National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for glossary aquifer field

  1. Glossary

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Alluvial aquifer: The alluvial aquifer is composed of unconsolidated sediments (silt, sand, gravel, cobbles) deposited by stream flow.

  2. ARM - Glossary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments? WeDatastreamstps DocumentationAtlanticENAField Participants Campaign DetailsgovAboutGlossary About

  3. The hydrogeochemistry of pond and rice field recharge : implications for the arsenic contaminated aquifers in Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumann, Rebecca B

    2010-01-01

    The shallow aquifers in Bangladesh, which provide drinking water for millions and irrigation water for innumerable rice fields, are severely contaminated with geogenic arsenic. Water mass balance calculations show that ...

  4. Glossary of fusion energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitson, M.O.

    1982-01-01

    This glossary gives brief descriptions of approximately 400 terms used by the fusion community. Schematic diagrams and photographs of the major US experiments are also included. (MOW)

  5. Virus removal by soil passage at field scale and ground-water protection of sandy aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassanizadeh, S. Majid

    Virus removal by soil passage at field scale and ground- water protection of sandy aquifers J; The Netherlands (E-mail: Majid@ct.tudelft.nl) Abstract Virus removal from groundwater by soil passage often for attachment than thereafter. A model is presented which interprets virus removal as a function of collision

  6. Shale Gas Glossary | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Glossary Shale Gas Glossary Shale Gas Glossary More Documents & Publications Natural Gas from Shale: Questions and Answers Modern Shale Gas Development in the United States: A...

  7. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE. A NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF AUBURN UNIVERSITY FIELD EXPERIMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2013-01-01

    University Thermal Energy Storage , LBL No. 10194. Edwards,modeling of thermal energy storage in aquifers, ProceedingsAquifer Thermal Energy Storage Programs (in preparation).

  8. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE. A NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF AUBURN UNIVERSITY FIELD EXPERIMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2013-01-01

    within the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program managedof a seasonal aquifer thermal energy storage experiment

  9. Appendix B. Glossary Appendix B. Glossary B-3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    . Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) -- A federal agency created in 1946 to manage the development, use of the Department of Energy and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission). base/neutral and acid extractables (BNAAppendix B. Glossary #12;#12;Appendix B. Glossary B-3 Appendix B. Glossary absorption, atomic

  10. Appendix C. Glossary Appendix C. Glossary C-3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    . Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) -- A federal agency created in 1946 to manage the development, use of the Department of Energy and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission). base/neutral and acid extractables (BNAAppendix C. Glossary #12;#12;Appendix C. Glossary C-3 Appendix C. Glossary absorption, atomic

  11. Appendix H: Glossary Appendix H: Glossary H-3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    by the vapor. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) -- A federal agency created in 1946 to manage the development, use.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission). base/neutral and acid extractables (BNAAppendix H: Glossary #12;Appendix H: Glossary H-3 Glossary of Environmental Terms AA -- See atomic

  12. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE. A NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF AUBURN UNIVERSITY FIELD EXPERIMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2013-01-01

    C.F. , 1980, "Aquifer Thermal Energy - Parameter Study" (infrom the Auburn University Thermal Energy Storage , LBL No.studies in aquifer thermal energy , Presented at the ~~~~~~~

  13. Quadrennial Technology Review Glossary

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram: Report Appendices |Project Management|Energy PumpedWind3 Glossary

  14. Comparison of Caprock Mineral Characteristics at Field Demonstration Sites for Saline Aquifer Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffith, C.A.; Lowry, G. (Carnegie Mellon University); Dzombak, D. (Carnegie Mellon University); Soong, Yee; Hedges, S.W.

    2008-10-01

    In 2003 the U.S Department of Energy initiated regional partnership programs to address the concern for rising atmospheric CO2. These partnerships were formed to explore regional and economical means for geologically sequestering CO2 across the United States and to set the stage for future commercial applications. Several options exist for geological sequestration and among these sequestering CO2 into deep saline aquifers is one of the most promising. This is due, in part, to the possibility of stabilized permanent storage through mineral precipitation from chemical interactions of the injected carbon dioxide with the brine and reservoir rock. There are nine field demonstration sites for saline sequestration among the regional partnerships in Phase II development to validate the overall commercial feasibility for CO2 geological sequestration. Of the nine sites considered for Phase II saline sequestration demonstration, seven are profiled in this study for their caprock lithologic and mineral characteristics.

  15. Hydraulic characterization of aquifers by thermal response testing: Validation by large-scale tank and field experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    (TRTs) are a common field method in shallow geothermics to estimate thermal properties of the ground. During the test, a constantly heated fluid is circulated in closed tubes within a vertical borehole heat is mainly studied in the con- text of geothermal energy use of shallow aquifers [Parr et al., 1983; Palmer

  16. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE. A NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF AUBURN UNIVERSITY FIELD EXPERIMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2013-01-01

    Current aquifer thermal storage projects are summarized in aDivision of Thermal and Mechanical Storage Systems. ThisAuburn University Thermal Energy Storage , LBL No. 10194.

  17. GLOSSARY OF WATER RESOURCES TERMS Compiled by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    District of Columbia, University of the

    #12;GLOSSARY OF WATER RESOURCES TERMS Compiled by WRRC Staff D.C. Water Resources Research Center;PREFACE The glossary of water research terms was compiled from a variety of other glossaries, dictionaries. The compilation and preparation of this edition of the glossary was carried out by WRRC staff including Faculty

  18. Seasonal dynamics in costal aquifers : investigation of submarine groundwater discharge through field measurements and numerical models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael, Holly Anne, 1976-

    2005-01-01

    The fresh and saline groundwater flowing from coastal aquifers into the ocean comprise submarine groundwater discharge (SGD). This outflow is an important pathway for the transport of nutrients and contaminants, and has ...

  19. Glossary: Carbon dioxide and climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-08-01

    This Glossary contains definitions of selected CO{sub 2}-related terms as well as tables containing information related to CO{sub 2} and climate. Each term is defined with an emphasis on its relationship to CO{sub 2} and climate. Many of the definitions are then followed by a more detailed description of the term and its use. References to the literature from which the definitions were taken are listed at the end of the Glossary.

  20. Field Evaluation of the Restorative Capacity of the Aquifer Downgradient of a Uranium In-Situ Recovery Mining Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reimus, Paul William

    2015-05-22

    A two-part field study was conducted in Smith Ranch-Highland in-situ recovery (ISR) near Douglas, Wyoming, to evaluate the restorative capacity of the aquifer downgradient (i.e., hydrologically downstream) of a Uranium ISR mining site with respect to the transport of uranium and other potential contaminants in groundwater after mining has ceased. The study was partially conducted by checking the Uranium content and the alkalinity of separate wells, some wells had been restored and others had not. A map and in-depth procedures of the study are included.

  1. Appendix C. Glossary Appendix C. Glossary C-3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    apacity is important to water quality. f an atom; it has the same harge and mass as that of a helium a a analytical detection limit -- The lowest reasonably accurate concentration of a d a aquifer -- A saturated

  2. DOE Acquisition and Project Management (APM) Glossary of Terms...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE Acquisition and Project Management (APM) Glossary of Terms Handbook FINAL VERSION 9-30-2014 DOE Acquisition and Project Management (APM) Glossary of Terms Handbook FINAL...

  3. An aquifer characterization at the Texas A&M University Brazos River Hydrologic Field Site, Burleson Co., Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wrobleski, Christine Lynn

    1996-01-01

    characteristics of the aquifer at this site were studied. The aquifer at the Brazos river site is an alluvial, heterogeneous, unconfined system having a saturated thickness of approximately forty feet. It is comprised of a fluvial deposited fining-upward sequence...

  4. Appendix B: Glossary of Polymer Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Christopher

    -334 (Wiley, New York, 1985). Acrylic ester polymers A group of amorphous carbon-chain polymers of whichAppendix B: Glossary of Polymer Materials This glossary emphasises the individuality of polymers and polymer families, historically, scientifically and technically. It complements the rest of the book

  5. REDD Glossary | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/Colorado <RAPID/Geothermal/Water Use/NevadaaTools < RAPID79.14SiliconGlossary Jump

  6. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01

    aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlined abovean Aquifer Used for Hot Water Storage: Digital Simulation ofof Aquifer Systems for Cyclic Storage of Water," of the Fall

  7. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01

    of such an aquifer thermal storage system were studied andusing aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"

  8. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01

    aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlined aboveModeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers," Proceed-ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

  9. Glossary

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    A blend of finished motor gasoline and alcohol (generally ethanol but sometimes methanol) in which 10 percent or less of the product is alcohol. For the purposes of this...

  10. Glossary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYear Jan Feb Mar87.1CubicYear Jan Feb2.5

  11. Glossary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYear Jan Feb Mar87.1CubicYear Jan Feb2.56 441 the

  12. Glossary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  13. Glossary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you not findGeoscience/EnvironmentGlobal Security Global

  14. RSSC GLOSSARY 8/99 GL-1 GLOSSARY OF BASIC RADIATION PROTECTION TERMINOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    RSSC GLOSSARY 8/99 GL-1 GLOSSARY OF BASIC RADIATION PROTECTION TERMINOLOGY ABSORBED DOSE: The amount of energy absorbed, as a result of radiation passing through a material, per unit mass of material by which energy from radiation is transferred to matter by interactions with the constituents of the matter

  15. State Energy Overview. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-10-01

    An overview of selected energy-related data for the United States, for each state, and for the District of Columbia is presented. Included are the quantities of energy produced and consumed, estimates of fuel reserves, the value of nonrenewable fuels produced by type, energy expenditures, and consumer prices. Also provided for each state are selected demographic and energy-related information that have been ranked and expressed as a percent of the national total. This overview provides a ready reference and a quick access to selected state energy information and state rankings for various socioeconomic and energy items. The State Energy Overview is arranged in five sections. The first section presents United States totals and an overview of state rankings. The second depicts data for the 50 states and the District of Columbia. The glossary presents definitions germane to this publication and the fourth section describes methodology and includes remarks concerning the information and methods used to estimate 1982 consumption numbers. The fifth section presents sources of data and information for this publication. A summary of each section is included.

  16. The IEA/ECBCS/Annex 40 Glossary on Commissioning 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akashi, Y.; Castro, N.; Novakovic, V.; Viaud, B.; Jandon, M.

    2004-01-01

    International Energy Agency's (IEA) Energy Conservation in Building and Community Systems' (ECBCS) Annex 40 has developed a glossary of commissioning terms as one of the first commissioning tools produced within the annex. The glossary consists...

  17. A controlled in situ field evaluation of a new dynamic vacuum slug test method in unconfined aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lauctes, B.A.; Schleyer, C.A.

    1995-09-01

    Most ground water site characterizations require initial estimates of the ground water flow velocity and potential downgradient extent of ground water contamination. The fundamental aquifer property, hydraulic conductivity, must be determined to make these essential estimates. Highly contaminated ground water often precludes conducting multi-well aquifer tests to evaluate hydraulic conductivity due to potential human health risks and ground water storage/treatment/disposal costs and logistics. Consequently, single-well slug tests are often sued, but the widely used pressure slug test method is not suitable for water table monitoring wells. As a result, a new slug test method was developed by GCL for unconfined aquifers. The new method was benchmarked against the widely used solid slug test method in a series of rising-head and falling-head slug tests. A statistical evaluation indicated no statistical difference (alpha = 0.05) between hydraulic conductivity values calculated from each method. The new dynamic vacuum method, designed specifically for use in water table monitoring wells, uses a continuous vacuum to draw air through the well screen exposed above the water table. The vacuum induces upwelling as air pressure inside the well casing drops below atmospheric pressure. Once upwelling equilibrates with the applied vacuum, the vacuum is released allowing the water to recover and the air pressure inside the casing to return to atmospheric pressure.

  18. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01

    varying solar energy inputs and thermal or power demands. Itusing aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"

  19. Field scale evaluation of the In Situ Permeable Flow Sensor and assessment of river-aquifer interaction at the Brazos River Hydrologic Field Site / by Andrew Scott Alden 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alden, Andrew Scott

    1996-01-01

    the Brazos River and the adjacent flood plain aquifer. Components of groundwater flow as determined from a piezometer gradient analysis of monitoring wells at the site were compared with results from the Flow Sensors. In the second phase of testing, two...

  20. Program Evaluation: Glossary | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool Fits theCommitteeCrystallineReserveInformation Resources »EERE ResourceGlossary

  1. Solar Energy Glossary | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram: Report AppendicesAVideoSolar Decathlon 2015: Build itEnergy Glossary

  2. A Glossary of GIS Terminology (92-13)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Padmanabhan, G.; Leipnik, Mark R.; Yoon, Jeawan

    1992-01-01

    A GLOSSARY OF GIS TERMINOLOGY: 92-13 A comprehensiveinformation systems (GIS) and related technologies, with an2. Physical Scientist (GIS Specialist), Mail stop LC277,

  3. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01

    and Zakhidov, 1971. "Storage of Solar Energy in a Sandy-Aquifer Storage of Hot Water from Solar Energy Collectors,"with solar energy systems, aquifer energy storage provides a

  4. Electric Power Monthly, August 1990. [Glossary included

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-11-29

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly summaries of electric utility statistics at the national, Census division, and State level. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data includes generation by energy source (coal, oil, gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear); generation by region; consumption of fossil fuels for power generation; sales of electric power, cost data; and unusual occurrences. A glossary is included.

  5. PNNL: Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis - Glossary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you notHeatMaRIEdioxideUser Careers/ HumanOurOutreachTour Glossary

  6. Glossary of Hydropower Terms | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,Executive CompensationEnergyGet Current: SwitchGlennPast ProjectsGlossary

  7. Glossary of Terms | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,Executive CompensationEnergyGet Current: SwitchGlennPastGlossary of Terms

  8. Shale Gas Glossary | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OF APPLICABLE DIRECTIVES Pursuant to theDepartmentWorkalongShale Gas Glossary

  9. Solar Energy Education. Industrial arts: teacher's guide. Field...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    guide. Field test edition. Includes glossary Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Solar Energy Education. Industrial arts: teacher's guide. Field test edition. Includes...

  10. Solar Energy Education. Home economics: teacher's guide. Field...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    guide. Field test edition. Includes glossary Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Solar Energy Education. Home economics: teacher's guide. Field test edition. Includes...

  11. Glossary of Health Coverage and Medical Terms Page 1 of 4 Glossary of Health Coverage and Medical Terms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glossary of Health Coverage and Medical Terms Page 1 of 4 Glossary of Health Coverage and Medical health care services. This may be called "eligible expense," "payment allowance" or "negotiated rate Billing.) Appeal A request for your health insurer or plan to review a decision or a grievance again

  12. Glossary Glossary

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    and drip gas, as well as liquid hydrocarbons produced from tar sands, gilsonite, and oil shale. Excludes topped crude oil, residual oil, other unfinished oils, and liquids...

  13. Glossary Glossary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYear Jan Feb Mar87.1CubicYear Jan Feb2.56 441 60

  14. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01

    thermal energy becomes apparent with the development of solarsolar energy systems, aquifer energy storage provides a buffer between time-varying solar energy inputs and thermal

  15. Subsurface microbial community structure correlates with uranium redox phases during in situ field manipulation in a contaminated aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kostka, Joel [Florida State University; Green, Stefan [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Wu, Wei-min [Stanford University; Criddle, Craig [Stanford University; Watson, David B [ORNL; Jardine, Philip M [ORNL

    2009-07-01

    Long-term field manipulation experiments investigating the effects of subsurface redox conditions on the fate and transport of soluble uranium(VI) were conducted over a 3 year period at the Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Center (OR-IFRC) in Oak Ridge, TN. In the highly contaminated source zone, introduction of ethanol to the subsurface stimulated native denitrifying, sulfate-reducing, iron-reducing and fermentative microorganisms and reduced U to below 0.03 mg/L. Subsequently, oxygen and nitrate were experimentally re-introduced into the subsurface to examine the potential for re-oxidation and re-mobilization of U(IV). Introduction of oxygen or nitrate caused changes in subsurface geochemistry and re-oxidation of U. After reoxidation, the subsurface experienced several months of starvation conditions before ethanol injection was restored to reduce the treatment zone. Subsurface microorganisms were characterized by community fingerprinting, targeted population analyses, and quantitative PCR of key functional groups in 50 samples taken during multiple phases of field manipulation. Statistical analysis confirmed the hypothesis that the microbial community would co-vary with the shifts in the subsurface geochemistry. The level of hydraulic connectivity of sampling wells to the injection well was readily tracked by microbial community analysis. We demonstrate quantitatively that specific populations, especially Desulfosporosinus, are heavily influenced by geochemical conditions and positively correlate with the immobilization of uranium. Following nitrate reoxidation, populations of Fe(II)-oxidizing, nitrate reducing organisms (Thiobacillus) showed an increase in relative abundance.

  16. 1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Glossary--Space-Heating...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Space-Heating Equipment Glossary-Space-Heating Equipment Boiler: A type of space-heating equipment consisting of a vessel or tank where heat produced from the combustion of such...

  17. Interim performance criteria for photovoltaic energy systems. [Glossary included

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeBlasio, R.; Forman, S.; Hogan, S.; Nuss, G.; Post, H.; Ross, R.; Schafft, H.

    1980-12-01

    This document is a response to the Photovoltaic Research, Development, and Demonstration Act of 1978 (P.L. 95-590) which required the generation of performance criteria for photovoltaic energy systems. Since the document is evolutionary and will be updated, the term interim is used. More than 50 experts in the photovoltaic field have contributed in the writing and review of the 179 performance criteria listed in this document. The performance criteria address characteristics of present-day photovoltaic systems that are of interest to manufacturers, government agencies, purchasers, and all others interested in various aspects of photovoltaic system performance and safety. The performance criteria apply to the system as a whole and to its possible subsystems: array, power conditioning, monitor and control, storage, cabling, and power distribution. They are further categorized according to the following performance attributes: electrical, thermal, mechanical/structural, safety, durability/reliability, installation/operation/maintenance, and building/site. Each criterion contains a statement of expected performance (nonprescriptive), a method of evaluation, and a commentary with further information or justification. Over 50 references for background information are also given. A glossary with definitions relevant to photovoltaic systems and a section on test methods are presented in the appendices. Twenty test methods are included to measure performance characteristics of the subsystem elements. These test methods and other parts of the document will be expanded or revised as future experience and needs dictate.

