Sample records for governing geophysical seismic

  1. Rules and Regulations Governing Geophysical, Seismic or Other Type Exploration on State-Owned Lands Other Than State-Owned Marine Waters (Mississippi)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rules and Regulations Governing Geophysical, seismic or Other Type Exploration on State-Owned Lands Other than State-Owned Marine Waters is applicable to the Natural Gas Sector and the Coal...

  2. Non-Seismic Geophysical Approaches to Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoversten, G.M.; Gasperikova, Erika

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter considers the application of a number of different geophysical techniques for monitoring geologic sequestration of CO2. The relative merits of the seismic, gravity, electromagnetic (EM) and streaming potential (SP) geophysical techniques as monitoring tools are examined. An example of tilt measurements illustrates another potential monitoring technique, although it has not been studied to the extent of other techniques in this chapter. This work does not represent an exhaustive study, but rather demonstrates the capabilities of a number of geophysical techniques on two synthetic modeling scenarios. The first scenario represents combined CO2 enhance oil recovery (EOR) and sequestration in a producing oil field, the Schrader Bluff field on the north slope of Alaska, USA. The second scenario is of a pilot DOE CO2 sequestration experiment scheduled for summer 2004 in the Frio Brine Formation in South Texas, USA. Numerical flow simulations of the CO2 injection process for each case were converted to geophysical models using petrophysical models developed from well log data. These coupled flow simulation geophysical models allow comparrison of the performance of monitoring techniques over time on realistic 3D models by generating simulated responses at different times during the CO2 injection process. These time-lapse measurements are used to produce time-lapse changes in geophysical measurements that can be related to the movement of CO2 within the injection interval.

  3. Applying petroleum geophysics to astrophysics: Quantitative 4D seismic study of the solar interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, Ian

    Applying petroleum geophysics to astrophysics: Quantitative 4D seismic study, is to a significant extent based on tomographic methods developed in geophysics. The proposed time-lapse seismic methods developed in petroleum geophysics offer the next

  4. Seismic petrophysics: An applied science for reservoir geophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seismic petrophysics: An applied science for reservoir geophysics WAYNE D. PENNINGTON, Michigan a number of seismic attributes, using either prestack or poststack data, or even both in combination's intuition and, per- haps, wishful thinking, as a guide. This short paper introduces a new term "seismic

  5. Optimisation of seismic network design: Application to a geophysical international lunar network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sambridge, Malcolm

    Optimisation of seismic network design: Application to a geophysical international lunar network. Informations about lunar seismicity and seismic subsurface models from the Apollo missions are used as a priori information in this study to optimise the geometry of future lunar seismic networks in order to best resolve

  6. Opportunities for improving regulations governing the seismic...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Support DOE NPH Design AN APPLICATION OF THE SSHAC LEVEL 3 PROCESS TO THE PROBABILISTIC SEISMIC HAZARD ANALYSIS FOR NUCLEAR FACILITIES AT THE HANFORD SITE, EASTERN WASHINGTON, USA...

  7. Integrated geophysical-petrological modeling of lithosphereasthenosphere1 boundary in Central Tibet using electromagnetic and seismic data2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Alan G.

    1 Integrated geophysical-petrological modeling of lithosphere­asthenosphere1 boundary in Central magnetotelluric and seismic data in petrologically24 consistent manner25 · Lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary a petrologically-driven approach to jointly model magnetotelluric (MT) and29 seismic surface wave dispersion (SW

  8. Karst characterization in a semi-arid region using gravity, seismic, and resistivity geophysical techniques.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnhart, Kevin Scott

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We proposed to customize emerging in situ geophysical monitoring technology to generate time-series data during sporadic rain events in a semi-arid region. Electrodes were to be connected to wireless %5Cnodes%22 which can be left in the eld for many months. Embedded software would then increase sampling frequency during periods of rainfall. We hypothesized that this contrast between no-volume ow in karst passageways dur- ing dry periods and partial- or saturated-volume ow during a rain event is detectable by these Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) geophysical nodes, we call this a Wireless Resistivity Network (WRN). The development of new methodologies to characterize semi-arid karst hydrology is intended to augment Sandia National Laboratorys mission to lead e orts in energy technologies, waste disposal and climate security by helping to identify safe and secure regions and those that are at risk. Development and initial eld testing identi ed technological barriers to using WRNs for identifying semi-arid karst, exposing R&D which can be targeted in the future. Gravity, seismic, and resis- tivity surveys elucidated how each technique might e ectively be used to characterize semi-arid karst. This research brings to light the importance and challenges with char- acterizing semi-arid karst through a multi-method geophysical study. As there have been very few studies with this emphasis, this study has expanded the body of practical experience needed to protect the nations water and energy security interests.

  9. A multi-physics, integrated approach to formation evaluation using borehole geophysical measurements and 3D seismic data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    porosity are obtained via active gamma ray density tools. Porosity estimates are subsequently used together with resistivity measurements to provide estimates of in- situ water saturation. Formation tester measurements of multi-physics borehole geophysical measurements and 3D seismic data. The objective is to estimate in-situ

  10. Summary Report of Geophysical Logging For The Seismic Boreholes Project at the Hanford Site Waste Treatment Plant.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, Martin G.; Price, Randall K.

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the period of June through October 2006, three deep boreholes and one corehole were drilled beneath the site of the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The boreholes were drilled to provide information on ground-motion attenuation in the basalt and interbedded sediments underlying the WTP site. This report describes the geophysical logging of the deep boreholes that was conducted in support of the Seismic Boreholes Project, defined below. The detailed drilling and geological descriptions of the boreholes and seismic data collected and analysis of that data are reported elsewhere.

  11. SAGE, Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    program . Description teaches modern geophysical exploration techniques: seismic reflection and refraction, gravity and magnetics, electromagnetics (including...

  12. A Feasibility Study of Non-Seismic Geophysical Methods for Monitoring Geologic CO2 Sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gasperikova, Erika; Hoversten, G. Michael

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    integrated geophysical and reservoir data" by Hoversten anddata inversion, in which the top and base of the reservoirdata with other information in order to produce more accurate maps of change within the reservoir.

  13. Temporal Integration of Seismic Traveltime Tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B.

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Time-lapse geophysical measurements and seismic imaging methods in particular are powerful techniques

  14. Modeling the resolution of inexpensive, novel non-seismic geophysical monitoring tools to monitor CO2 injection into coal beds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gasperikova, E.; Hoversten, G.M.

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensitivity study of gravity and electromagnetic (EM) techniques, and amplitude vs. angle (AVA) analysis for CO{sub 2} movement in coal beds was based on the SECARB pilot test planned in the Black Warrior basin in Alabama. In the area of interest, coalbed methane is produced mainly from the Black Creek, Mary Lee, and Pratt coal zones at depths between 400 and 700 m and approximately 3 m thick on average. The permeability of coal in the Black Warrior basin decreases exponentially with depth as overburden stress increases. The permeability of the top layer is 100 mD, while the permeability of the deepest layer is around 1 mD. The pilot field test will include injecting a total of 1000 tons of CO{sub 2} into these three coal zones ({approx}300 tons to each zone). The density, sonic and resistivity well-logs from a deep disposal well a couple of miles from the pilot test site were used to create background (pre-injection) models. Our laboratory measurements of seismic velocity and electrical resistivity as a function of CO{sub 2} saturation on coal core samples were used to provide a link between the coalbed CO{sub 2} flow simulation models and the geophysical models. The sensitivity studies showed that while the response to the 300 tons of CO{sub 2} injected into a single layer wouldn't produce measurable surface response for either gravity or EM, the response due to an industrial-size injection would produce measurable surface signal for both techniques. Gravity inversion results illustrated that, provided we can collect high-quality gravity data in the field and we have some a priori information about the depth of the reservoir, we can recover the spatial location of CO{sub 2} plume correctly, although with the smoothing constraint of the inversion, the area was slightly overestimated, resulting in an underestimated value of density change. AVA analysis showed that by inverting seismic and EM data jointly, much better estimates of CO{sub 2} saturation can be obtained, especially in the third injection zone, where seismic AVA data fail to detect the high CO{sub 2} saturation. Analysis of spatial resolution and detectability limits show that gravity and EM measurements could, under certain circumstances, be used as a lower-cost alternative to seismic measurements.

  15. Seismicity and tectonic relationships of the Nemaha Uplift and Midcontinent geophysical anomaly. Final project summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burchett, R.R.; Luza, K.V.; Van Eck, O.J.; Wilson, F.W.

    1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The geological surveys of Iowa, Nebraska, Kansas, and Oklahoma conducted a 4- to 6-year investigation of the seismicity and tectonic relationships of the Nemaha Uplift and associated geologic features in the Midcontinent. Regional geological, gravity, aeromagnetic, seismological, and topographic information were compiled on 1:1,000,000-scale base maps. The following maps were prepared: (1) relief, (2) earthquake epicenter and station location, (3) lineament, (4) geologic bedrock, (5) structure contour (base of Kansas City Group or older Pennsylvanian rock units), (6) Precambrian configuration, (7) Bouguer gravity anomaly, (8) aeromagnetic, and (9) Precambrian rock type. One correlation between earthquakes and tectonic structures was made. There appears to be recent as well as historical earthquake activity associated with the Humbolt Fault zone, southeastern Nebraska and northeastern Kansas.

  16. Rock physics and geophysics for unconventional resource, multi-component seismic, quantitative interpretation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glinsky, Michael E; Sassen, Doug; Rael, Howard; Chen, Jinsong

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An extension of a previously developed, rock physics, model is made that quantifies the relationship between the ductile fraction of a brittle/ductile binary mixture and the isotropic seismic reflection response. Making a weak scattering (Born) approximation and plane wave (eikonal) approximation, with a subsequent ordering according to the smallness of the angle of incidence, a linear singular value decomposition analysis is done to understand the stack weightings, number of stacks, and the type of stacks that will optimally estimate the two fundamental rock physics parameters. It is concluded that the full PP stack and the "full" PS stack are the two optimal stacks needed to estimate the two rock physics parameters. They dominate over both the second order AVO "gradient" stack and the higher order (4th order) PP stack.

  17. Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal Systems Principal Investigator: John H. Queen Hi-Q Geophysical Inc. Track Name: Seismicity and Reservoir Fracture...

  18. Full-Wave Seismic Data Assimilation: Theoretical Background and Recent Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Wyoming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Po

    -Wave Seismic Data Assimilation: Theoretical Background and Recent Advances Po Chen Department of Geology will formulate the seismological inverse problem for estimating seismic source and Earth structure parameters in the form of weak-constraint generalized inverse, in which the seismic wave equation and the associated

  19. Numerical Simulation in Applied Geophysics. From the Mesoscale to ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seismic wave propagation is a common technique used in hydrocarbon exploration geophysics, mining and reservoir characterization and production.

  20. Seismic velocity and Q anisotropy in fractured poroelastic media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Introduction. Seismic wave propagation through fractures is an important subject in hydrocarbon exploration geophysics, mining and reservoir characterization ...

  1. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Engineered Geothermal Systems Through Integrated Geophysical, Geologic and Geochemical Interpretation the Seismic Analysis Component Additional References Retrieved from "http:...

  2. Geophysical and transport properties of reservoir rocks. Final report for task 4: Measurements and analysis of seismic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, N.G.W.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal objective of research on the seismic properties of reservoir rocks is to develop a basic understanding of the effects of rock microstructure and its contained pore fluids on seismic velocities and attenuation. Ultimately, this knowledge would be used to extract reservoir properties information such as the porosity, permeability, clay content, fluid saturation, and fluid type from borehole, cross-borehole, and surface seismic measurements to improve the planning and control of oil and gas recovery. This thesis presents laboratory ultrasonic measurements for three granular materials and attempts to relate the microstructural properties and the properties of the pore fluids to P- and S-wave velocities and attenuation. These experimental results show that artificial porous materials with sintered grains and a sandstone with partially cemented grains exhibit complexities in P- and S-wave attenuation that cannot be adequately explained by existing micromechanical theories. It is likely that some of the complexity observed in the seismic attenuation is controlled by details of the rock microstructure, such as the grain contact area and grain shape, and by the arrangement of the grain packing. To examine these effects, a numerical method was developed for analyzing wave propagation in a grain packing. The method is based on a dynamic boundary integral equation and incorporates generalized stiffness boundary conditions between individual grains to account for viscous losses and grain contact scattering.

  3. Continental crust under compression: A seismic refraction study of South Island Geophysical Transect I, South Island, New Zealand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Okaya, David

    ) active source seismic survey was designed to show the style of lithospheric thickening due to late for by rapid erosion of Mesozoic sedimentary rocks on the west side of the orogen. In our model the lower crust, and the mechanical coupling with the lower lithosphere may be obscured as the orogen matures and erodes. To gain more

  4. GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 61, NO. 6 (NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 1996); P. 17151727, 13 FIGS., 1 TABLE. Inversion of seismic refraction data using genetic algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boschetti, Fabio

    GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 61, NO. 6 (NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 1996); P. 1715­1727, 13 FIGS., 1 TABLE. Inversion ABSTRACT The use of genetic algorithms in geophysical inverse problems is a relatively recent development in the application of genetic algorithms to geophysical problems: i.e., high dimensionality. The ad- dition

  5. ESTIMATING UNCERTAINTIES FOR GEOPHYSICAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    to directly measure the amount of oil in an area is to drill several wells, but drilling is a very expensive. These techniques are applied to the inversion of traveltime data collected in a cross well seismic experiment procedure, and the whole idea of geophysics is to predict the amount of oil without drilling in all possible

  6. Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    5 4.5.2 Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal Systems Presentation Number: 022 Investigator: Queen, John (Hi-Q Geophysical Inc.) Objectives: To develop...

  7. advanced borehole geophysical: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    approach to formation evaluation using borehole geophysical measurements and 3D seismic data Fossil Fuels Websites Summary: and depth of penetration). Techniques used for...

  8. Seismic viscoelastic attenuation Submitted to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cormier, Vernon F.

    Seismic viscoelastic attenuation Submitted to: Encyclopedia of Solid Earth Geophysics Harsh Gupta-3046 USA E-mail: vernon.cormier@uconn.edu Tel: 860-486-3547 Fax: 860-486-3346 #12;SEISMIC VISCOELASTIC ATTENUATION Synonyms Seismic intrinsic attenuation Definitions Linear viscoelastic attenuation. The loss

  9. Analysis of seismic anisotropy in 3D multi-component seismic data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Zhongping

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance of seismic anisotropy has been recognized by the oil industry since its first observation in hydrocarbon reservoirs in 1986, and the application of seismic anisotropy to solve geophysical problems has been ...

  10. Geophysical investigations of certain Montana geothermal areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wideman, C.J. (Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology, Butte); Dye, L.; Halvorson, J.; McRae, M.; Ruscetta, C.A.; Foley, D. (eds.)

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Selected hot springs areas of Montana have been investigated by a variety of geophysical techniques. Resistivity, gravity, seismic, and magnetic methods have been applied during investigations near the hot springs. Because the geology is extremely varied at the locations of the investigations, several geophysical techniques have usually been applied at each site.

  11. Geophysical detection and structural characterization of discontinuities in rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Geophysical detection and structural characterization of discontinuities in rock slopes (J. Deparis geophysical methods (seismic, electric and electromagnetic) are available to address this problem, differing and geophysical methods for characterizing the rock mass. Section 2 is dedicated to a review of the main

  12. Geophysical Prospecting, 2009, 57, 209224 doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2478.2008.00771.x Laboratory-scale study of field of view and the seismic interpretation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pyrak-Nolte, Laura J.

    -scale study of field of view and the seismic interpretation of fracture specific stiffness Angel Acosta-Colon1, on the interpretation of fracture properties from seismic wave propagation was investigated using an acous- tic lens of the field of view affected the interpretation of the fracture specific stiffness. Many small

  13. Reactive Transport Modeling and Geophysical Monitoring of Bioclogging at Reservoir Scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubbard, Susan

    Reactive Transport Modeling and Geophysical Monitoring of Bioclogging at Reservoir Scale Vikranth scale using a combination of reactive transport modeling and geophysical imaging tools (EM & seismic Sacramento basin, California; the model well (Citizen Green #1) was characterized using sonic, electrical

  14. GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 68, NO. 2 (MARCH-APRIL 2003); P. 441452, 16 FIGS., 2 TABLES. 10.1190/1.1567214

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 68, NO. 2 (MARCH-APRIL 2003); P. 441­452, 16 FIGS., 2 TABLES. 10 National Laboratory, Geophysics Group, Seismic Research Center, MS D443, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545. E

  15. Review of geophysical characterization methods used at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GV Last; DG Horton

    2000-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a review of geophysical methods used at Hanford in two parts: (1) shallow surface-based geophysical methods and (2) borehole geophysical methods. This review was not intended to be ``all encompassing'' but should represent the vast majority (>90% complete) of geophysical work conducted onsite and aimed at hazardous waste investigations in the vadose zone and/or uppermost groundwater aquifers. This review did not cover geophysical methods aimed at large-scale geologic structures or seismicity and, in particular, did not include those efforts conducted in support of the Basalt Waste Isolation Program. This review focused primarily on the more recent efforts.

  16. Towards a comprehensive open-source system for geophysical data processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patterson, William P.

    used in seismic interpretation. These three components operate in parallel on a distributed computerTowards a comprehensive open-source system for geophysical data processing and interpretation Glenn of a broad range of geophysical data, with emphasis on reflection/refraction seismics. The package also

  17. Fracture studies from amplitude versus offset and azimuth and vertical seismic profile data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varela Gutierrez, Isabel

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis I address the problem of determining fracture properties of subsurface rocks from geophysical surface seismic and vertical seismic profile (VSP) data. In the first part of this thesis I perform multi-attribute ...

  18. Direct Reservoir Parameter Estimation Using Joint Inversion of Marine Seismic AVA & CSEM Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    estimation of reservoir parameters from geophysical data isthe seismic data fit at times below the reservoir. InversionReservoir Parameter Estimation Using Joint Inversion of Marine Seismic AVA & CSEM Data

  19. Joint seismic-geodynamic-mineral physical modelling of African geodynamics: A reconciliation of deep-mantle convection with surface geophysical constraints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forte, A M; Quere, S; Moucha, R; Simmons, N A; Grand, S P; Mitrovica, J X; Rowley, D B

    2008-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent progress in seismic tomography provides the first complete 3-D images of the combined thermal and chemical anomalies that characterise the unique deep mantle structure below the African continent. With these latest tomography results we predict flow patterns under Africa that reveal a large-scale, active hot upwelling, or superplume, below the western margin of Africa under the Cape Verde Islands. The scale and dynamical intensity of this West African superplume (WASP) is comparable to that of the south African superplume (SASP) that has long been assumed to dominate the flow dynamics under Africa. On the basis of this new tomography model, we find the dynamics of the SASP is strongly controlled by chemical contributions to deep mantle buoyancy that significantly compensate its thermal buoyancy. In contrast, the WASP appears to be entirely dominated by thermal buoyancy. New calculations of mantle convection incorporating these two superplumes reveal that the plate-driving forces due to the flow generated by the WASP is as strong as that due to the SASP. We find that the chemical buoyancy of the SASP exerts a strong stabilising control on the pattern and amplitude of shallow mantle flow in the asthenosphere below the southern half of the African plate. The asthenospheric flow predictions provide the first high resolution maps of focussed upwellings that lie below the major centres of Late Cenozoic volcanism, including the Kenya domes and Hoggar massif that lies above a remnant plume head in the upper mantle. Inferences of sublithospheric deformation from seismic anisotropy data are shown to be sensitive to the contributions of chemical buoyancy in the SASP.

  20. Seismic Data Reconstruction via Shearlet-Regularized Directional Inpainting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steidl, Gabriele

    Seismic Data Reconstruction via Shearlet-Regularized Directional Inpainting S¨oren H¨auser and Jianwei Ma May 15, 2012 We propose a new method for seismic data reconstruction by directional weighted of thousands of meters with a good resolution, the seismic method has become the most commonly used geophysical

  1. Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-PREVIEW, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    (s) 2010 Overview of seismic imagery techniques applied to landslides characterization. Gilles Grandjean, geophysical methods based on seismic surveying appear to be well-adapted to investigate the morpho and non-intrusive measurements of acoustic (Vp) or shear (Vs) wave velocity, two important physical

  2. Seismic Evaluation of the Fruitland Formation with Implications on Leakage Potential of Injected CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Thomas H.

    on the analysis of 3D seismic from the area. 3D seismic interpretation reveals that the Late Cretaceous FruitlandSeismic Evaluation of the Fruitland Formation with Implications on Leakage Potential of Injected CO Basin pilot test include acquisition of geophysical logs, time lapse VSP and analysis of 3D seismic data

  3. Effects of uncertainty in rock-physics models on reservoir parameter estimation using marine seismic AVA and CSEM data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jinsong; Dickens, Thomas

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of reservoir parameters from geophysical data. TraditionalCSEM data, which are functions of reservoir resistivity rreservoir parameters from seismic AVA and CSEM data. In

  4. Canadian Seismic Agreement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wetmiller, R.J.; Lyons, J.A.; Shannon, W.E.; Munro, P.S.; Thomas, J.T.; Andrew, M.D.; Lapointe, S.P.; Lamontagne, M.; Wong, C.; Anglin, F.M.; Adams, J.; Cajka, M.G.; McNeil, W.; Drysdale, J.A. (Geological Survey of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada))

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a progress report of work carried out under the terms of a research agreement entitled the Canadian Seismic Agreement'' between the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), the Canadian Commercial Corporation and the Geophysics Division of the Geological Survey of Canada (GD/GSC) during the period from July 01, 1989 to June 30, 1990. The Canadian Seismic Agreement'' supports generally the operation of various seismograph stations in eastern Canada and the collection and analysis of earthquake data for the purpose of mitigating seismic hazards in eastern Canada and the northeastern US. The specific activities carried out in this one-year period are summarized below under four headings; Eastern Canada Telemetred Network and local network developments, Datalab developments, strong-motion network developments and earthquake activity. During this period the first surface fault unequivocably determined to have accompanied a historic earthquake in eastern North America, occurred in northern Quebec.

  5. Seismic reflection imaging of hydrostratigraphic facies in Boise: A tale of three scales Lee M. Liberty, Spencer H. Wood, and Warren Barrash, Center for Geophysical Investigation of the Shallow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Seismic reflection imaging of hydrostratigraphic facies in Boise: A tale of three scales Lee M Subsurface (CGISS), Boise State University Summary We have acquired, processed and interpreted seismic groundwater studies and to better understand the hydrostratigraphic significance of seismic boundaries. We use

  6. COLORADO FRONT RANGE SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC HAZARD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheehan, Anne F.

    COLORADO FRONT RANGE SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC HAZARD Anne F. Sheehan University of Colorado, seismic, seismicity, crust, fault, hazard ABSTRACT Construction of seismic hazard and risk maps depends upon carefully constrained input parameters including background seismicity, seismic attenuation

  7. GEOPHYSICAL APPLICATIONS OF SQUIDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goubau, W.M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    W. M. , and Clarke, J. : Geophysics Zimmerman, J. : Second1976). Sims, W. K. :, Geophysics E. , physics~. and Ketchen,Geo- and Clarke, J. : Geophysics Gamble, T. D. , Goubau, W.

  8. INTRODUCTION APPLIED GEOPHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merriam, James

    GEOL 384.3 INTRODUCTION TO APPLIED GEOPHYSICS OUTLINE INTRODUCTION TO APPLIED GEOPHYSICS GEOL 384 unknowns; the ones we don't know we don't know. And if one looks throughout the history of geophysics he didn't really say geophysics. He said, " ... our country and other free countries ...". But I am

  9. Modelling Seismic Wave Propagation for Geophysical Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National de la Recherche Scientifique, Institut de Recherche pour le développement 3Instituto de Geofisica

  10. Seismic interpretation of the Wind River Mountains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Voorhis, David

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SEISMIC INTERPBETATICN OF THE BIND RIVER MOUNTAINS A Thesis DAVID VAN VOORHIS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ACM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Auqust 'l982 Majcr Subject...: Geophysics SEISNIC INTERFRETATION OF THE HIND RIVER NOUNTAINS A Thes is by DAVID VAN VOORBIS Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman cf. Committee) (N em ber } m (Head of Department) August l 982 ABSTRACT Seismic Interpretation of the Wind...

  11. Estimating the hydraulic conductivity at the South Oyster Site from geophysical tomographic data using Bayesian techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubbard, Susan

    of ground penetrating radar (GPR) tomographic velocity, GPR tomographic attenuation, and seismic tomographic where prior information is limited. Among the geophysical data, GPR and seismic velocity are more useful in situ hydrological measurements. Conventional borehole techniques such as flowmeter and slug tests

  12. Deborah K. Smith Department of Geology and Geophysics, MS 22

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Deborah K.

    Deborah K. Smith Department of Geology and Geophysics, MS 22 Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution: Jordan, T. H., H. W. Menard, and D.K. Smith, Density and size distribution of seamounts in the eastern. Smith, H. W. Menard, J. A. Orcutt and T. H. Jordan, Seismic reflection site survey: correlation

  13. 3, 14071417, 2006 geophysical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    HESSD 3, 1407­1417, 2006 Modeling geophysical complexity: geometric determinism C. E. Puente and B System Sciences Modeling geophysical complexity: a case for geometric determinism C. E. Puente and B (cepuente@ucdavis.edu) 1407 #12;HESSD 3, 1407­1417, 2006 Modeling geophysical complexity: geometric

  14. Geophysical InversionFacility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Douglas W.

    UBC Geophysical InversionFacility Modelling and Inversion of EMI data collected over magnetic soils of EMI data acquired at sites with magnetic soils · Geophysical Proveouts · Geonics EM63 Data · First model parameters: · Location · Orientation · Polarizabilities 4 #12;UBC Geophysical Inversion Facility

  15. Integrated geophysical study of near-surface faults in the Wilcox Group, Texas, with application to lignite mining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satti, Sara A

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are exposed. Several geophysical tools, namely magnetics, frequency and time domain electromagnetics (FEM and TEM), ground penetrating radar (GPR) as well as seismic refraction were tested in an attempt to qualitatively determine the most efficient...

  16. Structure and evolution of the Australian continent : insights from seismic and mechanical heterogeneity and anisotropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simons, Frederik Jozef Maurits, 1974-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, I explore the geophysical structure and evolution of the Australian continental lithosphere. I combine insights from isotropic and anisotropic seismic surface-wave tomography with an analysis of the anisotropy ...

  17. Estimation of Impedance Using Seismic Reflection Data Based on Transdimensional Inversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dadi, Sireesh

    2014-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Deterministic seismic inversion can obtain optimal results when there is a linear relationship between data and model parameters during local optimization (single optimum solution). For nonlinear geophysical problems and in the presence of multiple...

  18. Geophysical Institute biennial report 1995--1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mission of the Geophysical Institute is to understand the basic physical processes governing Earth, especially as they occur in, or are relevant to the Arctic; to train graduate and undergraduate students to play leading roles in tomorrow`s society; to solve applied geophysical problems and develop resource-oriented technology of importance to the state and the nation; and to satisfy the intellectual and technological needs of fellow Alaskans through public service. The variety of subjects studied by the faculty, research staff members, and graduate students at the Geophysical Institute include auroral physics and chemistry, arctic haze, ice fog, atmospheric dynamics, ozone, Alaska weather patterns, regional meteorology and climatology, global climate change, cloud physics and radiation, permafrost, glaciers, sea ice, remote sensing, geothermal energy, tectonics, volcanoes and earthquakes. Summaries are presented of the projects undertaken by the Institute in these fields.

  19. Expedited Site Characterization Geophysics: Geophysical Methods and Tools for Site Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, N.E.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Site Characterization Geophysics CONTENTS INTRODUCTIONSite Characterization Geophysics SELF-POTENTIAL Referencesand Environmental Geophysics, S. H. Ward, ed. (Soc. Expl.

  20. Marine Geophysics: A Navy Symposium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shor, Elizabeth N; Ebrahimi, Carolyn L

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    electrical polarization. Geophysics 22:660-687. Vacquier,Raitt, R. W. 1964. Geophysics of the South Pacific.Research in Geophysics 2:223-241. Francis, T. J. G. , and R.

  1. Canadian seismic agreement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wetmiller, R.J.; Lyons, J.A.; Shannon, W.E.; Munro, P.S.; Thomas, J.T.; Andrew, M.D.; Lamontagne, M.; Wong, C., Anglin, F.M.; Plouffe, M.; Lapointe, S.P.; Adams, J.; Drysdale, J.A. (Geological Survey of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Geophysics Div.)

    1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the twenty-first progress report under the agreement entitled Canadian Seismic Agreement between the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Canadian Commercial Corporation. Activities undertaken by the Geophysics Division of the Geological Survey of Canada (GD/GSC) during the period from July 01, 1988 to June 30, 1989 and supported in part by the NRC agreement are described below under four headings; Eastern Canada Telemetred Network and local network developments, Datalab developments, strong motion network developments and earthquake activity. In this time period eastern Canada experienced its largest earthquake in over 50 years. This earthquake, which has been christened the Saguenay earthquake, has provided a wealth of new data pertinent to earthquake engineering studies in eastern North America and is the subject of many continuing studies, which are presently being carried out at GD and elsewhere. 41 refs., 21 figs., 7 tabs.

  2. Advanced Seismic While Drilling System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Radtke; John Fontenot; David Glowka; Robert Stokes; Jeffery Sutherland; Ron Evans; Jim Musser

    2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A breakthrough has been discovered for controlling seismic sources to generate selectable low frequencies. Conventional seismic sources, including sparkers, rotary mechanical, hydraulic, air guns, and explosives, by their very nature produce high-frequencies. This is counter to the need for long signal transmission through rock. The patent pending SeismicPULSER{trademark} methodology has been developed for controlling otherwise high-frequency seismic sources to generate selectable low-frequency peak spectra applicable to many seismic applications. Specifically, we have demonstrated the application of a low-frequency sparker source which can be incorporated into a drill bit for Drill Bit Seismic While Drilling (SWD). To create the methodology of a controllable low-frequency sparker seismic source, it was necessary to learn how to maximize sparker efficiencies to couple to, and transmit through, rock with the study of sparker designs and mechanisms for (a) coupling the sparker-generated gas bubble expansion and contraction to the rock, (b) the effects of fluid properties and dynamics, (c) linear and non-linear acoustics, and (d) imparted force directionality. After extensive seismic modeling, the design of high-efficiency sparkers, laboratory high frequency sparker testing, and field tests were performed at the University of Texas Devine seismic test site. The conclusion of the field test was that extremely high power levels would be required to have the range required for deep, 15,000+ ft, high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) wells. Thereafter, more modeling and laboratory testing led to the discovery of a method to control a sparker that could generate low frequencies required for deep wells. The low frequency sparker was successfully tested at the Department of Energy Rocky Mountain Oilfield Test Center (DOE RMOTC) field test site in Casper, Wyoming. An 8-in diameter by 26-ft long SeismicPULSER{trademark} drill string tool was designed and manufactured by TII. An APS Turbine Alternator powered the SeismicPULSER{trademark} to produce two Hz frequency peak signals repeated every 20 seconds. Since the ION Geophysical, Inc. (ION) seismic survey surface recording system was designed to detect a minimum downhole signal of three Hz, successful performance was confirmed with a 5.3 Hz recording with the pumps running. The two Hz signal generated by the sparker was modulated with the 3.3 Hz signal produced by the mud pumps to create an intense 5.3 Hz peak frequency signal. The low frequency sparker source is ultimately capable of generating selectable peak frequencies of 1 to 40 Hz with high-frequency spectra content to 10 kHz. The lower frequencies and, perhaps, low-frequency sweeps, are needed to achieve sufficient range and resolution for realtime imaging in deep (15,000 ft+), high-temperature (150 C) wells for (a) geosteering, (b) accurate seismic hole depth, (c) accurate pore pressure determinations ahead of the bit, (d) near wellbore diagnostics with a downhole receiver and wired drill pipe, and (e) reservoir model verification. Furthermore, the pressure of the sparker bubble will disintegrate rock resulting in an increased overall rates of penetration. Other applications for the SeismicPULSER{trademark} technology are to deploy a low-frequency source for greater range on a wireline for Reverse Vertical Seismic Profiling (RVSP) and Cross-Well Tomography. Commercialization of the technology is being undertaken by first contacting stakeholders to define the value proposition for rig site services utilizing SeismicPULSER{trademark} technologies. Stakeholders include national oil companies, independent oil companies, independents, service companies, and commercial investors. Service companies will introduce a new Drill Bit SWD service for deep HTHP wells. Collaboration will be encouraged between stakeholders in the form of joint industry projects to develop prototype tools and initial field trials. No barriers have been identified for developing, utilizing, and exploiting the low-frequency SeismicPULSER{trademark} source in a

  3. Seismic attenuation studies using frequency domain synthetic seismograms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butler, Theresa Meade

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SEISMIC ATTENUATION STUDIES USING FREQUENCY DOMAIN SYNTHETIC SEISMOGRAMS A Thesis by THERESA MEADE BUTLER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... August 1979 Major Subject: Geophysics SEISMIC ATTENUATION STUDIES USING FREQUENCY DOMAIN SYNTHETIC SEI SMOGRAMlS A Thesis by THERESA MEADE BUTLER Approved as to sty1e and content by: rman o Com ttee Head of epartmen (Member) Membe August 1979...

  4. Rayleigh wave filter for three-component seismic data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaidi, Syed Ali Asif

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RAYLEIGH WAVE FILTER FOR THREE ? COMPONENT SEISMIC DATA A Thesis by SYED ALI ASIF ZAIDI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M Lrniversity in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... August 1991 Major Subject: Geophysics RAYLEIGH WAVE FILTER FOR THREE ? COMPONENT SEISMIC DATA A Thesis SYED ALI ASIF ZAIDI Approved as to style and content by: Steven . Harder air of Committee) Joel S. Watkins (Member) Ronald M. Brimhall (1...

