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  1. Emerging Edge Capital EEC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Edge Capital EEC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Emerging Edge Capital (EEC) Place: London, United Kingdom Zip: SW1Y 4RS Sector: Renewable Energy Product: London-based company...

  2. UC Davis Energy Efficiency Center EEC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    UC Davis Energy Efficiency Center EEC Jump to: navigation, search Name: UC Davis Energy Efficiency Center (EEC) Place: California Sector: Efficiency Product: With a leadership...

  3. Edge Equilibrium Code (EEC) For Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Xujling

    2014-02-24

    The edge equilibrium code (EEC) described in this paper is developed for simulations of the near edge plasma using the finite element method. It solves the Grad-Shafranov equation in toroidal coordinate and uses adaptive grids aligned with magnetic field lines. Hermite finite elements are chosen for the numerical scheme. A fast Newton scheme which is the same as implemented in the equilibrium and stability code (ESC) is applied here to adjust the grids

  4. G-r

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    + ' 2 .-.a G-r ' h-3. . . ;. ' :;e :z 2+ * .c : -T x .& g& z?g s ?E 5& q s <' - e . . ' ..;z -. .-A-r -,,+ . ;a-. ..+ . .-- :... .- _ _.- .--i -,A. . -L& 5: .a ,-. LT.- -- .+. ,:T?: -.z.?; 7 : T t . : 7 TO : 8. 3. %ith. Jr., ChiJl, OpJr.tiOnJ Brmch ~d--mlon 4,; llonrmJo DATE: :aauuy 24, 19$#2 FROM : p- T- xiLon*, chl~f. TOBJ--JXI~J SubOfIlcs. Yodel Cftr, Y.T. &C~OJ~ IJ the Xonthlyb~Jrrr Report Iorfruuy 1952 corering aCtirit:JJ 113dJ: the TOLJ~~& SUt--0lfiCa rOr thiJ

  5. Runoff simulations from the Greenland ice sheet at Kangerlussuaq from 2006-2007 to 2007/08. West Greenland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mernild, Sebastian Haugard [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hasholt, Bent [UNIV OF COPENHAGEN; Van Den Broeke, Michiel [UTRECHT UNIV; Liston, Glen [COLORADO STATE UNIV

    2009-01-01

    This study focuses on runoff from a large sector of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) - the Kangerlussuaq drainage area, West Greenland - for the runoff observation period 2006/07 to 2007/08. SnowModel, a state-of-the-art snow-evolution modeling system, was used to simulate winter accumulation and summer ablation processes, including runoff. Independent in situ end-of-winter snow depth and high-resolution runoff observations were used for validation of simulated accumulation and ablation processes. Runoff was modeled on both daily and hourly time steps, filling a data gap of runoff exiting part of the GrIS. Using hourly meteorological driving data instead of smoothed daily-averaged data produced more realistic meteorological conditions in relation to snow and melt threshold surface processes, and produced 6-17% higher annual cumulative runoff. The simulated runoff series yielded useful insights into the present conditions of inter-seasonal and inter-annual variability of Kangerlussuaq runoff, and provided an acceptable degree of agreement between simulated and observed runoff. The simulated spatial runoff distributions, in some areas of the GrIS terminus, were as high as 2,750 mm w.eq. of runoff for 2006/07, while only 900 mm w.eq was simulated for 2007/08. The simulated total runoff from Kangerlussuaq was 1.9 km{sup 3} for 2006/07 and 1.2 km{sup 3} for 2007/08, indicating a reduction of 35-40% caused by the climate conditions and changes in the GrIS freshwater storage. The reduction in runoff from 2006/07 to 2007/08 occurred simultaneously with the reduction in the overall pattern of satellite-derived GrIS surface melt from 2007 to 2008.

  6. Greenland Ice Sheet Modeling Update (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Greenland Ice Sheet Modeling Update Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Greenland Ice Sheet Modeling Update You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's...

  7. Complex systems influence melting of Greenland ice sheet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    melting of Greenland ice sheet Complex systems influence melting of Greenland ice sheet International research team's field work shows that, well, things are more complicated...

  8. Greenland: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Greenland Population 56,968 GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption 0.01 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code GL 3-letter ISO code GRL Numeric ISO...

  9. Greenland ice sheet surface mass-balance modeling in a 131-year perspective, 1950-2080

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mernild, Sebastian Haugard; Liston, Glen; Hiemstra, Christopher; Christensen, Jens

    2009-01-01

    Fluctuations in the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) surface mass-balance (SMB) and freshwater influx to the surrounding oceans closely follow climate fluctuations and are of considerable importance to the global eustatic sea level rise. SnowModel, a state-of-the-art snow-evolution modeling system, was used to simulate variations in the GrIS melt extent, surface water balance components, changes in SMB, and freshwater influx to the ocean. The simulations are based on the IPCC scenario AlB modeled by the HIRHAM4 RCM (using boundary conditions from ECHAM5 AOGCM) from 1950 through 2080. In-situ meteorological station (GC-Net and WMO DMI) observations from inside and outside the GrIS were used to validate and correct RCM output data before it was used as input for SnowModel. Satellite observations and independent SMB studies were used to validate the SnowModel output and confirm the model's robustness. We simulated a {approx}90% increase in end-of-summer surface melt extent (0.483 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2}) from 1950 to 2080, and a melt index (above 2,000-m elevation) increase of 138% (1.96 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} x days). The greatest difference in melt extent occured in the southern part of the GrIS, and the greatest changes in the number of melt days was seen in the eastern part of the GrIS ({approx}50-70%) and was lowest in the west ({approx}20-30%). The rate of SMB loss, largely tied to changes in ablation processes, lead to an enhanced average loss of 331 km{sup 3} from 1950 to 2080, an average 5MB level of -99 km{sup 3} for the period 2070-2080. GrIS surface freshwater runoff yielded an eustatic rise in sea level from 0.8 {+-} 0.1 (1950-1959) to 1.9 {+-} 0.1 mm (2070-2080) sea level equivalent (SLE) y{sup -1}. The accumulated GrIS freshwater runoff contribution from surface melting equaled 160 mm SLE from 1950 through 2080.

  10. Microsoft Word - Gr91-CREEP-RUPTURE-rev.doc

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    to the Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Program 1. ... Gr 91. IDENTIFICATION OF MATERIALS Grade 91 steel is one of ... (ORNL) assumed the management of the technology program. ...

  11. Greenland, New Hampshire: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Greenland, New Hampshire: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 43.0361995, -70.8328322 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapp...

  12. ARM - Field Campaign - Lidar support for ICECAPS at Summit, Greenland

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsLidar support for ICECAPS at Summit, Greenland Campaign Links ICECAPS Campaign Summary (PDF) Summit Station Research Highlight New Data from Greenland for Arctic Climate Research Cloud Cocktail Melts Greenland Ice Sheet Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Lidar support for ICECAPS at Summit, Greenland 2010.04.15 - 2018.08.31 Lead Scientist : David Turner Abstract Beginning in May 2010, the Integrated

  13. Hainan Greenland Microalgae Biotechnology Co Ltd | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Microalgae Biotechnology Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hainan Greenland Microalgae Biotechnology Co Ltd Place: Hainan Province, China Product: Chinese biotechnology firm...

  14. Team advances understanding of the Greenland Ice Sheet's meltwater...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    drainage system are lacking and its evolution over the melt season is poorly understood. "Everyone wants to know what's happening under Greenland as it experiences more and...

  15. Greenland in RASM (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Greenland in RASM Authors: Lipscomb, William Henry 1 + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Laboratory Publication Date: ...

  16. Sandia's ice sheet modeling of Greenland, Antarctica helps predict

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    sea-level rise | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Sandia's ice sheet modeling of Greenland, Antarctica helps predict sea-level rise Wednesday, March 2, 2016 - 12:00am Sandia California researchers Irina Tezaur and Ray Tuminaro analyze a model of Antarctica. They are part of a Sandia team working to improve the reliability and efficiency of computational models that describe ice sheet behavior and dynamics. The Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets will make a dominant

  17. Complex systems influence melting of Greenland ice sheet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Complex systems influence melting of Greenland ice sheet Complex systems influence melting of Greenland ice sheet International research team's field work shows that, well, things are more complicated than we thought December 22, 2014 The newly discovered rolling movement shown in (A) three-dimensional cryo-electron microscopy image of ribosome, and (B) computer-generated atomic-resolution model of the human ribosome consistent with microscopy. An international team of researchers deployed to

  18. New climate model predicts likelihood of Greenland ice melt, sea level rise

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and dangerous temperatures New climate model predicts likelihood of Greenland ice melt New climate model predicts likelihood of Greenland ice melt, sea level rise and dangerous temperatures A new computer model of accumulated carbon emissions predicts the likelihood of crossing several dangerous climate change thresholds. November 20, 2015 Greenland ice loss. Greenland ice loss. Contact Kevin Roark Communications Office (505) 665-9202 Email "The model is based on idealized

  19. Meltwater flux and runoff modeling in the abalation area of jakobshavn Isbrae, West Greenland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mernild, Sebastian Haugard [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chylek, Petr [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Liston, Glen [COLORADO STATE UNIV.; Steffen, Konrad [UNIV OF COLORADO

    2009-01-01

    The temporal variability in surface snow and glacier melt flux and runoff were investigated for the ablation area of lakobshavn Isbrae, West Greenland. High-resolution meteorological observations both on and outside the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) were used as model input. Realistic descriptions of snow accumulation, snow and glacier-ice melt, and runoff are essential to understand trends in ice sheet surface properties and processes. SnowModel, a physically based, spatially distributed meteorological and snow-evolution modeling system was used to simulate the temporal variability of lakobshavn Isbrre accumulation and ablation processes for 2000/01-2006/07. Winter snow-depth observations and MODIS satellite-derived summer melt observations were used for model validation of accumulation and ablation. Simulations agreed well with observed values. Simulated annual surface melt varied from as low as 3.83 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3} (2001/02) to as high as 8.64 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3} (2004/05). Modeled surface melt occurred at elevations reaching 1,870 m a.s.l. for 2004/05, while the equilibrium line altitude (ELA) fluctuated from 990 to 1,210 m a.s.l. during the simulation period. The SnowModel meltwater retention and refreezing routines considerably reduce the amount of meltwater available as ice sheet runoff; without these routines the lakobshavn surface runoff would be overestimated by an average of 80%. From September/October through May/June no runoff events were simulated. The modeled interannual runoff variability varied from 1.81 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3} (2001/02) to 5.21 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3} (2004/05), yielding a cumulative runoff at the Jakobshavn glacier terminus of {approx}2.25 m w.eq. to {approx}4.5 m w.eq., respectively. The average modeled lakobshavn runoff of {approx}3.4 km{sup 3} y{sup -1} was merged with previous estimates of Jakobshavn ice discharge to quantify the freshwater flux to Illulissat Icefiord. For both runoff and ice discharge the average trends are

  20. Update on Greenland Ice Sheet Simulations In CISM and CESM (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Update on Greenland Ice Sheet Simulations In CISM and CESM Authors: Lipscomb, William Henry 1 + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Laboratory Publication Date: ...

  1. Meltwater effects on flow of Greenland's ice sheet less severe for sea

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    level rise than earlier feared, scientists say Side effects of increasing meltwater less severe than feared Meltwater effects on flow of Greenland's ice sheet less severe for sea level rise than earlier feared, scientists say The team found that accelerating ice sheet movement from increasing meltwater lubrication is likely to have only a minor role in future sea-level rise. August 19, 2013 A stream of meltwater on the surface of the Greenland Ice Sheet enters a moulin connecting to the

  2. Meltwater effects on flow of Greenland's ice sheet less severe for sea

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    level rise than earlier feared, scientists say Stories » Side effects of increasing meltwater less severe than feared Meltwater effects on flow of Greenland's ice sheet less severe for sea level rise than earlier feared, scientists say The team found that accelerating ice sheet movement from increasing meltwater lubrication is likely to have only a minor role in future sea-level rise. August 19, 2013 A stream of meltwater on the surface of the Greenland Ice Sheet enters a moulin connecting

  3. Optical observations of the type Ic supernova 2007gr in NGC 1058

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Juncheng; Wang, Xiaofeng; Li, Junzheng; Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Li, Weidong; Chornock, Ryan; Steele, Thea E-mail: wang_xf@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn

    2014-08-01

    We present extensive optical observations of the normal Type Ic supernova (SN) 2007gr, spanning from about one week before maximum light to more than one year thereafter. The optical light and color curves of SN 2007gr are very similar to those of the broad-lined Type Ic SN 2002ap, but the spectra show remarkable differences. The optical spectra of SN 2007gr are characterized by unusually narrow lines, prominent carbon lines, and slow evolution of the line velocity after maximum light. The earliest spectrum (taken at t = –8 days) shows a possible signature of helium (He I λ5876 at a velocity of ∼19,000 km s{sup –1}). Moreover, the larger intensity ratio of the [O I] λ6300 and λ6364 lines inferred from the early nebular spectra implies a lower opacity of the ejecta shortly after the explosion. These results indicate that SN 2007gr perhaps underwent a less energetic explosion of a smaller-mass Wolf-Rayet star (∼8-9 M{sub ☉}) in a binary system, as favored by an analysis of the progenitor environment through pre-explosion and post-explosion Hubble Space Telescope images. In the nebular spectra, asymmetric double-peaked profiles can be seen in the [O I] λ6300 and Mg I] λ4571 lines. We suggest that the two peaks are contributed by the blueshifted and rest-frame components. The similarity in velocity structure and the different evolution of the strength of the two components favor an aspherical explosion with the ejecta distributed in a torus or disk-like geometry, but inside the ejecta the O and Mg have different distributions.

  4. Changes in the firn structure of the western Greenland Ice Sheet caused by recent warming

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    de la Peña, S.; Howat, I. M.; Nienow, P. W.; van den Broeke, M. R.; Mosley-Thompson, E.; Price, S. F.; Mair, D.; Noël, B.; Sole, A. J.

    2015-06-11

    Atmospheric warming over the Greenland Ice Sheet during the last 2 decades has increased the amount of surface meltwater production, resulting in the migration of melt and percolation regimes to higher altitudes and an increase in the amount of ice content from refrozen meltwater found in the firn above the superimposed ice zone. Here we present field and airborne radar observations of buried ice layers within the near-surface (0–20 m) firn in western Greenland, obtained from campaigns between 1998 and 2014. We find a sharp increase in firn-ice content in the form of thick widespread layers in the percolation zone,more » which decreases the capacity of the firn to store meltwater. The estimated total annual ice content retained in the near-surface firn in areas with positive surface mass balance west of the ice divide in Greenland reached a maximum of 74 ± 25 Gt in 2012, compared to the 1958–1999 average of 13 ± 2 Gt, while the percolation zone area more than doubled between 2003 and 2012. Increased melt and column densification resulted in surface lowering averaging –0.80 ± 0.39 m yr⁻¹ between 1800 and 2800 m in the accumulation zone of western Greenland. Since 2007, modeled annual melt and refreezing rates in the percolation zone at elevations below 2100 m surpass the annual snowfall from the previous year, implying that mass gain in the region is retained after melt in the form of refrozen meltwater. If current melt trends over high elevation regions continue, subsequent changes in firn structure will have implications for the hydrology of the ice sheet and related abrupt seasonal densification could become increasingly significant for altimetry-derived ice sheet mass balance estimates.« less

  5. Mr. G. !4, :iundGr, :?l.ang l4.xqpr

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    G. !4, :iundGr, :?l.ang l4.xqpr - - K~*ti.Cranl &&tad cclqmy of mu 2. 0. Tkxs 158; 45%. Mealthy R~ticrn Cix3 Armti 31, ohlo ' WP i%r, gLtsx.hst * .- 3.sfzrcnEe ira made 9x8 your 3.&&w ddafi ihmmbdr %1, 3-956, pergarding thtr rEfrrp&d. of ttm ti~orim rna:irfuw WC the Eurwa CS 1Mfnaia, dixqyJ orr!pl. Thio of.mJs Rim earreagwndrd wfth th3 tmakb fJp4waBisrasr O flica the ~tsr5.n~ of' +.&~":a rrs&iuerg at "chair site, 1X0 iar D ctccayt thtl :K' ta:.E:il aril it

  6. History of ancient copper smelting pollution during Roman and Medieval times recorded in Greenland ice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, Sungmin; Candelone, J.P.; Patterson, C.C.; Boultron, C.F.

    1996-04-12

    Determination of copper concentrations in Greenland ice dated from seven millennia ago to the present showed values exceeding natural levels, beginning about 2500 years ago. This early large-scale pollution of the atmosphere of the Northern Hemisphere is attributed to emissions from the crude, highly polluting smelting technologies used for copper production during Roman and medieval times, especially in Europe and China. This study opens the way to a quantitative assessment of the history of early metal production, which was instrumental in the development of human cultures during ancient eras. 27 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  7. Leak before break evaluation for main steam piping system made of SA106 Gr.C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Kyoung Mo; Jee, Kye Kwang; Pyo, Chang Ryul; Ra, In Sik

    1997-04-01

    The basis of the leak before break (LBB) concept is to demonstrate that piping will leak significantly before a double ended guillotine break (DEGB) occurs. This is demonstrated by quantifying and evaluating the leak process and prescribing safe shutdown of the plant on the basis of the monitored leak rate. The application of LBB for power plant design has reduced plant cost while improving plant integrity. Several evaluations employing LBB analysis on system piping based on DEGB design have been completed. However, the application of LBB on main steam (MS) piping, which is LBB applicable piping, has not been performed due to several uncertainties associated with occurrence of steam hammer and dynamic strain aging (DSA). The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the applicability of the LBB design concept to main steam lines manufactured with SA106 Gr.C carbon steel. Based on the material properties, including fracture toughness and tensile properties obtained from the comprehensive material tests for base and weld metals, a parametric study was performed as described in this paper. The PICEP code was used to determine leak size crack (LSC) and the FLET code was used to perform the stability assessment of MS piping. The effects of material properties obtained from tests were evaluated to determine the LBB applicability for the MS piping. It can be shown from this parametric study that the MS piping has a high possibility of design using LBB analysis.

  8. Heat sources within the Greenland Ice Sheet: dissipation, temperate paleo-firn and cryo-hydrologic warming

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lüthi, M. P.; Ryser, C.; Andrews, L. C.; Catania, G. A.; Funk, M.; Hawley, R. L.; Hoffman, M. J.; Neumann, T. A.

    2015-01-01

    Ice temperature profiles from the Greenland Ice Sheet contain information on the deformation history, past climates and recent warming. We present full-depth temperature profiles from two drill sites on a flow line passing through Swiss Camp, West Greenland. Numerical modeling reveals that ice temperatures are considerably higher than would be expected from heat diffusion and dissipation alone. The possible causes for this extra heat are evaluated using a Lagrangian heat flow model. The model results reveal that the observations can be explained with a combination of different processes: enhanced dissipation (strain heating) in ice-age ice, temperate paleo-firn, and cryo-hydrologic warmingmore » in deep crevasses.« less

  9. Heat sources within the Greenland Ice Sheet: dissipation, temperate paleo-firn and cryo-hydrologic warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lthi, M. P.; Ryser, C.; Andrews, L. C.; Catania, G. A.; Funk, M.; Hawley, R. L.; Hoffman, M. J.; Neumann, T. A.

    2015-01-01

    Ice temperature profiles from the Greenland Ice Sheet contain information on the deformation history, past climates and recent warming. We present full-depth temperature profiles from two drill sites on a flow line passing through Swiss Camp, West Greenland. Numerical modeling reveals that ice temperatures are considerably higher than would be expected from heat diffusion and dissipation alone. The possible causes for this extra heat are evaluated using a Lagrangian heat flow model. The model results reveal that the observations can be explained with a combination of different processes: enhanced dissipation (strain heating) in ice-age ice, temperate paleo-firn, and cryo-hydrologic warming in deep crevasses.

  10. Seismicity on the western Greenland Ice Sheet: Surface fracture in the vicinity of active moulins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carmichael, Joshua D.; Joughin, Ian; Behn, Mark D.; Das, Sarah; King, Matt A.; Stevens, Laura; Lizarralde, Dan

    2015-06-25

    We analyzed geophone and GPS measurements collected within the ablation zone of the western Greenland Ice Sheet during a ~35 day period of the 2011 melt season to study changes in ice deformation before, during, and after a supraglacial lake drainage event. During rapid lake drainage, ice flow speeds increased to ~400% of winter values, and icequake activity peaked. At times >7 days after drainage, this seismicity developed variability over both diurnal and longer periods (~10 days), while coincident ice speeds fell to ~150% of winter values and showed nightly peaks in spatial variability. Approximately 95% of all detected seismicity in the lake basin and its immediate vicinity was triggered by fracture propagation within near-surface ice (<330 m deep) that generated Rayleigh waves. Icequakes occurring before and during drainage frequently were collocated with the down flow (west) end of the primary hydrofracture through which the lake drained but shifted farther west and outside the lake basin after the drainage. We interpret these results to reveal vertical hydrofracture opening and local uplift during the drainage, followed by enhanced seismicity and ice flow on the downstream side of the lake basin. This region collocates with interferometric synthetic aperture radar-measured speedup in previous years and could reflect the migration path of the meltwater supplied to the bed by the lake. The diurnal seismic signal can be associated with nightly reductions in surface melt input that increase effective basal pressure and traction, thereby promoting elevated strain in the surficial ice.

  11. Microwave signatures of ice hydrometeors from ground-based observations above Summit, Greenland

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pettersen, Claire; Bennartz, Ralf; Kulie, Mark S.; Merrelli, Aronne J.; Shupe, Matthew D.; Turner, David D.

