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1

PDF Document (387k)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

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2

Atascosa County, Texas ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Atascosa County, Texas ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Atascosa County, Texas ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number...

3

Wharton County Elec Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wharton County Elec Coop, Inc Wharton County Elec Coop, Inc Place Texas Utility Id 20472 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location TRE NERC ERCOT Yes ISO Ercot Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial - LP3 Commercial Commercial and Small Power Service Commercial Flood Light Fixtures-1000 w Mercury, Metallic or HPS Lighting Flood Light Fixtures-400 w Mercury, Metallic or HPS Lighting Industrial - LP3 Industrial Irrigation and Seasonal Agricultural Service Commercial Large Industrial Industrial Large Industrial-Primary Voltage Industrial

4

Award Recipient of ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry JM Eagle Wharton Plastic Pipe Manufacturing Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wharton Plastic Pipe Manufacturing Plant JM Eagle 10807 U.S. 59 Road Wharton, TX 77488 The Wharton Plastic Pipe Manufacturing Plant, located on an old cattle field, opened in 1985 by first manufacturing PVC pipe. The manufacturing of injection molding was added in 1988, corrugated pipe was added in 2009, and corrugated fittings were added in 2011. There are expectations for the plant to expand into manufacturing PE pipe fittings in the future. The Wharton plant achieved the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry in June 2010. The plant achieved a 15.5% reduction in energy intensity in the first year following its baseline. The success of achieving the Challenge for Industry came principally from an energy conservation program that focused on not operating equipment other than that needed for current production,

5

Atascosa County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8661281°, -98.5721016° 8661281°, -98.5721016° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":28.8661281,"lon":-98.5721016,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

6

Wharton, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

31546°, -74.5818254° 31546°, -74.5818254° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.8931546,"lon":-74.5818254,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

7

Wharton County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0932°, -96.1526985° 0932°, -96.1526985° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.3690932,"lon":-96.1526985,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

8

Award Recipient of the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry Wharton...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

manufacturing resources K-12 school resources Multifamily housing resources Restaurant resources Retail resources Senior care resources Small business resources State and...

9

San Antonio Regional Middle School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Bexar, Kendall, Bandera, Medina, Atascosa, Wilson, Guadalupe, Comal Date of Electric Car Competition: 2222013 Please contact the regional coordinator for more information on...

10

NIST WTC Public-Private Response Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... IAFSS, ASME, LANL, MIT, Princeton, Northwestern, UT Austin, Georgia Tech, Penn State, Drexel, Wharton, Columbia, Lehigh, UMd, WPI, ...

2012-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

11

WTC Technical Conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... IAFSS, ASME, LANL, MIT, Princeton, Northwestern, UT Austin, Georgia Tech, Penn State, Drexel, Wharton, Columbia, Lehigh, UMd, WPI, ...

2011-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

12

No Slide Title  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... IAFSS, ASME, LANL, MIT, Princeton, Northwestern, UT Austin, Georgia Tech, Penn State, Drexel, Wharton, Columbia, Lehigh, UMd, WPI, ...

2011-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

13

View / Download  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

University of Pennsylvania's School of. Engineering and Applied Science and the Wharton School. Her development of CermeTi has opened the door to many...

14

An Improved Algorithm for the Generalized Quadratic Assignment ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electrical and Systems Engineering, University of Pennsylvania ... Operations and Information Management, The Wharton School,. University .... feasible solution generators, Lagrangean relaxation, and subgradient optimization to solve hard.

15

R&D Tax Policy During the 1980s: Success of Failure?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1992. "Tax Incentives for R&D: What Do the Data Tell Us?"Implicit Tax Effects of the R&D Tax Credit." Wharton School,on Canadian Industrial R&D Expenditures." Canadian Public

Hall, Bronwyn H.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Ecological Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Process for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shari Stevens Region VII Steve Wharton Robert Koke Region III Barbara O'Korn Root Robert Davis Region VIII Gerry Henningsen, Ph.D.,D.V.M. Region IV Lynn Wellman Dale Hoff, Ph.D....

