National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for glycoside hydrolase family

  1. Variants of glycoside hydrolases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Teter, Sarah; Ward, Connie; Cherry, Joel; Jones, Aubrey; Harris, Paul; Yi, Jung

    2013-02-26

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent glycoside hydrolase, comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 21, 94, 157, 205, 206, 247, 337, 350, 373, 383, 438, 455, 467, and 486 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2, and optionally further comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 8, 22, 41, 49, 57, 113, 193, 196, 226, 227, 246, 251, 255, 259, 301, 356, 371, 411, and 462 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2 a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 8, 22, 41, 49, 57, 113, 193, 196, 226, 227, 246, 251, 255, 259, 301, 356, 371, 411, and 462 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2, wherein the variants have glycoside hydrolase activity. The present invention also relates to nucleotide sequences encoding the variant glycoside hydrolases and to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the nucleotide sequences.

  2. Variants of glycoside hydrolases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Teter, Sarah; Ward, Connie; Cherry, Joel; Jones, Aubrey; Harris, Paul; Yi, Jung

    2011-04-26

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent glycoside hydrolase, comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 21, 94, 157, 205, 206, 247, 337, 350, 373, 383, 438, 455, 467, and 486 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2, and optionally further comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 8, 22, 41, 49, 57, 113, 193, 196, 226, 227, 246, 251, 255, 259, 301, 356, 371, 411, and 462 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2 a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 8, 22, 41, 49, 57, 113, 193, 196, 226, 227, 246, 251, 255, 259, 301, 356, 371, 411, and 462 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2, wherein the variants have glycoside hydrolase activity. The present invention also relates to nucleotide sequences encoding the variant glycoside hydrolases and to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the nucleotide sequences.

  3. Differential Recognition and Hydrolysis of Host Carbohydrate Antigens by Streptococcus pneumoniae Family 98 Glycoside Hydrolases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Higgins, M.; Whitworth, G; El Warry, N; Randriantsoa, M; Samain, E; Burke, R; Vocadlo, D; Boraston, A

    2009-01-01

    The presence of a fucose utilization operon in the Streptococcus pneumoniae genome and its established importance in virulence indicates a reliance of this bacterium on the harvesting of host fucose-containing glycans. The identities of these glycans, however, and how they are harvested is presently unknown. The biochemical and high resolution x-ray crystallographic analysis of two family 98 glycoside hydrolases (GH98s) from distinctive forms of the fucose utilization operon that originate from different S. pneumoniae strains reveal that one enzyme, the predominant type among pneumococcal isolates, has a unique endo-{beta}-galactosidase activity on the LewisY antigen. Altered active site topography in the other species of GH98 enzyme tune its endo-{beta}-galactosidase activity to the blood group A and B antigens. Despite their different specificities, these enzymes, and by extension all family 98 glycoside hydrolases, use an inverting catalytic mechanism. Many bacterial and viral pathogens exploit host carbohydrate antigens for adherence as a precursor to colonization or infection. However, this is the first evidence of bacterial endoglycosidase enzymes that are known to play a role in virulence and are specific for distinct host carbohydrate antigens. The strain-specific distribution of two distinct types of GH98 enzymes further suggests that S. pneumoniae strains may specialize to exploit host-specific antigens that vary from host to host, a factor that may feature in whether a strain is capable of colonizing a host or establishing an invasive infection.

  4. Targeted discovery of glycoside hydrolases from a switchgrass-adapted compost community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allgaier, M.; Reddy, A.; Park, J. I.; Ivanova, N.; D'haeseleer, P.; Lowry, S.; Sapra, R.; Hazen, T.C.; Simmons, B.A.; VanderGheynst, J. S.; Hugenholtz, P.

    2009-11-15

    Development of cellulosic biofuels from non-food crops is currently an area of intense research interest. Tailoring depolymerizing enzymes to particular feedstocks and pretreatment conditions is one promising avenue of research in this area. Here we added a green-waste compost inoculum to switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) and simulated thermophilic composting in a bioreactor to select for a switchgrass-adapted community and to facilitate targeted discovery of glycoside hydrolases. Small-subunit (SSU) rRNA-based community profiles revealed that the microbial community changed dramatically between the initial and switchgrass-adapted compost (SAC) with some bacterial populations being enriched over 20-fold. We obtained 225 Mbp of 454-titanium pyrosequence data from the SAC community and conservatively identified 800 genes encoding glycoside hydrolase domains that were biased toward depolymerizing grass cell wall components. Of these, {approx}10% were putative cellulases mostly belonging to families GH5 and GH9. We synthesized two SAC GH9 genes with codon optimization for heterologous expression in Escherichia coli and observed activity for one on carboxymethyl cellulose. The active GH9 enzyme has a temperature optimum of 50 C and pH range of 5.5 to 8 consistent with the composting conditions applied. We demonstrate that microbial communities adapt to switchgrass decomposition using simulated composting condition and that full-length genes can be identified from complex metagenomic sequence data, synthesized and expressed resulting in active enzyme.

  5. Targeted Discovery of Glycoside Hydrolases from a Switchgrass-Adapted Compost Community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reddy, Amitha; Allgaier, Martin; Park, Joshua I.; Ivanoval, Natalia; Dhaeseleer, Patrik; Lowry, Steve; Sapra, Rajat; Hazen, Terry C.; Simmons, Blake A.; VanderGheynst, Jean S.; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2011-05-11

    Development of cellulosic biofuels from non-food crops is currently an area of intense research interest. Tailoring depolymerizing enzymes to particular feedstocks and pretreatment conditions is one promising avenue of research in this area. Here we added a green-waste compost inoculum to switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) and simulated thermophilic composting in a bioreactor to select for a switchgrass-adapted community and to facilitate targeted discovery of glycoside hydrolases. Smallsubunit (SSU) rRNA-based community profiles revealed that the microbial community changed dramatically between the initial and switchgrass-adapted compost (SAC) with some bacterial populations being enriched over 20-fold. We obtained 225 Mbp of 454-titanium pyrosequence data from the SAC community and conservatively identified 800 genes encoding glycoside hydrolase domains that were biased toward depolymerizing grass cell wall components. Of these, ,10percent were putative cellulasesmostly belonging to families GH5 and GH9. We synthesized two SAC GH9 genes with codon optimization for heterologous expression in Escherichia coli and observed activity for one on carboxymethyl cellulose. The active GH9 enzyme has a temperature optimum of 50uC and pH range of 5.5 to 8 consistent with the composting conditions applied. We demonstrate that microbial communities adapt to switchgrass decomposition using simulated composting condition and that full-length genes can be identified from complex metagenomic sequence data, synthesized and expressed resulting in active enzyme.

  6. New perspective on glycoside hydrolase binding to lignin from pretreated corn stover

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yarbrough, John M.; Mittal, Ashutosh; Mansfield, Elisabeth; Taylor, II, Larry E.; Hobdey, Sarah E.; Sammond, Deanne W.; Bomble, Yannick J.; Crowley, Michael F.; Decker, Stephen R.; Himmel, Michael E.; et al

    2015-12-18

    In this study, non-specific binding of cellulases to lignin has been implicated as a major factor in the loss of cellulase activity during biomass conversion to sugars. It is believed that this binding may strongly impact process economics through loss of enzyme activities during hydrolysis and enzyme recycling scenarios. The current model suggests glycoside hydrolase activities are lost though non-specific/non-productive binding of carbohydrate-binding domains to lignin, limiting catalytic site access to the carbohydrate components of the cell wall.

  7. Colloid-based multiplexed method for screening plant biomass-degrading glycoside hydrolase activities in microbial communities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reindl, W.; Deng, K.; Gladden, J.M.; Cheng, G.; Wong, A.; Singer, S.W.; Singh, S.; Lee, J.-C.; Yao, J.-S.; Hazen, T.C.; Singh, A.K; Simmons, B.A.; Adams, P.D.; Northen, T.R.

    2011-05-01

    The enzymatic hydrolysis of long-chain polysaccharides is a crucial step in the conversion of biomass to lignocellulosic biofuels. The identification and characterization of optimal glycoside hydrolases is dependent on enzyme activity assays, however existing methods are limited in terms of compatibility with a broad range of reaction conditions, sample complexity, and especially multiplexity. The method we present is a multiplexed approach based on Nanostructure-Initiator Mass Spectrometry (NIMS) that allowed studying several glycolytic activities in parallel under diverse assay conditions. Although the substrate analogs carried a highly hydrophobic perfluorinated tag, assays could be performed in aqueous solutions due colloid formation of the substrate molecules. We first validated our method by analyzing known {beta}-glucosidase and {beta}-xylosidase activities in single and parallel assay setups, followed by the identification and characterization of yet unknown glycoside hydrolase activities in microbial communities.

  8. On the protonation states, hydrogen bonding and catalytic mechanism of family 11 glycosidases: Direct visualization with neutrons

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fisher, Suzanne Zoe; Graham, David E.; Hanson, Leif; Kovalevskyi, Andrii Y.; Langan, Paul; Parks, Jerry M.; Wan, Qun; Ostermann, Andreas; Schrader, Tobias

    2015-10-06

    Most enzymatic reactions involve hydrogen or proton transfer among the enzyme, substrate, and water at physiological pH. Thus, enzyme catalysis cannot be fully understood without accurate mapping of hydrogen atom positions in these macromolecular catalysts. Direct information on the location of hydrogen atoms can be obtained using neutron crystallography. We used neutron crystallography and biomolecular simulation to characterize the initial stage of the glycoside hydrolysis reaction catalyzed by a family 11 glycoside hydrolase. We provide evidence that the catalytic glutamate residue alternates between two conformations bearing different basicities, first to obtain a proton from the bulk solvent, and then tomore » deliver it to the glycosidic oxygen to initiate the hydrolysis reaction.« less

  9. Cellulase variants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blazej, Robert; Toriello, Nicholas; Emrich, Charles; Cohen, Richard N.; Koppel, Nitzan

    2015-07-14

    This invention provides novel variant cellulolytic enzymes having improved activity and/or stability. In certain embodiments the variant cellulotyic enzymes comprise a glycoside hydrolase with or comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to one or more of residues F64, A226, and/or E246 in Thermobifida fusca Cel9A enzyme. In certain embodiments the glycoside hydrolase is a variant of a family 9 glycoside hydrolase. In certain embodiments the glycoside hydrolase is a variant of a theme B family 9 glycoside hydrolase.

  10. Community dynamics and glycoside hydrolase activities of thermophilic bacterial consortia adapted to switchgrass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gladden, J.M.; Allgaier, M.; Miller, C.S.; Hazen, T.C.; VanderGheynst, J.S.; Hugenholtz, P.; Simmons, B.A.; Singer, S.W.

    2011-05-01

    Industrial-scale biofuel production requires robust enzymatic cocktails to produce fermentable sugars from lignocellulosic biomass. Thermophilic bacterial consortia are a potential source of cellulases and hemicellulases adapted to harsher reaction conditions than commercial fungal enzymes. Compost-derived microbial consortia were adapted to switchgrass at 60 C to develop thermophilic biomass-degrading consortia for detailed studies. Microbial community analysis using small-subunit rRNA gene amplicon pyrosequencing and short-read metagenomic sequencing demonstrated that thermophilic adaptation to switchgrass resulted in low-diversity bacterial consortia with a high abundance of bacteria related to thermophilic paenibacilli, Rhodothermus marinus, and Thermus thermophilus. At lower abundance, thermophilic Chloroflexi and an uncultivated lineage of the Gemmatimonadetes phylum were observed. Supernatants isolated from these consortia had high levels of xylanase and endoglucanase activities. Compared to commercial enzyme preparations, the endoglucanase enzymes had a higher thermotolerance and were more stable in the presence of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([C2mim][OAc]), an ionic liquid used for biomass pretreatment. The supernatants were used to saccharify [C2mim][OAc]-pretreated switchgrass at elevated temperatures (up to 80 C), demonstrating that these consortia are an excellent source of enzymes for the development of enzymatic cocktails tailored to more extreme reaction conditions.

  11. Thermodynamics of enzyme-catalyzed reactions. Part 3. Hydrolases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, R.N.; Tewari, Y.B.

    1994-11-01

    Equilibrium constants and enthalpy changes for reactions catalyzed by the hydrolase class of enzymes have been compiled. For each reaction the following information is given: the reference for the data; the reaction studied; the name of the enzyme used and its Enzyme Commission number; the method of measurement; the conditions of measurement (temperature, pH, ionic strength, and the buffer(s) and cofactor(s) used); the data and an evaluation of it; and, sometimes, commentary on the data and on any corrections which have been applied to it or any calculations for which the data have been used. The data from 146 references have been examined and evaluated. Chemical Abstract Service registry numbers are given for the substances involved in these various reactions. There is a cross reference between the substances and the Enzyme Commission numbers of the enzymes used to catalyze the reactions in which the substances participate.

  12. Structural Studies of the Nudix GDP-mannose Hydrolase from E. coli Reveals a New Motif for Mannose Recognition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A Boto; W Xu; J Jakoncic; A Pannuri; T Romeo; M Bessman; S Gabelli; L Amzel

    2011-12-31

    The Nudix hydrolase superfamily, characterized by the presence of the signature sequence GX5EX7REUXEEXGU (where U is I, L, or V), is a well-studied family in which relations have been established between primary sequence and substrate specificity for many members. For example, enzymes that hydrolyze the diphosphate linkage of ADP-ribose are characterized by having a proline 15 amino acids C-terminal of the Nudix signature sequence. GDPMK is a Nudix enzyme that conserves this characteristic proline but uses GDP-mannose as the preferred substrate. By investigating the structure of the GDPMK alone, bound to magnesium, and bound to substrate, the structural basis for this divergent substrate specificity and a new rule was identified by which ADP-ribose pyrophosphatases can be distinguished from purine-DP-mannose pyrophosphatases from primary sequence alone. Kinetic and mutagenesis studies showed that GDPMK hydrolysis does not rely on a single glutamate as the catalytic base. Instead, catalysis is dependent on residues that coordinate the magnesium ions and residues that position the substrate properly for catalysis. GDPMK was thought to play a role in biofilm formation because of its upregulation in response to RcsC signaling; however, GDPMK knockout strains show no defect in their capacity of forming biofilms.

  13. NREL Support for a Functional Genomics Approach to Investigate Regulation of Phenolic Glycoside: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA number CRD-07-00218

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, M.

    2010-07-01

    NREL and MTU collaborated on a proposal 'A Functional Genomics Approach to Investigate Regulation of Phenolic Glycoside Metabolism in Populus' funded by the National Science Foundation.

  14. Thermal tolerant avicelase from Acidothermus cellulolyticus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ding, Shi-You (Golden, CO); Adney, William S. (Golden, CO); Vinzant, Todd B. (Golden, CO); Himmel, Michael E. (Littleton, CO)

    2009-05-26

    The invention provides a thermal tolerant (thermostable) cellulase, AviIII, that is a member of the glycoside hydrolase (GH) family. AviIII was isolated and characterized from Acidothermus cellulolyticus and, like many cellulases, the disclosed polypeptide and/or its derivatives may be useful for the conversion of biomass into biofuels and chemicals.

  15. Thermal tolerant avicelase from Acidothermus cellulolyticus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ding, Shi-You (Golden, CO); Adney, William S. (Golden, CO); Vinzant, Todd B. (Golden, CO); Himmel, Michael E. (Littleton, CO)

    2008-04-29

    The invention provides a thermal tolerant (thermostable) cellulase, AviIII, that is a member of the glycoside hydrolase (GH) family. AviIII was isolated and characterized from Acidothermus cellulolyticus and, like many cellulases, the disclosed polypeptide and/or its derivatives may be useful for the conversion of biomass into biofuels and chemicals.

  16. Methods of using thermal tolerant avicelase from Acidothermus cellulolyticus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adney, William S. (Golden, CO); Vinzant, Todd B. (Golden, CO); Ding, Shih-You (Golden, CO); Himmel, Michael E. (Golden, CO)

    2011-04-26

    The invention provides a thermal tolerant (thermostable) cellulase, AviIII, that is a member of the glycoside hydrolase (GH) family. AviIII was isolated and characterized from Acidothermus cellulolyticus, and, like many cellulases, the disclosed polypeptide and/or its derivatives may be useful for the conversion of biomass into biofuels and chemicals.

  17. Thermal tolerant exoglucanase from Acidothermus cellulolyticus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adney, William S. (Golden, CO); Ding, Shi-You (Golden, CO); Vinzant, Todd B. (Golden, CO); Himmel, Michael E. (Littleton, CO); Decker, Stephen R. (Berthoud, CO); McCarter, Suzanne Lantz (Denver, CO)

    2008-07-01

    The invention provides a thermal tolerant cellulase that is a member of the glycoside hydrolase family. The invention further discloses this cellulase as Gux1. Gux1 has been isolated and characterized from Acidothermus cellulolyticus. The invention further provides recombinant forms of the identified Gux1. Methods of making and using Gux1 polypeptides, including fusions, variants, and derivatives, are also disclosed.

  18. Determination of Organophosphate Pesticides at a Carbon Nanotube/Organophosphorus Hydrolase Electrochemical Biosensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deo, R P.; Wang, Joseph; Block, I; Mulchandani, Ashok; Joshi, K; Trojanowicz, M; Scholz, F; Chen, Wilfred; Lin, Yuehe

    2005-02-08

    An amperometric biosensor for organophosphorus (OP) pesticides based on a carbon-nanotube (CNT) modified transducer and an organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) biocatalyst is described. A bilayer approach with the OPH layer atop of the CNT film was used for preparing the CNT/OPH biosensor. The CNT layer leads to a greatly improved anodic detection of the enzymatically-generated p-nitrophenol product, including higher sensitivity and stability. The sensor performance was optimized with respect to the surface modification and operating conditions. Under the optimal conditions the biosensor was used to measure as low as 0.15 {micro}M paraoxon and 0.8 {micro}M methyl parathion with sensitivities of 25 and 6 nA/{micro}M, respectively.

  19. Insights into substrate specificity of NlpC/P60 cell wall hydrolases containing bacterial SH3 domains

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xu, Qingping; Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique; Liu, Xueqian W.; Patin, Delphine; Farr, Carol L.; Grant, Joanna C.; Chiu, Hsiu -Ju; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Knuth, Mark W.; Godzik, Adam; et al

    2015-09-15

    Bacterial SH3 (SH3b) domains are commonly fused with papain-like Nlp/P60 cell wall hydrolase domains. To understand how the modular architecture of SH3b and NlpC/P60 affects the activity of the catalytic domain, three putative NlpC/P60 cell wall hydrolases were biochemically and structurally characterized. In addition, these enzymes all have γ-d-Glu-A2pm (A2pm is diaminopimelic acid) cysteine amidase (ordl-endopeptidase) activities but with different substrate specificities. One enzyme is a cell wall lysin that cleaves peptidoglycan (PG), while the other two are cell wall recycling enzymes that only cleave stem peptides with an N-terminall-Ala. Their crystal structures revealed a highly conserved structure consisting ofmore » two SH3b domains and a C-terminal NlpC/P60 catalytic domain, despite very low sequence identity. Interestingly, loops from the first SH3b domain dock into the ends of the active site groove of the catalytic domain, remodel the substrate binding site, and modulate substrate specificity. Two amino acid differences at the domain interface alter the substrate binding specificity in favor of stem peptides in recycling enzymes, whereas the SH3b domain may extend the peptidoglycan binding surface in the cell wall lysins. Remarkably, the cell wall lysin can be converted into a recycling enzyme with a single mutation.Peptidoglycan is a meshlike polymer that envelops the bacterial plasma membrane and bestows structural integrity. Cell wall lysins and recycling enzymes are part of a set of lytic enzymes that target covalent bonds connecting the amino acid and amino sugar building blocks of the PG network. These hydrolases are involved in processes such as cell growth and division, autolysis, invasion, and PG turnover and recycling. To avoid cleavage of unintended substrates, these enzymes have very selective substrate specificities. Our biochemical and structural analysis of three modular NlpC/P60 hydrolases, one lysin, and two recycling enzymes, show that they may have evolved from a common molecular architecture, where the substrate preference is modulated by local changes. These results also suggest that new pathways for recycling PG turnover products, such as tracheal cytotoxin, may have evolved in bacteria in the human gut microbiome that involve NlpC/P60 cell wall hydrolases.« less

  20. New Cellulase Identification Method Holds Promise for Lower-Cost Biofuels (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A new computational approach to genomic data effectively distinguishes cellulases and non-cellulases within the protein family GH48, a key component for degrading lignocellulose for biofuels. Cellulase enzymes, particularly from the glycoside hydrolase family 48 (GH48), are a critical component of many lignocellulose-degrading systems that produce biomass to use for biofu- els. Typically it has been difficult and costly-but necessary-to distinguish required cellulase enzymes from unwanted

  1. A thiocyanate hydrolase of Thiobacillus thioparus. A novel enzyme catalyzing the formation of carbonyl sulfide from thiocyanate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katayama, Y.; Narahara, Y.; Inoue, Y.; Amano, F.; Kanagawa, T.; Kuraishi, H. (Faculty of Agriculture, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, (Japan))

    1992-05-05

    A thiocyanate hydrolase that catalyzes the first step in thiocyanate degradation was purified to homogeneity from Thiobacillus thioparus, an obligate chemolithotrophic eubacterium metabolizing thiocyanate to sulfate as an energy source. The thiocyanate hydrolase was purified 52-fold by steps involving ammonium sulfate precipitation, DEAE-Sephacel column chromatography, and hydroxylapatite column chromatography. The enzyme hydrolyzed 1 mol of thiocyanate to form 1 mol of carbonyl sulfide and 1 mol of ammonia as follows: SCN- + 2H2O----COS + NH3 + OH-. This is the first report describing the hydrolysis of thiocyanate to carbonyl sulfide by an enzyme. The enzyme had a molecular mass of 126 kDa and was composed of three different subunits: alpha (19 kDa), beta (23 kDa), and gamma (32 kDa). The enzyme exhibited optimal activities at pH 7.5-8.0 and at temperatures ranging from 30 to 40 degrees C. The Km value for thiocyanate was approximately 11 mM. Immunoblot analysis with polyclonal antibodies against the purified enzyme suggested that it was induced in T. thioparus cells when the cells were grown with thiocyanate.

  2. Thermal Tolerant Cellulase from Acidothermus Cellulolyticus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ding, S. Y.; Adney, W. S.; Vinzant, T. B.; Himmel, M. E.; Decker, S. R.

    2006-06-13

    The invention provides a thermal tolerant cellulase that is a member of the glycoside hydrolase family. The invention further discloses this cellulase as GuxA. GuxA has been isolated and characterized from Acidothermus cellulolyticus. The invention further provides recombinant forms of the identified GuxA. Methods of making and using GuxA polypeptides, including fusions, variants, and derivatives, are also disclosed.

  3. Thermal tolerant cellulase from Acidothermus cellulolyticus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ding, Shi-You; Adney, William S.; Vinzant, Todd B.; Himmel, Michael E.; Decker, Stephen R.

    2006-06-13

    The invention provides a thermal tolerant cellulase that is a member of the glycoside hydrolase family. The invention further discloses this cellulase as GuxA. GuxA has been isolated and characterized from Acidothermus cellulolyticus. The invention further provides recombinant forms of the identified GuxA. Methods of making and using GuxA polypeptides, including fusions, variants, and derivatives, are also disclosed.

  4. Successful Family Engagement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Families are a young child's most important first teachers, but engaging busy families in meaningful interactive learning can be a challenge. Join Pittsburgh's Carnegie Science Center and...

  5. Thermal tolerant mannanase from acidothermus cellulolyticus ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - Visit the NREL Commercialization and Technology Transfer Website Abstract: The invention provides a thermal tolerant mannanase that is a member of the glycoside hydrolase...

  6. Thermal tolerant exoglucanase from acidothermus cellulolyticus...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - Visit the NREL Commercialization and Technology Transfer Website Abstract: The invention provides a thermal tolerant cellulase that is a member of the glycoside hydrolase...

  7. Thermal tolerant cellulase from acidothermus cellulolyticus ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - Visit the NREL Commercialization and Technology Transfer Website Abstract: The invention provides a thermal tolerant cellulase that is a member of the glycoside hydrolase...

  8. Thermal tolerant cellulase from Acidothermus cellulolyticus ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enzymes for the Conversion of Biomass to Biofuels and Chemicals Abstract: The invention provides a thermal tolerant cellulase that is a member of the glycoside hydrolase...

  9. Thermal tolerant exoglucanase from Acidothermus cellulolyticus...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enzymes for the Conversion of Biomass to Biofuels and Chemicals Abstract: The invention provides a thermal tolerant cellulase that is a member of the glycoside hydrolase...

  10. Thermal tolerant mannanase from acidothermus cellulolyticus ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enzymes for the Conversion of Biomass to Biofuels and Chemicals Abstract: The invention provides a thermal tolerant mannanase that is a member of the glycoside hydrolase...

  11. The Vital Function of Fe3O4@Au nanocomposites for Hydrolase Biosensor Design and Its Application in Detection of Methyl Parathion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Yuting; Zhang, Weiying; Lin, Yuehe; Du, Dan

    2013-02-04

    A nanocomposite of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) decorating a magnetic Fe3O4 core was synthesized using cysteamine (SHNH2) as linker, and characterized by TEM, XPS, UV and electrochemistry. Then a hydrolase biosensor, based on self-assembly of methyl parathion hydrolase (MPH) on the Fe3O4@Au nanocomposite, was developed for sensitive and selective detection of the organophosphorus pesticide (OP) methyl parathion. The magnetic nanocomposite provides an easy way to construct the enzyme biosensor by simply exerting an external magnetic field, and also provides a simple way to renew the electrode surface by removing the magnet. Unlike inhibition-based enzyme biosensors, the hydrolase is not poisoned by OPs and thus is reusable for continuous measurement. AuNPs not only provide a large surface area, high loading efficiency and fast electron transfer, but also stabilize the enzyme through electrostatic interactions. The MPH biosensor shows rapid response and high selectivity for detection of methyl parathion, with a linear range from 0.5 to 1000 ng/mL and a detection limit of 0.1 ng/mL. It also shows acceptable reproducibility and stability. The simplicity and ease of operation of the proposed method has great potential for on-site detection of PS containing pesticides and provides a promising strategy to construct a robust biosensor.

  12. X-ray Crystallographic Analysis of [alpha]-Ketoheterocycle Inhibitors Bound to a Humanized Variant of Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mileni, Mauro; Garfunkle, Joie; Ezzili, Cyrine; Kimball, F.Scott; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Stevens, Raymond C.; Boger, Dale L.

    2010-11-03

    Three cocrystal X-ray structures of the {alpha}-ketoheterocycle inhibitors 3-5 bound to a humanized variant of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) are disclosed and comparatively discussed alongside those of 1 (OL-135) and its isomer 2. These five X-ray structures systematically probe each of the three active site regions key to substrate or inhibitor binding: (1) the conformationally mobile acyl chain-binding pocket and membrane access channel responsible for fatty acid amide substrate and inhibitor acyl chain binding, (2) the atypical active site catalytic residues and surrounding oxyanion hole that covalently binds the core of the {alpha}-ketoheterocycle inhibitors captured as deprotonated hemiketals mimicking the tetrahedral intermediate of the enzyme-catalyzed reaction, and (3) the cytosolic port and its uniquely important imbedded ordered water molecules and a newly identified anion binding site. The detailed analysis of their key active site interactions and their implications on the interpretation of the available structure-activity relationships are discussed providing important insights for future design.

  13. Development of monoclonal antibodies to human microsomal epoxide hydrolase and analysis of preneoplastic antigen-like molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duan, Hongying; Yoshimura, Kazunori; Kobayashi, Nobuharu; Sugiyama, Kazuo; Sawada, Jun-ichi; Saito, Yoshiro; Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D.; Akatsuka, Toshitaka

    2012-04-01

    Microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH) is a drug metabolizing enzyme which resides on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane and catalyzes the hydration of reactive epoxide intermediates that are formed by cytochrome P450s. mEH is also thought to have a role in bile acid transport on the plasma membrane of hepatocytes. It is speculated that efficient execution of such multiple functions is secured by its orientation and association with cytochrome P450 enzymes on the ER membrane and formation of a multiple transport system on the plasma membrane. In certain disease status, mEH loses its association with the membrane and can be detected as distinct antigens in the cytosol of preneoplastic foci of liver (preneoplastic antigen), in the serum in association with hepatitis C virus infection (AN antigen), or in some brain tumors. To analyze the antigenic structures of mEH in physiological and pathological conditions, we developed monoclonal antibodies against different portions of mEH. Five different kinds of antibodies were obtained: three, anti-N-terminal portions; one anti-C-terminal; and one, anti-conformational epitope. By combining these antibodies, we developed antigen detection methods which are specific to either the membrane-bound form or the linearized form of mEH. These methods detected mEH in the culture medium released from a hepatocellular carcinoma cell line and a glioblastoma cell line, which was found to be a multimolecular complex with a unique antigenic structure different from that of the membrane-bound form of mEH. These antibodies and antigen detection methods may be useful to study pathological changes of mEH in various human diseases. -- Highlights: ? Monoclonal antibodies against different portions of mEH were developed. ? They discriminate between the membrane-bound and the linearized forms of mEH. ? We analyze the antigenic structure of the altered form of mEH in tumor cells. ? Preneoplastic antigen is a multimolecular complex of mEH with a unique structure.

  14. Feds feed Families

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Representatives of the Office of Enterprise Assessments delivered more than 1,600 pounds of non-perishable food to the Manna Food Center on September 2, 2014 as part of the 2014 Feds Feed Families campaign. Manna feeds about 3,300 needy families in Montgomery County. Manna also provides food to 48 Montgomery County soup kitchens, food pantries, group homes, and emergency shelters.

  15. Mutational, Structural, and Kinetic Evidence for a Dissociative Mechanism in the GDP-mannose Mannosyl Hydrolase Reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xia,Z.; Azurmendi, H.; lairson, L.; Withers, S.; Gabelli, S.; Bianchet, M.; Amzel, L.; Mildvan, A.

    2005-01-01

    GDP-mannose hydrolase (GDPMH) catalyzes the hydrolysis of GDP-{alpha}-D-sugars by nucleophilic substitution with inversion at the anomeric C1 atom of the sugar, with general base catalysis by H124. Three lines of evidence indicate a mechanism with dissociative character. First, in the 1.3 Angstrom X-ray structure of the GDPMH-Mg{sup 2+}-GDP{center_dot}Tris{sup +} complex, the GDP leaving group interacts with five catalytic components: R37, Y103, R52, R65, and the essential Mg{sup 2+}. As determined by the effects of site-specific mutants on k{sub cat}, these components contribute factors of 24-, 100-, 309-, 24-, and {ge}10{sup 5}-fold, respectively, to catalysis. Both R37 and Y103 bind the {beta}-phosphate of GDP and are only 5.0 Angstroms apart. Accordingly, the R37Q/Y103F double mutant exhibits partially additive effects of the two single mutants on k{sub cat}, indicating cooperativity of R37 and Y103 in promoting catalysis, and antagonistic effects on K{sub m}. Second, the conserved residue, D22, is positioned to accept a hydrogen bond from the C2-OH group of the sugar undergoing substitution at C1, as was shown by modeling an {alpha}-D-mannosyl group into the sugar binding site. The D22A and D22N mutations decreased k{sub cat} by factors of 10{sup 2.1} and 10{sup 2.6}, respectively, for the hydrolysis of GDP-{alpha}-D-mannose, and showed smaller effects on K{sub m}, suggesting that the D22 anion stabilizes a cationic oxocarbenium transition state. Third, the fluorinated substrate, GDP-2F-{alpha}-D-mannose, for which a cationic oxocarbenium transition state would be destabilized by electron withdrawal, exhibited a 16-fold decrease in k{sub cat} and a smaller, 2.5-fold increase in K{sub m}. The D22A and D22N mutations further decreased the k{sub cat} with GDP-2F-{alpha}-D-mannose to values similar to those found with GDP-{alpha}-D-mannose, and decreased the K{sub m} of the fluorinated substrate. The choice of histidine as the general base over glutamate, the preferred base in other Nudix enzymes, is not due to the greater basicity of histidine, since the pK{sub a} of E124 in the active complex (7.7) exceeded that of H124 (6.7), and the H124E mutation showed a 10{sup 2.2}-fold decrease in k{sub cat}and a 4.0-fold increase in K{sub m} at pH 9.3. Similarly, the catalytic triad detected in the X-ray structure (H124---Y127---P120) is unnecessary for orienting H124, since the Y127F mutation had only 2-fold effects on k{sub cat} and K{sub m} with either H124 or E124 as the general base. Hence, a neutral histidine rather than an anionic glutamate may be necessary to preserve electroneutrality in the active complex.

  16. X-ray, NMR, and Mutational Studies of the Catalytic Cycle of the GDP-Mannose Mannosyl Hydrolase Reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gabelli,S.; Azurmendi, H.; Bianchet, M.; Amzel, L.; Mildva, A.

    2006-01-01

    GDP-mannose hydrolase catalyzes the hydrolysis with inversion of GDP-{alpha}-D-hexose to GDP and {beta}-D-hexose by nucleophilic substitution by water at C1 of the sugar. Two new crystal structures (free enzyme and enzyme-substrate complex), NMR, and site-directed mutagenesis data, combined with the structure of the enzyme-product complex reported earlier, suggest a four-stage catalytic cycle. An important loop (L6, residues 119-125) contains a ligand to the essential Mg{sup 2+} (Gln-123), the catalytic base (His-124), and three anionic residues. This loop is not ordered in the X-ray structure of the free enzyme due to dynamic disorder, as indicated by the two-dimensional 1H-15N HMQC spectrum, which shows selective exchange broadening of the imidazole nitrogen resonances of His-124 (k{sub ex} = 6.6 x 10{sup 4} s{sup -1}). The structure of the enzyme-Mg{sup 2+}-GDP-mannose substrate complex of the less active Y103F mutant shows loop L6 in an open conformation, while the structure of the enzyme-Mg{sup 2+}-GDP product complex showed loop L6 in a closed, 'active' conformation. 1H-15N HMQC spectra show the imidazole N of His-124 to be unprotonated, appropriate for general base catalysis. Substituting Mg{sup 2+} with the more electrophilic metal ions Mn{sup 2+} or Co{sup 2+} decreases the pK{sub a} in the pH versus k{sub cat} rate profiles, showing that deprotonation of a metal-bound water is partially rate-limiting. The H124Q mutation, which decreases k{sub cat} 103.4-fold and largely abolishes its pH dependence, is rescued by the Y103F mutation, which increases k{sub cat} 23-fold and restores its pH dependence. The structural basis of the rescue is the fact that the Y103F mutation shifts the conformational equilibrium to the open form moving loop L6 out of the active site, thus permitting direct access of the specific base hydroxide from the solvent. In the proposed dissociative transition state, which occurs in the closed, active conformation of the enzyme, the partial negative charge of the GDP leaving group is compensated by the Mg2+, and by the closing of loop L2 that brings Arg-37 closer to the -phosphate. The development of a positive charge at mannosyl C1, as the oxocarbenium-like transition state is approached, is compensated by closing the anionic loop, L6, onto the active site, further stabilizing the transition state.

  17. Thermal tolerant mannanase from acidothermus cellulolyticus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ding, Shi-You (Golden, CO); Adney, William S. (Golden, CO); Vinzant, Todd B. (Golden, CO); Himmel, Michael E. (Littleton, CO)

    2006-09-26

    The invention provides a thermal tolerant mannanase that is a member of the glycoside hydrolase family. The invention further discloses this mannanase as ManA. ManA has been isolated and characterized from Acidothermus cellulolyticus. The invention further provides recombinant forms of the identified ManA. Methods of making ManA polypeptides, including fusions, variants, and derivatives, are also disclosed. Methods of using mannanase A, including for the processing of food and for use in food stuffs as bulking agents and the like, are also disclosed.

  18. Deletion of Caldicellulosiruptor bescii CelA reveals its crucial role in the deconstruction of lignocellulosic biomass

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Young, Jenna; Chung, Daehwan; Bomble, Yannick J.; Himmel, Michael E.; Westpheling, Janet

    2014-10-09

    Background: Members of the bacterial genus Caldicellulosiruptor are the most thermophilic cellulolytic organisms described to date, and have the ability to grow on lignocellulosic biomass without conventional pretreatment. Different species vary in their abilities to degrade cellulose, and the presence of CelA, a bifunctional glycoside hydrolase that contains a Family 48 and a Family 9 catalytic domain, correlates well with cellulolytic ability in members of this genus. For example, C. hydrothermalis, which does not contain a CelA homolog, or a GH48 Family or GH9 Family glycoside hydrolase, is the least cellulolytic of the Caldicellulosiruptor species so far described. C. bescii,more » which contains CelA and expresses it constitutively, is among the most cellulolytic. In fact, CelA is the most abundant extracellular protein produced in C. bescii. The enzyme contains two catalytic units, a Family 9A-CBM3c processive endoglucanase and a Family 48 exoglucanase, joined by two Family 3b carbohydrate-binding domains. Although there are two non-reducing end-specific Family 9 and three reducing end-specific Family 48 glycoside hydrolases (producing primarily glucose and cellobiose; and cellobiose and cellotriose, respectively) in C. bescii, CelA is the only protein that combines both enzymatic activities. Results: A deletion of the celA gene resulted in a dramatic reduction in the microorganism’s ability to grow on crystalline cellulose (Avicel) and diminished growth on lignocellulosic biomass. A comparison of the overall endoglucanase and exoglucanase activities of the mutant compared with the wild-type suggests that the loss of the endoglucanase activity provided by the GH9 family domain is perhaps compensated for by other enzymes produced by the cell. In contrast, it appears that no other enzymes in the C. bescii secretome can compensate for the loss of exoglucanase activity. The change in enzymatic activity in the celA mutant resulted in a 15-fold decrease in sugar release on Avicel compared with the parent and wild-type strains. In conclusion: The exoglucanase activity of the GH48 domain of CelA plays a major role in biomass degradation within the suite of C. bescii biomass-degrading enzymes.« less

  19. The DOE Feeds Families Festival

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Department of Energy employees took a moment to give back to the Washington, D.C. community by holding our first "DOE Feeds Families Festival" outside of the Forrestal Building.

  20. Multi-Family Housing Loans and Grants

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Multi-family housing programs offer rural rental housing loans to provide affordable multi-family rental housing for very low-, low-, and moderate-income families, the elderly, and persons with...

  1. Proteomic and Functional Analysis of the Cellulase System Expressed by Postia placenta during Brown Rot of Solid Wood

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryu, Jae San; Shary, Semarjit; Houtman, Carl J.; Panisko, Ellen A.; Korripally, Premsagar; St John, Franz J.; Crooks, Casey; Siika-aho, Matti; Magnuson, Jon K.; Hammel, Ken

    2011-11-01

    Abstract Brown rot basidiomycetes have an important ecological role in lignocellulose recycling and are notable for their rapid degradation of wood polymers via oxidative and hydrolytic mechanisms. However, most of these fungi apparently lack processive (exo-acting) cellulases, such as cellobiohydrolases, which are generally required for efficient cellulolysis. The recent sequencing of the Postia placenta genome now permits a proteomic approach to this longstanding conundrum. We grew P. placenta on solid aspen wood, extracted proteins from the biodegrading substrate, and analyzed tryptic digests by shotgun liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Comparison of the data with the predicted P. placenta proteome revealed the presence of 34 likely glycoside hydrolases, but only four of these-two in glycoside hydrolase family 5, one in family 10, and one in family 12-have sequences that suggested possible activity on cellulose. We expressed these enzymes heterologously and determined that they all exhibited endoglucanase activity on phosphoric acid-swollen cellulose. They also slowly hydrolyzed filter paper, a more crystalline substrate, but the soluble/insoluble reducing sugar ratios they produced classify them as nonprocessive. Computer simulations indicated that these enzymes produced soluble/insoluble ratios on reduced phosphoric acid-swollen cellulose that were higher than expected for random hydrolysis, which suggests that they could possess limited exo activity, but they are at best 10-fold less processive than cellobiohydrolases. It appears likely that P. placenta employs a combination of oxidative mechanisms and endo-acting cellulases to degrade cellulose efficiently in the absence of a significant processive component.

  2. Genomic and experimental evidence for multiple metabolic functions in the RidA/YjgF/YER057c/UK114 (Rid) protein family

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Niehaus, Thomas D.; Gerdes, Svetlana; Hodge-Hanson, Kelsey; Zhukov, Aleksey; Cooper, Arthur J.L.; ElBadawi-Sidhu, Mona; Fiehn, Oliver; Downs, Diana M.; Hanson, Andrew D.

    2015-05-15

    It is now recognized that enzymatic or chemical side-reactions can convert normal metabolites to useless or toxic ones and that a suite of enzymes exists to mitigate such metabolite damage. Examples are the reactive imine/enamine intermediates produced by threonine dehydratase, which damage the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate cofactor of various enzymes causing inactivation. This damage is pre-empted by RidA proteins, which hydrolyze the imines before they do harm. RidA proteins belong to the YjgF/YER057c/UK114 family (here renamed the Rid family). Most other members of this diverse and ubiquitous family lack defined functions. Phylogenetic analysis divided the Rid family into a widely distributed,more » apparently archetypal RidA subfamily and seven other subfamilies (Rid1 to Rid7) that are largely confined to bacteria and often co-occur in the same organism with RidA and each other. The Rid1 to Rid3 subfamilies, but not the Rid4 to Rid7 subfamilies, have a conserved arginine residue that, in RidA proteins, is essential for imine-hydrolyzing activity. Analysis of the chromosomal context of bacterial RidA genes revealed clustering with genes for threonine dehydratase and other pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent enzymes, which fits with the known RidA imine hydrolase activity. Clustering was also evident between Rid family genes and genes specifying FAD-dependent amine oxidases or enzymes of carbamoyl phosphate metabolism. Biochemical assays showed that Salmonella enterica RidA and Rid2, but not Rid7, can hydrolyze imines generated by amino acid oxidase. Genetic tests indicated that carbamoyl phosphate overproduction is toxic to S. enterica cells lacking RidA, and metabolomic profiling of Rid knockout strains showed ten-fold accumulation of the carbamoyl phosphate-related metabolite dihydroorotate. Like the archetypal RidA subfamily, the Rid2, and probably the Rid1 and Rid3 subfamilies, have imine-hydrolyzing activity and can pre-empt damage from imines formed by amine oxidases as well as by pyridoxal 5'-phosphate enzymes. The RidA subfamily has an additional damage pre-emption role in carbamoyl phosphate metabolism that has yet to be biochemically defined. As a result, the Rid4 to Rid7 subfamilies appear not to hydrolyze imines and thus remain mysterious.« less

  3. North Shore Gas- Single Family Direct Install

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Owners of single-family homes, condos, townhomes and two-flats may be eligible for a free installation of new programmable thermostats, pipe insulation, showerheads, Compact Fluorescent Bulbs (CFLs...