    2016-04-15

    Multi-instrument, ground-based measurements provide unique and comprehensive data sets of the atmosphere for a specific location over long periods of time and resulting data compliment past and existing global satellite observations. This paper explores the effect of ice hydrometeors on ground-based, high-frequency passive microwave measurements and attempts to isolate an ice signature for summer seasons at Summit, Greenland, from 2010 to 2013. Data from a combination of passive microwave, cloud radar, radiosonde, and ceilometer were examined to isolate the ice signature at microwave wavelengths. By limiting the study to a cloud liquid water path of 40 gm–2 or less, themore » cloud radar can identify cases where the precipitation was dominated by ice. These cases were examined using liquid water and gas microwave absorption models, and brightness temperatures were calculated for the high-frequency microwave channels: 90, 150, and 225 GHz. By comparing the measured brightness temperatures from the microwave radiometers and the calculated brightness temperature using only gas and liquid contributions, any residual brightness temperature difference is due to emission and scattering of microwave radiation from the ice hydrometeors in the column. The ice signature in the 90, 150, and 225 GHz channels for the Summit Station summer months was isolated. As a result, this measured ice signature was then compared to an equivalent brightness temperature difference calculated with a radiative transfer model including microwave single-scattering properties for several ice habits. Initial model results compare well against the 4 years of summer season isolated ice signature in the high-frequency microwave channels.« less

  12. Seismicity on the western Greenland Ice Sheet: Surface fracture in the vicinity of active moulins

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Carmichael, Joshua D.; Joughin, Ian; Behn, Mark D.; Das, Sarah; King, Matt A.; Stevens, Laura; Lizarralde, Dan

    2015-06-25

    We analyzed geophone and GPS measurements collected within the ablation zone of the western Greenland Ice Sheet during a ~35 day period of the 2011 melt season to study changes in ice deformation before, during, and after a supraglacial lake drainage event. During rapid lake drainage, ice flow speeds increased to ~400% of winter values, and icequake activity peaked. At times >7 days after drainage, this seismicity developed variability over both diurnal and longer periods (~10 days), while coincident ice speeds fell to ~150% of winter values and showed nightly peaks in spatial variability. Approximately 95% of all detected seismicitymore » in the lake basin and its immediate vicinity was triggered by fracture propagation within near-surface ice (<330 m deep) that generated Rayleigh waves. Icequakes occurring before and during drainage frequently were collocated with the down flow (west) end of the primary hydrofracture through which the lake drained but shifted farther west and outside the lake basin after the drainage. We interpret these results to reveal vertical hydrofracture opening and local uplift during the drainage, followed by enhanced seismicity and ice flow on the downstream side of the lake basin. This region collocates with interferometric synthetic aperture radar-measured speedup in previous years and could reflect the migration path of the meltwater supplied to the bed by the lake. The diurnal seismic signal can be associated with nightly reductions in surface melt input that increase effective basal pressure and traction, thereby promoting elevated strain in the surficial ice.« less

  13. Diagenesis and porosity development associated with major sea level fluctuations, Upper Permian, Jameson land, east Greenland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scholle, P.A.; Ulmer, D.S. ); Stemmerik, L. )

    1990-05-01

    The Upper Permian of Jameson Land includes two major carbonate sequences, represented by the Karstryggen and Wegener Halvoe formations. The initial Karstryggen transgression led to the development of a shallow marine platform with structurally controlled evaporite basins (salinas) separated by stromatolitic, peloidal, or micritic carbonate depositional areas. The Wegener Havloe sequence reflects more rapid and extensive transgression with the deposition of three subcycles of fully marine, platform, or biohermal carbonates containing minor evaporites near the basin margins. Bioherms (bryozoan-brachiopod-marine cement mounds) show > 100 m of relief, indicating that large relative sea level changes were involved. Both the Karstryggen and Wgener Havloe cycles were terminated by major regressions, which led to karstic and/or fluvial incision of the underlying sequences. Not surprisingly, carbonate and evaporite diagenesis was greatly affected by these regional or eustatic sea level fluctuations. Evaporites dissolved or were replaced by calcite and celestite under the influence of meteoric waters. Limestones show collapse brecciation, grain leaching, soil development, and characteristic vadose and phreatic cements. Most significantly meteoric flushing led to massive dissolution of botryoidal marine cements (aragonite and probable high-Mg calcite) within biohermal facies on the Wegener Peninsula. This early porosity resurrection led to the preservation of porous bioherm core zones until hydrocarbon migration. Only late (posthydrocarbon), probably hydrothermal fluid flow led to cementation of the bioherm cores while expelling most of the reservoired hydrocarbons. If the sea level changes affecting the Greenlandic Permian are eustatic, then this study may provide significant clues to porosity development throughout the largely unexplored northern Zechstein basin.

  14. Depositional environment and organic geochemistry of the Upper Permian Ravenfjeld Formation source rock in East Greenland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christiansen, F.G.; Piasecki, S.; Stemmerik, L. ); Telnaes, N. )

    1993-09-01

    The Upper Permian Ravnefjeld Formation in East Greenland is composed of shales that laterally pass into carbonate buildups and platforms of the Wegener Halvo Formation. The Ravnefjeld Formation is subdivided into five units that can be traced throughout the Upper Permian depositional basin. Two of the units are laminated and organic rich and were deposited under anoxic conditions. They are considered good to excellent source rocks for liquid hydrocarbons with initial average TOC (total organic carbon) values between 4 and 5% and HI (hydrogen index) between 300 and 400. The cumulative source rocks are separated and enclosed by three units of bioturbated siltstone with a TOC of less than 0.5% and an HI of less than 100. These siltstones were deposited under relatively oxic conditions. The organic geochemistry of the source rocks is typical for marine source rocks with some features normally associated with carbonate/evaporite environments [low Pr/Ph (pristane/phytane), low CPI (carbon preference index), distribution of tricyclic and pentacyclic terpanes]. The establishment of anoxic conditions and subsequent source rock deposition was controlled by eustatic sea level changes. The subenvironment (paleogeographic setting, influx of carbonate material, water depth, salinity) has some influence on a number of bulk parameters [TOC-HI relations, TOC-TS (total sulfur) relations] and, in particular, biomarker parameters such as Pr/Ph and terpane ratios. All the basal shales or shales in the vicinity of carbonate buildups of platforms are characterized by low Pr/Ph, high C[sub 23] tricyclic terpanes, and high C[sub 35] and C[sub 33] hopanes. 52 refs., 20 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Greenland and Antarctic mass balances for present and doubled atmospheric CO{sub 2} from the GENESIS version-2 global climate model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, S.L.; Pollard, D.

    1997-05-01

    As anthropogenic greenhouse warming occurs in the next century, changes in the mass balances of Greenland and Antarctica will probably accelerate and may have significant effects on global sea level. Recent trends and possible future changes in these mass balances have received considerable attention in the glaciological literature, but until recently relatively few general circulation modeling (GCM) studies have focused on the problem. However, there are two significant problems in using GCMs to predict mass balance distributions on ice sheets: (i) the relatively coarse GCM horizontal resolution truncates the topography of the ice-sheet flanks and smaller ice sheets such as Greenland, and (ii) the snow and ice physics in most GCMs does not include ice-sheet-specific processes such as the refreezing of meltwater. Two techniques are described that attack these problems, involving (i) an elevation-based correction to the surface meteorology and (ii) a simple a posteriori correction for the refreezing of meltwater following Pfeiffer et al. Using these techniques in a new version 2 of the Global Environmental and Ecological Simulation of Interactive Systems global climate model, the authors present global climate and ice-sheet mass-balance results from two equilibrated runs for present and doubled atmospheric CO{sub 2}. This GCM is well suited for ice-sheet mass-balance studies because (a) the surface can be represented at a finer resolution (2{degrees} lat x 2{degrees} long) than the atmospheric GCM, (b) the two correction techniques are included as part of the model, and the model`s mass balances for present-day Greenland and Antarctica are realistic. 131 refs., 23 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Diagenetic history and hydrocarbon potential of Upper Permian carbonate buildups, Wegener Halvoe area, Jameson Land basin, east Greenland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scholle, P.A.; Ulmer, D.S. ); Stemmerik, L. )

    1991-04-01

    The Upper Permian of Jameson Land includes two carbonate sequences, the Karstryggen and Wegener Halvoe formations. The Karstryggen Formation contains hypersaline carbonates and localized evaporites that were heavily weathered and dissected prior to deposition of the overlying strata. The overlying Wegener Halvoe Formation represents an abrupt and extensive marine inundation over the underlying karstified Karstryggen surface. Bryozoan-brachiopod-algal-cement buildups of the Wegener Halvoe Formation are localized on karstic highs, and show up to 150 m of depositional relief. The diagenetic histories of the core and flank facies are very different. Core facies porosity was initially obliterated by marine cements, but repeated meteoric exposure altered unstable core facies constituents. This alteration produced extensive secondary porosity through grain and cement leaching with local collapse brecciation. Flank strata, however, underwent little sea-floor diagenesis, and low permeability and mineralogically stable grain composition protected these strata from meteoric alteration. Subsequent fracturing and hydrothermal fluid flow, however, flushed hydrocarbons and filled pores with ferroan calcite, barite, fluorite, galena, and baroque dolomite. This heating and flushing is thought to have been especially intense in the Wegener Halvoe region; thus, more basinal areas may still have reservoirs containing significant oil in equivalent Upper Permian limestones. If, as is likely, the sea level changes affecting the Greenland Permian were eustatic, then this study may provide significant clues to porosity development throughout the largely unexplored northern Zechstein basin and the Arctic basin of the Barent Sea. This study also provides some important connections to the probably time-equivalent Guadalupian carbonate reservoir rocks of west Texas-New Mexico and Wyoming.

  17. On the scalability of the Albany/FELIX first-order Stokes approximation ice sheet solver for large-scale simulations of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tezaur, Irina K.; Tuminaro, Raymond S.; Perego, Mauro; Salinger, Andrew G.; Price, Stephen F.

    2015-01-01

    We examine the scalability of the recently developed Albany/FELIX finite-element based code for the first-order Stokes momentum balance equations for ice flow. We focus our analysis on the performance of two possible preconditioners for the iterative solution of the sparse linear systems that arise from the discretization of the governing equations: (1) a preconditioner based on the incomplete LU (ILU) factorization, and (2) a recently-developed algebraic multigrid (AMG) preconditioner, constructed using the idea of semi-coarsening. A strong scalability study on a realistic, high resolution Greenland ice sheet problem reveals that, for a given number of processor cores, the AMG preconditionermore » results in faster linear solve times but the ILU preconditioner exhibits better scalability. A weak scalability study is performed on a realistic, moderate resolution Antarctic ice sheet problem, a substantial fraction of which contains floating ice shelves, making it fundamentally different from the Greenland ice sheet problem. Here, we show that as the problem size increases, the performance of the ILU preconditioner deteriorates whereas the AMG preconditioner maintains scalability. This is because the linear systems are extremely ill-conditioned in the presence of floating ice shelves, and the ill-conditioning has a greater negative effect on the ILU preconditioner than on the AMG preconditioner.« less

  18. The influence of air temperature inversions on snowmelt and glacier mass-balance simulations, Ammassalik island, SE Greenland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mernild, Sebastian Haugard [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Liston, Glen [COLORADO STATE UNIV.

    2009-01-01

    In many applications, a realistic description of air temperature inversions is essential for accurate snow and glacier ice melt, and glacier mass-balance simulations. A physically based snow-evolution modeling system (SnowModel) was used to simulate eight years (1998/99 to 2005/06) of snow accumulation and snow and glacier ice ablation from numerous small coastal marginal glaciers on the SW-part of Ammassalik Island in SE Greenland. These glaciers are regularly influenced by inversions and sea breezes associated with the adjacent relatively low temperature and frequently ice-choked fjords and ocean. To account for the influence of these inversions on the spatiotemporal variation of air temperature and snow and glacier melt rates, temperature inversion routines were added to MircoMet, the meteorological distribution sub-model used in SnowModel. The inversions were observed and modeled to occur during 84% of the simulation period. Modeled inversions were defined not to occur during days with strong winds and high precipitation rates due to the potential of inversion break-up. Field observations showed inversions to extend from sea level to approximately 300 m a.s.l., and this inversion level was prescribed in the model simulations. Simulations with and without the inversion routines were compared. The inversion model produced air temperature distributions with warmer lower elevation areas and cooler higher elevation areas than without inversion routines due to the use of cold sea-breeze base temperature data from underneath the inversion. This yielded an up to 2 weeks earlier snowmelt in the lower areas and up to 1 to 3 weeks later snowmelt in the higher elevation areas of the simulation domain. Averaged mean annual modeled surface mass-balance for all glaciers (mainly located above the inversion layer) was -720 {+-} 620 mm w.eq. y{sup -1} for inversion simulations, and -880 {+-} 620 mm w.eq. y{sup -1} without the inversion routines, a difference of 160 mm w.eq. y

  19. Evaluation of the use of common sculpin (Myoxocephalus scorpius) organ histology as bioindicator for element exposure in the fjord of the mining area Maarmorilik, West Greenland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sonne, Christian; Bach, Lis; Søndergaard, Jens; Rigét, Frank F.; Dietz, Rune; Mosbech, Anders; Leifsson, Pall S.; Gustavson, Kim

    2014-08-15

    The former Black Angel lead–zinc mine in Maarmorilik, West Greenland, is a historic example of how mining activity may result in a significant impact on the surrounding fjord system in terms of elevated concentrations of especially lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) in seawater, sediments and surrounding biota. In order to shed light on the present contamination and possible effects in the fjord we initiated a range of studies including a pilot study on gill and liver morphology of common sculpins (Myoxocephalus scorpius) around Maarmorilik. Sculpins were caught and sampled at five different stations known to represent a gradient of Pb concentrations. Fish livers from all specimens were analyzed for relevant elements in the area: Fe, Zn, As, Cu, Se, Cd, Pb, Ag, Hg, Co and Ni. Lead, As and Hg showed significant differences among the five stations. For 20% of the sculpins, Hg concentrations were in the range of lowest observed effect dose (LOED) of 0.1–0.5 μg/g ww for toxic threshold on reproduction and subclinical endpoints. Likewise LOEDs for tissue lesions, LOEDs for biochemistry, growth, survival and reproduction were exceeded for Cd (0.42–1.8 μg/g ww) and for As (11.6 μg/g ww) in 28% and 85% of the sculpins, respectively. Similar to this, the no observed effect dose (NOED) for biochemistry was exceeded for Pb (0.32 μg/g ww) and for growth, mortality and reproduction for Zn (60–68 μg/g ww) in 33% and 24% of the sculpins, respectively. For all sculpins, females were significantly larger than males and for five of the elements (Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Se) females had higher concentrations. The chronic lesions observed in liver (mononuclear cell infiltrates, necrosis, vacuolar hepatocytes, portal fibrosis, bile duct hyperplasia, active melanomacrophage centers) and gills (fusion and edema of secondary lamellae, laminar telangiectasis, mononuclear cell infiltrates, blebs) were similar to those in the literature studies for both wild and laboratory exposed sculpins and

  20. Greenland New Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    China Sector: Solar Product: China-based firm involved in silicon thin film solar cell technology. Coordinates: 31.966261, 119.472687 Show Map Loading map......

  1. Microsoft Word - Gr-hBN boundary state (050214)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... B atoms are specified in blue, N atoms are green, carbons are black, and Cu atoms are ... The boundary states are located around 0.1 eV above the Fermi energy. The calculations ...

  2. Greenland Ice Sheet "Sliding" a Small Contributor to Future Sea...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    ... by DOE's Office of Science under contract DE-AC02-05CH11231) and at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (supported by DOE's Office of Science under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725). ...

  3. Sandia's ice sheet modeling of Greenland, Antarctica helps predict...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Wednesday, March 2, 2016 - 12:00am Sandia California researchers Irina Tezaur and Ray ... Read more. Related Topics California climate lanl Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory ...

  4. Greenland Ice Sheet Modeling Update (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Relation: Conference: Regional Arctic System Model workshop ; 2014-06-04 - ... Sponsoring Org: DOELANL Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: ...

  5. Meltwater effects on flow of Greenland's ice sheet less severe...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    more to future sea-level rise than when considering the increases in melting alone," said co-author Stephen Price of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Climate Ocean and Sea...

  6. Greenland Ice Sheet "Sliding" a Small Contributor to Future Sea...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    A wide range of observations suggests that water generated by melt at the ice sheet ... vertical well-like shafts within a glacier through which water enters from the surface). ...

  7. Update on Greenland Ice Sheet Simulations In CISM and CESM (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Lipscomb, William Henry 1 + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Laboratory Publication Date: 2016-02-12 OSTI Identifier: 1238137 Report Number(s): ...

  8. New Method Relates Greenland Ice Sheet Changes to Sea-Level Rise...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Click to enlarge photo. Enlarge Photo jpg image, 244418 bytes Image courtesy of NASA Earth Observatory via a Creative Commons ...

  9. EM Press Releases | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    is awarding two separate grants together totaling about 7 million to the Commonwealth of Kentucky, Energy and Environment Cabinet (EEC) for regulatory oversight of the Paducah...

  10. Management Council - Center for Solar and Thermal Energy Conversion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Organization  MANAGEMENT COUNCIL Peter Green, Dir. MSE Rachel Goldman MSE Ctirad Uher Physics Jamie Phillips EECS Max Shtein MSE Roy Clarke Physics Ted Goodson III Chemistry ...

  11. Assessment of Negligible Creep, Off-Normal Welding and Heat Treatment of Gr91 Steel for Nuclear Reactor Pressure Vessel Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, Weiju; Terry, Totemeier

    2006-10-01

    Two different topics of Grade 91 steel are investigated for Gen IV nuclear reactor pressure vessel application. On the first topic, negligible creep of Grade 91 is investigated with the motivation to design the reactor pressure vessel in negligible creep regime and eliminate costly surveillance programs during the reactor operation. Available negligible creep criteria and creep strain laws are reviewed, and new data needs are evaluated. It is concluded that modifications of the existing criteria and laws, together with their associated parameters, are needed before they can be reliably applied to Grade 91 for negligible creep prediction and reactor pressure vessel design. On the second topic, effects of off-normal welding and heat treatment on creep behavior of Grade 91 are studied with the motivation to better define the control over the parameters in welding and heat treatment procedures. The study is focused on off-normal austenitizing temperatures and improper cooling after welding but prior to post-weld heat treatment.

  12. Investigators - Center for Solar and Thermal Energy Conversion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Investigators Director Name Department Email Peter Green MSE/ChemE pfgreen@umich.edu Principal Investigators Name Department Email Akram Boukai MSE boukai@umich.edu Roy Clarke Physics royc@umich.edu Barry Dunietz Chemistry bdunietz@umich.edu Steve Forrest EECS/Phys/MSE stevefor@umich.edu Eitan Geva Chemistry eitan@umich.edu Rachel Goldman MSE/EECS/Phys rsgold@umich.edu Ted Goodson Chemistry tgoodson@umich.edu L (Jay) Guo EECS guo@umich.edu Massoud Kaviany ME kaviany@umich.edu John Kieffer MSE

  13. INSL5 may be a unique marker of colorectal endocrine cells and neuroendocrine tumors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mashima, Hirosato; Ohno, Hideki; Yamada, Yumi; Sakai, Toshitaka; Ohnishi, Hirohide

    2013-03-22

    Highlights: ► INSL5 is expressed in enteroendocrine cells along the colorectum. ► INSL5 is expressed increasingly from proximal colon to rectum. ► INSL5 co-localizes rarely with chromogranin A. ► All rectal neuroendocrine tumors examined expressed INSL5. -- Abstract: Insulin-like peptide 5 (INSL5) is a member of the insulin superfamily, and is a potent agonist for RXFP4. We have shown that INSL5 is expressed in enteroendocrine cells (EECs) along the colorectum with a gradient increase toward the rectum. RXFP4 is ubiquitously expressed along the digestive tract. INSL5-positive EECs have little immunoreactivity to chromogranin A (CgA) and might be a unique marker of colorectal EECs. CgA-positive EECs were distributed normally along the colorectum in INSL5 null mice, suggesting that INSL5 is not required for the development of CgA-positive EECs. Exogenous INSL5 did not affect the proliferation of human colon cancer cell lines, and chemically-induced colitis in INSL5 null mice did not show any significant changes in inflammation or mucosal healing compared to wild-type mice. In contrast, all of the rectal neuroendocrine tumors examined co-expressed INSL5 and RXFP4. INSL5 may be a unique marker of colorectal EECs, and INSL5–RXFP4 signaling might play a role in an autocrine/paracrine fashion in the colorectal epithelium and rectal neuroendocrine tumors.

  14. November

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Laboratory, won an R&D 100 Award. - 112015 Greenland ice loss. New climate model predicts likelihood of Greenland ice melt, sea level rise and dangerous temperatures A...

  15. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8, 2012 [Data Announcements, Facility News] New Data from Greenland for Arctic Climate Research Bookmark and Share Instruments for ICECAPS operate on top and inside of the Mobile Science Facility at Summit Station in Greenland. Instruments for ICECAPS operate on top and inside of the Mobile Science Facility at Summit Station in Greenland. In 2010, researchers installed a powerful suite of climate and weather instruments at Greenland's frozen research outpost, Summit Station, for a long-term

  16. Washington County, Arkansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Farmington, Arkansas Fayetteville, Arkansas Goshen, Arkansas Greenland, Arkansas Johnson, Arkansas Lincoln, Arkansas Prairie Grove, Arkansas Springdale, Arkansas Tontitown,...

  17. Marble_Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1. These seven electrodes are made of Oxygen free high conductivity copper. They are also gold-plated to avoid oxidation. 2. Insulators are made of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) The TAMUTRAP was designed to observe the angular distribution between β and ѵ for β-delayed proton emitters. It will also be capable of performing a wide range of other possible experiments such as mass spectroscopy. 3 By far the largest Penning Trap. 4 5 TEC TCE TEE R1 ECE EEC EEC R2 TD ED 6 38.625" 7.3335" TD ED

  18. First increment of second specimen results to performance assessment-long term corrosion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, F.

    1998-01-01

    In this correspondence, we report the 6 month corrosion data of corrosion resistant alloys (alloys 825, C22 & C4, and Ti Gr 12 & Ti Gr 16, and Inconel 625) and one year data of corrosion-allowance materials (A387 Gr22, A516 Gr55 and A27 Gr70-40), intermediate resistance alloys (Monel 400 and CDA 715) and corrosion resistant materials (alloys C22 and 625 only).

  19. Software-Defined Solutions for Managing Energy Use in Small Commercial Buildings

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Lead Performer: University of California, Berkeley Project Partners: -- California Institute for Energy & Enviornment - Berkeley, CA -- Software Defined Buildings/EECS/UC Berkeley - Berkeley, CA -- Western Regional Cooling Center/UC Davis - Davis, CA -- Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory - Berkeley, CA -- Building Robotics - Oakland, CA

  20. CX-001547: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant - Energy Efficiency and Conservation Summary (EECS) (S)CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1Date: 03/31/2010Location(s): LouisianaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  1. CX-003582: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Efficiency and Conservation Strategy (EECS) and Air Conditioning Unity Replacement-Police StationCX(s) Applied: A11, B1.4, B2.5, B5.1Date: 08/23/2010Location(s): Wauwatosa, WisconsinOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  2. Effect of ocean temperature on southwestern U.S. climate analyzed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    depicts sea surface temperatures around Greenland from October 2010. Assuming that the past is a good indicator of the future, the scientists conclude that there should be...

  3. Rockingham County, New Hampshire: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    New Hampshire Derry, New Hampshire East Kingston, New Hampshire Epping, New Hampshire Exeter, New Hampshire Fremont, New Hampshire Greenland, New Hampshire Hampstead, New...

  4. December

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory depicts sea surface temperatures around Greenland from October 2010. Effect of ocean temperature on southwestern U.S. climate analyzed Researchers concluded...

  5. NERSC Supercomputers Help Explain the Last Big Freeze

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atlantic (near Greenland), allowing it to disrupt the ocean's heat engine. "With 18 kilometers between each grid-point, we have the highest resolution ocean model in paleoclimate....

  6. The use of electrical impedance spectroscopy for monitoring the hydration products of Portland cement mortars with high percentage of pozzolans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cruz, J.M.; Fita, I.C.; Soriano, L.; Pay, J.; Borrachero, M.V.

    2013-08-15

    In this paper, mortars and pastes containing large replacement of pozzolan were studied by mechanical strength, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) and electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The effect of metakaolin (35%) and fly ash (60%) was evaluated and compared with an inert mineral addition (andalusite). The portlandite content was measured, finding that the pozzolanic reaction produced cementing systems with all portlandite fixed. The EIS measurements were analyzed by the equivalent electrical circuit (EEC) method. An EEC with three branches in parallel was applied. The dc resistance was related to the degree of hydration and allowed us to characterize plain and blended mortars. A constant phase element (CPE) quantified the electrical properties of the hydration products located in the solidsolution interface and was useful to distinguish the role of inert and pozzolanic admixtures present in the cement matrix.

