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1

Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Jump to: navigation, search Statute Name Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Year 1953 Url [[File:|160px|link=]] Description References Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act pdf[1] This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Enacted in 1953, the Outer Continental Lands Act provides for the jurisdiction of the United States over the submerged lands of the outer Continental Shelf, and authorizes the Secretary of the Interior to lease such lands for certain purposes. "It is hereby declared to be the policy of the United States that- (1) the subsoil and seabed of the outer Continental Shelf appertain to the United States and are subject to its jurisdiction, control, and power of disposition as provided in this Act..."

2

Federal Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Production Statistics...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tags Minerals Management Service, MMS, Production, natural gas, gas, condensate, crude oil, oil, OCS production, Outer Continental Shelf, OSC, EIA, Energy Information...

3

Federal Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Production Statistics...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Statistics Energy Data Apps Maps Challenges Resources Blogs Let's Talk Energy Beta You are here Data.gov Communities Energy Data Federal Outer Continental Shelf Oil and...

4

Federal Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Production Statistics...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ALASKA Energy Data Apps Maps Challenges Resources Blogs Let's Talk Energy Beta You are here Data.gov Communities Energy Data Federal Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas...

5

Federal Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Production Statistics...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pacific Energy Data Apps Maps Challenges Resources Blogs Let's Talk Energy Beta You are here Data.gov Communities Energy Data Federal Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas...

6

Federal Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Production Statistics - Pacific  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pacific Pacific Energy Data Apps Maps Challenges Resources Blogs Let's Talk Energy Beta You are here Data.gov » Communities » Energy » Data Federal Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Production Statistics - Pacific Dataset Summary Description Federal Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Production Statistics for the Pacific by month and summarized annually. Tags {"Minerals Management Service",MMS,Production,"natural gas",gas,condensate,"crude oil",oil,"OCS production","Outer Continental Shelf",OSC,EIA,"Energy Information Agency",federal,DOE,"Department of Energy",DOI,"Department of the Interior","Pacific "} Dataset Ratings Overall 0 No votes yet Data Utility 0 No votes yet Usefulness

7

OIL AND GAS LEASING ON THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil and Gas Leasing, Exploration, & Development Process Solicit Comments 45-day Comment Period DraftOIL AND GAS LEASING ON THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF M i n e r a l s M a n a g e m e n t S e r v i c e www.mms.gov #12;OIL AND GAS LEASING ON THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Background The Minerals

Lotko, William

8

A Downscaled Wind Climatology on the Outer Continental Shelf  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 31-yr time series of boundary layer winds has been developed for a region on the outer continental shelf. This simulated time series was designed to be suitable to study the wind resources for a potential offshore wind farm. Reanalysis data were ...

Bryan K. Woods; Thomas Nehrkorn; John M. Henderson

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

A 30-Year Wind Climatology on the Outer Continental Shelf  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 31-year time series of boundary layer winds has been developed for a region on the outer continental shelf. This simulated time series was designed to be suitable to study the wind resources for a potential offshore wind farm. Reanalysis data ...

Bryan K. Woods; Thomas Nehrkorn; John M. Henderson

10

Potential alternative energy technologies on the Outer Continental Shelf.  

SciTech Connect

This technical memorandum (TM) describes the technology requirements for three alternative energy technologies for which pilot and/or commercial projects on the U.S. Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) are likely to be proposed within the next five to seven years. For each of the alternative technologies--wind, wave, and ocean current--the TM first presents an overview. After each technology-specific overview, it describes the technology requirements for four development phases: site monitoring and testing, construction, operation, and decommissioning. For each phase, the report covers the following topics (where data are available): facility description, electricity generated, ocean area (surface and bottom) occupied, resource requirements, emissions and noise sources, hazardous materials stored or used, transportation requirements, and accident potential. Where appropriate, the TM distinguishes between pilot-scale (or demonstration-scale) facilities and commercial-scale facilities.

Elcock, D.; Environmental Assessment

2007-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

11

Lease Issuance for Marine Hydrokinetic Technology Testing on the Outer Continental Shelf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Interior the Interior Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Office of Renewable Energy Programs OCS EIS/EA BOEM 2013-01140 Lease Issuance for Marine Hydrokinetic Technology Testing on the Outer Continental Shelf Offshore Florida Revised Environmental Assessment OCS EIS/EA BOEM 2013-01140 Lease Issuance for Marine Hydrokinetic Technology Testing on the Outer Continental Shelf Offshore Florida Revised Environmental Assessment Author Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Office of Renewable Energy Programs Published by U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Office of Renewable Energy Programs August 2013 iii FINDING OF NO SIGNIIFCANT IMPACT Lease Issuance for Marine Hydrokinetic Technology Testing on the Outer Continental

12

Observed Oceanic Response over the Upper Continental Slope and Outer Shelf during Hurricane Ivan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hurricane Ivan passed directly over an array of 14 acoustic Doppler current profilers deployed along the outer continental shelf and upper slope in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. Currents in excess of 200 cm s?1 were generated during this ...

W. J. Teague; E. Jarosz; D. W. Wang; D. A. Mitchell

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Federal Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Production Statistics - Gulf of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gulf of Gulf of Mexico Energy Data Apps Maps Challenges Resources Blogs Let's Talk Energy Beta You are here Data.gov » Communities » Energy » Data Federal Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Production Statistics - Gulf of Mexico Dataset Summary Description Federal Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Production Statistics for the Gulf of Mexico by month and summarized annually. Tags {"Minerals Management Service",MMS,Production,"natural gas",gas,condensate,"crude oil",oil,"OCS production","Outer Continental Shelf",OSC,EIA,"Energy Information Agency",federal,DOE,"Department of Energy",DOI,"Department of the Interior","Gulf of Mexico"} Dataset Ratings Overall 0 No votes yet Data Utility

14

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/JIP GOM Hydrate Research Cruise  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

While Drilling Operations The downhole logging while drilling (LWD) operations in the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate JIP Drilling Program (GOM-JIP) was designed in part to obtain...

15

Impacts of Increased Access to Oil & Natural Gas Resources in the Lower 48 Federal Outer Continental Shelf (released in AEO2007)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This analysis was updated for AEO2009: Impact of Limitations on Access to Oil and Natural Gas Resources in the Federal Outer Continental ShelfThe OCS is estimated to contain substantial resources of crude oil and natural gas; however, some areas of the OCS are subject to drilling restrictions. With energy prices rising over the past several years, there has been increased interest in the development of more domestic oil and natural gas supply, including OCS resources. In the past, Federal efforts to encourage exploration and development activities in the deep waters of the OCS have been limited primarily to regulations that would reduce royalty payments by lease holders. More recently, the States of Alaska and Virginia have asked the Federal Government to consider leasing in areas off their coastlines that are off limits as a result of actions by the President or Congress. In response, the Minerals Management Service (MMS) of the U.S. Department of the Interior has included in its proposed 5-year leasing plan for 2007-2012 sales of one lease in the Mid-Atlantic area off the coastline of Virginia and two leases in the North Aleutian Basin area of Alaska. Development in both areas still would require lifting of the current ban on drilling.

Information Center

2007-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

16

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/JIP GOM Hydrate Research Cruise  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wireline Logging Wireline Logging From: Timothy Collett, USGS Conventional Wireline Logging Operations in the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate JIP Drilling Program Conventional wireline (CWL) logging operations in the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate JIP Drilling Program (GOM-JIP) was scheduled to include the deployment of a signal logging string (Figure 1) and a vertical seismic profiling (VSP) tool (Figure 2) in several of the Atwater Valley and Keathley Canyon drill sites. The only wireline logging tool scheduled to be deployed was the FMS-sonic tool string, which consisted of the Formation MicroScanner (FMS), a general purpose inclinometer tool (GPIT), and scintillation gamma ray tool (SGT), and the dipole shear sonic imager tool (DSI). The vertical seismic imager tool (VSI) will also be deployed during the GOM-JIP drilling program. The wireline logging tools were provided by Schlumberger wireline services.

17

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/JIP GOM Hydrate Research Cruise  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cruise Cruise Special Report - Bottom-Simulating Reflections(BSR). Seismic lines from deep continental shelves all around the world contain anomalous reflections known as bottom-simulating reflections(BSR). The reflections mimic the sea-floor topography at a near constant depth below the surface, and commonly cut across geological layers. The nature of the reflection indicates a horizon across which seismic velocity dramatically decreases. At one time, scientists thought the reflection must be due to some mineralogical alteration in the sediment due to heat and pressure. Once the existence of natural methane hydrate was established, BSRs were thought to record the decrease in velocity when passing from hydrate-bearing sediments to those containing only water. Therefore, BSRs were thought to be a direct indicator of hydrate: no BSR meant no hydrate. However, the velocity contrast between hydrate and no-hydrate was determined to be insufficient to cause BSRs. Today, scientists have established that BSRs are an indication of concentrations of free methane gas that is blocked from further upward migration by the presence of methane hydrate in the overlying layers. Consequently, the distribution of BSRs may mark only a subset of the areas containing hydrate.

18

Performance Evaluation of HYCOM-GOM for Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment in the Florida Strait  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DoE) is assessing and mapping the potential off-shore ocean current hydrokinetic energy resources along the U.S. coastline, excluding tidal currents, to facilitate market penetration of water power technologies. This resource assessment includes information on the temporal and three-dimensional spatial distribution of the daily averaged power density, and the overall theoretical hydrokinetic energy production, based on modeled historical simulations spanning a 7-year period of record using HYCOM-GOM, an ocean current observation assimilation model that generates a spatially distributed three-dimensional representation of daily averaged horizontal current magnitude and direction time series from which power density time series and their statistics can be derived. This study ascertains the deviation of HYCOM-GOM outputs, including transport (flow) and power density, from outputs based on three independent observation sources to evaluate HYCOM-GOM performance. The three independent data sources include NOAA s submarine cable data of transport, ADCP data at a high power density location, and HF radar data in the high power density region of the Florida Strait. Comparisons with these three independent observation sets indicate discrepancies with HYCOM model outputs, but overall indicate that the HYCOM-GOM model can provide an adequate assessment of the ocean current hydrokinetic resource in high power density regions like the Florida Strait. Additional independent observational data, in particular stationary ADCP measurements, would be useful for expanding this model performance evaluation study. ADCP measurements are rare in ocean environments not influenced by tides, and limited to one location in the Florida Strait. HF radar data, although providing great spatial coverage, is limited to surface currents only.

Neary, Vincent S [ORNL; Gunawan, Budi [ORNL; Ryou, Albert S [ORNL

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Continental drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Workshop on Continental Drilling was convened to prepare a report for submission to the US Geodynamics Committee with respect to the contribution that could be made by land drilling to resolve major problems of geodynamics and consider the mechanisms by which the responsibility for scientific planning, establishment of priorities, administration, and budgeting for a land-drilling program within the framework of the aims of the Geodynamics Project would best be established. A new and extensive program to study the continental crust is outlined in this report. The Workshop focused on the following topics: processes in the continental crust (mechanism of faulting and earthquakes, hydrothermal systems and active magma chambers); state and structure of the continental crust (heat flow and thermal structure of the crust; state of ambient stress in the North American plate; extent, regional structure, and evolution of crystalline continental crust); short hole investigations; present state and needs of drilling technology; drill hole experimentation and instrumentation; suggestions for organization and operation of drilling project; and suggested level of effort and funding. Four recommendations are set down. 8 figures, 5 tables. (RWR)

Shoemaker, E.M. (ed.)

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

A Laboratory Model of Cooling over the Continental Shelf  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A laboratory experiment is conducted where hot water is cooled by exposure to air in a cylindrical rotating tank with a flat shallow outer continental shelf region next to a sloping continental slope bottom and a flat deep ocean center. It ...

J. A. Whitehead

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gom outer continental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

NETL: National Methane Hydrates R&D Program- 2009 GOM JIP Expedition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Expedition - The LWD Program Expedition - The LWD Program GoM JIP Leg II will feature a state-of-the-art LWD tool combination that will provide unprecedented information on the nature of the sediments and their pore fill constituents. The program will feature full research-level LWD data on formation lithology and porosity, and will include Schlumberger’s MP3 (quadrapole sonic tool) and PeriScope (3-D high-resolution resistivity) tools. These tools will provide full 3-D information on the both acoustic (both compressional and shear wave) and electrical properties of the sediment enabling the improved evaluation of gas hydrate in both pore filling and fracture-filling modes. This full suite of LWD tools includes the 4.75" MP3 multipole acoustic tool immediately behind the 6.75" bit, followed by an 8.5" reamer which opens up the hole for the 6.75" LWD tools that follow. These include the geoVISION resistivity imaging tool, the EcoScope integrated propagation resistivity, density and neutron tool, the TeleScope MWD tool, the PeriScope directional propagation resistivity tool, and the sonicVISION monopole acoustic tool whose sensors are ~160 ft above the bit.

22

Continental Shelf Fishing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: Why do most commercial fisherman don't fish beyond the continental shelf? Replies: The deep waters of the ocean offer little food...

23

Live From Outer Space  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Live from Outer Space: How Cells Influence the Growth of Nanostructures Live from Outer Space: How Cells Influence the Growth of Nanostructures Far above the heads of Earthlings, arrays of single-cell creatures embedded in nanostructures ride on the International Space Station (courtesy of Sandia National Laboratories and the University of New Mexico, NASA, and the U.S. Air Force) to test whether nanostructures whose formations were directed by yeast and other single cells can create more secure homes for their occupants-even in the vacuum and radiation of outer space-than those created by more standard chemical procedures. Cheap, tiny, and very lightweight sensors of chemical or biological agents could be made from long-lived cells that require no upkeep, yet sense and then communicate effectively with each other and their external

24

Estimation of Continental Precipitation Recycling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The total amount of water that precipitates on large continental regions is supplied by two mechanisms: 1) advection from the surrounding areas external to the region and 2) evaporation and transpiration from the land surface within the region. ...

Kaye L. Brubaker; Dara Entekhabi; P. S. Eagleson

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

C-Mod Outer Divertor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Outer Divertor Outer Divertor Upgrade - CDR 8/13/2010 MIT PSFC Contributions from: Jeff Doody, Soren Harrison, Dan Karnes, Bruce Lipschultz, Sam Pierson, Peter Titus, Rui Vieira, Jim Zaks, Han Zhang, Lihua Zhou 1 C-Mod Outer Divertor Upgrade - CDR * Motivation & requirements * Engineering design & analysis * Impact on vessel * Safety * Project plan & schedule * Budget 2 New divertor physics background and specification ! New divertor conceptual design review, August 13, 2010 ! B. Lipschultz ! Special thanks to R. Granetz, S. Wolfe and I. Hutchinson ! Motivation Specification of design goals Specification of load scenarios New divertor conceptual design review, August 13, 2010 ! General operation! * ICRF power: 0.5-1.0s of up to 6 MW! * Melting at leading edges of divertor sections (10)!

26

Outer bounds for user cooperation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We obtain a dependence balance based outer bound on the capacity region of the two-user multiple access channel with generalized feedback (MAC-GF). We investigate a Gaussian MAC with user-cooperation (MAC-UC), where each transmitter receives an additive ...

Ravi Tandon; Sennur Ulukus

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Turbine airfoil with a compliant outer wall  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine with a cooling system and a compliant dual wall configuration configured to enable thermal expansion between inner and outer layers while eliminating stress formation in the outer layer is disclosed. The compliant dual wall configuration may be formed a dual wall formed from inner and outer layers separated by a support structure. The outer layer may be a compliant layer configured such that the outer layer may thermally expand and thereby reduce the stress within the outer layer. The outer layer may be formed from a nonplanar surface configured to thermally expand. In another embodiment, the outer layer may be planar and include a plurality of slots enabling unrestricted thermal expansion in a direction aligned with the outer layer.

Campbell, Christian X. (Oviedo, FL); Morrison, Jay A. (Oviedo, FL)

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

28

Tank vessels transferring Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) oil proposed design and equipment standards  

SciTech Connect

The US Coast Guard proposes to require US and foreign flag tank vessels engaged in the transfer of OCS oil in bulk as cargo from an offshore oil exploitation or production facility to shore to have segregated ballast tanks, dedicated clean ballast tanks, or special ballast arrangements by 6/1/80. This proposal would implement the Port and Tanker Safety Act of 1978 and would eliminate the mixing of ballast water and oil, thus reducing operational pollution that could occur if there was a substantial increase in vessel traffic. Comments must be received by 6/16/80.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds (jensen-sonde)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment.

Mike Jensen; Jennifer Comstock; Anthony Del Genio; Scott Giangrande; Pavlos Kollias

30

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds (jensen-sonde)  

SciTech Connect

A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment.

Mike Jensen; Jennifer Comstock; Anthony Del Genio; Scott Giangrande; Pavlos Kollias

2012-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

31

EIS-0045: Coal Conversion Program, Continental Forest Industries...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

45: Coal Conversion Program, Continental Forest Industries, Combustors 1,2, and 3, Port Wentworth, Chatham County, Georgia EIS-0045: Coal Conversion Program, Continental Forest...

32

Continental margin subsidence and heat flow: important parameters in formation of petroleum hydrocarbons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Passive continental margins have been shown to subside with a 50-My exponentially decaying rate which cannot be explained by isostatic compensation for sediment loading. This suggests that the subsidence is dominated by geodynamic processes similar to those in the deep ocean. Two simple geologic models for continental breakup are developed: (1) attenuation of continental lithosphere; and (2) intrusion of mantle diapirs. These models for rifting give a direct relation between subsidence of passive margins and their surface heat flow through time. On this basis we develop a method of reconstructing the thermal history of sedimentary strata from regional subsidence and sedimentation history. Because generation of petroleum hydrocarbons depends on the intergrated time/temperature history of buried organic material, this reconstruction technique can be used to determine the depth to the oil range of the hydrocarbon generation window in advance of drilling. By way of example, we reconstruct time/temperature/depth plots and estimate hydrocarbon maturity for one site in the Falkland Plateau and three sites in the North Atlantic near Cape Hatteras. In addition to providing a method for evaluating hydrocarbon potential in frontier regions where there is little or no well control, this approach suggests that there may be significant potential for oil and gas generation on the outer part of the continental rise and in deep-sea sedimentary basins. 13 figures, 1 table.

Royden, L. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge); Sclater, J.G.; Von Herzen, R.P.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Vertical Velocities in Continental Boundary Layer Stratocumulus...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Persist of long time-scales * Impact on radiation budget - High SW albedo compared to land or ocean Klein and Hartmann 1993 But Why Continental Clouds? * They do exist -...

34

Mesoscale Evolution of a Continental Occluded Cyclone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A diagnostic study of a continental occluding extratropical cyclone (ETC) during 12 November 1992 is presented using initializations from the Mesoscale Atmospheric Prediction System (MAPS), a hybrid sigmaisentropic coordinate model. Whereas ...

Patrick S. Market; James T. Moore

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Continental Slope Flow Northeast of Taiwan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrographic observations and current measurements with a Shipboard Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler over the continental shelfslope junction northeast of Taiwan during 1017 August 1994 allow the construction of the mesoscale flow pattern ...

T. Y. Tang; Y. Hsueh; Y. J. Yang; J. C. Ma

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Drought Reconstructions for the Continental United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of a 2 lat 3 long grid of summer drought reconstructions for the continental United States estimated from a dense network of annual tree-ring chronologies is described. The drought metric used is the Palmer Drought Severity ...

Edward R. Cook; David M. Meko; David W. Stahle; Malcolm K. Cleaveland

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

ALMA: Exploring theALMA: Exploring the Outer Limits ofOuter Limits of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Z Machines ALMA: Exploring theALMA: Exploring the Outer Limits ofOuter Limits of Redshift Field Rich in Nearby Galaxies, Poor in Distant Galaxies Nearby galaxies in HDF Source: K. Lanzetta, SUNY-SB Distant galaxies in HDF #12;ALMA Deep Field Poor in Nearby Galaxies, Rich in Distant Galaxies Nearby

Groppi, Christopher

38

The basins on the Argentine continental margin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

After the stabilization of the central Gondwana Craton, orogenic belts were accreted, as a result of convergence events and an extensive passive margin developed in southwestern Gondwana. Thermal subsidence in Parana, Karoo-Ventania basins and the Late Paleozoic-Early Mesozoic rifts, were modified by the Gondwana breakup and the South Atlantic opening. Early Paleozoic marine transgressions deposited the Table Mountain Group in Ventania. In southwestern Patagonia foreland clastics were deposited. Magmatic arcs and marine units indicate a tectonic trough was formed, alternating with continental sequences, over Late Paleozoic metamorphics and intrusives, resulting from plastered terrains along the Gondwana margin. In Patagonia, Permo-Carboniferous continental and glacio marine clastics infill the basins, while in Ventania, paralic sequences, grade from neritic to continental to the northeast, extending beneath the continental margin. The Triassic-Jurassic rift basins progressed onto regional widespread acid lavas and were infilled by lagoonal organic-rich sequences. Early drift phase built basins transverse to the margin, with fluvio-lacustrine sequences: Salado, Colorado, Valdes-Rawson, San Julian and North Malvinas intracratonic basins, which underwent transtensional faulting. Post-Oxfordian to Neocomian brackish sequences, onlapped the conjugate basins during the margin`s drift, with petroleum systems, as in Austral and Malvinas. In the Valanginian, basic extrusions commenced to form on the continental border, heralding the oceanic phase. Due to thermal subsidence, offlaping sediments prograded onto the remaining half-grabens. Several petroleum systems, proven and hypothetical, are identified in this region.

Urien, C.M. [Buenos Aires Technological Institute Petroleum School, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Continental Biofuels Corporation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Continental Biofuels Corporation Continental Biofuels Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name Continental Biofuels Corporation Place Dallas, Texas Zip 75240 Sector Biofuels Product Dallas-based company devoted to agribusiness in Southeast Asia. The firms focus its agribusiness acquisitions on crops, especially palm oil plantations, that can be used as biofuels. Coordinates 32.778155°, -96.795404° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.778155,"lon":-96.795404,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

40

Barotropic Continental Shelf Waves on a ?-Plane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we consider the effect of the variation of the Coriolis parameter with latitude on barotropic shelf waves, using a ?-plane model. Solutions are constructed using the method of inner and outer asymptotic expansions, where the inner ...

A. Dorr; R. Grimshaw

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gom outer continental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Outer Bounds for User Cooperation Ravi Tandon Sennur Ulukus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Outer Bounds for User Cooperation Ravi Tandon Sennur Ulukus Department of Electrical and Computer. New York:Wiley, 1991. [7] R. Tandon and S. Ulukus. Dependence balance based outer bounds for Gaussian

Ulukus, Sennur

42

Regulations Related to the Outer Continental Shelf Moratoria and Implications of Not Renewing the Moratoria (released in AEO2009)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

From 1982 through 2008, Congress annually enacted appropriations riders prohibiting the Minerals Management Service (MMS) of the U.S. Department of the Interior from conducting activities related to leasing, exploration, and production of oil and natural gas on much of the Federal OCS. Further, a separate executive ban (originally put in place in 1990 by President George H.W. Bush and later extended by President William J. Clinton through 2012) also prohibited leasing on the OCS, with the exception of the Western Gulf of Mexico, portions of the Central and Eastern Gulf of Mexico, and Alaska. In combination, those actions prohibited drilling along the Atlantic and Pacific coasts, in the eastern Gulf of Mexico, and in portions of the central Gulf of Mexico. The Gulf of Mexico Energy Security Act of 2006 (Public Law 109-432) imposed yet a third ban on drilling through 2022 on tracts in the Eastern Gulf of Mexico that are within 125 miles of Florida, east of a dividing line known as the Military Mission Line, and in the Central Gulf of Mexico within 100 miles of Florida.

Information Center

2009-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

43

Marginally outer trapped surfaces in higher dimensions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review the basic setup of Kaluza-Klein theory, namely a 5-dimensional vacuum with a cyclic isometry, which corresponds to Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory in 4-dimensional spacetime. We first recall the behaviour of Killing horizons and its generators under bundle lift and projection. We then show that the property of compact surfaces of being (stably) marginally trapped is preserved under lift and projection provided the appropriate ("Pauli-") conformal scaling is used for the spacetime metric. We also discuss and compare recently proven area inequalities for stable axially symmetric 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional marginally outer trapped surfaces.

Tim-Torben Paetz; Walter Simon

2013-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

44

Northern Gulf of Mexico Continental Shelf Stock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

waters from 20 to 200m deep in the northern Gulf from the U.S.-Mexican border to the Florida Keys (Figure 1). Both coastal and offshore ecotypes of bottlenose dolphins occur in the Gulf of Mexico (Hersh and Duffield 1990; LeDuc and Curry 1998). The Continental Shelf Stock probably consists of a mixture of both the coastal and offshore ecotypes. The offshore and coastal ecotypes are genetically distinct using both mitochondrial and nuclear markers (Hoelzel et al. 1998). In the northwestern Atlantic, Torres et al. (2003) found a statistically significant break in the distribution of the ecotypes at 34 km from shore. The offshore ecotype was found exclusively seaward of 34km and in waters deeper than 34 m. Within 7.5km of shore, all animals were of the coastal ecotype. The continental shelf is much wider in the Gulf of Mexico so these results may not apply. The continental shelf stock range may extend into Mexican and Cuban territorial waters; however, there are no available estimates of either abundance or mortality from those countries. A stranded dolphin from the Florida Panhandle was rehabilitated and released over the shelf off western Florida, and traveled into the Atlantic Ocean (Wells et al. 1999). The bottlenose dolphins inhabiting waters <20m deep in

Bottlenose Dolphin (tursiops Truncatus Truncatus

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

SCUBA Mapping of Outer Galaxy Protostellar Candidates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We aim to study dust properties of massive star forming regions in the outer Galaxy, in a direction opposite to the Galactic center. We present observations of six outer Galaxy point sources IRAS 01045+6505, 01420+6401, 05271+3059, 05345+3556, 20222+3541 and 20406+4555, taken with the Submillimeter Common-User Bolometer Array (SCUBA) on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) at 450 and 850 micron. Single temperature greybody models are fitted to the Spectral Energy Distribution of the detected sub-mm cores to derive dust temperature, dust emissivity index and optical depth at 250 micron. The observed radial intensity profiles of the sub-mm cores were fitted with power laws to derive the indices describing the density distribution. At a resolution of 15" all six IRAS point sources show multiple emission peaks. Only four out of fourteen detected sub-mm cores show associated mid-infrared emission. For the sub-mm cores we derive dust temperatures of 32+-5 K and dust emissivity indices between 0.9 and 2.5. The density profiles of the sub-mm cores can be fitted by a single power law distribution with indices -1.5+-0.3, with most cores showing an index of -1.5. This is consistent with most observations of massive star forming regions and supports predictions of models of star formation which consider non-thermal support against gravitational collapse.

B. Mookerjea; G. Sandell; J. Stutzki; J. G. A. Wouterloot

2007-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

46

In Outer Space without a Space Suit?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The author proposes and investigates his old idea - a living human in space without the encumbrance of a complex space suit. Only in this condition can biological humanity seriously attempt to colonize space because all planets of Solar system (except the Earth) do not have suitable atmospheres. Aside from the issue of temperature, a suitable partial pressure of oxygen is lacking. In this case the main problem is how to satiate human blood with oxygen and delete carbonic acid gas (carbon dioxide). The proposed system would enable a person to function in outer space without a space suit and, for a long time, without food. That is useful also in the Earth for sustaining working men in an otherwise deadly atmosphere laden with lethal particulates (in case of nuclear, chemical or biological war), in underground confined spaces without fresh air, under water or a top high mountains above a height that can sustain respiration.

Alexander Bolonkin

2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

47

ARM - Field Campaign - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Experiment (MC3E) Experiment (MC3E) Campaign Links Science Plan MC3E Website Related Campaigns Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment: 2DVD Support 2011.04.22, Schwaller, SGP Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Airborne Instruments 2011.04.22, Poellot, AAF Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers 2011.04.22, Williams, SGP Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment: Parsivel Disdrometer Support 2011.04.22, Schwaller, SGP Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Inner Domain Thermodynamic Profiling during MC3E 2011.04.22, Turner, SGP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E)

48

Corrugated outer sheath gas-insulated transmission line  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas-insulated transmission line includes two transmission line sections each of which are formed of a corrugated outer housing enclosing an inner high-voltage conductor disposed therein, with insulating support means supporting the inner conductor within the outer housing and an insulating gas providing electrical insulation therebetween. The outer housings in each section have smooth end sections at the longitudinal ends thereof which are joined together by joining means which provide for a sealing fixed joint.

Kemeny, George A. (Pittsburgh, PA); Cookson, Alan H. (Churchill Boro, PA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Digital Offshore Cadastre (DOC) - Pacific83 ? Continental...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Continental Shelf Boundaries Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov Communities Ocean Data Digital...

50

Atlantic NAD 83 Continental Shelf Boundary (CSB) | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Continental Shelf Boundary (CSB) Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov Communities Ocean Data Atlantic NAD 83...

51

COLLOQUIUM: The Alfvnic Motions of the Sun's Outer Atmosphere...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8, 2013, 4:15pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: The Alfvnic Motions of the Sun's Outer Atmosphere Scott McIntosh National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)...

52

STAR FORMATION IN THE OUTER DISK OF SPIRAL GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect

We combine new deep and wide field of view H{alpha} imaging of a sample of eight nearby (d Almost-Equal-To 17 Mpc) spiral galaxies with new and archival H I and CO imaging to study the star formation and the star formation regulation in the outer disk. We find that, in agreement with previous studies, star formation in the outer disk has low covering fractions, and star formation is typically organized into spiral arms. The star formation in the outer disk is at extremely low levels, with typical star formation rate surface densities of {approx}10{sup -5} to 10{sup -6} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2}. We find that the ratio of the radial extent of detected H II regions to the radius of the H I disk is typically {approx}>85%. This implies that in order to further our understanding of the implications of extended star formation, we must further our understanding of the formation of extended H I disks. We measure the gravitational stability of the gas disk, and find that the outer gaseous disk is typically a factor of {approx}2 times more stable than the inner star-forming disk. We measure the surface density of outer disk H I arms, and find that the disk is closer to gravitational instability along these arms. Therefore, it seems that spiral arms are a necessary, but not sufficient, requirement for star formation in the outer disk. We use an estimation of the flaring of the outer gas disk to illustrate the effect of flaring on the Schmidt power-law index; we find that including flaring increases the agreement between the power-law indices of the inner and outer disks.

Barnes, Kate L.; Van Zee, Liese [Department of Astronomy, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Cote, Stephanie [Canadian Gemini Office, Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, Victoria (Canada); Schade, David, E-mail: barneskl@astro.indiana.edu, E-mail: vanzee@astro.indiana.edu, E-mail: Stephanie.Cote@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca, E-mail: David.Schade@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, Victoria (Canada)

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

53

Climate Sensitivity to Continental Ice Sheet Size and Configuration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A version of the NCAR Community Climate Model (CCM) has been used to carry out a study of climate sensitivity to the size and distribution of continental ice sheets by comparing two perpetual season, fixed sea surface temperature (SST), winter ...

Richard A. Shinn; Eric J. Barron

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Sensitivity of 30-Day Dynamical Forecasts to Continental Snow cover  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several series of 30-day simulations with a global simulation model are used to evaluate the sensitivities to continental snow cover over North America and Eurasia. The model is initialized with National Meteorological Center analyses for ...

John E. Walsh; Becky Ross

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Countergradient vorticity Flux Generated in Continental Boundary Currents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is suggested that the inshore shear of continental boundary flows like the Florida Current can be accounted for by a countergradient vorticity flux, rather than by lateral diffusion to the shore. Two simple barotropic models with cross-stream ...

Melvin E. Stern

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Multimodel Ensemble Reconstruction of Drought over the Continental United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Retrospectively simulated soil moisture from an ensemble of six land surface/hydrological models was used to reconstruct drought events over the continental United States for the period 19202003. The simulations were performed at one-half-degree ...

Aihui Wang; Theodore J. Bohn; Sarith P. Mahanama; Randal D. Koster; Dennis P. Lettenmaier

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Impact of Atmospheric Forcing on Antarctic Continental Shelf Water Masses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Antarctic continental shelf seas feature a bimodal distribution of water mass temperature, with the Amundsen and Bellingshausen Seas flooded by Circumpolar Deep Water that is several degrees Celsius warmer than the cold shelf waters prevalent ...

Alek A. Petty; Daniel L. Feltham; Paul R. Holland

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Selected data fron continental...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Selected data fron continental scientific drilling core holes VC-1 and VC-2a, Valles Caldera, New Mexico Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us...

59

Microphysics of Raindrop Size Spectra: Tropical Continental and Maritime Storms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work uses raindrop size spectra measured at the surface in tropical continental storms to determine the associated parameters of the best-fit gamma distributions. The physical processes responsible for those parameters and their relations to ...

Carlton W. Ulbrich; David Atlas

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Satellite Evidence of Enhanced Upwelling Along the European Continental Slope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TIROS-N AVHRR imagery is used to describe a persistent but localized band of upwelling which follows the contours of the European continental slope from the Porcupine Seabight (southwest of Ireland) to the Bay of Biscay. Its persistent occurrence,...

Robert R. Dickson; Paul A. Gurbutt; V. Narayana Pillai

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gom outer continental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Diffraction of Continental Shelf Waves by Irregular Alongshore Geometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Diffraction of continental shelf waves by irregular alongshore geometry, such as ridges, canyons and bumps, is examined. The full barotropic, shelf-wave equation is treated, and the solutions include forward and back scattering, and a description ...

Dong-Ping Wang

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Propagation of Barotropic Continental Shelf Waves over Irregular Bottom Topography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a geometry which roughly approximates that of a typical continental shelf and slope, the effects of a random bottom topography on free barotropic shelf waves are found. The bathymetric irregularity induces damping of the coherent wave due ...

K. H. Brink

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Continental Shelf Circulation Induced by a Moving, Localized Wind Stress  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A linear, two-dimensional model of a rotating, stratified fluid is constructed to investigate the circulation induced by a moving, localized line of surface stress. This model is used to analyze the effect of moving cold fronts on continental ...

John M. Klinck; Leonard J. Pietrafesa; Gerald S. Janowitz

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Factors Governing the Total Rainfall Yield from Continental Convective Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several important factors that govern the total rainfall from continental convective clouds were investigated by tracking thousands of convective cells in Israel and South Africa. The rainfall volume yield (Rvol) of the individual cells that ...

Daniel Rosenfeld; Abraham Gagin

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

The Propagation of Gravity Currents along Continental Shelves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analytical method for computing the speed at which the nose of a light (rotating) intrusion advances along a continental shelf is proposed. The nonlinear model includes two active layer; the intrusion itself, which occupies the entire shelf (...

Doron Nof; Stephen Van Gorder

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Relative Humidity over the West Florida Continental Shelf  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observed relative humidity variations on the coastal ocean of the West Florida Continental Shelf (WFS) are examined over the 5-yr period 19982003. Despite considerable daily variability within seasons, the monthly mean values are nearly constant ...

J. I. Virmani; R. H. Weisberg

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Observations of Boundary Mixing over the Continental Slope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of mixing over the continental slope using a towed body reveal a great lateral extent (several kilometers) of continuously turbulent fluid within a few hundred meters of the boundary at depth 1600 m. The largest turbulent dissipation ...

J. N. Moum; D. R. Caldwell; J. D. Nash; G. D. Gunderson

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Continental Shelf Parameters Inferred from SAR Internal Wave Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents preliminary results on the use of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery to extract oceanographic information about the continental shelf. From late spring through early fall the thermocline on the shelf is fully developed and ...

D. L. Porter; D. R. Thompson

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

The LHCb Outer Tracker Detector Design and Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Outer Tracker detector of the LHCb experiment is a gas filled detector based on straw tube technology. It comprises three stations each consisting of multiple layers of wires with both vertical orientation and $pm$5$^{mathbf{o}}$ stereo angles. The stations are designed to be built of modules which are mechanically stable, gas tight and capable of stand-alone operation. This paper describes the design and mass production procedures of Outer Tracker modules and discusses the quality assurance programme. Test results on the first modules produced are included.

Hommels, L B A

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

InterContinental Hotels Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

InterContinental Hotels Group InterContinental Hotels Group Jump to: navigation, search Name InterContinental Hotels Group Place Salt Lake City, Utah Zip 84130 Website http://www.intercontinentalhot Coordinates 40.7°, -111.94° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.7,"lon":-111.94,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

71

Continental Liquid-phase Stratus Clouds at SGP: Meteorological Influences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Continental Liquid-phase Stratus Clouds at SGP: Meteorological Influences Continental Liquid-phase Stratus Clouds at SGP: Meteorological Influences and Relationship to Adiabacity Kim, Byung-Gon Kangnung National University Schwartz, Stephen Brookhaven National Laboratory Miller, Mark Brookhaven National Laboratory Min, Qilong State University of New York at Albany Category: Cloud Properties The microphysical properties of continental stratus clouds observed over SGP appear to be substantially influenced by micrometeorological conditions, such as static stability and updraft velocity. These influences may contribute to the observed weak correlation of aerosol light scattering coefficient with cloud-drop effective radius [Kim et al., JGR, 2003], although aerosol light scattering coefficient is not necessarily the most suitable surrogate aerosol property for number concentration of cloud

72

THE 21 cm 'OUTER ARM' AND THE OUTER-GALAXY HIGH-VELOCITY CLOUDS: CONNECTED BY KINEMATICS, METALLICITY, AND DISTANCE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using high-resolution ultraviolet spectra obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph and the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer, we study the metallicity, kinematics, and distance of the gaseous 'outer arm' (OA) and the high-velocity clouds (HVCs) in the outer Galaxy. We detect the OA in a variety of absorption lines toward two QSOs, H1821+643 and HS0624+6907. We search for OA absorption toward eight Galactic stars and detect it in one case, which constrains the OA Galactocentric radius to 9 kpc absorption toward two stars; Complex G is therefore in the same region at R{sub G} = 8-10 kpc. HVC Complex C is known to be at a similar Galactocentric radius. Toward H1821+643, the low-ionization absorption lines are composed of multiple narrow components, indicating the presence of several cold clouds and rapid cooling and fragmentation. Some of the highly ionized gas is also surprisingly cool. Accounting for ionization corrections, we find that the OA metallicity is Z = 0.2-0.5 Z{sub Sun }, but nitrogen is underabundant and some species are possibly mildly depleted by dust. The similarity of the OA metallicity, Galactocentric location, and kinematics to those of the adjacent outer-Galaxy HVCs, including high velocities that are not consistent with Galactic rotation, suggests that the OA and outer-Galaxy HVCs could have a common origin.

Tripp, Todd M.; Song Limin, E-mail: tripp@astro.umass.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States)

2012-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

73

Generation of Topographic Waves over the Continental Margin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical experiments were carried out to simulate the generation of topographic waves by a Gulf Stream ring over the continental margin in a stratified ocean on an f-plane. The study was aimed at understanding the combined effect of density ...

Ping-Tung Shaw; S. Divakar

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Ozone Destruction in Continental Stratus Clouds: An Aircraft Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Apparent depletion of ozone in a cold (0C), continental stratus cloud system was observed during in situ data collection on 30 April 1994 at the Department of Energy Clouds and Radiation Test Bed site in northern Oklahoma. Analyses of the ...