  5. The impulse and wavelet responses of seismic arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benson, Mark Allen

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    December 1989 ivIajor Subject: Geophysics THE IMPULSE AND WAVELET RESPONSES OF SEISMIC ARRAYS A Thesis by MARK ALLEN BENSON Approved as to style and content by: An ony . Gan (Chair of Commit ee) Steve H. arder (Member) Joel S. Watkins (Member...) ZA~. = Joel S. Watkins (Head of Department) December 1989 ABSTRACT The Impulse and Wavelet Responses of Seismic Arrays. (December 1989) 111ark Allen Benson, B. A. , Iiniversity of Calil'ornia, Santa Barbara; B. S. , California State l...

  6. Rayleigh wave filter for three-component seismic data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaidi, Syed Ali Asif

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RAYLEIGH WAVE FILTER FOR THREE ? COMPONENT SEISMIC DATA A Thesis by SYED ALI ASIF ZAIDI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M Lrniversity in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... August 1991 Major Subject: Geophysics RAYLEIGH WAVE FILTER FOR THREE ? COMPONENT SEISMIC DATA A Thesis SYED ALI ASIF ZAIDI Approved as to style and content by: Steven . Harder air of Committee) Joel S. Watkins (Member) Ronald M. Brimhall (1...

  7. Geophys. J. R. astr. SOC.(1987) 91,429437 On the relation between seismic wave velocity and stress in a solid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyakhovsky, Vladimir

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -elastic isotropic models (Zaichenko et al. 1984; Schukin 1984). Interpretation of seismic results based on the Hooke in seismic zones implies that the traditional interpretation of geophysical investigations basedGeophys. J. R. astr. SOC.(1987) 91,429437 On the relation between seismic wave velocity and stress

  8. Joint environmental assessment for western NPR-1 3-dimensional seismic project at Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE), in conjunction with the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), has prepared an Environmental Assessment (DOE/EA-1124) to identify and evaluate the potential environmental impacts of the proposed geophysical seismic survey on and adjacent to the Naval Petroleum Reserve No.1 (NPR-1), located approximately 35 miles west of Bakersfield, California. NPR-1 is jointly owned and operated by the federal government and Chevron U.S.A. Production Company. The federal government owns about 78 percent of NPR-1, while Chevron owns the remaining 22 percent. The government`s interest is under the jurisdiction of DOE, which has contracted with Bechtel Petroleum Operations, Inc. (BPOI) for the operation and management of the reserve. The 3-dimensional seismic survey would take place on NPR-1 lands and on public and private lands adjacent to NPR-1. This project would involve lands owned by BLM, California Department of Fish and Game (CDFG), California Energy Commission (CEC), The Nature Conservancy, the Center for Natural Lands Management, oil companies (Chevron, Texaco, and Mobil), and several private individuals. The proposed action is designed to provide seismic data for the analysis of the subsurface geology extant in western NPR-1 with the goal of better defining the commercial limits of a currently producing reservoir (Northwest Stevens) and three prospective hydrocarbon bearing zones: the {open_quotes}A Fan{close_quotes} in Section 7R, the 19R Structure in Section 19R, and the 13Z Structure in Section 13Z. Interpreting the data is expected to provide NPR-1 owners with more accurate locations of structural highs, faults, and pinchouts to maximize the recovery of the available hydrocarbon resources in western NPR-1. Completion of this project is expected to increase NPR-1 recoverable reserves, and reduce the risks and costs associated with further exploration and development in the area.

  9. Oklahoma seismic network. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luza, K.V.; Lawson, J.E. Jr. [Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, OK (United States)]|[Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). Energy Center

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has established rigorous guidelines that must be adhered to before a permit to construct a nuclear-power plant is granted to an applicant. Local as well as regional seismicity and structural relationships play an integral role in the final design criteria for nuclear power plants. The existing historical record of seismicity is inadequate in a number of areas of the Midcontinent region because of the lack of instrumentation and (or) the sensitivity of the instruments deployed to monitor earthquake events. The Nemaha Uplift/Midcontinent Geophysical Anomaly is one of five principal areas east of the Rocky Mountain front that has a moderately high seismic-risk classification. The Nemaha uplift, which is common to the states of Oklahoma, Kansas, and Nebraska, is approximately 415 miles long and 12-14 miles wide. The Midcontinent Geophysical Anomaly extends southward from Minnesota across Iowa and the southeastern corner of Nebraska and probably terminates in central Kansas. A number of moderate-sized earthquakes--magnitude 5 or greater--have occurred along or west of the Nemaha uplift. The Oklahoma Geological Survey, in cooperation with the geological surveys of Kansas, Nebraska, and Iowa, conducted a 5-year investigation of the seismicity and tectonic relationships of the Nemaha uplift and associated geologic features in the Midcontinent. This investigation was intended to provide data to be used to design nuclear-power plants. However, the information is also being used to design better large-scale structures, such as dams and high-use buildings, and to provide the necessary data to evaluate earthquake-insurance rates in the Midcontinent.

  10. Geophysical Surveys of a Known Karst Feature, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carpenter, P.J.; Carr, B.J.; Doll, W.E.; Kaufmann, R.D.; Nyquist, J.E.

    1999-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Geophysical data were acquired at a site on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee to determine the characteristics of a mud-filled void and to evaluate the effectiveness of a suite of geophysical methods at the site. Methods that were used included microgravity, electrical resistivity, and seismic refraction. Both microgravity and resistivity were able to detect the void as well as overlying structural features. The seismic data provide bedrock depth control for the other two methods, and show other effects that are caused by the void.

  11. SAGE, Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Applied Geophysical Experience (SAGE) is a unique program designated to introduce geophysics students to geophysical exploration and research. SAGE's purpose is to enhance a...

  12. Fiber optic geophysical sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Homuth, E.F.

    1991-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optic geophysical sensor is described in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects. 2 figures.

  13. Well casing-based geophysical sensor apparatus, system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daily, William D. (Livermore, CA)

    2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A geophysical sensor apparatus, system, and method for use in, for example, oil well operations, and in particular using a network of sensors emplaced along and outside oil well casings to monitor critical parameters in an oil reservoir and provide geophysical data remote from the wells. Centralizers are affixed to the well casings and the sensors are located in the protective spheres afforded by the centralizers to keep from being damaged during casing emplacement. In this manner, geophysical data may be detected of a sub-surface volume, e.g. an oil reservoir, and transmitted for analysis. Preferably, data from multiple sensor types, such as ERT and seismic data are combined to provide real time knowledge of the reservoir and processes such as primary and secondary oil recovery.

  14. Geophysical Exploration (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An exploration permit is required for any entity conducting geophysical exploration within the state of Montana. Such entities are also required to follow rules adopted by the Board of Oil and Gas...

  15. Investigation of novel geophysical techniques for monitoring CO2 movement during sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoversten, G. Michael; Gasperikova, Erika

    2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost effective monitoring of reservoir fluid movement during CO{sub 2} sequestration is a necessary part of a practical geologic sequestration strategy. Current petroleum industry seismic techniques are well developed for monitoring production in petroleum reservoirs. The cost of time-lapse seismic monitoring can be born because the cost to benefit ratio is small in the production of profit making hydrocarbon. However, the cost of seismic monitoring techniques is more difficult to justify in an environment of sequestration where the process produces no direct profit. For this reasons other geophysical techniques, which might provide sufficient monitoring resolution at a significantly lower cost, need to be considered. In order to evaluate alternative geophysical monitoring techniques we have undertaken a series of numerical simulations of CO{sub 2} sequestration scenarios. These scenarios have included existing projects (Sleipner in the North Sea), future planned projects (GeoSeq Liberty test in South Texas and Schrader Bluff in Alaska) as well as hypothetical models based on generic geologic settings potentially attractive for CO{sub 2} sequestration. In addition, we have done considerable work on geophysical monitoring of CO{sub 2} injection into existing oil and gas fields, including a model study of the Weyburn CO{sub 2} project in Canada and the Chevron Lost Hills CO{sub 2} pilot in Southern California (Hoversten et al. 2003). Although we are specifically interested in considering ''novel'' geophysical techniques for monitoring we have chosen to include more traditional seismic techniques as a bench mark so that any quantitative results derived for non-seismic techniques can be directly compared to the industry standard seismic results. This approach will put all of our finding for ''novel'' techniques in the context of the seismic method and allow a quantitative analysis of the cost/benefit ratios of the newly considered methods compared to the traditional, more expensive, seismic technique. The Schrader Bluff model was chosen as a numerical test bed for quantitative comparison of the spatial resolution of various geophysical techniques being considered for CO{sub 2} sequestration monitoring. We began with a three dimensional flow simulation model provided by BP Alaska of the reservoir and developed a detailed rock-properties model from log data that provides the link between the reservoir parameters (porosity, pressure, saturations, etc.) and the geophysical parameters (velocity, density, electrical resistivity). The rock properties model was used to produce geophysical models from the flow simulations.

  16. Seismic Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Quittmeyer

    2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical work plan (TWP) describes the efforts to develop and confirm seismic ground motion inputs used for preclosure design and probabilistic safety 'analyses and to assess the postclosure performance of a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. As part of the effort to develop seismic inputs, the TWP covers testing and analyses that provide the technical basis for inputs to the seismic ground-motion site-response model. The TWP also addresses preparation of a seismic methodology report for submission to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The activities discussed in this TWP are planned for fiscal years (FY) 2006 through 2008. Some of the work enhances the technical basis for previously developed seismic inputs and reduces uncertainties and conservatism used in previous analyses and modeling. These activities support the defense of a license application. Other activities provide new results that will support development of the preclosure, safety case; these results directly support and will be included in the license application. Table 1 indicates which activities support the license application and which support licensing defense. The activities are listed in Section 1.2; the methods and approaches used to implement them are discussed in more detail in Section 2.2. Technical and performance objectives of this work scope are: (1) For annual ground motion exceedance probabilities appropriate for preclosure design analyses, provide site-specific seismic design acceleration response spectra for a range of damping values; strain-compatible soil properties; peak motions, strains, and curvatures as a function of depth; and time histories (acceleration, velocity, and displacement). Provide seismic design inputs for the waste emplacement level and for surface sites. Results should be consistent with the probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) for Yucca Mountain and reflect, as appropriate, available knowledge on the limits to extreme ground motion at Yucca Mountain. (2) For probabilistic analyses supporting the demonstration of compliance with preclosure performance objectives, provide a mean seismic hazard curve for the surface facilities area. Results should be consistent with the PSHA for Yucca Mountain and reflect, as appropriate, available knowledge on the limits to extreme ground motion at Yucca Mountain. (3) For annual ground motion exceedance probabilities appropriate for postclosure analyses, provide site-specific seismic time histories (acceleration, velocity, and displacement) for the waste emplacement level. Time histories should be consistent with the PSHA and reflect available knowledge on the limits to extreme ground motion at Yucca Mountain. (4) In support of ground-motion site-response modeling, perform field investigations and laboratory testing to provide a technical basis for model inputs. Characterize the repository block and areas in which important-to-safety surface facilities will be sited. Work should support characterization and reduction of uncertainties in inputs to ground-motion site-response modeling. (5) On the basis of rock mechanics, geologic, and seismic information, determine limits on extreme ground motion at Yucca Mountain and document the technical basis for them. (6) Update the ground-motion site-response model, as appropriate, on the basis of new data. Expand and enhance the technical basis for model validation to further increase confidence in the site-response modeling. (7) Document seismic methodologies and approaches in reports to be submitted to the NRC. (8) Address condition reports.

  17. Department of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Department of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines Golden, CO 80401 http://www.geophysics of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines Golden, CO 80401 http://www.geophysics.mines.edu/cgem Defended: May 11 (Geophysics) On Original Copies Dr. Terence K. Young Professor and Head Department of Geophysics Approved

  18. Crustal constraints on the origin of mantle seismicity in the Vrancea Zone, Romania: The case for active continental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knapp, Camelia Cristina

    Crustal constraints on the origin of mantle seismicity in the Vrancea Zone, Romania: The case, Bucharest, Romania c Faculty of Geology and Geophysics, University of Bucharest, Bucharest, Romania Received 17 November 2005 Abstract The Vrancea zone of Romania constitutes one of the most active seismic

  19. Physics and Astronomy Geophysics Concentration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thaxton, Christopher S.

    Physics and Astronomy Geophysics Concentration Strongly recommended courses Credits Term Dept. to Geophysics 3 PHY 3230 Thermal Physics 3 CHE 1101 Introductory Chemistry - I 3 CHE 1110 Introductory Chemistry

  20. 2, 637671, 2005 Geophysics and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    BGD 2, 637­671, 2005 Geophysics and geochemistry of seafloor brines S. B. Joye et al. Title Page Discussions is the access reviewed discussion forum of Biogeosciences Geophysical and geochemical signatures under a Creative Commons License. 637 #12;BGD 2, 637­671, 2005 Geophysics and geochemistry of seafloor

  1. Geophysical constraints on sediment dispersal systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnstone, Elizabeth Anne Carruthers; Johnstone, Elizabeth Anne Carruthers

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stratigraphic interpretation of seismic reflection patternsSeismic Stratigraphy and Its Sedimentological Interpretation

  2. Asteroid Surface Geophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murdoch, Naomi; Schwartz, Stephen R; Miyamoto, Hideaki

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The regolith-covered surfaces of asteroids preserve records of geophysical processes that have occurred both at their surfaces and sometimes also in their interiors. As a result of the unique micro-gravity environment that these bodies posses, a complex and varied geophysics has given birth to fascinating features that we are just now beginning to understand. The processes that formed such features were first hypothesised through detailed spacecraft observations and have been further studied using theoretical, numerical and experimental methods that often combine several scientific disciplines. These multiple approaches are now merging towards a further understanding of the geophysical states of the surfaces of asteroids. In this chapter we provide a concise summary of what the scientific community has learned so far about the surfaces of these small planetary bodies and the processes that have shaped them. We also discuss the state of the art in terms of experimental techniques and numerical simulations that...

  3. EA-1188: Chevron U.S.A., Inc. and Santa Fe Energy Resources, Inc. Midway Valley 3D Seismic Project, Kern County, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposed Midway Valley 3D Geophysical Exploration Project. Chevron U.S.A., Inc. and Santa Fe Energy Resources are proposing to conduct seismic...

  4. 10-Ch09-N51893 [13:43 2008/9/13] Temam & Tribbia: Computational Methods for the Atmosphere and the Oceans Page: 377 377434 Data Assimilation for Geophysical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Navon, Michael

    and the Oceans Page: 377 377­434 Data Assimilation for Geophysical Fluids Jacques Blum Laboratoire Jean of a flow. In the first part, the mathematical models governing geophysical flows are presented together of information on geophysical flows is provided by satellites displaying images of their evolution

  5. Geophysical remote sensing of water reservoirs suitable for desalinization.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldridge, David Franklin; Bartel, Lewis Clark; Bonal, Nedra; Engler, Bruce Phillip

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In many parts of the United States, as well as other regions of the world, competing demands for fresh water or water suitable for desalination are outstripping sustainable supplies. In these areas, new water supplies are necessary to sustain economic development and agricultural uses, as well as support expanding populations, particularly in the Southwestern United States. Increasing the supply of water will more than likely come through desalinization of water reservoirs that are not suitable for present use. Surface-deployed seismic and electromagnetic (EM) methods have the potential for addressing these critical issues within large volumes of an aquifer at a lower cost than drilling and sampling. However, for detailed analysis of the water quality, some sampling utilizing boreholes would be required with geophysical methods being employed to extrapolate these sampled results to non-sampled regions of the aquifer. The research in this report addresses using seismic and EM methods in two complimentary ways to aid in the identification of water reservoirs that are suitable for desalinization. The first method uses the seismic data to constrain the earth structure so that detailed EM modeling can estimate the pore water conductivity, and hence the salinity. The second method utilizes the coupling of seismic and EM waves through the seismo-electric (conversion of seismic energy to electrical energy) and the electro-seismic (conversion of electrical energy to seismic energy) to estimate the salinity of the target aquifer. Analytic 1D solutions to coupled pressure and electric wave propagation demonstrate the types of waves one expects when using a seismic or electric source. A 2D seismo-electric/electro-seismic is developed to demonstrate the coupled seismic and EM system. For finite-difference modeling, the seismic and EM wave propagation algorithms are on different spatial and temporal scales. We present a method to solve multiple, finite-difference physics problems that has application beyond the present use. A limited field experiment was conducted to assess the seismo-electric effect. Due to a variety of problems, the observation of the electric field due to a seismic source is not definitive.

  6. The contribution of pattern recognition of seismic and morphostructural data to seismic hazard assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peresan, Antonella; Soloviev, Alexander; Panza, Giuliano F

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The reliable statistical characterization of the spatial and temporal properties of large earthquakes occurrence is one of the most debated issues in seismic hazard assessment, due to the unavoidably limited observations from past events. We show that pattern recognition techniques, which are designed in a formal and testable way, may provide significant space-time constraints about impending strong earthquakes. This information, when combined with physically sound methods for ground shaking computation, like the neo-deterministic approach (NDSHA), may produce effectively preventive seismic hazard maps. Pattern recognition analysis of morphostructural data provide quantitative and systematic criteria for identifying the areas prone to the largest events, taking into account a wide set of possible geophysical and geological data, whilst the formal identification of precursory seismicity patterns (by means of CN and M8S algorithms), duly validated by prospective testing, provides useful constraints about impend...

  7. Department of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Department of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines Golden, CO 80401 http://www.geophysics;#12;Department of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines Golden, CO 80401 http://www.geophysics of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science (Geophysics). Golden, Colorado Date: April 14, 2005 Signed

  8. Department of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Department of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines Golden, CO 80401 http://www.geophysics of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines Golden, CO 80401 http://www.geophysics.mines.edu/cgem Defended: May 10 (Geophysics). Golden, Colorado Date May 15, 2006 Signed: on original copy Jeongmin Lee Signed: on original

  9. Department of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Department of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines Golden, CO 80401 http://www.geophysics of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines Golden, CO 80401 http://www.geophysics.mines.edu/cgem Defended: September fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science (Geophysics). Golden, Colorado Date

  10. National Seismological Network HIS MAJESTY'S GOVERNMENT OF NEPAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avouac, Jean-Philippe

    National Seismological Network HIS MAJESTY'S GOVERNMENT OF NEPAL Lainchour Kathmandu, Nepal March the establishment of Nepal's first seismic station at Phulchoki, Kathmandu in November, 1978 by the Department hazard assessment in the Nepal Himalaya. The network provides routine information on global seismicity

  11. Modeling and Evaluation of Geophysical Methods for Monitoring and Tracking CO2 Migration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniels, Jeff

    2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Geological sequestration has been proposed as a viable option for mitigating the vast amount of CO{sub 2} being released into the atmosphere daily. Test sites for CO{sub 2} injection have been appearing across the world to ascertain the feasibility of capturing and sequestering carbon dioxide. A major concern with full scale implementation is monitoring and verifying the permanence of injected CO{sub 2}. Geophysical methods, an exploration industry standard, are non-invasive imaging techniques that can be implemented to address that concern. Geophysical methods, seismic and electromagnetic, play a crucial role in monitoring the subsurface pre- and post-injection. Seismic techniques have been the most popular but electromagnetic methods are gaining interest. The primary goal of this project was to develop a new geophysical tool, a software program called GphyzCO2, to investigate the implementation of geophysical monitoring for detecting injected CO{sub 2} at test sites. The GphyzCO2 software consists of interconnected programs that encompass well logging, seismic, and electromagnetic methods. The software enables users to design and execute 3D surface-to-surface (conventional surface seismic) and borehole-to-borehole (cross-hole seismic and electromagnetic methods) numerical modeling surveys. The generalized flow of the program begins with building a complex 3D subsurface geological model, assigning properties to the models that mimic a potential CO{sub 2} injection site, numerically forward model a geophysical survey, and analyze the results. A test site located in Warren County, Ohio was selected as the test site for the full implementation of GphyzCO2. Specific interest was placed on a potential reservoir target, the Mount Simon Sandstone, and cap rock, the Eau Claire Formation. Analysis of the test site included well log data, physical property measurements (porosity), core sample resistivity measurements, calculating electrical permittivity values, seismic data collection, and seismic interpretation. The data was input into GphyzCO2 to demonstrate a full implementation of the software capabilities. Part of the implementation investigated the limits of using geophysical methods to monitor CO{sub 2} injection sites. The results show that cross-hole EM numerical surveys are limited to under 100 meter borehole separation. Those results were utilized in executing numerical EM surveys that contain hypothetical CO{sub 2} injections. The outcome of the forward modeling shows that EM methods can detect the presence of CO{sub 2}.

  12. Automatic deployment of a 2-D geophone array for efficient ultra-shallow seismic imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsoflias, Georgios P.; Steeples, Don W.; Czarnecki, Gerard P.; Sloan, Steven D.; Eslick, Robert C.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    : Data acquisition and preliminary processing strate- 324gies, Geophysics, 63, 1434?1450. 325Burridge, R., J. Graham, K. Shillcutt, R. Hirsh, and D. Kortenkamp (2003), 326Experiments with an EVA assistant Robot, paper presented at 7th Inter- 327national.... Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union. 0094-8276/06/2006GL025902$05.00 LXXXXX 1of4 103 acquire conventional ultra-shallow 3-D seismic data. The 104 method could be adapted to allow robotic shallow seismic 105 surveys in areas where people cannot...

  13. Understanding biogeobatteries: Where geophysics meets microbiology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Revil, A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    duckling of environmental geophysics, Leading Edge, 21(5),Pure and Applied Geophysics, 157, 357-382. Pinder, G.F. ,sulfide self-potentials, Geophysics, 25, 226–249. Sauck, W.

  14. Geophysical Monitoring of Hydrological and Biogeochemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubbard, Susan

    Geophysical Monitoring of Hydrological and Biogeochemical Transformations Associated with Cr explored the use of geophysical approaches for monitoring the spatiotemporal distribution of hydrological first integrated hydrological wellbore and geophysical tomographic data sets to estimate hydrological

  15. Seismic reflection data analysis of the Oriente and Swan Fracture Zones bounding the Cayman Trough 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tinker, Mary Norris

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SEISMIC REFLECTION DATA ANALYSIS OF THE ORIENTE AND SWAN FRACTURE ZONES BOUNDING THE CAYMAN TROUGH A Thesis by MARY NORRIS TINKER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8 M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1986 Major Subject: Geophysics SEISMIC REFLECTION DATA ANALYSIS OF THE ORIENTE AND SWAN FRACTURE ZONES BOUNDING THE CAYMAN TROUGH A Thesis by MARY NORRIS TINKER Approved as to style and content by: D. A. Fa quiet...

  16. Analysis of a reversed deep seismic refraction profile in the Atlantic Ocean, northeast of Puerto Rico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janakiramaiah, Bollapragada

    1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Geology and Geo- physics of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas, for his advice and encouragement, to Mr, John Hennion of the Lamont Geological Observatory, Columbia University, and the Lamont Observatory for re- leasing the geophysical... the corresponding geologic structure, The seismic measurements used were part of a larger seismic refraction program conducted in the Atlantic Ocean northeast of Puerto Rico in October, 1959, by a group from the Lamont Geological Observatory, Columbia University...

  17. Limitations for detecting small-scale faults using the coherency analysis of seismic data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnett, David Benjamin

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    LIMITATIONS FOR DETECTING SMALL-SCALE FAULTS USING THE COHERENCY ANALYSIS OF SEISMIC DATA A Thesis by DAVID BENJAMIN BARNETT Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 2005 Major Subject: Geophysics LIMITATIONS FOR DETECTING SMALL-SCALE FAULTS USING THE COHERENCY ANALYSIS OF SEISMIC DATA A Thesis by DAVID BENJAMIN BARNETT Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

  18. Seismic reflection data analysis of the Oriente and Swan Fracture Zones bounding the Cayman Trough

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tinker, Mary Norris

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SEISMIC REFLECTION DATA ANALYSIS OF THE ORIENTE AND SWAN FRACTURE ZONES BOUNDING THE CAYMAN TROUGH A Thesis by MARY NORRIS TINKER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8 M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1986 Major Subject: Geophysics SEISMIC REFLECTION DATA ANALYSIS OF THE ORIENTE AND SWAN FRACTURE ZONES BOUNDING THE CAYMAN TROUGH A Thesis by MARY NORRIS TINKER Approved as to style and content by: D. A. Fa quiet...

  19. Crump Geyser: High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Crump Geyser: High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration & Slim Well Drilling Crump Geyser: High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration & Slim Well...

  20. Seismic sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Green, M.A.; Cook, N.G.W.; McEvilly, T.V.; Majer, E.L.; Witherspoon, P.A.

    1987-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus is described for placement in a borehole in the earth, which enables the generation of closely controlled seismic waves from the borehole. Pure torsional shear waves are generated by an apparatus which includes a stator element fixed to the borehole walls and a rotor element which is electrically driven to rapidly oscillate on the stator element to cause reaction forces transmitted through the borehole walls to the surrounding earth. Longitudinal shear waves are generated by an armature that is driven to rapidly oscillate along the axis of the borehole, to cause reaction forces transmitted to the surrounding earth. Pressure waves are generated by electrically driving pistons that press against opposite ends of a hydraulic reservoir that fills the borehole. High power is generated by energizing the elements for more than about one minute. 9 figs.

  1. DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS UNDERGRADUATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS UNDERGRADUATE SURVIVAL MANUAL 2013-2014 SCHOOL OF OCEAN & EARTH SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY UNIVERSITY OF HAWAI`I AT MNOA Updated July 2013 #12;CONTENTS INTRODUCTION 1 Geology and Geophysics 1 Job Opportunities 1 Prepare Educationally 1 Challenges and Rewards 1 THE DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY

  2. INVERSION FOR APPLIED GEOPHYSICS: A TUTORIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Douglas W.

    INVERSION FOR APPLIED GEOPHYSICS: A TUTORIAL Douglas W. Oldenburg* and Yaoguo Li** * UBC-Geophysical, V6T 1Z4 ** Department of Geophysics, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado, 80401 INTRODUCTION Throughout this book there are numerous cases where geophysics has been used to help solve practical

  3. Department of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Department of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines Golden, CO 80401 http://www.geophysics Colorado School of Mines CGEM Dongjie Cheng #12;#12;Department of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines Golden, CO 80401 http://www.geophysics.mines.edu/cgem Defended: December 2003 Advisor: Dr. Yaoguo Li (GP

  4. Department of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Department of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines Golden, CO 80401 http://www.geophysics Colorado School of Mines CGEM Alisa Marie Green #12;Department of Geophysics Colorado School of Mines Golden, CO 80401 http://www.geophysics.mines.edu/cgem Defended: November 06, 2003 Advisor: Dr. Yaoguo Li

  5. Following more than 30 years of seismic and volcanic quiescence, the Canary Islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sleeman, Reinoud

    Following more than 30 years of seismic and volcanic quiescence, the Canary Islands region located History Several eruptions have taken place in the Canary Islands in the last 500 years, all of them, TRANSACTIONS, AMERICAN GEOPHYSICAL UNION PAGES 61,65 Monitoring the Reawakening of Canary Islands'Teide Volcano

  6. WAVELET ESTIMATION IN HOMOMORPHIC DOMAIN BY SPECTRAL AVERAGING, FOR DECONVOLUTION OF SEISMIC DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    WAVELET ESTIMATION IN HOMOMORPHIC DOMAIN BY SPECTRAL AVERAGING, FOR DECONVOLUTION OF SEISMIC DATA M In geophysics, a homomorphic system is used to modelize the convolution of an emitted wavelet (source) with the impulse response of the earth into the sum of the log spectra of the wavelet and the earth's response

  7. Seismic sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Green, Michael A. (Oakland, CA); Cook, Neville G. W. (Lafayette, CA); McEvilly, Thomas V. (Berkeley, CA); Majer, Ernest L. (El Cirrito, CA); Witherspoon, Paul A. (Berkeley, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus is described for placement in a borehole in the earth, which enables the generation of closely controlled seismic waves from the borehole. Pure torsional shear waves are generated by an apparatus which includes a stator element fixed to the borehole walls and a rotor element which is electrically driven to rapidly oscillate on the stator element to cause reaction forces transmitted through the borehole walls to the surrounding earth. Logitudinal shear waves are generated by an armature that is driven to rapidly oscillate along the axis of the borehole relative to a stator that is clamped to the borehole, to cause reaction forces transmitted to the surrounding earth. Pressure waves are generated by electrically driving pistons that press against opposite ends of a hydraulic reservoir that fills the borehole. High power is generated by energizing the elements at a power level that causes heating to over 150.degree. C. within one minute of operation, but energizing the elements for no more than about one minute.

  8. APPLICATION OF BOREHOLE GEOPHYSICS AT AN EXPERIMENTAL WASTE STORAGE SITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, P.H.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    letal Ore Deposits, 11 in Geophysics and Geochemistry in the11 Applications of Borehole Geophysics to Water-ResourcesAPPLICATION OF BOREHOLE GEOPHYSICS AT AN EXPERIMENTAL WASTE

  9. Lunar geophysics: The Moon's fundamental shape and paleomagnetism studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perera, Viranga

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tectonics.   Reviews  of  Geophysics  and  Space   Physics  SANTA CRUZ Lunar geophysics: The Moon’s fundamental shapeViranga Perera Lunar geophysics: The Moon’s fundamental

  10. SEISMIC RAY THEORY Seismic Ray Theory presents the most comprehensive treatment of the seismic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    , and the interpretation of seismic measurements. The book presents a consistent treatment of the seismic ray method, based#12;SEISMIC RAY THEORY Seismic Ray Theory presents the most comprehensive treatment of the seismic ray method available. This method plays an important role in seismology, seismic exploration

  11. Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal Systems Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal Systems Project objective: Make Seismic...

  12. Status of data, major results, and plans for geophysical activities, Yucca Mountain Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliver, H.W. [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (USA); Hardin, E.L. [Science Applications International Corp., Las Vegas, NV (USA); Nelson, P.H. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (USA)] [eds.

    1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes past and planned geophysical activities associated with the Yucca Mountain Project and is intended to serve as a starting point for integration of geophysical activities. This report relates past results to site characterization plans, as presented in the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Plan (SCP). This report discusses seismic exploration, potential field methods, geoelectrical methods, teleseismic data collection and velocity structural modeling, and remote sensing. This report discusses surface-based, airborne, borehole, surface-to-borehole, crosshole, and Exploratory Shaft Facility-related activities. The data described in this paper, and the publications discussed, have been selected based on several considerations; location with respect to Yucca Mountain, whether the success or failure of geophysical data is important to future activities, elucidation of features of interest, and judgment as to the likelihood that the method will produce information that is important for site characterization. 65 refs., 19 figs., 12 tabs.

  13. Improving School Governance | 1 Improving School Governance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    Improving School Governance | 1 Improving School Governance A Recommended Code of Governance for Schools: A flexible framework for strategic planning October 2012 Pilot version 1 #12;Improving School Governance | 2 #12;Improving School Governance | 3 This pilot version of the Recommended Code of Governance

  14. Integrated seismic study of naturally fractured tight gas reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, G.M.; Nur, A.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Reflection seismic methods are, and will continue to be, the key geophysical tool for imaging these heterogeneities in the subsurface of the earth. However, in spite of great advances in field acquisition techniques and computer processing power, the primary product of conventional seismic work is still only the spatial pattern of reflectivity, which is a measure of velocity variations. Most of the amplitude information goes unused. Although fracture zones may have a reflectivity signature, more often they will not, because of steeply dipping angles, limited offset range in the acquisition, a subtle impedance mismatch, or too thin a fractured zone relative to the wavelength. In fact, there is probably no single seismic attribute that will always tell us what we need to know about fracture zones. Our objective, in the project, is to integrate the principles of rock physics into a quantitative interpretation scheme that exploits the broader spectrum of fracture zone signatures: anomalous compressional and shear wave velocities; Q and velocity dispersion; increased velocity anisotropy amplitude variation with offset (AVO) response. Our goal is to incorporate four key elements: Acquisition and processing of seismic reflection field data. Theoretical studies of the anisotropic signatures of fractured rocks. Laboratory measurements of seismic velocity, velocity anisotropy, and attenuation in reservoir and cap rocks. Integration and interpretation of seismic, well log, and laboratory data, incorporating forward modeling.

  15. Major results of geophysical investigations at Yucca Mountain and vicinity, southern Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliver, H.W.; Ponce, D.A. [eds.] [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hunter, W.C. [ed.] [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States). Yucca Mountain Project Branch

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In the consideration of Yucca Mountain as a possible site for storing high level nuclear waste, a number of geologic concerns have been suggested for study by the National Academy of Sciences which include: (1) natural geologic and geochemical barriers, (2) possible future fluctuations in the water table that might flood a mined underground repository, (3) tectonic stability, and (4) considerations of shaking such as might be caused by nearby earthquakes or possible volcanic eruptions. This volume represents the third part of an overall plan of geophysical investigation of Yucca Mountain, preceded by the Site Characterization Plan (SCP; dated 1988) and the report referred to as the Geophysical White Paper, Phase 1, entitled Status of Data, Major Results, and Plans for Geophysical Activities, Yucca Mountain Project (Oliver and others, 1990). The SCP necessarily contained uncertainty about applicability and accuracy of methods then untried in the Yucca Mountain volcano-tectonic setting, and the White Paper, Phase 1, focused on summarization of survey coverage, data quality, and applicability of results. For the most part, it did not present data or interpretation. The important distinction of the current volume lies in presentation of data, results, and interpretations of selected geophysical methods used in characterization activities at Yucca Mountain. Chapters are included on the following: gravity investigations; magnetic investigations; regional magnetotelluric investigations; seismic refraction investigations; seismic reflection investigations; teleseismic investigations; regional thermal setting; stress measurements; and integration of methods and conclusions. 8 refs., 60 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Geological and geophysical studies of a geothermal area in the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    rocks; clasts; composition; conglomerate; economic geology; electrical methods; evolution; exploration; faults; folds; geophysical methods; geophysical surveys; geothermal...