  18. Aquifer behavior with reinjection 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonet, Euclides Jose

    1967-01-01

    AQUIFER BEHAVIOR WITH REINJECTION A Thesis By EUCLIDES JOSE BONET Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas ARUM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May, f967 Major Subject... Petroleum Engineering AQUIFER BEHAVIOR WITH REINJECTION A Thesis By E UC LI DES JOSE BONE T Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Member) (Member) May, 1967 ACKNOWLEDGMENT Thanks are due to Petroleo Brasilerio S...

  19. Production of an English/Russian glossary of terminology for nuclear materials control and accounting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schachowskoj, S.; Smith, H.A. Jr.

    1995-05-01

    The program plans for Former Soviet Union National Nuclear Materials Control and Accounting (MC and A) Systems Enhancements call for the development of an English/Russian Glossary of MC and A terminology. This glossary was envisioned as an outgrowth of the many interactions, training sessions, and other talking and writing exercises that would transpire in the course of carrying out these programs. This report summarizes the status of the production of this glossary, the most recent copy of which is attached to this report. The glossary contains over 950 terms and acronyms associated with nuclear material control and accounting for safeguards and nonproliferation. This document is organized as follows: English/Russian glossary of terms and acronyms; Russian/English glossary of terms and acronyms; English/Russian glossary of acronyms; and Russian/English glossary of acronyms.

  20. Field-Derived Hydraulic Properties for Perched-Water Aquifer Wells 299-E33-350 and 299-E33-351, Hanford Site B-Complex Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newcomer, Darrell R.

    2014-07-01

    During February and March 2014, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted hydraulic (slug) tests at 200-DV-1 Operable Unit wells 299-E33-350 (C8914) and 299-E33-351 (C8915) as part of B-Complex Area Perched-Water characterization activities at the Hanford Site 200-East Area. During the construction/completion phase of each well, two overlapping depth intervals were tested within the unconfined perched-water aquifer contained in the silty-sand subunit of the Cold Creek Unit. The purpose of the slug-test characterization was to provide estimates of transmissivity and hydraulic conductivity for the perched-water aquifer at these selected well locations.

  1. Analyzing aquifers associated with gas reservoirs using aquifer influence functions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Targac, Gary Wayne

    1988-01-01

    ANALYZING AQUIFERS ASSOCIATED WITH GAS RESERVOIRS USING AQUIFER INFLUENCE FUNCTIONS A Thesis by GARY WAYNE TARGAC Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE V z May 1988 z V z z I- Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering ANALYZING AQUIFERS ASSOCIATED WITH GAS RESERVOIRS USING AQUIFER INFLUENCE FUNCTIONS A Thesis by GARY WAYNE TARGAC Approved as to style and content by: (Chair of Committ R...

  2. Personal Glossaries On The WWW: An Exploratory Study James Blustein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blustein, J.

    definitions from the text of articles. Only the editable glossary tool allowed users to add, delete, and change entries. Both tools were evaluated to find out how useful they were to users reading technical articles online. The analyt- ical results showed that user performance improved with- out increasing total

  3. Glossary of Volatile Organic Compounds Ethylbenzene Carbon tetrachloride

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glossary of Volatile Organic Compounds · Ethylbenzene · Carbon tetrachloride · Benzene · 1 and petroleum. It is also found in manufactured products such as inks, insecticides, and paints. Ethylbenzene, carpet glues, varnishes and paints, and use of tobacco. Some people are exposed to ethylbenzene at work

  4. Computer surety: computer system inspection guidance. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-07-01

    This document discusses computer surety in NRC-licensed nuclear facilities from the perspective of physical protection inspectors. It gives background information and a glossary of computer terms, along with threats and computer vulnerabilities, methods used to harden computer elements, and computer audit controls.

  5. 227Bureau of Meteorology Annual Report 201314 GLOSSARY OF ACRONYMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    AviationSafetyAuthority CAWCR CentreforAustralianWeatherand ClimateResearch CCF CentralComputingFacility CDS Commonwealth227Bureau of Meteorology Annual Report 2013­14 AppendixB GLOSSARY OF ACRONYMS | A ABC AustralianFloodEstimation ARBIS Automatic RadioBurstIdentification Software ARC AustralianResearchCouncil ARM Atmospheric

  6. Solar Energy Education. Reader, Part II. Sun story. [Includes glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    Magazine articles which focus on the subject of solar energy are presented. The booklet prepared is the second of a four part series of the Solar Energy Reader. Excerpts from the magazines include the history of solar energy, mythology and tales, and selected poetry on the sun. A glossary of energy related terms is included. (BCS)

  7. November 2014 Laboratory Safety Manual Appendix B -Glossary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    Appendix B - Glossary Laboratory Safety Manual UW Environmental Health and Safety ANSI American National and public needs for national consensus standards and coordinates development of such standards. Many ANSI, etc. (ANSI, 1819 L Street NW, Suite 600, Washington DC 20036, 202-293-8020, http://www.ansi

  8. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01

    Accumulation of Solar Energy in an Aquifer. Geliotekhnika.Aquifer Heating in Solar-Energy Accumulation, Gelioteknhika.presented at Int. Solar Energy Soc. (American Sec. ) "Solar

  9. Planning Glossary CharlesF.Schwarz EdwardC.Thor GaryH.Elsner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Oxford: 911(038)­(73) Retrieval Terms: wildland planning; land utilization; range management; forestWildland Planning Glossary CharlesF.Schwarz EdwardC.Thor GaryH.Elsner PACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest., Edward C. Thor, and Gary H. Elsner. 1976. Wildland planning glossary. USDA Forest Serv. Gen Tech. Rep

  10. DOE Acquisition and Project Management (APM) Glossary of Terms Handbook FINAL VERSION 9-30-2014

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ACQUISITION AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT GLOSSARY OF TERMS HANDBOOK This handbook provides definitions of acquisition and project management terms commonly used in DOE projects to ensure consistent use of terms in DOE project documents and discussions. DOE APM Glossary of Terms Handbook – Final, September 2014

  11. Cogeneration handbook for the textile industry. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrett-Price, B.A.; Fassbender, L.L.; Moore, N.L.; Fassbender, A.G.; Eakin, D.E.; Gorges, H.A.

    1984-03-01

    The decision of whether to cogenerate involves several considerations, including technical, economic, environmental, legal, and regulatory issues. Each of these issues is addressed separately in this handbook. In addition, a chapter is included on preparing a three-phase work statement, which is needed to guide the design of a cogeneration system. In addition, an annotated bibliography and a glossary of terminology are provided. Appendix A provides an energy-use profile of the textile industry. Appendices B through O provide specific information that will be called out in subsequent chapters.

  12. Cogeneration handbook for the petroleum refining industry. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fassbender, L.L.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Moore, N.L.; Fassbender, A.G.; Eakin, D.E.; Gorges, H.A.

    1984-03-01

    The decision of whether to cogenerate involves several considerations, including technical, economic, environmental, legal, and regulatory issues. Each of these issues is addressed separately in this handbook. In addition, a chapter is included on preparing a three-phase work statement, which is needed to guide the design of a cogeneration system. In addition, an annotated bibliography and a glossary of terminology are provided. Appendix A provides an energy-use profile of the petroleum refining industry. Appendices B through O provide specific information that will be called out in subsequent chapters.

  13. Cogeneration handbook for the food processing industry. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eakin, D.E.; Fassbender, L.L.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Moore, N.L.; Fasbender, A.G.; Gorges, H.A.

    1984-03-01

    The decision of whether to cogenerate involves several considerations, including technical, economic, environmental, legal, and regulatory issues. Each of these issues is addressed separately in this handbook. In addition, a chapter is included on preparing a three-phase work statement, which is needed to guide the design of a cogeneration system. In addition, an annotated bibliography and a glossary of terminology are provided. Appendix A provides an energy-use profile of the food processing industry. Appendices B through O provide specific information that will be called out in subsequent chapters.

  14. Cogeneration handbook for the pulp and paper industry. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, E.A.; Moore, N.L.; Fassbender, L.L.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Fassbender, A.G.; Eakin, D.E.; Gorges, H.A.

    1984-03-01

    The decision of whether to cogenerate involves several considerations, including technical, economic, environmental, legal, and regulatory issues. Each of these issues is addressed separately in this handbook. In addition, a chapter is included on preparing a three-phase work statement, which is needed to guide the design of a cogeneration system. In addition, an annotated bibliography and a glossary of terminology are provided. Appendix A provides an energy-use profile of the pulp and paper industry. Appendices B and O provide specific information that will be called out in subsequent chapters.

  15. Cogeneration handbook for the chemical process industries. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fassbender, A.G.; Fassbender, L.L.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Moore, N.L.; Eakin, D.E.; Gorges, H.A.

    1984-03-01

    The desision of whether to cogenerate involves several considerations, including technical, economic, environmental, legal, and regulatory issues. Each of these issues is addressed separately in this handbook. In addition, a chapter is included on preparing a three-phase work statement, which is needed to guide the design of a cogeneration system. In addition, an annotated bibliography and a glossary of terminology are provided. Appendix A provides an energy-use profile of the chemical industry. Appendices B through O provide specific information that will be called out in subsequent chapters.

  16. Small Wind Guidebook/Glossary of Terms | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc JumpHeter Battery Technology CoWanpingSilveiraSmall Wind Guidebook/Glossary of

  17. UN-Glossary for Transportation Statistics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (Utility Company) Jump to:TucsonLLC Jump to:UDI Jump to:UGILtdGlossary for

  18. Transboundary aquifers: Southwestern states assess 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2008-01-01

    stream_source_info Transboundary aquifers.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 5261 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Transboundary aquifers.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 tx H2O... | pg. 14 Southwestern states assess Researchers from three universities in Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona and from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) are partnering on a new project to evaluate aquifers that span the United States and Mexico...

  19. Geophysical constraints on contaminant transport modeling in a heterogeneous fluvial aquifer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Chunmiao

    Geophysical constraints on contaminant transport modeling in a heterogeneous fluvial aquifer Jerry the geophysically derived hydraulic conductivity representation in numerical simulations of the natural the effectiveness of geophysically derived and flowmeter based representations of the hydraulic conductivity field

  20. English/Russian and Russian/English glossary of physical protection terms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soo Hoo, M.S. [ed.

    1995-07-01

    This glossary was prepared in fulfillment of the Glossary Preparation Task identified in the Program Plan for providing Assistance to the Russian Federation in Nuclear Material Control and Accounting and Physical Protection. The Program Plan is part of the Cooperative Threat Reduction Program as provided for under House Resolution (H.R.) 3807 (Title II, as referenced under Public Law (P.L.) 102-229. The terms in this glossary were derived from physical protection training material prepared at Sandia. The training material, and thus refinements to the glossary, has undergone years of development in presentation to both domestic and international audiences. Also, Russian Colleagues and interpreters have reviewed the translations for accuracy.

  1. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2012-01-01

    1978, High temperature underground thermal energy storage,in Proceedings, Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Workshop:High temperature underground thermal energy storage, in ATES

  2. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01

    Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Coupled withGeneration and Energy Storage," presented at Frontiers ofStudy of Underground Energy Storage Using High-Pressure,

  3. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2012-01-01

    High temperature underground thermal energy storage, inProceedings, Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Workshop:underground thermal energy storage, in ATES newsletter:

  4. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01

    Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Coupled withLow Temperature Thermal Energy Storage Program of Oak Ridgefor Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage: An Overview of the DOE-

  5. Regional Analysis And Characterization Of Fractured Aquifers...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Regional Analysis And Characterization Of Fractured Aquifers In The Virginia Blue Ridge And Piedmont Provinces Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  6. EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL STUDIES OF THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2011-01-01

    In Proceed- ings of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Work-Mathematical Modeling of Thermal Energy storage in Aquifers.In Proceed- ings of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Work-

  7. Seymour Aquifer Water Quality Improvement Project Final Report 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sij, J.; Morgan, C.; Belew, M.; Jones, D.; Wagner, K.

    2008-01-01

    The Seymour Aquifer is a shallow aquifer underlying over 300,000 acres in 20 counties in northwest central Texas. High nitrate concentrations are widespread in the Seymour Aquifer. Median nitrate levels in Knox, Haskell, Baylor, Hall, Wichita...

  8. THE SNAKE RIVER PLAIN AQUIFER THE SNAKE RIVER PLAIN AQUIFER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired Solar Fuel Production 1:PhysicsSyndicated Contentwo2aquifer THE INL

  9. ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS - - A SURVEY OF RECENT THEORETICAL STUDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2013-01-01

    temperature underground thermal energy storage. In Proc. Th~al modeling of thermal energy storage in aquifers. In ~~-Mathematical modeling; thermal energy storage; aquifers;

  10. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Aquifer Storage Reservoir...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Aquifer Storage Reservoir Configuration About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Aquifer Underground...

  11. Glossary of CERCLA, RCRA and TSCA related terms and acronyms. Environmental Guidance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This glossary contains CERCLA, RCRA and TSCA related terms that are most often encountered in the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration and Emergency Preparedness activities. Detailed definitions are included for key terms. The CERCLA definitions included in this glossary are taken from the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended and related federal rulemakings. The RCRA definitions included in this glossary are taken from the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and related federal rulemakings. The TSCA definitions included in this glossary are taken from the Toxic Substances and Control Act (TSCA) and related federal rulemakings. Definitions related to TSCA are limited to those sections in the statute and regulations concerning PCBs and asbestos.Other sources for definitions include additional federal rulemakings, assorted guidance documents prepared by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), guidance and informational documents prepared by the US Department of Energy (DOE), and DOE Orders. The source of each term is noted beside the term. Terms presented in this document reflect revised and new definitions published before July 1, 1993.

  12. References R-3 ANS 1986. Glossary of Terms in Nuclear Science and Technology, American Nuclear Society.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    of Environment and Conservation, Department of Energy, Oversight Division Status Report to the Public, NashvilleReferences #12;References R-3 REFERENCES ANS 1986. Glossary of Terms in Nuclear Science and Technology, American Nuclear Society. ANSI 1969. N13.1, Sampling Airborne Radioactive Materials in Nuclear

  13. Horizontal well hydraulics in leaky aquifers Hongbin Zhan*, Eungyu Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhan, Hongbin

    Horizontal well hydraulics in leaky aquifers Hongbin Zhan*, Eungyu Park Department of Geology presents a general study of horizontal well hydraulics for three aquifer types: a leaky confined aquifer- standing of horizontal well hydraulics under various aquifer conditions. 2. Mathematical model I

  14. THEORETICAL STUDIES IN LONG-TERM THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.F.

    2013-01-01

    Mathematical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers.of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, LawrenceF.P. "Thermal Energy Storage in a Confined Aquifer- Second

  15. Modelling Bioremediation of Uranium Contaminated Aquifers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rotter, Ben E G

    2008-01-01

    Radionuclide extraction, processing and storage have resulted in a legacy of radionuclide-contaminated groundwater aquifers worldwide. An emerging remediation technology for such sites is the in situ immobilisation of ...

  16. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01

    HAUSZ, W. , 1977. "Seasonal Storage in District Heating,"District Heating, July-August-September, 1977, pp. 5-11.aquifer storage for district heating and cooling. C. W.

  17. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01

    Storage in District Heating," District Heating, July-August-aquifer storage for district heating and cooling. C. W.fully, whether it is for district heating on a large scale,

  18. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2012-01-01

    aquifers for heat storage, solar captors for heat productionZakhidov, R. A. 8 1971, Storage of solar energy in a sandy-thermal energy storage for cogeneration and solar systems,

  19. The Early Abbasid Caliphate: A Political History. By HUGH KENNEDY. Totowa, N. J.: Barnes and Noble, 1981. Pp. 238. Maps, glossary, index, bibliography. $25.00.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ibrahim, Mahmood

    1983-01-01

    Barnes and Noble, 1981. Pp. KENNEDY. Maps, glossary, index,bibliography. $25.00. Hugh Kennedy's The Early Abbasidculture and civilization. Kennedy restricts his generally

  20. Aquitard control of stream-aquifer interaction and flow to a horizontal well in coastal aquifers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Dongmin

    2007-04-25

    FINITE HORIZONTAL WELL IN CONFINED AQUIFERS..................................................................86 4.1 Introduction ...................................................................................... 87 4.2 Seawater Upconing Profile... under a Horizontal-Well in a Thick Aquifer .............................................................................................90 4.3 Analysis of Critical Condition of Seawater Upconing................... 108 4.4 Discussion...

  1. C:\\ANNUAL\\Vol2chps.v8\\ANNUAL2.VP

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7 Glossary Aquifer Field: A sub-surface facility for storing natural gas consisting of water-bearing sands topped by an imper- meable cap rock. Balancing Item: Represents...

  2. Naturally weathered feldspar surfaces in the Navajo Sandstone aquifer, Black Mesa, Arizona: Electron microscopic characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Chen

    Naturally weathered feldspar surfaces in the Navajo Sandstone aquifer, Black Mesa, Arizona Abstract Naturally weathered feldspar surfaces in the Jurassic Navajo Sandstone at Black Mesa, Arizona-field dissolution rate discrepancy. At Black Mesa, feldspars in the Navajo Sandstone are dissolving at $105 times

  3. Two well storage systems for combined heating and airconditioning by groundwater heatpumps in shallow aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pelka, W.