Zhien Wang; Kenneth Sassen

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Effects of Continental Slope on the Mean Shelf Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Csanady's (1978) theory on the mean shelf circulation in a homogeneous ocean was re-examined by including effects of a continental slope. The results suggested that the mean southwestward flow on the Mid-Atlantic Blight is driven by an inflow ...

Dong-Ping Wang

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

THE FUTURE OF CONTINENTAL SCIENTIFIC DRILLING U.S. PERSPECTIVE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, so cooperation and coordination between the continental and marine drilling community is critical, and should be managed in coordination with technological, database and other support capabilities currently models of the dynamics of the solar system, produce insolation curves for any arbitrary time period, tune

Peterson, Blake R.

77

Leaf seal for inner and outer casings of a turbine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A plurality of arcuate, circumferentially extending leaf seal segments form an annular seal spanning between annular sealing surfaces of inner and outer casings of a turbine. The ends of the adjoining seal segments have circumferential gaps to enable circumferential expansion and contraction of the segments. The end of a first segment includes a tab projecting into a recess of a second end of a second segment. Edges of the tab seal against the sealing surfaces of the inner and outer casings have a narrow clearance with opposed edges of the recess. An overlying cover plate spans the joint. Leakage flow is maintained at a minimum because of the reduced gap between the radially spaced edges of the tab and recess, while the seal segments retain the capacity to expand and contract circumferentially.

Schroder, Mark Stewart (Hendersonville, NC); Leach, David (Simpsonville, SC)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

FIRST 100 T NON-DESTRUCTIVE MAGNET OUTER COIL SET  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The controlled power outer coil set of the first 100 T non-destructive (100 T ND) magnet is described. This magnet will be installed as part of the user facility research equipment at the National High Magnetic Field laboratory (NHMFL) Pulsed Field Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The 100 T ND controlled power outer coil set consists of seven nested, mechanically independent externally reinforced coils. These coils, in combination, will produce a 47 T platform field in a 225-mm diameter bore. Using inertial energy storage a synchronous motor/generator provides ac power to a set of seven ac-dc converters rated at 64 MW/80 MVA each. These converters energize three independent coil circuits to create 170 MJ of field energy in the outer coil set at the platform field of 47 T. Each coil consists of a multi-layer winding of high strength conductor supported by an external high strength stainless steel shell. Coils with the highest magnetic loads will utilize a reinforcing shell fabricated from highly cold worked 301 stainless steel strip. The autofrettage conditioning method will be used to pre-stress the coils and thereby limit conductor and reinforcement strains to the elastic range. The purpose of pre-stressing the coils is to attain a design life of 10,000 full field pulses. The operation and conditioning of the coil set will be described along with special features of its design, magnetic and structural analyses and construction.

J. BACON; A. BACA; ET AL

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Impact of Limitations on Access to Oil and Natural Gas Resources in the Federal Outer Continental Shelf (released in AEO2009)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The U.S. offshore is estimated to contain substantial resources of both crude oil and natural gas, but until recently some of the areas of the lower 48 OCS have been under leasing moratoria. The Presidential ban on offshore drilling in portions of the lower 48 OCS was lifted in July 2008, and the Congressional ban was allowed to expire in September 2008, removing regulatory obstacles to development of the Atlantic and Pacific OCS.

Information Center

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

80

Miocene structure of Mustang Island, Mustang Island East Addition and part of Matagorda Island, Outer Continental Shelf areas, Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding the Miocene structure of Mustang Island and the neighboring areas in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico helps to increase knowledge of the geology and hence contribute to petroleum exploration and production in the area. Interpretation of about 1465 miles of multifold, migrated seismic reflection data, integrated with 35 well log data, served to detail the Miocene structure and its evolution. Early Miocene sedimentation resulted in differential loading of mobile substrates of shale. This caused movement of the shale basinward. Further loading caused overlying sediments to yield, forming the Clemente-Tomas fault. This is a listric, down to the basin growth fault, lying on the seaward flanks of a shale ridge. Rollover anticlines characterize the hangingwall blocks of this fault especially in the southwestern part of the study area. These rollover anticlines could be potential hydrocarbon traps. Rapid sedimentation during the Middle Miocene was responsible for the formation of the contemporaneous growth faults of the Corsair-Wanda system. The Corsair fault is an extensive, listric, mostly concave up growth fault that diagonally runs through the area along a southwest-northeast trend. A salt withdrawal syncline separates the Wanda from the Corsair fault. This suggests that the Corsair formed as a result of primary salt withdrawal. Planar rotation of hangingwall blocks of the Corsair fault formed structural highs that are able to accumulate hydrocarbons. Continued sedimentation during the Middle-Upper Miocene caused the underlying salt to undergo secondary withdrawal. This withdrawal caused the overlying sediments to collapse into a half-turtle anticline upon which the Wanda fault appears to detach. The half-turtle anticlines and a series of horsts could be prospective zones of hydrocarbon accumulation. The Wanda fault zone appears to lie along the landward limit of salt deposition in this part of the Gulf of Mexico. The only salt diapir in the area lies immediately basinward of the Wanda fault.

Kasande, Robert

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gom outer continental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

EIS-0470: U.S. Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for the Cape Wind Energy Project on the Outer Continental Shelf off Massachusetts, Nantucket Sound  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The DOE Loan Programs Office is proposing to offer a loan guarantee to Cape Wind Associates, LLC for the construction and start-up of the Cape Wind Energy Project in Nantucket Sound, offshore of Massachusetts. The proposed Cape Wind Energy Project would consist of up to 130, 3.6-MW turbine generators, in an area of roughly 25-square miles, and would include 12.5 miles of 115-kilovolt submarine transmission cable and an electric service platform. To inform DOE's decision regarding a loan guarantee, DOE adopted the Department of the Interiors 2009 Final Cape Wind Energy Project EIS, in combination with two Cape Wind Environmental Assessments dated May 2010 and April 2011 (per 40 CFR 1506.4), as a DOE Final EIS (DOE/EIS-0470). The adequacy of the Department of the Interior final EIS adopted by DOE is the subject of a judicial action.

82

Formation and Quasi-Periodic Behavior of Outer Spiral Rainbands in a Numerically Simulated Tropical Cyclone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The formation and quasi-periodic behavior of outer spiral rainbands in a tropical cyclone simulated in the cloud-resolving tropical cyclone model version 4 (TCM4) are analyzed. The outer spiral rainbands in the simulation are preferably initiated ...

Qingqing Li; Yuqing Wang

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

ARM - Field Campaign - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Experiment Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers Related Campaigns Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) 2011.04.22, Jensen, SGP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers 2011.04.22 - 2011.06.06 Lead Scientist : Christopher Williams For data sets, see below. Description The scientific focus was to study the vertical structure of precipitation in a vertical column over the SGP Central Facility. These multi-frequency profiler observations enabled directly measuring the vertical air motion and retrieving the raindrop size distributions from near the surface to just under the freezing level. These profilers were deployed during MC3E

84

BNL | Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment Convective processes play a critical role in the Earth's energy balance through the redistribution of heat and moisture in the atmosphere and their link to the hydrological cycle. Accurate representation of convective processes in numerical models is vital towards improving current and future simulations of Earths climate system. Despite improvements in computing power, current operational weather and global climate models are unable to resolve the natural temporal and spatial scales important to convective processes and therefore must turn to parameterization schemes to represent these processes. In turn, parameterization schemes in cloud-resolving models need to be evaluated for their generality and application to a

85

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds - Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer(tomlinson-uhsas)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer (UHSASA) A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment. These files contain brightness temperatures observed at Purcell during MC3E. The measurements were made with a 5 channel (22.235, 23.035, 23.835, 26.235, 30.000GHz) microwave radiometer at one minute intervals. The results have been separated into daily files and the day of observations is indicated in the file name. All observations were zenith pointing. Included in the files are the time variables base_time and time_offset. These follow the ARM time conventions. Base_time is the number seconds since January 1, 1970 at 00:00:00 for the first data point of the file and time_offset is the offset in seconds from base_time.

Jason Tomlinson; Mike Jensen

86

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Microwave Radiometer Profiler (jensen-mwr)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment. These files contain brightness temperatures observed at Purcell during MC3E. The measurements were made with a 5 channel (22.235, 23.035, 23.835, 26.235, 30.000GHz) microwave radiometer at one minute intervals. The results have been separated into daily files and the day of observations is indicated in the file name. All observations were zenith pointing. Included in the files are the time variables base_time and time_offset. These follow the ARM time conventions. Base_time is the number seconds since January 1, 1970 at 00:00:00 for the first data point of the file and time_offset is the offset in seconds from base_time.

Mike Jensen

87

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds - Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer(tomlinson-uhsas)  

SciTech Connect

Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer (UHSASA) A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment. These files contain brightness temperatures observed at Purcell during MC3E. The measurements were made with a 5 channel (22.235, 23.035, 23.835, 26.235, 30.000GHz) microwave radiometer at one minute intervals. The results have been separated into daily files and the day of observations is indicated in the file name. All observations were zenith pointing. Included in the files are the time variables base_time and time_offset. These follow the ARM time conventions. Base_time is the number seconds since January 1, 1970 at 00:00:00 for the first data point of the file and time_offset is the offset in seconds from base_time.

Jason Tomlinson; Mike Jensen

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

88

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Microwave Radiometer Profiler (jensen-mwr)  

SciTech Connect

A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment. These files contain brightness temperatures observed at Purcell during MC3E. The measurements were made with a 5 channel (22.235, 23.035, 23.835, 26.235, 30.000GHz) microwave radiometer at one minute intervals. The results have been separated into daily files and the day of observations is indicated in the file name. All observations were zenith pointing. Included in the files are the time variables base_time and time_offset. These follow the ARM time conventions. Base_time is the number seconds since January 1, 1970 at 00:00:00 for the first data point of the file and time_offset is the offset in seconds from base_time.

Mike Jensen

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Outer Sphere Adsorption of Pb(II)EDTA on Goethite  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

FTIR and EXAFS spectroscopic measurements were performed on Pb(II)EDTA adsorbed on goethite as functions of pH (4-6), Pb(II)EDTA concentration (0.11 {micro}M - 72 {micro}M), and ionic strength (16 {micro}M - 0.5M). FTIR measurements show no evidence for carboxylate-Fe(III) bonding or protonation of EDTA at Pb:EDTA = 1:1. Both FTIR and EXAFS measurements suggest that EDTA acts as a hexadentate ligand, with all four of its carboxylate and both amine groups bonded to Pb(II). No evidence was observed for inner-sphere Pb(II)-goethite bonding at Pb:EDTA = 1:1. Hence, the adsorbed complexes should have composition Pb(II)EDTA{sup 2{minus}}. Since substantial uptake of PbEDTA(II){sup 2{minus}} occurred in the samples, we infer that Pb(II)EDTA{sup 2{minus}} adsorbed as outer-sphere complexes and/or as complexes that lose part of their solvation shells and hydrogen bond directly to goethite surface sites. We propose the term ''hydration-sphere'' for the latter type of complexes because they should occupy space in the primary hydration spheres of goethite surface functional groups, and to distinguish this mode of sorption from common structural definitions of inner- and outer-sphere complexes. The similarity of Pb(II) uptake isotherms to those of other divalent metal ions complexed by EDTA suggests that they too adsorb by these mechanisms. The lack of evidence for inner-sphere EDTA-Fe(III) bonding suggests that previously proposed metal-ligand - promoted dissolution mechanisms should be modified, specifically to account for the presence of outer-sphere precursor species.

Bargar, John R

1999-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

90

The Resolved Outer Population of NGC6822 with WFPC2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present F336W (U), F439W (B), F555W (V), and F675W (R) Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) photometry of two outer regions of the Local Group dwarf irregular galaxy NGC6822. The NE region is ~13 arcmin from the galaxy centre, while the W region lies 10 arcmin out, and within the wispy low surface brightness outer regions of the galaxy. The fields are not crowded and contain few NGC 6822 stars. We discuss errors and uncertainties and find that the W region contains a main sequence that extends to stars of about 2 solar masses, with an age of about 200 Myr. The NE region has no main sequence or stars younger than 1 Gyr, but does contain some luminous red stars that are not matched in the W field. These stars are not clumped in the field. The results suggest that the W region may be a trace of a tidal event that triggered the current star-formation in this isolated galaxy.

J. B. Hutchings; B. Cavanagh; L. Bianchi

1999-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

91

Outer zone electron precipitation produced by a VLF transmitter  

SciTech Connect

By means of high-resolution pitch angle measurements made by a magnetic-focusing electron spectrometer on the S3-3 satellite while in the drift loss cone region of the magnetosphere, characteristics of fluxes of 108- to 654-keV electron precipitated in the inner zone, in the slot region, and in the outer zone of the magnetosphere are all shown to be consistent with the precipitation's having been produced by the same ground-based VLF transmitter, UMS. Pitch angle measurements are used to locate the longitude of precipitation. The temporal pattern of transmitter operation obtained from synoptic data from a ground-based VLF receiver is used along with drift rate calculations to predict the electron energies as a function of L shell which should be observable by the S3-3 instrument. The predicted energy response is then compared with the in situ observations, getting complete agreement. Finally, wave-particle resonance calculations are made for each of the three regions. The study indicates that ground-based VLF transmitters, which have previously been shown to produce precipitation in the inner zone and slot regions, are almost certainly instrumental in precipitating electrons in the outer zone also. copyright American Geophysical Union 1988

Vampola, A.L.; Adams, C.D.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Photoionization of the outer electrons in noble gas endohedral atoms  

SciTech Connect

We suggest a prominent modification of the outer shell photoionization cross section in noble gas (NG) endohedral atoms NG-C{sub n} under the action of the electron shell of fullerene C{sub n}. This shell leads to two important effects: a strong enhancement of the cross section due to fullerene shell polarization under the action of the incoming electromagnetic wave and to prominent oscillation of this cross section due to the reflection of a photoelectron from the NG by the fullerene shell. Both factors lead to powerful maxima in the outer shell ionization cross sections of NG-C{sub n}, which we call giant endohedral resonances. The oscillator strength reaches a very large value in the atomic scale, 25. We consider atoms of all noble gases except He. The polarization of the fullerene shell is expressed in terms of the total photoabsorption cross section of the fullerene. The photoelectron reflection is taken into account in the framework of the so-called bubble potential, which is a spherical {delta}-type potential. It is assumed in the derivations that the NG is centrally located in the fullerene. It is also assumed, in accordance with the existing experimental data, that the fullerene radius R{sub C} is much larger than the atomic radius r{sub A} and the thickness {delta}{sub C} of the fullerene shell. As was demonstrated recently, these assumptions allow us to represent the NG-C{sub n} photoionization cross section as a product of the NG cross section and two well-defined calculated factors.

Amusia, M. Ya. [Hebrew University, Racah Institute of Physics (Israel)], E-mail: amusia@vms.huji.ac.il; Baltenkov, A. S. [Academy of Sciences of the Republic of Uzbekistan, Arifov Institute of Electronics (Uzbekistan); Chernysheva, L. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physicotechnical Institute (Russian Federation)

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

93

Hostile energetic particle radiation environments in earth's outer magnetosphere  

SciTech Connect

Many spacecraft operational problems in Earth's outer magnetosphere appear to be due to intense, transient radiation phenomena. Three types of naturally-occurring, and highly variable, hostile particle radiation environments are encountered at, or near, the geostationary orbit: (1) High-energy protons due to solar flares; (2) Energetic ions and electrons produced by magnetospheric substorms; and (3) very high energy electrons of uncertain origin. Present particle sensor systems provide energetic particle detection and assessment capabilities during these kinds of high-energy radiation events. In this paper, particular emphasis is given to highly relativistic electrons (3 approx. 10 MeV). Electron fluxes and energy spectra are shown which were measured by two high-energy electron sensor systems at 6.6 R/sub E/ from 1979 through 1984. Large, persistent increases in this population were found to be relatively infrequent and sporadic in 1979-81 around solar maximum. During the approach to solar minimum (1981 to present) it is observed that the highly relativistic electrons occur with a regular 27-day periodicity, and are well associated with the re-established solar wind stream structures. Through a superposed epoch analysis technique we show that an energetic electron enhancement typically rises on a 2- to 3-day time scale and decays on 3- to 4-day time scale at essentially all energies above approx.3 MeV. The present analysis suggests that the Jovian magnetosphere is a recurrent source of this significant electron population in the outer terrestrial magnetosphere and that these electrons have a very deleterious influence on spacecraft systems due to deep dielectric charging and low-dose susceptibility effects. 13 refs., 11 figs.

Baker, D.N.; Belian, R.D.; Higbie, P.R.; Klebesadel, R.W.; Blake, J.B.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Continental U.S. State Wind Resource Potential Tables (RDF Transformat...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Continental U.S. State Wind Resource Potential Tables (RDF Transformation) Submitted by Woodjr on Fri, 02042011 - 14:19 A linked data (RDF) transformation of the...

95

Phytoplankton distributions and species composition across the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during two flow regimes of the Mississippi River  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Phytoplankton abundance and species composition were examined over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during May 1992 and May 1993, as part of a phytoplankton diversity study funded by the Office of Naval Research. Phytoplankton distribution data were assessed in relation to the hydrography and physical processes on the shelf, which were studied as part of the Texas-Louisiana Shelf Circulation and Transport Processes Study (LATEX A). Phytoplankton group distributions from 1992 , which was an average flow year for the Mississippi River, were compared with observations from 1993, which was a record flow year. Water samples for phytoplankton determinations were examined at 22 locations on cross-shelf transacts from 90.5' to 94.0'W longitude. Samples were collected at the surface and the chlorophyll maximum from Niskin bottles attached to a Sea-Bird SBE911plus CTD, preserved in 1% glutaraldehyde, and analyzed using the Uterm6hl method and the inverted-microscope technique. Unique phytoplankton distributions and regionspecific hydrography and physical processes were found on the inner, middle, and outer shelf during both flow regimes. Some differences were found in May 1993 due to the record river discharge. In 1992 and 1993, the inner shelf was diatom dominated, and was characterized by the highest nutrient and lowest safety values. River discharge and associated nutrients were focused by the localized downcoast flow predominant on the inner shelf area during the month of May. Water column stability decreased moving from the eastern part of the shelf to the western part in May 1992. The opposite regime was present in May 1993. Inner shelf nutrient concentrations in May 1993 were approximately double those in May 1992. The increased river discharge in 1993 caused a dramatic shift in dominant diatom species to Skeletonema costatum (Grevifle) Grunow, which is found in a range of salinities, temperatures, and depths. Chain-forming diatom and others were predominant in both years. On the middle shelf, the presence of tychopelagic diatoms reflected the possibility of benthic regeneration of nutrients and resuspension into the upper water column. This flux from the benthos supported the phytoplankton community on the middle shelf, where a near-bottom chlorophyll maximum was found. Lower concentrations of phytoplankton were present on the middle shelf than the inner shelf during both years. The upper 30-70 m of the water column on the middle shelf were found to be oligotrophic, so smaller or more motile cers such as dinoflagenates, microflagellates, and coccolithophorids became more dominant. The outer shelf upper water column was nutrient-poor as well during both years, and dinoflageuates, microflagellates, and coccolithophorids were even more dominant than on the middle shelf. The diatom population decreased more moving from the middle to the outer shelf. Effects of a warm core Loop Current eddy were evident on the outer shelf area. Upwelling processes shallower than 100 m may provide a means of supporting the phytoplankton population at the chlorophyll maximum on the outer shelf. The location of the increased volume of river water across the shelf in May 1993 was identified based on the increase in overall phytoplankton abundance in May 1993.

Bontempi, Paula Susan

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Exploring the Outer Solar System with the ESSENCE Supernova Survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report the discovery and orbital determination of 14 trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) from the ESSENCE Supernova Survey difference imaging data set. Two additional objects discovered in a similar search of the SDSS-II Supernova Survey database were recovered in this effort. ESSENCE repeatedly observed fields far from the solar system ecliptic (-21{sup o} < {beta} < -5{sup o}), reaching limiting magnitudes per observation of I {approx} 23.1 and R {approx} 23.7. We examine several of the newly detected objects in detail, including 2003 UC{sub 414}, which orbits entirely between Uranus and Neptune and lies very close to a dynamical region that would make it stable for the lifetime of the solar system. 2003 SS{sub 422} and 2007 TA{sub 418} have high eccentricities and large perihelia, making them candidate members of an outer class of TNOs. We also report a new member of the 'extended' or 'detached' scattered disk, 2004 VN{sub 112}, and verify the stability of its orbit using numerical simulations. This object would have been visible to ESSENCE for only {approx}2% of its orbit, suggesting a vast number of similar objects across the sky. We emphasize that off-ecliptic surveys are optimal for uncovering the diversity of such objects, which in turn will constrain the history of gravitational influences that shaped our early solar system.

Becker, A.C.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Arraki, K.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Kaib, N.A.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Wood-Vasey, W.M.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Aguilera, C.; /Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs.; Blackman, J.W.; /Australian Natl. U., Canberra; Blondin, S.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Challis, P.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Clocchiatti, A.; /Rio de Janeiro, Pont. U. Catol.; Covarrubias, R.; /Kyushu Sangyo U.; Damke, G.; /Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs.; Davis, T.M.; /Bohr Inst. /Queensland U.; Filippenko, A.V.; /UC, Berkeley; Foley, R.J.; /UC, Berkeley; Garg, A.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys. /Harvard U.; Garnavich, P.M.; /Notre Dame U.; Hicken, M.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys. /Harvard U.; Jha, S.; /Harvard U. /SLAC; Kirshner, R.P.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Krisciunas, K.; /Notre Dame U. /Texas A-M; Leibundgut, B.; /Munich, Tech. U. /UC, Berkeley /NOAO, Tucson /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /Fermilab /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys. /Harvard U. /Chile U., Santiago /Ohio State U. /Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs. /Harvard U. /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Johns Hopkins U. /Australian Natl. U., Canberra /Australian Natl. U., Canberra /Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs. /Munich, Tech. U. /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys. /Harvard U. /Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs. /Texas A-M /Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs.

2011-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

97

GRAIN SORTING IN COMETARY DUST FROM THE OUTER SOLAR NEBULA  

SciTech Connect

Most young stars are surrounded by a disk of gas and dust. Close to the hot stars, amorphous dust grains from the parent molecular cloud are reprocessed into crystals that are then distributed throughout the accretion disk. In some disks, there is a reduction in crystalline grain size with heliocentric distance from the star. We investigated crystalline grain size distributions in chondritic porous (CP) interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) believed to be from small, icy bodies that accreted in outer regions of the solar nebula. The grains are Mg-rich silicates and Fe-rich sulfides, the two most abundant minerals in CP IDPs. We find that they are predominantly <0.25 {mu}m in radius with a mean grain size that varies from one CP IDP to another. We report a size-density relationship between the silicates and sulfides. A similar size-density relationship between much larger silicate and sulfide grains in meteorites from the asteroid belt is ascribed to aerodynamic sorting. Since the silicate and sulfide grains in CP IDPs are theoretically too small for aerodynamic sorting, their size-density relationship may be due to another process capable of sorting small grains.

Wozniakiewicz, P. J.; Bradley, J. P.; Ishii, H. A. [Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Brownlee, D. E. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Kearsley, A. T. [Department of Mineralogy, Natural History Museum, London SW7 5BD (United Kingdom); Burchell, M. J.; Price, M. C., E-mail: P.Wozniakiewicz@kent.ac.uk [School of Physical Sciences, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NH (United Kingdom)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Extreme lithium isotopic fractionation during continental weathering revealed in saprolites from South Carolina  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extreme lithium isotopic fractionation during continental weathering revealed in saprolites from in revised form 6 July 2004 Abstract The lithium concentration and isotopic composition of two saprolites the behavior of lithium isotopes during continental weathering. Both saprolites show a general trend

Rudnick, Roberta L.

99

The Breaking and Scattering of the Internal Tide on a Continental Slope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A strong internal tide is generated in the Luzon Strait that radiates westward to impact the continental shelf of the South China Sea. Mooring data in 1500-m depth on the continental slope show a fortnightly averaged incoming tidal flux of 12 kW m?...

Jody M. Klymak; Matthew H. Alford; Robert Pinkel; Ren-Chieh Lien; Yung Jang Yang; Tswen-Yung Tang

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Continental Divide El Coop Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Divide El Coop Inc Divide El Coop Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Continental Divide El Coop Inc Place New Mexico Utility Id 4265 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png COMMERCIAL RATE - GENERAL SERVICE Commercial IRRIGATION SERVICE ( UTILITY OWNED) Commercial IRRIGATION SERVICE (CONSUMER OWNED) Commercial LARGE POWER SERVICE (CONSUMER OWNED) Commercial LARGE POWER SERVICE (UTILITY OWNED) Commercial Large Industrial Transmission Service Industrial

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101

Organic geochemistry of continental margin and deep ocean sediments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this research continues to be the understanding of the complex processes of fossil fuel formation and migration. DOE funded research to date has focused on case histories'' of down-hole well profiles of light hydrocarbons, pyrograms, pyrolysis-GC and -GCMS parameters, and biomarker data from wells in the Louisiana and Texas Gulf Coasts the Alaskan North Slope. In the case of the Alaskan North Slope, geological data and one-dimensional maturation modeling have been integrated in order to better constrain possible source rocks, timing, and migration routes for oil and gas generation and expulsion processes.This period, biomarker analyses and organic petrographic analyses were completed for the Ikpikpuk well. In the case of the Gulf Coast, we have obtained a one-dimensional maturation model of the Cost B-1 well in E. Cameron field of the Louisiana Gulf Coast. The completed E. Cameron data set adds to the enigma of the Gulf Coast oils found on the continental shelf of Louisiana. If significant quantities of the oil are coming from relatively organic lean Tertiary rocks, then non-conventional'' expulsion and migration mechanisms, such as gas dissolved in oil must be invoked to explain the Gulf Coast oils reservoired on the Louisiana continental shelf. We are designing and starting to assemble a hydrous pyrolysis apparatus to follow, the laboratory, rates of generation and expulsion of sediment gases. Initiation of some new research to examine {delta}{sup 13}C of individual compounds from pyrolysis is also described. We are beginning to examine both the laboratory and field data from the Gulf Coast in the context of a Global Basin Research Network (GBRN). The purpose is to better understand subsurface fluid flow processes over geologic time in sedimentary basins and their relation to resource accumulation (i.e., petroleum and metal ores). 58 refs.

Whelan, J.K.; Hunt, J.M.; Eglinton, T.; Dickinson, P.; Johnson, C.; Buxton, L.; Tarafa, M.E.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

The Solar Wind in the Outer Heliosphere at Solar John D. Richardson and Chi Wang  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Solar Wind in the Outer Heliosphere at Solar Maximum John D. Richardson and Chi Wang Center solar wind observations in the outer heliosphere, concentrating on the recent data near solar maximum. The speed and temperature tend to be lower at solar maximum, due to the lack of coronal holes. The near

Richardson, John

103

Dependence Balance Based Outer Bounds for Gaussian Networks With Cooperation and Feedback  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We obtain new outer bounds on the capacity regions of the two-user multiple access channel with generalized feedback (MAC-GF) and the two-user interference channel with generalized feedback (IC-GF). These outer bounds are based on the idea of dependence ...

R. Tandon; S. Ulukus

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Aging and Phase Stability of Waste Package Outer Barrier  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report was prepared in accordance with ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). This report provides information on the phase stability of Alloy 22, the current waste package outer barrier material. The goal of this model is to determine whether the single-phase solid solution is stable under repository conditions and, if not, how fast other phases may precipitate. The aging and phase stability model, which is based on fundamental thermodynamic and kinetic concepts and principles, will be used to provide predictive insight into the long-term metallurgical stability of Alloy 22 under relevant repository conditions. The results of this model are used by ''General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of Waste Package Outer Barrier'' as reference-only information. These phase stability studies are currently divided into three general areas: Tetrahedrally close-packed (TCP) phase and carbide precipitation in the base metal; TCP and carbide precipitation in welded samples; and Long-range ordering reactions. TCP-phase and carbide precipitates that form in Alloy 22 are generally rich in chromium (Cr) and/or molybdenum (Mo) (Raghavan et al. 1984 [DIRS 154707]). Because these elements are responsible for the high corrosion resistance of Alloy 22, precipitation of TCP phases and carbides, especially at grain boundaries, can lead to an increased susceptibility to localized corrosion in the alloy. These phases are brittle and also tend to embrittle the alloy (Summers et al. 1999 [DIRS 146915]). They are known to form in Alloy 22 at temperatures greater than approximately 600 C. Whether these phases also form at the lower temperatures expected in the repository during the 10,000-year regulatory period must be determined. The kinetics of this precipitation will be determined for both the base metal and the weld heat-affected zone (HAZ). The TCP phases (P, {mu}, and {sigma}) are present in the weld metal in the as-welded condition. It may be possible to eliminate these phases through a solution anneal heat treatment, but that may not be possible for the closure weld because the spent nuclear fuel cladding cannot be heated to more than 350 C. The effects of any stress mitigation techniques (such as laser peening or solution heat treating) that may be used to reduce the tensile stresses on the closure welds must also be determined. Cold-work will cause an increase in dislocation density, and such an increase in dislocation density may cause an increase in diffusion rates that control precipitation kinetics (Porter et al. 1992 [DIRS 161265]; Tawancy et al. 1983 [DIRS 104991]). Long-range order (LRO) occurs in nickel (Ni)-Cr-Mo alloys (such as Alloy 22) at temperatures less than approximately 600 C. This ordering has been linked to an increased susceptibility of Ni-Cr-Mo alloys to stress corrosion cracking and hydrogen embrittlement (Tawancy et al. 1983 [DIRS 104991]). These analyses provide information on the rate at which LRO may occur in Alloy 22 under repository conditions. Determination of the kinetics of transformations through experimental techniques requires that the transformations being investigated be accelerated due to the fact that the expected service life is at least 10,000 years. Phase transformations are typically accelerated through an increase in temperature. The rate of transformation is determined at the higher temperature and is extrapolated to the lower temperatures of interest.

F. Wong

2004-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

105

Rates of tectonic and magmatic processes in the North Cascades continental magmatic arc  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Continental magmatic arcs are among the most dynamic. geologic systems, and documentation of the magmatic, thermal, and tectonic evolution of arcs is essential for understanding the processes of magma generation, ascent ...

Matzel, Jennifer E. Piontek, 1973-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Circulation Induced by River Inflow in Well Mixed Water over a Sloping Continental Shelf  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The pressure field over a sloping continental shelf subject to freshwater runoff at the coast can be resolved into a nearly two-dimensional dynamic height field and a residual field, the latter arising from the interaction of baroclinity and ...

G. T. Csanady

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

The Mean Along-Isobath Heat and Salt Balances over the Middle Atlantic Bight Continental Shelf  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mean heat and salt balances over the Middle Atlantic Bight continental shelf are investigated by testing the hypothesis that surface fluxes of heat or freshwater are balanced by along-isobath fluxes resulting from the mean, depth-averaged, ...

Steven J. Lentz

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Swell Transformation across the Continental Shelf. Part II: Validation of a Spectral Energy Balance Equation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State-of-the-art parameterizations of the interactions of waves with a sandy bottom are evaluated using extensive field observations of swell evolution across the North Carolina continental shelf and hindcasts performed with the spectral wave ...

Fabrice Ardhuin; T. H. C. Herbers; P. F. Jessen; W. C. O'Reilly

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

The Role of Entrainment in the Diurnal Cycle of Continental Convection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In continental convective environments, general circulation models typically produce a diurnal cycle of rainfall that peaks close to the noon maximum of insolation, hours earlier than the observed peak. One possible reason is insufficient ...

Anthony D. Del Genio; Jingbo Wu

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Supertidal Frequency Internal Waves on the Continental Shelf South of New England  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large-amplitude internal waves of supertidal frequency are commonly observed on continental shelves during the stratified mason. We present a series of intensive observations of such waves at an anchor station south of New England using two CTD ...

Derek M. Burrage; Richard W. Garvine

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Mixing and the Evolution of Cloud Droplet Size Spectra in a Vigorous Continental Cumulus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aircraft measurements in a vigorous, highly turbulent continental cumulus show predominantly bimodal and multiple peaked cloud droplet spectral shapes. The data are 100 m (1 s) averages. Three factors involved in the development of the cloud ...

Ilga R. Paluch; Charles A. Knight

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Observations and a Model of the Mean Circulation over the Middle Atlantic Bight Continental Shelf  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analyses of current time series longer than 200 days from 33 sites over the Middle Atlantic Bight continental shelf reveal a consistent mean circulation pattern. The mean depth-averaged flow is equatorward, alongshelf, and increases with ...

Steven J. Lentz

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Quasi-Geostrophic Topographically Generated Mean Flow over the Continental Margin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of oppositely directed, monthly mean alongshore currents and wind stress over the continental margin off the Pacific coast of North America motivate the theoretical examination of mean flow generation by topographic lee-wave drag. We ...

Roger M. Samelson; J. S. Allen

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Evolvement of tsunami waves on the continental shelves with gentle slope in the China Seas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Potential tsunami generated in the Okinawa Trench or the Manila Trench may attack the southeast coast of China. The continental shelves with extremely gentle slope in the China Seas affect the evolvement of tsunami waves. In this paper

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Modeling the Aerosol Extinction versus Backscatter Relationship for Lidar Applications: Maritime and Continental Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model to derive functional relationships linking extinction (?) and backscatter (?) of continental and maritime aerosol at 532 nm is presented and tested. These relationships are needed to solve the single-wavelength lidar equation, where both ...

Francesca Barnaba; Gian Paolo Gobbi

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Hydro-Climatological Trends in the Continental United States, 1948-88  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spatial patterns in trends of four monthly variables: average temperature, precipitation, streamflow, and average of the daily temperature range were examined for the continental United States for the period 194888. The data used are a subset of ...

Dennis P. Lettenmaier; Eric F. Wood; James R. Wallis

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

The Effects of In-Cloud Sulfate Production on Light-Scattering Properties of Continental Aerosol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Model calculations am presented for continental scenarios that demonstrate that the heterogeneity in the chemistry of different size cloud drops can have a significant impact on the amount of sulfate produced in cloud, its size distribution, and ...

Po-Fat Yuen; Dean A. Hegg; Timothy V. Larson

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Polarimetric Radar Analysis of Raindrop Size Variability in Maritime and Continental Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the Queensland Cloud Seeding Research Program, the CP2 polarimetric radar parameter differential radar reflectivity Zdr was used to examine the raindrop size evolution in both maritime and continental clouds. The focus of this paper is to ...

James W. Wilson; Charles A. Knight; Sarah A. Tessendorf; Courtney Weeks

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Advancing Global-and Continental-Scale Hydrometeorology: Contributions of GEWEX Hydrometeorology Panel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past 9 years, the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX), under the auspices of the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP), has coordinated the activities of the Continental Scale Experiments (CSEs) and other related research ...

R. G. Lawford; R. Stewart; J. Roads; H-J. Isemer; M. Manton; J. Marengo; T. Yasunari; S. Benedict; T. Koike; S. Williams

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Air, Sea, and Land Interactions of the Continental U.S. Hydroclimate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multidecadal simulations over the continental United States by an atmospheric general circulation model coupled to an ocean general circulation model is compared with that forced by observed sea surface temperature (SST). The differences in the ...

Vasubandhu Misra; P. A. Dirmeyer

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gom outer continental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

The Cascade of Tidal Energy from Low to High Modes on a Continental Slope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The linear transfer of tidal energy from large to small scales is quantified for small tidal excursion over a near-critical continental slope. A theoretical framework for low-wavenumber energy transfer is derived from flat bottom vertical modes ...

Samuel M. Kelly; Jonathan D. Nash; Kim I. Martini; Matthew H. Alford; Eric Kunze

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Aspects of the Tidal Variability Observed on the Southern California Continental Shelf  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of the current and temperature field from the southern California continental shelf are analyzed in a frequency band (0.66 cpd) dominated by tidal fluctuations. The seasonal variability of the temperature and horizontal velocity ...

A. Bratkovich

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Toward the Improvement of Aircraft-Icing Forecasts for the Continental United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An automated procedure is developed for detecting and forecasting atmospheric conditions conductive to aircraft icing over the continental United States. The procedure uses gridded output from the Nested-Grid Model, and is based on the manual ...

Paul Schultz; Marcia K. Politovich

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

The Turbulence Structure in a Continental Stratocumulus Cloud from Millimeter-Wavelength Radar Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The turbulent-scale vertical velocity structure in a continental stratocumulus cloud is studied using a 3-mm wavelength Doppler radar operating in a vertically pointing mode. The radar observations provided 30-m sampling in the vertical with 2-s ...

Pavlos Kollias; Bruce Albrecht

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Bottom Stress Estimates from Vertical Dissipation Rate Profiles on the Continental Shelf  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of the near-bottom distribution of the turbulent dissipation rate on the continental shelf west of Vancouver Island are used to calculate bottom stress. A free-failing vertical profiler with microstructure shear probes was used to ...

Richard K. Dewey; William R. Crawford

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Scale Dependence of the Predictability of Precipitation from Continental Radar Images. Part II: Probability Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Eulerian and Lagrangian persistence of precipitation patterns derived from continental-scale radar composite images are used as a measure of predictability and for nowcasting [the McGill algorithm for precipitation nowcasting by Lagrangian ...

Urs Germann; Isztar Zawadzki

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Laboratory Models of Bay-Type Continental Shelves in the Winter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A laboratory experiment consisting of a shallow sea of constant depth bounded by a deep ocean through a uniformly sloping continental rise was conducted. The experiment is cooled from above, and there is a region that exhibits sinking convection ...

Takashige Sugimoto; John A. Whitehead

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Long-Term Coastal Upwelling over a Continental ShelfSlope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Long-term coastal upwelling over a continental shelf-slope with emphasis on the planetary dispersion of Rossby waves is studied with numerical models. The ocean is forced by a wind stress with a limited longshore extent. The thermocline ...

Nobuo Suginohara; Yoshiteru Kitamura

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Upwelling Circulation on the Oregon Continental Shelf. Part II: Simulations and Comparisons with Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sixty-day simulations of flow on the Oregon continental shelf are performed using the Blumberg and Mellor sigma coordinate, primitive equation model. The model is two-dimensional (an across-shelf section) with high spatial resolution and ...

J. Federiuk; J. S. Allen

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Pan-continental droughts in North America over the last millennium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regional droughts are common in North America, but pan-continental droughts extending across multiple regions, including 2012, are rare relative to single region events. We use the tree-ring derived North American Drought Atlas to investigate ...

Benjamin I. Cook; Jason E. Smerdon; Richard Seager; Edward R. Cook

131

Thermal Fronts Generated by Internal Waves Propagating Obliquely along the Continental Slope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rapid temperature falls occurring at semidiurnal periods are observed close to the bottom above the continental slope in the Bay of Biscay. Simultaneous current measurements reveal that the abrupt temperature decrease O(0.5 K) within one minute ...

Johannes R. Gemmrich; Hans van Haren

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Statistical Evaluation of Combined Daily Gauge Observations and Rainfall Satellite Estimates over Continental South America  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a comprehensive assessment of a new high-resolution, gaugesatellite-based analysis of daily precipitation over continental South America during 2004. This methodology is based on a combination of additive and multiplicative ...