  4. EM Helps Military Families in Need

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    LAS VEGAS – Six families from Nellis Air Force Base in Las Vegas recently received nearly $4,000 in donations — funds that helped provide a welcome relief during the holidays.

  5. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Straus Family Creamery

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sustainability is both a founding principle and a core value of Straus Family Creamery, the first certified 100% organic creamery in the United States. To date, the company owns three plug-in...

  6. The Standard Work Specifications for Single-Family Home Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Standard Work Specifications for Single-Family Home Energy Upgrades are now available at your fingertips The Standard Work Specifications for Single-Family Home Energy ...

  7. Standard Work Specifications for Single-Family Home Energy Upgrades...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Standard Work Specifications for Single-Family Home Energy Upgrades Summary Fact Sheet Standard Work Specifications for Single-Family Home Energy Upgrades Summary Fact Sheet The ...

  8. Austin Energy- Multi-Family Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Austin Energy Multi-Family Program provides cash incentives to owners, developers, and property managers of apartments and other multi-family properties for making energy efficiency...

  9. Secretaries Chu and Donovan Sign Agreement to Help Working Families...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Donovan Sign Agreement to Help Working Families Weatherize Their Homes Secretaries Chu and Donovan Sign Agreement to Help Working Families Weatherize Their Homes May 6, 2009 - ...

  10. Saving American Families and Businesses Money through Lighting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Saving American Families and Businesses Money through Lighting Efficiency Saving American Families and Businesses Money through Lighting Efficiency February 12, 2016 - 1:38pm ...

  11. TIGRFAMS: The TIGRFAMs database of protein families

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    TIGRFAMs are protein families based on Hidden Markov Models or HMMs. Use this page to see the curated seed alignmet for each TIGRFam, the full alignment of all family members and the cutoff scores for inclusion in each of the TIGRFAMs. Also use this page to search through the TIGRFAMs and HMMs for text in the TIGRFAMs Text Search or search for specific sequences in the TIGRFAMs Sequence Search.[Copied from the Overview at http://www.jcvi.org/cms/research/projects/tigrfams/overview/] See also TIGRFAMs ordered by the roles they play at http://cmr.jcvi.org/tigr-scripts/CMR/shared/EvidenceList.cgi?ev_type=TIGRFAM&order_type=role.

  12. 'Lollachilipalooza' benefits Feds Feed Families effort | National

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nuclear Security Administration 'Lollachilipalooza' benefits Feds Feed Families effort | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press

  13. fed feed families | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    fed feed families | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA

  14. Genetic linkage analysis in familial breast and ovarian cancer: Results from 214 families

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Easton, D.F.; Ford, D. ); Bishop, D.T.; Crockford, G.P. )

    1993-04-01

    This paper reports the results of a collaborative linkage study involving 214 breast cancer families, including 57 breast-ovarian cancer families; this represents almost all the known families with 17q linkage data. Six markers on 17q, spanning approximately 30 cM, were typed in the families. The aims of the study were to define more precisely the localization of the disease gene, the extent of genetic heterogeneity and the characteristics of linked families and to estimate the penetrance of the 17q gene. Under the assumption of no genetic heterogeneity, the strongest linkage evidence was obtained with D17S588. Multipoint linkage analysis allowing for genetic heterogeneity provided evidence that the predisposing gene lies between the markers D17S588 and D17S250, an interval whose genetic length is estimated to be 8.3 cM in males and 18.0 cM in females. This position was supported over other intervals by odds of 66:1. The location of the gene with respect to D17S579 could not be determined unequivocally. Under the genetic model used in the analysis, the best estimate of the proportion of linked breast-ovarian cancer families was 1.0 (lower LOD -- 1 limit 0.79). In contrast, there was significant evidence of genetic heterogeneity among the families without ovarian cancer, with an estimated 45% being linked. These results suggest that a gene(s) on chromosome 17q accounts for the majority of families in which both early-onset breast cancer and ovarian cancer occur but that other genes predisposing to breast cancer exist. By examining the fit of the linkage data to different penetrance functions, the cumulative risk associated with the 17q gene was estimated to be 59% by age 50 years and 82% by age 70 years. The corresponding estimates for the breast-ovary families were 67% and 76%, and those for the families without ovarian cancer were 49% and 90%; these penetrance functions did not differ significantly from one another. 42 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Application for State Land Use Lease: Commercial/Multi-Family...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    CommercialMulti-Family Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Reference: Application for State Land Use Lease: CommercialMulti-Family Published...

  16. Be SMART Multi-Family Efficiency Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Under the Be SMART Multi-Family Program, the Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD) offers loans for energy efficiency improvements in existing multi-family rental proper...

  17. POLICY GUIDANCE MEMORANDUM #21 Family Members | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 Family Members POLICY GUIDANCE MEMORANDUM #21 Family Members Clarifies the definition and application of family member in our directives and services PDF icon Family Members Responsible Contacts Tiffany Wheeler Human Resources Specialist E-mail tiffany.wheeler@hq.doe.gov Phone (202) 586-8481 More Documents & Publications Office of Personnel Management (OPM) Guidance on Diversity and Inclusion POLICY GUIDANCE MEMORANDUM #14 Establishing a Residence for a Relocation Incentive

  18. 2013 Feds Feed Families: Your Generosity Counts | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 Feds Feed Families: Your Generosity Counts 2013 Feds Feed Families: Your Generosity Counts July 2, 2013 - 5:58pm Addthis (L to R) Kevin Knobloch, DOE Chief of Staff; Fletcher Honemond, Chief Learning Officer; Doug Keeler, Feds Feeds Families National Program Manager; Ella Daniels of the Capital Area Food Bank; Jennifer Hirschorn; Rauland Sharp, 2013 Feds Feeds Families Deputy Champion. | Photo courtesy of Ella Daniels. (L to R) Kevin Knobloch, DOE Chief of Staff; Fletcher Honemond, Chief

  19. Page 7, A Family-Friendly Workplace

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 of 11 Previous Page A Family-Friendly Workplace The Department of Energy (DOE) takes its commitment to recruiting, retaining, and motivating a highly skilled, diverse, and productive workforce very seriously. Our objective is to be the employer of choice in the public sector. The U.S. Department of Energy is the Top-Ranked Cabinet-Level Agency for employee satisfaction and engagement according to the 2005 Best Places to Work in the Federal Government Rankings. Below is a summary of additional

  20. Leptonic mixing, family symmetries, and neutrino phenomenology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Medeiros Varzielas, I. de [Departamento de Fisica and Centro de Fisica Teorica de Particulas, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Avenida Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Fakultaet fuer Physik, Technische Universitaet Dortmund D-44221 Dortmund (Germany); Gonzalez Felipe, R. [Departamento de Fisica and Centro de Fisica Teorica de Particulas, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Avenida Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Lisboa, Rua Conselheiro Emidio Navarro, 1959-007 Lisboa (Portugal); Serodio, H. [Departamento de Fisica and Centro de Fisica Teorica de Particulas, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Avenida Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2011-02-01

    Tribimaximal leptonic mixing is a mass-independent mixing scheme consistent with the present solar and atmospheric neutrino data. By conveniently decomposing the effective neutrino mass matrix associated to it, we derive generic predictions in terms of the parameters governing the neutrino masses. We extend this phenomenological analysis to other mass-independent mixing schemes which are related to the tribimaximal form by a unitary transformation. We classify models that produce tribimaximal leptonic mixing through the group structure of their family symmetries in order to point out that there is often a direct connection between the group structure and the phenomenological analysis. The type of seesaw mechanism responsible for neutrino masses plays a role here, as it restricts the choices of family representations and affects the viability of leptogenesis. We also present a recipe to generalize a given tribimaximal model to an associated model with a different mass-independent mixing scheme, which preserves the connection between the group structure and phenomenology as in the original model. This procedure is explicitly illustrated by constructing toy models with the transpose tribimaximal, bimaximal, golden ratio, and hexagonal leptonic mixing patterns.

  1. Rural Development Multi-Family Housing Energy Efficiency Initiative |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Rural Development Multi-Family Housing Energy Efficiency Initiative Rural Development Multi-Family Housing Energy Efficiency Initiative In order to help create a more energy independent rural America for the next century, the USDA Rural Development Multi-Family Housing Energy Efficiency Initiative enables applicants to several USDA housing programs to increase their program funding eligibility by incorporating green building practices into project designs, construction,

  2. NNSA Administrator Kicks Off DOE's 'Feds Feed Families' Campaign |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Administrator Kicks Off DOE's 'Feds Feed Families' Campaign NNSA Administrator Kicks Off DOE's 'Feds Feed Families' Campaign June 16, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Administrator Thomas P. D'Agostino today helped the Department of Energy (DOE) kick off its third annual "Feds Feed Families" campaign to assist local food banks in replenishing supplies during the summer months. DOE and NNSA, in partnership

  3. Willi Ernst and family members | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    founder and Managing Director. He sold his shares to Centrosolar but continues to run Biohaus. References: Willi Ernst (and family members)1 This article is a stub. You...

  4. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Multi-family/ Low Income...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program Multi-family Low Income Peer Exchange Call: Information Technology ... your program using for project information, marketing, assessment, tracking or evaluation? ...

  5. NNSA Production Office tops Feds Feed Families campaign goal...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    tops Feds Feed Families campaign goal | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation...

  6. SoCalGas- Multi-Family Residential Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Southern California Gas Company provides incentives to encourage the owners and managers of multi-family residential buildings to increase their energy efficiency. The program offers rebates for...

  7. Alabama Family Staying Nice and Cozy This Fall

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Recovery Act money to weatherize homes has resulted in much lower energy bills for Alabama families, including Mary, whose bill is about $300 cheaper now.

  8. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Multi-Family and Low Income...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Multi-Family and Low Income Peer Exchange Call: Using Partnerships to Drive Demand and ... can affect program efficiency * Liability issues may become more complex * Inertia may be ...

  9. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Multi-family and Low Income...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in this sector? How are they different than other multi-family buildings? What strategies are effective? 242013 2 Participating Programs and Organizations Programs: *...

  10. BRCA1-linked marker in postmenopausal breast cancer families

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Folsom, A.R.; Chen, P.L.; Sellers, T.A.

    1994-09-01

    A majority of breast and ovarian cancer families and half of the early-onset breast cancer families are linked to markers on 17q (BRCA1). While linkage has been demonstrated in families with premenopausal disease, few studies have tested these markers in families with postmenopausal breast cancer. In the Iowa Women`s Health Study, a population-based study of over 42,000 women, an association of waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) with the risk of postmenopausal breast cancer was found predominantly in women with a positive family history -- this interaction was associated with a 3.2-fold elevated risk. This effect was even more pronounced when the definition of family history included breast and ovarian cancer, known to be linked to 17q markers. We evaluated evidence for linkage with D17S579, a BRCA-1-linked marker, in 13 families in which the index case had postmenopausal breast cancer. Genotyping for alleles at D17S579 was performed on 84 blood samples. Linkage analysis assumed that the breast cancer trait had an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance with a penetrance of 80%. For the 13 families studied, the maximum lod score was 0.29 at a theta of 0.27. There was significant evidence against tight linkage of breast cancer with D17S579 (theta<0.4). Heterogeneity analysis suggested evidence for the presence of both linked and unlinked families. Partitioning informative families on WHR of the index case suggested heterogeneity. These data suggest that, in a subset of families identified by a postmenopausal breast cancer proband, risk of breast cancer may be mediated by BRCA1, with heterogeneity defined by WHR.

  11. Linkage heterogeneity among 59 Dutch hereditary breast cancer families

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cornelis, R.S.; Vliet, M. van; Leeuwen, I. van

    1994-09-01

    We have investigated 59 Dutch kindreds with at least three first-degree relatives with breast and/or ovarian cancer for linkage to BRCA1 on 17q12-q21, using at least 4 microsatellite markers flanking BRCA1 on either side. Assuming no heterogeneity, the overall multipoint lod score in this group of families was -7.59. A marked clustering of lod scores >0.5 was observed among the 13 families with a mean age of onset lower than 45 (total lod score: +3.36). Among the 8 kindreds with a mean age of onset lower than 45 and {ge}3 cases diagnosed under 45, the lod score was +4.43. Interestingly, most of the evidence against linkage was found in 17 families with a mean age of onset between 45 and 54 (total lod score of -8.72). It was estimated that 28% of the breast-only families might be caused by BRCA1. Over the 16 breast-ovarian cancer families a lod score of -3.78 was obtained under homogeneity. The highest lod score was +0.57, assuming heterogeneity with 33% of the families being linked to BRCA1. One family gave a multipoint lod score of -2.01 and thereby satisfies the conventional criterion of an unlinked family. Our results support the conclusions from earlier work by others, namely that BRCA1 predisposes particularly to early-onset breast cancer. The proportion of breast-ovarian cancer families we found linked to BRCA1 is much lower than that found by the Breast Cancer Linkage Consortium. This might be caused by the single unlinked family against an insufficient number of families able to give conclusive positive lod scores.

  12. A Nuclear Family: The Manhattan District | Y-12 National Security...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The ... A Nuclear Family: The Manhattan District The mp4 video format is not supported by this browser. Download video Captions: On Time: 26:40 min. Episode 2 tells our World War...

  13. A Nuclear Family: Extras - Introduction | Y-12 National Security...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... A Nuclear Family: Extras - Introduction The mp4 video format is not supported by this browser. Download video Captions: On Time: 6:59 min. D. Ray Smith, Y-12 historian,...

  14. Sam's Family Spa Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Technology's Geo-Heat Center Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleSam%27sFamilySpaPool%26SpaLowTemperatureGeothermalFacility&oldid305482" ...

  15. Secretaries Chu and Donovan Sign Agreement to Help Working Families

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Weatherize Their Homes | Department of Energy Donovan Sign Agreement to Help Working Families Weatherize Their Homes Secretaries Chu and Donovan Sign Agreement to Help Working Families Weatherize Their Homes May 6, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON - U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Secretary Shaun Donovan and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Steven Chu today announced an important step forward in the partnership between HUD and DOE to streamline and better

  16. Secretaries Donovan and Chu Announce Partnership to Help Working Families

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Weatherize Their Homes | Department of Energy Donovan and Chu Announce Partnership to Help Working Families Weatherize Their Homes Secretaries Donovan and Chu Announce Partnership to Help Working Families Weatherize Their Homes February 27, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis Philadelphia, PA - U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Secretary Shaun Donovan and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Steven Chu today announced a major partnership between HUD and DOE that will streamline

  17. Structure of a PL17 Family Alginate Lyase Demonstrates Functional

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Similarities among Exotype Depolymerases (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Structure of a PL17 Family Alginate Lyase Demonstrates Functional Similarities among Exotype Depolymerases Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Structure of a PL17 Family Alginate Lyase Demonstrates Functional Similarities among Exotype Depolymerases Authors: Park, David ; Jagtap, Sujit ; Nair, Satish K. [1] + Show Author Affiliations (UIUC) Publication Date:

  18. New Jersey: Reducing Energy Bills for Camden's Families | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Reducing Energy Bills for Camden's Families New Jersey: Reducing Energy Bills for Camden's Families April 25, 2013 - 12:58pm Addthis The Northgate II, a 308-unit apartment building, was treated with Aeroseal, thanks to a grant from New Jersey's Multifamily Weatherization Assistance Program. Aeroseal, developed at DOE's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory by Dr. Mark Modera, uses airborne adhesive particles to seal leaky air ducts. The Aeroseal treatment is expected to reduce

  19. A Family-Friendly Workplace | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Services » New Employee Orientation » A Family-Friendly Workplace A Family-Friendly Workplace The Department of Energy (DOE) takes its commitment to recruiting, retaining, and motivating a highly skilled, diverse, and productive workforce very seriously. Our objective is to be the employer of choice in the public sector. The U.S. Department of Energy is the Top-Ranked Cabinet-Level Agency for employee satisfaction and engagement according to the 2005 Best Places to Work in the Federal

  20. The Energy Department Feeds Families | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Energy Department Feeds Families The Energy Department Feeds Families August 13, 2015 - 2:35pm Addthis Oak Ridge Integrated Support Center employees Josh Clark (from left), Steve Martin, Katelynn Prutsman, Tom Rizzi and Hailey Beeler gave employees ice cream from a make-shift "ice cream truck" in exchange for non-perishable items. They even dressed the part! | Photo courtesy of Oak Ridge Integrated Support Center. Oak Ridge Integrated Support Center employees Josh Clark (from

  1. Functional and structural diversity in GH62 α-L-arabinofuranosidases from the thermophilic fungus Scytalidium thermophilum

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kaur, Amrit Pal; Nocek, Boguslaw P.; Xu, Xiaohui; Lowden, Michael J.; Leyva, Juan Francisco; Stogios, Peter J.; Cui, Hong; Leo, Rosa Di; Powlowski, Justin; Tsang, Adrian; et al

    2015-05-01

    The genome of the thermophilic fungus Scytalidium thermophilum (strain CBS 625.91) harbours a wide range of genes involved in carbohydrate degradation, including three genes, abf62A, abf62B and abf62C, predicted to encode glycoside hydrolase family 62 (GH62) enzymes. Transcriptome analysis showed that only abf62A and abf62C are actively expressed during growth on diverse substrates including straws from barley, alfalfa, triticale and canola. The abf62A and abf62C genes were expressed in Escherichia coli and the resulting recombinant proteins were characterized. Calcium-free crystal structures of Abf62C in apo and xylotriose bound forms were determined to 1.23 and 1.48 Å resolution respectively. Site-directed mutagenesismore » confirmed Asp55, Asp171 and Glu230 as catalytic triad residues, and revealed the critical role of non-catalytic residues Asp194, Trp229 and Tyr338 in positioning the scissile α-L-arabinofuranoside bond at the catalytic site. Further, the +2R substrate-binding site residues Tyr168 and Asn339, as well as the +2NR residue Tyr226, are involved in accommodating long-chain xylan polymers. Overall, our structural and functional analysis highlights characteristic differences between Abf62A and Abf62C, which represent divergent subgroups in the GH62 family.« less

  2. Conversion of levoglucosan and cellobiosan by Pseudomonas putida KT2440

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Linger, Jeffrey G.; Hobdey, Sarah E.; Franden, Mary Ann; Fulk, Emily M.; Beckham, Gregg T.

    2016-02-02

    Pyrolysis offers a straightforward approach for the deconstruction of plant cell wall polymers into bio-oil. Recently, there has been substantial interest in bio-oil fractionation and subsequent use of biological approaches to selectively upgrade some of the resulting fractions. A fraction of particular interest for biological upgrading consists of polysaccharide-derived substrates including sugars and sugar dehydration products such as levoglucosan and cellobiosan, which are two of the most abundant pyrolysis products of cellulose. Levoglucosan can be converted to glucose-6-phosphate through the use of a levoglucosan kinase (LGK), but to date, the mechanism for cellobiosan utilization has not been demonstrated. Here, wemore » engineer the microbe Pseudomonas putida KT2440 to use levoglucosan as a sole carbon and energy source through LGK integration. Furthermore, we demonstrate that cellobiosan can be enzymatically converted to levoglucosan and glucose with β-glucosidase enzymes from both Glycoside Hydrolase Family 1 and Family 3. β-glucosidases are commonly used in both natural and industrial cellulase cocktails to convert cellobiose to glucose to relieve cellulase product inhibition and to facilitate microbial uptake of glucose. Using an exogenous β-glucosidase, we demonstrate that the engineered strain of P. putida can grow on levoglucosan up to 60 g/L and can also utilize cellobiosan. Overall, this study elucidates the biological pathway to co-utilize levoglucosan and cellobiosan, which will be a key transformation for the biological upgrading of pyrolysis-derived substrates.« less

  3. Detection of eight BRCA1 mutations in 10 breast/ovarian cancer families, including 1 family with male breast cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sruewing, J.P.; Brody, L.C.; Erdos, M.R.

    1995-07-01

    Genetic epidemiological evidence suggests that mutations in BRCA1 may be responsible for approximately one half of early onset familial breast cancer and the majority of familial breast/ovarian cancer. The recent cloning of BRCA1 allows for the direct detection of mutations, but the feasibility of presymptomatic screening for cancer susceptibility is unknown. We analyzed genomic DNA from one affected individual from each of 24 families with at least three cases of ovarian or breast cancer, using SSCP assays. Variant SSCP bands were subcloned and sequenced. Allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization was used to verify sequence changes and to screen DNA from control individuals. Six frameshift and two missense mutations were detected in 10 different families. A frameshift mutation was detected in a male proband affected with both breast and prostate cancer. A 40-bp deletion was detected in a patient who developed intra-abdominal carcinomatosis 1 year after prophylactic oophorectomy. Mutations were detected throughout the gene, and only one was detected in more than a single family. These results provide further evidence that inherited breast and ovarian cancer can occur as a consequence of a wide array of BRCA1 mutations. These results suggests that development of a screening test for BRCA1 mutations will be technically challenging. The finding of a mutation in a family with male breast cancer, not previously thought to be related to BRCA1, also illustrates the potential difficulties of genetic counseling for individuals known to carry mutations. 37 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  4. Jefferson Lab Invites Families, Groups, Classes to Physics Fest Events |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jefferson Lab Families, Groups, Classes to Physics Fest Events Small Business A student watches in amazement at the behavior of inflated balloons after they have been pulled from a container of liquid nitrogen (at a temperature of -321 Fahrenheit). NEWPORT NEWS, Va., June 3, 2010 - The U.S. Department of Energy's Jefferson Lab invites families, groups and classes to sign up now for a summer 2010 or school year 2010-2011 Physics Fest. Seating is still available for the Physics Fests scheduled

  5. An Update on Feds Feeds Families | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Feds Feeds Families An Update on Feds Feeds Families November 19, 2012 - 5:32pm Addthis As a result of DOE employee efforts, the Energy Department received an award from OPM for donating the highest amount of non-perishable food items within the “small agency” category of Federal agencies participating in this year’s Campaign. | Photo courtesy of OPM. As a result of DOE employee efforts, the Energy Department received an award from OPM for donating the highest amount of

  6. HUD rehabilitation energy guidelines for multi-family dwellings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-09-01

    The Guidebook has been prepared to help people, like yourself, involved in the rehabilitation of a multi-family building. It will help you understand the basics of residential energy conservation, and to think positively about the potential economic benefits. The Guidebook, and the HUD Rehabilitation Energy Guidelines, are applicable to all climates from hot and humid Florida to the northern reaches of Alaska.

  7. Family Moderate Income Homeowners In New York State

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Family Moderate Income Homeowners In New York State: Enhancing Resource Accessibility Through Process Improvement and Targeted Outreach," by Residential Energy Efficiency Solutions, July 10, 2012, Arlington, Virginia. Provides an overview of broadening accessibility to financing through process improvement and targeted outreach.

  8. Experimental plan for the Single-Family Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, L.G.; Brown, M.A.; Wright, T.; White, D.L.

    1991-09-01

    The national evaluation of the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) consists of five separate studies. The Single-Family Study is one of three studies that will estimate program energy savings and cost effectiveness in principal WAP submarkets. This report presents the experimental plan for the Single-Family Study, which will be implemented over the next three years (1991--1993). The Single-Family Study will directly estimate energy savings for a nationally representative sample of single-family and small multifamily homes weatherized in the 1989 program year. Savings will be estimated from gas and electric utility billing records using the Princeton Scorekeeping Method (PRISM). The study will also assess nonenergy impacts (e.g., health, comfort, safety, and housing affordability), estimate cost effectiveness, and analyze factors influencing these outcomes. For homes using fuels such as wood, coal, fuel oil, kerosene, and propane as the primary source of space conditioning, energy savings will be studied indirectly. The study will assemble a large nationally representative data base. A cluster sampling approach will be used, in which about 400 subgrantees are selected in a first stage and weatherized homes are selected in a second range. To ensure that the Single-Family Study is able to identify promising opportunities for future program development, two purposively selected groups of subgrantees will be included: (1) subgrantees that install cooling measures (such as more efficient air conditioning equipment or radiant barriers), and (2) exemplary subgrantees that use state-of-the-art technologies and service delivery procedures (such as advanced audit techniques, blower door tests, infrared scanners, extensive client education, etc.). These two groups of subgrantees will be analyzed to identify the most effective program elements in specific circumstances. 14 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Neutrons Reveal New Electrocatalyst Family for Producing Hydrogen Fuel |

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Neutrons Reveal New Electrocatalyst Family for Producing Hydrogen Fuel Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) Community Resources Contact Information Basic Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-22/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3081 F: (301) 903-6594 E: Email Us More

  10. Jefferson Lab invites families, groups to Summer 2005 Physics Fests |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jefferson Lab Science Education staff member Steve Gagnon Steve Gagnon, Science Education, doing the popular "Deep Freeze (cryogenics)" presentation at the 2003 Open House. Photo credit: Greg Adams. Jefferson Lab invites families, groups to Summer 2005 Physics Fests April 7, 2005 Wednesday, June 8 Wednesday, June 29 Tuesday, July 12 Wednesday, July 27 Wednesday, August 10 This two-hour presentation (10 a.m. - noon) includes an interactive summary of the research conducted at the

  11. ETO family protein Mtgr1 mediates Prdm14 functions in stem cell...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ETO family protein Mtgr1 mediates Prdm14 functions in stem cell maintenance and primordial germ cell formation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ETO family protein Mtgr1 ...

  12. BC Hydro Brings Energy Savings to Low-Income Families in Canada...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BC Hydro Brings Energy Savings to Low-Income Families in Canada BC Hydro Brings Energy Savings to Low-Income Families in Canada The number of British Columbia, Canada, households ...

  13. Y-12 and East TN Public Broadcasting System ? A Nuclear Family...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - A Nuclear Family Video Miniseries The fourth and final episode of A Nuclear Family: Y-12 National Security Complex documentary film miniseries is complete and East TN PBS is...

  14. PG&E (Gas)- Multi-Family Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Through the Rebates for Multi-Family Properties Program, PG&E offers prescriptive rebates for owners and managers of multi-family properties of two or more units. Boilers, furnaces, clothes...

  15. Structure and T Cell Inhibition Properties of B7 Family Member...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Structure and T Cell Inhibition Properties of B7 Family Member, B7-H3 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Structure and T Cell Inhibition Properties of B7 Family Member, ...

  16. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Multi-Family Peer Exchange Call: Moving Multi-family Buildings from Assessments to Upgrades, January 24, 2013

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    January 24, 2013 Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Multi- Family Peer Exchange Call: Moving Multi-family Buildings from Assessments to Upgrades Agenda * Call Logistics and Attendance * Discussion  Do programs have any lessons learned, success stories, or challenges with regard to moving from assessments to upgrades in multi-family buildings they would like to share?  What hurdles have people faced in moving from assessments to upgrades and what are potential solutions?  What are

  17. Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens Bosarge Family Education Center

    High Performance Buildings Database

    Boothbay, ME The Bosarge Family Education Center offers the Gardens a unique opportunity to educate, influence and inspire the public regarding environmental sustainable living practices. The building is a new ~8000 SF Education Center adjacent to the existing Visitors Center in Boothbay ME, owned by Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens (CMBG). This project provides an important addition to CMBG's environmental programming and expands the Gardens' public image. It houses administrative office space as well as flexible and adaptable classroom space that can also be used for various events and gatherings.

  18. The development of a prechamber diesel engine family

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Filtri, G.; Morello, L.; Stroppiana, B.

    1989-01-01

    The development of a new family of prechamber diesel engines, based on a technological commonalty with the gasoline engines is reported. The range of diesel engines, all of them four-cylinder-in line, consist of 3 displacements: 1365cc - 1697cc - 1930cc either naturally aspirated or turbocharged. Mention is also made of their most significant technical innovations about their architecture and combustion chambers, and the main components such as block cylinder, head, crankshaft, connecting rods, pistons, timing gear and injection pump control, intake and exhaust manifolds.

  19. An evaluation of genetic heterogeneity in 145 breast-ovarian cancer families

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narod, S.A.; Ford, D.; Devilee, P.; Barkardottir, R.B.; Lynch, H.T.; Smith, S.A.; Ponder, B.A.J.; Weber, B.L.; Garber, J.E.; Birch, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    The breast-ovary cancer-family syndrome is a dominant predisposition to cancer of the breast and ovaries which has been mapped to chromosome region 17q12-q21. The majority, but not all, of breast-ovary cancer families show linkage to this susceptibility locus, designated BRCA1. We report the results of a linkage analysis of 145 families with both breast and ovarian cancer. These families contain either a total of three or more cases of early-onset (before age 60 years) breast cancer or ovarian cancer. All families contained at least one case of ovarian cancer. Overall, an estimated 76% of the 145 families are linked to the BRCA1 locus. None of the 13 families with cases of male breast cancer appear to be linked, but it is estimated that 92% (95% confidence interval 76%-100%) of families with no male breast cancer and with two or more ovarian cancers are linked to BRCA1. These data suggest that the breast-ovarian cancer-family syndrome is genetically heterogeneous. However, the large majority of families with early-onset breast cancer and with two or more cases of ovarian cancer are likely to be due to BRCA1 mutations. 39 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Y-12 employees, families and friends help East Tennessee during annual

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Volunteer Day | Y-12 National Security Complex employees, families ... Y-12 employees, families and friends help East Tennessee during annual Volunteer Day Posted: May 7, 2015 - 3:34pm Chris Clark, Contractor Assurance manager, and Rick Glass, Vice President of Mission Assurance for CNS, volunteered at the Oak Ridge Children's Museum. Y-12 National Security Complex employees, their families and friends lent helping hands to some 32 projects throughout the area - painting, landscaping,

  1. Linkage analysis of 19 French breast cancer families, with five chromosome 17q markers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazoyer, S.; Jamot, B.; Sobol, H. ); Lalle, P.; Bignon, Y.J.; Courjal, F. ); Narod, S.A. ); Dutrillaux, B.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, D. )

    1993-04-01

    Nineteen French breast and breast-ovarian cancer families were tested for linkage with five chromosome 17q markers. The five breast-ovarian cancer families as a group give positive evidence for linkage, whereas the 14 breast cancer-only families do not. Heterogeneity of linkage of breast and breast-ovarian cancers is significant in France and supports the existence of more than one susceptibility gene. 15 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Standard Work Specifications for Single-Family Home Energy Upgrades Summary

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fact Sheet | Department of Energy Standard Work Specifications for Single-Family Home Energy Upgrades Summary Fact Sheet Standard Work Specifications for Single-Family Home Energy Upgrades Summary Fact Sheet The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and numerous industry stakeholders developed the Standard Work Specifications for Single-Family Home Energy Upgrades to define the minimum requirements for high-quality residential energy upgrades.

  3. Affinity Maturation of a Potent Family of HIV Antibodies Is Primarily...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Affinity Maturation of a Potent Family of HIV Antibodies Is Primarily Focused on Accommodating or Avoiding Glycans Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Affinity Maturation of ...

  4. Weatherized Homes Saving Money for Families Across the U.S.

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    750 thousand homes have been weatherized over the past three years through the Department's Weatherization Assistance Program, saving families $400 a year on their heating and cooling bills.

  5. An interactive grid generator for TOUGH family code

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-01-09

    WinGridder has been developed for designing, generating, and visualizing (at various spatial scales) numerical grids used in reservoir simulations and groundwater modeling studies. It can save mesh files for TOUGH family codes and output additional grid information for various purposes in either graphic format or plain text format, many important features, such as inclined faults and offset, layering structure, local refinements, and embedded engineering structures, can be represented in the grid. The main advantages ofmore » this grid-generation software are its user friendly graphical interfaces, flexible grid design capabilities, efficient grid generation, and powerful searching and post-processing capability, especially for large size grid (e.g., a grid of million grid cells). The main improvements of the version 2.0 are (1) to add a capability of handling a repository with multiple sub-regions and specified drifts, (2) to use an interpolation method, instead of picking the nearest point, in calculating the geological data from the given digital geological model, and (3) enhanced searching and other capability.« less

  6. Pyrin gene and mutants thereof, which cause familial Mediterranean fever

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kastner, Daniel L. (Bethesda, MD); Aksentijevichh, Ivona (Bethesda, MD); Centola, Michael (Tacoma Park, MD); Deng, Zuoming (Gaithersburg, MD); Sood, Ramen (Rockville, MD); Collins, Francis S. (Rockville, MD); Blake, Trevor (Laytonsville, MD); Liu, P. Paul (Ellicott City, MD); Fischel-Ghodsian, Nathan (Los Angeles, CA); Gumucio, Deborah L. (Ann Arbor, MI); Richards, Robert I. (North Adelaide, AU); Ricke, Darrell O. (San Diego, CA); Doggett, Norman A. (Santa Cruz, NM); Pras, Mordechai (Tel-Hashomer, IL)

    2003-09-30

    The invention provides the nucleic acid sequence encoding the protein associated with familial Mediterranean fever (FMF). The cDNA sequence is designated as MEFV. The invention is also directed towards fragments of the DNA sequence, as well as the corresponding sequence for the RNA transcript and fragments thereof. Another aspect of the invention provides the amino acid sequence for a protein (pyrin) associated with FMF. The invention is directed towards both the full length amino acid sequence, fusion proteins containing the amino acid sequence and fragments thereof. The invention is also directed towards mutants of the nucleic acid and amino acid sequences associated with FMF. In particular, the invention discloses three missense mutations, clustered in within about 40 to 50 amino acids, in the highly conserved rfp (B30.2) domain at the C-terminal of the protein. These mutants include M6801, M694V, K695R, and V726A. Additionally, the invention includes methods for diagnosing a patient at risk for having FMF and kits therefor.

  7. Functional and structural diversity in GH62 ?-L-arabinofuranosidases from the thermophilic fungus Scytalidium thermophilum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaur, Amrit Pal; Nocek, Boguslaw P.; Xu, Xiaohui; Lowden, Michael J.; Leyva, Juan Francisco; Stogios, Peter J.; Cui, Hong; Leo, Rosa Di; Powlowski, Justin; Tsang, Adrian; Savchenko, Alexei

    2015-05-01

    The genome of the thermophilic fungus Scytalidium thermophilum (strain CBS 625.91) harbours a wide range of genes involved in carbohydrate degradation, including three genes, abf62A, abf62B and abf62C, predicted to encode glycoside hydrolase family 62 (GH62) enzymes. Transcriptome analysis showed that only abf62A and abf62C are actively expressed during growth on diverse substrates including straws from barley, alfalfa, triticale and canola. The abf62A and abf62C genes were expressed in Escherichia coli and the resulting recombinant proteins were characterized. Calcium-free crystal structures of Abf62C in apo and xylotriose bound forms were determined to 1.23 and 1.48 resolution respectively. Site-directed mutagenesis confirmed Asp55, Asp171 and Glu230 as catalytic triad residues, and revealed the critical role of non-catalytic residues Asp194, Trp229 and Tyr338 in positioning the scissile ?-L-arabinofuranoside bond at the catalytic site. Further, the +2R substrate-binding site residues Tyr168 and Asn339, as well as the +2NR residue Tyr226, are involved in accommodating long-chain xylan polymers. Overall, our structural and functional analysis highlights characteristic differences between Abf62A and Abf62C, which represent divergent subgroups in the GH62 family.

  8. Where are the mini Kreutz-family comets?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ye, Quan-Zhi; Wiegert, Paul A.; Hui, Man-To; Kracht, Rainer

    2014-12-01

    The Kreutz family of sungrazing comets contains over 2000 known members, many of which are believed to be under ?100 m sizes (mini comets) and have only been studied at small heliocentric distances (r {sub H}) with space-based SOHO/STEREO spacecraft. To understand the brightening process of mini Kreutz comets, we conducted a survey using CFHT/MegaCam at moderate r {sub H} guided by SOHO/STEREO observations. We identify two comets that should be in our search area but are not detected, indicating that the comets have either followed a steeper brightening rate within the previously reported rapid brightening stage (the brightening burst), or the brightening burst starts earlier than expected. We present a composite analysis of the pre-perihelion light curves of five Kreutz comets that cover to ?1 AU. We observe significant diversity in the light curves that can be used to grossly classify them into two types: C/Ikeya-Seki and C/SWAN follow the canonical r{sub H}{sup ?4} while the others follow r{sub H}{sup ?7}. In particular, C/SWAN seems to have undergone an outburst (?m > 5 mag) or a rapid brightening (n ? 11) between r {sub H} = 1.06 AU and 0.52 AU, and shows hints of structural/compositional differences compared to other bright Kreutz comets. We also find evidence that the Kreutz comets as a population lose their mass less efficiently than the dynamically new comet, C/ISON, and are relatively devoid of species that drive C/ISON's activity at large r {sub H}. Concurrent observations of C/STEREO in different wavelengths also suggest that a blueward species such as CN may be the main driver for brightening bursts, instead of sodium as previously thought.

  9. New Materials Family on the Block | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    New Materials Family on the Block Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) Community Resources Contact Information Basic Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-22/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3081 F: (301) 903-6594 E: Email Us More Information » 12.14.15 New Materials Family on the Block A family of single-phase

  10. Table 5.8. U.S. Vehicle Fuel Consumption by Family Income, 1994

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    and 1994 Vehicle Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total 1993 Family Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral Assist- ance 1 RSE Row Factor: Less than 5,000 5,000...

  11. Table 5.10. U.S. Average Vehicle Fuel Consumption by Family...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1993 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total 1993 Family Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral Assist- ance 1 RSE Row Factor: Less than 5,000 5,000...

  12. Table 5.9. U.S. Average Vehicle-Miles Traveled by Family Income...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1993 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total 1993 Family Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral Assist- ance 1 RSE Row Factor: Less than 5,000 5,000...

  13. A Nuclear Family: Extras - About the Series | Y-12 National Security...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - ... A Nuclear Family: Extras - About the Series The mp4 video format is not supported by this browser. Download video Captions: On Time: 11:49 min. D. Ray Smith, Y-12 historian,...

  14. A Nuclear Family: I've Seen It | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    I've ... A Nuclear Family: I've Seen It The mp4 video format is not supported by this browser. Download video Captions: On Time: 26:42 min. Episode 1 shows how the lives of East...

  15. A Nuclear Family: Lifting The Veil | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lifting ... A Nuclear Family: Lifting The Veil The mp4 video format is not supported by this browser. Download video Captions: On Time: 26:40 min. Episode 4 describes Y-12's focus...

  16. A Nuclear Family: A Race For Peace | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Race ... A Nuclear Family: A Race For Peace The mp4 video format is not supported by this browser. Download video Captions: On Time: 26:40 min. Episode 3 reveals how Y-12 helped...

  17. PG&E- Multi-Family Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    PG&E offers prescriptive rebates for owners and managers of multi-family properties of two or more units. Appliances, boilers, water heating, HVAC, and lighting improvements are among the...

  18. Working Families Tax Relief Act of 2004 (released in AEO2005)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2005-01-01

    The Working Families Tax Relief Act of 2004 was signed into law on October 13, 2004. Primarily, the Act reduces taxes for individuals and businesses. At least two provisions relate to energy: Depletion of marginal properties and qualified vehicles.

  19. Roy Williams as recalled by his son and family ? Or: Roy Williams...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    his son and family - Or: Roy Williams: A leader among many (title at it appeared The Oak Ridger) The rewards for writing stories about Y-12 history come in many and varied formsl...

  20. Seattle City Light- Multi-Family Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Seattle City Light provides incentives for multi-family housing properties with 5 or more units to increase their energy efficiency. Rebates are offered for common area lighting and weatherization...

  1. "Feds Feed Families" Events to Be Held at Department of Energy Facilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Please come and enjoy the Department of Energy (DOE) Feeds Families Festivals featuring the Deputy Secretary’s Band, “Yellow Cake,” fun-filled activities, and discounted lunches! The events will be...

  2. RESRAD Family of Codes - A Suite of Tools for Environmental Radiological Dose Assessment

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    RESRAD Family of Codes - A Suite of Tools for Environmental Radiological Dose Assessment Charley Yu, PhD, CHP RESRAD Program Manager Environmental Science Division Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL Presented at Environmental Radiological Assistance Directory Web Conference June 27, 2012 Presentation Outline  RESRAD Family of Codes Overview  Brief Overview of the RESRAD Methodology  RESRAD-BUILD Overview  RESRAD-OFFSITE Overview  RESRAD-BIOTA Overview  Summary 2 RESRAD

  3. ETO family protein Mtgr1 mediates Prdm14 functions in stem cell maintenance

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and primordial germ cell formation (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect ETO family protein Mtgr1 mediates Prdm14 functions in stem cell maintenance and primordial germ cell formation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ETO family protein Mtgr1 mediates Prdm14 functions in stem cell maintenance and primordial germ cell formation Authors: Nady, Nataliya ; Gupta, Ankit ; Ma, Ziyang ; Swigut, Tomek ; Koide, Akiko ; Koide, Shohei ; Wysocka, Joanna [1] ; UC) [2] + Show Author Affiliations

  4. Characterization of a Y-Family DNA Polymerase eta from the Eukaryotic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Thermophile Alvinella pompejana (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Characterization of a Y-Family DNA Polymerase eta from the Eukaryotic Thermophile Alvinella pompejana Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Characterization of a Y-Family DNA Polymerase eta from the Eukaryotic Thermophile Alvinella pompejana Human DNA polymerase η (HsPol η ) plays an important role in translesion synthesis (TLS), which allows for replication past DNA

  5. Characterization of a Y-Family DNA Polymerase eta from the Eukaryotic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Thermophile Alvinella pompejana (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Characterization of a Y-Family DNA Polymerase eta from the Eukaryotic Thermophile Alvinella pompejana Title: Characterization of a Y-Family DNA Polymerase eta from the Eukaryotic Thermophile Alvinella pompejana Human DNA polymerase η (HsPol η ) plays an important role in translesion synthesis (TLS), which allows for replication past DNA damage such as UV-induced cis-syn cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs). Here, we

  6. 9-2-14_CBFO_Employees_Help_Locally_In_Annual_Feds_Feed_Families_Effort_2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photo Caption: CBFO Employees Help Locally in Annual Feds Feed Families Effort CARLSBAD, N.M., September 2, 2014 -- U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) Manager Joe Franco is shown with some donations contributed to the annual Feds Feed Families campaign as supported by CBFO employees. The CBFO has responsibility for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and the National Transuranic Program. Since the campaign began in 2009, the DOE, working in

  7. Family-Owned Restaurant Serves Up Huge Energy Savings | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Family-Owned Restaurant Serves Up Huge Energy Savings Family-Owned Restaurant Serves Up Huge Energy Savings May 8, 2013 - 2:27pm Addthis Energy efficiency upgrades helped the Athenian Corner reduce its operating costs and improved the restaurant's bottom line. | Photo courtesy of BetterBuildings Lowell Energy Upgrade program. Energy efficiency upgrades helped the Athenian Corner reduce its operating costs and improved the restaurant's bottom line. | Photo courtesy of BetterBuildings

  8. BC Hydro Brings Energy Savings to Low-Income Families in Canada |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy BC Hydro Brings Energy Savings to Low-Income Families in Canada BC Hydro Brings Energy Savings to Low-Income Families in Canada The number of British Columbia, Canada, households eligible for Better Buildings Residential Network member BC Hydro's Energy Conservation Assistance Program (ECAP) just doubled. British Columbia Energy Minister Bill Bennett recently announced an increase in the low-income qualification cutoff for BC Hydro's free home energy-saving kits and

  9. The Standard Work Specifications for Single-Family Home Energy Upgrades are

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    now available€ at your fingertips! | Department of Energy The Standard Work Specifications for Single-Family Home Energy Upgrades are now available€ at your fingertips! The Standard Work Specifications for Single-Family Home Energy Upgrades are now available€ at your fingertips! This announcement contains information on the availability of the SWS Online Tool. PDF icon sws_tool_available.pdf More Documents & Publications Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals: Request for

  10. Analysis of Installed Measures and Energy Savings for Single-Family Residential Better Buildings Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heaney, M.; Polly, B.