    1980-07-01

    The use of soil and ground water as an energy source and heat storage systems for heat pumps in order to conserve energy in heating and air conditioning buildings is discussed. Information is included on heat pump operation and performance, aquifer characteristics, soil and ground water temperatures, and cooling and heating demands. Mathematical models are used to calculate flow and temperature fields in the aquifer. It is concluded that two well storage systems with ground water heat pumps are desirable, particularly in northern climates. (LCL)

  4. Formation dry-out from CO2 injection into saline aquifers: Part 1, Effects of solids precipitation and their mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pruess, Karsten

    2009-01-01

    Formation in Natural Gas Storage Aquifers, Proceedings,documented for aquifer gas storage systems, where halite (

  5. SEASONAL THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS-MATHEMATICAL MODELING STUDIES IN 1979

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2013-01-01

    LBL~l0208 SEASONAL THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS~began working on seasonal thermal energy storage in aquifers

  6. ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS - - A SURVEY OF RECENT THEORETICAL STUDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2013-01-01

    temperature underground thermal energy storage. In Proc. Th~1980), Aquifer Thermal Energy Sto:t'age--·a survey, Invit.edal modeling of thermal energy storage in aquifers. In ~~-

  7. Capture zone design for a contaminated shallow unconfined aquifer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cann, Eric Roy

    1997-01-01

    Petroleum contamination has impacted a shallow unconfined Pleistocene terrace aquifer, in Travis County, East Austin, Texas (Figure 1). The aquifer was contaminated from accidental spills released from a bulk petroleum storage facility that operated...

  8. EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL STUDIES OF THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2011-01-01

    K" and Hare, R, C" Thermal Storage for Eco-energy utilities,Current aquifer thermal storage projects are sum- marized inIn Proceed- ings of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Work-

  9. A Lumped Parameter Model for the Edwards Aquifer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anaya, Roberto; Wanakule, Nisai

    1993-01-01

    A lumped parameter model has been developed to simulate monthly water levels and spring flows in the Edwards Aquifer. It is less complex and easier to use than the existing complex finite difference models for the Edwards Aquifer. The lumped...

  10. ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS - - A SURVEY OF RECENT THEORETICAL STUDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2013-01-01

    underground thermal energy storage. In Proc. Th~rmal1980), 'I'hermal energy storage? in a confined aquifer·--al modeling of thermal energy storage in aquifers. In ~~-

  11. On the solute transport in an aquifer-aquitard system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bian, Aiguo

    2009-05-15

    in the aquitard, retardation and radioactive decay in the aquifer and aquitard are taken into account. Mass exchange via diffusion between the aquifer and aquitard are investigated. The effects of hydrologic properties of the aquitard on solute transport...

  12. Radon Concern in the Hickory Aquifer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, Amanda

    2005-01-01

    stream_source_info Radon concern in the hickory aquifer.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 5403 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Radon concern in the hickory aquifer.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset...=ISO-8859-1 Radon ConcernStory by Amanda Crawford tx H2O | pg. 20 As the primary water source for Mason,Concho, McCulloch, San Saba, Menard, Kimble, and Gillespie counties in Central Texas, the threat of elevated radionuclide concentra- tions...

  13. Solar Energy Education. Reader, Part II. Sun story. [Includes glossary]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541 *ImpactScience(Technical Report) | SciTech

  14. field

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    09%2A en Ten-Year Site Plans (TYSP) http:www.nnsa.energy.govaboutusouroperationsinfopsinfopstysp

    field field-type-text field-field-page-name">
  15. Aquifer characterization and groundwater modeling in support of remedial actions at the Weldon Spring Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durham, L.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Carman, J.D. [Jacobs Engineering Group, Inc., St. Charles, MO (United States)

    1993-10-01

    Aquifer characterization studies were performed to develop a hydrogeologic understanding of an unconfined shallow aquifer at the Weldon Spring site west of St. Louis, Missouri. The 88-ha site became contaminated because of uranium and thorium processing and disposal activities that took place from the 1940s through the 1960s. Slug and pumping tests provided valuable information on the lateral distribution of hydraulic conductivities, and packer tests and lithologic information were used to determine zones of contrasting hydrologic properties within the aquifer. A three-dimensional, finite- element groundwater flow model was developed and used to simulate the shallow groundwater flow system at the site. The results of this study show that groundwater flow through the system is predominantly controlled by a zone of fracturing and weathering in the upper portion of the limestone aquifer. The groundwater flow model, developed and calibrated from field investigations, improved the understanding of the hydrogeology and supported decisions regarding remedial actions at the site. The results of this study illustrate the value, in support of remedial actions, of combining field investigations with numerical modeling to develop an improved understanding of the hydrogeology at the site.

  16. Aquifer Management for CO2 Sequestration 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anchliya, Abhishek

    2010-07-14

    Storage of carbon dioxide is being actively considered for the reduction of green house gases. To make an impact on the environment CO2 should be put away on the scale of gigatonnes per annum. The storage capacity of deep saline aquifers...

  17. A GLOSSARY OF GIS TERMINOLOGY: 92-13 A comprehensive alphabetical listing of technical terms and their common

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    A GLOSSARY OF GIS TERMINOLOGY: 92-13 A comprehensive alphabetical listing of technical terms and their common meanings and an alphabetical list of acronyms related to geographic information systems (GIS State University, Fargo ND 58105. Email: gpadmana@plains.ndak.edu. 2. Physical Scientist (GIS Specialist

  18. GLOSSARY OF INFORMATION SECURITY THREATS Computer any electronic device used for storing, processing and transmitting data according

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Yi

    a computer virus. Can appear to be a legitimate program or system resource. WormGLOSSARY OF INFORMATION SECURITY THREATS Computer · any electronic device used or damage your computer. Pharming ·(aka Vishing) a hacker's attack aiming to redirect

  19. COCS GLOSSARY

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    used in metallurgy and geology. Direct engineering and technical personnel through the drilling, boring, cutting, excavating, and grading processes. Typical specializations are...

  20. Manufacturing Glossary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr 2012Decade Year-0 Year-1Total0.0 0.0 0.00.

  1. MSDS Glossary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse BergkampCentermillion to

  2. University of Minnesota aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) project report on the third long-term cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoyer, M.C.; Hallgren, J.P.; Uebel, M.H.; Delin, G.N.; Eisenreich, S.J.; Sterling, R.L.

    1994-12-01

    The University of Minnesota aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system has been operated as a field test facility (FTF) since 1982. The objectives were to design, construct, and operate the facility to study the feasibility of high-temperature ATES in a confined aquifer. Four short-term and two long-term cycles were previously conducted, which provided a greatly increased understanding of the efficiency and geochemical effects of high-temperature aquifer thermal energy storage. The third long-term cycle (LT3) was conducted to operate the ATES system in conjunction with a real heating load and to further study the geochemical impact that heated water storage had on the aquifer. For LT3, the source and storage wells were modified so that only the most permeable portion, the Ironton-Galesville part, of the Franconia-Ironton-Galesville aquifer was used for storage. This was expected to improve storage efficiency by reducing the surface area of the heated volume and simplify analysis of water chemistry results by reducing the number of aquifer-related variables which need to be considered. During LT3, a total volume of 63.2 {times} 10{sup 3} m {sup 3} of water was injected at a rate of 54.95 m{sup 3}/hr into the storage well at a mean temperature of 104.7{degrees}C. Tie-in to the reheat system of the nearby Animal Sciences Veterinary Medicine (ASVM) building was completed after injection was completed. Approximately 66 percent (4.13 GWh) of the energy added to the aquifer was recovered. Approximately 15 percent (0.64 GWh) of the usable (10 building. Operations during heat recovery with the ASVM building`s reheat system were trouble-free. Integration into more of the ASVM (or other) building`s mechanical systems would have resulted in significantly increasing the proportion of energy used during heat recovery.

  3. Application of the decline curve method to aquifers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potnis, Girish Vijay

    1992-01-01

    on p/z plot. . . 7. Hypothetical semi-log decline curve for an aquifer . 19 20 20 21 8. Hypothetical exponential decline on log-log plot for an aquifer . . 9. Normalized influx rate curves for aquifer with different radii, . . . 10. Decline.... Hurst modified steady-state method~, 3. van Everdingen and Hurst pseudosteady state methods, 4. Carter - Tracy method, 5. Influence or resistance function methods 6. Fetkovich methodt 1 The most basic model of these methods is the Schilthuis steady...

  4. Aquifer sensitivity assessment modeling at a large scale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berg, R.C.; Abert, C.C. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

    1994-03-01

    A 480 square-mile region within Will County, northeastern Illinois was used as a test region for an evaluation of the sensitivity of aquifers to contamination. An aquifer sensitivity model was developed using a Geographic Information System (GIS) with ARC/INFO software to overlay and combine several data layers. Many of the input data layers were developed using 2-dimensional surface modeling (Interactive Surface Modeling (ISM)) and 3-dimensional volume modeling (Geologic Modeling Program (GMP)) computer software. Most of the input data layers (drift thickness, thickness of sand and gravel, depth to first aquifer) were derived from interpolation of descriptive logs for water wells and engineering borings from their study area. A total of 2,984 logs were used to produce these maps. The components used for the authors' model are (1) depth to sand and gravel or bedrock, (2) thickness of the uppermost sand and gravel aquifer, (3) drift thickness, and (4) absence or presence of uppermost bedrock aquifer. The model is an improvement over many aquifer sensitivity models because it combines specific information on depth to the uppermost sand and gravel aquifer with information on the thickness of the uppermost sand and gravel aquifer. The manipulation of the source maps according to rules-based assumptions results in a colored aquifer sensitivity map for the Will County study area. This colored map differentiates 42 aquifer sensitivity map areas by using line patterns within colors. The county-scale model results in an aquifer sensitivity map that can be a useful tool for making land-use planning decisions regarding aquifer protection and management of groundwater resources.

  5. ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS - - A SURVEY OF RECENT THEORETICAL STUDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2013-01-01

    hydrothermal flows; seasonal storage; type curves; thermalseasonal aquifer Berkeley, 75-"76, warm~wa.t.er storage program, n:, Numerical sim- In P:roc. Thermal

  6. EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL STUDIES OF THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2011-01-01

    Department of Energy, Energy Storage Division through thegeneration and energy storage, Presented at Frontiers ofIn Proceed- ings of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Work-

  7. Groundwater nitrates in the Seymour Aquifer: problem or resource? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arreola-Triana, Alejandra

    2012-01-01

    stream_source_info Groundwater nitrates in the seymour aquifer.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 7802 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Groundwater nitrates in the seymour aquifer.pdf.txt Content-Type text.../plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 24 tx H2O Fall 2012 Story by Alejandra Arreola-Triana In the Rolling Plains of Texas, the Seymour Aquifer is the major source of water for Haskell, Jones and Knox counties. ?e water from the Seymour Aquifer, however...

  8. Chemical and Isotopic Prediction of Aquifer Temperatures in the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Chemical and Isotopic Prediction of Aquifer Temperatures in the Geothermal System at Long...

  9. Multivariate analysis of cross-hole georadar velocity and attenuation tomograms for aquifer zonation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Multivariate analysis of cross-hole georadar velocity and attenuation tomograms for aquifer for characterizing heterogeneous alluvial aquifers. A multivariate statistical technique, known as k-means cluster radar, multivariate statistics, unconfined aquifers Citation: Tronicke, J., K. Holliger, W. Barrash

  10. Representing aquifer architecture in macrodispersivity models with an analytical solution of the transition probability matrix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Zhiming

    Representing aquifer architecture in macrodispersivity models with an analytical solution] The multi-dimensional transition probability model represents hydrofacies architecture in modeling aquifer heterogeneity. The structure of the aquifer architecture is mathematically characterized by a canonical

  11. SEASONAL THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS-MATHEMATICAL MODELING STUDIES IN 1979

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2013-01-01

    Aspects of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage." Lawrencethe Auburn University Thermal Energy Storage Experiment."LBL~l0208 SEASONAL THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS~

  12. SEASONAL THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS-MATHEMATICAL MODELING STUDIES IN 1979

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2013-01-01

    of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage." Lawrence Berkeleythe Auburn University Thermal Energy Storage Experiment."LBL~l0208 SEASONAL THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS~

  13. THEORETICAL STUDIES IN LONG-TERM THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.F.

    2013-01-01

    Mathematical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers.of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrencethe Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage program managed by

  14. SEASONAL THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS-MATHEMATICAL MODELING STUDIES IN 1979

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2013-01-01

    of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage." Lawrence BerkeleyP, Andersen, "'rhermal Energy Storage in a Confined Aquifer~University Thermal Energy Storage Experiment." Lawrence

  15. Aquifer thermal energy (heat and chill) storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenne, E.A.

    1992-11-01

    As part of the 1992 Intersociety Conversion Engineering Conference, held in San Diego, California, August 3--7, 1992, the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program coordinated five sessions dealing specifically with aquifer thermal energy storage technologies (ATES). Researchers from Sweden, The Netherlands, Germany, Switzerland, Denmark, Canada, and the United States presented papers on a variety of ATES related topics. With special permission from the Society of Automotive Engineers, host society for the 1992 IECEC, these papers are being republished here as a standalone summary of ATES technology status. Individual papers are indexed separately.

  16. MANAGEMENT OF GROUNDWATER IN SALT WATER INGRESS COASTAL AQUIFERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, C.P.

    MANAGEMENT OF GROUNDWATER IN SALT WATER INGRESS COASTAL AQUIFERS C. P. Kumar Scientist `E1 dealing with exploitation, restoration and management of fresh groundwater in coastal aquifers, the key is disturbed by groundwater withdrawals and other human activities that lower groundwater levels, reduce fresh

  17. Aquifer Sampling Tube Results for Fiscal Year 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, Mary J.; Peterson, Robert E.

    2003-10-27

    This report presents and discusses results of the fiscal year 2003 sampling event associated with aquifer tubes along the Columbia River in the northern Hanford Site. Aquifer tube data help define the extent of groundwater contamination near the river, determine vertical variations in contamination, monitor the performance of interim remedial actions near the river, and support impact studies.

  18. Method for isolating two aquifers in a single borehole

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burklund, P.W.

    1984-01-20

    A method for isolating and individually instrumenting separate aquifers within a single borehole is disclosed. A borehole is first drilled from the ground surface, through an upper aquifer, and into a separating confining bed. A casing, having upper and lower sections separated by a coupling collar, is lowered into the borehole. The borehole is grouted in the vicinity of the lower section of the casing. A borehole is then drilled through the grout plug and into a lower aquifer. After the lower aquifer is instrumented, the borehole is grouted back into the lower portion of the casing. Then the upper section of the casing is unscrewed via the coupling collar and removed from the borehole. Finally, instrumentation is added to the upper aquifer and the borehole is appropriately grouted. The coupling collar is designed to have upper right-hand screw threads and lower left-hand screw thread, whereby the sections of the casing can be readily separated.

  19. Tracer advection by steady groundwater flow in a stratified aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sposito, Garrison; Weeks, Scott W.

    1997-01-02

    The perfectly stratified aquifer has often been investigated as a simple, tractable model for exploring new theoretical issues in subsurface hydrology. Adopting this approach, we show that steady groundwater flows in the perfectly stratified aquifer are always confined to a set of nonintersecting permanent surfaces, on which both streamlines and vorticity lines lie. This foliation of the flow domain exists as well for steady groundwater flows in any isotropic, spatially heterogeneous aquifer. In the present model example it is a direct consequence of the existence of a stream function, we then demonstrate that tracer plume advection by steady groundwater flow in a perfectly stratified aquifer is never ergodic, regardless of the initial size of the tracer plume. This nonergodicity, which holds also for tracer advection in any isotropic, spatially heterogeneous aquifer, implies that stochastic theories of purely advective tracer plume movement err in assuming ergodic behavior to simplify probabilistic calculations of plume spatial concentration moments.

  20. IMPROVED NUMERICAL METHODS FOR MODELING RIVER-AQUIFER INTERACTION.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tidwell, Vincent C.; Sue Tillery; Phillip King

    2008-09-01

    A new option for Local Time-Stepping (LTS) was developed to use in conjunction with the multiple-refined-area grid capability of the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) groundwater modeling program, MODFLOW-LGR (MF-LGR). The LTS option allows each local, refined-area grid to simulate multiple stress periods within each stress period of a coarser, regional grid. This option is an alternative to the current method of MF-LGR whereby the refined grids are required to have the same stress period and time-step structure as the coarse grid. The MF-LGR method for simulating multiple-refined grids essentially defines each grid as a complete model, then for each coarse grid time-step, iteratively runs each model until the head and flux changes at the interfacing boundaries of the models are less than some specified tolerances. Use of the LTS option is illustrated in two hypothetical test cases consisting of a dual well pumping system and a hydraulically connected stream-aquifer system, and one field application. Each of the hypothetical test cases was simulated with multiple scenarios including an LTS scenario, which combined a monthly stress period for a coarse grid model with a daily stress period for a refined grid model. The other scenarios simulated various combinations of grid spacing and temporal refinement using standard MODFLOW model constructs. The field application simulated an irrigated corridor along the Lower Rio Grande River in New Mexico, with refinement of a small agricultural area in the irrigated corridor.The results from the LTS scenarios for the hypothetical test cases closely replicated the results from the true scenarios in the refined areas of interest. The head errors of the LTS scenarios were much smaller than from the other scenarios in relation to the true solution, and the run times for the LTS models were three to six times faster than the true models for the dual well and stream-aquifer test cases, respectively. The results of the field application show that better estimates of daily stream leakage can be made with the LTS simulation, thereby improving the efficiency of daily operations for an agricultural irrigation system. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTSThe authors appreciatively acknowledge support for Sue Tillery provided by Sandia National Laboratories' through a Campus Executive Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) research project.Funding for this study was provided by Directed Research and Development (LDRD) research project.

  1. Field studies of virus transport in a heterogeneous sandy aquifer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vogel, Jason Robert

    1997-01-01

    enteric viruses in ground water, however, has been well documented. Viral contamination of ground water from septic tank, sewer line, or waste disposal site failures has lead to increased efforts to quantify the transport of viruses through the ground...

  2. Number of Existing Natural Gas Aquifers Storage Fields

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb MarthroughFeet)Feet) YearThousand81Nuclear > U.S.43

  3. Summary of three dimensional pump testing of a fractured rock aquifer in the western Siberian Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nichols, R.L.; Looney, B.B.; Eddy-Dilek, C.A.; Drozhko, E.G.; Glalolenko, Y.V.; Mokrov, Y.G.; Ivanov, I.A.; Glagolev, A.V.; Vasil`kova, N.A.

