superheat liquids in presence of a magnetic field that undergo sudden variation of magnetic field is discussed. This possible phenomenon may play a very impor...

F. J. Arias

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Review of potential impacts to sea turtles from underwater explosive removal of offshore structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to collect and synthesize existing information relevant to the explosive removal of offshore structures (EROS) in aquatic environments. Data sources were organized and summarized by topic - explosive removal methods, physics of underwater explosions, sea turtle resources, documented impacts to sea turtles, and mitigation of effects. Information was gathered via electronic database searches and literature source review. Bulk explosive charges are the most commonly used technique in EROS. While the physical principles of underwater detonations and the propagation of pressure and acoustic waves are well understood, there are significant gaps in the application of this knowledge. Impacts to sea turtles from explosive removal operations may range from non-injurious effects (e.g. acoustic annoyance; mild tactile detection or physical discomfort) to varying levels of injury (i.e. non-lethal and lethal injuries). Very little information exists regarding the impacts of underwater explosions on sea turtles. Effects of explosions on turtles often must be inferred from documented effects to other vertebrates with lungs or other gas-containing organs, such as mammals and most fishes. However, a cautious approach should be used when determining impacts to sea turtles based on extrapolations from other vertebrates. The discovery of beached sea turtles and bottlenose dolphins following an explosive platform removal event in 1986 prompted the initiation of formal consultation between the U.S. Department of the Interior, Minerals Management Service (MMS) and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), authorized through the Endangered Species Act Section 7, to determine a mechanism to minimize potential impacts to listed species. The initial consultation resulted in a requirement for oil and gas companies to obtain a permit (through separate consultations on a case-by-case basis) prior to using explosives in Federal waters. Because many offshore structure removal operations are similar, a 'generic' Incidental Take Statement was established by the NMFS that describes requirements to protect sea turtles when an operator's individual charge weights did not exceed 50 lb (23 kg). Requirements associated with the Incidental Take Permit were revised in 2003 and 2006 to accommodate advances in explosive charge technologies, removals of structures in deeper waters, and adequate protection of deep water marine mammal species in Gulf of Mexico waters. Generally, these requirements include pre- and post-detonation visual monitoring using standard surface and aerial survey methods for sea turtles and marine mammals, and, in some scenarios, passive acoustic survey methods for marine mammals within a specified radius from an offshore structure. The survey program has been successful in mitigating impacts to sea turtles associated with EROS. However, even with these protective measures in place, there have been observations of sea turtles affected by explosive platform removals.

Viada, Stephen T. [CSA International, Inc., 759 Parkway Street, Jupiter, FL 33477 (United States)], E-mail: sviada@conshelf.com; Hammer, Richard M. [CSA International, Inc., 759 Parkway Street, Jupiter, FL 33477 (United States)], E-mail: rhammer@conshelf.com; Racca, Roberto [JASCO Research Ltd., Vancouver Island Technology Park, Suite 2101, 4464 Markham Street, Victoria, British Columbia, V8Z 7X8 (Canada)], E-mail: rob@jasco.com; Hannay, David [JASCO Research Ltd., Vancouver Island Technology Park, Suite 2101, 4464 Markham Street, Victoria, British Columbia, V8Z 7X8 (Canada)], E-mail: dave@jasco.com; Thompson, M. John [CSA International, Inc., 759 Parkway Street, Jupiter, FL 33477 (United States)], E-mail: jthompson@conshelf.com; Balcom, Brian J. [CSA International, Inc., 759 Parkway Street, Jupiter, FL 33477 (United States)], E-mail: bbalcom@conshelf.com; Phillips, Neal W. [CSA International, Inc., 759 Parkway Street, Jupiter, FL 33477 (United States)], E-mail: nphillips@conshelf.com

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

344

DOE/EA-1613: Environmental Assessment for the Proposed High Explosive Pressing Facility (June 2008)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE/EA-1613 DOE/EA-1613 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE PROPOSED HIGH EXPLOSIVE PRESSING FACILITY PANTEX PLANT * AMARILLO, TEXAS * JUNE 2008 Environmental Assessment for the Proposed High Explosive Pressing Facility Pantex Plant June 2008 Page i CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION.......................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 BACKGROUND ............................................................................................................................ 1 2.1 Alternatives ........................................................................................................................... 1 2.1.1 Preferred Alternative ..............................................................................................

345

Thermal treatment of high explosives at Mason & Hanger/Pantex Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pantex plant presently processes about 45,000 kg (100,000 lb) of high explosives annually by outdoor burning. About half of the explosives are weapon components weighing over 5 kg (10 lb) which come directly out of nuclear weapons being removed from the stockpile. The other half is generated from various support processes, special tests, etc. Burning serves the three-fold purpose of demilitarizing, removing all classified characteristics, and eliminating the severe hazard posed by the explosives themselves. Transporting such large quantities of classified high explosives for such processing at another site would be prohibitive. Computerized atmospheric modelling of the burning process was conducted during the past year. The results were somewhat surprising in that oxides of nitrogen and carbon monoxide, two ``criteria pollutants,`` were not of great concern even though it is known that high explosives contain significant amounts of nitrogen and they generate measureable amounts of carbon monoxide when they are burned. Rather, it was determined that hydrogen fluoride gas is of much greater concern, and stringent controls on the burning operation have been implemented to address this concern. Although the amount of fluorine-containing explosive must be restricted, other kinds of air emissions are not a great concern. This favorable situation is largely due to the flat, featureless, sparsely inhabited terrain, the distance to the nearest plant boundary, the wind, the lack of stagnant atmospheric conditions, and the tremendous rate of heat release.

Patterson, W.E.; Phelan, P.F.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

346

Method for attenuating seismic shock from detonating explosive in an in situ oil shale retort  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In situ oil shale retorts are formed in formation containing oil shale by excavating at least one void in each retort site. Explosive is placed in a remaining portion of unfragmented formation within each retort site adjacent such a void, and such explosive is detonated in a single round for explosively expanding formation within the retort site toward such a void for forming a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale in each retort. This produces a large explosion which generates seismic shock waves traveling outwardly from the blast site through the underground formation. Sensitive equipment which could be damaged by seismic shock traveling to it straight through unfragmented formation is shielded from such an explosion by placing such equipment in the shadow of a fragmented mass in an in situ retort formed prior to the explosion. The fragmented mass attenuates the velocity and magnitude of seismic shock waves traveling toward such sensitive equipment prior to the shock wave reaching the vicinity of such equipment.

Studebaker, Irving G. (Grand Junction, CO); Hefelfinger, Richard (Grand Junction, CO)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Secondary wastes and high explosive residues generated during production of main high explosive charges for nuclear weapons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study identifies the sources of high-explosive (HE) residues and hazardous and nonhazardous wastes generated during the production of the main HE charges for nuclear weapons, and estimates their quantities and characteristics. The results can be used as a basis for design of future handling and treatment systems for solid and liquid HE residues and wastes at any proposed new HE production facilities. This paper outlines a general methodology for documenting and estimating the volumes and characteristics of the solid and liquid HE residues and hazardous and nonhazardous wastes. We prepared volume estimates by applying this method to actual past Pantex plant HE production operations. To facilitate the estimating, we separated the HE main-charge production process into ten discrete unit operations and four support operations, and identified the corresponding solid and liquid HE residues and waste quantities. Four different annual HE main-charge production rates of 100, 500, 1000, and 2000 HE units/yr were assumed to develop the volume estimates and to establish the sensitivity of the estimates to HE production rates. The total solids (HE residues and hazardous and nonhazardous wastes) estimated range from 800 to 2800 ft{sup 3}/yr and vary uniformly with the assumed HE production rate. The total liquids estimated range from 73,000 to 1,448,000 gal/yr and also vary uniformly with the assumed production rate.

Jardine, L.J.; McGee, J.T.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

A virtual prototype for an explosives detection system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of the resonance-absorption based explosives detection system (EDS), as initially planned, involved the parallel development of a high-current proton accelerator (with a long development time) and the other detection subsystems. The design approach for the latter was to develop a capability for computer modeling the essential processes of each subsystem, benchmark these models by experiment, and link the models, i.e., creating a virtual prototype, to explore the effect of subsystem design changes on the EDS system performance. Additionally, when the EDS prototype system was completed, the linked models would be used to investigate further trade-offs in defining an airport system. Most of the necessary subsystem modeling was completed and used in subsystem design. Linking of all of the subsystems was accomplished to some degree or another. There are many physical and mathematical processes that take place between the acceleration of the proton beam and the final display of the reconstructed image. Figure 1 summarizes these processes and indicates which code was used to model each particular process. Section II reports on the modeling of the proton beam incident on a {sup 13}C target. The gamma-ray output is the desired output from this phase of modeling. Section III describes the tools used to investigate the transport of the gamma-rays through computer simulated phantoms (suitcases). Two different codes were used in this investigation: a Monte Carlo photon transport code and a ray tracing code. One benchmark between these codes was accomplished. Section IV is concerned with the model calculations performed on single detectors. The calculations again were performed with a Monte Carlo transport code. The reconstruction code, used throughout in the simulations and as the workhorse in the analysis of the real experiments. The authors conclude, in Section VII, with the assessment of the simulation/virtual prototyping of the real experiment.

Seed, T.; Berman, B.L.; Zahrt, J.D.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Condensed-phase decomposition in thermally-aged explosives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In previous work, the isothermal decomposition of nitrocellulose (NC) was examined using two substantially different experimental techniques that are being developed to investigate condensed-phase chemistry occurring during the thermal decomposition of a variety of explosives. The confined isothermal aging technique involved confined thin-film samples heated to temperatures of 150 to 170{degrees}C, for 1 to 72 hours. Condensed-phase chemistry was monitored real-time using FTIR. Results indicated that the first step in decomposition was scission of the O-NO{sub 2} bond and subsequent formation of carbonyl and hydroxyl products. Scission of the O-NO{sub 2} bond appeared to occur by a first-order reaction. Additional unconfined rapid isothermal decomposition experiments with NC have been completed and are described in this paper. Those additional experiments extended the previous work and investigated the effect of varying film thickness (from about 0.2 to 0.6 microns), varying temperature (from about 420 to 640{degrees}C), and using {sup 15}NO{sub 2}-labled NC. The results indicated that decomposition of NC appears to involve at least two principal mechanisms: (1) O-NO{sub 2} bond scission, which is accompanied by carbonyl or hydroxyl formation, and (2) polymer fragmentation. These two mechanisms occur simultaneously. At temperatures of 170{degrees}C, or lower, polymer fragmentation appears negligible, but at temperatures of 420{degrees}C, or higher, polymer fragmentation is appreciable and occurs at rates comparable to those for O-NO{sub 2} bond scission. While polymer fragmentation may be associated with O-NO{sub 2} bond scission, at higher temperatures, additional steps must be involved in the fragmentation mechanism. At each end of the temperatures range from about 150 to 420{degrees}C, the rate of O-NO{sub 2} bond scission appears reasonably consistent with a mechanism dominated by a first-order decomposition step.

Erickson, K.L.; Trott, W.M.; Renlund, A.M.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Secondary wastes and high explosive residues generated during production of main high explosive charges for nuclear weapons. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study identifies the sources of high-explosive (HE) residues and hazardous and nonhazardous wastes generated during the production of the main HE charges for nuclear weapons, and estimates their quantities and characteristics. The results can be used as a basis for design of future handling and treatment systems for solid and liquid HE residues and wastes at any proposed new HE production facilities. This paper outlines a general methodology for documenting and estimating the volumes and characteristics of the solid and liquid HE residues and hazardous and nonhazardous wastes. To facilitate the estimating, we separated the HE main-charge production process into ten discrete unit operations and four support operations, and identified the corresponding solid and liquid HE residues and waste quantities. Four different annual HE main-charge production rates of 100, 500, 1000, and 2000 HE units/yr were assumed to develop the volume estimates and to establish the sensitivity of the estimates to HE production rates. The total solids (HE residues and hazardous and nonhazardous wastes) estimated range from 800 to 2800 ft{sup 3}/yr and vary uniformly with the assumed HE production rate. The total liquids estimated range from 73,000 to 1,448.000 gal/yr and also vary uniformly with the assumed production rate. Of the estimated solids, the hazardous wastes (e.g., electrical vehicle batteries and light tubes) were about 2% of the total volumes. The generation of solid HE residues varied uniformly with the HE production rates and ranged from about 20% of the total solids volume for the 100 HE units/yr case to about 60% for the 2000 units/yr case. The HE machining operations generated 60 to 80% of the total solid HE residues, depending on the assumed production rate, and were also the sources of the most concentrated HE residues.

Jardine, L.J.; McGee, J.T.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Biodegradation of high explosives on granular activated carbon [GAC]: Enhanced desorption of high explosives from GAC -- Batch studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Adsorption to GAC is an effective method for removing high explosives (HE) compounds from water, but no permanent treatment is achieved. Bioregeneration, which treats adsorbed contaminants by desorption and biodegradation, is being developed as a method for reducing GAC usage rates and permanently degrading RDX and HMX. Because desorption is often the limiting mass transfer mechanism in bioregeneration systems, several methods for increasing the rate and extent of desorption of RDX and HMX are being studied. These include use of cosolvents (methanol and ethanol), surfactants (both anionic and nonionic), and {beta}- and {gamma}-cyclodextrins. Batch experiments to characterize the desorption of these HEs from GAC have been completed using Northwestern LB-830, the GAC being used at Pantex. Over a total of 11 days of desorption, about 3% of the adsorbed RDX was desorbed from the GAC using buffered water as the desorption fluid. In comparison, about 96% of the RDX was extracted from the GAC by acetonitrile over the same desorption period. Ethanol and methanol were both effective in desorbing RDX and HMX; higher alcohol concentrations were able to desorb more HE from the GAC. Surfactants varied widely in their abilities to enhance desorption of HEs. The most effective surfactant that was studied was sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), which desorbed 56.4% of the adsorbed RDX at a concentration of 500 mg SDS/L. The cyclodextrins that were used were marginally more effective than water. Continuous-flow column tests are underway for further testing the most promising of these methods. These results will be compared to column experiments that have been completed under baseline conditions (using buffered water as the desorption fluid). Results of this research will support modeling and design of further desorption and bioregeneration experiments.

Morley, M.C.; Speitel, G.E. Jr. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Pushing 1D CCSNe to explosions: model and SN 1987A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on a method, PUSH, for triggering core-collapse supernova explosions of massive stars in spherical symmetry. We explore basic explosion properties and calibrate PUSH such that the observables of SN1987A are reproduced. Our simulations are based on the general relativistic hydrodynamics code AGILE combined with the detailed neutrino transport scheme IDSA for electron neutrinos and ALS for the muon and tau neutrinos. To trigger explosions in the otherwise non-exploding simulations, we rely on the neutrino-driven mechanism. The PUSH method locally increases the energy deposition in the gain region through energy deposition by the heavy neutrino flavors. Our setup allows us to model the explosion for several seconds after core bounce. We explore the progenitor range 18-21M$_{\\odot}$. Our studies reveal a distinction between high compactness (HC) and low compactness (LC) progenitor models, where LC models tend to explore earlier, with a lower explosion energy, and with a lower remnant mass. HC models are...

Perego, A; Frhlich, C; Ebinger, K; Eichler, M; Casanova, J; Liebendoerfer, M; Thielemann, F -K

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Clean, agile alternative binders, additives and plasticizers for propellant and explosive formulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) a clean, agile manufacturing of explosives, propellants and pyrotechniques (CANPEP) effort set about to identify new approaches to materials and processes for producing propellants, explosives and pyrotechniques (PEP). The RDX based explosive PBXN-109 and gun propellant M-43 were identified as candidates for which waste minimization and recycling modifications might be implemented in a short time frame. The binders, additives and plasticizers subgroup identified cast non-curable thermoplastic elastomer (TPE) formulations as possible replacement candidates for these formulations. Paste extrudable explosives were also suggested as viable alternatives to PBXN-109. Commercial inert and energetic TPEs are reviewed. Biodegradable and hydrolyzable binders are discussed. The applicability of various types of explosive formulations are reviewed and some issues associated with implementation of recyclable formulations are identified. It is clear that some processing and weaponization modifications will need to be made if any of these approaches are to be implemented. The major advantages of formulations suggested here over PBXN-109 and M-43 is their reuse/recyclability. Formulations using TPE or Paste could by recovered from a generic bomb or propellant and reused if they met specification or easily reprocessed and sold to the mining industry.

Hoffman, D.M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Hawkins, T.W. [Phillips Lab., Edwards AFB, CA (United States); Lindsay, G.A. [Naval Weapons Station, China Lake, CA (United States)] [and others

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

High explosive spot test analyses of samples from Operable Unit (OU) 1111  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A preliminary evaluation has been completed of environmental contaminants at selected sites within the Group DX-10 (formally Group M-7) area. Soil samples taken from specific locations at this detonator facility were analyzed for harmful metals and screened for explosives. A sanitary outflow, a burn pit, a pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) production outflow field, an active firing chamber, an inactive firing chamber, and a leach field were sampled. Energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) was used to obtain semi-quantitative concentrations of metals in the soil. Two field spot-test kits for explosives were used to assess the presence of energetic materials in the soil and in items found at the areas tested. PETN is the major explosive in detonators manufactured and destroyed at Los Alamos. No measurable amounts of PETN or other explosives were detected in the soil, but items taken from the burn area and a high-energy explosive (HE)/chemical sump were contaminated. The concentrations of lead, mercury, and uranium are given.