  17. GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 66, NO. 1 (JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2001); P. 2530 Reservoir geophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 66, NO. 1 (JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2001); P. 25­30 Reservoir geophysics Wayne D. Pennington INTRODUCTION The concept of petroleum reservoir geophysics is relatively new. In the past, the role of geophysics was largely confined to exploration and, to a lesser degree, the development

  18. USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GEOTHERMAL FIELD, CALIFORNIA Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP...

  19. Using Micro-Seismicity and Seismic Velocities to Map Subsurface...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Field California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Using Micro-Seismicity and Seismic Velocities to Map Subsurface...

  20. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At...

  1. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2008) Exploration...

  2. Corporate Governance and Taxation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyck, Alexander

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accounting and Corporate Governance,” Journal of Accounting1997) “A Survey of Corporate Governance” Journal of FinanceCorporate Governance and Taxation Mihir A. Desai* Harvard

  3. Seismic Imaging and Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    I give an overview of LANL's capability in seismic imaging and monitoring. I present some seismic imaging and monitoring results, including imaging of complex structures, subsalt imaging of Gulf of Mexico, fault/fracture zone imaging for geothermal exploration at the Jemez pueblo, time-lapse imaging of a walkway vertical seismic profiling data for monitoring CO{sub 2} inject at SACROC, and microseismic event locations for monitoring CO{sub 2} injection at Aneth. These examples demonstrate LANL's high-resolution and high-fidelity seismic imaging and monitoring capabilities.

  4. Seismic characterization of fractures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JM Carcione

    2014-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Seismic characterization of fractures. José M. Carcione, OGS, Italy. Fractured geological formations are generally represented with a stress-strain relation.

  5. Geophysical Institute. Biennial report, 1993-1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1993-1994 Geophysical Institute Biennial Report was published in November 1995 by the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks. It contains an overview of the Geophysical Institute, the Director`s Note, and research presentations concerning the following subjects: Scientific Predictions, Space Physics, Atmospheric Sciences, Snow, Ice and Permafrost, Tectonics and Sedimentation, Seismology, Volcanology, Remote Sensing, and other projects.

  6. INSTITUTE OF GEOPHYSICS AND PLANETARY PHYSICS (IGPP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INSTITUTE OF GEOPHYSICS AND PLANETARY PHYSICS (IGPP) LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY (LANL) FY11, 2010 1. INTRODUCTION The Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics (IGPP) at Los Alamos National of California's Systemwide Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics. Its science mission is to promote

  7. 2010 Western Pacific Geophysics Search Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Chung-Sang

    2010 Western Pacific Geophysics Meeting Search Results Cite abstracts as Author(s) (2010), Title: Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK, United States AU: Ragunathan, S EM: srivatta@gi.alaska.edu AF: Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK, United

  8. Geophysical Institute. Biennial report, 1993-1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1993-1994 Geophysical Institute Biennial Report was published in November 1995 by the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks. It contains an overview of the Geophysical Institute, the Director`s Note, and research presentations concerning the following subjects: scientific predictions, space physics, atmospheric sciences, snow, ice and permafrost, tectonics and sedimentation, seismology, volcanology, remote sensing, and other projects.

  9. Latest development in seismic texture analysis for subsurface structure, facies, and reservoir characterization: A review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Dengliang

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In exploration geology and geophysics, seismic texture is still a developing concept that has not been sufficiently known, although quite a number of different algorithms have been published in the literature. This paper provides a review of the seismic texture concepts and methodologies, focusing on latest developments in seismic amplitude texture analysis, with particular reference to the gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) and the texture model regression (TMR) methods. The GLCM method evaluates spatial arrangements of amplitude samples within an analysis window using a matrix (a two-dimensional histogram) of amplitude co-occurrence. The matrix is then transformed into a suite of texture attributes, such as homogeneity, contrast, and randomness, which provide the basis for seismic facies classification. The TMR method uses a texture model as reference to discriminate among seismic features based on a linear, least-squares regression analysis between the model and the data within an analysis window. By implementing customized texture model schemes, the TMR algorithm has the flexibility to characterize subsurface geology for different purposes. A texture model with a constant phase is effective at enhancing the visibility of seismic structural fabrics, a texture model with a variable phase is helpful for visualizing seismic facies, and a texture model with variable amplitude, frequency, and size is instrumental in calibrating seismic to reservoir properties. Preliminary test case studies in the very recent past have indicated that the latest developments in seismic texture analysis have added to the existing amplitude interpretation theories and methodologies. These and future developments in seismic texture theory and methodologies will hopefully lead to a better understanding of the geologic implications of the seismic texture concept and to an improved geologic interpretation of reflection seismic amplitude

  10. Seismic velocity and Q anisotropy in fractured poroelastic media Juan E. Santos a,b,c,n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Juan

    , knowledge of fracture orientation, densities and sizes is essential since these factors control hydrocarbon (fractal) skeleton with fractures. We show that fractures induce strong seismic velocity and Q anisotropy subject in hydrocarbon exploration geophysics, mining and reser- voir characterization and production [1

  11. Calibration of Seismic Attributes for Reservoir Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wayne D. Pennington

    2002-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The project, "Calibration of Seismic Attributes for Reservoir Characterization," is now complete. Our original proposed scope of work included detailed analysis of seismic and other data from two to three hydrocarbon fields; we have analyzed data from four fields at this level of detail, two additional fields with less detail, and one other 2D seismic line used for experimentation. We also included time-lapse seismic data with ocean-bottom cable recordings in addition to the originally proposed static field data. A large number of publications and presentations have resulted from this work, inlcuding several that are in final stages of preparation or printing; one of these is a chapter on "Reservoir Geophysics" for the new Petroleum Engineering Handbook from the Society of Petroleum Engineers. Major results from this project include a new approach to evaluating seismic attributes in time-lapse monitoring studies, evaluation of pitfalls in the use of point-based measurements and facies classifications, novel applications of inversion results, improved methods of tying seismic data to the wellbore, and a comparison of methods used to detect pressure compartments. Some of the data sets used are in the public domain, allowing other investigators to test our techniques or to improve upon them using the same data. From the public-domain Stratton data set we have demonstrated that an apparent correlation between attributes derived along 'phantom' horizons are artifacts of isopach changes; only if the interpreter understands that the interpretation is based on this correlation with bed thickening or thinning, can reliable interpretations of channel horizons and facies be made. From the public-domain Boonsville data set we developed techniques to use conventional seismic attributes, including seismic facies generated under various neural network procedures, to subdivide regional facies determined from logs into productive and non-productive subfacies, and we developed a method involving cross-correlation of seismic waveforms to provide a reliable map of the various facies present in the area. The Wamsutter data set led to the use of unconventional attributes including lateral incoherence and horizon-dependent impedance variations to indicate regions of former sand bars and current high pressure, respectively, and to evaluation of various upscaling routines. The Teal South data set has provided a surprising set of results, leading us to develop a pressure-dependent velocity relationship and to conclude that nearby reservoirs are undergoing a pressure drop in response to the production of the main reservoir, implying that oil is being lost through their spill points, never to be produced. Additional results were found using the public-domain Waha and Woresham-Bayer data set, and some tests of technologies were made using 2D seismic lines from Michigan and the western Pacific ocean.

  12. CALIBRATION OF SEISMIC ATTRIBUTES FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wayne D. Pennington; Horacio Acevedo; Aaron Green; Joshua Haataja; Shawn Len; Anastasia Minaeva; Deyi Xie

    2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The project, ''Calibration of Seismic Attributes for Reservoir Calibration,'' is now complete. Our original proposed scope of work included detailed analysis of seismic and other data from two to three hydrocarbon fields; we have analyzed data from four fields at this level of detail, two additional fields with less detail, and one other 2D seismic line used for experimentation. We also included time-lapse seismic data with ocean-bottom cable recordings in addition to the originally proposed static field data. A large number of publications and presentations have resulted from this work, including several that are in final stages of preparation or printing; one of these is a chapter on ''Reservoir Geophysics'' for the new Petroleum Engineering Handbook from the Society of Petroleum Engineers. Major results from this project include a new approach to evaluating seismic attributes in time-lapse monitoring studies, evaluation of pitfalls in the use of point-based measurements and facies classifications, novel applications of inversion results, improved methods of tying seismic data to the wellbore, and a comparison of methods used to detect pressure compartments. Some of the data sets used are in the public domain, allowing other investigators to test our techniques or to improve upon them using the same data. From the public-domain Stratton data set we have demonstrated that an apparent correlation between attributes derived along ''phantom'' horizons are artifacts of isopach changes; only if the interpreter understands that the interpretation is based on this correlation with bed thickening or thinning, can reliable interpretations of channel horizons and facies be made. From the public-domain Boonsville data set we developed techniques to use conventional seismic attributes, including seismic facies generated under various neural network procedures, to subdivide regional facies determined from logs into productive and non-productive subfacies, and we developed a method involving cross-correlation of seismic waveforms to provide a reliable map of the various facies present in the area. The Wamsutter data set led to the use of unconventional attributes including lateral incoherence and horizon-dependent impedance variations to indicate regions of former sand bars and current high pressure, respectively, and to evaluation of various upscaling routines. The Teal South data set has provided a surprising set of results, leading us to develop a pressure-dependent velocity relationship and to conclude that nearby reservoirs are undergoing a pressure drop in response to the production of the main reservoir, implying that oil is being lost through their spill points, never to be produced. Additional results were found using the public-domain Waha and Woresham-Bayer data set, and some tests of technologies were made using 2D seismic lines from Michigan and the western Pacific ocean.

  13. Proposed geologic model based on geophysical well logs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diaz C, S.; Puente C, I.; de la Pena L, A.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An investigation of the subsurface based on a qualitative interpretation of well logs was carried out at Cerro Prieto to obtain information on the distribution of the different lithofacies that make up a deltaic depositional system. The sedimentological interpretation derived from the resistivity and spontaneous potential are shown in several cross-sections of the field. In addition to the sedimentological interpretation, a map of the structural geology of the region based on well logs and available geophysical information was prepared, including the results of gravity and seismic refraction surveys. The depth to the zone of hydrothermal alteration described by Elders (1980) was found by means of temperature, electrical, and radioactive logs. Two maps showing the configuration of the top of this anomaly show a clear correlation with the gravity anomalies found in the area.

  14. New Paradigm for Seismic Networks: Crowd-Sourced Seismic Networks,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greer, Julia R.

    #12;New Paradigm for Seismic Networks: Crowd-Sourced Seismic Networks, including Buildings Tom Egill Hauksson #12;SCSN: what does it encompass? · ~360 Seismic Stations · ~60 stations from partners SCSN/SCEDC total of ~26 FTE's #12;Crowd Sourced Networks · Current broadband seismic network

  15. Fracture Properties From Seismic Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burns, Daniel R.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fractures scatter seismic energy and this energy can be analyzed to provide information about fracture

  16. Seismicity and seismic response of the Soviet-designed VVER (Water-cooled, Water moderated Energy Reactor) reactor plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, D.C.; Gvildys, J.; Wang, C.Y.; Spencer, B.W.; Sienicki, J.J.; Seidensticker, R.W.; Purvis, E.E. III

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On March 4, 1977, a strong earthquake occurred at Vrancea, Romania, about 350 km from the Kozloduy plant in Bulgaria. Subsequent to this event, construction of the unit 2 of the Armenia plant was delayed over two years while seismic features were added. On December 7, 1988, another strong earthquake struck northwest Armenia about 90 km north of the Armenia plant. Extensive damage of residential and industrial facilities occurred in the vicinity of the epicenter. The earthquake did not damage the Armenia plant. Following this event, the Soviet government announced that the plant would be shutdown permanently by March 18, 1989, and the station converted to a fossil-fired plant. This paper presents the results of the seismic analyses of the Soviet-designed VVER (Water-cooled, Water moderated Energy Reactor) plants. Also presented is the information concerning seismicity in the regions where VVERs are located and information on seismic design of VVERs. The reference units are the VVER-440 model V230 (similar to the two units of the Armenia plant) and the VVER-1000 model V320 units at Kozloduy in Bulgaria. This document provides an initial basis for understanding the seismicity and seismic response of VVERs under seismic events. 1 ref., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Method of migrating seismic records

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ober, Curtis C. (Las Lunas, NM); Romero, Louis A. (Albuquerque, NM); Ghiglia, Dennis C. (Longmont, CO)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a method of migrating seismic records that retains the information in the seismic records and allows migration with significant reductions in computing cost. The present invention comprises phase encoding seismic records and combining the encoded seismic records before migration. Phase encoding can minimize the effect of unwanted cross terms while still allowing significant reductions in the cost to migrate a number of seismic records.

  18. Stochastic estimation of aquifer geometry using seismic refraction data with borehole depth constraints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Jinsong [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Hubbard, Susan S [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Korneev, V. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Gaines, David [University of Tennessee; Baker, Gregory S. [University of Tennessee; Watson, David [ORNL

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a Bayesian model to invert surface seismic refraction data with depth constraints from boreholes for characterization of aquifer geometry and apply it to seismic and borehole data sets collected at the contaminated Oak Ridge National Laboratory site in Tennessee. Rather than the traditional approach of first inverting the seismic arrival times for seismic velocity and then using that information to aid in the spatial interpolation of wellbore data, we jointly invert seismic first arrival time data and wellbore based information, such as depths of key lithological boundaries. We use a staggered grid finite difference algorithm with second order accuracy in time and fourth order accuracy in space to model seismic full waveforms and use an automated method to pick the first arrival times. We use Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods to draw many samples from the joint posterior probability distribution, on which we can estimate the key interfaces and their associated uncertainty as a function of horizontal location and depth. We test the developed method on both synthetic and field case studies. The synthetic studies show that the developed method is effective at rigorous incorporation of multiscale data and the Bayesian inversion reduces uncertainty in estimates of aquifer zonation. Applications of the approach to field data, including two surface seismic profiles located 620 m apart from each other, reveal the presence of a low velocity subsurface zone that is laterally persistent. This geophysically defined feature is aligned with the plume axis, suggesting it may serve as an important regional preferential flow pathway.

  19. SEISMIC EVALUATION OF HYDROCARBON SATURATION IN DEEP-WATER RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Batzle; D-h Han; R. Gibson; O. Djordjevic

    2003-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The ''Seismic Evaluation of Hydrocarbon Saturation in Deep-Water Reservoirs'' (Grant/Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT15342) began September 1, 2002. During this second quarter: A Direct Hydrocarbon Indicator (DHI) symposium was held at UH; Current DHI methods were presented and forecasts made on future techniques; Dr. Han moved his laboratory from HARC to the University of Houston; Subcontracts were re-initiated with UH and TAMU; Theoretical and numerical modeling work began at TAMU; Geophysical Development Corp. agreed to provide petrophysical data; Negotiations were begun with Veritas GDC to obtain limited seismic data; Software licensing and training schedules were arranged with Paradigm; and Data selection and acquisition continues. The broad industry symposium on Direct Hydrocarbon Indicators was held at the University of Houston as part of this project. This meeting was well attended and well received. A large amount of information was presented, not only on application of the current state of the art, but also on expected future trends. Although acquisition of appropriate seismic data was expected to be a significant problem, progress has been made. A 3-D seismic data set from the shelf has been installed at Texas A&M University and analysis begun. Veritas GDC has expressed a willingness to provide data in the deep Gulf of Mexico. Data may also be available from TGS.

  20. Environmental geophysics - fad or future?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romig, P.R. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    For ten years, the oil industry has suffered cycles of downsizing, out-sourcing, and reorganization. As layoffs and early retirement have become widespread, an increasing number of geophysicists have seen the environmental business as an opportunity to stay in their chosen professions. There have been predictions that the use of geophysics for environmental mapping and characterization could spawn an industry larger than oil exploration. These predictions have come from serious financial analysts as well as from hopeful geophysicists, so they cannot be ignored. There also are reputable professionals who believe that environmentalism is a fad which will die out as soon as the next oil shortage occurs. They point to recent publicity about excessive expenditures for waste remediation as a signal of the beginning of the end. These conflicting views raise serious questions about the form and function of, and the future for, environmental geophysics. This paper reviews these views.

  1. Research review Geophysical subsurface imaging for ecological applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    Research review Geophysical subsurface imaging for ecological applications Author resistivity imaging, geophysical imaging, ground-penetrating radar, plant­soil interactions, soil be costly, time consuming, andinfeasible, especially if the spatial scales involved are large. Geophysical

  2. Towards Real Earth Models --Computational Geophysics on Unstructured Tetrahedral Meshes?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farquharson, Colin G.

    Towards Real Earth Models -- Computational Geophysics on Unstructured Tetrahedral Meshes? Colin tetrahedral meshes. EM geophysics on unstructured tetrahedral meshes. Disadvantages, difficulties, challenges. Conclusions. #12;Outline: Geological models! Advantages of unstructured tetrahedral meshes. EM geophysics

  3. Howard A. Zebker Professor of Geophysics and Electrical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zebker, Howard

    Howard A. Zebker Professor of Geophysics and Electrical Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, Departments of Geophysics and Electrical Engineering (joint appt.), Stanford University, Stanford, CA. 1995-2006 Associate Professor, Departments of Geophysics and Electrical Engineering (joint appt.), Stanford University

  4. Open government information awareness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKinley, Ryan, 1976-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the United States, there is a widening gap between a citizen's ability to monitor his or her government and the government's ability to monitor a citizen. Average citizens have limited access to important government ...

  5. Law and Corporate Governance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fligstein, Neil; Choo, Jennifer

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1997. A survey of corporate governance. J. Finan. 52(2):737-1999. Employees and Corporate Governance. Washington, DC:structural change in corporate governance. J. Law Soc. 27(

  6. Unstructured grid modelling to create 3-D Earth models that unify geological and geophysical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farquharson, Colin G.

    Unstructured grid modelling to create 3-D Earth models that unify geological and geophysical Conclusion The common Earth model Geophysical inversion Geological and geophysical models Instructured meshes Geophysical inversion Geological and geophysical models Instructured meshes Motivation: The common Earth model

  7. Crump Geyser: High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Crump Geyser: High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration & Slim Well Drilling John Casteel Nevada Geothermal Power Co. Validation of Innovative Exploration...

  8. Regional geophysics, Cenozoic tectonics and geologic resources...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    geophysics, Cenozoic tectonics and geologic resources of the Basin and Range Province and adjoining regions Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  9. On the Quantum Aspects of Geophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Darabi

    2004-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a simple quantum mechanical justification for the formation of folded mountains. It is very appealing to develop this idea to a theory of {\\it Quantum Geophysics}

  10. Integrated Surface Geophysical Methods for Characterization of...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Integrated Surface Geophysical Methods for Characterization of the Naval Air Warfare Center, New Jersey Author USGS Published Publisher Not...

  11. Derivation of site-specific relationships between hydraulic parameters and p-wave velocities based on hydraulic and seismic tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brauchler, R.; Doetsch, J.; Dietrich, P.; Sauter, M.

    2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, hydraulic and seismic tomographic measurements were used to derive a site-specific relationship between the geophysical parameter p-wave velocity and the hydraulic parameters, diffusivity and specific storage. Our field study includes diffusivity tomograms derived from hydraulic travel time tomography, specific storage tomograms, derived from hydraulic attenuation tomography, and p-wave velocity tomograms, derived from seismic tomography. The tomographic inversion was performed in all three cases with the SIRT (Simultaneous Iterative Reconstruction Technique) algorithm, using a ray tracing technique with curved trajectories. The experimental set-up was designed such that the p-wave velocity tomogram overlaps the hydraulic tomograms by half. The experiments were performed at a wellcharacterized sand and gravel aquifer, located in the Leine River valley near Göttingen, Germany. Access to the shallow subsurface was provided by direct-push technology. The high spatial resolution of hydraulic and seismic tomography was exploited to derive representative site-specific relationships between the hydraulic and geophysical parameters, based on the area where geophysical and hydraulic tests were performed. The transformation of the p-wave velocities into hydraulic properties was undertaken using a k-means cluster analysis. Results demonstrate that the combination of hydraulic and geophysical tomographic data is a promising approach to improve hydrogeophysical site characterization.

  12. March 30, 2009 16:44 Geophysical and Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics gafdbo09 Geophysical and Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Hanbali, Ahmad

    March 30, 2009 16:44 Geophysical and Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics gafdbo09 Geophysical (geophysical) fluid models: two-dimensional vortical systems in a generalized streamfunction-vorticity rep

  13. Reservoir permeability from seismic attribute analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goloshubin, G.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the reservoir permeability based on seismic and log data.seismic reservoir response based on well and 3D seismic datadata analysis we suggest seismic imaging of the reservoir

  14. Opportunities for improving regulations governing the seismic safety of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked QuestionsDepartmentGas and Oil ResearchEnergyOnHSS IndependentEnergylarge

  15. Merging high resolution geophysical and geochemical surveys to...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    high resolution geophysical and geochemical surveys to reduce exploration risk at Glass Buttes, Oregon Merging high resolution geophysical and geochemical surveys to reduce...

  16. Advanced 3D Geophysical Imaging Technologies for Geothermal Resource...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3D Geophysical Imaging Technologies for Geothermal Resource Characterization Advanced 3D Geophysical Imaging Technologies for Geothermal Resource Characterization Advanced 3D...

  17. Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal Systems; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for...

  18. Seismic Structure And Seismicity Of The Cooling Lava Lake Of...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Seismic Structure And Seismicity Of The Cooling Lava Lake Of Kilauea Iki, Hawaii Abstract The...

  19. Evaluation of a Vector Hypercube for Seismic Modelling Seismic modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renaut, Rosemary

    Evaluation of a Vector Hypercube for Seismic Modelling Abstract Seismic modelling is a computationally to produce realistic seismic traces intensive problem. A 2D syn- Rosemary Renautt and Johnny equation is the first step in the generation of a synthetic seismogram as an aid in the interpretation

  20. APPLIED GEOPHYSICS FIELD CLASS GEOLOGY 437

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nickrent, Daniel L.

    APPLIED GEOPHYSICS FIELD CLASS GEOLOGY 437 SPRING 2014 OF NATURAL RESOURCES INCLUDING OIL, COAL, MINERALS AND GROUNDWATER. OTHER APPLICATIONS OF GEOPHYSICS MAY, IF AVAILABLE, WE WILL VISIT AN OIL DRILLING RIG IN OPERATION. DATES FOR FIELD TRIPS WILL DEPEND ON THE WEATHER

  1. A new approach to integrate seismic and production data in reservoir models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ouenes, A.; Chawathe, A.; Weiss, W. [New Mexico Tech, Socorro, NM (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A great deal of effort is devoted to reducing the uncertainties in reservoir modeling. For example, seismic properties are used to improve the characterization of interwell properties by providing porosity maps constrained to seismic impedance. Another means to reduce uncertainties is to constrain the reservoir model to production data. This paper describes a new approach where the production and seismic data are simultaneously used to reduce the uncertainties. In this new approach, the primary geologic parameter that controls reservoir properties is identified. Next, the geophysical parameter that is sensitive to the dominant geologic parameter is determined. Then the geology and geophysics are linked using analytic correlations. Unfortunately, the initial guess resulted in a reservoir model that did not match the production history. Since the time required for trial and error matching of production history is exorbitant, an automatic history matching method based on a fast optimization method was used to find the correlating parameters. This new approach was illustrated with an actual field in the Williston Basin. Upscalling problems do not arise since the scale is imposed by the size of the seismic bin (66m, 219 ft) which is the size of the simulator gridblocks.

  2. Canadian Seismic Agreement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basham, P.W.; Lyons, J.A.; Drysdale, J.A.; Shannon, W.E.; Andersen, F.; Hayman, R.B.; Wetmiller, R.J.

    1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ECTN network has remained stable over the past year; progress on the new concentrator software has been slow. Major developments have taken place in the Ottawa Data Laboratory including the installation of a new VAX system and further development of the Seismic Analysis Monitor software. A new initiative has been the development of hardware and software for the Sudbury Local Telemetered Network, which can be considered a prototype for a smart outstation. The performance of the ECTN over the past year is described along with a summary of eastern Canadian seismicity during the reporting period and a list of EPB research publications on eastern Canadian seismicity during the past year. 4 figures, 3 tables.

  3. Controllable seismic source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gomez, Antonio; DeRego, Paul Jeffrey; Ferrel, Patrick Andrew; Thom, Robert Anthony; Trujillo, Joshua J.; Herridge, Brian

    2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for generating seismic waves includes a housing, a strike surface within the housing, and a hammer movably disposed within the housing. An actuator induces a striking motion in the hammer such that the hammer impacts the strike surface as part of the striking motion. The actuator is selectively adjustable to change characteristics of the striking motion and characteristics of seismic waves generated by the impact. The hammer may be modified to change the physical characteristics of the hammer, thereby changing characteristics of seismic waves generated by the hammer. The hammer may be disposed within a removable shock cavity, and the apparatus may include two hammers and two shock cavities positioned symmetrically about a center of the apparatus.

  4. Canadian Seismic Agreement. Annual report, July--June 1990: Volume 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wetmiller, R.J.; Lyons, J.A.; Shannon, W.E.; Munro, P.S.; Thomas, J.T.; Andrew, M.D.; Lapointe, S.P.; Lamontagne, M.; Wong, C.; Anglin, F.M.; Adams, J.; Cajka, M.G.; McNeil, W.; Drysdale, J.A. [Geological Survey of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a progress report of work carried out under the terms of a research agreement entitled the ``Canadian Seismic Agreement`` between the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), the Canadian Commercial Corporation and the Geophysics Division of the Geological Survey of Canada (GD/GSC) during the period from July 01, 1989 to June 30, 1990. The ``Canadian Seismic Agreement`` supports generally the operation of various seismograph stations in eastern Canada and the collection and analysis of earthquake data for the purpose of mitigating seismic hazards in eastern Canada and the northeastern US. The specific activities carried out in this one-year period are summarized below under four headings; Eastern Canada Telemetred Network and local network developments, Datalab developments, strong-motion network developments and earthquake activity. During this period the first surface fault unequivocably determined to have accompanied a historic earthquake in eastern North America, occurred in northern Quebec.

  5. Electrical Impedance Tomography in geophysics, application of EIDORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Andy

    Electrical Impedance Tomography in geophysics, application of EIDORS Lesparre N., Adler A., Gibert to adapt EIDORS for applications in geophysics. In geophysics, we apply EIT in order to image inner. The spatial resolution of the method in geophysics is of the order of meters and the penetration depth can

  6. Bachelor of Science, Geophysics, 2013-2014 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Bachelor of Science, Geophysics, 2013-2014 Name ID# Date General Degree Requirements Residency with Lab 4 COMPSCI 115 Introduction to C 2 GEOPH 201 Seeing the Unseen: an Introduction to Geophysics 4 GEOPH 300 Physics of the Earth 3 GEOPH 305 Applied Geophysics 3 GEOPH 420 Geophysical Applications

  7. SURFACE GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION - COMPENDIUM DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RUCKER DF; MYERS DA

    2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the evolution of the surface geophysical exploration (SGE) program and highlights some of the most recent successes in imaging conductive targets related to past leaks within and around Hanford's tank farms. While it is noted that the SGE program consists of multiple geophysical techniques designed to (1) locate near surface infrastructure that may interfere with (2) subsurface plume mapping, the report will focus primarily on electrical resistivity acquisition and processing for plume mapping. Due to the interferences from the near surface piping network, tanks, fences, wells, etc., the results of the three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of electrical resistivity was more representative of metal than the high ionic strength plumes. Since the first deployment, the focus of the SGE program has been to acquire and model the best electrical resistivity data that minimizes the influence of buried metal objects. Toward that goal, two significant advances have occurred: (1) using the infrastructure directly in the acquisition campaign and (2) placement of electrodes beneath the infrastructure. The direct use of infrastructure was successfully demonstrated at T farm by using wells as long electrodes (Rucker et al., 2010, 'Electrical-Resistivity Characterization of an Industrial Site Using Long Electrodes'). While the method was capable of finding targets related to past releases, a loss of vertical resolution was the trade-off. The burying of electrodes below the infrastructure helped to increase the vertical resolution, as long as a sufficient number of electrodes are available for the acquisition campaign.

  8. PhD in Cryosphere Geophysics The Cryosphere Geophysics and Remote Sensing group (CryoGARs) at Boise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    PhD in Cryosphere Geophysics The Cryosphere Geophysics and Remote Sensing group (CryoGARs) at Boise on the GrIS. A solid background in field geophysics is preferred. The successful applicant will join the CryoGars group and Center for Geophysical Investigation of the Shallow Subsurface (CGISS) at Boise

  9. Fractals in geophysics Geophysical phenomena of interest to geoscientists include both atmospheric and terrestrial related processes, which

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rangarajan, Govindan

    Preface Fractals in geophysics Geophysical phenomena of interest to geoscientists include both-fractal type. Recently, there has been much interdisciplinary interest in the application of geophysical of the spatio-temporal organization of geophysical phenomena from micro to macro levels [1­6]. Wider application

  10. Geophysical modeling of the Franklin Township buried valley, and associated aquifer, Portage County, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Yuejun; Palmer, D.F. (Kent State Univ., OH (United States). Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed geophysical survey was conducted in Franklin Township, Portage County, Ohio to delineate a buried valley. A combination of the gravity, electrical resistivity, and surface refraction seismic modeling has been applied to determine the bedrock topography, the lithology of the bedrock, the nature of the glacial fill, and the thickness of the associated aquifer. Three dimensional gravity modeling defines the size and shape of the glacial fill with low density compared to the surrounding bedrock and provides a bedrock topography map with a high resolution. The calculated bedrock topography coincides with the water well data available in the area. Resistivity modeling was used to search for a least-squares fit between the measured and the theoretical curves to evaluate the layer thickness and resistivity. The resistivity profile indicates that there exists an aquifer with the thickness about 50 feet within the glacial fill. The level of the soil moisture and the water table is suggested by the resistivity data as well. The seismic profile supports the bedrock boundary calculated by gravity modeling, and shows that the upper part of the bedrock consists of three layers, upper sandstone, shale, and lower sandstone. The comprehensive geophysical interpretation infers that the pre-glacial valley, cut through Sharon Sandstone, Meadville Shale to Berea Sandstone, was extended and deepened at the northern end, and filled with glacial material derived from the north during the later glacial period, resulting in a thick aquifer in the glacial fill.

  11. Siena College Web Governance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siena College Web Governance Web Governance: Roles & Responsibilities. WEB ADVISORY COMMITTEE (WAC) The Web Advisory Committee is the Owner of the Siena homepage. The Web Advisory Committee is responsible for: Providing the process that will move Siena College

  12. Water information bulletin No. 30: geothermal investigations in Idaho. Part 11. Geological, hydrological, geochemical and geophysical investigations of the Nampa-Caldwell and adjacent areas, southwestern Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, J.C. (ed.)

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The area under study included approximately 925 sq km (357 sq mi) of the Nampa-Caldwell portion of Canyon County, an area within the central portion of the western Snake River Plain immediately west of Boise, Idaho. Geologic mapping, hydrologic, geochemical, geophysical, including detailed gravity and aeromagnetic surveys, were run to acquire needed data. In addition, existing magnetotelluric and reflection seismic data were purchased and reinterpreted in light of newly acquired data.

  13. GEOPHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ?nite-element formulation (Smith. I975). handle any kind of waves in complex media but are limited mainly because nu- merical dispersion prevents them from

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

    2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently hampered by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver arrays will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

  15. Development of a 400 Level 3C Clamped Downhole Seismic Receiver Array for 3D Borehole Seismic Imaging of Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bjorn N. P. Paulsson

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently hampered by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver arrays will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

  16. Development of a 400 Level 3C Clamped Downhole Seismic Receiver Array for 3D Borehole Seismic Imaging of Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bjorn N.P Paulsson

    2006-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently hampered by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver arrays will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

  17. Development of a 400 Level 3C Clamped Downhole Seismic Receiver Array for 3D Borehole Seismic Imaging of Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

    2005-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently hampered by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver arrays will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

  18. SAGE, Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to merge their data into a broader picture. The techniques used for this project were seismic refraction reflection (using a Vibroseis source), gravity, and electromagnetics...

  19. Federal Government Resources- Tribal Communities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The federal government recognizes tribal nations as "domestic dependent nations" and has established a number of laws attempting to clarify the government to government relationship between the...

  20. Canadian seismic agreement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wetmiller, R.J.; Lyons, J.A.; Shannon, W.E.; Munro, P.S.; Thomas, J.T.; Andrew, M.D.; Lamontagne, M.; Wong, C.; Anglin, F.M.; Plouffe, M.; Adams, J.; Drysdale, J.A. (Geological Survey of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Geophysics Div.)

    1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the period of this report, the contract resources were spent on operation and maintenance of the Eastern Canada Telemetred Network (ECTN), development of special purpose local network systems, servicing and maintenance of the strong-motion seismograph network in eastern Canada, operation of the Ottawa data lab and earthquake monitoring and reporting. Of special note in this period was the final completion of the Sudbury (SLTN) and Charlevoix (CLTN) local networks and the integration of their data processing and analysis requirements in the regular analysis stream for ECTN data. These networks now acquire high quality digital data for detailed analysis of seismic activity and source properties from these two areas, thus effectively doubling the amount of seismic data being received by the Ottawa data lab. 37 refs., 17 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Seismic Facies Characterization By Scale Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrmann, Felix J.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the years, there has been an ongoing struggle to relate well-log and seismic data due to the inherent bandwidth limitation of seismic data, the problem of seismic amplitudes, and the apparent inability to delineate ...