Daniel A. Vila; Luis Gustavo G. de Goncalves; David L. Toll; Jose Roberto Rozante

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

A statistical method for improving continental shelf and near-shore marine climate predictions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spatially and temporally homogeneous measurements of ocean temperature variability at high resolution on the continental shelf are scarce. Daily estimates of large-scale ocean properties are readily available from global ocean reanalysis products. ...

Eric C. J. Oliver; Neil J. Holbrook

134

Combined Effects of Wind-Driven Upwelling and Internal Tide on the Continental Shelf  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Internal tides on the continental shelf can be intermittent as a result of changing hydrographic conditions associated with wind-driven upwelling. In turn, the internal tide can affect transports associated with upwelling. To study these ...

A. L. Kurapov; J. S. Allen; G. D. Egbert

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

The Influence of Buoyancy Flux from Estuaries on Continental Shelf Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The release of freshwater from a midlatitude estuary to the continental shelf is modeled numerically as a Rossby adjustment problem using a primitive equation model. As the initial salinity front is relaxed, a first baroclinic-mode Kelvin wave ...

Andrew J. Weaver; William W. Hsieh

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

A Modeling Study on the Early Electrical Development of Tropical Convection: Continental and Oceanic (Monsoon) Storms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical modeling studies of continental tropical and maritime tropical convection were conducted using the two-dimensional, nonhydrostatic, cloud electrification model developed at the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology. The model ...

Scot C. Randell; Steven A. Rutledge; Richard D. Farley; John H. Helsdon Jr.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Particle trap to sheath contact for a gas-insulated transmission line having a corrugated outer conductor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A particle trap to outer elongated conductor or sheath contact for gas-insulated transmission lines. The particle trap to outer sheath contact of the invention is applicable to gas-insulated transmission lines having either corrugated or non-corrugated outer sheaths. The contact of the invention includes an electrical contact disposed on a lever arm which in turn is rotatably disposed on the particle trap and biased in a direction to maintain contact between the electrical contact and the outer sheath.

Fischer, William H. (Pittsburgh, PA); Cookson, Alan H. (Pittsburgh, PA); Yoon, Kue H. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1984-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

138

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/JIP GOM Hydrate Research Cruise  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Core Processing Core Processing Photos and other pertinent images from the cruise will be posted in the "Photo Gallery" as they become available. Core Processing Photos taken by NETL scientist aboard the Uncle John. These photos show the various tools used to analyze pressurized and non-pressurized core taken from the first drilling location at Atwater Valley. A_Transferring core to lab B_Pressure Core Transfer Chamber BC_Pressure core lab BCC_Core Processing Lab Transferring core to lab Pressure core transfer chamber Pressure core lab Core Processing lab BD_Pressure core analysis tools2 C_Pressure core analysis tools Ga Tech Mechanical Measurements Tool GeoTek Core logger Pressure core analysis tools Pressure core analysis tools Georgia Tech Mechanical measurements tool GeoTek core logger

139

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/JIP GOM Hydrate Research Cruise  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The DOE/JIP Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Cruise The DOE/JIP Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Cruise Status Reports During this expedition we will maintain an intermittent log of information relayed from the chief scientist on the expedition. To view a report for a particular day click on the "Day x" link in any highlighted box. The planned cruise timeline [PDF-13KB] is April 17 - May 21, 2005. This is the "planned" timeline. The schedule may change without prior notification due weather conditions or other unplanned occurrences. April 17 Day 1 April 18 Day 2 April 19 Day 3 April 20 Day 4 April 21 Day 5 April 22 Day 6 April 23 Day 7 April 24 Day 8 April 25 Day 9 April 26 Day 10 April 27 Day 11 April 28 Day 12 April 29 Day 13 April 30 Day 14 May 1 Day 15 May 2 Day 16 May 3 Day 17 May 4 Day 18 May 5

140

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/JIP GOM Hydrate Research Cruise  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pressurized Coring Equipment Pressurized Coring Equipment Pressure Core Equipment used by the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate JIP Drilling Program Pressure Core Equipment - Photo Gallery One of the key objectives of the ChevronTexaco Gulf of Mexico hydrates Joint Industry Project is the collection and analyses of deepwater sediment samples. Because these samples may contain hydrate which is only stable at specific temperature and pressure conditions it is necessary to use specialized sampling equipment. Otherwise, the combination of reduced pressure and increased temperatures as the sample is retrieved through 4,000 feet of gulf seawater will fully dissociate the hydrate, leaving only gas and water. Although techniques exist to infer hydrates presence from distinctive geochemical markers, we have lost the ability to image the nature of hydrate distribution, or to conduct measurements of the various physical and chemical properties of hydrates in the host sediments.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gom outer continental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/JIP GOM Hydrate Research Cruise  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Core Handling Core Handling From: Cruise Prospectus [PDF-827KB] Visit the Photo Gallery for more pictures showing core handling Non-pressurized and Pressure Core Handling Non-pressurized Core Handling (Fugro Hydraulic Piston Corer and Fugro Corer) Photo of Core packed in ice bath Core packed in ice bath Cores that might contain gas hydrates should be recovered as quickly as possible. An ice bath may be used in some cases to slow the dissociation process. A core reception/preparation van will be on the deck of the Uncle John where individual cores (perhaps up to 9 m long) can be laid on ‘core hooks' and quickly drilled, labeled and sectioned. Infrared (IR) camera imaging will be done as soon as practical after core recovery. Both track-mounted and hand held IR cameras will be used to identify the

142

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/JIP GOM Hydrate Research Cruise  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis - Fugro Operations and Geotechnical Investigations PDF-7.13MB National Methane Hydrate R&D Program website. Photos: Photo Gallery - miscellaneous - Photos from...

143

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/JIP GOM Hydrate Research Cruise  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Contacts Contact information for technical or media related information is listed below. Media Related Inquiries: Otis Mills Office of Public Affairs Coordination, NETL...

144

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/JIP GOM Hydrate Research Cruise  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

available. Day 10 - 26 April 2005 Day 10 photos showing core taken using the Fugro Hydraulic Piston Corer (FHPC) and the seabed frame which houses the FHPC. Core1 core2...

145

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/JIP GOM Hydrate Research Cruise  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Non-pressurized and Pressure Core Handling Non-pressurized Core Handling (Fugro Hydraulic Piston Corer and Fugro Corer) Photo of Core packed in ice bath Core packed in ice...

146

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/JIP GOM Hydrate Research Cruise  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geochemistry Program On-Board Uncle John From: Miriam Kastner, University of California at San Diego On-Board Geochemistry Analyses The objectives of the geochemistry program are...

147

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/JIP GOM Hydrate Research Cruise  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The DOEJIP Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Cruise Status Reports During this expedition we will maintain an intermittent log of information relayed from the chief scientist on the...

148

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/JIP GOM Hydrate Research Cruise  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pressurized Coring Equipment Pressure Core Equipment used by the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate JIP Drilling Program Pressure Core Equipment - Photo Gallery One of the key objectives...

149

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/JIP GOM Hydrate Research Cruise  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the omni-directional source generates compressional, shear, and Stoneley waves into hard formations. The configuration of the DSI also allows recording of both in-line and...

150

Turbine airfoil with dual wall formed from inner and outer layers separated by a compliant structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine with a cooling system and a compliant dual wall configuration configured to enable thermal expansion between inner and outer layers while eliminating stress formation is disclosed. The compliant dual wall configuration may be formed a dual wall formed from inner and outer layers separated by a compliant structure. The compliant structure may be configured such that the outer layer may thermally expand without limitation by the inner layer. The compliant structure may be formed from a plurality of pedestals positioned generally parallel with each other. The pedestals may include a first foot attached to a first end of the pedestal and extending in a first direction aligned with the outer layer, and may include a second foot attached to a second end of the pedestal and extending in a second direction aligned with the inner layer.

Campbell; Christian X. (Oviedo, FL), Morrison; Jay A. (Oviedo, FL)

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

151

Turbulence Structure of the Hurricane Boundary Layer between the Outer Rainbands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the Coupled Boundary Layers AirSea Transfer (CBLAST)-Hurricane program, flights were conducted to directly measure turbulent fluxes and turbulence properties in the high-wind boundary layer of hurricanes between the outer rainbands. ...

Jun A. Zhang; William M. Drennan; Peter G. Black; Jeffrey R. French

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Miniature Supercells in an Offshore Outer Rainband of Hurricane Ivan (2004)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Airborne Doppler radar observations are used to document the structure of three miniature supercells embedded in an outer rainband of Hurricane Ivan on 15 September 2004. The cells were located more than 100 km offshore, beyond the Doppler range ...

Matthew D. Eastin; M. Christopher Link

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

How Do Outer Spiral Rainbands Affect Tropical Cyclone Structure and Intensity?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A long-standing issue on how outer spiral rainbands affect the structure and intensity of tropical cyclones is studied through a series of numerical experiments using the cloud-resolving tropical cyclone model TCM4. Because diabatic heating due ...

Yuqing Wang

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Multiscale Processes Leading to Supercells in the Landfalling Outer Rainbands of Hurricane Katrina (2005)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shallow supercells are frequently observed within the outer rainbandsboth onshore and offshoreof landfalling tropical cyclones (TCs). Such supercells can produce tornadoes along the coast even when the center of the parent TC is hundreds of ...

Benjamin W. Green; Fuqing Zhang; Paul Markowski

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Structure of continental rifts: Role of older features and magmatism  

SciTech Connect

Recent geological and geophysical studies in several continental rifts have begun to shed light on the details of the processes which govern the structural evolution of these important exploration targets. In Kenya and Tanzania, the classic East African rift has been the object of several investigations which reveal that its location follows the boundary (suture ) between the Tanzanian craton (Archean) and Mozambiquan belt (Proterozoic), The Baikal rift also follows a similar boundary, and the Mid-continent rift of North America appears to do the same. Rifts themselves often act as zones of weakness which are reactivated by younger tectonic regimes. The classic North American example of this effect is the Eocambrian Southern Oklahoma aulacogen which was deformed to create the Anadarko basin and Wichita uplift in the late Paleozoic. The Central basin platform has a similar history although the original rift formed at [approximately]1,100Ma. Integration of geophysical data with petrologic and geochemical data from several rift zones has also provided a new picture of the nature and extent of magmatic modification of the crust. An interesting contradiction is that Phanerozoic rifts, except the Afar region, show little evidence for major magmatic modification of the crust whereas, at least in North America, many Precambrian rifts are associated with very large mafic bodies in the crust. The Kenya rift displays evidence for modification of the lower crust in a two-phase magmatic history, but upper crustal magmatic features are limited to local intrusions associated with volcanoes. In this rift, complex basement structure plays a much more important role than previously realized, and the geophysical signatures of basement structure and magmatism are easy to confuse. If this is also the case in other rifts, additional rift basins remain to be discovered.

Keller, G.R. (Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Eddy and Wind-Forced Heat Transports in the Gulf of Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Gulf of Mexico (GOM) receives heat from the Caribbean Sea via the YucatanLoop Current (LC) system, and the corresponding ocean heat content (OHC) is important to weather and climate of the continental United States. However, the mechanisms ...

Y-L. Chang; L-Y. Oey

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E)  

SciTech Connect

Convective processes play a critical role in the Earths energy balance through the redistribution of heat and moisture in the atmosphere and subsequent impacts on the hydrologic cycle. Global observation and accurate representation of these processes in numerical models is vital to improving our current understanding and future simulations of Earths climate system. Despite improvements in computing power, current operational weather and global climate models are unable to resolve the natural temporal and spatial scales that are associated with convective and stratiform precipitation processes; therefore, they must turn to parameterization schemes to represent these processes. In turn, the physical basis for these parameterization schemes needs to be evaluated for general application under a variety of atmospheric conditions. Analogously, space-based remote sensing algorithms designed to retrieve related cloud and precipitation information for use in hydrological, climate, and numerical weather prediction applications often rely on physical parameterizations that reliably translate indirectly related instrument measurements to the physical quantity of interest (e.g., precipitation rate). Importantly, both spaceborne retrieval algorithms and model convective parameterization schemes traditionally rely on field campaign data sets as a basis for evaluating and improving the physics of their respective approaches. The Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) will take place in central Oklahoma during the AprilMay 2011 period. The experiment is a collaborative effort between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and the National Aeronautics and Space Administrations (NASA) Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission Ground Validation (GV) program. The field campaign leverages the unprecedented observing infrastructure currently available in the central United States, combined with an extensive sounding array, remote sensing and in situ aircraft observations, NASA GPM ground validation remote sensors, and new ARM instrumentation purchased with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding. The overarching goal is to provide the most complete characterization of convective cloud systems, precipitation, and the environment that has ever been obtained, providing constraints for model cumulus parameterizations and space-based rainfall retrieval algorithms over land that have never before been available. Several different components of convective cloud and precipitation processes tangible to both the convective parameterization and precipitation retrieval algorithm problem are targeted, such as preconvective environment and convective initiation, updraft/downdraft dynamics, condensate transport and detrainment, precipitation and cloud microphysics, spatial and temporal variability of precipitation, influence on the environment and radiation, and a detailed description of the large-scale forcing.

Jensen, MP; Petersen, WA; Del Genio, AD; Giangrande, SE; Heymsfield, A; Heymsfield, G; Hou, AY; Kollias, P; Orr, B; Rutledge, SA; Schwaller, MR; Zipser, E

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Conductor load bearing roller for a gas-insulated transmission line having a corrugated outer conductor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas-insulated transmission line includes a corrugated outer conductor, an inner conductor disposed within and insulated from the outer conductor by means of support insulators and an insulating gas, and a transport device for supporting and permitting movement of the inner conductor/insulating support assembly axially along the corrugated outer conductor without radial displacement. The transport device includes two movable contacts, such as skids or rollers, supported on a common pivot lever, the pivot lever being rotatably disposed about a pivot lever axis, which pivot lever axis is in turn disposed on the periphery of a support insulator or particle trap if one is used. The movable contacts are separated axially a distance equal to the axial distance between the peaks and valleys of the corrugations of the outer conductor and separated radially a distance equal to the radial distance between the peaks and valleys of the corrugations of the outer conductor. The transport device has the pivot lever axis disposed perpendicular to the direction of travel of the inner conductor/insulating support assembly.

Fischer, William H. (Pittsburgh, PA); Yoon, Kue H. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1984-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

159

Outer Bounds for Multiple-Access Channels With Feedback Using Dependence Balance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use the idea of dependence balance to obtain a new outer bound for the capacity region of the discrete memoryless multiple-access channel with noiseless feedback (MAC-FB). We consider a binary additive noisy MAC-FB whose feedback capacity is not known. The binary additive noisy MAC considered in this paper can be viewed as the discrete counterpart of the Gaussian MAC-FB. Ozarow established that the capacity region of the two-user Gaussian MAC-FB is given by the cut-set bound. Our result shows that for the discrete version of the channel considered by Ozarow, this is not the case. Direct evaluation of our outer bound is intractable due to an involved auxiliary random variable whose large cardinality prohibits an exhaustive search. We overcome this difficulty by using a composite function and its properties to explicitly evaluate our outer bound. Our outer bound is strictly less than the cut-set bound at all points on the capacity region where feedback increases capacity. In addition, we explicitly evaluate the CoverLeung achievable rate region for the binary additive noisy MAC-FB in consideration. Furthermore, using the tools developed for the evaluation of our outer bound, we also explicitly characterize the boundary of the feedback capacity region of the binary erasure MAC, for which the CoverLeung achievable rate region is known to be tight. This last result confirms that the feedback strategies developed by Kramer for the binary erasure MAC are capacity achieving.

Ravi Tandon; Sennur Ulukus

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Dependence Balance Based Outer Bounds for Gaussian Networks with Cooperation and Feedback  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We obtain new outer bounds on the capacity regions of the two-user multiple access channel with generalized feedback (MAC-GF) and the two-user interference channel with generalized feedback (IC-GF). These outer bounds are based on the idea of dependence balance which was proposed by Hekstra and Willems [1]. To illustrate the usefulness of our outer bounds, we investigate three different channel models. We first consider a Gaussian MAC with noisy feedback (MAC-NF), where transmitter $k$, $k=1,2$, receives a feedback $Y_{F_{k}}$, which is the channel output $Y$ corrupted with additive white Gaussian noise $Z_{k}$. As the feedback noise variances become large, one would expect the feedback to become useless, which is not reflected by the cut-set bound. We demonstrate that our outer bound improves upon the cut-set bound for all non-zero values of the feedback noise variances. Moreover, in the limit as $\\sigma_{Z_{k}}^{2}\\to \\infty$, $k=1,2$, our outer bound collapses to the capacity region of the Gaussian MAC wit...

Tandon, Ravi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gom outer continental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Implementation of an Outer Can Welding System for Savannah River Site FB-Line  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper details three phases of testing to confirm use of a Gas Tungsten Arc (GTA) system for closure welding the 3013 outer container used for stabilization/storage of plutonium metals and oxides. The outer container/lid closure joint was originally designed for laser welding, but for this application, the gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding process has been adapted. The testing progressed in three phases: (1) system checkout to evaluate system components for operational readiness, (2) troubleshooting to evaluate high weld failure rates and develop corrective techniques, and (3) pre-installation acceptance testing.

Howard, S.R.

2003-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

162

Preliminary engineering studies for the support shell of the outer tracker of the SDC detector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Solenoidal Detector Collaboration (SDC) detector is in the conceptual design phase. ORNL is currently working with various sub-groups on the design of the outer tracker portion of the SDC detector. A major focus in the outer tracker design is the structure that mounts and supports the tracking elements. This structure must meet extreme requirements of alignment and stability while containing a minimum of material. This report describes the requirements, evaluations, and analyses that have been performed on the two options being explored; a cylindrical support shell and a modular support shell.

Vandergriff, D.H.; Mayhall, J.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Deep Flow along the Western Boundary South of the Blake Bahama Outer Ridge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In JuneJuly 1990, hydrographic, chlorofluorocarbon (CFC), and velocity observations were taken along the western boundary of the North Atlantic south of the Blake Bahama Outer Ridge from 30 to 24N between the northern Bahamas and 71W. The ...

Elizabeth Johns; Rana A. Fine; Robert L. Molinari

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Outer Bounds for Multiple Access Channels with Feedback using Dependence Balance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use the idea of dependence balance to obtain a new outer bound for the capacity region of the discrete memoryless multiple access channel with noiseless feedback (MAC-FB). We consider a binary additive noisy MAC-FB whose feedback capacity is not known. The binary additive noisy MAC considered in this paper can be viewed as the discrete counterpart of the Gaussian MAC-FB. Ozarow established that the capacity region of the two-user Gaussian MAC-FB is given by the cut-set bound. Our result shows that for the discrete version of the channel considered by Ozarow, this is not the case. Direct evaluation of our outer bound is intractable due to an involved auxiliary random variable whose large cardinality prohibits an exhaustive search. We overcome this difficulty by using functional analysis to explicitly evaluate our outer bound. Our outer bound is strictly less than the cut-set bound at all points on the capacity region where feedback increases capacity. In addition, we explicitly evaluate the Cover-Leung achi...

Tandon, Ravi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Outer bounds for multiple-access channels with feedback using dependence balance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We use the idea of dependence balance to obtain a new outer bound for the capacity region of the discrete memoryless multiple-access channel with noiseless feedback (MAC-FB). We consider a binary additive noisy MAC-FB whose feedback capacity is not known. ... Keywords: cut-set bound, dependence balance, multiple-access channel with feedback (MAC-FB)

Ravi Tandon; Sennur Ulukus

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

FilMINT: An Outer Approximation-Based Solver for Convex Mixed-Integer Nonlinear Programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a new solver for convex mixed-integer nonlinear programs (MINLPs) that implements a linearization-based algorithm. The solver is based on an algorithm of Quesada and Grossmann [Quesada, I., I. E. Grossmann. 1992. An LP/NLP based branch-and-bound ... Keywords: LP/NLP-based branch and bound, mixed-integer nonlinear programming, outer approximation

Kumar Abhishek; Sven Leyffer; Jeff Linderoth

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Electron loss rates from the outer radiation belt caused by the filling of the outer plasmasphere: the calm before the storm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements from 7 spacecraft in geosynchronous orbit are analyzed to determine the decay rate of the number density of the outer electron radiation belt prior to the onset of high-speed-stream-driven geomagnetic storms. Superposed-data analysis is used wan(?) a collection of 124 storms. When there is a calm before the storm, the electron number density decays exponentially before the storm with a 3.4-day e-folding time: beginning about 4 days before storm onset, the density decreases from {approx}4x10{sup -4} cm{sup -3} to {approx}1X 10{sup -4} cm{sup -3}. When there is not a calm before the storm, the number-density decay is very smalL The decay in the number density of radiation-belt electrons is believed to be caused by pitch-angle scattering of electrons into the atmospheric loss cone as the outer plasmasphere fills during the calms. While the radiation-belt electron density decreases, the temperature of the electron radiation belt holds approximately constant, indicating that the electron precipitation occurs equally at all energies. Along with the number density decay, the pressure of the outer electron radiation belt decays and the specific entropy increases. From the measured decay rates, the electron flux to the atmosphere is calculated and that flux is 3 orders of magnitude less than thermal fluxes in the magnetosphere, indicating that the radiation-belt pitch-angle scattering is 3 orders weaker than strong diffusion. Energy fluxes into the atmosphere are calculated and found to be insufficient to produce visible airglow.

Borovsky, Joseph E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Denton, Michael H [LANCASTER UNIV

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

An integrated approach to modelling land-use change on continental and global scales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land-use and land-cover change are important drivers of global environmental change, affecting the state of biodiversity, the global carbon cycle, and other aspects of the earth system. In this article we describe the development of the land-use model ... Keywords: Continental and global scale land-use change modelling, Human-environment interaction, Land-use systems, Model framework

Rdiger Schaldach; Joseph Alcamo; Jennifer Koch; Christina Klking; David M. Lapola; Jan Schngel; Jrg A. Priess

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Hydrographic and Current Observations on the Continental Slope and Shelf of the Western Equatorial Atlantic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrographic and current-profiling data from December 1980 and current-meter data obtained between September 1980 and November 1981 from the continental slope and shelf of the western equatorial Atlantic between 2 and 7N are used to describe ...

Charles N. Flagg; R. Lee Gordon; Scott McDowell

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

A Model of Gulf Stream Frontal Instabilities, Meanders and Eddies along the Continental Slope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For a simplified model of the Gulf Stream front along a vertical-walled continental slope of a constant-depth ocean basin, the dynamics governing frontal instabilities, meanders, and eddies depend primarily on (i) L0/ R0, the ratio of the cross-...

Lie-Yauw Oey

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

The K1 Tide on the Continental Shelf from Nova Scotia to Cape Hatteras  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A description is given of the K1 tide over the northeast continental shelf off North America from Nova Scotia to Cape Hatteras. Analyzed pressure data obtained from W. Brown and J. Irish (University of New Hampshire) have been used to draw up the ...

Peter R. Daifuku; Robert C. Beardsley

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Stability and charging characteristics of the comma head region of continental winter cyclones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents analyses of the fine-scale structure of convection in the comma head of two continental winter cyclones and a 16-storm climatology analyzing the distribution of lightning within the comma head. A case study of a deep cyclone is ...

Robert M. Rauber; Joseph Wegman; David M. Plummer; Andrew A. Rosenow; Melissa Peterson; Greg M. McFarquhar; Brian F. Jewett; David Leon; Patrick S. Market; Kevin R. Knupp; Jason M. Keeler; Steven M. Battaglia

173

A remote sensing observatory for hydrologic sciences: A genesis for scaling to continental hydrology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A remote sensing observatory for hydrologic sciences: A genesis for scaling to continental. It is in this spirit that we advocate establishing a hydrologic remote sensing observatory (RSO) to advance sensing al. (2006), A remote sensing observatory for hydrologic sciences: A genesis for scaling

Katul, Gabriel

174

SimClast: An aggregated forward stratigraphic model of continental shelves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a new basin-scale, 2DH model of continental shelves with a focus on generating clastic stratigraphy. The model, SimClast, is capable of simulating fluvial channel network dynamics, plume deposition, wave-induced cross-shore and longshore ... Keywords: Coupling, Fluvio-deltaic, Numerical model, Sedimentary, Stratigraphy, Waves

Rory A. F. Dalman; Gert Jan Weltje

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Lithium isotopic composition and concentration of the deep continental crust Fang-Zhen Teng a,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lithium isotopic composition and concentration of the deep continental crust Fang-Zhen Teng a April 2008 Accepted 5 June 2008 Editor: B. Bourdon Keywords: Lithium Isotope fractionation Deep. Lithium concentrations of granulite xenoliths also vary widely (0.5 to 21 ppm) and are, on average, lower

Mcdonough, William F.

176

Influences of Continental Monsoons and AirSea Coupling on the Climate of the Equatorial Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An airsealand coupled model of intermediate complexity was used to reveal the important roles of airsea coupling and adjacent continental monsoons (i.e., American monsoons and AsianAustralian monsoons) on the annual cycle and mean state of ...

Xiouhua Fu; Bin Wang

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Wilson cycles, tectonic inheritance, and rifting of the North American Gulf of Mexico continental margin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wilson cycles, tectonic inheritance, and rifting of the North American Gulf of Mexico continental during opening of the Gulf of Mexico. Unlike the Atlantic margins, where Wilson cycles were first recognized, breakup in the Gulf of Mexico did not initially focus within the orogen, but was instead

Huerta, Audrey D.

178

Continental insulation, mantle cooling, and the surface area of oceans and continents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Continental insulation, mantle cooling, and the surface area of oceans and continents A. Lenardica, Rice University, Houston, TX 77251-1892, United States b School of Mathematical Sciences, Building 28 May 2005 Abstract It is generally assumed that continents, acting as thermal insulation above

Manga, Michael

179

A virtual tall tower network for understanding continental sources and sinks of CO2  

SciTech Connect

Our understanding of the North American terrestrial carbon cycle is limited by both a lack of continental atmospheric CO2 data, and by a need for methods to interpret these and other continental data with confidence. In response to this challenge a rapid expansion of the N. American carbon cycle observational network is underway. This expansion includes a network of continuous, continental CO2 mixing ratio observations being collected at a subset of AmeriFlux towers. Progress in developing this resource includes instrument development, site installation, calibration and intercalibration efforts, and initiation of a uniform data product. Progess in applying these data include proposed methods for interpreting surface layer measurements in atmospheric inversions (the virtual tall towers approach), examination of coherence patterns in continental mixing ratios in response to weather and climate, and application of these mixing ratio measurements in formal atmospheric inversions. Future work will merge these methods with interpretation of flux towers observations of terrestrial carbon fluxes in an effort to create a single coherent diagnosis of North American terrestrial carbon fluxes over a multi-year period.

Davis, K.J.; Richardson, S.J.; Miles, N.L.

2007-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

180

Modified Halocline Water over the Laptev Sea Continental Margin: Historical Data Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Historical hydrographic data (1940s2010) show a distinct cross-slope difference of the lower halocline water (LHW) over the Laptev Sea continental margins. Over the slope, the LHW is on average warmer and saltier by 0.2C and 0.5 psu, ...

Igor A. Dmitrenko; Sergey A. Kirillov; Vladimir V. Ivanov; Bert Rudels; Nuno Serra; Nikolay V. Koldunov

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gom outer continental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Current Meter Observations on the Continental Slope at Two Sites in the Eastern Gulf of Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current-meter observations obtained at two sites on the continental slope of the eastern Gulf of Mexico, at nominal positions of 29N, 88W (the Mobile site) and 27.5N, 85.5W (the Tampa site) are presented. Data were collected at three levels ...

Robert L. Molinari; Dennis A. Mayer

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

FallWinter Current Reversals on the TexasLouisiana Continental Shelf  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fallwinter recurrence of current reversal from westward to eastward is identified on the TexasLouisiana continental shelf using the current-meter [TexasLouisiana Shelf Physical Oceanography Program (LATEX-A)] and near-surface drifting buoy [...

Peter P. Chu; Leonid M. Ivanov; Oleg V. Melnichenko

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

A density-temperature description of the outer electron radiation belt during geomagnetic storms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electron flux measurements from 7 satellites in geosynchronous orbit from 1990-2007 are fit with relativistic bi-Maxwellians, yielding a number density n and temperature T description of the outer electron radiation belt. For 54.5 spacecraft years of measurements the median value ofn is 3.7x10-4 cm-3 and the median value ofT is 142 keY. General statistical properties of n, T, and the 1.1-1.5 MeV flux J are investigated, including local-time and solar-cycle dependencies. Using superposed-epoch analysis triggered on storm onset, the evolution of the outer electron radiation belt through high-speed-steam-driven storms is investigated. The number density decay during the calm before the storm is seen, relativistic-electron dropouts and recoveries from dropout are investigated, and the heating of the outer electron radiation belt during storms is examined. Using four different triggers (SSCs, southward-IMF CME sheaths, southward-IMF magnetic clouds, and minimum Dst), CME-driven storms are analyzed with superposed-epoch techniques. For CME-driven storms an absence of a density decay prior to storm onset is found, the compression of the outer electron radiation belt at time of SSC is analyzed, the number-density increase and temperature decrease during storm main phase is seen, and the increase in density and temperature during storm recovery phase is observed. Differences are found between the density-temperature and the flux descriptions, with more information for analysis being available in the density-temperature description.

Borovsky, Joseph E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cayton, Thomas E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Denton, Michael H [LANCASTER UNIV

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

MitoNEET is a Uniquely Folded Outer Mitochondrial Membrane Protein  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MitoNEET is a Uniquely Folded Outer MitoNEET is a Uniquely Folded Outer Mitochondrial Membrane Protein Stabilized by Diabetes Drugs The rise in obesity in the United States parallels a dramatic increase in obesity-associated diseases, most notably type-2 diabetes. This disease is predicted to reach epidemic proportions in the next several decades (Zimmet et al 2001, Urek et al 2007). Thus, understanding the biochemical processes underlying type-2 diabetes and identifying new targets for therapeutic intervention are critical for national and world health. A drug of choice to treat type-II diabetes is pioglitazone, a thiazolidinedione (TZD) derivative originally thought to exert its effect through activation of the nuclear transcription factor PPARg. Recently, a novel protein target for pioglitazone was discovered and was called mitoNEET (Colca et al 2004). This protein is anchored to the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) (Wiley et al 2007). Contrary to predictions that this was a zinc-finger transcription factor we discovered that mitoNEET is a novel 2Fe-2S protein.

185

Incorporating Peptides in the Outer Coordination Sphere of Bio-inspired Electrocatalysts for Hydrogen Production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Four new cyclic 1,5-diaza-3,7-diphosphacyclooctane ligands have been prepared and used to synthesize [Ni(PPh2NR2)2]2+ complexes in which R is a mono- or dipeptide. These complexes represent a first step in developing an outer coordination sphere for this class of complexes that can mimic the outer coordination sphere of the active sites of hydrogenase enzymes. Importantly, these complexes retain the electrocatalytic activity of the parent [Ni(PPh2NPh2)2]2+ complex in acetonitrile solution with turnover frequencies (TOF) for hydrogen production ranging from 14 to 25 s-1 in the presence of p-cyanoanilinium trifluoromethanesulphonic acid and 135-1000 s-1 in the presence of triflic acid salt of protonated dimethylformamide, with moderately low overpotentials, ~0.3 V. The addition of small amounts of water result in rate increases of 5-7 times. Unlike the parent complex, these complexes demonstrate dynamic structural transformations in solution whereby the dipeptide tail interacts with the nickel center. These results establish a building block from which larger peptide scaffolding can be added to allow the [Ni(PR2NR2)2]2+ molecular catalytic core to begin to mimic the multifunctional outer coordination sphere of enzymes. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences' Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences Division. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

Jain, Avijita; Lense, Sheri; Linehan, John C.; Raugei, Simone; Cho, Herman M.; DuBois, Daniel L.; Shaw, Wendy J.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

DETECTING THE RAPIDLY EXPANDING OUTER SHELL OF THE CRAB NEBULA: WHERE TO LOOK  

SciTech Connect

We present a range of steady-state photoionization simulations, corresponding to different assumed shell geometries and compositions, of the unseen postulated rapidly expanding outer shell to the Crab Nebula. The properties of the shell are constrained by the mass that must lie within it, and by limits to the intensities of hydrogen recombination lines. In all cases the photoionization models predict very strong emissions from high ionization lines that will not be emitted by the Crab's filaments, alleviating problems with detecting these lines in the presence of light scattered from brighter parts of the Crab. The near-NIR [Ne VI] {lambda}7.652 {mu}m line is a particularly good case; it should be dramatically brighter than the optical lines commonly used in searches. The C IV {lambda}1549 doublet is predicted to be the strongest absorption line from the shell, which is in agreement with Hubble Space Telescope observations. We show that the cooling timescale for the outer shell is much longer than the age of the Crab, due to the low density. This means that the temperature of the shell will actually ''remember'' its initial conditions. However, the recombination time is much shorter than the age of the Crab, so the predicted level of ionization should approximate the real ionization. In any case, it is clear that IR observations present the best opportunity to detect the outer shell and so guide future models that will constrain early events in the original explosion.

Wang Xiang; Ferland, G. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Baldwin, J. A.; Loh, E. D.; Richardson, C. T., E-mail: xiang.wang@uky.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-2320 (United States)

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

187

Study of the B-Meson Lifetime and the Performance of the Outer Tracker at LHCb  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The research in the dissertation addresses two issues: the overall performance of the LHCb Outer Tracker (OT) detectors as shown during quality checks and beam tests; the study of the lifetimes of B+ and B0 mesons at LHCb. Physics at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, Geneva requires high performance detectors. One of the four major LHC experiments is the Large Hadron Collider beauty experiment (LHCb). It is a dedicated B-physics experiment for precision measurements of CP violation in the B-meson system and for studying rare B decays. In order to efficiently reconstruct the trajectories of charged particles, LHCb is equipped with Outer Tracker (OT), consisting of gaseous straw tube detectors. The OT system comprises three stations each consisting of multiple layers of wires in vertical and non-vertical orientation. Basic unit of the stations is the OT module - a self-contained gas-detector unit filled with a counting gas mixture. The outer tracker module production was carefully monitored by variety of...

Vankov, P

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Similarity of Deep Continental Cumulus Convection as Revealed by a Three-Dimensional Cloud-Resolving Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A three-dimensional cloud-resolving simulation of midlatitude continental convection during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program summer 1997 intensive observation period (IOP) is used to study the similarity of several second and ...

Marat F. Khairoutdinov; David A. Randall

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

On Intermediate Models for Barotropic Continental Shelf and Slope Flow Fields. Part I: Formulation and Comparison of Exact Solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Motivated by the general objective of pursuing oceanographic process and data assimilation studies of the complex, nonlinear eddy and jet current fields observed over the continental shelf and slope off the west coast of the United States, we ...

J. S. Allen; J. A. Barth; P. A. Newberger

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Estimation of Climate Change Impact on Mean Annual Runoff across Continental Australia Using Budyko and Fu Equations and Hydrological Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the climate change impact on mean annual runoff across continental Australia estimated using the Budyko and Fu equations informed by projections from 15 global climate models and compares the estimates with those from extensive ...

J. Teng; F. H. S. Chiew; J. Vaze; S. Marvanek; D. G. C. Kirono

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Horizontal Scales of Variability over the Middle Atlantic Bight Shelf Break and Continental Rise from Finescale Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations with fine horizontal resolution are used to identify the horizontal scales of variability over the Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB) shelf break and continental rise. Spray gliders collected observations along two alongshelf transects over ...

Robert E. Todd; Glen G. Gawarkiewicz; W. Brechner Owens

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

The Influence of Time-Dependent Melting on the Dynamics and Precipitation Production in Maritime and Continental Storm Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulations of one maritime and four continental observed cases of deep convection are performed with the Hebrew University Cloud Model that has spectral bin microphysics. The maritime case is from observations made on 18 September 1974 during ...

Vaughan T. J. Phillips; Andrei Pokrovsky; Alexander Khain

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Structure and Generation of Turbulence at Interfaces Strained by Internal Solitary Waves Propagating Shoreward over the Continental Shelf  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detailed observations of the structure within internal solitary waves propagating shoreward over Oregon's continental shelf reveal the evolving nature of interfaces as they become unstable and break, creating turbulent flow. A persistent feature ...

J. N. Moum; D. M. Farmer; W. D. Smyth; L. Armi; S. Vagle

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Coastal Upwelling: OnshoreOffshore Circulation, Equatorward Coastal Jet and Poleward Undercurrent over a Continental Shelf-Slope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The onshore-offshore circulation, equatorward coastal jet and poleward undercurrent associated with coastal upwelling are studied with numerical models. The model ocean has a continental shelf-slope uniform in the longshort direction and is ...

Nobuo Suginohara

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Scale-Dependence of the Predictability of Precipitation from Continental Radar Images. Part I: Description of the Methodology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The lifetime of precipitation patterns in Eulerian and Lagrangian space derived from continental-scale radar images is used as a measure of predictability. A three-step procedure is proposed. First, the motion field of precipitation is determined ...

Urs Germann; Isztar Zawadzki

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Prediction of continental shelf sediment transport using a theoretical model of the wave-current boundary layer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents an application of the Grant-Madsen-Glenn bottom boundary layer model (Grant and Madsen, 1979; Glenn and Grant, 1987) to predictions of sediment transport on the continental shelf. The analysis is a ...

Goud, Margaret R

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

The Influence of Ocean Surface Temperature Gradient and Continentality on the Walker Circulation. Part I: Prescribed Tropical Changes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coarse-mesh, global climate model developed at the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) has been used to assess the influence of ocean surface temperature (OST) gradient and continentality on the Walker circulation. The basic model ...

Robert M. Chervin; Leonard M. Druyan

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Cross-shelf circulation and momentum and heat balances over the inner continental shelf near Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The water circulation and evolution of water temperature over the inner continental shelf are investigated using observations of water velocity, temperature, density, and bottom pressure; surface gravity waves; wind stress; ...

Fewings, Melanie Rinn

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Influence of an Offshore Shift in the Gulf Stream on Waters of the South Carolina Continental Shelf  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 4.3-month-long dataset from moorings on the continental shelf off South Carolina during 1986 showed unusual midrecord shifts in bottom pressure, temperature, stratification, and alongshelf currents. The Gulf Stream moved farther offshore during ...

Dana K. Savidge; Jackson O. Blanton; Thomas N. Lee; Robert H. Evans

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Bayesian Inference and Markov Chain Monte Carlo Sampling to Reconstruct a Contaminant Source on a Continental Scale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A methodology combining Bayesian inference with Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling is applied to a real accidental radioactive release that occurred on a continental scale at the end of May 1998 near Algeciras, Spain. The source parameters (...

Luca Delle Monache; Julie K. Lundquist; Branko Kosovi?; Gardar Johannesson; Kathleen M. Dyer; Roger D. Aines; Fotini K. Chow; Rich D. Belles; William G. Hanley; Shawn C. Larsen; Gwen A. Loosmore; John J. Nitao; Gayle A. Sugiyama; Philip J. Vogt

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gom outer continental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Apparatus and methods for installing, removing and adjusting an inner turbine shell section relative to an outer turbine shell section  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine includes upper and lower inner shell sections mounting the nozzles and shrouds and which inner shell is supported by pins secured to a surrounding outer shell. To disassemble the turbine for access to the inner shell sections and rotor, an alignment fixture is secured to the lower outer shell section and has pins engaging the inner shell section. To disassemble the turbine, the inner shell weight is transferred to the lower outer shell section via the alignment fixture and cradle pins. Roller assemblies are inserted through access openings vacated by support pins to permit rotation of the lower inner shell section out of and into the lower outer shell section during disassembly and assembly. The alignment fixture includes adjusting rods for adjusting the inner shell axially, vertically, laterally and about a lateral axis. A roller over-cage is provided to rotate the inner shell and a dummy shell to facilitate assembly and disassembly in the field.