17

Capturing Carbon Will it work to cool the world?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Capturing Carbon Will it work to cool the world? Speakers: Dr. Malcolm Wilson Chief Executive in Exploration Geophysics Department of Geoscience, University of Calgary Theme Leader for Secure Carbon Storage, Carbon Management Canada Don Wharton Vice-President, Sustainable Development TransAlta Corporation

Calgary, University of

18

{Timko Bio 09-11 w-pic.1 } As the Chief Technology & Strategy Officer for Pitney Bowes, Joe Timko leads a portfolio that  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and technology to this role. He joined Pitney Bowes in 2010 from McKinsey & Company where he was a Partner, and operations. Prior to McKinsey, Joe was a product manager and R&D leader for Bell Laboratories Bell and McKinsey, Joe was recognized as a people developer. Joe received an MBA from The Wharton

Lin, Xiaodong

19

Climate Zone Number 2 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2 is defined as 2 is defined as Hot - Humid(2A) with IP Units 6300 < CDD50ºF ≤ 9000 and SI Units 3500 < CDD10ºC ≤ 5000 Dry(2B) with IP Units 6300 < CDD50ºF ≤ 9000 and SI Units 3500 < CDD10ºC ≤ 5000 . The following places are categorized as class 2 climate zones: Acadia Parish, Louisiana Alachua County, Florida Allen Parish, Louisiana Anderson County, Texas Angelina County, Texas Appling County, Georgia Aransas County, Texas Ascension Parish, Louisiana Assumption Parish, Louisiana Atascosa County, Texas Atkinson County, Georgia Austin County, Texas Avoyelles Parish, Louisiana Bacon County, Georgia Baker County, Florida Baker County, Georgia Baldwin County, Alabama Bandera County, Texas Bastrop County, Texas Bay County, Florida Beauregard Parish, Louisiana Bee County, Texas

20

Climate Zone 2A | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Zone 2A Climate Zone 2A Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard consisting of Climate Zone Number 2 and Climate Zone Subtype A. Climate Zone 2A is defined as Hot - Humid with IP Units 6300 < CDD50ºF ≤ 9000 and SI Units 3500 < CDD10ºC ≤ 5000 . The following places are categorized as class 2A climate zones: Acadia Parish, Louisiana Alachua County, Florida Allen Parish, Louisiana Anderson County, Texas Angelina County, Texas Appling County, Georgia Aransas County, Texas Ascension Parish, Louisiana Assumption Parish, Louisiana Atascosa County, Texas Atkinson County, Georgia Austin County, Texas Avoyelles Parish, Louisiana Bacon County, Georgia Baker County, Florida Baker County, Georgia Baldwin County, Alabama Bastrop County, Texas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "goliad atascosa wharton" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Argonne Transportation Technology R&D Center - Lithium-ion Batteries,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alternative Fuels Autonomie Batteries Downloadable Dynamometer Database Engines Green Racing GREET Hybrid Electric Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Materials Modeling, Simulation & Software Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles PSAT Smart Grid Student Competitions Technology Analysis Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center Working With Argonne Contact TTRDC Photo of battery developers that links to story Press Coverage What's New Multimedia Logo of the Wharton School of Business Dec. 13. Knowledge@Wharton. Green SPorts and Transportation: The Elephant in the Room Logo of Crain's Chicago Business Dec. 10. Crain's Chicago Business. Argonne chemist Pete Chupas named one of Crain's 2013 "40 under 40" Logo of the Sioux City Journal Dec. 2. Sioux City Journal. Ethanol Supporters Say the Numbers Support Their Industry

22

Evidence from the Natural Gas Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

country. It was founded in 1969 through a grant from Oppenheimer & Company in honor of its late partner, Rodney L. White. The Center receives support from its endowment and from annual contributions from its Members. The Center sponsors a wide range of financial research. It publishes a working paper series and a reprint series. It holds an annual seminar, which for the last several years has focused on household financial decision making. The Members of the Center gain the opportunity to participate in innovative research to break new ground in the field of finance. Through their membership, they also gain access to the Wharton Schools faculty

Christopher C. Geczy; Bernadette A. Minton; Catherine Schrand

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration Project, Final Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0473)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