    1996-10-30

    A group of scientists from the Savannah River Technology Center and Russia successfully completed a 17 day field investigation of a fractured rock aquifer at the MAYAK PA nuclear production facility in Russia. The test site is located in the western Siberian Basin near the floodplain of the Mishelyak river. The fractured rock aquifer is composed of orphyrites, tuff, tuffbreccia and lava and is overlain by 0.5--12 meters of elluvial and alluvial sediments. A network of 3 uncased wells (176, 1/96, and 2/96) was used to conduct the tests. Wells 176 and 2/96 were used as observation wells and the centrally located well 1/96 was used as the pumping well. Six packers were installed and inflated in each of the observation wells at a depth of up to 85 meters. The use of 6 packers in each well resulted in isolating 7 zones for monitoring. The packers were inflated to different pressures to accommodate the increasing hydrostatic pressure. A straddle packer assembly was installed in the pumping well to allow testing of each of the individual zones isolated in the observation wells. A constant rate pumping test was run on each of the 7 zones. The results of the pumping tests are included in Appendix A. The test provided new information about the nature of the fractured rock aquifers in the vicinity of the Mishelyak river and will be key information in understanding the behavior of contaminants originating from process wastes discharged to Lake Karachi. Results from the tests will be analyzed to determine the hydraulic properties of different zones within the fractured rock aquifer and to determine the most cost effective clean-up approach for the site.

  4. Underground helium travels to the Earth's surface via aquifers...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tweet EmailPrint Before it can put the party in party balloons, helium is carried from deep within the Earth's crust to the surface via aquifers, according to new research...

  5. KINETICS OF TOLUENE DEGRADATION BY DENITRIFYING AQUIFER MICROORGANISMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    of toluene in nitrate-enhanced in situ bioremediation schemes and in estimating the duration of such cleanup environment (e.g., waste- water treatment units) to another (e,g., aquifer systems). Biokinetic data

  6. Analyzing aquifer driven reservoirs using a computer-oriented approach 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flumerfelt, Raymond William

    1996-01-01

    A new computer-oriented approach for analyzing aquifer driven reservoirs incorporates both geological and historical pressure data to determine original hydrocarbons-in-place and to forecast production. This new approach does not rely entirely...

  7. Migration and trapping of CO? in saline aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacMinn, Christopher William

    2012-01-01

    Mitigation of climate change requires a reduction in atmospheric carbon dioxide (C0 2) emissions. One promising tool for achieving this is the large-scale injection of CO2 into deep saline aquifers. After injection, upward ...

  8. Seawater circulation in coastal aquifers : processes and impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karam, Hanan Nadim

    2012-01-01

    This thesis explores the subterranean domain of chemical cycling in coastal oceans abutting permeable aquifers, where transport through sediments is dominated by advection, rather than diffusion. We investigate the mechanisms ...

  9. Hydrogeology and groundwater modeling of a Calvert Bluff aquifer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, James

    1989-01-01

    of the Wilcox/Carrizo Aquifer System 15 16 17 18 SITE DESCRIPTION. 21 Site Physiography and Climate. . Site Geology Site Hydrogeology. 21 21 25 TABLE OF CONTENTS (CONTINUED) PAGE INVESTIGATION OF THE STUDY SAND. 29 Method: Delineating the Study... HYDROGEOLOGY AND GROUNDWATER MODELING OF A CALVERT BLUFF AQUIFER A Thesis by JAMES LAWRENCE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE...

  10. Reduction of trichloroethylene in a model aquifer with methanotrophic bacteria 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hicks, Duane Dee

    1990-01-01

    REDUCTION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE IN A MODEL AQUIFER WITH METHANOTROPHIC BACTERIA A Thesis by Duane Dee Hicks Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fullfillment of the requirements for thc degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1990 Major Subject: Civil Engineering REDUCTION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE IN A MODEL AQUIFER WITH METHANOTROPHIC BACTEPslA A Thesis by Duane Dec Hicks Approved as to style and content by Bill Batchclor (Chair of Committee...

  11. Methanogens in Central Texas aquifers: a microbiological and molecular study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacRae, Martha Jean Davies

    1992-01-01

    METHANOGENS IN CENTRAL TEXAS AQUIFERS: A MICROBIOLOGICAL AND MOLECULAR STUDY A Thesis by MARTHA JEAN DAVIES MACRAE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A8cM University in partial fulfillmen of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject: Oceanography METHANOGENS IN CENTRAL TEXAS AQUIFERS: A MICROBIOLOGICAL AND MOLECULAR STUDY A Thesis by MARTHA JEAN DAVIES MACRAE Approved as to style and content by: James W. Ammerman (Chair...

  12. Rice Field Geochemistry and Hydrology: An Explanation for Why Groundwater Irrigated Fields in Bangladesh are Net Sinks of Arsenic from Groundwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumann, Rebecca B.

    Irrigation of rice fields in Bangladesh with arsenic-contaminated groundwater transfers tens of cubic kilometers of water and thousands of tons of arsenic from aquifers to rice fields each year. Here we combine observations ...

  13. Delineation of hydrostratigraphic units in a carbonate aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durham, L.A. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Carman, J.D.; Hopkins, L.P. (Jacobs Engineering Group, Inc., St. Charles, MO (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Aquifer characterization activities were performed to develop a hydrogeologic understanding of a site west of St. Louis, Missouri, which became contaminated as a result of U and Th processing and disposal activities that took place from the 1940s through the 1960s. Slug and pumping tests were performed as part of the aquifer characterization process. Packer tests, rock quality designations (RQDs), and lithologic information were used to determine zones of contrasting hydrologic properties within the aquifer. RQD, a general indicator of rock competence and variability, was determined for about 640 intervals from 107 coreholes. On the basis of the hydraulic conductivity data obtained from the packer tests and the vertical correlations established between RQD values, hydraulic conductivity and depth, the aquifer was characterized as having two different hydrostratigraphic units. The first unit includes bedrock near the phreatic surface. Because of extensive weathering, the hydraulic conductivity of this unit is high. The second unit is composed of unweathered bedrock that has a small hydraulic conductivity and is located below the weathered unit. A three-dimensional groundwater flow model was used to improve the estimated hydraulic conductivity values for each layer. It was determined that ground-water flow through the system is predominantly controlled by a zone of fracturing and weathering in the upper, weathered portion of the aquifer which is more likely to transport contaminants relative to the lower portion of the limestone aquifer. The results indicate the value of packer tests and RQD data in defining hydrostratigraphic units within a single aquifer and ultimately in supporting decisions regarding remedial-action.

  14. THEORETICAL STUDIES IN LONG-TERM THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.F.

    2013-01-01

    Mathematical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers.Proceedings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop,A.D. 1 Andersen, F.P. "Thermal Energy Storage in a Confined

  15. A simulation model for generation of aquifer characteristics and contaminant concentrations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deena, Jayaram

    1993-01-01

    Remediation of natural systems such as aquifers requires a thorough characterization of its physical and hydraulic properties. Variability in physical and hydraulic properties of aquifers makes design and operation of suitable remediation process...

  16. The 1997 Irrigation Suspension Program for the Edwards Aquifer: Evaluation and Alternatives 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keplinger, Keith O.; McCarl, Bruce A.

    1998-01-01

    (drought) Management Rules. The Aquifer region, however, experienced a wet Spring in 1997, so that even irrigators not enrolled in the program applied little or no irrigation water. If conditions were dry in Spring 1997, aquifer simulation results indicate...

  17. A Farm-Level Evaluation of Agricultural Profit and Ground Water Quality: Texas Seymour Aquifer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chowdhury, Manzoor; Lacewell, Ronald D.; McCarl, Bruce A.; Ozuna, Teofilo Jr.; Benson, Verel W.; Harris, Billy L.; Dyke, Paul T.

    1994-01-01

    The Seymour Aquifer of north-central Texas is known to have elevated levels of nitrates. The design of economically sound policies for reducing agriculture's nitrate contribution to the aquifer suggests a need to evaluate alternative management...

  18. Geochemical modeling of an aquifer storage and recovery project in Union County, Arkansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Ni, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01

    The Sparta aquifer in Union County, Arkansas has served as an important potable water supply to the public and industrial sectors in the area. However, increasing water demand and sustained heavy pumping from the aquifer ...

  19. Hydraulics of horizontal wells in fractured shallow aquifer systems Eungyu Parka,*, Hongbin Zhanb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhan, Hongbin

    Hydraulics of horizontal wells in fractured shallow aquifer systems Eungyu Parka,*, Hongbin Zhanb Accepted 1 May 2003 Abstract An analysis of groundwater hydraulic head in the vicinity of a horizontal well in fractured or porous aquifers considering confined, leaky confined, and water-table aquifer boundary

  20. Estimating recharge thresholds in tropical karst island aquifers: Barbados, Puerto Rico and Guam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banner, Jay L.

    Estimating recharge thresholds in tropical karst island aquifers: Barbados, Puerto Rico and Guam in tropical island aquifers, such as Barbados, Guam and Puerto Rico, are significantly influenced by tropical of rainfall. The karst aquifers on Barbados, Guam and Puerto Rico have similar rainwater and groundwater

  1. Saving for dry days: Aquifer storage and recovery may help 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2008-01-01

    | pg. 2 Saving for dry days Story by Kathy Wythe tx H2O | pg. 3 Aquifer storage and recovery may help With reoccurring droughts and growing population, Texas will always be looking for better ways to save or use water. Some water suppliers... in Texas are turning to aquifer storage and recovery. During the dry summer of 2008, the San Antonio Water System (SAWS) had enough assets in its ?bank? (of water) to make with- drawals to meet the needs of its customers. The water bank is the utility...

  2. Legal and regulatory issues affecting aquifer thermal energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendrickson, P.L.

    1981-10-01

    This document updates and expands the report with a similar title issued in October 1980. This document examines a number of legal and regulatory issues that potentially can affect implementation of the aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) concept. This concept involves the storage of thermal energy in an underground aquifer until a later date when it can be effectively utilized. Either heat energy or chill can be stored. Potential end uses of the energy include district space heating and cooling, industrial process applications, and use in agriculture or aquaculture. Issues are examined in four categories: regulatory requirements, property rights, potential liability, and issues related to heat or chill delivery.

  3. Fresh Water Generation from Aquifer-Pressured Carbon Storage: Annual Report FY09

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolery, T; Aines, R; Hao, Y; Bourcier, W; Wolfe, T; Haussman, C

    2009-11-25

    This project is establishing the potential for using brine pressurized by Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) operations in saline formations as the feedstock for desalination and water treatment technologies including reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF). The aquifer pressure resulting from the energy required to inject the carbon dioxide provides all or part of the inlet pressure for the desalination system. Residual brine is reinjected into the formation at net volume reduction, such that the volume of fresh water extracted balances the volume of CO{sub 2} injected into the formation. This process provides additional CO{sub 2} storage capacity in the aquifer, reduces operational risks (cap-rock fracturing, contamination of neighboring fresh water aquifers, and seismicity) by relieving overpressure in the formation, and provides a source of low-cost fresh water to offset costs or operational water needs. This multi-faceted project combines elements of geochemistry, reservoir engineering, and water treatment engineering. The range of saline formation waters is being identified and analyzed. Computer modeling and laboratory-scale experimentation are being used to examine mineral scaling and osmotic pressure limitations. Computer modeling is being used to evaluate processes in the storage aquifer, including the evolution of the pressure field. Water treatment costs are being evaluated by comparing the necessary process facilities to those in common use for seawater RO. There are presently limited brine composition data available for actual CCS sites by the site operators including in the U.S. the seven regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (CSPs). To work around this, we are building a 'catalog' of compositions representative of 'produced' waters (waters produced in the course of seeking or producing oil and gas), to which we are adding data from actual CCS sites as they become available. Produced waters comprise the most common examples of saline formation waters. Therefore, they are expected to be representative of saline formation waters at actual and potential future CCS sites. We are using a produced waters database (Breit, 2002) covering most of the United States compiled by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). In one instance to date, we have used this database to find a composition corresponding to the brine expected at an actual CCS site (Big Sky CSP, Nugget Formation, Sublette County, Wyoming). We have located other produced waters databases, which are usually of regional scope (e.g., NETL, 2005, Rocky Mountains basins).

  4. Fresh Water Generation from Aquifer-Pressured Carbon Storage: Interim Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aines, R D; Wolery, T J; Hao, Y; Bourcier, W L

    2009-07-22

    This project is establishing the potential for using brine pressurized by Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) operations in saline formations as the feedstock for desalination and water treatment technologies including nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO). The aquifer pressure resulting from the energy required to inject the carbon dioxide provides all or part of the inlet pressure for the desalination system. Residual brine would be reinjected into the formation at net volume reduction. This process provides additional storage space (capacity) in the aquifer, reduces operational risks by relieving overpressure in the aquifer, and provides a source of low-cost fresh water to offset costs or operational water needs. Computer modeling and laboratory-scale experimentation are being used to examine mineral scaling and osmotic pressure limitations for brines typical of CCS sites. Computer modeling is being used to evaluate processes in the aquifer, including the evolution of the pressure field. This progress report deals mainly with our geochemical modeling of high-salinity brines and covers the first six months of project execution (September, 2008 to March, 2009). Costs and implementation results will be presented in the annual report. The brines typical of sequestration sites can be several times more concentrated than seawater, requiring specialized modeling codes typical of those developed for nuclear waste disposal calculations. The osmotic pressure developed as the brines are concentrated is of particular concern, as are precipitates that can cause fouling of reverse osmosis membranes and other types of membranes (e.g., NF). We have now completed the development associated with tasks (1) and (2) of the work plan. We now have a contract with Perlorica, Inc., to provide support to the cost analysis and nanofiltration evaluation. We have also conducted several preliminary analyses of the pressure effect in the reservoir in order to confirm that reservoir pressure can indeed be used to drive the reverse osmosis process. Our initial conclusions from the work to date are encouraging: (1) The concept of aquifer-pressured RO to provide fresh water associated with carbon dioxide storage appears feasible. (2) Concentrated brines such as those found in Wyoming are amenable to RO treatment. We have looked at sodium chloride brines from the Nugget Formation in Sublette County. 20-25% removal with conventional methods is realistic; higher removal appears achievable with NF. The less concentrated sulfate-rich brines from the Tensleep Formation in Sublette County would support >80% removal with conventional RO. (3) Brines from other proposed sequestration sites can now be analyzed readily. An osmotic pressure curve appropriate to these brines can be used to evaluate cost and equipment specifications. (4) We have examined a range of subsurface brine compositions that is potentially pertinent to carbon sequestration and noted the principal compositional trends pertinent to evaluating the feasibility of freshwater extraction. We have proposed a general categorization for the feasibility of the process based on total dissolved solids (TDS). (5) Withdrawing pressurized brine can have a very beneficial effect on reservoir pressure and total available storage capacity. Brine must be extracted from a deeper location in the aquifer than the point of CO{sub 2} injection to prevent CO{sub 2} from migrating to the brine extraction well.

  5. Geochemical detection of carbon dioxide in dilute aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, S; Hao, Y; Aines, R

    2009-03-27

    Carbon storage in deep saline reservoirs has the potential to lower the amount of CO{sub 2} emitted to the atmosphere and to mitigate global warming. Leakage back to the atmosphere through abandoned wells and along faults would reduce the efficiency of carbon storage, possibly leading to health and ecological hazards at the ground surface, and possibly impacting water quality of near-surface dilute aquifers. We use static equilibrium and reactive transport simulations to test the hypothesis that perturbations in water chemistry associated with a CO{sub 2} gas leak into dilute groundwater are important measures for the potential release of CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere. Simulation parameters are constrained by groundwater chemistry, flow, and lithology from the High Plains aquifer. The High Plains aquifer is used to represent a typical sedimentary aquifer overlying a deep CO{sub 2} storage reservoir. Specifically, we address the relationships between CO{sub 2} flux, groundwater flow, detection time and distance. The CO{sub 2} flux ranges from 10{sup 3} to 2 x 10{sup 6} t/yr (0.63 to 1250 t/m{sup 2}/yr) to assess chemical perturbations resulting from relatively small leaks that may compromise long-term storage, water quality, and surface ecology, and larger leaks characteristic of short-term well failure.

  6. Investigating cross-contamination of aquifers Paul M. Santi John E. McCray Jamie L. Martens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Investigating cross-contamination of aquifers Paul M. Santi · John E. McCray · Jamie L. Martens Abstract Shallow aquifers can cross-contaminate deeper aquifers through penetration of an intervening of several of these techniques at three sites ex- periencing aquifer cross-contamination, the authors con

  7. Death Valley Lower Carbonate Aquifer Monitoring Program Wells Down gradient of the Proposed Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Inyo County

    2006-07-26

    Inyo County has participated in oversight activities associated with the Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository since 1987. The overall goal of these studies are the evaluation of far-field issues related to potential transport, by ground water, or radionuclides into Inyo County, including Death Valley, and the evaluation of a connection between the Lower Carbonate Aquifer (LCA) and the biosphere. Our oversight and completed Cooperative Agreement research, and a number of other investigators research indicate that there is groundwater flow between the alluvial and carbonate aquifers both at Yucca Mountain and in Inyo County. In addition to the potential of radionuclide transport through the LCA, Czarnecki (1997), with the US Geological Survey, research indicate potential radionuclide transport through the shallower Tertiary-age aquifer materials with ultimate discharge into the Franklin Lake Playa in Inyo County. The specific purpose of this Cooperative Agreement drilling program was to acquire geological, subsurface geology, and hydrologic data to: (1) establish the existence of inter-basin flow between the Amargosa Basin and Death Valley Basin; (2) characterize groundwater flow paths in the LCA through Southern Funeral Mountain Range, and (3) Evaluation the hydraulic connection between the Yucca Mountain repository and the major springs in Death Valley through the LCA.

  8. Descriptive analysis of aquifer thermal energy storage systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reilly, R.W.