McRae, D.; Haywood, W.; Powell, J.; Harris, B.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Explosives disposal demonstration projects. Progress report, April 12, 1995--June 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains quarterly reports on two projects. The first is undertaking the environmental restoration at the Pantex Plant. Research objectives are organized under four general tasks: field testing and produced water treatment, bioremediation of contaminated groundwater and soils, vadose zone remediation, and chromium remediation. The other project goal is to demonstrate generation of diamond by explosive compression of Carbon 60 and Carbon 70 and mixtures of these fullerenes. The intent is to exploit expertise developed by Pantex and other DOE Laboratories in the area of understanding and modeling of explosive compression for initiation of nuclear fission reactions to explosively compress carbon in the form of fullerenes with the goal of transforming the material into the diamond phase.

Charbeneau, R.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Hydrolysis of plutonium: Corrosion kinetics in DMSO solutions containing simulated high explosive and water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A sequence of experiments is described that address the compatibility of plutonium metal with dimethyl sulfoxide solvent and with solutions containing simulated HMX explosive and simulated explosive plus water. In the absence of water, reaction is slow and forms a thin adherent product layer on clean metal surfaces. Corrosion of oxide-coated plutonium is observed after 15 to 20 days in a solution containing 0.18 mass % (0.11 M) water. After corrosion initiates, the rate accelerates rapidly and attains a value of 0.13 mg Pu/cm{sup 2} h with a surface that is approximately one percent active. Dependence of the Pu + H{sub 2}O reaction on water concentration is evaluated using the data from literature sources. Hazards associated with the use of wet dimethyl sulfoxide as a solvent for removing explosives during weapon dismantlement are identified and a simple method for their mitigation is outlined.

Haschke, J.M.; Pruner, R.E. II

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Thermal Cook-off of an HMX Based Explosive: Pressure Gauge Experiments and Modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Safety issues related to thermal cook-off are important for handling and storing explosive devices. Violence of event as a function of confinement is important for prediction of collateral events. There are major issues, which require an understanding of the following events: (1) transit to detonation of a pressure wave from a cook-off event, (2) sensitivity of HMX based explosives changes with thermally induced phase transitions and (3) the potential danger of neighboring explosive devices being affected by a cook-off reaction. Results of cook-off events of known size, confinement and thermal history allows for development and/or calibrating computer models for calculating events that are difficult to measure experimentally.

Urtiew, P A; Forbes, J W; Tarver, C M; Garcia, F; Greenwood, D W; Vandersall, K S

2002-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

358

Explosion Mechanism of Core-Collapse Supernovae --- a View Ten Years after SN 1987A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The observation of neutrinos from Supernova~1987A has confirmed the theoretical conjecture that these particles play a crucial role during the collapse of the core of a massive star. Only one per cent of the energy they carry away from the newly formed neutron star may account for all the kinetic and electromagnetic energy responsible for the spectacular display of the supernova explosion. However, the neutrinos emitted from the collapsed stellar core at the center of the explosion couple so weakly to the surrounding matter that convective processes behind the supernova shock and/or inside the nascent neutron star might be required to increase the efficiency of the energy transfer to the stellar mantle and envelope. The conditions for a successful explosion by the neutrino-heating mechanism and the possible importance of convection in and around the neutron star are shortly reviewed.

H. -Th. Janka

1997-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

359

Explosive Contamination from Substrate Surfaces: Differences and Similarities in Contamination Techniques using RDX and C-4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The amount of time that an explosive is present on the surface of a material is dependent upon the original amount of explosive on the surface, temperature, humidity, rain, etc. This laboratory study focused on looking at similarities and differences in three different surface contamination techniques that are used when performance testing explosive trace detection equipment in an attempt to determine how effective the techniques are at replicating actual field samples. The three techniques used were dry transfer deposition of solutions using the Transportation Security Laboratory (TSL) patented dry transfer techniques (US patent 6470730), direct deposition of explosive standards, and fingerprinting of actual explosives. Explosives were deposited on the surface of one of five substrates using one of the three different deposition techniques. The process was repeated for each surface type using each contamination technique. The surface types used were: 50% cotton/50% polyester as found in T-shirts, 100% cotton with a smooth surface such as that found in a cotton dress shirt, 100% cotton on a rough surface such as that found on canvas or denim, suede leather such as might be found on jackets, purses, or shoes, and metal obtained from a car hood at a junk yard. The samples were not pre-cleaned prior to testing and contained sizing agents, and in the case of the metal, oil and dirt. The substrates were photographed using a Zeiss Discover V12 stereoscope with Axiocam ICc1 3 megapixel digital camera to determine the difference in the crystalline structure and surface contamination in an attempt to determine differences and similarities associated with current contamination techniques.

C.J. Miller; T.S. Yoder

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Reactive Flow Modeling of Liquid Explosives via ALE3D/Cheetah Simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We carried out reactive flow simulations of liquid explosives such as nitromethane using the hydrodynamic code ALE3D coupled with equations of state and reaction kinetics modeled by the thermochemical code Cheetah. The simulation set-up was chosen to mimic cylinder experiments. For pure unconfined nitromethane we find that the failure diameter and detonation velocity dependence on charge diameter are in agreement with available experimental results. Such simulations are likely to be useful for determining detonability and failure behavior for a wide range of experimental conditions and explosive compounds.

Kuo, I W; Bastea, S; Fried, L E

2010-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "graaff confetti explosion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Standoff reflectionabsorption spectra of surface adsorbed explosives measured with pulsed quantum cascade lasers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We demonstrate a standoff detection scheme of surface adsorbed explosives based on the broadband quantum cascade laser (QCL) infrared reflectionabsorption spectroscopy and ultraviolet laser photodecomposition. We utilized a sub-second rapid-scan data acquisition scheme to record continuously scanned spectra which revealed the broad-band absorption features of surface adsorbed explosive molecules such as cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX) and trinitrotoluene with a surface concentration of 1?g/cm2. The standoff QCL spectra perfectly reproduce the reflectance spectra obtained with a conventional Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy instrument. The conformation conversion of RDX molecules is also observed and studied.

Xunchen Liu; Charles W. Van Neste; Manisha Gupta; Ying Y. Tsui; Seonghwan Kim; Thomas Thundat

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Standoff Hyperspectral Imaging of Explosives Residues Using Broadly Tunable External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser Illumination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe experimental results on the detection of explosives residues using active hyperspectral imaging by illumination of the target surface using an external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) and imaging using a room temperature microbolometer camera. The active hyperspectral imaging technique forms an image hypercube by recording one image for each tuning step of the ECQCL. The resulting hyperspectral image contains the full absorption spectrum produced by the illumination laser at each pixel in the image which can then be used to identify the explosive type and relative quantity using spectral identification approaches developed initially in the remote sensing community.

Bernacki, Bruce E.; Phillips, Mark C.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Developmental of a Vapor Cloud Explosion Risk Analysis Tool Using Exceedance Methodology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cloud explosions [4]. Lenoir and Davenport [5] have presented a review of many major incidents involving vapor cloud explosions worldwide from 1921 to 1991. Hydrocarbon materials such as ethane, ethylene, propane, and butane, which have been involved... are typically either in the form of gas, liquid, or two-phase. Examples of hydrocarbon gas releases are methane through butane, while liquid releases could be crude oil, diesel, jet fuel, or others. An example of a two-phase leak is condensate since it is a...

Alghamdi, Salem

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

364

Hyperspectral Microscopy of Explosives Particles Using an External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using infrared hyperspectral imaging, we demonstrate microscopy of small particles of the explosives compounds RDX, tetryl, and PETN with near diffraction-limited performance. The custom microscope apparatus includes an external cavity quantum cascade laser illuminator scanned over its tuning range of 9.13-10.53 m in four seconds, coupled with a microbolometer focal plane array to record infrared transmission images. We use the hyperspectral microscopy technique to study the infrared absorption spectra of individual explosives particles, and demonstrate sub-nanogram detection limits.

Phillips, Mark C.; Bernacki, Bruce E.

2012-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

365

DRAFT - DOE O 452.2C, Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order establishes requirements to implement the nuclear explosive security and use control (UC) elements of DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety (NEWS) Program, to ensure authorized use, when directed by proper authority, and protect against deliberate unauthorized acts (DUAs), deliberate unauthorized use (DUU), and denial of authorized use (DAU).

366

Planar blast scaling with condensed-phase explosives in a shock tube  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Blast waves are strong shock waves that result from large power density deposition into a fluid. The rapid energy release of high-explosive (HE) detonation provides sufficiently high power density for blast wave generation. Often it is desirable to quantify the energy released by such an event and to determine that energy relative to other reference explosives to derive an explosive-equivalence value. In this study, we use condensed-phase explosives to drive a blast wave in a shock tube. The explosive material and quantity were varied to produce blast waves of differing strengths. Pressure transducers at varying lengths measured the post-shock pressure, shock-wave arrival time and sidewall impulse associated with each test. Blast-scaling concepts in a one-dimensional geometry were then used to both determine the energy release associated with each test and to verify the scaling of the shock position versus time, overpressure versus distance, and impulse. Most blast scaling measurements to-date have been performed in a three-dimensional geometry such as a blast arena. Testing in a three-dimensional geometry can be challenging, however, as spherical shock-wave symmetry is required for good measurements. Additionally, the spherical wave strength decays rapidly with distance and it can be necessary to utilize larger (several kg) quantities of explosive to prevent significant decay from occurring before an idealized blast wave has formed. Such a mode of testing can be expensive, require large quantities of explosive, and be limited by both atmospheric conditions (such as rain) and by noise complaints from the population density near the test arena. Testing is possible in more compact geometries, however. Non-planar blast waves can be formed into a quasi-planar shape by confining the shock diffraction with the walls of a shock tube. Regardless of the initial form, the wave shape will begin to approximate a planar front after successive wave reflections from the tube walls. Such a technique has previously been used to obtain blast scaling measurements in the planar geometry with gaseous explosives and the condensed-phase explosive nitroguanidine. Recently, there has been much interest in the blast characterization of various non-ideal high explosive (NIHE) materials. With non-ideals, the detonation reaction zone is significantly larger (up to several cm for ANFO) than more ideal explosives. Wave curvature, induced by charge-geometry, can significantly affect the energy release associated with NIHEs. To measure maximum NIHE energy release accurately, it is desirable to minimize any such curvature and, if possible, to overdrive the detonation shock to ensure completion of chemical reactions ahead of the sonic locus associated with the reaction zone. This is achieved in the current study through use of a powerful booster HE and a charge geometry consisting of short cylindrical lengths of NIHE initiated along the charge centerline.

Jackson, Scott L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

367

DOE Order Self Study Modules - DOE O 452.1D, Nuclear Explosive and Weapon Surety Program and  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CONTINUING TRAINING SELF- CONTINUING TRAINING SELF- STUDY PROGRAM DOE O 452.1D NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE AND WEAPON SURETY PROGRAM DOE O 452.2D NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE SAFETY DOE O 452.1D and DOE O 452.2D Familiar Level June 2011 1 DOE O 452.1D NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE AND WEAPON SURETY PROGRAM DOE O 452.2D NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE SAFETY FAMILIAR LEVEL OBJECTIVES Given the familiar level of this module and the resources listed below, you will be able to answer the following questions: 1. What are the objectives of implementing U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) O 452.1D? 2. Define the following terms as they apply to this Order: Abnormal environment High explosive detonation 3. What are the objectives of implementing DOE O 452.2D? 4. What are the general requirements of DOE O 452.2D?

368

Alternative methods for proposed explosive demolition of large, obsolete pol storage tanks, Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri. Technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A desk study was undertaken to assess explosion demolition methodologies that would allow Army Explosive Ordinance Demolition (EOD) engineer teams assigned to Ft. Leonard Wood to safely and effectively demolish to ground level three very large metal POL (petroleum, oil, and lubricant) storage tanks. These tanks have outlived their usefulness and are scheduled for removal by the most rapid and cost effective method. An analysis by Ft. Leonard Wood determined explosive demolition to be the method of choice. A primary concern was possible corollary damage to nearby military and civilian housing and occupants. This study investigated several explosive sources and methodologies and provided predictions of corollary damage effects versus distance from the charge to be expected for explosive charge weights ranging from 10 to 500 lb. Prediction curves were developed for both ideal and average weather conditions.

Ingram, J.K.; Cheek, J.B.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Thermal Activation of the High Explosive NTO: Sublimation, Decomposition, and Autocatalysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermal Activation of the High Explosive NTO: Sublimation, Decomposition, and Autocatalysis Gregory of Chemistry, UniVersity of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 ReceiVed: July 26, 2001; In Final Form: January 15 of 5-nitro-2,4-dihydro-3H-1,2,4-triazol-3-one (NTO) leads to competitive sublimation and condensed

Utah, University of

370

Underwater Explosive Shock Consolidation of Nanocomposite Pr2Fe14B/-Fe Magnetic Powders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

performance permanent magnets has focused attention on exchange-coupled nanocomposites because of their low to fabricate exchange-coupled Pr2Fe14B/-Fe nanocomposite bulk magnets, using explosively generated shock waves, ensured exchange coupling between the hard and soft phases, resulting in magnetic properties better than

Liu, J. Ping

371

Explosive shock processing of Pr2Fe14B/ Fe exchange-coupled nanocomposite bulk magnets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Explosive shock processing of Pr2Fe14B/ ­Fe exchange-coupled nanocomposite bulk magnets Z.Q. Jin between neigh- boring magnetic phases.1,2 The prerequisite for effective exchange coupling is a small are usually used to produce single-phase microcrystalline permanent magnets, are not favored in making bulk

Liu, J. Ping

372

Xsense -a miniaturised multi-sensor platform for explosives detection Michael Stenbk Schmidt1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Xsense - a miniaturised multi-sensor platform for explosives detection Michael Stenbæk Schmidt1 University of Denmark 4 Dept. of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta, Canada. ABSTRACT a sensor platform consisting of four independent detector principles capable of detecting concentrations

373

Creep Testing Plastic-Bonded Explosives in Uni-axial Compression  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High fidelity measurements of time-dependent strain in the plastic-bonded explosives LX-17-1 and PBX 9502 have been performed under constant, uni-axial, compressive load using a custom designed apparatus. The apparatus uses a combination of extensometers and linear variable differential transformers coupled with a data acquisition system, thermal controls, and gravitational loading. The materials being tested consist of a crystalline explosive material mixed with a polymeric binder. The behavior of each material is related to the type of explosive and to the percentage and type of binder. For any given plastic-bonded explosive, the creep behavior is also dependent on the stress level and test temperature. Experiments were conducted using a 3 x 3 stress-temperature matrix with a temperature range of 24 C to 70 C and with stresses ranging from 250-psi to 780-psi. Analysis of the data has shown that logarithmic curve fits provide an accurate means of quantification and facilitate a long-term predictive capability. This paper will discuss the design of the apparatus, experimental results, and analyses.

Gagliardi, F J; Cunningham, B J

2008-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

374

Emergency Action Plan For incidents involving hazardous materials, fires, explosions, or natural gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-492-6025. For Non-Emergency Fire and Natural Gas Questions call the CU Fire Marshall @ 303-492-4042. AdditionalEmergency Action Plan For incidents involving hazardous materials, fires, explosions, or natural gas leaks, the following actions should be taken: 1) Life Safety First 2) Evacuate Immediate Area 3

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

375

Explosive eruption of coal and basalt and the end-Permian mass extinction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...explosive combustion, and the atmospheric rise necessary for global distribution...carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) and water. This sudden release of organic carbon...complications including vapor condensation, fragmentation energy, and...funded under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009...

Darcy E. Ogden; Norman H. Sleep

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Unveiling the nature of red novae cool explosions using archive plate photometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Based on archive photographic photometry and recent CCD photometric data for red novae V4332 Sgr and V838 Mon, we established their stellar composition, exploded components, and the nature of explosions. Low temperature in the outburst maximum is due to quasi-adiabatic expansion of a massive stellar envelope after the central energy surge preceded the outburst.

Goranskij, Vitaly; Zharova, Alla; Shugarov, Sergei; Barsukova, Elena; Kroll, Peter

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Apparatus and methods for real-time detection of explosives devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present disclosure relates, according to some embodiments, to apparatus, devices, systems, and/or methods for real-time detection of a concealed or camouflaged explosive device (e.g., EFPs and IEDs) from a safe stand-off distance. Apparatus, system and/or methods of the disclosure may also be operable to identify and/or spatially locate and/or detect an explosive device. An apparatus or system may comprise an x-ray generator that generates high-energy x-rays and/or electrons operable to contact and activate a metal comprised in an explosive device from a stand-off distance; and a detector operable to detect activation of the metal. Identifying an explosive device may comprise detecting characteristic radiation signatures emitted by metals specific to an EFP, an IED or a landmine. Apparatus and systems of the disclosure may be mounted on vehicles and methods of the disclosure may be performed while moving in the vehicle and from a safe stand-off distance.