  2. Expedited Site Characterization Geophysics: Geophysical Methods and Tools for Site Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, N.E.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    battery belt, 4 batteries, 2 chargers ) IO0 ,,L t ,, , i l,, E__d CharacterizationCharacterization Geophysics SPECIFICATIONS: TEMI3 MAGNETIC ANTENNA General Power: Two 9V alkaline batteries BatteryCharacterization Geophysics RESISTIVITY/ INDUCED POLARIZATION (_nt'd/ For the standard resistivit 7 technique, a battery-

  3. SEISMIC ATTENUATION FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel Walls; M.T. Taner; Naum Derzhi; Gary Mavko; Jack Dvorkin

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report we will show results of seismic and well log derived attenuation attributes from a deep water Gulf of Mexico data set. This data was contributed by Burlington Resources and Seitel Inc. The data consists of ten square kilometers of 3D seismic data and three well penetrations. We have computed anomalous seismic absorption attributes on the seismic data and have computed Q from the well log curves. The results show a good correlation between the anomalous absorption (attenuation) attributes and the presence of gas as indicated by well logs.

  4. Frequent-Interval Seismic CPTu

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    PE NPH Engineering Manager, DOE-SR Motivation The seismic piezocone penetration test (SCPTu) utilized at SRS because it provides rapid and thorough site characterization....

  5. Governance of Adjustments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wernerfelt, Birger

    2003-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The article proposes a research program to compare game forms in terms of their ability to govern ex post adjustments to ex ante contracts. The comparisons can be ...

  6. SEISMIC DETERMINATION OF RESERVOIR HETEROGENEITY: APPLICATION TO THE CHARACTERIZATION OF HEAVY OIL RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthias G. Imhof; James W. Castle

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the project was to examine how seismic and geologic data can be used to improve characterization of small-scale heterogeneity and their parameterization in reservoir models. The study focused on West Coalinga Field in California. The project initially attempted to build reservoir models based on different geologic and geophysical data independently using different tools, then to compare the results, and ultimately to integrate them all. We learned, however, that this strategy was impractical. The different data and tools need to be integrated from the beginning because they are all interrelated. This report describes a new approach to geostatistical modeling and presents an integration of geology and geophysics to explain the formation of the complex Coalinga reservoir.

  7. Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-233, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-233, 2010 EGU General Assembly 2010 © Author with the best available petrophysical and geophysical information at the time of development. Engineering fluid

  8. Overview of seismic panel activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bandyopadhyay, K.K.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In January 1991, the DOE-EM appointed a Seismic Panel to develop seismic criteria that can be used for evaluation of underground storage tanks containing high level radioactive wastes. The Panel expects to issue the first draft of the criteria report in January 1992. This paper provides an overview of the Panel's activities and briefly discusses the criteria. 3 refs.

  9. SEISMIC ATTENUATION FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel Walls; M.T. Taner; Naum Derzhi; Gary Mavko; Jack Dvorkin

    2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RSI has access to two synthetic seismic programs: Osiris seismic modeling system provided by Odegaard (Osiris) and synthetic seismic program, developed by SRB, implementing the Kennett method for normal incidence. Achieving virtually identical synthetic seismic traces from these different programs serves as cross-validation for both. The subsequent experiments have been performed with the Kennett normal incidence code because: We have access to the source code, which allowed us to easily control computational parameters and integrate the synthetics computations with our graphical and I/O systems. This code allows to perform computations and displays on a PC in MatLab or Octave environment, which is faster and more convenient. The normal incidence model allows us to exclude from the synthetic traces some of the physical effects that take place in 3-D models (like inhomogeneous waves) but have no relevance to the topic of our investigation, which is attenuation effects on seismic reflection and transmission.

  10. Seismic Design Expectations Report

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2Uranium Transfer to FundPreparedContinuingHearings »Seismic Design

  11. MULTIFRACTALS, GENERALIZED SCALE INVARIANCE AND COMPLEXITY IN GEOPHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovejoy, Shaun

    MULTIFRACTALS, GENERALIZED SCALE INVARIANCE AND COMPLEXITY IN GEOPHYSICS DANIEL SCHERTZER LEESU, Que. H3A 2T8, Canada lovejoy@physics.mcgill.ca Received The complexity of geophysics has been with anisotropy, which is rather ubiquitous in geophysics. Keywrods: multifractals, generalized scale invariance

  12. Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-8384, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-8384, 2010 EGU General Assembly 2010 © Author are known to be highly dependent on local site characteristics. Therefore combining geophysical meth- ods. In order to calibrate geophysical measurements, obser- vations of 130 boreholes (4 meters deep) were made

  13. Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-4993, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-4993, 2010 EGU General Assembly 2010 © Author(s) 2010 Geophysical observations at cavity collapse Philippe Jousset, Behrooz Bazargan-Sabet, François relate the variations of the brine pumping rate with the evolutions of the induced geophysical signals

  14. GEOPHYSICAL DETECTION OF UNDERGROUND CAVITIES DRIAD-LEBEAU1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    GEOPHYSICAL DETECTION OF UNDERGROUND CAVITIES DRIAD-LEBEAU1 Lynda, PIWAKOWSKI2 Bogdan, STYLES3 & Environmental Geophysics Research Group, School of Physical and Geographical Sciences, Keele University, UK; p.lataste@ghymac.u- bordeaux1.fr ABSTRACT: In this paper, we present a synthesis of the geophysical investigations conducted

  15. Syllabus: Applied Environmental Geophysics MGG 525 Fall 2011, 3 credits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    1 Syllabus: Applied Environmental Geophysics MGG 525 Fall 2011, 3 credits (Version 110824e) Instructor: Mark Grasmueck, Associate Professor Marine Geology and Geophysics RSMAS University of Miami Tel: The purpose of this course is to familiarize you with the fundamentals of near-surface geophysical site

  16. Uncertainty and Predictability in Geophysics: Chaos and Multifractal Insights

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovejoy, Shaun

    Uncertainty and Predictability in Geophysics: Chaos and Multifractal Insights Daniel Schertzer Department, McGill University, Montreal, Canada Uncertainty and error growth are crosscutting geophysical extremes. The focus is now on time-space geophysical scaling behavior: their multifractality. It is found

  17. Scale, scaling and multifractals in geophysics: twenty Shaun Lovejoy1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovejoy, Shaun

    Scale, scaling and multifractals in geophysics: twenty years on Shaun Lovejoy1 and Daniel Schertzer number of degrees of freedom approaches to nonlin- ear geophysics: a) the transition from fractal are generally necessary for geophysical applications. We illustrate these ideas with data analyses from both

  18. Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-4885, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-4885, 2010 EGU General Assembly 2010 © Author(s) 2010 The DIGISOIL multi-sensor system: from geophysical measurements to soil properties. Gilles geophysical technologies for answering this societal demand. To this aim, DIGISOIL addresses four issues

  19. 2 Geophysical Aspects of Non-Newtonian Fluid Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balmforth, Neil

    2 Geophysical Aspects of Non-Newtonian Fluid Mechanics N.J. Balmforth1 and R.V. Craster2 1 research, both for industrial fluid prob- lems and for applications elsewhere, notably geophysically and where this theory might be used in the geophysical contexts. 2.2 Microstructure and Macroscopic Fluid

  20. Nathan L. B. Bangs ADDRESS Institute for Geophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    Nathan L. B. Bangs ADDRESS Institute for Geophysics The University of Texas Pickle Research Campus@utig.ig.utexas.edu EDUCATION B.A. Williams College, 1983, Geology and Physics M.A. Columbia University, 1986, Marine Geophysics M. Phil. Columbia University, 1987, Marine Geophysics Ph.D. Columbia University, 1991, Marine

  1. DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS School of Ocean & Earth Science & Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS School of Ocean & Earth Science & Technology University of Hawaii at Manoa REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS The minor requires GG 101 (or 103) & 101L or GG 170, 200, and 11 credits hours of non-introductory Geology and Geophysics courses at the 300

  2. Preliminary Open File Report: Geological and Geophysical Studies in Grass Valley, Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beyer, H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of August 1976. Seismic Data and Preliminary InterpretationMethods Seismic Data and Prel iminary Interpretation

  3. SEISMIC INTERFEROMETRY FOR TEMPORAL MONITORING Norimitsu Nakata

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snieder, Roel

    SEISMIC INTERFEROMETRY FOR TEMPORAL MONITORING by Norimitsu Nakata #12;c Copyright by Norimitsu Seismic interferometry, where one computes coherency of waves between two or more receivers and averages from the first study related to seismic interferometry (although the name of seismic interferometry has

  4. Reservoir Characterization Using Intelligent Seismic Inversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    reservoir performance. Field Development #12;- Issues about the data and problems regarding data analysis characterization studies. - Inverse modeling of reservoir properties from the seismic data is known as seismic inversion. SEISMIC LOGS #12;1. Does a relationship exist between seismic data and reservoir characteristics

  5. Seismic stratigraphy and salt tectonics along the Sigsbee Escarpment, southeastern Green Canyon region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swiercz, Alan Mark

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1986 Major Subject: Geophysics SEISItllC STRATIGHAPHY AND SALT TECTONICS ALONG THE 'ilGSHEL' L'SCARPMENT. SOI. THEASTERX GREEN CANYON RFGION A Thesis ALAN MARK SWIERCZ Approved as to style and content by: Earl... R. Hoskins (Chairman of Committee) Robert J. McCabe (Member) Gr M. arberg (Member) AVilliam R. Bryant ('Member) j~/ Earl R. Hoskins (Head of Department) December 1986 ABSTRAC'T Seismic Stratigraphy and Salt Tectonics along the Sigsbee...

  6. Seismic event classification system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dowla, Farid U. (Castro Valley, CA); Jarpe, Stephen P. (Brentwood, CA); Maurer, William (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the computer interpretation of seismic data, the critical first step is to identify the general class of an unknown event. For example, the classification might be: teleseismic, regional, local, vehicular, or noise. Self-organizing neural networks (SONNs) can be used for classifying such events. Both Kohonen and Adaptive Resonance Theory (ART) SONNs are useful for this purpose. Given the detection of a seismic event and the corresponding signal, computation is made of: the time-frequency distribution, its binary representation, and finally a shift-invariant representation, which is the magnitude of the two-dimensional Fourier transform (2-D FFT) of the binary time-frequency distribution. This pre-processed input is fed into the SONNs. These neural networks are able to group events that look similar. The ART SONN has an advantage in classifying the event because the types of cluster groups do not need to be pre-defined. The results from the SONNs together with an expert seismologist's classification are then used to derive event classification probabilities.

  7. Seismic event classification system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dowla, F.U.; Jarpe, S.P.; Maurer, W.

    1994-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In the computer interpretation of seismic data, the critical first step is to identify the general class of an unknown event. For example, the classification might be: teleseismic, regional, local, vehicular, or noise. Self-organizing neural networks (SONNs) can be used for classifying such events. Both Kohonen and Adaptive Resonance Theory (ART) SONNs are useful for this purpose. Given the detection of a seismic event and the corresponding signal, computation is made of: the time-frequency distribution, its binary representation, and finally a shift-invariant representation, which is the magnitude of the two-dimensional Fourier transform (2-D FFT) of the binary time-frequency distribution. This pre-processed input is fed into the SONNs. These neural networks are able to group events that look similar. The ART SONN has an advantage in classifying the event because the types of cluster groups do not need to be pre-defined. The results from the SONNs together with an expert seismologist's classification are then used to derive event classification probabilities. 21 figures.

  8. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 27, NO. 22, PAGES 2615-3618, NOVEMBER 15, 2000 Geodetic network optimization for geophysical parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tingley, Joseph V.

    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 27, NO. 22, PAGES 2615-3618, NOVEMBER 15, 2000 3615 Geodetic network optimization for geophysical parameters Geoffrey Blewitt Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology is gener- alized here, to seek the network configuration that optimizes the precision of geophysical

  9. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 24, NO. 23, PAGES 3097-3100, DECEMBER 1, 1997 Applicability of wavelet algorithm for geophysical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasilyev, Oleg V.

    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 24, NO. 23, PAGES 3097-3100, DECEMBER 1, 1997 Applicability of wavelet algorithm for geophysical viscoelastic flow Oleg V. Vasilyev,1 David A. Yuen,2 and Yuri Yu. Podladchikov3 Abstract. This paper introduces a newly developed wavelet technique for modeling of geophysical

  10. Geology and Geophysics at the University of Utah Advisors for Undergraduate Geology & Geophysics Students (2014-15 academic year)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Cari

    Geology and Geophysics at the University of Utah Advisors for Undergraduate Geology & Geophysics Students (2014-15 academic year): General Academic Advising for Geology & Geophysics Majors ­ Ms. Judy for Geology Emphasis, Geoscience Major ­ Prof. Brenda Bowen (email: brenda.bowen@ utah.edu, office: 341 FASB

  11. Expedited Site Characterization Geophysics: Geophysical Methods and Tools for Site Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, N.E.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    APPLICATIONS Gamma-ray spectrometry is a tool for geologicGAMMA-RAY SPECTROMETRY .Seismic reflection • Gamma-ray • Metal-specific spectrometry

  12. Integrated system for seismic evaluations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, J.; Philippacopoulos, A.J.; Miller, C.A.; Costantino, C.J.; Graves, H.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the various features of the Seismic Module of the CARES system (Computer Analysis for Rapid Evaluation of Structures). This system was developed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to perform rapid evaluations of structural behavior and capability of nuclear power plant facilities. The CARES is structured in a modular format. Each module performs a specific type of analysis i.e., static or dynamic, linear or nonlinear, etc. This paper describes the features of the Seismic Module in particular. The development of the Seismic Module of the CARES system is based on an approach which incorporates all major aspects of seismic analysis currently employed by the industry into an integrated system that allows for carrying out interactively computations of structural response to seismic motions. The code operates on a PC computer system and has multi-graphics capabilities. It has been designed with user friendly features and it allows for interactive manipulation of various analysis phases during the seismic design process. The capabilities of the seismic module include (a) generation of artificial time histories compatible with given design ground response spectra, (b) development of Power Spectral Density (PSD) functions associated with the seismic input, (c) deconvolution analysis using vertically propagating shear waves through a given soil profile, and (d) development of in-structure response spectra or corresponding PSD's. It should be pointed out that these types of analyses can also be performed individually by using available computer codes such as FLUSH, SAP, etc. The uniqueness of the CARES, however, lies on its ability to perform all required phases of the seismic analysis in an integrated manner. 5 refs., 6 figs.

  13. Mine seismicity and the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiappetta, F. [Blasting Analysis International, Allentown, PA (United States); Heuze, F.; Walter, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Hopler, R. [Powderman Consulting Inc., Oxford, MD (United States); Hsu, V. [Air Force Technical Applications Center, Patrick AFB, FL (United States); Martin, B. [Thunder Basin Coal Co., Wright, WY (United States); Pearson, C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Stump, B. [Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States); Zipf, K. [Univ. of New South Wales (Australia)

    1998-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface and underground mining operations generate seismic ground motions which are created by chemical explosions and ground failures. It may come as a surprise to some that the ground failures (coal bumps, first caves, pillar collapses, rockbursts, etc.) can send signals whose magnitudes are as strong or stronger than those from any mining blast. A verification system that includes seismic, infrasound, hydroacoustic and radionuclide sensors is being completed as part of the CTBT. The largest mine blasts and ground failures will be detected by this system and must be identified as distinct from signals generated by small nuclear explosions. Seismologists will analyze the seismic records and presumably should be able to separate them into earthquake-like and non earthquake-like categories, using a variety of so-called seismic discriminants. Non-earthquake essentially means explosion- or implosion-like. Such signals can be generated not only by mine blasts but also by a variety of ground failures. Because it is known that single-fired chemical explosions and nuclear explosion signals of the same yield give very similar seismic records, the non-earthquake signals will be of concern to the Treaty verification community. The magnitude of the mine-related events is in the range of seismicity created by smaller nuclear explosions or decoupled tests, which are of particular concern under the Treaty. It is conceivable that legitimate mining blasts or some mine-induced ground failures could occasionally be questioned. Information such as shot time, location and design parameters may be all that is necessary to resolve the event identity. In rare instances where the legitimate origin of the event could not be resolved by a consultation and clarification procedure, it might trigger on On-Site Inspection (OSI). Because there is uncertainty in the precise location of seismic event as determined by the International Monitoring System (IMS), the OSI can cover an area of up to 1,000 squared kilometers. In active mining districts this area could include several different mining operations. So, an OSI could be disruptive both to the mining community and to the US Government which must host the foreign inspection team. Accordingly, it is in the best interest of all US parties to try and eliminate the possible occurrence of false alarms. This can be achieved primarily by reducing the ambiguity of mine-induced seismic signals, so that even if these remain visible to the IMS they are clearly consistent with recognizable mining patterns.

  14. annual hanford seismic: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the resulting distributions 5. Include the seismic hazard 64 Probabilistic seismic risk analysis of existing buildings in regions with moderate seismicity Physics...

  15. alternate seismic support: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the resulting distributions 5. Include the seismic hazard 76 Probabilistic seismic risk analysis of existing buildings in regions with moderate seismicity Physics...

  16. Non-Linear Seismic Soil Structure Interaction (SSI) Method for...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Non-Linear Seismic Soil Structure Interaction (SSI) Method for Developing Non-Linear Seismic SSI Analysis Techniques Non-Linear Seismic Soil Structure Interaction (SSI) Method for...

  17. Assessing Beyond Design Basis Seismic Events and Implications...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    on Seismic Risk Assessing Beyond Design Basis Seismic Events and Implications on Seismic Risk September 19, 2012 Presenter: Jeffrey Kimball, Technical Specialist (Seismologist)...

  18. SEISMIC ANALYSIS FOR PRECLOSURE SAFETY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.N. Lindner

    2004-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this seismic preclosure safety analysis is to identify the potential seismically-initiated event sequences associated with preclosure operations of the repository at Yucca Mountain and assign appropriate design bases to provide assurance of achieving the performance objectives specified in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 10 CFR Part 63 for radiological consequences. This seismic preclosure safety analysis is performed in support of the License Application for the Yucca Mountain Project. In more detail, this analysis identifies the systems, structures, and components (SSCs) that are subject to seismic design bases. This analysis assigns one of two design basis ground motion (DBGM) levels, DBGM-1 or DBGM-2, to SSCs important to safety (ITS) that are credited in the prevention or mitigation of seismically-initiated event sequences. An application of seismic margins approach is also demonstrated for SSCs assigned to DBGM-2 by showing a high confidence of a low probability of failure at a higher ground acceleration value, termed a beyond-design basis ground motion (BDBGM) level. The objective of this analysis is to meet the performance requirements of 10 CFR 63.111(a) and 10 CFR 63.111(b) for offsite and worker doses. The results of this calculation are used as inputs to the following: (1) A classification analysis of SSCs ITS by identifying potential seismically-initiated failures (loss of safety function) that could lead to undesired consequences; (2) An assignment of either DBGM-1 or DBGM-2 to each SSC ITS credited in the prevention or mitigation of a seismically-initiated event sequence; and (3) A nuclear safety design basis report that will state the seismic design requirements that are credited in this analysis. The present analysis reflects the design information available as of October 2004 and is considered preliminary. The evolving design of the repository will be re-evaluated periodically to ensure that seismic hazards are properly evaluated and identified. This document supersedes the seismic classifications, assignments, and computations in ''Seismic Analysis for Preclosure Safety'' (BSC 2004a).

  19. Seismicity and seismic stress in the Coso Range, Coso geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    seismic stress in the Coso Range, Coso geothermal field, and Indian Wells Valley region, Southeast-Central California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to...

  20. Seismic pulse propagation with constant Q and stable probability distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francesco Mainardi; Massimo Tomirotti

    2010-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The one-dimensional propagation of seismic waves with constant Q is shown to be governed by an evolution equation of fractional order in time, which interpolates the heat equation and the wave equation. The fundamental solutions for the Cauchy and Signalling problems are expressed in terms of entire functions (of Wright type) in the similarity variable and their behaviours turn out to be intermediate between those for the limiting cases of a perfectly viscous fluid and a perfectly elastic solid. In view of the small dissipation exhibited by the seismic pulses, the nearly elastic limit is considered. Furthermore, the fundamental solutions for the Cauchy and Signalling problems are shown to be related to stable probability distributions with index of stability determined by the order of the fractional time derivative in the evolution equation.

  1. INTEGRATING GEOLOGIC AND GEOPHYSICAL DATA THROUGH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Douglas W.

    INTEGRATING GEOLOGIC AND GEOPHYSICAL DATA THROUGH ADVANCED CONSTRAINED INVERSIONS by Peter George framework (i.e. minimization of an objective function). I developed several methods to reach this goal constraints to the inverse problem. Lastly, I developed an iterative procedure for cooperatively inverting

  2. Investigating the point seismic array concept with seismic rotation measurements.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbott, Robert E.; Aldridge, David Franklin

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spatially-distributed arrays of seismometers are often utilized to infer the speed and direction of incident seismic waves. Conventionally, individual seismometers of the array measure one or more orthogonal components of rectilinear particle motion (displacement, velocity, or acceleration). The present work demonstrates that measure of both the particle velocity vector and the particle rotation vector at a single point receiver yields sufficient information to discern the type (compressional or shear), speed, and direction of an incident plane seismic wave. Hence, the approach offers the intriguing possibility of dispensing with spatially-extended received arrays, with their many problematic deployment, maintenance, relocation, and post-acquisition data processing issues. This study outlines straightforward mathematical theory underlying the point seismic array concept, and implements a simple cross-correlation scanning algorithm for determining the azimuth of incident seismic waves from measured acceleration and rotation rate data. The algorithm is successfully applied to synthetic seismic data generated by an advanced finite-difference seismic wave propagation modeling algorithm. Application of the same azimuth scanning approach to data acquired at a site near Yucca Mountain, Nevada yields ambiguous, albeit encouraging, results. Practical issues associated with rotational seismometry are recognized as important, but are not addressed in this investigation.

  3. Downhole hydraulic seismic generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gregory, Danny L. (Corrales, NM); Hardee, Harry C. (Albuquerque, NM); Smallwood, David O. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A downhole hydraulic seismic generator system for transmitting energy wave vibrations into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system contains an elongated, unitary housing operably connected to a well head aboveground by support and electrical cabling, and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a hydraulic oscillator containing a double-actuating piston whose movement is controlled by an electro-servovalve regulating a high pressure hydraulic fluid flow into and out of upper and lower chambers surrounding the piston. The spent hydraulic fluid from the hydraulic oscillator is stored and pumped back into the system to provide high pressure fluid for conducting another run at the same, or a different location within the borehole.

  4. Near-surface neotectonic deformation associated with seismicity in the northeastern United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexander, S.S.; Gold, D.P.; Gardner, T.W.; Slingerland, R.L.; Thornton, C.P. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (USA). Dept. of Geosciences)

    1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the Lancaster, PA seismic zone a multifaceted investigation revealed several manifestations of near-surface, neotectonic deformation. Remote sensing data together with surface geological and geophysical observations, and recent seismicity reveal that the neotectonic deformation is concentrated in a NS-trending fault zone some 50 km in length and 10--20 km in width. Anomalies associated with this zone include distinctive lineament and surface erosional patterns; geologically recent uplift evidenced by elevations of stream terraces along the Susquehanna River; and localized contemporary travertine deposits in streams down-drainage from the inferred active fault zone. In the Moodus seismic zone the frequency of tectonically-controlled lineaments was observed to increase in the Moodus quadrangle compared to adjacent areas and dominant lineament directions were observed that are perpendicular and parallel to the orientation of the maximum horizontal stress direction (N80-85E) recently determined from in-situ stress measurements in a 1.5 km-deep borehole in the seismic zone and from well-constrained earthquake focal mechanisms. 284 refs., 33 figs.

  5. Highlights of the 2009 SEG summer research workshop on ""CO2 sequestration geophysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lumley, David [U. W. AUSTRALIA; Sherlock, Don [CHEVRON; Daley, Tom [LBNL; Lawton, Don [U CALGARY; Masters, Ron [SHELL; Verliac, Michel [SCHLUMBERGER; White, Don [GEOL. SURVEY CANADA

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2009 SEG Summer Research Workshop on 'CO{sub 2} Sequestration Geophysics' was held August 23-27, 2009 in Banff, Canada. The event was attended by over 100 scientists from around the world, which proved to be a remarkably successful turnout in the midst of the current global financial crisis and severe corporate travel restrictions. Attendees included SEG President Larry Lines (U. Calgary), and CSEG President John Downton (CGG Veritas), who joined SRW Chairman David Lumley (UWA) in giving the opening welcome remarks at the Sunday Icebreaker. The workshop was organized by an expert technical committee representing a good mix of industry, academic, and government research organizations. The format consisted of four days of technical sessions with over 60 talks and posters, plus an optional pre-workshop field trip to the Columbia Ice Fields to view firsthand the effects of global warming on the Athabasca glacier. Group technical discussion was encouraged by requiring each presenter to limit themselves to 15 minutes of presentation followed by a 15 minute open discussion period. Technical contributions focused on the current and future role of geophysics in CO{sub 2} sequestration, highlighting new research and field-test results with regard to site selection and characterization, monitoring and surveillance, using a wide array of geophysical techniques. While there are too many excellent contributions to mention all individually here, in this paper we summarize some of the key workshop highlights in order to propagate new developments to the SEG community at large.

  6. Highlights of the 2009 SEG summer research workshop on"CO2 Sequestration Geophysics"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lumley, D.; Sherlock, D.; Daley, T.; Huang, L.; Lawton, D.; Masters, R.; Verliac, M.; White, D.

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2009 SEG Summer Research Workshop on CO2 Sequestration Geophysics was held August 23-27, 2009 in Banff, Canada. The event was attended by over 100 scientists from around the world, which proved to be a remarkably successful turnout in the midst of the current global financial crisis and severe corporate travel restrictions. Attendees included SEG President Larry Lines (U. Calgary), and CSEG President John Downton (CGG Veritas), who joined SRW Chairman David Lumley (UWA) in giving the opening welcome remarks at the Sunday Icebreaker. The workshop was organized by an expert technical committee (see side bar) representing a good mix of industry, academic, and government research organizations. The format consisted of four days of technical sessions with over 60 talks and posters, plus an optional pre-workshop field trip to the Columbia Ice Fields to view firsthand the effects of global warming on the Athabasca glacier (Figures 1-2). Group technical discussion was encouraged by requiring each presenter to limit themselves to 15 minutes of presentation followed by a 15 minute open discussion period. Technical contributions focused on the current and future role of geophysics in CO2 sequestration, highlighting new research and field-test results with regard to site selection and characterization, monitoring and surveillance, using a wide array of geophysical techniques. While there are too many excellent contributions to mention all individually here, in this paper we summarize some of the key workshop highlights in order to propagate new developments to the SEG community at large.

  7. Seismic anisotropy of fractured rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Schoenberg, C. M. Sayers

    2000-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    of seismic anisotropy to determine the orientation of fracture sets is of ... this assumption of noninteraction does not imply that the ... conventional (2-subscript) condensed 6 x 6 matrix notation,. 11. 6, while ... have simple physical interpretations.

  8. Down hole periodic seismic generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hardee, Harry C. (Albuquerque, NM); Hills, Richard G. (Las Cruces, NM); Striker, Richard P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A down hole periodic seismic generator system for transmitting variable frequency, predominantly shear-wave vibration into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system comprises a unitary housing operably connected to a well head by support and electrical cabling and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a variable speed pneumatic oscillator and a self-contained pneumatic reservoir for producing a frequency-swept seismic output over a discrete frequency range.

  9. Advanced downhole periodic seismic generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hardee, Harry C. (Albuquerque, NM); Hills, Richard G. (Las Cruces, NM); Striker, Richard P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1991-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An advanced downhole periodic seismic generator system for transmitting variable frequency, predominantly shear-wave vibration into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system comprises a unitary housing operably connected to a well head by support and electrical cabling and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a variable speed pneumatic oscillator and a self-contained pneumatic reservoir for producing a frequency-swept seismic output over a discrete frequency range.

  10. Governance & Policies Effective: October 1997

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardy, Christopher R.

    Governance & Policies Effective: October 1997 University Governance DEANS' COUNCIL Approved: October 1997 Revised: November 22, 2006 University Provost The Deans' Council is an assembly of the chief

  11. Newberry Seismic Deployment Fieldwork Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, J; Templeton, D C

    2012-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the seismic deployment of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Geotech GS-13 short-period seismometers at the Newberry Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) Demonstration site located in Central Oregon. This Department of Energy (DOE) demonstration project is managed by AltaRock Energy Inc. AltaRock Energy had previously deployed Geospace GS-11D geophones at the Newberry EGS Demonstration site, however the quality of the seismic data was somewhat low. The purpose of the LLNL deployment was to install more sensitive sensors which would record higher quality seismic data for use in future seismic studies, such as ambient noise correlation, matched field processing earthquake detection studies, and general EGS microearthquake studies. For the LLNL deployment, seven three-component seismic stations were installed around the proposed AltaRock Energy stimulation well. The LLNL seismic sensors were connected to AltaRock Energy Gueralp CMG-DM24 digitizers, which are powered by AltaRock Energy solar panels and batteries. The deployment took four days in two phases. In phase I, the sites were identified, a cavity approximately 3 feet deep was dug and a flat concrete pad oriented to true North was made for each site. In phase II, we installed three single component GS-13 seismometers at each site, quality controlled the data to ensure that each station was recording data properly, and filled in each cavity with native soil.

  12. Development of a 400 Level 3C Clamped Downhole Seismic Receiver Array for 3D Borehole Seismic Imaging of Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bjorn N. P. Paulsson

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to perform high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology has been hampered by the lack of acquisition technology necessary to record large volumes of high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data. This project took aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array has removed the technical acquisition barrier for recording the data volumes necessary to do high resolution 3D VSP and 3D cross-well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that promise to take the gas industry to the next level in their quest for higher resolution images of deep and complex oil and gas reservoirs. Today only a fraction of the oil or gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of detailed compartmentalization of oil and gas reservoirs. In this project, we developed a 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array that allows for economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring. This new array has significantly increased the efficiency of recording large data volumes at sufficiently dense spatial sampling to resolve reservoir complexities. The receiver pods have been fabricated and tested to withstand high temperature (200 C/400 F) and high pressure (25,000 psi), so that they can operate in wells up to 7,620 meters (25,000 feet) deep. The receiver array is deployed on standard production or drill tubing. In combination with 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources, the 400 level receiver array can be used to obtain 3D 9C data. These 9C borehole seismic data provide both compressional wave and shear wave information that can be used for quantitative prediction of rock and pore fluid types. The 400-level borehole receiver array has been deployed successfully in a number of oil and gas wells during the course of this project, and each survey has resulted in marked improvements in imaging of geologic features that are critical for oil or gas production but were previously considered to be below the limits of seismic resolution. This added level of reservoir detail has resulted in improved well placement in the oil and gas fields that have been drilled using the Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} images. In the future, the 400-level downhole seismic receiver array is expected to continue to improve reservoir characterization and drilling success in deep and complex oil and gas reservoirs.

  13. College of Natural Science and Mathematics Department of Geology and Geophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartman, Chris

    gEophySicS College of Natural Science and Mathematics Department of Geology and Geophysics 907 credits The geophysics program at UAF specializes in several broad areas of re- search and is closely connected with the Geophysical Institute. Although much of the research conducted by geophysics faculty

  14. Multi-Attribute Seismic/Rock Physics Approach to Characterizing Fractured Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Mavko

    2004-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Most current seismic methods to seismically characterize fractures in tight reservoirs depend on a few anisotropic wave propagation signatures that can arise from aligned fractures. While seismic anisotropy can be a powerful fracture diagnostic, a number of situations can lessen its usefulness or introduce interpretation ambiguities. Fortunately, laboratory and theoretical work in rock physics indicates that a much broader spectrum of fracture seismic signatures can occur, including a decrease in P- and S-wave velocities, a change in Poisson's ratio, an increase in velocity dispersion and wave attenuation, as well as well as indirect images of structural features that can control fracture occurrence. The goal of this project was to demonstrate a practical interpretation and integration strategy for detecting and characterizing natural fractures in rocks. The approach was to exploit as many sources of information as possible, and to use the principles of rock physics as the link among seismic, geologic, and log data. Since no single seismic attribute is a reliable fracture indicator in all situations, the focus was to develop a quantitative scheme for integrating the diverse sources of information. The integrated study incorporated three key elements: The first element was establishing prior constraints on fracture occurrence, based on laboratory data, previous field observations, and geologic patterns of fracturing. The geologic aspects include analysis of the stratigraphic, structural, and tectonic environments of the field sites. Field observations and geomechanical analysis indicates that fractures tend to occur in the more brittle facies, for example, in tight sands and carbonates. In contrast, strain in shale is more likely to be accommodated by ductile flow. Hence, prior knowledge of bed thickness and facies architecture, calibrated to outcrops, are powerful constraints on the interpreted fracture distribution. Another important constraint is that fracturing is likely to be more intense near faults--sometimes referred to as the damaged zone. Yet another constraint, based on world-wide observations, is that the maximum likely fracture density increases with depth in a well-defined way. Defining these prior constrains has several benefits: they lead to a priori probability distributions of fractures, that are important for objective statistical integration; they limit the number of geologic hypotheses that need to be theoretically modeled; they provide plausible models for fracture distributions below the seismic resolution. The second element was theoretical rock physics modeling of optimal seismic attributes, including offset and azimuth dependence of traveltime, amplitude, and impedance signatures of anisotropic fractured rocks. The suggested workflow is to begin with an elastic earth model, based on well logs, theoretically add fractures to the likely facies as defined by the geologic prior information, and then compute synthetic seismic traces and attributes, including variations in P and S-wave velocities, Poisson's ratio, reflectivity, travel time, attenuation, and anisotropies of these parameters. This workflow is done in a Monte-Carlo fashion, yielding ranges of expected fracture signatures, and allowing realistic assessments of uncertainty to be honored. The third element was statistical integration of the geophysical data and prior constraints to map fracture intensity and orientations, along with uncertainties. A Bayesian framework was developed that allowed systematic integration of the prior constraints, the theoretical relations between fractures and their seismic signatures, and the various observed seismic observations. The integration scheme was successfully applied on an East Texas field site. The primary benefit from the study was the optimization and refinement of practical workflows for improved geophysical characterization of natural fractures and for quantifying the uncertainty of these interpretations. By presenting a methodology for integrating various types of information, the workflow will

  15. Canadian Seismic Agreement: Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wetmiller, R.J.; Lyons, J.A.; Shannon, W.E.; Munro, P.S.; Thomas, J.T.; Andrew, M.D.; Lamontagne, M.; Wong, C.; Drysdale, J.A.

