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Sample records for goliad atascosa wharton

  1. Village of Wharton, Ohio (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    - File1a1 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 20471 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes This...

  2. Project Profile: Design of Social and Economic Incentives and Information Campaigns to Promote Solar Technology Diffusion through Data-Driven Behavior Modeling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sandia National Laboratories, along with partners at the California Center for Sustainable Energy, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, the University of Pennsylvania Wharton School, and...

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: Global Insight, Inc. / Department...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    combining DRI (formerly Data Resources, Inc.) and WEFA (formerly Wharton Econometric Forecasting Associates). Due to copyrightdistribution laws being derived from a proprietary...

  4. Project Profile: Design of Social and Economic Incentives and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Pennsylvania Wharton School, and Vanderbilt University, under the Solar Energy Evolution and Diffusion Studies (SEEDS) program, developed powerful computer algorithms that ...

  5. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Klein, P (1) Mishra, S (1) Newman, JF (1) Turner, DD (1) Wainwright, CE (1) Wharton, S (1) ... Klein, P ; Bonin, TA ; Newman, JF ; Turner, DD ; Chilson, P ; Blumberg, WG ; Mishra, ...

  6. LABLE: A multi-institutional, student-led, atmospheric boundary...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Klein, P. ; Bonin, T. A. ; Newman, J. F. ; Turner, D. D. ; Chilson, P. B. ; Wainwright, C. E. ; Blumberg, W. G. ; Mishra, S. ; Carney, M. ; Jacobsen, E. P. ; Wharton, ...

  7. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Carney, M (1) Chilson, P (1) Jacobsen, EP (1) Klein, P (1) Mishra, S (1) Newman, JF (1) Turner, DD (1) Wainwright, CE (1) Wharton, S (1) Save Results Save this search to My Library ...

  8. Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment (LABLE) Final Campaign...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Klein, P 1 ; Bonin, TA ; Newman, JF 2 ; Turner, DD 3 ; Chilson, P 4 ; Blumberg, WG 4 ; Mishra, S ; Wainwright, CE ; Carney, M 1 ; Jacobsen, EP 4 ; Wharton, S ...

  9. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Assessment of Land Surface Model Performance in WRF for Simulating Wind at Heights Relevant to the Wind Energy Community Wharton, S ; Simpson, M ; Osuna, J ; Newman, J ; Biraud, S ...

  10. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    UNAM 5 (1982) 1 1982DO01 K.G.R. Doss, P.D. Barnes, N. Colella, S.A. Dytman, R.A. Eisenstein, C. Ellegaard, F. Takeutchi, W.R. Wharton, J.F. Amann, R.H. Pehl et al, Phys. Rev....

  11. DESIGN AND TEST OF NON-EVACUATED SOLAR

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... C o l l a r e s - P e r e i r a , Nancy Goodman, P e r e t z Greenman, Peter Roothan, and ... Goodman, P r . Greenman, J. O'Gallagher, A. Rabl, L. Wharton and R. Winston, "Nonevacuated ...

  12. Sandia National Laboratories: Global Insight, Inc. / Department of Labor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facebook Twitter YouTube Flickr RSS Working with Sandia Global Insight, Inc. / Department of Labor Global Insight, Inc. (GII), was created by combining DRI (formerly Data Resources, Inc.) and WEFA (formerly Wharton Econometric Forecasting Associates). Due to copyright/distribution laws being derived from a proprietary service that Sandia pays for, Sandia can no longer provide GII factor information at this website. However, Sandia will continue to supply the DOL and the "combined key

  13. DOE/SC-ARM-14-034 Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment (LABLE) Final Campaign Report P Klein WG Blumberg TA Bonin S Mishra JF Newman M Carney DD Turner EP Jacobsen PB Chilson S Wharton CE Wainwright RK Newsom November 2014 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy,

  14. Role of Surface Energy Exchange Field Campaign Report

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    40 The Role of Surface Energy Exchange for Simulating Wind Inflow: An Evaluation of Multiple Land Surface Models in WRF for the Southern Great Plains Site Field Campaign Report S Wharton M Simpson J Osuna J Newman S Biraud May 2016 CLIMATE RESEARCH FACILITY Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability

  15. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Switch to Detail View for this search SciTech Connect Search Results Page 1 of 1 Search for: All records Creators/Authors contains: "Wharton, Sonia" × Sort by Relevance Sort by Date (newest first) Sort by Date (oldest first) Sort by Relevance « Prev Next » Everything8 Electronic Full Text4 Citations2 Multimedia0 Datasets2 Software0 Filter Results Filter by Subject carbon (4) carbon dioxide (4) ecosystems (4) resolution (4) biosphere (3) climates (3) satellites (3) disturbances (2)

  16. Using multispectral videography to distinguish the pattern of zonation and plant species composition in brackish water marshes of the Rio Grande Delta

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judd, F.W.; Lonard, R.I.; Everitt, J.H. [Univ. of Texas-Pan American, Edinburg, TX (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    Cyclical flooding of the Rio Grande and movement of floodwater into distributary channels formerly constituted significant freshwater input into the marshes of the Rio Grande Delta, but dams and flood control projects have eliminated this source of freshwater. The marshes are now dependent on rainfall alone for freshwater input and may be experiencing significant change in species of vegetation, abundance and patterns of distribution. Unfortunately, little is known of the ecology of these marshes. As a first step in providing needed information, multispectral videography was used to distinguish species composition and patterns of zonation in a brackish water marsh at Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge, Cameron County, Texas. The line intercept method of vegetation analysis provided ground truth and quantified species distribution and abundance. The vegetation of a typical brackish water marsh is organized into three zones along an elevation gradient. At the lowest elevations there is a distinct zone dominated by maritime saltwort, Batis maritime. At the lowest elevations in this zone where rainwater remains the longest, stands of California bulrush, Scirpus californicus, occur. An intermediate zone supports shoregrass, Monanthochloe littoralis, as the dominant species. A third (highest) zone is dominated by Gulf cordgrass, Spartina spartinae. The upper margin of this zone grades gradually into a shrub-grassland community that occurs on lomas (clay dunes). Each of the zones is distinguished by a distinctive signature in the multispectral videography. The Batis maritime community has a bright pink to red image response. Monanthochloe littoralis has a dark brown color and Spartina spartinae has a light gray to pinkish-tan color. Brackish water marshes may be distinguished from saltwater marshes by the relative positions of the Monanthochloe littoralis and Spartina spartinae communities, but additional data are needed before this possibility is confirmed.

  17. Subsidence at Boling salt dome: results of multiple resource production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mullican, W.F. III

    1988-02-01

    Boling dome (Wharton and Fort Bend Counties) has experienced more overall subsidence and collapse than any other dome in Texas. These processes are directly related to production of sulfur and hydrocarbons from the southeastern quadrant of the dome. Greatest vertical movement due to subsidence and collapse is 35 ft (based on the Boling 7.5 min topographic map, last surveyed in 1953). Most of the subsidence (83%) is attributed to sulfur production, whereas only 11 to 12% can be linked to hydrocarbon production. Reservoir compaction is the dominant mechanism of land subsidence in areas of hydrocarbon production at Boling dome. Trough subsidence, chimneying, plug caving, and piping are the characteristic mechanisms over sulfur fields developed at the salt dome. The structural and hydrologic stability of the surface and subsurface at Boling dome is compromised by these active deformation processes. Damage to pipelines and well-casing strings may result in costly leaks which have the potential of being uncontrollable and catastrophic. Reduction in hydrologic stability may result if natural aquitards are breached and fresh water mixes with saline water or if hydrologic conduits to the diapir are opened, allowing unrestricted dissolution of the salt stock.