  7. Edge equilibrium code for tokamaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Xujing; Drozdov, Vladimir V.

    2014-01-15

    The edge equilibrium code (EEC) described in this paper is developed for simulations of the near edge plasma using the finite element method. It solves the Grad-Shafranov equation in toroidal coordinate and uses adaptive grids aligned with magnetic field lines. Hermite finite elements are chosen for the numerical scheme. A fast Newton scheme which is the same as implemented in the equilibrium and stability code (ESC) is applied here to adjust the grids.

  8. Risk Group and Biosafety Level Definitions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Group and Biosafety Level Definitions European Economic Community (DIRECTIVE 93/88/EEC, Oct. 1993) (1) Group 1 biological agent means one that is unlikely to cause human disease; (2) Group 2 biological agent means one that can cause human disease and might be a hazard to workers; it is unlikely to spread to the community; there is usually effective prophylaxis or treatment available; (3) Group 3 biological agent means one that can cause severe human disease and present a serious hazard to

  9. Research Program - Center for Solar and Thermal Energy Conversion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In the Inorganic PV thrust, we develop nanostructured materials architectures for solar energy conversion by engineering absorption and transport properties not available in the bulk. In particular, we aim to exploit unique quantum effects at the nanoscale which are promising for the realization of new paradigms in solar energy conversion such as intermediate band or hot carrier solar cells. Thrust Leaders: Prof. Rachel Goldman (MSE)&nbspand Prof. Jamie Phillips (EECS) Recent Publications -

  10. PERI Auto-tuning Memory Intensive Kernels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PERI - Auto-tuning Memory Intensive Kernels for Multicore Samuel Williams † , Kaushik Datta † , Jonathan Carter , Leonid Oliker † , John Shalf , Katherine Yelick † , David Bailey CRD/NERSC, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA † Computer Science Division, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA E-mail: SWWilliams@lbl.gov, kdatta@eecs.berkeley.edu, JTCarter@lbl.gov, LOliker@lbl.gov, JShalf@lbl.gov, KAYelick@lbl.gov, DHBailey@lbl.gov

  11. Analyzing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Analyzing the Effect of Different Programming Models Upon Performance and Memory Usage on Cray XT5 Platforms Hongzhang Shan Future Technology Group, Computational Research Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 Haoqiang Jin NAS Division, NASA Arms Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035-1000 Karl Fuerlinger University of California at Berkeley, EECS Department, Computer Science Division Berkeley, CA 94720 Alice Koniges, Nicholas J. Wright NERSC, Lawrence Berkeley

  12. Microsoft PowerPoint - Horst Simon.BitstoBuidings2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Efficient Computing: From Bits to Energy Efficient Computing: From Bits to Buildings Horst D. Simon Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and EECS Dept., UC Berkeley hdsimon@lbl.gov The Salishan Conference on High-Speed Computing April 29, 2009 Acknowledgements A l b f i di id l h t ib t d t A large number of individuals have contributed to energy efficiency in computing at Berkeley Lab, UC Berkeley, and to this presentation: David Bailey (CRD), Michael

  13. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    advances understanding of the Greenland Ice Sheet's meltwater channels October 1, 2014 EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE: Wednesday, Oct. 1, 2014, 1 p.m. ET LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Oct. 1, 2014-An international research team's field work, drilling and measuring melt rates and ice sheet movement in Greenland is showing that things are, in fact, more complicated than we thought. "Although the Greenland Ice Sheet initially speeds up each summer in its slow-motion race to the sea, the network of meltwater

  14. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets will make a dominant contribution to twenty-first century sea-level rise if current climate trends continue, studied in a five-year project ...

  15. LMS-AMC-S01980-0-0.cdr

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    1965-2005 Year Pollock Pacific Cod Sable Fish Yellow Fin Sole Greenland Turbot Arrow Tooth Flounder a Rock Sole c Other Flat Fish Alaska Plaice Pacific Ocean Complex b Pacific ...

  16. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10, 2010 [Facility News] Supporting Science at Summit Station, Greenland Bookmark and Share This month, an ARM micropulse lidar and ceilometer began collecting data from Summit Station in Greenland as part of the ICECAPS field campaign that runs through October 2014. Scientist Matthew Shupe joined colleagues on location to install the ICECAPS mobile laboratory, documenting their progress through his field blog. Great job, Matt! Visit the campaign website for more information

  17. Sandia National Laboratories:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    05, 2016 Articles Nondestructive Testing Nondestructive Testing: Sandia looks inside composites Sandia takes home three national tech transfer awards Decon, bombs, and above and beyond Sandians win Black Engineer of the Year awards Sandians win Black Engineer of the Year awards Ice sheet modeling of Greenland, Antarctica helps predict sea-level rise Ice sheet modeling of Greenland, Antarctica helps predict sea-level rise Making waves Making waves Grid modernization Grid modernization New Mexico

  18. Oak Ridge National Laboratory | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory A snapshot of NNSA's counterterrorism mission NNSA's mission of counterterrorism and counterproliferation is supported through innovative science and technology. Recently, Associate Administrator and Deputy Undersecretary for Counterterrorism and Counterproliferation Jay Tilden visited Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and met with... Sandia's ice sheet modeling of Greenland, Antarctica helps predict sea-level rise The Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets will make

  19. climate | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    climate NNSA labs fight fire with simulation Fire season is in full swing in the driest parts of the United States, and capabilities of NNSA's labs are helping equip firefighters in the heated battle to save property and environment. NNSA's labs are perfectly suited to support emergency response related to fire. A long history of... Sandia's ice sheet modeling of Greenland, Antarctica helps predict sea-level rise The Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets will make a dominant contribution to 21st

  20. ornl | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ornl A snapshot of NNSA's counterterrorism mission NNSA's mission of counterterrorism and counterproliferation is supported through innovative science and technology. Recently, Associate Administrator and Deputy Undersecretary for Counterterrorism and Counterproliferation Jay Tilden visited Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and met with... Sandia's ice sheet modeling of Greenland, Antarctica helps predict sea-level rise The Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets will make a dominant contribution

  1. clothiaux-98.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    climate NNSA labs fight fire with simulation Fire season is in full swing in the driest parts of the United States, and capabilities of NNSA's labs are helping equip firefighters in the heated battle to save property and environment. NNSA's labs are perfectly suited to support emergency response related to fire. A long history of... Sandia's ice sheet modeling of Greenland, Antarctica helps predict sea-level rise The Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets will make a dominant contribution to 21st

  2. ovtchinnikov-98.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ornl A snapshot of NNSA's counterterrorism mission NNSA's mission of counterterrorism and counterproliferation is supported through innovative science and technology. Recently, Associate Administrator and Deputy Undersecretary for Counterterrorism and Counterproliferation Jay Tilden visited Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and met with... Sandia's ice sheet modeling of Greenland, Antarctica helps predict sea-level rise The Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets will make a dominant contribution

  3. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    climate model predicts likelihood of Greenland ice melt, sea level rise and dangerous temperatures November 20, 2015 LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Nov. 16, 2015-A new computer model of accumulated carbon emissions predicts the likelihood of crossing several dangerous climate change thresholds. These include global temperature rise sufficient to lose the Greenland Ice Sheet and generate seven meters of long-term sea level rise, or tropical region warming to a level that is deadly to humans and other

  4. Thermal Gradient Holes At Breitenbush Hot Springs Area (Ingebritsen...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (1993) Heat Flow From Four New Research Drill Holes In The Western Cascades, Oregon, Usa Additional References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleThermalGr...

  5. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Journal Reference: Street LE, GR Shaver, EB Rastetter, MT van Wijk, BA Kaye, and M Williams. 2012. "Incident radiation and the allocation of nitrogen within Arctic plant...

  6. Micro-Earthquake At Coso Geothermal Area (2007) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    area Julian, B.R.; Foulger, G.R. (1 January 2010) IMPROVED METHODS FOR MAPPING PERMEABILITY AND HEAT SOURCES IN GEOTHERMAL AREAS USING MICROEARTHQUAKE DATA Additional...

  7. Selecting The Optimal Logging Suite For Geothermal Reservoir...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and tensile wall fractures, and were adequate to detect stratigraphic features. Density, photo-electric factor (PEF), neutron, and gamma ray (GR) logs provided sufficient...

  8. Neutron Log At Alum Area (Moos & Ronne, 2010) | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technique Neutron Log Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Density, photo-electric factor (PEF), neutron, and gamma ray (GR) logs provided sufficient...

  9. Gamma Log At Alum Area (Moos & Ronne, 2010) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technique Gamma Log Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Density, photo-electric factor (PEF), neutron, and gamma ray (GR) logs provided sufficient...

  10. Lion Energy SA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Lion Energy SA Place: Athens, Greece Zip: GR 152 35 Sector: Hydro, Hydrogen, Solar Product: Lion Energy owns proprietary technologies for conversion of waste...

  11. CHEM.PLANT.ADMIN.REC.302.1.08.T.PDF

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... quench scrubber, a submicron aerosol scrubber, a nitrogen oxide gas removal system, ... Particulate emissions must not exceed 180 mgdscm (dry standard cubic meter) or 0.008 gr...

  12. Control system and method for a hybrid electric vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tamor, Michael Alan

    2001-03-06

    Several control methods are presented for application in a hybrid electric vehicle powertrain including in various embodiments an engine, a motor/generator, a transmission coupled at an input thereof to receive torque from the engine and the motor generator coupled to augment torque provided by the engine, an energy storage device coupled to receive energy from and provide energy to the motor/generator, an engine controller (EEC) coupled to control the engine, a transmission controller (TCM) coupled to control the transmission and a vehicle system controller (VSC) adapted to control the powertrain.

  13. # Energy Measuremenfs Group

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ri EECE # Energy Measuremenfs Group SUMMARY REPORT . AiRIAL R4DIOLOGICAL SURVEY - NIAGARA FALLS AREA NIAGARA FALLS, NEh' YORK DATE OF SURVEY: SEPTEMBER 1979 APPROVED FOR DISTRIBUTION: P Stuart, EC&G, Inc. . . Herbirt F. Hahn, Department of Energy PERFDRflED BY EGtf, INC. UNDER CONTRACT NO. DE-AHO&76NV01163 WITH THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY II'AFID 010 November 30, 1979 - The Aerial Measurements System (A%), operated by EC&t, Inc< for the Un i ted States Department of

  14. DOE HQ Special Needs in an Emergency

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    T he in fo rm at io n m ay be ag gr eg at ed in to li st s, ch ar ts , an d or gr ap hs . In fo rm at io n pr ov id ed ne ed on ly de sc ri be th e ki nd of as si st an ce re qu ...

  15. Influence of emission threshold of explosive emission cathodes on current waveform in foilless diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, P.; Liu, G. Z.; Huo, S. F.; Sun, J.; Chen, C. H.

    2015-08-15

    The emission threshold of explosive emission cathodes (EECs) is an important factor for beam quality. It can affect the explosive emission delay time, the plasma expansion process on the cathode surface, and even the current amplitude when the current is not fully space-charge-limited. This paper researches the influence of the emission threshold of an annular EEC on the current waveform in a foilless diode when the current is measured by a Rogowski coil. The particle-in-cell simulation which is performed under some tolerable and necessary simplifications shows that the long explosive emission delay time of high-threshold cathodes may leave an apparent peak of displacement current on the rise edge of the current waveform, and this will occur only when the electron emission starts after this peak. The experimental researches, which are performed under a diode voltage of 1 MV and a repetitive frequency of 20 Hz, demonstrate that the graphite cathode has a lower emission threshold and a longer lifetime than the stainless steel cathode according to the variation of the peak of displacement current on the rise edge of the current waveform.

  16. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3, 2013 [Facility News, Feature Stories and Releases] Cloud Cocktail Melts Greenland Ice Sheet Bookmark and Share Like the partygoer that just won't leave, low-level clouds hang around and cause temperatures to rise Not all clouds are created equal-especially in the Arctic. New research published in the journal Nature shows that low-level clouds in Greenland that contain just the right amount of water are thick enough to block heat from escaping to space, but thin enough to allow sunlight to

  17. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Meltwater effects on flow of Greenland's ice sheet less severe for sea level rise than earlier feared, scientists say August 19, 2013 LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Aug. 19, 2013-The effects of increased melting on the future motion of and sea-level contribution from Greenland's massive ice sheet are not quite as dire as previously thought, according to a new study from an international team of researchers. In a paper published this month in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), the team

  18. Efficient H{sub 2} production over Au/graphene/TiO{sub 2} induced by surface plasmon resonance of Au and band-gap excitation of TiO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Yang; Yu, Hongtao; Wang, Hua; Chen, Shuo; Quan, Xie

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: Both surface plasmon resonance and band-gap excitation were used for H{sub 2} production. Au/Gr/TiO{sub 2} composite photocatalyst was synthesized. Au/Gr/TiO{sub 2} exhibited enhancement of light absorption and charge separation. H{sub 2} production rate of Au/Gr/TiO{sub 2} was about 2 times as high as that of Au/TiO{sub 2}. - Abstract: H{sub 2} production over Au/Gr/TiO{sub 2} composite photocatalyst induced by surface plasmon resonance of Au and band-gap excitation of TiO{sub 2} using graphene (Gr) as an electron acceptor has been investigated. Electron paramagnetic resonance study indicated that, in this composite, Gr collected electrons not only from Au with surface plasmon resonance but also from TiO{sub 2} with band-gap excitation. Surface photovoltage and UVvis absorption measurements revealed that compared with Au/TiO{sub 2}, Au/Gr/TiO{sub 2} displayed more effective photogenerated charge separation and higher optical absorption. Benefiting from these advantages, the H{sub 2} production rate of Au/Gr/TiO{sub 2} composite with Gr content of 1.0 wt% and Au content of 2.0 wt% was about 2 times as high as that of Au/TiO{sub 2}. This work represents an important step toward the efficient application of both surface plasmon resonance and band-gap excitation on the way to converting solar light into chemical energy.

  19. Enhanced efficiency of graphene-silicon Schottky junction solar cells by doping with Au nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, X.; Zhang, X. W. Yin, Z. G.; Meng, J. H.; Gao, H. L.; Zhang, L. Q.; Zhao, Y. J.; Wang, H. L.

    2014-11-03

    We have reported a method to enhance the performance of graphene-Si (Gr/Si) Schottky junction solar cells by introducing Au nanoparticles (NPs) onto the monolayer graphene and few-layer graphene. The electron transfer between Au NPs and graphene leads to the increased work function and enhanced electrical conductivity of graphene, resulting in a remarkable improvement of device efficiency. By optimizing the initial thickness of Au layers, the power conversion efficiency of Gr/Si solar cells can be increased by more than three times, with a maximum value of 7.34%. These results show a route for fabricating efficient and stable Gr/Si solar cells.

  20. G R Inc formerly known as Jawon Medical Co Ltd | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    R Inc formerly known as Jawon Medical Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: G&R Inc (formerly known as Jawon Medical Co Ltd) Place: Gwangju, Gwangju, Korea (Republic) Zip:...

  1. McClean-DE-FG02-05ER64119_final

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Oceanography University of California, San Diego 9500 Gilman Drive, 0230 La ... Bering Sea. Ph.D. Thesis, University of California, San Diego, USA, 2013. 2. Wang, J, G.R. ...

  2. What will the Smart Grid Look Like?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... consistent market operation across regions. reVISIon date: 32009 For more InFormatIon Go to: www.themodernGrId.orG Fourth, it will provide power quality for the digital economy. ...

  3. CHRISTIAN SEIGNEUR

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Huang, M., G.R. Carmichael, S. Kulkarni, D.G. Streets, Z. Lu, Q. Zhang, R.B. Pierce, Y. Kondo, J.L. Jimenez, M.J. Cubison, B. Anderson, and A. Wisthaler, Sectoral and Geographical...

  4. CX-002557: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    G.R. SilicateCX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 05/26/2010Location(s): Hoquiam, WashingtonOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  5. Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    March 19, 2013 | Author(s): Alex Friedman, LLNL | Download File: ndcx40g.r6000res1280ipstep5faster.mov | mov | 26 MB Kinetic Modelling in ICF March 19, 2013 | Author(s): Chuang ...

  6. BABAR-PUB-14/002 SLAC-PUB-15979

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ab , 55 G. Piredda a , 55 C. B unger, 56 S. Dittrich, 56 O. Gr unberg, 56 T. Hartmann, 56 M. Hess, 56 T. Leddig, 56 C. Vo, 56 R. Waldi, 56 T. Adye, 57 E. O. Olaiya, 57...

  7. Gabriel Rodriguez-Calero > Postdoc - Abruña Group > Researchers, Postdocs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Graduates > The Energy Materials Center at Cornell Gabriel Rodriguez-Calero Postdoc - Abruña Group gr235@cornell.edu Gabriel received his PhD in Summer 2014.

  8. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Hogg, D.W. (2) Ichikawa, S.-I. (2) Inada, Naohisa (2) Ivezic, Z. (2) Kayo, Issha (2) Kent, S. (2) Knapp, G.R. (2) Morokuma, Tomoki (2) Save Results Save this search to My...

  9. Press Pass - Press Releases

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tufts University: Cindy Pollard, 617-627-3175, cynthia.pollard@tufts.edu Greece: University of Athens: Elias Marselos, 1-36 89 772, elmars@interel.uoa.gr Korea:...

  10. ARM XDC Datastreams

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... GR HAIL RA RAIN DZ DRIZZLE SN SNOW SG SNOW GRAINS GS SMALL HAIL &OR SNOW PELLETS PE ICE PELLETS IC CRYSTALS FG+ HEAVY FOG (FG & LE.25 MILES) FG FOG BR MIST UP UNKNOWN ...

  11. Directory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    order Object Created Object Last Modified Assessment of Negligible Creep Off-Normal Welding and Heat Treatment of GR91 Steel for Nuclear Reactor Pressure Vessel Application.pdf...

  12. Rolls Royce Fuel Cell Systems Ltd RRFCS | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rolls Royce Fuel Cell Systems Ltd RRFCS Jump to: navigation, search Name: Rolls-Royce Fuel Cell Systems Ltd (RRFCS) Place: Leicestershire, England, United Kingdom Zip: LE11 3GR...

  13. Glossary Glossary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    calculated in terms of the following for- mula: Deg API 141.5 sp gr60degF 60degF - 131.5 The higher the API gravity, the lighter the compound. Light crudes generally exceed...

  14. Technical Sessions J. C. Doran Pacific; Northwest Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a site, we hoped to see a clear signature of the effElcts of surface inhomogeneities, test one or more par;metric schemes relating turbulent fluxes to vertical gr;dients of...

  15. Center for Materials at Irradiation and Mechanical Extremes:...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    dpa rates"J Nucl Mat. 367-370 (2007) 399 R.J. Kurtz, G.R. Odette, T. Yamamoto, D.S. Gelles et. al: The transport and fate of helium in martensitic steels at fusion relevant He...

  16. A=19O (1983AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    83AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 19O) GENERAL: See (1978AJ03) and Table 19.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1977GR16, 1979DA15, 1980KU05, 1982KI02). Electromagnetic transitions: (1976MC1G, 1978KR19, 1980KU05). Special states: (1977GR16, 1977SH18, 1979DA15, 1982KI02). Astrophysical questions: (1978WO1E). Complex reactions involving 19O: (1978KO01, 1979AL22, 1981GR08). Other topics: (1977GR16, 1977SH18, 1979BE1H, 1979CO09, 1980SH1H, 1982KI02). Ground-state properties

  17. A=6B (2002TI10)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2002TI10) (Not illustrated) Not observed: see ( 1984AJ01, 1989GR06 [6Li(π+, π-) at Eπ+ = 180, 240 MeV], 1993PO11 [properties of exotic light nuclei]) (1998SU18

  18. A=6C (2002TI10)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2002TI10) (Not illustrated) Not observed: see (1979AJ01, 1984AJ01, 1989GR06 [6Li(π+, π-) at Eπ+ = 180, 240 MeV], 1993PO11 [properties of exotic light nuclei]) (1998SU18

  19. NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    00 Florida Int'l Univ Miami, FL The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio FE/TDIC/Coal/ETP Jessica Mullen The Fundamental Creep Behavior Model of Gr.91 Alloy by Integrated Computational In the current proposed work, the Recipient shall mainly investigate the Gr.91 base alloy and weldment with the Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME) approach. JESSICA MULLEN Digitally signed by JESSICA MULLEN DN: c=US, o=U.S. Government, ou=Department of Energy, cn=JESSICA MULLEN,

  20. The role of intrahepatic CD3 +/CD4 −/CD8 − double negative T (DN T) cells in enhanced acetaminophen toxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Getachew, Yonas; Cusimano, Frank A.; James, Laura P.; Thiele, Dwain L.

    2014-10-15

    The role of the immune system, specifically NK, NKT and CD3 cells, in acetaminophen (APAP) induced liver injury remains inconsistently defined. In the present study, wild type (C57BL/6J) mice and granzyme B deficient (GrB −/−) mice were treated with acetaminophen to assess the role of the immune system in acute liver injury. Doses of acetaminophen that induced sub lethal liver injury in wild type mice unexpectedly produced fatal hepatotoxicity in granzyme B deficient (GrB −/−) mice. Analysis revealed that GrB −/− mice had an increased population of intrahepatic CD3 (+), CD4 (−), and CD8 (−) lymphocytes expressing the CD69 activation marker and Fas ligand. Depletion of these cells in the GrB −/− and wild type mice made them less susceptible to APAP injury, while depletion of NK1.1 (+) cells or both CD4 (+) and CD8 (+) T cells failed to provide the same hepatoprotection. Transfer of the GrB −/− IHLs further exacerbated liver injury and increased mortality in wild type mice but not in LRP/LPR mice, lacking fas expression. Conclusions: Acetaminophen toxicity is enhanced by the presence of activated, FasL expressing intrahepatic CD3 (+), CD4 (−), CD8 (−), NK1.1 (−) T cells. Depletion of these cells from GrB −/− mice and wild type mice greatly reduces mortality and improves the course of liver injury recovery. - Highlights: • Intrahepatic lymphocytes (IHLs) from GrB −/− mice harbor activated DNT cells. • IHLs from GrB −/− mice exhibit enhanced Fas ligand expression. • Acetaminophen toxicity is enhanced by activated, FasL expressing DNT cells.

  1. Desk study of production energy savings control systems feasibility study. (Russia). Volume 1. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-07-17

    The objective of the feasibility study is to determine the marketability of heating/ventilating energy conserving control systems in the major city markets of eastern Russia. The second part of the objective is to determine if the existing military based Zelenograd micro-electronic manufacturing and research facility can be utilized to produce Direct Digital Control systems for use within Russia as well as for export to the European Economic Community (EEC) and other countries. Because significant exports of U.S. products and services to support the joint venture are questionable, it is suggested that, potential markets for U.S. products be identified. Sources of capital to finance the joint venture should be identified.

  2. Progress in passive solar energy systems. Volume 8. Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayes, J.; Andrejko, D.A.