Blackburn, Brandon W [Idaho Falls, ID; Hunt, Alan W [Pocatello, ID; Chichester, David L [Idaho Falls, ID

2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

378

Steam Explosions, Earthquakes, and Volcanic Eruptions--What's in Yellowstone's Future?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Steam Explosions, Earthquakes, and Volcanic Eruptions-- What's in Yellowstone's Future? U. In the background, steam vigorously rises from the hot Each year, millions of visitors come to admire the hot, such as geysers. Steam and hot water carry huge quantities of thermal en- ergy to the surface from the magma cham

Torgersen, Christian

379

High-speed digital shadowgraphy of shock waves from explosions and gunshots  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Mach, and C. V. Boys used open electric sparks to illuminate high-speed physics over 100 years ago by laboratory- scale explosions and the discharge of firearms. Allotted space permits only a fraction of twin 0.76m-diameter f/5 schlieren- quality parabolic mirrors, a 1kW Oriel xenon arc la

Settles, Gary S.

380

Lithosphereatmosphereionosphere coupling after the 2003 explosive eruption of the Soufriere Hills Volcano, Montserrat  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......solid Earth around 4 mHz. Numerical approximations...analysis|Ionosphere/atmosphere interactions|Volcano...frequency domain (2.2 mHz) and identified...and the ionospheric plasma and can be described...peak centered at 4 mHz, and an apparent...previously reported after atmospheric explosions from ionospheric......

Thomas Dautermann; Eric Calais; Philippe Lognonn; Glen S. Mattioli

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "graaff confetti explosion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Prototype explosives-detection system based on nuclear-resonance absorption in nitrogen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A prototype explosives-detection system (EDS) that was developed for experimental evaluation of a nuclear-resonance absorption technique is described. The major subsystems are a proton accelerator and beam transport, high-temperature proton target, an airline-luggage tomographic inspection station, and an image-processing/detection-alarm subsystem. The detection system performance, based on a limited experimental test, is reported.

Morgado, R.E.; Arnone, G.; Cappiello, C.C.; Gardner, S.D.; Hollas, C.L.; Ussery, L.E.; White, J.M.; Zahrt, J.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Krauss, R.A. [Federal Aviation Administration, Atlantic City International Airport, NJ (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Fire and the related effects of nuclear explosions. 1982 Asilomar Conference  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the proceedings of a Federal Emergency Management Agency-sponsored Conference on fire and the related effects of nuclear explosions (with passing attention to earthquakes and other nonnuclear mishaps). This conference, the fifth of an annual series (formally called Blast/Fire Interaction Conferences), was held during the week of April 25, 1982, again at Asilomar, California.

Martin, S.B.; Alger, R.S. (eds.)

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

The use of explosives by the US Antarctic Program. Environmental report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report was prepared to assist principal investigators and others in complying with NEPA and the protocol on environmental protection to the Antarctic Treaty. Research activities and associated support operations in Antarctica sometimes require use of explosives. This report evaluates potential environmental impacts associated with such activities and possible methods for mitigating those impacts. The greatest single use of explosives, and the only type of blasting that will occur on the Polar Plateau (an exception is the rare use of explosives to cave in dangerous ice for safety reasons), is for seismic surveys. The charges for these are small-scale, are placed in or on the snow or ice, are distributed linearly over long distances, and present no potential impacts to soil or geological substrata. Impacts from those would be less than minor or transitory. Wherever possible, blasting holes in sea ice will be replaced by drilling by auger or melting. Other uses of explosives, such as in geologic research and construction, are discussed.

Ensminger, J.T.; Blasing, T.J.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Laboratory investigation of the dust explosibility characteristics of three Nova Scotia coals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The explosion characteristics of coal dust/air and methane/coal dust/air mixtures have been determined experimentally. All tests were conducted at initial pressures of nominally 1.0 bar in a 26 / spherical explosion bomb. Run-of-mine coal from the Prince, Lingan and Phalen seams of the Cape Breton Development Corporation was used. Two size fractions of each coal were tested at dust concentrations ranging from the lean flammability limit to 1.0 kg m?3. The explosion parameters measured for each test were the maximum explosion pressure, Pmax, and the maximum rate of pressure rise, (dP/dt)max. Methane addition to the coal dust/air mixtures was found to increase both Pmax and (dP/dt)max, the effect being most significant at low dust concentrations. A reduction in mass mean diameter of the coal or an increase in the parent coal volatile content was found to have a similar effect on Pmax and (dP/dt)max. These observations are consistent with a description of coal dust flame propagation by gas-phase combustion of devolatilization products.

Paul R. Amyotte; Kenneth J. Mintz; Michael J. Pegg; Yu-Hong Sun; Kenneth I. Wilkie

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

The explosion and fire on the Piper Alpha platform, 6 July 1988. A case study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...from injuries, includ- ing burns; 109 deaths from inhalation...ascertained. (Death was caused by burn injuries in only four cases...launch her workboat. MV Silver Pit 1. The Piper standby vessel...explosion. 3. The MV Silver Pit's fast rescue craft (FRC...

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

The sun is an active star that produces explosions of matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The sun is an active star that produces explosions of matter and energy. The space between CME. The white circle is the size of the sun. Solar Storm Timeline Day Time What Happened Tuesday 4:50 PM Gas eruption on Sun Thursday 3:36 AM Plasma storm reaches Earth. Thursday 5:20 AM Storm at maximum

387

Analysis of Teleseismic Signals from Underground Nuclear Explosions Originating in Four Geological Environments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......from the E. Kazakh site and the Nevada Test Site lie in between these two values...to an underground explosion at Nevada test site, Can. J. earth Sci., 6...from the E. Kazakh site and the Nevada Test Site lie in between these two values......

H. S. Hasegawa

1971-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Supernova explosions, 511 keV photons, gamma ray bursts and mirror matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There are three astroparticle physics puzzles which fire the imagination: the origin of the ``Great Positron Producer'' in the galactic bulge, the nature of the gamma-ray bursts central engine and the mechanism of supernova explosions. We show that the mirror matter model has the potential to solve all three of these puzzles in one beautifully simple strike.

R. Foot; Z. K. Silagadze

2004-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

389

Metadata of the chapter that will be visualized online Chapter Title Seismic Monitoring of Nuclear Explosions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,000 10 nuclear test explosions were conducted. About 500 of 11 these were carried out in the atmosphere with some regional concentra- 14 tions, and aroused widespread public opposition to 15 nuclear testing. A few nuclear tests were carried out under- 16 water and in space. The great majority, about 1,500, were

Foulger, G. R.

390

Explosions of Syngas/CO2 Mixtures in Oxygen-Enriched Air  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Most of the scientific works on syngas combustion deal with dry air as oxidizer, whereas very few studies have been carried out on syngas combustion in oxygen-enriched air (i.e., oxy-combustion). In this work, the explosion behavior (peak pressure and ...

Ernesto Salzano; Anna Basco; Francesco Cammarota; Valeria Di Sarli; Almerinda Di Benedetto

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Response of a bubble bearing viscoelastic fluid to rapid decompression: Implications for explosive volcanic eruptions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Response of a bubble bearing viscoelastic fluid to rapid decompression: Implications for explosive Abstract We conducted rapid decompression experiments using bubble-bearing viscoelastic fluid in a vertical of the bubbles, DP=Pg ?Po, to understand the behavior of bubbly-magmas under rapid decompression. We find

Manga, Michael

392

X-ray studies of supernova remnants: A different view of supernova explosions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...be found in refs. 1719. Type Ia SNe and Their SNRs Open Issues in Type Ia SNe. Type Ia SNe are believed to be the thermonuclear explosion of a C + O white dwarf (WD) that is destabilized when its mass becomes close to the Chandrasekhar limit by accretion...

Carles Badenes

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

SEVERE WEATHER EXPLOSION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Alert people in the immediate area to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEVERE WEATHER EXPLOSION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EVACUATE · Alert people in the immediate area not operate any electrical devices, phones, appliances, light switches, or equipment with open flames within the affected area EVACUATE · Leave area and go to an exterior location where you can call 911 from a land line

Karonis, Nicholas T.

394

Composting of soils/sediments and sludges containing toxic organics including high energy explosives. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory and pilot-scale experimentation were conducted to evaluate composting as an on-site treatment technology to remediate soils contaminated with hazardous waste at DOE`s PANTEX Plant. Suspected contaminated sites within the PANTEX Plant were sampled and analyzed for explosives, other organics, and inorganic wastes. Soils in drainage ditches and playas at PANTEX Plant were found to be contaminated with low levels of explosives (including RDX, HMX, PETN and TATB). Additional sites previously used for solvent disposal were heavily contaminated with solvents and transformation products of the solvent, as well as explosives and by-products of explosives. Laboratory studies were conducted using {sup 14}C-labeled explosives and {sup 14}C-labeled diacetone alcohol contaminated soil loaded into horse manure/hay composts at three rates: 20, 30, and 40%(W/W). The composts were incubated for six weeks at approximately 60{degree}C with continuous aeration. All explosives degraded rapidly and were reduced to below detection limits within 3 weeks in the laboratory studies. {sup 14}C-degradates from {sup 14}C-RDX, {sup 14}C-HMX and {sup 14}C-TATB were largely limited to {sup 14}CO{sub 2} and unextracted residue in the compost. Volatile and non-volatile {sup 14}C-degradates were found to result from {sup 14}C-PETN breakdown, but these compounds were not identified. {sup 14}C-diacetone alcohol concentrations were significantly reduced during composting. However, most of the radioactivity was volatilized from the compost as non-{sup 14}CO{sub 2} degradates or as {sup 14}C-diacetone alcohol. Pilot scale composts loaded with explosives contaminated soil at 30% (W/W) with intermittent aeration were monitored over six weeks. Data from the pilot-scale study generally was in agreement with the laboratory studies. However, the {sup 14}C-labeled TATB degraded much faster than the unlabeled TATB. Some formulations of TATB may be more resistant to composting activity than others.

Doyle, R.C.; Kitchens, J.F.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

NUCLEOSYNTHESIS IN TWO-DIMENSIONAL DELAYED DETONATION MODELS OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA EXPLOSIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the explosion mechanism of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), different scenarios have been suggested. In these, the propagation of the burning front through the exploding white dwarf (WD) star proceeds in different modes, and consequently imprints of the explosion model on the nucleosynthetic yields can be expected. The nucleosynthetic characteristics of various explosion mechanisms are explored based on three two-dimensional explosion simulations representing extreme cases: a pure turbulent deflagration, a delayed detonation following an approximately spherical ignition of the initial deflagration, and a delayed detonation arising from a highly asymmetric deflagration ignition. Apart from this initial condition, the deflagration stage is treated in a parameter-free approach. The detonation is initiated when the turbulent burning enters the distributed burning regime. This occurs at densities around 10{sup 7} g cm{sup -3}-relatively low as compared to existing nucleosynthesis studies for one-dimensional spherically symmetric models. The burning in these multidimensional models is different from that in one-dimensional simulations as the detonation wave propagates both into unburned material in the high-density region near the center of a WD and into the low-density region near the surface. Thus, the resulting yield is a mixture of different explosive burning products, from carbon-burning products at low densities to complete silicon-burning products at the highest densities, as well as electron-capture products synthesized at the deflagration stage. Detailed calculations of the nucleosynthesis in all three models are presented. In contrast to the deflagration model, the delayed detonations produce a characteristic layered structure and the yields largely satisfy constraints from Galactic chemical evolution. In the asymmetric delayed detonation model, the region filled with electron capture species (e.g., {sup 58}Ni, {sup 54}Fe) is within a shell, showing a large off-set, above the bulk of {sup 56}Ni distribution, while species produced by the detonation are distributed more spherically.

Maeda, K. [Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (IPMU), University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Roepke, F.K.; Fink, M.; Hillebrandt, W.; Travaglio, C. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 1, 85741 Garching (Germany); Thielemann, F.-K., E-mail: keiichi.maeda@ipmu.j [Department Physik, Universitaet Basel, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland)

2010-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

396

Monte Carlo simulation of explosive detection system based on a DeuteriumDeuterium (DD) neutron generator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract An explosive detection system based on a DeuteriumDeuterium (DD) neutron generator has been simulated using the Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP5). Nuclear-based explosive detection methods can detect explosives by identifying their elemental components, especially nitrogen. Thermal neutron capture reactions have been used for detecting prompt gamma emission (10.82MeV) following radiative neutron capture by 14N nuclei. The explosive detection system was built based on a fully high-voltage-shielded, axial DD neutron generator with a radio frequency (RF) driven ion source and nominal yield of about 1010 fast neutrons per second (E=2.5MeV). Polyethylene and paraffin were used as moderators with borated polyethylene and lead as neutron and gamma ray shielding, respectively. The shape and the thickness of the moderators and shields are optimized to produce the highest thermal neutron flux at the position of the explosive and the minimum total dose at the outer surfaces of the explosive detection system walls. In addition, simulation of the response functions of NaI, BGO, and LaBr3-based ?-ray detectors to different explosives is described.

K. Bergaoui; N. Reguigui; C.K. Gary; C. Brown; J.T. Cremer; J.H. Vainionpaa; M.A. Piestrup

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Explosion bonding of dissimilar materials for fabricating APS front end components: Analysis of metallurgical and mechanical properties and UHV applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The front end beamline section contains photon shutters and fixed masks. These components are made of OFHC copper and GlidCOP AL-15. Stainless steels (304 or 316) are also used for connecting photon shutters and fixed masks to other components that operate in the ultrahigh vacuum system. All these dissimilar materials need to be joined together. However, bonding these dissimilar materials is very difficult because of their different mechanical and thermal properties and incompatible metallurgical properties. Explosion bonding is a bonding method in which the controlled energy of a detonating explosive is used to create a metallurgical bond between two or more similar or dissimilar materials. No intermediate filler metal, for example, a brazing compound or soldering alloy, is needed to promote bonding, and no external heat need be applied. A study of the metallurgical and mechanical properties and YGV applications of GlidCop AL-15, OFHC copper, and 304 stainless steel explosion-bonded joints has been done. This report contains five parts: an ultrasonic examination of explosion-bonded joints and a standard setup; mechanical-property and thermal-cycle tests of GlidCop AL-15/304 stainless steel explosion-bonded joints; leak tests of a GlidCop AL-15/304 stainless steel explosion-bonded interfaces for UHV application; metallurgical examination of explosion-bonded interfaces and failure analysis, and discussion and conclusion.

Li, Yuheng; Shu, Deming; Kuzay, T.M.

1994-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

398

A Preparation Zone For Volcanic Explosions Beneath Naka-Dake Crater, Aso  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » A Preparation Zone For Volcanic Explosions Beneath Naka-Dake Crater, Aso Volcano, As Inferred From Magnetotelluric Surveys Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Preparation Zone For Volcanic Explosions Beneath Naka-Dake Crater, Aso Volcano, As Inferred From Magnetotelluric Surveys Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The 1st crater of Naka-dake, Aso volcano, is one of the most active craters in Japan, and known to have a characteristic cycle of activity that consists of the formation of a crater lake, drying-up of the

399

Nuclear Explosives Safety Evaluation Process (DOE-STD-3015-2004)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

SENSITIVE DOE-STD-3015-2004 November 2004 Superseding DOE-STD-3015-2001 DOE STANDARD NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE SAFETY EVALUATION PROCESS U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web site at http://tis.eh.doe.gov/techstds/. DOE-STD-3015-2004 iii FOREWORD This Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standard is approved for use by the Assistant Deputy Administrator for Military Application and Stockpile Operations, National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), and is available for use with DOE O 452.1, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE AND WEAPON SURETY PROGRAM, and DOE O 452.2, SAFETY OF

400

Thin-layer chromatography and colorimetric analysis of multi-component explosive mixtures  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thin-layer chromatography method for detection and identification of common military and peroxide explosives in samples includes the steps of provide a reverse-phase thin-layer chromatography plate; prepare the plate by marking spots on which to deposit the samples by touching the plate with a marker; spot one micro liter of a first standard onto one of the spots, spot one micro liter of a second standard onto another of the spots, and spot samples onto other of spots producing a spotted plate; add eluent to a developing chamber; add the spotted plate to the developing chamber; remove the spotted plate from the developing chamber producing a developed plate; place the developed plate in an ultraviolet light box; add a visualization agent to a dip tank; dip the developed plate in the dip tank and remove the developed plate quickly; and detect explosives by viewing said developed plate.