W.A. W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO 2 Capture and Sequestration Project Final Environmental Impact Statement Summary February 2013 DOE/EIS-0473 Office of Fossil Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK COVER SHEET Responsible Federal Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Title: W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO 2 Capture and Sequestration Project, Final Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0473) Location: Southeastern Texas, including Fort Bend, Wharton, and Jackson counties Contacts: For further information about this Environmental Impact Statement, contact: For general information on the DOE process for implementing the National Environmental Policy Act, contact: Mark W. Lusk U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 (304) 285-4145 or Mark.Lusk@netl.doe.gov

24

EIS-0473-DEIS-Summary-2012.pdf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO 2 Capture and Sequestration Project Draft Environmental Impact Statement Summary September 2012 DOE/EIS-0473D Office of Fossil Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK COVER SHEET Responsible Federal Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Title: W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO 2 Capture and Sequestration Project, Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0473D) Location: Southeastern Texas, including Fort Bend, Wharton, and Jackson Counties Contacts: For further information about this Environmental Impact Statement, contact: For general information on the DOE process for implementing the National Environmental Policy Act, contact: Mark W. Lusk U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory

25

An applied paleoecology case study: Bahia Grande, Texas prior to construction of the Brownsville Ship Channel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bahia Grande is a large lagoon located within Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge in Cameron County, Texas. When the Brownsville Ship Channel was built along the southern end of the lagoon in 1936, Bahia Grande was cut off from the marine water of Laguna Madre. Since that time, Bahia Grande has been primarily dry with only ephemeral fresh water coming from heavy rainfall events, resulting in a severe decline in biological productivity. A restoration project led by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has proposed to cut new channels between Bahia Grande and the Ship Channel to restore the connection with Laguna Madre. This is a large-scale project with major implications for the water quality, surrounding ecology, and associated biota in the region. Unfortunately, because very little is known about Bahia Grande prior to isolation, it is difficult to predict whether the results of the restoration will be comparable to the pre-Ship Channel environment. Paleoecological data provide the best opportunity to understand what Bahia Grande was like in the past. This study uses statistical analyses of the molluscan death assemblages from Bahia Grande to gain a better understanding of the environmental conditions in the lagoon before it was isolated. The first question addressed is how does Bahia Grande relate to other water bodies on the Texas coast? This may provide a modern analog to the past conditions in Bahia Grande. The second question inquires whether there are any local patterns or variations within Bahia Grande and several smaller surrounding lagoons. These results provide an important baseline for comparison with the restored lagoon. The results of this investigation show that, in a regional context, Bahia Grande was most similar to Alazan Bay and Baffin Bay, which are mostly enclosed shallow bays with high salinities due to the arid climate and limited freshwater inflow. Within Bahia Grande, there are several distinct molluscan assemblages. Salinity and water coverage are the most likely environmental factors responsible for the differences within Bahia Grande. Additionally, data from surrounding lagoons strongly indicate that some connections with Bahia Grande existed in the past.

Lichlyter, Stephen Alvah

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Foraging ecology of wintering wading birds along the Gulf of Mexico coast  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I studied flock composition, distribution and foraging ecology of wintering wading birds along the Gulf of Mexico coast. I focused on geographic variability in wintering wading bird assemblages, the processes that structured these assemblages and habitat use by wading birds. I found considerable variation among three sites, Aransas National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR), Texas; Marsh Island Wildlife Refuge (MIWR), Louisiana; and Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuge (CNWR), Florida. Species comprising wintering wading bird assemblages varied regionally. ANWR had the most species-rich assemblage, with eight species. MIWR had only six wading bird species. And CNWR had only three different species. Processes that structured wintering wading bird assemblages also varied regionally. In ANWR, Texas, the Random Fraction niche apportionment model (RF model) best explained the empirical abundance data for ANWR. For abundance data from MIWR a good fit was obtained with the MacArthur Fraction (MF) model and the Power Fraction (PF) models. None of the models fully explained the CNWR abundance data. I also examined patterns of habitat partitioning among wintering wading birds at three different scales at two sites, Matagorda Island National Wildlife Refuge (MINWR) and Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge (LANWR). At the macrohabitat level, wintering wading birds showed interspecific differences in macrohabitat use of both open water habitats and vegetated flats. At the mesohabitat level all species at MINWR used the category nearest the edge most often, alternatively, at LANWR wading birds were most often in the mesohabitat category of 8.1- 12 m. from the edge. In both locations wading birds partitioned habitat based on water depth. Finally, I found that Great Egrets and Snowy Egrets participated more often in flock foraging and derived more benefits from feeding in flocks than other species. Great Egrets feeding in flocks had a higher mean strike rate than those foraging alone, whereas Snowy Egrets had a higher success rate foraging in flocks than those foraging alone. In the case of the darkercolored species (e.g., Great Blue Herons, etc.) they either showed no difference in behaviors between birds foraging in flocks versus those foraging alone or they actually did worse when they foraged in flocks.