    1983-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference sponsored by the US DOE, the Solar Energy Research Institute, SolarVision, Inc., and the Southern California Solar Energy Society. The topics considered at the conference included sizing solar energy systems for agricultural applications, a farm scale ethanol production plant, the EEC wind energy RandD program, the passive solar performance assessment of an earth-sheltered house, the ARCO 1 MW photovoltaic power plant, the performance of a dendritic web photovoltaic module, second generation point focused concentrators, linear fresnel lens concentrating photovoltaic collectors, photovoltaic conversion efficiency, amorphous silicon thin film solar cells, a photovoltaic system for a shopping center, photovoltaic power generation for the utility industry, spectral solar radiation, and the analysis of insolation data.

  3. A study of photocatalytic grapheneTiO{sub 2} synthesis via peroxo titanic acid refluxed sol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Low, Wasu; Boonamnuayvitaya, Virote

    2013-08-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: TiO{sub 2} synthesized via PTA as a precursor demonstrates exclusively anatase phase. The TEM image of GRTiO{sub 2} (PTA) demonstrates that TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles are successfully loaded onto graphene sheet. The specific surface area seems to increase with increasing weight ratio of graphene oxide. It was observed that GRTiO{sub 2} showed higher adsorption compared to bare TiO{sub 2} (PTA). The GRTiO{sub 2} (PTA, 1:50) catalyst showed higher photocatalytic activity than any other catalyst. - Abstract: In the present work, grapheneTiO{sub 2} (GRTiO{sub 2}) photocatalyst with various weight ratios of graphene was synthesized using peroxo titanic acid solution (PTA) as a precursor for TiO{sub 2}. Graphene oxide prepared by Hummer's method was converted to graphene under ultraviolet (UV) irradiation in ethanolwater solvent for 48 h. The as-prepared GRTiO{sub 2} composites were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, UVvis spectrophotometry, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The automated potentiostat was applied to measure the photocurrent generations of prepared catalysts. The photocatalytic activities of GRTiO{sub 2} (PTA) catalysts were determined by measuring the percentage methylene blue (MB) degradation. The results showed that TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were successfully loaded onto graphene sheet and the surface area of catalysts increased with increasing weight ratio of graphene. In addition, GRTiO{sub 2} (PTA, 1:50) exhibited the highest photocatalytic activity among the catalysts under UV and visible light irradiation. The adsorption edge of GRTiO{sub 2} was shifted to a longer wavelength of 400 nm in comparison with that of pure TiO{sub 2} (PTA). The increase in the photocatalytic performance of GRTiO{sub 2} (PTA) catalyst may be attributed to the increase in surface area, the extension of light absorption in the visible light region, and

  4. Extracting the three- and four-graviton vertices from binary pulsars and coalescing binaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cannella, Umberto; Foffa, Stefano; Maggiore, Michele; Sanctuary, Hillary; Sturani, Riccardo

    2009-12-15

    Using a formulation of the post-Newtonian expansion in terms of Feynman graphs, we discuss how various tests of general relativity (GR) can be translated into measurement of the three- and four-graviton vertices. In problems involving only the conservative dynamics of a system, a deviation of the three-graviton vertex from the GR prediction is equivalent, to lowest order, to the introduction of the parameter {beta}{sub PPN} in the parametrized post-Newtonian formalism, and its strongest bound comes from lunar laser ranging, which measures it at the 0.02% level. Deviation of the three-graviton vertex from the GR prediction, however, also affects the radiative sector of the theory. We show that the timing of the Hulse-Taylor binary pulsar provides a bound on the deviation of the three-graviton vertex from the GR prediction at the 0.1% level. For coalescing binaries at interferometers we find that, because of degeneracies with other parameters in the template such as mass and spin, the effects of modified three- and four-graviton vertices is just to induce an error in the determination of these parameters and, at least in the restricted PN approximation, it is not possible to use coalescing binaries for constraining deviations of the vertices from the GR prediction.

  5. Effect of ocean temperature on southwestern U.S. climate analyzed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Effect of ocean temperature on southwestern climate Effect of ocean temperature on southwestern U.S. climate analyzed Researchers concluded that only part of the recent temperature rise in the Southwest could be attributed to greenhouse gases. December 19, 2013 Image from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Environmental Visualization Laboratory depicts sea surface temperatures around Greenland from October 2010. Image from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's

  6. News Stories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News Stories News Stories Featured articles about DOE Office of Science programs and people at Los Alamos. Advanced Scientific Computing Greenland Ice Sheet "Sliding" a Small Contributor to Future Sea-Level Rise Awards Ten Los Alamos scientists, including four sponsored by the DOE Office of Science, honored by American Physical Society Los Alamos scientist Christopher Lee to receive DOE Office of Science Early Career Award Laboratory Chemist selected as the 2015 recipient of the F.

  7. Effect of ocean temperature on southwestern U.S. climate analyzed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    December » Effect of ocean temperature on southwestern climate Effect of ocean temperature on southwestern U.S. climate analyzed Researchers concluded that only part of the recent temperature rise in the Southwest could be attributed to greenhouse gases. December 19, 2013 Image from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Environmental Visualization Laboratory depicts sea surface temperatures around Greenland from October 2010. Image from National Oceanic and Atmospheric

  8. PISCEES for prediction

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PISCEES for prediction PISCEES for prediction The Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets will make a dominant contribution to twenty-first century sea-level rise if current climate trends continue, studied in a five-year project called Predicting Ice Sheet and Climate Evolution at Extreme Scales (PISCEES) February 19, 2016 Human-gorilla divergence may have occurred two million years earlier than thought (Photo : Flickr: Rod Waddington) Antarctica "The data we get from climate scientists are

  9. Microsoft PowerPoint - 06_ARM_AWG_Lacis_2007.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geoengineering: Geoengineering: Plan B Remedy for Global Warming y g Andy Lacis Aerosol Working Group 26 March 2007 Some Radiative Aspects of Proposed Geoengineering Countermeasures to Global Warming (submitted to PNAS) g ( ) Andrew A. Lacis, Jennifer L. Alltop, Solomon M. Hsiang, Kirk D. Knobelspiesse, Jing Li, Cindy B. Pearl Accelerated melting of Greenland ice due to global warming . . . How can aerosols be used to counteract global warming? * Injection of sulfur into the lower stratosphere *

  10. Science Briefs - 2013

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Briefs - 2013 Read in detail about specific Los Alamos science achievements, and the honors our scientists are accruing. Image from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Environmental Visualization Laboratory depicts sea surface temperatures around Greenland from October 2010. Effect of ocean temperature on southwestern U.S. climate analyzed Researchers concluded that only part of the recent temperature rise in the Southwest could be attributed to greenhouse gases. -

  11. Raman scattering from superhard rhenium diboride under high pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Miao; Winkler, Björn; Mao, Zhu; Kaner, Richard B.; Tolbert, Sarah H. E-mail: tolbert@chem.ucla.edu; Kavner, Abby E-mail: tolbert@chem.ucla.edu

    2014-01-06

    Lattice vibrational properties of superhard rhenium diboride (ReB{sub 2}) were examined up to 8 GPa in a diamond anvil cell using Raman spectroscopy techniques. Linear pressure coefficients and mode Grüneisen parameters are obtained. Good agreement is found between the experimental and theoretical calculated Grüneisen parameters. Examination of the calculated mode Grüneisen parameters reveals that both B-B and Re-B covalent bonds play a dominant role in supporting the applied load under pressure. A comparison of vibrations parallel and perpendicular to the c-axis indicates that bonds along the c-axis tend to take greater loads. Our results agree with observations of elastic lattice anisotropy obtained from both in situ X-ray diffraction measurements and ultrasonic resonance spectra.

  12. A=20O (1983AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 20O) GENERAL: See also (1978AJ03) and Table 20.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations: (1977GR16). Special states: (1977GR16). Astrophysical questions: (1978WO1E). Other topics: (1977GR16, 1978RA1J, 1979BE1H). 1. 20O(β-)20F Qm = 3.816 20O decays to 20F*(1.06) [Jπ = 1+] with a half-life of 13.51 ± 0.05 sec (weighted mean of (1970MA42, 1974AL09)), log ft = 3.75 ± 0.01. Upper limits for the branching to other states of 20F are shown

  13. Development of integraded mechanistically-based degradation-mode models for performance assessment of high-level waste containers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, J. C., LLNL

    1998-06-01

    A key component of the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) being designed for containment of spent-fuel and high-level waste at the proposed geological repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada is a two-tayer canister. In this particular design, the inner barrier is made of a corrosion resistant material (CRM) such as Alloy 825, 625 or C-22, while the outer barrier is made of a corrosion-allowance material (CAM) such as A516 Gr 55 or Monel 400. At the present time, Alloy C- 22 and A516 Gr 55 are favored.

  14. Import Manipulate Plot RELAP5/MOD3 Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, K. R.

    1999-10-05

    XMGR5 was derived from an XY plotting tool called ACE/gr, which is copyrighted by Paul J. Turner and in the public domain. The interactive version of ACE/GR is xmgr, and includes a graphical interface to the X-windows system. Enhancements to xmgr have been developed which import, manipualate, and plot data from RELAP/MOD3, MELCOR, FRAPCON, and SINDA codes, and NRC databank files. capabilities, include two-phase property table lookup functions, an equation interpreter, arithmetic library functions, and units conversion. Plot titles, labels, legends, and narrative can be displayed using Latin or Cyrillic alphabets.

  15. Molecular Solid EOS based on Quasi-Harmonic Oscillator approximation for phonons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2014-09-02

    A complete equation of state (EOS) for a molecular solid is derived utilizing a Helmholtz free energy. Assuming that the solid is nonconducting, phonon excitations dominate the specific heat. Phonons are approximated as independent quasi-harmonic oscillators with vibrational frequencies depending on the specific volume. The model is suitable for calibrating an EOS based on isothermal compression data and infrared/Raman spectroscopy data from high pressure measurements utilizing a diamond anvil cell. In contrast to a Mie-Gr ̈uneisen EOS developed for an atomic solid, the specific heat and Gr ̈uneisen coefficient depend on both density and temperature.

  16. Import Manipulate Plot RELAP5/MOD3 Data

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1999-10-05

    XMGR5 was derived from an XY plotting tool called ACE/gr, which is copyrighted by Paul J. Turner and in the public domain. The interactive version of ACE/GR is xmgr, and includes a graphical interface to the X-windows system. Enhancements to xmgr have been developed which import, manipualate, and plot data from RELAP/MOD3, MELCOR, FRAPCON, and SINDA codes, and NRC databank files. capabilities, include two-phase property table lookup functions, an equation interpreter, arithmetic library functions, andmore » units conversion. Plot titles, labels, legends, and narrative can be displayed using Latin or Cyrillic alphabets.« less

  17. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    62 1957GR1D Groshev and Demidov, Sov. J. At. Energy 3 (1957) 853 1957HA1K S.S. Hanna and L. Meyer-Schutzmeister, Phys. Rev. 108 (1957) 1644 1957HE1C Hebbard, Ph.D.Thesis, Univ. of...

  18. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ER RI I W Wi in nt te er r S Su ur rf fa ac ce e G Gr re ee en nh ho ou us se e F Fl lu ux xe es s Greenhouse Gas Emission Band (cm -1 ) GL Flux (Wm 2 ) AERI Flux (Wm 2 ) CFC-11...

  19. Testing universal relations of neutron stars with a nonlinear matter-gravity coupling theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sham, Y.-H.; Lin, L.-M.; Leung, P. T. E-mail: lmlin@phy.cuhk.edu.hk

    2014-02-01

    Due to our ignorance of the equation of state (EOS) beyond nuclear density, there is still no unique theoretical model for neutron stars (NSs). It is therefore surprising that universal EOS-independent relations connecting different physical quantities of NSs can exist. Lau et al. found that the frequency of the f-mode oscillation, the mass, and the moment of inertia are connected by universal relations. More recently, Yagi and Yunes discovered the I-Love-Q universal relations among the mass, the moment of inertia, the Love number, and the quadrupole moment. In this paper, we study these universal relations in the Eddington-inspired Born-Infeld (EiBI) gravity. This theory differs from general relativity (GR) significantly only at high densities due to the nonlinear coupling between matter and gravity. It thus provides us an ideal case to test how robust the universal relations of NSs are with respect to the change of the gravity theory. Due to the apparent EOS formulation of EiBI gravity developed recently by Delsate and Steinhoff, we are able to study the universal relations in EiBI gravity using the same techniques as those in GR. We find that the universal relations in EiBI gravity are essentially the same as those in GR. Our work shows that, within the currently viable coupling constant, there exists at least one modified gravity theory that is indistinguishable from GR in view of the unexpected universal relations.

  20. Globular and Open Clusters Observed by SDSS/SEGUE: the Giant Stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrison, Heather L.; Ma, Zhibo; Clem, James L.; An, Deokkeun; Connor, Thomas; Schechtman-Rook, Andrew; Harding, Paul; Casagrande, Luca; Rockosi, Constance; Yanny, Brian; Beers, Timothy C.; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Schneider, Donald P.

    2015-12-21

    We present griz observations for the clusters M92, M13 and NGC 6791 and gr photometry for M71, Be 29 and NGC 7789. In addition we present new membership identifications for all these clusters, which have been observed spectroscopically as calibrators for the SDSS/SEGUE survey; this paper focuses in particular on the red giant branch stars in the clusters. In a number of cases, these giants were too bright to be observed in the normal SDSS survey operations, and we describe the procedure used to obtain spectra for these stars. For M71, also present a new variable reddening map and a new fiducial for the gr giant branch. For NGC 7789, we derived a transformation from Teff to g-r for giants of near solar abundance, using IRFM Teff measures of stars with good ugriz and 2MASS photometry and SEGUE spectra. The result of our analysis is a robust list of known cluster members with correctly dereddened and (if needed) transformed gr photometry for crucial calibration efforts for SDSS and SEGUE.

  1. U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 99-310

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    r e d fr om Gr a v i t y D a ta , Ne va da Test Si te , N e va da by G.A. Phelps 1 , V.E. ... Figure 1. Map showing simplified geology of the Nevada Test Site region. White, Cenozoic ...

  2. Globular and Open Clusters Observed by SDSS/SEGUE: the Giant Stars

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Morrison, Heather L.; Ma, Zhibo; Clem, James L.; An, Deokkeun; Connor, Thomas; Schechtman-Rook, Andrew; Harding, Paul; Casagrande, Luca; Rockosi, Constance; Yanny, Brian; et al

    2015-12-21

    We present griz observations for the clusters M92, M13 and NGC 6791 and gr photometry for M71, Be 29 and NGC 7789. In addition we present new membership identifications for all these clusters, which have been observed spectroscopically as calibrators for the SDSS/SEGUE survey; this paper focuses in particular on the red giant branch stars in the clusters. In a number of cases, these giants were too bright to be observed in the normal SDSS survey operations, and we describe the procedure used to obtain spectra for these stars. For M71, also present a new variable reddening map and amore » new fiducial for the gr giant branch. For NGC 7789, we derived a transformation from Teff to g-r for giants of near solar abundance, using IRFM Teff measures of stars with good ugriz and 2MASS photometry and SEGUE spectra. The result of our analysis is a robust list of known cluster members with correctly dereddened and (if needed) transformed gr photometry for crucial calibration efforts for SDSS and SEGUE.« less

  3. APPOLLO 9

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    le DG B.Grégory prend la parole et introduit le cosmonaute américain Russell Schweickart, qui fait un exposé sur la mission APPOLLO 9 et l'avenir de l'exploration spatiale avec présentation d'un film avec musique, mais sans parole, après commentaires et questions

  4. A=17F (71AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electromagnetic transitions: (BA59M, FA59E, RA60B, BA64AA, GR65E, KA65F, MA66BB, KA67J, ... The decay is to the ground state of 17O. The spectrum has the allowed shape down to 150 ...

  5. Enhancing the use of coals by gas reburning-sorbent injection: Volume 4 -- Gas reburning-sorbent injection at Lakeside Unit 7, City Water, Light and Power, Springfield, Illinois. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-03-01

    A demonstration of Gas Reburning-Sorbent Injection (GR-SI) has been completed at a cyclone-fired utility boiler. The Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER) has designed, retrofitted and tested a GR-SI system at City Water Light and Power`s 33 MWe Lakeside Station Unit 7. The program goals of 60% NO{sub x} emissions reduction and 50% SO{sub 2} emissions reduction were exceeded over the long-term testing period; the NO{sub x} reduction averaged 63% and the SO{sub 2} reduction averaged 58%. These were achieved with an average gas heat input of 22% and a calcium (sorbent) to sulfur (coal) molar ratio of 1.8. GR-SI resulted in a reduction in thermal efficiency of approximately 1% at full load due to firing natural gas which forms more moisture in flue gas than coal and also results in a slight increase in air heater exit gas temperature. Minor impacts on other areas of unit performance were measured and are detailed in this report. The project at Lakeside was carried out in three phases, in which EER designed the GR-SI system (Phase 1), completed construction and start-up activities (Phase 2), and evaluated its performance with both short parametric tests and a long-term demonstration (Phase 3). This report contains design and technical performance data; the economics data for all sites are presented in Volume 5.

  6. BPA-2012-01869-FOIA Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    information because it does not shed any light on how BPA has performed its statutory duties. N*me Ed*c*den Oe'.S.ries Gr*dc Cannell,KevinG Ex 0193 12 Schmidt,Sunshine R Ex 6...

  7. Papers Published - April 1, 1999 - March 31, 2000

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    P.W. Stankus, T.N. Thompson, R.S. Towell, R.E. Tribble, M.A. Vasiliev, Y.C. Wang, Z.F. Wang, J.C. Webb, J.L. Willis, D.K. Wise and G.R. Young (FNAL E866NuSea Collaboration)...

  8. A=9Be (1979AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PDF or PS). Shell model: (1975KU27, 1975SC1K, 1977CA08, 1977JA14, 1978BO31). and cluster models: (1974CH19, 1974GR42, 1974PA1B, 1975AB1E, 1975CH28, 1975KR1D, 1975RO1B,...

  9. A=19F (1983AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1978DA1N, 1978MA2H, 1979DA15, 1980KU05, 1980MC1L, 1981ER03, 1981GR06, 1982KI02). Cluster, collective and rotational models: (1977BU22, 1977FO1E, 1978BR21, 1978CH26,...

  10. American Associatio

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... that transfers in the case of planarians, it seems ... cm around the foodcup was white and constituted the "food ... RNA ige cte d gr ou p. , i n j e c t 0 n 8 40 09 g 'e Kl 0 ...

  11. A=20Ne (1987AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1986VA18, 1986VA23, 1986WE1C, 1987FA09, 1987KO15, 1987NI04, 1987RI03, 1987RO10). Muon and neutrino capture and reactions: (1983RO1E, 1984EL1D, 1984GR03, 1985MI1D,...

  12. A=20F (1959AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are listed in Table 20.4 Resonances in 19F(n, )16N (in PDF or PS) (BO55A, MA55L: see graph in (HU58)). See also (WI37E, BO55D, GR55D, KO58A). 15. 19F(d, p)20F Qm 4.379 Q0 ...

  13. Scaling of volume to surface ratio and doubling time in growing unicellular organisms: Do cells appear quantum-mechanical systems?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atanasov, Atanas Todorov

    2014-10-06

    The scaling of physical and biological characteristics of the living organisms is a basic method for searching of new biophysical laws. In series of previous studies the author showed that in Poikilotherms, Mammals and Aves, the volume to surface ratio VS{sup ?1} (m) of organisms is proportional to their generation time T{sub gt}(s) via growth rate v (m s{sup ?1}): VS{sup ?1}?=?v{sub gr}T{sup r}. The power and the correlation coefficients are near to 1.0. Aim of this study is: i) to prove with experimental data the validity of the above equation for Unicellular organisms and ii) to show that perhaps, the cells are quantum-mechanical systems. The data for body mass M (kg), density ? (kg/m{sup 3}), minimum and maximum doubling time T{sub dt} (s) for 50 unicellular organisms are assembled from scientific sources, and the computer program Statistics is used for calculations. In result i) the analytical relationship from type: VS{sup ?1}?=?4.46?10{sup ?11}T{sub dt} was found, where v{sub gr}?=?4.4610{sup ?11} m/s and ii) it is shown that the products between cell mass M, cell length expressed by V/S ratio and growth rate v{sub gr} satisfied the Heisenberg uncertainty principle i.e. the inequalities V/SMv{sub gr}>h/2? and T{sub dt}Mv{sub gr}{sup 2}>h/2? are valid, where h= 6.62610{sup ?34} J?s is the Planck constant. This rise the question: do cells appear quantum-mechanical systems?.

  14. Field installation proves coiled tubing ESP completions successful

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tovar, J.J.; Head, P.; Jordan, R.

    1995-06-01

    Coiled tubing (CT) technology has contributed new and innovative solutions for wells using electrical submersible pumps (ESP). A CT-ESP deployment system was developed as part of a joint industry project to take advantage of this new technology. Ten oil and service companies and the EEC, under the Thermie program, participated in its development. Two main areas were identified to introduce these innovations. The first was deployment and well control. This area has a great impact on the safety and operational aspects of installing and servicing ESPs. The second is cost. As ESPs are considered for new field developments and recompletion of old fields, installation and workover costs play a major role in the selection of completion alternatives. One of the main limitations of ESPs in the past has been the economics of installation and uncertainty about pump life. With focus in these two major areas, a system was successfully produced that offers considerable advantages over existing technologies. The reduction in rig time and equipment cost makes this alternative very attractive for areas where technical and economic obstacles such as live well deployment and high operating cost limit the use of ESP technology. Two field tests have been carried successfully during the development of this system.

  15. Biogas end-use in the European community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Constant, M.; Naveau, H.; Nyns, E.J. ); Ferrero, G.L.

    1989-01-01

    In Europe over the past few years the generation of biogas for energy and environmental purposes has been gaining in importance. Industrial wastewaters, cattle manure, sewage sludges, urban wastes, crop residues, algae and aquatic biomass are all typical of the materials being utilized. In contrast to the extensive inventory of biomethanation processes which has been carried out within the EEC, until recently a detailed, up-to-date investigation of the end-sues of biogas had not been undertaken. To supply the necessary information, the Commission of the European Communities and the Belgian Science Policy Office jointly entrusted a study to the Unit of Bioengineering at the Catholic University of Louvain, Belgium. This book is record of the study and has the following key features: it gives a broad overview of the ongoing use of biogas in Europe; it summarizes available data on storage, purification and engines using biogas; it draws several conclusions concerning the technical and economic viability of the processes; it discusses the problems of using biogas; and it outlines recommendations and future R and D and demonstration projects in the field.

  16. Processing and modeling issues for thin-film solar cell devices: Annual subcontract report, January 16, 1995 -- January 15, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birkmire, R.W.; Phillips, J.E.; Buchanan, W.A.; Eser, E.; Hegedus, S.S.; McCandless, B.E.; Meyers, P.V.; Shafarman, W.N.