Pagoria, Philip F.; Mitchell, Alexander R.; Whipple, Richard E.; Carman, M. Leslie

2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "graaff confetti explosion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Reactive wave growth in shock-compressed thermally degraded high explosives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors have performed experiments to study the effect of thermal degradation on shock sensitivity and growth to detonation of several high-density plastic bonded explosives, confined in stainless steel cells. Assemblies were heated in situ in the target chamber of a light-gas gun. Confinement was varied to allow, in some cases, for thermal expansion of the explosive, and in other cases to vent the decomposition gases. Particle velocity profiles were measured using VISAR at a LiF window interface. Results for the IHE PBX-9502 showed that its sensitivity to shock initiation could be dramatically increased or decreased depending on the confinement conditions during heating. Effects were much less pronounced for PBX-9404 and PBX-9501.

Renlund, A.M.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Thin-film methods for examining the decomposition chemistry of explosives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental techniques using thin-film samples and infrared spectroscopy have been developed to examine thermally-induced condensed-phase decomposition chemistry of explosives. Experiments with nitrocellulose (NC) and 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) were done to examine the effects of confining the decomposition proucts so that intimate contact was maintained with the remaining explosive during isothermal decomposition at temperatures below those of the respective DTA exotherms. The NC experiments showed that substantial NC decomposition occurred at 150C and confinement of the decomposition products influenced the decomposition reactions. Some of the mechanisms and reaction rates with confined samples compared favorably with published mechanisms and rates from unconfined samples, while other mechanisms and reaction rates differed. The TATB experiments showed that significant TATB degradation occurred at temperatures as low as 210C, and substantial degradation occurred within 24 hours at 250C which is about 80C below the temperature of the DTA exotherm for TATB.

Erickson, K.L.; Trott, W.M.; Renlund, A.M.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Reactive wave growth in shock-compressed thermally degraded high explosives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have performed experiments to study the effect of thermal degradation on shock sensitivity and growth to detonation of several high-density plastic bonded explosives confined in stainless steel cells. Assemblies were heated in situ in the target chamber of a light-gas gun. Confinement was varied to allow in some cases for thermal expansion of the explosive and in other cases to vent the decomposition gases. Particle velocity profiles were measured using VISAR at a LiF window interface. Results for the IHE PBX-9502 showed that its sensitivity to shock initiation could be dramatically increased or decreased depending on the confinement conditions during heating. Effects were much less pronounced for PBX-9404 and PBX-9501.

Anita M. Renlund

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Reactive wave growth in shock-compressed thermally degraded high explosives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have performed experiments to study the effect of thermal degradation on shock sensitivity and growth to detonation of several high-density plastic bonded explosives, confined in stainless steel cells. Assemblies were heated {ital in situ} in the target chamber of a light-gas gun. Confinement was varied to allow, in some cases, for thermal expansion of the explosive, and in other cases to vent the decomposition gases. Particle velocity profiles were measured using VISAR at a LiF window interface. Results for the IHE PBX-9502 showed that its sensitivity to shock initiation could be dramatically increased or decreased depending on the confinement conditions during heating. Effects were much less pronounced for PBX-9404 and PBX-9501. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

Renlund, A.M. [Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800, MS 1454, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1454 (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Discrimination of nuclear explosions against civilian sources based on atmospheric xenon isotopic activity ratios  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A global monitoring system for atmospheric xenon radioactivity is being established as part of the International Monitoring System that will be used to verify compliance with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) once the treaty has entered into force. This paper studies isotopic activity ratios to support interpretation of observed atmospheric concentrations of 135Xe, 133mXe, 133Xe and 131mXe. The goal is to distinguish nuclear explosion sources from civilian releases. Simulations of nuclear explosions, empirical data for both test and reactor releases as well as observations by measurement stations of the International Noble Gas Experiment (INGE) are used to provide a proof of concept for the isotopic ratio based method for source discrimination.

Kalinowski, Martin B.; Axelssson, A.; Bean, Marc; Blanchard, X.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Brachet, G.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Peters, Jana; Pistner, Christoph; Raith, Maria; Ringbom, Anders; Saey, P. R.; Schlosser, C.; Stocki, Trevor J.; Taffary, T.; Ungar, R. Kurt

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Wedge test data for three new explosives: LAX112, 2,4-DNI, and TNAZ  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High pressure Pop-plots and inert Hugoniot curves have been measured for three new explosives: LAX112 (3,6-diamino-1,2,4,5-tetrazine-1,4-dioxide), 2,4-DNI (2,4-dinitroimidazole), and TNAZ (1,3,3-trinitroazetidine). LAX112 and 2,4-DNI are of interest because of their insensitivity, while TNAZ is useful for its performance and castability. The shock sensitivity of LAX112 and 2,4-DNI fall between that of pressed TNT and PBX9502, LAX112 being the less sensitive. The shock sensitivity of TNAZ falls between that of pressed PETN and PBX9501. The inert Hugoniots for all three materials are comparable to those of other explosives. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

Hill, L.G.; Seitz, W.L.; Kramer, J.F.; Murk, D.M.; Medina, R.S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Wedge test data for three new explosives: LAX112, 2,4-DNI, and TNAZ  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High pressure Pop-plots and inert Hugoniot curves have been measured for three new explosives: LAX112 (3,6-diamino-1,2,4,5-tetrazine-1,4-dioxide), 2,4-DNI (2,4-dinitroimidazole), and TNAZ (1,3,3-trinitroazetidine). LAX112 and 2,4-DNI are of interest because of their insensitivity, while TNAZ is useful for its performance and castability. The shock sensitivity of LAX112 and 2,4-DNI fall between that of pressed TNT and PBX9502, LAX112 being the less sensitive. The shock sensitivity of TNAZ falls between that of pressed PETN and PBX9501. The Pop-plot and Hugoniot data for TNAZ matches well with the lower pressure gas-gun data of Sheffield, Gustavsen, and Alcon. The inert Hugoniots for all three materials are comparable to those of other explosives.

Hill, L.G.; Seitz, W.L.; Kramer, J.F.; Murk, D.M.; Medina, R.S.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

A Neutron Based Scanner to Detect Explosives in Small, Sealed Containers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A scanning system has been designed for portal protection applications, with the capability of detecting explosive materials after an initial scan of 30 seconds. The scanner operates using the principle of neutron induced return gamma-ray spectrometry. This system utilizes high purity germanium detectors, a neutron generator based on deuterium-tritium fusion and a unique neutron reflector and guide design. The neutron reflector amplifies the flux and alters the energy spectrum of neutrons produced by the generator. A depleted uranium reflector is shown to perform 7.3 times better than no reflector, and is found to perform 1.5 times better than a tungsten reflector using MCNP simulation. This improvement is due to neutron knockout and induced fission occurring in depleted uranium. The system is capable of detecting 300 g of explosives with 90% detection probability, which includes a 15% rescan rate after a 30 second initial scan.

Koltick, D.; Sword, E. [Physics Department, Purdue University 525 Northwestern Avenue, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

409

Development of graphene nanoplatelet embedded polymer microcantilever for vapour phase explosive detection applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, a graphene based strain sensor has been reported for explosive vapour detection applications by exploiting the piezoresistive property of graphene. Instead of silicon based cantilevers, a low cost polymeric micro-cantilever platform has been used to fabricate this strain sensor by embedding the graphene nanoplatelet layer inside the beam. The fabricated devices were characterized for their mechanical and electromechanical behaviour. This device shows a very high gauge factor which is around ?144. Also the resonant frequency of these cantilevers is high enough such that the measurements are not affected by environmental noise. These devices have been used in this work for reliable detection of explosive vapours such as 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene down to parts-per-billion concentrations in ambient conditions.

Ray, Prasenjit; Pandey, Swapnil; Ramgopal Rao, V. [Centre of Excellence in Nanoelectronics, Department of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai (India)

2014-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

410

Macroscopic observables experimentally linked to microscopic processes in the explosive fracture and fragmentation of metals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The response of a metal element to explosive loading depends on a broad spectrum of explosive and metal properties, macroscopic geometry plays a crucial role in defining the localized loading history and the resulting gradients of interest, while microscopic effects and defects are generally believed responsible for damage nucleation. Certain experiments reduce the complexity by producing conditions that are uniform in some sense, allowing dynamic measurement of variables that can be correlated with corresponding microscopic effects observed in recovery experiments. Spherical expansion of thin shells, that eventually fragment, and steady wave loading of flat plates are two such experiments. Proton radiography, x-radiography, laser velocimetry, imaging IR, and visible light photography all have produced dynamic measurements in 4340 steel, copper, uranium alloys, tantalum, and titanium. Correlation of the macroscopic measurements with microscopy on recovered samples has been done with a statistical approach.

Hull, Lawrence M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

411

Security training symposium: Meeting the challenge: Firearms and explosives recognition and detection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These conference proceedings have been prepared in support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Security Training Symposium on Meeting the Challenge -- Firearms and Explosives Recognition and Detection,'' November 28 through 30, 1989, in Bethesda, Maryland. This document contains the edited transcripts of the guest speakers. It also contains some of the speakers' formal papers that were distributed and some of the slides that were shown at the symposium (Appendix A).

Not Available

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Calculation of safe parameters of air shock waves for underwater explosions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper proposes a functional relationship for the calculation of the pressure at an air shock-wave front in underwater explosions of plaster-blasting charges. The maximum permissible mass of the charge and safe distance for objects can be calculated for an assigned value of the critical pressure at the air shock-wave front. The authors also state that this work was conducted as there are practically no significant results of experimental or theoretical investigations of this problem.

Smolii, N.I.; Ganopol'skii, M.I.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Implementation of strength and burn models for plastic-bonded explosives and propellants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have implemented the burn model in LS-DYNA. At present, the damage (porosity and specific surface area) is specified as initial conditions. However, history variables that are used by the strength model are reserved as placeholders for the next major revision, which will be a completely interactive model. We have implemented an improved strength model for explosives based on a model for concrete. The model exhibits peak strength and subsequent strain softening in uniaxial compression. The peak strength increases with increasing strain rate and/or reduced ambient temperature. Under triaxial compression compression, the strength continues to increase (or at least not decrease) with increasing strain. This behaviour is common to both concrete and polymer-bonded explosives (PBX) because the microstructure of these composites is similar. Both have aggregate material with a broad particle size distribution, although the length scale for concrete aggregate is two orders of magnitude larger than for PBX. The (cement or polymer) binder adheres to the aggregate, and is both pressure and rate sensitive. There is a larger bind binder content in concrete, compared to the explosive, and the aggregates have different hardness. As a result we expect the parameter values to differ, but the functional forms to be applicable to both. The models have been fit to data from tests on an AWE explosive that is HMX based. The decision to implement the models in LS-DYNA was based on three factors: LS-DYNA is used routinely by the AWE engineering analysis group and has a broad base of experienced users; models implemented in LS-DYNA can be transferred easily to LLNL's ALE 3D using a material model wrapper developed by Rich Becker; and LS-DYNA could accommodate the model requirements for a significant number of additional history variables without the significant time delay associated with code modification.

Reaugh, J E

2009-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

414

Explosive Instability and Erupting Flux Tubes in a Magnetised Plasma Atmosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The eruption of multiple flux tubes in a magnetised plasma atmosphere is proposed as a mechanism for explosive release of energy in plasmas. Linearly stable isolated flux tubes are shown to be metastable in a box model magnetised atmosphere in which ends of the field lines are embedded in conducting walls. The energy released by destabilising such field lines can be a significant fraction of the gravitational energy stored in the system. This energy can be released in a fast dynamical time.

Cowley, S C; Henneberg, S A; Wilson, H R

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Measurement of an Explosively Driven Hemispherical Shell Using 96 Points of Optical Velocimetry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the measurement of the surface motion of a hemispherical copper shell driven by high explosives. This measurement was made using three 32-channel multiplexed photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV) systems, in combination with a novel compound optical probe. Clearly visible are detailed features of the motion of the shell over time, enhanced by spatial correlation. Significant non-normal motion is apparent, and challenges in measuring such a geometry are discussed.

Danielson, J. R. [LANL; Daykin, E P [NSTec; Diaz, A. B. [NSTec; Doty, D. L. [LANL; Frogget, B. C. [NSTec; Furlanetto, M. R. [LANL; Gallegos, C. H. [NSTec; Gibo, M [NSTec; Garza, A [NSTec; Holtkamp, D B [LANL; Hutchins, M S [NSTec; Perez, C [NSTec; Perez, C [NSTec; Pena, M [NSTec; Romero, V T [NSTec; Shinas, M A [LANL; Teel, M G [NSTec; Tabaka, L J [LANL

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Delayed neutrino-driven supernova explosions aided by the standing accretion-shock instability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present results of 2D hydrodynamic simulations of stellar core collapse, which confirm that the neutrino-heating mechanism remains viable for the explosion of a wider mass range of supernova progenitors with iron cores. We used an energy-dependent treatment of the neutrino transport based on the "ray-by-ray plus" approximation, in which the number, energy, and momentum equations are closed with a variable Eddington factor obtained by iteratively solving a model Boltzmann equation. We focus on the evolution of a 15 Msun progenitor and show that shock revival and the explosion are initiated at about 600 ms post bounce, powered by neutrino energy deposition. Similar to previous findings for an 11.2 Msun star, but significantly later, the onset of the explosion is fostered by the standing accretion shock instability (SASI). This instability exhibits highest growth rates for the dipole and quadrupole modes, which lead to large-amplitude bipolar shock oscillations and push the shock to larger radii, thus increasing the time accreted matter is exposed to neutrino heating in the gain layer. Therefore also convective overturn behind the shock is strengthened. A "soft" nuclear equation of state that causes a rapid contraction and a smaller radius of the forming neutron star and thus a fast release of gravitational binding energy, seems to be more favorable for an explosion. Rotation has the opposite effect because it leads to a more extended and cooler neutron star and thus lower neutrino luminosities and mean energies and overall less neutrino heating. Neutron star g-mode oscillations and the acoustic mechanism play no important role in our simulations. (abridged)

A. Marek; H. Th. Janka

2007-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

417

AN INVESTIGATION INTO THE CHARACTER OF PRE-EXPLOSION CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA SHOCK MOTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the structure of the stalled supernova shock in both two and three dimensions (2D and 3D, respectively) and explore the differences in the effects of neutrino heating and the standing accretion shock instability (SASI). We find that early on the amplitude of the dipolar mode of the shock is factors of {approx}2-3 smaller in 3D than in 2D. However, later in both 3D and 2D, the monopole and dipole modes start to grow until explosion. Whereas in 2D, the (l, m) = (1, 0) mode changes sign quasi-periodically, producing the 'up-and-down' motion always seen in modern 2D simulations, in 3D this almost never happens. Rather, in 3D when the dipolar mode starts to grow, it grows in magnitude and wanders stochastically in direction until settling before explosion to a particular patch of solid angle. Furthermore, in 2D, we find that the amplitude of the dipolar shock deformation separates into two classes. For the first, identified with the SASI and for a wide range of 'low' neutrino luminosities, this amplitude remains small and roughly constant. For the other, identified with higher luminosities and neutrino-driven convection, the dipolar amplitude grows sharply. Importantly, it is only for this higher luminosity class that we see neutrino-driven explosions within {approx}1 s of bounce. Moreover, for the 'low' luminosity runs (including zero), the power spectra of these dipolar oscillations peak in the 30-50 Hz range associated with advection timescales, while for the high-luminosity runs the power spectra at lower frequencies are significantly more prominent. We associate this enhanced power at lower frequencies with slower convective effects and the secular growth of the dipolar shock amplitude. Though our study involves a simplified, parameterized approach, on the basis of it we hypothesize that neutrino-driven buoyant convection should almost always dominate the SASI when the supernova explosion is neutrino-driven.

Burrows, Adam; Dolence, Joshua C.; Murphy, Jeremiah W., E-mail: burrows@astro.princeton.edu, E-mail: jdolence@astro.princeton.edu, E-mail: jmurphy@astro.princeton.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Lightcurves of thermonuclear supernovae as a probe of the explosion mechanism and their use in cosmology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermonuclear supernovae are valuable for cosmology but their physics is not yet fully understood. Modeling the development and propagation of nuclear flame is complicated by numerous instabilities. The predictions of supernova light curves still involve some simplifying assumptions, but one can use the comparison of the computed fluxes with observations to constrain the explosion mechanism. In spite of great progress in recent years, a number of issues remains unsolved both in flame physics and light curve modeling.

S. Blinnikov; E. Sorokina

2002-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

419

Thermonuclear Runaways on Accreting White Dwarfs: Models of Classical Novae Explosions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The mechanism of classical novae explosions is explained, together with some of their observational properties. The scarce but not null impact of novae in the chemical evolution of the Milky Way is analyzed, as well as their relevance for the radioactivity in the Galaxy. A special emphasis is given to the predicted gamma-ray emission from novae and its relationship with the thermonuclear model itself and its related nucleosynthesis.