Sherry, Dawn Ann

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Analysis of the Pass Cavallo shipwreck assemblage, Matagorda Bay, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A survey conducted in February of 1998 located an anomaly originally believed to be the remains of L'Aimable. L'Aimable was one of four ships utilized by Rene-Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle, for his voyage to colonize the Gulf Coast in 1684. The anomaly, a wrecked vessel with a heavy iron signature, was located outside the entrance to the historic pass into Matagorda Bay, Texas. Artifacts were extracted from the wreck site to aid in the identification of the vessel, which was subsequently determined to be more recent in origin. A preliminary examination of the artifacts indicates that the shipwreck dates to the first half of the 19th century. The survey recovered over two hundred artifacts. The assemblage of artifacts includes over 80 lead shot, over 40 examples of brass firearm furniture, over 15 firearm fragments, several pieces of copper sheathing, and iron bar stock. Almost two-thirds of the material is associated with small arms. The majority of the identifiable firearms are military arms of three patterns: the British Short Land Pattern, the British India Pattern, and the 1757 Spanish musket. Historical research has determined that these arms were circulating in Texas, New Orleans, and Mexico, as early as 1815. The British Pattern arms were both purchased for the Mexican army in the 1820s, and used by the British Infantry in the Battle of New Orleans in 1815. The 1757 Spanish musket was used chiefly by Spanish expeditionary forces in North America in the late 18th century. Evidence garnered from the artifacts suggest that the firearms were shipboard cargo onboard a small, wood-hulled sailing vessel that wrecked between the years 1815 and 1845. Archival and historical research isolated nine wreck candidates for this period. Historical research and artifact analysis suggest the Hannah Elizabeth as the primary candidate for this wreck site. The Hannah Elizabeth was a small merchant schooner from New Orleans laden with a munitions cargo for Texas troops stationed at Goliad. The vessel wrecked at the entrance of the historic Pass Cavallo while evading capture from a Mexican brig-of-war in November of 1835.

Borgens, Amy Anne

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Education Program for Improved Water Quality in Copano Bay Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Copano Bay watershed covers approximately 1.4 million acres encompassing portions of Karnes, Bee, Goliad, Refugio, San Patricio and Aransas counties. Copano Bay and its main tributaries, the Mission and Aransas rivers, were placed on the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) 303(d) list in 1998 due to levels of bacteria that exceed water quality standards established to protect oyster waters use. A Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) program was initiated in September 2003 to identify and assess sources of these bacteria. The Center for Research in Water Resources at the University of Texas at Austin (UT CRWR) was funded by TCEQ to conduct computer-based modeling to determine the bacterial loading and reductions necessary to attain water quality standards. Subsequently Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi (TAMU-CC) conducted bacterial source tracking (BST) with funding from Texas General Land Office (TGLO) and the Coastal Bend Bays and Estuaries Program (CBBEP) to determine actual sources of bacteria. Due to the findings of the initial efforts of the TMDL and concerns voiced by stakeholders in the watershed, Texas AgriLife Extension Service was awarded a Clean Water Act 319(h) Nonpoint Source Grant from the Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board (TSSWCB) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The overall goal of this project was to improve water quality in Copano Bay and its tributaries by increasing awareness of water quality issues throughout the watershed. This increased awareness was to be accomplished by providing education and demonstrations for land and livestock owners in the watershed on best management practices (BMPs) to decrease or prevent bacteria from entering waterways. Through creation of a project website, 52 educational programs, and nine one-on-one consultations over the span of the project, we have reached 5,408 residents in and around the Copano Bay watershed. Additionally, through this project all data collected for the initial TMDL efforts was re-evaluated and findings were presented in the Task 2 Report. Project members developed a curriculum for horse owners, A Guide to Good Horsekeeping that addressed BMPs specific to horse operations. Land and livestock owners who had already implemented BMPs or were interested in implementing BMPs were given a participation certificate.