    1980-06-01

    The technical and economic feasibility of large-scale aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) was examined. A key to ATESs attractiveness is its simplicity of design and construction. The storage device consists of two ordinary water wells drilled into an aquifer, connected at the surface by piping and a heat exchanger. During the storage cycle water is pumped out of the aquifer, through the heat exchanger to absorb thermal energy, and then back down into the aquifer through the second well. The thermal storage remains in the aquifer storage bubble until required for use, when it is recovered by reversing the storage operation. For many applications the installation can probably be designed and constructed using existing site-specific information and modern well-drilling techniques. The potential for cost-effective implementation of ATES was investigated in the Twin Cities District Heating-Cogeneration Study in Minnesota. In the study, ATES demonstrated a net energy saving of 32% over the nonstorage scenario, with an annual energy cost saving of $31 million. Discounting these savings over the life of the project, the authors found that the break-even capital cost for ATES construction was $76/kW thermal, far above the estimated ATES development cost of $23 to 50/kW thermal. It appears tht ATES can be highly cost effective as well as achieve substantial fuel savings. ATES would be environmentally beneficial and could be used in many parts of the USA. The existing body of information on ATES indicates that it is a cost-effective, fuel-conserving technique for providing thermal energy for residential, commercial, and industrial users. The negative aspects are minor and highly site-specific, and do not seem to pose a threat to widespread commercialization. With a suitable institutional framework, ATES promises to supply a substantial portion of the nation's future energy needs. (LCL)

  9. Using Pressure and Volumetric Approaches to Estimate CO2 Storage Capacity in Deep Saline Aquifers

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Thibeau, Sylvain; Bachu, Stefan; Birkholzer, Jens; Holloway, Sam; Neele, Filip; Zhou, Quanlin

    2014-12-31

    Various approaches are used to evaluate the capacity of saline aquifers to store CO2, resulting in a wide range of capacity estimates for a given aquifer. The two approaches most used are the volumetric “open aquifer” and “closed aquifer” approaches. We present four full-scale aquifer cases, where CO2 storage capacity is evaluated both volumetrically (with “open” and/or “closed” approaches) and through flow modeling. These examples show that the “open aquifer” CO2 storage capacity estimation can strongly exceed the cumulative CO2 injection from the flow model, whereas the “closed aquifer” estimates are a closer approximation to the flow-model derived capacity. Anmore »analogy to oil recovery mechanisms is presented, where the primary oil recovery mechanism is compared to CO2 aquifer storage without producing formation water; and the secondary oil recovery mechanism (water flooding) is compared to CO2 aquifer storage performed simultaneously with extraction of water for pressure maintenance. This analogy supports the finding that the “closed aquifer” approach produces a better estimate of CO2 storage without water extraction, and highlights the need for any CO2 storage estimate to specify whether it is intended to represent CO2 storage capacity with or without water extraction.« less

  10. Using Pressure and Volumetric Approaches to Estimate CO2 Storage Capacity in Deep Saline Aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thibeau, Sylvain; Bachu, Stefan; Birkholzer, Jens; Holloway, Sam; Neele, Filip; Zhou, Quanlin

    2014-12-31

    Various approaches are used to evaluate the capacity of saline aquifers to store CO2, resulting in a wide range of capacity estimates for a given aquifer. The two approaches most used are the volumetric “open aquifer” and “closed aquifer” approaches. We present four full-scale aquifer cases, where CO2 storage capacity is evaluated both volumetrically (with “open” and/or “closed” approaches) and through flow modeling. These examples show that the “open aquifer” CO2 storage capacity estimation can strongly exceed the cumulative CO2 injection from the flow model, whereas the “closed aquifer” estimates are a closer approximation to the flow-model derived capacity. An analogy to oil recovery mechanisms is presented, where the primary oil recovery mechanism is compared to CO2 aquifer storage without producing formation water; and the secondary oil recovery mechanism (water flooding) is compared to CO2 aquifer storage performed simultaneously with extraction of water for pressure maintenance. This analogy supports the finding that the “closed aquifer” approach produces a better estimate of CO2 storage without water extraction, and highlights the need for any CO2 storage estimate to specify whether it is intended to represent CO2 storage capacity with or without water extraction.

  11. Aquifer thermal energy storage reference manual: seasonal thermal energy storage program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prater, L.S.

    1980-01-01

    This is the reference manual of the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage (STES) Program, and is the primary document for the transfer of technical information of the STES Program. It has been issued in preliminary form and will be updated periodically to include more technical data and results of research. As the program progresses and new technical data become available, sections of the manual will be revised to incorporate these data. This primary document contains summaries of: the TRW, incorporated demonstration project at Behtel, Alaska, Dames and Moore demonstration project at Stony Brook, New York, and the University of Minnesota demonstration project at Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota; the technical support programs including legal/institutional assessment; economic assessment; environmental assessment; field test facilities; a compendia of existing information; numerical simulation; and non-aquifer STES concepts. (LCL)

  12. Field metabolomics and laboratory assessments of anaerobic intrinsic bioremediation of hydrocarbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    Field metabolomics and laboratory assessments of anaerobic intrinsic bioremediation of hydrocarbons the in situ anaerobic attenuation of hydrocarbons in a contaminated aquifer underly- ing a former refinery. Metabolite profiles associated with anaerobic hydrocarbon decay revealed the microbial utilization

  13. Geophysical Monitoring of Ground Surface Deformation Associated with a Confined Aquifer Storage and Recovery Operation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bonneville, Alain; Heggy, Essam; Strickland, Christopher E.; Normand, Jonathan; Dermond, Jeffrey A.; Fang, Yilin; Sullivan, E. C.

    2015-08-11

    A main issue in the storage of large volumes of fluids, mainly water and CO2, in the deep subsurface is to determine their field-scale-induced displacements and consequences on the mechanical behavior of the storage reservoir and surroundings. A quantifiable estimation of displacement can be made by combining the robust, cost-effective, and repeatable geophysical techniques of micro-gravimetry, differential global positioning system (DGPS), and differential synthetic aperture radar interferometry (DInSAR). These techniques were field tested and evaluated in an active large-volume aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) project in Pendleton, Oregon, USA, where three ASR wells are injecting up to 1.9 million m3/yr-1more »into basalt aquifers to a depth of about 150 m. Injection and recovery of water at the wells was accompanied by significant gravity anomalies and vertical deformation of the ground surface localized to the immediate surroundings of the injection wells as evidenced by DGPS and gravity measurements collected in 2011. At a larger scale, and between 2011 and 2013, DInSAR monitoring of the Pendleton area suggests the occurrence of sub-centimetric deformation in the western part of the city and close to the injection locations associated with the ASR cycle. A numerical simulation of the effect of the water injection gives results in good agreement with the observations and confirms the validity of the approach, which could be deployed in similar geological contexts to look at the mechanical effects of water and gas injections. The gravity signal reflects deep phenomena and gives additional insight into the repartition of fluids in the subsurface.« less

  14. Hydrogeophysical methods for analyzing aquifer storage and recovery systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minsley, B.J.; Ajo-Franklin, J.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Morgan, F.D.

    2009-12-01

    Hydrogeophysical methods are presented that support the siting and monitoring of aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) systems. These methods are presented as numerical simulations in the context of a proposed ASR experiment in Kuwait, although the techniques are applicable to numerous ASR projects. Bulk geophysical properties are calculated directly from ASR flow and solute transport simulations using standard petrophysical relationships and are used to simulate the dynamic geophysical response to ASR. This strategy provides a quantitative framework for determining site-specific geophysical methods and data acquisition geometries that can provide the most useful information about the ASR implementation. An axisymmetric, coupled fluid flow and solute transport model simulates injection, storage, and withdrawal of fresh water (salinity {approx}500 ppm) into the Dammam aquifer, a tertiary carbonate formation with native salinity approximately 6000 ppm. Sensitivity of the flow simulations to the correlation length of aquifer heterogeneity, aquifer dispersivity, and hydraulic permeability of the confining layer are investigated. The geophysical response using electrical resistivity, time-domain electromagnetic (TEM), and seismic methods is computed at regular intervals during the ASR simulation to investigate the sensitivity of these different techniques to changes in subsurface properties. For the electrical and electromagnetic methods, fluid electric conductivity is derived from the modeled salinity and is combined with an assumed porosity model to compute a bulk electrical resistivity structure. The seismic response is computed from the porosity model and changes in effective stress due to fluid pressure variations during injection/recovery, while changes in fluid properties are introduced through Gassmann fluid substitution.

  15. Relationship of regional water quality to aquifer thermal energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, R.D.

    1983-11-01

    Ground-water quality and associated geologic characteristics may affect the feasibility of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system development in any hydrologic region. This study sought to determine the relationship between ground-water quality parameters and the regional potential for ATES system development. Information was collected from available literature to identify chemical and physical mechanisms that could adversely affect an ATES system. Appropriate beneficiation techniques to counter these potential geochemical and lithologic problems were also identified through the literature search. Regional hydrology summaries and other sources were used in reviewing aquifers of 19 drainage regions in the US to determine generic geochemical characteristics for analysis. Numerical modeling techniques were used to perform geochemical analyses of water quality from 67 selected aquifers. Candidate water resources regions were then identified for exploration and development of ATES. This study identified six principal mechanisms by which ATES reservoir permeability may be impaired: (1) particulate plugging, (2) chemical precipitation, (3) liquid-solid reactions, (4) formation disaggregation, (5) oxidation reactions, and (6) biological activity. Specific proven countermeasures to reduce or eliminate these effects were found. Of the hydrologic regions reviewed, 10 were identified as having the characteristics necessary for ATES development: (1) Mid-Atlantic, (2) South-Atlantic Gulf, (3) Ohio, (4) Upper Mississippi, (5) Lower Mississippi, (6) Souris-Red-Rainy, (7) Missouri Basin, (8) Arkansas-White-Red, (9) Texas-Gulf, and (10) California.

  16. Using GIS Tainted Glasses to Help Subdivide the Ogallala/High Plains Aquifer in Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Brownie

    2013-11-20

    Using GIS Tainted Glasses to Help Subdivide the Ogallala/High Plains Aquifer Brownie Wilson Geohydrology Section Kansas Geological Survey University of Kansas 12th Annual GIS Day @ KU November 20, 2013 The High Plains Aquifer Kansas Geological... Survey The High Plains Aquifer in Kansas Great Bend Prairie Equus Beds Ogallala Kansas Geological Survey Accumulated Water Level Change, 1996 to 2012 Kansas Geological Survey Water Management Activities, circa 2000 Kansas Geological Survey • Active...

  17. Preliminary potentiometric map and flow dynamic characteristics for the upper-basalt confined aquifer system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spane, F.A. Jr.; Raymond, R.G.

    1993-09-01

    This report presents the first comprehensive Hanford Site-wide potentiometric map for the upper-basalt confined aquifer system (i.e., the upper Saddle Mountains Basalt). In constructing the potentiometric map, over forty on-site and off-site monitoring wells and boreholes were used. The potentiometric map developed for the upper-basalt confined aquifer is consistent with the areal head pattern indicated for the Mabton interbed, which is a deeper and more areally extensive confined aquifer underlying the Hanford Site. Salient features for the upper-basalt confined aquifer system potentiometric map are described.

  18. Isotopes of helium, hydrogen, and carbon as groundwater tracers in aquifers along the Colorado River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haber, Samuel Ainsworth

    2009-01-01

    production within the aquifer, and extraneous crustal fluxes. Heliumhelium, these components include air-equilibration (He eq ), dissolved air bubbles (He a ), in situ production (

  19. Glossary and Acronyms SRS GLOSSARY AND ACRONYMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -line - the facility in the F-Area where uranyl nitrate was converted to uranium oxide. Aliquot - a fraction

  20. RETIREMENT CHOICE GLOSSARY Retirement Choice Glossary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    through Brokerage Services. DEFINED CONTRIBUTION PLAN The JHU 403(b) Retirement Plan is a defined and to preserve capital. Often used interchangeably with bond fund. 403(b) PLAN Section 403(b) of the Internal-deferred retirement plans. IN-SERVICE WITHDRAWAL A withdrawal made from a 403(b) plan account before you leave

  1. Storage capacity and injection rate estimates for CO? sequestration in deep saline aquifers in the conterminous United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szulczewski, Michael Lawrence

    2009-01-01

    A promising method to mitigate global warming is injecting CO? into deep saline aquifers. In order to ensure the safety of this method, it is necessary to understand how much CO? can be injected into an aquifer and at what ...

  2. Interactions and Implications of a Collector Well with a River in an Unconfined Aquifer with Regional Background Flow 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dugat, William D., IV

    2010-01-14

    the petroleum industry and hydrologic sciences. This study improved the understanding of the interaction of collector wells and the aquifers/reservoirs they tap by numerically modeling flux exchanges between a collector well and a river in an unconfined aquifer...

  3. Barriers to water marketing: opinions of major pumpers on water marketing issues in the Edwards Aquifer region 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, Laura Maureen

    1996-01-01

    Groundwater use is a contentious issue in the Edwards Aquifer region of Texas. Many environmentalists are advocating groundwater law reform, much to the chagrin of property rights advocates. Establishment of tighter controls in the Edwards Aquifer...

  4. Potential Risks of Freshwater Aquifer Contamination with Geosequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, Robert

    2013-09-30

    Substantial leakage of CO{sub 2} from deep geological strata to shallow potable aquifers is likely to be rare, but chemical detection of potential leakage nonetheless remains an integral component of any safe carbon capture and storage system. CO{sub 2} that infiltrates an unconfined freshwater aquifer will have an immediate impact on water chemistry by lowering pH in most cases and by altering the concentration of total dissolved solids. Chemical signatures in affected waters provide an important opportunity for early detection of leaks. In the presence of CO{sub 2}, trace elements such as Mn, Fe, and Ca can increase by an order of magnitude or more above control concentrations within 100 days. Therefore, these and other elements should be monitored along with pH as geochemical markers of potential CO{sub 2} leaks. Dissolved inorganic carbon and alkalinity can also be rapidly responsive to CO{sub 2} and are stable indicators of a leak. Importantly, such changes may be detectable long before direct changes in CO{sub 2} are observed. The experimental results also suggest that the relative severity of the impact of leaks on overlying drinking-water aquifers should be considered in the selection of CO{sub 2} sequestration sites. One primary selection criteria should be metal and metalloid availability, such as uranium and arsenic abundance, to carefully monitor chemical species that could trigger changes above maximum contaminant levels (MCLs). Overall, the risks of leakage from underground CO{sub 2} storage are real but appear to be manageable if systems are closely monitored.

  5. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Aquifer Storage Reservoir

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4Cubic43,728Configuration Aquifer Storage

  6. Detecting sub-glacial aquifers in the north polar layered deposits with Mars Express/MARSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gurnett, Donald A.

    effects, local geothermal hot spots, or heat-generating glacial sliding. Ice cap basal melting mayDetecting sub-glacial aquifers in the north polar layered deposits with Mars Express/MARSIS W. M into the polar ice mass is modeled to determine the capability of the instrument to locate sub-glacial aquifers

  7. Spreading and convective dissolution of carbon dioxide in vertically confined, horizontal aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huppert, Herbert

    Spreading and convective dissolution of carbon dioxide in vertically confined, horizontal aquifers of carbon dioxide (CO2) into saline aquifers is a promising tool for reducing anthropogenic CO2 emissions. At reservoir conditions, the injected CO2 is buoyant relative to the ambient groundwater. The buoyant plume

  8. Time-lapse gravity monitoring of an aquifer storage recovery project in Leyden, Colorado Kristofer Davis*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Time-lapse gravity monitoring of an aquifer storage recovery project in Leyden, Colorado Kristofer on using time-lapse micro-gravity surveying to monitor an aquifer storage recovery project. An abandoned coal mine is being developed into an underground water reservoir in Leyden, Colorado. Excess water from

  9. Limiting Pumping from the Edwards Aquifer: An Economic Investigation of Proposals, Water Markets and Springflow Guarantees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    Limiting Pumping from the Edwards Aquifer: An Economic Investigation of Proposals, Water Markets for pumping and springflow which in turn provides water for recreation and habitat for several endangered species. A management authority is charged with aquifer management and is mandated to reduce pumping

  10. Convective dissolution of carbon dioxide in saline aquifers Jerome A. Neufeld,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huppert, Herbert

    Convective dissolution of carbon dioxide in saline aquifers Jerome A. Neufeld,1 Marc A. Hesse,2 of carbon dioxide in saline aquifers, Geophys. Res. Lett., 37, L22404, doi:10.1029/2010GL044728. [2] The storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in geological formations has been proposed as a technological means

  11. Effect of permeability anisotropy on buoyancy-driven flow for CO2 sequestration in saline aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firoozabadi, Abbas

    ) in deep saline aquifers is considered one of the most effective methods for carbon sequestration., 48, W09539, doi:10.1029/2012WR011939.* 1. Introduction [2] Carbon sequestration in deep salineEffect of permeability anisotropy on buoyancy-driven flow for CO2 sequestration in saline aquifers

  12. A Fractal Interpretation of Controlled-Source Helicopter Electromagnetic Survey Data Seco Creek, Edwards Aquifer, TX 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Decker, Kathryn T.

    2010-07-14

    The Edwards aquifer lies in the structurally complex Balcones fault zone and supplies water to the growing city of San Antonio. To ensure that future demands for water are met, the hydrological and geophysical properties of the aquifer must be well...

  13. Information content of slug tests for estimating hydraulic properties in realistic, high-conductivity aquifer scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Information content of slug tests for estimating hydraulic properties in realistic, high for partially-penetrating slug tests in unconfined aquifers (Malama et al., in press) provides a semi the ultimate goal of determining aquifer properties such as hydraulic conductivity K and specific storage Ss

  14. 1 Estimating aquifer hydraulic properties from the inversion of surface 2 Streaming Potential (SP) anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sailhac, Pascal

    1 Estimating aquifer hydraulic properties from the inversion of surface 2 Streaming Potential (SP with the geometry of the water table. It follows that 11 SP measurements can be used to estimate aquifer hydraulic and found that we 14 are able to estimate the hydraulic conductivity and the depth 15 and the thickness

  15. Regional assessment of aquifers for thermal-energy storage. Volume 2. Regions 7 through 12

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-06-01

    This volume contains information on the geologic and hydrologic framework, major aquifers, aquifers which are suitable and unsuitable for annual thermal energy storage (ATES) and the ATES potential of the following regions of the US: Unglaciated Central Region; Glaciated Appalachians, Unglaciated Appalachians; Coastal Plain; Hawaii; and Alaska. (LCL)

  16. Rapid nutrient load reduction during infiltration of managed aquifer recharge in an agricultural groundwater basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Andrew

    Rapid nutrient load reduction during infiltration of managed aquifer recharge in an agricultural% to 60% of the nitrate load being removed over the first 6 weeks of managed aquifer recharge operation Management Agency, Watsonville, CA, USA Abstract: Artificial recharge of groundwater is an increasingly

  17. An Evaluation of the 1997 Edwards Aquifer Irrigation Suspension Keith O. Keplinger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    dry, that suspending irrigation would have substantially reduced pumping and augmented critical1 An Evaluation of the 1997 Edwards Aquifer Irrigation Suspension Keith O. Keplinger Research;2 An Evaluation of the 1997 Edwards Aquifer Irrigation Suspension ABSTRACT In early 1997, the Texas Edwards

  18. Chloride Analysis of the Soils Overlaying the Carrizo-Wilcox Aquifer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolf, Emery

    2013-09-28

    Science Society of America Journal 58(1):6-14. Jones, Scott. "The Carrizo-Wilcox Aquifer in Texas." The Carrizo-Wilcox Aquifer in Texas. Emporia State University, Spring 2008. Web. 08 Sept. 2013. Maliva, Robert, and Thomas Missimer. “Recharge...