    2015-04-30

    This report presents an analysis of data for residential single-family projects reported by 37 organizations that were awarded federal financial assistance (cooperative agreements or grants) by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Better Buildings Neighborhood Program.1 The report characterizes the energy-efficiency measures installed for single-family residential projects and analyzes energy savings and savings prediction accuracy for measures installed in a subset of those projects.

  11. An estimated 5% of new protein structures solved today represent a new Pfam family

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mistry, Jaina; Kloppmann, Edda; Rost, Burkhard; Punta, Marco

    2013-11-01

    This study uses the Pfam database to show that the sequence redundancy of protein structures deposited in the PDB is increasing. The possible reasons behind this trend are discussed. High-resolution structural knowledge is key to understanding how proteins function at the molecular level. The number of entries in the Protein Data Bank (PDB), the repository of all publicly available protein structures, continues to increase, with more than 8000 structures released in 2012 alone. The authors of this article have studied how structural coverage of the protein-sequence space has changed over time by monitoring the number of Pfam families that acquired their first representative structure each year from 1976 to 2012. Twenty years ago, for every 100 new PDB entries released, an estimated 20 Pfam families acquired their first structure. By 2012, this decreased to only about five families per 100 structures. The reasons behind the slower pace at which previously uncharacterized families are being structurally covered were investigated. It was found that although more than 50% of current Pfam families are still without a structural representative, this set is enriched in families that are small, functionally uncharacterized or rich in problem features such as intrinsically disordered and transmembrane regions. While these are important constraints, the reasons why it may not yet be time to give up the pursuit of a targeted but more comprehensive structural coverage of the protein-sequence space are discussed.

  12. miR-92a family and their target genes in tumorigenesis and metastasis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Molin; Guan, Xingfang; Sun, Yuqiang; Mi, Jun; Shu, Xiaohong; Liu, Fang; Li, Chuangang

    2014-04-15

    The miR-92a family, including miR-25, miR-92a-1, miR-92a-2 and miR-363, arises from three different paralog clusters miR-17-92, miR-106a-363, and miR-106b-25 that are highly conservative in the process of evolution, and it was thought as a group of microRNAs (miRNAs) correlated with endothelial cells. Aberrant expression of miR-92a family was detected in multiple cancers, and the disturbance of miR-92a family was related with tumorigenesis and tumor development. In this review, the progress on the relationship between miR-92a family and their target genes and malignant tumors will be summarized. - Highlights: Aberrant expression of miR-92a, miR-25 and miR-363 can be observed in many kinds of malignant tumors. The expression of miR-92a family is regulated by LOH, epigenetic alteration, transcriptional factors such as SP1, MYC, E2F, wild-type p53 etc. Roles of miR-92a family in tumorigenesis and development: promoting cell proliferation, invasion and metastasis, inhibiting cell apoptosis.

  13. A high incidence of BRCA1 mutations in 20 breast-ovarian cancer families

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serova, O.; Montagna, M.; Sylla, B.

    1996-01-01

    We have analyzed 20 breast-ovarian cancer families, the majority of which show positive evidence of linkage to chromosome 17q12, for germ-line mutations in the BRCA1 gene. BRCA1 mutations cosegregating with breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility were identified in 16 families, including 1 family with a case of male breast cancer. Nine of these mutations have not been reported previously. The majority of mutations were found to generate a premature stop codon leading to the formation of a truncated BRCA1 protein of 2%-88% of the expected normal length. Two mutations altered the RING finger domain. Sequencing of genomic DNA led to the identification of a mutation in the coding region of BRCA1 in 12 families, and cDNA analysis revealed an abnormal or missing BRCA1 transcript in 4 of the 8 remaining families. A total of eight mutations were associated with a reduced quantity of BRCA1 transcript. We were unable to detect BRCA1 mutations in 4 of the 20 families, but only 1 of these was clearly linked to BRCA1. It is expected that the majority of clear examples of the breast-ovarian cancer syndrome will be associated with germ-line mutations in the coding region of BRCA1. 30 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. The Sorcerer II Global Ocean Sampling Expedition: Expanding theUniverse of Protein Families

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yooseph, Shibu; Sutton, Granger; Rusch, Douglas B.; Halpern,Aaron L.; Williamson, Shannon J.; Remington, Karin; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Heidelberg, Karla B.; Manning, Gerard; Li, Weizhong; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Cieplak, Piotr; Miller, Christopher S.; Li, Huiying; Mashiyama, Susan T.; Joachimiak, Marcin P.; van Belle, Christopher; Chandonia, John-Marc; Soergel, David A.; Zhai, Yufeng; Natarajan, Kannan; Lee, Shaun; Raphael,Benjamin J.; Bafna, Vineet; Friedman, Robert; Brenner, Steven E.; Godzik,Adam; Eisenberg, David; Dixon, Jack E.; Taylor, Susan S.; Strausberg,Robert L.; Frazier, Marvin; Venter, J.Craig

    2006-03-23

    Metagenomics projects based on shotgun sequencing of populations of micro-organisms yield insight into protein families. We used sequence similarity clustering to explore proteins with a comprehensive dataset consisting of sequences from available databases together with 6.12 million proteins predicted from an assembly of 7.7 million Global Ocean Sampling (GOS) sequences. The GOS dataset covers nearly all known prokaryotic protein families. A total of 3,995 medium- and large-sized clusters consisting of only GOS sequences are identified, out of which 1,700 have no detectable homology to known families. The GOS-only clusters contain a higher than expected proportion of sequences of viral origin, thus reflecting a poor sampling of viral diversity until now. Protein domain distributions in the GOS dataset and current protein databases show distinct biases. Several protein domains that were previously categorized as kingdom specific are shown to have GOS examples in other kingdoms. About 6,000 sequences (ORFans) from the literature that heretofore lacked similarity to known proteins have matches in the GOS data. The GOS dataset is also used to improve remote homology detection. Overall, besides nearly doubling the number of current proteins, the predicted GOS proteins also add a great deal of diversity to known protein families and shed light on their evolution. These observations are illustrated using several protein families, including phosphatases, proteases, ultraviolet-irradiation DNA damage repair enzymes, glutamine synthetase, and RuBisCO. The diversity added by GOS data has implications for choosing targets for experimental structure characterization as part of structural genomics efforts. Our analysis indicates that new families are being discovered at a rate that is linear or almost linear with the addition of new sequences, implying that we are still far from discovering all protein families in nature.

  15. Relativistic static thin dust disks with an inner edge: An infinite family of new exact solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzalez, Guillermo A.; Gutierrez-Pineres, Antonio C.; Vina-Cervantes, Viviana M.

    2009-06-15

    An infinite family of new exact solutions of the vacuum Einstein equations is presented. The solutions are static and axially symmetric and correspond to an infinite family of thin dust disks with a central inner edge. The metric functions of all the solutions can be explicitly computed, and can be expressed in a simple manner in terms of oblate spheroidal coordinates. The energy density of all the disks of the family is positive everywhere and well behaved, so that the corresponding energy-momentum tensor is in full agreement with all the energy conditions. Moreover, although the total mass of the disks is infinite, the solutions are asymptotically flat and the Riemann tensor is regular everywhere, as it is shown by computing the curvature scalars. Now, besides its importance as a new family of exact solutions of the vacuum Einstein equations, the main importance of this family of solutions is that it can be easily superposed with the Schwarzschild solution in order to describe thin disks surrounding a central black hole. Accordingly, a detailed analysis of this superposition will be presented in a subsequent paper.

  16. Linkage studies with 17q and 18q markers in a breast/ovarian cancer family

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milner, B.J.; Allan, L.A.; Kelly, K.F.; Johnston, A.; Haites, N. ); Cruickshank, D.; Hall, M.; Kitchener, H.; Parkin, D. )

    1993-04-01

    Genes on chromosomes 17q and 18q have been shown to code for putative tumor suppressors. By a combination of allele-loss studies on sporadic ovarian carcinomas and linkage analysis on a breast/ovarian cancer family, the authors have investigated the involvement of such genes in these diseases. Allele loss occurred in sporadic tumors from both chromosome 17p, in 18/26 (69%) cases, and chromosome 17q, in 15/22 (68%) cases. In the three familial tumors studied, allele loss also occurred on chromosome 17 (in 2/3 cases for 17p markers and in 2/2 cases for a 17q allele). Allele loss on chromosome 18q, at the DCC (deleted in colorectal carcinomas) locus, was not as common (6/16 cases [38%]) in sporadic ovarian tumors but had occurred in all three familial tumors. The results of linkage analysis on the breast/ovarian cancer family suggested linkage between the disease locus and 17q markers, with a maximum lod score of 1.507 obtained with Mfd188 (D17S579) polymorphism at 5% recombination. The maximum lod score for DCC was 0.323 at 0.1% recombination. In this family the results are consistent with a predisposing gene for breast/ovarian cancer being located at chromosome 17q21. 24 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  17. Complete genome of the cellyloytic thermophile Acidothermus cellulolyticus 11B provides insights into its ecophysiological and evloutionary adaptations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barabote, Ravi D.; Xie, Gary; Leu, David H.; Normand, Philippe; Necsulea, Anamaria; Daubin, Vincent; Medigue, Claudine; Adney, William S.; Xu,Xin Clare; Lapidus, Alla; Detter, Chris; Pujic, Petar; Bruce, David; Lavire, Celine; Challacombe, Jean F.; Brettin, Thomas S.; Berry, Alison M.

    2009-01-01

    We present here the complete 2.4 Mb genome of the cellulolytic actinobacterial thermophile, Acidothermus cellulolyticus 11B. New secreted glycoside hydrolases and carbohydrate esterases were identified in the genome, revealing a diverse biomass-degrading enzyme repertoire far greater than previously characterized, and significantly elevating the industrial value of this organism. A sizable fraction of these hydrolytic enzymes break down plant cell walls and the remaining either degrade components in fungal cell walls or metabolize storage carbohydrates such as glycogen and trehalose, implicating the relative importance of these different carbon sources. A novel feature of the A. cellulolyticus secreted cellulolytic and xylanolytic enzymes is that they are fused to multiple tandemly arranged carbohydrate binding modules (CBM), from families 2 and 3. Interestingly, CBM3 was found to be always N-terminal to CBM2, suggesting a functional constraint driving this organization. While the catalytic domains of these modular enzymes are either diverse or unrelated, the CBMs were found to be highly conserved in sequence and may suggest selective substrate-binding interactions. For the most part, thermophilic patterns in the genome and proteome of A. cellulolyticus were weak, which may be reflective of the recent evolutionary history of A. cellulolyticus since its divergence from its closest phylogenetic neighbor Frankia, a mesophilic plant endosymbiont and soil dweller. However, ribosomal proteins and non-coding RNAs (rRNA and tRNAs) in A. cellulolyticus showed thermophilic traits suggesting the importance of adaptation of cellular translational machinery to environmental temperature. Elevated occurrence of IVYWREL amino acids in A. cellulolyticus orthologs compared to mesophiles, and inverse preferences for G and A at the first and third codon positions also point to its ongoing thermoadaptation. Additional interesting features in the genome of this cellulolytic, hot-springs dwelling prokaryote include a low occurrence of pseudogenes or mobile genetic elements, an unexpected complement of flagellar genes, and presence of three laterally-acquired genomic islands of likely ecophysiological value.

  18. Comparative genomics of the white-rot fungi, Phanerochaete carnosa and P. chrysosporium, to elucidate the genetic basis of the distinct wood types they colonize

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suzuki, Hitoshi; MacDonald, Jacqueline; Syed, Khajamohiddin; Salamov, Asaf; Hori, Chiaki; Aerts, Andrea; Henrissat, Bernard; Wiebenga, Ad; vanKuyk, Patricia A.; Barry, Kerrie; Lindquist, Erika; LaButti, Kurt; Lapidus, Alla; Lucas, Susan; Coutinho, Pedro; Gong, Yunchen; Samejima, Masahiro; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan; Abou-Zaid, Mamdouh; de Vries, Ronald P.; Igarashi, Kiyohiko; Yadav, Jagit S.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Master, Emma R.

    2012-02-17

    Background Softwood is the predominant form of land plant biomass in the Northern hemisphere, and is among the most recalcitrant biomass resources to bioprocess technologies. The white rot fungus, Phanerochaete carnosa, has been isolated almost exclusively from softwoods, while most other known white-rot species, including Phanerochaete chrysosporium, were mainly isolated from hardwoods. Accordingly, it is anticipated that P. carnosa encodes a distinct set of enzymes and proteins that promote softwood decomposition. To elucidate the genetic basis of softwood bioconversion by a white-rot fungus, the present study reports the P. carnosa genome sequence and its comparative analysis with the previously reported P. chrysosporium genome. Results P. carnosa encodes a complete set of lignocellulose-active enzymes. Comparative genomic analysis revealed that P. carnosa is enriched with genes encoding manganese peroxidase, and that the most divergent glycoside hydrolase families were predicted to encode hemicellulases and glycoprotein degrading enzymes. Most remarkably, P. carnosa possesses one of the largest P450 contingents (266 P450s) among the sequenced and annotated wood-rotting basidiomycetes, nearly double that of P. chrysosporium. Along with metabolic pathway modeling, comparative growth studies on model compounds and chemical analyses of decomposed wood components showed greater tolerance of P. carnosa to various substrates including coniferous heartwood. Conclusions The P. carnosa genome is enriched with genes that encode P450 monooxygenases that can participate in extractives degradation, and manganese peroxidases involved in lignin degradation. The significant expansion of P450s in P. carnosa, along with differences in carbohydrate- and lignin-degrading enzymes, could be correlated to the utilization of heartwood and sapwood preparations from both coniferous and hardwood species.

  19. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Multi-Family Peer Exchange Call: Shared Space vs. In-unit Upgrades in Multi-family Buildings, Call Slides and Summary, May 9, 2013

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Neighborhood Program Multi- Family Peer Exchange Call: Shared Space vs. In- unit Upgrades in Multi-family Buildings Call Slides and Summary Agenda * Call Logistics and Attendance * Future Call Topic Suggestions and Polling * Discussion  To what extent are programs focusing on shared space and technology in multi-family buildings vs. in-unit upgrades? Where are the biggest energy efficiency opportunities?  What are effective strategies for each type of work? What are the challenges?  How

  20. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Multi-family/Low Income Peer Exchange Call: Strategies to Address Split Incentives in Multi-family Buildings Call Slides and Discussion Summary, April 26, 2012

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    26, 2012 Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Multi- family/Low Income Peer Exchange Call: Strategies to Address Split Incentives in Multi-family Buildings Call Slides and Discussion Summary Agenda * Call Logistics and Attendance  How are you working with owners and tenants on multi-family upgrades? * Program Experience and Lessons:  Michael Croston, Repower Bremerton * Discussion:  What are some of the key challenges for working with rental properties?  What are effective

  1. Homogenization of a thin plate reinforced with periodic families of rigid rods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nazarov, Sergei A; Sweers, Guido H; Slutskij, Andrey S

    2011-08-31

    The asymptotics of the solution to the elastic bending problem for a thin plate reinforced with several periodic families of closely spaced but disjoint rods are constructed and justified, the result of homogenization being substantially different from the case when the rods are welded together into a single periodic mesh. The material in the rods is assumed to be appreciably more rigid than that in the plate. An averaged fourth-order differential operator is obtained from summing the nonelliptic operators generated by each of the families of the rods. This operator is shown to be elliptic if and only if the rods from at least two families are nonparallel. As a simplified example, the paper examines a similar stationary heat conduction problem. Bibliography: 24 titles.

  2. Familial site-specific Ovarian cancer is linked to BRCA1 on 17q12-21

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steichen-Gersdorf, E.; Gallion, H.H.; Ponder, M.A.; Pye, C.; Mazoyer, S.; Smith, S.A.; Ponder, B.A.J.; Ford, D.; Easton, D.F.; Girodet, C.

    1994-11-01

    In a study of nine families with {open_quotes}site-specific{close_quotes} ovarian cancer (criterion: three or more cases of epithelial ovarian cancer and no cases of breast cancer diagnosed at age <50 years) we have obtained evidence of linkage to the breast-ovarian cancer susceptibility gene, BRCA1 on 17q12-21. If the risk of cancer in these families is assumed to be restricted to the ovary, the best estimate of the proportion of families linked to BRCA1 is .78 (95% confidence interval .32-1.0). If predisposition to both breast and ovarian cancer is assumed, the proportion linked is 1.0 (95% confidence interval .46-1.0). The linkage of familial site-specific ovarian cancer to BRCA1 indicates the possibility of predictive testing in such families; however, this is only appropriate in families where the evidence for linkage to BRCA1 is conclusive. 17 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  3. NNSA Production Office more than doubles Feds Feed Families campaign goal |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Y-12 National Security Complex more ... NNSA Production Office more than doubles Feds Feed Families campaign goal Posted: October 14, 2015 - 11:16am NPO employees are shown making a bulk purchase of food from employee donations to the Feds Feed Families campaign. This food went to the Second Harvest of East Tennessee. Oak Ridge, Tenn. -- Employees of the National Nuclear Security Administration Production Office (NPO) have donated 28,605 pounds of food as part of the annual U.S. Department

  4. NNSA Production Office tops Feds Feed Families campaign goal | Y-12

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Security Complex tops ... NNSA Production Office tops Feds Feed Families campaign goal Posted: September 16, 2013 - 9:45am Oak Ridge, Tenn. - Employees of the National Nuclear Security Administration Production Office have donated 17,348 pounds of food as part of the annual U.S. Department of Energy's "Feds Feed Families" campaign. The campaign, which ended on September 6, surpassed the goal of 17,000 pounds. "I am extremely proud and moved by the generosity of NPO

  5. An Invitation for Family Fun at PPPL's Open House on June 1 | Princeton

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plasma Physics Lab An Invitation for Family Fun at PPPL's Open House on June 1 By Jeanne Jackson DeVoe May 13, 2013 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook An Invitation for Family Fun at PPPL's Open House on June 1 The U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Open House will be a fun science festival for every age, with NASA moon rocks, a Hall of Machines, an art show of paintings of PPPL, science activities for kids and tours of fusion machines. The event on June 1

  6. 10,000th Waste Shipment Milestone is All in the Family | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 10,000th Waste Shipment Milestone is All in the Family 10,000th Waste Shipment Milestone is All in the Family August 29, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis A Waste Isolation Pilot Plant facility shift manager inspects the shipping manifest of the 10,000th safe shipment to roll through the gates at the Department of Energy’s Waste Isolation Pilot Plant on Sept. 24, 2011. A Waste Isolation Pilot Plant facility shift manager inspects the shipping manifest of the 10,000th safe shipment to roll

  7. Energy Department Provides $140.3 Million to Low-Income Families for Home

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Weatherization | Department of Energy 140.3 Million to Low-Income Families for Home Weatherization Energy Department Provides $140.3 Million to Low-Income Families for Home Weatherization April 3, 2006 - 9:55am Addthis Funding is first installment of $243 million in total weatherization grants for FY 2006 WASHINGTON, D.C. - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Samuel W. Bodman today announced $140.3 million in weatherization program grants to 31 states and the Navajo Nation to make

  8. Department of Energy Provides Nearly $112 Million to Low-Income Families

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    for Home Weatherization | Department of Energy 112 Million to Low-Income Families for Home Weatherization Department of Energy Provides Nearly $112 Million to Low-Income Families for Home Weatherization March 29, 2007 - 12:17pm Addthis Funding is First Installment of $204.5 Million in Total Weatherization Grants for FY 2007 WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced $111.6 million in weatherization grants to 30 states and the Navajo Nation to make energy efficiency

  9. Department of Energy Provides Nearly $88 Million to Low-Income Families for

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Home Weatherization | Department of Energy 88 Million to Low-Income Families for Home Weatherization Department of Energy Provides Nearly $88 Million to Low-Income Families for Home Weatherization June 29, 2007 - 2:36pm Addthis Funding is Second Installment of $200 Million in Total Weatherization Grants for FY 2007 WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced $88 million in weatherization grants to 20 states to make energy efficiency improvements in homes of low-income

  10. Dy-Mn-Si as a representative of family of 'Dy-Transition

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Metal-Si' systems: Its isothermal sections, empirical rProd. Type: FTPules and new rare-earth manganese silicides (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Dy-Mn-Si as a representative of family of 'Dy-Transition Metal-Si' systems: Its isothermal sections, empirical rProd. Type: FTPules and new rare-earth manganese silicides Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Dy-Mn-Si as a representative of family of 'Dy-Transition Metal-Si' systems: Its isothermal sections, empirical rProd. Type: FTPules

  11. DOE Provides $96.4 Million to Low-Income Families for Home Weatherization |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy $96.4 Million to Low-Income Families for Home Weatherization DOE Provides $96.4 Million to Low-Income Families for Home Weatherization July 6, 2006 - 2:50pm Addthis Funding is Second Installment of $243 Million in Total Weatherization Grants for FY 2006 WASHINGTON, D.C. - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Samuel W. Bodman today announced $96.4 million in weatherization program grants to 19 states to make energy efficiency improvements in homes of low-income

  12. CNS donations help lower-income Appalachian families | Y-12 National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Security Complex CNS donations help ... CNS donations help lower-income Appalachian families Posted: December 21, 2015 - 1:44pm Y-12 Historian and ADFAC board member Ray Smith (left) and Y-12 Site Manager Bill Tindal present Annie Cacheiro, ADFAC executive director, a donation from CNS. A year ago, the Aid to Distressed Families of Appalachian Counties', or ADFAC's, School Supply Program was able to serve a record breaking 2,808 children, providing necessary school supplies to students in 29

  13. Feds Feed Families Wraps Up Successful Campaign to Stock Area Food Banks |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Feds Feed Families Wraps Up Successful Campaign to Stock Area Food Banks Feds Feed Families Wraps Up Successful Campaign to Stock Area Food Banks August 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis EM’s Nevada Site Office took first place in the site-submitted category of DOE’s CANstruction Sculpture Contest for its entry, shown here, inspired by London’s Tower Bridge during the 2012 Summer Olympics. EM's Nevada Site Office took first place in the site-submitted category of

  14. The activity of CouR, a MarR family transcriptional regulator, is modulated

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    through a novel molecular mechanism (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect The activity of CouR, a MarR family transcriptional regulator, is modulated through a novel molecular mechanism Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The activity of CouR, a MarR family transcriptional regulator, is modulated through a novel molecular mechanism CouR, a MarR-type transcriptional repressor, regulates the cou genes, encoding p-hydroxycinnamate catabolism in the soil bacterium Rhodococcus jostii RHA1.

  15. STEP-UP Coaches a University Park Family to Comfort and Savings |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy STEP-UP Coaches a University Park Family to Comfort and Savings STEP-UP Coaches a University Park Family to Comfort and Savings The average American household spends nearly $2,000 per year on energy used in the home, $200 to $400 of which could be paying for wasted energy due to drafts, air leaks around openings, and outdated heating and cooling systems. What statistics fail to convey is the feeling of not wanting to remove your coat when you walk in the door, the dread

  16. Get the Family in on the Energy-Saving Act | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    the Family in on the Energy-Saving Act Get the Family in on the Energy-Saving Act April 21, 2010 - 7:30am Addthis Erin R. Pierce Erin R. Pierce Former Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs It's no wonder that many of Earth Day's most ardent supporters are children. Environmental education is growing into a fixture in classrooms across the United States. Students are often eager to put their lessons in sustainability into practice at home. In turn, children are often the

  17. Genetic heterogeneity and localization of a familial breast-ovarian cancer gene on chromosome 17q12-q21

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, S.A.; Ponder, M.; Pye, C.; Ponder, B.A.J. ); Easton, D.F.; Ford, D.; Peto, J.; Anderson, K.; Averill, D.; Stratton, M. )

    1993-04-01

    In a study of 31 breast cancer families and 12 breast-ovarian cancer families, we have obtained clear evidence of linkage to markers on chromosome 17q in the families with ovarian cancer (maximum lod score 3.34 at [theta] = .04) but only weak evidence in those without ovarian cancer. Recombinant events indicate that the gene lies between D17S588 and D17S250. 9 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Switch to Detail View for this search SciTech Connect Search Results Page 1 of 1 Search for: All records Creators/Authors contains: "Kelly, Robert M" × Sort by Relevance Sort by Date (newest first) Sort by Date (oldest first) Sort by Relevance « Prev Next » Everything8 Electronic Full Text2 Citations6 Multimedia0 Datasets0 Software0 Filter Results Filter by Subject bacteria (3) capacity (3) biofuels (2) biomass (2) biomass fuels (2) carbohydrates (2) glycosides (2) hydrolases (2)

  19. West Valley Demonstration Project Food Drive Delivers Food for 700 Families

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WEST VALLEY, N.Y. – EM employees at West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) helped collect and deliver 114,843 pounds of food, including 360 turkeys, to nine food pantries in the West Valley area, just in time to benefit about 700 families in need during the holidays.

  20. Do Babies Matter? The Effect of Family Formation on Men and Women in Science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mary Ann Mason

    2007-10-30

    Mary Ann Mason, Professor of Social Welfare and Law at the University of California, Berkeley, presents "Do Babies Matter? The Effect of Family Formation on Men and Women in Science." In her talk, she discusses the difficulties of women who have a career in science or in other male-dominated professions.

  1. Do Babies Matter? The Effect of Family Formation on Men and Women in Science

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Mary Ann Mason

    2010-09-01

    Mary Ann Mason, Professor of Social Welfare and Law at the University of California, Berkeley, presents "Do Babies Matter? The Effect of Family Formation on Men and Women in Science." In her talk, she discusses the difficulties of women who have a career in science or in other male-dominated professions.

  2. Weatherization and Indoor Air Quality: Measured Impacts in Single Family Homes Under the Weatherization Assistance Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pigg, Scott; Cautley, Dan; Francisco, Paul; Hawkins, Beth A; Brennan, Terry M

    2014-09-01

    This report summarizes findings from a national field study of indoor air quality parameters in homes treated under the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP). The study involved testing and monitoring in 514 single-family homes (including mobile homes) located in 35 states and served by 88 local weatherization agencies.

  3. Genome-wide analysis of the omega-3 fatty acid desaturase gene family in Gossypium

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yurchenko, Olga P.; Park, Sunjung; Ilut, Daniel C.; Inmon, Jay J.; Millhollon, Jon C.; Liechty, Zach; Page, Justin T.; Jenks, Matthew A.; Chapman, Kent D.; Udall, Joshua A.; et al

    2014-11-18

    The majority of commercial cotton varieties planted worldwide are derived from Gossypium hirsutum, which is a naturally occurring allotetraploid produced by interspecific hybridization of A- and D-genome diploid progenitor species. While most cotton species are adapted to warm, semi-arid tropical and subtropical regions, and thus perform well in these geographical areas, cotton seedlings are sensitive to cold temperature, which can significantly reduce crop yields. One of the common biochemical responses of plants to cold temperatures is an increase in omega-3 fatty acids, which protects cellular function by maintaining membrane integrity. The purpose of our study was to identify and characterizemore » the omega-3 fatty acid desaturase (FAD) gene family in G. hirsutum, with an emphasis on identifying omega-3 FADs involved in cold temperature adaptation. Results: Eleven omega-3 FAD genes were identified in G. hirsutum, and characterization of the gene family in extant A and D diploid species (G. herbaceum and G. raimondii, respectively) allowed for unambiguous genome assignment of all homoeologs in tetraploid G. hirsutum. The omega-3 FAD family of cotton includes five distinct genes, two of which encode endoplasmic reticulum-type enzymes (FAD3-1 and FAD3-2) and three that encode chloroplast-type enzymes (FAD7/8-1, FAD7/8-2, and FAD7/8-3). The FAD3-2 gene was duplicated in the A genome progenitor species after the evolutionary split from the D progenitor, but before the interspecific hybridization event that gave rise to modern tetraploid cotton. RNA-seq analysis revealed conserved, gene-specific expression patterns in various organs and cell types and semi-quantitative RT-PCR further revealed that FAD7/8-1 was specifically induced during cold temperature treatment of G. hirsutum seedlings. Conclusions: The omega-3 FAD gene family in cotton was characterized at the genome-wide level in three species, showing relatively ancient establishment of the gene family prior to the split of A and D diploid progenitor species. The FAD genes are differentially expressed in various organs and cell types, including fiber, and expression of the FAD7/8-1 gene was induced by cold temperature. These data define the genetic and functional genomic properties of this important gene family in cotton and provide a foundation for future efforts to improve cotton abiotic stress tolerance through molecular breeding approaches.« less

  4. The earth-coupled heat pump: Utilizing innovative technology in single family rehabilitation strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-11-01

    The study examines the feasibility of incorporating the use of earth-coupled heat pump technology in single-family housing rehabilitation projects, based on energy conservation attributes and financial considerations. Following evaluation of a theoretical model which indicated that installations of the heat pumps were feasible, the heat pumps were tested under actual conditions in five single family housing units which were part of the Urban Homesteading Program, and were matched with comparable units which did not receive special treatment. Energy consumption information was collected for all units for twelve months. Variables were identified, and the data was analyzed for individual housing units and compared with the results predicted by the theoretical model to determine the practicality of incorporating such technology in large scale rehabilitation projects. 14 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Food and gift drives help make holidays brighter for regional families

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    STEM skills Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:Mar. 2016 all issues All Issues » submit Food and gift drives help make holidays brighter for regional families Donations impact seven-county region February 1, 2016 Northern New Mexico children excitedly open their gifts, while volunteers get ready to deliver bicycles. Northern New Mexico children excitedly open their gifts, while volunteers get ready to deliver bicycles.

  6. National impacts of the Weatherization Assistance Program in single-family and small multifamily dwellings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, M.A.; Berry, L.G.; Balzer, R.A.; Faby, E.

    1993-05-01

    Since 1976, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has operated one of the largest energy conservation programs in the nation -- the low-income Weatherization Assistance Program. The program strives to increase the energy efficiency of dwellings occupied by low-income persons in order to reduce their energy consumption, lower their fuel bills, increase the comfort of their homes, and safeguard their health. It targets vulnerable groups including the elderly, people with disabilities, and families with children. The most recent national evaluation of the impacts of the Program was completed in 1984 based on energy consumption data for households weatherized in 1981. DOE Program regulations and operations have changed substantially since then: new funding sources, management principles, diagnostic procedures, and weatherization technologies have been incorporated. Many of these new features have been studied in isolation or at a local level; however, no recent evaluation has assessed their combined, nationwide impacts to date or their potential for the future. In 1990, DOE initiated such an evaluation. This evaluation is comprised of three ``impact`` studies (the Single-Family Study, High-Density Multifamily Study, and Fuel-Oil Study) and two ``policy`` studies. Altogether, these five studies will provide a comprehensive national assessment of the Weatherization Assistance Program as it existed in the 1989 Program Year (PY 1989). This report presents the results of the first phase of the Single-Family Study. It evaluates the energy savings and cost effectiveness of the Program as it has been applied to the largest portion of its client base -- low-income households that occupy single-family dwellings, mobile homes, and small (2- to 4-unit) multifamily dwellings. It is based upon a representative national sample that covers the full range of conditions under which the program was implemented in PY 1989.

  7. Standard Work Specifications for Single-Family Home Energy Upgrades Summary (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and numerous industry stakeholders developed the Standard Work Specifications for Single-Family Home Energy Upgrades to define the minimum requirements for high-quality residential energy upgrades. Today, the Standard Work Specifications provide a unique source for defining high-quality home energy upgrades, establishing clear expectations for homeowners, contractors, trainers, workers, program administrators, and organizations that provide financing for energy upgrades.

  8. Pantexans donate more than $6,000 of cookware to families in need |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration donate more than $6,000 of cookware to families in need | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets

  9. Stockbridge-Munsee Health & Wellness Center and Family Center Renewable Energy Feasibility Study

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Stockbridge-Munsee Health & Wellness Center & Family Center Renewable Energy Feasibility Study. Stockbridge-Munsee Tribal Overview * A Band of Mohican Indians * From the Algonquin language group of Tribes. Papscanee Village Site Painting follows archeological reports & accurately depicts pre European village. Tribal History * The tribe lived along the Muh-he-con-ne-ok River, "where the waters are never still". (now the Hudson River) * The Stockbridge name came from the town

  10. Stockbridge-Munsee Health & Wellness Center and Family Center Renewable Energy Feasibility Study

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Stockbridge-Munsee Health & Wellness Center & Family Center Renewable Energy Feasibility Study. Stockbridge-Munsee Tribal Overview * A Band of Mohican Indians * From the Algonquin language group of Tribes. Papscanee Village Site Painting follows archeological reports & accurately depicts pre European village. Tribal History * The tribe lived along the Muh-he-con-ne-ok River, "where the waters are never still". (now the Hudson River) * The Stockbridge name came from the town

  11. Managing the Drivers of Air Flow and Water Vapor Transport in Existing Single-Family Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cummings, James; Withers, Charles; Martin, Eric; Moyer, Neil

    2012-10-01

    This report is a revision of an earlier report titled: Measure Guideline: Managing the Drivers of Air Flow and Water Vapor Transport in Existing Single-Family Homes. Revisions include: Information in the text box on page 1 was revised to reflect the most accurate information regarding classifications as referenced in the 2012 International Residential Code. “Measure Guideline” was dropped from the title of the report. An addition was made to the reference list.

  12. DOE Fact Sheet: Cost-Effectiveness of Deep Green Alterations of Multi-family Buildings in

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Fact Sheet: Cost-Effectiveness of Deep Green Alterations of Multi-family Buildings in Seattle Overview The City of Seattle was a multiple awardee of the Climate Action Champions (CAC) Notice of Technical Assistance (NOTA). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy offered technical assistance from its Commercial Building Partnerships (CBP) Program to provide CACs with additional opportunities for technical assistance to support and advance their

  13. Zero Energy-Ready Single-Family Homes - Building America Top Innovation |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy Photo of a zero-energy, single-family home. Building homes that are zero energy ready is a goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program and one embodied in Building America's premier home certification program, the Challenge Home (now Zero Energy Ready Home) program. This Top Innovation highlights Building America research teams who have worked directly with builders to construct zero energy or zero energy ready homes. Since 2008, DOE Builders

  14. HUD rehabilitation energy guidelines for one-to-four family dwellings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-09-01

    The Guidebook has been prepared to help people who are involved in the rehabilitation of a single-family house (or low-rise building with up to four housing units). It helps to understand the basics of residential energy conservation, and to think positively about the potential economic benefits. The Guidebook, and the HUD Rehabilitation Energy Guidelines are designed for all climates ranging from hot and humid Florida to the northern reaches of Alaska. Chapter 1 outlines how investments in energy conservation can be `cost-effective` and actually put money into your pocket each year. Chapter 2 provides an introduction to the issues and factors that determine how much energy your building will consume. Chapter 3 of the Guidebook contains the specific HUD Rehabilitation Energy Guidelines for One-to-Four Family Dwellings. Chapter 4 provides some examples of typical energy conservation measures in various climates. Appendix A is where you will find the climate zone for the appropriate county in your state. In the back of the book, Appendix G contains a blank copy of the One-to-Four Family Cost-Effectiveness Worksheet to copy or tear out for use on your project.

  15. Retrofit of a MultiFamily Mass Masonry Building in New England

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ueno, K.; Kerrigan, P.; Wytrykowska, H.; Van Straaten, R.

    2013-08-01

    Merrimack Valley Habitat for Humanity (MVHfH) has partnered with Building Science Corporation to provide high performance affordable housing for 10 families in the retrofit of an existing brick building (a former convent) into condominiums. The research performed for this project provides information regarding advanced retrofit packages for multi-family masonry buildings in Cold climates. In particular, this project demonstrates safe, durable, and cost-effective solutions that will potentially benefit millions of multi-family brick buildings throughout the East Coast and Midwest (Cold climates). The retrofit packages provide insight on the opportunities for and constraints on retrofitting multifamily buildings with ambitious energy performance goals but a limited budget. The condominium conversion project will contribute to several areas of research on enclosures, space conditioning, and water heating. Enclosure items include insulation of mass masonry building on the interior, airtightness of these types of retrofits, multi-unit building compartmentalization, window selection, and roof insulation strategies. Mechanical system items include combined hydronic and space heating systems with hydronic distribution in small (low load) units, and ventilation system retrofits for multifamily buildings.

  16. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Multi-family/ Low Income Peer Exchange Call: Information Technology Tools for Multi-family Building Programs Call Slides and Discussion Summary, March 15, 2012

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5, 2012 Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Multi-family/ Low Income Peer Exchange Call: Information Technology Tools for Multi-family Building Programs Call Slides and Discussion Summary Agenda * Call Logistics and Attendance  What information technology tools is your program using for project information, marketing, assessment, tracking or evaluation? What do you wish you had? * Program Experience and Lessons:  Heather Larson, StopWaste.org, Energy Upgrade California  Adam Palmer,

  17. Fact #638: August 30, 2010 Average Expenditure for a New Car Declines in Relation to Family Earnings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Although the average expenditure for a new car has increased from 1967 to 2009, family earnings have also been on the rise. For this period, new car expenditures went from $3,216 to $23,186, while...

  18. The Standard Work Specifications for Single-Family Home Energy Upgrades are now available€ at your fingertips!

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Standard Work Specifications for Single-Family Home Energy Upgrades are now availableat your fingertips! The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) are pleased to announce that the Standard Work Specifications for Single-Family Home Energy Upgrades are now available via a user-friendly online tool, with specifications for manufactured housing and multifamily homes to follow. Explore the Standard Work Specifications Online Tool now. Standard work

  19. Economic analysis of a passive solar multiple-family dwelling for upstate New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laquatra, J. Jr.

    1982-02-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the economic feasibility of passive solar energy as applied to a multiple-family dwelling in three upstate New York cities: Buffalo, Rochester, and Syracuse. Specifically, two passive solar applications - a Trombe wall and a direct-gain system - for a nine-unit structure designed by Total Environmental Action, Inc. were analyzed through the use of a solar economic performance code. City-specific data, including climatological information, building construction costs, utility rates, and property taxes were used, as were various economic parameters to reflect economic conditions in general and specifically those of the solar systems' owners.

  20. An invitation for family fun at PPPL's Open House on June 1 | Princeton

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plasma Physics Lab An invitation for family fun at PPPL's Open House on June 1 By Jeanne Jackson DeVoe May 13, 2013 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Adam Cohen, PPPL's deputy director for operations, far left, and engineer James Chrzanowski, far right, both in black, talk to visitors during a tour at PPPL's 2010 Open House. (Photo by Elle Starkman/ PPPL Office of Communications) Adam Cohen, PPPL's deputy director for operations, far left, and engineer James Chrzanowski, far

  1. Philips Light Sources & Electronics is Developing an Efficient, Smaller, Cost-Effective Family of LED Drivers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    With the help of DOE funding, Philips Light Sources & Electronics is developing a new family of LED drivers that are more efficient and cost-effective as well as smaller in size than currently available drivers. The new drivers are switch-mode power supplies that are similar to today's drivers, but with an improved design. In addition, they have a different topology—boost plus LLC—for wattages of 40W and above, but they retain the commonly used flyback topology at lower wattages.

  2. Structural Characterization of Inhibitors with Selectivity against Members of a Homologous Enzyme Family

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pavlovsky, Alexander G.; Liu, Xuying; Faehnle, Christopher R.; Potente, Nina; Viola, Ronald E.

    2013-01-31

    The aspartate biosynthetic pathway provides essential metabolites for many important biological functions, including the production of four essential amino acids. As this critical pathway is only present in plants and microbes, any disruptions will be fatal to these organisms. An early pathway enzyme, L-aspartate-{beta}-semialdehyde dehydrogenase, produces a key intermediate at the first branch point of this pathway. Developing potent and selective inhibitors against several orthologs in the L-aspartate-{beta}-semialdehyde dehydrogenase family can serve as lead compounds for antibiotic development. Kinetic studies of two small molecule fragment libraries have identified inhibitors that show good selectivity against L-aspartate-{beta}-semialdehyde dehydrogenases from two different bacterial species, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Vibrio cholerae, despite the presence of an identical constellation of active site amino acids in this homologous enzyme family. Structural characterization of enzyme-inhibitor complexes have elucidated different modes of binding between these structurally related enzymes. This information provides the basis for a structure-guided approach to the development of more potent and more selective inhibitors.