Berthold, A.; Moench, E.; Wagner, K.; Paschal, J.

2012-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

29

Effect of Rate and Season of Application of Aminocyclopyrachlor on the Control of Acacia Farnesiana (L.) Willd. in South Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study was conducted on two rangeland sites in south Texas with large populations of huisache (Acacia farnesiana (L.) Willd.); the Bush Ranch in Goliad County, and the Hitchcock Ranch in Bee County. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effect of three herbicide treatments and three seasons of application on 1) apparent mortality of huisache, 2) huisache canopy cover, 3) huisache stem density, and 4) herbaceous ground cover. Herbicide treatments included aminocyclopyrachlor alone at a rate of 0.315 kg a.i. ha-1, aminocyclopyrachlor + triclopyr at a rate of 0.210 kg a.i. ha-1 + 0.420 kg a.e. ha-1, and triclopyr + picloram at a rate of 0.560 kg a.e. ha-1 + 0.560 kg a.e. ha-1. Herbicide treatments were applied over 3 x 30 m plots containing previously mowed huisache in May, July, and October of 2010 with ground-broadcast equipment at a rate of 140 L ha-1. Randomly selected huisache individuals and herbaceous ground cover at randomly selected points were monitored for the duration of the study. Statistical analyses of huisache mortality, canopy area, and stem densities revealed that at both sites one year after treatment, huisache mortality across the three seasons of application was consistently higher in plots treated with aminocyclopyrachlor + triclopyr (50 to 99%) versus those treated with aminocyclopyrachlor alone (16 to 78%) or triclopyr + picloram (4 to 70%). This mixture also provided the greatest reductions in huisache canopy area (60 to 99% reduction) and stem density (61 to 99% reduction). Also at both sites, spring applications consistently provided the greatest huisache control and canopy and stem reductions. Herbicide treatment and season of application had little effect on post-treatment herbaceous ground cover, likely due to extreme drought conditions in 2011. Of the possible combinations of seasons of application and herbicide treatments, the application in the spring of aminocyclopyrachlor plus triclopyr provided the most desirable results in terms of huisache mortality, canopy reduction, and stem density reduction. However, for sites invaded by huisache that are located near to potentially susceptible crops, the application of aminocyclopyrachlor plus triclopyr or aminocyclopyrachlor alone in the fall after the harvest of those crops may be more appropriate in order to avoid non-target injury while still providing acceptable huisache control.

McGinty, Joshua

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Economic feasibility of ethanol production from sweet sorghum juice in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental and political concerns centered on energy use from gasoline have led to a great deal of research on ethanol production. The goal of this thesis is to determine if it is profitable to produce ethanol in Texas using sweet sorghum juice. Four different areas, Moore, Hill, Willacy, and Wharton Counties, using two feedstock alternatives, sweet sorghum only and sweet sorghum and corn, will be analyzed using Monte Carlo simulation to determine the probability of economic success. Economic returns to the farmers in the form of a contract price for the average sweet sorghum yield per acre in each study area and to the ethanol plant buying sweet sorghum at the contract price will be simulated and ranked. The calculated sweet sorghum contract prices offered to farmers are $9.94, $11.44, $29.98, and $36.21 per ton in Wharton, Willacy, Moore, and Hill Counties, respectively. The contract prices are equal to the next most profitable crop returns or ten percent more than the total cost to produce sweet sorghum in the study area. The wide variation in the price is due to competing crop returns and the sweet sorghum growing season. Ethanol production using sweet sorghum and corn is the most profitable alternative analyzed for an ethanol plant. A Moore County ethanol plant has the highest average net present value of $492.39 million and is most preferred overall when using sweet sorghum and corn to produce ethanol. Sweet sorghum ethanol production is most profitable in Willacy County but is not economically successful with an average net present value of $-11.06 million. Ethanol production in Hill County is least preferred with an average net present value of $-712.00 and $48.40 million when using sweet sorghum only and sweet sorghum and corn, respectively. Producing unsubsidized ethanol from sweet sorghum juice alone is not profitable in Texas. Sweet sorghum ethanol supplemented by grain is more economical but would not be as profitable as producing ethanol from only grain in the Texas Panhandle. Farmers profit on average from contract prices for sweet sorghum when prices cover total production costs for the crop.