  19. Physical chemistry of soils and aquifers: A special issue in honor of Garrison Sposito

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silver, Whendee

    Editorial Physical chemistry of soils and aquifers: A special issue in honor of Garrison Sposito This special issue of GCA has been organized in honor of Professor Garrison Sposito (University of California and Aquifer systems: A Symposium in Honor of Garrison Sposito,'' which was co-sponsored by the Geochemistry

  20. Effect of methane pulsation on methanotropic biodegradation of trichloroethylene in an in-situ model aquifer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natarajan, Ranjan

    1993-01-01

    in all zones except the first. The pressure differential across the aquifer was less during pulsation degradation and the amount of nutrients utilized was half when compared to the baseline degradation. The flow of water in the aquifer was a constant.... OPERATING SYSTEM. EXPERIMENTAL PLANS. EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stimulation of Methanotrophic Population . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Baseline TCE Degradation Tests Residual Activity Degradation. Pulsing of Methane...

  1. Aquifer operator scaling and the effect on solute mixing and dispersion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bäumer, Boris

    , are associated with thicker layering of aquifer sediments and more preferential, unmixed transport. Therefore for realistic simulation of transport. Citation: Benson, D. A., M. M. Meerschaert, B. Baeumer, and H. In the 1970s, an understanding evolved that no aquifer could be completely characterized [Freeze, 1975; Gelhar

  2. Hydrochemical evidence of the depth of penetration of anthropogenic recharge in sandstone aquifers underlying

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheffield, University of

    Hydrochemical evidence of the depth of penetration of anthropogenic recharge in sandstone aquifers of anthropogenic solutes (major ions, trace metals) in Permo-Triassic sandstone aquifers underlying two mature of anthropogenic solutes to depths of between 30 and 47 m below ground in the unconfined sandstone and confirm

  3. Effects of surfactants on the desorption of organic contaminants from aquifer materials. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brickell, J.L.

    1989-08-01

    The efficiency of removing organic contaminants from groundwater aquifers by the pump and treat process is adversely affected by the retardation of the contaminant's mobility due to adsorption onto aquifer material. The use of surfactants in conjunction with the pump and treat process has the potential for improving contaminant mobility by solubilizing the adsorbed contaminant.

  4. Using complex resistivity imaging to infer biogeochemical processes associated with bioremediation of a uranium-contaminated aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flores-Orozco, Adrian; Williams, Kenneth H.; Long, Philip E.; Hubbard, Susan S.; Kemna, Andreas

    2011-07-07

    Experiments at the Department of Energy’s Rifle Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site near Rifle, Colorado (USA) have demonstrated the ability to remove uranium from groundwater by stimulating the growth and activity of Geobacter species through acetate amendment. Prolonging the activity of these strains in order to optimize uranium bioremediation has prompted the development of minimally-invasive and spatially-extensive monitoring methods diagnostic of their in situ activity and the end products of their metabolism. Here we demonstrate the use of complex resistivity imaging for monitoring biogeochemical changes accompanying stimulation of indigenous aquifer microorganisms during and after a prolonged period (100+ days) of acetate injection. A thorough raw-data statistical analysis of discrepancies between normal and reciprocal measurements and incorporation of a new power-law phase-error model in the inversion were used to significantly improve the quality of the resistivity phase images over those obtained during previous monitoring experiments at the Rifle IRFC site. The imaging results reveal spatiotemporal changes in the phase response of aquifer sediments, which correlate with increases in Fe(II) and precipitation of metal sulfides (e.g., FeS) following the iterative stimulation of iron and sulfate reducing microorganism. Only modest changes in resistivity magnitude were observed over the monitoring period. The largest phase anomalies (>40 mrad) were observed hundreds of days after halting acetate injection, in conjunction with accumulation of Fe(II) in the presence of residual FeS minerals, reflecting preservation of geochemically reduced conditions in the aquifer – a prerequisite for ensuring the long-term stability of immobilized, redox-sensitive contaminants, such as uranium.

  5. Using complex resistivity imaging to infer biogeochemical processes associated with bioremediation of a uranium-contaminated aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orozco, A. Flores; Williams, K.H.; Long, P.E.; Hubbard, S.S.; Kemna, A.

    2011-04-01

    Experiments at the Department of Energy's Rifle Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site near Rifle, Colorado (USA) have demonstrated the ability to remove uranium from groundwater by stimulating the growth and activity of Geobacter species through acetate amendment. Prolonging the activity of these strains in order to optimize uranium bioremediation has prompted the development of minimally-invasive and spatially-extensive monitoring methods diagnostic of their in situ activity and the end products of their metabolism. Here we demonstrate the use of complex resistivity imaging for monitoring biogeochemical changes accompanying stimulation of indigenous aquifer microorganisms during and after a prolonged period (100+ days) of acetate injection. A thorough raw-data statistical analysis of discrepancies between normal and reciprocal measurements and incorporation of a new power-law phase-error model in the inversion were used to significantly improve the quality of the resistivity phase images over those obtained during previous monitoring experiments at the Rifle IRFC site. The imaging results reveal spatiotemporal changes in the phase response of aquifer sediments, which correlate with increases in Fe(II) and precipitation of metal sulfides (e.g., FeS) following the iterative stimulation of iron and sulfate reducing microorganism. Only modest changes in resistivity magnitude were observed over the monitoring period. The largest phase anomalies (>40 mrad) were observed hundreds of days after halting acetate injection, in conjunction with accumulation of Fe(II) in the presence of residual FeS minerals, reflecting preservation of geochemically reduced conditions in the aquifer - a prerequisite for ensuring the long-term stability of immobilized, redox-sensitive contaminants, such as uranium.

  6. Hydrogeologic and climatic influences on spatial and interannual variation of recharge to a tropical karst island aquifer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banner, Jay L.

    of groundwater in tropical island aquifers, such as on Barbados, are significantly influenced by tropical of rainfall. This study shows that estimates of average annual recharge to the limestone aquifer on Barbados, island aquifers, Barbados, ENSO Citation: Jones, I. C., and J. L. Banner, Hydrogeologic and climatic

  7. Dispersivity estimates from a tracer experiment in a sandy aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mallants, D.; Espino, A.; Van Hoorick, M.; Feyen, J.; Vandenberghe, N.; Loy, W.

    2000-04-01

    The success or failure of transport models in predicting the migration of a contaminant plume is ground water depends to a large extent on the quality of flow and transport parameters used. In this study, the authors investigate the spatial variability in the tracer velocity and dispersivity in a shallow sandy aquifer in northern Belgium. Based on hydraulic conductivity measurements on cores sampled along a vertical profile, the aquifer was found to be mildly heterogeneous, i.e., with the variance of the log-transformed conductivity K, {sigma}{sup 2}{sub lnK}, equal to 0.22. By means of a natural gradient tracer experiment, transport of a chloride tracer was investigated in a three-dimensional network of multilevel point samplers (MLS). Least squares fitting of a two-dimensional transport model to the individual breakthrough curves resulted in an average longitudinal dispersivity that was 10 times larger than the transverse dispersivity. The results further showed the existence of a dispersion-scale effect whereby the depth-averaged longitudinal dispersivity increases with increasing travel distance. The average longitudinal dispersivity corresponding to a travel distance of 10 m was equal to 0.2 m. The authors finally show that theoretical expressions for the macroscopic dispersivity tensor, which require input on hydraulic conductivity heterogeneity, could be used here to approximate the observed dispersive behavior. These conceptually simple models are useful to estimate macroscopic dispersivities when no tracer data are available.

  8. Hydrochemistry and hydrogeologic conditions within the Hanford Site upper basalt confined aquifer system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spane, F.A. Jr.; Webber, W.D.

    1995-09-01

    As part of the Hanford Site Ground-Water Surveillance Project, Flow System Characterization Task. Pacific Northwest Laboratory examines the potential for offsite migration of contamination within the upper basalt confined aquifer system for the US Department of Energy (DOE). As part of this activity, groundwater samples were collected over the past 2 years from selected wells completed in the upper Saddle Mountains Basalt. The hydrochemical and isotopic information obtained from these groundwater samples provides hydrologic information concerning the aquifer-flow system. Ideally, when combined with other hydrologic property information, hydrochemical and isotopic data can be used to evaluate the origin and source of groundwater, areal groundwater-flow patterns, residence and groundwater travel time, rock/groundwater reactions, and aquifer intercommunication for the upper basalt confined aquifer system. This report presents the first comprehensive Hanford Site-wide summary of hydrochemical properties for the upper basalt confined aquifer system. This report provides the hydrogeologic characteristics (Section 2.0) and hydrochemical properties (Section 3.0) for groundwater within this system. A detailed description of the range of the identified hydrochemical parameter subgroups for groundwater in the upper basalt confined aquifer system is also presented in Section 3.0. Evidence that is indicative of aquifer contamination/aquifer intercommunication and an assessment of the potential for offsite migration of contaminants in groundwater within the upper basalt aquifer is provided in Section 4.0. The references cited throughout the report are given in Section 5.0. Tables that summarize groundwater sample analysis results for individual test interval/well sites are included in the Appendix.

  9. Field measurements and analyses of electrokinetic seismoelectric signals generated in sedimentary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petersen, Brent

    these aquifers and aquitards amenable to seismoelectric investigation. The results of vertical profiling to confirm that the co-seismic fields predicted by a quasi-static model are consistent with field measurements. The amplitudes of the co-seismic field are influenced by the resistivity and porosity

  10. Gas Geochemistry of the Dogger Geothermal Aquifer (Paris Basin, France)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Criaud, A.; Fouillac, C.; Marty, B.; Brach, M.; Wei, H.F.

    1987-01-20

    The low enthalpy program developed in the Paris Basin provides the opportunity for studying the gas geochemistry of the calcareous aquifer of the Dogger. Hydrocarbons and CO{sub 2} are mainly biogenic, He displays high concentrations. He, Ar and N{sub 2} have multiple origins (radioactive decay, atmospheric migration, biochemical processes). The distribution of the gases in the zones of the basin varies in relation to the general chemistry, sedimentology and hydrodynamics. The gas geothermometers do not apply to this environment but useful estimations of the redox potential of the fluid can be derived from CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}/NH{sub 4}{sup +} ratios. H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S are involved in corrosion processes and scaling in the pipes. 12 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Microbial ecology and carbon cycling in Texas aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Chuanlun; Grossman, E.L. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Geology); MacRae, M.; Ammerman, J.W. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Oceanography)

    1992-01-01

    To evaluate the relationship between microbial activity and carbon cycling in the subsurface, the authors performed geochemical and microbiological analyses on ground-waters from 15 wells in three aquifers in Texas--the Edwards (Ed), the Wilcox-Carrizo (WC), and the Sparta-Queen City (SQC). Samples were collected from 128 to 976 m depth. Total bacteria enumerated by direct count methodology range from 1.6 [times] 10[sup 3] to 4.0 [times] 10[sup 4] cells/ml. In both the (SQC) and (WC) aquifers, total bacterial counts decrease with depth. Total counts in (SQC) waters decrease from 6 [times] 10[sup 3] cells/ml at 217 m to 2 [times] 10[sup 3] cells/ml at 616 m; total counts in (WC) waters decrease from 32 [times] 10[sup 3] cells/ml at 369 m to [approximately]5 [times] 10[sup 3] cells/ml at 907 m. Except for two wells, all of the waters contained trace to large amounts of methane. Carbon isotopic analyses of dissolved and head-gas methane range from [minus]80 to [minus]9[per thousand]. Light [delta] C-13 values for methane indicate methane production by bacteria without secondary alteration while heavy [delta] C-13 values for methane strongly suggest methane oxidation, probably by sulfate reduction. delta C-13 values of DIC for high bicarbonate waters indicate a source of CO[sub 2] associated with methanogenesis through fermentation reactions and CO[sub 2] reduction. No correlation is found between the response to the archaebacterial probe and methane content in water, probably due to the limited sensitivity of the archaebacterial probe. However, anaerobic laboratory incubations of water samples in nutrient media showed significant production of methane for all cultured samples except those showing isotopic evidence for methane oxidation. This suggests that methanogens may be present in all waters except those in which methane oxidation has occurred.

  12. Controlled-source electromagnetic mapping of a faulted sandstone aquifer in central Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gorman, Erin Margaret

    1998-01-01

    Controlled-source electromagnetic mapping (CSEM) techniques were used to identify lateral variations in electrical conductivity associated with faults and facies contacts in a shallow sandstone aquifer in central Texas. The purpose of the research...

  13. Hydrologic and hydraulic assessment of artificial recharge in the Sparta Aquifer of Union County, Arkansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sowby, Robert B

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater pumping from the Sparta aquifer in Union County, Arkansas, has long exceeded natural recharge, threatening the regional water supply. An alternative water-supply project, completed in 2004, now provides treated ...

  14. Physical and chemical effects of CO2 storage in saline aquifers of the southern North Sea 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Niklas

    2013-07-01

    One of the most promising mitigation strategies for greenhouse gas accumulation in the atmosphere is carbon capture and storage (CCS). Deep saline aquifers are seen as the most efficient carbon dioxide (CO2) storage sites, ...

  15. Assessment of Potential Benzene Contamination of the Ogallala Aquifer at the Pantex Plant, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazen, Terry

    Assessment of Potential Benzene Contamination of the Ogallala Aquifer at the Pantex Plant, Texas (near detection limits) concentrations of volatile organic compounds including benzene, toluene (MCL), measured concentrations of benzene were near or exceeded MCL values. Based on concerns raised

  16. Analysis of No-Flow Boundaries in Mixed Unconfined-Confined Aquifer Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langerlan, Kent A.

    2010-07-14

    As human population increases, demand for water supplies will cause an increase in pumping rates from confined aquifers which may become unconfined after long-term pumping. Such an unconfined-confined conversion problem has not been fully...

  17. Weathered Diesel oil as a sorptive phase for hydrophobic organic compounds in aquifer materials 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hudson, Rondall James

    1994-01-01

    The sorptive properties of weathered diesel oil were investigated by conducting miscible displacement experiments with three hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs), acenapthene, fluorene, and dibenzothiophene, as tracers in columns containing aquifer...

  18. Analytical models of contaminant transport in coastal aquifers Diogo T. Bolster a,*, Daniel M. Tartakovsky a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolster, Diogo

    , sources, social impact and remediation) show that Boron contamination in coastal aquifers poses.g., Cyprus, Mexico, Oman and Israel, hundreds of wells along the coastline had to be shut down. A common

  19. Simulation Study of Heat Transportation in an Aquifer about Well-water-source Heat Pump 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cong, X.; Liu, Y.; Yang, W.

    2006-01-01

    The study of groundwater reinjection, pumping and heat transportation in an aquifer plays an important theoretical role in ensuring the stability of deep-well water reinjection and pumping as well as smooth reinjection. Based on the related...

  20. Microbial Activity during Biodegradation and its Effects on Groundwater Velocity in a Contaminated Aquifer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schillig, Peter Curtis

    2008-03-26

    A petroleum hydrocarbon plume was introduced into a controlled flow gate within the relatively homogenous Borden aquifer, Canada. Down-gradient of the release, O2 was added to stimulate microbial activity and biodegradation ...

  1. 40 Years Of Dogger Aquifer Management In Ile-De-France, Paris...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    40 Years Of Dogger Aquifer Management In Ile-De-France, Paris Basin, France Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: 40 Years Of Dogger...

  2. STIMULATION OF GEOTHERMAL AQUIFERS Paul Kruger and Henry J. Ramey, J r .

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    . STIMULATION OF GEOTHERMAL AQUIFERS Paul Kruger and Henry J. Ramey, J r . Co o f Geothermal Formations . . . . . . . . 6 Table 2: Water Quali t y Constituents-Water Distribution Coefficients . . . . . . . . 62 Table 7: Gaseous Constituents i n Geothermal Fluids . . . . . . 64

  3. THEORETICAL STUDIES IN LONG-TERM THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.F.

    2013-01-01

    ~Symposium, "Thermal Storage of Solar Energy 11 , Amsterdam,TNO~Symposium "Thermal Storage of Solar Energy" 5~6 NovemberAquifer Storage of Hot Water from Solar Energy Collectors.

  4. Monitoring pumping test response in a fractured aquifer using ground-penetrating radar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsoflias, Georgios P.; Halihan, Todd; Sharp Jr., John M.

    2001-05-01

    Fractured aquifers present a number of problems when attempting to characterize flow on the well scale (less than 100 m). Standard hydraulic testing methods are expensive because of the need for installation of monitoring ...

  5. Evaluating Impacts of CO2 Intrusion into an Unconsolidated Aquifer: II. Modeling Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Liange; Qafoku, Nikolla; Lawter, Amanda R.; Wang, Guohui; Shao, Hongbo; Brown, Christopher F.