Leach, David (Niskayuna, NY); Bergendahl, Peter Allen (Scotia, NY); Waldo, Stuart Forrest (Salem, NC); Smith, Robert Leroy (Milford, OH); Phelps, Robert Kim (Milford, OH)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

The use of stellar occultations to study the figures and atmospheres of small bodies in the outer solar system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The methods of analyzing stellar occultations by small bodies in the outer solar system are discussed with examples from Triton, Pluto, and Charon. Simulations were performed characterizing the analysis of multi-chord ...

Person, Michael James

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Particle trap to sheath non-binding contact for a gas-insulated transmission line having a corrugated outer conductor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A non-binding particle trap to outer sheath contact for use in gas insulated transmission lines having a corrugated outer conductor. The non-binding feature of the contact according to the teachings of the invention is accomplished by having a lever arm rotatably attached to a particle trap by a pivot support axis disposed parallel to the direction of travel of the inner conductor/insulator/particle trap assembly.

Fischer, William H. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1984-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

204

Radioisotope electric propulsion of sciencecraft to the outer solar system and near-interstellar space  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent results are presented in the study of radioisotope electric propulsion as a near-term technology for sending small robotic sciencecraft to the outer Solar System and near-interstellar space. Radioisotope electric propulsion (REP) systems are low-thrust, ion propulsion units based on radioisotope electric generators and ion thrusters. Powerplant specific masses are expected to be in the range of 100 to 200 kg/kW of thrust power. Planetary rendezvous missions to Pluto, fast missions to the heliopause (100 AU) with the capability to decelerate an orbiter for an extended science program and prestellar missions to the first gravitational lens focus of the Sun (550 AU) are investigated.

Noble, R.J.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

PLANET-PLANET SCATTERING IN PLANETESIMAL DISKS. II. PREDICTIONS FOR OUTER EXTRASOLAR PLANETARY SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

We develop an idealized dynamical model to predict the typical properties of outer extrasolar planetary systems, at radii comparable to the Jupiter-to-Neptune region of the solar system. The model is based upon the hypothesis that dynamical evolution in outer planetary systems is controlled by a combination of planet-planet scattering and planetary interactions with an exterior disk of small bodies ('planetesimals'). Our results are based on 5000 long duration N-body simulations that follow the evolution of three planets from a few to 10 AU, together with a planetesimal disk containing 50 M{sub +} from 10 to 20 AU. For large planet masses (M {approx}> M{sub Sat}), the model recovers the observed eccentricity distribution of extrasolar planets. For lower-mass planets, the range of outcomes in models with disks is far greater than that which is seen in isolated planet-planet scattering. Common outcomes include strong scattering among massive planets, sudden jumps in eccentricity due to resonance crossings driven by divergent migration, and re-circularization of scattered low-mass planets in the outer disk. We present the distributions of the eccentricity and inclination that result, and discuss how they vary with planet mass and initial system architecture. In agreement with other studies, we find that the currently observed eccentricity distribution (derived primarily from planets at a {approx}< 3 AU) is consistent with isolated planet-planet scattering. We explain the observed mass dependence-which is in the opposite sense from that predicted by the simplest scattering models-as a consequence of strong correlations between planet masses in the same system. At somewhat larger radii, initial planetary mass correlations and disk effects can yield similar modest changes to the eccentricity distribution. Nonetheless, strong damping of eccentricity for low-mass planets at large radii appears to be a secure signature of the dynamical influence of disks. Radial velocity measurements capable of detecting planets with K {approx} 5 m s{sup -1} and periods in excess of 10 years will provide constraints on this regime. Finally, we present an analysis of the predicted separation of planets in two-planet systems, and of the population of planets in mean-motion resonances (MMRs). We show that, if there are systems with {approx} Jupiter-mass planets that avoid close encounters, the planetesimal disk acts as a damping mechanism and populates MMRs at a very high rate (50%-80%). In many cases, resonant chains (in particular the 4:2:1 Laplace resonance) are set up among all three planets. We expect such resonant chains to be common among massive planets in outer planetary systems.

Raymond, Sean N. [Universite de Bordeaux, Observatoire Aquitain des Sciences de l'Univers, 2 rue de l'Observatoire, BP 89, F-33271 Floirac Cedex (France); Armitage, Philip J. [JILA, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Gorelick, Noel, E-mail: pja@jilau1.colorado.ed [Google, Inc., 1600 Amphitheatre Parkway, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States)

2010-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

206

Segmentation of the Outer Contact on P-Type Coaxial Germanium Detectors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Germanium detector arrays are needed for low-level counting facilities. The practical applications of such user facilities include characterization of low-level radioactive samples. In addition, the same detector arrays can also perform important fundamental physics measurements including the search for rare events like neutrino-less double-beta decay. Coaxial germanium detectors having segmented outer contacts will provide the next level of sensitivity improvement in low background measurements. The segmented outer detector contact allows performance of advanced pulse shape analysis measurements that provide additional background reduction. Currently, n-type (reverse electrode) germanium coaxial detectors are used whenever a segmented coaxial detector is needed because the outer boron (electron barrier) contact is thin and can be segmented. Coaxial detectors fabricated from p-type germanium cost less, have better resolution, and are larger than n-type coaxial detectors. However, it is difficult to reliably segment p-type coaxial detectors because thick (~1 mm) lithium-diffused (hole barrier) contacts are the standard outside contact for p-type coaxial detectors. During this Phase 1 Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) we have researched the possibility of using amorphous germanium contacts as a thin outer contact of p-type coaxial detectors that can be segmented. We have developed amorphous germanium contacts that provide a very high hole barrier on small planar detectors. These easily segmented amorphous germanium contacts have been demonstrated to withstand several thousand volts/cm electric fields with no measurable leakage current (<1 pA) from charge injection over the hole barrier. We have also demonstrated that the contact can be sputter deposited around and over the curved outside surface of a small p-type coaxial detector. The amorphous contact has shown good rectification properties on the outside of a small p-type coaxial detector. These encouraging results are the first fundamental steps toward demonstrating the viability of the amorphous germanium contacts for much larger segmented p-type coaxial detectors. Large segmented p-type coaxial detectors based on this technology could serve as the gamma-ray spectrometers on instruments such as the Radionuclide Aerosol Sampler/Analyzer (RASA). These detectors will provide a more sensitive, lower background measurement than currently available unsegmented p-type coaxial detectors.

Hull, Ethan L.; Pehl, Richard H.; Lathrop, James R.; Martin, Gregory N.; Mashburn, R. B.; Miley, Harry S.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Hossbach, Todd W.

2006-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

207

The Evolving Magnetic Scales of the Outer Solar Atmosphere and Their Potential Impact on Heliospheric Turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The presence of turbulent phenomena in the outer solar atmosphere is a given. However, because we are reduced to remotely sensing the atmosphere of a star with instruments of limited spatial and/or spectral resolution, we can only infer the physical progression from macroscopic to microscopic phenomena. Even so, we know that many, if not all, of the turbulent phenomena that pervade interplanetary space have physical origins at the Sun and so in this brief article we consider some recent measurements which point to sustained potential source(s) of heliospheric turbulence in the magnetic and thermal domains. In particular, we look at the scales of magnetism that are imprinted on the outer solar atmosphere by the relentless magneto-convection of the solar interior and combine state-of-the-art observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and the Coronal Multi-channel Polarimeter (CoMP) which are beginning to hint at the origins of the wave/plasma interplay prevalent closer to the Earth. While linking th...

McIntosh, Scott W; Threlfall, James; De Moortel, Ineke; Leamon, Robert J; Tian, Hui

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Examining the specific entropy (density of adiabatic invariants) of the outer electron radiation belt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using temperature and number-density measurements of the energetic-electron population from multiple spacecraft in geosynchronous orbit, the specific entropy S = T/n{sup 2/3} of the outer electron radiation belt is calculated. Then 955,527 half-hour-long data intervals are statistically analyzed. Local-time and solar-cycle variations in S are examined. The median value of the specific entropy (2.8 x 10{sup 7} eVcm{sup 2}) is much larger than the specific entropy of other particle populations in and around the magnetosphere. The evolution of the specific entropy through high-speed-stream-driven geomagnetic storms and through magnetic-cloud-driven geomagnetic storms is studied using superposed-epoch analysis. For high-speed-stream-driven storms, systematic variations in the entropy associated with electron loss and gain and with radiation-belt heating are observed in the various storm phases. For magnetic-cloud-driven storms, multiple trigger choices for the data superpositions reveal the effects of interplanetary shock arrival, sheath driving, cloud driving, and recovery phase. The specific entropy S = T/n{sup 2/3} is algebraically expressed in terms of the first and second adiabatic invariants of the electrons: this allows a relativistic expression for S in terms of T and n to be derived. For the outer electron radiation belt at geosynchronous orbit, the relativistic corrections to the specific entropy expression are -15%.

Borovsky, Joseph E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Denton, Michael H [LANCASTER UNIV

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

INSTABILITY-DRIVEN DYNAMICAL EVOLUTION MODEL OF A PRIMORDIALLY FIVE-PLANET OUTER SOLAR SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

Over the last decade, evidence has mounted that the solar system's observed state can be favorably reproduced in the context of an instability-driven dynamical evolution model, such as the 'Nice' model. To date, all successful realizations of instability models have concentrated on evolving the four giant planets onto their current orbits from a more compact configuration. Simultaneously, the possibility of forming and ejecting additional planets has been discussed, but never successfully implemented. Here we show that a large array of five-planet (two gas giants + three ice giants) multi-resonant initial states can lead to an adequate formation of the outer solar system, featuring an ejection of an ice giant during a phase of instability. Particularly, our simulations demonstrate that the eigenmodes that characterize the outer solar system's secular dynamics can be closely matched with a five-planet model. Furthermore, provided that the ejection timescale of the extra planet is short, orbital excitation of a primordial cold classical Kuiper Belt can also be avoided in this scenario. Thus, the solar system is one of many possible outcomes of dynamical relaxation and can originate from a wide variety of initial states. This deems the construction of a unique model of solar system's early dynamical evolution impossible.

Batygin, Konstantin; Brown, Michael E. [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Betts, Hayden, E-mail: kbatygin@gps.caltech.edu [Polytechnic School, Pasadena, CA 91106 (United States)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

210

The Roles of Outer Membrane Cytochromes of Shewanella and Geobacter in Extracellular Electron Transfer  

SciTech Connect

As key components of the electron transfer (ET) pathways used for dissimilatory reduction of solid iron [Fe(III)] and manganese [Mn(IV)] (hydr)oxides, outer membrane cytochromes MtrC and OmcA of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and OmcE and OmcS of Geobacter sulfurreducens mediate ET reactions extracellularly. Cell surface-exposed MtrC and OmcA can transfer electrons directly to the metal oxides. S. oneidensis MR-1 cells also secrete flavins that can facilitate ET to the oxides. The secreted flavins are thought to serve either as chelators that form soluble Fe(III)/Mn(IV)-flavin complexes or as electron shuttles that ferry the electrons from cell-associated ET proteins to the metal oxides. Cell-surface localization may also permit MtrC and OmcA to transfer electrons extracellularly to either flavin-chelated Fe(III)/Mn(IV) or oxidized flavins. OmcE and OmcS are proposed to be located on the Geobacter cell surface where they are believed to function as the intermediates to relay electrons to type IV pili, which are then hypothesized to transfer electrons directly to the metal oxides. Thus, cell surface-localization positions these outer membrane cytochromes to transfer electrons to Fe(III)/Mn(IV) oxides external to the bacterial cells either directly, indirectly, or both, demonstrating a common strategy shared by Shewanella and Geobacter for extracellular reduction of the oxides.

Shi, Liang; Richardson, David; Wang, Zheming; Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Outer-zone electron precipitation produced by a vlf transmitter. Technical report  

SciTech Connect

Using high-resolution pitch-angle measurements made by a magnetic-focusing electron spectrometer on the S3-3 satellite while in the drift-loss-cone region of the magnetosphere, characteristics of fluxes of 108 to 654-keV electrons precipitated in the inner zone, in the slot region, and in the outer zone of the magnetosphere are all shown to be consistent with the precipitation having been produced by the same ground-based VLF transmitter, UMS. Pitch angle measurements are used to locate the longitude of precipitation. The temporal pattern of transmitter operation obtained from synoptic data from a ground-based VLF receiver is used along with drift-rate calculations to predict the electron energies as a function of L-shell which should be observable by the S3-3 instrument. The predicted energy response is then compared with the in-situ observations, getting complete agreement. Finally, wave-particle resonance calculations are made for each of the three regions. The study indicates that ground-based VLF transmitters, which have previously been shown to produce precipitation in the inner zone and slot regions, are almost certainly instrumental in precipitating electrons in the outer zone also.

Vampola, A.L.; Adams, C.D.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

An outer gap model of high-energy emission from rotation-powered pulsars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe a refined calculation of high energy emission from rotation-powered pulsars based on the Outer Gap model of Cheng, Ho \\&~Ruderman (1986a,b). We have improved upon previous efforts to model the spectra from these pulsars (e. g. Cheng, et al. 1986b; Ho 1989) by following the variation in particle production and radiation properties with position in the outer gap. Curvature, synchrotron and inverse-Compton scattering fluxes vary significantly over the gap and their interactions {\\it via} photon-photon pair production build up the radiating charge populations at varying rates. We have also incorporated an approximate treatment of the transport of particle and photon fluxes between gap emission zones. These effects, along with improved computations of the particle and photon distributions, provide very important modifications of the model gamma-ray flux. In particular, we attempt to make specific predictions of pulse profile shapes and spectral variations as a function of pulse phase and suggest fu...

Chiang, J

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Distinct constrictive processes, separated in time and space,divide Caulobacter inner and outer membranes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cryo-electron microscope tomography (cryoEM) and a fluorescence loss in photobleaching (FLIP) assay were used to characterize progression of the terminal stages of Caulobacter crescentus cell division. Tomographic cryoEM images of the cell division site show separate constrictive processes closing first the inner, and then the outer, membrane in a manner distinctly different from septum-forming bacteria. The smallest observed pre-fission constrictions were 60 nm for both the inner and outer membrane. FLIP experiments had previously shown cytoplasmic compartmentalization, when cytoplasmic proteins can no longer diffuse between the two nascent progeny cell compartments, occurring 18 min before daughter cell separation in a 135 min cell cycle. Here, we used FLIP experiments with membrane-bound and periplasmic fluorescent proteins to show that (1) periplasmic compartmentalization occurs after cytoplasmic compartmentalization, consistent with the cryoEM observations, and (2) inner membrane and periplasmic proteins can diffuse past the FtsZ constriction site, indicating that the cell division machinery does not block membrane diffusion.

Judd, Ellen M.; Comolli, Luis R.; Chen, Joseph C.; Downing,Kenneth H.; Moerner, W.E.; McAdams, Harley H.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Benthic study of the continental slope off Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. Volume 3. Appendices  

SciTech Connect

The Point is an area that supports a most productive pelagic fishery, including tuna, swordfish, marlin, and more. The objective of the study is to analyze video tapes from near the Point, in order to provide data on epibenthic, megafaunal invertebrates including species composition, relative abundances, and large scale (1 km) distribution. The Point is not a defined spot on a chart. Although fishermen do use the steep shelf break for location, they generally look for the west wall of the Gulf Stream. The Point and the oil lease site coincidentally occur where the Gulf Stream parts the continental slope, just north of the eastern-most tip of Cape Hatteras.

Diaz, R.J.; Blake, J.A.; Lohse, D.P.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

A probabilistic tornado wind hazard model for the continental United States  

SciTech Connect

A probabilistic tornado wind hazard model for the continental United States (CONUS) is described. The model incorporates both aleatory (random) and epistemic uncertainties associated with quantifying the tornado wind hazard parameters. The temporal occurrences of tornadoes within the continental United States (CONUS) is assumed to be a Poisson process. A spatial distribution of tornado touchdown locations is developed empirically based on the observed historical events within the CONUS. The hazard model is an aerial probability model that takes into consideration the size and orientation of the facility, the length and width of the tornado damage area (idealized as a rectangle and dependent on the tornado intensity scale), wind speed variation within the damage area, tornado intensity classification errors (i.e.,errors in assigning a Fujita intensity scale based on surveyed damage), and the tornado path direction. Epistemic uncertainties in describing the distributions of the aleatory variables are accounted for by using more than one distribution model to describe aleatory variations. The epistemic uncertainties are based on inputs from a panel of experts. A computer program, TORNADO, has been developed incorporating this model; features of this program are also presented.

Hossain, Q; Kimball, J; Mensing, R; Savy, J

1999-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

216

Non-binding conductor load bearing roller for a gas-insulated transmission line having a corrugated outer conductor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas-insulated transmission line includes a corrugated outer conductor, an inner conductor disposed within and insulated from the outer conductor by means of support insulators and an insulating gas, and a non-binding transport device for supporting and permitting movement of the inner conductor/insulating support assembly axially along the corrugated outer conductor without radial displacement and for moving without binding along corrugations of any slope less than vertical. The transport device includes two movable contacts, such as skids or rollers, supported on a common pivot lever, the pivot lever being rotatably disposed about a pivot lever axis, which pivot lever axis is in turn disposed on the periphery of a support insulator or particle trap if one is used. The movable contacts are separated axially a distance equal to the axial distance between the peaks and valleys of the corrugations of the outer conductor and separated radially a distance equal to the radial distance between the peaks and valleys of the corrugations of the outer conductor. The transport device has the pivot lever axis disposed parallel to the motion of travel of the inner conductor/insulating support assembly.

Fischer, William H. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

General and Localized Corrosion of Outer Barrier of High-Level Waste Container in Yucca Mountain  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As described in the License Application Design Selection Report, the recommended waste, package design is Engineering Design Alternative II (CRWMS M&O 1999). This design includes a double-wall waste package (WP) underneath a protective drip shield (DS). purpose and scope of the process-level model described here is to account for both general and localized corrosion of the waste package outer barrier (WPOB), which assumed to be Alloy 22 (UNS N06022-21Cr-13Mo-4Fe-3W-2C-Ni) (ASTM 1997a). This model will include several sub-models, which will account for dry oxidation (DOX), humid air corrosion (HAC), general corrosion (GC) in the aqueous phase, and localized corrosion (LC) the aqueous phase. This model serves as a feed to the waste package degradation (WAPDEG) code for performance, assessment.

Farmer, J.; McCright, D.; Gdowski, G.; Wang, F.; Summers, T.; Bedrossian, P.; Horn, J.; Lian, T.; Estill, J.; Lingenfelter, A.; Halsey, W.

2000-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

218

Using Cepheids to determine the galactic abundance gradient. III.First results for the outer disc  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As a continuation of our previous work, which concerned the radial abundance distribution in the galactic disc over the distances 4-10 kpc this paper presents the first results on the metallicicty in the outer disc (RG > 10 kpc). Based on high-resolution spectra obtained for 19 distant Cepheids we sampled galactocentric distances from 10 to 12 kpc. Combined with the results of our previous work on the inner and middle parts of the galactic disc, the present data enable one to study the structure of the radial abundance distribution over a large baseline. In particular, we find indications of a discontinuity in the radial abundance distribution for iron as well as a number of the other elements. The discontinuity is seen at a galactocentric distance RG = 10 kpc. This finding supports the results reported earlier by Twarog et al. (1997).

S. M. Andrievsky; V. V. Kovtyukh; R. E. Luck; J. R. D. Lepine; W. J. Maciel; Yu. V. Beletsky

2002-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

219

Apparatus and methods for relieving thermally induced stresses in inner and outer bands of thermally cooled turbine nozzle stages  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

To control the temperature mismatch between the inner and outer bands and covers forming plenums with the inner and outer bands on sides thereof remote from the hot gas path, passages extend from the leading edge of the covers in communication with the hot gases of combustion to the trailing edge of the covers in communication with the hot gas flowpath. A mixing chamber is provided in each passage in communication with compressor discharge air for mixing the hot gases of combustion and compressor discharge air for flow through the passage, thereby heating the cover and minimizing the temperature differential between the inner and outer bands and their respective covers. The passages are particularly useful adjacent the welded or brazed joints between the covers and inner band portions.

Yu, Yufeng Phillip (Guilderland, NY); Itzel, Gary Michael (Clifton Park, NY); Correia, Victor H. S. (Milton Mills, NH)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds - Single Column Model Forcing (xie-scm_forcing)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The constrained variational objective analysis approach described in Zhang and Lin [1997] and Zhang et al. [2001]was used to derive the large-scale single-column/cloud resolving model forcing and evaluation data set from the observational data collected during Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E), which was conducted during April to June 2011 near the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The analysis data cover the period from 00Z 22 April - 21Z 6 June 2011. The forcing data represent an average over the 3 different analysis domains centered at central facility with a diameter of 300 km (standard SGP forcing domain size), 150 km and 75 km, as shown in Figure 1. This is to support modeling studies on various-scale convective systems.

Shaocheng Xie; Renata McCoy; Yunyan Zhang

2012-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gom outer continental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Determinants of alternative fuel vehicle choice in the continental United States.  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the ongoing investigation into the determinants of alternative fuel vehicle choice. A stated preference vehicle choice survey was conducted for the 47 of the continental U.S. states, excluding California. The national survey is based on and is an extension of previous studies on alternative fuel vehicle choice for the State of California conducted by the University of California's Institute of Transportation Studies (UC ITS). Researchers at UC ITS have used the stated-preference national survey to produce a series of estimates for new vehicle choice models. Three of these models are presented in this paper. The first two of the models were estimated using only the data from the national survey. The third model presented in this paper pools information from the national and California surveys to estimate a true national model for new vehicle choice.

Tompkins, M.

1997-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

222

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds - Single Column Model Forcing (xie-scm_forcing)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The constrained variational objective analysis approach described in Zhang and Lin [1997] and Zhang et al. [2001]was used to derive the large-scale single-column/cloud resolving model forcing and evaluation data set from the observational data collected during Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E), which was conducted during April to June 2011 near the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The analysis data cover the period from 00Z 22 April - 21Z 6 June 2011. The forcing data represent an average over the 3 different analysis domains centered at central facility with a diameter of 300 km (standard SGP forcing domain size), 150 km and 75 km, as shown in Figure 1. This is to support modeling studies on various-scale convective systems.

Shaocheng Xie; Renata McCoy; Yunyan Zhang

223

Epibenthic invertebrates and fishes of the continental shelf of the northwestern Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data from 34 epibenthic trawls were made on the continental shelf of the northwestern Gulf of Mexico between depths 13 and 400 meters. These took 6,468 individuals belonging to 251 species of demersal fishes and invertebrates, with a mean number of 287 individuals per hectare. The average biomass for all the assemblages was 294 mg/m2 (0.294 g/m2), and the average diversity (H') was 2.0. Hypoxic conditions were not found during the investigation. There was no correlation found between the number of species and depth. Biomass and diversity were not statistically significant between nearshore and offshore. A relatively high number of species were collected from the northwestern Gulf of Mexico compared with the northeastern Gulf; in addition, northwestern Gulf diversity lies between stable tropical shelves and those in temperate latitudes. Evaluation of the percentage similarity indices between stations showed low similarity among the assemblages.

Al-Jabr, Abdulrahman Mohammad

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Feasibility of Partial ZrO[subscript 2] Coatings on Outer Surface of Annular UO[subscript 2] Pellets to Control Gap Conductance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The viability of depositing a thin porous coating of zirconia on the outer surface of an annular UO[subscript 2] pellet

Feinroth, H.

225

The Formation and Maintenance of Density Fronts on the U.S. Southeastern Continental Shelf during Winter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Density fronts on the U.S. southeastern continental shelf, during winter, am formed by (i) breakdown of the shelf-break front by Gulf Stream meanders or strong southward winds or both, (ii) shoreward intrusion of upper Gulf Stream warm water by ...

Lie-Yauw Oey

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Seabed Stresses in Combined Wave and Steady Flow Conditions on the Nova Scotia Continental Shelf: Field Measurements and Predictions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A tripod holding electromagnetic flowmeters at two heights within 1 m above the seabed has been deployed at two shallow sites (25 and 45 m depths) on the continental shelf off Nova Scotia, Canada. Wave flows are comparable with the small mean ...

D. A. Huntley; D. G. Hazen

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

North American Climate in CMIP5 Experiments. Part I: Evaluation of Historical Simulations of Continental and Regional Climatology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the first part of a three-part paper on North American climate in CMIP5 that evaluates the historical simulations of continental and regional climatology with a focus on a core set of seventeen models. We evaluate the models for a set of ...

Justin Sheffield; Andrew Barrett; Brian Colle; D. Nelun Fernando; Rong Fu; Kerrie L. Geil; Qi Hu; Jim Kinter; Sanjiv Kumar; Baird Langenbrunner; Kelly Lombardo; Lindsey N. Long; Eric Maloney; Annarita Mariotti; Joyce E. Meyerson; Kingtse C. Mo; J. David Neelin; Sumant Nigam; Zaitao Pan; Tong Ren; Alfredo Ruiz-Barradas; Yolande L. Serra; Anji Seth; Jeanne M. Thibeault; Julienne C. Stroeve; Ze Yang; Lei Yin

228

Small magnetic loops connecting the quiet surface and the hot outer atmosphere of the Sun  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sunspots are the most spectacular manifestation of solar magnetism, yet, 99% of the solar surface remains 'quiet' at any time of the solar cycle. The quiet sun is not void of magnetic fields, though; they are organized at smaller spatial scales and evolve relatively fast, which makes them difficult to detect. Thus, although extensive quiet Sun magnetism would be a natural driver to a uniform, steady heating of the outer solar atmosphere, it is not clear what the physical processes involved would be due to lack of observational evidence. We report the topology and dynamics of the magnetic field in very quiet regions of the Sun from spectropolarimetric observations of the Hinode satellite, showing a continuous injection of magnetic flux with a well organized topology of Omega-loop from below the solar surface into the upper layers. At first stages, when the loop travels across the photosphere, it has a flattened (staple-like) geometry and a mean velocity ascent of $\\sim3$ km/s. When the loop crosses the minimum...

Gonzalez, M J Martinez; Ramos, A Asensio; Rubio, L R Bellot

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Active Hydrogenation Catalyst with a Structured, Peptide-Based Outer-Coordination Sphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The synthesis, catalytic activity, and structural features of a rhodium-based hydrogenation catalyst containing a phosphine ligand coupled to a 14-residue peptide are reported. Both CD and NMR spectroscopy show that the peptide adopts a helical structure in 1:1:1 TFE/MeCN/H2O that is maintained when the peptide is attached to the ligand and when the ligand is attached to the metal complex. The metal complex hydrogenates aqueous solutions of 3-butenol to 1-butanol at 360 50 turnovers/Rh/h at 294 K. This peptide- based catalyst represents a starting point for developing and characterizing a peptide-based outer-coordination sphere that can be used to introduce enzyme-like features into molecular catalysts. This work was funded by the US DOE Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences, Geoscience and Biosciences Division (AJ, JCL and WJS), the Office of Science Early Career Research Program through the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (GWB, MLR and WJS). Part of the research was conducted at the W.R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by U.S. Department of Energys Office of Biolog-ical and Environmental Research (BER) program located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

Jain, Avijita; Buchko, Garry W.; Reback, Matthew L.; O'Hagan, Molly J.; Ginovska-Pangovska, Bojana; Linehan, John C.; Shaw, Wendy J.

2012-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

230

A New Giant Stellar Structure Near the Outer Halo of M31: Satellite or Stream?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey has revealed an overdensity of stars ~3 degrees to the north-east of the Andromeda galaxy through a number excess of luminous red giant stars, which we have called Andromeda NE. With the data at hand, the distance to Andromeda NE is well enough determined to ascertain that these stars are bound within M31's dark matter halo, rather than a physically unrelated projection. Andromeda NE has a g-band absolute magnitude of ~ -11.6 and central surface brightness of ~29 mag/arcsec, making it nearly two orders of magnitude more diffuse than any known Local Group dwarf galaxy at that luminosity. Andromeda NE's red giant branch color is unlike that of M31's outer disk or the stellar stream reported by Ibata et al. (2001), arguing against a direct link between Andromeda NE and these structures. Depending on its exact distance, Andromeda NE may be undergoing tidal disruption, if indeed we have imaged the main body of the stellar feature.

Zucker, D B; Bell, E F; Martnez-Delgado, D; Grebel, E K; Rix, H W; Rockosi, C M; Holtzman, J A; Walterbos, R A M; Ivezic, Z; Brinkmann, J; Brewington, H; Harvanek, M J; Kleinman, S J; Krzesnski, J; Long, D; Newman, P R; Nitta, A; Snedden, S A; Zucker, Daniel B.; Kniazev, Alexei Y.; Bell, Eric F.; Martinez-Delgado, David; Grebel, Eva K.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Rockosi, Constance M.; Holtzman, Jon A.; Walterbos, Rene A. M.; Ivezic, Zeljko; Brewington, Howard; Harvanek, Michael; Krzesinski, Jurek; Long, Dan; Newman, Peter R.; Nitta, Atsuko; Snedden, Stephanie A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

A New Giant Stellar Structure in the Outer Halo of M31  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey has revealed an overdensity of luminous red giant stars ~ 3 degrees (40 projected kpc) to the northeast of M31, which we have called Andromeda NE. The line-of-sight distance to Andromeda NE is within approximately 50 kpc of M31; Andromeda NE is not a physically unrelated projection. Andromeda NE has a g-band absolute magnitude of ~ -11.6 and central surface brightness of ~ 29 mag/sq.arcsec, making it nearly two orders of magnitude more diffuse than any known Local Group dwarf galaxy at that luminosity. Based on its distance and morphology, Andromeda NE is likely undergoing tidal disruption. Andromeda NE's red giant branch color is unlike that of M31's present-day outer disk or the stellar stream reported by Ibata et al. (2001), arguing against a direct link between Andromeda NE and these structures. However, Andromeda NE has a red giant branch color similar to that of the G1 clump; it is possible that these structures are both material torn off of M31's disk in the distant past, or that these are both part of one ancient stellar stream.

Daniel B. Zucker; Alexei Y. Kniazev; Eric F. Bell; David Martinez-Delgado; Eva K. Grebel; Hans-Walter Rix; Constance M. Rockosi; Jon A. Holtzman; Rene A. M. Walterbos; Zeljko Ivezic; J. Brinkmann; Howard Brewington; Michael Harvanek; S. J. Kleinman; Jurek Krzesinski; Don Q. Lamb; Dan Long; Peter R. Newman; Atsuko Nitta; Stephanie A. Snedden

2004-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

232

Molecular Clouds and Infrared Stellar Clusters in the Far-Outer Ronald L. Snell 1 , John M. Carpenter 2 , Mark H. Heyer 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular Clouds and Infrared Stellar Clusters in the Far-Outer Galaxy Ronald L. Snell 1 , John M We present a study of the molecular cloud content and star formation ac- tivity in the far-0) and K 0 -band near-infrared imaging. This region contains 63 far-outer Galaxy molecular clouds; the most

Carpenter, John

233

Spitzer Observations of Star Formation in the Extreme Outer Disk of M83 (NGC5236)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spitzer IRAC observations of two fields in the XUV-disk of M83 have been recently obtained,3R_{HII} away from the center of the galaxy (R_{HII)=6.6 kpc).GALEX UV images have shown the two fields to host in-situ recent star formation.The IRAC images are used in conjunction with GALEX data and new HI imaging from THINGS to constrain stellar masses and ages of the UV clumps in the fields,and to relate the local recent star formation to the reservoir of available gas. multi wavelength photometry in the UV and mid-IR bands of 136 UV clumps(spatial resolution >220pc) identified in the two target fields, together with model fitting of the stellar UV-MIR SED,suggest that the clumps cover a range of ages between a few Myr and >1Gyr with a median value around ages,for which only a small fraction of the mass in stars appears to have formed in the past ~10Myr, agrees with the dearth of Ha emission observed in these outer fiel ds. At the location of our IRAC fields, the HI map shows localized enhancement and clumping of atomic gas. A comparison of the observed star formation with the gas reservoir shows that the UV clumps follow the Schmidt--Kennicutt scaling law of star formation,and that star formation is occurring in regions with gas dens ities at approximately (within a factor of a few) the critical density value de -rived according to the Toomre Q gravitational stability criterion. The signifi cant 8 micron excess in several of the clumps (16% of the total by number accou nting for ~67% of the 8 micron flux)) provides evidence for the existence of dust in these remote fields, in agreement with results for other galaxies. Furt hermore, we observe a relatively small excess of emission at 4.5 micron in the clumps...

Hui Dong; Daniela Calzetti; Michael Regan; David Thilker; Luciana Bianchi; Gerhardt R. Meurer; Fabian Walter

2008-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

234

Workshop on core and sample curation for the National Continental Scientific Drilling Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Workshop on Core and Sample Curation was held to discuss the best means of handling, distributing, and advertising samples and data collected during a Continental Scientific Drilling Program (CSDP) and to establish better communication between sample curators regarding common problems. It was geneerally agreed that CSDP samples should be handled, on a regional basis, by existing data systems and sample repositories judged to have adequate staff and support. Repository design, sample handling procedures, and sample accounting systems were discussed. Across North America, support for curation of geological samples was varied, but it was strongest within states or regions with well-established energy and mineral industries. A well-supported repository pays for itself through the circulation and preservation of samples and stratigraphic information. A national CSDP must have a well-established curatorial policy and system of regional repositories to circulate information and samples throughout the scientific community. Well-curated samples and data are a national resource with considerable benefits for industry and academia. Attendees agreed to form a Society of Geoscience Curators to maintain communication between curators from private, government, and university repositories and core research laboratories.

Goff, S.; Heiken, G. (eds.)

1981-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

235

Long-term Statistics of Continental Cumuli: Does Aerosol Trigger Cumulus Variability?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric aerosols may control the formation, maintenance, and dissipation of cumuli by changing their microphysics. Recent observational and modeling results exist both in support and against strong potential impacts of aerosol [1-3]. Typically, the aerosol impact on water clouds has been investigated for regions with high aerosol loading and/or large atmospheric moisture [4]. Can we provide observational evidence of the aerosol-cloud relationship for a relatively dry continental region with low/moderate aerosol burden? To address this question, we revisit the aerosol-cloud relationship at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. In comparison with highly polluted regions, the SGP site is characterized by relatively small-to-moderate aerosol loading. Also, moisture content is small-to-moderate (compared to marine and coastal regions) for the SGP site. Because cumulus clouds have important impacts on climate forcing estimations [5] and are susceptible to aerosol effects [6], we focus on fair-weather cumuli (FWC) and their association with aerosol concentration and other potentially important factors. This association is investigated using a new 8-year aerosol and cloud climatology (2000-2007) developed with collocated and coincident surface and satellite observations.

Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Berg, Larry K.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Flynn, Connor J.; Turner, David D.

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

The effect of LNG on the relationship between UK and Continental European natural gas markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The long-term relationship between the prices of natural gas in the United Kingdom and oil-indexed natural gas in the North West European market is the result of seasonal arbitrage. This paper empirically investigates this long-term relationship and offers two main contributions: (i) To the best knowledge of the author, this is the first study to take into account important UK spot gas market drivers such as seasonality, temperature and gas storage injection/withdrawal behaviour when examining the structural relationship between UK and Continental European markets. (ii) The effect of UK import capacity extensions since 2005, through both pipeline and LNG regasifcation capacity, on this longterm relationship will be analyzed. The results suggest that there is a signifcant structural break in 2006 when the two markets decouple and move from an old to a new, much weaker, long-term relationship. From the end of 2008 onwards, the time at which UK LNG imports started to increase, this long-term relationship appears to break down altogether.

unknown authors

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Use of an ions thruster to dispose of type II long-lived fission products into outer space  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To dispose of long-lived fission products (LLFPs) into outer space, an ions thruster can be used instead of a static accelerator. The specifications of the ions thrusters which are presently studies for space propulsion are presented, and their usability discussed. Using of a rocket with an ions thruster for disposing of the LLFPs directly into the sun required a larger amount of energy than does the use of an accelerator.

Takahashi, H.; Yu, A.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

ELEMENTAL ABUNDANCE RATIOS IN STARS OF THE OUTER GALACTIC DISK. IV. A NEW SAMPLE OF OPEN CLUSTERS  

SciTech Connect

We present radial velocities and chemical abundances for nine stars in the old, distant open clusters Be18, Be21, Be22, Be32, and PWM4. For Be18 and PWM4, these are the first chemical abundance measurements. Combining our data with literature results produces a compilation of some 68 chemical abundance measurements in 49 unique clusters. For this combined sample, we study the chemical abundances of open clusters as a function of distance, age, and metallicity. We confirm that the metallicity gradient in the outer disk is flatter than the gradient in the vicinity of the solar neighborhood. We also confirm that the open clusters in the outer disk are metal-poor with enhancements in the ratios [{alpha}/Fe] and perhaps [Eu/Fe]. All elements show negligible or small trends between [X/Fe] and distance (<0.02 dex kpc{sup -1}), but for some elements, there is a hint that the local (R{sub GC} < 13 kpc) and distant (R{sub GC} > 13 kpc) samples may have different trends with distance. There is no evidence for significant abundance trends versus age (<0.04 dex Gyr{sup -1}). We measure the linear relation between [X/Fe] and metallicity, [Fe/H], and find that the scatter about the mean trend is comparable to the measurement uncertainties. Comparison with solar neighborhood field giants shows that the open clusters share similar abundance ratios [X/Fe] at a given metallicity. While the flattening of the metallicity gradient and enhanced [{alpha}/Fe] ratios in the outer disk suggest a chemical enrichment history different from that of the solar neighborhood, we echo the sentiments expressed by Friel et al. that definitive conclusions await homogeneous analyses of larger samples of stars in larger numbers of clusters. Arguably, our understanding of the evolution of the outer disk from open clusters is currently limited by systematic abundance differences between various studies.

Yong, David [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Weston, ACT 2611 (Australia); Carney, Bruce W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3255 (United States); Friel, Eileen D., E-mail: yong@mso.anu.edu.au, E-mail: bruce@physics.unc.edu, E-mail: efriel@indiana.edu [Department of Astronomy, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

HIGH-ALBEDO C-COMPLEX ASTEROIDS IN THE OUTER MAIN BELT: THE NEAR-INFRARED SPECTRA  

SciTech Connect

Primitive, outer-belt asteroids are generally of low albedo, reflecting carbonaceous compositions like those of CI and CM meteorites. However, a few outer-belt asteroids having high albedos are known, suggesting the presence of unusually reflective surface minerals or, conceivably, even exposed water ice. Here, we present near-infrared (1.1-2.5 {mu}m) spectra of four outer-belt C-complex asteroids with albedos {>=}0.1. We find no absorption features characteristic of water ice (near 1.5 and 2.0 {mu}m) in the objects. Intimate mixture models set limits to the water ice by weight {<=}2%. Asteroids (723) Hammonia and (936) Kunigunde are featureless and have (60%-95%) amorphous Mg pyroxenes that might explain the high albedos. Asteroid (1276) Ucclia also shows a featureless reflection spectrum with (50%-60%) amorphous Mg pyroxenes. Asteroid (1576) Fabiola shows a possible weak, broad absorption band (1.5-2.1 {mu}m). The feature can be reproduced by (80%) amorphous Mg pyroxenes or orthopyroxene (crystalline silicate), either of which is likely to cause its high albedo. We discuss the origin of high-albedo components in primitive asteroids.