    1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes activities undertaken by the Geophysics Division (GD) of the Geological Survey of Canada (GSC) during the period June 1986 to June 1987 and supported in part by the NRC agreement. The activities include ECTN and portable network developments, datalab developments, strong motion network developments and earthquake activity.

  16. Three-Dimensional Seismic Imaging of the Ryepatch Geothermal Reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feighner, Mark A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    support in the interpretation of the seismic and tomographicinterpretation is partially supported by the re- h s flection seismic

  17. Advanced Seismic Data Analysis Program (The Hot Pot Project), DOE Award: DE-EE0002839, Phase 1 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oski Energy, LLC,

    2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A five-line (23 mile) reflection- seismic survey was conducted at the Hot Pot geothermal prospect area in north-central Nevada under the USDOE (United States Department of Energy) Geothermal Technologies Program. The project objective was to utilize innovative seismic data processing, integrated with existing geological, geophysical and geochemical information, to identify high-potential drilling targets and to reduce drilling risk. Data acquisition and interpretation took place between October 2010 and April 2011. The first round of data processing resulted in large areas of relatively poor data, and obvious reflectors known from existing subsurface information either did not appear on the seismic profiles or appeared at the wrong depth. To resolve these issues, the velocity model was adjusted to include geologic input, and the lines were reprocessed. The resulting products were significantly improved, and additional detail was recovered within the high-velocity and in part acoustically isotropic basement. Features visible on the improved seismic images include interpreted low angle thrust faults within the Paleozoic Valmy Formation, which potentially are reactivated in the current stress field. Intermediate-depth wells are currently targeted to test these features. The seismic images also suggest the existence of Paleogene sedimentary and volcanic rocks which potentially may function as a near- surface reservoir, charged by deeper structures in Paleozoic rocks.

  18. Seismic Tomography: Definitions Lapo Boschi (lapo@erdw.ethz.ch)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boschi, Lapo

    Tomography Seismic tomography is the science of interpreting seismic measurements (seismograms) to derive; that is to say, solve the seismological inverse problem. Seismic data and their interpretation Seismic stationsSeismic Tomography: Definitions Lapo Boschi (lapo@erdw.ethz.ch) September 14, 2009 Seismic

  19. Geophysical monitoring and reactive transport modeling of ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Y.; Ajo-Franklin, J.B.; Spycher, N.; Hubbard, S.S.; Zhang, G.; Williams, K.H.; Taylor, J.; Fujita, Y.; Smith, R.

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation is the basis for a promising in-situ remediation method for sequestration of divalent radionuclide and trace metal ions. It has also been proposed for use in geotechnical engineering for soil strengthening applications. Monitoring the occurrence, spatial distribution, and temporal evolution of calcium carbonate precipitation in the subsurface is critical for evaluating the performance of this technology and for developing the predictive models needed for engineering application. In this study, we conducted laboratory column experiments using natural sediment and groundwater to evaluate the utility of geophysical (complex resistivity and seismic) sensing methods, dynamic synchrotron x-ray computed tomography (micro-CT), and reactive transport modeling for tracking ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation processes under site relevant conditions. Reactive transport modeling with TOUGHREACT successfully simulated the changes of the major chemical components during urea hydrolysis. Even at the relatively low level of urea hydrolysis observed in the experiments, the simulations predicted an enhanced calcium carbonate precipitation rate that was 3-4 times greater than the baseline level. Reactive transport modeling results, geophysical monitoring data and micro-CT imaging correlated well with reaction processes validated by geochemical data. In particular, increases in ionic strength of the pore fluid during urea hydrolysis predicted by geochemical modeling were successfully captured by electrical conductivity measurements and confirmed by geochemical data. The low level of urea hydrolysis and calcium carbonate precipitation suggested by the model and geochemical data was corroborated by minor changes in seismic P-wave velocity measurements and micro-CT imaging; the latter provided direct evidence of sparsely distributed calcium carbonate precipitation. Ion exchange processes promoted through NH{sub 4}{sup +} production during urea hydrolysis were incorporated in the model and captured critical changes in the major metal species. The electrical phase increases were potentially due to ion exchange processes that modified charge structure at mineral/water interfaces. Our study revealed the potential of geophysical monitoring for geochemical changes during urea hydrolysis and the advantages of combining multiple approaches to understand complex biogeochemical processes in the subsurface.

  20. Florida Atlantic University Student Government

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    and responsibilities designated by the Student Government Constitution and this Chapter of the Student Body Statutes

  1. A geophysical shock and air blast simulator at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fournier, K. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brown, C. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); May, M. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Compton, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Walton, O. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Shingleton, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kane, J. O. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Holtmeier, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Loey, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mirkarimi, P. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dunlop, W. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Guyton, R. L. [National Security Technologies, Livermore, CA (United States); Huffman, E. [National Security Technologies, Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy partitioning energy coupling experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have been designed to measure simultaneously the coupling of energy from a laser-driven target into both ground shock and air blast overpressure to nearby media. The source target for the experiment is positioned at a known height above the ground-surface simulant and is heated by four beams from the NIF. The resulting target energy density and specific energy are equal to those of a low-yield nuclear device. The ground-shock stress waves and atmospheric overpressure waveforms that result in our test system are hydrodynamically scaled analogs of full-scale seismic and air blast phenomena. This report summarizes the development of the platform, the simulations, and calculations that underpin the physics measurements that are being made, and finally the data that were measured. Agreement between the data and simulation of the order of a factor of two to three is seen for air blast quantities such as peak overpressure. Historical underground test data for seismic phenomena measured sensor displacements; we measure the stresses generated in our ground-surrogate medium. We find factors-of-a-few agreement between our measured peak stresses and predictions with modern geophysical computer codes.

  2. A geophysical shock and air blast simulator at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fournier, K. B.; Brown, C. G.; May, M. J.; Compton, S.; Walton, O. R.; Shingleton, N.; Kane, J. O.; Holtmeier, G.; Loey, H.; Mirkarimi, P. B.; Dunlop, W. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-481, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Guyton, R. L.; Huffman, E. [National Securities Technologies, Vasco Rd., Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy partitioning energy coupling experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have been designed to measure simultaneously the coupling of energy from a laser-driven target into both ground shock and air blast overpressure to nearby media. The source target for the experiment is positioned at a known height above the ground-surface simulant and is heated by four beams from the NIF. The resulting target energy density and specific energy are equal to those of a low-yield nuclear device. The ground-shock stress waves and atmospheric overpressure waveforms that result in our test system are hydrodynamically scaled analogs of full-scale seismic and air blast phenomena. This report summarizes the development of the platform, the simulations, and calculations that underpin the physics measurements that are being made, and finally the data that were measured. Agreement between the data and simulation of the order of a factor of two to three is seen for air blast quantities such as peak overpressure. Historical underground test data for seismic phenomena measured sensor displacements; we measure the stresses generated in our ground-surrogate medium. We find factors-of-a-few agreement between our measured peak stresses and predictions with modern geophysical computer codes.

  3. Unified geophysical and geological 3-D Earth models Colin Farquharson, Peter Leli`evre, and Charles Hurich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farquharson, Colin G.

    Unified geophysical and geological 3-D Earth models Colin Farquharson, Peter Leli`evre, and Charles and geophysics. Outline Geological models Geophysical models and numerical modelling Rectilinear grids vs triangles. Can capture arbitrarily complicated subsurface contacts. #12;Geophysical models: rectilinear

  4. Governance & Policies Effective: 1997

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardy, Christopher R.

    stakeholders, review, evaluate, and recommend changes, adjustments, and updates to the General EducationGovernance & Policies Effective: 1997 Faculty Senate General Education Review Committee Approved of the term. 2. Faculty Representatives: Two members from each of the four academic units (Education

  5. Governance and Environmental Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in their adoption of environmental protection and natural resource conservation policies? · If variation in cityGovernance and Environmental Sustainability Ann Bowman Kennedy Chair at the Bush School #12;Outline Policymakers and specific environmental media Implementation Local communities and multi- media #12

  6. Machine Learning for Seismic Signal Processing: Seismic Phase Classification on a Manifold

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Francois

    Machine Learning for Seismic Signal Processing: Seismic Phase Classification on a Manifold Juan--In this research, we consider the supervised learning problem of seismic phase classification. In seismology, knowledge of the seismic activity arrival time and phase leads to epicenter localization and surface

  7. Probabilistic seismic risk analysis of existing buildings in regions with moderate seismicity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Probabilistic seismic risk analysis of existing buildings in regions with moderate seismicity C to apply an approach based on risk for the seismic assessment of existing buildings. In this innovative analytical seismic assessment methods, as the ratio between the capacity and the requirement of the current

  8. Seismic vulnerability analysis of moderate seismicity areas using in situ experimental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Seismic vulnerability analysis of moderate seismicity areas using in situ experimental techniques (LGIT), LCPC, CNRS, Université Joseph Fourier Grenoble Abstract Seismic vulnerability analysis. This curve is particularly interesting in moderate seismic areas. This methodology is applied to the Grenoble

  9. Radiated seismic energy from coda measurements and no scaling in apparent stress with seismic moment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prieto, Germán A.

    Radiated seismic energy from coda measurements and no scaling in apparent stress with seismic March 2010; accepted 9 April 2010; published 31 August 2010. [1] The seismic coda consists of scattered of radiated wave energy. We apply an empirical Green's function (EGF) method to the seismic coda in order

  10. Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory general circulation model investigation of the indirect radiative effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Lynn

    Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory general circulation model investigation of the indirect Corporation for Atmospheric Research, Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey, USA V. Ramaswamy, Paul A. Ginoux, and Larry W. Horowitz Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton, New

  11. Geophysical Prospecting 31,265-292, 1983. REFLECTION OF ELASTIC WAVES FROM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Juan

    Geophysical Prospecting 31,265-292, 1983. REFLECTION OF ELASTIC WAVES FROM PERIODICALLY STRATIFIED from Periodically Stratified Media with Interfacial Slip, Geophysical Prospecting 31 phase propagation in some other direction. INTRODUCTION Geophysical media often exhibit anisotropic

  12. Highlights of the 2009 SEG summer research workshop on "CO2 Sequestration Geophysics"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lumley, D.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on “CO 2 Sequestration Geophysics” David Lumley (U. W.on “CO 2 Sequestration Geophysics” was held August 23-27,sequestration: Model Studies: Geophysics, 73, WA105-WA112.

  13. Geophysical constraints on contaminant transport modeling in a heterogeneous fluvial aquifer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Chunmiao

    Geophysical constraints on contaminant transport modeling in a heterogeneous fluvial aquifer Jerry the geophysically derived hydraulic conductivity representation in numerical simulations of the natural the effectiveness of geophysically derived and flowmeter based representations of the hydraulic conductivity field

  14. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Mapping seismic anisotropy using harmonic1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levin, Vadim

    . J. Park N. Piana Agostinetti V. Levin Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, CNT, Rome4 Yale University, CT, USA5 Rutgers University, NJ, USA6 Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia

  15. A Feasibility Study of Non-Seismic Geophysical Methods for Monitoring Geologic CO2 Sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gasperikova, Erika; Hoversten, G. Michael

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    combined CO 2 enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and sequestrationis introduced for enhanced oil/gas recovery or for geologic

  16. Seismic Attribute Analysis Using Higher Order Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenidge, Janelle Candice

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Seismic data processing depends on mathematical and statistical tools such as convolution, crosscorrelation and stack that employ second-order statistics (SOS). Seismic signals are non-Gaussian and therefore contain information beyond SOS. One...

  17. Calibration of Seismic Attributes for Reservoir Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pennington, Wayne D.

    2002-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is intended to enhance the ability to use seismic data for the determination of rock and fluid properties through an improved understanding of the physics underlying the relationships between seismic attributes and formation.

  18. Evaluation of strategies for seismic design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsertikidou, Despoina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current trends in seismic design require a new approach, oriented in satisfying motion related design requirements and limiting both structural and non-structural damage. Seismic isolation and damping devices are currently ...

  19. Seismic imaging using higher order statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivasan, Karthik

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Improvements in seismic resolution beyond typical seismic wavelength will have significant implications for hydrocarbon exploration and production. Conventional imaging algorithms can be derived as a least squared optimization problem in which...

  20. Geophysical investigation, Salmon Site, Lamar County, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geophysical surveys were conducted in 1992 and 1993 on 21 sites at the Salmon Site (SS) located in Lamar County, Mississippi. The studies are part of the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) being conducted by IT Corporation for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). During the 1960s, two nuclear devices and two chemical tests were detonated 826 meters (in) (2710 feet [ft]) below the ground surface in the salt dome underlying the SS. These tests were part of the Vela Uniform Program conducted to improve the United States capability to detect, identify, and locate underground nuclear detonations. The RI/FS is being conducted to determine if any contamination is migrating from the underground shot cavity in the salt dome and if there is any residual contamination in the near surface mud and debris disposal pits used during the testing activities. The objective of the surface geophysical surveys was to locate buried debris, disposal pits, and abandoned mud pits that may be present at the site. This information will then be used to identify the locations for test pits, cone penetrometer tests, and drill hole/monitor well installation. The disposal pits were used during the operation of the test site in the 1960s. Vertical magnetic gradient (magnetic gradient), electromagnetic (EM) conductivity, and ground-penetrating radar (GPR) surveys were used to accomplish these objectives. A description of the equipment used and a theoretical discussion of the geophysical methods are presented Appendix A. Because of the large number of figures relative to the number of pages of text, the geophysical grid-location maps, the contour maps of the magnetic-gradient data, the contour maps of the EM conductivity data, and the GPR traverse location maps are located in Appendix B, Tabs I through 22. In addition, selected GPR records are located in Appendix C.

  1. Treatise on Geophysics, 2nd Edition 00 (2014) 141 To appear in Treatise on Geophysics, 2nd Edition, Eds. T. Spohn & G. Schubert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Treatise on Geophysics, 2nd Edition 00 (2014) 1­41 To appear in Treatise on Geophysics, 2nd Edition Author manuscript, published in "Treatise on Geophysics, 2nd edition, G. Schubert, T. Spohn (Ed.) (2014) in press" #12;T. Guillot & D. Gautier / Treatise on Geophysics, 2nd Edition 00 (2014) 1­41 2 Contents 1

  2. SEISMIC IMAGING WITH THE GENERALIZED RADON ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    SEISMIC IMAGING WITH THE GENERALIZED RADON. TRANSFORM AND DOUBLE BEAMFORMING: A CURVELET. TRANSFORM PERSPECTIVE. M V DE ...

  3. Development of a HT Seismic Tool

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The program objective is to design; fabricate and field test two high temperature (HT) seismic tools in an EGS application.

  4. NMSLO Application for Permit to Conduct Geophysical Exploration...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: NMSLO Application for Permit to Conduct Geophysical Exploration on Unleased State LandsLegal Published NA Year...

  5. Advanced 3D Geophysical Imaging Technologies for Geothermal Resource Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Haijiang

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the ongoing development of joint geophysical imaging methodologies for geothermal site characterization and demonstrate their potential in two regions: Krafla volcano and associated geothermal fields in ...

  6. Merging High Resolution Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys to...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Buttes, Oregon Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Merging High Resolution Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys to Reduce...

  7. An Initial Value of Information (VOI) Framework for Geophysical...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Geothermal Energy Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: An Initial Value of Information (VOI) Framework for Geophysical...

  8. Geophysical Investigation and Assessment of the Rye Patch Known...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area, Rye Patch, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Dissertation: Geophysical Investigation and Assessment of the Rye Patch Known...

  9. A Conceptual Model Approach to the Geophysical Exploration of...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    approach is particularly effective in geothermal exploration because it promotes the interpretation of geophysics in the context of this wider range of geoscience information....

  10. Advanced 3D Geophysical Imaging Technologies for Geothermal Resource Characterization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. This project aims to develop improved geophysical imaging method for characterizing subsurface structure, identify fluid locations, and characterize fractures.

  11. Merging high resolution geophysical and geochemical surveys to...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Merging high resolution geophysical and geochemical surveys to reduce exploration risk at Glass Buttes, Oregon Patrick Walsh Ormat Nevada Inc. Innovative technologies May 19, 2010...

  12. Impact of seismic resolution on geostatistical techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukerji, T.; Rio, P.; Mavko, G.M.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Seismic measurements are often incorporated in geostatistical techniques for estimation and simulation of petrophysical properties such as porosity. The good correlation between seismic and rock properties provides a basis for these techniques. Seismic data have a wide spatial coverage not available in log or core data. However, each seismic measurement has a characteristic response function determined by the source-receiver geometry and signal bandwidth. The image response of the seismic measurement gives a filtered version of the true velocity image. Therefore the seismic image we obtain cannot reflect exactly the true seismic velocity at all scales of spatial heterogeneities present in the earth. The seismic response function can be conveniently approximated in the spatial spectral domain using a Born approximation. Our goal is to study how the seismic image response affects the estimation of variograms and spatial scales, and its impact on geostatistical results. Limitations of view angles and signal bandwidth not only smoothes the seismic image, increasing the variogram range, but can also introduce anisotropic spatial structures in the image. We can add value to the seismic data by better characterizing an quantifying these attributes. As an exercise we present example of seismically assisted cosimulation of porosity between wells.

  13. April 22, 2010 Seismic Reflection VI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ito, Garrett

    4/21/2010 1 GG450 April 22, 2010 Seismic Reflection VI Data Interpretation II Today's material section Chrono- stratigraphic section Relations of strata to boundaries of a depositional sequence Seismic stratigraphic reflection terminations within an idealized seismic sequence Reflection configurations #12

  14. Seismic, shock, and vibration isolation - 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, H. (Argonne National Lab., Argonne, IL (US)); Mostaghel, N. (Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (US))

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book contains papers presented at a conference on pressure vessels and piping. Topics covered include: Design of R-FBI bearings for seismic isolation; Benefits of vertical and horizontal seismic isolation for LMR nuclear reactor units; and Some remarks on the use and perspectives of seismic isolation for fast reactors.

  15. BOOK REVIEW Seismic Communication and Adventure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Munshi-South, Jason

    BOOK REVIEW Seismic Communication and Adventure Among African Elephants The Elephant's Secret Sense in Namibia as she first develops the hypothesis that elephants can communicate using seismic signals. Science documenting the elephants' listening behavior and responses to seismic cues. However, these scientific

  16. SEISMIC VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT USING AMBIENT VIBRATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    SEISMIC VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT USING AMBIENT VIBRATIONS: METHOD AND VALIDATION Clotaire Michel, France cmichel@obs.ujf-grenoble.fr Abstract Seismic vulnerability in wide areas is usually assessed like USA or Italy. France is a country with moderate seismicity so that it requires lower-cost methods

  17. SEISMIC MONITORING OF CARBON DIOXIDE FLUID FLOW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Juan

    SEISMIC MONITORING OF CARBON DIOXIDE FLUID FLOW J. E. Santos1, G. B. Savioli2, J. M. Carcione3, D´e, Argentina SEISMIC MONITORING OF CARBON DIOXIDE FLUID FLOW ­ p. #12;Introduction. I Storage of CO2). SEISMIC MONITORING OF CARBON DIOXIDE FLUID FLOW ­ p. #12;Introduction. II CO2 is separated from natural

  18. OSI Passive Seismic Experiment at the Former Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sweeney, J J; Harben, P

    2010-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    On-site inspection (OSI) is one of the four verification provisions of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). Under the provisions of the CTBT, once the Treaty has entered into force, any signatory party can request an on-site inspection, which can then be carried out after approval (by majority voting) of the Executive Council. Once an OSI is approved, a team of 40 inspectors will be assembled to carry out an inspection to ''clarify whether a nuclear weapon test explosion or any other nuclear explosion has been carried out in violation of Article I''. One challenging aspect of carrying out an on-site inspection (OSI) in the case of a purported underground nuclear explosion is to detect and locate the underground effects of an explosion, which may include an explosion cavity, a zone of damaged rock, and/or a rubble zone associated with an underground collapsed cavity. The CTBT (Protocol, Section II part D, paragraph 69) prescribes several types of geophysical investigations that can be carried out for this purpose. One of the methods allowed by the CTBT for geophysical investigation is referred to in the Treaty Protocol as ''resonance seismometry''. This method, which was proposed and strongly promoted by Russia during the Treaty negotiations, is not described in the Treaty. Some clarification about the nature of the resonance method can be gained from OSI workshop presentations by Russian experts in the late 1990s. Our understanding is that resonance seismometry is a passive method that relies on seismic reverberations set up in an underground cavity by the passage of waves from regional and teleseismic sources. Only a few examples of the use of this method for detection of underground cavities have been presented, and those were done in cases where the existence and precise location of an underground cavity was known. As is the case with many of the geophysical methods allowed during an OSI under the Treaty, how resonance seismology really works and its effectiveness for OSI purposes has yet to be determined. For this experiment, we took a broad approach to the definition of ''resonance seismometry''; stretching it to include any means that employs passive seismic methods to infer the character of underground materials. In recent years there have been a number of advances in the use of correlation and noise analysis methods in seismology to obtain information about the subsurface. Our objective in this experiment was to use noise analysis and correlation analysis to evaluate these techniques for detecting and characterizing the underground damage zone from a nuclear explosion. The site that was chosen for the experiment was the Mackerel test in Area 4 of the former Nevada Test Site (now named the Nevada National Security Site, or NNSS). Mackerel was an underground nuclear test of less than 20 kT conducted in February of 1964 (DOENV-209-REV 15). The reason we chose this site is because there was a known apical cavity occurring at about 50 m depth above a rubble zone, and that the site had been investigated by the US Geological Survey with active seismic methods in 1965 (Watkins et al., 1967). Note that the time delay between detonation of the explosion (1964) and the time of the present survey (2010) is nearly 46 years - this would not be typical of an expected OSI under the CTBT.

  19. Marine Geophysical Researches 20: 403423, 1998. 1998 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    Marine Geophysical Researches 20: 403­423, 1998. © 1998 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed Abstract Recent multibeam bathymetric and geophysical data recorded in the West Philippine Basin, east

  20. 2013 American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. High resolution imaging of the melt distribution in 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    © 2013 American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. High resolution imaging of the melt;© 2013 American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. Abstract We determine the 3-D melt geometry

  1. Publications of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology University of Hawaii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Publications of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology University of Hawaii 2011 1 (2011). Lunar swirls: Examining crustal magnetic anomalies and space weathering trends. J. Geophysics

  2. Publications of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology University of Hawaii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Publications of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology University of Hawaii 2000 1 Sensing Volcanism, Remote Sensing of Active Volcanism, AGU Geophysical Monograph Series 116, Mouginis

  3. Use of Geophysical Techniques to Characterize Fluid Flow in a Geothermal Reservoir

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objectives: Joint inversion of geophysical data for ground water flow imaging; Reduced the cost in geothermal exploration and monitoring; & Combined passive and active geophysical methods.

  4. NATIONAL GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE, HYDERABAD, INDIA. Induction Workshop: (18 -23 October, 2004)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harinarayana, T.

    . 13. Open session · Venue:: National Geophysical Research Institute (An ISO 9001 Organisation in different sectors of the Himalaya. #12;· Venue:: National Geophysical Research Institute (An ISO 9001

  5. Time-lapse Joint Inversion of Geophysical Data and its Applications...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Time-lapse Joint Inversion of Geophysical Data and its Applications to Geothermal Prospecting Time-lapse Joint Inversion of Geophysical Data and its Applications to Geothermal...

  6. DALHOUSIE UNIVERSITY, DEPARTMENT OF EARTH SCIENCES Assistant Professor -Geophysics, Sedimentology, or Geochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brownstone, Rob

    DALHOUSIE UNIVERSITY, DEPARTMENT OF EARTH SCIENCES Assistant Professor - Geophysics, Sedimentology position in Geophysics, Sedimentology, or Geochemistry. The appointment is probationary tenure

  7. Seismic Performance Requirements for WETF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hans Jordan

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report develops recommendations for requirements on the Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility (WETF) performance during seismic events. These recommendations are based on fragility estimates of WETF structures, systems, and components that were developed by LANL experts during facility walkdowns. They follow DOE guidance as set forth in standards DOE-STD-1021-93, ''Natural Phenomena Hazards Performance Categorization Guidelines for Structures, Systems, and Components'' and DOE-STD-1020-94, ''Natural Phenomena Hazards Design and Evaluation Criteria for Department of Energy Facilities''. Major recommendations are that WETF institute a stringent combustible loading control program and that additional seismic bracing and anchoring be provided for gloveboxes and heavy equipment.

  8. Valuation of Government Policies and Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucas, Deborah J.

    Governments play a central role in the allocation of capital and risk in the economy. Evaluating the cost to taxpayers of government investments requires an assumption about the government’s cost of capital. Governments ...

  9. Project EARTH-13-SHELL4: The geological significance of seismic anisotropy of fine-grained sedimentary sequences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    hydrocarbon accumulations or for CO2 storage sites, and increasingly as reservoirs for shale gas plays. Seismic data can help elucidate systematic variations in critical physical parameters governing the fluid-azimuth anisotropy data. The anisotropy is an output from the velocity analysis but there seems to be only a weak

  10. Corporate governance and banking regulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander, Kern

    The globalisation of banking markets has raised important issues regarding corporate governance regulation for banking institutions. This research paper addresses some of the major issues of corporate governance as it relates to banking regulation...

  11. Fuel storage basin seismic analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanjilal, S.K.; Winkel, B.V.

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 105-KE and 105-KW Fuel Storage Basins were constructed more than 35 years ago as repositories for irradiated fuel from the K East and K West Reactors. Currently, the basins contain irradiated fuel from the N Reactor. To continue to use the basins as desired, seismic adequacy in accordance with current US Department of Energy facility requirements must be demonstrated. The 105-KE and 105-KW Basins are reinforced concrete, belowground reservoirs with a 16-ft water depth. The entire water retention boundary, which currently includes a portion of the adjacent reactor buildings, must be qualified for the Hanford Site design basis earthquake. The reactor building interface joints are sealed against leakage with rubber water stops. Demonstration of the seismic adequacy of these interface joints was initially identified as a key issue in the seismic qualification effort. The issue of water leakage through seismicly induced cracks was also investigated. This issue, coupled with the relatively complex geometry of the basins, dictated a need for three-dimensional modeling. A three-dimensional soil/structure interaction model was developed with the SASSI computer code. The development of three-dimensional models of the interfacing structures using the ANSYS code was also found to be necessary. 8 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  12. SEISMIC ATTENUATION FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel Walls; M.T. Taner; Naum Derzhi; Gary Mavko; Jack Dvorkin

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed and tested technology for a new type of direct hydrocarbon detection. The method uses inelastic rock properties to greatly enhance the sensitivity of surface seismic methods to the presence of oil and gas saturation. These methods include use of energy absorption, dispersion, and attenuation (Q) along with traditional seismic attributes like velocity, impedance, and AVO. Our approach is to combine three elements: (1) a synthesis of the latest rock physics understanding of how rock inelasticity is related to rock type, pore fluid types, and pore microstructure, (2) synthetic seismic modeling that will help identify the relative contributions of scattering and intrinsic inelasticity to apparent Q attributes, and (3) robust algorithms that extract relative wave attenuation attributes from seismic data. This project provides: (1) Additional petrophysical insight from acquired data; (2) Increased understanding of rock and fluid properties; (3) New techniques to measure reservoir properties that are not currently available; and (4) Provide tools to more accurately describe the reservoir and predict oil location and volumes. These methodologies will improve the industry's ability to predict and quantify oil and gas saturation distribution, and to apply this information through geologic models to enhance reservoir simulation. We have applied for two separate patents relating to work that was completed as part of this project.

  13. Geology and Geophysics College of Science code-BS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kihara, Daisuke

    Geology and Geophysics College of Science code-BS Code-GEOP 120 Credits "C-"or better required Geology Field Experience (summer) (3) Science/Engineering Elective (2xxxx or above) (3) Science ******************************************************************************************************************************** (effective Fall 2013) #12;Geology and Geophysics http

  14. Geology and Geophysics College of Science code-BS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kihara, Daisuke

    Geology and Geophysics College of Science code-BS Code-GEOP 120 Credits "C-"or better required Professional Elective (3xxxx and above) (6) EAPS 49000 Geology Field Experience (summer) (3) Science ******************************************************************************************************************************** (effective Fall 2013) #12;Geology and Geophysics Fall 2014 Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary

  15. PETER LEE OLSON Present Position: Professor of Geophysical Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olson, Peter L.

    Power Plant Siting Program Scientific Steering Panel, NASA GRM mission University Corporation of California, Berkeley, California M.A. Geophysics, June 1974, University of California, Berkeley, California B of California, Berkeley (1980) Assistant Professor of Geophysical Fluid Dynamics, Johns Hopkins University

  16. PETER LEE OLSON Present Position: Professor of Geophysical Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olson, Peter L.

    Union, Tectonophysics Section Scientific Advisory Board, Maryland Power Plant Siting Program Scientific Dynamics EDUCATION: Ph.D. Geophysics, June 1977, University of California, Berkeley, California M.A. Geophysics, June 1974, University of California, Berkeley, California B.A. Geology, June 1972, University

  17. PETER LEE OLSON Present Position: Professor of Geophysical Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olson, Peter L.

    Union, Tectonophysics Section Scientific Advisory Board, Maryland Power Plant Siting Program Scientific of California, Berkeley, California M.A. Geophysics, June 1974, University of California, Berkeley, California B of California, Berkeley (1980) Assistant Professor of Geophysical Fluid Dynamics, Johns Hopkins University

  18. Numerical Simulation in Applied Geophysics. From the Mesoscale to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Juan

    Numerical Simulation in Applied Geophysics. From the Mesoscale to the Macroscale Juan E. Santos Numerical Simulation in Applied Geophysics. From the Mesoscale to the Macroscale ­ p. #12;Introduction. I layering, fractures and craks at the mesoscale (on the order of centimeters) are common in the earth

  19. Government Funding Opportunity Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental AssessmentsGeoffrey(SC) GettingGit GitGlobalGoldenGovernment

  20. Unied States Government

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona,Site Operations Guide Doc.5 R A DUnied States Government

  1. Large natural geophysical events: planetary planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knox, J.B.; Smith, J.V.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geological and geophysical data suggest that during the evolution of the earth and its species, that there have been many mass extinctions due to large impacts from comets and large asteroids, and major volcanic events. Today, technology has developed to the stage where we can begin to consider protective measures for the planet. Evidence of the ecological disruption and frequency of these major events is presented. Surveillance and warning systems are most critical to develop wherein sufficient lead times for warnings exist so that appropriate interventions could be designed. The long term research undergirding these warning systems, implementation, and proof testing is rich in opportunities for collaboration for peace.

  2. Seismic Volume Visualization for Horizon Extraction Daniel Patel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    present a novel system for rapidly interpret- ing and visualizing seismic volumetric data. First we to seismic data interpretation. Keywords: Seismic interpretation, Seismic horizons, Volume ren- dering hydrocarbons are trapped. In this paper we present a system for rapid interpretation of seismic reflection

  3. Seismic Isolation Working Meeting Gap Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Justin Coleman; Piyush Sabharwall

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ultimate goal in nuclear facility and nuclear power plant operations is operating safety during normal operations and maintaining core cooling capabilities during off-normal events including external hazards. Understanding the impact external hazards, such as flooding and earthquakes, have on nuclear facilities and NPPs is critical to deciding how to manage these hazards to expectable levels of risk. From a seismic risk perspective the goal is to manage seismic risk. Seismic risk is determined by convolving the seismic hazard with seismic fragilities (capacity of systems, structures, and components (SSCs)). There are large uncertainties associated with evolving nature of the seismic hazard curves. Additionally there are requirements within DOE and potential requirements within NRC to reconsider updated seismic hazard curves every 10 years. Therefore opportunity exists for engineered solutions to manage this seismic uncertainty. One engineered solution is seismic isolation. Current seismic isolation (SI) designs (used in commercial industry) reduce horizontal earthquake loads and protect critical infrastructure from the potentially destructive effects of large earthquakes. The benefit of SI application in the nuclear industry is being recognized and SI systems have been proposed, in the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) 4 standard, to be released in 2014, for Light Water Reactors (LWR) facilities using commercially available technology. However, there is a lack of industry application to the nuclear industry and uncertainty with implementing the procedures outlined in ASCE-4. Opportunity exists to determine barriers associated with implementation of current ASCE-4 standard language.