Margarita Hernanz; Jordi Jose

2000-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

420

EA-507; Environmental Assessment and FONSI For The FAA Explosive Detection System Independent Validation And Verification Program INEL  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

07; Environmental Assessment and FONSI For The FAA Explosive 07; Environmental Assessment and FONSI For The FAA Explosive Detection System Independent Validation And Verification Program INEL Table of Contents 1. NEED FOR PROPOSED ACTION 2. DESCRIPTION OF THE PROPOSED ACTION 3. ALTERNATIVES TO PROPOSED ACTION 4. ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS OF PROPOSED ACTION 5. CONCLUSIONS/SUMMARY 6. LIST OF PREPARERS 7. REFERENCES APPENDIX I Map of WRRTF APPENDIX II Accident Safety Analysis FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION EXPLOSIVE DETECTION SYSTEM - INDEPENDENT VALIDATION AND VERIFICATION PROGRAM LIST OF FIGURES Page XXX WATER REACTOR RESEARCH TEST FACT 1. NEED FOR PROPOSED ACTION The urgent development, fabrication, and operation of advanced explosive detection systems are needed by the Federal Aviation Agency (FAA) to

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421

Tandem Accelerator with Vacuum Insulation for Boron-Neutron-Capture Therapy and Detection of Explosives by Resonance Absorption of ?-Rays  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The status of the design work on an electrostatic tandem-accelerator with vacuum insulation for 2.5 MeV protons and ... neutron therapy and the detection of explosives by nuclear-resonance absorption of ?-rays.

G. I. Dimov; Yu. I. Bel'chenko; G. S. Krainov; R. A. Salimov

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Characterization of an explosively bonded aluminum proton beam window for the Spallation Neutron Source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An effort is underway at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) to change the design of the 1st Generation high-nickel alloy proton beam window (PBW) to one that utilizes aluminum for the window material. One of the key challenges to implementation of an aluminum PBW at the SNS was selection of an appropriate joining method to bond an aluminum window to the stainless steel bulk shielding of the PBW assembly. An explosively formed bond was selected as the most promising joining method for the aluminum PBW design. A testing campaign was conducted to evaluate the strength and efficacy of explosively formed bonds that were produced using two different interlayer materials: niobium and titanium. The characterization methods reported here include tensile testing, thermal-shock leak testing, optical microscopy, and advanced scanning electron microscopy. All tensile specimens examined failed in the aluminum interlayer and measured tensile strengths were all slightly greater than the native properties of the aluminum interlayer, while elongation values were all slightly lower. A leak developed in the test vessel with a niobium interlayer joint after repeated thermal-shock cycles, and was attributed to an extensive crack network that formed in a layer of niobium-rich intermetallics located on the bond interfaces of the niobium interlayer; the test vessel with a titanium interlayer did not develop a leak under the conditions tested. Due to the experience gained from these characterizations, the explosively formed bond with a titanium interlayer was selected for the aluminum PBW design at the SNS.

McClintock, David A [ORNL] [ORNL; Janney, Jim G [ORNL] [ORNL; Parish, Chad M [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

An electromagnetic and thermodynamic lumped parameter model of an explosively driven regenerative magnetohydrodynamic generator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to develop a simple, yet accurate, lumped parameter mathematical model for an explosively driven magnetohydrodynamic generator that can predict the pulse power variables of voltage and current from startup through regenerative operation. The inputs to the model will be the plasma properties entering the generator as predicted by the explosive shock model of Reference [1]. The strategy used was to simplify electromagnetic and thermodynamic three dimensional effects into a zero dimensional model. The model will provide a convenient tool for researchers to optimize designs to be used in pulse power applications. The model is validated using experimental data of Reference [1]. An overview of the operation of the explosively driven generator is first presented. Then a simplified electrical circuit model that describes basic performance of the device is developed. Then a lumped parameter model that incorporates the coupled electromagnetic and thermodynamic effects that govern generator performance is described and developed. The model is based on fundamental physical principles and parameters that were either obtained directly from design data or estimated from experimental data. The model was used to obtain parameter sensitivities and predict beyond the limits observed in the experiments to the levels desired by the potential Department of Defense sponsors. The model identifies process limitations that provide direction for future research.

Morrison, J.L.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Proceedings of the 2009 Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These proceedings contain papers prepared for the Monitoring Research Review 2009: Ground -Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies, held 21-23 September, 2009 in Tucson, Arizona,. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

Wetovsky, Marv A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Aguilar - Chang, Julio [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Anderson, Dale [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Arrowsmith, Marie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Arrowsmith, Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Baker, Diane [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Begnaud, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Harste, Hans [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Maceira, Monica [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Patton, Howard [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Phillips, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Randall, George [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rowe, Charlotte [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stead, Richard [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Steck, Lee [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Whitaker, Rod [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yang, Xiaoning ( David ) [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

425

Proceedings of the 2011 Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These proceedings contain papers prepared for the Monitoring Research Review 2011: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies, held 13-15 September, 2011 in Tucson, Arizona. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), National Science Foundation (NSF), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States' capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

Wetovsky, Marvin A. [Editor; Patterson, Eileen F. [Editor; Sandoval, Marisa N. [Editor

2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

426

Proceedings of the 2010 Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These proceedings contain papers prepared for the Monitoring Research Review 2010: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies, held 21-23 September, 2010 in Orlando, Florida,. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, National Science Foundation (NSF), Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

Wetovsky, Marvin A. [Editor; Patterson, Eileen F. [Editor

2010-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

427

Production of D-lactic acid from sugarcane bagasse using steam-explosion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study investigated the production of D-lactic acid from unutilized sugarcane bagasse using steam explosion pretreatment. The optimal steam pressure for a steaming time of 5 min was determined. By enzymatic saccharification using Meicellase, the highest recovery of glucose from raw bagasse, 73.7%, was obtained at a steam pressure of 20 atm. For residue washed with water after steam explosion, the glucose recovery increased up to 94.9% at a steam pressure of 20 atm. These results showed that washing with water is effective in removing enzymatic reaction inhibitors. After steam pretreatment (steam pressure of 20 atm), D-lactic acid was produced by Lactobacillus delbrueckii NBRC 3534 from the enzymatic hydrolyzate of steam-exploded bagasse and washed residue. The conversion rate of D-lactic acid obtained from the initial glucose concentration was 66.6% for the hydrolyzate derived from steam-exploded bagasse and 90.0% for that derived from the washed residue after steam explosion. These results also demonstrated that the hydrolyzate of steam-exploded bagasse (without washing with water) contains fermentation inhibitors and washing with water can remove them.

Chizuru Sasaki; Ryosuke Okumura; Ai Asakawa; Chikako Asada; Yoshitoshi Nakamura

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Photon and neutron interrogation techniques for chemical explosives detection in air cargo: A critical review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scanning cargo transported via aircraft ("air cargo") for explosive threats is a problem that, at present, lacks a comprehensive technical solution. While explosives detection in the baggage-scanning domain has a rich history that sheds light on potential solutions for air cargo, baggage scanning differs in several ways and thus one cannot look to the present array of technologies. Some contemporary solutions, like trace analysis, are not readily applied to cargo due to sampling challenges while the larger geometry of air cargo makes others less effective. This review article examines an array of interrogation techniques using photons and neutrons as incident particles. We first present a summary of the signatures and observables explosives provide and review how they have been exploited in baggage scanning. Following this is a description of the challenges posed by the air cargo application space. After considering interrogation sources, methods focused on transmission imaging, sub-surface examination and elemental characterization are described. It is our goal to shed light on the technical promise of each method while largely deferring questions that revolve around footprint, safety and conduct of operations. Our overarching intent is that a comprehensive understanding of potential techniques will foster development of a comprehensive solution.

Runkle, Robert C.; White, Timothy A.; Miller, Erin A.; Caggiano, Joseph A.; Collins, Brian A.

2009-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

429

Hydrodynamic Modeling of Air Blast Propagation from the Humble Redwood Chemical High Explosive Detonations Using GEODYN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two-dimensional axisymmetric hydrodynamic models were developed using GEODYN to simulate the propagation of air blasts resulting from a series of high explosive detonations conducted at Kirtland Air Force Base in August and September of 2007. Dubbed Humble Redwood I (HR-1), these near-surface chemical high explosive detonations consisted of seven shots of varying height or depth of burst. Each shot was simulated numerically using GEODYN. An adaptive mesh refinement scheme based on air pressure gradients was employed such that the mesh refinement tracked the advancing shock front where sharp discontinuities existed in the state variables, but allowed the mesh to sufficiently relax behind the shock front for runtime efficiency. Comparisons of overpressure, sound speed, and positive phase impulse from the GEODYN simulations were made to the recorded data taken from each HR-1 shot. Where the detonations occurred above ground or were shallowly buried (no deeper than 1 m), the GEODYN model was able to simulate the sound speeds, peak overpressures, and positive phase impulses to within approximately 1%, 23%, and 6%, respectively, of the actual recorded data, supporting the use of numerical simulation of the air blast as a forensic tool in determining the yield of an otherwise unknown explosion.

Chipman, V D

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

430

Partitioning of seismo-acoustic motions for near-surface explosions and yield estimation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Explosions near the Earths surface excite both atmospheric overpressure and seismic ground motions. The amplitudes of air-blast (and hence acoustic/infrasound) overpressures and seismic motions depend on the explosive yield as well as the height-of-burst (HOB for above ground emplacement) or depth-of-burial (DOB for buried emplacement). We present analysis of air-blast overpressures and seismic motions with the goal of developing methods for robust yield estimation for near-surface blasts. Our investigations are based on the HUMBLE REDWOOD set of chemical high-explosive tests at Kirkland Air Force Base in Albuquerque NM. We find that the air-blast positive phase impulse and seismic P-wave zero-to-peak displacement amplitude are robust estimators of yield. An empirical model for the amplitudes as a function of yield range and HOB/DOB is presented and allows estimation of yield and HOB/DOB given a set of air-blast and seismic measurements. We find that yield and HOB/DOB can be estimated simultaneously by combining air-blast and seismic measurements. Strong trade-offs between the amplitudes and the yield and HOB/DOB for a single measurement type inhibit accurate estimates. However simultaneous inversion of both overpressure and seismic measurements improve estimates justifying combined seismo-acoustic analysis.

Arthur Rodgers

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Proceedings of the 30th Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These proceedings contain papers prepared for the 30th Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies, held 23-25 September, 2008 in Portsmouth, Virginia. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Air Force Technical Applications Center (AFTAC), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

Wetovsky, Marv A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Aguilar-chang, Julio [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Arrowsmith, Marie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Arrowsmith, Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Baker, Diane [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Begnaud, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Harste, Hans [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Maceira, Monica [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Patton, Howard [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Phillips, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Randall, George [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Revelle, Douglas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rowe, Charlotte [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stead, Richard [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Steck, Lee [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Whitaker, Rod [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yang, Xiaoning [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

432

Thermonuclear explosion of rotating massive stars could explain core-collapse supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is widely thought that core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe), the explosions of massive stars following the collapse of the stars' iron cores, is obtained due to energy deposition by neutrinos. So far, this scenario was not demonstrated from first principles. Kushnir and Katz (2014) have recently shown, by using one-dimensional simulations, that if the neutrinos failed to explode the star, a thermonuclear explosion of the outer shells is possible for some (tuned) initial profiles. However, the energy released was small and negligible amounts of ejected $^{56}$Ni were obtained, implying that these one-dimensional collapse induced thermonuclear explosions (CITE) are unlikely to represent typical CCSNe. Here I provide evidence supporting a scenario in which the majority of CCSNe are the result of CITE. I use two-dimensional simulations to show that collapse of stars that include slowly (few percent of breakup) rotating $\\sim0.1-10\\,M_{\\odot}$ shells of mixed helium-oxygen, leads to an ignition of a thermonuclear d...

Kushnir, Doron

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Performance evaluation of booster materials in the plastic bonded explosive PBX 9502 in a hemispherical wave breakout test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An explosive booster is normally required to initiate detonation in an insensitive high explosive (lHE). Booster materials must be ignitable by a conventional detonator and deliver sufficient energy and favorable pulse shape to initiate the IHE charge. The explosive booster should be as insensitive as reasonably possible to maintain the overall safety margin of the explosive assembly. A hemispherical wave breakout test termed the on ionskin test is one of the methods of testing the performance of booster materials in an initiation train assembly. There are several variations of this basic test which are known by other names. In this test, the wave breakout time-position history at the surface of a hemispherical IHE acceptor charge is recorded, and the relative uniformity of breakout allows qualitative comparison between booster candidates and quantitative comparison of several metrics. The results of a series of onionskin experiments evaluating the performance of some new booster formulations in the triaminotrinitrobenzene (TA TB) -based plastic bonded explosive PBX 9502 will be presented. The boosters were tested in an onionskin arrangement in which the booster pellet was cylindrical, and the tests were performed at a temperature of-55{sup o}C to emphasize variations in spreading performance. The modification from the traditional hemispherical geometry facilitated efficient explosive fabrication and charge assembly, but the results indicate that this geometry was not ideal for several reasons. Despite the complications arising from geometry, promising performance was observed from booster formulations including 3,3' -diamino-4,4'azoxyfurazan.

Hooks, Daniel E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Morris, John S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hill, Larry G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Francois, Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Capabilities for high explosive pulsed power research at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research on topics requiring high magnetic fields and high currents have been pursued using high explosive pulsed power (HEPP) techniques since the 1950s at Los Alamos National Laboratory. We have developed many sophisticated HEPr systems through the years, and most of them depend on technology available from the nuclear weapons program. Through the 1980s and 1990s, our budgets would sustain parallel efforts in zpinch research using both HEPr and capacitor banks. In recent years, many changes have occurred that are driven by concerns such as safety, security, and environment, as well as reduced budgets and downsizing of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) complex due to the end of the cold war era. In this paper, we review the teclmiques developed to date, and adaptations that are driven by changes in budgets and our changing complex. One new Ranchero-based solid liner z-pinch experimental design is also presented. Explosives that are cast to shape instead of being machined, and initiation systems that depend on arrays of slapper detonators are important new tools. Some materials that are seen as hazardous to the environment are avoided in designs. The process continues to allow a wide range of research however, and there are few, if any, experiments that we have done in the past that could not be perform today. The HErr firing facility at Los Alamos continues to have a 2000 lb. high explosive limit, and our 2.4 MJ capacitor bank remains a mainstay of the effort. Modem diagnostic and data analysis capabilities allow fewer personnel to achieve better results, and in the broad sense we continue to have a robust capability.

Goforth, James H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oona, Henn [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tasker, Douglas G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kaul, A M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

A viscoplastic model of expanding cylindrical shells subjected to internal explosive detonations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Magnetic flux compression generators rely on the expansion of thin ductile shells to generate magnetic fields. These thin shells are filled with high explosives, which when detonated, cause the shell to expand to over 200% strain at strain-rates on the order of 10{sup 4} s{sup {minus}1}. Experimental data indicate the development and growth of multiple plastic instabilities which appear in a quasi-periodic pattern on the surfaces of the shells. These quasi-periodic instabilities are connected by localized zones of intense shear that are oriented approximately 45{degree} from the outward radial direction. The quasi-periodic instabilities continue to develop and eventually become through-cracks, causing the shell to fragment. A viscoplastic constitutive model is formulated to model the high strain-rate expansion and provide insight into the development of plastic instabilities. The formulation of the viscoplastic constitutive model includes the effects of shock heating and damage in the form of microvoid nucleation, growth, and coalescence in the expanding shell. This model uses the Johnson-Cook strength model with the Mie-Grueneisen equation of state and a modified Gurson yield surface. The constitutive model includes the modifications proposed by Tvergaard and the plastic strain controlled nucleation introduced by Neeleman. The constitutive model is implemented as a user material subroutine into ABAQUS/Explicit, which is a commercially available nonlinear explicit dynamic finite element program. A cylindrical shell is modeled using both axisymmetric and plane strain elements. Two experiments were conducted involving plane wave detonated, explosively filled, copper cylinders. Instability, displacement, and velocity data were recorded using a fast framing camera and a Fabry-Perot interferometer. Good agreement is shown between the numerical results and experimental data. An additional explosively bulged cylinder experiment was also performed and a photomicrograph of an instability is shown to provide a qualitative comparison between the experimental observations and the numerical predictions.

Martineau, R.L.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Laser pyrolysis of explosives combined with mass spectral studies of the ignition zone  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By combining a laser ignition technique with mass spectroscopic analysis we have developed a means of rapid determination of some of the molecules involved in the thermal ignition process of a high explosive. This technique also enables the study of how parameters such as initial gas pressure (0.15.0 MPa), type of gas (helium, air or nitrogen), laser wavelength (911 ?m), laser pulse width (1 ms?1 s) and laser power (10180 W) influence the production of major decomposition products (N2O, HCN, NO2, H2CO, NO and CO2) and some of the larger fragments in the reaction zone. It also permits the detection and identification of some of the larger molecule fragments involved in the ignition process. The experimental equipment consists mainly of a 180 W CO2 laser, an explosives test vessel, and a mass spectrometer. This paper describes in detail the techniques and apparatus used and gives an introductory study of the fast laser pyrolysis/laser ignition for 1,3,5-trinitrohexahydro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX). The combined laser ignition/mass spectroscopy method gives advantages over earlier pyrolysis-MS methods in that it permits us to follow the transition from a slow thermal decomposition to a self-sustained deflagration. The method also makes it possible to study these processes at elevated pressures (up to 5.0 MPa). In the RDX pre-ignition zone some decomposition intermediates were identified: triazine (C3N3H3) and possibly (CN)2. In the pre-ignition zone of RDX we have also identified both condensed-phase and gas-phase processes. In order to show the general applicability of the method results are also presented for other high explosives: HNS, PETN, TNT and Tetryl.