Kasuga, Toshihiro [Public Relations Center, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Usui, Fumihiko; Hasegawa, Sunao [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara 252-5210 (Japan); Ootsubo, Takafumi [Astronomical Institute, Tohoku University, 6-3 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Kuroda, Daisuke, E-mail: toshi.kasuga@nao.ac.jp [Okayama Astrophysical Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 3037-5 Honjo, Kamogata, Asakuchi, Okayama 719-0232 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Parity restoration in the Highly Truncated Diagonalization Approach: application to the outer fission barrier of $^{240}$Pu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The restoration of the parity symmetry has been performed in the framework of the Highly Truncated Diagonalization Approach suited to treat correlations in an explicitly particle-number conserving microscopic approach. To do so we have assumed axial symmetry and used a generalized Wick's theorem due to L\\"owdin in a projection-after-variation scheme. We have chosen the Skyrme SkM$^*$ energy-density functional for the particle-hole channel and a density-independent delta force for the residual interaction. We have applied this approach in the region of the outer fission barrier of the $^{240}$Pu nucleus. As a result, we have shown that the $K^{\\pi} = 0^+$ fission isomeric state is statically unstable against intrinsic-parity breaking modes, while the projection does not affect the energy at the top of the intrinsic outer fission barrier. Altogether, this leads to an increase of the height of the outer fission barrier--with respect to the fission isomeric state--by about 350 keV, affecting thus significantly th...

Hao, T V Nhan; Bonneau, L

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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241

Parity restoration in the Highly Truncated Diagonalization Approach: application to the outer fission barrier of $^{240}$Pu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The restoration of the parity symmetry has been performed in the framework of the Highly Truncated Diagonalization Approach suited to treat correlations in an explicitly particle-number conserving microscopic approach. To do so we have assumed axial symmetry and used a generalized Wick's theorem due to L\\"owdin in a projection-after-variation scheme. We have chosen the Skyrme SkM$^*$ energy-density functional for the particle-hole channel and a density-independent delta force for the residual interaction. We have applied this approach in the region of the outer fission barrier of the $^{240}$Pu nucleus. As a result, we have shown that the $K^{\\pi} = 0^+$ fission isomeric state is statically unstable against intrinsic-parity breaking modes, while the projection does not affect the energy at the top of the intrinsic outer fission barrier. Altogether, this leads to an increase of the height of the outer fission barrier--with respect to the fission isomeric state--by about 350 keV, affecting thus significantly the fission-decay lifetime of the considered fission isomer.

T. V. Nhan Hao; P. Quentin; L. Bonneau

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Comparison of 700-hPa NCEP-R1 and AMIP-R2 Wind Patterns over the Continental United States Using Cluster Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clustering techniques are adapted to facilitate the comparison of gridded 700-hPa wind flow patterns spanning the continental United States. A recent decade (198594) of wind component data has been extracted from two widely used reanalysis ...

Ellen J. Cooter; Jenise Swall; Robert Gilliam

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

On the connection between continental-scale land surface processes and the tropical climate in a coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An evaluation is presented of the impact on tropical climate of continental-scale perturbations given by different representations of land surface processes (LSP) in a general circulation model that includes atmosphere-ocean interactions. One ...

Hsi-Yen Ma; C. Roberto Mechoso; Yongkang Xue; Heng Xiao; J. David Neelin; Xuan Ji

244

Global Evaluation of the ISBA-TRIP Continental Hydrological System. Part II: Uncertainties in River Routing Simulation Related to Flow Velocity and Groundwater Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the companion paper to this one (Part I), the Interactions between Soil, Biosphere, and AtmosphereTotal Runoff Integrating Pathways (ISBA-TRIP) continental hydrological system of the Centre National de Recherches Mtorologiques is evaluated ...

B. Decharme; R. Alkama; H. Douville; M. Becker; A. Cazenave

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

A One-Dimensional Model of Continental Ice Volume Fluctuations through the Pleistocene: Implications for the Origin of the Mid-Pleistocene Climate Transition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new one-dimensional, zonally averaged high resolution spherical model of the accumulation and flow of continental ice sheets in response to variations in insolation forcing has been constructed. The model includes a detailed representation of ...

G. DeBlonde; W. R. Peltier

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

On Intermediate Models for Barotropic Continental Shelf and Slope Flow Fields. Part II: Comparison of Numerical Model Solutions in Doubly Periodic Domains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of a program to improve understanding of the dynamics of the complicated, vigorous eddy and jet flow fields recently observed over the continental shelf and slope, we investigate the potential of intermediate models for use in both ...

J. A. Barth; J. S. Allen; P. A. Newberger

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

On the Potential Change in Surface Water Vapor Deposition over the Continental United States due to Increases in Atmospheric Greenhouse Gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characteristics of surface water vapor deposition (WVD) over the continental United States under the present climate and a future climate scenario reflecting the mid-twenty-first-century increased greenhouse gas concentrations were evaluated by ...

Zaitao Pan; Moti Segal; Charles Graves

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Global Evaluation of the ISBA-TRIP Continental Hydrological System. Part I: Comparison to GRACE Terrestrial Water Storage Estimates and In Situ River Discharges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In earth system models, the partitioning of precipitation among the variations of continental water storage, evapotranspiration, and freshwater runoff to the ocean has a major influence on the terrestrial water and energy budgets and thereby on ...

R. Alkama; B. Decharme; H. Douville; M. Becker; A. Cazenave; J. Sheffield; A. Voldoire; S. Tyteca; P. Le Moigne

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

A Microphysical Retrieval Scheme for Continental Low-Level Stratiform Clouds: Impacts of the Subadiabatic Character on Microphysical Properties and Radiation Budgets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using measurements from the Department of Energys Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program, a modified ground-based remote sensing technique is developed and evaluated to study the impacts of the subadiabatic character of continental low-level ...

Hung-Neng S. Chin; Daniel J. Rodriguez; Richard T. Cederwall; Catherine C. Chuang; Allen S. Grossman; John J. Yio; Qiang Fu; Mark A. Miller

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Assssment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Segment-specific theoretical resource was aggregated by major hydrologic region in the contiguous, lower 48 states and totaled 1,146 TWh/yr. The aggregate estimate of the Alaska theoretical resource is 235 TWh/yr, yielding a total theoretical resource estimate of 1,381 TWh/yr for the continental US. The technically recoverable resource in the contiguous 48 states was estimated by applying a recovery factor to the segment-specific theoretical resource estimates. The recovery factor scales the theoretical resource for a given segment to take into account assumptions such as minimum required water velocity and depth during low flow conditions, maximum device packing density, device efficiency, and flow statistics (e.g., the 5 percentile flow relative to the average flow rate). The recovery factor also takes account of ?back effects? ? feedback effects of turbine presence on hydraulic head and velocity. The recovery factor was determined over a range of flow rates and slopes using the hydraulic model, HEC-RAS. In the hydraulic modeling, presence of turbines was accounted for by adjusting the Manning coefficient. This analysis, which included 32 scenarios, led to an empirical function relating recovery factor to slope and discharge. Sixty-nine percent of NHDPlus segments included in the theoretical resource estimate for the contiguous 48 states had an estimated recovery factor of zero. For Alaska, data on river slope was not readily available; hence, the recovery factor was estimated based on the flow rate alone. Segment-specific estimates of the theoretical resource were multiplied by the corresponding recovery factor to estimate

Jacobson, Paul T. [Electric Power Research Institute; Ravens, Thomas M. [University of Alaska Anchorage; Cunningham, Keith W. [University of Alaska Fairbanks; Scott, George [National Renewable Energy Laboratory

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

251

Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stress corrosion cracking is one of the most common corrosion-related causes for premature breach of metal structural components. Stress corrosion cracking is the initiation and propagation of cracks in structural components due to three factors that must be present simultaneously: metallurgical susceptibility, critical environment, and static (or sustained) tensile stresses. This report was prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). The purpose of this report is to provide an evaluation of the potential for stress corrosion cracking of the engineered barrier system components (i.e., the drip shield, waste package outer barrier, and waste package stainless steel inner structural cylinder) under exposure conditions consistent with the repository during the regulatory period of 10,000 years after permanent closure. For the drip shield and waste package outer barrier, the critical environment is conservatively taken as any aqueous environment contacting the metal surfaces. Appendix B of this report describes the development of the SCC-relevant seismic crack density model (SCDM). The consequence of a stress corrosion cracking breach of the drip shield, the waste package outer barrier, or the stainless steel inner structural cylinder material is the initiation and propagation of tight, sometimes branching, cracks that might be induced by the combination of an aggressive environment and various tensile stresses that can develop in the drip shields or the waste packages. The Stainless Steel Type 316 inner structural cylinder of the waste package is excluded from the stress corrosion cracking evaluation because the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA) does not take credit for the inner cylinder. This document provides a detailed description of the process-level models that can be applied to assess the performance of Alloy 22 (used for the waste package outer barrier) and Titanium Grade 7 (used for the drip shield) that are subjected to the effects of stress corrosion cracking. The use of laser peening or other residual stress mitigation techniques is considered as a means of mitigating stress corrosion cracking in the waste package final closure lid weld.

G. Gordon

2004-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

252

NETL: National Methane Hydrates R&D Program- 2009 GOM JIP Expedition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Site Summaries - Site Summaries Site Summary – Walker Ridge Block 313 The drill sites at Walker Ridge 313 lies in ~6,500 ft of water within the western part of the “Terrebonne” mini-basin in the northern Gulf of Mexico. The primary target of drilling were a series of strong seismic anomaly that lay approximately 3,000 fbsf (feet below the seafloor). These anomalies exhibit strong “positive” amplitude response, indicating a horizon in the subsurface across which the speed of sound waves significantly increases. In addition, these same horizons, when traced deeper to the west, are observed to switch “polarity” to a strong negative response. Pre-drill interpretations determined that this collection of seismic responses was indicative of free gas accumulations (the negative anomalies) being trapped within porous and permeable sand horizons by significant accumulations of overlying gas hydrate within the sediment pore space. The primary goal of JIP drilling at this site was to test the validity of this interpretation through drilling and logging of wells at this site.

253

NETL: National Methane Hydrates R&D Program- 2009 GOM JIP Expedition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The National Methane Hydrates R&D Program The National Methane Hydrates R&D Program 2009 Gulf of Mexico JIP - Leg II DOE-Sponsored Expedition Confirms Resource-Quality Gas Hydrate in the Gulf of Mexico Leg II Initial Scientific Reports Now Available Photo of semi-submersible Helix Project Background Participants Pre-Drilling Expedition Overview Drilling/Logging Sites The LWD Program Site Summaries Walker Ridge-Block 313 Green Canyon-Block 955 Alaminos Canyon block 21 and East Breaks block 992 JIP Website [external site] FITI article - Summer 2009 Leg II Initial Scientific Reports On May 6, 2009, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the U.S. Minerals Management Service, an industry research consortium led by Chevron, and others completed a landmark gas hydrate

254

NETL: National Methane Hydrates R&D Program- 2009 GOM JIP Expedition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Green Canyon Block 955 Green Canyon Block 955 The gas hydrates JIP site selection team identified numerous potential targets in Green Canyon block 955. Three of these sites were drilled in Leg II. The wells are located in over 6,500 ft of water near the foot of the Sigsbee Escarpment. The locations are near a major embayment into the Escarpment (“Green Canyon”) which has served as a persistent focal point for sediment delivery into the deep Gulf of Mexico. Topographic map of the seafloor in the Green Canyon area. Topographic map of the seafloor in the Green Canyon area. Block 955 lies just seaward of the Sigsbee Escarpment in ~6,500 feet of water Green Canyon block 995 includes a prominent channel/levee complex that has transported and deposited large volumes of sandy sediment from the canyon to the deep Gulf of Mexico abyssal plain. The southwest corner of the block includes a recently developed structural high caused by deeper mobilization of salt. The crest of the structural high is cut by complex network of faults that can provide pathways for migrating fluids and gases. Geophysical data reviewed during assessment of the site revealed a complex array of geophysical responses near the inferred base of gas hydrate stability. Some of these responses are suggestive of free gas and some indicative of gas hydrate, but all are limited to depths that are near or below the inferred base of gas hydrate stability.

255

NETL: National Methane Hydrates R&D Program- 2009 GOM JIP Expedition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and geophysical evaluations of numerous potential sites, seeking evidence for active petroleum systems (gas sources and migration pathways) co-located with sand-prone...

256

Gas Hydrate Characterization in the GoM using Marine EM Methods  

SciTech Connect

In spite of the importance of gas hydrate as a low-carbon fuel, a possible contributor to rapid climate change, and a significant natural hazard, our current understanding about the amount and distribution of submarine gas hydrate is somewhat poor; estimates of total volume vary by at least an order of magnitude, and commercially useful concentrations of hydrate have remained an elusive target. This is largely because conventional geophysical tools have intrinsic limitations in their ability to quantitatively image hydrate. It has long been known from well logs that gas hydrate is resistive compared to the host sediments, and electrical and electromagnetic methods have been proposed and occasionally used to image hydrates. This project seeks to expand our capabilities to use electromagnetic methods to explore for gas hydrate in the marine environment. An important basic science aspect of our work was to quantify the resistivity of pure gas hydrate as a function of temperature at seafloor pressures. We designed, constructed, and tested a highpressure cell in which hydrate could be synthesized and then subjected to electrical conductivity measurements. Impedance spectroscopy at frequencies between 20 Hz and 2 MHz was used to separate the effect of the blocking electrodes from the intrinsic conductivity of the hydrate. We obtained very reproducible results that showed that pure methane hydrate was several times more resistive than the water ice that seeded the synthesis, 20,000 {Ohm}m at 0{degrees}#14;C, and that the activation energy is 30.6 kJ/mol over the temperature range of -15 to 15{degrees}#14;C. Adding silica sand to the hydrate, however, showed that the addition of the extra phase caused the conductivity of the assemblage to increase in a counterintuitive way. The fact that the increased conductivity collapsed after a percolation threshold was reached, and that the addition of glass beads does not produce a similar increase in conductivity, together suggest that while the surface of the gas hydrate grains are not intrinsically conductive, the presence of sand does increase their conductivity. In the field component of this project, we carried out an 18day cruise on the R.V. Roger Revelle in the Gulf of Mexico from 7th-??26th October 2008 to collect controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) data over four hydrate prospects; blocks AC 818, WR 313, GC 955, and MC 118. During these surveys we deployed 30 ocean bottom electromagnetic (OBEM) recorders a total of 94 times at four survey areas and towed the Scripps Undersea Electromagnetic Source Instrument (SUESI) a total of 103 hours. SUESI transmission was 200 A on a 50 m dipole antenna at heights of 70-100 m above the seafloor. We also towed a neutrally buoyant 3-axis electric field recorder behind the SUESI antenna at a constant offset of 300 m. The use of a towed receiver that is "flown" above the seafloor allowed us to operate in areas where seafloor infrastructure such as wellheads, pipelines, and installed scientific equipment existed. We reduced the data to apparent resistivity psuedosections. The most compelling results come from the hydrate observatory at MC 118, where a localized resistivity anomaly is clearly identified under the southeast crater in an otherwise uniform 1 {Ohm}m background. The data from MC 118 also show that authigenic carbonate does not necessarily express itself as a confounding resistor, as was feared at the start of this project. While the results from the other prospects are much more complicated, the data are well correlated with known geology, and line to line agreement is good. Although these data are not amenable to 1D inversion as was initially hoped, we expect to use a newly developed 2D CSEM inversion code to continue to get useful information from this rich data set.

Steven Constable

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

257

NETL: National Methane Hydrates R&D Program- 2009 GOM JIP Expedition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

soon as possible. Please note as you access these reports that the data and preliminary results represent work very much still in progress. Studies to calibrate pre-drill...

258

,"GOM Gross EST",,,"Louisiana Gross EST",,,"New Mexico Gross...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gross EST",,,"Wyoming Gross EST",,,"Other States Gross EST",,,"Lower 48 Gross EST",,,"Alaska Gross State Data",,,"U. S. Gross EST" ,"Initial Est","Revised Est",,"Initial...

259

NETL: National Methane Hydrates R&D Program- 2009 GOM JIP Expedition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A small isolated sand body within the target interval was penetrated by the 1995 ExxonMobil Rockefeller well (EB992 001). Log data from that well indicated a sand 130 ft...

260

NETL: National Methane Hydrates R&D Program- 2009 GOM JIP Expedition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

high is cut by complex network of faults that can provide pathways for migrating fluids and gases. Geophysical data reviewed during assessment of the site revealed a...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gom outer continental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

NETL: National Methane Hydrates R&D Program- 2009 GOM JIP Expedition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of fracture-filling gas hydrate. As drilling proceeding, the lack of use of heavy drilling fluids and slow penetration rates (both designed intentionally to maximize the...

262

Selected data fron continental scientific drilling core holes VC-1 and VC-2a, Valles Caldera, New Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents geochemical and isotopic data on rocks and water and wellbore geophysical data from the Continental Scientific Drilling Program core holes VC-1 and VC-2a, Valles Caldera, New Mexico. These core holes were drilled as a portion of a broader program that seeks to answer fundamental questions about magma, water/rock interactions, ore deposits, and volcanology. The data in this report will assist the interpretation of the hydrothermal system in the Jemez Mountains and will stimulate further research in magmatic processes, hydrothermal alteration, ore deposits, hydrology, structural geology, and hydrothermal solution chemistry. 37 refs., 36 figs., 28 tabs.

Musgrave, J.A.; Goff, F.; Shevenell, L.; Trujillo, P.E. Jr.; Counce, D.; Luedemann, G.; Garcia, S.; Dennis, B.; Hulen, J.B.; Janik, C.; Tomei, F.A.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Assssment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded the Electric Power Research Institute and its collaborative partners, University of Alaska ? Anchorage, University of Alaska ? Fairbanks, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, to provide an assessment of the riverine hydrokinetic resource in the continental United States. The assessment benefited from input obtained during two workshops attended by individuals with relevant expertise and from a National Research Council panel commissioned by DOE to provide guidance to this and other concurrent, DOE-funded assessments of water based renewable energy. These sources of expertise provided valuable advice regarding data sources and assessment methodology. The assessment of the hydrokinetic resource in the 48 contiguous states is derived from spatially-explicit data contained in NHDPlus ?a GIS-based database containing river segment-specific information on discharge characteristics and channel slope. 71,398 river segments with mean annual flow greater than 1,000 cubic feet per second (cfs) mean discharge were included in the assessment. Segments with discharge less than 1,000 cfs were dropped from the assessment, as were river segments with hydroelectric dams. The results for the theoretical and technical resource in the 48 contiguous states were found to be relatively insensitive to the cutoff chosen. Raising the cutoff to 1,500 cfs had no effect on estimate of the technically recoverable resource, and the theoretical resource was reduced by 5.3%. The segment-specific theoretical resource was estimated from these data using the standard hydrological engineering equation that relates theoretical hydraulic power (Pth, Watts) to discharge (Q, m3 s-1) and hydraulic head or change in elevation (??, m) over the length of the segment, where ? is the specific weight of water (9800 N m-3): ??? = ? ? ?? For Alaska, which is not encompassed by NPDPlus, hydraulic head and discharge data were manually obtained from Idaho National Laboratory?s Virtual Hydropower Prospector, Google Earth, and U.S. Geological Survey gages. Data were manually obtained for the eleven largest rivers with average flow rates greater than 10,000 cfs and the resulting estimate of the theoretical resource was expanded to include rivers with discharge between 1,000 cfs and 10,000 cfs based upon the contribution of rivers in the latter flow class to the total estimate in the contiguous 48 states. Segment-specific theoretical resource was aggregated by major hydrologic region in the contiguous, lower 48 states and totaled 1,146 TWh/yr. The aggregate estimate of the Alaska theoretical resource is 235 TWh/yr, yielding a total theoretical resource estimate of 1,381 TWh/yr for the continental US. The technically recoverable resource in the contiguous 48 states was estimated by applying a recovery factor to the segment-specific theoretical resource estimates. The recovery factor scales the theoretical resource for a given segment to take into account assumptions such as minimum required water velocity and depth during low flow conditions, maximum device packing density, device efficiency, and flow statistics (e.g., the 5 percentile flow relative to the average flow rate). The recovery factor also takes account of ?back effects? ? feedback effects of turbine presence on hydraulic head and velocity. The recovery factor was determined over a range of flow rates and slopes using the hydraulic model, HEC-RAS. In the hydraulic modeling, presence of turbines was accounted for by adjusting the Manning coefficient. This analysis, which included 32 scenarios, led to an empirical function relating recovery factor to slope and discharge. Sixty-nine percent of NHDPlus segments included in the theoretical resource estimate for the contiguous 48 states had an estimated recovery factor of zero. For Alaska, data on river slope was not readily available; hence, the recovery factor was estimated based on the flow rate alone. Segment-specific estimates of the theoretical resource were multiplied by the corresponding recovery factor to estimate

Jacobson, Paul T. [Electric Power Research Institute; Ravens, Thomas M. [University of Alaska Anchorage; Cunningham, Keith W. [University of Alaska Fairbanks; Scott, George [National Renewable Energy Laboratory

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

264

The outer-coordination sphere: incorporating amino acids and peptides as ligands for homogeneous catalysts to mimic enzyme function  

SciTech Connect

Great progress has been achieved in the field of homogeneous transition metal-based catalysis, however, as a general rule these solution based catalysts are still easily outperformed, both in terms of rates and selectivity, by their analogous enzyme counterparts, including structural mimics of the active site. This observation suggests that the features of the enzyme beyond the active site, i.e. the outer-coordination sphere, are important for their exceptional function. Directly mimicking the outer-coordination sphere requires the incorporation of amino acids and peptides as ligands for homogeneous catalysts. This effort has been attempted for many homogeneous catalysts which span the manifold of catalytic reactions and often require careful thought regarding solvent type, pH and characterization to avoid unwanted side reactions or catalyst decomposition. This article reviews the current capability of synthesizing and characterizing this often difficult category of metal-based catalysts. This work was funded by the DOE Office of Science Early Career Research Program through the Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

Shaw, Wendy J.

2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

265

Atmospheric constraints for the CO2 partial pressure on terrestrial planets near the outer edge of the habitable zone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent years, several potentially habitable, probably terrestrial exoplanets and exoplanet candidates have been discovered. The amount of CO2 in their atmosphere is of great importance for surface conditions and habitability. In the absence of detailed information on the geochemistry of the planet, this amount could be considered as a free parameter. Up to now, CO2 partial pressures for terrestrial planets have been obtained assuming an available volatile reservoir and outgassing scenarios. This study aims at calculating the allowed maximum CO2 pressure at the surface of terrestrial exoplanets orbiting near the outer boundary of the habitable zone by coupling the radiative effects of the CO2 and its condensation at the surface. These constraints might limit the permitted amount of atmospheric CO2, independent of the planetary reservoir. A 1D radiative-convective cloud-free atmospheric model was used. CO2 partial pressures are fixed according to surface temperature and vapor pressure curve. Considered scena...

von Paris, Philip; Hedelt, Pascal; Rauer, Heike; Selsis, Franck; Stracke, Barbara

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Crystal Structures of the Outer Membrane Domain of Intimin and Invasin from Enterohemorrhagic E. coli and Enteropathogenic Y. pseudotuberculosis  

SciTech Connect

Intimins and invasins are virulence factors produced by pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria. They contain C-terminal extracellular passenger domains that are involved in adhesion to host cells and N-terminal {beta} domains that are embedded in the outer membrane. Here, we identify the domain boundaries of an E. coli intimin {beta} domain and use this information to solve its structure and the {beta} domain structure of a Y. pseudotuberculosis invasin. Both {beta} domain structures crystallized as monomers and reveal that the previous range of residues assigned to the {beta} domain also includes a protease-resistant domain that is part of the passenger. Additionally, we identify 146 nonredundant representative members of the intimin/invasin family based on the boundaries of the highly conserved intimin and invasin {beta} domains. We then use this set of sequences along with our structural data to find and map the evolutionarily constrained residues within the {beta} domain.

Fairman, James W.; Dautin, Nathalie; Wojtowicz, Damian; Liu, Wei; Noinaj, Nicholas; Barnard, Travis J.; Udho, Eshwar; Przytycka, Teresa M.; Cherezov, Vadim; Buchanan, Susan K. (CUA); (Einstein); (NIH); (Scripps)

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

267

Lithium isotopic systematics of A-type granites and their mafic enclaves: Further constraints on the Li isotopic composition of the continental crust  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lithium isotopic systematics of A-type granites and their mafic enclaves: Further constraints form 6 February 2009 Accepted 15 February 2009 Editor: D.B. Dingwell Keywords: Lithium isotopes A-type granite Mafic enclave Continental crust Lithium concentrations and isotopic compositions of 39 A

Mcdonough, William F.

268

Crop, forestry, and manure residue inventory, continental United States. Volume 3. West North-Central: including, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota  

SciTech Connect

This document is one of eight similar data packages that make up a national residue inventory summarizing annual agricultural wastes generated in the nine census regions within the continental United States. The inventory is based upon data available through mid-1975 which are shown in Section II by region, state, and country, as well as by waste type, amount, and use.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Chemical evidence of kerogen formation in source rocks and oil shales via selective preservation of thin resistant outer walls of microalgae: Origin of ultralaminae  

SciTech Connect

New structures, termed ultralaminae, were recently observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy, usually in high amounts, in a number of kerogens from oil shales and source rocks. Morphological similarities were noted between ultralaminae and the thin (ca. 15 nm) resistant outer walls, composed of non-hydrolyzable macromolecules (algaenans), commonly occurring in extant Chlorophyceae, especially in the cosmopolitan genus Scenedesmus. Identification of the pyrolysis products of S. quadricauda algaenan showed (i) a highly aliphatic structure based on a macromolecular network of long (up to C{sub 32}) polymethylenic chains probably cross-linked by ether bridges, and (ii) a close correlation based on the formation of n-alkylnitriles, between this algaenan and two ultralaminar kerogens, the Rundle Oil Shale and the Green River Shale. These fossil ultralaminae, therefore, likely originated from the selective preservation of the thin, algaenan-containing, outer walls of Scenedesmus and/or of other Chlorophyceae containing outer walls of a similar morphology and composition. Previous evidence of kerogen formation via selective preservation of algaenans was restricted to rather uncommon kerogens; the present results, added to ultralamina common occurrence and abundance, point to a wide involvement and to a large contribution of the selective preservation of algaenan-containing thin outer walls of Chlorophyceae in the formation of kerogens in a number of lacustrine source rocks and oil shales.

Derenne, S.; Largeau, C.; Casadevall, E.; Berkaloff, C.; Rousseau, B. (Ecole Normale Superieure, Cedex (France))

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

PHOTOSYNTHESIS OF CARBON DIOXIDE FROM CARBON SURFACES COATED WITH OXYGEN: IMPLICATIONS FOR INTERSTELLAR MOLECULAR CLOUDS AND THE OUTER SOLAR SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

We investigate via infrared spectroscopy the synthesis of CO{sub 2} by ultraviolet irradiation (6.41 eV) of amorphous carbon covered with solid O{sub 2} at 21 K. Oxidation occurs at the O{sub 2}-carbon interface promoted by photon excitation or dissociation of O{sub 2} molecules. The CO{sub 2} production is linear with photon fluence with a yield of 3.3 {+-} 0.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} CO{sub 2} photon{sup -1}; the yield does not decrease at high fluences (at least up to 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} photons cm{sup -2}) since CO{sub 2} is not photodissociated at this photon energy. Replacing oxygen with water ice did not produce CO{sub 2} since H{sub 2}O does not dissociate at this photon energy. The CO{sub 2} synthesis process discussed in this Letter does not require H{sub 2}O or CO and may be important in cold astrophysical environments where O{sub 2} could be locally segregated on carbonaceous grains, such as in molecular clouds and icy objects in the outer solar system.

Fulvio, D.; Raut, U.; Baragiola, R. A., E-mail: df6vz@virginia.edu, E-mail: ur5n@virginia.edu, E-mail: raul@virginia.edu [Laboratory for Atomic and Surface Physics, University of Virginia, Thornton Hall B-114, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States)

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

271

Targeted Protein Degradation of Outer Membrane Decaheme Cytochrome MtrC Metal Reductase in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Measured Using Biarsenical Probe CrAsH-EDT2  

SciTech Connect

Development of efficient microbial biofuel cells requires an ability to exploit interfacial electron transfer reactions to external electron acceptors, such as metal oxides; such reactions occur in the facultative anaerobic gram-negative bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 through the catalytic activity of the outer membrane decaheme c-type cytochrome MtrC. Central to the utility of this pathway to synthetic biology is an understanding of cellular mechanisms that maintain optimal MtrC function, cellular localization, and renewal by degradation and resynthesis. In order to monitor trafficking to the outer membrane, and the environmental sensitivity of MtrC, we have engineered a tetracysteine tag (i.e., CCPGCC) at its C-terminus that permits labeling by the cell impermeable biarsenical fluorophore, carboxy-FlAsH (CrAsH) of MtrC at the surface of living Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cells. In comparison, the cell permeable reagent FlAsH permits labeling of the entire population of MtrC, including proteolytic fragments resulting from incorrect maturation. We demonstrate specific labeling by CrAsH of engineered MtrC which is dependent on the presence of a functional type-2 secretion system (T2S), as evidenced by T2S system gspD or gspG deletion mutants which are incapable of CrAsH labeling. Under these latter conditions, MtrC undergoes proteolytic degradation to form a large 35-38 kDa fragment; this degradation product is also resolved during normal turnover of the CrAsH-labeled MtrC protein. No MtrC protein is released into the medium during turnover, suggesting the presence of cellular turnover systems involving MtrC reuptake and degradation. The mature MtrC localized on the outer membrane is a long-lived protein, with a turnover rate of 0.043 hr-1 that is insensitive to O2 concentration. Maturation of MtrC is relatively inefficient, with substantial rates of turnover of the immature protein prior to export to the outer membrane (i.e., 0.028 hr-1) that are consistent with the inherent complexity associated with correct heme insertion and acylation of MtrC that occurs in the periplasm prior to its targeting to the outer membrane. These latter results suggest that MtrC protein trafficking to the outer membrane and its subsequent degradation are tightly regulated, which is consistent with cellular processing pathways that target MtrC to extracellular structures and their possible role in promoting electron transfer from Shewanella to extracellular acceptors.

Xiong, Yijia; Chen, Baowei; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Bigelow, Diana J.; Squier, Thomas C.

2011-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

272

Limitations of ad hoc "SKA+VLBI" configurations & the need to extend SKA to trans-continental dimensions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The angular resolution of the proposed Square Kilometre Array, SKA, must be extended towards the milliarcsecond scale if it is to resolve the distant starburst galaxies that are likely to dominate the radio source counts at micro and sub-microJy flux levels. This paper considers the best way of extending SKA's angular resolution towards the milliarcsecond scale. Two possible SKA-VLBI configurations have been investigated and simulated SKA and SKA-VLBI visibility data sets generated. The effects of non-uniform data weighting on the associated images are considered. The results suggest that the preferred option is for SKA to be extended to trans-continental dimensions. By retaining 50% of the array's collecting area within a region no larger than 50 km, the surface brightness sensitivity of the array at arcsec resolution is hardly compromised. In this configuration SKA's capabilities are impressive: in a single 12 hour run, between 100-1000 sources will be simultaneously detected and imaged with arcsecond, sub-arcsecond and milliarcsecond resolution.

M. A. Garrett

1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

273

The impact of climate and CO{sub 2} changes on ecosystem dynamics of the continental United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The VEMAP study used three biogeochemical (BGC) models to investigate the impact of changes in climate and CO{sub 2} concentrations over the continental US. These models were Biome-BGC, CENTURY, and TEM. Differences among the BGC models and the climate scenarios (three different GCM-derived 2xCO{sub 2} climates were used) contributed equally to the variation in estimates of C dynamics under changing climate and CO,. The response of the individual biogeochemical models to increases in temperature and tp water stress are largely responsible for their behavior under climate change. All three models generally predict increases in C uptake when increases in temperature are not vastly greater than increases in precipitation, such as seen in the GFDL scenario. Differences in the biotic response to elevated CO{sub 2} determined the overall response of NPP and total system C storage due to differences on the manner in which plant C/N, transpiration, and photosynthesis are modified by the three different BGC models.

Ojima, D.S. [Colorado State Univ., Ft. Collins, CO (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, Surface Meteorology (williams-surfmet)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

Christopher Williams; Mike Jensen

275

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, Vertical Air Motion (williams-vertair)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

Christopher Williams; Mike Jensen

276

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, Parcivel Disdrometer (williams-disdro)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

Christopher Williams; Mike Jensen

277

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, 449 MHz Profiler(williams-449_prof)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

Christopher Williams; Mike Jensen

278

Paul Becker  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Service Office of Protected Resources, and NOAA's Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program for oil and gas exploration and ...

2012-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

279

Identification and Characterization of UndA-HRCR-6, an Outer Membrane Endecaheme c-Type Cytochrome of Shewanella sp. Strain HRCR-6  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The outer membrane decaheme c-type cytochromes (c-Cyt) MtrC and OmcA of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1(MR-1) play critical roles in extracellular reduction of iron [Fe(III)] oxides and uranium [ U(VI)]. To identify and characterize the outer membrane c-Cyts found in the metal-reducing Shewanella strains isolated from the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River (HRCR), 7 HRCR isolates were tested for the presence of mtrC, omcA and undA1 (a gene encoding a putative 11-heme c-Cyt) homologues in their genomes. All 7 tested strains possessed an mtrC homologue, while 3 strains had an omcA homologue and the remaining 4 strains contained an undA1 homologue. The coding region of an undA1 homologue from HRCR isolate 6 was cloned and sequenced. Because it was 93% identical to the UndA of S. baltica OS223, the protein product encoded by this sequenced gene was named as UndA-HRCR6. In MR-1, UndA-HRCR6 (i) restored an MR-1 mutants ability to reduce solid phase ferrihydrite at 40% of that for MR-1 wild type, (ii) increased extracellular formation of UO2 associated with the outer membrane and extracellular polymeric substances in a U(VI) reduction assay and (iii) was secreted to the extracellular environment by bacterial type II secretion system. UndA-HRCR6 was purified from the membrane fraction following its overexpression in MR-1 cells. Purified UndA-HRCR6 possessed 11 heme-Fe and reduced ferric complexes. Collectively, these results show that UndA-HRCR6 is an outer membrane endecaheme c-Cyt and can serve an extracellular metal reductase with functions similar to that of MR-1 MtrC and OmcA.

Shi, Liang; Belchik, Sara M.; Wang, Zheming; Kennedy, David W.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Marshall, Matthew J.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

The distribution and optical response of particles on the continental shelf and their relationship to cross-isopycnal mixing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The relationships of optics, particles, and hydrography to shelf mixing processes were analyzed on a mid-continental shelf south of New England. The objectives were to characterize the types, sizes and sources of particles present in the water column and their effects on optics during conditions of strong stratification (late summer) and weak stratification (spring) and to determine how the particles and optics change over time in response to different forcing functions (wind, surface gravity waves, internal waves, solibors - large scale internal waves- and tides). An unexpected opportunity was presented by the passage of Hurricane Edouard close to the sampling site. Under both strong and weak stratification, surface oaters had high values of fluorescence, particulate organic carbon, and chlorophyll a. Mid-waters contained higher concentrations of particulate organic carbon than bottom oaters, but the optical characteristics of particles more closely resembled those of bottom waters (resuspended and adverted material). Strongly stratified conditions typically exhibited little mixing, with the exception of when extreme forcing events, such as the hurricane, passed through the sampling site. Most of the events sampled during the summer cruise were the result of addiction rather than mixing. Spring conditions included weakly stratified waders with frequent wind events (Nor'easters). Strong forcing events caused surface mixing initially, but solar heating stratified surface waders and gradually inhibited mixing. Particle size distribution changed with stratification. A dramatic increase was observed with the passage of the hurricane, and an initial increase in large particles followed by a substantial increase in smaller particles was observed during a spring phytoplankton bloom. Spring particle settling flux was 3 times higher in the bottom 40 meters than during the previous summer. Relationships between optics and discrete samples generally correlate better under mixed conditions than stratified conditions. During the stratified period, particle distributions were constrained by density layers, where as during weakly stratified periods, the waders were more mixed, leading to a more uniform distribution of particulate matter in the surface and the bottom waters.

Blakey, Joshua C.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gom outer continental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Reiz Continental Hotel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WORKSHOP OBJECTIVES:> To proffer solution to the energy problems in Africa by providing a forum for exchange of ideas by major stake holders.:> To address important aspects of the implementation of Renewable Energy Programmes in Africa.:> Explore emerging policy issues, regulations and implementation frameworks for the development of renewable energy and energy efficiency markets in Africa.:> Public awareness creation among poiicy makers, investors and the generai public on the potentials of renewable energy and energy efficiency in Africa SCOPE OF WORKSHOP:> State-of-the-art lectures to be delivered by seasoned experts in renewable energy in such areas as: Sea Water desalination Solar drying (food & cash crops,

University Nigeria; Sustalnable Economie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Chicago's Continental Divide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by highway, railroad, air and water. Its strategic location at the south end of Lake Michigan has been largely responsible. Among other unique advantages, it has an inexhaustible...

283

Economic and legal aspects of the organization of planning and construction of structures on the Continental Shelf of Arctic Seas of Russia  

SciTech Connect

At the current stage of development of Russia`s economy the problem arises of refining the concept and working out a strategy of developing the oil gas resources of the continental shelf. The given concept determines the main strategic directions with respect to the disposition, volumes, and scope of works, creation and use of special equipment, structures, and floating equipment, determination of the extent and dynamics of investments, evaluation of the potential possibilities of various financial sources, etc. Strategy is based on the fairly long-term (15-20 years) cost effectiveness of exploration and development of offshore oil and gas reserves governed by the high geologic prospects and poor study of the continental shelf of Russia. The approach to the solution of this problem obviously, should provide for the follow stages: Planning an exploration program realized mainly by centralized budgetary funds. The second stage is a prediction of the results of the competition, i.e., prediction of the number of specific blocks being claimed. A special problem is the selection of the form of licensing agreement. The existing legislation, particularly the Russian Federation Mineral Resources Law, provides for forms of concession and production sharing in addition to the traditional leasing form. One of the problems is the absence of an official division of Russian water areas according to their status: territoral waters, 200-mile exclusive (economic) zone, and continental shelf. Legal problems begin with the presence of variant readings in the formulation of the concepts of three aforementioned zones. All these problems either directly or indirectly determine the economic conditions and successfulness of the converted and other enterprises and organizations developing offshore oil and gas resources.