  4. BDGEOS :The geophysical data base at SHOM (Service Hydrographiqueet OcCanographique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brest, Université de

    BDGEOS :The geophysical data base at SHOM (Service Hydrographiqueet OcCanographique -dela Marine) M-mail :ribaud@ysecafr Abstract - A Geophysical Data Base (BDGEOS) has been developped at EPSHOM to come up~esand from geophysical surveys or are interpreted and modelled data bases wati0d Geophysical ~ ~ t a values

  5. CURRICULUM VITAE TARJE NISSEN-MEYER address: ETH Zurich, Institute of Geophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nissen-Meyer, Tarje

    CURRICULUM VITAE TARJE NISSEN-MEYER address: ETH Zurich, Institute of Geophysics Sonneggstrasse 5: ++41 (0) 44 633 3154 fax: ++41 (0) 44 633 1065 AUGUST 5, 2010 Education 2007 Ph.D. Geophysics in field geology, mathematics, seismology, geodynamics, geophysics 2001 Diplom Geophysics (M

  6. New perspectives on superparameterization for geophysical turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majda, Andrew J. [Center for Atmosphere Ocean Science, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, 251 Mercer St., New York, NY 10012 (United States); Center for Prototype Climate Modelling, NYU Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Grooms, Ian, E-mail: grooms@cims.nyu.edu [Center for Atmosphere Ocean Science, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, 251 Mercer St., New York, NY 10012 (United States)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a research expository paper regarding superparameterization, a class of multi-scale numerical methods designed to cope with the intermittent multi-scale effects of inhomogeneous geophysical turbulence where energy often inverse-cascades from the unresolved scales to the large scales through the effects of waves, jets, vortices, and latent heat release from moist processes. Original as well as sparse space–time superparameterization algorithms are discussed for the important case of moist atmospheric convection including the role of multi-scale asymptotic methods in providing self-consistent constraints on superparameterization algorithms and related deterministic and stochastic multi-cloud parameterizations. Test models for the statistical numerical analysis of superparameterization algorithms are discussed both to elucidate the performance of the basic algorithms and to test their potential role in efficient multi-scale data assimilation. The very recent development of grid-free seamless stochastic superparameterization methods for geophysical turbulence appropriate for “eddy-permitting” mesoscale ocean turbulence is presented here including a general formulation and illustrative applications to two-layer quasigeostrophic turbulence, and another difficult test case involving one-dimensional models of dispersive wave turbulence. This last test case has randomly generated solitons as coherent structures which collapse and radiate wave energy back to the larger scales, resulting in strong direct and inverse turbulent energy cascades.

  7. Corporate Governance, the Environment, and the Internet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew, Jane

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    contemporary society: Corporate governance at a crossroads.R. (1997). A survey of corporate governance. The Journal ofCorporate Governance, the Environment, and the Internet Jane

  8. Lesson from Fiascos in Russian Corporate Governance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Merritt; Heller, Michael

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cause Corporate Governance Failures . . . . . . . . . 1.understanding of how corporate governance works. See Heller,Shareholders in Corporate Governance (1999) (mimeo on file

  9. Lesson from Fiascos in Russian Corporate Governance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Merritt B.; Heller, Michael A.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cause Corporate Governance Failures . . . . . . . . . 1.understanding of how corporate governance works. See Heller,Shareholders in Corporate Governance (1999) (mimeo on file

  10. Capital Structure Implications for Corporate Governance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajan, Nishanth

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A. R¨oell, 2002, “Corporate governance and control,” ECGI-Enjoying the quiet life? Corporate governance and managerialGrinstein, 2007, “Corporate governance and firm value: The

  11. Sampling and Analysis Plan Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Boreholes Project.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brouns, Thomas M.

    2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) describes planned data collection activities for four entry boreholes through the sediment overlying the Saddle Mountains Basalt, up to three new deep rotary boreholes through the Saddle Mountains Basalt and sedimentary interbeds, and one corehole through the Saddle Mountains Basalt and sedimentary interbeds at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) site. The SAP will be used in concert with the quality assurance plan for the project to guide the procedure development and data collection activities needed to support borehole drilling, geophysical measurements, and sampling. This SAP identifies the American Society of Testing Materials standards, Hanford Site procedures, and other guidance to be followed for data collection activities. Revision 3 incorporates all interim change notices (ICN) that were issued to Revision 2 prior to completion of sampling and analysis activities for the WTP Seismic Boreholes Project. This revision also incorporates changes to the exact number of samples submitted for dynamic testing as directed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Revision 3 represents the final version of the SAP.

  12. DISPLACEMENT BASED SEISMIC DESIGN CRITERIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HOFMAYER,C.H.

    1999-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The USNRC has initiated a project to determine if any of the likely revisions to traditional earthquake engineering practice are relevant to seismic design of the specialized structures, systems and components of nuclear power plants and of such significance to suggest that a change in design practice might be warranted. As part of the initial phase of this study, a literature survey was conducted on the recent changes in seismic design codes/standards, on-going activities of code-writing organizations/communities, and published documents on displacement-based design methods. This paper provides a summary of recent changes in building codes and on-going activities for future codes. It also discusses some technical issues for further consideration.

  13. SEISMIC ATTENUATION FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel Walls; M.T. Taner; Gary Mavko; Jack Dvorkin

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In Section 1 of this first report we will describe the work we are doing to collect and analyze rock physics data for the purpose of modeling seismic attenuation from other measurable quantities such as porosity, water saturation, clay content and net stress. This work and other empirical methods to be presented later, will form the basis for ''Q pseudo-well modeling'' that is a key part of this project. In Section 2 of this report, we will show the fundamentals of a new method to extract Q, dispersion, and attenuation from field seismic data. The method is called Gabor-Morlet time-frequency decomposition. This technique has a number of advantages including greater stability and better time resolution than spectral ratio methods.

  14. Tube-wave seismic imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korneev, Valeri A. (Lafayette, CA); Bakulin, Andrey (Houston, TX)

    2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The detailed analysis of cross well seismic data for a gas reservoir in Texas revealed two newly detected seismic wave effects, recorded approximately 2000 feet above the reservoir. A tube-wave (150) is initiated in a source well (110) by a source (111), travels in the source well (110), is coupled to a geological feature (140), propagates (151) through the geological feature (140), is coupled back to a tube-wave (152) at a receiver well (120), and is and received by receiver(s) (121) in either the same (110) or a different receiving well (120). The tube-wave has been shown to be extremely sensitive to changes in reservoir characteristics. Tube-waves appear to couple most effectively to reservoirs where the well casing is perforated, allowing direct fluid contact from the interior of a well case to the reservoir.

  15. Tube-wave seismic imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korneev, Valeri A [LaFayette, CA

    2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The detailed analysis of cross well seismic data for a gas reservoir in Texas revealed two newly detected seismic wave effects, recorded approximately 2000 feet above the reservoir. A tube-wave (150) is initiated in a source well (110) by a source (111), travels in the source well (110), is coupled to a geological feature (140), propagates (151) through the geological feature (140), is coupled back to a tube-wave (152) at a receiver well (120), and is and received by receiver(s) (121) in either the same (110) or a different receiving well (120). The tube-wave has been shown to be extremely sensitive to changes in reservoir characteristics. Tube-waves appear to couple most effectively to reservoirs where the well casing is perforated, allowing direct fluid contact from the interior of a well case to the reservoir.

  16. Nuclear component horizontal seismic restraint

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Snyder, Glenn J. (Lynchburg, VA)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear component horizontal seismic restraint. Small gaps limit horizontal displacement of components during a seismic occurrence and therefore reduce dynamic loadings on the free lower end. The reactor vessel and reactor guard vessel use thicker section roll-forged rings welded between the vessel straight shell sections and the bottom hemispherical head sections. The inside of the reactor guard vessel ring forging contains local vertical dovetail slots and upper ledge pockets to mount and retain field fitted and installed blocks. As an option, the horizontal displacement of the reactor vessel core support cone can be limited by including shop fitted/installed local blocks in opposing alignment with the reactor vessel forged ring. Beams embedded in the wall of the reactor building protrude into apertures in the thermal insulation shell adjacent the reactor guard vessel ring and have motion limit blocks attached thereto to provide to a predetermined clearance between the blocks and reactor guard vessel ring.

  17. S E R I E S SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S E R I E S SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN SYNERGIES COMMISSION platform for distributed hybrid testing #12;SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN? Celestina Overview Implementation Validation Next steps #12;SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES

  18. SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN SYNERGIES ENISTAT: Experimental and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN SYNERGIES ENISTAT: Experimental-TA Project #12;SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN SYNERGIES Partners (Users) · METU Ragueneau · SCHOECK (Germany): Steffen Scheer, Seref Diler #12;SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES

  19. S E R I E S SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S E R I E S SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN SYNERGIES COMMISSION Database: Architecture and implementation #12;SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN Conclusions #12;SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN SYNERGIES 3 SERIES Concluding

  20. SEISMIC ATTENUATION FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel Walls; M.T. Taner; Naum Derzhi; Gary Mavko; Jack Dvorkin

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report we will show the fundamental concepts of two different methods to compute seismic energy absorption. The first methods gives and absolute value of Q and is based on computation with minimum phase operators. The second method gives a relative energy loss compared to a background trend. This method is a rapid, qualitative indicator of anomalous absorption and can be combined with other attributes such as band limited acoustic impedance to indicate areas of likely gas saturation.

  1. INVERSE SCATTERING OF SEISMIC DATA WITH THE ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1910-61-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the inverse scattering of seismic reflection data making use of the generalized Radon transform. Through an extension, the relevant transform attains ...

  2. SEISMIC MONITORING OF CARBON DIOXIDE FLUID FLOW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    santos

    SEISMIC MONITORING OF. CARBON DIOXIDE FLUID FLOW. J. E. Santos. 1. , G. B. Savioli. 2. , J. M. Carcione. 3. , D. Gei. 3. 1. CONICET, IGPUBA, Fac.

  3. Optimization Online - Constrained optimization in seismic reflection ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Delbos

    2004-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Jul 7, 2004 ... Constrained optimization in seismic reflection tomography: an SQP augmented Lagrangian approach. F. Delbos (Frederic.Delbos ***at*** ifp.fr)

  4. Finite element approximation of coupled seismic and ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    zyserman

    layer, having a thickness of about 10 nm. Finite element approximation of coupled seismic and electromagnetic waves in gas hydrate-bearing sediments – p.

  5. Hanford site seismic monitoring instrumentation plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reidel, S.P.

    1996-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a plan to comply with the seismic monitoring provisions of US DOE Order 5480.28, Natural Phenomena Hazards.

  6. Infrasound Generation from the HH Seismic Hammer.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Kyle Richard

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The HH Seismic hammer is a large, %22weight-drop%22 source for active source seismic experiments. This system provides a repetitive source that can be stacked for subsurface imaging and exploration studies. Although the seismic hammer was designed for seismological studies it was surmised that it might produce energy in the infrasonic frequency range due to the ground motion generated by the 13 metric ton drop mass. This study demonstrates that the seismic hammer generates a consistent acoustic source that could be used for in-situ sensor characterization, array evaluation and surface-air coupling studies for source characterization.

  7. Seismic stimulation for enhanced oil recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pride, S.R.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    aims to enhance oil production by sending seismic wavesbe expected to enhance oil production. INTRODUCTION The hopethe reservoir can cause oil production to increase. Quite

  8. Breakthroughs in Seismic and Borehole Characterization of Basalt Sequestration Targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, E. C.; Hardage, Bob A.; McGrail, B. Peter; Davis, Klarissa N.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mafic continental flood basalts form a globally important, but under-characterized CO2 sequestration target. The Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) in the northwestern U.S. is up to 5 km thick and covers over 168,000 km2. In India, flood basalts are 3 km thick and cover greater than 500,000 km2. Laboratory experiments demonstrate that the CRBG and other basalts react with formation water and super critical (sc) CO2 to precipitate carbonates, thus adding a potential mineral trapping mechanism to the standard trapping mechanisms of most other types of CO2 sequestration reservoirs. Brecciated tops of individual basalt flows in the CRBG form regional aquifers that locally have greater than 30% porosity and three Darcies of permeability. Porous flow tops are potential sites for sequestration of gigatons of scCO2 in areas where the basalts contain unpotable water and are at depths greater than 800 m. In this paper we report on the U.S. DOE Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership surface seismic and borehole geophysical characterization that supports a field test of capacity, integrity, and geochemical reactivity of CRBG reservoirs in eastern Washington, U.S.A. Traditional surface seismic methods have had little success in imaging basalt features in on-shore areas where the basalt is thinly covered by sediment. Processing of the experimental 6.5 km, 5 line 3C seismic swath included constructing an elastic wavefield model, identifying and separating seismic wave modes, and processing the swath as a single 2D line. Important findings include: (1) a wide variety of shear wave energy modes swamp the P-wave seismic records; (2) except at very short geophone offsets, ground roll overprints P-wave signal; and (3) because of extreme velocity contrasts, P-wave events are refracted at incidence angles greater than 7-15 degrees. Subsequent removal of S-wave and other noise during processing resulted in tremendous improvement in image quality. The application of wireline logging to onshore basalts is underexploited. Full waveform sonic logs and resistivity-based image logs acquired in the 1250 m basalt pilot borehole provide powerful tools for evaluating geomechanics and lithofacies. The azimuth of the fast shear wave is parallel to SH and records the changes through time in basalt flow and tectonic stress tensors. Combined with image log data, azimuthal S-wave data provide a borehole technique for assessing basalt emplacement and cooling history that is related to the development of reservoirs and seals, as well as the orientation of tectonic stresses and fracture systems that could affect CO2 transport or containment. Reservoir and seal properties are controlled by basalt lithofacies, and rescaled P- and S- wave slowness curves, integrated with image logs, provide a tool for improved recognition of subsurface lithofacies.

  9. Results of Tank-Leak Detection Demonstration Using Geophysical Techniques at the Hanford Mock Tank Site-Fiscal Year 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, D BRENT.; Gee, Glendon W.; Sweeney, Mark D.

    2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During July and August of 2001, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), hosted researchers from Lawrence Livermore and Lawrence Berkeley National laboratories, and a private contractor, HydroGEOPHYSICS, Inc., for deployment of the following five geophysical leak-detection technologies at the Hanford Site Mock Tank in a Tank Leak Detection Demonstration (TLDD): (1) Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT); (2) Cross-Borehole Electromagnetic Induction (CEMI); (3) High-Resolution Resistivity (HRR); (4) Cross-Borehole Radar (XBR); and (5) Cross-Borehole Seismic Tomography (XBS). Under a ''Tri-party Agreement'' with Federal and state regulators, the U.S. Department of Energy will remove wastes from single-shell tanks (SSTs) and other miscellaneous underground tanks for storage in the double-shell tank system. Waste retrieval methods are being considered that use very little, if any, liquid to dislodge, mobilize, and remove the wastes. As additional assurance of protection of the vadose zone beneath the SSTs, tank wastes and tank conditions may be aggressively monitored during retrieval operations by methods that are deployed outside the SSTs in the vadose zone.

  10. The use of exploration 3D seismic data to optimise oil exploration in OPL 210 deepwater, Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, L.C.; Lilletveit, R.; Sandvoll, T. [Statoil and BP Alliance, Stavanger (Norway)] [and others

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Allied Energy and the Statoil and BP Alliance are currently partners in the OPL 210 license, in deepwater Nigeria. The license has a 5 year initial exploration phase which carries a two well commitment. To optimize the location of these wells in this challenging and costly drilling environment the partnership has decided to acquire extensive exploration 3D seismic data within the block. Interpretation of the first of two planned 3D surveys has led to a much clearer understanding of: (a) The structural segmentation of the prospect and thus a clearer idea of the likely hydrocarbon pool size. (b) The distribution of amplitude anomalies and thus, hopefully, a superior understanding of reservoir distribution and hydrocarbons. Here the limiting factor is clearly the lack of deepwater geophysical calibration, due to the absence of wells. Consequently, conclusions at this stage, are qualitative either than quantative. Combined with detailed seismic stratigraphic and high tech geophysical analysis, these two aspects will assist in the highgrading of segments in the prospect, prior to final decisions on the well locations. The first well, planned for 1995, will be one of the first wells drilled in the Nigerian deepwater area. Examples of both 2D and 3D data will be used to demonstrate the above and some of the first well results will be integrated into our interpretation to highlight how some of our perceptions may have changed.

  11. Local Government Revenue Bonds (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Limited obligation local government bonds ("special revenue bonds") may be issued for qualified electric energy generation facilities, including those powered by renewables. These bonds generally...

  12. Government Personal Property Asset Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1998-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes procedures for managing Government personal property owned or leased by and in the custody of Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters employees. Cancels HQ 1400.1.

  13. Governance & Policies Effective: October 1997

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardy, Christopher R.

    Governance & Policies Effective: October 1997 Academic Policy: Undergraduate Studies ACADEMIC AMNESTY Approved: October 1997 Revised: May 16, 2007, Deans' Council March 20, 2007, Faculty Senate Former

  14. Governance & Policies Effective: October 1997

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardy, Christopher R.

    Governance & Policies Effective: October 1997 Academic Policy: Undergraduate Studies LEAVE of ABSENCE Approved: October 1997 Reviewed: June 4, 2007 Deans' Council, Faculty Senate Students who wish

  15. Governance & Policies Effective: October 1997

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardy, Christopher R.

    Governance & Policies Effective: October 1997 Academic Policy INDEPENDENT STUDY Approved: October 1997 Reviewed: June 1, 2007 Deans' Council, Faculty Senate Independent study allows the student

  16. Governance & Policies Effective: October 1997

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardy, Christopher R.

    Governance & Policies Effective: October 1997 Academic Policy STUDY at OTHER INSTITUTIONS Approved: October 1997 Revised: Spring 2000 Reviewed: June 1, 2007 Deans' Council, Faculty Senate Undergraduate

  17. Governance & Policies Effective: October 1997

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardy, Christopher R.

    Governance & Policies Effective: October 1997 Academic Policy: Graduate Studies GRADUATE ASSISTANTSHIPS Approved: October 1997 Revised: May 24, 2007 Deans' Council Graduate assistantships are awarded

  18. Transition Strategies: Government Options and Market Penetration...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Strategies: Government Options and Market Penetration Scenarios Transition Strategies: Government Options and Market Penetration Scenarios Presentation on Transition Strategies:...

  19. An Integrated Approach to Nanotechnology Governance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paddock, LeRoy

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An Integrated Approach to Nanotechnology Governance LeRoyLegal and Social Issues . NANOTECHNOLOGY1. A National Nanotechnology Governance D

  20. Constrained optimization in seismic reflection tomography: an SQP ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Seismic reflection tomography is a method for determining a subsurface velocity model from the traveltimes of seismic waves reflecting on geological interfaces.

  1. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region...

  2. Protocol for Addressing Induced Seismicity Associated with Enhanced...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Protocol for Addressing Induced Seismicity Associated with Enhanced Geothermal Systems Protocol for Addressing Induced Seismicity Associated with Enhanced Geothermal Systems This...

  3. Application of the Computer Program SASSI for Seismic SSI Analysis...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    the Computer Program SASSI for Seismic SSI Analysis of WTP Facilities Application of the Computer Program SASSI for Seismic SSI Analysis of WTP Facilities Application of the...

  4. Effects of Seismic Motion Incoherency on SSI and SSSI Responses...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Effects of Seismic Motion Incoherency on SSI and SSSI Responses of Nuclear Structures for Different Soil Site Conditions Effects of Seismic Motion Incoherency on SSI and SSSI...

  5. An Asymptotic Model of Seismic Reflection from a Permeable Layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silin, Dmitriy; Goloshubin, Gennady

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hilterman, F.J. : Seismic Amplitude Interpretation. Number 4interpretations of some poroelasticity coef?cients. For instance, we demonstrate that the An Asymptotic Model of Seismic

  6. The INL Seismic Risk Assessment Project: Requirements for Addressing...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Seismic Hazard Analysis AN APPLICATION OF THE SSHAC LEVEL 3 PROCESS TO THE PROBABILISTIC SEISMIC HAZARD ANALYSIS FOR NUCLEAR FACILITIES AT THE HANFORD SITE, EASTERN WASHINGTON, USA...

  7. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Senior Seismic Hazard Analysis...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    SEISMIC HAZARD ANALYSIS FOR NUCLEAR FACILITIES AT THE HANFORD SITE, EASTERN WASHINGTON, USA A Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis Update Review for Two DOE Sites and NGA-East...

  8. DOE New Madrid Seismic Zone Electric Utility Workshop Summary...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    New Madrid Seismic Zone Electric Utility Workshop Summary Report - August 2010 DOE New Madrid Seismic Zone Electric Utility Workshop Summary Report - August 2010 The DOE New Madrid...

  9. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental...

  10. Joint inversion of electrical and seismic data for Fracture char...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Joint inversion of electrical and seismic data for Fracture char. and Imaging of Fluid Flow in Geothermal Systems Joint inversion of electrical and seismic data for Fracture char....

  11. Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal Systems Below Surface-Exposed High-Velocity Rocks Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing...

  12. Application of Random Vibration Theory Methodology for Seismic...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Application of Random Vibration Theory Methodology for Seismic Soil-Structure Interaction Analysis Application of Random Vibration Theory Methodology for Seismic Soil-Structure...

  13. National Center for Digital Government National Center for Digital Government

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    -545-1108 www.umass.edu/digitalcenter September 28, 2007 NCDG Hosts Officials from Kazakhstan The National Kazakhstan on Wednesday, September 26, 2007. Amherst, MA­ The National Center for Digital Government (NCDG) welcomed a delegation of business and government leaders from the Republic of Kazakhstan on Wednesday

  14. Use of Geophysical Techniques to Characterize Fluid Flow in a...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    modeling with TOUGH and eTOUGH * Stochastic and deterministic joint inversion - Use seismic to provide the architecture of the system plus wells, - Use EMresistivity,...

  15. Stress, seismicity and structure of shallow oil reservoirs of Clinton County, Kentucky. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton-Smith, T. [Kentucky Geological Survey, Lexington, KY (United States)

    1995-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Between 1993 and 1995 geophysicists of the Los Alamos National Laboratory, in a project funded by the US Department of Energy, conducted extensive microseismic monitoring of oil production in the recently discovered High Bridge pools of Clinton County and were able to acquire abundant, high-quality data in the northern of the two pools. This investigation provided both three-dimensional spatial and kinetic data relating to the High Bridge fracture system that previously had not been available. Funded in part by the Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Kentucky Geological Survey committed to develop a geological interpretation of these geophysical results, that would be of practical benefit to future oils exploration. This publication is a summary of the results of that project. Contents include the following: introduction; discovery and development; regional geology; fractured reservoir geology; oil migration and entrapment; subsurface stress; induced seismicity; structural geology; references; and appendices.

  16. MODELING COUPLED FLUID FLOW AND GEOMECHANICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL PHENOMENA WITHIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MODELING COUPLED FLUID FLOW AND GEOMECHANICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL PHENOMENA WITHIN A FINITE ELEMENT for the modeling of geomechanical effects induced by reservoir production/injection and the cyclic dependence

  17. An Integrated Geophysical Analysis Of The Upper Crust Of The...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Of The Upper Crust Of The Southern Kenya Rift Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: An Integrated Geophysical Analysis Of The Upper...

  18. Reconnaissance geophysical studies of the geothermal system in...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mabey, D.R.; Hoover, D.B.; O'Donnell, J.E.; Wilson and C.W. Published Journal Geophysics, 1211978 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Citation...

  19. airborne geophysical survey: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    V; Vaalsta, Timo P; Li, Ju; Blair, David G 2011-01-01 12 A Virtual Excavation: Combining 3D Immersive Virtual Reality and Geophysical Surveying Computer Technologies and...

  20. airborne geophysical surveys: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    V; Vaalsta, Timo P; Li, Ju; Blair, David G 2011-01-01 12 A Virtual Excavation: Combining 3D Immersive Virtual Reality and Geophysical Surveying Computer Technologies and...

  1. A Geothermal Field Model Based On Geophysical And Thermal Prospectings...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Model Based On Geophysical And Thermal Prospectings In Nea Kessani (Ne Greece) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A Geothermal...

  2. REVIEWSOF GEOPHYSICS,VOL. 25, NO. 2, PAGES153-161, MARCH1987 U.S. NATIONAL REPORT TO INTERNATIONAL UNION OF GEODESY AND GEOPHYSICS 1983-1986

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Jeff

    REVIEWSOF GEOPHYSICS,VOL. 25, NO. 2, PAGES153-161, MARCH1987 U.S. NATIONAL REPORT TO INTERNATIONAL UNION OF GEODESY AND GEOPHYSICS 1983-1986 RecentResearchin SnowHydrology JEFF DOZIER Centerfor Remote thespectraldistri- butionof the incomingsolardirectanddiffuseirradianceand thespectralalbedo: Copyfight1987bytheAmericanGeophysical

  3. University of Toronto Governing Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boonstra, Rudy

    fiVO AR BO R VELUT University of Toronto Governing Council W eb C opy UNIVERSITY FUNDS INVESTMENT://www.governingcouncil.utoronto.ca/ #12;UNIVERSITY FUNDS INVESTMENT POLICY June 21, 2007 Table of Contents 1. DESCRIPTION OF UNIVERSITY.....................................................................................................6 W eb C opy University of Toronto Governing Council--Web version 2 #12;UNIVERSITY FUNDS INVESTMENT

  4. 3. PROJECT GOVERNANCE 1. Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    3. PROJECT GOVERNANCE 1. Introduction In October 2010, the CEI UPF-Icària project, led by Pompeu Fabra University (UPF), was named an International Campus of Excellence (CEI). The project defined a set I. CEI UPF-Icària governance model Source: CEI UPF-Icària project The specific purpose of each unit

  5. Marine geophysical study of cyclic sedimentation and shallow sill intrusion in the floor of the Central Gulf of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kluesner, Jared W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J.M, 1977, Seismic stratigraphic interpretation of clasticvia integrated interpretation of seismic, magnetic andand Interpretations .. 2.4.1 Seismic

  6. Marine geophysical study of cyclic sedimentation and shallow sill intrusion in the floor of the Central Gulf of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kluesner, Jared W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    via integrated interpretation of seismic, magnetic andInterpretations .. 2.4.1 Seismic2.4 RESULTS AND INTERPRETATIONS 2.4.1 Seismic Stratigraphy

  7. Seismic of the territory Toktogul reservoir, Kyrgyzstan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamchybekov, Murataly; Yegemberdiyeva, Kuliya [Institute of Seismology of National Academy Science Kyrgyz Republic (Kyrgyzstan)

    2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In connection with that this seismic in the territory of Naryn cascade maybe has its peculiarity in cludding in the territory Toktogul reservoir before of the building of the Toktogul dam, during of the building and after accordingly was decided to consider the seismic in this space of times. The arm of the present paper is estimation seismic of the territory Toktogul reservoir for different times: before of the building of the Toktogul dam (1960-1973), during its filling (1974-1980) and since start it's of the uninterruptedly exploitation to present time (1981-2006). The territory in that located the cascade of Naryn River is considered that seismic active in the Central part of the Tien Shan. The tectonic motions are become here intensity. The presence of the large faults is complicating significantly the seismic situation of the study region.

  8. SEISMIC ATTENUATION FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel Walls; M.T. Taner; Naum Derzhi; Gary Mavko; Jack Dvorkin

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report we will show some new Q related seismic attributes on the Burlington-Seitel data set. One example will be called Energy Absorption Attribute (EAA) and is based on a spectral analysis. The EAA algorithm is designed to detect a sudden increase in the rate of exponential decay in the relatively higher frequency portion of the spectrum. In addition we will show results from a hybrid attribute that combines attenuation with relative acoustic impedance to give a better indication of commercial gas saturation.

  9. Newberry EGS Seismic Velocity Model

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Templeton, Dennise

    We use ambient noise correlation (ANC) to create a detailed image of the subsurface seismic velocity at the Newberry EGS site down to 5 km. We collected continuous data for the 22 stations in the Newberry network, together with 12 additional stations from the nearby CC, UO and UW networks. The data were instrument corrected, whitened and converted to single bit traces before cross correlation according to the methodology in Benson (2007). There are 231 unique paths connecting the 22 stations of the Newberry network. The additional networks extended that to 402 unique paths crossing beneath the Newberry site.

  10. Newberry EGS Seismic Velocity Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Templeton, Dennise

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use ambient noise correlation (ANC) to create a detailed image of the subsurface seismic velocity at the Newberry EGS site down to 5 km. We collected continuous data for the 22 stations in the Newberry network, together with 12 additional stations from the nearby CC, UO and UW networks. The data were instrument corrected, whitened and converted to single bit traces before cross correlation according to the methodology in Benson (2007). There are 231 unique paths connecting the 22 stations of the Newberry network. The additional networks extended that to 402 unique paths crossing beneath the Newberry site.

  11. Joint stochastic inversion of geophysical data for reservoir parameter estimation Jinsong Chen* and G. Michael Hoversten, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jinsong

    Joint stochastic inversion of geophysical data for reservoir parameter estimation Jinsong Chen the stochastic framework, both reservoir parameters and geophysical attributes at unsampled locations. Introduction Conventional methods for reservoir parameter estimation using multiple sources of geophysical data

  12. GEOCHEMISTRY, GEOPHYSICS, GEOSYSTEMS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, The influence of non-uniform ambient noise on1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    GEOCHEMISTRY, GEOPHYSICS, GEOSYSTEMS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, The influence of non, Institute of Geophysics, ETH Zurich, Sonneggstrasse 5, Zurich, Switzerland. T. Nissen-Meyer, Institute of Geophysics, ETH Zurich, Sonneggstrasse 5, Zurich, Switzerland. Olaf Schenk, Institute of Computational

  13. GEOPHYSICAL METHODS In 2003, a group of scientists in Swit-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Podladchikov, Yuri

    intriguing questions with implications for the way oil and gas reserves are discovered and produced. Research with an eye on oil and gas. The seismic industry systematically disregards seismic data below 10 Hz as noise with Petrobras in Brazil, Pemex in Mexico, Norsk Hydro in Libya and KOC in the Arabian Peninsula, it is evident

  14. Central and Eastern United States (CEUS) Seismic Source Characterization (SSC) for Nuclear Facilities Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin J. Coppersmith; Lawrence A. Salomone; Chris W. Fuller; Laura L. Glaser; Kathryn L. Hanson; Ross D. Hartleb; William R. Lettis; Scott C. Lindvall; Stephen M. McDuffie; Robin K. McGuire; Gerry L. Stirewalt; Gabriel R. Toro; Robert R. Youngs; David L. Slayter; Serkan B. Bozkurt; Randolph J. Cumbest; Valentina Montaldo Falero; Roseanne C. Perman' Allison M. Shumway; Frank H. Syms; Martitia (Tish) P. Tuttle [Tish

    2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a new seismic source characterization (SSC) model for the Central and Eastern United States (CEUS). It will replace the Seismic Hazard Methodology for the Central and Eastern United States, EPRI Report NP-4726 (July 1986) and the Seismic Hazard Characterization of 69 Nuclear Plant Sites East of the Rocky Mountains, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Model, (Bernreuter et al., 1989). The objective of the CEUS SSC Project is to develop a new seismic source model for the CEUS using a Senior Seismic Hazard Analysis Committee (SSHAC) Level 3 assessment process. The goal of the SSHAC process is to represent the center, body, and range of technically defensible interpretations of the available data, models, and methods. Input to a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) consists of both seismic source characterization and ground motion characterization. These two components are used to calculate probabilistic hazard results (or seismic hazard curves) at a particular site. This report provides a new seismic source model. Results and Findings The product of this report is a regional CEUS SSC model. This model includes consideration of an updated database, full assessment and incorporation of uncertainties, and the range of diverse technical interpretations from the larger technical community. The SSC model will be widely applicable to the entire CEUS, so this project uses a ground motion model that includes generic variations to allow for a range of representative site conditions (deep soil, shallow soil, hard rock). Hazard and sensitivity calculations were conducted at seven test sites representative of different CEUS hazard environments. Challenges and Objectives The regional CEUS SSC model will be of value to readers who are involved in PSHA work, and who wish to use an updated SSC model. This model is based on a comprehensive and traceable process, in accordance with SSHAC guidelines in NUREG/CR-6372, Recommendations for Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis: Guidance on Uncertainty and Use of Experts. The model will be used to assess the present-day composite distribution for seismic sources along with their characterization in the CEUS and uncertainty. In addition, this model is in a form suitable for use in PSHA evaluations for regulatory activities, such as Early Site Permit (ESPs) and Combined Operating License Applications (COLAs). Applications, Values, and Use Development of a regional CEUS seismic source model will provide value to those who (1) have submitted an ESP or COLA for Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) review before 2011; (2) will submit an ESP or COLA for NRC review after 2011; (3) must respond to safety issues resulting from NRC Generic Issue 199 (GI-199) for existing plants and (4) will prepare PSHAs to meet design and periodic review requirements for current and future nuclear facilities. This work replaces a previous study performed approximately 25 years ago. Since that study was completed, substantial work has been done to improve the understanding of seismic sources and their characterization in the CEUS. Thus, a new regional SSC model provides a consistent, stable basis for computing PSHA for a future time span. Use of a new SSC model reduces the risk of delays in new plant licensing due to more conservative interpretations in the existing and future literature. Perspective The purpose of this study, jointly sponsored by EPRI, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the NRC was to develop a new CEUS SSC model. The team assembled to accomplish this purpose was composed of distinguished subject matter experts from industry, government, and academia. The resulting model is unique, and because this project has solicited input from the present-day larger technical community, it is not likely that there will be a need for significant revision for a number of years. See also Sponsors Perspective for more details. The goal of this project was to implement the CEUS SSC work plan for developing a regional CEUS SSC model. The work plan, formulated by the project manager and a

  15. Fault properties from seismic Q M. H. Worthington1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    ®cally concerned with the analysis and interpretation of some vertical seismic pro®ling (VSP) data from a holeFault properties from seismic Q M. H. Worthington1 and J. A. Hudson2 1 T. H. Huxley School of seismic Q from a North Sea vertical seismic pro®ling data set has revealed an abrupt increase

  16. Interactive Seismic Interpretation with Piecewise Global Energy Minimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Interactive Seismic Interpretation with Piecewise Global Energy Minimization Thomas H¨ollt King and horizons. However, seismic interpretation and horizon tracing is a difficult and error-prone task, often starts with creating a model of the subsurface structures, the seismic interpretation. A seismic

  17. SEISMIC GEOTECHNICAL INVESTIGATIONS FOR BRIDGES M. K. Yegian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yegian, Mishac

    1 SEISMIC GEOTECHNICAL INVESTIGATIONS FOR BRIDGES M. K. Yegian 1 , F. ASCE ABSTRACT Seismic and impedance calculations; assessment of foundation performance under the design seismic loads; and in the case of existing bridges, if deemed necessary, design of seismic retrofit measures. The outcomes of each

  18. Seismic response of fractures and induced anisotropy in poroelastic media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Juan

    Seismic response of fractures and induced anisotropy in poroelastic media Juan E. Santos stituto) and R. Mart´inez Corredor (UNLP) Department of Mathematics, University of Calgary, October 2014 Seismic variations of velocity and attenuation of seismic waves. Seismic response of fractures and induced anisotropy

  19. SERIES workshopSERIES workshop Role of research infrastructures in seismic rehabilitationRole of research infrastructures in seismic rehabilitationRole of research infrastructures in seismic rehabilitationRole of research infrastructures in seismic rehabi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SERIES workshopSERIES workshop Role of research infrastructures in seismic rehabilitationRole of research infrastructures in seismic rehabilitationRole of research infrastructures in seismic rehabilitationRole of research infrastructures in seismic rehabilitation Istanbul, 8Istanbul, 8--9 February 20129

  20. Seismic transducer modeling using ABAQUS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen R. Novascone

    2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A seismic transducer, known as an orbital vibrator, consists of a rotating imbalance driven by an electric motor. When suspended in a liquid-filled wellbore, vibrations of the device are coupled to the surrounding geologic media. In this mode, an orbital vibrator can be used as an efficient rotating dipole source for seismic imaging. Alternately, the motion of an orbital vibrator is affected by the physical properties of the surrounding media. From this point of view, an orbital vibrator can be used as a stand-alone sensor. The reaction to the surroundings can be sensed and recorded by geophones inside the orbital vibrator. These reactions are a function of the media’s physical properties such as modulus, damping, and density, thereby identifying the rock type. This presentation shows how the orbital vibrator and surroundings were modeled with an ABAQUS acoustic FEM. The FEM is found to compare favorably with theoretical predictions. A 2D FEM and analytical model are compared to an experimental data set. Each model compares favorably with the data set.