    2015-08-04

    Large scale deployment of CO2 geological sequestration requires the assessment of the risks. One of the potential risks is the impact of CO2 leakage on shallow groundwater overlying the sequestration site.The understanding of the key chemical processes and parameters are critical for building numerical models for risk assessment. Model interpretation of laboratory and field tests is an effective way to enhance such understanding. Column experiments in which CO2 charged synthetic groundwater flowed through a column packed with material from High Plains aquifer was conducted and concentration of several constituents in the effluent water was analyzed. In this paper, reactive transport model was developed to interpret the observed concentration changes, attempting to shed light on the chemical reactions and key parameters that control the concentration changes of these constituents. The reactive transport model catches the concentration changes of pH, Ca, Mg, Ba, Sr, Cs, As and Pb fairly well. Calcite dissolution and Ca-driven cation exchange reactions are the major drivers for the concentration changes of Ca, Ba, Sr, and Cs. The pH-driven adsorption/desorption reactions lead to a concentration increase of As and Pb. The volume fraction and reactive surface area of calcite, CEC and sorption capacity are key parameters in determining the magnitude of concentration increase. Model results also show that the dissolution of calcite with Ba impurity could be an alternative explanation of the increase in Ba concentration.

  6. Uncertainty analyses of CO2 plume expansion subsequent to wellbore CO2 leakage into aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hou, Zhangshuan; Bacon, Diana H.; Engel, David W.; Lin, Guang; Fang, Yilin; Ren, Huiying; Fang, Zhufeng

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we apply an uncertainty quantification (UQ) framework to CO2 sequestration problems. In one scenario, we look at the risk of wellbore leakage of CO2 into a shallow unconfined aquifer in an urban area; in another scenario, we study the effects of reservoir heterogeneity on CO2 migration. We combine various sampling approaches (quasi-Monte Carlo, probabilistic collocation, and adaptive sampling) in order to reduce the number of forward calculations while trying to fully explore the input parameter space and quantify the input uncertainty. The CO2 migration is simulated using the PNNL-developed simulator STOMP-CO2e (the water-salt-CO2 module). For computationally demanding simulations with 3D heterogeneity fields, we combined the framework with a scalable version module, eSTOMP, as the forward modeling simulator. We built response curves and response surfaces of model outputs with respect to input parameters, to look at the individual and combined effects, and identify and rank the significance of the input parameters.

  7. Generalized thickness and configuration of the top of the intermediate aquifer, West-Central Florida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corral, M.A. Jr.; Wolansky, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    The water-bearing units of the intermediate aquifer consist of discontinuous sand, gravel, shell, and limestone and dolomite beds in the Tamiami Formation of late Miocene age and the Hawthorn Formation of middle Miocene age. Within parts of Polk, Manatee, Hardee, De Soto, Sarasota, and Charlotte Counties, sand and clay beds within the Tampa Limestone that are hydraulically connected to the Hawthorn Formation are also included in the intermediate aquifer. 15 refs.

  8. Geology and hydrogeology of the Edwards Aquifer Transition Zone, Bexar County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neathery, Jeffrey Stephen

    1989-01-01

    GEOLOGY AND HYDROGEOLOGY OF THE EDWARDS AQUIFER TRANSITION ZONE, BEXAR COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by JEFFREY STEPHEN HEATHERY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AQh University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1989 Major Subject: Geology GEOLOGY AND HYDROGEOLOGY OF THE EDWARDS AQUIFER TRANSITION ZONE, BEXAR COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by JEFFREY STEPHEN HEATHERY Approved as to style and content by: Chris pher C. Mathewson...

  9. An investigation of pneumatic control on immiscible contaminant migration in confined aquifers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watts, John David

    1991-01-01

    AN INVESTIGATION OF PNEUMATIC CONTROL ON IMMISCIBLE CONTAMINANT MIGRATION IN CONFINED AQUIFERS A Thesis by JOHN DAVID WATTS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1991 Major Subject: Civil Engineering AN INVESTIGATION OF PNEUMATIC CONTROL ON IMMISCIBLE CONTAMINANT MIGRATION IN CONFINED AQUIFERS A Thesis by JOHN DAVID %VATTS Approved as to style and content by: W e . mes...

  10. Glossary API Gravity: An

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Finished motor gaso- line formulated for use in motor vehicles, the composition and properties of which meet the requirements of the reformulated gasoline regu- Energy...

  11. Glossary API Gravity: An

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Finished motor gaso- line formulated for use in motor vehicles, the composition and properties of which meet the requirements of the reformulated gasoline regulations...

  12. Alternative fuel information: Glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This short document contains definitions of acronyms and definitions of terms used in papers on the use of alternative fuels in automobiles.

  13. Glossary | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sciences NES - National Evaluation Services NFPA - National Fire Protection Association NGV - New Generation of Vehicles NGVC - Natural Gas Vehicle Coalition NIST - National...

  14. Glossary of Sewing Terms 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-05-01

    to sleeve opening with cuff. Pre-shrink ? Washing/dry-cleaning fabric to allow for shrinkage of fabric before construction. Princess line ? Garment fitted with seams in- stead of darts. Ravel ? To fray. Raw edge ? Unfinished edge of fabric. Right side... area. Also done to fabric before cutting out a garment to prevent further fabric shrinkage. Silhouette ? Outline or contour of a figure or garment. Single-breasted ? Center front closing with enough flap to allow one row of buttons. Slash ? Cut...

  15. Chapter 7 - Glossary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D BGene Network ShapingDate: M-16-04-04Journal Article:

  16. Glossary API Gravity: An

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYear Jan Feb Mar87.1CubicYear Jan Feb2.56 441 60 60

  17. Glossary API Gravity: An

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYear Jan Feb Mar87.1CubicYear Jan Feb2.56 441 60 60

  18. LCLS CDR Glossary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResource and Job EventpopLA349226762ContributionsC

  19. Glossary | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof Energy Services »Information1 GeothermalTemperatures

  20. Word Pro - Glossary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices Globaldieselgasolinemonthlysummer1Netec 188792chemical

  1. Glossary | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFinancial Opportunities FinancialofInformation GeothermalInformation

  2. HYDROGEL TRACER BEADS: THE DEVELOPMENT, MODIFICATION, AND TESTING OF AN INNOVATIVE TRACER FOR BETTER UNDERSTANDING LNAPL TRANSPORT IN KARST AQUIFERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amanda Laskoskie, Harry M. Edenborn, and Dorothy J. Vesper

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this specific research task is to develop proxy tracers that mimic contaminant movement to better understand and predict contaminant fate and transport in karst aquifers. Hydrogel tracer beads are transported as a separate phase than water and can used as a proxy tracer to mimic the transport of non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL). They can be constructed with different densities, sizes & chemical attributes. This poster describes the creation and optimization of the beads and the field testing of buoyant beads, including sampling, tracer analysis, and quantitative analysis. The buoyant beads are transported ahead of the dissolved solutes, suggesting that light NAPL (LNAPL) transport in karst may occur faster than predicted from traditional tracing techniques. The hydrogel beads were successful in illustrating this enhanced transport.

  3. Fresh Water Generation from Aquifer-Pressured Carbon Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aines, R D; Wolery, T J; Bourcier, W L; Wolfe, T; Haussmann, C

    2010-02-19

    Can we use the pressure associated with sequestration to make brine into fresh water? This project is establishing the potential for using brine pressurized by Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) operations in saline formations as the feedstock for desalination and water treatment technologies including reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF). Possible products are: Drinking water, Cooling water, and Extra aquifer space for CO{sub 2} storage. The conclusions are: (1) Many saline formation waters appear to be amenable to largely conventional RO treatment; (2) Thermodynamic modeling indicates that osmotic pressure is more limiting on water recovery than mineral scaling; (3) The use of thermodynamic modeling with Pitzer's equations (or Extended UNIQUAC) allows accurate estimation of osmotic pressure limits; (4) A general categorization of treatment feasibility is based on TDS has been proposed, in which brines with 10,000-85,000 mg/L are the most attractive targets; (5) Brines in this TDS range appear to be abundant (geographically and with depth) and could be targeted in planning future CCS operations (including site selection and choice of injection formation); and (6) The estimated cost of treating waters in the 10,000-85,000 mg/L TDS range is about half that for conventional seawater desalination, due to the anticipated pressure recovery.

  4. Climate Change Impacts on the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer in South-Central Oklahoma due to Projected Precipitation Variations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osborne, Cesalea

    2014-11-19

    through NASA CAN NNX10AU65A The Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer spans five counties in south-central Oklahoma: Carter, Coal, Johnston, Murray, and Pontotoc Base Data • Aquifer study area, roads, rural/non-rural communities, state/county boundaries Methodology... through NASA CAN NNX10AU65A The Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer spans five counties in south-central Oklahoma: Carter, Coal, Johnston, Murray, and Pontotoc Base Data • Aquifer study area, roads, rural/non-rural communities, state/county boundaries Methodology...

  5. Evaluating impacts of CO2 gas intrusion into a confined sandstone aquifer: Experimental results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qafoku, Nikolla; Lawter, Amanda R.; Shao, Hongbo; Wang, Guohui; Brown, Christopher F.

    2014-12-31

    Deep subsurface storage and sequestration of CO2 has been identified as a potential mitigation technique for rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Sequestered CO2 represents a potential risk to overlying aquifers if the CO2 leaks from the deep storage reservoir. Experimental and modeling work is required to evaluate potential risks to groundwater quality and develop a systematic understanding of how CO2 leakage may cause important changes in aquifer chemistry and mineralogy by promoting dissolution/precipitation, adsorption/desorption, and redox reactions. Sediments from the High Plains aquifer in Kansas, United States, were used in this investigation, which is part of the National Risk Assessment Partnership Program sponsored by the US Department of Energy. This aquifer was selected to be representative of consolidated sand and gravel/sandstone aquifers overlying potential CO2 sequestration repositories within the continental US. In this paper, we present results from batch experiments conducted at room temperature and atmospheric pressure with four High Plains aquifer sediments. Batch experiments simulate sudden, fast, and short-lived releases of the CO2 gas as would occur in the case of well failure during injection. Time-dependent release of major, minor, and trace elements were determined by analyzing the contacting solutions. Characterization studies demonstrated that the High Plains aquifer sediments were abundant in quartz and feldspars, and contained about 15 to 20 wt% montmorillonite and up to 5 wt% micas. Some of the High Plains aquifer sediments contained no calcite, while others had up to about 7 wt% calcite. The strong acid extraction tests confirmed that in addition to the usual elements present in most soils, rocks, and sediments, the High Plains aquifer sediments had appreciable amounts of As, Cd, Pb, Cu, and occasionally Zn, which potentially may be mobilized from the solid to the aqueous phase during or after exposure to CO2. However, the results from the batch experiments showed that the High Plains sediments mobilized only low concentrations of trace elements (potential contaminants), which were detected occasionally in the aqueous phase during these experiments. Importantly, these occurrences were more frequent in the calcite-free sediment. Results from these investigations provide useful information to support site selection, risk assessment, and public education efforts associated with geological CO2 storage and sequestration.

  6. Evaluating Impacts of CO2 Gas Intrusion Into a Confined Sandstone aquifer: Experimental Results

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Qafoku, Nikolla; Lawter, Amanda R.; Shao, Hongbo; Wang, Guohui; Brown, Christopher F.

    2014-12-31

    Deep subsurface storage and sequestration of CO2 has been identified as a potential mitigation technique for rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Sequestered CO2 represents a potential risk to overlying aquifers if the CO2 leaks from the deep storage reservoir. Experimental and modeling work is required to evaluate potential risks to groundwater quality and develop a systematic understanding of how CO2 leakage may cause important changes in aquifer chemistry and mineralogy by promoting dissolution/precipitation, adsorption/desorption, and redox reactions. Sediments from the High Plains aquifer in Kansas, United States, were used in this investigation, which is part of the National Risk Assessment Partnershipmore »Program sponsored by the US Department of Energy. This aquifer was selected to be representative of consolidated sand and gravel/sandstone aquifers overlying potential CO2 sequestration repositories within the continental US. In this paper, we present results from batch experiments conducted at room temperature and atmospheric pressure with four High Plains aquifer sediments. Batch experiments simulate sudden, fast, and short-lived releases of the CO2 gas as would occur in the case of well failure during injection. Time-dependent release of major, minor, and trace elements were determined by analyzing the contacting solutions. Characterization studies demonstrated that the High Plains aquifer sediments were abundant in quartz and feldspars, and contained about 15 to 20 wt% montmorillonite and up to 5 wt% micas. Some of the High Plains aquifer sediments contained no calcite, while others had up to about 7 wt% calcite. The strong acid extraction tests confirmed that in addition to the usual elements present in most soils, rocks, and sediments, the High Plains aquifer sediments had appreciable amounts of As, Cd, Pb, Cu, and occasionally Zn, which potentially may be mobilized from the solid to the aqueous phase during or after exposure to CO2. However, the results from the batch experiments showed that the High Plains sediments mobilized only low concentrations of trace elements (potential contaminants), which were detected occasionally in the aqueous phase during these experiments. Importantly, these occurrences were more frequent in the calcite-free sediment. Results from these investigations provide useful information to support site selection, risk assessment, and public education efforts associated with geological CO2 storage and sequestration.« less

  7. Evaluating Impacts of CO2 Gas Intrusion Into a Confined Sandstone aquifer: Experimental Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qafoku, Nikolla; Lawter, Amanda R.; Shao, Hongbo; Wang, Guohui; Brown, Christopher F.

    2014-12-31

    Deep subsurface storage and sequestration of CO2 has been identified as a potential mitigation technique for rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Sequestered CO2 represents a potential risk to overlying aquifers if the CO2 leaks from the deep storage reservoir. Experimental and modeling work is required to evaluate potential risks to groundwater quality and develop a systematic understanding of how CO2 leakage may cause important changes in aquifer chemistry and mineralogy by promoting dissolution/precipitation, adsorption/desorption, and redox reactions. Sediments from the High Plains aquifer in Kansas, United States, were used in this investigation, which is part of the National Risk Assessment Partnership Program sponsored by the US Department of Energy. This aquifer was selected to be representative of consolidated sand and gravel/sandstone aquifers overlying potential CO2 sequestration repositories within the continental US. In this paper, we present results from batch experiments conducted at room temperature and atmospheric pressure with four High Plains aquifer sediments. Batch experiments simulate sudden, fast, and short-lived releases of the CO2 gas as would occur in the case of well failure during injection. Time-dependent release of major, minor, and trace elements were determined by analyzing the contacting solutions. Characterization studies demonstrated that the High Plains aquifer sediments were abundant in quartz and feldspars, and contained about 15 to 20 wt% montmorillonite and up to 5 wt% micas. Some of the High Plains aquifer sediments contained no calcite, while others had up to about 7 wt% calcite. The strong acid extraction tests confirmed that in addition to the usual elements present in most soils, rocks, and sediments, the High Plains aquifer sediments had appreciable amounts of As, Cd, Pb, Cu, and occasionally Zn, which potentially may be mobilized from the solid to the aqueous phase during or after exposure to CO2. However, the results from the batch experiments showed that the High Plains sediments mobilized only low concentrations of trace elements (potential contaminants), which were detected occasionally in the aqueous phase during these experiments. Importantly, these occurrences were more frequent in the calcite-free sediment. Results from these investigations provide useful information to support site selection, risk assessment, and public education efforts associated with geological CO2 storage and sequestration.

  8. Geochemical and Microbiological Characterization of the Arbuckle Saline Aquifer, a Potential CO2 Storage Reservoir; Implications for Hydraulic Separation and Caprock Integrity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scheffer, Aimee

    2012-12-31

    goals, implementation of GCS is almost certainly necessary. As a result, the Department of Energy has funded the examination of the Arbuckle saline aquifer, as well as other aquifers around the United States, to assess their potential as carbon storage...

  9. Isotope characterization of shallow aquifers in the Horombe region, South of Madagascar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fareze, L P; Ramaroson, V; Andriambololona, Raoelina; Andriamiarintsoa, G; Razafitsalama, P R; Rahobisoa, J J; Randrianarison, H; Ranaivoarisoa, A; Marah, H

    2012-01-01

    The present study deals with the problem of evaluation of the recharge mechanism and the characterization of the groundwater flow system in the basement shallow aquifer, which is one of the groundwater resource in the semi-arid South region of Madagascar. Stable isotopes (deuterium and oxygen-18) and tritium are used to achieve with accuracy the hydrogeological and geochemical dynamics study. Chemical analysis is used to provide complementary information to the investigation. A space distribution of tritium concentration and isotopic composition in groundwater shows evidence of two opposite categories of aquifers, which is confirmed by the chemical analysis results and by the geological features of the study site. Some groundwater flow path directions have been identified in the study area thanks to the tritium concentration space distribution and the geological formation. Besides, the groundwater recharge of the shallow aquifers in the South of Madagascar has been characterized by the exponential mixing mode...

  10. Uncertainty Analysis of Capacity Estimates and Leakage Potential for Geologic Storage of Carbon Dioxide in Saline Aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Storage of Carbon Dioxide in Saline Aquifers by Yamama Raza Submitted to the Engineering Systems DivisionUncertainty Analysis of Capacity Estimates and Leakage Potential for Geologic Storage of Carbon Dioxide in Saline Aquifers by Yamama Raza S.B., Engineering Science, Smith College, 2006 Submitted

  11. Impact of porous medium desiccation during anhydrous CO2 injection in deep saline aquifers: up scaling from experimental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    flow rate and capillary properties on the desiccation mechanisms. Keywords: supercritical CO2, dryingImpact of porous medium desiccation during anhydrous CO2 injection in deep saline aquifers: up - France Abstract Injection of CO2 in geological reservoirs or deep aquifers is nowadays studied

  12. Elucidating geochemical response of shallow heterogeneous aquifers to CO2 leakage using high-performance computing: Implications for monitoring of CO2 sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis K.; Maxwell, Reed M.; Siirila, Erica R.; Hammond, Glenn E.; Lichtner, Peter C.