    1996-08-01

    The overall mission of the Institute of Energy Conversion is the development of thin film photovoltaic cells, modules, and related manufacturing technology and the education of students and professionals in photovoltaic technology. The objectives of this four-year NREL subcontract are to advance the state of the art and the acceptance of thin film PV modules in the areas of improved technology for thin film deposition, device fabrication, and material and device characterization and modeling, relating to solar cells based on CuInSe{sub 2} and its alloys, on a-Si and its alloys, and on CdTe. In the area of CuInSe{sub 2} and its alloys, EEC researchers have produced CuIn{sub 1-x}GaxSe{sub 2} films by selenization of elemental and alloyed films with H{sub 2}Se and Se vapor and by a wide variety of process variations employing co-evaporation of the elements. Careful design, execution and analysis of these experiments has led to an improved understanding of the reaction chemistry involved, including estimations of the reaction rate constants. Investigation of device fabrication has also included studies of the processing of the Mo, US and ZnO deposition parameters and their influence on device properties. An indication of the success of these procedures was the fabrication of a 15% efficiency CuIn{sub 1-x}GaxSe{sub 2} solar cell.

  17. Lung Cancer Survival Prediction using Ensemble Data Mining on Seer Data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Agrawal, Ankit; Misra, Sanchit; Narayanan, Ramanathan; Polepeddi, Lalith; Choudhary, Alok

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the lung cancer data available from the SEER program with the aim of developing accurate survival prediction models for lung cancer. Carefully designed preprocessing steps resulted in removal/modification/splitting of several attributes, and 2 of the 11 derived attributes were found to have significant predictive power. Several supervised classification methods were used on the preprocessed data along with various data mining optimizations and validations. In our experiments, ensemble voting of five decision tree based classifiers and meta-classifiers was found to result in the best prediction performance in terms of accuracy and area under the ROC curve. We have developedmore » an on-line lung cancer outcome calculator for estimating the risk of mortality after 6 months, 9 months, 1 year, 2 year and 5 years of diagnosis, for which a smaller non-redundant subset of 13 attributes was carefully selected using attribute selection techniques, while trying to retain the predictive power of the original set of attributes. Further, ensemble voting models were also created for predicting conditional survival outcome for lung cancer (estimating risk of mortality after 5 years of diagnosis, given that the patient has already survived for a period of time), and included in the calculator. The on-line lung cancer outcome calculator developed as a result of this study is available at http://info.eecs.northwestern.edu:8080/LungCancerOutcomeCalculator/.« less

  18. Push or Pull? Proton Responsive Ligand Effects in Rhenium Tricarbonyl CO 2 Reduction Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manbeck, Gerald F.; Muckerman, James T.; Szalda, David J.; Himeda, Yuichiro; Fujita, Etsuko

    2015-02-19

    Proton responsive ligands offer control of catalytic reactions through modulation of pH-dependent properties, second coordination sphere stabilization of transition states, or by providing a local proton source for multi-proton, multi-electron reactions. Two fac-[ReI(?-diimine)(CO)?Cl] complexes with ?-diimine = 4,4'- (or 6,6'-) dihydroxy-2,2'-bipyridine (4DHBP and 6DHBP) have been prepared and analyzed as electrocatalysts for reduction of carbon dioxide. Consecutive electrochemical reduction of these complexes yields species identical to those obtained by chemical deprotonation. An energetically feasible mechanism for reductive deprotonation is proposed in which the bpy anion is protonated followed by loss of H? and 2H?. Cyclic voltammetry reveals a two-electron, three-wave system owing to competing EEC and ECE pathways. The chemical step of the ECE pathway might be attributed to the reductive deprotonation. but cannot be distinguished from chloride dissociation. The rate obtained by digital simulation is approximately 8 s?. Under CO?, these competing reactions generate a two-slope catalytic waveform with onset potential of 1.65 V vs Ag/AgCl. Reduction of CO? to CO by the [ReI (4DHBP2H?)(CO)?]? suggests the interaction of CO? with the deprotonated species or a third reduction followed by catalysis. Conversely, the reduced form of [Re(6DHBP)(CO)?Cl] converts CO? to CO with a single turnover.

  19. Phonon anharmonicity of monoclinic zirconia and yttrium-stabilized zirconia

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Chen W.; Smith, Hillary L.; Lan, Tian; Niedziela, Jennifer L.; Munoz, Jorge A.; Keith, J. Brian; Mauger, L.; Abernathy, Douglas L; Fultz, B.

    2015-04-13

    Inelastic neutron scattering measurements on monoclinic zirconia (ZrO2) and 8 mol% yttrium-stabilized zirconia were performed at temperatures from 300 to 1373 ωK. We reported temperature-dependent phonon densities of states (DOS) and Raman spectra obtained at elevated temperatures. First-principles lattice dynamics calculations with density functional theory gave total and partial phonon DOS curves and mode Grüneisen parameters. These mode Grüneisen parameters were used to predict the experimental temperature dependence of the phonon DOS with partial success. However, substantial anharmonicity was found at elevated temperatures, especially for phonon modes dominated by the motions of oxygen atoms. Yttrium-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) was somewhat moremore » anharmonic and had a broader phonon spectrum at low temperatures, owing in part to defects in its structure. YSZ also has a larger vibrational entropy than monoclinic zirconia.« less

  20. Phonon anharmonicity of monoclinic zirconia and yttrium-stabilized zirconia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Chen W.; Smith, Hillary L.; Lan, Tian; Niedziela, Jennifer L.; Munoz, Jorge A.; Keith, J. Brian; Mauger, L.; Abernathy, Douglas L; Fultz, B.

    2015-04-13

    Inelastic neutron scattering measurements on monoclinic zirconia (ZrO2) and 8 mol% yttrium-stabilized zirconia were performed at temperatures from 300 to 1373 ωK. We reported temperature-dependent phonon densities of states (DOS) and Raman spectra obtained at elevated temperatures. First-principles lattice dynamics calculations with density functional theory gave total and partial phonon DOS curves and mode Grüneisen parameters. These mode Grüneisen parameters were used to predict the experimental temperature dependence of the phonon DOS with partial success. However, substantial anharmonicity was found at elevated temperatures, especially for phonon modes dominated by the motions of oxygen atoms. Yttrium-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) was somewhat more anharmonic and had a broader phonon spectrum at low temperatures, owing in part to defects in its structure. YSZ also has a larger vibrational entropy than monoclinic zirconia.

  1. Evaluation of Gas Reburning and Low N0x Burners on a Wall Fired Boiler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-09-01

    Under the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Program (Round 3), a project was completed to demonstrate control of boiler emissions that comprise acid rain precursors, especially NOX. The project involved operating gas reburning technology combined with low NO, burner technology (GR-LNB) on a coal-fired utility boiler. Low NOX burners are designed to create less NOX than conventional burners. However, the NO, control achieved is in the range of 30-60-40, and typically 50%. At the higher NO, reduction levels, CO emissions tend to be higher than acceptable standards. Gas Reburning (GR) is designed to reduce the level of NO. in the flue gas by staged fuel combustion. When combined, GR and LNBs work in harmony to both minimize NOX emissions and maintain an acceptable level of CO emissions. The demonstration was performed at Public Service Company of Colorado's (PSCO) Cherokee Unit 3, located in Denver, Colorado. This unit is a 172 MW. wall-fired boiler that uses Colorado bituminous, low-sulfur coal and had a pre GR-LNB baseline NOX emission of 0.73 lb/1 Oe Btu. The target for the project was a reduction of 70 percent in NOX emissions. Project sponsors included the U.S. Department of Energy, the Gas Research Institute, Public Service Company of Colorado, Colorado Interstate Gas, Electric Power Research Institute, and the Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER). EER conducted a comprehensive test demonstration program over a wide range of boiler conditions. Over 4,000 hours of operation were achieved. Intensive measurements were taken to quantify the reductions in NOX emissions, the impact on boiler equipment and operability, and all factors influencing costs. The results showed that GR-LNB technology achieved excellent emission reductions. Although the performance of the low NOX burners (supplied by others) was somewhat less than expected, a NOX reduction of 65% was achieved at an average gas heat input of 180A. The performance goal of 70

  2. A=11C (1985AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 11C) GENERAL: See also (1980AJ01) and Table 11.17 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations:(1981RA06, 1983SH38). Special states:(1981RA06). Complex reactions involving 11C:(1979BO22, 1980GR10, 1980WI1K, 1980WI1L, 1981MO20, 1982GE05, 1982LY1A, 1982RA31, 1983FR1A, 1983OL1A, 1983WI1A, 1984GR08, 1984HI1A). Electromagnetic transitions:(1978KR19). Applied work:(1979DE1H, 1982BO1N, 1982HI1H, 1982KA1R, 1982ME1C, 1982NE1D, 1982PI1H, 1982YA1C,

  3. Strangeness production with massive'' gluons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biro, T.S. Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Justus-Liebig-Universitaet, Giessen ); Levai, P.; Mueller, B. )

    1990-11-01

    We present a perturbative calculation of strange-quark production by the processes {ital g}{r arrow}{ital s}+{ital {bar s}}, {ital g}+{ital g}{r arrow}{ital s}+{ital {bar s}}, and {ital q}+{ital {bar q}}{r arrow}{ital s}+{ital {bar s}} in a quark-gluon plasma containing gluons that are effectively massive'' due to medium effects. We consider only transverse polarizations of the gluons. We find that for a gluon mass beyond 300 MeV the one-gluon decay dominates, and that there is an {ital enhancement} of {ital s{bar s}} production from massive gluons compared with the massless case.

  4. Experimental determination of the radial dose function of {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y IVBT sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holmes, Shannon M.; DeWerd, Larry A.; Micka, John A.

    2006-09-15

    A series of measurements were undertaken using both high sensitivity radiochromic film and new lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeters in a liquid water medium to define the radial dose function of {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y beta emitting intravascular brachytherapy sources more accurately. These measurements of a single 5 French source pellet served to verify current Monte Carlo transport models and extrapolation chamber measurements of the radial dose function, thus providing the recommended independent published measurements for g(r) of these sources. A slight deviation in the published radial dose function at depth leads the authors to recommend that treatment planning be performed using updated g(r) values from current Monte Carlo transport models verified by measurements such as those shown in this investigation.

  5. Imaging an event horizon: mitigation of scattering toward Sagittarius A*

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fish, Vincent L.; Lu, Ru-Sen; Doeleman, Sheperd S.; Pankratius, Victor; Johnson, Michael D.; Narayan, Ramesh; Vertatschitsch, Laura E.; Bouman, Katherine L.; Zoran, Daniel; Freeman, William T.; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Broderick, Avery E.; Gwinn, Carl R.

    2014-11-10

    The image of the emission surrounding the black hole in the center of the Milky Way is predicted to exhibit the imprint of general relativistic (GR) effects, including the existence of a shadow feature and a photon ring of diameter ∼50 μas. Structure on these scales can be resolved by millimeter-wavelength very long baseline interferometry. However, strong-field GR features of interest will be blurred at λ ≥ 1.3 mm due to scattering by interstellar electrons. The scattering properties are well understood over most of the relevant range of baseline lengths, suggesting that the scattering may be (mostly) invertible. We simulate observations of a model image of Sgr A* and demonstrate that the effects of scattering can indeed be mitigated by correcting the visibilities before reconstructing the image. This technique is also applicable to Sgr A* at longer wavelengths.

  6. GALEX DIFFUSE OBSERVATIONS OF THE SKY: THE DATA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murthy, Jayant

    2014-08-01

    I present tabulations of the diffuse observations made by the GALEX spacecraft in two UV bands (FUV: 1539 and NUV: 2316 ) from the (almost) final data release of the GALEX spacecraft (GR6/GR7). This data release includes all the FUV observations and the majority of the NUV observations. I discuss overall trends in the data but the primary purpose of this paper is to make the data available to the public. The data files described in this paper are hosted by the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes at the Space Telescope Science Insitute from whence they may be downloaded. For ease of use, I have also created maps of the diffuse radiation in both bands over the entire observed sky at 6' resolution.

  7. Synthesis, crystal structure and DFT studies of N-(4-acetyl-5,5-dimethyl-4,5-dihydro-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-yl)acetamide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gautam, P.; Gautam, D.; Chaudhary, R. P.

    2013-12-15

    The title compound N-(4-acetyl-5,5-dimethyl-4,5-dihydro-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-yl)acetamide (III) was obtained from the reaction of 2-(propan-2-ylidene)hydrazinecarbothioamide (II) with acetic anhydride instead of formation of the desired thiosemcarbazide derivative of Meldrum acid. The structures of II and III were established by elemental analysis, IR, NMR, Mass and X-ray crystallographic studies. II crystallizes in triclinic system, sp. gr. P-bar1 Z = 2; III crystallizes in the monoclinic system, sp. gr. P2{sub 1}/c, Z = 8. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been carried out for III. {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR of III has been calculated and correlated with experimental results.

  8. A=18F (1983AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    83AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 18F) GENERAL: See also (1978AJ03) and Table 18.11 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1977AN1P, 1977GR16, 1977SO1C, 1978CO08, 1978DA1N, 1978MA2H, 1979BU12, 1979DA15, 1980GO01, 1980KU05, 1980MA18, 1981EL1D, 1981ER03, 1981GR06, 1982KI02). Cluster, collective and deformed models: (1977BU22, 1978BU03, 1978PI1E, 1978SA15, 1978TA1A, 1979BU12, 1979SA31, 1980RO19, 1981CH24). Electromagnetic transitions: (1976MC1G, 1977BU22, 1977HA1Z, 1977HE1L,

  9. A=19Ne (1987AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7AJ02) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 19Ne) GENERAL: See (1983AJ01) and Table 19.21 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Nuclear models:(1983BR29, 1983PO02). Special states: (1983BI1C, 1983BR29, 1983PO02, 1986AN07). Electromagnetic transitions: (1982BR24, 1983BR29, 1985AL21). Astrophysical questions: (1981WA1Q, 1982WI1B, 1986LA07). Applications:(1982BO1N). Complex reactions involving 19Ne:(1981DE1P, 1983JA05, 1984GR08, 1985BE40, 1986GR1A, 1986HA1B, 1987RI03). Pion capture and reactions (See

  10. A=6Li (1979AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    79AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 6Li) GENERAL: See also (1974AJ01) and Table 6.2 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. Shell model: (1974KA11, 1975DI04, 1975GO1B, 1975VE01, 1976CE03, 1976GH1A). Collective, rotational and deformed models: (1974BO25). Cluster and α-particle models: (1972KR1A, 1973DO09, 1973LI23, 1974BA30, 1974GR24, 1974JA1K, 1974KA11, 1974NO03, 1974PA1B, 1974SH08, 1974WO1B, 1975BL1C, 1975GO08, 1975GR26, 1975HA48, 1975KR1A, 1975LE1A, 1975LI1C, 1975MI09, 1975NO03,

  11. A=7Li (1979AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 7Li) GENERAL: See also (1974AJ01) and Table 7.2 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1974KA11, 1975DI04, 1977ST04, 1978BO31). Collective, rotational or deformed models: (1974BO25, 1976BR26). Cluster and α-particle models: (1973HO1A, 1974GR24, 1974KA11, 1975KU1H, 1975GR26, 1975MI09, 1975PA11, 1975RO1B, 1977BE50, 1977MI03, 1977SA22, 1978RA09). Astrophysical questions: (1973BA1H, 1973CA1B, 1973CO1B, 1973IB1A, 1973SM1A, 1973TI1A, 1973TR1B,

  12. A=9Be (1974AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 9Be) GENERAL: See also (1966LA04) and Table 9.2 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1961KO1A, 1965CO25, 1965GR18, 1965VO1A, 1966AD06, 1966BA26, 1966HA18, 1966MA1P, 1966WI1E, 1967CO32, 1967ST1C, 1968GO01, 1969BO1V, 1969BO19, 1969BO33, 1969GU03, 1969VA1C, 1970CO1H, 1971CO28, 1971GR02, 1971NO02, 1972LE1L, 1973HA49, 1973KU03). Aplha and cluster models: (1965NE1B, 1966HI1A, 1967TA1C, 1968KU1B, 1969BA1J, 1969NE1C, 1970BA1Q, 1971LE1N, 1971NO02,

  13. USDA Rural Development: Sustaining Relationships in Indian Country

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Development Sustaining Relationships in Indian Country USDA Rural Development Organizational Structure National Office State Directors Program Directors Specialists Architects Engineers Technicians Area Directors Native American Coordinators General Field Representatives Rur al Utilities Ser vice Rur al Housing & Community Facilities Rur al Business Cooper ative Ser vice Rural Development Program Areas Progr am Areas Business & Industr y Guar anteed Loans Rur al Business Enter pr ise Gr

  14. Microsoft Word - NiGdNi_multilayers bh

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Comprehensive Study of a Rare-earth Ferromagnet/Transition Metal Ferromagnet Interface Using X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism The manipulation of thin-film magnetic multilayers has been an active and technologically relevant area of research since the discovery of giant magnetoresistance in magnetic multilayers by Fert and Grünberg in 1988 [1, 2]. The design of such devices is made simpler by utilizing the intrinsic properties of the materials from which they are made. In this study

  15. Creep behavior of a nuclear pressure vessel under severe accident conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beghini, M.; Bertini, L.; Vitale, E.

    1996-12-31

    The results of a study on the creep behavior of the vessel lower head under severe accident conditions are reported. An experimental program aimed at the evaluation of the creep properties of A533grB steel at high temperature (800--1,100 C) and under biaxial loading is summarized and the main results reported. A Finite Element simulation of the lower head under severe accident conditions allows to show the effect of the main parameters affecting the time to rupture.

  16. A Comprehensive Study of a Rare-earth Ferromagnet/Transition Metal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ferromagnet Interface Using X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource A Comprehensive Study of a Rare-earth Ferromagnet/Transition Metal Ferromagnet Interface Using X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism Wednesday, August 31, 2016 The manipulation of thin-film magnetic multilayers has been an active and technologically relevant area of research since the discovery of giant magnetoresistance in magnetic multilayers by Fert and Grünberg in 1988 [1, 2]. The

  17. Microsoft Word - short_abstract.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ashton Short (Angelo State University) Mentor: Dr. Dave Youngblood Reconciling Giant Resonance Data Isoscalar Giant Resonances (GR), which are shape oscillations of the nucleus involving highly collective motion of the nucleons, are of particular importance because they can tell us bulk properties of a nucleus, such as its compression modulus. The quantities needed to obtain these bulk properties are the strengths and energies for each resonance. Where distinct peaks are apparent in the data,

  18. Aluminoborosilicate glasses codoped with rare-earth elements as radiation-protective covers for solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malchukova, E. V. Abramov, A. S.; Nepomnyashchikh, A. I.; Terukov, E. I.

    2015-06-15

    The radiation hardness of aluminoborosilicate glasses codoped with rare-earth ions of Sm, Gd or Sm, Eu in various ratios is studied. The effect of codoping and β irradiation at a dose of 10{sup 9} Gr on the optical transmission and electron paramagnetic resonance spectra is examined. It is found that the introduction of Sm and Gd codopants in a 1 : 1 ratio reduces the number of radiation defects and raises the transmission of irradiated glasses in the visible spectral range.

  19. History of Cern

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    Cérémonie à l'occasion de l'apparition du premier volume du livre sur l'histoire du Cern, avec plusieurs personnes présentes qui jouaient un rôle important dans cette organisation européenne couronnée de succès grâce à l'esprit des membres fondateurs qui est et restera essentiel

  20. Is Electromagnetic Gravity Control Possible?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vargas, Jose G.; Torr, Douglas G.

    2004-02-04

    We study the interplay of Einstein's Gravitation (GR) and Maxwell's Electromagnetism, where the distribution of energy-momentum is not presently known (The Feynman Lectures, Vol 2, Chapter 27, section 4). As Feynman himself stated, one might in principle use Einstein's equations of GR to find such a distribution. GR (born in 1915) presently uses the Levi-Civita connection, LCC (the LCC was born two years after GR as a new concept, and not just as the pre-existing Christoffel symbols that represent it). Around 1927, Einstein proposed for physics an alternative to the LCC that constitutes a far more sensible and powerful affine enrichment of metric Riemannian geometry. It is called teleparallelism (TP). Its Finslerian version (i.e. in the space-time-velocity arena) permits an unequivocal identification of the EM field as a geometric quantity. This in turn permits one to identify a completely geometric set of Einstein equations from curvature equations. From their right hand side, one may obtain the actual distribution of EM energy-momentum. It is consistent with Maxwell's equations, since these also are implied by the equations of structure of TP. We find that the so-far-unknown terms in this distribution amount to a total differential and do not, therefore, alter the value of the total EM energy-momentum. And yet these extra terms are at macroscopic distances enormously larger than the standard quadratic terms. This allows for the generation of measurable gravitational fields by EM fields. We thus answer affirmatively the question of the title.

  1. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Light Absorption of Primary Organic Aerosol Paper Named ACS Editors' Choice Download a printable PDF Submitter: Lu, Z., Argonne National Laboratory Streets, D. ., Argonne National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Lu Z, DG Streets, E Winijkul, F Yan, Y Chen, TC Bond, Y Feng, MK Dubey, S Liu, JP Pinto, and GR Carmichael. 2015. "Light absorption properties and radiative effects of primary organic aerosol emissions."

  2. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    From Fire to Ice Download a printable PDF Submitter: Kulkarni, G., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Kulkarni GR, M Nandasiri, A Zelenyuk, J Beranek, N Madaan, A Devaraj, V Shutthanandan, S Thevuthasan, and T Varga. 2015. "Effects of crystallographic properties on the ice nucleation properties of volcanic ash particles." Geophysical Research Letters, 42(8), doi:10.1002/2015GL063270. Tons of

  3. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pollution Changes Clouds' Ice Crystal Genesis Download a printable PDF Submitter: Kulkarni, G., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Kulkarni GR, K Zhang, C Zhao, M Nandasiri, V Shutthanandan, X Liu, L Berg, and J Fast. 2015. "Ice formation on nitric acid-coated dust particles: Laboratory and modeling studies." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 120(15), doi:10.1002/2014JD022637.

  4. SASW Measurements at Hanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    H - Spectral Analysis of Surface Waves Hanford Site-Wide Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis (PSHA): Seismic Shear Wave Velocity Profiling at Hanford, WA SASW Testing and Analysis Procedures, V s Profiles, Sensitivity Studies and Responses to Technical Integration Team Questions for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, WA by Kenneth H. Stokoe, II Yin-Cheng Lin Sungmoon Hwang, and Julia Roberts May 7, 2014 Geotechnical Engineering Report GR14-1 Geotechnical Engineering Center Civil

  5. How does pressure gravitate? Cosmological constant problem confronts observational cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narimani, Ali; Scott, Douglas; Afshordi, Niayesh E-mail: nafshordi@pitp.ca

    2014-08-01

    An important and long-standing puzzle in the history of modern physics is the gross inconsistency between theoretical expectations and cosmological observations of the vacuum energy density, by at least 60 orders of magnitude, otherwise known as the cosmological constant problem. A characteristic feature of vacuum energy is that it has a pressure with the same amplitude, but opposite sign to its energy density, while all the precision tests of General Relativity are either in vacuum, or for media with negligible pressure. Therefore, one may wonder whether an anomalous coupling to pressure might be responsible for decoupling vacuum from gravity. We test this possibility in the context of the Gravitational Aether proposal, using current cosmological observations, which probe the gravity of relativistic pressure in the radiation era. Interestingly, we find that the best fit for anomalous pressure coupling is about half-way between General Relativity (GR), and Gravitational Aether (GA), if we include Planck together with WMAP and BICEP2 polarization cosmic microwave background (CMB) observations. Taken at face value, this data combination excludes both GR and GA at around the 3 σ level. However, including higher resolution CMB observations (''highL'') or baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAO) pushes the best fit closer to GR, excluding the Gravitational Aether solution to the cosmological constant problem at the 4- 5 σ level. This constraint effectively places a limit on the anomalous coupling to pressure in the parametrized post-Newtonian (PPN) expansion, ζ{sub 4} = 0.105 ± 0.049 (+highL CMB), or ζ{sub 4} = 0.066 ± 0.039 (+BAO). These represent the most precise measurement of this parameter to date, indicating a mild tension with GR (for ΛCDM including tensors, with 0ζ{sub 4}=), and also among different data sets.