Henric stmark; Helena Bergman; Katrin Ekvall

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Recovering of dielectric constants of explosives via a globally strictly convex cost functional  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The inverse problem of estimating dielectric constants of explosives using boundary measurements of one component of the scattered electric field is addressed. It is formulated as a coefficient inverse problem for a hyperbolic differential equation. After applying the Laplace transform, a new cost functional is constructed and a variational problem is formulated. The key feature of this functional is the presence of the Carleman Weight Function for the Laplacian. The strict convexity of this functional on a bounded set in a Hilbert space of an arbitrary size is proven. This allows for establishing the global convergence of the gradient descent method. Some results of numerical experiments are presented.

Michael V. Klibanov; Nguyen Trung Thnh

2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

438

3-nitro-1,2,4-triazol-5-one, a less sensitive explosive  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A less sensitive explosive, 3-nitro-1,2,4-triazol-5-one. The compound 3-nitro-1,2,4-triazol-5-one (NTO) has a crystal density of 1.93 g/cm.sup.3 and calculated detonation velocity and pressure equivalent to those of RDX. It can be prepared in high yield from inexpensive starting materials in a safe synthesis. Results from initial small-scale sensitivity tests indicate that NTO is less sensitive than RDX and HMX in all respects. A 4.13 cm diameter, unconfined plate-dent test at 92% of crystal density gave the detonation pressure predicted for NTO by the BKW calculation.

Lee, Kien-Yin (Los Alamos, NM); Coburn, Michael D. (Los Alamos, NM)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Effects of Temperature and Humidity on the Characterization of C-4 Explosive Threats  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The amount of time that an explosive is present on the surface of a material is dependent upon the original amount of explosive on the surface, adhesive forces, temperature and humidity, as well as other environmental factors. This laboratory study focused on evaluating RDX crystal morphology changes resulting from variations in temperature and humidity conditions of the sample. The temperature and humidity conditions were controlled using a Tenney THRJ environmental chamber and a Tenney T11RC-1.5 environmental chamber. These chambers allow the temperature and humidity to be held within 3C and 5% RH. The temperature and humidity conditions used for this test series were: 40F/40%RH, ~70F/20%RH (samples left on benchtop), 70F/70%RH, 70F/95%RH, 95F/40%RH, 95F/70%RH, and 95F/95%RH. These temperature and humidity set points were chosen to represent a wide range of conditions that may be found in real world scenarios. C-4 (RDX crystals and binder material) was deposited on the surface of one of six substrates by placing a fingerprint from the explosive block onto the matrix surface. The substrates were chosen to provide a range of items that are commonly used. Six substrate types were used during these tests: 50% cotton/50% polyester as found in T-shirts, 100% cotton with a smooth surface such as that found in a cotton dress shirt, 100% cotton on a rough surface such as that found on canvas or denim, suede leather such as might be found on jackets, purses, or shoes, painted metal obtained from a junked car hood, and a computer diskette. The samples were not pre-cleaned prior to testing and contained sizing agents, and in the case of the metal: oil, dirt, scratches, and rust spots. The substrates were photographed at various stages of testing, using a Zeiss Discover V12 stereoscope with Axiocam ICc1 3 megapixel digital camera, to determine any changes in the crystalline morphology. Some of the samples were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) in an attempt to determine how the explosive was bound to the substrate.

C. J. Miller

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

A Safer Nuclear Enterprise - Application to Nuclear Explosive Safety (NES)(U)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Activities and infrastructure that support nuclear weapons are facing significant challenges. Despite an admirable record and firm commitment to make safety a primary criterion in weapons design, production, handling, and deployment - there is growing apprehension about terrorist acquiring weapons or nuclear material. At the NES Workshop in May 2012, Scott Sagan, who is a proponent of the normal accident cycle, presented. Whether a proponent of the normal accident cycle or High Reliability Organizations - we have to be diligent about our safety record. Constant vigilance is necessary to maintain our admirable safety record and commitment to Nuclear Explosive Safety.

Morris, Tommy J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "graaff confetti explosion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Chemical recovery process using break up steam control to prevent smelt explosions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improvement in a chemical recovery process in which a hot liquid smelt is introduced into a dissolving tank containing a pool of green liquor. The improvement comprises preventing smelt explosions in the dissolving tank by maintaining a first selected superatmospheric pressure in the tank during normal operation of the furnace; sensing the pressure in the tank; and further impinging a high velocity stream of steam upon the stream of smelt whenever the pressure in the tank decreases below a second selected superatmospheric pressure which is lower than said first pressure.

Kohl, Arthur L. (Woodland Hills, CA); Stewart, Albert E. (Eagle Rock, CA)

1988-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

442

Exploration of Coulomb explosion dynamics through excited vibrational states of molecules  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The fragmentation dynamics of H{sub 2}{sup +} molecular ions in intense laser fields is investigated by means of a high-precision ab initio method beyond the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. Special attention is paid to the detailed Coulomb explosion (CE) mechanisms and dynamics through excited vibrational states of H{sub 2}{sup +}. A kinetic-energy release (KER) spectrum and CE phenomenon is predicted, in which the kinetic-energy distribution of H{sup +} ions exhibits a series of peaks separated by one photon energy. A proposed scheme for observation of the KER spectrum and CE dynamics is presented.

Zhou Zhongyuan; Chu, Shih-I [Department of Chemistry, University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas 66045 (United States)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Evaluating chemical and physical properties of grain dust for use in an explosion hazard indicator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

0, um P 30. 0 40. 0 50. 0 FIG. l Hlnimum explosive concentration as a function of particle diameter and distance between particles, the highest levels measured at transfer points. From studies at Texas AFM University, Parnell and 8arton (1979... ) found dust levels in wheat and grain sorghum from a terminal elevator vary from 1000 to 5000 grams of dust less than 100 um per metric ton of grain (2 to 10 pounds per ton). Levels of dust in grain sorghum samples collected by Parnell (1981...

Plemons, Dorothy Sue

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

444

Improved Models of Stellar Core Collapse and Still no Explosions: What is Missing?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of stellar core-collapse with and without rotation are presented which for the first time were performed by solving the Boltzmann equation for the neutrino transport including a state-of-the-art description of neutrino interactions. Although convection develops below the neutrinosphere and in the neutrino-heated region behind the supernova shock, the models do not explode. This suggests missing physics, possibly with respect to the nuclear equation of state and weak interactions in the subnuclear regime. However, it might also indicate a fundamental problem of the neutrino-driven explosion mechanism.

R. Buras; M. Rampp; H. -Th. Janka; K. Kifonidis

2003-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

445

Interaction of explosively driven dense plasmas with a low-intensity laser radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The results of first experiments on reflectivity of polarized light on an explosively driven dense xenon plasma are presented. The study of polarized reflectivity properties of the plasma was accomplished using a laser light of wavelength ? = 1064 nm and at incident angles ? = 030. With density ? = 2.7 g cm?3, pressure P = 10.5 GPa and temperatures up to T ~ 3?104 K of the investigated plasma, conditions with strong Coulomb interaction (the nonideality parameter up to ? ~ 2.0) were present. Reflectivities, which were calculated via the Helmholtz equation incorporating a density profile for the plasma surface, are compared to the experimental results.

Yu Zaporozhets; V Mintsev; V Gryaznov; V Fortov; H Reinholz; G Rpke

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Models for close-in atmospheric dispersion, explosive releases, and particle deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Relatively simple models are presented to simulate close-in atmospheric dispersion, explosive releases, and particle deposition. Close-in generally refers to distances less than 50 m downwind from the source. These models assume simple gas dispersion (no chemical reactions, neutral buoyancy) and that particles behave as a gas expect they can be removed from the plume by a simple, deposition-velocity mechanism. These models have been combined into a QuickBASIC program (INEXPLC.BAS) and its PC executable form (INEXPLC.EXE). These programs, along with sample input and output files, are available from the author.

Bloom, S.G.

1993-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

447

Infrared near-field spectroscopy of trace explosives using an external cavity quantum cascade laser  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Utilizing a broadly-tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser for scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM), we measure infrared spectra of explosives particles by probing characteristic nitro-group resonances in the 7.1-7.9 m wavelength range. Measurements are presented with spectral resolution of 0.25 cm-1, spatial resolution of 25 nm, <100 attomolar sensitivity, and at a rapid acquisition time of 90 s per spectrum. We demonstrate high reproducibility of the acquired s-SNOM spectra with very high signal-to-noise ratios and relative noise of <0.02 in self-homodyne detection.

Craig, Ian M.; Taubman, Matthew S.; Lea, Alan S.; Phillips, Mark C.; Josberger, Erik E.; Raschke, Markus Bernd

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

448

Explosions of O-Ne-Mg Cores, the Crab Supernova, and Subluminous Type II-P Supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present results of simulations of stellar collapse and explosions in spherical symmetry for progenitor stars in the 8-10 solar mass range with an O-Ne-Mg core. The simulations were continued until nearly one second after core bounce and were performed with the Prometheus/Vertex code with a variable Eddington factor solver for the neutrino transport, including a state-of-the-art treatment of neutrino-matter interactions. Particular effort was made to implement nuclear burning and electron capture rates with sufficient accuracy to ensure a smooth continuation, without transients, from the progenitor evolution to core collapse. Using two different nuclear equations of state (EoSs), a soft version of the Lattimer & Swesty EoS and the significantly stiffer Wolff & Hillebrandt EoS, we found no prompt explosions, but instead delayed explosions, powered by neutrino heating and the neutrino-driven baryonic wind which sets in about 200 ms after bounce. The models eject little nickel ( 0.46, which suggests a chemical composition that is not in conflict with galactic abundances. No low-entropy matter with Ye << 0.5 is ejected. This excludes such explosions as sites of a low-entropy r-process. The low explosion energy and nucleosynthetic implications are compatible with the observed properties of the Crab supernova, and the small nickel mass supports the possibility that our models explain some subluminous Type II-P supernovae.

F. S. Kitaura; H. -Th. Janka; W. Hillebrandt

2005-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

449

Comparison of explosive and vibroseis source energy penetration during COCORP deep seismic reflection profiling in the Williston basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Comparison of high-fold (50) vibroseis recordings with coincident low-fold (6) explosive source data from deep reflection surveys in the Williston Basin indicates that while vibroseis generated energy decays to ambient noise levels at 7--9 s two-way traveltime (twtt) (20--30 km depth), energy from explosive sources remains above ambient levels to 35--60 s twtt (105--180 km depth). Moreover, single, moderately sized (30 kg) and well-placed charges proved to be as effective as larger (90 kg) sources at penetrating to mantle traveltimes in this area. However, the explosive source energy proved highly variable, with source-to-ground coupling being a major limiting factor in shot efficacy. Stacked results from the vibroseis sources provide superior imagery of shallow and moderate crustal levels by virtue of greater redundancy and shot-to-shot uniformity; shot statics, low fold, and ray-path distortion across the relatively large (24--30 km aperture) spreads used during the explosive recording have proven to be especially problematic in producing conventional seismic sections. In spite of these complications, the explosive source recording served its primary purpose in confirming Moho truncation and the presence of a dipping reflection fabric in the upper mantle along the western flank of the Trans-Hudson orogen buried beneath the Williston Basin.

Steer, D.N.; Brown, L.D.; Knapp, J.H.; Baird, D.J. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)] [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Pilot-scale pressurized base hydrolysis of HMX plastic-bonded explosives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A pilot-scale, pressurized, base hydrolysis reactor has been designed and its construction is nearly completed. Up to 120 L of 1--6 M NaOH aqueous solutions will convert as much as 25 kg of consolidated, explosive pieces to non-energetic compounds. Temperatures approaching 155 C in the pressurized unit will reduce reaction times significantly for the destruction of plastic-bonded explosives compared to previous atmospheric-pressure reactors. The hydrolysis effluent is then pumped into a holding tank where it is fed into a hydrothermal oxidation reactor for complete destruction to non-hazardous products. The hydrothermal unit operates at 480 C and 100 MPa and hydrogen peroxide fed into the reactor at two points will ensure complete destruction of all organic species and nitrogen-containing salts. The entire system is comprised of eight major components and is assembled on five separate and transportable skids. Following construction and preliminary testing at Los Alamos National Laboratory, the unit will be shipped to the Pantex Plant where it will be used for continuous demilitarization activities.

Larson, S.A.; Brewer, G.R.; Harradine, D.M.; Polston, C.E.; Le, L.A.; Bishop, R.L.; Dell`Orco, P.C.; Flesner, R.L.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

451

Effects of binder concentration on the properties of plastic-bonded explosives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of plastic-bonded explosives (PBX) has been formulated with more binder than is normally contained in high-energy formulations. Adding a relatively small amount of binder to a material such as PBX 9501 (95/2.5/1.25/1.25 wt % HMX/Estane/BDNPA/BDNPF (the BDNPA and BDNPF form a eutectic that is frequently called simply the eutectic)) was found to decrease the shock sensitivity while not decreasing the energy of the explosive. The best compromise for a PBX 9501-type material contains about 92 wt % HMX. Adding additional binder does not continue to decrease the gap sensitivity of the formulation; however, the energy of the PBX decreases as expected. The higher-binder formulations are of potential use because of the possibility of formulating a PBX with energy similar to TATB formulations, such as PBX 9502 (95/5 wt % TATB/Kel-F 800), and with a higher strain to failure. 2 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Steele, R.D.; Stretz, L.A.; Taylor, G.W.; Rivera, T.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

High explosives vapor detection by atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization/tandem mass spectrometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The combination of atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization with tandem mass spectrometry for the detection of traces of high explosives is described. Particular emphasis is placed on use of the quadrupole ion trap as the type of tandem mass spectrometer. Atmospheric sampling glow discharge provides a simple, rugged, and efficient means for anion formation while the quadrupole ion trap provides for efficient tandem mass spectrometry. Mass selective ion accumulation and non-specific ion activation methods can be used to overcome deleterious effects arising from ion/ion interactions. Such interactions constitute the major potential technical barrier to the use of the ion trap for real-time monitoring of targeted compounds in uncontrolled and highly variable matrices. Tailored waveforms can be used to effect both mass selective ion accumulation and ion activation. Concatenated tailored waveforms allow for both functions in a single experiment thereby providing the capability for monitoring several targeted species simultaneously. The combination of atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization with a state-of-the-art analytical quadrupole ion trap is a highly sensitive and specific detector for traces of high explosives. The combination is also small and inexpensive relative to virtually any other form of tandem mass spectrometry. The science and technology underlying the glow discharge/ion trap combination is sufficiently mature to form the basis for an engineering effort to make the detector portable. 85 refs.

McLuckey, S.A.; Goeringer, D.E.; Asano, K.G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical and Analytical Sciences Div.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Free-radical reactions in glow and explosion of carbon monoxide-oxygen mixtures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Examination of published compilations of rate coefficients of free-radical reactions yields reactions that are associated with chain branching in mixtures of CO and O/sub 2/ and small quantities of hydrogen or water vapor. The complete mechanism included diffusion of HO/sub 2/ radicals to the vessel wall and their adsorption and reaction at the surface. This mechanism is applied to the data of E.J. Buckler and R.G.W. Norrish on the branched-chain explosion of CO-O/sub 2/ mixtures containing H/sub 2/ in the order of 1 mm Hg. Substantial agreement is found between theory and experiment. Further, the mechanism is applied to experiments of Bond, Gray, and Griffiths with an H/sub 2/ content of 0.01-0.05 mm Hg. By specifying details of the adsorption and surface reaction of HO/sub 2/ on the basis of Langmuir's adsorption the phenomenon of flow is explained and the regions of slow reaction, glow, and explosion are described in accord with the experimental data. It is confirmed that the reaction between CO and O/sub 2/ requires the presence of a hydrogenous compound such as H/sub 2/, H/sub 2/O, CH/sub 4/, etc., and that ''dry'' homogenous reaction is not possible except at very high temperatures.