  3. Adverse reproductive outcomes in families of atomic veterans: The feasibility of epidemiologic studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-12-31

    This is an outstanding report from a distinguished academy committee, which in 71 pages of text provides the scientific basis for the carefully crafted 8-page executive summary. The principles and issues of the required epidemiological study are presented calmly and concisely, as are the ensuing short chapters on radiation biology, genetics and risk estimation, and all other adverse reproductive outcomes. The committee was mandated by Congress to determine the feasibility, cost and duration of a study on adverse reproductive outcomes in families of atomic veteran. The committee found that a scientifically adequate and epidemiologically valid study could not be mounted and the cost would be tens of millions of dollars lasting a decade. The Committee presents a number of well-discussed approaches in support of their position.

  4. Support and utilization of the LSI-11 processor family at SLAC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kieffer, J.; Logg, C.A.; Farwell, D.E.

    1981-01-01

    Microcomputer systems based on the DEC LSI-11 processor family have been in use at SLAC for five years. They are used for a wide variety of applications. The support of these systems is divided into three general areas: engineering, maintenance, and software. Engineering specifies the system to match user requirements. SLAC has been able to design one general purpose system which can be tailored to fit many specific requirements. Maintenance provides system and component diagnostic services and repair. Software support includes software consulting services, assistance in systems design, and the development and support of special purpose operating systems and programs. These support functions are handled as subtasks by three teams in the SLAC Electronics Instrumentation Group. Each of these teams utilizes several LSI-11 systems in the performance of its primary tasks. They work closely together to jointly provide overall support for the larger SLAC community.

  5. Pathways and barriers to genetic testing and screening: Molecular genetics meets the high-risk family. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duster, T.

    1998-11-01

    The proliferation of genetic screening and testing is requiring increasing numbers of Americans to integrate genetic knowledge and interventions into their family life and personal experience. This study examines the social processes that occur as families at risk for two of the most common autosomal recessive diseases, sickle cell disease (SC) and cystic fibrosis (CF), encounter genetic testing. Each of these diseases is found primarily in a different ethnic/racial group (CF in Americans of North European descent and SC in Americans of West African descent). This has permitted them to have a certain additional lens on the role of culture in integrating genetic testing into family life and reproductive planning. A third type of genetic disorder, the thalassemias was added to the sample in order to extent the comparative frame and to include other ethnic and racial groups.

  6. Single Dirac Cone Topological Surface State and Unusual Thermoelectric Property of Compounds from a New Topological Insulator Family

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Y

    2011-08-18

    Angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) study on TlBiTe2 and TlBiSe2 from a Thallium-based III-V-VI2 ternary chalcogenides family revealed a single surface Dirac cone at the center of the Brillouin zone for both compounds. For TlBiSe{sub 2}, the large bulk gap ({approx} 200meV) makes it a topological insulator with better mechanical properties than the previous binary 3D topological insualtor family. For TlBiTe{sub 2}, the observed negative bulk gap indicates it as a semi-metal, rather than a narrow gap semi-conductor as conventionally believed; this semi-metality naturally explains its mysteriously small thermoelectric figure of merit comparing to other compounds in the family. Finally, the unique band structures of TlBiTe{sub 2} also suggests it as a candidate for topological superconductors.

  7. Better Buildings Multi-Family Peer Exchange Call Featuring: Stewards of Affordable Housing for the FutureCall Slides and Discussion Summary, April 7, 2011

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    7, 2011 BetterBuildings Multi-Family Peer Exchange Call Featuring: Stewards of Affordable Housing for the Future Call Slides and Discussion Summary Agenda * Call logistics and attendance * Key multi-family topics * Stewards of Affordable Housing for the Future (SAHF) - Overview by Becky Schaaf and Jeanne Engel, SAHF * Q&A and discussion of multi-family topics * Next steps  Future call topics  Call frequency, format, etc. 4/28/2011 2 Participating Grant Programs * Augusta, ME *

  8. Novel inherited mutations and variable expressivity of BRCA1 alleles, including the founder mutation 185delAG in Ashkenazi Jewish families

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, L.S.; Szabo, C.I.; Ostermeyer, E.A.

    1995-12-01

    Thirty-seven families with four or more cases of breast cancer or breast and ovarian cancer were analyzed for mutations in BRCA1. Twelve different germ-line mutations, four novel and eight previously observed, were detected in 16 families. Five families of Ashkenazi Jewish descent carried the 185delAG mutation and shared the same haplotype at eight polymorphic markers spanning {approximately}850 kb at BRCA1. Expressivity of 185delAG in these families varied, from early-onset bilateral breast cancer and ovarian cancer to late-onset breast cancer without ovarian cancer. Mutation 4184delTCAA occurred independently in two families. In one family, penetrance was complete, with females developing early-onset breast cancer or ovarian cancer and the male carrier developing prostatic cancer, whereas, in the other family, penetrance was incomplete and only breast cancer occurred, diagnosed at ages 38-81 years. Two novel nonsense mutations led to the loss of mutant BRCA1 transcript in families with 10 and 6 cases of early-onset breast cancer and ovarian cancer. A 665-nt segment of the BRCA1 3{prime}-UTR and 1.3 kb of genomic sequence including the putative promoter region were invariant by single-strand conformation analysis in 13 families without coding-sequence mutations. Overall in our series, BRCA1 mutations have been detected in 26 families: 16 with positive BRCA1 lod scores, 7 with negative lod scores (reflecting multiple sporadic breast cancers), and 3 not tested for linkage. Three other families have positive lod scores for linkage to BRCA2, but 13 families without detected BRCA1 mutations have negative lod scores for both BRCA1 and BRCA2. 57 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Standard Work Specifications for Single-Family Home Energy Upgrades Summary (Fact Sheet), Guidelines For Home Energy Professionals, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Work Specifications for Single-Family Home Energy Upgrades Summary The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and numer- ous industry stakeholders developed the Standard Work Specifications for Single-Family Home Energy Upgrades to define the minimum requirements for high- quality residential energy upgrades. The Standard Work Specifications for Single-Family Home Energy Upgrades is the first of three documents that will be published in 2012 and 2013 as

  10. Measured energy savings and economics of retrofitting existing single- family homes: An update of the BECA-B database

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, S.D.; Goldman, C.A.; Harris, J.P.

    1991-02-01

    These appendices are the companion volume to report number LBL--28147 Vol.1, with the same title. The summary data tables include physical characteristics, energy consumption, savings, and the retrofit measures installed and their costs for each retrofit project. Each existing single family residential building'' retrofit project in the BECA-B database is described. 99 refs. (BM)

  11. Variant Humicola grisea CBH1.1

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goedegebuur, Frits (Vlaardingen, NL); Gualfetti, Peter (San Francisco, CA); Mitchinson, Colin (Half Moon Bay, CA); Larenas, Edmund (Moss Beach, CA)

    2012-08-07

    Disclosed are variants of Humicola grisea Cel7A (CBH1.1), H. jecorina CBH1 variant or S. thermophilium CBH1, nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted.

  12. Variant Humicola grisea CBH1.1

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goedegebuur, Frits (Vlaardingen, NL); Gualfetti, Peter (San Francisco, CA); Mitchinson, Colin (Half Moon Bay, CA); Larenas, Edmund (Moss Beach, CA)

    2011-08-16

    Disclosed are variants of Humicola grisea Cel7A (CBH1.1), H. jecorina CBH1 variant or S. thermophilium CBH1, nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted.

  13. Variant Humicola grisea CBH1.1

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goedegebuur, Frits (Vlaardingen, NL); Gualfetti, Peter (San Francisco, CA); Mitchinson, Colin (Half Moon Bay, CA); Larenas, Edmund (Moss Beach, CA)

    2008-12-02

    Disclosed are variants of Humicola grisea Cel7A (CBH1.1), H. jecorina CBH1 variant or S. thermophilium CBH1, nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted.

  14. Variant Humicola grisea CBH1.1

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goedegebuur, Frits (Vlaardingen, NL); Gualfetti, Peter (San Francisco, CA); Mitchinson, Colin (Half Moon Bay, CA); Larenas, Edmund (Moss Beach, CA)

    2011-05-31

    Disclosed are variants of Humicola grisea Cel7A (CBH1.1), H. jecorina CBH1 variant or S. thermophilium CBH1, nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted.

  15. CBH1 homologs and variant CBH1 cellulases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goedegebuur, Frits (Rozenlaan, NL); Gualfetti, Peter (San Francisco, CA); Mitchinson, Colin (Half Moon Bay, CA); Neefe, Paulien (Zoetermeer, NL)

    2011-05-31

    Disclosed are a number of homologs and variants of Hypocrea jecorina Cel7A (formerly Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I or CBH1), nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The homologs and variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted and/or deleted.

  16. Variant humicola grisea CBH1.1

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goedegebuur, Frits; Gualfetti, Peter; Mitchinson, Colin; Edmund, Larenas

    2014-09-09

    Disclosed are variants of Humicola grisea Cel7A (CBH1.1), H. jecorina CBH1 variant or S. thermophilium CBH1, nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted.

  17. Variant Humicola grisea CBH1.1

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goedegebuur, Frits; Gualfetti, Peter; Mitchinson, Colin; Larenas, Edmund

    2014-03-18

    Disclosed are variants of Humicola grisea Cel7A (CBH1.1), H. jecorina CBH1 variant or S. thermophilium CBH1, nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted.

  18. Variant Humicola grisea CBH1.1

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goedegeburr, Frits; Gualfetti, Peter; Mitchinson, Colin; Larenas, Edmund

    2013-02-19

    Disclosed are variants of Humicola grisea Cel7A (CBH1.1), H. jecorina CBH1 variant or S. thermophilium CBH1, nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted.

  19. CBH1 homologs and variant CBH1 cellulases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goedegebuur, Frits (Rozenlaan, NL); Gualfetti, Peter (San Francisco, CA); Mitchinson, Colin (Half Moon Bay, CA); Neefe, Paulien (Zoetermeer, NL)

    2008-11-18

    Disclosed are a number of homologs and variants of Hypocrea jecorina Cel7A (formerly Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I or CBH1), nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The homologs and variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted and/or deleted.

  20. CBH1 homologs and varian CBH1 cellulase

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goedegebuur, Frits; Gualfetti, Peter; Mitchinson, Colin; Neefe, Paulien

    2014-07-01

    Disclosed are a number of homologs and variants of Hypocrea jecorina Cel7A (formerly Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I or CBH1), nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The homologs and variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted and/or deleted.

  1. HTGR Technology Family Assessment for a Range of Fuel Cycle Missions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven J. Piet; Samuel E. Bays; Nick R. Soelberg

    2010-11-01

    This report examines how the HTGR technology family can provide options for the once through, modified open cycle (MOC), or full recycle fuel cycle strategies. The HTGR can serve all the fuel cycle missions that an LWR can; both are thermal reactors. Additional analyses are warranted to determine if HTGR full recycle service could provide improved consumption of transuranic (TRU) material than LWRs (as expected), to analyze the unique proliferation resistance issues associated with the pebble bed approach, and to further test and analyze methods to separate TRISO-coated fuel particles from graphite and/or to separate used HTGR fuel meat from its TRISO coating. The feasibility of these two separation issues is not in doubt, but further R&D could clarify and reduce the cost and enable options not adequately explored at present. The analyses here and the now-demonstrated higher fuel burnup tests (after the illustrative designs studied here) should enable future MOC and full recycle HTGR concepts to more rapidly consume TRU, thereby offering waste management advantages. Interest in limited separation or minimum fuel treatment separation approaches motivates study of impurity-tolerant fuel fabrication.

  2. HTGR Technology Family Assessment for a Range of Fuel Cycle Missions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven J. Piet; Samuel E. Bays; Nick Soelberg

    2010-08-01

    This report examines how the HTGR technology family can provide options for the once through, modified open cycle (MOC), or full recycle fuel cycle strategies. The HTGR can serve all the fuel cycle missions that an LWR can; both are thermal reactors. Additional analyses are warranted to determine if HTGR full recycle service could provide improved consumption of transuranic (TRU) material than LWRs (as expected), to analyze the unique proliferation resistance issues associated with the pebble bed approach, and to further test and analyze methods to separate TRISO-coated fuel particles from graphite and/or to separate used HTGR fuel meat from its TRISO coating. The feasibility of these two separation issues is not in doubt, but further R&D could clarify and reduce the cost and enable options not adequately explored at present. The analyses here and the now-demonstrated higher fuel burnup tests (after the illustrative designs studied here) should enable future MOC and full recycle HTGR concepts to more rapidly consume TRU, thereby offering waste management advantages. Interest in limited separation or minimum fuel treatment separation approaches motivates study of impurity-tolerant fuel fabrication. Several issues are outside the scope of this report, including the following: thorium fuel cycles, gas-cooled fast reactors, the reliability of TRISO-coated particles (billions in a reactor), and how soon any new reactor or fuel type could be licensed and then deployed and therefore impact fuel cycle performance measures.

  3. Genome-wide analysis of the omega-3 fatty acid desaturase gene family in Gossypium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yurchenko, Olga P.; Park, Sunjung; Ilut, Daniel C.; Inmon, Jay J.; Millhollon, Jon C.; Liechty, Zach; Page, Justin T.; Jenks, Matthew A.; Chapman, Kent D.; Udall, Joshua A.; Gore, Michael A.; Dyer, John M.

    2014-11-18

    The majority of commercial cotton varieties planted worldwide are derived from Gossypium hirsutum, which is a naturally occurring allotetraploid produced by interspecific hybridization of A- and D-genome diploid progenitor species. While most cotton species are adapted to warm, semi-arid tropical and subtropical regions, and thus perform well in these geographical areas, cotton seedlings are sensitive to cold temperature, which can significantly reduce crop yields. One of the common biochemical responses of plants to cold temperatures is an increase in omega-3 fatty acids, which protects cellular function by maintaining membrane integrity. The purpose of our study was to identify and characterize the omega-3 fatty acid desaturase (FAD) gene family in G. hirsutum, with an emphasis on identifying omega-3 FADs involved in cold temperature adaptation. Results: Eleven omega-3 FAD genes were identified in G. hirsutum, and characterization of the gene family in extant A and D diploid species (G. herbaceum and G. raimondii, respectively) allowed for unambiguous genome assignment of all homoeologs in tetraploid G. hirsutum. The omega-3 FAD family of cotton includes five distinct genes, two of which encode endoplasmic reticulum-type enzymes (FAD3-1 and FAD3-2) and three that encode chloroplast-type enzymes (FAD7/8-1, FAD7/8-2, and FAD7/8-3). The FAD3-2 gene was duplicated in the A genome progenitor species after the evolutionary split from the D progenitor, but before the interspecific hybridization event that gave rise to modern tetraploid cotton. RNA-seq analysis revealed conserved, gene-specific expression patterns in various organs and cell types and semi-quantitative RT-PCR further revealed that FAD7/8-1 was specifically induced during cold temperature treatment of G. hirsutum seedlings. Conclusions: The omega-3 FAD gene family in cotton was characterized at the genome-wide level in three species, showing relatively ancient establishment of the gene family prior to the split of A and D diploid progenitor species. The FAD genes are differentially expressed in various organs and cell types, including fiber, and expression of the FAD7/8-1 gene was induced by cold temperature. These data define the genetic and functional genomic properties of this important gene family in cotton and provide a foundation for future efforts to improve cotton abiotic stress tolerance through molecular breeding approaches.

  4. Concentrations of the urinary pyrethroid metabolite 3-phenoxybenzoic acid in farm worker families in the MICASA study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trunnelle, Kelly J.; Bennett, Deborah H.; Ahn, Ki Chang; Schenker, Marc B.; Tancredi, Daniel J.; Gee, Shirley J.; Stoecklin-Marois, Maria T.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2014-05-01

    Indoor pesticide exposure is a growing concern, particularly from pyrethroids, a commonly used class of pesticides. Pyrethroid concentrations may be especially high in homes of immigrant farm worker families who often live in close proximity to agricultural fields, and are faced with poor housing conditions, causing higher pest infestation and more pesticide use. We investigate exposure of farm worker families to pyrethroids in a study of mothers and children living in Mendota, CA within the population-based Mexican Immigration to California: Agricultural Safety and Acculturation (MICASA) Study. We present pyrethroid exposure based on an ELISA analysis of urinary metabolite 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3PBA) levels among 105 women and 103 children. The median urinary 3PBA levels (children=2.56 ug/g creatinine, mothers=1.46 ug/g creatinine) were higher than those reported in population based studies for the United States general population, but similar to or lower than studies with known high levels of pyrethroid exposure. A positive association was evident between poor housing conditions and the urinary metabolite levels, showing that poor housing conditions are a contributing factor to the higher levels of 3PBA seen in the urine of these farm worker families. Further research is warranted to fully investigate sources of exposure. - Highlights: We investigate exposure of farm worker families to pyrethroids. We present pyrethroid exposure based on an ELISA analysis of urinary 3PBA levels. 3PBA levels were higher than those reported for the U.S. general population. Poor housing conditions may be associated with pyrethroid exposure.

  5. Downstream effects of mountaintop coal mining: comparing biological conditions using family- and genus-level macroinvertebrate bioassessment tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pond, G.J.; Passmore, M.E.; Borsuk, F.A.; Reynolds, L.; Rose, C.J.

    2008-09-15

    Surface coal mining with valley fills has impaired the aquatic life in numerous streams in the Central Appalachian Mountains. We characterized macroinvertebrate communities from riffles in 37 small West Virginia streams (10 unmined and 27 mined sites with valley fills) sampled in the spring index period (March-May) and compared the assessment results using family- and genus-level taxonomic data. Specific conductance was used to categorize levels of mining disturbance in mined watersheds as low (<500 {mu} S/cm), medium (500-1000 {mu} S/cm), or high (>1000 {mu} S/cm). Four lines of evidence indicate that mining activities impair biological condition of streams: shift in species assemblages, loss of Epherneroptera taxa, changes in individual metrics and indices, and differences in water chemistry. Results were consistent whether family- or genus-level data were used. In both family- and genus-level nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMS) ordinations, mined sites were significantly separated from unmined sites, indicating that shifts in community structure were caused by mining. Several Epherneroptera genera (e.g., Ephemerella, Epeorus, Drunella) and their families (Ephemerellidae, Heptageniidae) were correlated most strongly with the primary NMS axis. These same Ephemeroptera were absent and, thus, eliminated from most of the mined sites. Total Ephemeroptera richness and relative abundance both declined with increasing mining disturbance. Several other metrics, such as richness, composition, tolerance, and diversity, clearly discriminated unmined vs mined sites. The results show that mining activity has had subtle to severe impacts on benthic macroinvertebrate communities and that the biological condition most strongly correlates with a gradient of ionic strength.

  6. MeshVoro: A Three-Dimensional Voronoi Mesh Building Tool for the TOUGH Family of Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman, C. M.; Boyle, K. L.; Reagan, M.; Johnson, J.; Rycroft, C.; Moridis, G. J.

    2013-09-30

    Few tools exist for creating and visualizing complex three-dimensional simulation meshes, and these have limitations that restrict their application to particular geometries and circumstances. Mesh generation needs to trend toward ever more general applications. To that end, we have developed MeshVoro, a tool that is based on the Voro (Rycroft 2009) library and is capable of generating complex threedimensional Voronoi tessellation-based (unstructured) meshes for the solution of problems of flow and transport in subsurface geologic media that are addressed by the TOUGH (Pruess et al. 1999) family of codes. MeshVoro, which includes built-in data visualization routines, is a particularly useful tool because it extends the applicability of the TOUGH family of codes by enabling the scientifically robust and relatively easy discretization of systems with challenging 3D geometries. We describe several applications of MeshVoro. We illustrate the ability of the tool to straightforwardly transform a complex geological grid into a simulation mesh that conforms to the specifications of the TOUGH family of codes. We demonstrate how MeshVoro can describe complex system geometries with a relatively small number of grid blocks, and we construct meshes for geometries that would have been practically intractable with a standard Cartesian grid approach. We also discuss the limitations and appropriate applications of this new technology.

  7. Modes of Action and Functions of ERECTA-family Receptor-like Kinases in Plant Organ Growth and Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TORII, Keiko U.

    2012-05-01

    Higher plants constitute the central resource for renewable lignocellulose biomass that can supplement for the world's depleting stores of fossil fuels. As such, understanding the molecular and genetic mechanisms of plant organ growth will provide key knowledge and genetic resources that enables manipulation of plant biomass feedstock for better growth and productivity. The goal of this proposal is to understand how cell proliferation and growth are coordinated during aboveground organ morphogenesis, and how cell-cell signaling mediated by a family of receptor kinases coordinates plant organogenesis. The well-established model plant Arabidopsis thaliana is used for our research to facilitate rapid progress. Specifically, we focus on how ERECTA-family leucine-rich repeat receptor kinases (LRR-RLKs) interact in a synergistic manner to promote organogenesis and pattern formation in Arabidopsis. This project was highly successful, resulted in fourteen publications including nine peer-reviewed original research articles. One provisional US patent has been filed through this DOE funding. We have addressed the critical roles for a family of receptor kinases in coordinating proliferation and differentiation of plants, and we successfully elucidated the downstream targets of this signaling pathway in specifying stomatal patterning.

  8. Haplotype and phenotype analysis of six recurrent BRCA1 mutations in 61 families: Results of an international study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neuhausen, S.L.; Skolnick, M.H.; Goldgar, D.E.

    1996-02-01

    Several BRCA1 mutations have now been found to occur in geographically diverse breast and ovarian cancer families. To investigate mutation origin and mutation-specific phenotypes due to BRCA1, we constructed a haplotype of nine polymorphic markers within or immediately flanking the BRCA1 locus in a set of 61 breast/ovarian cancer families selected for having one of six recurrent BRCA1 mutations. Tests of both mutations and family-specific differences in age at diagnosis were not significant. A comparison of the six mutations in the relative proportions of cases of breast and ovarian cancer was suggestive of an effect (P = .069), with 57% of women presumed affected because of the 1294 del 40 BRCA1 mutation having ovarian cancer, compared with 14% of affected women with the splice-site mutation in intron 5 of BRCA1. For the BRCA1 mutations studied here, the individual mutations are estimated to have arisen 9-170 generations ago. In general, a high degree of haplotype conservation across the region was observed, with haplotype differences most often due to mutations in the short-tandem-repeat markers, although some likely instances of recombination also were observed. For several of the instances, there was evidence for multiple, independent, BRCA1 mutational events. 22 refs., 1 fig., 4 tab.

  9. Linkage analysis of chromosome 17q markers and breast-ovarian cancer in Icelandic families, and possible relationship to prostatic cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arason, A.; Barkardottir, R.B.; Egilsson, V. )

    1993-04-01

    Seven families, selected for breast cancer segregation, have been analyzed for chromosome 17q12-q23 linkage to breast and ovarian cancer. In two of them, linkage is seen with most markers tested, increasing toward the most proximal region, but without informative recombinations above NM23. In the remaining families, no linkage is observed. Families with 17q linkage are not easily distinguished by clinical characteristics such as early onset (mean age at diagnosis [le]45 years) or organs involved. In fact, the family with the highest lod scores ([ge]2.3) belongs to the [open quotes]later onset[close quotes] (>45 years) category of families. Interestingly, prostatic cancer is the most frequent malignancy, after breast cancer, in the families that were studied (13 cases total, all metastasizing) and is especially prevalent in males presumed to carry the trait. Of 16 paternal carriers, 7 (44%) had developed prostatic cancer. Haplotype analysis in families with 17q linkage reveals two further prostatic cases as potential carriers. The authors propose that breast cancer genes may predispose to prostatic cancer in male carriers. 12 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Multi-Family and Low Income Peer Exchange Call: Using Partnerships to Drive Demand and Provide Services in Communities, February 2, 2012

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Multi-Family and Low Income Peer Exchange Call: Using Partnerships to Drive Demand and Provide Services in Communities Agenda * Call Logistics and Attendance  What kind of partnerships does your program have for multi-family or low income outreach or service delivery? * Program Experience and Lessons:  Kelvin Keraga, NYSERDA, EmPower New York  Jeanine Otte, CNT Energy, Chicago  Rosemary Olsen, Community Development Corporation of Long Island, Long Island Green Homes * Discussion: 

  11. Design and fabrication of 6.1-.ANG. family semiconductor devices using semi-insulating A1Sb substrate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sherohman, John W.; Coombs, III, Arthur W.; Yee, Jick Hong; Wu, Kuang Jen J.

    2007-05-29

    For the first time, an aluminum antimonide (AlSb) single crystal substrate is utilized to lattice-match to overlying semiconductor layers. The AlSb substrate establishes a new design and fabrication approach to construct high-speed, low-power electronic devices while establishing inter-device isolation. Such lattice matching between the substrate and overlying semiconductor layers minimizes the formation of defects, such as threaded dislocations, which can decrease the production yield and operational life-time of 6.1-.ANG. family heterostructure devices.

  12. SU(3){sub c} x SU(3){sub L} x U(1){sub X} models with four families

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benavides, Richard H.; Ponce, William A.; Giraldo, Yithsbey

    2010-07-01

    In the context of the local gauge group SU(3){sub c} x SU(3){sub L} x U(1){sub X}, we look for possible four family models, where all the particles carry ordinary electric charges. Thirteen different anomaly-free fermion structures emerge, out of which only two are realistic. For the simplest physical structure, we calculate the charged and neutral weak currents and the tree-level Fermion masses. We also look for new sources of flavor changing neutral currents in the quark sector in connection with the upcoming experimental results at the Large Hadron Collider.

  13. Theory of nodal s±-wave pairing symmetry in the Pu-based 115 superconductor family

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Das, Tanmoy; Zhu, Jian -Xin; Graf, Matthias J.

    2015-02-27

    The spin-fluctuation mechanism of superconductivity usually results in the presence of gapless or nodal quasiparticle states in the excitation spectrum. Nodal quasiparticle states are well established in copper-oxide, and heavy-fermion superconductors, but not in iron-based superconductors. Here, we study the pairing symmetry and mechanism of a new class of plutonium-based high-Tc superconductors and predict the presence of a nodal s⁺⁻ wave pairing symmetry in this family. Starting from a density-functional theory (DFT) based electronic structure calculation we predict several three-dimensional (3D) Fermi surfaces in this 115 superconductor family. We identify the dominant Fermi surface “hot-spots” in the inter-band scattering channel,more » which are aligned along the wavevector Q = (π, π, π), where degeneracy could induce sign-reversal of the pairing symmetry. Our calculation demonstrates that the s⁺⁻ wave pairing strength is stronger than the previously thought d-wave pairing; and more importantly, this pairing state allows for the existence of nodal quasiparticles. Finally, we predict the shape of the momentum- and energy-dependent magnetic resonance spectrum for the identification of this pairing symmetry.« less

  14. Supernova 2010as: the lowest-velocity member of a family of flat-velocity type IIb supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Folatelli, Gastn; Bersten, Melina C.; Nomoto, Ken'ichi [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Kuncarayakti, Hanindyo; Hamuy, Mario [Departamento de Astronoma, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Olivares Estay, Felipe; Pignata, Giuliano [Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Andres Bello, Avda. Republica 252, Santiago (Chile); Anderson, Joseph P. [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Vitacura, Santiago (Chile); Holmbo, Simon; Stritzinger, Maximilian [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Maeda, Keiichi [Department of Astronomy, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-Oiwake-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Morrell, Nidia; Contreras, Carlos; Phillips, Mark M. [Las Campanas Observatory, Carnegie Observatories, Casilla 601, La Serena (Chile); Frster, Francisco [Center for Mathematical Modelling, Universidad de Chile, Avenida Blanco Encalada 2120 Piso 7, Santiago (Chile); Prieto, Jos Luis [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, 4 Ivy Lane, Peyton Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Valenti, Stefano [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, 6740 Cortona Drive, Suite 102, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Afonso, Paulo; Altenmller, Konrad; Elliott, Jonny, E-mail: gaston.folatelli@ipmu.jp [Max-Planck-Institut fr extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrae 1, D-85740 Garching (Germany); and others

    2014-09-01

    We present extensive optical and near-infrared photometric and spectroscopic observations of the stripped-envelope supernova SN 2010as. Spectroscopic peculiarities such as initially weak helium features and low expansion velocities with a nearly flat evolution place this object in the small family of events previously identified as transitional Type Ib/c supernovae (SNe). There is ubiquitous evidence of hydrogen, albeit weak, in this family of SNe, indicating that they are in fact a peculiar kind of Type IIb SNe that we name 'flat-velocity' Type IIb. The flat-velocity evolutionwhich occurs at different levels between 6000 and 8000 km s{sup 1} for different SNesuggests the presence of a dense shell in the ejecta. Despite the spectroscopic similarities, these objects show surprisingly diverse luminosities. We discuss the possible physical or geometrical unification picture for such diversity. Using archival Hubble Space Telescope images, we associate SN 2010as with a massive cluster and derive a progenitor age of ?6 Myr, assuming a single star-formation burst, which is compatible with a Wolf-Rayet progenitor. Our hydrodynamical modeling, on the contrary, indicates that the pre-explosion mass was relatively low, ?4 M {sub ?}. The seeming contradiction between a young age and low pre-SN mass may be solved by a massive interacting binary progenitor.

  15. Structural insight into dynamic bypass of the major cisplatin-DNA adduct by Y-family polymerase Dpo4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, Jimson H.Y.; Brown, Jessica A.; Suo, Zucai; Blum, Paul; Nohmi, Takehiko; Ling, Hong

    2010-08-23

    Y-family DNA polymerases bypass Pt-GG, the cisplatin-DNA double-base lesion, contributing to the cisplatin resistance in tumour cells. To reveal the mechanism, we determined three structures of the Y-family DNA polymerase, Dpo4, in complex with Pt-GG DNA. The crystallographic snapshots show three stages of lesion bypass: the nucleotide insertions opposite the 3{prime}G (first insertion) and 5{prime}G (second insertion) of Pt-GG, and the primer extension beyond the lesion site. We observed a dynamic process, in which the lesion was converted from an open and angular conformation at the first insertion to a depressed and nearly parallel conformation at the subsequent reaction stages to fit into the active site of Dpo4. The DNA translocation-coupled conformational change may account for additional inhibition on the second insertion reaction. The structures illustrate that Pt-GG disturbs the replicating base pair in the active site, which reduces the catalytic efficiency and fidelity. The in vivo relevance of Dpo4-mediated Pt-GG bypass was addressed by a dpo-4 knockout strain of Sulfolobus solfataricus, which exhibits enhanced sensitivity to cisplatin and proteomic alterations consistent with genomic stress.

  16. Theory of nodal s±-wave pairing symmetry in the Pu-based 115 superconductor family

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Tanmoy; Zhu, Jian -Xin; Graf, Matthias J.

    2015-02-27

    The spin-fluctuation mechanism of superconductivity usually results in the presence of gapless or nodal quasiparticle states in the excitation spectrum. Nodal quasiparticle states are well established in copper-oxide, and heavy-fermion superconductors, but not in iron-based superconductors. Here, we study the pairing symmetry and mechanism of a new class of plutonium-based high-Tc superconductors and predict the presence of a nodal s⁺⁻ wave pairing symmetry in this family. Starting from a density-functional theory (DFT) based electronic structure calculation we predict several three-dimensional (3D) Fermi surfaces in this 115 superconductor family. We identify the dominant Fermi surface “hot-spots” in the inter-band scattering channel, which are aligned along the wavevector Q = (π, π, π), where degeneracy could induce sign-reversal of the pairing symmetry. Our calculation demonstrates that the s⁺⁻ wave pairing strength is stronger than the previously thought d-wave pairing; and more importantly, this pairing state allows for the existence of nodal quasiparticles. Finally, we predict the shape of the momentum- and energy-dependent magnetic resonance spectrum for the identification of this pairing symmetry.

  17. Effects of quark family nonuniversality in SU(3){sub c} x SU(4){sub L} x U(1){sub X} models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nisperuza, Jorge L.; Sanchez, Luis A.

    2009-08-01

    Flavor changing neutral currents arise in the SU(3){sub c} x SU(4){sub L} x U(1){sub X} extension of the standard model because anomaly cancellation among the fermion families requires one generation of quarks to transform differently from the other two under the gauge group. In the weak basis the distinction between quark families is meaningless. However, in the mass eigenstates basis, the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa mixing matrix motivates us to classify left-handed quarks in families. In this sense there are, in principle, three different assignments of quark weak eigenstates into mass eigenstates. In this work, by using measurements at the Z pole, atomic parity violation data, and experimental input from neutral meson mixing, we examine two different models without exotic electric charges based on the 3-4-1 symmetry, and address the effects of quark family nonuniversality on the bounds on the mixing angle between two of the neutral currents present in the models and on the mass scales M{sub Z{sub 2}} and M{sub Z{sub 3}} of the new neutral gauge bosons predicted by the theory. The heaviest family of quarks must transform differently in order to keep lower bounds on M{sub Z{sub 2}} and M{sub Z{sub 3}} as low as possible without violating experimental constraints.

  18. Covalent Coupling of Organophosphorus Hydrolase Loaded Quantum Dots to Carbon Nanotube/Au Nanocomposite for Enhanced Detection of Methyl Parathion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, Dan; Chen, Wenjuan; Zhang, Weiying; Liu, Deli; Li, Haibing; Lin, Yuehe

    2010-02-15

    An amperometric biosensor for highly selective and sensitive determination of methyl parathion (MP) was developed based on dual signal amplification: (1) a large amount of introduced enzyme on the electrode surface and (2) synergistic effects of nanoparticles towards enzymatic catalysis. The fabrication process includes (1) electrochemical deposition of gold nanoparticles by a multi-potential step technique at multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) film pre-cast on a glassy carbon electrode and (2) immobilization of methyl parathion degrading enzyme (MPDE) onto a modified electrode through CdTe quantum dots (CdTe QDs) covalent attachment. The introduced MWCNT and gold nanoparticles significantly increased the surface area and exhibited synergistic effects towards enzymatic catalysis. CdTe QDs are further used as carriers to load a large amount of enzyme. As a result of these two important enhancement factors, the proposed biosensor exhibited extremely sensitive, perfectly selective, and rapid response to methyl parathion in the absence of a mediator.

  19. SU(4){sub L} x U(1){sub X} three-family model for the electroweak interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez, Luis A.; Wills-Toro, Luis A.; Zuluaga, Jorge I.

    2008-02-01

    An extension of the gauge group SU(2){sub L} x U(1){sub Y} of the standard model to the symmetry group SU(4){sub L} x U(1){sub X} (3-4-1 for short) is presented. The model does not contain exotic electric charges and anomaly cancellation is achieved with a family of quarks transforming differently from the other two, thus leading to FCNC. By introducing a discrete Z{sub 2} symmetry we obtain a consistent fermion mass spectrum, and avoid unitarity violation of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa mixing matrix arising from the mixing of ordinary and exotic quarks. The neutral currents coupled to all neutral vector bosons are studied, and by using CERN LEP and SLAC Linear Collider data at Z-pole and atomic parity violation data, we bound parameters of the model related to tree-level Z-Z{sup '} mixing. These parameters are further constrained by using experimental input from neutral meson mixing in the analysis of sources of FCNC present in the model. Constraints coming from the contribution of exotic particles to the one-loop oblique electroweak parameters S, T and U are also briefly discussed. Finally, a comparison is done of the predictions of different classes of 3-4-1 models without exotic electric charges.

  20. Lithium Polysulfidophosphates: A Family of Lithium-Conducting Sulfur-Rich Compounds for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Zhan [ORNL] [ORNL; Liu, Zengcai [ORNL] [ORNL; Fu, Wujun [ORNL] [ORNL; Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL] [ORNL; Liang, Chengdu [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Given the great potential for improving the energy density of state-of-the-art lithium-ion batteries by a factor of 5, a breakthrough in lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries will have a dramatic impact in a broad scope of energy related fields. Conventional Li-S batteries that use liquid electrolytes are intrinsically short-lived with low energy efficiency. The challenges stem from the poor electronic and ionic conductivities of elemental sulfur and its discharge products. We report herein lithium polysulfidophosphates (LPSP), a family of sulfur-rich compounds, as the enabler of long-lasting and energy-efficient Li-S batteries. LPSP have ionic conductivities of 3.0 10-5 S cm-1 at 25 oC, which is 8 orders of magnitude higher than that of Li2S (~10-13 S cm-1). The high Li-ion conductivity of LPSP is the salient characteristic of these compounds that impart the excellent cycling performance to Li-S batteries. In addition, the batteries are configured in an all-solid state that promises the safe cycling of high-energy batteries with metallic lithium anodes.

  1. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of human kallikrein 7, a serine protease of the multigene kallikrein family

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernndez, Israel S.; Stndker, Ludger; Forssmann, Wolf-Georg; Gimnez-Gallego, Guillermo; Romero, Antonio

    2007-08-01

    The cloning, expression, purification and crystallization of recombinant human kallikrein 7, directly synthesized in the active form in E. coli, is described. Diffraction data were collected to 2.8 resolution from native crystals. Human kallikreins are a group of serine proteases of high sequence homology whose genes are grouped as a single cluster at chromosome 19. Although the physiological roles of kallikreins are generally still unknown, members of the kallikrein family have been clearly implicated in pathological situations such as cancer and psoriasis. Human kallikrein 7 (hK7) has been shown to be involved in pathological keratinization, psoriasis and ovarian cancer. In order to gain insight into the molecular structure of this protein, hK7 was crystallized after recombinant production in its folded and active form using a periplasmic secretion vector in Escherichia coli. The crystals belonged to the rhombohedral space group H32 and diffracted to 2.8 . The phase problem was solved by molecular replacement using the mouse kallikrein-related protein neuropsin. Completion of the model and structure refinement are under way.

  2. Your Family Today!

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    place. The alarm may need to be moved to a new location. Some of the newer models have a "hush" button that silences nuisance alarms. How Long will my Smoke Alarm Last? Most alarms...

  3. Dear Family and friends,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and environmental engineering. He holds a B.S. in geology from Muenster University in Germany and an M.S. in geology from the Technical University of Berlin, Germany. He edited...

  4. A common region of deletion on chromosome 17q in both sporadic and familial epithelial ovarian tumors distal to BRCA1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Godwin, A.K.; Vanderveer, L.; Schultz, D.C.; Altomare, D.A.; Buetow, K.H.; Daly, M.; Getts, L.A.; Masny, A.; Rosenblum, N.

    1994-10-01

    Linkage analysis in familial breast and ovarian cancer and studies of allelic deletion in sporadic ovarian tumors have identified a region on chromosome 17q containing a candidate tumor-suppressor gene (referred to as BRCA1) of likely importance in ovarian carcinogenesis. We have examined normal and tumor DNA samples from 32 patients with sporadic and 8 patients with familial forms of the disease, for loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at 21 loci on chromosome 17 (7 on 17p and 14 on 17q). LOH on 17p was 55% (22/40) for informative 17p13.1 and 17p13.3 markers. When six polymorphic markers flanking the familial breast/ovarian cancer susceptibility locus on 17q12-q21 were used, LOH was 58% (23/40), with one tumor showing telomeric retention. Evaluation of a set of markers positioned telomeric to BRCA1 resulted in the highest degree of LOH, 73% (29/40), indicating that a candidate locus involved in ovarian cancer may reside distal to BRCA1. Five of the tumors demonstrating allelic loss for 17q markers were from individuals with a strong family history of breast and ovarian cancer. More important, two of these tumors (unique patient number [UPN] 57 and UPN 79) retained heterozygosity for all informative markers spanning the BRCA1 locus but showed LOH at loci distal to but not including the anonymous markers CMM86 (D17S74) and 42D6 (D17S588), respectively. Deletion mapping of seven cases (two familial and five sporadic) showing limited LOH on 17q revealed a common region of deletion, distal to GH and proximal to D17S4, that spans {approximately} 25 cM. These results suggest that a potential tumor-suppressor gene involved in both sporadic and familial ovarian cancer may reside on the distal portion of chromosome 17q and is distinct from the BRCA1 gene. 58 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Design, development and testing of a solar-powered multi-family residential size prototype turbocompressor heat pump

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1981-03-01

    A program described to design, fabricate, and conduct preliminary testing of a prototype solar-powered Rankine cycle turbocompressor heat pump module for a multi-family residential building is presented. A solar system designed to use the turbocompressor heat pump module including all of the subsystems required and the various system operating modes is described in Section I. Section II includes the preliminary design analyses conducted to select the heat pump module components and operating features, working fluid, configuration, size and performance goals, and estimated performance levels in the cooling and heating modes. Section III provides a detailed description of the other subsystems and components required for a complete solar installation. Using realistic performance and cost characteristics for all subsystems, the seasonal performance of the UTC heat pump is described in various US locations. In addition, the estimated energy savings and an assessment of the economic viability of the solar system is presented in Section III. The detailed design of the heat pump module and the arrangement of components and controls selected to conduct the laboratory performance tests are described in Section IV. Section V provides a description of the special laboratory test facility, including the subsystems to simulate the collectors and storage tanks for building load and ambient conditions and the instrumentation, monitoring, and data acquisition equipment. The test results and sample computer analyses and comparisons with predicted performance levels are presented in Section VI. Various appendices provide supplementary and background information concerning working fluid selection (A), configuration selection (B), capacity control concepts (C), building models (D), computer programs used to determine component and system performance and total system economics (E), and weather data (F).

  6. Map refinement of locus RP13 to human chromosome 17p13.3 in a second family with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kojis, T.L.; Heinzmann, C.; Ngo, J.T.

    1996-02-01

    In order to elucidate the genetic basis of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) in a large eight-generation family (UCLA-RP09) of British descent, we assessed linkage between the UCLA-RP09 adRP gene and numerous genetic loci, including eight adRP candidate genes, five anonymous adRP-linked DNA loci, and 20 phenotypic markers. Linkage to the UCLA-RP09 disease gene was excluded for all eight candidate genes analyzed, including rhodopsin (RP4) and peripherin/RDS (RP7), for the four adRP loci RP1, RP9, RP10 and RP11, as well as for 17 phenotypic markers. The anonymous DNA marker locus D17S938, linked to adRP locus RP13 on chromosome 17p13.1, yielded a suggestive but not statistically significant positive lod score. Linkage was confirmed between the UCLA-RP09 adRP gene and markers distal to D17S938 in the chromosomal region 17p13.3. A reanalysis of the original RP13 data from a South African adRP family of British descent, in conjunction with our UCLA-RP09 data, suggests that only one adRP locus exists on 17p but that it maps to a more telomeric position, at band 17p13.3, than previously reported. Confirmation of the involvement of RP13 in two presumably unrelated adRP families, both of British descent, suggests that this locus is a distinct adRP gene in a proportion of British, and possibly other, adRP families. 39 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Benchmarking for electric utilities, tree trimming benchmarking, service line installation to single family residence, and distribution revenue meter testing and repair

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harder, J.