  6. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the Blackbody Calibration of Pyrgeometers By Ibrahim Reda, Julian Gröbner * , Tom Stoffel, Daryl Myers, and Bruce Forgan ** Eighteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Science Team Meeting *Physikalisch-Meteorologisches Observatorium Davos, World Radiation Center (PMOD/WRC) ** Bureau of Meteorology, Australia Abstract Pyrgeometers are used to measure the atmospheric longwave irradiance through out the ARM program sites. Previous calibrations of pyrgeometers using

  7. Synthesis and structure of triphenylbismuth bis(3-phenylprop-2-enoate)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andreev, P. V. Somov, N. V.; Kalistratova, O. S.; Gushchin, A. V.; Chuprunov, E. V.

    2015-07-15

    The newly synthesized triphenylbismuth bis(3-phenylprop-2-enoate) was studied by X-ray diffraction and by IR, UV, and NMR spectroscopy. The crystals are monoclinic, sp. gr. C2/c, Z = 4, a = 13.2820(4) Å, b = 21.3750(2) Å, c = 12.2407(2) Å, β = 119.936(1)°. The coordination polyhedron of the bismuth atom can be described as a distorted pentagonal bipyramid.

  8. June 2014 Most Viewed Documents for Biology And Medicine | OSTI, US Dept of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information June 2014 Most Viewed Documents for Biology And Medicine Modification to the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) Visual Editor (MCNPVised) to Read in Computer Aided Design (CAD) Files Randolph Schwarz; Leland L. Carter; Alysia Schwarz (2005) 37 Geothermal demonstration: Zunil food dehydration facility Maldonado, O. (Consultecnia, Guatemala City (Guatemala)); Altseimer, J.; Thayer, G.R. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Cooper, L.

  9. March 2014 Most Viewed Documents for Biology And Medicine | OSTI, US Dept

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information March 2014 Most Viewed Documents for Biology And Medicine Carbon Dioxide Sequestering Using Microalgal Systems Daniel J. Stepan; Richard E. Shockey; Thomas A. Moe; Ryan Dorn (2002) 30 Dose and volume specification for reporting interstitial therapy NONE (1997) 29 Geothermal demonstration: Zunil food dehydration facility Maldonado, O. (Consultecnia, Guatemala City (Guatemala)); Altseimer, J.; Thayer, G.R. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM

  10. DOEFIX'

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    DOEFIX' G-r 3 - 1 ' -(s-EL, Effi (07-W) Urited States Government memorandum CT. 3 Department of Energy ~~~~~~ EM-421 (W. R. Williams, 903-8149) SUBJECT: -Authorization for Remedial Action at the Combustion Engineering Site, Windsor, Connecticut T0 i. Price, OR The Combustion Engineering facility in Windsor, Connecticut, is designated for remedial action under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). This designation is based on the results of a radiological survey,

  11. Theory of gyroresonance and free-free emissions from non-Maxwellian quasi-steady-state electron distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fleishman, Gregory D.; Kuznetsov, Alexey A.

    2014-02-01

    Currently there is a concern about the ability of the classical thermal (Maxwellian) distribution to describe quasi-steady-state plasma in the solar atmosphere, including active regions. In particular, other distributions have been proposed to better fit observations, for example, kappa- and n-distributions. If present, these distributions will generate radio emissions with different observable properties compared with the classical gyroresonance (GR) or free-free emission, which implies a way of remotely detecting these non-Maxwellian distributions in the radio observations. Here we present analytically derived GR and free-free emissivities and absorption coefficients for the kappa- and n-distributions, and discuss their properties, which are in fact remarkably different from each other and from the classical Maxwellian plasma. In particular, the radio brightness temperature from a gyrolayer increases with the optical depth τ for kappa-distribution, but decreases with τ for n-distribution. This property has a remarkable consequence allowing a straightforward observational test: the GR radio emission from the non-Maxwellian distributions is supposed to be noticeably polarized even in the optically thick case, where the emission would have strictly zero polarization in the case of Maxwellian plasma. This offers a way of remote probing the plasma distribution in astrophysical sources, including solar active regions as a vivid example.

  12. Degradation mode survey of titanium-base alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gdowski, G.E.; Ahluwalia, H.S.

    1995-01-30

    Of the materials reviewed, commercially pure titanium, Ti Gr 2, is the most susceptible to crevice corrosion. Ti Gr 7, 12, and 16 are likely to be resistant to crevice corrosion under the current expected Yucca Mountain repository conditions. Although Grade 7 has the greatest resistance to crevice corrosion it is also the most expensive. Although the possibility of sustained loads cracking exists, it has not yet been observed in a Ti alloys. For hydride precipitation to occur 100{degrees}C, the hydrogen concentration would need to be relatively high, much higher than the maximum amount of hydrogen allowed during the manufacture of ({alpha} Ti alloys (0.0 15 wt%). A large amount of (SCC) stress corrosion cracking data accumulated at SNL and BNL for the WIPP program and by the Canadian Waste Management Program on titanium grades 2 and 12 indicates that there is no SCC at naturally occurring potentials in various brines. Hydride-induced cracking of titanium is a possibility and therefore, further investigation of this phenomenon under credible repository conditions is warranted. One disadvantage of titanium and its alloys is that their strengths decrease rather rapidly with temperature. This is due to the strong temperature dependence of interstitial solute strengthening mechanisms. Ti Gr 12 and 16 are recommended for further consideration as candidate materials for high level nuclear waste containers.

  13. Massive gravity wrapped in the cosmic web

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shim, Junsup; Lee, Jounghun; Li, Baojiu E-mail: jounghun@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2014-03-20

    We study how the filamentary pattern of the cosmic web changes if the true gravity deviates from general relativity (GR) on a large scale. The f(R) gravity, whose strength is controlled to satisfy the current observational constraints on the cluster scale, is adopted as our fiducial model and a large, high-resolution N-body simulation is utilized for this study. By applying the minimal spanning tree algorithm to the halo catalogs from the simulation at various epochs, we identify the main stems of the rich superclusters located in the most prominent filamentary section of the cosmic web and determine their spatial extents per member cluster to be the degree of their straightness. It is found that the f(R) gravity has the effect of significantly bending the superclusters and that the effect becomes stronger as the universe evolves. Even in the case where the deviation from GR is too small to be detectable by any other observables, the degree of the supercluster straightness exhibits a conspicuous difference between the f(R) and the GR models. Our results also imply that the supercluster straightness could be a useful discriminator of f(R) gravity from the coupled dark energy since it is shown to evolve differently between the two models. As a final conclusion, the degree of the straightness of the rich superclusters should provide a powerful cosmological test of large scale gravity.

  14. Biochemical characterization of nuclear receptors for vitamin D{sub 3} and glucocorticoids in prostate stroma cell microenvironment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hidalgo, Alejandro A.; Montecinos, Viviana P.; Paredes, Roberto; Godoy, Alejandro S.; McNerney, Eileen M.; Tovar, Heribelt; Pantoja, Diego; Johnson, Candace; Trump, Donald; Onate, Sergio A.

    2011-08-19

    Highlights: {yields} Fibroblasts from benign and carcinoma-associated stroma were biochemically characterized for VDR and GR function as transcription factors in prostate stroma cell microenvironment. {yields} Decreased SRC-1/CBP coactivators recruitment to VDR and GR may result in hormone resistance to 1,25D{sub 3} in stromal cell microenvironment prostate cancer. {yields} 1a,25-Dyhidroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (1,25D{sub 3}) and glucocorticoids, either alone or in combination, may not be an alternative for 'some' advanced prostate cancers that fails androgen therapies. -- Abstract: The disruption of stromal cell signals in prostate tissue microenvironment influences the development of prostate cancer to androgen independence. 1{alpha},25-Dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (1,25D{sub 3}) and glucocorticoids, either alone or in combination, have been investigated as alternatives for the treatment of advanced prostate cancers that fails androgen therapies. The effects of glucocorticoids are mediated by the intracellular glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Similarly, the effect of 1,25D{sub 3} is mediated by the 1,25D{sub 3} nuclear receptor (VDR). In this study, fibroblasts from benign- (BAS) and carcinoma-associated stroma (CAS) were isolated from human prostates to characterize VDR and GR function as transcription factors in prostate stroma. The VDR-mediated transcriptional activity assessed using the CYP24-luciferase reporter was limited to 3-fold induction by 1,25D{sub 3} in 9 out of 13 CAS (70%), as compared to >10-fold induction in the BAS clinical sample pair. Expression of His-tagged VDR (Ad-his-VDR) failed to recover the low transcriptional activity of the luciferase reporter in 7 out of 9 CAS. Interestingly, expression of Ad-his-VDR successfully recovered receptor-mediated induction in 2 out of the 9 CAS analyzed, suggesting that changes in the receptor protein itself was responsible for decreased response and resistance to 1,25D{sub 3} action. Conversely, VDR

  15. Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) Intraspecific Variation and Thermotolerance Classification Using in Vitro Seed Germination Assay

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Seepaul, Ramdeo; Macoon, Bisoondat; Reddy, K. Raja; Baldwin, Brian

    2011-06-01

    Cardinal temperatures for plant processes have been used for thermotolerance screening of genotypes, geoclimatic adaptability determination and phenological prediction. Current simulation models for switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) utilize single cardinal temperatures across genotypes for both vegetative and reproductive processes although in-tra-specific variation exists among genotypes. An experiment was conducted to estimate the cardinal temperatures for seed germination of 14 diverse switchgrass genotypes and to classify genotypes for temperature tolerance. Stratified seeds of each genotype were germinated at eight constant temperatures from 10 °C to 45 °C under a constant light intensity of 35 μmol m-2s-1 for 12 hd-1. Germination wasmore » recorded at 6-h intervals in all treatments. Maximum seed germination (MSG) and germination rate (GR), estimated by fitting Sigmoidal function to germination-time series data, varied among genotypes. Quadratic and bilinear models best described the MSG and GR responses to temperature, respectively. The mean cardinal temperatures, Tmin, Topt, and Tmax, were 8.1, 26.6, and 45.1 °C for MSG and 11.1, 33.1, and 46.0 °C for GR, respectively. Cardinal temperatures for MSG and GR; however, varied significantly among genotypes. Genotypes were classified as sensitive (Cave-in-Rock, Dacotah, Expresso, Forestburg˜, Kanlow, ˜Sunburst, Trailblazer, and ˜Tusca™), intermediate (˜Alamo, Blackwell, Carthage, ˜Shawnee™, and Shelter™) and tolerant (˜Summer) to high temperature based on cumulative temperature response index (CTRI) estimated by summing individual response indices estimated from the MSG and GR cardinal temperatures. Similarly, genotypes were also classified as sensitive (Alamo, Blackwell, Carthage, Dacotah, Shawnee, Shelter and Summer), moderately sensitive (Cave-in-rock, Forestburg, Kanlow, Sunburst, and Tusca), moderately tolerant (Trailblazer), and tolerant (Expresso) to low temperatures. The cardinal

  16. Evaluation of Gas Reburning and Low N0x Burners on a Wall Fired Boiler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-07-01

    Under the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Program (Round 3), a project was completed to demonstrate control of boiler NOX emissions and to a lesser degree, due to coal replacement, SO2 emissions. The project involved combining Gas Reburning with Low NOX Burners (GR-LNB) on a coal-fired electric utility boiler to determine if high levels of NO, reduction (70VO) could be achieved. Sponsors of the project included the U.S. Depatiment of Energy, the Gas Research Institute, Public Service Company of Colorado, Colorado Interstate Gas, Electric Power Research Institute, and the Energy and Environmental Research Corporation. The GR-LNB demonstration was petformed on Public Service Company of Colorado's (PSCO) Cherokee Unit #3, located in Denver, Colorado. This unit is a 172 MW~ wall-fired boiler that uses Colorado bituminous, low-sulfur coal. It had a baseline NO, emission level of 0.73 lb/1 OG Btu using conventional burners. Low NOX burners are designed to yield lower NOX emissions than conventional burners. However, the NOX control achieved with this technique is limited to 30-50Y0. Also, with LNBs, CO emissions can increase to above acceptable standards. Gas Reburning (GR) is designed to reduce NO, in the flue gas by staged fuel combustion. This technology involves the introduction of' natural gas into the hot furnace flue gas stream. When combined, GR and LNBs minimize NOX emissions and maintain acceptable levels of CO emissions. A comprehensive test program was completed, operating over a wide range of boiler conditions. Over 4,000 hours of operation were achieved, providing substantial data. Measurements were taken to quantify reductions in NOX emissions, the impact on boiler equipment and operability and factors influencing costs. The GR-LNB technology achieved good NO, emission reductions and the goals of the project were achieved. Although the performance of the low NOX burners (supplied by others) was less than expected, a NOX reduction of 65

  17. SU-E-I-07: An Improved Technique for Scatter Correction in PET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, S; Wang, Y; Lue, K; Lin, H; Chuang, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In positron emission tomography (PET), the single scatter simulation (SSS) algorithm is widely used for scatter estimation in clinical scans. However, bias usually occurs at the essential steps of scaling the computed SSS distribution to real scatter amounts by employing the scatter-only projection tail. The bias can be amplified when the scatter-only projection tail is too small, resulting in incorrect scatter correction. To this end, we propose a novel scatter calibration technique to accurately estimate the amount of scatter using pre-determined scatter fraction (SF) function instead of the employment of scatter-only tail information. Methods: As the SF depends on the radioactivity distribution and the attenuating material of the patient, an accurate theoretical relation cannot be devised. Instead, we constructed an empirical transformation function between SFs and average attenuation coefficients based on a serious of phantom studies with different sizes and materials. From the average attenuation coefficient, the predicted SFs were calculated using empirical transformation function. Hence, real scatter amount can be obtained by scaling the SSS distribution with the predicted SFs. The simulation was conducted using the SimSET. The Siemens Biograph 6 PET scanner was modeled in this study. The Software for Tomographic Image Reconstruction (STIR) was employed to estimate the scatter and reconstruct images. The EEC phantom was adopted to evaluate the performance of our proposed technique. Results: The scatter-corrected image of our method demonstrated improved image contrast over that of SSS. For our technique and SSS of the reconstructed images, the normalized standard deviation were 0.053 and 0.182, respectively; the root mean squared errors were 11.852 and 13.767, respectively. Conclusion: We have proposed an alternative method to calibrate SSS (C-SSS) to the absolute scatter amounts using SF. This method can avoid the bias caused by the insufficient

  18. Human health safety evaluation of cosmetics in the EU: A legally imposed challenge to science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pauwels, M.; Rogiers, V.

    2010-03-01

    As stated in the European legislation, cosmetic products present on the European market must be safe for the consumer. Safety evaluation of the products is carried out by a qualified safety assessor who needs to consider potential exposure scenarios next to the physicochemical and toxicological profiles of all composing ingredients. Whereas, until recently, the tools to determine the toxicological profile of cosmetic ingredients mainly consisted of animal experiments, they have now been narrowed down substantially by the legally imposed animal testing ban on cosmetic ingredients, taken up in the Cosmetic Products Directive (76/768/EEC). This Directive, however, is not a stand-alone piece of European legislation, since as well directly as indirectly it is influenced by a complex web of related legislations. Vertical legislations deal with different categories of chemicals, including dangerous substances, biocides, plant protection products, food additives, medicinal products, and of course also cosmetics. Horizontal legislative texts, on the contrary, cover more general fields such as protection of experimental animals, consumer product safety, misleading of consumers, specific provisions for aerosols, and others. Experience has learnt that having a general overview of these related legislations is necessary to understand their impact on the cosmetic world in general terms and on cosmetic safety evaluation in particular. This goes for a variety of concerned parties, including national and European regulators/agencies, contract laboratories, raw material suppliers, cosmetic companies, research and educational centers. They all deal with a number of aspects important for the quality and toxicity of cosmetics and their ingredients. This review summarises the most relevant points of the legislative texts of different types of product categories and emphasises their impact on the safety evaluation of cosmetics.

  19. Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator Reference Guide Version 6.4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keiter, Eric R.; Mei, Ting; Russo, Thomas V.; Schiek, Richard; Sholander, Peter E.; Thornquist, Heidi K.; Verley, Jason; Baur, David Gregory

    2015-12-01

    This document is a reference guide to the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator, and is a companion document to the Xyce Users' Guide [1] . The focus of this document is (to the extent possible) exhaustively list device parameters, solver options, parser options, and other usage details of Xyce . This document is not intended to be a tutorial. Users who are new to circuit simulation are better served by the Xyce Users' Guide [1] . Trademarks The information herein is subject to change without notice. Copyright c 2002-2015 Sandia Corporation. All rights reserved. Xyce TM Electronic Simulator and Xyce TM are trademarks of Sandia Corporation. Portions of the Xyce TM code are: Copyright c 2002, The Regents of the University of California. Produced at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Written by Alan Hindmarsh, Allan Taylor, Radu Serban. UCRL-CODE-2002-59 All rights reserved. Orcad, Orcad Capture, PSpice and Probe are registered trademarks of Cadence Design Systems, Inc. Microsoft, Windows and Windows 7 are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation. Medici, DaVinci and Taurus are registered trademarks of Synopsys Corporation. Amtec and TecPlot are trademarks of Amtec Engineering, Inc. Xyce 's expression library is based on that inside Spice 3F5 developed by the EECS Department at the University of California. The EKV3 MOSFET model was developed by the EKV Team of the Electronics Laboratory-TUC of the Technical University of Crete. All other trademarks are property of their respective owners. Contacts Bug Reports (Sandia only) http://joseki.sandia.gov/bugzilla http://charleston.sandia.gov/bugzilla World Wide Web http://xyce.sandia.gov http://charleston.sandia.gov/xyce (Sandia only) Email xyce@sandia.gov (outside Sandia) xyce-sandia@sandia.gov (Sandia only)

  20. Push or Pull? Proton Responsive Ligand Effects in Rhenium Tricarbonyl CO 2 Reduction Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manbeck, Gerald F.; Muckerman, James T.; Szalda, David J.; Himeda, Yuichiro; Fujita, Etsuko

    2015-02-19

    Proton responsive ligands offer control of catalytic reactions through modulation of pH-dependent properties, second coordination sphere stabilization of transition states, or by providing a local proton source for multi-proton, multi-electron reactions. Two fac-[ReI(α-diimine)(CO)₃Cl] complexes with α-diimine = 4,4'- (or 6,6'-) dihydroxy-2,2'-bipyridine (4DHBP and 6DHBP) have been prepared and analyzed as electrocatalysts for reduction of carbon dioxide. Consecutive electrochemical reduction of these complexes yields species identical to those obtained by chemical deprotonation. An energetically feasible mechanism for reductive deprotonation is proposed in which the bpy anion is protonated followed by loss of H₂ and 2H⁺. Cyclic voltammetry reveals a two-electron, three-wave system owing to competing EEC and ECE pathways. The chemical step of the ECE pathway might be attributed to the reductive deprotonation. but cannot be distinguished from chloride dissociation. The rate obtained by digital simulation is approximately 8 s⁻¹. Under CO₂, these competing reactions generate a two-slope catalytic waveform with onset potential of –1.65 V vs Ag/AgCl. Reduction of CO₂ to CO by the [ReI (4DHBP–2H⁺)(CO)₃]⁻ suggests the interaction of CO₂ with the deprotonated species or a third reduction followed by catalysis. Conversely, the reduced form of [Re(6DHBP)(CO)₃Cl] converts CO₂ to CO with a single turnover.

  1. Push or Pull? Proton Responsive Ligand Effects in Rhenium Tricarbonyl CO 2 Reduction Catalysts

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Manbeck, Gerald F.; Muckerman, James T.; Szalda, David J.; Himeda, Yuichiro; Fujita, Etsuko

    2015-02-19

    Proton responsive ligands offer control of catalytic reactions through modulation of pH-dependent properties, second coordination sphere stabilization of transition states, or by providing a local proton source for multi-proton, multi-electron reactions. Two fac-[ReI(α-diimine)(CO)₃Cl] complexes with α-diimine = 4,4'- (or 6,6'-) dihydroxy-2,2'-bipyridine (4DHBP and 6DHBP) have been prepared and analyzed as electrocatalysts for reduction of carbon dioxide. Consecutive electrochemical reduction of these complexes yields species identical to those obtained by chemical deprotonation. An energetically feasible mechanism for reductive deprotonation is proposed in which the bpy anion is protonated followed by loss of H₂ and 2H⁺. Cyclic voltammetry reveals a two-electron, three-wavemore » system owing to competing EEC and ECE pathways. The chemical step of the ECE pathway might be attributed to the reductive deprotonation. but cannot be distinguished from chloride dissociation. The rate obtained by digital simulation is approximately 8 s⁻¹. Under CO₂, these competing reactions generate a two-slope catalytic waveform with onset potential of –1.65 V vs Ag/AgCl. Reduction of CO₂ to CO by the [ReI (4DHBP–2H⁺)(CO)₃]⁻ suggests the interaction of CO₂ with the deprotonated species or a third reduction followed by catalysis. Conversely, the reduced form of [Re(6DHBP)(CO)₃Cl] converts CO₂ to CO with a single turnover.« less

  2. Latitudinal distribution of the recent Arctic warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chylek, Petr; Lesins, Glen K; Wang, Muyin

    2010-12-08

    Increasing Arctic temperature, disappearance of Arctic sea ice, melting of the Greenland ice sheet, sea level rise, increasing strength of Atlantic hurricanes are these impending climate catastrophes supported by observations? Are the recent data really unprecedented during the observational records? Our analysis of Arctic temperature records shows that the Arctic and temperatures in the 1930s and 1940s were almost as high as they are today. We argue that the current warming of the Arctic region is affected more by the multi-decadal climate variability than by an increasing concentration of carbon dioxide. Unfortunately, none of the existing coupled Atmosphere-Ocean General Circulation Models used in the IPCC 2007 cIimate change assessment is able to reproduce neither the observed 20th century Arctic cIimate variability nor the latitudinal distribution of the warming.