Von Elbe, G.; Lewis, B.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Time-resolved spectroscopic studies of detonating heterogeneous explosives. [HMX and HNS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Emission spectroscopy and pulsed-laser-excited Raman scattering methods have been applied to the study of detonating heterogeneous explosives, including PETN, HMX and HNS. Time-resolved spectra of emission from detonating HNS show the evolution of features due to electronically-excited radical species. For HNS, the CN(B-X) system near 388 nm has been studied at a wavelength resolution of 0.5 A. Boltzmann vibrational temperatures have been calculated by comparing the experimental data with computer-simulated spectra. These temperatures are consistent with the expected trend of detonation temperature as a function of charge density. Using 532-nm laser excitation, single-pulse Raman scattering measurements have been made at the free surface of detonating HMX and PETN samples. Monotonic attenuation of Raman scattering intensity over a 100-ns interval is observed after detonation front arrival at the free surface. Depletion of the Raman signal occurs prior to significant loss of the scattered laser light. The significance of the Raman measurements as a possible probe of reaction zone length in detonating explosives is discussed. 21 refs., 11 figs.

Trott, W.M.; Renlund, A.M.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Astrophysical Shrapnel: Discriminating Among Near-Earth Stellar Explosion Sources of Live Radioactive Isotopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the production and deposition on Earth of isotopes with half-lives in the range 10$^{5}$ to 10$^{8}$ years that might provide signatures of nearby stellar explosions, extending previous analyses of Core-Collapse Supernovae (CCSNe) to include Electron-Capture Supernovae (ECSNe), Super-Asymptotic Giant Branch (SAGBs) stars, Thermonuclear/Type Ia Supernovae (TNSNe), and Kilonovae/Neutron Star Mergers (KNe). We revisit previous estimates of the $^{60}$Fe and $^{26}$Al signatures, and extend these estimates to include $^{244}$Pu and $^{53}$Mn. We discuss interpretations of the $^{60}$Fe signals in terrestrial and lunar reservoirs in terms of a nearby stellar ejection ~2.2 Myr ago, showing that (i) the $^{60}$Fe yield rules out the TNSN and KN interpretations, (ii) highly constrain a SAGB interpretation but do not completely them rule out, (iii) are consistent with a CCSN origin, and (iv) are highly compatible with an ECSN interpretation. Future measurements could resolve the radioisotope deposition over time, and we use the Sedov blast wave solution to illustrate possible time-resolved profiles. Measuring such profiles would independently probe the blast properties including distance, and would provide additional constraints the nature of the explosion.

Brian J. Fry; Brian D. Fields; John R. Ellis

2015-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

456

Environmental implications of explosive ordnance disposal open burn/open detonation operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Army created their first Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) teams in 1941, primarily to deal with the possibility of unexploded ordnance in occupied areas. Training with the British, who had developed a strong EOD program in response to the air raids on their cities and military installations, the Army teams concentrated on the safety of the technician and the local population. The gradual advent of Environmental laws since the 1970s was largely unnoticed by the EOD community, whose operatives continued to value safety over environmental considerations. Now, the Army is faced with sites throughout the country that were used as EOD areas or impact areas that need to be investigated and decontaminated before installations are turned over for public use. Records of the OB/OD activities conducted on these ranges are often sketchy or nonexistent, since the personnel performing the work were not required to keep detailed records. To develop the site investigation or initiate closure plans needed to clean these areas, it is necessary to know how EOD operations historically have been conducted. The specific methods which have been used by EOD technicians for the past 50 years vary by the types of explosives available and the types of munitions to be disposed of. The residues left by the operation would therefore vary, which would change the methods by which a site investigation should be conducted.

Steen, C. [EMCON Alaska, Inc., Anchorage, AK (United States); Seutter, C.C. [Explosive Disposal Engineering and Technology, Wasilla, AK (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

457

Relativistic Collapse and Explosion of Rotating Supermassive Stars with Thermonuclear Effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present results of general relativistic simulations of collapsing supermassive stars with and without rotation using the two-dimensional general relativistic numerical code Nada, which solves the Einstein equations written in the BSSN formalism and the general relativistic hydrodynamic equations with high-resolution shock-capturing schemes. These numerical simulations use an equation of state that includes the effects of gas pressure and, in a tabulated form, those associated with radiation and the electron-positron pairs. We also take into account the effect of thermonuclear energy released by hydrogen and helium burning. We find that objects with a mass of ?5 ? 105 M ? and an initial metallicity greater than Z CNO ? 0.007 do explode if non-rotating, while the threshold metallicity for an explosion is reduced to Z CNO ? 0.001 for objects uniformly rotating. The critical initial metallicity for a thermonuclear explosion increases for stars with a mass ?106 M ?. For those stars that do not explode, we follow the evolution beyond the phase of black hole (BH) formation. We compute the neutrino energy loss rates due to several processes that may be relevant during the gravitational collapse of these objects. The peak luminosities of neutrinos and antineutrinos of all flavors for models collapsing to a BH are L ? ~ 1055 erg s1. The total radiated energy in neutrinos varies between E ? ~ 1056 erg for models collapsing to a BH and E ? ~ 1045-1046 erg for models exploding.

Pedro J. Montero; Hans-Thomas Janka; Ewald Mller

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Inspecting the minefield and residual explosives by fast neutron activation method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As an upgrade of a robotic mobile system for antipersonnel land-mine clearance, a fast neutron probe has been considered for the detection of mines and explosive residues. Laboratory tests were made by using the 14 MeV 6 x 10{sup 7} neutrons/sec beam with the associated alpha particle detection and with a LaBr{sub 3} gamma ray detector. Simulant of the anti-personal mine was used as a target. Several measurements were made with the target buried into the soil at different depths. For each depth minimal time measurement was estimated for false negative 0.4 % and false positive equal to 10 %. Tests showed that is possible to detect buried land-mine as well as residual explosives; however, in order to reach the optimal speed of 10 cm/s for de-mining vehicle it is necessarily to use several sealed tube neutron generators and few tens of LaBr{sub 3} gamma ray detectors. (authors)

Sudac, D. [Rudjer Boskovic Inst., Bijenicka c. 54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Majetic, S. [DOK-ING Ltd., Kanalski put 1, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Kollar, R. [A.C.T. D.o.o., Prilesje 4, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Nad, K.; Obhodas, J. [Rudjer Boskovic Inst., Bijenicka c. 54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Valkovic, V. [A.C.T. D.o.o., Prilesje 4, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Metallurgical failure analysis of a propane tank boiling liquid expanding vapor explosion (BLEVE).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A severe fire and explosion occurred at a propane storage yard in Truth or Consequences, N.M., when a truck ran into the pumping and plumbing system beneath a large propane tank. The storage tank emptied when the liquid-phase excess flow valve tore out of the tank. The ensuing fire engulfed several propane delivery trucks, causing one of them to explode. A series of elevated-temperature stress-rupture tears developed along the top of a 9800 L (2600 gal) truck-mounted tank as it was heated by the fire. Unstable fracture then occurred suddenly along the length of the tank and around both end caps, along the girth welds connecting the end caps to the center portion of the tank. The remaining contents of the tank were suddenly released, aerosolized, and combusted, creating a powerful boiling liquid expanding vapor explosion (BLEVE). Based on metallography of the tank pieces, the approximate tank temperature at the onset of the BLEVE was determined. Metallurgical analysis of the ruptured tank also permitted several hypotheses regarding BLEVE mechanisms to be evaluated. Suggestions are made for additional work that could provide improved predictive capabilities regarding BLEVEs and for methods to decrease the susceptibility of propane tanks to BLEVEs.

Kilgo, Alice C.; Eckelmeyer, Kenneth Hall; Susan, Donald Francis

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Single Guided Mode Theory of Long Range Infrasonic Propagation from Nuclear Explosions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The trend of research on the problem of giving an adequate theoretical interpretation to the pressure waveforms recorded following nuclear explosions has been towards progressively more realistic models of the atmosphere resulting in lengthy numerical computations to determine and superimpose the atmosphere's natural modes of guided propagation. Such computations and existing data indicate that the earliest portion of such waveforms may be attributed to a pseudomode analogous to that predicted by Lamb for the isothermal atmosphere. Recently Bretherton and Garrett have succeeded in isolating and deriving the dispersion relation for this mode using perturbation techniques. In the present paper this analysis is extended with the derivation of an approximate set of partial differential equations not involving height which include the effects of winds horizontal gradients and nonlinearities and which may be considered as governing the two?dimensional propagation over the earth's surface of the Lamb mode. The solution for nuclear explosion excitation is given for the case of a stratified atmosphere with farfield nonlinear effects neglected and is compared with numerical computations based on the multimode theory.

Allan D. Pierce

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "graaff confetti explosion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Relativistic collapse and explosion of rotating supermassive stars with thermonuclear effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present results of general relativistic simulations of collapsing supermassive stars with and without rotation using the two-dimensional general relativistic numerical code Nada, which solves the Einstein equations written in the BSSN formalism and the general relativistic hydrodynamics equations with high resolution shock capturing schemes. These numerical simulations use an equation of state which includes effects of gas pressure, and in a tabulated form those associated with radiation and the electron-positron pairs. We also take into account the effect of thermonuclear energy released by hydrogen and helium burning. We find that objects with a mass of 5x10^{5} solar mass and an initial metallicity greater than Z_{CNO}~0.007 do explode if non-rotating, while the threshold metallicity for an explosion is reduced to Z_{CNO}~0.001 for objects uniformly rotating. The critical initial metallicity for a thermonuclear explosion increases for stars with mass ~10^{6} solar mass. For those stars that do not explode we follow the evolution beyond the phase of black hole formation. We compute the neutrino energy loss rates due to several processes that may be relevant during the gravitational collapse of these objects. The peak luminosities of neutrinos and antineutrinos of all flavors for models collapsing to a BH are ~10^{55} erg/s. The total radiated energy in neutrinos varies between ~10^{56} ergs for models collapsing to a BH, and ~10^{45}-10^{46} ergs for models exploding.

Pedro J. Montero; Hans-Thomas Janka; Ewald Mueller

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Sensitivity study of explosive nucleosynthesis in type Ia supernovae: Modification of individual thermonuclear reaction rates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Background: Type Ia supernovae contribute significantly to the nucleosynthesis of many Fe-group and intermediate-mass elements. However, the robustness of nucleosynthesis obtained via models of this class of explosions has not been studied in depth until now.Purpose: We explore the sensitivity of the nucleosynthesis resulting from thermonuclear explosions of massive white dwarfs with respect to uncertainties in nuclear reaction rates. We put particular emphasis on indentifying the individual reactions rates that most strongly affect the isotopic products of these supernovae.Method: We have adopted a standard one-dimensional delayed detonation model of the explosion of a Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf and have postprocessed the thermodynamic trajectories of every mass shell with a nucleosynthetic code to obtain the chemical composition of the ejected matter. We have considered increases (decreases) by a factor of 10 on the rates of 1196 nuclear reactions (simultaneously with their inverse reactions), repeating the nucleosynthesis calculations after modification of each reaction rate pair. We have computed as well hydrodynamic models for different rates of the fusion reactions of 12C and of 16O. From the calculations we have selected the reactions that have the largest impact on the supernova yields, and we have computed again the nucleosynthesis using two or three alternative prescriptions for their rates, taken from the JINA REACLIB database. For the three reactions with the largest sensitivity we have analyzed as well the temperature ranges where a modification of their rates has the strongest effect on nucleosynthesis.Results: The nucleosynthesis resulting from the type Ia supernova models is quite robust with respect to variations of nuclear reaction rates, with the exception of the reaction of fusion of two 12C nuclei. The energy of the explosion changes by less than ?4% when the rates of the reactions 12C+12C or 16O+16O are multiplied by a factor of 10 or 0.1. The changes in the nucleosynthesis owing to the modification of the rates of these fusion reactions are also quite modest; for instance, no species with a mass fraction larger than 0.02 experiences a variation of its yield larger than a factor of 2. We provide the sensitivity of the yields of the most abundant species with respect to the rates of the most intense reactions with protons, neutrons, and ?. In general, the yields of Fe-group nuclei are more robust than the yields of intermediate-mass elements. Among the species with yields larger than 10?8M?, 35S has the largest sensitivity to the nuclear reaction rates. It is remarkable that the reactions involving elements with Z>22 have a tiny influence on the supernova nucleosynthesis. Among the charged-particle reactions, the most influential on supernova nucleosynthesis are 30Si+p?31P+?, 20Ne+??24Mg+?, and 24Mg+??27Al+p. The temperatures at which a modification of their rate has a larger impact are in the range 2?T?4 GK.Conclusions: The explosion model (i.e., the assumed conditions and propagation of the flame) chiefly determines the element production of type Ia supernovae and derived quantities such as their luminosity, while the nuclear reaction rates used in the simulations have a small influence on the kinetic energy and final chemical composition of the ejecta. Our results show that the uncertainty in individual thermonuclear reaction rates cannot account for discrepancies of a factor of 2 between isotopic ratios in type Ia supernovae and those in the solar system, especially within the Fe group.

Eduardo Bravo and Gabriel Martnez-Pinedo

2012-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

463

Regional mb: Ms, Lg/Pg amplitude ratios and Lg spectral ratios as criteria for distinguishing between earthquakes and explosions: a theoretical study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......among small-magnitude events on Nevada Test Site, Geophys. J. R. astr. Soc...separation of explosions in the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and nearby earthquakes...use data for explosions at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and therefore the crustal......

R. C. Lilwall

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

DOE-STD-1185-2004; Nuclear Explosive Safety Study Functional Area Qualification Standard  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

STD-1185-2004 STD-1185-2004 August 2004 DOE STANDARD NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE SAFETY STUDY FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1185-2004 i This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-STD-1185-2004

465

3-nitro-1,2,4-triazol-5-one: A less sensitive explosive  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A less sensitive explosive, 3-nitro-1,2,4-triazol-5-one. The compound 3-nitro--1,2,4-triazol-5-one (NTO) has a crystal density of 1.93 g/cm/sup 3/ and calculated detonation velocity and pressure equivalent to those of RDX. It can be prepared in high yield from inexpensive starting materials in a safe synthesis. Results from initial small-scale sensitivity tests indicate that NTO is less sensitive than RDX and HMX in all respects. A 4.13 cm diameter, unconfined plate-dent test at 92% of crystal density gave the detonation pressure predicted for NTO by the BKW calculation. 3 tabs.

Lee, Kien-Yin; Coburn, M.D.

1987-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

466

A logic model for cook-off phenomenology in high explosives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Logic models are valuable tools in the development of predictive models for complex physical processes. The use of deductive logic in the form of a possibility tree makes it straightforward to develop a comprehensive set of unique, alternative paths that describe the system. We demonstrate the power of this approach for the complex process of cook-off of high explosives (HE). The possibility tree describes the causal paths from heating HE to the alternative end states. One of these end states is a violent reaction. Conversion of the tree to the equivalent digraph yields a valuable visualization tool for examining the relationships between sub-processes and provides a sound framework for the development of analytical models.

Eisenhawer, S. W. (Stephen W.); Bott, T. F. (Terrence F.); Luck, L. B.; Kingson, J.; Key, B. P. (Brian P.)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Environmental assessment of the thermal neutron activation explosive detection system for concourse use at US airports  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is an environmental assessment of a system designed to detect the presence of explosives in checked airline baggage or cargo. The system is meant to be installed at the concourse or lobby ticketing areas of US commercial airports and uses a sealed radioactive source of californium-252 to irradiate baggage items. The major impact of the use of this system arises from direct exposure of the public to scattered or leakage radiation from the source and to induced radioactivity in baggage items. Under normal operation and the most likely accident scenarios, the environmental impacts that would be created by the proposed licensing action would not be significant. 44 refs., 19 figs., 18 tabs.

Jones, C.G.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Gamma-Ray Bursts: Super-Explosions in the Universe and Related High-Energy Phenomena  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The recent progress in studies of gamma-ray bursts, their afterglows, and host galaxies is discussed. The emphasis is given to high-energy phenomena associated with gamma-ray burst explosions: high-energy cosmic rays, neutrinos, gravitational waves. We also show how the relativistic fireball model for GRBs can be used to constrain modern theories of large and infinite extra-dimensions. In particular, in the frame of 5D gravity with the Standard Model localized on 3D brane (Dvali et al. 2000), the very existence of relativistic fireballs of $\\sim 10^{53}$ ergs puts the lower bound on the quantum gravity scale $\\sim 0.1$ eV.

K. A. Postnov

2001-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

469

Nuclear Rocket Test Facility Decommissioning Including Controlled Explosive Demolition of a Neutron-Activated Shield Wall  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site, the Test Cell A Facility was used in the 1960s for the testing of nuclear rocket engines, as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Program. The facility was decontaminated and decommissioned (D&D) in 2005 using the Streamlined Approach For Environmental Restoration (SAFER) process, under the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Utilities and process piping were verified void of contents, hazardous materials were removed, concrete with removable contamination decontaminated, large sections mechanically demolished, and the remaining five-foot, five-inch thick radiologically-activated reinforced concrete shield wall demolished using open-air controlled explosive demolition (CED). CED of the shield wall was closely monitored and resulted in no radiological exposure or atmospheric release.