Nikitin, B.A.; Perchik, A.I.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

West Florida Continental Shelf: a study of geothermal flows and other processes affecting radionuclides and trace metals. Progress report, October 1, 1979-July 1, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research progress is reported for the period October 1979-July 1980. Physical and chemical investigations have been made of the single known geothermal discharge on the West Florida Continental Shelf. It was discovered the discharge phenomenon is of regional extent. The origin of the discharges is normal seawater which enters the substrate of the Floridian plateau. The discharges are enriched in Ra 226 and Rn 222, heavy metals (Pb, Ca), and calcium, and depleted in magnesium. The effects of these thermal discharges on the shelf environment were investigated. (ACR)

Fanning, K.A.; Byrne, R.H.; Betzer, P.R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Environmental sampling and mud sampling program of CSDP (Continental Scientific Drilling Program) core hole VC-2B, Valles Caldera, New Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An environmental sampling and drilling mud sampling program was conducted during the drilling operations of Continental Scientific Drilling Program (CSDP) core hole VC-2B, Valles caldera, New Mexico. A suite of four springs and creeks in the Sulphur Springs area were monitored on a regular basis to ensure that the VC-2B drilling program was having no environmental impact on water quality. In addition, a regional survey of springs in and around the Jemez Mountains was conducted to provide background data for the environmental monitoring. A drilling mud monitoring program was conducted during the operations to help identify major fluid entries in the core hole. 32 refs., 14 figs., 7 tabs.

Meeker, K.; Goff, F.; Gardner, J.N.; Trujillo, P.E.; Counce, D.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

The responses of net primary production (NPP) and total carbon storage for the continental United States to changes in atmospheric CO{sub 2}, climate, and vegetation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We extrapolated 3 biogeochemistry models (BIOME-BGC, CENTURY, and TEM) across the continental US with the vegetation distributions of 3 biogeography models (BIOME2, DOLY, and MAPSS) for contemporary climate at 355 ppmv CO{sub 2} and each of 3 GCM climate scenarios at 710 ppmv. For contemporary conditions, continental NPP ranges from 3132 to 3854 TgC/yr and total carbon storage ranges from 109 to 125 PgC. The responses of NPP range from no response (BIOME-BGC with DOLY or MAPSS vegetations for UKMO climate) to increases of 53% and 56% (TEM with BIOME2 vegetations for GFDL and OSU climates). The responses of total carbon storage vary from a decrease of 39% (BIOME-BGC with MAPSS vegetation for UKMO climate) to increases of 52% and 56% (TEM with BIOME2 vegetations for OSU and GFDL climates). The UKMO responses of BIOME-BGC with MAPSS vegetation are caused by both decreased forest area (from 44% to 38%) and photosynthetic water stress. The OSU and GFDL responses of TEM with BIOME2 vegetations are caused by forest expansion (from 46% to 67% for OSU and to 75% for GFDL) and increased nitrogen cycling.

McGuire, D.A. [Marine Biological Lab., Woods Hole, MA (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

The Final Step in Phage Lysis: The Role of the Rz-Rz1 Spanin Complex in the Disruption of the Outer Membrane  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of the work described in this dissertation is to better understand the role of Rz and Rz1 function with respect to phage lysis. We determined using both a genetic and biochemical approach that the Rz protein is an inner membrane protein containing a single N-terminal transmembrane domain (TMD) with an Nin/Cout topology. Consistent with previous work on Rz1, the Rz1 lipoprotein was found to be localized to the outer membrane (OM). Following localization, both Rz and Rz1 form homodimers in vivo due to intermolecular disulfide formation. Despite being localized to apposing membranes, the two proteins form a complex. A small number of phages encode a potential single protein equivalent of Rz-Rz1. This protein, termed a spanin, is predicted to tether the inner and outer membranes by a single polypeptide chain. Based on complementation, it was concluded that gp11 from the phage T1 is a functional equivalent of Rz-Rz1. Gp11, and by analogy the Rz-Rz1 two-component spanin complex, threads the meshwork of the PG layer. The presence of an Rz-Rz1 complex, which forms in the presence of peptidoglycan (PG), is supported by in vivo results. The soluble periplasmic domains of Rz and Rz1, which are dimeric and monomeric respectively, were purified. Circular dichroism analysis indicates that Rz is structured, with significant ?-helical content, whereas Rz1, in which 10 out 39 residues are proline, is unstructured. Mixing the proteins results in the formation of a complex with significant new ?-helical content. Negative-stain images reveal ~ 25 nm x ~ 4 nm rod-shaped structures. Holin independent activity of Rz and Rz1 is found to disrupt whole cells. Furthermore, time lapse microscopy of ? and ?Rzam lysis allows us to conclude that Rz and Rz1 are essential for lysis. These results suggest a model for Rz-Rz1 function which begins with Rz and Rz1 forming a complex through direct interaction prior to holin and endolysin function. Holin-mediated hole formation allows the endolysin to degrade PG which sterically hinders Rz-Rz1 activity. Removal of PG by endolysin degradation thus triggers Rz-Rz1 OM disruption via fusion of the inner and outer membranes.

Berry, Joel Dallas

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Biochemical and biophysical characterization of the major outer surface protein, OSP-A from North American and European isolates of Borrelia burgdorferi  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lyme borreliosis, caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, is the most common vector-borne disease in North America and Western Europe. As the major delayed immune response in humans, a better understanding of the major outer surface lipoproteins OspA and OspB are of much interest. These proteins have been shown to exhibit three distinct phylogenetic genotypes based on their DNA sequences. This paper describes the cloning of genomic DNA for each variant and amplification of PCR. DNA sequence data was used to derive computer driven phylogenetic analysis and deduced amino acid sequences. Overproduction of variant OspAs was carried out in E. coli using a T7-based expression system. Circular dichroism and fluorescence studies was carried out on the recombinant B31 PspA yielding evidence supporting a B31 protein containing 11% alpha-helix, 34% antiparallel beta-sheet, 12% parallel beta sheet.

McGrath, B.C.; Dunn, J.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); France, L.L. [Plum Island Animal Disease Center, Greenport, NY (United States); Jaing, W.; Polin, D.; Gorgone, G.; Luft, B.; Dykhuizen, D. [SUNY at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

289

Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of the outer membrane cytochrome OmcA from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The outer membrane cytochrome OmcA functions as a terminal metal reductase in the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. The ten-heme centers shuttle electrons from the transmembrane donor complex to extracellular electron acceptors. Here, the crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of OmcA are reported. Crystals of OmcA were grown by the sitting-drop vapor-diffusion method using PEG 20 000 as a precipitant. The OmcA crystals belonged to space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 93.0, b = 246.0, c = 136.6 A , * = 90, * = 97.8, * = 90*. X-ray diffraction data were collected to a maximum resolution of 3.25 A .

Tomanicek, S. J.; Johs, Alexander; Sawhney, M. S.; Shi, Liang; Liang, L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of the outer membrane cytochrome OmcA from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1  

SciTech Connect

The outer membrane cytochrome OmcA functions as a terminal metal reductase in the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. The ten-heme centers shuttle electrons from the transmembrane donor complex to extracellular electron acceptors. Here, the crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of OmcA are reported. Crystals of OmcA were grown by the sitting-drop vapor-diffusion method using PEG 20 000 as a precipitant. The OmcA crystals belonged to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 93.0, b = 246.0, c = 136.6 {angstrom}, = 90, {beta} = 97.8, {gamma} = 90{sup o}. X-ray diffraction data were collected to a maximum resolution of 3.25 {angstrom}.

Tomanicek, S.J.; Johs, A.; Sawhney, M.S.; Shi, L.; Liang, L. (PNNL); (ORNL)

2012-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

291

THE OUTER DISKS OF EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES. II. SURFACE-BRIGHTNESS PROFILES OF UNBARRED GALAXIES AND TRENDS WITH HUBBLE TYPE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present azimuthally averaged radial profiles of R-band surface brightness for a complete sample of 47 early-type, unbarred galaxies, as a complement to our previous study of early-type barred galaxies. Following very careful sky subtraction, the profiles can typically be determined down to brightness levels well below 27 mag arcsec{sup -2} and in the best cases below 28 mag arcsec{sup -2}. We classified the profiles according to the scheme used previously for the barred sample: Type I profiles are single unbroken exponential radial declines in brightness; Type II profiles ('truncations') have an inner shallow slope (usually exponential) which changes at a well-defined break radius to a steeper exponential; and Type III profiles ('antitruncations') have an inner exponential that is steeper, giving way to a shallower outer (usually exponential) decline. By combining these profiles with previous studies, we can make the first clear statements about the trends of outer-disk-profile types along the Hubble sequence (including both barred and unbarred galaxies), and their global frequencies. We find that Type I profiles are most frequent in early-type disks, decreasing from one-third of all S0-Sa disks to barely 10% of the latest-type spirals. Conversely, Type II profiles (truncations) increase in frequency with Hubble type, from only {approx}25% of S0 galaxies to {approx}80% of Sd-Sm spirals. Overall, the fractions of Type I, II, and III profiles for all disk galaxies (Hubble types S0-Sm) are 21%, 50%, and 38%, respectively; this includes galaxies ({approx}8% of the total) with composite Type II+III profiles (counted twice). Finally, we note the presence of bars in 10 galaxies previously classified (optically) as 'unbarred'. This suggests that {approx}20% of optically unbarred galaxies are actually barred; the bars in such cases can be weak, obscured by dust, or so large as to be mistaken for the main disk of the galaxy.

Gutierrez, Leonel [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Instituto de Astronomia, Ensenada, B. C. (Mexico); Erwin, Peter [Max-Planck-Insitut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, 85748 Garching (Germany); Aladro, Rebeca; Beckman, John E., E-mail: leonel@astrosen.unam.mx, E-mail: r.aladro@ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: jeb@iac.es, E-mail: erwin@mpe.mpg.de [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, Tenerife (Spain)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

292

Binding and Direct Electrochemistry of OmcA, an Outer-Membrane Cytochrome from an Iron Reducing Bacterium, with Oxide Electrodes: A Candidate Biofuel Cell System  

SciTech Connect

Dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria transfer electrons to solid ferric respiratory electron acceptors. Outer-membrane cytochromes expressed by these organisms are of interest in both microbial fuel cells and biofuel cells. We use optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy (OWLS) to show that OmcA, an 85 kDa decaheme outer-membrane c-type cytochrome from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, adsorbs to isostructural Al2O3 and Fe2O3 in similar amounts. Adsorption is ionic-strength and pH dependent (peak adsorption at pH 6.57.0). The thickness of the OmcA layer on Al2O3 at pH 7.0 [5.8 1.1 (2r) nm] from OWLS is similar, within error, to that observed using atomic force microscopy (4.8 2 nm). The highest adsorption density observed was 334 ng cm 2 (2.4 1012 molecules cm 2), corresponding to a monolayer or 9.9 nm diameter spheres or submonolayer coverage by smaller molecules. Direct electrochemistry of OmcA on Fe2O3 electrodes was observed using cyclic voltammetry, with cathodic peak potentials of 380 to 320 mV versus Ag/AgCl. Variations in the cathodic peak positions are speculatively attributed to redox-linked conformation change or changes in molecular orientation. OmcA can exchange electrons with ITO electrodes at higher current densities than with Fe2O3. Overall, OmcA can bind to and exchange electrons with several oxides, and thus its utility in fuel cells is not restricted to Fe2O3.

Eggleston, Carrick M.; Voros, Janos; Shi, Liang; Lower, Brian H.; Droubay, Timothy; Colberg, Patricia J.

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

293

Heat Flow and Gas Hydrates on the Continental Margin of India: Building on Results from NGHP Expedition 01  

SciTech Connect

The Indian National Gas Hydrate Program (NGHP) Expedition 01 presented the unique opportunity to constrain regional heat flow derived from seismic observations by using drilling data in three regions on the continental margin of India. The seismic bottom simulating reflection (BSR) is a well-documented feature in hydrate bearing sediments, and can serve as a proxy for apparent heat flow if data are available to estimate acoustic velocity and density in water and sediments, thermal conductivity, and seafloor temperature. Direct observations of temperature at depth and physical properties of the sediment obtained from drilling can be used to calibrate the seismic observations, decreasing the uncertainty of the seismically-derived estimates. Anomalies in apparent heat flow can result from a variety of sources, including sedimentation, erosion, topographic refraction and fluid flow. We constructed apparent heat flow maps for portions of the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin, the Mahanadi basin, and the Andaman basin and modeled anomalies using 1-D conductive thermal models. Apparent heat flow values in the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin and Mahanadi basin are generally 0.035 to 0.055 watts per square meter (W/m2). The borehole data show an increase in apparent heat flow as water depth increases from 900 to 1500 m. In the SW part of the seismic grid, 1D modeling of the effect of sedimentation on heat flow shows that ~50% of the observed increase in apparent heat flow with increasing water depth can be attributed to trapping of sediments behind a "toe-thrust" ridge that is forming along the seaward edge of a thick, rapidly accumulating deltaic sediment pile. The remainder of the anomaly can be explained either by a decrease in thermal conductivity of the sediments filling the slope basin or by lateral advection of heat through fluid flow along stratigraphic horizons within the basin and through flexural faults in the crest of the anticline. Such flow probably plays a role in bringing methane into the ridge formed by the toe-thrust. Because of the small anomaly due to this process and the uncertainty in thermal conductivity, we did not model this process explicitly. In the NE part of the K-G basin seismic grid, a number of local heat flow lows and highs are observed, which can be attributed to topographic refraction and to local fluid flow along faults, respectively. No regional anomaly can be resolved. Because of lack of continuity between the K-G basin sites within the seismic grid and those ~70 km to the NE in water depths of 1200 to 1500 m, we do not speculate on the reason for higher heat flow at these depths. The Mahanadi basin results, while limited in geographic extent, are similar to those for the KG basin. The Andaman basin exhibits much lower apparent heat flow values, ranging from 0.015 to 0.025 W/m2. Heat flow here also appears to increase with increasing water depth. The very low heat flow here is among the lowest heat flow observed anywhere and gives rise to a very thick hydrate stability zone in the sediments. Through 1D models of sedimentation (with extremely high sedimentation rates as a proxy for tectonic thickening), we concluded that the very low heat flow can probably be attributed to the combined effects of high sedimentation rate, low thermal conductivity, tectonic thickening of sediments and the cooling effect of a subducting plate in a subduction zone forearc. Like for the K-G basin, much of the local variability can be attributed to topography. The regional increase in heat flow with water depth remains unexplained because the seismic grid available to us did not extend far enough to define the local tectonic setting of the slope basin controlling this observational pattern. The results are compared to results from other margins, both active and passive. While an increase in apparent heat flow with increasing water depth is widely observed, it is likely a result of different processes in different places. The very low heat flow due to sedimentation and tectonics in the Andaman basin is at the low end of glob

Trehu, Anne; Kannberg, Peter

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

294

Heat Flow and Gas Hydrates on the Continental Margin of India: Building on Results from NGHP Expedition 01  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Indian National Gas Hydrate Program (NGHP) Expedition 01 presented the unique opportunity to constrain regional heat flow derived from seismic observations by using drilling data in three regions on the continental margin of India. The seismic bottom simulating reflection (BSR) is a well-documented feature in hydrate bearing sediments, and can serve as a proxy for apparent heat flow if data are available to estimate acoustic velocity and density in water and sediments, thermal conductivity, and seafloor temperature. Direct observations of temperature at depth and physical properties of the sediment obtained from drilling can be used to calibrate the seismic observations, decreasing the uncertainty of the seismically-derived estimates. Anomalies in apparent heat flow can result from a variety of sources, including sedimentation, erosion, topographic refraction and fluid flow. We constructed apparent heat flow maps for portions of the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin, the Mahanadi basin, and the Andaman basin and modeled anomalies using 1-D conductive thermal models. Apparent heat flow values in the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin and Mahanadi basin are generally 0.035 to 0.055 watts per square meter (W/m{sup 2}). The borehole data show an increase in apparent heat flow as water depth increases from 900 to 1500 m. In the SW part of the seismic grid, 1D modeling of the effect of sedimentation on heat flow shows that {approx}50% of the observed increase in apparent heat flow with increasing water depth can be attributed to trapping of sediments behind a 'toe-thrust' ridge that is forming along the seaward edge of a thick, rapidly accumulating deltaic sediment pile. The remainder of the anomaly can be explained either by a decrease in thermal conductivity of the sediments filling the slope basin or by lateral advection of heat through fluid flow along stratigraphic horizons within the basin and through flexural faults in the crest of the anticline. Such flow probably plays a role in bringing methane into the ridge formed by the toe-thrust. Because of the small anomaly due to this process and the uncertainty in thermal conductivity, we did not model this process explicitly. In the NE part of the K-G basin seismic grid, a number of local heat flow lows and highs are observed, which can be attributed to topographic refraction and to local fluid flow along faults, respectively. No regional anomaly can be resolved. Because of lack of continuity between the K-G basin sites within the seismic grid and those {approx}70 km to the NE in water depths of 1200 to 1500 m, we do not speculate on the reason for higher heat flow at these depths. The Mahanadi basin results, while limited in geographic extent, are similar to those for the K-G basin. The Andaman basin exhibits much lower apparent heat flow values, ranging from 0.015 to 0.025 W/m{sup 2}. Heat flow here also appears to increase with increasing water depth. The very low heat flow here is among the lowest heat flow observed anywhere and gives rise to a very thick hydrate stability zone in the sediments. Through 1D models of sedimentation (with extremely high sedimentation rates as a proxy for tectonic thickening), we concluded that the very low heat flow can probably be attributed to the combined effects of high sedimentation rate, low thermal conductivity, tectonic thickening of sediments and the cooling effect of a subducting plate in a subduction zone forearc. Like for the K-G basin, much of the local variability can be attributed to topography. The regional increase in heat flow with water depth remains unexplained because the seismic grid available to us did not extend far enough to define the local tectonic setting of the slope basin controlling this observational pattern. The results are compared to results from other margins, both active and passive. While an increase in apparent heat flow with increasing water depth is widely observed, it is likely a result of different processes in different places. The very low heat flow due to sedimentation and tectonics in the Andaman basi

Anne Trehu; Peter Kannberg

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

295

THE HUBBLE WIDE FIELD CAMERA 3 TEST OF SURFACES IN THE OUTER SOLAR SYSTEM: THE COMPOSITIONAL CLASSES OF THE KUIPER BELT  

SciTech Connect

We present the first results of the Hubble Wide Field Camera 3 Test of Surfaces in the Outer Solar System. The purpose of this survey was to measure the surface properties of a large number of Kuiper Belt objects and attempt to infer compositional and dynamical correlations. We find that the Centaurs and the low-perihelion scattered disk and resonant objects exhibit virtually identical bifurcated optical color distributions and make up two well-defined groups of objects. Both groups have highly correlated optical and NIR colors that are well described by a pair of two-component mixture models that have different red components but share a common neutral component. The small, H{sub 606} {approx}> 5.6 high-perihelion excited objects are entirely consistent with being drawn from the two branches of the mixing model, suggesting that the color bifurcation of the Centaurs is apparent in all small excited objects. On the other hand, objects larger than H{sub 606} {approx} 5.6 are not consistent with the mixing model, suggesting some evolutionary process avoided by the smaller objects. The existence of a bifurcation amongst all excited populations argues that the two separate classes of object existed in the primordial disk before the excited Kuiper Belt was populated. The cold classical objects exhibit a different type of surface that has colors that are consistent with being drawn from the red branch of the mixing model, but with much higher albedos.

Fraser, Wesley C.; Brown, Michael E., E-mail: fraserw@gps.caltech.edu [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

296

In Vivo Identification of the Outer Membrane Protein OmcA-MtrC Interaction Network in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Cells Using Novel Hydrophobic Chemical Cross-Linkers  

SciTech Connect

Outer membrane (OM) cytochromes OmcA (SO1779) and MtrC (SO1778) are the integral components of electron transfer used by Shewanella oneidensis for anaerobic respiration of metal (hydr)oxides. Here the OmcA-MtrC interaction was identified in vivo using a novel hydrophobic chemical cross-linker (MRN) combined with immunoprecipitation techniques. In addition, identification of other OM proteins from the cross-linked complexes allows first visualization of the OmcA-MtrC interaction network. Further experiments on omcA and mtrC mutant cells showed OmcA plays a central role in the network interaction. For comparison, two commercial cross-linkers were also used in parallel and both resulted in fewer OM protein identifications, indicating the superior properties of MRN for identification of membrane protein interactions. Finally, comparison experiments of in vivo cross-linking and cell lysate cross-linking resulted in significantly different protein interaction data, demonstrating the importance of in vivo cross-linking for study of protein-protein interactions in cells.

Zhang, Haizhen; Tang, Xiaoting; Munske, Gerhard R.; Zakharova, Natalia L.; Yang, Li; Zheng, Chunxiang; Wolff, Meagan A.; Tolic, Nikola; Anderson, Gordon A.; Shi, Liang; Marshall, Matthew J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Bruce, James E.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Trends for Outer Disk Profiles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The surface-brightness profiles of galaxy disks fall into three main classes, based on whether they are simple exponentials (Type I), bend down at large radii (Type II, "truncations") or bend up at large radii (Type III, "antitruncations"). Here, we discuss how the frequency of these different profiles depends on Hubble type, environment, and the presence or absence of bars; these trends may herald important new tests for disk formation models.

Peter Erwin; Michael Pohlen; Leonel Gutierrez; John E. Beckman

2007-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

298

Outer planet magnetospheres: a tutorial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar wind magnetic fields. This has long been postulated as the ultimate cause of the geomagnetic storm,

Russell, C T

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

First CSDP (Continental Scientific Drilling Program)/thermal regimes core hole project at Valles Caldera, New Mexico (VC-1): Drilling report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a review and summary of the core drilling operations of the first Valles Caldera research borehole (VC-1) under the Thermal Regimes element of the Continental Scientific Drilling Program (CSDP). The project is a portion of a broader program that seeks to answer fundamental scientific questions about magma, rock/water interactions, and volcanology through shallow (<1-km) core holes at Long Valley, California; Salton Sea, California; and the Valles Caldera, New Mexico. The report emphasizes coring operations with reference to the stratigraphy of the core hole, core quality description, core rig specifications, and performance. It is intended to guide future research on the core and in the borehole, as well as have applications to other areas and scientific problems in the Valles Caldera. The primary objectives of this Valles Caldera coring effort were (1) to study the hydrogeochemistry of a subsurface geothermal outflow zone of the caldera near the source of convective upflow, (2) to obtain structural and stratigraphic information from intracaldera rock formations in the southern ring-fracture zone, and (3) to obtain continuous core samples through the youngest volcanic unit in Valles Caldera, the Banco Bonito rhyolite (approximately 0.1 Ma). All objectives were met. The high percentage of core recovery and the excellent quality of the samples are especially notable. New field sample (core) handling and documentation procedures were successfully utilized. The procedures were designed to provide consistent field handling of the samples and logs obtained through the national CSDP.

Rowley, J.; Hawkins, W.; Gardner, J. (comps.)

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, S-band Radar (williams-s_band)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

Christopher Williams

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gom outer continental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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301

Hydrothermal brecciation in the Jemez Fault zone, Valles Caldera, New Mexico: Results from CSDP (Continental Scientific Drilling Program) corehole VC-1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Paleozoic and Precambrian rocks intersected deep in Continental Scientific Drilling Program corehole VC-1, adjacent to the late Cenozoic Valles caldera complex, have been disrupted to form a spectacular breccia sequence. The breccias are of both tectonic and hydrothermal origin, and probably formed in the Jemez fault zone, a major regional structure with only normal displacement since mid-Miocene. Tectonic breccias are contorted, crushed, sheared, and granulated; slickensides are commmon. Hydrothermal breccias, by contrast, lack these frictional textures, but arej commonly characterized by fluidized matrix foliation and prominent clast rounding. Fluid inclusions in the hydrothermal breccias are dominantly two-phase, liquid-rich at room temperature, principally secondary, and form two distinctly different compositional groups. Older inclusions, unrelated to brecciation, are highly saline and homogenize to the liquid phase in the temperature range 189 to 246/sup 0/C. Younger inclusions, in part of interbreccia origin, are low-salinity and homogenize (also to liquid) in the range 230 to 283/sup 0/C. Vapor-rich inclusions locally trapped along with these dilute liquid-rich inclusions document periodic boiling. These fluid-inclusion data, together with alteration assemblages and textures as well as the local geologic history, have been combined to model hydrothermal brecciation at the VC-1 site.

Hulen, J.B.; Nielson, D.L.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Frequency variations of quasi-periodic ELF-VLF emissions: A possible new ground-based diagnostic of the outer high-latitude magnetosphere  

SciTech Connect

Magnetic pulsations and quasi-periodic (QP) amplitude modulations of ELF-VLF waves at Pc 3-4 frequencies (15-50 mHz) are commonly observed simultaneously in cusp-latitude data. The naturally occurring ELF-VLF emissions are believed to be modulated within the magnetosphere by the compressional component of geomagnetic pulsations formed external to the magnetosphere. The authors have examined data from South Pole Station (L {approximately} 14) to determine the occurrence and characteristics of QP emissions. On the basis of 14 months of data during 1987 and 1988 they found that QP emissions typically appeared in both the 0.5-1 kHz and 1-2 kHz receiver channels at South Pole Station and ocassionally in the 2-4 kHz channel. The QP emission frequency appeared to depend on solar wind parameters and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) direction, and the months near fall equinox in both 1987 and 1988 showed a significant increase in the percentage of QP emissions only in the lowest-frequency channel. The authors present a model consistent with these variations in which high-latitude (nonequatorial) magnetic field minima near the magnetopause play a major role, because the field magnitude governs both the frequency of ELF-VLF emissions and the whistler mode propagation cutoffs. Because the field in these regions will be strongly influenced by solar wind and IMF parameters, variations in the frequency of such emissions may be useful in providing ground-based diagnostics of the outer high-latitude magnetosphere. 32 refs., 13 figs.

Alford, J.; Engebretson, M. [Ausburg College, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Arnoldy, R. [Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States); Inan, U. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

The Roles of Advection and In Situ Growth in Determining the Dynamics of Continental Shelf Zooplankton: High Frequency Measurements of Zooplankton Biomass Coupled with Measurements of Secondary Productivity in the Middle Atlantic Bight  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Evaluation of the role of continental margins in planetary carbon cycles can be approached in various ways, with the extremes being knowledge generated either by large-scale studies of a few basic characteristics of the carbon cycle of shelves worldwide (comparative approach) or by temporally intensive studies of a few sites selected to typify contrasting processes. Mechanisms of cross-shelf transfer, for example, are presently of great interest and within the US there are at least four differing continental shelf environments in which cross-shelf processes are driven by storms (southern Bering Sea, northeastern US), by jets and eddies (northern California coast), by freshwater runoff (Bering Sea, Gulf of Mexico), and by frontal meanders and filaments of the Gulf Stream (southeastern US). Because the type and magnitude of the physical forcing, and its variability on an annual scale, are fundamental to the response of the carbon cycle, investigation of each of these shelves would offer insight useful to predictive global understanding of the carbon cycle on continental shelves.

Smith, Sharon L.

1999-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

304

Geochemical assessment of gaseous hydrocarbons: mixing of bacterial and thermogenic methane in the deep subsurface petroleum system, Gulf of Mexico continental slope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mixtures of bacterial and thermogenic methane are found both at vents at the seafloor and in reservoirs in the deep subsurface of the Gulf of Mexico continental slope. The C1-C5 gas that most recently charged reservoirs of Jolliet (GC 184), Genesis (GC 160/161) and Petronius (VK 786) fields is estimated to include 17%-28%, 31%-51%, 31%-49% bacterial methane, respectively. Geochemical assessment of the reservoir gas in the fields show that the gas may be the product of thermal cracking of Upper Jurassic crude oil before final migration to the reservoirs. The gas from three different fields is of similar thermal maturity levels. In contrast to oil in reservoirs in the fields, which shows biodegradation effects, the C1-C5 reservoir gas is unaltered by biodegradation. Late gas migration may have occurred at or near present burial depth and flushed the reservoir system of previously biodegraded hydrocarbon gas to include any previous bacterial methane. Molecular and isotopic properties of reservoir gas and oil suggest that bacterial methane mixed with thermogenic hydrocarbon gas before entering the reservoirs. Thus the source of the bacterial methane is logically deeper than the present depth (>~4 km) and temperatures of the reservoirs. High sedimentation rate and low geothermal gradient may offer conditions favorable for generation and preservation of bacterial methane in deep subsurface petroleum system of the Gulf slope. Bacterial methane dispersed across the large drainage areas of the deep subsurface petroleum system may have been swept by migrating fluids at >4 km, and then charged both vents (GC 185, GC 233 and GC 286) at the seafloor and reservoirs in the deep subsurface. The volume of bacterial methane from geologically significant depth in rapidly subsiding basins may be underestimated.

Ozgul, Ercin

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Bibliography and Literature Database, Ecology of the Southern California Bight  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

outer continental shelf; oil and gas exploration; Fischer;DC . Descriptors: oil and gas exploration; environmentalE&P, Inc. Exploration activities State oil and gas leases

Allen, L

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

U  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FR 9388; 2813). DOEEIS-0470 Department of Energy Loan Guarantee to Support the Cape Wind Energy Project on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) off Massachusetts, in Nantucket...

307

Statement by Secretary W. Bodman on Senate Passage of S. 3711...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

will help strengthen our nation's energy security by expanding the development of crude oil and natural gas reserves along our Outer Continental Shelf. "Just by going to the...

308

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Convective processes play a critical role in the Earth's energy balance through the redistribution of heat and moisture in the atmosphere and their link to the hydrological cycle. Accurate representation of convective processes in numerical models is vital towards improving current and future simulations of Earths climate system. Despite improvements in computing power, current operational weather and global climate models are unable to resolve the natural temporal and spatial scales important to convective processes and therefore must turn to parameterization schemes to represent these processes. In turn, parameterization schemes in cloud-resolving models need to be evaluated for their generality and application to a variety of atmospheric conditions. Data from field campaigns with appropriate forcing descriptors have been traditionally used by modelers for evaluating and improving parameterization schemes.

Mike Jensen; Mary Jane Bartholomew; Anthony Del Genio; Scott Giangrande; Pavlos Kollias

2012-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

309

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Convective processes play a critical role in the Earth's energy balance through the redistribution of heat and moisture in the atmosphere and their link to the hydrological cycle. Accurate representation of convective processes in numerical models is vital towards improving current and future simulations of Earths climate system. Despite improvements in computing power, current operational weather and global climate models are unable to resolve the natural temporal and spatial scales important to convective processes and therefore must turn to parameterization schemes to represent these processes. In turn, parameterization schemes in cloud-resolving models need to be evaluated for their generality and application to a variety of atmospheric conditions. Data from field campaigns with appropriate forcing descriptors have been traditionally used by modelers for evaluating and improving parameterization schemes.

Mike Jensen; Mary Jane Bartholomew; Anthony Del Genio; Scott Giangrande; Pavlos Kollias

310

Shallow water flow is a serious drilling hazard encoun-tered across several areas of the Gulf of Mexico (GoM).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

question: "How does fresh- water come to be near the seafloor in deepwater areas of the Gulf of Mexico extending from onshore to offshore. This option is not generally accepted by experienced Gulf of MexicoShallow water flow is a serious drilling hazard encoun- tered across several areas of the Gulf

Texas at Austin, University of

311

NOAA/NMFS Developments NOAA Funds Major Alaskan Marine Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from outer continental shelf oil and gas exploration and development. RESEARCH CONTINUED ON OIL impacts of oil exploration and development activities on Alaska's outer continental shelf. BASELINE University (OSU) at Corvallis to contin ue research on the effects of oil spills on fish, shellfish, marine

312

Role of Outer Membrane C-Type Cytochromes MtrC and OmcA in Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1 Cell Production, Accumulation, and Detachment During Respiration on Hematite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solid phase iron oxides are considered to be important terminal electron acceptors for microbial respiration in many anoxic environments. Besides the knowledge that cells attach to and reduce these substrates, other aspects of surface-associated cell behavior and the related cell surface components that influence cell-mineral interactions are not well understood. In the present study, wild-type cells of the dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 formed thin biofilms one-to-two cell layers in thickness when respiring on natural specular hematite under flow conditions similar to those which exist in aquatic sediments and subsurface environments. The distribution of cells within the biofilm indicated that direct contact was not required for electron transfer from cells to the mineral surface. Detached biomass in the form of single cells represented >99% of the surface-associated wild-type cell production from respiration on hematite over the biofilm life cycle. A mutant deficient in the outer membrane c35 type cytochrome OmcA, while still able to respire and replicate on hematite, established a lower steady-state cell density on the mineral surface than that of the wild-type strain. A mutant deficient in MtrC, another outer membrane c-type cytochrome, and a mutant deficient in both cytochromes were unable to reduce sufficient amounts of hematite to support detectable growth on the mineral surface. When considered in the context of previous work, the results support a growing body of evidence that the relative importance of OmcA and MtrC to cell respiration and replication depends on the form of iron oxide available as terminal electron acceptor.

Mitchell, Andrew C.; Peterson, L.; Reardon, Catherine L.; Reed, Samantha B.; Culley, David E.; Romine, Margaret F.; Geesey, Gill G.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

The solar wind in the outer heliosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The solar wind evolves as it moves outward due to interactions with both itself and with the circum-heliospheric interstellar medium. The speed is, on average, constant out to 30 AU, then starts a slow decrease due to the ...

Richardson, John D.

314

Exploring the Outer Limits of Numerical Relativity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We perform several black-hole binary evolutions using fully nonlinear numerical relativity techniques at separations large enough that low-order post-Newtonian expansions are expected to be accurate. As a case study, we evolve an equal-mass nonspinning black-hole binary from a quasicircular orbit at an initial coordinate separation of D=100M for three different resolutions. We find that the orbital period of this binary (in the numerical coordinates) is T=6422M. The orbital motion agrees with post-Newtonian predictions to within 1%. Interestingly, we find that the time derivative of the coordinate separation is dominated by a purely gauge effect leading to an apparent contraction and expansion of the orbit at twice the orbital frequency. Based on these results, we improved our evolution techniques and studied a set of black hole binaries in quasi-circular orbits starting at D=20M, D=50M, and D=100M for ~ 5, 3, and 2 orbits, respectively. We find good agreement between the numerical results and post-Newtonian predictions for the orbital frequency and radial decay rate, radiated energy and angular momentum, and waveform amplitude and phases. The results are relevant for the future computation of long-term waveforms to assist in the detection and analysis of gravitational waves by the next generation of detectors as well as the long-term simulations of black-hole binaries required to accurately model astrophysically realistic circumbinary accretion disks.

Carlos O. Lousto; Yosef Zlochower

2013-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

315

Standing Stocks and Faunal Zonation of Deep-Sea Benthos: Patterns and Predictions across Scales  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The deep ocean (> 200-m depth) covers more than 65 percent of earth's surface and is known as the largest active carbon sink of the planet. Photosynthesis fixes inorganic carbon into organic rich-compounds to fuel the biological production in the upper ocean. A small portion of the photosynthetic carbon eventually sinks to the seafloor to support diverse deep-sea life. In this dissertation, the phytoplankton production and export flux of particulate organic carbon (POC) to the seafloor were linked to standing stocks and compositional changes of the deep-sea soft bottom assemblages. The pattern and processes of energy transfer from the surface ocean to the deep sea was examined by modeling the global benthic bacteria, meiofauna, macrofauna, and megafauna biomass from remotely sensed ocean color images and the seafloor relief. The analysis was then scaled down to the macrofauna of the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) to examine the global pattern on regional oceanic features with contrasting productivity regimes. These results suggested a universal decline of benthic standing stocks down the continental margins that is caused by an exponential decrease of export POC flux with depth. A revisit of historical epibenthic invertebrate sampling in the North Atlantic showed that both individual species and multi-species assemblages occurred in narrow depth bands that hugged the topography from the upper continental slope out to the Hatteras Abyssal Plain. The continuum compositional change suggested that the continuous decline of benthic food supply with depth was the potential driving force for the pattern of bathymetric faunal zonation. A broad, systematic survey across multiple depth transects in the northern GoM suggested that macrofauna zonation is not only taking place across isobaths, but also form the northeast to the northwest GoM due to a horizontal productivity gradient created by the nutrient-laden Mississippi River. Analyses of long-term demersal fish data from 1964 to 2002 in the northern GoM showed no evidence of large-scale faunal change across different sampling times. Base on the pooled data, a shift in rate of fish species replacement may be caused by complex biological interactions or changes in environmental heterogeneity along depth or productivity gradients.

Wei, Chih-Lin

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment Science...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

aircraft will fly above and within the clouds while radar systems scan through the storm from multiple locations. At the same time, additional ground-based instruments will...

317

Iron isotopic fractionation during continental weathering  

SciTech Connect

The biological activity on continents and the oxygen content of the atmosphere determine the chemical pathways through which Fe is processed at the Earth's surface. Experiments have shown that the relevant chemical pathways fractionate Fe isotopes. Measurements of soils, streams, and deep-sea clay indicate that the {sup 56}Fe/{sup 54}Fe ratio ({delta}{sup 56}Fe relative to igneous rocks) varies from +1{per_thousand} for weathering residues like soils and clays, to -3{per_thousand} for dissolved Fe in streams. These measurements confirm that weathering processes produce substantial fractionation of Fe isotopes in the modern oxidizing Earth surface environment. The results imply that biologically-mediated processes, which preferentially mobilize light Fe isotopes, are critical to Fe chemistry in weathering environments, and that the {delta}{sup 56}Fe of marine dissolved Fe should be variable and negative. Diagenetic reduction of Fe in marine sediments may also be a significant component of the global Fe isotope cycle. Iron isotopes provide a tracer for the influence of biological activity and oxygen in weathering processes through Earth history. Iron isotopic fractionation during weathering may have been smaller or absent in an oxygen-poor environment such as that of the early Precambrian Earth.

Fantle, Matthew S.; DePaolo, Donald J.

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Pycnobathic Currents over the Upper Continental Slope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamic interaction of a sloping seafloor with along-isobath density variation is calculated for cases involving a sharp pycnocline and a surface-to-bottom front. Pycnocline depth is supposed to vary in the alongshore direction only, over a ...

G. T. Csanady

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Diagnosis of Multiyear Predictability on Continental Scales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new statistical optimization method is used to identify components of surface air temperature and precipitation on six continents that are predictable in multiple climate models on multiyear time scales. The components are identified from ...