Morris, Brittany Danielle

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Banks as Secret Keepers ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Banks are optimally opaque institutions. They produce debt for use as a transaction medium (bank money), which requires that information about the backing assets not be revealed, so that bank money does not fluctuate in value, reducing its efficiency in trade. This need for opacity conflicts with the production of information about investment projects, necessary for allocative efficiency. How can information be produced and not revealed? Financial intermediaries exist to hide such information; they are created and structured to keep secrets. For the economy as a whole, this can be accomplished by a separation in how firms finance themselves; they divide into bank finance and capital market/stock market finance based on how well they can be used to maintain information away from liquidity markets. Firms with large projects, risky projects or projects easy to evaluate are less likely to be financed by banks. We thank Michael Woodford and seminar participants at Columbia, MIT, Rutgers, Universite de Montreal, Wharton and the SED Meetings at Cyprus for useful comments. The usual waiver of liability applies.

Tri Vi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

The Demand for Homeowners Insurance with Bundled Catastrophe Coverages *  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we estimate demand for homeowner insurance in Florida. Since we are interested in a number of factors influencing demand, we approach the problem from two directions. Using 3SLS estimation, we first estimate two hedonic equations representing the price mark-up and the level of premiums per contract. We are interested in how the contracts are bundled and how the various terms influence the price mark-up and the overall level of premiums. Second, we estimate the demand for homeowners insurance using the ISO's indicated loss cost as our proxy forreal insurance services demanded. We assume that the demand for coverage is essentially a joint demand and thus we can estimate the demand for cat cover separately from the demand for non-cat cover. Two notable results are that cat coverage is more price sensitive than non-cat coverage and that cat coverage is an inferior good. This research is supported by the Wharton Project on Managing Catastrophic Risks. This paper will contribute to a report that will be jointly written and published by the Insurance Services Office (ISO) and the authors. We gratefully acknowledge the assistance of ISO in providing much of the data used in this analysis and of the companies who have allowed their exposure data to be used for this research project. The efforts of Michael Murray of ISO deserve particular recognition. James Ament, Howard Kunreuther, Neil Doherty, Michael Murray and Steven Nivin provided helpful comments on an earlier draft. This paper is still preliminary and many revisions still remain to be made. The Demand for Catastrophe Insurance with Bundled Catastrophic Coverages

Martin F. Grace; Robert W. Klein; Paul R. Kleindorfer

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Analysis of alternative-fuel price trajectories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Findings are presented from a study to (1) acquire, analyze, and report alternative published price projections including both oil- and coal-price trajectories, and to (2) apply the fixed-annuity formula to the updated primary source projections (Energy Information Administration; Data Resources, Inc.; and Wharton Econometric Forecasting Associates, Inc.) and to the newly acquired price projections. This report also encompasses: comparisons of key assumptions underlying the price projections, and a discussion of the applicability of the fixed-annuity formula as used in the alternative-cost calculation. Section II contains graphic presentations of all updated and newly acquired coal and oil price forecasts and the corresponding calculated annuity equivalents, tabulated presentations and discussions of each forecast and underlying assumptions, and a description of how each forecast price series was transformed into input for the present-value formulas. Section III presents the fixed-annuity formula employed and discusses its appropriateness for this application. Section IV discusses the applicability of the net present value approach for comparing alternate-fuel price trajectories. Appendix A contains a listing of contacts as potential sources of price forecasts. Appendix B contains the raw forecast data from each forecast source and the coal and oil price series derived from the raw data which were actually input into the cost calculation procedure. Appendix C contains a description and listing of the computer program developed to implement the cost calculation procedure. Finally, Appendix D contains tabulations and discussions of other alternative world crude price forecasts that were identified, but for which no corresponding coal-price projections were available. (MCW)