    1994-12-31

    An American Public Power Association (APPA) task force study on benchmarking for electric utilities is presented. Benchmark studies were made of three activities: (1) Tree trimming; (2) Service line installation to single family residence; (3) Distribution revenue meter testing and repair criteria. The results of the study areas are summarized for 15 utilities. The methodologies used for data collection and analysis are discussed. 28 figs., 9 tabs.

  8. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Multi-family/Low Income Peer Exchange Call: Tenant Education and Training Call Slides and Discussion Summary, July 28, 2011

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Multi-family/Low Income Peer Exchange Call: Tenant Education and Training Call Slides and Discussion Summary Agenda * Call Logistics and Attendance  What tenant education questions or needs do you have? * Tenant Education Resources and Program Experience:  Emily Mitchell, Enterprise Community Partners (ECP)  William Ho, ECP, Alameda County, CA * Grant Project Discussion: * What is your program doing? * How can tenant education complement other

  9. Better Buildings Residential Network Multi-Family & Low-Income Housing Peer Exchange Call Series: Loan Programs for Low- and Moderate-Income Households, March 13, 2014

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Family & Low-Income Housing Peer Exchange Call Series: Loan Programs for Low- and Moderate-Income Households March 13, 2014 Agenda  Call Logistics and Introductions  Featured Participants  Becca Harmon Murphy (Indianapolis Neighborhood Housing Partnership)  Discussion:  What strategies or approaches has your program used to build interest in your loan programs for moderate- and low-income households? What has worked well, and why do you think it was effective?  What

  10. Better Buildings Residential Network Multi-Family/ Low Income Peer Exchange Call Series: Strengthening Relationships between Energy and Housing Programs, October 31, 2013

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Family/ Low Income Peer Exchange Call Series: Strengthening Relationships between Energy and Housing Programs October 31, 2013 Agenda  Call Logistics and Introductions  Discussion:  What are some examples of energy and housing programs working together?  What are the benefits of pursuing housing and energy goals simultaneously?  What strategies are there for strengthening the relationship between energy and housing programs?  Are there challenges with this approach?  Other

  11. Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call: Commercial and Multi-family Building Benchmarking and Disclosure, Call Slides, July 25, 2013

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    25, 2013 Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call: Commercial and Multi-family Building Benchmarking and Disclosure Call Slides Agenda * Call Logistics and Introductions * Introducing the Better Buildings Residential Network * Discussion:  What energy benchmarking policies/requirements/ordinances are in place across the country?  Are policies on building disclosure of energy use creating momentum/driving demand in the marketplace for energy audits and retrofits?  How are

  12. EA-2001: Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings' Baseline Standards Update (RIN 1904-AD39)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is publishing this final rule to implement provisions in the Energy Conservation and Production Act (ECPA) that require DOE to update the baseline Federal energy efficiency performance standards for the construction of new Federal commercial and multi-family high-rise residential buildings. This rule updates the baseline Federal commercial standard to the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 90.1-2013.

  13. Structural Insight on the Mechanism of Regulation of the MarR Family of Proteins: High-Resolution Crystal Structure of a Transcriptional Repressor from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saridakis, Vivian; Shahinas, Dea; Xu, Xiaohui; Christendat, Dinesh

    2008-03-31

    Transcriptional regulators belonging to the MarR family are characterized by a winged-helix DNA binding domain. These transcriptional regulators regulate the efflux and influx of phenolic agents in bacteria and archaea. In Escherichia coli, MarR regulates the multiple antibiotic resistance operon and its inactivation produces a multiple antibiotic resistance phenotype. In some organisms, active efflux of drug compounds will produce a drug resistance phenotype, whereas in other organisms, active influx of chlorinated hydrocarbons results in their rapid degradation. Although proteins in the MarR family are regulators of important biological processes, their mechanism of action is not well understood and structural information about how phenolic agents regulate the activity of these proteins is lacking. This article presents the three-dimensional structure of a protein of the MarR family, MTH313, in its apo form and in complex with salicylate, a known inactivator. A comparison of these two structures indicates that the mechanism of regulation involves a large conformational change in the DNA binding lobe. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay and biophysical analyses further suggest that salicylate inactivates MTH313 and prevents it from binding to its promoter region.

  14. Activation of IL-2 receptor {alpha}-chain gene by individual members of the rel oncogene family in association with serum response factor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, J.W.; Jamieson, C.A.; Ross, J.L.

    1995-08-15

    Expression of the IL-2R{alpha} gene is regulated by members of the c-Rel/NF-{kappa}B family of transcription factors binding to the {kappa}B site in the promoter. Previous work has not defined the role of individual members of the c-Rel family in the activation of the IL-2R{alpha} gene. Using the COS cell system, we were able to reconstitute the regulation of the IL-2R{alpha} promoter by expressing cloned Rel family members with serum response factor (SRF). We found that c-rel alone activated the IL-2R{alpha} promoter only weakly but worked with the p50 subunit of NF-{kappa}B (NFKB1) to give a higher level of expression. We showed that c-rel heterodimerizes with p50 and the amount of this heterodimer correlated with the level of IL-2R{alpha} gene expression. Our results provide evidence that c-rel/p50 heterodimers activate gene expression in the context of a cellular promoter. We show that c-rel or p65 can cooperate with SRF in the activation of this promoter and the transactivation by c-rel with SRF was enhanced by p50. Synergistic activation required both {kappa}B an CArG sites, and binding studies show that these that these adjacent sites can be occupied simultaneously. The transactivation observed with cloned transcription factors mimics the physiologic induction of the IL-2R{alpha} gene since multiple sequence elements cooperate to give gene activation. The data support the model that c-rel/p50 or p65 can cooperate with SRF to specifically target the expression of the IL-2R{alpha} gene in activated T cells.

  15. EA-1918: Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and MultiFamily High-Rise Residential Buildings" RIN 1904-AC60

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of implementing provisions in the Energy Conservation and Production Act (ECPA) that require DOE to update the baseline Federal energy efficiency performance standards for the construction of new Federal buildings, including commercial and multi-family high-rise residential buildings. This EA addresses Federal commercial standard to the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 90.1-2010. The Final Rule was published in the Federal Register on July 9, 2013, 78 FR 40945.

  16. The CD36, CLA-1(CD36L1), and LIMPII (CD36L2) gene family: Cellular distribution, chromosomal location, and genetic evolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvo, D.; Vega, M.A.; Dopazo, J.

    1995-01-01

    CD36, CLA-1, and LIMPII are single polypeptide membrane glycoproteins, and the genes encoding them constitute a recently described gene family. In the present paper, a cDNA encoding the human lysosomal membrane protein LIMPII was used to determine its expression pattern in cells of various lineages. Like CLA-1, and in contrast with the restricted expression of CD36, the expression of LIMPII is widespread. Mapping of the human LIMPII and CLA-1 genes (gene symbols CD36L2 and CD36L1, respectively) to specific chromosomes revealed that CLA-1, LIMPII, and CD36 do not form a gene cluster, but are found dispersed on chromosomes 12, 4, and 7, respectively. These data, together with the phylogenetic analysis carried out for the members of this family, indicate that the LIMPII, CIA-1, and CD36 genes diverged early in evolution from an ancestor gene, possibly before the divergence between the arthropods and the vertebrates. 48 refs., 5 figs.

  17. Fluorescent detection of apoptotic cells using a family of zinc coordination complexes with selective affinity for membrane surfaces that are enriched with phosphatidylserine.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Bradley D.; Lambert, Timothy N.; Lakshmi, C.; Hanshaw, Roger, G.

    2005-03-01

    The appearance of phosphatidylserine on the membrane surface of apoptotic cells (Jurkat, CHO, HeLa) is monitored by using a family of bis(Zn{sup 2+}-2,2{prime}-dipicolylamine) coordination compounds with appended fluorescein or biotin groups as reporter elements. The phosphatidylserine affinity group is also conjugated directly to a CdSe/CdS quantum dot to produce a probe suitable for prolonged observation without photobleaching. Apoptosis can be detected under a wide variety of conditions, including variations in temperature, incubation time, and binding media. Binding of each probe appears to be restricted to the cell membrane exterior, because no staining of organelles or internal membranes is observed.

  18. New energy-conserving passive solar single-family homes. Cycle 5, Category 2 HUD solar heating and cooling demonstration program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    The 91 new single-family, energy-conserving passive solar homes described represent award winning designs of the series of five demonstration cycles of the HUD program. Information is presented to help builders and lenders to understand passive solar design, to recognize passive solar buildings, and to provide specific design, construction, and marketing suggestions and details. The first section describes the concept of passive solar energy, explains the various functions which passive solar systems must perform, and discusses the various types of passive systems found in the Cycle 5 projects. The second section discusses each of the 91 solar homes. The third section details the issues of climate requirements and site design concerns, gives examples of building construction, and suggests how to market solar homes. The appendices address more technical aspects of the design and evaluation of passive solar homes.

  19. Site-directed mutagenesis and molecular modelling studies show the role of Asp82 and cysteines in rat acylase 1, a member of the M20 family

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herga, Sameh; Brutus, Alexandre; Vitale, Rosa Maria; Miche, Helene; Perrier, Josette; Puigserver, Antoine; Scaloni, Andrea; Giardina, Thierry . E-mail: thierry.giardina@univ.u-3mrs.fr

    2005-05-06

    Acylase 1 from rat kidney catalyzes the hydrolysis of acyl-amino acids. Sequence alignment has shown that this enzyme belongs to the metalloprotein family M20. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments led to the identification of one functionally important amino acid residue located near one of the zinc coordinating residues, which play a critical role in the enzymatic activity. The D82N- and D82E-substituted forms showed no significant activity and very low activity, respectively, along with a loss of zinc coordination. Molecular modelling investigations indicated a putative role of D82 in ensuring a proper protonation of catalytic histidine. In addition, none of the five cysteine residues present in the rat kidney acylase 1 sequence seemed involved in the catalytic process: the loss of activity induced by the C294A substitution was probably due to a conformational change in the 3D structure.

  20. Two distinct origins of a common BRCA1 mutation in breast-ovarian cancer families: A genetic study of 15 185delAG-mutation kindreds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berman, D.B.; Schultz, D.C.; Godwin, A.K.

    1996-06-01

    We screened 163 women from breast-ovarian cancer-prone families, as well as 178 individuals affected with breast and/or ovarian cancer but unselected for family history, for germ-line mutations in exon 2 of BRCA1, by SSCP analysis and direct sequencing. A total of 25 mutations were detected. Thirteen of 64 Jewish Ashkenazi women and 2 non-Jewish individuals were found to possess the 185delAG mutation. Haplotype data for all 15 individuals, with markers intragenic to BRCA1, suggest that the Jewish Ashkenazi individuals share a common ancestry that is distinct from the lineage shared by the other two women. These data provide the first evidence of two distinct lines of transmission for the 185delAG mutation, only one of which has its origins in the Jewish Ashkenazi population. Our screening also uncovered 10 affected individuals with an 11-bp deletion at nucleotide 188 of BRCA1 (188del11), 4 of whom are Ashkenazi Jews. This is only the third reported mutation detected within the Jewish Ashkenazi population and may represent the second most common alteration in BRCA1 found in Ashkenazi Jews in the United States. The observed overrepresentation of specific mutations within a subgroup of the general population may eventually contribute to the development of inexpensive and routine tests for BRCA1 mutations, as well as to the elucidation of other contributory factors (e.g., diet, environment, and chemical exposures) that may play a key role in cancer initiation and development. The implications of the mutational data, as well as the role that founder effect, demographic history, and penetrance play in the resulting observed phenomena, are discussed. 32 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Human KZNF Gene Catalog - A comprehensive catalog of human KRAB-associated zinc finger genes: insights into the evolutionary history of a large family of transcriptional repressors

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Huntley, S; Baggott, D. M.; Hamilton, A. T.; Tran-Gyamfi, M.; Yang, S.; Kim, J.; Gordon, L.; Branscomb, E.; Stubbs, L.

    Kruppel-type zinc finger (ZNF) motifs are prevalent components of transcription factor proteins in all eukaryotes. KRAB-ZNF proteins, in which a potent repressor domain is attached to a tandem array of DNA-binding zinc-finger motifs, are specific to tetrapod vertebrates and represent the largest class of ZNF proteins in mammals. To define the full repertoire of human KRAB-ZNF proteins, we searched the genome sequence for key motifs and then constructed and manually curated gene models incorporating those sequences. The resulting gene catalog contains 423 KRAB-ZNF protein-coding loci, yielding alternative transcripts that altogether predict at least 742 structurally distinct proteins. Active rounds of segmental duplication, involving single genes or larger regions and including both tandem and distributed duplication events, have driven the expansion of this mammalian gene family. Comparisons between the human genes and ZNF loci mined from the draft mouse, dog, and chimpanzee genomes not only identified 103 KRAB-ZNF genes that are conserved in mammals but also highlighted a substantial level of lineage-specific change; at least 136 KRAB-ZNF coding genes are primate specific, including many recent duplicates. KRAB-ZNF genes are widely expressed and clustered genes are typically not coregulated, indicating that paralogs have evolved to fill roles in many different biological processes. To facilitate further study, we have developed a Web-based public resource with access to gene models, sequences, and other data, including visualization tools to provide genomic context and interaction with other public data sets. [This abstract was copied from: S Huntley, DM Baggott, AT Hamilton, M Tran-Gyamfi, S Yang, J Kim, L Gordon, E Branscomb, and L Stubbs. 2006. A comprehensive catalog of human KRAB-associated zinc finger genes: insights into the evolutionary history of a large family of transcriptional repressors, Genome Research 16(5):669 - 677] The website provides the ability to search the online catalog by genomic coordinates, name, locus type, and motifs, to utilize a graphical browser and to download data files.

  2. A fourth polymorph in the family of BEDT-TTF salts with thiocyanatocuprate(I) anions: (BEDT-TTF){<_4}Cu{<_3}(NCS){<_5}.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlueter, J. A.; Geiser, U.; Wang, H. H.; Manson, J. L.

    2012-05-01

    A new crystallographic modification was found in the family of BEDT-TTF salts containing thiocyanatocuprate(I) anions. The cation radical salt crystallizes in the P{sup {bar 1}} space group with a = 8.2720(9) {angstrom}, b = 19.099(2) {angstrom}, c = 43.758(5) {angstrom}, {alpha} = 81.088(4){sup o}, {beta} = 87.253(4){sup o}, {gamma} = 83.790(4){sup o}, V = 6786.2(13) {angstrom}{sup 3} at 150 K. The BEDT-TTF radical cations pack in an {alpha}-type motif, but every four columns, there is a slip in the layer. Where this slip occurs, the stacks are coupled in a {beta}'' manner. The material exhibits semiconductive behavior with an activation energy of 0.13 eV above 250 K and 0.22 eV below. Packing motif of the (BEDT-TTF){sub 4}Cu{sub 3}(NCS){sub 5} structure.

  3. Metazoan Gene Families from Metazome

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Metazome is a joint project of the Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute and the Center for Integrative Genomics to facilitate comparative genomic studies amongst metazoans. Clusters of orthologous and paralogous genes that represent the modern descendents of ancestral gene sets are constructed at key phylogenetic nodes. These clusters allow easy access to clade specific orthology/paralogy relationships as well as clade specific genes and gene expansions. As of version 2.0.4, Metazome provides access to twenty-four sequenced and annotated metazoan genomes, clustered at nine evolutionarily significant nodes. Where possible, each gene has been annotated with PFAM, KOG, KEGG, and PANTHER assignments, and publicly available annotations from RefSeq, UniProt, Ensembl, and JGI are hyper-linked and searchable. The included organisms (by common name) are: Human, Mouse, Rat, Dog, Opossum, Chicken, Frog, Stickleback, Medaka, Fugu pufferfish; Zebrafish, Seasquirt - savignyi, Seasquirt - intestinalis, Amphioxus, Sea Urchin, Fruitfly, Mosquite, Yellow Fever Mosquito, Silkworm, Red Flour Beetle, Worm, Briggsae Worm, Owl limpet (snail), and Sea anemone. [Copied from Metazome Overview at http://www.metazome.net/Metazome_info.php

  4. Comparative mapping of DNA markers from the familial Alzheimer disease and Down syndrome regions of human chromosome 21 to mouse chromosomes 16 and 17

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, S.V.; Nadeau, J.H.; Tanzi, R.E.; Watkins, P.C.; Jagadesh, J.; Taylor, B.A.; Haines, J.L.; Sacchi, N.; Gusella, J.F. )

    1988-08-01

    Mouse trisomy 16 has been proposed as an animal model of Down syndrome (DS), since this chromosome contains homologues of several loci from the q22 band of human chromosome 21. The recent mapping of the defect causing familial Alzheimer disease (FAD) and the locus encoding the Alzheimer amyloid {beta} precursor protein (APP) to human chromosome 21 has prompted a more detailed examination of the extent of conservation of this linkage group between the two species. Using anonymous DNA probes and cloned genes from human chromosome 21 in a combination of recombinant inbred and interspecific mouse backcross analyses, the authors have established that the linkage group shared by mouse chromosome 16 includes not only the critical DS region of human chromosome 21 but also the APP gene and FAD-linked markers. Extending from the anonymous DNA locus D21S52 to ETS2, the linkage map of six loci spans 39% recombination in man but only 6.4% recombination in the mouse. A break in synteny occurs distal to ETS2, with the homologue of the human marker D21S56 mapping to mouse chromosome 17. Conservation of the linkage relationships of markers in the FAD region suggests that the murine homologue of the FAD locus probably maps to chromosome 16 and that detailed comparison of the corresponding region in both species could facilitate identification of the primary defect in this disorder. The break in synteny between the terminal portion of human chromosome 21 and mouse chromosome 16 indicates, however, that mouse trisomy 16 may not represent a complete model of DS.

  5. Lignocellulose Degradation Mechanisms Across the Tree of Life

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cragg, Simon M.; Beckham, Gregg T.; Bruce, Neil C.; Bugg, Timothy D. H.; Distel, Daniel L.; Dupree, Paul; Etxabe, Amaia Green; Goodell, Barry S.; Jellison, Jody; McGeehan, John E.; et al

    2015-11-14

    Organisms use diverse mechanisms involving multiple complementary enzymes, particularly glycoside hydrolases (GHs), to deconstruct lignocellulose. Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) produced by bacteria and fungi facilitate deconstruction as does the Fenton chemistry of brown-rot fungi. Lignin depolymerisation is achieved by white-rot fungi and certain bacteria, using peroxidases and laccases. Meta-omics is now revealing the complexity of prokaryotic degradative activity in lignocellulose-rich environments. Protists from termite guts and some oomycetes produce multiple lignocellulolytic enzymes. We found that the Lignocellulose-consuming animals secrete some GHs, but most harbour a diverse enzyme-secreting gut microflora in a mutualism that is particularly complex in termites. Shipworms however,more » house GH-secreting and LPMO-secreting bacteria separate from the site of digestion and the isopod Limnoria relies on endogenous enzymes alone. Moreover, the omics revolution is identifying many novel enzymes and paradigms for biomass deconstruction, but more emphasis on function is required, particularly for enzyme cocktails, in which LPMOs may play an important role.« less

  6. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of the Salicylyl-acyltranferase SsfX3 from a Tetracycline Biosynthetic Pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pickens, Lauren B.; Sawaya, Michael R.; Rasool, Huma; Pashkov, Inna; Yeates, Todd O.; Tang, Yi

    2012-03-14

    SsfX3 is a GDSL family acyltransferase that transfers salicylate to the C-4 hydroxyl of a tetracycline intermediate in the penultimate step during biosynthesis of the anticancer natural product SF2575. The C-4 salicylate takes the place of the more common C-4 dimethylamine functionality, making SsfX3 the first acyltransferase identified to act on a tetracycline substrate. The crystal structure of SsfX3 was determined at 2.5 {angstrom}, revealing two distinct domains as follows: an N-terminal {beta}-sandwich domain that resembles a carbohydrate-binding module, and a C-terminal catalytic domain that contains the atypical {alpha}/{beta}-hydrolase fold found in the GDSL hydrolase family of enzymes. The active site lies at one end of a large open binding pocket, which is spatially defined by structural elements from both the N- and C-terminal domains. Mutational analysis in the putative substrate binding pocket identified residues from both domains that are important for binding the acyl donor and acceptor. Furthermore, removal of the N-terminal carbohydrate-binding module-like domain rendered the stand-alone {alpha}/{beta}-hydrolase domain inactive. The additional noncatalytic module is therefore proposed to be required to define the binding pocket and provide sufficient interactions with the spatially extended tetracyclic substrate. SsfX3 was also demonstrated to accept a variety of non-native acyl groups. This relaxed substrate specificity toward the acyl donor allowed the chemoenzymatic biosynthesis of C-4-modified analogs of the immediate precursor to the bioactive SF2575; these were used to assay the structure activity relationships at the C-4 position.

  7. A component of green tea (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate, promotes apoptosis in T24 human bladder cancer cells via modulation of the PI3K/Akt pathway and Bcl-2 family proteins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qin Jie [Department of Urology, First Affiliated Hospital, Medical College, Zhejiang University, Qingchun Road 79, Hangzhou 310003, Zhejiang Province (China); Xie Liping [Department of Urology, First Affiliated Hospital, Medical College, Zhejiang University, Qingchun Road 79, Hangzhou 310003, Zhejiang Province (China)]. E-mail: xielp@zjuem.zju.edu.cn; Zheng Xiangyi [Department of Urology, First Affiliated Hospital, Medical College, Zhejiang University, Qingchun Road 79, Hangzhou 310003, Zhejiang Province (China); Wang Yunbin [Department of Urology, First Affiliated Hospital, Medical College, Zhejiang University, Qingchun Road 79, Hangzhou 310003, Zhejiang Province (China); Bai Yu [Department of Urology, First Affiliated Hospital, Medical College, Zhejiang University, Qingchun Road 79, Hangzhou 310003, Zhejiang Province (China); Shen Huafeng [Department of Urology, First Affiliated Hospital, Medical College, Zhejiang University, Qingchun Road 79, Hangzhou 310003, Zhejiang Province (China); Li Longcheng [Department of Urology, University of California San Francisco and Veteran Affairs Medical Center San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Dahiya, Rajvir [Department of Urology, University of California San Francisco and Veteran Affairs Medical Center San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2007-03-23

    Bladder cancer is the fourth most common cancer in men and ninth most common in women. It has a protracted course of progression and is thus an ideal candidate for chemoprevention strategies and trials. This study was conducted to evaluate the chemopreventive/antiproliferative potential of (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG, the major phytochemical in green tea) against bladder cancer and its mechanism of action. Using the T24 human bladder cancer cell line, we found that EGCG treatment caused dose- and time-dependent inhibition of cellular proliferation and cell viability, and induced apoptosis. Mechanistically, EGCG inhibits phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase/Akt activation that, in turn, results in modulation of Bcl-2 family proteins, leading to enhanced apoptosis of T24 cells. These findings suggest that EGCG may be an important chemoprevention agent for the management of bladder cancer.

  8. Draft Environmental Assessment for Direct Final Rule, 10 CFR 434, Energy Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise High-Rise Multi-FamilyResidential BuildingsŽ and 10 CFR 435, Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Re

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR Final Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and Multi- Family High-Rise Residential Buildings' Baseline Standards Update" (RIN 1904-AD39) (DOE/EA-2001) Prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy September 2015 2 Environmental Assessment for Final Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential

  9. Superactive cellulase formulation using cellobiohydrolase-1 from Penicillium funiculosum

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adney, William S.; Baker, John O.; Decker, Stephen R.; Chou, Yat-Chen; Himmel, Michael E.; Ding, Shi-You

    2012-10-09

    Purified cellobiohydrolase I (glycosyl hydrolase family 7 (Cel7A)) enzymes from Penicillium funiculosum demonstrate a high level of specific performance in comparison to other Cel7 family member enzymes when formulated with purified EIcd endoglucanase from A. cellulolyticus and tested on pretreated corn stover. This result is true of the purified native enzyme, as well as recombinantly expressed enzyme, for example, that enzyme expressed in a non-native Aspergillus host. In a specific example, the specific performance of the formulation using purified recombinant Cel7A from Penicillium funiculosum expressed in A. awamori is increased by more than 200% when compared to a formulation using purified Cel7A from Trichoderma reesei.

  10. Superactive cellulase formulation using cellobiohydrolase-1 from Penicillium funiculosum

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adney, William S. (Golden, CO); Baker, John O. (Golden, CO); Decker, Stephen R. (Berthoud, CO); Chou, Yat-Chen (Golden, CO); Himmel, Michael E. (Littleton, CO); Ding, Shi-You (Golden, CO)

    2008-11-11

    Purified cellobiohydrolase I (glycosyl hydrolase family 7 (Cel7A) enzymes from Penicillium funiculosum demonstrate a high level of specific performance in comparison to other Cel7 family member enzymes when formulated with purified EIcd endoglucanase from A. cellulolyticus and tested on pretreated corn stover. This result is true of the purified native enzyme, as well as recombinantly expressed enzyme, for example, that enzyme expressed in a non-native Aspergillus host. In a specific example, the specific performance of the formulation using purified recombinant Cel7A from Penicillium funiculosum expressed in A. awamori is increased by more than 200% when compared to a formulation using purified Cel7A from Trichoderma reesei.

  11. Methodology and assumptions for evaluating heating and cooling energy requirements in new single-family residential buildings: Technical support document for the PEAR (Program for Energy Analysis of Residences) microcomputer program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Y.J.; Ritschard, R.; Bull, J.; Byrne, S.; Turiel, I.; Wilson, D.; Hsui, C.; Foley, D.

    1987-01-01

    This report provides technical documentation for a software package called PEAR (Program for Energy Analysis of Residences) developed by LBL. PEAR offers an easy-to-use and accurate method of estimating the energy savings associated with various energy conservation measures used in site-built, single-family homes. This program was designed for use by non-technical groups such as home builders, home buyers or others in the buildings industry, and developed as an integral part of a set of voluntary guidelines entitled Affordable Housing Through Energy Conservation: A Guide to Designing and Constructing Energy Efficient Homes. These guidelines provide a method for selecting and evaluating cost-effective energy conservation measures based on the energy savings estimated by PEAR. This work is part of a Department of Energy program aimed at conducting research that will improve the energy efficiency of the nation's stock of conventionally-built and manufactured homes, and presenting the results to the public in a simplified format.

  12. We have created a new family of...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (redox) active ionic liquids for redox flow batteries using inexpensive, non-toxic, and highly abundant precursors. By incorporating the redox active species into the...

  13. Chicagoland Single-Family Housing Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spanier, J.; Scheu, R.; Brand, L.; Yang, J.

    2012-06-01

    In this report, the PARR team identifies housing characteristics and energy use for fifteen housing types in the Chicagoland (Cook County, Illinois) region and specifies measure packages that provide an optimum level of energy savings based on a BEopt analysis. The analysis is based on assessor data and actual energy consumption data on 432,605 houses representing approximately 30% of the population.

  14. Chicagoland Single-Family Housing Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spanier, J.; Scheu, R.; Brand, L.; Yang, J.

    2012-06-01

    In this report, the PARR team identifies housing characteristics and energy use for fifteen housing types (groups) in the Chicagoland (Cook County, Illinois) region and specifies measure packages that provide an optimum level of energy savings based on a BEopt analysis. The analysis is based on assessor data and actual energy consumption data on 432,605 houses representing approximately 30% of the population.

  15. Fermilab | Newsroom | Press Releases | Fermilab Outdoor Family...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    falcons and owls as well as a collection of bird bones, droppings, feathers and hunting gear. The program is designed for first through seventh grade students. Scout troops are...

  16. Savannah River Nuclear Solutions awards family scholarships ...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    45,000 were awarded to 15 area students. May 17, 2013 at 4:00 pm Blog archive October 2015 (8) September 2015 (9) August 2015 (10) July 2015 (8) June 2015 (6) May 2015 (18) April...

  17. Weatherization Saves Families Energy and Money

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On October 30, communities throughout the nation will celebrate National Weatherization Day, which recognizes an industry of weatherization service providers, state and local agencies, and researchers dedicated to improving the energy efficiency of...

  18. Complete genome of the cellulolytic thermophile Acidothermus cellulolyticus 11B provides insights into its ecophysiological and evolutionary adaptations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Gary; Detter, John C; Bruce, David C; Challacombe, Jean F; Brettin, Thomas S; Necsulea, Anamaria; Daubin, Vincent; Medigue, Claudine; Adney, William S; Xu, Xin C; Lapidus, Alla; Pujic, Pierre; Berry, Alison M; Barabote, Ravi D; Leu, David; Normand, Phillipe

    2009-01-01

    We present here the complete 2.4 MB genome of the actinobacterial thermophile, Acidothermus cellulolyticus 11B, that surprisingly reveals thermophilic amino acid usage in only the cytosolic subproteome rather than its whole proteome. Thermophilic amino acid usage in the partial proteome implies a recent, ongoing evolution of the A. cellulolyticus genome since its divergence about 200-250 million years ago from its closest phylogenetic neighbor Frankia, a mesophilic plant symbiont. Differential amino acid usage in the predicted subproteomes of A. cellulolyticus likely reflects a stepwise evolutionary process of modern thermophiles in general. An unusual occurrence of higher G+C in the non-coding DNA than in the transcribed genome reinforces a late evolution from a higher G+C common ancestor. Comparative analyses of the A. cellulolyticus genome with those of Frankia and other closely-related actinobacteria revealed that A. cellulolyticus genes exhibit reciprocal purine preferences at the first and third codon positions, perhaps reflecting a subtle preference for the dinucleotide AG in its mRNAs, a possible adaptation to a thermophilic environment. Other interesting features in the genome of this cellulolytic, hot-springs dwelling prokaryote reveal streamlining for adaptation to its specialized ecological niche. These include a low occurrence of pseudo genes or mobile genetic elements, a flagellar gene complement previously unknown in this organism, and presence of laterally-acquired genomic islands of likely ecophysiological value. New glycoside hydrolases relevant for lignocellulosic biomass deconstruction were identified in the genome, indicating a diverse biomass-degrading enzyme repertoire several-fold greater than previously characterized, and significantly elevating the industrial value of this organism.

  19. Complete genome of the cellulolytic thermophile Acidothermus cellulolyticus 11B provides insights into its ecophysiological and evolutionary adaptations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Gary; Detter, Chris; Bruce, David; Challacome, Jean F; Brettin, Thomas S; Barabote, Ravi D; Leu, David; Normand, Philippe; Necsula, Anamaria; Daubin, Vincent; Medigue, Claudine; Xu, Xin C; Lapidus, Alla; Pujic, Pierre; Richardson, Paul; Berry, Alison M

    2008-01-01

    We present here the complete 2.4 MB genome of the actinobacterial thermophile, Acidothermus cellulolyticus lIB, that surprisingly reveals thermophilic amino acid usage in only the cytosolic subproteome rather than its whole proteome. Thermophilic amino acid usage in the partial proteome implies a recent, ongoing evolution of the A. cellulolyticus genome since its divergence about 200-250 million years ago from its closest phylogenetic neighbor Frankia, a mesophilic plant symbiont. Differential amino acid usage in the predicted subproteomes of A. cellulolyticus likely reflects a stepwise evolutionary process of modern thermophiles in general. An unusual occurrence of higher G+C in the non-coding DNA than in the transcribed genome reinforces a late evolution from a higher G+C common ancestor. Comparative analyses of the A. cellulolyticus genome with those of Frankia and other closely-related actinobacteria revealed that A. cellulolyticus genes exhibit reciprocal purine preferences at the first and third codon positions, perhaps reflecting a subtle preference for the dinucleotide AG in its mRNAs, a possible adaptation to a thermophilic environment. Other interesting features in the genome of this cellulolytic, hot-springs dwelling prokaryote reveal streamlining for adaptation to its specialized ecological niche. These include a low occurrence of pseudogenes or mobile genetic elements, a flagellar gene complement previously unknown in this organism, and presence of laterally-acquired genomic islands of likely ecophysiological value. New glycoside hydrolases relevant for lignocellulosic biomass deconstruction were identified in the genome, indicating a diverse biomass-degrading enzyme repertoire several-fold greater than previously characterized, and significantly elevating the industrial value of this organism.

  20. Genome, transcriptome, and secretome analysis of wood decay fungus Postia placenta supports unique mechanisms of lignocellulose conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez, Diego; Challacombe, Jean; Morgenstern, Ingo; Hibbett, David; Schmoll, Monika; Kubicek, Christian P.; Ferreira, Patricia; Ruiz-Duenas, Francisco; Martinez, Angel T.; Kersten, Phil; Hammel, Ken; Vanden Wymelenberg, Amber; Gaskell, Jill; Lindquist, Erika; Sabat, Gregorz; Splinter Bondurant, Sandra; Larrondo, Luis F.; Canessa, Paulo; Vicuna, Rafael; Yadev, Jagjit; Doddapaneni, Harshavardhan; Subramanian, Venkataramanan; Pisabarro, Antonio; Lavin, Jose L.; Oguiza, Jose A.; Master, Emma; Henrissat, Bernard; Coutinho, Pedro M.; Harris, Paul; Magnuson, Jon K.; Baker, Scott E.; Bruno, Kenneth S.; Kenealy, William; Hoegger, Patrik; Kues, Ursula; Ramaiya, Preethi; Lucas, Susan; Salamov, Asaf; Shapiro, Harris; Tu, Hank; Chee, Christine L.; Misra, Monica; Xie, Gary; Teter, Sarah; Yaver, Debbie; James, Tim; Mokrejs, Martin; Pospisek, Martin; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Brettin, T.; Rokhsar, Daniel S.; Berka, Randy; Cullen, Dan

    2009-02-10

    Brown-rot fungi such as Postia placenta are common inhabitants of forest ecosystems and are also largely responsible for the destructive decay of wooden structures. Rapid depolymerization of cellulose is a distinguishing feature of brown-rot, but the biochemical mechanisms and underlying genetics are poorly understood. Systematic examination of the P. placenta genome, transcriptome, and secretome revealed unique extracellular enzyme systems, including an unusual repertoire of extracellular glycoside hydrolases. Genes encoding exocellobiohydrolases and cellulose-binding domains, typical of cellulolytic microbes, are absent in this efficient cellulose-degrading fungus. When P. placenta was grown in media containing cellulose as sole carbon source, transcripts corresponding to many hemicellulases and to a single putative ?-1-4 endoglucanase were expressed at high levels relative to glucose grown cultures. These transcript profiles were confirmed by direct identification of peptides by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Also upregulated under cellulolytic culture conditions were putative iron reductases, quinone reductase, and structurally divergent oxidases potentially involved in extracellular generation of Fe(II) and H2O2. These observations are consistent with a biodegradative role for Fenton chemistry in which Fe(II) and H2O2 react to form hydroxyl radicals, highly reactive oxidants capable of depolymerizing cellulose. The P. placenta genome resources provide unparalleled opportunities for investigating such unusual mechanisms of cellulose conversion. More broadly, the genome offers insight into the diversification of lignocellulose degrading mechanisms in fungi. In particular, comparisons between P. placenta and the closely related white-rot fungus, Phanerochaete chrysosporium support an evolutionary shift from white-rot to brown-rot during which efficient depolymerization of lignin was lost.

  1. Genome, transcriptome, and secretome analysis of wood decay fungus postia placenta supports unique mechanisms of lignocellulose conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez, Diego; Challacombe, Jean F; Misra, Monica; Xie, Gary; Brettin, Thomas; Morgenstern, Ingo; Hibbett, David; Schmoll, Monika; Kubicek, Christian P; Ferreira, Patricia; Ruiz - Duenase, Francisco J; Martinez, Angel T; Kersten, Phil; Hammel, Kenneth E; Vanden Wymelenberg, Amber; Gaskell, Jill; Lindquist, Erika; Sabati, Grzegorz; Bondurant, Sandra S; Larrondo, Luis F; Canessa, Paulo; Vicunna, Rafael; Yadavk, Jagiit; Doddapaneni, Harshavardhan; Subramaniank, Venkataramanan; Pisabarro, Antonio G; Lavin, Jose L; Oguiza, Jose A; Master, Emma; Henrissat, Bernard; Coutinho, Pedro M; Harris, Paul; Magnuson, Jon K; Baker, Scott; Bruno, Kenneth; Kenealy, William; Hoegger, Patrik J; Kues, Ursula; Ramaiva, Preethi; Lucas, Susan; Salamov, Asaf; Shapiro, Harris; Tuh, Hank; Chee, Christine L; Teter, Sarah; Yaver, Debbie; James, Tim; Mokrejs, Martin; Pospisek, Martin; Grigoriev, Igor; Rokhsar, Dan; Berka, Randy; Cullen, Dan

    2008-01-01

    Brown-rot fungi such as Postia placenta are common inhabitants of forest ecosystems and are also largely responsible for the destructive decay of wooden structures. Rapid depolymerization of cellulose is a distinguishing feature of brown-rot, but the biochemical mechanisms and underlying genetics are poorly understood. Systematic examination of the P. placenta genome, transcriptome and secretome revealed unique extracellular enzyme systems, including an unusual repertoire of extracellular glycoside hydrolases. Genes encoding exocellobiohydrolases and cellulose-binding domains, typical of cellulolytic microbes, are absent in this efficient cellulose-degrading fungus. When P. placenta was grown in medium containing cellulose as sole carbon source, transcripts corresponding to many hemicellulases and to a single putative {beta}-1-4 endoglucanase were expressed at high levels relative to glucose grown cultures. These transcript profiles were confirmed by direct identification of peptides by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC{center_dot}MSIMS). Also upregulated during growth on cellulose medium were putative iron reductases, quinone reductase, and structurally divergent oxidases potentially involved in extracellular generation of Fe(II) and H202. These observations are consistent with a biodegradative role for Fenton chemistry in which Fe(II) and H202 react to form hydroxyl radicals, highly reactive oxidants capable of depolymerizing cellulose. The P. placenta genome resources provide unparalleled opportunities for investigating such unusual mechanisms of cellulose conversion. More broadly, the genome offers insight into the diversification of lignocellulose degrading mechanisms in fungi. Comparisons to the closely related white-rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium support an evolutionary shift from white-rot to brown-rot during which the capacity for efficient depolymerization of lignin was lost.

  2. Activity-based protein profiling of secreted cellulolytic enzyme activity dynamics in Trichoderma reesei QM6a, NG14, and RUT-C30

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Lindsey N.; Culley, David E.; Hofstad, Beth A.; Chauvigne-Hines, Lacie M.; Zink, Erika M.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Smith, Richard D.; Callister, Stephen J.; Magnuson, Jon M.; Wright, Aaron T.

    2013-12-01

    Development of alternative, non-petroleum based sources of bioenergy that can be applied in the short-term find great promise in the use of highly abundant and renewable lignocellulosic plant biomass.1 This material obtained from different feedstocks, such as forest litter or agricultural residues, can yield liquid fuels and other chemical products through biorefinery processes.2 Biofuels are obtained from lignocellulosic materials by chemical pretreatment of the biomass, followed by enzymatic decomposition of cellulosic and hemicellulosic compounds into soluble sugars that are converted to desired chemical products via microbial metabolism and fermentation.3, 4 To release soluble sugars from polymeric cellulose multiple enzymes are required, including endoglucanase, exoglucanase, and ?-glucosidase.5, 6 However, the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose into soluble sugars remains a significant limiting factor to the efficient and economically viable utilization of lignocellulosic biomass for transport fuels.7, 8 The primary industrial source of cellulose and hemicellulases is the mesophilic soft-rot fungus Trichoderma reesei,9 having widespread applications in food, feed, textile, pulp, and paper industries.10 The genome encodes 200 glycoside hydrolases, including 10 cellulolytic and 16 hemicellulolytic enzymes.11 The hypercellulolytic catabolite derepressed strain RUT-C30 was obtained through a three-step UV and chemical mutagenesis of the original T. reesei strain QM6a,12, 13 in which strains M7 and NG14 were intermediate, having higher cellulolytic activity than the parent strain but less activity and higher catabolite repression than RUT-C30.14 Numerous methods have been employed to optimize the secreted enzyme cocktail of T. reesei including cultivation conditions, operational parameters, and mutagenesis.3 However, creating an optimal and economical enzyme mixture for production-scale biofuels synthesis may take thousands of experiments to identify.

  3. 2007 GRC on Cellulases and Cellulosomes (July 29-August 3, 2007)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Morrison Nancy Ryan Gray

    2008-09-22

    Cellulose, a key component of the plant cell wall, comprises the most abundant source of organic carbon on the planet and its microbial degradation is of considerable biological and industrial importance. Indeed, the microbial degradation of cellulose and other plant structural polysaccharides is critical to the maintenance of the carbon cycle in terrestrial and marine microbial ecosystems, host invasion by several phytopathogens, and herbivore nutrition. While the enzymes that attack cellulose are already widely used in several biotechnology-based industries, the major future application of these biocatalysts is the conversion of plant biomass into bio-ethanol and other forms of energy. In that context, the 2007 Conference will present the latest breakthroughs in our understanding of the enzymology, structural biology and (meta)genomics underpinning the conversion of plant structural polysaccharides into fermentable sugars, both in natural and engineered processes. There is also an increased emphasis on the roles of other carbohydrate active enzymes in plant biomass conversion. The themes for the scientific sessions include: (1) crystallographic and biochemical analyses of enzyme structure and function; (2) molecular mechanisms underpinning enzyme catalysis, processivity and specificity; (3) functional and comparative analyses of carbohydrate binding modules and enzyme-substrate interactions; (4) directed evolution for the development of catalytically superior glycoside hydrolases; (5) biophysical and structural analyses of native and chemically pretreated plant biomass and component polysaccharides; (6) genomics of specialist polysaccharide degrading microbes; (7) metagenomics and ecophysiology of plant biomass degradation in natural and engineered processes and; (8) enhancement of industrial bioprocesses by metabolic engineering and related approaches. While the Conference draws many of its participants from academia and government agencies, colleagues from industry have made many important and valuable contributions to the success of all the Conferences. This makes the Conference a truly interactive and productive venue for all sectors interested in the fundamental and applied sciences of cellulases, cellulosomes, and other carbohydrate active enzymes.