  1. 2013 American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. The 2010 California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Ronald C.

    © 2013 American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. The 2010 California Research at the Nexus.50331 AcceptedArticle #12;© 2013 American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. Abstract

  2. International Geophysical Conference and Exhibition, 26-29 February 2012 -Brisbane, Australia 1 Structurally constrained lithology characterization using magnetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    22 nd International Geophysical Conference and Exhibition, 26-29 February 2012 - Brisbane meaningful lithologic information directly from geophysical data. Here, we describe a multi-faceted approach

  3. Collaborative Research: hydrogeological-geophysical methods for subsurface site characterization. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, G. [Stanford Univ., CA (US); Rubin, Y.N. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (US)

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    'The general purpose is the subsurface characterization of LLNL superfund site. The goal is to get the most accurate map of the hydrogeological parameters, necessary for modeling and designing the cleanup efforts at the site, using well log data and remote sensing geophysical techniques. In the second year of the project progress has been made in several areas: gathering and interpreting Vertical Seismic Profile (VSP) and Electromagnetic (EM) surveys; investigating the impact of various seismic measurements on upscaling of rock physics relations between sediment properties; and developing a new approach to integrate geophysical and hydrological data using state of the art methods to characterize the subsurface lithology. Vertical Seismic Profile data has been gathered from selected wells at the Treatment Facility D (TFD) during April 1996 and April 1998. The most striking finding here is the detection of anomalies related to saturation conditions. Preliminary results have revealed three anomalously low acoustic velocity zones with velocities below 1,000 m/s; this is lower than the natural acoustic velocity in saturated media by pure water (1,500 m/s). These three zones appear to be associated with HSUs 3a, 3b and 5. Velocities below 600 m/s have been revealed in the 3a and 3b HSUs (http://www.ce.Berkeley.edu/{approximately}ezzedine/DOE/paul.html). The authors believe that these anomalies are indicative of partial saturation. This explanation is supported by the water samples taken from pumping stations near the VSP well sites which appears to contain air bubbles. A gas analysis of water samples has not yet been performed. The authors hypothesize that this gas can be either air being sucked-in from the vadose zone above the water table, or from some chemical reaction. As a matter of fact, the natural water table level at this site was around 20 m below ground surface before any large scale pumping began, and had dropped to 25.5 m, in April 98. Furthermore, some of these low velocity zones are occurring not only in the major free-flowing sand or gravel parts of the HSU, but in boundary layers of silty sand either above or below the main HSU conductor. An electromagnetic survey was conducted at the site during June 4--25, 1997, and they worked on its interpretation. Seven cross well EM data sets were collected. Both 1D and 2D simulations, approximating the actual site and survey setup, were conducted. The 1D simulations were conducted using the code EM1D for one data set. Newman and Alumbaugh''s 3D forward code was used to simulate the response of both a resistive layer (representing HSU 4) and a conductive layer at the same location. Three separate inversion algorithms were applied to the data: Newman and Alumbaugh''s 2.5D finite difference and integral solution algorithm, Alumbaugh''s iterative Born approximation with a cylindrical symmetry, and Tseng''s 3D extended born approximation. The field EM data are still being analyzed.'

  4. Joint environmental assessment for Chevron USA, Inc. and Santa Fe Energy Resources, Inc.: Midway Valley 3D seismic project, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The proposed Midway Valley 3D Geophysical Exploration Project covers approximately 31,444 aces of private lands, 6,880 acres of Department of Energy (DOE) Lands within Naval Petroleum Reserve 2 (NPR2) and 3,840 acres of lands administered by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), in western Kern County, California. This environmental assessment (EA) presents an overview of the affected environment within the project area using results of a literature review of biological field surveys previously conducted within or adjacent to a proposed 3D seismic project. The purpose is to provide background information to identify potential and known locations of sensitive wildlife and special status plant species within the proposed seismic project area. Biological field surveys, following agency approved survey protocols, will be conducted during October through November 1996 to acquire current resources data to provide avoidance as the project is being implemented in the field.

  5. Seismic hazard from the Hispaniola subduction zone: Correction to "Historical perspective on seismic hazard to Hispaniola and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ten Brink, Uri S.

    Seismic hazard from the Hispaniola subduction zone: Correction to "Historical perspective on seismic hazard to Hispaniola and the northeast Caribbean region" Uri S. ten Brink, William H. Bakun), Seismic hazard from the Hispaniola subduction zone: Correction to "Historical perspective on seismic

  6. Seismic Wave Propagation in Alluvial Basins and Influence of Site-City Interaction Seismic Wave Propagation in Alluvial Basins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Seismic Wave Propagation in Alluvial Basins and Influence of Site-City Interaction 1 Seismic Wave of alluvial deposits have a major influence on seismic wave propagation and amplification. However influence seismic wave propagation near the free surface. In this paper, the influence of surface structures

  7. Seismic margins and calibration of piping systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shieh, L.C.; Tsai, N.C.; Yang, M.S.; Wong, W.L.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) is a US Nuclear Regulatory Commission-funded, multiyear program conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Its objective is to develop a complete, fully coupled analysis procedure for estimating the risk of earthquake-induced radioactive release from a commercial nuclear power plant and to determine major contributors to the state-of-the-art seismic and systems analysis process and explicitly includes the uncertainties in such a process. The results will be used to improve seismic licensing requirements for nuclear power plants. In Phase I of SSMRP, the overall seismic risk assessment methodology was developed and assembled. The application of this methodology to the seismic PRA (Probabilistic Risk Assessment) at the Zion Nuclear Power Plant has been documented. This report documents the method deriving response factors. The response factors, which relate design calculated responses to best estimate values, were used in the seismic response determination of piping systems for a simplified seismic probablistic risk assessment. 13 references, 31 figures, 25 tables.

  8. Corporate governance and insider trading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rozanov, Konstantin A

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I investigate the relation between corporate governance and insider trading by corporate executives. Despite the general view that trade on non-public information adversely affects capital market participants, the impact ...

  9. Governance & Policies Effective: October 1997

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardy, Christopher R.

    Governance & Policies Effective: October 1997 Faculty Senate COMMITTEE on COOPERATIVE EDUCATION/INTERNSHIP PROGRAMS Approved: as of 1997 review Faculty Senate Membership 1. The co-op coordinators from each

  10. LOCAL GOVERNMENT EMERGENCY PLANNING HANDBOOK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    management system and communications plan consistent with existing state and federal energy emergencyCALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION LOCAL GOVERNMENT EMERGENCY PLANNING HANDBOOK April 2004 PUBLICATION and authorities, and to integrate their management and communications systems with both the California Energy

  11. Understanding biogeobatteries: Where geophysics meets microbiology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Revil, A.; Mendonca, C.A.; Atekwana, E.A.; Kulessa, B.; Hubbard, S.S.; Bohlen, K.

    2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Although recent research suggests that contaminant plumes behave as geobatteries that produce an electrical current in the ground, no associated model exists that honors both geophysical and biogeochemical constraints. Here, we develop such a model to explain the two main electrochemical contributions to self-potential signals in contaminated areas. Both contributions are associated with the gradient of the activity of two types of charge carriers, ions and electrons. In the case of electrons, bacteria act as catalysts for reducing the activation energy needed to exchange the electrons between electron donor and electron acceptor. Possible mechanisms that facilitate electron migration include iron oxides, clays, and conductive biological materials, such as bacterial conductive pili or other conductive extracellular polymeric substances. Because we explicitly consider the role of biotic processes in the geobattery model, we coined the term 'biogeobattery'. After theoretical development of the biogeobattery model, we compare model predictions with self-potential responses associated with laboratory and field-scale conducted in contaminated environments. We demonstrate that the amplitude and polarity of large (>100 mV) self-potential signatures requires the presence of an electronic conductor to serve as a bridge between electron donors and acceptors. Small self-potential anomalies imply that electron donors and electron acceptors are not directly interconnected, but instead result simply from the gradient of the activity of the ionic species that are present in the system.

  12. Seismicity parameters preceding moderate to major earthquakes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    von Seggern, D.; Alexander, S.S.; Baag, C.

    1981-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Seismic events reported in the bulletins of the two large arrays, LASA and NORSAR, were merged with those from the NEIS bulletin for the period 1970-1977. Using a lower cutoff of m/sub b/ = 5.8, 510 'main shocks' within the P range of LASA or NORSAR were selected for this period; and various seismicity trends prior to them were investigated. A search for definite foreshocks, based on a significantly short time delay to the main shock, revealed that the true rate of foreshock occurrence was less than 20%. Foreshocks are almost exclusively associated with shallow (h<100 km) main shocks. Averaging shows that the seismicity level around the main shock increases somewhat for 10 days before main shocks; this feature peaks in the last 3--4 hours prior to the main shocks. Again by averaging, the seismicity about main shocks is shown to tend with time toward the main shock as its origin time is approached, but the average effect is small (approx.10% change).Using a new variable to track the departures from both spatial and temporal randomness, the Poisson-like behavior of deeper seismicity (>100 km) was demonstrated. For shallow events (<100 km) this variable reveals numerous instances of clustering and spatial-temporal seismic gaps, with little tendency toward a uniformity of behavior prior to main shocks. A statistical test of the validity of seismic precursors was performed for approximately 90 main shock regions which had sufficient seismicity. Using a five-variable vector, (interevent time, interevent distance, magnitude, epicentral distance to main shock, and depth difference relative to main shock) for each event in a 'precursory' time window of 500 days before the main shock and for each event in a 'normal' time window of 500 days before that, the null hypothesis of equal vector means between the two groups was tested. At 90% confidence levels, less than 30% of the main shock regions were thus found to exhibit precursory seismicity changes.

  13. Seismic Pulses Derivation from the Study of Source Signature Characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rahman, Syed Mustafizur; Nawawi, M. N. Mohd.; Saad, Rosli [School of Physics, Univeristi Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia)

    2010-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper deals with a deterministic technique for the derivation of seismic pulses by the study of source characteristics. The spectral characteristics of the directly or the nearest detected seismic signal is analyzed and considered as the principle source signature. Using this signature seismic pulses are derived with accurate time position in the seismic traces. The technique is applied on both synthetic and field refraction seismic traces. In both cases it has estimated that the accurate time shifts along with amplitude coefficients.

  14. Seismic Structure of Shallow Lithosphere at Locations of Distinctive Seafloor Spreading /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henig, Ashlee Shae

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lithologic interpretations of our seismic results are guidedx and z. Interpretation of the 2D seismic velocity models (to aid in interpretation of rock type from seismic velocity.

  15. Developing Government Renewable Energy Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurt S. Myers; Thomas L. Baldwin; Jason W. Bush; Jake P. Gentle

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Army Corps of Engineers has retained Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to conduct a study of past INL experiences and complete a report that identifies the processes that are needed for the development of renewable energy projects on government properties. The INL has always maintained expertise in power systems and applied engineering and INL’s renewable energy experiences date back to the 1980’s when our engineers began performing US Air Force wind energy feasibility studies and development projects. Over the last 20+ years of working with Department of Defense and other government agencies to study, design, and build government renewable projects, INL has experienced the do’s and don’ts for being successful with a project. These compiled guidelines for government renewable energy projects could include wind, hydro, geothermal, solar, biomass, or a variety of hybrid systems; however, for the purpose of narrowing the focus of this report, wind projects are the main topic discussed throughout this report. It is our thought that a lot of what is discussed could be applied, possibly with some modifications, to other areas of renewable energy. It is also important to note that individual projects (regardless the type) vary to some degree depending on location, size, and need but in general these concepts and directions can be carried over to the majority of government renewable energy projects. This report focuses on the initial development that needs to occur for any project to be a successful government renewable energy project.

  16. Smithsonian/NASA ADS Physics/Geophysics Abstract Service Find Similar Abstracts (with default settings below)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojahedi, Mohammad

    Smithsonian/NASA ADS Physics/Geophysics Abstract Service · Find Similar Abstracts (with default | Query Form | Preferences | HELP | FAQ Physics/Geophysics arXiv e-prints Send Query Reset #12;

  17. Publications of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology University of Hawaii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Publications of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology University of Hawaii 2003 1 volcanic collapse formation, Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems, 4 (9), 1077, doi:10.1029/2002GC000483

  18. Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-4777-1, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12, EGU2010-4777-1, 2010 EGU General Assembly 2010 © Author" River and the damage caused can create routes for floods. Geophysical methods such as Multi

  19. Publications of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology University of Hawaii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Publications of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology University of Hawaii 2005 1. 2 craters. Journal of Geophysical Research 110, E10001, doi: 10.1029/2004JE002338, 2005. 7. Blewett, D. T

  20. A NEW PETROLOGICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL INVESTIGATION OF THE PRESENT-DAY PLUMBING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A NEW PETROLOGICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL INVESTIGATION OF THE PRESENT-DAY PLUMBING SYSTEM OF MT. VESUVIUS, on geophysical information, in particular, magnetotelluric (MT) data, and on petrological and geochemical

  1. Assessment of seismic margin calculation methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, R.P.; Murray, R.C.; Ravindra, M.K.; Reed, J.W.; Stevenson, J.D.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seismic margin review of nuclear power plants requires that the High Confidence of Low Probability of Failure (HCLPF) capacity be calculated for certain components. The candidate methods for calculating the HCLPF capacity as recommended by the Expert Panel on Quantification of Seismic Margins are the Conservative Deterministic Failure Margin (CDFM) method and the Fragility Analysis (FA) method. The present study evaluated these two methods using some representative components in order to provide further guidance in conducting seismic margin reviews. It is concluded that either of the two methods could be used for calculating HCLPF capacities. 21 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

  2. Electrical Resistivity and Seismic Surveys at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, April 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seth S. Haines; Bethany L. Burton; Donald S. Sweetkind; Theodore H. Asch

    2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In April 2007, the USGS collected direct-current (DC) electrical resistivity data and shear- (S) and compressional- (P) wave seismic data to provide new detail of previously mapped, overlapping fault splays at two administrative areas in the Nevada Test Site (NTS). In NTS Area 7, we collected two-dimensional DC resistivity data along a transect crossing the Yucca Fault parallel to, and between, two transects along which resistivity data were collected in a previous study in 2006. In addition, we collected three-dimensional DC resistivity data in a grid that overlies part of the 2007 transect. The DC resistivity data show that the fault has a footwall that is more conductive than the hanging wall and an along-strike progression of the fault in a location where overlapping splays are present. Co-located with the northernmost of the two 2006 DC resistivity transects, we acquired S- and P-wave seismic data for both reflection and refraction processing. The S-wave data are corrupted by large amounts of converted (P-wave) energy likely due to the abundance of fractured caliche in the shallow subsurface. The P-wave data show minimal reflected energy, but they show clear refracted first arrivals. We have inverted these first arrival times to determine P-wave seismic velocity models. The seismic model for the transect in Area 7 shows low velocities extending to the base of the model at the location of the Yucca Fault, as well as low velocities at the eastern end of the transect, in the vicinity of the adjacent crater. These new surveys provide further detail about the geometry of the Yucca Fault in this location where it shows two overlapping splays. We collected P- and S-wave seismic data along a transect in the southern part of NTS Area 2, corresponding with the location of a 2006 DC resistivity transect that targeted a set of small faults identified with field mapping. Again, the S-wave data are difficult to interpret. The P-wave data show clear first arrivals that we inverted, yielding a velocity model that shows lateral heterogeneity similar to the 2006 DC resistivity models. Finally, we collected P-wave data along a second transect in Area 2, located north of the first line and in an area of a very minor fault that was targeted by another 2006 DC resistivity survey. The P-wave refraction velocity model shows generally high velocities, with a zone of somewhat lower velocities in the central part of the transect. The position of the low velocity zone corresponds with the location of a minor fault, though it is unclear whether the two are related. Together, these results demonstrate the value of geophysical data for mapping the subsurface extent of faults. The 2007 DC resistivity data complement the 2006 data and provide important new detail of the overlapping fault splays. The seismic data demonstrate the ability of P-wave refraction methods to identify the damage zones at faults, and they show the difficulties associated with S-wave methods in areas with caliche. Combining all of the geophysical data from the Area 7 studies, we are able to develop a coherent interpretation of the relation between the site geology, the fault, and the observations.

  3. RECOMMENDATIONS FOR ESTABLISHING AN IDENTITY ECOSYSTEM GOVERNANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perkins, Richard A.

    RECOMMENDATIONS FOR ESTABLISHING AN IDENTITY ECOSYSTEM GOVERNANCE STRUCTURE THE DEPARTMENT an Identity Ecosystem Governance Structure This page is intentionally left blank. #12;Recommendations for Establishing an Identity Ecosystem Governance Structure Foreword The Internet is one of the most

  4. Fiscal stimulus through state and local governments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feiveson, Laura (Laura Judith)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    State and local governments in the United States make up more than half of total government consumption and investment and almost 90 percent of total government employment. Despite these facts, the debates surrounding ...

  5. Potential-field geophysical programs for VAX 7xx computers; documentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A U.S. Geological Survey report is presented documenting potential-field geophysical programs for VAX 7xx computers.

  6. SMACS. Probabilistic Seismic Analysis System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, J.J.; Maslenikov, O.R.; Tiong, L.W.; Mraz, M.J. [EQE Incorporated, San Ramon, CA (United States); Bumpus, S.; Gerhard, M.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1992-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The SMACS (Seismic Methodology Analysis Chain with Statistics) system of computer programs is one of the major computational tools of the U.S. NRC Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP). SMACS is comprised of the core program SMAX, which performs the SSI response analyses, five preprocessing programs, and two postprocessors. The preprocessing programs include: GLAY and CLAN, which generate the nominal impedance matrices and wave scattering vectors for surface-founded structures; INSSIN, which projects the dynamic properties of structures to the foundation in the form of modal participation factors and mass matrices; SAPPAC, which projects the dynamic and pseudostatic properties of multiply-supported piping systems to the support locations, and LNGEN, which can be used to generate the multiplication factors to be applied to the nominal soil, structural, and subsystem properties for each of the response calculations in accounting for random variations of these properties. The postprocessors are: PRESTO, which performs statistical operations on the raw data from the response vectors that SMAX produces to calculate best fit lognormal distributions for each response location, and CHANGO, which manipulates the data produced by PRESTO to produce other results of interest to the user. Also included is the computer program SAP4 (a modified version of the University of California, Berkeley SAPIV program), a general linear structural analysis program used for eigenvalue extractions and pseudostatic mode calculations of the models of major structures and subsystems. SAP4 is used to prepare input to the INSSIN and SAPPAC preprocessing programs. The GLAY and CLAN programs were originally developed by J.E. Luco (UCSD) and H.L. Wong (USC).

  7. Integrated Geophysical Examination of the CRREL Permafrost Tunnel's Fairbanks Silt Units, Fox, Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stillman, David E.

    C41A-0429 Integrated Geophysical Examination of the CRREL Permafrost Tunnel's Fairbanks Silt Units report on a recent geophysical survey of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' Cold Region Research geophysical signatures of permanently frozen loess and massive wedge ice. We exploited the increasing path

  8. GEON: Geophysical data add the 3rd dimension in geospatial studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    GEON: Geophysical data add the 3rd dimension in geospatial studies Aldouri, R.; Keller, G. R of subsurface information to provide a 3-D perspective on data. Geophysical data provide information about projects has required the development of many sophisticated tools to allow users to utilize geophysical

  9. MonteCarloType Techniques for Processing Interval Uncertainty, and Their Geophysical and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Karen

    Monte­Carlo­Type Techniques for Processing Interval Uncertainty, and Their Geophysical contact email vladik@cs.utep.edu Abstract To determine the geophysical structure of a region, we measure are independently normally distributed. Problem: the resulting accuracies are not in line with geophysical intuition

  10. Analysis of Geophysical Time Series Using Discrete Wavelet Transforms: An Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Percival, Don

    Analysis of Geophysical Time Series Using Discrete Wavelet Transforms: An Overview Donald B geophysical time series. The basic idea is to transform a time series into coefficients describing how in geophysical data analysis. The intent of this article is to give an overview of how DWTs can be used

  11. Monte-Carlo-Type Techniques for Processing Interval Uncertainty, and Their Geophysical and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Karen

    Monte-Carlo-Type Techniques for Processing Interval Uncertainty, and Their Geophysical contact email vladik@cs.utep.edu Abstract To determine the geophysical structure of a region, we measure are independently normally distributed. Problem: the resulting accuracies are not in line with geophysical intuition

  12. Geophysical inversion in an integrated mineral exploration program: examples from the San Nicolas deposit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Douglas W.

    Geophysical inversion in an integrated mineral exploration program: examples from the San Nicol´as deposit Nigel Phillips and Douglas W. Oldenburg, UBC-Geophysical Inversion Facility, University of British of the subsurface from surface geophysical data, coupled with an increasing need to explore for minerals

  13. 1340 The Leading Edge October 2008 SAGE celebrates 25 years of learning geophysics by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1340 The Leading Edge October 2008 SAGE celebrates 25 years of learning geophysics by doing geophysics The increasing world demand and record-high costs for energy and mineral resources, along and educators we must seriously ask if our geophysics pipeline can adequately address this crisis. One program

  14. Multifractals and Wavelets: A potential tool in Geophysics Rudolf H. Riedi, Rice University, Houston, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riedi, Rudolf H.

    Multifractals and Wavelets: A potential tool in Geophysics Rudolf H. Riedi, Rice University of pos- sible applications in geophysics. It is elaborated how a description of the well log measurement to the mentioned elds. This paper is written in the hope of achieving the same in the area of geophysics. The idea

  15. GEOPHYSICAL INVERSION IN AN INTEGRATED EXPLORATION PROGRAM: EXAMPLES FROM THE SAN NICOL AS DEPOSIT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Douglas W.

    GEOPHYSICAL INVERSION IN AN INTEGRATED EXPLORATION PROGRAM: EXAMPLES FROM THE SAN NICOL ´AS DEPOSIT information to the explorationist. This thesis examines the role geophysical inversion can assume in an integrated explo- ration program, and the impact it can have on the results. As an example, geophysical data

  16. Northern Thailand Geophysics Field Camp: Overview of Activities Lee M. Liberty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Northern Thailand Geophysics Field Camp: Overview of Activities Lee M. Liberty Boise State University conducted a geophysics field camp in northern Thailand in January, 2010 to train students and professionals in geophysical methods to address environmental and engineering challenges. Faculty, technicians

  17. GEOPHYSICS?[The application of physics to problems in the Earth Sciences.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merriam, James

    W HAT IS GEOPHYSICS?[The application of physics to problems in the Earth Sciences.] In applied geophysics we inject a signal into the ground and record how the ground changes that signal as it passes://duke.usask.ca~merriam/geo_phys/ Rewarding careers are possible in exploration and environmental geophysics. Graduates of the U of S qualify

  18. Geophysical Surveying with Marine Networked Mobile Robotic Systems: The WiMUST Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jesus, Sérgio M.

    Geophysical Surveying with Marine Networked Mobile Robotic Systems: The WiMUST Project [Extended for geophysical surveying. This paper describes the main features of the envisaged developments, with a focus.00. Figure 1: Conventional geophysical surveying using long lines of towed streamers team. Such teams

  19. Dr. Benjamin R. Phillips Benjamin Phillips is a Program Director in Geophysics at the National Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    Dr. Benjamin R. Phillips Benjamin Phillips is a Program Director in Geophysics at the National for Geophysics at the University of Texas at Austin developing earthquake location techniques in support. Associate Program Director, Geophysics National Science Foundation 4201 Wilson Boulevard Arlington, VA 22230

  20. Geophysical Prospecting 36,571-590,1988 ELASTIC WAVE PROPAGATION IN MEDIA WITH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Juan

    Geophysical Prospecting 36,571-590,1988 ELASTIC WAVE PROPAGATION IN MEDIA WITH PARALLEL FRACTURES propagation in media with parallel frac- tures and aligned cracks. Geophysical Prospecting 36,571-590. A model,CT 06877-4108, USA. Institute for Earth Sciences, Department of Geophysics, PB 80021, 3508 TA Utrecht

  1. Bachelor of Science, Geosciences, Geophysics Emphasis, 2014-2015 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Bachelor of Science, Geosciences, Geophysics Emphasis, 2014-2015 Name ID# Date General Degree General Chemistry II with Lab 4 GEOPH 201 Seeing the Unseen: an Introduction to Geophysics 4 GEOG 360 Physics I & II with Calculus & Labs Physics Option II: PHYS 111-112 General Physics 8-10 Geophysics

  2. Publications of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology University of Hawaii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Publications of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology University of Hawaii 2002 1-scale multielement analysis of the lunar surface using iron, titanium, and thorium abundances, Journal of Geophysical distribution of lunar composition: New results from Lunar Prospector Journal of Geophysical Research, VOL. 107

  3. Geophysical and Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics, Vol. 101, Nos. 56, OctoberDecember 2007, 469487

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lathrop, Daniel P.

    Geophysical and Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics, Vol. 101, Nos. 5­6, October­December 2007, 469, USA zInstitute of Geophysics, University of Go¨ ttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, D-37077 Go¨ ttingen (though later work by Banka and *Corresponding author. Email: dpl@complex.umd.edu Geophysical

  4. Journal of Life Sciences 6 (2012) 335-341 The International Research Group in Geophysics Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Journal of Life Sciences 6 (2012) 335-341 The International Research Group in Geophysics Europe to create the IRGGEA (International Group in Geophysics Europe Africa) in order to pursue the scientific: Scientific network, ethical rules, geophysics, sustainable research, Africa. 1. Introduction

  5. Publications of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology University of Hawaii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Publications of the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology University of Hawaii 2006 1 with an albedo feature near Airy crater in the lunar nearside highlands. Geophysical Research Letters. 9. Boyce viewed by the THEMIS instrument: Double-layered ejecta craters. J. Geophysical Research, 111, E10005, doi

  6. Geophysical methods applied to characterize landfill covers with geocomposite F. Genelle1, 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Geophysical methods applied to characterize landfill covers with geocomposite F. Genelle1, 2 , C attempt to characterize with geophysical methods the state of landfill covers to detect damages that can. The geophysical methods used were the Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT), cartography with an Automatic

  7. Joint inversion of marine seismic AVA and CSEM data using statistical rock-physics models and Markov random fields: Stochastic inversion of AVA and CSEM data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, J.; Hoversten, G.M.

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Joint inversion of seismic AVA and CSEM data requires rock-physics relationships to link seismic attributes to electrical properties. Ideally, we can connect them through reservoir parameters (e.g., porosity and water saturation) by developing physical-based models, such as Gassmann’s equations and Archie’s law, using nearby borehole logs. This could be difficult in the exploration stage because information available is typically insufficient for choosing suitable rock-physics models and for subsequently obtaining reliable estimates of the associated parameters. The use of improper rock-physics models and the inaccuracy of the estimates of model parameters may cause misleading inversion results. Conversely, it is easy to derive statistical relationships among seismic and electrical attributes and reservoir parameters from distant borehole logs. In this study, we develop a Bayesian model to jointly invert seismic AVA and CSEM data for reservoir parameter estimation using statistical rock-physics models; the spatial dependence of geophysical and reservoir parameters are carried out by lithotypes through Markov random fields. We apply the developed model to a synthetic case, which simulates a CO{sub 2} monitoring application. We derive statistical rock-physics relations from borehole logs at one location and estimate seismic P- and S-wave velocity ratio, acoustic impedance, density, electrical resistivity, lithotypes, porosity, and water saturation at three different locations by conditioning to seismic AVA and CSEM data. Comparison of the inversion results with their corresponding true values shows that the correlation-based statistical rock-physics models provide significant information for improving the joint inversion results.

  8. 4-D seismic technologies: intersurvey calibration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelley, Jeffrey Paul

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    seismic data sets at different times in the production life of a reservoir, calibrating, then comparing the data sets and interpreting intersurvey differences in terms of fluid change or movement. In practice 4-D (time-lapse) analysis is typically...

  9. 4-D seismic technologies: intersurvey calibration 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelley, Jeffrey Paul

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    seismic data sets at different times in the production life of a reservoir, calibrating, then comparing the data sets and interpreting intersurvey differences in terms of fluid change or movement. In practice 4-D (time-lapse) ...

  10. Non-physical energy in seismic interferometry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Simon James

    2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-physical arrivals produced by seismic interferometry, the process whereby Green’s functions are synthesized between two points by cross-correlation, crossconvolution or deconvolution, are often considered to provide ...

  11. Study of induced seismicity for reservoir characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Junlun, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main goal of the thesis is to characterize the attributes of conventional and unconventional reservoirs through passive seismicity. The dissertation is comprised of the development and applications of three new methods, ...

  12. Seismic assessment strategies for masonry structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeJong, Matthew J. (Matthew Justin)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Masonry structures are vulnerable to earthquakes, but their seismic assessment remains a challenge. This dissertation develops and improves several strategies to better understand the behavior of masonry structures under ...

  13. Seismic retrofitting of deficient Canadian buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gemme, Marie-Claude

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many developed countries such as Canada and the United States are facing a significant infrastructure crisis. Most of their facilities have been built with little consideration of seismic design and durability issues. As ...

  14. Reservoir fracture characterizations from seismic scattered waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Xinding

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The measurements of fracture parameters, such as fracture orientation, fracture density and fracture compliance, in a reservoir is very important for field development and exploration. Traditional seismic methods for ...

  15. Bayesian estimation of resistivities from seismic velocities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Werthmüller, Dieter

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    I address the problem of finding a background model for the estimation of resistivities in the earth from controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) data by using seismic data and well logs as constraints. Estimation of ...

  16. Geophysical Investigations of Archaeological Resources in Southern Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brenda Ringe Pace; Gail Heath; Clark Scott; Carlan McDaniel

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Idaho National Laboratory and other locations across southern Idaho, geophysical tools are being used to discover, map, and evaluate archaeological sites. A variety of settings are being explored to expand the library of geophysical signatures relevant to archaeology in the region. Current targets of interest include: prehistoric archaeological features in open areas as well as lava tube caves, historical structures and activity areas, and emigrant travel paths. We draw from a comprehensive, state of the art geophysical instrumentation pool to support this work. Equipment and facilities include ground penetrating radar, electromagnetic and magnetic sensors, multiple resistivity instruments, advanced positioning instrumentation, state of the art processing and data analysis software, and laboratory facilities for controlled experiments.

  17. Advances in borehole geophysics for hydrology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, P.H.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Borehole geophysical methods provide vital subsurface information on rock properties, fluid movement, and the condition of engineered borehole structures. Within the first category, salient advances include the continuing improvement of the borehole televiewer, refinement of the electrical conductivity dipmeter for fracture characterization, and the development of a gigahertz-frequency electromagnetic propagation tool for water saturation measurements. The exploration of the rock mass between boreholes remains a challenging problem with high potential; promising methods are now incorporating high-density spatial sampling and sophisticated data processing. Flow-rate measurement methods appear adequate for all but low-flow situations. At low rates the tagging method seems the most attractive. The current exploitation of neutron-activation techniques for tagging means that the wellbore fluid itself is tagged, thereby eliminating the mixing of an alien fluid into the wellbore. Another method uses the acoustic noise generated by flow through constrictions and in and behind casing to detect and locate flaws in the production system. With the advent of field-recorded digital data, the interpretation of logs from sedimentary sequences is now reaching a sophisticated level with the aid of computer processing and the application of statistical methods. Lagging behind are interpretive schemes for the low-porosity, fracture-controlled igneous and metamorphic rocks encountered in the geothermal reservoirs and in potential waste-storage sites. Progress is being made on the general problem of fracture detection by use of electrical and acoustical techniques, but the reliable definition of permeability continues to be an elusive goal.