Not Available

1980-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

34

Faculty, Staff, and Student Cooperators About Our Cover Spigelia marilandica, Indian Pink, is an  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in southern Kentucky (Wharton and Barbour 1971), it is found as a roadside plant on a variety of soil types. Over its rangeFlorida into east Texas, southeast Oklahoma, southwest Indiana, northwest Georgia, and east South Carolinait is common (Duncan and Duncan 1999). The red tubular flowers with five folded lobes showing the yellow interior color are stunning; they stop people dead in their tracks (Armitage 1997). An average of 13 (8-17 on 68 stems on a five-yearold division) of the 2-inch (5-cm) upright flowers are found on a one-sided cyme. The glossy ovate, opposite, sessile leaves add to the attractive appearance of the plant. West Kentucky plants grow 18-24 inches (46-61 cm) tall in sun or shade landscape environments. The bloom period starts in late May and continues through June; occasionally scattered blooms will occur in the fall. Rick Darke (2002) says they will re-bloom heavily if cut back after June flowering. Individual plants in the University of Kentucky Research and Education Center Botanical Garden, Princeton, KY are now seven years old and show signs of indefinite longevity. Spigelia marilandica is known to attract hummingbirds (Cullina 2000; Glick 2002). This characteristic, added to the beauty of the flowers, the size of the plant, its environmental and pest tolerances, and longevity in the landscape, indicate Spigelia marilandica is an plant that should be more widely used in landscapesin particular, Kentucky landscapes. A quick search of catalogs and nursery contacts indicate that the plant is much more available than in the past thanks to tissue culture propagation. Spigelia marilandica won Kentuckys 2010 Theodore Klein Plant Award (go to

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Advanced Liquid Natural Gas Onboard Storage System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cummins Westport Incorporated (CWI) has designed and developed a liquefied natural gas (LNG) vehicle fuel system that includes a reciprocating pump with the cold end submerged in LNG contained in a vacuum-jacketed tank. This system was tested and analyzed under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced LNG Onboard Storage System (ALOSS) program. The pumped LNG fuel system developed by CWI and tested under the ALOSS program is a high-pressure system designed for application on Class 8 trucks powered by CWI's ISX G engine, which employs high-pressure direct injection (HPDI) technology. A general ALOSS program objective was to demonstrate the feasibility and advantages of a pumped LNG fuel system relative to on-vehicle fuel systems that require the LNG to be ''conditioned'' to saturation pressures that exceeds the engine fuel pressure requirements. These advantages include the capability to store more fuel mass in given-size vehicle and station tanks, and simpler lower-cost LNG refueling stations that do not require conditioning equipment. Pumped LNG vehicle fuel systems are an alternative to conditioned LNG systems for spark-ignition natural gas and port-injection dual-fuel engines (which typically require about 100 psi), and they are required for HPDI engines (which require over 3,000 psi). The ALOSS program demonstrated the feasibility of a pumped LNG vehicle fuel system and the advantages of this design relative to systems that require conditioning the LNG to a saturation pressure exceeding the engine fuel pressure requirement. LNG tanks mounted on test carts and the CWI engineering truck were repeatedly filled with LNG saturated at 20 to 30 psig. More fuel mass was stored in the vehicle tanks as well as the station tank, and no conditioning equipment was required at the fueling station. The ALOSS program also demonstrated the general viability and specific performance of the CWI pumped LNG fuel system design. The system tested as part of this program is designed to be used on Class 8 trucks with CWI ISX G HPDI engines. Extensive test cart and engineering truck tests of the pump demonstrated good durability and the high-pressure performance needed for HPDI application. The LNG tanks manufactured by Taylor-Wharton passed SAE J2343 Recommended Practice drop tests and accelerated road-load vibration tests. NER and hold-time tests produced highly consistent results. Additional tests confirmed the design adequacy of the liquid level sensor, vaporizer, ullage volume, and other fuel system components. While the testing work performed under this program focused on a high-pressure pumped LNG fuel system design, the results also validate the feasibility of a low-pressure pumped fuel system. A low-pressure pumped fuel system could incorporate various design refinements including a simpler and lighter-weight pump, which would decrease costs somewhat relative to a high-pressure system.

Greg Harper; Charles Powars

2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z