  18. QER- Comment of William Smith III

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hello DOE, Thanks for accepting my comments on the Quadrennial Energy Review by e-mail. There will be those who wish to promote nuclear energy as a source of electricity for future use in the USA. I speak against this form of energy. Because it creates long-lived radioactive wastes, nuclear power is incompatible with the biological world in which we live and from which we evolved. The lasting nature of these wastes creates a moral quandry for us in this generation, as we leave behind such biological poisons for our descents to manage, in ways which we do not yet know. A further problem with nucler energy is that any fission reaction creates plutonium, the stuff of nuclear weapons. If nuclear power reactors were to be spread around the world, inevitably the proliferation of nuclear weapons would follow. So-called '4th generation' or 'thorium' reactors suffer from a similar problem, for although they may generate less plutonium, their fuel cycle involves creation of large amounts of U-233 which carries a similar proliferation risk to plutonium-239. I advocate crafting an energy future for our nation bsed on the natural flows of renewable energy, coupled with a diversified structure which generates electricity at many smaller sources. Implicit in any modern energy system is the increased efficiency of energy usage which will continue to lower the bulk amounts of energy, particularly electricity, which our society uses to satisfy our industrial, military, commercial, and personal needs. Clearly as a nation we must participate in the worldwide effort to control the buildup of carbon dioxide gases and other pollutants which threaten the stability of the earth's climate. I would like to bring to your attention these papers from the Rocky Mountain Institute which touch on the above issues: http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/2009-09_FourNuclearMyths and http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/2012-01_FarewellToFossilFuels and http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/E05-14_NuclearPowerEconomics.... If you have not yet done so, I strongly urge you to contact the Rocky Mountain Institute and contract with them for their advice in consulting on the Quadrennial Energy Review. Sincerely, William Wharton Smith III

  19. Advanced Liquid Natural Gas Onboard Storage System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg Harper; Charles Powars

    2003-10-31

    Cummins Westport Incorporated (CWI) has designed and developed a liquefied natural gas (LNG) vehicle fuel system that includes a reciprocating pump with the cold end submerged in LNG contained in a vacuum-jacketed tank. This system was tested and analyzed under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced LNG Onboard Storage System (ALOSS) program. The pumped LNG fuel system developed by CWI and tested under the ALOSS program is a high-pressure system designed for application on Class 8 trucks powered by CWI's ISX G engine, which employs high-pressure direct injection (HPDI) technology. A general ALOSS program objective was to demonstrate the feasibility and advantages of a pumped LNG fuel system relative to on-vehicle fuel systems that require the LNG to be ''conditioned'' to saturation pressures that exceeds the engine fuel pressure requirements. These advantages include the capability to store more fuel mass in given-size vehicle and station tanks, and simpler lower-cost LNG refueling stations that do not require conditioning equipment. Pumped LNG vehicle fuel systems are an alternative to conditioned LNG systems for spark-ignition natural gas and port-injection dual-fuel engines (which typically require about 100 psi), and they are required for HPDI engines (which require over 3,000 psi). The ALOSS program demonstrated the feasibility of a pumped LNG vehicle fuel system and the advantages of this design relative to systems that require conditioning the LNG to a saturation pressure exceeding the engine fuel pressure requirement. LNG tanks mounted on test carts and the CWI engineering truck were repeatedly filled with LNG saturated at 20 to 30 psig. More fuel mass was stored in the vehicle tanks as well as the station tank, and no conditioning equipment was required at the fueling station. The ALOSS program also demonstrated the general viability and specific performance of the CWI pumped LNG fuel system design. The system tested as part of this program is designed to be used on Class 8 trucks with CWI ISX G HPDI engines. Extensive test cart and engineering truck tests of the pump demonstrated good durability and the high-pressure performance needed for HPDI application. The LNG tanks manufactured by Taylor-Wharton passed SAE J2343 Recommended Practice drop tests and accelerated road-load vibration tests. NER and hold-time tests produced highly consistent results. Additional tests confirmed the design adequacy of the liquid level sensor, vaporizer, ullage volume, and other fuel system components. While the testing work performed under this program focused on a high-pressure pumped LNG fuel system design, the results also validate the feasibility of a low-pressure pumped fuel system. A low-pressure pumped fuel system could incorporate various design refinements including a simpler and lighter-weight pump, which would decrease costs somewhat relative to a high-pressure system.