  4. Orpinomyces cellulase CelE protein and coding sequences

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Xin-Liang (Athens, GA); Ljungdahl, Lars G. (Athens, GA); Chen, Huizhong (Athens, GA)

    2000-08-29

    A CDNA designated celE cloned from Orpinomyces PC-2 encodes a polypeptide (CelE) of 477 amino acids. CelE is highly homologous to CelB of Orpinomyces (72.3% identity) and Neocallimastix (67.9% identity), and like them, it has a non-catalytic repeated peptide domain (NCRPD) at the C-terminal end. The catalytic domain of CelE is homologous to glycosyl hydrolases of Family 5, found in several anaerobic bacteria. The gene of celE is devoid of introns. The recombinant proteins CelE and CelB of Orpinomyces PC-2 randomly hydrolyze carboxymethylcellulose and cello-oligosaccharides in the pattern of endoglucanases.

  5. Magnetocrystalline interactions and oxidation state determination of Mn{sub (2?x)}V{sub (1+x)}O{sub 4} (x=0, 1/3 and 1) magnetorresistive spinel family

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pomiro, F.; Ceppi, S.; De Paoli, J.M.; Snchez, R.D.; Mesquita, A.; Tirao, G.; and others

    2013-09-15

    Oxidation states of transition metal cations in spinels-type oxides are sometimes extremely difficult to determine by conventional spectroscopic methods. One of the most complex cases occurs when there are different cations, each one with several possible oxidation states, as in the case of the magnetoresistant Mn{sub (2?x)}V{sub (1+x)}O{sub 4} (x=0, 1/3 and 1) spinel-type family. In this contribution we describe the determination of the oxidation state of manganese and vanadium in Mn{sub (2?x)}V{sub (1+x)}O{sub 4} (x=0, 1/3,1) spinel-type compounds by analyzing XANES and high-resolution K? X-ray fluorescence spectra. The ionic models found are Mn{sup 2+}{sub 2}V{sup 4+}O{sub 4}, Mn{sup 2+}{sub 5/3}V{sup 3.5+}{sub 4/3}O{sub 4} and Mn{sup 2+}V{sup 3+}{sub 2}O{sub 4}. Combination of the present results with previous data provided a reliable cation distribution model. For these spinels, single magnetic electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) lines are observed at 480 K showing the interaction among the different magnetic ions. The analysis of the EPR parameters show that g-values and relative intensities are highly influenced by the concentration and the high-spin state of Mn{sup 2+}. EPR broadening linewidth is explained in terms of the bottleneck effect, which is due to the presence of the fast relaxing V{sup 3+} ion instead of the weak Mn{sup 2+} (S state) coupled to the lattice. The EPR results, at high temperature, are well explained assuming the oxidation states of the magnetic ions obtained by the other spectroscopic techniques. - Graphical abstract: View of the crystallographic structure of a spinel. It shows as an example one of the models of ion distribution determined for the spinels Mn{sub (2?x)}V{sub (1+x)}O{sub 4} (x=0, 1/3,1). Display Omitted - Highlights: Determination of oxidation state of the metallic ions in Mn{sub (2?x)}V{sub (1+x)}O{sub 4} (x=0,1/3,1) by XAS and XES techniques. The ionic models found are Mn{sup 2+}{sub 2}V{sup 4+}O{sub 4}, Mn{sup 2+}{sub 5/3}V{sup 3.5+}{sub 4/3}O{sub 4} and Mn{sup 2+}V{sup 3+}O{sub 4}. EPR spectra correspond almost exclusively to a resonance of Mn{sup 2+}.

  6. Structural and Mechanistic Insights into C-P Bond Hydrolysis by

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Phosphonoacetate Hydrolase (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Structural and Mechanistic Insights into C-P Bond Hydrolysis by Phosphonoacetate Hydrolase Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Structural and Mechanistic Insights into C-P Bond Hydrolysis by Phosphonoacetate Hydrolase Bacteria have evolved pathways to metabolize phosphonates as a nutrient source for phosphorus. In Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021, 2-aminoethylphosphonate is catabolized to phosphonoacetate, which is converted to

  7. Structural and Mechanistic Insights into C-P Bond Hydrolysis...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Structural and Mechanistic Insights into C-P Bond Hydrolysis by Phosphonoacetate Hydrolase Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Structural and Mechanistic Insights into C-P ...

  8. Engineering towards a complete heterologous cellulase secretome in Yarrowia lipolytica reveals its potential for consolidated bioprocessing

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wei, Hui; Wang, Wei; Alahuhta, Markus; Vander Wall, Todd; Baker, John O.; Taylor, Larry E.; Decker, Stephen R.; Himmel, Michael E.; Zhang, Min

    2014-10-16

    Background: Yarrowia lipolytica is an oleaginous yeast capable of metabolizing glucose to lipids, which then accumulate intracellularly. However, it lacks the suite of cellulolytic enzymes required to break down biomass cellulose and cannot therefore utilize biomass directly as a carbon source. Toward the development of a direct microbial conversion platform for the production of hydrocarbon fuels from cellulosic biomass, the potential for Y. lipolytica to function as a consolidated bioprocessing strain was investigated by first conducting a genomic search and functional testing of its endogenous glycoside hydrolases. Once the range of endogenous enzymes was determined, the critical cellulases from Trichodermamore » reesei were cloned into Yarrowia. Results: Initially, work to express T. reesei endoglucanase II (EGII) and cellobiohydrolase (CBH) II in Y. lipolytica resulted in the successful secretion of active enzymes. However, a critical cellulase, T. reesei CBHI, while successfully expressed in and secreted from Yarrowia, showed less than expected enzymatic activity, suggesting an incompatibility (probably at the post-translational level) for its expression in Yarrowia. This result prompted us to evaluate alternative or modified CBHI enzymes. Our subsequent expression of a T. reesei-Talaromyces emersonii (Tr-Te) chimeric CBHI, Chaetomium thermophilum CBHI, and Humicola grisea CBHI demonstrated remarkably improved enzymatic activities. Specifically, the purified chimeric Tr-Te CBHI showed a specific activity on Avicel that is comparable to that of the native T. reesei CBHI. Furthermore, the chimeric Tr-Te CBHI also showed significant synergism with EGII and CBHII in degrading cellulosic substrates, using either mixed supernatants or co-cultures of the corresponding Y. lipolytica transformants. The consortia system approach also allows rational volume mixing of the transformant cultures in accordance with the optimal ratio of cellulases required for efficient degradation of cellulosic substrates. In Conclusion: Taken together, this work demonstrates the first case of successful expression of a chimeric CBHI with essentially full native activity in Y. lipolytica, and supports the notion that Y. lipolytica strains can be genetically engineered, ultimately by heterologous expression of fungal cellulases and other enzymes, to directly convert lignocellulosic substrates to biofuels.« less

  9. EA-1871: Environmental Assessment for Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, “EE Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings” and 10 CFR 435, “EE Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings"

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for DOE‘s Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, ―Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings‖ and 10 CFR 435, ―Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings‖ Baseline Standards Update. The final rule updates the baseline standards in 10 CFR 433 and 10 CFR 435 to the latest private sector standards based on the cost-effectiveness of the latest private sector standards and DOE‘s determination that energy efficiency has been improved in these codes as required by 42 U.S.C 6831 et seq. DOE is issuing its final determinations on American National Standards Institute (ANSI)/American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc. (ASHRAE)/Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA) Standard 90.1-2007 (ASHRAE 2007) and the International Code Council‘s 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) in the same edition of the Federal Register as this final rule.

  10. NNSA Production Office tops Feds Feed Families campaign goal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - 9:45am Oak Ridge, Tenn. - Employees of the National Nuclear Security Administration Production Office have donated 17,348 pounds of food as part of the annual U.S. Department...

  11. Better Buildings Residential Network Multi-Family & Low-Income...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Windows Exterior Doors Appliances DSM free * * * * * * * incentive from local utility w be 1,600 incentive from program w be 1,500 Initial Program * Program - Tiered ...

  12. ‘Can Do’ Attitude Brings EM Family Together

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    OAK RIDGE, Tenn. – It’s 7:51 a.m. on a Tuesday morning. A white, long-bed 4x4 Dodge Ram turns the corner, entering the parking lot. The rumble of the hemi-powered engine stops and the door opens as Jim Kopotic, the federal project director for the East Tennessee Technology Park, one of EM’s primary cleanup sites in Oak Ridge, exits the cab.

  13. Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2011-12-01

    Provides state and local policymakers with information on successful approaches to the design and implementation of residential efficiency programs for households ineligible for low-income programs.

  14. Y-12 employees, families and friends help East Tennessee during...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    resource center at the Volunteer Ministry Center in Knoxville. Donna Bennett (at left), James Woody of the Local 252C Chemical Operators (kneeling) and Atomic Trades and Labor...

  15. Energy behaviours of northern California Girl Scouts and their families

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boudet, H; Ardoin, NM; Flora, J; Armel, KC; Desai, M; Robinson, TN

    2014-10-01

    Climate change is likely the most critical societal challenge to the futures of today's children. Mitigation will require a concerted effort to change household energy behaviour electricity use, transportation and food consumption patterns. A first step to changing behaviour is to better understand current behaviour and its intrapersonal (knowledge and attitudes), interpersonal (norms, communication and behaviour) and contextual (demographics and geography) correlates. To date, our understanding of the energy behaviours of children is limited. To begin to fill this gap, we report the results of a survey on the electricity, transportation and food-related energy behaviours of 323 fourth- and fifth-grade girls and their parents in 31 Girl Scout troops in Northern California. Our findings show positive attitudes and perceived norms toward energy-saving behaviours among child and adult respondents, but low or moderate levels of knowledge, communication, and behaviour, particularly for behaviours that require adult assistance. Girls' choices about electricity behaviours appear to be governed by intrapersonal and interpersonal influences, while transportation behaviour is constrained by geographic context. Food-related behaviour, particularly meat consumption, was not readily modelled. Policy and education-related implications for future interventions aimed at enhancing children's energy-saving behaviours are discussed. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Rural Development Multi-Family Housing Energy Efficiency Initiative...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and operations. Housing programs included in this initiative include: Section 515 Rural Rental Housing Program for New Construction Section 514 Farm Labor Housing Loans...

  17. Utilities Bringing More Solar Energy to Families and Businesses

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The SunShot Initiative works with utilities to help generate, integrate, and distribute solar energy. EERE recently announced $18 million in funding for projects with utilities, potentially allowing hundreds of gigawatts of solar energy to be added to the grid.

  18. Geothermal System Saves Dollars, Makes Sense for Maryland Family

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Derwood, Maryland resident Chris Gearon shares how he used a tax credit from the Recovery Act to help upgrade the heating and cooling system in his home to a geothermal one helping him save money and energy.

  19. ORISE: Beryllium Awareness for Employees and Families (Video)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transcript (MS-Word)

  20. Weatherization Saves Families Energy and Money | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Addthis William Stewart, with Veterans Green Jobs, blows cellulose insulation in the ... Weatherization Day Tammara Thayer thanks Steve Lemaire (left) and Zump Urycki for ...

  1. Jefferson Lab invites families, groups to Summer Physics Fests | Jefferson

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab Physics Fests April 12, 2004 Wednesday, June 9 Wednesday, June 30 Wednesday, July 28 Wednesday, August 11 Wednesday, August 25 This two-hour presentation (10 a.m. - noon) includes an interactive summary of the research conducted at the Department of Energy's Jefferson Lab followed by the popular "Deep Freeze (cryogenics) and Hot Stuff (plasmas)" presentations, which demonstrate some of the technology used at JLab to conduct experiments. Parents, teachers and youth planning to

  2. Jefferson Lab invites families, groups, to Summer 2006 Physiscs Fests |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jefferson Lab 2006 Physics Fests March 17, 2006 Thursday, June 1 Wednesday, July 12 Wednesday, July 26 A Physics Fest is a two-hour presentation (10 a.m. - noon) that includes an interactive summary of the research conducted at the Department of Energy's Jefferson Lab followed by the popular "Deep Freeze (cryogenics) and Hot Stuff (plasmas)" presentations, which demonstrate some of the technology used at Jefferson Lab to conduct experiments. Parents, teachers and youth planning to

  3. SCE - Multi-Family Residential Energy Efficiency Programs | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    High Efficiency Clothes Washers: 50 - 100unit Energy Star Refrigerators: 50unit Dual Pane Windows: 0.75sq. ft. Central Air and Heat Pumps: 150unit Water Heaters: 30...

  4. Seattle City Light - Multi-Family Residential Energy Efficiency...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for common area lighting and weatherization measures including the installation of dual-pane windows and increased insulation, although insulation-only jobs are not eligible...

  5. NNSA Production Office more than doubles Feds Feed Families campaign...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fund CNS supports Tenn. Science Bowl CNS helps provide housing to homeless veterans Robbins named NNSA Production Office Deputy Manager Uranium project achieves safety milestone...

  6. Surface theory of a family of topological Kondo insulators (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Have feedback or suggestions for a way to improve these results? Save Share this Record Citation Formats MLA APA Chicago Bibtex Export Metadata Endnote Excel CSV XML Send to ...

  7. Structure of a PL17 Family Alginate Lyase Demonstrates Functional...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    APA Chicago Bibtex Export Metadata Endnote Excel CSV XML Save to My Library Send to Email Send to Email Email address: Content: Close Send Cite: MLA Format Close Cite: APA ...

  8. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Multi-family/Low Income...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... that has tools to do Audits, Quality Control on Audits to Contracting and ... Customers from Audits to Upgrades * Using Social Media for Outreach * Working with the ...

  9. Saving American Families and Businesses Money through Lighting Efficiency

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A newly proposed Energy Department efficiency rule for lightbulbs will make it easier for consumers to make cost-effective, energy efficient choices to light their homes and offices. The proposal marks the next step of a public process that has been underway for more than two years and will continue over the course of this year to keep pace with changes in lighting technology.

  10. CenterPoint Energy Low-Rise Multi Family Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: This Incentive is only available to customers in the CenterPoint Energy Houston electric territory.

  11. Puget Sound Energy- Multi-Family Efficiency Retrofit Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    PSE’s Multifamily Program incentives include a range of measures aimed at assisting existing multifamily buildings. There are prescriptive rebates for equipment such as windows, insulation, light...

  12. How Do You Encourage Your Family to Use Less Water?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    While there are many ways to keep your HOT water use to a minimum, sometimes the best thing to do is just shut off the water as much as possible!

  13. Retiree Heads Back to Work, Helps Families Stay Afloat

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mark Morris of South Bend, Ind., is among many in the country who were already retired, but whose 401(k) account took a big hit when the stock market crashed. Mark had retired as a utility-company supervisor in mid-2007, but he lost 40 percent of his retirement money and knew he had to go back to work.

  14. SDG&E (Electric) - Multi-Family Residential Efficiency Program...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    State California Program Type Rebate Program Rebate Amount Clothes Washers: 75-150 Room Air Conditioner: 50 Central Heat Pumps: 100 Insulation: 0.15sq. ft. CFLs: 4-10...

  15. Save Energy at This Year's Family Reunion | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    That's okay. You can still save energy by opting for an environmentally friendly brand that is biodegradable and made with recycled materials. Provide filtered tap water instead of ...

  16. Crystallographic Snapshot of Glycosylasparaginase Precursor Poised for Autoprocessing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Y.; Guo, H

    2010-01-01

    Glycosylasparaginase belongs to a family of N-terminal nucleophile hydrolases that autoproteolytically generate their mature enzymes from single-chain protein precursors. Previously, based on a precursor structure paused at pre-autoproteolysis stage by a reversible inhibitor (glycine), we proposed a mechanism of intramolecular autoproteolysis. A key structural feature, a highly strained conformation at the scissile peptide bond, had been identified and was hypothesized to be critical for driving autoproteolysis through an N-O acyl shift. To examine this 'twist-and-break' hypothesis, we report here a 1.9-{angstrom}-resolution structure of an autoproteolysis-active precursor (a T152C mutant) that is free of inhibitor or ligand and is poised to undergo autoproteolysis. The current crystallographic study has provided direct evidence for the natural conformation of the glycosylasparaginase autocatalytic site without influence from any inhibitor or ligand. This finding has confirmed our previous proposal that conformational strain is an intrinsic feature of an active precursor.

  17. Structure of XC6422 from Xanthomonas campestris at 1.6 Å resolution: a

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    small serine α/β-hydrolase (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Structure of XC6422 from Xanthomonas campestris at 1.6 Å resolution: a small serine α/β-hydrolase Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Structure of XC6422 from Xanthomonas campestris at 1.6 Å resolution: a small serine α/β-hydrolase The crystal structure of a conserved hypothetical protein from X. campestris has been determined to a resolution of 1.6 Å. The determined X. campestris structure shows that it belongs

  18. Theoretical Study of the Inverting Mechanism in a Processive Cellobiohydrolase with Quantum Mechanical Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, S.; Payne, C. M.; Himmel, M. E.; Crowley, M. F.; Paton, R. S.; Beckham, G. T.

    2012-01-01

    The Hypocrea jecorina Family 6 cellobiohydrolase (Cel6A) is one of most efficient enzymes for cellulose deconstruction to soluble sugars and is thus of significant current interest for the growing biofuels industry. Cel6A is known to hydrolyze b(1,4)-glycosidic linkages in cellulose via an inverting mechanism, but there are still questions that remain regarding the role of water and the catalytic base. Here we study the inverting, single displacement, hydrolytic reaction mechanism in Cel6A using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The computational model used to follow the reaction is a truncated active site model with several explicit waters based on structural studies of H. jecorina Cel6A. Proposed mechanisms are evaluated with several density functionals. From our calculations, the role of the water in nucleophilic attack on the anomeric carbon, and the roles of several residues in the active site loops are elucidated explicitly for the first time. We also apply quantum mechanical calculations to understand the proton transfer reaction which completes the catalytic cycle.

  19. Comparative proteomic analysis of outer membrane vesicles from Shigella flexneri under different culture conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yong; Liu, Liguo; Fu, Hua; Wei, Candong Jin, Qi

    2014-10-31

    Highlights: We utilized mTRAQ-based quantification to study protein changes in Congo red-induced OMVs. A total of 148 proteins were identified in S. flexneri-derived OMVs. Twenty-eight and five proteins are significantly up- and down-regulated in the CR-induced OMV, respectively. The result implied that a special sorting mechanism of particular proteins into OMVs may exist. Key node proteins in the protein interaction network might be important for pathogenicity. - Abstract: The production of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) is a common and regulated process of gram-negative bacteria. Nonetheless, the processes of Shigella flexneri OMV production still remain unclear. S. flexneri is the causative agent of endemic shigellosis in developing countries. The Congo red binding of strains is associated with increased infectivity of S. flexneri. Therefore, understanding the modulation pattern of OMV protein expression induced by Congo red will help to elucidate the bacterial pathogenesis. In the present study, we investigated the proteomic composition of OMVs and the change in OMV protein expression induced by Congo red using mTRAQ-based quantitative comparative proteomics. mTRAQ labelling increased the confidence in protein identification, and 148 total proteins were identified in S. flexneri-derived OMVs. These include a variety of important virulence factors, including Ipa proteins, TolC family, murein hydrolases, and members of the serine protease autotransporters of Enterobacteriaceae (SPATEs) family. Among the identified proteins, 28 and five proteins are significantly up- and down-regulated in the Congo red-induced OMV, respectively. Additionally, by comprehensive comparison with previous studies focused on DH5a-derived OMV, we identified some key node proteins in the proteinprotein interaction network that may be involved in OMV biogenesis and are common to all gram-negative bacteria.

  20. Zero Energy-Ready Single-Family Homes - Building America Top...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Find case studies of Building America projects across the country that demonstrate zero ... More Documents & Publications Building America Top Innovations 2013 Profile - Zero ...

  1. Energy Department Provides $140.3 Million to Low-Income Families...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    program grants to 31 states and the Navajo Nation to make energy efficiency ... Every state, the District of Columbia, the Navajo Nation and the Inter-Tribal Council of ...

  2. Building America Top Innovations 2013 Profile Zero Energy-Ready Single-Family Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-09-01

    Building homes that are zero energy-ready is a goal of the U.S. Department of Energys Building America program and one embodied in Building Americas premier home certification program, the Challenge Home program. This case study describes several examples of successful zero energy-ready home projects completed by Building America teams and partner builders.

  3. California Solar Initiative- Single-Family Affordable Solar Housing (SASH) Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The California Solar Initiative (CSI), enacted by SB 1 of 2006, provides financial incentives for installing solar technologies through a variety of smaller sub-programs. Of the $3.2 billion in t...

  4. California Solar Initiative- Multi-Family Affordable Solar Housing (MASH) Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The California Solar Initiative (CSI), enacted by SB 1 of 2006, provides financial incentives to customers in investor-owned utility (IOU) territories of Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&...

  5. Structure of GDNF Family Ligand Artemin Complexed with Its GFRa3...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    motor neurons has stimulated interest in their use for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's. These structurally related neurotrophic factors signal by...

  6. 9-2-14_CBFO_Employees_Help_Locally_In_Annual_Feds_Feed_Families...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    local area food banks. -DOE- 010DR0914 U.S. Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office Waste Isolation Pilot Plant P.O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 Media Contact: Deb Gill...

  7. Durable Airtightness in Single-Family Dwellings: Field Measurements and Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, Wanyu; Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max

    2015-06-01

    Durability of the building envelope is important to new homes that are increasingly built with improved levels of airtightness. It is also important to weatherized homes such that energy savings from retrofit measures, such as air sealing, are persistent. This paper presents a comparison of air leakage measurements collected in November 2013 through March 2014, with two sets of prior data collected between 2001-2003 from 17 new homes located near Atlanta, GA, and 17 homes near Boise, ID that were weatherized in 2007-2008. The purpose of the comparison is to determine if there are changes to the airtightness of building envelopes over time. The air leakage increased in all but one of the new homes, with a mean increase of about 25%. A regression analysis was performed to describe the relationship between prior and current measurements in terms of normalized leakage (NL).

  8. ConEd (Gas)- Multi-family Energy Efficiency Incentives Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Con Edison offers a free energy audit and rebates for Multifamily buildings. Incentives are offered for energy efficient heating equipment for 5-75 unit buildings in the eligible service area....

  9. A PUBLICATION FOR ALL MEMBERS OF THE NNSA/NSO FAMILY Contents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 March 2003 Brooks returns to NSO 1 BN managment changes 2 A view of history 2 Atlas' relocation to NTS 3 Six Sigma 4 Beyond the call 4 Employees assist with Channel Island expedition 5 A new champion at Science Bowl 6 Carbon monoxide safety 8 Lessons Learned 9 Milestones 10 Calendar 11 Brooks returns to NSO photo by Dillard Vincent Ambassador Linton Brooks (center), administrator for nuclear security at the National Nuclear Security Administration, visits the new Atlas facility at the Nevada

  10. A PUBLICATION FOR ALL MEMBERS OF THE NNSA/NSO FAMILY Contents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    89 April 2003 2004 Budget 1 Six Sigma 3 News Briefs 4 Cards return a "winning" hand 5 BN revamps ISM program 5 Industrial Sites Project 6 Partnering for Education 8 Lessons from a Goose 9 Lessons Learned 10 Earth Day 2003 11 Milestones 12 Calendar 13 FY 2004 budget On February 3, 2003, President George W. Bush formally submitted the Fiscal Year (FY) 2004 budget to Congress. Included in the budget was an increase for the National Nuclear Security Administration of almost 12 percent over

  11. A PUBLICATION FOR ALL MEMBERS OF THE NNSA/NSO FAMILY Contents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    91 August 2003 BN leads effort to secure new NTS work 1 News Briefs 2 Six Sigma 3 BN management changes 3 Capturing never before seen photographs 4 Arthritis and you 4 Beyond the Call 6 Students' investigation amends injustice 7 Performance Awards 8 BN conducts first craft safety survey 10 No good deed goes unnoticed 10 Promoting safety 11 Partnering for Education 12 Lessons Learned 13 Protecting your valuable assets 13 Thunderstorm season is here 14 Milestones 16 Calendar of Events 17 BN leads

  12. A PUBLICATION FOR ALL MEMBERS OF THE NNSA/NSO FAMILY Contents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 October 2003 Brooks addresses NNSA staff 1 NNSA scientists con- duct 20th subcritical experiment 2 Unicorn subcritical experiment planned 2 Tanks a lot! 3 NTS cafeteria prices to increase 3 NTS history gets new home 3 Watusi team honored with award 4 Bechtel donates $500,000 to new UNLV research facility 5 BN reorganizes 5 Stoller-Navarro is new EM contractor 6 First BN yellow belt qualifies 6 And so it continues 7 To Your Health 7 Beryllium All-Hands 9 New toxic metal lab 10 Task foces to

  13. A PUBLICATION FOR ALL MEMBERS OF THE NNSA/NSO FAMILY Contents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 November/December 2003 Holiday messages 1 Nanos visits NTS 3 An Atlas update 3 Nevada strike team 4 returns as heroes CAUTION: 5 Potential Ordnance Area WSI-NV presents 6 ABCD awards CAB for NTS 6 Programs...A Decade of Progress Analysis of 7 Livermore Operations photo tube production This is only a test 8 The Web: Not as 9 anonymous as you think Be checklist 11 added to work control packages Be signs 11 WSI-NV 12 employees assist Quannah McCall with annual harvest Breast cancer 12 awareness

  14. A PUBLICATION FOR ALL MEMBERS OF THE NNSA/NSO FAMILY Issue

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Issue 90 May 2003 by Kirsten Kellogg Homeland Security Advisors from several western states, includ- ing New Mexico, Nevada, and Utah, toured the Nevada Test Site on April 15 and witnessed first hand the expertise and capabili- ties available for home- land security activities. Following several brief- ings from Mike Canavan, Bechtel Nevada's assistant gen- eral manager of the combating terrorism program, and members of his staff regarding the National Center for Combating Terrorism, Jerry

  15. A PUBLICATION FOR ALL MEMBERS OF THE NNSA/NSO FAMILY Issue

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Issue 91 June/July 2003 JASPER successfully fired at NTS 1 BN management changes 2 CIC moves and changes name 3 This is only a test 3 Heat and You 5 Six Sigma 6 An early Christmas for a North Las Vegas resident 7 Employees excavate valuable gift 9 Bridging the distance 10 Nevada Employees Association supports the troops 11 WSI-NV presents ABCD Awards 12 WSI-NV reaches out to future generations 13 Partnering for Education 14 Pahrump's Relay for Life 15 Health Check 16 Lessons Learned 17 Southern

  16. A PUBLICATION FOR ALL MEMBERS OF THE NNSA/NV FAMILY Contents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 February/March 2004 Transuranic waste leaves NTS for WIPP by Dona Merritt On January 7, 2004, the Nevada Test Site (NTS) made its first shipment of transuranic waste (manmade radioactive elements heavier than uranium, hence the name "trans" or "beyond" uranium) to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico. Throughout the remainder of 2004, approxi- mately 60 shipments are planned to be made from Nevada to this underground repository for permanent

  17. Dy-Mn-Si as a representative of family of 'Dy-TransitionMetal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Resource Relation: Journal Name: Journal of Solid State Chemistry; Journal Volume: 206; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2013 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All ...

  18. Growth of tungsten bronze family crystals. Final technical report, 6 May 1985-30 November 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neurgaonkar, R.R.; Cross, L.E.

    1988-03-01

    A systematic investigation of tungsten bronze crystals for electro-optic and photorefractive applications was carried out successfully. The Sr{sub 1-X}BaXNb{sub 2}O{sub 6} (SBN) and Ba{sub 2-X}SrXK{sub 1-y}NaYNb{sub 5}O{sub 15} (BSKNN) system crystals were grown in optical quality with and without specific impurities whose purpose is to enhance photorefractive coupling and speed. Both SBN and BSKNN crystals appear to be excellent hosts for electro-optic applications, e.g., modulators, waveguides, and spatial light modulators (SLM) and photorefractive applications, e.g., phase conjugation, image processing, optical computing and laser hardening. For photorefractive applications, cerium and chromium doping show the largest effects on photorefractive coupling and speed.

  19. A PUBLICATION FOR ALL MEMBERS OF THE NNSA/NSO FAMILY Contents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... improved the efficiency and effectiveness of the scheduling process for the NSO fleet. ... Prior to RATS, responders used contour maps to estimate the geographical spot where the ...

  20. New Family of Multilevel Matrix Converters for Wind Power Applications: Final Report, July 2002 - March 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erickson, R.; Angkititrakul, S.; Almazeedi, K.

    2006-12-01

    The goal of this project was to develop a new modular multilevel matrix converter for wind power applications and to demonstrate a working scale model in the laboratory.

  1. FINAL REPORT: The Role of RUB (related to ubiquitin) Family of Proteins in the Hormone Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callis, Judy

    2013-03-27

    The Rub pathway is a conserved protein modification pathway. RUB (called Rubp1 in budding yeast, Nedd8 in animals and RUB in plants) is a ubiquitin-like 76-amino acid protein. It covalently attaches to protein using an enzymatic machinery analogous to the enzymes that attach ubiquitin to its substrate proteins. However, the nature of the complement of Rub-modified proteins in organisms was not clear. From bioinformatics analyses, one can identify a Rub activating enzymes and Rub conjugating enzymes. However, in many cases, their biochemical properties were not described. In DOE-funded work, we made major advances in our understanding of the Rub pathway in yeast and plants, work that is applicable to other organisms as well. There is a multi-subunit enzyme called SCF in all eukaryotes. The SCF consists of several subunits that serve as a scaffold (the cullin, SKP and RBX subunits) and one subunit that interacts with the substrate. This cullin protein (called Cdc53p in yeast and CULLIN 1 in plants and animals) was a known Rub target. In this work, we identified additional Rub targets in yeast as the other cullin-like proteins Cul3p and Rtt101p. Additionally we described the conservation of the Rub pathway because plant RUB1 can conjugated to yeast Cdc53p- in yeast. In the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, we characterized the Rub activating enzymes and showed that they are not biochemically equivalent. We also showed that the Rub pathway is essential in plants and characterized plants with reduced levels of rub proteins. These plants are affected in multiple developmental processes. We discovered that they over-produce ethylene as dark-grown seedlings. We characterized a mutant allele of CULLIN1 in Arabidopsis with impaired interaction with RBX and showed that it is unstable in vivo. We used our knowledge of monitoring protein degradation to map the degradation determinants in a plant transcription factor. Finally, we took a mass spectrometric approach to identify novel Rub targets in plants and identified DDB1a, a subunit of an different ubiquitin ligase as a potential Rub-modified protein. Altogether, these studies have advanced our knowledge of the Rub pathway in all organisms.

  2. A SURVEY OF STELLAR FAMILIES: MULTIPLICITY OF SOLAR-TYPE STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raghavan, Deepak; McAlister, Harold A.; Henry, Todd J.; Gies, Douglas R.; White, Russel J.; Latham, David W.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Mason, Brian D.; Ten Brummelaar, Theo A.

    2010-09-15

    We present the results of a comprehensive assessment of companions to solar-type stars. A sample of 454 stars, including the Sun, was selected from the Hipparcos catalog with {pi}>40 mas, {sigma}{sub {pi}/{pi}} < 0.05, 0.5 {<=} B - V {<=} 1.0 ({approx}F6-K3), and constrained by absolute magnitude and color to exclude evolved stars. These criteria are equivalent to selecting all dwarf and subdwarf stars within 25 pc with V-band flux between 0.1 and 10 times that of the Sun, giving us a physical basis for the term 'solar-type'. New observational aspects of this work include surveys for (1) very close companions with long-baseline interferometry at the Center for High Angular Resolution Astronomy Array, (2) close companions with speckle interferometry, and (3) wide proper-motion companions identified by blinking multi-epoch archival images. In addition, we include the results from extensive radial-velocity monitoring programs and evaluate companion information from various catalogs covering many different techniques. The results presented here include four new common proper-motion companions discovered by blinking archival images. Additionally, the spectroscopic data searched reveal five new stellar companions. Our synthesis of results from many methods and sources results in a thorough evaluation of stellar and brown dwarf companions to nearby Sun-like stars. The overall observed fractions of single, double, triple, and higher-order systems are 56% {+-} 2%, 33% {+-} 2%, 8% {+-} 1%, and 3% {+-} 1%, respectively, counting all confirmed stellar and brown dwarf companions. If all candidate, i.e., unconfirmed, companions identified are found to be real, the percentages would change to 54% {+-} 2%, 34% {+-} 2%, 9% {+-} 2%, and 3% {+-} 1%, respectively. Our completeness analysis indicates that only a few undiscovered companions remain in this well-studied sample, implying that the majority (54% {+-} 2%) of solar-type stars are single, in contrast to the results of prior multiplicity studies. Our sample is large enough to enable a check of the multiplicity dependence on various physical parameters by analyzing appropriate subsamples. Bluer, more massive stars are seen as more likely to have companions than redder, less massive ones, consistent with the trend seen over the entire spectral range. Systems with larger interaction cross sections, i.e., those with more than two components or long orbital periods, are preferentially younger, suggesting that companions may be stripped over time by dynamical interactions. We confirm the planet-metallicity correlation (i.e., higher metallicity stars are more likely to host planets), but are unable to check it for brown dwarfs due to the paucity of such companions, implying that the brown dwarf desert extends over all separation regimes. We find no correlation between stellar companions and metallicity for B - V < 0.625, but among the redder subset, metal-poor stars ([Fe/H] <-0.3) are more likely to have companions with a 2.4{sigma} significance. The orbital-period distribution of companions is unimodal and roughly log normal with a peak and median of about 300 years. The period-eccentricity relation shows the expected circularization for periods below 12 days, caused by tidal forces over the age of the Galaxy, followed by a roughly flat distribution. The mass-ratio distribution shows a preference for like-mass pairs, which occur more frequently in relatively close pairs. The fraction of planet hosts among single, binary, and multiple systems are statistically indistinguishable, suggesting that planets are as likely to form around single stars as they are around components of binary or multiple systems with sufficiently wide separations. This, along with the preference of long orbital periods among stellar systems, increases the space around stars conducive for planet formation, and perhaps life.

  3. HUD rehabilation energy guidelines for one-to-four family dwellings (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-09-01

    The guidebook and Microsoft Excel worksheet diskette allows the user to calculate which enery consevation improvements are cost-effective when properties are rehabilitated. The information is applicable for all climates, from Florida to Alaska. The information is presented in a manner so that owners of building can better assess the needs and opportunities of a particular renovation project. They will also be able to ask better question of designers, builders, and contractors. The guidebook explains how properlly rehabilitating dwellings can increase energy efficiency and reduce costs. It discusses the issues and factors that determine how much energy a building will consume, including heat flow, air leakage, insulation, and heating and cooling systems. The guide also includes the specific HUD Rehabilitation Energy Guidelines for Dwellings with general and location-specific recommendations for energy conservation improvements. These guidelines are followed by examples of typical energy conservation measures in different climates. Each of these examples includes a Cost Effectiveness Excel Worksheet to show the overall simple payback. This easy-to-use worksheet walks through the entire evaluation process. The user simply enters in the appropriate information, much of which is menu driven. Appendicies provide a table that shows counties nationwide by climate zone, a list of resources, a glossary, and sample surveys and worksheets to help owners with their rehabilitation projects. Regulatory Background: The guidelines used in this guidebook are the Department of Housing and Urban Development`s `Standards for Cost Effective Energy Conservation` for property rehabilitation undertaken with HUD assistance. The information that used to be included in the regulations, with respect to energy efficiency, published as 24CFR39, is now contained in these guidelines.

  4. HUD rehabilitation energy guidelines for multi-family dwellings (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-09-01

    The guidebook and Microsoft Excel worksheet diskette allows the user to calculate which enery consevation improvements are cost-effective when properties are rehabilitated. The information is applicable for all climates, from Florida to Alaska. The information is presented in a manner so that owners of building can better assess the needs and opportunities of a particular renovation project. They will also be able to ask better question of designers, builders, and contractors. The guidebook explains how properlly rehabilitating dwellings can increase energy efficiency and reduce costs. It discusses the issues and factors that determine how much energy a building will consume, including heat flow, air leakage, insulation, and heating and cooling systems. The guide also includes the specific HUD Rehabilitation Energy Guidelines for Dwellings with general and location-specific recommendations for energy conservation improvements. These guidelines are followed by examples of typical energy conservation measures in different climates. Each of these examples includes a Cost Effectiveness Excel Worksheet to show the overall simple payback. This easy-to-use worksheet walks through the entire evaluation process. The user simply enters in the appropriate information, much of which is menu driven. Appendicies provide a table that shows counties nationwide by climate zone, a list of resources, a glossary, and sample surveys and worksheets to help owners with their rehabilitation projects. Regulatory Background: The guidelines used in this guidebook are the Department of Housing and Urban Development`s `Standards for Cost Effective Energy Conservation` for property rehabilitation undertaken with HUD assistance. The information that used to be included in the regulations, with respect to energy efficiency, published as 24CFR39, is now contained in these guidelines.

  5. A Meta-Analysis of Single-Family Deep Energy Retrofit Performance...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technologies Division Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION Word Cloud More Like This Full Text...

  6. The activity of CouR, a MarR family transcriptional regulator...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    OSTI Identifier: 1223714 GrantContract Number: AC02-06CH11357 Type: Accepted Manuscript ... Save Share this Record Citation Formats MLA APA Chicago Bibtex Export Metadata Endnote ...

  7. Investigation of a family of power conditioners integrated into a utility grid: final report Category I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, P.; Putkovich, R.P.

    1981-07-01

    A study was conducted of the requirements for and technologies applicable to power conditioning equipment in residential solar photovoltaic systems. A survey of companies known or thought to manufacture power conditioning equipment was conducted to asses the technology. Technical issues regarding ac and dc interface requirements were studied. A baseline design was selected to be a good example of existing technology which would not need significant development effort for its implementation. Alternative technologies are evaluated to determine which meet the baseline specification, and their costs and losses are evaluated. Areas in which cost improvements can be obtained are studied, and the three best candidate technologies--the current-sourced converter, the HF front end converter, and the programmed wave converter--are compared. It is concluded that the designs investigated will meet, or with slight improvement could meet, short term efficiency goals. Long term efficiency goals could be met if an isolation transformer were not required in the power conditioning equipment. None of the technologies studied can meet cost goals unless further improvements are possible. (LEW)

  8. Characterization of a Y-Family DNA Polymerase eta from the Eukaryotic ThermophileAlvinella pompejana

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kashiwagi, Sayo; Kuraoka, Isao; Fujiwara, Yoshie; Hitomi, Kenichi; Cheng, Quen J.; Fuss, Jill O.; Shin, David S.; Masutani, Chikahide; Tainer, John A.; Hanaoka, Fumio; et al

    2010-01-01

    Human DNA polymerase?(HsPol?) plays an important role in translesion synthesis (TLS), which allows for replication past DNA damage such as UV-inducedcis-syncyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs). Here, we characterized ApPol?from the thermophilic wormAlvinella pompejana, which inhabits deep-sea hydrothermal vent chimneys. ApPol?shares sequence homology with HsPol?and contains domains for binding ubiquitin and proliferating cell nuclear antigen. Sun-induced UV does not penetrateAlvinella'senvironment; however, this novel DNA polymerase catalyzed efficient and accurate TLS past CPD, as well as 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine and isomers of thymine glycol induced by reactive oxygen species. In addition, we found that ApPol?is more thermostable than HsPol?, as expected from its habitat temperature.moreMoreover, the activity of this enzyme was retained in the presence of a higher concentration of organic solvents. Therefore, ApPol?provides a robust, human-like Pol?that is more active after exposure to high temperatures and organic solvents.less

  9. Managing the Drivers of Air Flow and Water Vapor Transport in Existing Single Family Homes (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cummings, J.; Withers, C.; Martin, E.; Moyer, N.

    2012-10-01

    This document focuses on managing the driving forces which move air and moisture across the building envelope. While other previously published Measure Guidelines focus on elimination of air pathways, the ultimate goal of this Measure Guideline is to manage drivers which cause air flow and water vapor transport across the building envelope (and also within the home), control air infiltration, keep relative humidity (RH) within acceptable limits, avoid combustion safety problems, improve occupant comfort, and reduce house energy use.

  10. Building America Top Innovations 2013 Profile … Zero Energy-Ready Single-Family Homes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AMERICA TOP INNOVATIONS 2013 PROFILE Building homes that are zero energy ready is a goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's Building America program and one embodied in Building America's premier home certification program, the Challenge Home program. A net zero energy home is one that produces as much energy as the home uses. Solar power from photovoltaic panels can provide the energy but before the panels go on, there is a lot the builder can do to reduce the amount of power the home will

  11. California Solar Initiative- Multi-Family Affordable Solar Housing (MASH) Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    '''''Track 2 was closed in 2011. Track 1 incentives have been fully subscribed for all three program administrators and waitlists have been established. Contact the appropriate program...

  12. Building America Top Innovations 2013 Profile – Zero Energy-Ready Single-Family Homes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Many Building America teams (ARBI, BA-PIRC, BSC, CARB, IBACOS, NorthernSTAR, PHI, etc.) have worked with home builders to design and test zero-energy-ready homes.

  13. California Solar Initiative- Single-Family Affordable Solar Housing (SASH) Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The California Solar Initiative (CSI) provides financial incentives for installing solar technologies through a variety of smaller sub-programs. Of the $3.2 billion in total funding for the CSI, ...

  14. Ameren Illinois (Electric & Gas)- Multi-Family Properties Energy Efficiency Incentives

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The shell measure segment offers incentives for air sealing the shell of multifamily buildings. Incentives will be paid based on the total CFM reduction. Insulation incentives will be based on sq...

  15. Burlington Electric Department- Multi-Family Rental Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Burlington Electric Department offers an innovative rebate program geared towards rental apartment owners. The program is designed to offer rebates on some of the most energy intensive household...

  16. A PUBLICATION FOR ALL MEMBERS OF THE NNSA/NV FAMILY Contents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... and the contribution of knowledge, innovation, process efficien- cy, technical complexity, application, or combinations of such to the fields of science and engineering. ...

  17. Comment on 'Waves and solitons in the two-family Calogero model'

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andric, I.; Jonke, L.; Jurman, D.

    2008-05-15

    We argue that in the paper we comment on the authors failed to prove that all known solutions of the Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield sector of duality-based Calogero model are indeed all solutions.