Liwei Jia; Timothy DelSole

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of large methane hydrate resources in the U.S. Outer Continental Shelf. According to the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE), the information will be...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gom outer continental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

GPS constraints on continental deformation in the Africa-Arabia-Eurasia continental collision zone and implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and eastern Anatolia (Turkey), the southwestern Aegean/Peloponnesus, the Lesser Caucasus, and Central Iran shortening along the Caucasus and Zagros mountain belts around the periphery of the collision zone Survey for Seismic Protection, Yerevan, Armenia. 7 Joint Stock Company ``Airgeodetic'', Tbilisi, Georgia

Vernant, Philippe

322

File:BOEMRE OCS.oil.gas.2007-12.map.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OCS.oil.gas.2007-12.map.pdf OCS.oil.gas.2007-12.map.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil & Gas Leasing Program 2007 - 2012 Size of this preview: 700 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(5,250 × 4,500 pixels, file size: 1.39 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil & Gas Leasing Program 2007 - 2012 Sources Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement (BOEMRE) Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2008-09-12 Extent Continental US plus Alaska Countries United States UN Region Northern America US Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil & Gas Leasing Program 2007 - 2012. Includes Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico, Pacific and Alaska Regions.Shows existing leases, areas available for leasing, areas withdrawn from leasing,

323

Property:File/Description | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Description Description Jump to: navigation, search Property Name File/Description Property Type Text Description Description of the file's contents/purpose. Pages using the property "File/Description" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A Australia-Solar-Map.png + Average Daily Solar Exposure: Australia B BOEMRE OCS.oil.gas.2007-12.map.pdf + Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil & Gas Leasing Program 2007 - 2012 BOEMRE US.CSB.Map.pdf + US Continental Shelf Boundary (CSB) Areas BOEMRE US.CSB.bathy.map.pdf + Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Boundary Areas, in color BOEMRE atlantic.OCS.multiple.use.map.2003.pdf + Multiple Uses of the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf BOEMRE lease.platforms.santa.barb.map.5.2010.pdf + Federal Leases in Pacific Ocean, near Santa Maria Basin

324

Placing outer space : an earthly ethnography of other worlds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation concerns the role of place in scientific practice. Ideas of place, I argue, shape and are shaped by science. I specifically look at the community of planetary scientists who, though they cannot step foot ...

Messeri, Lisa Rebecca

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Chemistry and line emission of outer protoplanetary disks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The structure and chemistry of protoplanetary disks depends strongly on the nature of the central star around which it has formed. The dust temperature is mainly set by the stellar luminosity, while the chemistry of the upper disk layers depends on the amount of intercepted UV and X-ray flux. We will study the differences in chemistry, thermal sturcture and line emission around Herbig Ae/Be, T Tauri stars and low mass M dwarfs. Predictions will be made for future observations with SOFIA and Herschel.

Inga Kamp; Cornelis P. Dullemond; Michiel Hogerheijde; Jesus Emilio Enriquez

2005-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

326

Dynamic processes in the outer heliosphere: voyager observations and models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Res. 105, 2337, 2000. Wang, C., Richardson, J.D. Energy partition between solar wind protons of 70 AU. The character of the solar wind plasma data between 2002 and 2003 changed to a regime in which the speed, density and magnetic field magnitude are positively correlated. The average speed of the solar

Richardson, John

327

An Outer-Inner Approximation for separable MINLPs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1, we give the number of customers and location in each instances and either the total CPU time to solve the instance or, if the instance could not be solved...

328

An Outer-Inner Approximation for separable MINLPs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Table 1, we present the main characteristics of each instance (number of customers and location) and for each method the total CPU time to solve the instance...

329

Outer Banks Ocean Energy Corporation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

28370 Sector Wind energy Product Privately-held company that plans to develop a 200-600MW offshore wind farm in federal lease blocks near North Carolina's barrier islands, known as...

330

General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of Waste Package Outer Barrier  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Alloy 22 is an extremely Corrosion Resistant Material, with a very stable passive film. Based upon exposures in the LTCTF, the GC rates of Alloy 22 are typically below the level of detection, with four outliers having reported rates up to 0.75 #mu#m per year. In any event, over the 10,000 year life of the repository, GC of the Alloy 22 (assumed to be 2 cm thick) should not be life limiting. Because measured corrosion potentials are far below threshold potentials, localized breakdown of the passive film is unlikely under plausible conditions, even in SSW at 120 deg C. The pH in ambient-temperature crevices formed from Alloy 22 have been determined experimentally, with only modest lowering of the crevice pH observed under plausible conditions. Extreme lowering of the crevice pH was only observed under situations where the applied potential at the crevice mouth was sufficient to result in catastrophic breakdown of the passive film above the threshold potential in non-buffered conditions not characteristic of the Yucca Mountain environment. In cases where naturally ocurring buffers are present in the crevice solution, little or no lowering of the pH was observed, even with significant applied potential. With exposures of twelve months, no evidence of crevice corrosion has been observed in SDW, SCW and SAW at temperatures up to 90 deg C. An abstracted model has been presented, with parameters determined experimentally, that should enable performance assessment to account for the general and localized corrosion of this material. A feature of this model is the use of the materials specification to limit the range of corrosion and threshold potentials, thereby making sure that substandard materials prone to localized attack are avoided. Model validation will be covered in part by a companion SMR on abstraction of this model.

Farmer, J.C.; McCright, R.D.

2000-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

331

NOT FOR CIRCULATION OUTSIDE OF ENERGY INC.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the U.S. offshore Gulf of Mexico (GOM) oil and gas province has matured, the exploration and production industry has pushed into deeper waters supported by technology advances and the growing awareness that the GOM represents one of the most important supply areas for hydrocarbons. This case presents an analysis of GOM deepwater development from the perspective of our virtual company, Energy Inc., a company that was faced with developing an entry strategy for the GOM deepwater in 1998. It includes an overview of GOM trends and incorporates specific U.S. energy policy questions, as outlined below. Should the U.S., through its federal Minerals Management Service (MMS), an agency of the Department of Interior, provide incentives for risk taking in GOM deepwater blocks through royalty relief? How should expensive transportation infrastructure investments be made to deliver GOM production to shore and under what policy and regulatory framework?

unknown authors

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

File:BOEMRE atlantic.OCS.multiple.use.map.2003.pdf | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

atlantic.OCS.multiple.use.map.2003.pdf atlantic.OCS.multiple.use.map.2003.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Multiple Uses of the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf Size of this preview: 550 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(4,958 × 5,408 pixels, file size: 3.06 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Multiple Uses of the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf Sources Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement (BOEMRE) Related Technologies Offshore wind Creation Date 2003-10 Extent Northeast coast of US Countries United States UN Region Northern America States Maryland, Delaware, New Jersey, New York, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Massachusetts Map published in October 2003 by the BOEMRE illustrating multiple uses of the outer continental shelf of the Atlantic Ocean, in the region between

333

NREL GIS Data: Continental United States Photovoltaic High Resolution |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Photovoltaic High Resolution Photovoltaic High Resolution Dataset Summary Description Abstract: Monthly and annual average solar resource potential for 48 Contiguous United States. Purpose: Provide information on the solar resource potential for the 48 contiguous states. Supplemental_Information: This data provides monthly average and annual average daily total solar resource averaged over surface cells of 0.1 degrees in both latitude and longitude, or about 10 km in size. This data was developed using the State University of New York/Albany satellite radiation model. This model was developed by Dr. Richard Perez and collaborators at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and other universities for the U.S. Department of Energy. Specific information about this model can be found in Perez, et al. (2002). This model uses hourly radiance images from geostationary weather satellites, daily snow cover data, and monthly averages of atmospheric water vapor, trace gases, and the amount of aerosols in the atmosphere to calculate the hourly total insolation (sun and sky) falling on a horizontal surface. Atmospheric water vapor, trace gases, and aerosols are derived from a variety of sources. The procedures for converting the collector at latitude tilt are described in Marion and Wilcox (1994). Where possible, existing ground measurement stations are used to validate the data. Nevertheless, there is uncertainty associated with the meterological input to the model, since some of the input parameters are not avalable at a 10km resolution. As a result, it is believed that the modeled values are accurate to approximately 10% of a true measured value within the grid cell. Due to terrain effects and other micoclimate influences, the local cloud cover can vary significantly even within a single grid cell. Furthermore, the uncertainty of the modeled estimates increase with distance from reliable measurement sources and with the complexity of the terrain.

334

NREL GIS Data: Continental United States High Resolution Concentrating  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

High Resolution Concentrating High Resolution Concentrating Solar Power Dataset Summary Description Abstract: Monthly and annual average solar resource potential for the lower 48 states of the United States of America. Purpose: Provide information on the solar resource potential for the for the lower 48 states of the United States of America. Supplemental_Information: This data provides monthly average and annual average daily total solar resource averaged over surface cells of approximatley 40 km by 40 km in size. This data was developed from the Climatological Solar Radiation (CSR) Model. The CSR model was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy. Specific information about this model can be found in Maxwell, George and Wilcox (1998) and George and Maxwell (1999). This model uses information on cloud cover, atmostpheric water vapor and trace gases, and the amount of aerosols in the atmosphere to calculate the monthly average daily total insolation (sun and sky) falling on a horizontal surface. The cloud cover data used as input to the CSR model are an 7-year histogram (1985-1991) of monthly average cloud fraction provided for grid cells of approximately 40km x 40km in size. Thus, the spatial resolution of the CSR model output is defined by this database. The data are obtained from the National Climatic Data Center in Ashville, North Carolina, and were developed from the U.S. Air Force Real Time Nephanalysis (RTNEPH) program. Atmospheric water vapor, trace gases, and aerosols are derived from a variety of sources. The procedures for converting the collector at latitude tilt are described in Marion and Wilcox (1994). Where possible, existing ground measurement stations are used to validate the data. Nevertheless, there is uncertainty associated with the meterological input to the model, since some of the input parameters are not avalible at a 40km resolution. As a result, it is believed that the modeled values are accurate to approximately 10% of a true measured value within the grid cell. Due to terrain effects and other micoclimate influences, the local cloud cover can vary significantly even within a single grid cell. Furthermore, the uncertainty of the modeled estimates increase with distance from reliable measurement sources and with the complexity of the terrain.

335

Continental rifting across the Southern Gulf of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

earthquake in the Aleutian Islands . . . . . . . . . .from a 4.4 Ms event in the Aleutian Islands- both OSN1 and4.4 Ms shallow earthquake in the Aleutian Islands. Location

Sutherland, Fiona Helen

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Multimedia from the U.S. Extended Continental Shelf Project  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

This website provides images, videos, graphics, and maps illustrating concepts and events related to the project.

337

Simulating Continental Surface Waters: An Application to Holocene Northern Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model (SWAM) to predict surface waters (lakes and wetlands) on the scale of atmospheric general circulation models is developed. SWAM is based on a linear reservoir hydrologic model and is driven by runoff, precipitation, evaporation, ...

Michael T. Coe

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Sensitivity Studies on the Continentality of a Numerically Simulated Cumulonimbus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cloud model of Tripoli and Cotton was used to simulate a cumulonimbus cloud observed during the Cooperative Convective Precipitation Experiment (CCOPE). We tested the sensitivity of the precipitation pathways in the model to the initial ...

R. Banta; K. R. Hanson

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

the continental crust or the over-lying sediments. Microorganisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-floor hot springs dotting the ridge crests in 1979, microbes were obviously a crucial part of it. More oceanographer put it. On closer inspection, microbiologist Craig Taylor of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Lovley, Derek

340

Observation and Theory of the Diurnal Continental Thermal Tide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Harmonic analysis of summer Automated Surface Observing System (ASOS) data over North America shows sun-following diurnal temperature and pressure oscillations with amplitudes increasing in the western United States (i.e., 58 K and 60120 hPa, ...

Yanping Li; Ronald B. Smith

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gom outer continental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Small-Scale Variability in Warm Continental Cumulus Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have analyzed small-scale fluctuations in microphysical, dynamical and thermodynamical parameters measured in two warm cumulus clouds during the Cooperative Convective Precipitation Experiment (CCOPE) project (1981) in light of predictions of ...

P. H. Austin; M. B. Baker; A. M. Blyth; J. B. Jensen

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Continental Shelf Research 26 (2006) 194--205  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The benthic communities of the deep insular shelf at the Hind Bank marine conservation district (MCD), an important spawning aggregation site for groupers, were studied with the Seabed autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) at depths between 32 and 54 m. Four digital phototransects provided data on benthic species composition and abundance of the insular shelf off St. Thomas, US Virgin Islands. Within the western side of the MCD, well-developed coral reefs with 43% mean living coral cover were found. The Montastrea annularis complex was dominant at all four sites between 33 and 47 m, the depth range where reefs were present. Maximum coral cover found was 70% at depths of 38--40 m. Quantitative determinations of sessile benthic populations, as well as the presence of motile megabenthic invertebrates and algae were obtained. The Seabed AUV provided new quantitative and descriptive information of a unique coral reef habitat found within this deeper insular shelf area.

Characterizing The Deep; Roy A. Armstrong A; Hanumant Singh B; Juan Torres A; Richard S. Nemeth C; Ali Can B; Chris Roman B; Ryan Eustice B; Lauren Riggs D; Graciela Garcia-moliner A

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

The world's offshore continental margins contain vast reserves of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- ural gas that is embedded in cold, near-seafloorstrata.Published esti- mates suggest that the energy rep- resented by gas hydrate may exceed the energy available from conventional fossil fuel by a fac energy planning. Groups in several nations are attemptingtoevaluatetheresource and to define seafloor

Texas at Austin, University of

344

Continental and Oceanographic Data Information CODIS version 1.0  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.5 Chlorophenolics A suite of 43 chlorophenolic compounds consisting of chlorinated phenols, guaiacols, catechols range from non-hydrophobic (log Kow 0.88 for catechols) to moderately hydrophobic (log Kow 5

345

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds (comstock-hvps)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Convective processes play a critical role in the Earth's energy balance through the redistribution of heat and moisture in the atmosphere and their link to the hydrological cycle. Accurate representation of convective processes in numerical models is vital towards improving current and future simulations of Earths climate system. Despite improvements in computing power, current operational weather and global climate models are unable to resolve the natural temporal and spatial scales important to convective processes and therefore must turn to parameterization schemes to represent these processes. In turn, parameterization schemes in cloud-resolving models need to be evaluated for their generality and application to a variety of atmospheric conditions. Data from field campaigns with appropriate forcing descriptors have been traditionally used by modelers for evaluating and improving parameterization schemes.

Mike Jensen; Jennifer Comstock; Anthony Del Genio; Scott Giangrande; Pavlos Kollias

346

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds (comstock-hvps)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Convective processes play a critical role in the Earth's energy balance through the redistribution of heat and moisture in the atmosphere and their link to the hydrological cycle. Accurate representation of convective processes in numerical models is vital towards improving current and future simulations of Earths climate system. Despite improvements in computing power, current operational weather and global climate models are unable to resolve the natural temporal and spatial scales important to convective processes and therefore must turn to parameterization schemes to represent these processes. In turn, parameterization schemes in cloud-resolving models need to be evaluated for their generality and application to a variety of atmospheric conditions. Data from field campaigns with appropriate forcing descriptors have been traditionally used by modelers for evaluating and improving parameterization schemes.

Mike Jensen; Jennifer Comstock; Anthony Del Genio; Scott Giangrande; Pavlos Kollias

2012-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

347

The Unpredictable Nature of Internal Tides on Continental Shelves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Packets of nonlinear internal waves (NLIWs) in a small area of the Mid-Atlantic Bight were 10 times more energetic during a local neap tide than during the preceding spring tide. This counterintuitive result cannot be explained if the waves are ...

Jonathan D. Nash; Samuel M. Kelly; Emily L. Shroyer; James N. Moum; Timothy F. Duda

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Continental-Scale Simulation of the Antarctic Katabatic Wind Regime  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Katabatic winds are a common feature of the lower Antarctic atmosphere. Although these drainage flows are quite shallow, there is increasing evidence that the low-level circulations are an important component in establishing large-scale ...

Thomas R. Parish; David H. Bromwich

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Continentality of the South Florida Summertime CCN Aerosol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) were obtained in the south Florida region as part of NOAA's Florida Area Cumulus Experiment (FACE). During the summer of 1975, CCN measurements were obtained near the bases of cumulus clouds by ...

Robert I. Sax; James G. Hudson

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Continental-Scale River Flow in Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The hydrologic cycle is a major part of the global climate system. There is an atmospheric flux of water from the ocean surface to the continents. The cycle is closed by return flow in rivers. In this paper a river routing model is developed to ...

James R. Miller; Gary L. Russell; Guilherme Caliri

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Infrared Continental Surface Emissivity Spectra Retrieved from AIRS Hyperspectral Sensor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS; NASA Aqua platform) observations over land are interpreted in terms of monthly mean surface emissivity spectra at a resolution of 0.05 ?m and skin temperature. For each AIRS observation, an estimation of the ...

E. Pquignot; A. Chdin; N. A. Scott

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

NREL GIS Data: Continental United States Photovoltaic Low Resolution...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the uncertainty of the modeled estimates increase with distance from reliable measurement sources and with the complexity of the terrain. Units are in kilowatt hours...

353

NREL GIS Data: Continental United States Photovoltaic Low Resolution...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the uncertainty of the modeled estimates increase with distance from reliable measurement sources and with the complexity of the terrain. Further information can be...

354

NREL GIS Data: Continental United States Photovoltaic Low Resolution  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the uncertainty of the modeled estimates increase with distance from reliable measurement sources and with the complexity of the terrain.
Further information can...

355

NREL GIS Data: Continental United States Photovoltaic Low Resolution  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the uncertainty of the modeled estimates increase with distance from reliable measurement sources and with the complexity of the terrain. Units are in kilowatt hours...

356

Vorticity and Instability during Flow Reversals on the Continental Shelf  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flow reversals during relaxation of the equatorward wind on the northern California shelf are studied with observations and a simple numerical model. Data from the CODE experiment are used to document the changes in the cross-shelf profiles of ...

Uwe Send

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Fuel Economy of the 2013 Bentley Continental GTC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Version of This Page Compare Side-by-Side 12 cyl, 6.0 L Automatic (S6) Premium Gas or E85 FFV EPA Fuel Economy Miles per Gallon Personalize Premium Gas 14 Combined 11 City 19...

358

Fuel Economy of the 2013 Bentley Continental Supersports Convertible  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Version of This Page Compare Side-by-Side 12 cyl, 6.0 L Automatic (S6) Premium Gas or E85 FFV EPA Fuel Economy Miles per Gallon Personalize Premium Gas 14 Combined 12 City 19...

359

Fuel Economy of the 2013 Bentley Continental GT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Version of This Page Compare Side-by-Side 12 cyl, 6.0 L Automatic (S6) Premium Gas or E85 FFV EPA Fuel Economy Miles per Gallon Personalize Premium Gas 14 Combined 12 City 19...

360

book review: A truly colourful inter?continental tropical kaleidoscope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

contrasttosomeeditedbooks,thisreadslikea coherentoutfeatures ofthisbook,though,isthatthebread?and?toscience thatmakesthebookallthemoreenjoyable.

Sheil, Douglas

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gom outer continental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Optimal adaptive sampling for continental shelf acoustic forecasting.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shallow water acoustic propagation variability is driven by bathymetry and geo?acoustic and oceanographic variabilities. At the shelf?break

Kevin D. Heaney

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Evaluation of Global Satellite Rainfall Products over Continental Europe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An extensive evaluation of two global-scale high-resolution satellite rainfall products is performed using 8 yr (200310) of reference rainfall data derived from a network of rain gauges over Europe. The comparisons are performed at a daily ...

Dimitrios Stampoulis; Emmanouil N. Anagnostou

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

NREL GIS Data: Continental United States Photovoltaic High Resolution  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

data, and monthly averages of atmospheric water vapor, trace gases, and the amount of aerosols in the atmosphere to calculate the hourly total insolation (sun and sky) falling on a...

364

NREL GIS Data: Continental United States High Resolution Concentrating  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

on cloud cover, atmostpheric water vapor and trace gases, and the amount of aerosols in the atmosphere to calculate the monthly average daily total insolation (sun and...

365

What Controls the Vertical Extent of Continental Shallow Cumulus...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

what controls the vertical extent of shallow cumulus. Higher boundary-layer relative humidity is found on thick-cloud days, associated with large-scale moisture advection before...

366

Norway's natural gas exports to continental Europe fell in spring ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

367

CHAPTER 5 MANDATORY & DISCRETIONARY FuNDS COAStAl ZONE MANAGEMENt FUND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and result- ing economic loss caused by obstructions related to oil and gas exploration, development the impacts from Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) oil and gas production. Congress appropriated $150 are derived from fees collected by the Secretary of the Interior from the holders of leases, exploration

368

NOAAINMFS Developments Arctic Marine Research Contracts Awarded  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on tunal porpoise, and the economic and biolog- August 1977 pacts of gas and oil exploration pre- dict the probable ecological impacts of oil and gas development on Alaska's outer continental mammals, and birds, and smaller organisms which oc- cupy the two Arctic coastal areas prior to oil and gas

369

Indicators of the direct economic impacts due to oil and gas development in the Gulf of Nexico: results of year 1. Volume 2. Narrative  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study investigated the direct employment and salary impacts of oil and gas activities on the Federal Outer Continental Shelf in the Gulf of Mexico during 1984. The study also documented the geographic distribution of these impacts. Primary data for the study was provided by nine major oil and gas operations in the Gulf of Mexico and by several contractors to these companies.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Indicators of the direct economic impacts due to oil and gas development in the Gulf of Mexico: results of year 1. Volume 1. Executive summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study investigated the direct employment and salary impacts of oil and gas activities on the Federal Outer Continental Shelf in the Gulf of Mexico during 1984. The study also documented the geographic distribution of these impacts. Primary data for the study were provided by nine major oil and gas operations in the Gulf of Mexico and by several contractors to these companies.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Indicators of the direct economic impacts due to oil and gas development in the Gulf of Mexico: results of year 1. Volume 3. Exhibits and data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study investigated the direct employment and salary impacts of oil and gas activities on the Federal Outer Continental Shelf in the Gulf of Mexico during 1984. The study also documented the geographic distribution of these impacts. Primary data for this study were provided by nine major oil and gas operations in the Gulf of Mexico and by several contractors to these companies.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

WRITTEN STATEMENT OF JANE LUBCHENCO, Ph.D.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to monitor the effects of the oil spill on Louisiana's coastal marshes and fishery species. · NOAA's National ON "OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF OIL AND GAS STRATEGY AND IMPLICATIONS OF THE DEEPWATER HORIZON RIG EXPLOSION oil spill. My name is Dr. Jane Lubchenco and I am the Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans

373

Constraints to leasing and development of federal resources: OCS oil and gas and geothermal. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chapter I identifies possible technological, economic, and environmental constraints to geothermal resource development. Chapter II discusses constraints relative to outer continental shelf and geothermal resources. General leasing information for each resource is detailed. Chapter III summarizes the major studies relating to development constraints. 37 refs. (PSB)

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The northern GOM is a prolific hydrocarbon province where rapid migration of oil, gases, and brines from deep subsurface petroleum reservoirs occurs through faults...

375

Estimating Gas Production from a Cut Off Survey  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Test files have been generated for several areas for the initial model development and testing. Test files for Texas, Oklahoma, GOM, New Mexico, Louisiana, ...

376

Cracking in Other Material Systems - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 11, 2012 ... Program Organizers: Ramgopal Thodla, DNV Columbus; Suresh Divi, TIMET; Sai Venkateswaran, BP America Inc., E&P GoM Production

377

Abbreviations  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Department of Energy EIA Energy Information Administration, U.S. Department of Energy FERC Federal Energy Regulatory Commission GOM Gulf of Mexico LNG Liquefied natural gas Mcf...

378

3-5-09_Final_Testimony_(EIA)_(Gruenspecht).pdf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

feet in the Pacific, and 21 trillion cubic feet in the Eastern GOM. Assumptions about exploration, development, and production of economical fields, such as drilling schedules,...

379

Environmnentally Assisted Cracking in O&G - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 10, 2012... TIMET; Sai Venkateswaran, BP America Inc., E&P GoM Production ... State University; 2Shell International Exploration and Production, Inc.

380

CX-007493: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-007493: Categorical Exclusion Determination GoM Miocene Carbon Dioxide Site Characterization Mega Transect: High-Resolution 3-dimensional Seismic...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gom outer continental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Offshore Oil and Gas Platforms as Stepping Stones for Expansion of Coral Communities: A Molecular Genetic Analysis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The northern Gulf of Mexico (GOM) is one of the most productive oil and gas exploration areas in the world, currently containing approximately 3,800 offshore (more)

Atchison, Amy D

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

The Resource Potential of Natural Gas Hydrates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

risks Schematic representation of offshore spill risk profile % of recorded spills & drilling phase in the GOM & North Sea -Source: SINTEF Database * Cementing Failures *...

383

Microsoft Word - figure_03.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas in the United States and the Gulf of Mexico, 2005 (Million Cubic Feet) GOM Gulf of Mexico Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-895, "Monthly Quantity...

384

File:BOEMRE US.CSB.bathy.map.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

bathy.map.pdf bathy.map.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Boundary Areas, in color Size of this preview: 727 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(6,008 × 4,958 pixels, file size: 824 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Boundary Areas, in color Sources Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement (BOEMRE) Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Extent Pacific Ocean, Alaska Region, GUlf of Mexico, Atlantic Countries United States UN Region Northern America Shows U.S. Continental Shelf Boundary (CSB) areas, on a color coded topo/bathy background. File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment

385

EIA - Daily Report 10/24/05 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

24, 4:00 pm Shut-in Status Date Shut-in Oil (bbld) % of Total Federal GOM Shut-in Gas (mmcfd) % of Total Federal GOM 10242005 1,018,478 64.6% 5,472 54.2% 10212005 986,805...

386

EIA Report 11/22/05 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2, 3:00 pm Shut-in Status Date Shut-in Oil (bbld) % of Total Federal GOM Shut-in Gas (mmcfd) % of Total Federal GOM 11222005 621,233 39.4% 3,219 31.9% 11212005 633,064 40.2%...

387

Temporal and Spatial Variability in Juvenile Red Snapper Otolith Elemental Signatures in the Northern Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Northern Gulf of Mexico WILLIAM F. PATTERSON III* Department of Biology, University of West Florida, 11000 of the northern Gulf of Mexico (GOM) to determine if otolith elemental signatures could be employed as natural important reef fishes in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico (GOM). Significant bycatch mortality caused by shrimp

Chen, Zhongxing

388

Investigation of Vertical and Horizontal Momentum Transfer in the Gulf of Mexico Using Empirical Mode Decomposition Method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Investigation of Vertical and Horizontal Momentum Transfer in the Gulf of Mexico Using Empirical of deep mooring stations in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) have been analyzed with the newly developed empirical are in general agreement with the modeled results by Oey and Lee. 1. Introduction The Gulf of Mexico (GOM

389

38-kHz ADCP investigation of deep scattering layers in sperm whale habitat in the northern Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A hull-mounted 38-kHz phased-array acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) was used to acoustically survey the continental margin of the northern Gulf of Mexico (GOM) during 6 cruises in 2002-2003. This is the first backscatter survey with a 38-kHz ADCP in the Gulf of Mexico. ADCPs have been used as a proxy to measure the volume backscatter return from plankton in the water column, however previous studies were restricted to the upper 200 to 300 meters due to the relatively high frequency of operation (150-300 kHz) of the transducers. In addition to measuring deep water current velocities, the 38-kHz phased-array ADCP can measure Relative Acoustic Backscatter Intensity (RABI) as deep as 1000 meters. The daytime depth of the main deep scattering layer at 400 to 500 meters was resolved, and locally high backscatter intensity can be seen down to 800 meters. The objectives were to determine how to analyze RABI from the instrument to resolve scattering layers, and then to seek secondary deep scattering layers of potential prey species below the main deep scattering layer, from 600 to 800 meters in the feeding range for Gulf of Mexico sperm whales. Based on RABI from the 38-kHz ADCP, secondary DSLs in sperm whale diving range were more commonly recorded over the continental shelf than in the deep basin region of the Gulf of Mexico. The daytime depths of migrating plankton showed variation depending on physical circulation features (cyclone, anticyclone, proximity to Mississippi river, and Loop Current) present. Vertical migrations compared between concurrently running 38 and 153-kHz ADCPs showed an overlap of acoustic scatterers recorded by the two instruments, however the 153-kHz instrument has much finer vertical resolution. Vertical migration rates were calculated and simultaneous net tow samples from one of the cruises was used to compare abundance estimates by the two methods.

Kaltenberg, Amanda May

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Tropical Cyclone Outer Surface Winds Derived from Satellite Microwave Sounder Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Upper tropospheric temperature anomalies are detected in brightness temperature data from the Nimbus 6 Scanning Microwave Spectrometer (SCAMS). Brightness temperature anomalies are related to surface pressure anomalies through the radiative ...

Stanley Q. Kidder; William M. Gray; Thomas H. Vonder Haar

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

X Ray Precursors in GRBs and SGRs: outer X tails around a Precessing Gamma Jet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Weak isolated X-ray precursor events before the main Gamma Ray Burst, GRB, and also rare Soft Gamma Repeaters, SGR, events are in disagreement with any Fireball, or Magnetar, scenarios. These models are originated by an unique explosive event leading, by internal-external shock waves, to softer secondary trains following a main gamma signals. Indeed the earliest GRB980519,GRB981226 events as well as the latest and most distant identified one as GRB000131 are showing rare but well identified and distinct X Ray precursor, occurring tens of seconds or even a minute before the main GRB eruption. These weak X precursors bursts correspond to non-negligible energy powers, up to million Supernova ones. They are rare, about (3-6)% of all GRBs, but not unique. Similar huge explosive precursor are in total disagreement with a successive main Fireball GRB outburst. Comparable brief X-ray precursor flashes are found also in rarest and most detailed SGRs events as those observed on 27 and 29 August 1999 from SGR 1900+14. They are inconsistent with a Magnetar Fireball explosion. We interpret them as earlier marginal blazing of outlying X conical Jet tails surrounding a narrower gamma precessing,spinning beamed Jet in blazing mode toward the Earth; later re-crossing and better hitting of the target -the satellite detectors- is source of the main GRB (and SGR) observed structured event. The X Ray precursor existence is an additional remarkable evidence of the Precessing relativistic Jet Nature of both GRBs and SGRs.

Daniele Fargion

2000-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

392

A Solvent Cleaning Process for the Outer Surface of Plastic ICF Capsules  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Selected papers from 20th Target Fabrication Meeting, May 20-24, 2012, Santa Fe, NM, Guest Editor: Robert C. Cook

S. H. Baxamusa; S. D. Bhandarkar; J. L. Reynolds; B. Maranville; J. Horner; D. C. Mason; C. L. Heinbockel; N. A. Antipa; A. D. Conder

393

The chemistry of multiply deuterated molecules in protoplanetary disks. I. The outer disk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present new models of the deuterium chemistry in protoplanetary disks, including, for the first time, multiply deuterated species. We use these models to explore whether observations in combination with models can give us clues as to which desorption processes occur in disks. We find, in common with other authors, that photodesorption can allow strongly bound molecules such as HDO to exist in the gas phase in a layer above the midplane. Models including this process give the best agreement with the observations. In the midplane, cosmic ray heating can desorb weakly bound molecules such as CO and N$_2$. We find the observations suggest that N$_2$ is gaseous in this region, but that CO must be retained on the grains to account for the observed DCO$^+$/HCO$^+$. This could be achieved by CO having a higher binding energy than N$_2$ (as may be the case when these molecules are accreted onto water ice) or by a smaller cosmic ray desorption rate for CO than assumed here, as suggested by recent theoretical work. For gaseous molecules the calculated deuteration can be greatly changed by chemical processing in the disk from the input molecular cloud values. On the grains singly deuterated species tend to retain the D/H ratio set in the molecular cloud, whereas multiply deuterated species are more affected by the disk chemistry. Consequently the D/H ratios observed in comets may be partly set in the parent cloud and partly in the disk, depending on the molecule.

K. Willacy

2007-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

394

A new method for power generation and distribution in outer space  

SciTech Connect

The power system is a major component of a space system's size, mass, technical complexity, and hence, cost. To date, space systems include the energy source as an integral part of the mission satellite. Potentially significant benefit could be realized by separating the energy source from the end-use system and transmitting the power via an energy beam (power beaming) (Coomes et al., 1989). This concept parallels the terrestrial central generating station and transmission grid. In this summary, the system components required for power beaming implementation are outlined and applied to a satellite for power beaming implementation are outlined and applied to a satellite constellation to demonstrate the feasibility of implementing power beaming in the next 20 years. 5 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

Bamberger, J.A.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Design and R&D for the C-Mod Outer Divertor Upgrade  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Divertor and High-Heat-Flux Components / Proceedings of the Twentieth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (TOFE-2012) (Part 1), Nashville, Tennessee, August 27-31, 2012

Soren Harrison et al.

396

NMR structural and functional studies of the mithochondrial outer membrane protein VDAC by Thomas J. Malia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Apoptosis is a mechanism of programmed cell death required by multicellular organisms during development and for tissue maintenance. Bcl-2 family proteins are central regulators of apoptosis and many of their primary roles ...

Malia, Thomas J., 1977-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Title of dissertation: LIQUID SODIUM MODEL OF EARTH'S OUTER CORE Woodrow Shew, Doctor of Philosophy, 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

engineering, FEM simulation of bony structures, applications to MEMS & Nano devices, tribology, and bio the thermochemical splitting of H2S emissions from the oil and gas industry into usable components to reduce the use from the South Saskatchewan River to Melfort to simulate controlled leakages and to make online

Lathrop, Daniel P.

398

Sensitivity of a Spectrally Filtered and Nudged Limited-Area Model to Outer Model Options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical filters required to control spatial computational modes in a limited-area model (LAM) that uses the unstaggered. A grid are developed and tested over the complex topography of the Great Basin of the western United States. The filters ...

Kim M. Waldron; Jan Paegle; John D. Horel

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Outer valence orbital response to proton positions in prototropic tautomers of adenine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Orbital response to proton positions in the prototropic tautomers of adenine (Ade-N1, Ade-N3, Ade-N7 and Ade-N9) has been studied in position space and momentum space using dual space analysis (DSA). Based on the electronic structures of our previous ... Keywords: Adenine tautomers, coordinate and momentum space analysis, molecular properties, theoretical orbital momentum distribution

Saumitra Saha; Feng Wang; Clia Fonseca Guerra; F. Matthias Bickelhaupt

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

The role of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 outer surface structures in extracellular electron transfer  

SciTech Connect

Shewanella oneidensis is a facultative anaerobe that uses more than 14 different terminal electron acceptors for respiration. These include metal oxides and hydroxyoxides, and toxic metals such as uranium and chromium. Mutants deficient in metal reduction were isolated using the mariner transposon derivative, minihimar RB1. These included mutants with transposon insertions in the prepilin peptidase and type II secretion system genes. All mutants were deficient in Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction, and exhibited slow growth when DMSO was used as the electron acceptor. The genome sequence of S. oneidensis contains one prepilin peptidase gene, pilD. A similar prepilin peptidase that may function in the processing of type II secretion prepilins was not found. Single and multiple chromosomal deletions of four putative type IV pilin genes did not affect Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction. These results indicate that PilD in S. oneidensis is responsible for processing both type IV and type II secretion prepilin proteins. Type IV pili do not appear to be required for Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction.

Bouhenni, Rachida; Vora, Gary J.; Biffinger, Justin C.; Shirodkar, Sheetal; Brockman, K. L.; Ray, Ricky; Wu, Peter; Johnson, Brandy J.; Biddle, E. M.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Fitzgerald, Lisa A.; Little, Brenda; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Ringeisen, Bradley R.; Saffarini, Daad

2010-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gom outer continental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Lagrangian Characterization of Circulation over Submarine Banks with Application to the Outer Gulf of Maine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method to obtain an overall description of the Lagrangian circulation in complex two-dimensional time-periodic current fields is illustrated through its application to current fields from a numerical model of the Gulf of Maine. The method. ...

Herman Radderinkhof; John W. Loder

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

RESULTS FROM PANEL DISCUSSION SESSION 4: OUTER PLANETS FUTURE MISSION CONCEPTS AND TECHNOLOGY NEEDS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Boeing, USA (4) Observatory of Nice, France (5) NASA / Jet Propulsion Laboratory, USA (6) NASA / AMES (Boeing, USA) · Thomas Spilker (JPL, USA) · Ethiraj Venkatapathy (NASA/Ames, USA). The session to be the most abundant of the heavy elements in the giant planets (the term heavy element includes all elements

Atreya, Sushil

403

The M2 Tide and Its Residual on the Outer Banks of the Gulf of Maine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tidal computations are reported for the Gulf of Maine with emphasis on its seaward banks. Georges Bank, Browns Bank, Nantucket Shoals, and the nearshore region off Cape Sable. The model is 3D and nonlinear, with quadratic vertical viscosity; ...

Daniel R. Lynch; Christopher E. Naimie

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Environment on the Surfaces of the Drip Shield and Waste Package Outer Barrier  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides supporting analysis of the conditions at which an aqueous solution can exist on the drip shield or waste package surfaces, including theoretical underpinning for the evolution of concentrated brines that could form by deliquescence or evaporation, and evaluation of the effects of acid-gas generation on brine composition. This analysis does not directly feed the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA), but supports modeling and abstraction of the in-drift chemical environment (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169863]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169860]). It also provides analyses that may support screening of features, events, and processes, and input for response to regulatory inquiries. This report emphasizes conditions of low relative humidity (RH) that, depending on temperature and chemical conditions, may be dry or may be associated with an aqueous phase containing concentrated electrolytes. Concentrated solutions at low RH may evolve by evaporative concentration of water that seeps into emplacement drifts, or by deliquescence of dust on the waste package or drip shield surfaces. The minimum RH for occurrence of aqueous conditions is calculated for various chemical systems based on current understanding of site geochemistry and equilibrium thermodynamics. The analysis makes use of known characteristics of Yucca Mountain waters and dust from existing tunnels, laboratory data, and relevant information from the technical literature and handbooks.

T. Wolery

2005-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

405

EIS-0470: U.S. Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for the Cape Wind Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0: U.S. Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for the Cape 0: U.S. Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for the Cape Wind Energy Project on the Outer Continental Shelf off Massachusetts, Nantucket Sound EIS-0470: U.S. Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for the Cape Wind Energy Project on the Outer Continental Shelf off Massachusetts, Nantucket Sound Summary The DOE Loan Programs Office is proposing to offer a loan guarantee to Cape Wind Associates, LLC for the construction and start-up of the Cape Wind Energy Project in Nantucket Sound, offshore of Massachusetts. The proposed Cape Wind Energy Project would consist of up to 130, 3.6-MW turbine generators, in an area of roughly 25-square miles, and would include 12.5 miles of 115-kilovolt submarine transmission cable and an electric service platform. To inform DOE's decision regarding a loan guarantee, DOE adopted

406

Federal Oil and Gas Royalty Simplification and Fairness Act of 1996 | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Simplification and Fairness Act of 1996 Simplification and Fairness Act of 1996 Jump to: navigation, search Statute Name Federal Oil and Gas Royalty Simplification and Fairness Act Year 1996 Url Royaltysimplact.jpg Description To improve the management of royalties from Federal and outer continental shelf oil and gas leases References Federal Oil and Gas Royalty Simplification and Fairness Act of 1996[1] The Federal Oil and Gas Royalty Simplification and Fairness Act of 1996 was created to improve the management of royalties from Federal and outer continental shelf oil and gas leases, and for other purposes. References ↑ "Federal Oil and Gas Royalty Simplification and Fairness Act of 1996" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Federal_Oil_and_Gas_Royalty_Simplification_and_Fairness_Act_of_1996&oldid=334637

407

Deepwater royalty relief product of 3 1/2 year U.S. political effort  

SciTech Connect

Against the backdrop of more than 20 years of increasingly stringent environmental regulation, ever-expanding exploration and development moratoria on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), and reductions in producer tax incentives, oil and natural gas exploration companies active in deep waters of the Gulf of Mexico recently won a significant legislative victory. On Nov. 28, 1995, President Clinton signed into law S.395, the Alaska Power Administration Sale Act. Title 3 of S.395 embodies the Outer Continental Shelf Deep Water Royalty Relief Act. This landmark legislation provides substantial incentives for oil and natural gas production in the gulf of Mexico by temporarily eliminating royalties on certain deepwater leases. It is the first direct incentive for oil and gas production enacted at the federal level in many years. This paper reviews the elements used to arrive at this successful legislation including the congressional leadership. It describes debates, cabinet level discussions, and use of parlimentary procedures.