Michael Kruzic

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Spiral Disk Instability Can Drive Thermonuclear Explosions in Binary White Dwarf Mergers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermonuclear, or Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), originate from the explosion of carbon-oxygen white dwarfs, and serve as standardizable cosmological candles. However, despite their importance, the nature of the progenitor systems which give rise to SNe Ia has not been hitherto elucidated. Observational evidence favors the double-degenerate channel, in which merging white dwarf binaries lead to SNe Ia. Furthermore, significant discrepancies exist between observations and theory, and to date, there has been no self-consistent merger model which yields a SNe Ia. Here we show that a spiral mode instability in the accretion disk formed during a binary white dwarf merger leads to a detonation on a dynamical timescale. This mechanism sheds light on how white dwarf mergers may frequently yield SNe Ia.

Kashyap, Rahul; Garca-Berro, Enrique; Aznar-Sigun, Gabriela; Ji, Suoqing; Lorn-Aguilar, Pablo

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Hybrid similarity measure for case retrieval in CBR and its application to emergency response towards gas explosion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Case retrieval is a primary step in case-based reasoning (CBR). It is important to measure the similarity between each historical case and the target case during the case retrieval process. In recent years, some methods for similarity measure with multiple ... Keywords: Attribute value, Case retrieval, Case-based reasoning (CBR), Emergency response, Gas explosion, Hybrid similarity

Zhi-Ping Fan; Yong-Hai Li; Xiaohuan Wang; Yang Liu

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Fabrication of Optical Fiber Mechanical Shock Sensors for the Los Alamos HERT (High Explosive Radio Telemetry) Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document lists the requirements for the fiber optic mechanical shock sensor for the Los Alamos HERT (High Explosive Radio Telemetry) project and provides detailed process steps for fabricating, testing, and assembling the fiber shock sensors for delivery to Los Alamos.

P. E. Klingsporn

2005-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

473

Shock-heating of stellar envelopes: a possible common mechanism at the origin of explosions and eruptions in massive stars  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......generally, the low binding energy of massive-star envelopes...example. The origin of the energy deposition that we artificially...explosion or to a fizzle. Alternative sources in massive stars...objects with low binding energy, they may still be of...massive stars such as Car (not directly addressed......

Luc Dessart; Eli Livne; Roni Waldman

2010-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

474

2-D axisymmetric calculations of surface waves generated by an explosion in an island, mountain and sedimentary basin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......modelled after Yucca Valley at the Nevada Test Site. In order to include finer details...geologic structure on Yucca Flats, Nevada Test Site, explosion waveforms: two-dimensional...from East Kazakh, Amchitka and Nevada Test Sites, AFGL-TR-86-0043.. Stevens......

J. L. Stevens; K. L. McLaughlin; B. Shkoller; S. M. Day

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Lord Justice of Appeal John Fletcher Moulton and explosives production in World War I: the mathematical mind triumphant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...disclosed the true costs of manufacturing...prewar toluene production. When gas companies distilled...at 47% of the cost of the year before...at 40% of the cost of imported TNT...in explosive production had been surmounted...supplying poisonous gases. Their irrational...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Explosive basaltic volcanism of the Chikurachki Volcano (Kurile arc, Russia): Insights on pre-eruptive magmatic conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Explosive basaltic volcanism of the Chikurachki Volcano (Kurile arc, Russia): Insights on pre-Sakhalinsk, Russia d Institute of Volcanic Geology and Geochemistry, 683006 Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky, Russia e Vernadsky Institute of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry, 117975 Moscow, Russia Received 13 December

Belousov, Alexander

477

Honey bees (Apis mellifera) as explosives detectors: exploring proboscis extension reflex conditioned response to trinitrotolulene (TNT)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We examined honey bee's associative learning response to conditioning with trinitrotolulene (TNT) vapor concentrations generated at three temperatures and their ability to be reconditioned after a 24 h period. We used classical conditioning of the proboscis extension (PER) in honey bees using TNT vapors as the conditioned stimulus and sucrose as the unconditioned stimulus. We conducted fifteen experimental trials with an explosives vapor generator set at 43 C, 25 C and 5 C, producing three concentrations of explosives (1070 ppt, 57 ppt, and 11 ppt). Our objective was to test the honey bee's ability to exhibit a conditioned response to TNT vapors at all three concentrations by comparing the mean percentage of honey bees successfully exhibiting a conditioned response within each temperature group. Furthermore, we conducted eight experimental trials to test the honey bee's ability to retain their ability to exhibit a conditioned response to TNT after 24h period by comparing the mean percentage of honey bees with a conditioned response TNT on the first day compared to the percentage of honey bees with a conditioned response to TNT on the second day. Results indicate that there was no significant difference between the mean percentage of honey bees with a conditioned response to TNT vapors between three temperature groups. There was a significant difference between the percentage of honey bees exhibiting conditioned response on the first day of training compared to the percentage of honey bees exhibiting conditioned response 24 h after training. Our experimental results indicate that honey bees can be trained to exhibit a conditioned response to a range of TNT concentrations via PER However, it appears that the honey bee's ability to retain the conditioned response to TNT vapors after 24h significantly decreases.

Taylor-mccabe, Kirsten J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wingo, Robert M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Haarmann, Timothy K [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Sensitivity study of explosive nucleosynthesis in Type Ia supernovae: I. Modification of individual thermonuclear reaction rates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We explore the sensitivity of the nucleosynthesis due to type Ia supernovae with respect to uncertainties in nuclear reaction rates. We have adopted a standard one-dimensional delayed detonation model of the explosion of a Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf, and have post-processed the thermodynamic trajectories of every mass-shell with a nucleosynthetic code, with increases (decreases) by a factor of ten on the rates of 1196 nuclear reactions. We have computed as well hydrodynamic models for different rates of the fusion reactions of 12C and of 16O. For selected reactions, we have recomputed the nucleosynthesis with alternative prescriptions for their rates taken from the JINA REACLIB database, and have analyzed the temperature ranges where modifications of their rates have the strongest effect on nucleosynthesis. The nucleosynthesis resulting from the Type Ia supernova models is quite robust with respect to variations of nuclear reaction rates, with the exception of the reaction of fusion of 12C nuclei. The energy of the explosion changes by less than \\sim4%. The changes in the nucleosynthesis due to the modification of the rates of fusion reactions are as well quite modest, for instance no species with a mass fraction larger than 0.02 experiences a variation of its yield larger than a factor of two. We provide the sensitivity of the yields of the most abundant species with respect to the rates of the most intense reactions with protons, neutrons, and alphas. In general, the yields of Fe-group nuclei are more robust than the yields of intermediate-mass elements. Among the charged particle reactions, the most influential on supernova nucleosynthesis are 30Si + p \\rightleftarrows 31P + {\\gamma}, 20Ne + {\\alpha} \\rightleftarrows 24Mg + {\\gamma}, and 24Mg + {\\alpha} \\rightleftarrows 27Al + p. The temperatures at which a modification of their rate has a larger impact are in the range 2 < T < 4 GK. (abridged)

Eduardo Bravo; Gabriel Martnez-Pinedo

2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

479

Forensic analyses of explosion debris from the January 2, 1992 Pd/D{sub 2}O electrochemistry incident at SRI International  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The January 2, 1992 explosion in an electrochemistry laboratory at SRI International (SRI) resulted in the death of scientist Andrew Riley, and gained some notoriety due to its association with experimental work in the controversial field of cold fusion research. Selected components of explosion debris were subjected to forensic analyses at LLNL to elucidate potential causes of, or contributing factors to, the explosion. Interrogation of the debris by LLNL encompassed nuclear, chemical, physical, and materials investigations. Nuclear studies for the determination of tritium and neutron-activation products in stainless steel and brass were negative. No evidence of signature species indicative of orthodox nuclear events was detected. The inorganic and particulate analyses were likewise negative with respect to residues of unexpected chemical species. Such target compounds included conventional explosives, accelerants, propellants, or any exceptional industrial chemicals. The GC-MS analyses of trace organic components in the explosion debris provided perhaps the most interesting results obtained at LLNL. Although no evidence of organic explosives, oxidizers, or other unusual compounds was detected, the presence of a hydrocarbon oil in the interior of the electrochemical cell was established. It is likely that its source was lubricating fluid from the machining of the metal cell components. If residues of organic oils are present during electrolysis experiments, the potential exists for an explosive reaction in the increasingly enriched oxygen atmosphere within the headspace of a metal cell.

Andresen, B.; Whipple, R.; Vandervoort, D.; Grant, P.

1992-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

480

LDRD summary report. Part 1: initiation studies of thin film explosvies used for scabbling concrete. Part 2: investigation of spray techniques for use in explosive scabbling of concrete  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe a new method for the scabbling of concrete surfaces using a thin layer of explosive material sprayed onto the surfaces. We also developed a new explosive mixture that could be applied with commercial spray painting equipment. The first part of our record describes experiments that studied methods for the initiation of the sprayed explosive. We successfully initiated layers 0.36 mm thick using a commercial EBW detonator, a flying plate detonator, and by pellet impact. The second part of our report describes a survey of spray methods and tests with two commercial spray systems that we believe could be used for developing a robotic spray system.

Benham, R.A.; Bickes, R.W. Jr.; Grubelich, M.C.; Wackerbarth, D.E.; Brock, J.L.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "graaff confetti explosion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

The Off-Site Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs: Assessing Potential Environmental Liabilities through an Examination of Proposed Nuclear Projects,High Explosive Experiments, and High Explosive Construction Activities Volume 3 of 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the results of nearly six years (2002-2008) of historical research and field studies concerned with evaluating potential environmental liabilities associated with U.S. Atomic Energy Commission projects from the Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs. The Plowshare Program's primary purpose was to develop peaceful uses for nuclear explosives. The Vela Uniform Program focused on improving the capability of detecting, monitoring and identifying underground nuclear detonations. As a result of the Project Chariot site restoration efforts in the early 1990s, there were concerns that there might be other project locations with potential environmental liabilities. The Desert Research Institute conducted archival research to identify projects, an analysis of project field activities, and completed field studies at locations where substantial fieldwork had been undertaken for the projects. Although the Plowshare and Vela Uniform nuclear projects are well known, the projects that are included in this research are relatively unknown. They are proposed nuclear projects that were not executed, proposed and executed high explosive experiments, and proposed and executed high explosive construction activities off the Nevada Test Site. The research identified 170 Plowshare and Vela Uniform off-site projects and many of these had little or no field activity associated with them. However, there were 27 projects that merited further investigation and field studies were conducted at 15 locations.

Beck Colleen M.,Edwards Susan R.,King Maureen L.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

The Off-Site Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs: Assessing Potential Environmental Liabilities through an Examination of Proposed Nuclear Projects,High Explosive Experiments, and High Explosive Construction Activities Volume 1 of 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the results of nearly six years (2002-2008) of historical research and field studies concerned with evaluating potential environmental liabilities associated with U.S. Atomic Energy Commission projects from the Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs. The Plowshare Program's primary purpose was to develop peaceful uses for nuclear explosives. The Vela Uniform Program focused on improving the capability of detecting, monitoring and identifying underground nuclear detonations. As a result of the Project Chariot site restoration efforts in the early 1990s, there were concerns that there might be other project locations with potential environmental liabilities. The Desert Research Institute conducted archival research to identify projects, an analysis of project field activities, and completed field studies at locations where substantial fieldwork had been undertaken for the projects. Although the Plowshare and Vela Uniform nuclear projects are well known, the projects that are included in this research are relatively unknown. They are proposed nuclear projects that were not executed, proposed and executed high explosive experiments, and proposed and executed high explosive construction activities off the Nevada Test Site. The research identified 170 Plowshare and Vela Uniform off-site projects and many of these had little or no field activity associated with them. However, there were 27 projects that merited further investigation and field studies were conducted at 15 locations.

Beck Colleen M,Edwards Susan R.,King Maureen L.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Effect of meteorological data averaging times on plume concentrations from explosive ordnance disposal open burning operations. Master`s thesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Open Burning (OB) operations are performed to treat and dispose of unserviceable munitions in the Department of Defense (DOD) inventory. This thesis effort sought to develop a computer model, based upon the Gaussian Puff Equation. The model varies from standard plume modeling practices by not making the assumption that the wind direction, wind speed and turbulence are uniform throughout the duration of the burn. The model assigns meteorological data to each explosion (puff) generated by the OB source. The experiments in this research effort assigned meteorological data to the puffs based upon averaging the weather data over 1, 10, and 60 minute periods. The results of the research showed that there was a statistically significant difference (95% confidence) between 1 minute and 60 minute weather data plume concentrations in the receptor grid in 100% of the experiments performed.

Widmann, I.L.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Failure of a neutrino-driven explosion after core-collapse may lead to a thermonuclear supernova  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We demonstrate that $\\sim10$ seconds after core-collapse of a massive star, a thermonuclear explosion of the outer shells is possible for some (tuned) initial density and composition profiles, assuming the neutrinos failed to explode the star. The explosion may lead to a successful supernova, as first suggested by Burbidge, Burbidge, Fowler and Hoyle (1957). We perform a series of one-dimensional (1D) calculations of collapsing massive stars with simplified initial density profiles (similar to the results of stellar evolution calculations) and various compositions (not similar to 1D stellar evolution calculations). We assume that the neutrinos escaped with negligible effect on the outer layers, which inevitably collapse. As the shells collapse, they compress and heat up adiabatically, enhancing the rate of thermonuclear burning. In some cases, where significant shells of mixed helium and oxygen are present with pre-collapsed burning times of $\\lesssim100\\,\\textrm{s}$ ($\\approx10$ times the free-fall time), a ...

Kushnir, Doron

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

NMIS With Gamma Spectrometry for Attributes of Pu and HEU, Explosives and Chemical Agents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The concept for the system described herein is an active/passive Nuclear Materials Identification System{sup 2} (NMIS) that incorporates gamma ray spectrometry{sup 3}. This incorporation of gamma ray spectrometry would add existing capability into this system. This Multiple Attribute System can determine a wide variety of attributes for Pu and highly enriched uranium (HEU) of which a selected subset could be chosen. This system can be built using commercial off the shelf (COTS) components. NMIS systems are at All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF) and Russian Federal Nuclear Center Institute of Technical Physics, (VNIITF) and measurements with Pu have been performed at VNIIEF and analyzed successfully for mass and thickness of Pu. NMIS systems are being used successfully for HEU at the Y-12 National Security Complex. The use of active gamma ray spectrometry for high explosive HE and chemical agent detection is a well known activation analysis technique, and it is incorporated here. This report describes the system, explains the attribute determination methods for fissile materials, discusses technical issues to be resolved, discusses additional development needs, presents a schedule for building from COTS components, and assembly with existing components, and discusses implementation issues such as lack of need for facility modification and low radiation exposure.

Mihalczo, J. T.; Mattingly, J. K.; Mullens, J. A.; Neal, J. S.

2002-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

486

Sensitivity effects of void density and arrangements in a REBO high explosive  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The shock response of two-dimensional model, high explosive crystals with various arrangements of circular voids is explored. We simulate a piston impact using molecular dynamics simulations with a Reactive Empirical Bond Order (REBO) model potential for a sub-micron, sub-ns exothermic reaction in a diatomic molecular solid. In square lattices of voids all of one size, reducing that size or increasing the porosity while holding the other parameter fixed causes the hotspots to consume the material more quickly and detonation to occur sooner and at lower piston velocities. The early time behavior is seen to follow a very simple ignition and growth model. The hotspots are seen to collectively develop a broad pressure wave (a sonic, diffuse deflagration front) that, upon merging with the lead shock, transforms it into a detonation. The reaction yields produced by triangular lattices are not significantly different. With random void arrangements, the mean time to detonation is 15.5% larger than with the square lattice; the standard deviation of detonation delays is just 5.1%.

Herring, Stuart Davis [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Germann, Timothy C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gronbech - Jensen, Niels [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

487

Critical velocities for deflagration and detonation triggered by voids in a REBO high explosive  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of circular voids on the shock sensitivity of a two-dimensional model high explosive crystal are considered. We simulate a piston impact using molecular dynamics simulations with a Reactive Empirical Bond Order (REBO) model potential for a sub-micron, sub-ns exothermic reaction in a diatomic molecular solid. The probability of initiating chemical reactions is found to rise more suddenly with increasing piston velocity for larger voids that collapse more deterministically. A void with radius as small as 10 nm reduces the minimum initiating velocity by a factor of 4. The transition at larger velocities to detonation is studied in a micron-long sample with a single void (and its periodic images). The reaction yield during the shock traversal increases rapidly with velocity, then becomes a prompt, reliable detonation. A void of radius 2.5 nm reduces the critical velocity by 10% from the perfect crystal. A Pop plot of the time-to-detonation at higher velocities shows a characteristic pressure dependence.

Herring, Stuart Davis [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Germann, Timothy C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jensen, Niels G [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Ocean acoustic effects of explosions on land: Evaluation of Cook Inlet beluga whale habitability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Eagle River Flats is an impact region for artillery at Fort Richardson Alaska. Adjacent to the Flats is the Knik Arm of Cook Inlet which is the habitat for a distinct population of beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas). In order to assess the effects of 155 mm artillery explosions on the habitat of these whales a series of 6.8 kg C4 plasti