  18. Measurement-Based Evaluation of Installed Filtration System Performance in Single-Family Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, Wanyu Rengie; Singer, Brett C.

    2014-04-03

    This guide discusses important study design issues to consider when conducting an on-site evaluation of filtration system performance. The two most important dichotomies to consider in developing a study protocol are (1) whether systems are being evaluated in occupied or unoccupied homes and (2) whether different systems are being compared in the same homes or if the comparison is between systems installed in different homes. This document provides perspective and recommendations about a suite of implementation issues including the choice of particle measurement devices, selection of sampling locations, ways to control and/or monitor factors and processes that can impact particle concentrations, and data analysis approaches.

  19. STEP-UP Coaches a University Park Family to Comfort and Savings...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The average American household spends nearly 2,000 per year on energy used in the home, 200 to 400 of which could be paying for wasted energy due to drafts, air leaks around ...

  20. A flavone derivative from Sesbania sesban leaves and its cytotoxicity against murine leukemia P-388 cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dianhar, Hanhan Syah, Yana Maolana Mujahidin, Didin Hakim, Euis Holisotan Juliawaty, Lia Dewi

    2014-03-24

    Sesbania sesban, locally named as Jayanti, is one of Indonesia plants belonging to Fabaceae family. This species is traditionally used by Indonesian people to cure digestive disorders, fever, or headache. Jayanti can grow well in tropical to subtropical region, such as in Asia and Africa. Based on literature, qualitative analysis of the methanol extract of leaves of S. sesban showed that it contained flavonoids, alkaloids, saponins and glycosides. In addition, the activity assay of extracts of different tissues of this species showed antitumor, antimalarial, and antidiabetic activityies (leaves and seed extracts), antioxidants (flower extract), and analgesic (wood extract). Though the extracts of S. sesban parts showed interesting activities, chemical study of those extracts have not been widely reported. Therefore, the objective of this research was to isolate the secondary metabolites from methanol extract of leaves of S. sesban and to determine their cytotoxicity against murine leukemia P-388 cells. One compound has been obtained and identified as 3-hydroxy-4',7-dimethoxyflavone (1), a new isolated compound from nature. This compound was obtained through separation of methanol extract using various chromatographic techniques, such as vacuum liquid chromatography and radial chromatography. The structure elucidation of isolated compound was based on 1D NMR ({sup 1}H-NMR and {sup 13}C-NMR) and 2D NMR (HMBC). The cytotoxicity of methanol extract and compound 1 against murine leukemia P-388 cells examined through MTT assay showed IC{sub 50} value of 60.04 ?g/mL and 5.40 ?g/mL, respectively.

  1. Characterization and analysis of the cotton cyclopropane fatty acid synthase family and their contribution to cyclopropane fatty acid synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu X. H.; Shanklin J.; Rawat, R.

    2011-05-01

    Cyclopropane fatty acids (CPA) have been found in certain gymnosperms, Malvales, Litchi and other Sapindales. The presence of their unique strained ring structures confers physical and chemical properties characteristic of unsaturated fatty acids with the oxidative stability displayed by saturated fatty acids making them of considerable industrial interest. While cyclopropenoid fatty acids (CPE) are well-known inhibitors of fatty acid desaturation in animals, CPE can also inhibit the stearoyl-CoA desaturase and interfere with the maturation and reproduction of some insect species suggesting that in addition to their traditional role as storage lipids, CPE can contribute to the protection of plants from herbivory. Three genes encoding cyclopropane synthase homologues GhCPS1, GhCPS2 and GhCPS3 were identified in cotton. Determination of gene transcript abundance revealed differences among the expression of GhCPS1, 2 and 3 showing high, intermediate and low levels, respectively, of transcripts in roots and stems; whereas GhCPS1 and 2 are both expressed at low levels in seeds. Analyses of fatty acid composition in different tissues indicate that the expression patterns of GhCPS1 and 2 correlate with cyclic fatty acid (CFA) distribution. Deletion of the N-terminal oxidase domain lowered GhCPS's ability to produce cyclopropane fatty acid by approximately 70%. GhCPS1 and 2, but not 3 resulted in the production of cyclopropane fatty acids upon heterologous expression in yeast, tobacco BY2 cell and Arabidopsis seed. In cotton GhCPS1 and 2 gene expression correlates with the total CFA content in roots, stems and seeds. That GhCPS1 and 2 are expressed at a similar level in seed suggests both of them can be considered potential targets for gene silencing to reduce undesirable seed CPE accumulation. Because GhCPS1 is more active in yeast than the published Sterculia CPS and shows similar activity when expressed in model plant systems, it represents a strong candidate gene for CFA accumulation via heterologous expression in production plants.

  2. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: A Disruptive Concept for a Whole Family of New Battery Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Parthian Energy at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about a disruptive concept for a...

  3. Synthesis, structures and properties of a family of four two-dimensional coordination polymers constructed from 5-hydroxyisophthalate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Kou-Lin; Zhang, Jing-Bo; Jing, Chu-Yue; Zhang, Lei; Walton, Richard I.; Zhu, Peizhi; Ng, Seik Weng

    2014-03-15

    Four 2D coordination polymers (CPs) with different structures containing the multifunctional ligand 5-hydroxyisophthalate (5-OH-BDC{sup 2?}), [Zn(5-OH-BDC)(btb)]2H{sub 2}O (1), [Cd(5-OH-BDC)(btp)(H{sub 2}O)]3H{sub 2}O (2), [Cd(5-OH-BDC)(bth){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)]H{sub 2}O (3) and [Pb(5-OH-BDC)]H{sub 2}O (4) [btp=1, 3-bis(1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)propane, btb=1,4-bis(1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)butane, bth=1, 6-bis(1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)hexane] were obtained. 13 were synthesised hydrothermally, while 4 was obtained under ambient condition. The adjacent (2D?2D) polycatenated 2D layers of 1 polythread in a parallel manner to form an unusual 2D?3D polythreaded framework. 2 contains an undulated 2D (4, 4) network and further extends into an embracing double-layer structure through the CH? and ?? stacking interactions. 3 exhibits a non-interpenetrating 2D (4, 4)-network. 4 exhibits a 2D double-layered binodal (4, 4)-net containing oblong nanochannels with symbol (4{sup 3}6{sup 3}){sub 2}. Reversible dehydrationrehydration is observed in 1, 2 and 4, which fall within the category of recoverable collapsing and guest-induced re-formation frameworks, while 3 exhibits irreversible dehydrationrehydration behaviour. The solid state fluorescent properties of 14 have been investigated. -- Graphical abstract: Among four 2D CPs reported, 1 is an unusual 2D?3D polythreaded framework. 4 exhibits 2D double-layered binodal (4, 4)-net containing nanochannels. Reversible dehydrationrehydration is observed in 1, 2 and 4. Highlights: Four 2D CPs based on 5-hydroxyisophthalate with d{sup 10} and Pb(II) ions were reported. 1 is an unusual 2D?3D polythreaded framework. 4 shows a binodal (4, 4)-connected 2D double-layer network with nanochannels. The materials 1, 2 and 4 show reversible dehydrationrehydration behaviours. Solid state fluorescent properties were investigated.

  4. A Meta-Analysis of Single-Family Deep Energy Retrofit Performance in the U.S.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Less, Brennan; Walker, Iain

    2014-03-01

    The current state of Deep Energy Retrofit (DER) performance in the U.S. has been assessed in 116 homes in the United States (US), using actual and simulated data gathered from the available domestic literature. Substantial airtightness reductions averaging 63% (n=48) were reported (two- to three-times more than in conventional retrofits), with average post-retrofit airtightness of 4.7 Air Changes per House at 50 Pascal (ACH50) (n=94). Yet, mechanical ventilation was not installed consistently. In order to avoid indoor air quality (IAQ) issues, all future DERs should comply with ASHRAE 62.2-2013 requirements or equivalent. Projects generally achieved good energy results, with average annual net-site and net-source energy savings of 47%20% and 45%24% (n=57 and n=35), respectively, and carbon emission reductions of 47%22% (n=23). Net-energy reductions did not vary reliably with house age, airtightness, or reported project costs, but pre-retrofit energy usage was correlated with total reductions (MMBtu). Annual energy costs were reduced $1,283$804 (n=31), from a pre-retrofit average of $2,738$1,065 to $1,588$561 post-retrofit (n=25 and n=39). The average reported incremental project cost was $40,420$30,358 (n=59). When financed on a 30-year term, the median change in net-homeownership cost was only $1.00 per month, ranging from $149 in savings to an increase of $212 (mean=$15.67$87.74; n=28), and almost half of the projects resulted in reductions in net-cost. The economic value of a DER may be much greater than is suggested by these net-costs, because DERs entail substantial non-energy benefits (NEBs), and retrofit measures may add value to a home at resale similarly to general remodeling, PV panel installation, and green/energy efficient home labels. These results provide estimates of the potential of DERs to address energy use in existing homes across climate zones that can be used in future estimates of the technical potential to reduce household energy use and greenhouse gas emissions through DERs.

  5. A Meta-Analysis of Single-Family Deep Energy Retrofit Performance in the U.S.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Less, Brennan; Walker, Iain

    2014-08-01

    The current state of Deep Energy Retrofit (DER) performance in the U.S. has been assessed in 116 homes in the United States, using actual and simulated data gathered from the available domestic literature. Substantial airtightness reductions averaging 63% (n=48) were reported (two- to three-times more than in conventional retrofits), with average post-retrofit airtightness of 4.7 Air Changes per House at 50 Pascal (ACH50) (n=94). Yet, mechanical ventilation was not installed consistently. In order to avoid indoor air quality (IAQ) issues, all future DERs should comply with ASHRAE 62.2-2013 requirements or equivalent. Projects generally achieved good energy results, with average annual net-site and net-source energy savings of 47%20% and 45%24% (n=57 and n=35), respectively, and carbon emission reductions of 47%22% (n=23). Net-energy reductions did not vary reliably with house age, airtightness, or reported project costs, but pre-retrofit energy usage was correlated with total reductions (MMBtu).

  6. SISGR-Fundamental Experimental and Theoretical Studies on a Novel Family of Oxide Catalyst Supports for Water Electrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumta, Prashant

    2014-10-03

    Identification and development of non-noble metal based electro-catalysts or electro-catalysts with significant reduction of expensive noble metal contents (E.g. IrO2, Pt) with comparable electrochemical performance as the standard noble metal/metal oxide for proton exchange membrane (PEM) based water electrolysis would constitute a major breakthrough in the generation of hydrogen by water electrolysis. Accomplishing such a system would not only result reduction of the overall capital costs of PEM based water electrolyzers, but also help attain the targeted hydrogen production cost [< $ 3.0 / gallon gasoline equivalent (gge)] comparable to conventional liquid fuels. In line with these goals, it was demonstrated that fluorine doped IrO2 thin films and nanostructured high surface area powders display remarkably higher electrochemical activity, and comparable durability as pure IrO2 electro-catalyst for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in PEM based water electrolysis. Furthermore, corrosion resistant SnO2 and NbO2 support has been doped with F and coupled with IrO2 or RuO2 for use as an OER electro-catalyst. A solid solution of SnO2:F or NbO2:F with only 20 - 30 mol.% IrO2 or RuO2 yielding a rutile structure in the form of thin films and bulk nanoparticles displays similar electrochemical activity and stability as pure IrO2/RuO2. This would lead to more than 70 mol.% reduction in the noble metal oxide content. Novel nanostructured ternary (Ir,Sn,Nb)O2 thin films of different compositions FUNDAMENTAL STUDY OF NANOSTRUCTURED ELECTRO-CATALYSTS WITH REDUCED NOBLE METAL CONTENT FOR PEM BASED WATER ELECTROLYSIS 4 have also been studied. It has been shown that (Ir0.40Sn0.30Nb0.30)O2 shows similar electrochemical activity and enhanced chemical robustness as compared to pure IrO2. F doping of the ternary (Ir,Sn,Nb)O2 catalyst helps in further decreasing the noble metal oxide content of the catalyst. As a result, these reduced noble metal oxide catalyst systems would potentially be preferred as OER electro-catalysts for PEM electrolysis. The excellent performance of the catalysts coupled with its robustness would make them great candidates for contributing to significant reduction in the overall capital costs of PEM based water electrolyzers. This s.thesis provides a detailed fundamental study of the synthesis, materials, characterization, theoretical studies and detailed electrochemical response and potential mechanisms of these novel electro-catalysts for OER processes.

  7. The activity of CouR, a MarR family transcriptional regulator, is modulated through a novel molecular mechanism

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Otani, Hiroshi; Stogios, Peter J.; Xu, Xiaohui; Nocek, Boguslaw; Li, Shu -Nan; Savchenko, Alexei; Eltis, Lindsay D.

    2015-09-22

    CouR, a MarR-type transcriptional repressor, regulates the cou genes, encoding p-hydroxycinnamate catabolism in the soil bacterium Rhodococcus jostii RHA1. The CouR dimer bound two molecules of the catabolite p-coumaroyl–CoA (Kd = 11 ± 1 μM). The presence of p-coumaroyl–CoA, but neither p-coumarate nor CoASH, abrogated CouR's binding to its operator DNA in vitro. The crystal structures of ligand-free CouR and its p-coumaroyl–CoA-bound form showed no significant conformational differences, in contrast to other MarR regulators. The CouR–p-coumaroyl–CoA structure revealed two ligand molecules bound to the CouR dimer with their phenolic moieties occupying equivalent hydrophobic pockets in each protomer and their CoAmore » moieties adopting non-equivalent positions to mask the regulator's predicted DNA-binding surface. More specifically, the CoA phosphates formed salt bridges with predicted DNA-binding residues Arg36 and Arg38, changing the overall charge of the DNA-binding surface. The substitution of either arginine with alanine completely abrogated the ability of CouR to bind DNA. By contrast, the R36A/R38A double variant retained a relatively high affinity for p-coumaroyl–CoA (Kd = 89 ± 6 μM). Altogether, our data point to a novel mechanism of action in which the ligand abrogates the repressor's ability to bind DNA by steric occlusion of key DNA-binding residues and charge repulsion of the DNA backbone.« less

  8. Bacillus cereus Phosphopentomutase Is an Alkaline Phosphatase Family Member That Exhibits an Altered Entry Point into the Catalytic Cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panosian, Timothy D.; Nannemann, David P.; Watkins, Guy R.; Phelan, Vanessa V.; McDonald, W. Hayes; Wadzinski, Brian E.; Bachmann, Brian O.; Iverson, Tina M.

    2011-09-15

    Bacterial phosphopentomutases (PPMs) are alkaline phosphatase superfamily members that interconvert {alpha}-D-ribose 5-phosphate (ribose 5-phosphate) and {alpha}-D-ribose 1-phosphate (ribose 1-phosphate). We investigated the reaction mechanism of Bacillus cereus PPM using a combination of structural and biochemical studies. Four high resolution crystal structures of B. cereus PPM revealed the active site architecture, identified binding sites for the substrate ribose 5-phosphate and the activator {alpha}-D-glucose 1,6-bisphosphate (glucose 1,6-bisphosphate), and demonstrated that glucose 1,6-bisphosphate increased phosphorylation of the active site residue Thr-85. The phosphorylation of Thr-85 was confirmed by Western and mass spectroscopic analyses. Biochemical assays identified Mn{sup 2+}-dependent enzyme turnover and demonstrated that glucose 1,6-bisphosphate treatment increases enzyme activity. These results suggest that protein phosphorylation activates the enzyme, which supports an intermolecular transferase mechanism. We confirmed intermolecular phosphoryl transfer using an isotope relay assay in which PPM reactions containing mixtures of ribose 5-[{sup 18}O{sub 3}]phosphate and [U-{sup 13}C{sub 5}]ribose 5-phosphate were analyzed by mass spectrometry. This intermolecular phosphoryl transfer is seemingly counter to what is anticipated from phosphomutases employing a general alkaline phosphatase reaction mechanism, which are reported to catalyze intramolecular phosphoryl transfer. However, the two mechanisms may be reconciled if substrate encounters the enzyme at a different point in the catalytic cycle.

  9. Critical Question #7: What are the Best Practices for Single-Family Ventilation in All Climate Regions?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Why ventilate? What are the ultimate goals of ventilation requirements in codes and standards? What are the characteristics of an effective ventilation system in new vs. existing construction? What are the risks and solutions associated with ventilation in hot-humid climates?

  10. Identification and characterization of core cellulolytic enzymes from Talaromyces cellulolyticus (formerly Acremonium cellulolyticus) critical for hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Inoue, Hiroyuki; Decker, Stephen R.; Taylor, Larry E.; Yano, Shinichi; Sawayama, Shigeki

    2014-10-09

    Background: Enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated lignocellulosic biomass is an essential process for the production of fermentable sugars for industrial use. A better understanding of fungal cellulase systems will provide clues for maximizing the hydrolysis of target biomass. Talaromyces cellulolyticus is a promising fungus for cellulase production and efficient biomass hydrolysis. Several cellulolytic enzymes purified from T. cellulolyticus were characterized in earlier studies, but the core enzymes critical for hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass remain unknown. Results: Six cellulolytic enzymes critical for the hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose were purified from T. cellulolyticus culture supernatant using an enzyme assay based on synergistic hydrolysismore » of Avicel. The purified enzymes were identified by their substrate specificities and analyses of trypsin-digested peptide fragments and were classified into the following glycosyl hydrolase (GH) families: GH3 (β-glucosidase, Bgl3A), GH5 (endoglucanase, Cel5A), GH6 (cellobiohydrolase II, Cel6A), GH7 (cellobiohydrolase I and endoglucanase, Cel7A and Cel7B, respectively), and GH10 (xylanase, Xyl10A). Hydrolysis of dilute acid-pretreated corn stover (PCS) with mixtures of the purified enzymes showed that Cel5A, Cel7B, and Xyl10A each had synergistic effects with a mixture of Cel6A and Cel7A. Cel5A seemed to be more effective in the synergistic hydrolysis of the PCS than Cel7B. The ratio of Cel5A, Cel6A, Cel7A, and Xyl10A was statistically optimized for the hydrolysis of PCS glucan in the presence of Bgl3A. The resultant mixture achieved higher PCS glucan hydrolysis at lower enzyme loading than a culture filtrate from T. cellulolyticus or a commercial enzyme preparation, demonstrating that the five enzymes play a role as core enzymes in the hydrolysis of PCS glucan. In Conclusion: Core cellulolytic enzymes in the T. cellulolyticus cellulase system were identified to Cel5A, Cel6A, Cel7A, Xyl10A, and Bgl3A and characterized. The optimized mixture of these five enzymes was highly effective for the hydrolysis of PCS glucan, providing a foundation for future improvement of the T. cellulolyticus cellulase system.« less

  11. Catalytic Routes for the Conversion of Biomass Derivatives to Hydrocarbons and/or Platform Chemicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silks, III, Louis A.

    2015-10-07

    Unprotected carbohydrates were reacted in amine-catalyzed cascade reactions with various methyl ketones to give a direct access to C-glycosides by an operationally simple protocol. As the reaction mechanism,an aldol condensation followed by an intramolecular conjugate addition is assumed.

  12. Thermophilic and thermoacidophilic biopolymer-degrading genes and enzymes from alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and related organisms, methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, David N.; Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S.; Reed, David W.; Lacey, Jeffrey A.; Henriksen, Emily D.

    2010-12-28

    Isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius are provided. Further provided are methods of at least partially degrading, cleaving, or removing polysaccharides, lignocellulose, cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, starch, chitin, polyhydroxybutyrate, heteroxylans, glycosides, xylan-, glucan-, galactan, or mannan-decorating groups using isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius.

  13. Thermophilic and thermoacidophilic biopolymer-degrading genes and enzymes from alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and related organisms, methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, David N.; Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S.; Reed, David W.; Lacey, Jeffrey A.; Henriksen, Emily D.

    2012-06-19

    Isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius are provided. Further provided are methods of at least partially degrading, cleaving, or removing polysaccharides, lignocellulose, cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, starch, chitin, polyhydroxybutyrate, heteroxylans, glycosides, xylan-, glucan-, galactan-, or mannan-decorating groups using isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius.

  14. Thermophilic and thermoacidophilic biopolymer-degrading genes and enzymes from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and related organisms, methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, David N.; Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S.; Reed, David W.; Lacey, Jeffrey A.; Henriksen, Emily D.

    2015-06-02

    Isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius are provided. Further provided are methods of at least partially degrading, cleaving, or removing polysaccharides, lignocellulose, cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, starch, chitin, polyhydroxybutyrate, heteroxylans, glycosides, xylan-, glucan-, galactan-, or mannan-decorating groups using isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius.

  15. Thermophilic and thermoacidophilic biopolymer-degrading genes and enzymes from alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and related organisms, methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, David N; Apel, William A; Thompson, Vicki S; Reed, David W; Lacey, Jeffrey A; Henriksen, Emily D

    2013-07-30

    Isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius are provided. Further provided are methods of at least partially degrading, cleaving, or removing polysaccharides, lignocellulose, cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, starch, chitin, polyhydroxybutyrate, heteroxylans, glycosides, xylan-, glucan-, galactan-, or mannan-decorating groups using isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius.

  16. Thermophilic and thermoacidophilic biopolymer-degrading genes and enzymes from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and related organisms, methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, David N.; Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S.; Reed, David W.; Lacey, Jeffrey A.

    2013-10-15

    Isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius are provided. Further provided are methods of at least partially degrading, cleaving, or removing polysaccharides, lignocellulose, cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, starch, chitin, polyhydroxybutyrate, heteroxylans, glycosides, xylan-, glucan-, galactan-, or mannan-decorating groups using isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius.

  17. Thermophilic and thermoacidophilic biopolymer-degrading genes and enzymes from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and related organisms, methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, David N; Apel, William A; Thompson, Vicki S; Reed, David W; Lacey, Jeffrey A; Henriksen, Emily D

    2013-04-23

    Isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius are provided. Further provided are methods of at least partially degrading, cleaving, or removing polysaccharides, lignocellulose, cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, starch, chitin, polyhydroxybutyrate, heteroxylans, glycosides, xylan-, glucan-, galactan-, or mannan-decorating groups using isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius.

  18. Genetic analysis of the regulation of TCH gene expression, Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braam, Janet

    2008-10-28

    The Arabidopsis TCH genes, originally isolated as a consequence of their upregulation in response to the mechanical stimulus of touch, are also upregulated by a variety of seemingly disparate environmental and hormonal stimuli. To gain insight into the complexities of TCH gene regulation, a number of approaches were taken. Regulatory elements responsible for regulation were identified and characteristics of the regulation were evaluated. Reporter genes were used to monitor expression localization and dynamics. Microarray analyses of genome-wide expression behavior indicated that touch-inducible gene expression is more widespread than generally appreciated. Identification of all touch-regulated genes shed light on the types of cellular processes that may be altered in response to mechanical stress perturbations. Expression of the TCH2 gene, also called CML24, encoding a calmodulin (CaM)-like (CML) protein, was evaluated. CML24 shares over 40% amino acid sequence identity with CaM, has 4 EF hands and undergoes a Ca2+-dependent change in migration rate through denaturing gel electrophoresis, indicating that CML24 binds Ca2+ and, as a consequence, undergoes conformational changes. CML24 expression occurs in all major organs and is induced from 2- to 15-fold in plants subjected to touch, darkness, heat, cold, hydrogen peroxide, abscisic acid (ABA) and indole-3-acetic acid. The putative CML24 regulatory region confers reporter expression at sites of predicted mechanical stress, in regions undergoing growth, in vascular tissues and various floral organs and in stomata, trichomes and hydathodes. CML24 underexpressing transgenics are resistant to ABA inhibition of germination and seedling growth, defective in long-day induction of flowering, and have enhanced tolerance to CoCl2, molybdic acid, ZnSO4 and MgCl2. These data present evidence that CML24 encodes a potential Ca2+ sensor that may function to enable responses to ABA, day length and presence of various salts. Further investigation of CML24 function and regulation led to the finding that CML24 has a critical role in nitric oxide regulation. Distinct tilling mutant alleles demonstrated that CML24 can act as a switch in the response to day length perception. Because of potential redundancy with the related CML23 gene, CML23 T-DNA insertion mutants were identified and characterized. Together, CML23 and CML24 impact the autonomous regulatory pathway of the transition to flowering. Nitric oxide levels are elevated in cml23/cml24 double mutants. Therefore, CML23 and CML24 are potential calcium sensors regulate nitric oxide accumulation. In collaboration with Drs. McCann and Carpita, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to assess, verify and classify wall architectural changes that occur as a result of single XTH insertion mutations. Thirty-four homozygous mutant lines of Arabidopsis representing 21 members of the xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolase gene family provided a set of mutants to characterize. Kohonen networks classified cell wall architectures of xth mutant lines and previously characterized cell wall mutants. The xth mutants were found to have chemical changes in their cell walls not detectable as phenotypic growth and development changes, consistent with the existence of feed-back loops that modify wall composition in response to a life-long deficiency of a cell wall enzyme. To gain insight into the potential physiological relevance of the distinct members of the XTH family, GUS reporter fusion genes were constructed, and plants expressing these transgenes were characterized to reveal spatial and temporal patterns of expression. In addition, Genevestigator sources were mined for comprehensive and comparative XTH expression regulation analysis. These data revealed that the Arabidopsis XTHs are likely expressed in every developmental stage from seed germination through flowering. All organs showed XTH::GUS expression and most, if not all, are found to express multiple XTH::GUS genes suggesting that XTHs may contribute to morphogenesis at every d

  19. Structure of a Rhamnogalacturonan Fragment from Apple Pectin: Implications for Pectin Architecture

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wu, Xiangmei; Mort, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    A comore » mmercial apple pectin was sequentially digested with the cloned enzymes endopolygalacturonase, galactanase, arabinofuranosidase, xylogalacturonase, and rhamnogalacturonan hydrolase. The rhamnogalacturonan hydrolase-generated oligosaccharides were separated by ultrafiltration, anion exchange, and size-exclusion chromatography. Fractions from the ion exchange chromatography were pooled, lyophilized, and screened by MALDI-TOF MS. An oligosaccharide (RGP14P3) was identified and its structure, α -D-Gal p A- ( 1 → 2 ) - α -L-Rha p - ( 1 → 4 ) - α -D-Gal p A- ( 1 → 2 ) - α -L-Rha p - ( 1 → 4 ) - α -D-Gal p A, determined by 1D and 2D NMR spectrometry. This oligosaccharide probably represents a direct connection between homogalacturonan and rhamnogalacturonan in pectin. Alternatively, it could indicate that the nonreducing end of rhamnogalacturonan starts with a galacturonic acid residue.« less

  20. EFFICACY OF FILTRATION PROCESSES TO OBTAIN WATER CLARITY AT K EAST SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL (SNF) BASIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DUNCAN JB

    2006-09-28

    The objective is to provide water clarity to the K East Basin via filtration processes. Several activities are planned that will challenge not only the capacity of the existing ion exchange modules to perform as needed but also the current filtration system to maintain water clarity. Among the planned activities are containerization of sludge, removal of debris, and hydrolasing the basin walls to remove contamination.

  1. Correlating size and composition-dependent effects with magnetic, Mssbauer, and pair distribution function measurements in a family of catalytically active ferrite nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, Stanislaus; Papaefthymiou, Georgia C.; Lewis, Crystal S.; Han, Jinkyu; Zhang, Cheng; Li, Qiang; Shi, Chenyang; Abeykoon, A. M.Milinda; Billinge, Simon J.L.; Stach, Eric; Thomas, Justin; Guerrero, Kevin; Munayco, Pablo; Munayco, Jimmy; Scorzelli, Rosa B.; Burnham, Philip; Viescas, Arthur J; Tiano, Amanda L.

    2015-05-06

    The magnetic spinel ferrites, MFe?O? (wherein 'M' = a divalent metal ion such as but not limited to Mn, Co, Zn, and Ni), represent a unique class of magnetic materials in which the rational introduction of different 'M's can yield correspondingly unique and interesting magnetic behaviors. Herein we present a generalized hydrothermal method for the synthesis of single-crystalline ferrite nanoparticles with 'M' = Mg, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn, respectively, which can be systematically and efficaciously produced simply by changing the metal precursor. Our protocol can moreover lead to reproducible size control by judicious selection of various surfactants. As such, we have probed the effects of both (i) size and (ii) chemical composition upon the magnetic properties of these nanomaterials using complementary magnetometry and Mssbauer spectroscopy techniques. The structure of the samples was confirmed by atomic PDF analysis of X-ray and electron powder diffraction data as a function of particle size. These materials retain the bulk spinel structure to the smallest size (i.e., 3 nm). In addition, we have explored the catalytic potential of our ferrites as both (a) magnetically recoverable photocatalysts and (b) biological catalysts, and noted that many of our as-prepared ferrite systems evinced intrinsically higher activities as compared with their iron oxide analogues.

  2. Cytoplasmic sequestration of the tumor suppressor p53 by a heat shock protein 70 family member, mortalin, in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gestl, Erin E.; Anne Boettger, S.

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Eight human colorectal cell lines were evaluated for p53 and mortalin localization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Six cell lines displayed cytoplasmic sequestration of the tumor suppressor p53. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Direct interaction between mortalin and p53 was shown in five cell lines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell lines positive for p53 sequestration yielded elevated p53 expression levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study yields the first evidence of cytoplasmic sequestration p53 by mortalin. -- Abstract: While it is known that cytoplasmic retention of p53 occurs in many solid tumors, the mechanisms responsible for this retention have not been positively identified. Since heatshock proteins like mortalin have been associated with p53 inactivation in other tumors, the current study sought to characterize this potential interaction in never before examined colorectal adenocarcinoma cell lines. Six cell lines, one with 3 different fractions, were examined to determine expression of p53 and mortalin and characterize their cellular localization. Most of these cell lines displayed punctate p53 and mortalin localization in the cell cytoplasm with the exception of HCT-8 and HCT116 379.2 cells, where p53 was not detected. Nuclear p53 was only observed in HCT-116 40-16, LS123, and HT-29 cell lines. Mortalin was only localized in the cytoplasm in all cell lines. Co-immunoprecipitation and immunohistochemistry revealed that p53 and mortalin were bound and co-localized in the cytoplasmic fraction of four cell lines, HCT-116 (40-16 and 386; parental and heterozygous fractions respectively of the same cell line), HT-29, LS123 and LoVo, implying that p53 nuclear function is limited in those cell lines by being restricted to the cytoplasm. Mortalin gene expression levels were higher than gene expression levels of p53 in all cell lines. Cell lines with cytoplasmic sequestration of p53, however, also displayed elevated p53 gene expression levels compared to cell lines without p53 sequestration. Our data reveal the characteristic cytoplasmic sequestration of p53 by the heat shock protein mortalin in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell lines, as is the case for other cancers, such as glioblastomas and hepatocellular carcinomas.

  3. Left to Our Own Devices – Financing Efficiency for Small Business and Low-Income Families (2009 Environmental Defense Fund Report)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    There is a widely known gap between cost-effective behavior, consumption patterns and actual marketplace conditions. This engineering gap/efficiency gap is particularly the case for low-income households and small businesses, which tend to depend on older, inefficient equipment. This study identifies the limitations of current and potential of relatively new mechanisms for efficiency investment micro-financing.

  4. Correlating size and composition-dependent effects with magnetic, Mössbauer, and pair distribution function measurements in a family of catalytically active ferrite nanoparticles

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wong, Stanislaus; Papaefthymiou, Georgia C.; Lewis, Crystal S.; Han, Jinkyu; Zhang, Cheng; Li, Qiang; Shi, Chenyang; Abeykoon, A. M.Milinda; Billinge, Simon J.L.; Stach, Eric; et al

    2015-05-06

    The magnetic spinel ferrites, MFe₂O₄ (wherein 'M' = a divalent metal ion such as but not limited to Mn, Co, Zn, and Ni), represent a unique class of magnetic materials in which the rational introduction of different 'M's can yield correspondingly unique and interesting magnetic behaviors. Herein we present a generalized hydrothermal method for the synthesis of single-crystalline ferrite nanoparticles with 'M' = Mg, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn, respectively, which can be systematically and efficaciously produced simply by changing the metal precursor. Our protocol can moreover lead to reproducible size control by judicious selection of various surfactants. Asmore » such, we have probed the effects of both (i) size and (ii) chemical composition upon the magnetic properties of these nanomaterials using complementary magnetometry and Mössbauer spectroscopy techniques. The structure of the samples was confirmed by atomic PDF analysis of X-ray and electron powder diffraction data as a function of particle size. These materials retain the bulk spinel structure to the smallest size (i.e., 3 nm). In addition, we have explored the catalytic potential of our ferrites as both (a) magnetically recoverable photocatalysts and (b) biological catalysts, and noted that many of our as-prepared ferrite systems evinced intrinsically higher activities as compared with their iron oxide analogues.« less

  5. Phylogenetic and comparative gene expression analysis of barley (Hordeum vulgare)WRKY transcription factor family reveals putatively retained functions betweenmonocots and dicots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mangelsen, Elke; Kilian, Joachim; Berendzen, Kenneth W.; Kolukisaoglu, Uner; Harter, Klaus; Jansson, Christer; Wanke, Dierk

    2008-02-01

    WRKY proteins belong to the WRKY-GCM1 superfamily of zinc finger transcription factors that have been subject to a large plant-specific diversification. For the cereal crop barley (Hordeum vulgare), three different WRKY proteins have been characterized so far, as regulators in sucrose signaling, in pathogen defense, and in response to cold and drought, respectively. However, their phylogenetic relationship remained unresolved. In this study, we used the available sequence information to identify a minimum number of 45 barley WRKY transcription factor (HvWRKY) genes. According to their structural features the HvWRKY factors were classified into the previously defined polyphyletic WRKY subgroups 1 to 3. Furthermore, we could assign putative orthologs of the HvWRKY proteins in Arabidopsis and rice. While in most cases clades of orthologous proteins were formed within each group or subgroup, other clades were composed of paralogous proteins for the grasses and Arabidopsis only, which is indicative of specific gene radiation events. To gain insight into their putative functions, we examined expression profiles of WRKY genes from publicly available microarray data resources and found group specific expression patterns. While putative orthologs of the HvWRKY transcription factors have been inferred from phylogenetic sequence analysis, we performed a comparative expression analysis of WRKY genes in Arabidopsis and barley. Indeed, highly correlative expression profiles were found between some of the putative orthologs. HvWRKY genes have not only undergone radiation in monocot or dicot species, but exhibit evolutionary traits specific to grasses. HvWRKY proteins exhibited not only sequence similarities between orthologs with Arabidopsis, but also relatedness in their expression patterns. This correlative expression is indicative for a putative conserved function of related WRKY proteins in mono- and dicot species.

  6. At-a-Glance: Comparing the 2016 Medicare Supplement, PPO and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    750 Family 500 Individual 1500 Family 150 Individual 450 Family 0 by member plan pays deductibles : Medicare Part A Deductible, Medicare Part B Deductible 3,000...

  7. At-a-Glance: Comparing the 2015 Medicare Supplement, PPO and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    750 Family 500 Individual 1500 Family 150 Individual 450 Family 0 by member plan pays deductibles : Medicare Part A Deductible, Medicare Part B Deductible 3,000...

  8. Picnic | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Picnic Picnic Family members enjoying themselves at a picnic.

  9. Solar technical assistance provided to Forest City military communities in Hawaii for incorporation of 20-30 MW of solar energy generation to power family housing for US Navy personnel.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dominick, Jeff; Merrigan, Tim; Boudra, Will; Miller, Ryan; Cisneros, Gabriela; Rosenthal, Andrew L.; Kuszmaul, Scott S.; Gupta, Vipin P.

    2010-06-01

    In May 2007, Forest City Military Communities won a US Department of Energy Solar America Showcase Award. As part of this award, executives and staff from Forest City Military Communities worked side-by-side with a DOE technical assistance team to overcome technical obstacles encountered by this large-scale real estate developer and manager. This paper describes the solar technical assistance that was provided and the key solar experiences acquired by Forest City Military Communities over an 18 month period.

  10. EA-1463: 10 CFR 433: Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings and 10 CFR 435: Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The EA examines the potential environmental impacts of the Final Rule on building habitability and the outdoor environment. To identify the potential environmental impacts that may result from implementing the Final Rule for new Federal commercial and residential buildings, DOE compared the Final Rule with the “no-action alternative” of using the current Federal standards – 10 CFR Part 434 and 10 CFR Part 435 Subpart C (referred to as the “no-action alternative”).

  11. Complete genome sequence of the termite hindgut bacterium Spirochaeta coccoides type strain (SPN1 T ), reclassification in the genus Sphaerochaeta as Sphaerochaeta coccoides comb. nov. and emendations of the family Spirochaetaceae and the genus Sphaerochaeta

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abt, Birte; Han, Cliff; Scheuner, Carmen; Lu, Megan; Lapidus, Alla L.; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Spring, Stefan; Gronow, Sabine; Goker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Detter, J. Chris

    2012-01-01

    Spirochaeta coccoides Droege et al. 2006 is a member of the genus Spirochaeta Ehrenberg 1835, one of the oldest named genera within the Bacteria. S. coccoides is an obligately anaerobic, Gram-negative, non-motile, spherical bacterium that was isolated from the hindgut contents of the termite Neotermes castaneus. The species is of interest because it may play an important role in the digestion of breakdown products from cellulose and hemicellulose in the termite gut. Here we provide a taxonomic re-evaluation for strain SPN1{sup T}, and based on physiological and genomic characteristics, we propose its reclassification as a novel species in the genus Sphaerochaeta, a recently published sister group of the Spirochaeta. The 2,227,296 bp long genome of strain SPN1{sup T} with its 1,866 protein-coding and 58 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  12. Modeling microbial dynamics in heterogeneous environments: Growth on soil carbon sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Resat, Haluk; Bailey, Vanessa L.; McCue, Lee Ann; Konopka, Allan

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a new hybrid model to study how microbial dynamics are affected by the heterogeneity in the physical structure of the environment. The modeling framework can represent porous media such as soil. The individual based biological model can explicitly simulate microbial diversity, and cell metabolism is regulated via optimal allocation of cellular resources to enzyme synthesis, control of growth rate by protein synthesis capacity, and shifts to dormancy. This model was developed to study how microbial community functioning is influenced by local environmental conditions and by the functional attributes of individual microbes. Different strategies for acquisition of carbon from polymeric cellulose were investigated. Bacteria that express membrane-associated hydrolase had different growth and survival dynamics in soil pores than bacteria that release extracellular hydrolases. The kinetic differences may suggest different functional roles for these two classes of microbes in cellulose utilization. Our model predicted an emergent behavior in which co-existence led to higher cellulose utilization efficiency and reduced stochasticity. Microbial community dynamics were simulated at two spatial scales: micro-pores that resemble 6-20 {micro}m size portions of the soil physical structure and in 111 {micro}m size soil aggregates with a random pore structure. Trends in dynamic properties were very similar at these two scales, implying that micro-scale studies can be useful approximations to aggregate scale studies when local effects on microbial dynamics are studied.

  13. Novel Insights into the Diversity of Catabolic Metabolism from Ten Haloarchaeal Genomes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Iain; Scheuner, Carmen; Goker, Markus; Mavromatis, Kostas; Hooper, Sean D.; Porat, Iris; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2011-05-03

    The extremely halophilic archaea are present worldwide in saline environments and have important biotechnological applications. Ten complete genomes of haloarchaea are now available, providing an opportunity for comparative analysis. We report here the comparative analysis of five newly sequenced haloarchaeal genomes with five previously published ones. Whole genome trees based on protein sequences provide strong support for deep relationships between the ten organisms. Using a soft clustering approach, we identified 887 protein clusters present in all halophiles. Of these core clusters, 112 are not found in any other archaea and therefore constitute the haloarchaeal signature. Four of the halophiles were isolated from water, and four were isolated from soil or sediment. Although there are few habitat-specific clusters, the soil/sediment halophiles tend to have greater capacity for polysaccharide degradation, siderophore synthesis, and cell wall modification. Halorhabdus utahensis and Haloterrigena turkmenica encode over forty glycosyl hydrolases each, and may be capable of breaking down naturally occurring complex carbohydrates. H. utahensis is specialized for growth on carbohydrates and has few amino acid degradation pathways. It uses the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway instead of the oxidative pathway, giving it more flexibility in the metabolism of pentoses. These new genomes expand our understanding of haloarchaeal catabolic pathways, providing a basis for further experimental analysis, especially with regard to carbohydrate metabolism. Halophilic glycosyl hydrolases for use in biofuel production are more likely to be found in halophiles isolated from soil or sediment.

  14. Proteomics based compositional analysis of complex cellulase-hemicellulase mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chundawat, Shishir P.; Lipton, Mary S.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Uppugundla, Nirmal; Gao, Dahai; Balan, Venkatesh; Dale, Bruce E.

    2011-10-07

    Efficient deconstruction of cellulosic biomass to fermentable sugars for fuel and chemical production is accomplished by a complex mixture of cellulases, hemicellulases and accessory enzymes (e.g., >50 extracellular proteins). Cellulolytic enzyme mixtures, produced industrially mostly using fungi like Trichoderma reesei, are poorly characterized in terms of their protein composition and its correlation to hydrolytic activity on cellulosic biomass. The secretomes of commercial glycosyl hydrolase producing microbes was explored using a proteomics approach with high-throughput quantification using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Here, we show that proteomics based spectral counting approach is a reasonably accurate and rapid analytical technique that can be used to determine protein composition of complex glycosyl hydrolase mixtures that also correlates with the specific activity of individual enzymes present within the mixture. For example, a strong linear correlation was seen between Avicelase activity and total cellobiohydrolase content. Reliable, quantitative and cheaper analytical methods that provide insight into the cellulosic biomass degrading fungal and bacterial secretomes would lead to further improvements towards commercialization of plant biomass derived fuels and chemicals.