  3. Laurentide Ice Sheet meltwater and abrupt climate change during the last glaciation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, H W; Flower, B P; Quinn, T M; Hollander, D J; Guilderson, T P

    2005-10-02

    A leading hypothesis to explain abrupt climate change during the last glacial cycle calls on fluctuations in the margin of the North American Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS), which may have routed freshwater between the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) and North Atlantic, affecting North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) variability and regional climate. Paired measurements of {delta}O and Mg/Ca of foraminiferal calcite from GOM sediments reveal five episodes of LIS meltwater input from 28-45 thousand years ago (ka) that do not match the millennial-scale Dansgaard-Oeschger (D/O) warmings recorded in Greenland ice. We suggest that summer melting of the LIS may occur during Antarctic warming and likely contributed to sea-level variability during Marine Isotope Stage 3 (MIS 3).

  4. Time varying arctic climate change amplification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chylek, Petr; Dubey, Manvendra K; Lesins, Glen; Wang, Muyin

    2009-01-01

    During the past 130 years the global mean surface air temperature has risen by about 0.75 K. Due to feedbacks -- including the snow/ice albedo feedback -- the warming in the Arctic is expected to proceed at a faster rate than the global average. Climate model simulations suggest that this Arctic amplification produces warming that is two to three times larger than the global mean. Understanding the Arctic amplification is essential for projections of future Arctic climate including sea ice extent and melting of the Greenland ice sheet. We use the temperature records from the Arctic stations to show that (a) the Arctic amplification is larger at latitudes above 700 N compared to those within 64-70oN belt, and that, surprisingly; (b) the ratio of the Arctic to global rate of temperature change is not constant but varies on the decadal timescale. This time dependence will affect future projections of climate changes in the Arctic.

  5. A multi-model assessment of pollution transport to the Arctic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shindell, D T; Chin, M; Dentener, F; Doherty, R M; Faluvegi, G; Fiore, A M; Hess, P; Koch, D M; MacKenzie, I A; Sanderson, M G; Schultz, M G; Schulz, M; Stevenson, D S; Teich, H; Textor, C; Wild, O; Bergmann, D J; Bey, I; Bian, H; Cuvelier, C; Duncan, B N; Folberth, G; Horowitz, L W; Jonson, J; Kaminski, J W; Marmer, E; Park, R; Pringle, K J; Schroeder, S; Szopa, S; Takemura, T; Zeng, G; Keating, T J; Zuber, A

    2008-03-13

    We examine the response of Arctic gas and aerosol concentrations to perturbations in pollutant emissions from Europe, East and South Asia, and North America using results from a coordinated model intercomparison. These sensitivities to regional emissions (mixing ratio change per unit emission) vary widely across models and species. Intermodel differences are systematic, however, so that the relative importance of different regions is robust. North America contributes the most to Arctic ozone pollution. For aerosols and CO, European emissions dominate at the Arctic surface but East Asian emissions become progressively more important with altitude, and are dominant in the upper troposphere. Sensitivities show strong seasonality: surface sensitivities typically maximize during boreal winter for European and during spring for East Asian and North American emissions. Mid-tropospheric sensitivities, however, nearly always maximize during spring or summer for all regions. Deposition of black carbon (BC) onto Greenland is most sensitive to North American emissions. North America and Europe each contribute {approx}40% of total BC deposition to Greenland, with {approx}20% from East Asia. Elsewhere in the Arctic, both sensitivity and total BC deposition are dominated by European emissions. Model diversity for aerosols is especially large, resulting primarily from differences in aerosol physical and chemical processing (including removal). Comparison of modeled aerosol concentrations with observations indicates problems in the models, and perhaps, interpretation of the measurements. For gas phase pollutants such as CO and O{sub 3}, which are relatively well-simulated, the processes contributing most to uncertainties depend on the source region and altitude examined. Uncertainties in the Arctic surface CO response to emissions perturbations are dominated by emissions for East Asian sources, while uncertainties in transport, emissions, and oxidation are comparable for European

  6. Evaluation of Gas Reburning & Low NOx Burners on a Wall Fired Boiler Performance and Economics Report Gas Reburning-Low NOx Burner System Cherokee Station Unit 3 Public Service Company of Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-07-01

    Under the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Program (Round 3), a project was completed to demonstrate control of boiler NOX emissions and to a lesser degree, due to coal replacement, SO2 emissions. The project involved combining Gas Reburning with Low NOX Burners (GR-LNB) on a coal-fired electric utility boiler to determine if high levels of NOX reduction (70%) could be achieved. Sponsors of the project included the U.S. Department of Energy, the Gas Research Institute, Public Service Company of Colorado, Colorado Interstate Gas, Electric Power Research Institute, and the Energy and Environmental Research Corporation. The GR-LNB demonstration was performed on Public Service Company of Colorado's (PSCO) Cherokee Unit #3, located in Denver, Colorado. This unit is a 172 MW~ wall-fired boiler that uses Colorado Bituminous, low-sulfur coal. It had a baseline NOX emission level of 0.73 lb/106 Btu using conventional burners. Low NOX burners are designed to yield lower NOX emissions than conventional burners. However, the NOX control achieved with this technique is limited to 30-50%. Also, with LNBs, CO emissions can increase to above acceptable standards. Gas Reburning (GR) is designed to reduce NOX in the flue gas by staged fuel combustion. This technology involves the introduction of natural gas into the hot furnace flue gas stream. When combined, GR and LNBs minimize NOX emissions and maintain acceptable levels of CO emissions. A comprehensive test program was completed, operating over a wide range of boiler conditions. Over 4,000 hours of operation were achieved, providing substantial data. Measurements were taken to quantify reductions in NOX emissions, the impact on boiler equipment and operability and factors influencing costs. The GR-LNB technology achieved good NOX emission reductions and the goals of the project were achieved. Although the performance of the low NOX burners (supplied by others) was less than expected, a NOX reduction of 65% was

  7. Van der Waals epitaxial growth of two-dimensional single-crystalline GaSe domains on graphene

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Xufan; Basile, Leonardo; Huang, Bing; Ma, Cheng; Lee, Jaekwang; Vlassiouk, Ivan V.; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Lin, Ming -Wei; Chi, Miaofang; Idrobo Tapia, Juan Carlos; et al

    2015-07-22

    Two-dimensional (2D) van der Waals (vdW) heterostructures are a family of artificially-structured materials that promise tunable optoelectronic properties for devices with enhanced functionalities. Compared to stamping, direct epitaxy of vdW heterostructures is ideal for clean interlayer interfaces and scalable device fabrication. Here, we explore the synthesis and preferred orientations of 2D GaSe atomic layers on graphene (Gr) by vdW epitaxy. Guided by the wrinkles on graphene, GaSe nuclei form that share a predominant lattice orientation. Due to vdW epitaxial growth many nuclei grow as perfectly aligned crystals and coalesce to form large (tens of microns), single-crystal flakes. Through theoretical investigationsmore » of interlayer energetics, and measurements of preferred orientations by atomic-resolution STEM and electron diffraction, a 10.9 interlayer rotation of the GaSe lattice with respect to the underlying graphene is found to be the most energetically preferred vdW heterostructure with the largest binding energy and the longest-range ordering. These GaSe/Gr vdW heterostructures exhibit an enhanced Raman E21g band of monolayer GaSe along with highly-quenched photoluminescence due to strong charge transfer. Despite the very large lattice mismatch of GaSe/Gr through vdW epitaxy, the predominant orientation control and convergent formation of large single-crystal flakes demonstrated here is promising for the scalable synthesis of large-area vdW heterostructures for the development of new optical and optoelectronic devices.« less

  8. Van der Waals epitaxial growth of two-dimensional single-crystalline GaSe domains on graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Xufan; Basile, Leonardo; Huang, Bing; Ma, Cheng; Lee, Jaekwang; Vlassiouk, Ivan V.; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Lin, Ming -Wei; Chi, Miaofang; Idrobo Tapia, Juan Carlos; Rouleau, Christopher M.; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Yoon, Mina; Geohegan, David B.; Xiao, Kai

    2015-07-22

    Two-dimensional (2D) van der Waals (vdW) heterostructures are a family of artificially-structured materials that promise tunable optoelectronic properties for devices with enhanced functionalities. Compared to stamping, direct epitaxy of vdW heterostructures is ideal for clean interlayer interfaces and scalable device fabrication. Here, we explore the synthesis and preferred orientations of 2D GaSe atomic layers on graphene (Gr) by vdW epitaxy. Guided by the wrinkles on graphene, GaSe nuclei form that share a predominant lattice orientation. Due to vdW epitaxial growth many nuclei grow as perfectly aligned crystals and coalesce to form large (tens of microns), single-crystal flakes. Through theoretical investigations of interlayer energetics, and measurements of preferred orientations by atomic-resolution STEM and electron diffraction, a 10.9 interlayer rotation of the GaSe lattice with respect to the underlying graphene is found to be the most energetically preferred vdW heterostructure with the largest binding energy and the longest-range ordering. These GaSe/Gr vdW heterostructures exhibit an enhanced Raman E21g band of monolayer GaSe along with highly-quenched photoluminescence due to strong charge transfer. Despite the very large lattice mismatch of GaSe/Gr through vdW epitaxy, the predominant orientation control and convergent formation of large single-crystal flakes demonstrated here is promising for the scalable synthesis of large-area vdW heterostructures for the development of new optical and optoelectronic devices.

  9. Van der Waals Epitaxial Growth of Single-Crystal Two-Dimensional GaSe on Graphene

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Xufan; Basile, Leonardo; Huang, Bing; Ma, Cheng; Lee, Jaekwang; Vlassiouk, Ivan V.; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Lin, Ming-Wei; Chi, Miaofang; Idrobo Tapia, Juan Carlos; et al

    2015-07-22

    Two-dimensional (2D) van der Waals (vdW) heterostructures are a family of artificially-structured materials that promise tunable optoelectronic properties for devices with enhanced functionalities. Compared to stamping, direct epitaxy of vdW heterostructures is ideal for clean interlayer interfaces and scalable device fabrication. Here, we explore the synthesis and preferred orientations of 2D GaSe atomic layers on graphene (Gr) by vdW epitaxy. Guided by the wrinkles on graphene, GaSe nuclei form that share a predominant lattice orientation. Due to vdW epitaxial growth many nuclei grow as perfectly aligned crystals and coalesce to form large (tens of microns), single-crystal flakes. Through theoretical investigationsmoreof interlayer energetics, and measurements of preferred orientations by atomic-resolution STEM and electron diffraction, a 10.9 interlayer rotation of the GaSe lattice with respect to the underlying graphene is found to be the most energetically preferred vdW heterostructure with the largest binding energy and the longest-range ordering. These GaSe/Gr vdW heterostructures exhibit an enhanced Raman E21g band of monolayer GaSe along with highly-quenched photoluminescence due to strong charge transfer. Despite the very large lattice mismatch of GaSe/Gr through vdW epitaxy, the predominant orientation control and convergent formation of large single-crystal flakes demonstrated here is promising for the scalable synthesis of large-area vdW heterostructures for the development of new optical and optoelectronic devices.less

  10. The dark side of galaxy colour: evidence from new SDSS measurements of galaxy clustering and lensing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hearin, Andrew P.; Watson, Douglas F.; Becker, Matthew R.; Reyes, Reinabelle; Berlind, Andreas A.; Zentner, Andrew R.

    2014-08-12

    The age matching model has recently been shown to predict correctly the luminosity L and g-r color of galaxies residing within dark matter halos. The central tenet of the model is intuitive: older halos tend to host galaxies with older stellar populations. In this paper, we demonstrate that age matching also correctly predicts the g-r color trends exhibited in a wide variety of statistics of the galaxy distribution for stellar mass M* threshold samples. In particular, we present new measurements of the galaxy two-point correlation function and the galaxy-galaxy lensing signal as a function of M* and g-r color from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and show that age matching exhibits remarkable agreement with these and other statistics of low-redshift galaxies. In so doing, we also demonstrate good agreement between the galaxy-galaxy lensing observed by SDSS and the signal predicted by abundance matching, a new success of this model. We describe how age matching is a specific example of a larger class of Conditional Abundance Matching models (CAM), a theoretical framework we introduce here for the first time. CAM provides a general formalism to study correlations at fixed mass between any galaxy property and any halo property. The striking success of our simple implementation of CAM provides compelling evidence that this technique has the potential to describe the same set of data as alternative models, but with a dramatic reduction in the required number of parameters. CAM achieves this reduction by exploiting the capability of contemporary N-body simulations to determine dark matter halo properties other than mass alone, which distinguishes our model from conventional approaches to the galaxy-halo connection.

  11. Grande Ronde Basin Chinook Salmon Captive Brood and Conventional Supplementation Program, 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carmichael, Richard W.

    2003-03-01

    Endangered Species Permit Number 1011 (formerly Permit No. 973) authorizes ODFW to take listed spring chinook salmon juveniles from Catherine Creek (CC), Lostine River (LR) and Grande Ronde River (GR) for research and enhancement purposes. Modification 2 of this permit authorizes ODFW to take adults for spawning and the production and release of smolts for the Captive and Conventional broodstock programs. This report satisfies the requirement that an annual report be submitted. Herein we report on activities conducted and provide cursory data analyses for the Grande Ronde spring chinook salmon Captive and Conventional broodstock projects from 1 January-31 December 2000.

  12. Raymond Murphy | Inventors | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Raymond Murphy Raymond Murphy Water Technical Manager GR Oil & Gas Technology Center Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share (Opens in new window) Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window) Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window) "The oil & gas industry is in constant search of water treatment products that promise smarter, cheaper and more environmentally friendly operation. We invent those

  13. High pressure melting curves of silver, gold and copper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hieu, Ho Khac

    2013-11-15

    In this work, based on the Lindemann's formula of melting and the pressure-dependent Grüneisen parameter, we have investigated the pressure effect on melting temperature of silver, gold and copper metals. The analytical expression of melting temperature as a function of volume compression has been derived. Our results are compared with available experimental data as well as with previous theoretical studies and the good and reasonable agreements are found. We also proposed the potential of this approach on predicting melting of copper at very high pressure.

  14. Evaluation of In-Situ Tritium Transport Parameters for Type 316 Stainless Steel during Irradiation

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    In-Situ Tritium Transport Parameters for Type 316 Stainless Steel during Irradiation D.J. Senor, W.G. Luscher K.K. Clayton, G.R. Longhurst Tritium Focus Group Meeting Savannah River National Laboratory Aiken, SC 23 April 2014 PNNL-SA-102143 Motivation and Scope TMIST-2 Experiment Measured in-reactor steady state tritium permeation through Type 316 stainless steel as a function of tritium partial pressure and temperature Tritium permeation irradiation enhancement of ~3X was observed relative to

  15. Shear viscosity coefficient of liquid lanthanides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patel, H. P. Thakor, P. B. Prajapati, A. V.; Sonvane, Y. A.

    2015-05-15

    Present paper deals with the computation of shear viscosity coefficient (η) of liquid lanthanides. The effective pair potential v(r) is calculated through our newly constructed model potential. The Pair distribution function g(r) is calculated from PYHS reference system. To see the influence of local field correction function, Hartree (H), Tailor (T) and Sarkar et al (S) local field correction function are used. Present results are compared with available experimental as well as theoretical data. Lastly, we found that our newly constructed model potential successfully explains the shear viscosity coefficient (η) of liquid lanthanides.

  16. Scapolite as a potential sensor of fluid composition in calc-silicates and granulites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moecher, D.P.; Essene, E.J.

    1985-01-01

    Scapolite has been proposed as reservoir for CO/sub 2/ in the lower crust (Goldsmith 1976) and as a sensor of fluid composition in scapolite-bearing calc-silicates and granulites. The scapolite decarbonation reaction 2Meionite(Me)+Quartz(Qz)=5Anorthite(An)+Grossular(Gr)+2CO/sub 2/, obtained by addition of the reaction 3An+Cc=Me and An+2Cc+Qz=Gr+2CO/sub 2/, is a potential equilibrium applicable to a variety of lithologies and grades by which CO/sub 2/ activities could theoretically be calculated. Assuming partial ordering in natural scapolite, and S/sub 298//sup 0/ (Me)=728.6J/mol x K, the scapolite decarbonation reaction has a virtually flat slope in the range 700-1000/sup 0/C and 2.2+/-0.1kb with 2Me+Qz on the high P side of the reaction. Values of logK for the reaction were determined at elevated P, and aCO/sub 2/ calculated for scapolite-bearing calc-silicate assemblages (Sc+Pg+Gt+Q+Di+/-Cc) from Perry Sound (PS), Ontario and the Furua Complex (FC), Tanzania (Coolen 1980), for which X(Gr)approx. =0.8, X(An)approx. =0.6-0.8, and X(Me)greater than or equal to0.7. The a-X relations used were Perkins (1979) for garnet, Newton and Perkins (1982) for plagioclase, and Oterdoom and Gunter (1983) for scapolite. However application of the scapolite decarbonation reaction to garnet-bearing granulites with X(Gr)less than or equal to0.20 yields erroneous estimates of aCO/sub 2/(greater than or equal to1.0) suggesting incorrect assumptions used to determine S/sub 298//sup 0/ for stably ordered meionite or the a-X relations of Oterdoom and Gunter. Further refinement of the thermodynamic data base and evaluation of the degree and effect of order-disorder in natural scapolites must be performed in order to use scapolite to calculate fluid composition in high grade metamorphites.

  17. Development of integrated mechanistically-based degradation-mode models for performance assessment of high-level waste containers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bedrossian, P; Estill, J; Farmer, J; Hopper, R; Horn, J; Huang, J S; McCright, D; Roy, A; Wang, F; Wilfinger, K

    1999-02-08

    A key component of the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) being designed for containment of spent-fuel and high-level waste at the proposed geological repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada is a two-layer canister. In this particular design, the inner barrier is made of a corrosion resistant material (CRM) such as Alloy 825, 625 or C-22, while the outer barrier is made of a corrosion-allowance material (CAM) such as A516 Gr 55, a carbon steel, or Monel 400. At the present time, Alloy C-22 and A516 G4 55 are favored.

  18. TO

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    S. R. Gustaxson,, Chief, SF Materials Accounta- DATE: w 20: 195% bility Branch, Prcduction Division, Nem York Operations Office FROM : Y AL-a&-- V went Vespe, Chief, SF Idaterials Accountability Branch Technical Services Division, Chicago Operations Office =JsJ-: REQUEST FCR UfMNItiL4 COZPWNDS FOR PRATT &?7HIn,EY AIRCPSL"T Itwfilbe ippreciateci if arrangements are maiie to supply Pratt & V&itney with the followi?g material: Uranium hydride 500 gr~am3 Uranium dioxide <

  19. Diquat induces renal proximal tubule injury in glutathione reductase-deficient mice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, Lynette K. . E-mail: rogersl@ccri.net; Bates, Carlton M.; Welty, Stephen E.; Smith, Charles V.

    2006-12-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been associated with many human diseases, and glutathione (GSH)-dependent processes are pivotal in limiting tissue damage. To test the hypothesis that Gr1{sup a1Neu} (Neu) mice, which do not express glutathione reductase (GR), would be more susceptible than are wild-type mice to ROS-mediated injury, we studied the effects of diquat, a redox cycling toxicant. Neu mice exhibited modest, dose- and time-dependent elevations in plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activities, 126 {+-} 36 U/l at 2 h after 5 {mu}mol/kg of diquat, but no ALT elevations were observed in diquat-treated C3H/HeN mice for up to 6 h after 50 {mu}mol/kg of diquat. Histology indicated little or no hepatic necrosis in diquat-treated mice of either strain, but substantial renal injury was observed in diquat-treated Neu mice, characterized by brush border sloughing in the proximal tubules by 1 h and tubular necrosis by 2 h after doses of 7.5 {mu}mol/kg. Decreases in renal GSH levels were observed in the Neu mice by 2 h post dose (3.4 {+-} 0.4 vs 0.2 {+-} 0.0 {mu}mol/g tissue at 0 and 50 {mu}mol/kg, respectively), and increases in renal GSSG levels were observed in the Neu mice as early as 0.5 h after 7.5 {mu}mol/kg (105.5 {+-} 44.1 vs 27.9 {+-} 4.8 nmol/g tissue). Blood urea nitrogen levels were elevated by 2 h in Neu mice after doses of 7.5 {mu}mol/kg (Neu vs C3H, 32.8 {+-} 4.1 vs 17.9 {+-} 0.3 mg/dl). Diquat-induced renal injury in the GR-deficient Neu mice offers a useful model for studies of ROS-induced renal necrosis and of the contributions of GR in defense against oxidant-mediated injuries in vivo.

  20. L'Aventure du LHC

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    Cette présentation s?adressera principalement aux personnes qui ont construit le LHC. La construction du LHC fut longue et difficile. De nombreux problèmes sont apparus en cours de route. Tous ont été résolus grâce au dévouement et à l?engagement du personnel et des collaborateurs. Je reviendrai sur les coups durs et les réussites qui ont marqués ces 15 dernières années et je vous montrerai combien cette machine, le fruit de vos efforts, est extraordinaire.

  1. 02H

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    H Thermal Neutron Capture Evaluated Data Measurements Thermal Neutron Capture 1965CO17: 1H(n, γ), E = thermal; measured σ. 1973COWZ: 1H(n, γ); measured σ. 1977CO06: 1H(n, γ), E = 0.0253 eV; measured σ. 1978VYZY: 1H(n, γ); measured σ. 2H deduced binding energy. Ge(Li) detectors. 1980GR02: 1H(n, γ), E = thermal; measured Eγ; deduced Q, neutron mass. 2H deduced neutron binding energy. 1980IS02: 1H(n, γ), E = thermal; measured Eγ, Iγ. 2H deduced Q, neutron binding energy. 1982VA13:

  2. Experimental Validation Data for Computational Fluid Dynamics of Forced Convection on a Vertical Flat Plate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, Jeff R.; Lance, Blake W.; Smith, Barton L.

    2015-08-10

    We present computational fluid dynamics (CFD) validation dataset for turbulent forced convection on a vertical plate. The design of the apparatus is based on recent validation literature and provides a means to simultaneously measure boundary conditions (BCs) and system response quantities (SRQs). Important inflow quantities for Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS). CFD are also measured. Data are acquired at two heating conditions and cover the range 40,000 < Rex < 300,000, 357 < Reδ2 < 813, and 0.02 < Gr/Re2 < 0.232.

  3. Section 61

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Retrieval of Cloud Properties from Ground-Based Lidar/Radiometer Data C.M.R. Platt, S.A. Young, R.T. Austin, S.C. Marsden, G.R. Patterson, J.A. Bennett, B. Petraitis, and B. Turner CSIRO, Division of Atmospheric Research Aspendale, Victoria, Australia Abstract The retrieval of cloud properties from Lidar/Radiometer data by the LIRAD method is described. Several data sets taken by the CSIRO Division of Atmospheric Research are now available for such retrievals as a result of several major field

  4. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction study of porcine carboxypeptidase B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akparov, V. Kh.; Timofeev, V. I. Kuranova, I. P.

    2015-05-15

    Crystals of porcine pancreatic carboxypeptidase B have been grown in microgravity by the capillary counter-diffusion method through a gel layer. The X-ray diffraction study showed that the crystals belong to sp. gr. P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 and have the following unit-cell parameters: a = b = 79.58 Å, c = 100.51 Å; α = β = γ = 90.00°. The X-ray diffraction data set suitable for the determination of the three-dimensional structure at atomic resolution was collected from one of the grown crystals at the SPring 8 synchrotron facility to 0.98 Å resolution.