Davis, R.E. [Stuntz and Davis, Washington, DC (United States); Neff, S. [Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee, Washington, DC (United States)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

EA-1965: Southeast National Marine Renewable Energy Center (SNMREC) Offshore Testing Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Energy (DOE), through its Wind and Water Power Technologies Office (WWPTO), is proposing to provide federal funding to Florida Atlantic Universitys South-East National Marine Renewable Energy Center (FAU SNMREC) to support the at sea testing of FAU SNMRECs experimental current generation turbine and the deployment and operation of their Small-Scale Ocean Current Turbine Test Berth, sited on the outer continental shelf (OCS) in waters off the coast of Ft Lauderdale, Florida. SNMREC is proposing to demonstrate the test berth site readiness by testing their pilot-scale experimental ocean current turbine unit at that location. The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) is conducting an Environmental Assessment to analyze the impacts associated with leasing OCS lands to FAU SNMREC, per their jurisdictional responsibilities under the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act. DOE is a cooperating agency in this process.

409

Federal offshore statistics: 1992. Leasing, exploration, production, and revenues as of December 31, 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act, enacted in 1953 and amended several times, charges the Secretary of the Interior with the responsibility for administering and managing mineral exploration and development of the outer continental shelf, as well as for conserving its natural resources. This report documents the following: Federal offshore lands; offshore leasing activity and status; offshore development activity; offshore production of crude oil and natural gas; Federal offshore oil and natural gas sales volume and royalties; revenue from Federal offshore leases; disbursement of Federal offshore revenue; reserves and resource estimates of offshore oil and natural gas; oil pollution in US and international waters; and international activities and marine minerals. 11 figs., 83 tabs.

Francois, D.K.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

410

Numerical simulations of depressurization-induced gas production from gas hydrate reservoirs at the Walker Ridge 312 site, northern Gulf of Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2009, the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) Gas Hydrates Joint-Industry-Project (JIP) Leg II drilling program confirmed that gas hydrate occurs at high saturations within reservoir-quality sands in the GOM. A comprehensive logging-while-drilling dataset was collected from seven wells at three sites, including two wells at the Walker Ridge 313 site. By constraining the saturations and thicknesses of hydrate-bearing sands using logging-while-drilling data, two-dimensional (2D), cylindrical, r-z and three-dimensional (3D) reservoir models were simulated. The gas hydrate occurrences inferred from seismic analysis are used to delineate the areal extent of the 3D reservoir models. Numerical simulations of gas production from the Walker Ridge reservoirs were conducted using the depressurization method at a constant bottomhole pressure. Results of these simulations indicate that these hydrate deposits are readily produced, owing to high intrinsic reservoir-quality and their proximity to the base of hydrate stability. The elevated in situ reservoir temperatures contribute to high (540 MMscf/day) predicted production rates. The production rates obtained from the 2D and 3D models are in close agreement. To evaluate the effect of spatial dimensions, the 2D reservoir domains were simulated at two outer radii. The results showed increased potential for formation of secondary hydrate and appearance of lag time for production rates as reservoir size increases. Similar phenomena were observed in the 3D reservoir models. The results also suggest that interbedded gas hydrate accumulations might be preferable targets for gas production in comparison with massive deposits. Hydrate in such accumulations can be readily dissociated due to heat supply from surrounding hydrate-free zones. Special cases were considered to evaluate the effect of overburden and underburden permeability on production. The obtained data show that production can be significantly degraded in comparison with a case using impermeable boundaries. The main reason for the reduced productivity is water influx from the surrounding strata; a secondary cause is gas escape into the overburden. The results dictate that in order to reliably estimate production potential, permeability of the surroundings has to be included in a model.

Myshakin, Evgeniy M.; Gaddipati, Manohar; Rose, Kelly; Anderson, Brian J.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Comparison of Simulated and Observed Continental Tropical Anvil Clouds and Their Radiative Heating Profiles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vertically pointing millimeter-wavelength radar observations of anvil clouds extending from mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) that pass over an Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) field site in Niamey, Niger, are compared to anvil ...

Scott W. Powell; Robert A. Houze Jr.; Anil Kumar; Sally A. McFarlane

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Predictability of Precipitation from Continental Radar Images. Part V: Growth and Decay  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a Lagrangian frame of reference, the accuracy of rainfall systems predicted by nowcasting algorithms can be improved by incorporating the growth and decay of the rainfall. The scale dependence of predictability of growth and decay of ...

Basivi Radhakrishna; Isztar Zawadzki; Frdric Fabry

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

The Kinematics of a Midlatitude, Continental Mesoscale Convective System and Its Mesoscale Vortex  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors present a unique, scale-discriminating study of the environment-relative circulations within a mesoscale convective system (MCS) and mesoscale convective vortex (MCV). The MCS, a leading convective line and trailing stratiform region ...

Jason C. Knievel; Richard H. Johnson

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Projections of Future Drought in the Continental United States and Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using the Palmer drought severity index, the ability of 19 state-of-the-art climate models to reproduce observed statistics of drought over North America is examined. It is found that correction of substantial biases in the models surface air ...

Michael Wehner; David R. Easterling; Jay H. Lawrimore; Richard R. Heim Jr.; Russell S. Vose; Benjamin D. Santer

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Assembling Dacite in a Continental Subduction Zone: A Case Study of Tauhara Volcano.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Mount Tauhara is the largest dacitic volcanic complex of onshore New Zealand and comprises seven subaerial domes and associated lava and pyroclastic flows, with a (more)

Tutt, Chelsea May

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

A 4-Yr Climatology of Cold-Season Bow Echoes over the Continental United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A search of radar mosaics and level-II Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 Doppler (WSR-88D) data revealed 51 cold-season (OctoberApril) bow echoes that occurred in the contiguous United States from 199798 to 200001. Proximity soundings indicated ...

Patrick C. Burke; David M. Schultz

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Evaluation of numerical weather prediction for intra-day solar forecasting in the continental United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MOS),NumericalWeatherPrediction(NWP),SolarForecastingofnumericalweatherpredictionforintra?daysolarsolarenergyapplicationsbasedonaerosolchemicaltransportand numericalweather

Mathiesen, Patrick; Kleissl, Jan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

On the Longshelf Structure and Dynamics of Subtidal Currents on the Eastern United States Continental Shelf  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Strong correlations were observed among subtidal longshelf currents from the Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB) to the Georges Bank region, a distance spanning 615 km. The longshelf current consisted predominantly of wind-forced motions and freely ...

Marlene Noble; Bradford Butman; Edward Williams

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Z .Lithos 48 1999 5780 Imaging the continental upper mantle using electromagnetic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by two monopolar submarine HVDC cables (2? 250MW, 275kV) linked to operate in parallel on the both side

Jones, Alan G.

420

Scattering of Coastally Trapped Waves by Changes in Continental Shelf Width  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The scattering of dispersive, barotropic, coastally-trapped waves by narrowing and widening shelves is investigated. The shelves considered maintain a shelf-similar exponential shape. For such shelves, previous investigators have shown that no ...

Ian Webster

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gom outer continental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

The effect of LNG on the relationship between UK and Continental Europena natural gas markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the price of crude oil will stimulate oil drilling and hence increase the production costs of natural gas, which pushes up its price. Third, as many of the firms drilling for crude oil also drill for natural gas, increasing oil prices result in an increased... in 1995, Barton and Vermeire (1999) claim that gas-on-gas competition in the UK has weakened the oil and gas price link. They argue that gas prices can now move over the range determined by, on the lower end, the marginal cost of gas production and...

Koenig, Philipp

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

422

CSDP: the seismology of continental thermal regimes. Final technical report, January 1, 1975-December 31, 1984  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research progress is reported in the development of new seismological tools to define and characterize the geometry, mechanical construction and mass transport process of a geothermal system, and their application to various geothermal systems including the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock System, New Mexico, Kilauea and Kilauea Iki, Hawaii, Mt. St. Helens, Washington, and Long Valley, California. (ACR)

Aki, K.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Sensing animal group behavior and bio-clutter in the ocean over continental shelf scales  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fish populations often comprise the largest biomass in a productive marine ecosystem. They typically play an essential role in inter-trophic energy transport, and serve as a mainstay for human consumption comprising roughly ...

Srinivasan, Jagannathan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Ocean circulation and dynamics on the west Antarctic Peninsula continental shelf  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Observations of current velocity, temperature, salinity and pressure from a 2-year moored array deployment and four hydrographic cruises conducted by the United States Southern Ocean GLOBEC program on the western Antarctic ...

Moffat Varas, Carlos F

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Deconstructing the Mississippi River : restoring a continental system through the integration of flexible infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The most prevalent social and economic issues plaguing cities are symptomatic of much bigger underlying environmental problems. Cities are governed by legislation set within artificial political boundaries, however ecology ...

Heard, Haley R. (Haley Ruth)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Scattering of Continental Shelf Waves at a Discontinuity in Shelf Width  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analytical solution is presented for the scattering of a free shelf wave incident upon a discontinuity in shelf width in a barotropic ocean. The discussion of solutions relying on backscattered free-waves with large wavenumbers which may not ...

John L. Wilkin; David C. Chapman

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Representing Uncertainty in Continental-Scale Gridded Precipitation Fields for Agrometeorological Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work proposes a relatively simple methodology for creating ensembles of precipitation inputs that are consistent with the spatial and temporal scale necessary for regional crop modeling. A high-quality reference precipitation dataset [the ...

A. J. W. de Wit; S. de Bruin; P. J. J. F. Torfs

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Efficient localization in a dispersive waveguide : applications in terrestrial continental shelves and on Europa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methods are developed for passive source localization and environmental parameter estimation in seismo-acoustic waveguides by exploiting the dispersive behavior of guided wave propagation. The methods developed are applied ...

Lee, Sunwoong

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Predictability of Precipitation from Continental Radar Images. Part IV: Limits to Prediction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Predictability of precipitation is examined from storm to synoptic scales through an experimental approach using continent-scale radar composite images. The lifetime of radar reflectivity patterns in Eulerian and Lagrangian coordinates is taken ...

Urs Germann; Isztar Zawadzki; Barry Turner

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Intermittent Intense Turbulent Mixing under Ice in the Laptev Sea Continental Shelf  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vertical mixing in the bottom boundary layer and pycnocline of the Laptev Sea is evaluated from a rapidly sampled 12-h time series of microstructure temperature, conductivity, and shear observations collected under 100% sea ice during October ...

Yueng-Djern Lenn; Tom P. Rippeth; Chris P. Old; Sheldon Bacon; Igor Polyakov; Vladimir Ivanov; Jens Hlemann

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Comparison of Simulated and Observed Continental Tropical Anvil Clouds and Their Radiative Heating Profiles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vertically pointing millimeter-wavelength radar observations of anvil clouds extending from mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) that pass over an Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) field site in Niamey, Niger, are compared to anvil structures generated by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale model using six different microphysical schemes. The radar data provide the statistical distribution of the radar reflectivity values as a function of height and anvil thickness. These statistics are compared to the statistics of the modeled anvil cloud reflectivity at all altitudes. Requiring the model to be statistically accurate at all altitudes is a stringent test of the model performance. The typical vertical profile of radiative heating in the anvil clouds is computed from the radar observations. Variability of anvil structures from the different microphysical schemes provides an estimate of the inherent uncertainty in anvil radiative heating profiles. All schemes underestimate the optical thickness of thin anvils and cirrus, resulting in a bias of excessive net anvil heating in all of the simulations.

Powell, Scott W.; Houze, R.; Kumar, Anil; McFarlane, Sally A.

2012-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

432

Production of Temporally Consistent Gridded Precipitation and Temperature Fields for the Continental United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The availability of long-term gridded datasets of precipitation, temperature, and other surface meteorological variables offers the potential for deriving a range of land surface conditions that have not been directly observed. These include, for ...

Alan F. Hamlet; Dennis P. Lettenmaier

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Spatiotemporal Trends in Lake Effect and Continental Snowfall in the Laurentian Great Lakes, 19511980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new raster-based monthly snowfall climatology was derived from 19511980 snowfall station data for the Laurentian Great Lakes. An automated methodology was used to obtain higher spatial resolution than previously obtained. The increase in ...

D. C. Norton; S. J. Bolsenga

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Iron Speciation and Mixing in Single Aerosol Particles from the Asian Continental Outflow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bioavailable iron from atmospheric aerosol is an essential nutrient that can control oceanic productivity, thereby impacting the global carbon budget and climate. Particles collected on Okinawa Island during an atmospheric pollution transport event from China were analyzed using complementary single particle techniques to determine the iron source and speciation. Comparing the spatial distribution of iron within ambient particles and standard Asian mineral dust, it was determined that field-collected atmospheric Fe-containing particles have numerous sources, including anthropogenic sources such as coal combustion. Fe-containing particles were found to be internally mixed with secondary species such as sulfate, soot, and organic carbon. The mass weighted average Fe(II) fraction (defined as Fe(II)/[Fe(II)+Fe(III)]) was determined to be 0.33 {+-} 0.08. Within the experimental uncertainty, this value lies close to the range of 0.26-0.30 determined for representative Asian mineral dust. Previous studies have indicated that the solubility of iron from combustion is much higher than that from mineral dust. Therefore, chemical and/or physical differences other than oxidation state may help explain the higher solubility of iron in atmospheric particles.

Moffet, Ryan C.; Furutani, Hiroshi; Rodel, Tobias; Henn, Tobias R.; Sprau, Peter; Laskin, Alexander; Uematsu, Mitsuo; Gilles, Marry K.

2012-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

435

Projecting Continental U.S. Water Stress Based on Global Datasets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Human populations may be adversely impacted by water stress, a situation which is commonly defined as a per capita water availability of less than 1700 cubic meters of freshwater per person per year. Water stress may result from either overuse of available freshwater resources or a reduction in the amount of available water due to decreases in rainfall and stored water supplies. Analyzing the interrelationship between human populations and water availability is complicated by the uncertainties associated with climate change projections and population projections. We have developed a simple methodology to integrate disparate climate and population data sources and develop first-order per capita water availability projections at the global scale. Simulations from the coupled land-ocean-atmosphere Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3) forced with a range of hypothetical greenhouse gas emissions scenarios have been used to project grid-based changes in precipitation minus evapotranspiration as proxies for changes in runoff, or fresh water supply. Population growth changes, according to Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) storylines, have been used as proxies for changes in fresh water demand by 2025, 2050 and 2100. These freshwater supply and demand projections have then been combined to yield estimates of per capita water availability aggregated by U.S. watershed. Results suggest that important insights might be extracted from the use of the process developed here, including the identification of potentially vulnerable areas in need of more detailed analysis. This high-level analysis also illustrates the relative importance of population growth versus climate change in in altering future freshwater supplies. However, these are only exemplary insights and, as such, could be considered hypotheses that should be rigorously tested with multiple climate models, multiple observational climate datasets, and more comprehensive population growth projections.

Parish, Esther S [ORNL; Kodra, Evan [Northeastern University; Steinhaeuser, Karsten [University of Minnesota; Ganguly, Auroop R [Northeastern University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Continental speciation in the tropics: contrasting biogeographic patterns of divergence in the Uroplatus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

clause. their permit will involve the employment by the permittee of a porn or persons, the permittee

Kelly, John J.

437

Advances in Predicting Continental Low Stratus with a Regional NWP Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the eastern Alpine region, subinversion cloudiness associated with elevated temperature inversions is a frequent phenomenon in autumn and winter, which often persists for several days. Although the prediction of fog and low stratus by ...

Alexander Kann; Harald Seidl; Christoph Wittmann; Thomas Haiden

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

A Local Energetics Analysis of the Life Cycle Differences between Consecutive, Explosively Deepening, Continental Cyclones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Local energetics diagnostics of the life cycles of consecutive, explosively deepening, extratropical cyclones that migrated across central North America in April 2001 are presented. Both storms developed rapidly and followed nearly identical ...

Steven G. Decker; Jonathan E. Martin

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Microphysical and Radar Observations of Seeded and Nonseeded Continental Cumulus Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Controlled cloud seeding experiments were conducted near Bethlehem, South Africa during the summer of 198485. The experimental unit was the semi-isolated cumulus congestus cloud. Microphysical measurements were obtained by three instrumented ...

T. W. Krauss; R. T. Bruintjes; J. Verlinde

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

One-Dimensional Earth Resistivity Models for Selected Areas of Continental United States & Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical modeling of the effect of geomagnetically induced currents (GIC) in power transmission networks involves two components: geophysical and technological. The geophysical component deals with the calculation of a geoelectric field at locations along the transmission network. (The need for the geophysical component in the modeling process in the industry is due to the lack of regular recordings of the geoelectric field, either at geomagnetic observatories or along power ...

2012-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gom outer continental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Continental Scientific Drilling Program thermal regimes: comparative site assessment geology of five magma-hydrothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The geology and salient aspects of geophysics and hydrogeochemistry of five high-grade geothermal systems in the USA are reviewed. On the basis of this information, a target location is suggested for a deep (5- to 8-km) borehole that will maximize the amount of scientific information to be learned at each of the five geothermal areas.

Goff, F.; Waters, A.C. (eds.)

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Paleomagnetic and stratigraphic techniques for identifying sediment processes on continental margins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and to distinguish geomagnetic features from deformationalthere were a number of geomagnetic excursions i n the Bmnhesand to distinguish geomagnetic features from deformational

Schwehr, Kurt

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Observation of an Anticyclonic Eddy near the Continental Shelf Break South of New England  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A small scale but energetic and highly nonlinear anticyclonic eddy was observed near the New England Shelf Break in July 1983. Satellite images show a tongue of shelf water 15 km wide flowing offshore then turning anticyclonically westward. ...

Robert W. Houghton; Donald B. Olson; Peter J. Celone

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Evaluation of Drought Indices Based on Thermal Remote Sensing of Evapotranspiration over the Continental United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The reliability of standard meteorological drought indices based on measurements of precipitation is limited by the spatial distribution and quality of currently available rainfall data. Furthermore, they reflect only one component of the surface ...

Martha C. Anderson; Christopher Hain; Brian Wardlow; Agustin Pimstein; John R. Mecikalski; William P. Kustas

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Infrared Continental Surface Emissivity Spectra and Skin Temperature Retrieved from IASI Observations over the Tropics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land surface temperature and emissivity spectra are essential variables for improving models of the earth surfaceatmosphere interaction or retrievals of atmospheric variables such as thermodynamic profiles, chemical composition, cloud and aerosol ...

Virginie Capelle; Alain Chdin; Eric Pquignot; Peter Schlssel; Stuart M. Newman; Noelle A. Scott

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Drought-Induced Warming in the Continental United States under Different SST Regimes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Climate Variability and Predictability (U.S. CLIVAR) Drought Working Group (DWG) recently performed a series of experiments in which a number of AGCMs were forced with different leading patterns of global SST variability. These ...

Randal D. Koster; Hailan Wang; Siegfried D. Schubert; Max J. Suarez; Sarith Mahanama

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

1 From buckling to e continental lit numerical mode imalayan syntaxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-building response to regional shortening. From: KHAN,M. A., TRBLOAR,P. J., SEARLE,M. P. & JAN,M. Q. (eds) Tectonics environments and evolved metamorphically over the same interval (Burg et a/. 1997, 1998). We then present

Podladchikov, Yuri

448

Recent blackouts in US and continental Europe: is liberalisation to blame?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Increased liberalisation of electricity supply industry has resulted in a significant increase in inter-area (or cross-border) trades which often are not properly accounted for when assessing system security. The traditional decentralised way of operating...

Bialek, Janusz

2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

449

Modeling Terrestrial Hydrological Systems at the Continental Scale: Testing the Accuracy of an Atmospheric GCM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A global hydrological routing algorithm (HYDRA) that simulates seasonal river discharge and changes in surface water level on a spatial resolution of 5? long 5? lat is presented. The model is based on previous work by M. T. Coe and incorporates ...

Michael T. Coe

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Aspects of the physical control of phytoplankton dynamics over the Southern California Bight continental shelf  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

forcing of the offshore depth of the nitracline . . . . . .of the nitracline, and the offshore depth of the nitraclinethe inner shelf than offshore. This cross-shelf shoaling of

Lucas, Andrew J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Aspects of the Physical Control of Phytoplankton Dynamics over the Southern California Bight Continental Shelf  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

forcing of the offshore depth of the nitracline . . . . . .of the nitracline, and the offshore depth of the nitraclinethe inner shelf than offshore. This cross-shelf shoaling of

Lucas, Andrew J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Sensitivity of the Continental Hydrological Cycle to the Spatial Resolution over the Iberian Peninsula  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the broad context of the downscaling methods that are used to study climatic change impacts, the dependence of the surface hydrological processes simulated by the Organising Carbon and Hydrology in Dynamic Ecosystem (ORCHIDEE) land surface ...

S. Vrant; K. Laval; J. Polcher; M. De Castro

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Very Early Formation of Big, Liquid Drops Revealed by ZDR in Continental Cumulus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Examination of the early radar echo histories of several vigorous, cumulus clouds in northeast Colorado and northwest Kansas, with sensitive, dual-polarization radar, reveals the formation of millimeter-sized water drops at about the same time ...

Charles A. Knight

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the methodology and results of the most rigorous assessment to date of the riverine hydrokinetic energy resource in the contiguous 48 states and Alaska, excluding tidal waters. The assessment provides estimates of the gross, naturally available resource, termed the theoretical resource, as well as estimates, termed the technically recoverable resource, that account for selected technological factors affecting capture and conversion of the theoretical resource. The ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

455

Two-Layer Model of Summer Circulation on the Southeast U.S. Continental Shelf  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The summer circulation in the South Atlantic Bight is investigated using a two-layer finite element model. Simulations using a steady state mean summer wind field lead to the following conclusions. (i) the adjustment time of the shelf circulation ...

Joao A. Lorenzzetti; John D. Wang; Thomas N. Lee

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

An Update on SURFRADThe GCOS Surface Radiation Budget Network for the Continental United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Surface Radiation budget (SURFRAD) network was developed for the United States in the middle 1990s in response to a growing need for more sophisticated in situ surface radiation measurements to support satellite system validation; numerical ...

John A. Augustine; Gary B. Hodges; Christopher R. Cornwall; Joseph J. Michalsky; Carlos I. Medina

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Fish population and behavior revealed by instantaneous continental-shelf scale imaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The application of a technique to instantaneously image and continuously monitor the abundance, spatial distribution, and behavior of fish populations over thousands of square kilometers using Ocean Acoustic Waveguide ...

Symonds, Deanelle T

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Continental Shelf Research 22 (2002) 967986 Physical and chemical effects of grain aggregates on the Palos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

............................................................................ 41 4.5 PROPOSED REFRIGERANT CHARGING METHOD ................................................ 43 4.................................................................................... 76 6.2.1 Experimental Setup and Procedure Figure 4.9: Thermocouple Stability Test

459

Outside the continental United States international travel and contagion impact quick look tool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a tool that will allow public health analysts to estimate infectious disease risk at the country level as a function of different international transportation modes. The prototype focuses on a cholera epidemic originating within ... Keywords: HealthGIS, epidmiology, health informatics, public health, spatio-temporal modeling

Courtney D. Corley; Mary J. Lancaster; Robert T. Brigantic; Brenda Kunkel; George Muller; Taylor McKenzie

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Internal Tide Generation at the Continental Shelf Modeled Using a Modal Decomposition: Two-Dimensional Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stratified flow over topography is studied, with oceanic applications in mind. A model is developed for a fluid with arbitrary vertical stratification and a free surface, flowing over three-dimensional topography of arbitrary size and steepness, ...

Stephen D. Griffiths; R. H. J. Grimshaw

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gom outer continental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Paleomagnetic and stratigraphic techniques for identifying sediment processes on continental margins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

environment of the Ardath Shale [M.S. fabric offine-Conclusion A . A r d a t h Shale B. Santa B a r b a r a C. Eslumped outcrop of Ardath Shale north of Scripps Pier at 32

Schwehr, Kurt

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Test Reference Year Generation and Evaluation Methods in the Continental Mediterranean Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Different meteorological data series called multiyear data, long-term average measured data series, or test reference years (TRYs) are required for solar energy system simulation. It is known that the use of the multiyear data approach requires a ...

Julia Bilbao; Argimiro Miguel; JosA. Franco; Arturo Ayuso

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Evaluation of Biases of Satellite Rainfall Estimation Algorithms over the Continental United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A bias-adjusted radar rainfall product is created and used for evaluation of two satellite rainfall estimation algorithms. Three years of collocated rainfall estimates from radar, rain gauges, a microwave satellite algorithm, and a multispectral (...

Jeffrey R. McCollum; Witold F. Krajewski; Ralph R. Ferraro; Mamoudou B. Ba

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Stratigraphic evolution of an outcropping continental slope system, Tres Pasos Formation at Cerro Divisadero, Chile  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 2000; Sinclair and Tomasso, 2002); the Paleozoic Karoo foreland basin, South Africa (Grecula et al

465

A succession of continental red beds in the Paleogene Carroza Formation, north-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Venezuela and Petrozuata (Conoco-Philips/PDVSA joint venture); Ecopetrol­ Colombia; PEMEX, Mexico ­ Colombia, Pipeline System 4 for PEMEX ­ Mexico. Have experience and background of oil/gas fields. Consulting and on-the-job solutions for Corrosion, Paraffin and Asphaltene Control of Pemex, Mexico; YPF

Ahmad, Sajjad

466

Persistent Nature of Secondary Diurnal Modes of Precipitation over Oceanic and Continental Regimes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This investigation seeks a better understanding of the assorted mechanisms controlling the global distribution of diurnal precipitation variability based on the use of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) microwave radiometer and radar ...

Song Yang; Kwo-Sen Kuo; Eric A. Smith

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Uranium-series comminution ages of continental sediments: Case study of a Pleistocene alluvial fan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and river transport. Uranium-Series Geochemistry 52, 533-using high- precision uranium isotopic measurements.B. , Turner, S.P. , 2008. Uranium-series isotopes in river

Lee, Victoria E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Linking flux network measurements to continental scale simulations: ecosystem carbon dioxide exchange capacity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FROM EASTERN MASSACHUSETTS W. WYATT OSWALD Harvard Forest, Harvard University, Petersham, MA 01366 e, Minneapolis, MN 55455 DAVID R. FOSTER Harvard Forest, Harvard University, Petersham, MA 01366 The analysis

469

What NEON Is The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is a continental-scale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at the Harvard Forest, Petersham, MA 2. Mid-Atlantic site (to be determined) 3. Southeast site based

Patterson, Bruce D.

470

Uranium-series comminution ages of continental sediments: Case study of a Pleistocene alluvial fan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a stream-dominated alluvial fan, San Joaquin valley,on Quaternary fluvial fans, San Joaquin Basin, California,M. , (Eds), Alluvial Fans: Geomorphology, Sedimentology,

Lee, Victoria E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Chemical Heterogeneity across Cloud Droplet Size Spectra in Continental and Marine Air Masses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Variations in the chemical composition of cloud droplets of different sizes are predicted in models. Measurements made in natural clouds to verify this prediction are extremely limited, however. During the spring of 1995 and the summers of 1995 ...

Surabi Menon; V. K. Saxena; B. D. Logie

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Observations and a Model of Undertow over the Inner Continental Shelf  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Onshore volume transport (Stokes drift) due to surface gravity waves propagating toward the beach can result in a compensating Eulerian offshore flow in the surf zone referred to as undertow. Observed offshore flows indicate that wave-driven ...

Steven J. Lentz; Melanie Fewings; Peter Howd; Janet Fredericks; Kent Hathaway

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Mesoscale Simulations of the Land Surface Effects of Historical Logging in a Moist Continental Climate Regime  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An enhanced knowledge of the feedbacks from land surface changes on regional climates is of great importance in the attribution of climate change. To explore the effects of deforestation on a midlatitude climate regime, two sets of two five-...

Nicholas P. Klingaman; Jason Butke; Daniel J. Leathers; Kevin R. Brinson; Elsa Nickl

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

The correlation of 27 day period solar activity and daily maximum temperature in continental Australia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the first observation of a 27 day period component in daily maximum temperature recorded at widely spaced locations in Australia. The 27 day component, extracted by band pass filtering, is correlated with the variation of daily solar radio flux during years close to solar minimum. We demonstrate that the correlation is related to the emergence of regions of solar activity on the Sun separated, temporally, from the emergence of other active regions. In this situation, which occurs only near solar minimum, the observed 27 day variation of temperature can be in phase or out of phase with the 27 day variation of solar activity. During solar maximum correlation of temperature and solar activity is much less defined. The amplitude of the 27 day temperature response to solar activity is large, at times as high as 6 degrees C, and much larger than the well documented temperature response to the 11 year cycle of solar activity. We demonstrate that the 27 day temperature response is localised to the Australia...

Edmonds, Ian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Intra- to Multidecadal Climate Variability over the Continental United States: 193299  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Trend analysis is used frequently in climate studies, but it is vulnerable to a number of conceptual shortcomings. This analysis of U.S. climate division data uses an alternate approach. The method used here subjects time series of annual average ...

Steven A. Mauget

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Sulfur geochemistry of thermogenic gas hydrate and associated sediment from the Texas-Louisiana continental slope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermogenic gas hydrate and associated sediment were recovered from the northern Gulf of Mexico east of the Mississippi Canyon to investigate the interactions between gas hydrate and sedimentary sulfides. Sediment solid phase analyses included total reduced sulfide (TRS), acid volatile sulfide, and citrate-dithionate and HCl extractable iron. Pore-fluid measurements included []H?S, chloride, sulfate, ammonia and total dissolved inorganic carbon. Gas hydrate hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide content were measured using a new wet chemical technique. The []?S relative to Vienna Canyon Diablo troilite was determined for TRS and hydrate H?S. Extensive (>95%) reduction of pore-fluid sulfate occurred, resulting in exceptionally high []H?S concentrations (up to ~10 mM) and TRS concentrations (271 50 []mole/g). However, the mole fraction of H?S within the gas hydrate was too low (~0.3%) to significantly influence hydrate stability. This appears related to high reactive iron concentrations which average 256 66 []mol/g (pyrite iron + HCl extractable iron). These iron-rich sediments are thus capable of sequestering much of the generated sulfide in the form of TRS minerals, thereby making it unavailable for incorporation by gas hydrate. The TRS concentrations are about an order of magnitude greater than expected for sites at similar water depths in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Steep dissolved []H?S concentration gradients were observed both above and below the gas hydrate indicating diffusion of sulfide from the surrounding system into the gas hydrate. The gradients were used to estimate an incorporation rate of ~1 []mol H?S/yr-cm assuming molecular diffusion. TRS in close proximity to the hydrate was depleted in ?S by ~10[0/00] relative to TRS remote to the hydrate. The precise mechanism responsible for this relative depletion in ?S is not clear, but may prove an important geochemical indicator of sediments in which gas hydrate is or has been present. Studies at other sites will be necessary to confirm the generality of these observations.

Gledhill, Dwight Kuehl

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Eddy-Train Encounters with a Continental Boundary: A South Atlantic Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Satellite altimetry suggests that large anticyclonic eddies (rings) originating from the Agulhas Current retroflection occasionally make their way across the entire South Atlantic Ocean. What happens when these rings encounter a western boundary ...

Jos L. L. Azevedo; Doron Nof; Mauricio M. Mata

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Large-Eddy Simulation of Post-Cold-Frontal Continental Stratocumulus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous large-eddy simulations (LES) of stratocumulus-topped boundary layers have been exclusively set in marine environments. Boundary layer stratocumulus clouds are also prevalent over the continent but have not been simulated previously. A ...

David B. Mechem; Yefim L. Kogan; David M. Schultz

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Continental scale estimastes of the biotic carbon flux from land cover change: 1850 to 1980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes a Numeric Data Package (NDP) that contains annual carbon flux estimates from land cover change for nine regions of the world (i.e., North America, Europe, the Former Soviet Union, Pacific Developed Region, China, South and Central America, North Africa-Middle East, Tropical Africa, and South and Southeast Asia). Annual rates of land cover change and vegetation-soil response curves for each region and ecosystem are included in the database. The vegetation-soil curves are used in a bookkeeping carbon model to estimate the carbon flux with the atmosphere from the clearing or degradation of vegetation, cultivation of soils, decay of dead vegetation, and the recovery of abandoned lands. The model calculates the net flux of carbon in each region based on land cover change rates and vegetation-soil response curves for the period 1850 to 1980 (a few regions have WA cover records beginning in 1700 and carbon flux estimates ending in 1990). These data were collected and modeled in an attempt to reduce the uncertainty associated with the magnitude and time course of the flux of carbon from terrestrial vegetation to the atmosphere.

Daniels, R.C. [ed.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Houghton, R.A.; Hackler, J.L. [Woods Hole Research Center, MA (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Long-Term Observations of the Dynamics of the Continental Planetary Boundary Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Time series of mixed layer depth, zi, and stable boundary layer height from March through October of 1998 are derived from a 915-MHz boundary layer profiling radar and CO2 mixing ratio measured from a 447-m tower in northern Wisconsin. Mixed ...

Chuixiang Yi; Kenneth J. Davis; Bradford W. Berger; Peter S. Bakwin

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "gom outer continental" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Neural network-based sensitivity analysis of summertime convection over the continental US  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although land-atmosphere coupling is thought to play a role in shaping the mean climate and its variability, it remains difficult to quantify precisely. The present study aims to isolate relationships between early morning surface turbulent fluxes ...

Filipe Aires; Pierre Gentine; Kirsten L. Findell; Benjamin R. Lintner; Christopher Kerr

482

Continental Passive Microwave-Based Rainfall Estimation Algorithm: Application to the Amazon Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a new statistical algorithm to estimate rainfall over the Amazon Basin region using the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Microwave Imager (TMI). The algorithm relies on empirical relationships derived for different ...

Thiago S. Biscaro; Carlos A. Morales

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Continental energy security: Energy security in the North American context1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

300 0 500 *Oil & gas from EIA ** Unconventional oil & gas; uncertain, could be large Other Methane Oil Gas Coal GtC Reserve growth Proven reserves* Emissions (CDIAC) EIA IPCC CO2(ppmv) 600 400 200 100 Hydrates Shale Oil Tar Sands ? ** #12;Caption if needed #12;"Free Will" Alternative 1. Phase Out Coal CO2

Hughes, Larry

484

Subthermocline Eddies over the Washington Continental Slope as Observed by Seagliders, 2003-09  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the California Current System, subthermocline, lens-like anticyclonic eddies generated within the California Undercurrent (CU) are one mechanism for lateral transport of the warm, saline waters of the CU. Garfield et al. (1999) established the ...

Noel A. Pelland; Charles C. Eriksen; Craig M. Lee

485

The Dynamics of Fluid Flow and Associated Chemical Fluxes at Active Continental Margins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mixture of fluids introduced during drilling and in situdrilling and geologic setting..13 1.4.2 The three fluidof drilling indicators (IR imagery and pore fluid chemical

Solomon, Evan A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

The Dynamics of fluid flow and associated chemical fluxes at active continental margins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mixture of fluids introduced during drilling and in situdrilling and geologic setting..13 1.4.2 The three fluidof drilling indicators (IR imagery and pore fluid chemical

Solomon, Evan Alan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Selecting effective fluorescent lamp and ballast for retrofit in the continental United States. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Electrical lighting is a major contributor to daytime peak energy demand, accounting for about 30 percent of total electricity consumption in most Army facilities. Some of this energy may be wasted because many existing lighting systems at Army Installations use outmoded technologies. While recent technology has improved the energy efficiency of all lighting systems, fluorescent lighting-the most widely used interior building lighting-has shown the greatest efficiency gains. Retrofits using high-efficiency fluorescent lamps and ballasts can yield significant operating cost savings. High-efficiency fluorescent lighting systems are widely available, but current information on their performance characteristics is highly technical and not easily accessible to Army facility managers considering retrofit options. This report provides a single, accessible source that summarizes fluorescent lamp and ballast performance characteristics and outlines selection procedures. Fluorescent lamp, Retrofit, Ballast, Lighting. Energy conservation.

Taylor, W.R.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Effects of Frozen Soil on Snowmelt Runoff and Soil Water Storage at a Continental Scale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The presence of ice in soil dramatically alters soil hydrologic and thermal properties. Despite this important role, many recent studies show that explicitly including the hydrologic effects of soil ice in land surface models degrades the ...

Guo-Yue Niu; Zong-Liang Yang

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

A Coupled HydrodynamicBottom Boundary Layer Model of Ekman Flow on Stratified Continental Shelves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a hydrodynamic model with turbulent energy closure that uses a simplified wave-current interaction model of the bottom boundary layer to compute bed drag coefficients. The coupled model is used to investigate the interaction ...

Timothy R. Keen; Scott M. Glenn

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Regional Precipitation Quantile Values for the Continental United States Computed from L-Moments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Precipitation quantile values have been computed for 9 probabilities, 8 durations, 12 starting months, and 1 1 1 regions across the United States. L-moment methodology has been used for the calculations. Discussed are the rationale for selecting ...

Nathaniel B. Guttman; J. R. M. Hosking; James R. Wallis

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Office of Fossil Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Rice to be appropriate. The initial ocean locations are Blake Ridge, Hydrate Ridge, Peru Margin and GOM. The permafrost location is Mallik. Although the ultimate goal of the...

492

Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Rice to be appropriate. The initial ocean locations are Blake Ridge, Hydrate Ridge, Peru Margin and GOM. The permafrost location is Mallik. Although the ultimate goal of the...

493

Office of Fossil Energy DOE Award No.: DE-NT0005668 Quarterly...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil Energy DOE Award No.: DE-NT0005668 Quarterly Report October 2009 to April 2011 Gas Hydrate Characterization in the GoM using Marine EM Methods Submitted by: Scripps...

494

Investigation of Vertical and Horizontal Momentum Transfer in the Gulf of Mexico Using Empirical Mode Decomposition Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data from a series of deep mooring stations in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) have been analyzed with the newly developed empirical mode decomposition and Hilbert spectral analysis method, abbreviated as HilbertHuang transformation (HHT). The flows in ...

Ronald J. Lai; Norden Huang

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) -...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Archive) JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | PricesDemandSupply | Storage In the News: Natural gas drilling activity in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico (GOM) generally increased over the...

496

Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves By Water Depth, 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves and Production by Water Depth, 2009 1 Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves and Production by Water Depth The Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore region (GOM...

497

A Proposal for Analyzing and Forecasting Lower-Atmospheric Undular Bores in the Western Gulf of Mexico Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is presented for analyzing and forecasting the occurrence of lower-atmospheric undular bores over the western and central Gulf of Mexico (GOM) and adjacent land areas using standard operational forecasting and analysis techniques. The ...

Ph