  15. Methods of combined bioprocessing and related microorganisms, thermophilic and/or acidophilic enzymes, and nucleic acids encoding said enzymes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, David N; Apel, William A; Thompson, Vicki S; Ward, Thomas E

    2013-07-23

    A genetically modified organism comprising: at least one nucleic acid sequence and/or at least one recombinant nucleic acid isolated from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and encoding a polypeptide involved in at least partially degrading, cleaving, transporting, metabolizing, or removing polysaccharides, cellulose, lignocellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, starch, sugars, sugar oligomers, carbohydrates, complex carbohydrates, chitin, heteroxylans, glycosides, xylan-, glucan-, galactan-, or mannan-decorating groups; and at least one nucleic acid sequence and/or at least one recombinant nucleic acid encoding a polypeptide involved in fermenting sugar molecules to a product. Additionally, enzymatic and/or proteinaceous extracts may be isolated from one or more genetically modified organisms. The extracts are utilized to convert biomass into a product. Further provided are methods of converting biomass into products comprising: placing the genetically modified organism and/or enzymatic extracts thereof in fluid contact with polysaccharides, cellulose, lignocellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, starch, sugars, sugar oligomers, carbohydrates, complex carbohydrates, chitin, heteroxylans, glycosides, and/or xylan-, glucan-, galactan-, or mannan-decorating groups.

  16. Methods of combined bioprocessing and related microorganisms, thermophilic and/or acidophilic enzymes, and nucleic acids encoding said enzymes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, David N; Apel, William A; Thompson, Vicki S; Ward, Thomas E

    2014-04-08

    A genetically modified organism comprising: at least one nucleic acid sequence and/or at least one recombinant nucleic acid isolated from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and encoding a polypeptide involved in at least partially degrading, cleaving, transporting, metabolizing, or removing polysaccharides, cellulose, lignocellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, starch, sugars, sugar oligomers, carbohydrates, complex carbohydrates, chitin, heteroxylans, glycosides, xylan-, glucan-, galactan-, or mannan-decorating groups; and at least one nucleic acid sequence and/or at least one recombinant nucleic acid encoding a polypeptide involved in fermenting sugar molecules to a product. Additionally, enzymatic and/or proteinaceous extracts may be isolated from one or more genetically modified organisms. The extracts are utilized to convert biomass into a product. Further provided are methods of converting biomass into products comprising: placing the genetically modified organism and/or enzymatic extracts thereof in fluid contact with polysaccharides, cellulose, lignocellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, starch, sugars, sugar oligomers, carbohydrates, complex carbohydrates, chitin, heteroxylans, glycosides, and/or xylan-, glucan-, galactan-, or mannan-decorating groups.

  17. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National EPO National PPO Medicare Supplement Years of Service Single Retiree + 1 Family Single Retiree + 1 Family Single Retire + 1 Family 20 80.00 143.00 214.00 84.00...

  18. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National EPO National PPO Medicare Supplement Years of Service Single Adult + 1 Family Single Adult + 1 Family Single Adult + 1 Family 20 80.00 143.00 214.00 84.00...

  19. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Multi-Family Program provides cash incentives to owners, developers, and property managers of apartments and other multi-family properties for making energy...

  20. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Austin Energy- Multi-Family Energy Efficiency Rebate Program The Austin Energy Multi-Family Program provides cash incentives to owners, developers, and property managers of...

  1. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    SCE- Multi-Family Residential Energy Efficiency Programs Southern California Edison (SCE) offers prescriptive rebates to multi-family properties for lighting, HVAC technologies,...

  2. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Multi-Family Residential Energy Efficiency Programs Southern California Edison (SCE) offers prescriptive rebates to multi-family properties for lighting, HVAC technologies, water...

  3. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    homes which exceed 2008 Title 24 standards by 15%. The program is open to all single-family and multi-family new construction projects. A... Eligibility: Construction,...

  4. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    exceed 2008 Title 24 standards by 15%. The program is open to all single-family and multi-family new construction projects. A... Eligibility: Construction, Residential, Installers...

  5. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: A Disruptive Concept...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Disruptive Concept for a Whole Family of New Battery Systems Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: A Disruptive Concept for a Whole Family of New Battery Systems...

  6. Accidental Death & Dismemberment Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Only: covers only you Employee + Child(ren) or Modified Family: covers you and your children Employee + Family: covers you, your spousedomestic partner and your children...

  7. AD&D insurance offers three coverage options

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Only: covers only you Employee + Child(ren) or Modified Family: covers you and your children* Employee + Family: covers you, your spousedomestic partner and your children* *The...

  8. Weatherization and Intergovernmental FY14 Budget At-a-Glance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Policy and Programs on technical assistance and financial support issues and options. ... families across the nation, saving each family hundreds of dollars on their heating and ...

  9. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    taxes, and special ad valorem taxes, but does not apply to special assessments. Eligible properties include single-family to four-family dwellings. The exemption applies directly...

  10. Table 4

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9. Mean Annual Electricity Consumption for Lighting, by Family Income by Number of Household Members, 1993 (Kilowatthours) Number of Household Members Family Income All Households...

  11. Table 4

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0. Mean Annual Electricity Consumption for Lighting, by Family Income by Number of Rooms, 1993 (Kilowatthours) Number of Rooms Family Income Total Households One to Three Four Five...

  12. Document

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Appropriations Act, 1999 (Pub. L. 105-277), requires Federal agencies to issue a Family Policymaking Assessment for any rule or policy that may affect family well- being....

  13. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    but does not apply to special assessments. Eligible properties include single-family to four-family dwellings. The exemption applies directly to a variety of equipment and...

  14. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Equipment, LED Lighting, Commercial Refrigeration Equipment Austin Energy- Multi-Family Energy Efficiency Rebate Program The Austin Energy Multi-Family Program provides cash...

  15. B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112 10 .11 .3 New ENERGY STARBuilt Green Single-family Homes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....

  16. Energy Conservation Contract (4 activities)

    K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

    Students learn about saving energy and encourage their families to conserve by completing the following activities

  17. Home construction | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Home construction Home construction Family members inspect construction of their future home.

  18. Microsoft PowerPoint - 11_Flynn_AWG_VAP_Review4SSC.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AWG Review of VAP Priorities f S S t C itt for SunSet Committee Translator: Connor Flynn Developers: Annette Koontz, Chitra Sivaraman p , Several AWG VAP Families * MFRSR and NIMFR AOD Family * AOS and IAP Family AOS and IAP Family * The Raman Lidar Family Th A l "B E i " d * The Aerosol "Best-Estimate" product * MPL Family MFRSR and NIMFR AOD Family * Complete traceability of all corrections - Offsets compensation Offsets compensation - Gain and nominal calibration - Cosine

  19. "Table HC1.1.3 Housing Unit Characteristics by Average Floorspace--"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Housing Unit Characteristics by Average Floorspace--" " Single-Family Housing Units and Mobile Homes, 2005" ,,"Single- Family and Mobile Homes (millions)","Average Square Feet per Housing Unit-- Single-Family and Mobile Homes" ," Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Single-Family Detached",,,"Single-Family Attached",,,"Mobile Homes" "Housing Unit

  20. Genetic heterogeneity of breast-ovarian cancer revisited

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narod, S.; Ford, D.; Easton, D.

    1995-10-01

    We have recently reported the results of a linkage analysis of 145 breast-ovarian cancer families. Each family has three or more cases of early-onset breast cancer (age {le}60) or of ovarian cancer, and all families have at least one case of ovarian cancer (there were nine site-specific ovarian cancer families). Overall, we estimated that 76% of the families were linked to the BRCA1 locus. 5 refs., 1 tab.

  1. Molecular-Scale Features that Govern the Effects of O-Glycosylation on a Carbohydrate-Binding Module

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guan, Xiaoyang; Chaffey, Patrick K.; Zeng, Chen; Greene, Eric R.; Chen, Liqun; Drake, Matthew R.; Chen, Claire; Groobman, Ari; Resch, Michael G.; Himmel, Michael E.; Beckham, Gregg T.; Tan, Zhongping

    2015-09-21

    The protein glycosylation is a ubiquitous post-translational modification in all kingdoms of life. Despite its importance in molecular and cellular biology, the molecular-level ramifications of O-glycosylation on biomolecular structure and function remain elusive. Here, we took a small model glycoprotein and changed the glycan structure and size, amino acid residues near the glycosylation site, and glycosidic linkage while monitoring any corresponding changes to physical stability and cellulose binding affinity. The results of this study reveal the collective importance of all the studied features in controlling the most pronounced effects of O-glycosylation in this system. This study suggests the possibility of designing proteins with multiple improved properties by simultaneously varying the structures of O-glycans and amino acids local to the glycosylation site.

  2. Molecular-Scale Features that Govern the Effects of O-Glycosylation on a Carbohydrate-Binding Module

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Guan, Xiaoyang; Chaffey, Patrick K.; Zeng, Chen; Greene, Eric R.; Chen, Liqun; Drake, Matthew R.; Chen, Claire; Groobman, Ari; Resch, Michael G.; Himmel, Michael E.; et al

    2015-09-21

    The protein glycosylation is a ubiquitous post-translational modification in all kingdoms of life. Despite its importance in molecular and cellular biology, the molecular-level ramifications of O-glycosylation on biomolecular structure and function remain elusive. Here, we took a small model glycoprotein and changed the glycan structure and size, amino acid residues near the glycosylation site, and glycosidic linkage while monitoring any corresponding changes to physical stability and cellulose binding affinity. The results of this study reveal the collective importance of all the studied features in controlling the most pronounced effects of O-glycosylation in this system. This study suggests the possibility ofmore » designing proteins with multiple improved properties by simultaneously varying the structures of O-glycans and amino acids local to the glycosylation site.« less

  3. Sr{sub 9}Ni{sub 6.64}O{sub 21}: A new member (n = 2) of the perovskite-related A{sub 3n+3}A{sub n}{prime}B{sub 3+n}O{sub 9+6n} family

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campa, J.; Gutierrez-Puebla, E.; Monge, A.

    1996-10-01

    Crystals of a new phase Sr{sub 9}Ni{sub 6.64}O{sub 21} were grown. This compound in the n = 2 member of the A{sub 3n+3}A{sub n}{prime}B{sub n+3}O{sub 6n+9} series. The composition and the crystal structure have been established form X-ray single crystal diffraction data. The structure contains face-shared chains of NiO{sub 6} polyhedra parallel to the c axis and is related with hexagonal 2H polytype perovskite. Sr{sub 9}Ni{sub 6.64}O{sub 21} crystallizes in the space group R3c (No. 167) with a = 9.467(2) {angstrom}, c = 35.87(5) {angstrom}, V = 2784.(4) {angstrom}{sup 3}, and Z = 6. A comparison is made between the structure of the title compound and the other members of the series.

  4. Draft Environmental Assessment for Direct Final Rule, 10 CFR 434, "Energy Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise High-Rise Multi-FamilyResidential Buildings" and 10 CFR 435, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Re

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR Final Rule, 10 CFR Part 435, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings' Baseline Standards Update" (RIN 1904-AD56) (DOE/EA-2020) Prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy January 11, 2016 1 ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS CAIR Clean Air Interstate Rule CAP Climate Action Plan CEQ Council on Environmental Quality CFR Code of Federal Regulations CH 4 methane CO 2 carbon

  5. City of Tallahassee Utilities- Energy Star Certified New Homes Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The City of Tallahassee Utilities offers a rebate of $1 per square foot (up to $2,000) for ENERGY STAR qualified new homes. Qualifying housing types include single-family detached, single-family...

  6. SoCalGas- California Advanced Homes Incentives

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    SoCalGas offers an incentive for home builders to build homes which exceed 2008 Title 24 standards by 15%. The program is open to all single-family and multi-family new construction projects. A...

  7. PG&E- California Advanced Homes Incentives

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E) offers an incentive for home builders to build homes which exceed 2008 Title 24 standards by 15%. The program is open to all single-family and multi-family new...

  8. SDG&E- California Advanced Homes Incentives

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    SDG&E offers an incentive for home builders to build homes which exceed 2008 Title 24 standards by 15%. The program is open to all single-family and multi-family new construction projects. A...

  9. SCE- California Advanced Homes Incentives

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Southern California Edison offers an incentive for home builders to build homes which exceed 2008 Title 24 standards by 15%. The program is open to all single-family and multi-family new...

  10. Fermilab | Newsroom | Press Releases | January 26, 2015: Science...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    02 January 26, 2015 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Science, art and hands-on fun at Fermilabs Family Open House on Sunday, Feb. 8 photo The Family Open House is one of the most popular...

  11. South River EMC- Energy Star Homes Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    South River EMC offers incentives to home buyers and builders who purchase or construct Energy Star certified single-family site built homes, manufactured homes, and multi-family dwellings. Energy...

  12. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Informatio...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    MP3 - This is one of the audio codingsformats defined in the MPEG family of standards Adobe Flash MP4 - This is one of the audio codingsformats defined in the MPEG family of...

  13. Minnesota Power- Solar-Thermal Water Heating Rebate Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Minnesota Power offers a 25% rebate for qualifying solar thermal water heating systems. The maximum award for single-family customers is $2,000 per customer; $4,000 for 2-3 family unit buildings;...

  14. City of Aspen- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The City of Aspen encourages interested residents and businesses to increase the energy efficiency of homes and offices through rebates and incentives for both single-family and multi-family...

  15. Energy Conservation Loan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Loans for large residential properties are available through the Multi-Family Energy Conservation Loan Program. The terms of this loan are similar to loans for single-family dwellings, with a hig...

  16. City of Milwaukee- Energy Efficiency (Me2) Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Milwaukee Energy Efficiency is a loan program for residential energy efficiency improvements. Loans are available for owner-occupied single family residences or owner-occupied multi-family reside...

  17. Electric Power Board of Chattanooga- Energy Efficient New Homes Program for Builders & Developers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Electric Power Board of Chattanooga, in collaboration with the Tennessee Valley Authority, offers an incentive to builders and developers of single-family and multi-family homes to build energy...

  18. Tag: employees

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    46all en CNS donations help lower-income Appalachian families http:www.y12.doe.govcommunitycns-donations-help-lower-income-appalachian-families

  19. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rates by PlanTier and Years of Service HDHP PPO Years of Service Single Adult + Children Adult + Spouse Family Single Adult + Children Adult + Spouse Family 20 91.00 162.00...

  20. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rates by PlanTier and Years of Service HDHP PPO Years of Service Single Retiree + Children Retiree + Spouse Family Single Retiree + Children Retiree + Spouse Family 20 91.00...

  1. (Press Release, Video, Press Event, Other)","Text of Major Communicati...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... upgrades and will be available for families making up to 200% of the federal poverty level - or about 44,000 a year for a family of four. 55,140 for Alaska and 50,720 ...

  2. Obama Administration Delivers More Than $66 Million for Weatherization...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOE's Weatherization Assistance Program will be available to families making up to 200 percent of the federal poverty level - or about 44,000 a year for a family of four. ...

  3. Obama Administration Delivers More than $288 Million for Weatherizatio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE's Weatherization Assistance Program will be available to families making up to 200 percent of the federal poverty level - or about 44,000 a year for a family of four. ...

  4. Obama-Biden Administration Announces More Than $112.4 Million...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to 6,500 per home in energy efficiency upgrades and will be available for families making up to 200% of the federal poverty level - or about 44,000 a year for a family of four. ...

  5. Obama-Biden Administration Announces More Than $113.2 Million...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to 6,500 per home in energy efficiency upgrades and will be available for families making up to 200% of the federal poverty level - or about 44,000 a year for a family of four. ...

  6. Obama-Biden Administration Announces More Than $49 Million in...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to 6,500 per home in energy efficiency upgrades and will be available for families making up to 200% of the federal poverty level - or about 44,000 a year for a family of four. ...

  7. Obama-Biden Administration Announces More Than $122.3 Million...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to 6,500 per home in energy efficiency upgrades and will be available for families making up to 200% of the federal poverty level - or about 44,000 a year for a family of four. ...

  8. Administration Announces Nearly $8 Billion in Weatherization...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    upgrades and will be available for families making up to 200% of the federal poverty level - or about 44,000 a year for a family of four. 55,140 for Alaska and 50,720 ...

  9. Obama-Biden Administration Announces More Than $46.3 Million...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to 6,500 per home in energy efficiency upgrades and will be available for families making up to 200% of the federal poverty level - or about 55,140 a year for a family of four. ...

  10. Obama Administration Delivers More than $304 Million for Weatherizatio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE's Weatherization Assistance Program will be available to families making up to 200 percent of the federal poverty level - or about 44,000 a year for a family of four. ...

  11. Obama-Biden Administration Announces More Than $127.3 Million...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to 6,500 per home in energy efficiency upgrades and will be available for families making up to 200% of the federal poverty level - or about 44,000 a year for a family of four. ...

  12. Obama Administration Delivers More than $60 Million for Weatherization...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE's Weatherization Assistance Program will be available to families making up to 200 percent of the federal poverty level - or about 44,000 a year for a family of four. ...

  13. DOE Delivers Over $80 Million in Weatherization Funding to First...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... DOE's Weatherization Assistance Program will be available to families making up to 200 percent of the federal poverty level - or about 44,000 a year for a family of four. ...

  14. Obama-Biden Administration Announces More Than $352.4 Million...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to 6,500 per home in energy efficiency upgrades and will be available for families making up to 200% of the federal poverty level - or about 44,000 a year for a family of four. ...

  15. Obama-Biden Administration Announces More Than $44 Million in...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to 6,500 per home in energy efficiency upgrades and will be available for families making up to 200% of the federal poverty level - or about 44,000 a year for a family of four. ...

  16. Obama Administration Delivers More than $101 Million for Weatherizatio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE's Weatherization Assistance Program will be available to families making up to 200 percent of the federal poverty level - or about 44,000 a year for a family of four. ...

  17. Obama Administration Delivers More than $101 Million for Weatherizatio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program will be available to families making up to 200 percent of the federal poverty level - or about 44,000 a year for a family of four. Weatherization projects allow...

  18. Critical Question #7: What are the Best Practices for Single...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    7: What are the Best Practices for Single-Family Ventilation in All Climate Regions? Critical Question 7: What are the Best Practices for Single-Family Ventilation in All Climate...

  19. Chelating agents for technetium-99M

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fritzberg, A.R.; Kasina, S.

    1987-06-02

    The present invention relates to a novel family of Technetium chelating agents (ligands) based upon amide and mercaptide donor groups.

  20. Chelating agents for technetium-99M

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fritzberg, Alan R. (Salt Lake City, UT); Kasina, Sudhakar (Salt Lake City, UT)

    1987-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel family of Technetium chelating agents (ligands) based upon amide and mercaptide donor groups.

  1. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    other multi-family properties for making energy efficiency... Eligibility: Commercial, Construction, Multifamily Residential Savings Category: Solar Water Heat, Solar...

  2. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric, Solar Photovoltaics, Wind (All), Daylighting, Wind (Small) Marin County- Green Building Requirements Marin County's original Single Family Dwelling Energy...

  3. "Table HC1.2.3 Living Space Characteristics by Average Floorspace--"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Living Space Characteristics by Average Floorspace--" " Single-Family Housing Units and Mobile Homes, 2005" ,,"Single- Family and Mobile Homes (millions)","Average Square Feet per Housing Unit" ," Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Single-Family Detached",,,"Single-Family Attached",,,"Mobile Homes" "Housing Unit

  4. Panhandle Energies LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Panhandle Energies LLC Place: Shreveport, Louisiana Product: Family business with experience in developing and managing bioethanol plants. Coordinates:...

  5. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    measures through the Home Energy Loan Program. Participating single or multi-family... Eligibility: Residential, Multifamily Residential Savings Category: Solar...

  6. Partners and Stakeholders

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Concentrating on the single-family residential sector, this section looks at the organizations and groups that influence financing programs.

  7. NREL Energy Efficiency Potential Mapping

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Residential newexisting homes; single family and multifamily Audience: National... Maps, Heatmap Matrices, Supply Curves Key Issues: * Compiling comprehensive building ...

  8. Kinarot Jordan Valley Technological Incubator | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    - Jordan Valley Technological Incubator Place: Israel Sector: Services Product: General Financial & Legal Services ( Private family-controlled ) References: Kinarot - Jordan...

  9. Peregrine Ventures | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Peregrine Ventures Place: Israel Sector: Services Product: General Financial & Legal Services ( Private family-controlled ) References: Peregrine...

  10. Precede Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Precede Technologies Place: Israel Sector: Services Product: General Financial & Legal Services ( Private family-controlled ) References: Precede...

  11. Applied Process Engineering Laborotory APEL | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Engineering Laborotory (APEL) Place: United States Sector: Services Product: General Financial & Legal Services ( Private family-controlled ) References: Applied Process...

  12. Oxycarbonitride phosphors and light emitting devices using the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Yuanqiang; Romanelli, Michael D.; Tian, Yongchi

    2015-12-22

    A family of oxycarbonitride phosphor compositions is provided. Also provided are light emitting devices incorporating the oxycarbonitride phosphor compositions.

  13. Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals: Standard Work Specifications for

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Single-Family Home Energy Upgrades | Department of Energy Standard Work Specifications for Single-Family Home Energy Upgrades Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals: Standard Work Specifications for Single-Family Home Energy Upgrades The Standard Work Specifications (SWS) for Single-Family Home Energy Upgrades define the minimum acceptable outcomes for any weatherization or home performance task to be effective, durable, and safe. PDF icon sws_singlefamily.pdf More Documents &

  14. Building America Case Study: Conway Street Apartments, Greenfield, Massachusetts (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-12-01

    While single-family, detached homes account for 63% of households (EIA 2009); multi-family homes account for a very large portion of that remaining housing stock, and this fraction is growing. Through recent research efforts, CARB has been evaluating strategies and technologies that can make dramatic improvements in energy performance in multi-family buildings

  15. Conway Street Apartments: A Multifamily Deep Energy Retrofit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldrich, R.; Williamson, J.

    2014-11-01

    While single-family, detached homes account for 63% of households (EIA 2009); multi-family homes account for a very large portion of that remaining housing stock, and this fraction is growing. Through recent research efforts, CARB has been evaluating strategies and technologies that can make dramatic improvements in energy performance in multi-family buildings.

  16. Down-regulation of the Caffeic acid O-methyltransferase Gene in Switchgrass Reveals a Novel Monolignol Analog

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Standaert, Robert F; Engle, Nancy L; Martin, Madhavi Z; Sangha, Amandeep K; Parks, Jerry M; Smith, Jeremy C; Samuel, Reichel; Pu, Yunqiao; Ragauskas, A J; Hamilton, Choo Yieng; Fu, Chunxiang; Wang, Zeng-Yu; Davison, Brian H; Dixon, Richard A; Mielenz, Jonathan R

    2012-01-01

    Down-regulation of the caffeic acid 3-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene in the lignin biosynthetic pathway of switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) resulted in cell walls of transgenic plants releasing more constituent sugars after pretreatment by dilute acid and treatment with glycosyl hydrolases from an added enzyme preparation and from Clostridium thermocellum. Fermentation of both wild-type and transgenic switchgrass after milder hot water pretreatment with no water washing showed that only the transgenic switchgrass inhibited C. thermocellum. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-based metabolomics were undertaken on cell wall aqueous extracts to determine the nature of the microbial inhibitors, confirming the increased concentration of a number of phenolic acids and aldehydes that are known inhibitors of fermentation. Metabolomic analyses of the transgenic biomass additionally revealed the presence of a novel monolignol-like metabolite, identified as trans-3, 4-dimethoxy-5-hydroxycinnamyl alcohol (iso-sinapyl alcohol) in both non-pretreated, as well as hot water pretreated samples. Although there was no indication that iso-sinapyl alcohol was integrated into the cell wall, diversion of substrates from sinapyl alcohol to free iso-sinapyl alcohol, its glucoside, and associated upstream lignin pathway changes, including increased phenolic aldehydes and acids, are associated with more facile cell wall deconstruction, and to the observed inhibitory effect on microbial growth.

  17. High and Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation Induce Different Secretome Profiles in a Human Skin Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Qibin; Matzke, Melissa M.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Moore, Ronald J.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Hu, Zeping; Monroe, Matthew E.; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.; Morgan, William F.

    2014-03-18

    It is postulated that secreted soluble factors are important contributors of bystander effect and adaptive responses observed in low dose ionizing radiation. Using multidimensional liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry based proteomics, we quantified the changes of skin tissue secretome the proteins secreted from a full thickness, reconstituted 3-dimensional skin tissue model 48 hr after exposure to 3, 10 and 200 cGy of X-rays. Overall, 135 proteins showed statistical significant difference between the sham (0 cGy) and any of the irradiated groups (3, 10 or 200 cGy) on the basis of Dunnett adjusted t-test; among these, 97 proteins showed a trend of downregulation and 9 proteins showed a trend of upregulation with increasing radiation dose. In addition, there were 21 and 8 proteins observed to have irregular trends with the 10 cGy irradiated group either having the highest or the lowest level among all three radiated doses. Moreover, two proteins, carboxypeptidase E and ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase isozyme L1 were sensitive to ionizing radiation, but relatively independent of radiation dose. Conversely, proteasome activator complex subunit 2 protein appeared to be sensitive to the dose of radiation, as rapid upregulation of this protein was observed when radiation doses were increased from 3, to 10 or 200 cGy. These results suggest that different mechanisms of action exist at the secretome level for low and high doses of ionizing radiation.

  18. Structure of an aprataxin?DNA complex with insights into AOA1 neurodegenerative disease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tumbale, Percy; Appel, C. Denise; Kraehenbuehl, Rolf; Robertson, Patrick D.; Williams, Jessica S.; Krahn, Joe; Ahel, Ivan; Williams, R. Scott (NIEHS); (Manchester)

    2012-09-17

    DNA ligases finalize DNA replication and repair through DNA nick-sealing reactions that can abort to generate cytotoxic 5'-adenylation DNA damage. Aprataxin (Aptx) catalyzes direct reversal of 5'-adenylate adducts to protect genome integrity. Here the structure of a Schizosaccharomyces pombe Aptx-DNA-AMP-Zn{sup 2+} complex reveals active site and DNA interaction clefts formed by fusing a histidine triad (HIT) nucleotide hydrolase with a DNA minor groove-binding C{sub 2}HE zinc finger (Znf). An Aptx helical 'wedge' interrogates the base stack for sensing DNA ends or DNA nicks. The HIT-Znf, the wedge and an '[F/Y]PK' pivot motif cooperate to distort terminal DNA base-pairing and direct 5'-adenylate into the active site pocket. Structural and mutational data support a wedge-pivot-cut HIT-Znf catalytic mechanism for 5'-adenylate adduct recognition and removal and suggest that mutations affecting protein folding, the active site pocket and the pivot motif underlie Aptx dysfunction in the neurodegenerative disorder ataxia with oculomotor apraxia 1 (AOA1).

  19. Identification of a Xylogalacturonan Xylosyltransferase Involved in Pectin Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pauly, Markus; Sorensen, Susanne Oxenboll; Harholt, Jesper; Geshi, Naomi; Sakuragi, Yumiko; Moller, Isabel; Zandleven, Joris; Bernal, Adriana J.; Jensen, Niels Bjerg; Sorensen, Charlotte; Jensen, Jacob K.; Beldman, Gerrit; Willats, William G.T.; Scheller, Henrik

    2009-08-19

    Xylogalacturonan (XGA) is a class of pectic polysaccharide found in plant cell walls. The Arabidopsis thaliana locus At5g33290 encodes a predicted Type II membrane protein, and insertion mutants of the At5g33290 locus had decreased cell wall xylose. Immunological studies, enzymatic extraction of polysaccharides, monosaccharide linkage analysis, and oligosaccharide mass profiling were employed to identify the affected cell wall polymer. Pectic XGA was reduced to much lower levels in mutant than in wild-type leaves, indicating a role of At5g33290 in XGA biosynthesis. The mutated gene was designated xylogalacturonan deficient1 (xgd1). Transformation of the xgd1-1 mutant with the wild-type gene restored XGA to wild-type levels. XGD1 protein heterologously expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana catalyzed the transfer of xylose from UDP-xylose onto oligogalacturonides and endogenous acceptors. The products formed could be hydrolyzed with an XGA-specific hydrolase. These results confirm that the XGD1 protein is a XGA xylosyltransferase. The protein was shown by expression of a fluorescent fusion protein in N. benthamiana to be localized in the Golgi vesicles as expected for a glycosyltransferase involved in pectin biosynthesis.

  20. Life state response to environmental crisis: the case of the Love Canal, Niagara Falls, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masters, S.K.

    1986-01-01

    This thesis explored the differences between two life stages - young and old - in perceiving and responding to man-made environmental disaster, as well as the support resources utilized to cope with disaster - personal, familial/friendship, and organizational. Because of the characteristics of man-made environmental disaster, and because of the different conditions of life and constructions of reality of older and younger families, it was expected that definitions of the situation would vary by life stage and locus of control - authoritative and personal. The research took place in the Love Canal neighborhood of Niagara Falls, New York. Fifty-eight families were interviewed in the fall of 1978, and thirty-nine of these families were reinterviewed in the spring of 1979. Interviews were tape recorded, transcribed, and coded. The data were presented in contingency tables and interview excerpts. The interview schedules elicited information of perception of impact, responses to impact, and the utilization of support resources. In an authoritative locus of control situation, the major findings were that both older and younger families perceived impact, that older families were slightly less disrupted, that younger families relied on organizational and familial/friendship support resources, and that older families relied on familial/friendship support resources.

  1. Cellobiohydrolase 1 from Trichoderma reesei degrades cellulose in single cellobiose steps

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brady, Sonia K.; Sreelatha, Sarangapani; Feng, Yinnian; Chundawat, Shishir P. S.; Lang, Matthew J.

    2015-12-10

    Cellobiohydrolase 1 from Trichoderma reesei (TrCel7A) processively hydrolyses cellulose into cellobiose. Although enzymatic techniques have been established as promising tools in biofuel production, a clear understanding of the motor’s mechanistic action has yet to be revealed. We develop an optical tweezers-based single-molecule (SM) motility assay for precision tracking of TrCel7A. Direct observation of motility during degradation reveals processive runs and distinct steps on the scale of 1 nm. Our studies suggest TrCel7A is not mechanically limited, can work against 20 pN loads and speeds up when assisted. Temperature-dependent kinetic studies establish the energy requirements for the fundamental stepping cycle, whichmore » likely includes energy from glycosidic bonds and other sources. Moreover, through SM measurements of isolated TrCel7A domains, we determine that the catalytic domain alone is sufficient for processive motion, providing insight into TrCel7A’s molecular motility mechanism.« less

  2. The obscure events contributing to the evolution of an incipient sex chromosome in Populus A retrospective working hypothesis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Chen, Jay [ORNL; Labbe, Jessy L [ORNL; Ranjan, Priya [ORNL; DiFazio, Steven P [West Virginia University; Slavov, Goncho T. [West Virginia University; Yin, Tongming [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Genetic determination of gender is a fundamental developmental and evolutionary process in plants. Although it appears that dioecy in Populus is partially genetically controlled, the precise gender-determining systems remain unclear. The recently-released second draft assembly and annotated gene set of the Populus genome provided an opportunity to re-visit this topic. We hypothesized that over evolutionary time, selective pressure has reformed the genome structure and gene composition in the peritelomeric region of the chromosome XIX which has resulted in a distinctive genome structure and cluster of genes contributing to gender determination in Populus. Multiple lines of evidence support this working hypothesis. First, the peritelomeric region of the chromosome XIX contains significantly fewer single nucleotide polymorphisms than the rest of Populus genome and has a distinct evolutionary history. Second, the peritelomeric end of chromosome XIX contains the largest cluster of the nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) class of disease resistances genes in the entire Populus genome. Third, there is a high occurrence of small microRNAs on chromosome XIX coincident to the region containing the putative gender-determining locus and the major cluster of NBS-LRR genes. Further, by analyzing the metabolomic profiles of floral bud in male and female Populus trees using a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, we found there are gender-specific accumulations of phenolic glycosides. Taken together, these findings provide new insights into the genetic control of gender determination in Populus.

  3. Cellobiohydrolase 1 from Trichoderma reesei degrades cellulose in single cellobiose steps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brady, Sonia K.; Sreelatha, Sarangapani; Feng, Yinnian; Chundawat, Shishir P. S.; Lang, Matthew J.

    2015-12-10

    Cellobiohydrolase 1 from Trichoderma reesei (TrCel7A) processively hydrolyses cellulose into cellobiose. Although enzymatic techniques have been established as promising tools in biofuel production, a clear understanding of the motor’s mechanistic action has yet to be revealed. We develop an optical tweezers-based single-molecule (SM) motility assay for precision tracking of TrCel7A. Direct observation of motility during degradation reveals processive runs and distinct steps on the scale of 1 nm. Our studies suggest TrCel7A is not mechanically limited, can work against 20 pN loads and speeds up when assisted. Temperature-dependent kinetic studies establish the energy requirements for the fundamental stepping cycle, which likely includes energy from glycosidic bonds and other sources. Moreover, through SM measurements of isolated TrCel7A domains, we determine that the catalytic domain alone is sufficient for processive motion, providing insight into TrCel7A’s molecular motility mechanism.

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: About Sandia: Community Involvement:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Education Programs: DOE Science Bowl Math Night Family Math Night Family Math Night provides an evening of hands-on math activities held at local elementary schools. Students and parents work together on fun math games and activities. Sandia provides all materials and instructions. Availability is limited, so reserve your Family Math Night today! Contact Albuquerque, NM Laurie Bergemann (505) 284-5204 ljberge@sandia.gov

  5. Vice President Biden Unveils Report Focused on Expanding Green Jobs And

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Savings For Middle Class Families | Department of Energy Unveils Report Focused on Expanding Green Jobs And Energy Savings For Middle Class Families Vice President Biden Unveils Report Focused on Expanding Green Jobs And Energy Savings For Middle Class Families October 19, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - Vice President Biden today unveiled Recovery Through Retrofit, a report that builds on the foundation laid in the Recovery Act to expand green job opportunities and boost

  6. Airfoils for wind turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tangler, James L. (Boulder, CO); Somers, Dan M. (State College, PA)

    1996-01-01

    Airfoils for the blade of a wind turbine wherein each airfoil is characterized by a thickness in a range from 16%-24% and a maximum lift coefficient designed to be largely insensitive to roughness effects. The airfoils include a family of airfoils for a blade 15 to 25 meters in length, a family of airfoils for a blade 1 to 5 meters in length, and a family of airfoils for a blade 5 to 10 meters in length.

  7. LOS ALAMOS, N.M., May 22, 2013-Los Alamos National Laboratory's Bradbury

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    partnering in national Blue Star Museums program May 22, 2013 Free admission for active duty military, their family members LOS ALAMOS, N.M., May 22, 2013-Los Alamos National Laboratory's Bradbury Science Museum is again partnering with the National Endowment for the Arts, Blue Star Families Foundation and the Department of Defense in the Blue Star Museums program to host active duty military personnel and their families from Memorial Day, May 27, through Labor Day, Sept. 2. "In this the

  8. Airfoils for wind turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tangler, J.L.; Somers, D.M.

    1996-10-08

    Airfoils are disclosed for the blade of a wind turbine wherein each airfoil is characterized by a thickness in a range from 16%-24% and a maximum lift coefficient designed to be largely insensitive to roughness effects. The airfoils include a family of airfoils for a blade 15 to 25 meters in length, a family of airfoils for a blade 1 to 5 meters in length, and a family of airfoils for a blade 5 to 10 meters in length. 10 figs.

  9. National Grid Deep Energy Retrofit Pilot, Massachusetts and Rhode Island (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    National Grid Deep Energy Retrofit Pilot Massachusetts and Rhode Island PROJECT INFORMATION Construction: Deep energy retrofit (DER) Type: 37 comprehensive retrofits, 5 partial retrofits Housing Type: 31 single-family, 8 two- family, and 3 three-family dwellings Pilot Program Sponsor: National Grid, www.nationalgridus.com Technical Support Partner: Building Science Corporation, www.buildingscience.com Contractors: Various Projects Completed: 2009-2012 Climate Zone: Cold POST-RETROFIT PERFORMANCE

  10. EA-2001: Energy Efficiency Design Standards: New Federal Commercial and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings and New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings | Department of Energy 1: Energy Efficiency Design Standards: New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings and New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings EA-2001: Energy Efficiency Design Standards: New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings and New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is publishing

  11. Microsoft Word - PPO Medicare Retiree Highlight Sheet_010116.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Medicare Retiree_01/01/16 Customer Service: (877) 878-LANL (5265) Los Alamos National Labs Plan Highlights - Medicare Retirees National PPO Medical Program Cost-Sharing Features, Covered Services, and Limitations Member's Share of Covered Charges Preferred Provider (In-Network) 1,2 Nonpreferred Provider (Out-of-Network) 1,2 Calendar Year Deductible 1 (Family deductible is an aggregate of three times individual amount and may be met by three or more family members.) 1 $250 Individual $750 Family

  12. Audit Report: OAS-RA-11-01 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1 Audit Report: OAS-RA-11-01 October 14, 2010 The State of Illinois Weatherization Assistance Program The Department of Energy's Weatherization Assistance Program received $5 billion under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) to improve the energy efficiency of single-family, multi-family, and mobile homes owned or occupied by individuals or families with low incomes. Of the $5 billion, the Department awarded the State of Illinois a 3-year Weatherization Assistance

  13. Comments of NRDC on Department of Energy Interim Final Rule: Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Conservation for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings and New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings | Department of Energy NRDC on Department of Energy Interim Final Rule: Energy Conservation for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings and New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings Comments of NRDC on Department of Energy Interim Final Rule: Energy Conservation for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise

  14. EERE Success Story-New Jersey: Reducing Energy Bills for Camden's

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Families | Department of Energy Reducing Energy Bills for Camden's Families EERE Success Story-New Jersey: Reducing Energy Bills for Camden's Families April 25, 2013 - 12:58pm Addthis The Northgate II, a 308-unit apartment building, was treated with Aeroseal, thanks to a grant from New Jersey's Multifamily Weatherization Assistance Program. Aeroseal, developed at DOE's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory by Dr. Mark Modera, uses airborne adhesive particles to seal leaky air ducts. The

  15. New Employee Orientation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Employees' Group Life Insurance (FEGLI) Thrift Savings Plan (TSP) A Family-Friendly Workplace Benefit Forms DOE Substance Abuse Testing Program Security Forms and Information...

  16. Southern Coal finds value in the met market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiscor, S.

    2009-11-15

    The Justice family launches a new coal company (Southern Coal Corp.) to serve metallurgical and steam coal markets. 1 tab., 3 photos.

  17. Energy News | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Home Energy Education Challenge (AHEEC), a student competition created to help families save money by saving energy. May 15, 2014 Energy Department Announces Secretarial...

  18. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Need 3 Significant number of low-income customers. * 12% of families below federal poverty level. * 18% of households receive food stamps. * 34% have household incomes income...

  19. Before Y-12

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Some of the displaced families had previously been displaced from the northern portion of Anderson County when the Tennessee Valley Authority built its first dam, Norris Dam. This ...

  20. Comments of NRDC on Department of Energy Interim Final Rule:...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    NRDC's comments on Interim Final Rule: Energy Conservation for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings and New Federal Low-Rise Residential ...

  1. Energy Saver 101 Infographic: Home Heating | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Office of Public Affairs Space heating is likely the largest energy expense in your home, accounting for about 45 percent of the average American family's energy bills. That...

  2. High-Performance Affordable Housing with Habitat for Humanity...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Find more case studies of Building America projects across the country that provide ... Building America Top Innovations 2013 Profile - Zero Energy-Ready Single-Family Homes ...

  3. High-Performance with Solar Electric Reduced Peak Demand: Premier...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Find more case studies of Building America projects across the country that demonstrate ... Building America Top Innovations 2013 Profile - Zero Energy-Ready Single-Family Homes

  4. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    America to a new winter holiday Festivus. The Airing of Grievances, one of the core traditions of Festivus, involved friends and family telling each other about all the...

  5. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biomass Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Energy Conservation Loan Loans for large residential properties are available through the Multi-Family...

  6. Radiation and Chemical Risk Management | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RESRAD: Family of Risk Codes Latest News Battelle shows off technology to cope with terror attacks Columbus Dispatch Energy efficiency: National labs try to cut energy bills...

  7. Holiday Gift Drive

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Disabilities Espanola Valley Toy Run Las Vegas Adult Protective Services La Tierra Montessori Los Alamos Family Council Ohkay Owingeh Boys and Girls Clubs Rio ArribaLos Alamos...

  8. LANL: CPO: Los Alamos National Laboratory Impacts and Investments...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    School * Espanola Valley Toy Run, Inc. * Espanola Adult Protective Services * La Tierra Montessori * Rio Arriba office of NM Mexico Children, Youth & Families Dept. * Wings of Hope...

  9. Cutting Wasteful Spending While Protecting Our Priorities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Congress must work together on a budget that cuts wasteful spending while supporting jobs, the economy, and middle-class families.

  10. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of leadership: portrait helps commemorate Los Alamos anniversary April 5, 2013 Family of Gen. Leslie Groves donates official portrait to Historical Society LOS ALAMOS, N.M., April...

  11. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and property managers of apartments and other multi-family properties for making energy efficiency... Eligibility: Commercial, Construction, Multifamily Residential Savings...

  12. Other Incentive | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Local Government Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Photovoltaics Yes Lakeland Electric - Solar Water Heating Program (Florida) Other...

  13. Science and Suds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    activities and dynamic speakers to engage kids, families and individuals interested in life-long learning in science, technology, engineering, art and math. For the full...

  14. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Roofs Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Energy Conservation Loan Loans for large residential properties are available through the Multi-Family Energy...

  15. Guides and Case Studies for Cold and Very Cold Climates | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Housing Innovation Award, this single-family home built in a peat bog has underground storage tanks and drainage tanks, blown fiberglass insulation, coated rigid polyisocyanurate,...

  16. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings SCE- Multi-Family Residential Energy Efficiency Programs Southern California Edison (SCE) offers prescriptive rebates to...

  17. Microsoft Word - 20050821_Appendix_A.doc

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A9. U.S. Average Vehicle-Miles Traveled by Family Income and Poverty Status, 2001 (Thousand Miles per Household) ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION HOUSEHOLD VEHICLES ENERGY USE:...

  18. Microsoft Word - 20050821_Appendix_A.doc

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0. U.S. Average Vehicle Fuel Consumption by Family Income and Poverty Status, 2001 (Gallons per Household) ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION HOUSEHOLD VEHICLES ENERGY USE: LATEST...

  19. Oxford Innovation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Innovation Jump to: navigation, search Name: Oxford Innovation Place: United Kingdom Sector: Services Product: General Financial & Legal Services ( Private family-controlled )...

  20. Setting the Record Straight on Weatherization | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, helping families across the nation cut their energy bills. The Associated Press ran an article today critical of the...