  18. Decision analysis for seismic retrofit of structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Ryan J.

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    of earthquakes as deterministic statements that will not occur for a long time rather than as probabilistic statements about the events (May 2004). Due to the aforementioned concerns regarding the decreased likelihood of building damage from seismic activity...-05, American Society of Civil Engineers, Reston, VA. Bai, J.-W., Hueste, M. B., and Gardoni, P. (2007). ?A probabilistic framework for the assessment of structural losses due to seismic events.? J. Struct. Engrg., submitted for review. Bracci, J. M...

  19. Fluid driven torsional dipole seismic source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hardee, Harry C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A compressible fluid powered oscillating downhole seismic source device capable of periodically generating uncontaminated horizontally-propagated, shear waves is provided. A compressible fluid generated oscillation is created within the device which imparts an oscillation to a housing when the device is installed in a housing such as the cylinder off an existing downhole tool, thereby a torsional seismic source is established. Horizontal waves are transferred to the surrounding bore hole medium through downhole clamping.

  20. Forecasting Seismic Signatures of Stellar Magnetic Activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. A. Dziembowski

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    For the Sun, a tight correlation between various activity measures and oscillation frequencies is well documented. For other stars, we have abundant data on magnetic activity and its changes but not yet on its seismic signature. A prediction of the activity induced frequency changes in stars based on scaling the solar relations is presented. This seismic signature of the activity should be measurable in the data expected within few years.

  1. Acoustic and Seismic Modalities for Unattended Ground Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elbring, G.J.; Ladd, M.D.; McDonald, T.S.; Sleefe, G.E.

    1999-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we have presented the relative advantages and complementary aspects of acoustic and seismic ground sensors. A detailed description of both acoustic and seismic ground sensing methods has been provided. Acoustic and seismic phenomenology including source mechanisms, propagation paths, attenuation, and sensing have been discussed in detail. The effects of seismo-acoustic and acousto-seismic interactions as well as recommendations for minimizing seismic/acoustic cross talk have been highlighted. We have shown representative acoustic and seismic ground sensor data to illustrate the advantages and complementary aspects of the two modalities. The data illustrate that seismic transducers often respond to acoustic excitation through acousto-seismic coupling. Based on these results, we discussed the implications of this phenomenology on the detection, identification, and localization objectives of unattended ground sensors. We have concluded with a methodology for selecting the preferred modality (acoustic and/or seismic) for a particular application.

  2. Seismic behavior of structural silicone glazing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zarghamee, M.S.; Schwartz, T.A. [Simpson Gumpertz and Heger Inc., Arlington, MA (United States); Gladstone, M. [Dow Corning Corp., Fremont, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In seismic events, glass curtain walls undergo racking deformation, while the flat glass lites do not rack due to their high shear stiffness. If the glass curtain wall is not isolated from the building frame by specifically designed connections that accommodate relative motion, seismic racking motion of the building frame will demand significant resiliency of the sealant that secures the glass to the curtain wall framing. In typical four-sided structural silicone glazing systems used in buildings with unbraced moment frames, the magnitude of seismic racking is likely to stress the sealants significantly beyond the sealant design strength. In this paper, the extent of the expected seismic racking motion, the behavior of the structural silicone glazing when subjected to the expected racking motion, and the field performance of a building with four-sided structural silicone glazing during the Northridge earthquake are discussed. The details of a curtain wall design concept consisting of shop-glazed subframes connected to the building frame and the connections that accommodate seismic motion of the subframe relative to the building frame is developed. Specific recommendations are made for the design of the four-sided structural silicone glazing systems for seismic loads.

  3. Crustal structure beneath the gravity lineations in the Gravity Lineations, Intraplate Melting, Petrologic and Seismic Expedition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webb, Spahr C.

    , Petrologic and Seismic Expedition (GLIMPSE) study area from seismic refraction data R. Chadwick Holmes,1, Intraplate Melting, Petrologic and Seismic Expedition (GLIMPSE) experiment investigated the velocity in the Gravity Lineations, Intraplate Melting, Petrologic and Seismic Expedition (GLIMPSE) study area from

  4. Geophysical inversion with adaptive array processing of ambient noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Traer, James

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    transfer ocean surface wave energy into the Earth’s crustthe transmission of surface wave energy to seismic energy issteady high winds and wave energy [see Fig.2.1 (c)–(e)] over

  5. An Integrated Geophysical Study Of The Geothermal Field Of Tule...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tule Chek, B.C., Mexico, geothermal area were used to compute such trade-off diagrams. Seismic results were employed to constrain the gravity interpretation. An upper bound on...

  6. american geophysical union: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1-D velocity models and the double-difference method were used for the relocation of seismic events. Geostatistical analysis shows that in first Marco, Shmuel "Shmulik" 12 2009...

  7. Assessment of government tribology programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, M.B.; Levinson, T.M.

    1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An assessment has been made to determine current tribology research and development work sponsored or conducted by the government. Data base surveys and discussions were conducted to isolate current projects sponsored primarily by 21 different government organizations. These projects were classified by subject, objective, energy relevance, type of research, phenomenon being investigated, variables being studied, type of motion, materials and application. An abstract of each project was prepared which included the classification, sponsor, performing organization and a project description. It was found that current work is primarily materials oriented to meet military requirements. Other than the high temperature programs very few of the tribology projects accomplish energy related objectives.

  8. Three-Year Non-Tenure Track Visiting Assistant Professor Position Geophysics -The University of Alabama Department of Geological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Chunmiao

    Three-Year Non-Tenure Track Visiting Assistant Professor Position ­ Geophysics - The University of Alabama invites applications for a three-year, non-tenure track visiting faculty position in geophysics geophysical sub-disciplines, preference will be given to candidates who will enhance our existing geophysics

  9. Canadian seismic agreement. Annual report. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wetmiller, R.J.; Lyons, J.A.; Shannon, W.E.; Munro, P.S.; Thomas, J.T.; Andrew, M.D.; Lamontagne, M.; Drysdale, J.A.

    1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Activities undertaken by the Geophysics Division, Geological Survey of Canada (GSC) during the period June 1985 to June 1986 and supported in part by the NRC are described below under four headings; ECTN and portable network developments, datalab developments, strong motion network developments and earthquake activity.

  10. Seismic Line Location Map Hot Pot Project, Humboldt County, Nevada 2010

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    Location of seismic lines carried out under DOE funded project Advanced Seismic Data Analysis Program (The Hot Pot Project).

  11. Seismic Line Location Map Hot Pot Project, Humboldt County, Nevada 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lane, Michael

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Location of seismic lines carried out under DOE funded project Advanced Seismic Data Analysis Program (The Hot Pot Project).

  12. First Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

    2010-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. The Hanford Seismic Network recorded 81 local earthquakes during the first quarter of FY 2010. Sixty-five of these earthquakes were detected in the vicinity of Wooded Island, located about eight miles north of Richland just west of the Columbia River. The Wooded Island events recorded this quarter is a continuation of the swarm events observed during fiscal year 2009 and reported in previous quarterly and annual reports (Rohay et al; 2009a, 2009b, 2009c, and 2009d). Most of the events were considered minor (coda-length magnitude [Mc] less than 1.0) with only 1 event in the 2.0-3.0 range; the maximum magnitude event (2.5 Mc) occurred on December 22 at depth 2.1 km. The average depth of the Wooded Island events during the quarter was 1.4 km with a maximum depth estimated at 3.1 km. This placed the Wooded Island events within the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG). The low magnitude of the Wooded Island events has made them undetectable to all but local area residents. The Hanford SMA network was triggered several times by these events and the SMA recordings are discussed in section 6.0. During the last year some Hanford employees working within a few miles of the swarm area and individuals living directly across the Columbia River from the swarm center have reported feeling many of the larger magnitude events. Strong motion accelerometer (SMA) units installed directly above the swarm area at ground surface measured peak ground accelerations approaching 15% g, the largest values recorded at Hanford. This corresponds to strong shaking of the ground, consistent with what people in the local area have reported. However, the duration and magnitude of these swarm events should not result in any structural damage to facilities. The USGS performed a geophysical survey using satellite interferometry that detected approximately 1 inch uplift in surface deformation along an east-west transect within the swarm area. The uplift is thought to be caused by the release of pressure that has built up in sedimentary layers, cracking the brittle basalt layers with the Columbia River Basalt Formation (CRBG) and causing the earthquakes. Similar earthquake swarms have been recorded near this same location in 1970, 1975 and 1988 but not with SMA readings or satellite imagery. Prior to the 1970s, swarming may have occurred, but equipment was not in place to record those events. The Wooded Island swarm, due its location and the limited magnitude of the events, does not appear to pose any significant risk to Hanford waste storage facilities. Since swarms of the past did not intensify in magnitude, seismologists do not expect that these events will persist or increase in intensity. However, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) will continue to monitor the activity. Outside of the Wooded Island swarm, sixteen earthquakes were recorded, all minor events. Seven earthquakes were located at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km), most likely in the pre-basalt sediments and nine earthquakes at depths greater than 9 km, within the basement. Geographically, seven earthquakes were located in known swarm areas and nine earthquakes were classified as random events.

  13. GOVERNING COUNCIL Asbestos Management Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boonstra, Rudy

    : · The University will establish an Asbestos Management Program which will outline a comprehensive system to actively manage and stringently control all asbestos-containing materials in University buildings, and allGOVERNING COUNCIL Asbestos Management Policy June 23, 2011 To request an official copy

  14. University of Toronto Governing Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Yu

    , overall cost estimate and sources of funds) as defined in the Project Planning Report Business BoardfiVO AR BO R VELUT University of Toronto Governing Council W eb C opy Policy on Capital Planning and Capital Projects June 28, 2001 To request an official copy of this policy, contact: The Office

  15. Florida Atlantic University Student Government

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    : The purpose of club funding is to assist Florida Atlantic University recognized student clubs2 #12;2 Florida Atlantic University Student Government Council of Student Organizations (COSO) Boca Raton Campus Funding and Emergency Funding Policies and Procedures CHAPTER I: STATEMENTS Title A

  16. Government Personal Property Asset Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish procedures for managing Government personal owned or leased by the Department of Energy (DOE) and in the custody of DOE Headquarters employees, including those in the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), in accordance with Federal and Departmental regulations. Cancels HQ O 580.1.

  17. Australian Government on ILLEGAL logging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Australian Government the AXE on ILLEGAL logging Bringing down a practical approach AN AUSTRALIAN. NOVEMBER 2006 #12;#12;Foreword Illegal logging corrupts the trade in timber-based products and inevitably management of the world's forest resources. Therefore, it is in Australia's interests to stop illegal logging

  18. Government 2020 and the perpetual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -based strategic insights for senior executives around critical public and private sector issues. This executive;1 The future of societies around the world is being shaped by six drivers outside the realm of government control. Powerful changes related to demographics, globalization, environmental concerns, societal

  19. Second and Third Quarters Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartshorn, Donald C.; Reidel, Stephen P.; Rohay, Alan C.

    1999-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Hanford Seismic Monitoring provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network (HSN) for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. Hanford Seismic Monitoring also locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site.

  20. EOS, TRANSACTIONS, AMERICAN GEOPHYSICAL UNION Geomagnetic data provided by different

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michigan, University of

    (from measurements to modeling) in Encyclopedia of Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism [Gub- bins geomagnetic variations over a long time and at a given location. Currently, more than 70 countries oper- ateEOS, TRANSACTIONS, AMERICAN GEOPHYSICAL UNION Geomagnetic data provided by different platforms

  1. Surface OceanLower Atmosphere Processes Geophysical Research Series 187

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohfeld, Karen

    , British Columbia, Canada Andy Ridgwell Bristol Research Initiative for the Dynamic Global Environment251 Surface Ocean­Lower Atmosphere Processes Geophysical Research Series 187 Copyright 2009, and processes have been identified that have improved our understanding of the modern and future carbon cycle

  2. Hydrogeological-Geophysical Methods for Subsurface Site Characterization - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubin, Yoram

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this research project is to increase water savings and show better ecological control of natural vegetation by developing hydrogeological-geophysical methods for characterizing the permeability and content of water in soil. The ground penetrating radar (GPR) tool was developed and used as the surface geophysical method for monitoring water content. Initial results using the tool suggest that surface GPR is a viable technique for obtaining precision volumetric water content profile estimates, and that laboratory-derived petrophysical relationships could be applied to field-scale GPR data. A field-scale bacterial transport study was conducted within an uncontaminated sandy Pleistocene aquifer to evaluate the importance of heterogeneity in controlling the transport of bacteria. Geochemical, hydrological, geological, and geophysical data were collected to characterize the site prior to and after chemical and bacterial injection experiments. Study results shows that, even within the fairly uniform shallow marine deposits of the narrow channel focus area, heterogeneity existed that influenced the chemical tracer transport over lateral distances of a few meters and vertical distances of less than a half meter. The interpretation of data suggest that the incorporation of geophysical data with limited hydrological data may provide valuable information about the stratigraphy, log conductivity values, and the spatial correlation structure of log conductivity, which have traditionally been obtainable only by performing extensive and intrusive hydrological sampling.

  3. JournalofGeophysicalResearch: EarthSurface RESEARCH ARTICLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Small, Eric

    surface, referred to as "bed topography." Observations show that bed topography affects erosion. HereJournalofGeophysicalResearch: EarthSurface RESEARCH ARTICLE 10.1002/2013JF002872 Key Points topography yields orders of magnitude increase in erosion rates · With bed topography, greatest ero- sion

  4. ADVANCES IN GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 39 LOCAL TSUNAMIS AND EARTHQUAKE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    equations describe the evolution of tsunamis during run-up in such a way that the shoreline is fixed in (ADVANCES IN GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 39 LOCAL TSUNAMIS AND EARTHQUAKE SOURCE PARAMETERS ERIC L. GEIST u in estimating the severity of local tsunamis gener- ated by earthquakes is explaining the great event

  5. Geophysical phenomena during an ionospheric modication experiment at Troms, Norway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Geophysical phenomena during an ionospheric modi®cation experiment at Tromsù, Norway N. F-9037, Tromsù, and The University Courses of Svalbard, Svalbard, Norway 3 EISCAT, N-9027 Ramfjùrdbotn, Norway Received: 13 October 1997 / Revised: 11 May 1998 / Accepted: 26 May 1998 Abstract. We present

  6. Nonlinear Processes in Geophysics (2002) 9: 7578 Nonlinear Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Geophysical Society 2002 A universal mirror wave-mode threshold condition for non-thermal space plasma plasmas. As a result, the transition from two temperature Maxwellians to realistic non-thermal features type modes downstream of the Earth's bow shock were reported (Hubert et al., 1989). The dispersion

  7. Nonlinear Processes in Geophysics (2001) 8: 201209 Nonlinear Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of prediction of climate changes due to hu- man activity. All anthropogenic actions on the climate sys- tem Geophysical Society 2001 Climate model attractors: chaos, quasi-regularity and sensitivity to small, Russia Received: 6 July 2000 ­ Revised: 25 October 2000 ­ Accepted: 28 November 2000 Abstract

  8. Hengill geothermal volcanic complex (Iceland) characterized by integrated geophysical observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hengill geothermal volcanic complex (Iceland) characterized by integrated geophysical observations be used to infer the location of magma chambers or productive geothermal areas. The Hengill volcanic triple-junction complex has a well-developed geothermal system, which is being exploited to extract hot

  9. JournalofGeophysicalResearch: SpacePhysics RESEARCH ARTICLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Usoskin, Ilya G.

    of the high-energy solar particles in interplanetary space. The method includes the determination , and I. G. Usoskin1,3 1 Sodankylä Geophysical Observatory (Oulu Unit), University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland, 2 Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia, Bulgaria

  10. Nonlinear Processes in Geophysics (2001) 8: 429438 Nonlinear Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geophysical Society 2001 Mesoscale predictability under various synoptic regimes W. A. Nuss and D. K. Miller slightly ro- tated terrain are compared to gauge the sentivity of mesoscale forecasts to small forecast errors on the mesoscale in both wind and precipitation. The largest mesoscale errors occur when

  11. governance

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysisDarby Dietrich5 |0/%2A0/%2A

  12. SEISMIC ATTENUATION FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel Walls; M.T. Taner; Gary Mavko; Jack Dvorkin

    2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In fully-saturated rock and at ultrasonic frequencies, the microscopic squirt flow induced between the stiff and soft parts of the pore space by an elastic wave is responsible for velocity-frequency dispersion and attenuation. In the seismic frequency range, it is the macroscopic cross-flow between the stiffer and softer parts of the rock. We use the latter hypothesis to introduce simple approximate equations for velocity-frequency dispersion and attenuation in a fully water saturated reservoir. The equations are based on the assumption that in heterogeneous rock and at a very low frequency, the effective elastic modulus of the fully-saturated rock can be estimated by applying a fluid substitution procedure to the averaged (upscaled) dry frame whose effective porosity is the mean porosity and the effective elastic modulus is the Backus-average (geometric mean) of the individual dry-frame elastic moduli of parts of the rock. At a higher frequency, the effective elastic modulus of the saturated rock is the Backus-average of the individual fully-saturated-rock elastic moduli of parts of the rock. The difference between the effective elastic modulus calculated separately by these two methods determines the velocity-frequency dispersion. The corresponding attenuation is calculated from this dispersion by using (e.g.) the standard linear solid attenuation model.

  13. Annual Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartshorn, Donald C.; Reidel, Steve P.; Rohay, Alan C.

    2004-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes seismic activity at and around the Hanford Site during Fiscal Year 2004. It is also the first description of seismic activity during the fourth quarter of FY04.

  14. Seismic Reflection Studies in Long Valley Caldera, Califomia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Black, Ross A.; Deemer, Sharon J.; Smithson, Scott B.

    1991-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Seismic reflection studies in Long Valley caldera, California, indicate that seismic methods may be successfully employed to image certain types of features in young silicic caldera environments. However, near-surface ...

  15. Seismic Facies Classification And Identification By Competitive Neural Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saggaf, Muhammad M.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an approach based on competitive networks for the classification and identification of reservoir facies from seismic data. This approach can be adapted to perform either classification of the seismic facies based ...

  16. A Study of SSI Effects Incorporating Seismic Wave Incoherence...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    A Study of SSI Effects Incorporating Seismic Wave Incoherence within the DOE Complex A Study of SSI Effects Incorporating Seismic Wave Incoherence within the DOE Complex A Study of...

  17. Time-lapse seismic monitoring of subsurface fluid flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuh, Sung H.

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Time-lapse seismic monitoring repeats 3D seismic imaging over a reservoir to map fluid movements in a reservoir. During hydrocarbon production, the fluid saturation, pressure, and temperature of a reservoir change, thereby altering the acoustic...

  18. Motion based seismic design and loss estimation of diagrid structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liptack, Robert J. (Robert Jeffrey)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Diagrids are becoming an increasingly popular structural system in high rise design and construction. Little research has been performed on the seismic performance of Diagrids and how it integrates with seismic loss ...

  19. Characterization of the Virgo Seismic Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Virgo Collaboration; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; P. Astone; G. Ballardin; F. Barone; M. Barsuglia; A. Basti; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; M. G. Beker; A. Belletoile; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; M. Blom; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; V. Boschi; L. Bosi; B. Bouhou; S. Braccini; C. Bradaschia; M. Branchesi; T. Briant; A. Brillet; V. Brisson; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; G. Cagnoli; E. Calloni; B. Canuel; F. Carbognani; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; E. Cesarini; O. Chaibi; E. Chassande-Mottin; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; C. N. Colacino; J. Colas; A. Colla; M. Colombini; A. Conte; M. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; E. Cuoco; S. DAntonio; V. Dattilo; M. Davier; R. Day; R. De Rosa; G. Debreczeni; W. Del Pozzo; M. del Prete; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; M. Di Paolo Emilio; A. Di Virgilio; A. Dietz; M. Drago; G. Endroczi; V. Fafone; I. Ferrante; F. Fidecaro; I. Fiori; R. Flaminio; L. A. Forte; J. -D. Fournier; J. Franc; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Galimberti; L. Gammaitoni; F. Garufi; M. E. Gaspar; G. Gemme; E. Genin; A. Gennai; A. Giazotto; R. Gouaty; M. Granata; C. Greverie; G. M. Guidi; J. -F. Hayau; A. Heidmann; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; P. Jaranowski; I. Kowalska; A. Krolak; N. Leroy; N. Letendre; T. G. F. Li; N. Liguori; M. Lorenzini; V. Loriette; G. Losurdo; E. Majorana; I. Maksimovic; N. Man; M. Mantovani; F. Marchesoni; F. Marion; J. Marque; F. Martelli; A. Masserot; C. Michel; L. Milano; Y. Minenkov; M. Mohan; N. Morgado; A. Morgia; S. Mosca; B. Mours; L. Naticchioni; F. Nocera; G. Pagliaroli; L. Palladino; C. Palomba; F. Paoletti; M. Parisi; A. Pasqualetti; R. Passaquieti; D. Passuello; G. Persichetti; F. Piergiovanni; M. Pietka; L. Pinard; R. Poggiani; M. Prato; G. A. Prodi; M. Punturo; P. Puppo; D. S. Rabeling; I. Racz; P. Rapagnani; V. Re; T. Regimbau; F. Ricci; F. Robinet; A. Rocchi; L. Rolland; R. Romano; D. Rosinska; P. Ruggi; B. Sassolas; D. Sentenac; L. Sperandio; R. Sturani; B. Swinkels; M. Tacca; L. Taffarello; A. Toncelli; M. Tonelli; O. Torre; E. Tournefier; F. Travasso; G. Vajente; J. F. J. van den Brand; C. Van Den Broeck; S. van der Putten; M. Vasuth; M. Vavoulidis; G. Vedovato; D. Verkindt; F. Vetrano; A. Vicere; J. -Y. Vinet; S. Vitale; H. Vocca; R. L. Ward; M. Was; M. Yvert; A. Zadrozny; J. -P. Zendri

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Virgo gravitational wave detector is an interferometer (ITF) with 3km arms located in Pisa, Italy. From July to October 2010, Virgo performed its third science run (VSR3) in coincidence with the LIGO detectors. Despite several techniques adopted to isolate the interferometer from the environment, seismic noise remains an important issue for Virgo. Vibrations produced by the detector infrastructure (such as air conditioning units, water chillers/heaters, pumps) are found to affect Virgo's sensitivity, with the main coupling mechanisms being through beam jitter and scattered light processes. The Advanced Virgo (AdV) design seeks to reduce ITF couplings to environmental noise by having most vibration-sensitive components suspended and in-vacuum, as well as muffle and relocate loud machines. During the months of June and July 2010, a Guralp-3TD seismometer was stationed at various locations around the Virgo site hosting major infrastructure machines. Seismic data were examined using spectral and coherence analysis with seismic probes close to the detector. The primary aim of this study was to identify noisy machines which seismically affect the ITF environment and thus require mitigation attention. Analyzed machines are located at various distances from the experimental halls, ranging from 10m to 100m. An attempt is made to measure the attenuation of emitted noise at the ITF and correlate it to the distance from the source and to seismic attenuation models in soil.

  20. Salvo: Seismic imaging software for complex geologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    OBER,CURTIS C.; GJERTSEN,ROB; WOMBLE,DAVID E.

    2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes Salvo, a three-dimensional seismic-imaging software for complex geologies. Regions of complex geology, such as overthrusts and salt structures, can cause difficulties for many seismic-imaging algorithms used in production today. The paraxial wave equation and finite-difference methods used within Salvo can produce high-quality seismic images in these difficult regions. However this approach comes with higher computational costs which have been too expensive for standard production. Salvo uses improved numerical algorithms and methods, along with parallel computing, to produce high-quality images and to reduce the computational and the data input/output (I/O) costs. This report documents the numerical algorithms implemented for the paraxial wave equation, including absorbing boundary conditions, phase corrections, imaging conditions, phase encoding, and reduced-source migration. This report also describes I/O algorithms for large seismic data sets and images and parallelization methods used to obtain high efficiencies for both the computations and the I/O of seismic data sets. Finally, this report describes the required steps to compile, port and optimize the Salvo software, and describes the validation data sets used to help verify a working copy of Salvo.

  1. First Quarter Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohay, Alan C.; Reidel, Stephen P.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Clayton, Ray E.

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the earthquake data collected from October 2005 to December 2005 from the Hanford Seismic Network

  2. Towards the Understanding of Induced Seismicity in Enhanced Geothermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Continuum through Discontinuum Representations: Capturing Reservoir Stimulation, Evolution and Induced Seismicity Microearthquake Technology for EGS Fracture Characterization...

  3. Method for processing seismic data to identify anomalous absorption zones

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taner, M. Turhan

    2006-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed for identifying zones anomalously absorptive of seismic energy. The method includes jointly time-frequency decomposing seismic traces, low frequency bandpass filtering the decomposed traces to determine a general trend of mean frequency and bandwidth of the seismic traces, and high frequency bandpass filtering the decomposed traces to determine local variations in the mean frequency and bandwidth of the seismic traces. Anomalous zones are determined where there is difference between the general trend and the local variations.

  4. Geothermometry At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Shevenell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Shevenell & De Rocher, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location...

  5. Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada...

  6. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Yellowstone Region (Chatterjee...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Yellowstone Region (Chatterjee, Et Al., 1985) Exploration Activity...

  7. The Seismic Analyzer: Interpreting and Illustrating 2D Seismic Data Daniel Patel, Christopher Giertsen, John Thurmond, John Gjelberg, and M. Eduard Groller, Member, IEEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Seismic Analyzer: Interpreting and Illustrating 2D Seismic Data Daniel Patel, Christopher for quickly interpreting and illustrating 2D slices of seismic volumetric reflection data. Searching for oil of the seismic data prior to interpretation. We improve the annotation of seismic structures by applying novel

  8. NON-INVASIVE DETERMINATION OF THE LOCATION AND DISTRBUTION OF FREE-PHASE DENSE NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS (DNAPL) BY SEISMIC REFLECTION TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael G. Waddell; William J. Domoracki; Jerome Eyer

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Earth Sciences and Resources Institute, University of South Carolina is conducting a proof of concept study to determine the location and distribution of subsurface DNAPL carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}) contamination at the 216-Z-9 crib, 200 West area, DOE Hanford Site, Washington by use of two-dimensional high-resolution seismic reflection surveys and borehole geophysical data. The study makes use of recent advances in seismic reflection amplitude versus offset (AVO) technology to directly detect the presence of subsurface DNAPL. The techniques proposed are noninvasive means of site characterization and direct free-phase DNAPL detection. This final report covers the results of Tasks 1, 2, and 3. Task (1) contains site evaluation and seismic modeling studies. The site evaluation consists of identifying and collecting preexisting geological and geophysical information regarding subsurface structure and the presence and quantity of DNAPL. The seismic modeling studies were undertaken to determine the likelihood that an AVO response exists and its probable manifestation. Task (2) is the design and acquisition of 2-D seismic reflection data to image areas of probable high concentration of DNAPL. Task (3) is the processing and interpretation of the 2-D data. During the commission of these tasks four seismic reflection profiles were collected. Subsurface velocity information was obtained by vertical seismic profile surveys in three wells. The interpretation of these data is in two parts. Part one is the construction and interpretation of structural contour maps of the contact between the Hanford Fine unit and the underlying Plio/Pleistocene unit and of the contact between the Plio/Pleistocene unit and the underlying caliche layer. These two contacts were determined to be the most likely surfaces to contain the highest concentration CCl{sub 4}. Part two of the interpretation uses the results of the AVO modeling to locate any seismic amplitude anomalies that might be associated with the presence of high concentrations of CCl{sub 4}. Based on the modeling results three different methods of AVO analysis were preformed on the seismic data: enhanced amplitude stacks, offset range limited stacks, and gradient stacks. Seismic models indicate that the reflection from the contact between the Hanford Fine and the Plio/Pleistocene should exhibit amplitude variations where there are high concentrations of CCl{sub 4}. A series of different scenarios were modeled. The first scenario is the Hanford Fine pores are 100% saturated with CCl{sub 4} and the underlying Plio/Pleistocene pores are saturated with air. In this scenario the reflection coefficients are slightly negative at the small angles of incidence and become increasing more negative at the larger angles of incidence (dim-out). The second scenario is the Hanford Fine pores are saturated with air and Plio/Pleistocene pores are saturated with CCl{sub 4}. In this scenario the reflection coefficients are slightly positive at the small angles of incidence and become negative at the large angles of incidence (polarity reversal). Finally the third scenario is both the Hanford Fine and the Plio/Pleistocene pores are saturated CCl{sub 4}. In this scenario the reflection coefficients at the small angles of incidence are slightly positive, but much less than background response, and with increasing angle of incidence the reflection coefficients become slightly more positive. On the field data areas where extraction wells have high concentrations of CCl{sub 4} a corresponding dim-out and/or a polarity reversal is noted.

  9. Expressive Visualization and Rapid Interpretation of Seismic Volumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Expressive Visualization and Rapid Interpretation of Seismic Volumes Daniel Patel Thesis, Christopher Giertsen, John Thurmond, Eduard Gr¨oller The Seismic Analyzer: Interpreting and Illustrating 2D of Seismic Data Published in: Vision, Modelling and Visualization (VMV) 2007 Authors: Daniel Patel

  10. Knowledge Assisted Visualization Knowledge-assisted visualization of seismic data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for knowledge-assisted annotation and computer-assisted interpretation of seismic data for oil and gas, using seismic interpretation, is performed that makes it fit very naturally into the paradigmKnowledge Assisted Visualization Knowledge-assisted visualization of seismic data Daniel Patel a

  11. Staged Hybrid Genetic Search for Seismic Data Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitley, Darrell

    Christof Stork yy and Tony Kusuma yy Abstract --- Seismic data interpretation problems are typ­ icallyStaged Hybrid Genetic Search for Seismic Data Imaging Keith E. Mathias, y L. Darrell Whitley, y. Geological exploration em­ ploys seismic reflection surveys to obtain subsurface im­ ages of geologic beds

  12. Finding hydrocarbons in the classroom using "free" seismic interpretation software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finding hydrocarbons in the classroom using "free" seismic interpretation software WAYNE D Technological Univer- sity, we recently introduced a new course in seismic processing and interpretation of this paper is to pro- vide details of the class assignment in seismic interpretation, and to encourage

  13. STOCHASTIC SEISMIC EMISSION FROM ACOUSTIC GLORIES AND THE QUIET SUN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Douglas C.

    STOCHASTIC SEISMIC EMISSION FROM ACOUSTIC GLORIES AND THE QUIET SUN A.-C. DONEA1, C. LINDSEY2 and D; accepted 8 January 2000) Abstract. Helioseismic images of multipolar active regions show enhanced seismic'. The acoustic glories contain elements that sustain an average seismic emission 50% greater than similar

  14. Tutorial on seismic interferometry: Part 1 --Basic principles and applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snieder, Roel

    Tutorial on seismic interferometry: Part 1 -- Basic principles and applications Kees Wapenaar1 , Deyan Draganov1 , Roel Snieder2 , Xander Campman3 , and Arie Verdel3 ABSTRACT Seismic interferometry is the retrieval of seismic surface-wave responses from ambient noise and the subsequent tomographic determination

  15. Seismic Retrofitting of RC Frames with RC Infilling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seismic Retrofitting of RC Frames with RC Infilling SERIES Workshop: "Role of research infrastructures in seismic rehabilitation" 8 - 9 February 2012, Istanbul, Turkey C. Z. Chrysostomou, N. Kyriakides, P. Kotronis, P. Roussis, M. Poljansek, F. Taucer RC Infilling of Existing RC Structures for Seismic

  16. Global seismic monitoring as probabilistic inference Nimar S. Arora

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Stuart

    Global seismic monitoring as probabilistic inference Nimar S. Arora Department of Computer Science of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), primarily through detection and localization of seismic events. We nuclear explosions. A global network of seismic, radionuclide, hydroacoustic, and infrasound sensors

  17. Seismic Observation Systems in Nagoya University and Publication of Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    Seismic Observation Systems in Nagoya University and Publication of Data Nobuo Fukuwa,a) Jun Tobita,b) and Hiroaki Kojimac) This paper reports the current situation of the seismic monitoring program conducted by Nagoya University. First, the system for observing seismic ground motion in the Tokai Region is described

  18. Seismic Engineering Research Infrastructures for European Synergies (SERIES)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seismic Engineering Research Infrastructures for European Synergies (SERIES) M.N. Fardis University of Patras, Greece SUMMARY: Through the 4-year project SERIES (Seismic Engineering Research Infrastructures of their research. It also helps them to enhance their potential, by jointly developing novel seismic testing

  19. Seismic shape parameters estimation and ground-roll suppression using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spagnolini, Umberto

    Seismic shape parameters estimation and ground-roll suppression using vector-sensor beamforming the problem of estimating the shape parameters of seismic wavefields in linear arrays. The purpose of the subsurface layers from the seismic wavefields registered by surface sensors. However, only the waves

  20. Seismic Velocity Estimation from Time Migration Maria Kourkina Cameron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cameron, Maria Kourkina

    Seismic Velocity Estimation from Time Migration by Maria Kourkina Cameron Diplom (Moscow Institute Dung-Hai Lee Spring 2007 #12;Seismic Velocity Estimation from Time Migration Copyright c 2007 by Maria Kourkina Cameron #12;Abstract Seismic Velocity Estimation from Time Migration by Maria Kourkina Cameron