  5. LA--12O48-MS DE91

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    -12O48-MS DE91 010299 I ~ I i Tm Thou.mwl Yews of Solitude? 0)1 llzfuhwh!lll Illfrlwiml i)ffo fhc Wmtefsolfltiwl Pilot Project Rqwsitory GrL~gor!/B L')/fo)"(i* Craig W. Kirhood** HmwjOfwf7y Marfit~/. Pmquak!!i+ ~~~~n~~~~L..Al...s.Me. M.xico 87541 L A N L % D I O T D I U E Table of Contents Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. D O . . . . . . . . . . . ...ooOO.OO..OOOOO"OO".OO """"."" 'ti 1. Introduction . .

  6. A=8B (1988AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 8B) GENERAL: See also (1984AJ01) and Table 8.9 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. Model calculations: (1983SH38). Special states: (1982PO12, 1988KH03). Complex reactions involving 8B: (1982AL08, 1983OL1A, 1984GR08, 1986HA1B, 1987TAZU, 1988AR05, 1988KI05). Astrophysical questions: (1984HA1B, 1985BO1E, 1985GI1C, 1985KL1A, 1985LA1C, 1988BA86). Reactions involving pions: (1983SP06). Hypernuclei: (1983SH38). Other topics: (1985AN28). Ground state of

  7. J U N

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    U N E 2 0 1 1 A P OL IC Y F R A M E WOR K F OR T H E 21st CEN T U RY GR I D: Enabling Our Secure Energy Future EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT NATIONAL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY COUNCIL W AS HIN GTON , D C. 20502 June 13,2011 Dear Colleagues: We are pleased to transmit the report "A Policy Framework for the 21 s l Century Grid: Enabling Our Secure Energy Future." This report outlines policy recommendations that build upon the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 and the Obama

  8. Production EVSE Fact Sheet: DC Fast Charger: Hasetec

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ProGrAM Production EVSE Fact Sheet: DC Fast Charger: Hasetec Specifcations Grid connection Hardwired Connector type CHAdeMo Approximate size (H x W x D inches) 38 x 69 x 21 Charge level DC Fast Charge Input voltage 480 VAC - 3 Phase Isolation Transformer 1 75 kVA Maximum input current 2 120 Amp Test Conditions Test date 10/23/2012 Supply frequency (Hz) 60 Initial ambient temperature (°F) 85 Vehicle Charged Make and model 2011 Nissan Leaf Battery type Li-ion Initial Leaf ESS State of Charge 3 9%

  9. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Lease Condensate Production by API Gravity Definitions Key Terms Definition API Gravity API gravity is the American Petroleum Institute's measure of specific gravity of crude oil or condensate in degrees. The measuring scale is calibrated in terms of degrees API: Degrees API = (141.5 / (sp. gr. 60ºF / 60ºF)) - 131.5 Barrel A unit of volume equal to 42 U.S. gallons. Crude Oil A mixture of hydrocarbons that exists in liquid phase in natural underground reservoirs and remains liquid at

  10. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    API Gravity Definitions Key Terms Definition API Gravity An arbitrary scale expressing the gravity or density of liquid petroleum products. The measuring scale is calibrated in terms of degrees API; it is calculated as follows: Degrees API = (141.5 / (sp. gr. 60ºF / 60ºF)) - 131.5 The higher the API gravity, the lighter the compound. Light crudes generally exceed 38 degrees API and heavy crudes are commonly labeled as all crudes with an API gravity of 22 degrees or below. Intermediate crudes

  11. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Percentages of Total Imported Crude by API Gravity Definitions Key Terms Definition API Gravity An arbitrary scale expressing the gravity or density of liquid petroleum products. The measuring scale is calibrated in terms of degrees API; it is calculated as follows: Degrees API = (141.5 / (sp. gr. 60ºF / 60ºF)) - 131.5 The higher the API gravity, the lighter the compound. Light crudes generally exceed 38 degrees API and heavy crudes are commonly labeled as all crudes with an API gravity of 22

  12. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    API Gravity Definitions Key Terms Definition API Gravity An arbitrary scale expressing the gravity or density of liquid petroleum products. The measuring scale is calibrated in terms of degrees API; it is calculated as follows: Degrees API = (141.5 / (sp. gr. 60ºF / 60ºF)) - 131.5 The higher the API gravity, the lighter the compound. Light crudes generally exceed 38 degrees API and heavy crudes are commonly labeled as all crudes with an API gravity of 22 degrees or below. Intermediate crudes

  13. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Qualities of Crude Oil Input Definitions Key Terms Definition API Gravity An arbitrary scale expressing the gravity or density of liquid petroleum products. The measuring scale is calibrated in terms of degrees API; it is calculated as follows: Degrees API = (141.5 / (sp. gr. 60ºF / 60ºF)) - 131.5 The higher the API gravity, the lighter the compound. Light crudes generally exceed 38 degrees API and heavy crudes are commonly labeled as all crudes with an API gravity of 22 degrees or below.

  14. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    API Gravity Definitions Key Terms Definition API Gravity An arbitrary scale expressing the gravity or density of liquid petroleum products. The measuring scale is calibrated in terms of degrees API; it is calculated as follows: Degrees API = (141.5 / (sp. gr. 60ºF / 60ºF)) - 131.5 The higher the API gravity, the lighter the compound. Light crudes generally exceed 38 degrees API and heavy crudes are commonly labeled as all crudes with an API gravity of 22 degrees or below. Intermediate crudes

  15. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    API Gravity Definitions Key Terms Definition API Gravity An arbitrary scale expressing the gravity or density of liquid petroleum products. The measuring scale is calibrated in terms of degrees API; it is calculated as follows: Degrees API = (141.5 / (sp. gr. 60ºF / 60ºF)) - 131.5 The higher the API gravity, the lighter the compound. Light crudes generally exceed 38 degrees API and heavy crudes are commonly labeled as all crudes with an API gravity of 22 degrees or below. Intermediate crudes

  16. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    API Gravity Definitions Key Terms Definition API Gravity An arbitrary scale expressing the gravity or density of liquid petroleum products. The measuring scale is calibrated in terms of degrees API; it is calculated as follows: Degrees API = (141.5 / (sp. gr. 60ºF / 60ºF)) - 131.5 The higher the API gravity, the lighter the compound. Light crudes generally exceed 38 degrees API and heavy crudes are commonly labeled as all crudes with an API gravity of 22 degrees or below. Intermediate crudes

  17. Experimental Validation Data for Computational Fluid Dynamics of Forced Convection on a Vertical Flat Plate

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Harris, Jeff R.; Lance, Blake W.; Smith, Barton L.

    2015-08-10

    We present computational fluid dynamics (CFD) validation dataset for turbulent forced convection on a vertical plate. The design of the apparatus is based on recent validation literature and provides a means to simultaneously measure boundary conditions (BCs) and system response quantities (SRQs). Important inflow quantities for Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS). CFD are also measured. Data are acquired at two heating conditions and cover the range 40,000 < Rex < 300,000, 357 < Reδ2 < 813, and 0.02 < Gr/Re2 < 0.232.

  18. Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator Users Guide Version 6.2.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keiter, Eric R.; Mei, Ting; Russo, Thomas V.; Schiek, Richard; Sholander, Peter E.; Thornquist, Heidi K.; Verley, Jason; Baur, David Gregory

    2014-09-01

    registered trademarks of Cadence Design Systems, Inc. Microsoft, Windows and Windows 7 are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation. Medici, DaVinci and Taurus are registered trademarks of Synopsys Corporation. Amtec and TecPlot are trademarks of Amtec Engineering, Inc. Xyce 's expression library is based on that inside Spice 3F5 developed by the EECS Department at the University of California. The EKV3 MOSFET model was developed by the EKV Team of the Electronics Laboratory-TUC of the Technical University of Crete. All other trademarks are property of their respective owners. Contacts Bug Reports (Sandia only) http://joseki.sandia.gov/bugzilla http://charleston.sandia.gov/bugzilla World Wide Web http://xyce.sandia.gov http://charleston.sandia.gov/xyce (Sandia only) Email xyce%40sandia.gov (outside Sandia) xyce-sandia%40sandia.gov (Sandia only)

  19. Ground-state and dynamical properties of two-dimensional dipolar Fermi liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abedinpour, Saeed H.; Asgari, Reza; Tanatar, B.; Polini, Marco

    2014-01-15

    We study the ground-state properties of a two-dimensional spin-polarized fluid of dipolar fermions within the EulerLagrange Fermi-hypernetted-chain approximation. Our method is based on the solution of a scattering Schrdinger equation for the pair amplitude ?(g(r)), where g(r) is the pair distribution function. A key ingredient in our theory is the effective pair potential, which includes a bosonic term from JastrowFeenberg correlations and a fermionic contribution from kinetic energy and exchange, which is tailored to reproduce the HartreeFock limit at weak coupling. Very good agreement with recent results based on quantum Monte Carlo simulations is achieved over a wide range of coupling constants up to the liquid-to-crystal quantum phase transition. Using the fluctuationdissipation theorem and a static approximation for the effective inter-particle interactions, we calculate the dynamical densitydensity response function, and furthermore demonstrate that an undamped zero-sound mode exists for any value of the interaction strength, down to infinitesimally weak couplings. -- Highlights: We have studied the ground state properties of a strongly correlated two-dimensional fluid of dipolar fermions. We have calculated the effective inter-particle interaction and the dynamical densitydensity response function. We have shown that an undamped zero sound mode exists at any value of the interaction strength.

  20. Spherically symmetric analysis on open FLRW solution in non-linear massive gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiang, Chien-I; Izumi, Keisuke; Chen, Pisin E-mail: izumi@phys.ntu.edu.tw

    2012-12-01

    We study non-linear massive gravity in the spherically symmetric context. Our main motivation is to investigate the effect of helicity-0 mode which remains elusive after analysis of cosmological perturbation around an open Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) universe. The non-linear form of the effective energy-momentum tensor stemming from the mass term is derived for the spherically symmetric case. Only in the special case where the area of the two sphere is not deviated away from the FLRW universe, the effective energy momentum tensor becomes completely the same as that of cosmological constant. This opens a window for discriminating the non-linear massive gravity from general relativity (GR). Indeed, by further solving these spherically symmetric gravitational equations of motion in vacuum to the linear order, we obtain a solution which has an arbitrary time-dependent parameter. In GR, this parameter is a constant and corresponds to the mass of a star. Our result means that Birkhoff's theorem no longer holds in the non-linear massive gravity and suggests that energy can probably be emitted superluminously (with infinite speed) on the self-accelerating background by the helicity-0 mode, which could be a potential plague of this theory.

  1. Emergent cosmology revisited

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bag, Satadru; Sahni, Varun; Shtanov, Yuri; Unnikrishnan, Sanil E-mail: varun@iucaa.ernet.in E-mail: sanil@lnmiit.ac.in

    2014-07-01

    We explore the possibility of emergent cosmology using the effective potential formalism. We discover new models of emergent cosmology which satisfy the constraints posed by the cosmic microwave background (CMB). We demonstrate that, within the framework of modified gravity, the emergent scenario can arise in a universe which is spatially open/closed. By contrast, in general relativity (GR) emergent cosmology arises from a spatially closed past-eternal Einstein Static Universe (ESU). In GR the ESU is unstable, which creates fine tuning problems for emergent cosmology. However, modified gravity models including Braneworld models, Loop Quantum Cosmology (LQC) and Asymptotically Free Gravity result in a stable ESU. Consequently, in these models emergent cosmology arises from a larger class of initial conditions including those in which the universe eternally oscillates about the ESU fixed point. We demonstrate that such an oscillating universe is necessarily accompanied by graviton production. For a large region in parameter space graviton production is enhanced through a parametric resonance, casting serious doubts as to whether this emergent scenario can be past-eternal.

  2. Light hadron spectra in the constituent quark model with the Kobayashi-Kondo-Maskawa-'t Hooft effective U {sub A} (1) symmetry breaking interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dmitrasinovic, V. . E-mail: dmitrasin@yahoo.com; Toki, H.

    2006-02-15

    We make a critical comparison of several versions of instanton-induced interactions present in the literature, all based on ITEP group's extension to three colours and flavours of 't Hooft's effective lagrangian, with the predictions of the phenomenological Kobayashi-Kondo-Maskawa (KKM) chiral quark lagrangian. We analyze the effects of all versions of the effective U {sub A} (1) symmetry breaking interactions on light hadron spectra in the non-relativistic constituent quark model. We show that the KKMT force, when used as a residual hyperfine interaction reproduces the correct ordering of pseudoscalar and vector mesons even without explicitly taking chiral symmetry into account. Moreover, the nucleon spectra are also correctly reproduced, only the Roper resonance remains too high, albeit lower than usual, at 1660 MeV. The latter's lower than expected mass is not due to a small excitation energy, as in the Glozman-Riska (GR) model, but to a combination of colour, flavour, and spatial wave function properties that enhance the relevant matrix elements. The KKMT interaction explicitly depends on flavour and spin of the quarks, but unlike the GR flavour-spin one it has a firm footing in QCD. In the process we provide several technical advances, in particular we show the first explicit derivation of the three-body Fierz transformation and apply it to the KKM interaction. We also discuss the ambiguities associated with the colour degree of freedom.

  3. Buoyant instabilities in downward flow in a symmetrically heated vertical channel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, G.; Greif, R.

    1996-07-01

    This study of the downward flow of nitrogen in a tall, partially heated vertical channel (upstream isothermal at T{sub in}*, heated region isothermal at T{sub s}* downstream adiabatic) shows the strong effects of buoyancy even for small temperature differences. Time-dependent oscillations including periodic flow reversals occur along the channel walls. Although the flow and heat transfer are asymmetric, the temperature and axial component of velocity show symmetric reflections at two times that are half a period apart and the lateral component of velocity shows antisymmetric reflections at the two times. There is strong interaction between the downward flow in the central region of the channel and the upward flow along the heated channel walls. At the top of the heated region, the upward buoyant flow turns toward the center of the channel and is incorporated into the downward flow. Along the channel centerline there are nonmonotonic variations of the axial component of velocity and temperature and a large lateral component of velocity that reverses direction periodically. Results are presented for Re = 219.7 and Gr/Re{sup 2} = 1.83, 8.0, and 13.7. The heat transfer and the frequency of the oscillations increases and the flow and temperature fields become more complex as Gr/Re{sup 2} increases. The results have applications to fiber drying, food processing, crystal growth, solar energy collection, cooling of electronic circuits, ventilation, etc.

  4. Structure of complexes of nitrilo tris methylene phosphonic acid with copper, [CuN(CH{sub 2}PO{sub 3}){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 3}] and Na{sub 4}[CuN(CH{sub 2}PO{sub 3}){sub 3}]{sub 2} · 19H{sub 2}O, as bactericides and inhibitors of scaling and corrosion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Somov, N. V.; Chausov, F. F.

    2015-03-15

    Nitrilotris methylene phosphonate triaqua copper and octasodium bis(nitrilotris methylene phosphonate cuprate(II)) nonadecahydrate have been synthesized and investigated. [CuN(CH{sub 2}PO{sub 3}){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 3}] is crystallized in the sp. gr. P2{sub 1}/c, Z = 4, a = 9.2506(2) Å, b = 15.9815(2) Å, c = 9.5474(2) Å, β = 113.697(2)°. The copper atom is coordinated by oxygen atoms in the configuration of elongated octahedron; the ligand (of bridge type) links neighboring copper atoms. Na{sub 8}[CuN(CH{sub 2}PO{sub 3}){sub 3}]{sub 2} · 19H{sub 2}O is crystallized in the sp. gr. P2{sub 1}/c, Z = 2, a = 11.24550(10) Å, b = 17.38980(10) Å, c = 13.5852(2) Å, β = 127.8120(10)°. This complex is chelating; the copper atom closes three five-membered N-C-P-O-Cu cycles with a shared Cu-N bond. Copper is coordinated in a distorted trigonal-bipyramidal configuration.

  5. Li-Ion polymer cells thermal property changes as a function of cycle-life

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maleki, Hossein; Wang, Hsin; Porter, Wallace D; Hallmark, Jerry

    2014-01-01

    The impact of elevated temperature chargeedischarge cycling on thermal conductivity (K-value) of Lithium Ion Polymer (LIP) cells of various chemistries from three different manufacturers was investigated. These included high voltage (Graphite/LiCoO2:3.0e4.35 V), wide voltage (Si:C/LiCoO2:2.7e4.35 V) and conventional (Graphite/LiCoO2:3.0e4.2 V) chemistries. Investigation results show limited variability within the in-plane and through-plane K-values for the fresh cells with graphite-based anodes from all three suppliers. After 500 cycles at 45 C, in-plane and through-plane K-values of the high voltage cells reduced less vs. those for the wide voltage cells. Such results suggest that high temperature cycling could have a greater impact on thermal properties of Si:C cells than on the LIP cells with graphite (Gr) anode cells we tested. This difference is due to the excess swelling of Si:C-anode based cells vs. Gr-anode cells during cycling, especially at elevated temperatures. Thermal modeling is used to evaluate the impact of K-value changes, due to cycles at 45 C, on the cells internal heat propagation under internal short circuit condition that leads to localized meltdown of the separator.

  6. The MGGB equation-of-state for multifield applications: a numerical recipe for analytic expression of sesame EOS data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kashiwa, B. A.

    2010-12-01

    Abstract A thermodynamically consistent and fully general equationof state (EOS) for multifield applications is described. EOS functions are derived from a Helmholtz free energy expressed as the sum of thermal (fluctuational) and collisional (condensedphase) contributions; thus the free energy is of the MieGruneisen1 form. The phasecoexistence region is defined using a parameterized saturation curve by extending the form introduced by Guggenheim,2 which scales the curve relative to conditions at the critical point. We use the zerotemperature condensedphase contribution developed by Barnes,3 which extends the ThomasFermiDirac equation to zero pressure. Thus, the functional form of the EOS could be called MGGB (for Mie GruneisenGuggenheimBarnes). Substancespecific parameters are obtained by fitting the lowdensity energy to data from the Sesame4 library; fitting the zerotemperature pressure to the Sesame cold curve; and fitting the saturation curve and latent heat to laboratory data,5 if available. When suitable coexistence data, or Sesame data, are not available, then we apply the Principle of Corresponding States.2 Thus MGGB can be thought of as a numerical recipe for rendering the tabular Sesame EOS data in an analytic form that includes a proper coexistence region, and which permits the accurate calculation of derivatives associated with compressibility, expansivity, Joule coefficient, and specific heat, all of which are required for multifield applications. 1

  7. Degradation mode survey candidate titanium-base alloys for Yucca Mountain project waste package materials. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gdowski, G.E.

    1997-12-01

    The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) is evaluating materials from which to fabricate high-level nuclear waste containers (hereafter called waste packages) for the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Because of their very good corrosion resistance in aqueous environments titanium alloys are considered for container materials. Consideration of titanium alloys is understandable since about one-third (in 1978) of all titanium produced is used in applications where corrosion resistance is of primary importance. Consequently, there is a considerable amount of data which demonstrates that titanium alloys, in general, but particularly the commercial purity and dilute {alpha} grades, are highly corrosion resistant. This report will discuss the corrosion characteristics of Ti Gr 2, 7, 12, and 16. The more highly alloyed titanium alloys which were developed by adding a small Pd content to higher strength Ti alloys in order to give them better corrosion resistance will not be considered in this report. These alloys are all two phase ({alpha} and {beta}) alloys. The palladium addition while making these alloys more corrosion resistant does not give them the corrosion resistance of the single phase {alpha} and near-{alpha} (Ti Gr 12) alloys.

  8. Crystalline and spin chiralities in multiferroics with langasite-type structure and Fe{sub 1–x}Co{sub x}Si crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pikin, S. A. Lyubutin, I. S.; Dudka, A. P.

    2015-09-15

    It is shown that, when magnetic ordering occurs in layered iron-containing langasites (sp. gr. P321), one of the reasons for spin chiralities of different signs is the presence of structural chirality (the existence of inversion twins), which, in turn, is due to the nonsymmetricity of these crystals. Spin helicoids arise in these multiferroics at split sites of Fe{sup 3+} ions below the Néel point. The direction of electric polarization vectors coincides with the direction of the magnetic helicoid axes because of the piezoelectric properties of these materials. Due to the magnetostriction effects, structural chirality wave vector k{sub z} exceeds the magnetic helicoid wave vector by a factor of 2: k{sub z} = 2q{sub z}. The temperatures of transitions to the chiral structural and chiral magnetic states may differ. In particular, if the structural transition initial temperature exceeds the magnetic transition temperature (Τ{sub U}> Τ{sub M}), structural displacements may arise in the absence of magnetism at Τ{sub M} < Τ < Τ{sub U}. In noncentrosymmetric Fe{sub 1–x}Co{sub x}Si crystals (sp. gr. P2{sub 1}3), which are not multiferroics, magnetic chirality is due to the Dzyaloshinski–Moriya interaction. The dependence of the moduli of incommensurate wave number of the corresponding helicoid on the atomic composition of the crystals under consideration is nonmonotonic.

  9. Particle image velocimetry measurements for opposing flow in a vertical channel with a differential and asymmetric heating condition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez-Suastegui, L. [Graduate Student, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, C.U., Mexico 04510 D.F. (Mexico); Trevino, C. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, C.U., Mexico 04510 D.F. (Mexico)

    2007-10-15

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements were carried out in an experimental investigation of laminar mixed convection in a vertical duct with a square cross-section. The main downward water-flow is driven by gravity while a portion of a lateral side is heated, and buoyancy forces produce non-stationary vortex structures close to the heated region. Various ranges of the Grashof number, Gr are studied in combination with the Reynolds number, Re varying from 300 to 700. The values of the generalized buoyancy parameter or Richardson number, Ri = Gr/Re{sup 2} parallel to the Grashof number are included in the results. The influence of these nondimensional parameters and how they affect the fluid flow structure and vortex sizes and locations are reported. The flow patterns are nonsymmetric, periodic, and exhibit increasing complexity and frequency for increasing buoyancy. For the averaged values of the resulting vortex dimensions, it was found that a better and more congruent representation occurs when employing the Grashof and Reynolds numbers as independent parameters. (author)

  10. Cutting-edge issues of core-collapse supernova theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kotake, Kei; Nakamura, Ko; Kuroda, Takami; Takiwaki, Tomoya

    2014-05-02

    Based on multi-dimensional neutrino-radiation hydrodynamic simulations, we report several cutting-edge issues about the long-veiled explosion mechanism of core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe). In this contribution, we pay particular attention to whether three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamics and/or general relativity (GR) would or would not help the onset of explosions. By performing 3D simulations with spectral neutrino transport, we show that it is more difficult to obtain an explosion in 3D than in 2D. In addition, our results from the first generation of full general relativistic 3D simulations including approximate neutrino transport indicate that GR can foster the onset of neutrino-driven explosions. Based on our recent parametric studies using a light-bulb scheme, we discuss impacts of nuclear energy deposition behind the supernova shock and stellar rotation on the neutrino-driven mechanism, both of which have yet to be included in the self-consistent 3D supernova models. Finally we give an outlook with a summary of the most urgent tasks to extract the information about the explosion mechanisms from multi-messenger CCSN observables.