    2013-03-01

    Predicting and quantifying impacts of potential carbon dioxide (CO2) leakage into shallow aquifers that overlie geologic CO2 storage formations is an important part of developing reliable carbon storage techniques. Leakage of CO2 through fractures, faults or faulty wellbores can reduce groundwater pH, inducing geochemical reactions that release solutes into the groundwater and pose a risk of degrading groundwater quality. In order to help quantify this risk, predictions of metal concentrations are needed during geologic storage of CO2. Here, we present regional-scale reactive transport simulations, at relatively fine-scale, of CO2 leakage into shallow aquifers run on the PFLOTRAN platform using high-performance computing. Multiple realizations of heterogeneous permeability distributions were generated using standard geostatistical methods. Increased statistical anisotropy of the permeability field resulted in more lateral and vertical spreading of the plume of impacted water, leading to increased Pb2+ (lead) concentrations and lower pH at a well down gradient of the CO2 leak. Pb2+ concentrations were higher in simulations where calcite was the source of Pb2+ compared to galena. The low solubility of galena effectively buffered the Pb2+ concentrations as galena reached saturation under reducing conditions along the flow path. In all cases, Pb2+ concentrations remained below the maximum contaminant level set by the EPA. Results from this study, compared to natural variability observed in aquifers, suggest that bicarbonate (HCO3) concentrations may be a better geochemical indicator of a CO2 leak under the conditions simulated here.

  13. Apparatus and method for extraction of chemicals from aquifer remediation effluent water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McMurtrey, Ryan D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Ginosar, Daniel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Moor, Kenneth S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Shook, G. Michael (Idaho Falls, ID); Moses, John M. (Dedham, MA); Barker, Donna L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method for extraction of chemicals from an aquifer remediation aqueous effluent are provided. The extraction method utilizes a critical fluid for separation and recovery of chemicals employed in remediating aquifers contaminated with hazardous organic substances, and is particularly suited for separation and recovery of organic contaminants and process chemicals used in surfactant-based remediation technologies. The extraction method separates and recovers high-value chemicals from the remediation effluent and minimizes the volume of generated hazardous waste. The recovered chemicals can be recycled to the remediation process or stored for later use.

  14. The recovery of crude oil spilled on a ground water aquifer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malter, Paul Lawrence

    1983-01-01

    THE RECOVERY OF CRUDE OIL SPILLED ON A GROUND WATER AQUIFER A Thesis by PAUL LAWRENCE MALTER Approved as to style and content by: oy W, ann, J (Ch irman of Committee) / Dona McDona (Head of Department) as (Me ) 0 s Le a . ~e e (Member...) May 1983 ABSTRACT The Recovery of Crude Oil Spilled on a Ground Water Aquifer. (Nay 1983) Paul Lawrence Malter, B. S. , Texas A6K University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Roy W. Bann, Jr. Case histories of previous petroleum spill cleanups...

  15. Impact of background flow on dissolution trapping of carbon dioxide injected into saline aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rapaka, Saikiran

    2011-01-01

    While there has been a large interest in studying the role of dissolution-driven free convection in the context of geological sequestration, the contribution of forced convection has been largely ignored. This manuscript considers CO$_2$ sequestration in saline aquifers with natural background flow and uses theoretical arguments to compute the critical background velocity needed to establish the forced convective regime. The theoretical arguments are supported by two dimensional high-resolution numerical simulations which demonstrate the importance of forced convection in enhancing dissolution in aquifers characterised by low Rayleigh numbers.

  16. 1 Spreading and convective dissolution of carbon dioxide in vertically 2 confined, horizontal aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neufeld, Jerome A.

    1 Spreading and convective dissolution of carbon dioxide in vertically 2 confined, horizontal] Injection of carbon dioxide (CO2) into saline aquifers is a promising tool for reducing 6 anthropogenic CO2 emissions. At reservoir conditions, the injected CO2 is buoyant relative 7 to the ambient groundwater

  17. COUPLED HYDROMECHANICAL MODELING OF CO2 SEQUESTRATION IN DEEP SALINE AQUIFERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolster, Diogo

    1 COUPLED HYDROMECHANICAL MODELING OF CO2 SEQUESTRATION IN DEEP SALINE AQUIFERS VICTOR VILARRASA1,2 , DIOGO BOLSTER1 , SEBASTIA OLIVELLA1 , JESUS CARRERA2 1 Departmen of Geotechnical Engineering and Geosciences, Civil Engineering School, Technical University of Catalonia, GHS, UPC, 08034 Barcelona, Spain. 2

  18. BENEFITS OF IMPROVING WATER QUALITY IN THE ABBOTSFORD AQUIFER: AN APPLICATION OF CONTINGENT VALUATION METHODS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the surface in many places; this does not allow the soil to filter much fertilizer or fecal waste. Water. As well, defense expenditures (actual outlays on bottled water and water filters) and a ranking method#12;BENEFITS OF IMPROVING WATER QUALITY IN THE ABBOTSFORD AQUIFER: AN APPLICATION OF CONTINGENT

  19. Investigating the stratigraphy of an alluvial aquifer using crosswell seismic traveltime tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Investigating the stratigraphy of an alluvial aquifer using crosswell seismic traveltime tomography In this study, we investigate the use of crosswell P-wave seismic tomography to obtain spatially extensive collected cross- well and borehole-to-surface seismic data in wells 17.1 m apart. We carefully considered

  20. Monitoring aquifer storage and recovery using multiple geophysical methods , Kristofer Davis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -gravity methods to monitor an aquifer storage recovery (ASR) project. An abandoned coal mine has been developed interpretation of TEM data with time-lapse gravity for characterizing the hydrogeophysical properties gravity and TEM data allows us to predict hydrologic properties of the rubble zones that constitute

  1. Microbial Abundance and Activity in a Low-Conductivity Aquifer System in East-Central Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossman, Ethan L.

    , clays, and lignite of the Eocene Yegua formation, and wells were installed in all water-bearing sands sources [17]. Evaluation of the potential for bioremediation in these aquifers requires a bet- ter for bioremediation appear good, as numerous studies have shown that nutritionally diverse microorganisms are present

  2. Edible Aquifers Activity Steps 1. Review what groundwater is, the geology of groundwater hydrologic systems, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Deborah

    , sprinkles; a top soil layer: 7. Pour clear soda onto the soil (precipitation) & observe water percolation the decline in the water table. 9. Add pollutants to the top soil (food coloring, concentrated juiceQ.com) Groundwater is any water found below the land surface. It is found as soil moisture, in aquifers in the pore

  3. Constraining groundwater flow in the glacial drift and saginaw aquifers in the Michigan Basin through helium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    through helium concentrations and isotopic ratios T. WEN1 , M. C. CASTRO1 , C. M. HALL1 , D. L. PINTI2 that in situ production is negligible and that most He excesses have a source external to the aquifer Drift 14 C ages. Key words: 14 C ages, Groundwater flow, helium ages, helium fluxes, sedimentary basin

  4. EFFECT OF IMMISCIBLE LIQUID CONTAMINANTS ON P-WAVE TRANSMISSION THROUGH NATURAL AQUIFER SAMPLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan

    EFFECT OF IMMISCIBLE LIQUID CONTAMINANTS ON P-WAVE TRANSMISSION THROUGH NATURAL AQUIFER SAMPLES Jil the effect of non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) contaminants on P-wave velocity and attenuation attenuation, which may be due to lithology and/or contaminants (NAPL or gas phase). Intact core was obtained

  5. AQUIFER BIOTHERMOREMEDIATION USING HEAT PUMPS: SOUND THEORETICAL BASIS AND RESULTS ON THERMAL, GEOCHEMICAL AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    example, the long-term use of groundwater heat pumps for air conditioning of homes or buildings can induce and hydrogeological background. The presence of organic pollutants in the aquifer can amplify these phenomena/or the well productivity, (ii) an inappropriate temperature for the use of groundwater heat pumps for air

  6. CO[subscript 2] migration in saline aquifers: Regimes in migration with dissolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacMinn, C.W.

    We incorporate CO[subscript 2] dissolution due to convective mixing into a sharp-interface mathematical model for the post-injection migration of a plume of CO[subscript 2] in a saline aquifer. The model captures CO[subscript ...

  7. Tide-induced groundwater fluctuation in a coastal leaky confined aquifer system extending under the sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    Tide-induced groundwater fluctuation in a coastal leaky confined aquifer system extending under, China Abstract. This paper presents the analytical solution of groundwater response to tidal fluctuation length, dimensionless leakage, and tidal efficiency on the groundwater level fluctuations in the inland

  8. Using tracer experiments to determine deep saline aquifers caprocks transport characteristics for carbon dioxide storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    for carbon dioxide storage P. Bachaud1,2 , Ph. Berne1 , P. Boulin1,3,4 , F. Renard5,6 , M. Sardin2 , J caprocks from a deep saline aquifer in the Paris basin. Introduction Storage of carbon dioxide in deep. This technique is applied to measure the transport properties of a carbonate caprock with permeability lower than

  9. Groundwater flow to a horizontal or slanted well in an unconfined aquifer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhan, Hongbin

    with the horizontal aquifer units; (4) drilling oper- ations are feasible near the ground surfaces that are obstructed groundwater, vapor, or oil improves the effective recovery of fluids. In a case study in a thin oil reservoir, and mine dewatering [Hantush and Papadopulos, 1962]. [4] An early study of fluid flow to a horizontal well

  10. Evaluating the impact of aquifer layer properties on geomechanical response during CO2 geological sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bao, Jie; Xu, Zhijie; Lin, Guang; Fang, Yilin

    2013-04-01

    Numerical models play an essential role in understanding the facts of carbon dioxide (CO2) geological sequestration in the life cycle of a storage reservoir. We present a series of test cases that reflect a broad and realistic range of aquifer reservoir properties to systematically evaluate and compare the impacts on the geomechanical response to CO2 injection. In this study, a coupled hydro-mechanical model was introduced to simulate the sequestration process, and a quasi-Monte Carlo sampling method was introduced to efficiently sample the value of aquifer properties and geometry parameters. Aquifer permeability was found to be of significant importance to the geomechanical response to the injection. To study the influence of uncertainty of the permeability distribution in the aquifer, an additional series of tests is presented, based on a default permeability distribution site sample with various distribution deviations generated by the Monte Carlo sampling method. The results of the test series show that different permeability distributions significantly affect the displacement and possible failure zone.

  11. SPATIAL PRECIPITATION TRENDS AND EFFECTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON THE HAWAI'IAN HUALALAI AQUIFER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Charles W.

    THESIS SPATIAL PRECIPITATION TRENDS AND EFFECTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON THE HAWAI'IAN HUALALAI AQUIFER;Copyright by Alyssa Danielle Hendricks 2015 All Rights Reserved #12;ii ABSTRACT SPATIAL PRECIPITATION TRENDS and understood spatially and temporally at a multitude of scales, trends in precipitation are less understood

  12. Review and problem definition of water/rock reactions associated with injection of spent geothermal fluids from a geothermal plant into aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elders, W.A.

    1986-07-01

    Among the technical problems faced by the burgeoning geothermal industry is the disposal of spent fluids from power plants. Except in unusual circumstances the normal practice, especially in the USA, is to pump these spent fluids into injection wells to prevent contamination of surface waters, and possibly in some cases, to reduce pressure drawdown in the producing aquifers. This report is a survey of experience in geothermal injection, emphasizing geochemical problems, and a discussion of approaches to their possible mitigation. The extraction of enthalpy from geothermal fluid in power plants may cause solutions to be strongly supersaturated in various dissolved components such as silica, carbonates, sulfates, and sulfides. Injection of such supersaturated solutions into disposal wells has the potential to cause scaling in the well bores and plugging of the aquifers, leading to loss of injectivity. Various aspects of the geochemistry of geothermal brines and their potential for mineral formation are discussed, drawing upon a literature survey. Experience of brine treatment and handling, and the economics of mineral extraction are also addressed in this report. Finally suggestions are made on future needs for possible experimental, field and theoretical studies to avoid or control mineral scaling.

  13. Annual Report On Regional Aquifer Modeling And Data Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Zhiming

    .................................................................................. 13 3.1 Estimates based on 2-D flow, measured hydraulic gradients and field-based hydraulic........................................................................... 19 4.2 Model Calibrations, Using New Water Level Data from R-wells

  14. Geochemical Impacts of Leaking CO2 from Subsurface Storage Reservoirs to Unconfined and Confined Aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qafoku, Nikolla; Brown, Christopher F.; Wang, Guohui; Sullivan, E. C.; Lawter, Amanda R.; Harvey, Omar R.; Bowden, Mark

    2013-04-15

    Experimental research work has been conducted and is undergoing at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to address a variety of scientific issues related with the potential leaks of the carbon dioxide (CO2) gas from deep storage reservoirs. The main objectives of this work are as follows: • Develop a systematic understanding of how CO2 leakage is likely to influence pertinent geochemical processes (e.g., dissolution/precipitation, sorption/desorption and redox reactions) in the aquifer sediments. • Identify prevailing environmental conditions that would dictate one geochemical outcome over another. • Gather useful information to support site selection, risk assessment, policy-making, and public education efforts associated with geological carbon sequestration. In this report, we present results from experiments conducted at PNNL to address research issues related to the main objectives of this effort. A series of batch and column experiments and solid phase characterization studies (quantitative x-ray diffraction and wet chemical extractions with a concentrated acid) were conducted with representative rocks and sediments from an unconfined, oxidizing carbonate aquifer, i.e., Edwards aquifer in Texas, and a confined aquifer, i.e., the High Plains aquifer in Kansas. These materials were exposed to a CO2 gas stream simulating CO2 gas leaking scenarios, and changes in aqueous phase pH and chemical composition were measured in liquid and effluent samples collected at pre-determined experimental times. Additional research to be conducted during the current fiscal year will further validate these results and will address other important remaining issues. Results from these experimental efforts will provide valuable insights for the development of site-specific, generation III reduced order models. In addition, results will initially serve as input parameters during model calibration runs and, ultimately, will be used to test model predictive capability and competency. The results from these investigations will provide useful information to support site selection, risk assessment, and public education efforts associated with geological, deep subsurface CO2 storage and sequestration.

  15. Evaluating Impacts of CO2 Intrusion into an Unconsolidated Aquifer. I. Experimental Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawter, Amanda R.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Wang, Guohui; Shao, Hongbo; Brown, Christopher F.

    2015-08-04

    Capture and deep subsurface sequestration of CO2 has been identified as a potential mitigation technique for rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Sequestered CO2 represents a potential risk to overlying aquifers if the CO2 leaks from the deep storage reservoir. Batch and column experiments combined with wet chemical extractions were conducted to evaluate these risks to groundwater quality and to understand effects of CO2 leakage on aquifer chemistry and mineralogy. Sediments from the High Plains aquifer in Kansas, a confined sandstone aquifer, were used to study time-dependent release of major, minor and trace elements when exposed to CO2 gas. Results showed that Ca, Ba, Si, Mg, Sr, Na, and K increased either instantaneously or followed nonlinear increasing trends with time, indicating dissolution and/or desorption reactions controlled their release. Other elements, such as Mn and Fe, were also released from all sediments, creating a potential for redox reactions to occur. Results from acid extractions confirmed sediments had appreciable amounts of contaminants that may potentially be released into the aqueous phase. However, results from the batch and column experiments demonstrated that only a few trace elements (e.g., As, Cu, Cr, Pb) were released, indicating the risk of groundwater quality degradation due to exposure to leakage of sequestered CO2 is low. Concentrations of Mo were consistently higher in the control experiments (absence of CO2) and were below detection in the presence of CO2 indicating a possible benefit of CO2 in groundwater aquifers. These investigations will provide useful information to support site selection, risk assessment, and public education efforts associated with geological CO2 storage and sequestration.

  16. Potential Impacts of Leakage from Black Rock Reservoir on the Hanford Site Unconfined Aquifer: Initial Hypothetical Simulations of Flow and Contaminant Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freedman, Vicky L.

    2008-01-30

    Initial scoping calculations of the unconfined aquifer at the Hanford Site were carried out for the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) to investigate the potential impacts on the Hanford unconfined aquifer that would result from leakage from the proposed Black Rock Reservoir to the west. Although impacts on groundwater flow and contaminant transport were quantified based on numerical simulation results, the investigation represented a qualitative assessment of the potential lateral recharge that could result in adverse effects on the aquifer. Because the magnitude of the potential leakage is unknown, hypothetical bounding calculations were performed. When a quantitative analysis of the magnitude of the potential recharge from Black Rock Reservoir is obtained, the hydrologic impacts analysis will be revisited. The analysis presented in this report represents initial bounding calculations. A maximum lateral recharge (i.e., upland flux) was determined in the first part of this study by executing steady-state flow simulations that raised the water table no higher than the elevation attained in the Central Plateau during the Hanford operational period. This metric was selected because it assumed a maximum remobilization of contaminants that existed under previous fully saturated conditions. Three steady-state flow fields were then used to analyze impacts to transient contaminant transport: a maximum recharge (27,000 acre-ft/yr), a no additional flux (365 acre-ft/yr), and an intermediate recharge case (16,000 acre-ft/yr). The transport behavior of four radionuclides was assessed for a 300 year simulation period with the three flow fields. The four radionuclides are tritium, iodine-129, technetium-99, and uranium-238. Transient flow and transport simulations were used to establish hypothetical concentration distributions in the subsurface. Using the simulated concentration distributions in 2005 as initial conditions for steady-state flow runs, simulations were executed to investigate the relative effects on contaminant transport from the increased upland fluxes. Contaminant plumes were analyzed for 1) peak concentrations and arrival times at downstream points of compliance, 2) the area of the aquifer contaminated at or above the drinking water standard (DWS), and 3) the total activity remaining in the domain at the end of the simulation. In addition to this analysis, unit source release simulations from a hypothetical tracer were executed to determine relative travel times from the Central Plateau. The results of this study showed that increases in the lateral recharge had limited impact on regional flow directions but accelerated contaminant transport. Although contaminant concentrations may have initially increased for the more mobile contaminants (tritium, technetium-99, and iodine-129), the accelerated transport caused dilution and a more rapid decline in concentrations relative to the Base Case (no additional flux). For the low-mobility uranium-238, higher lateral recharge caused increases in concentration, but these concentrations never approached the DWS. In this preliminary investigation, contaminant concentrations did not exceed the DWS study metric. With the increases in upland fluxes, more mass was transported out of the aquifer, and concentrations were diluted with respect to the base case where no additional flux was considered.

  17. Potential Impacts of Leakage from Black Rock Reservoir on the Hanford Site Unconfined Aquifer: Initial Hypothetical Simulations of Flow and Contaminant Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freedman, Vicky L.

    2007-03-09

    Initial scoping calculations of the unconfined aquifer at the Hanford Site were carried out for the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) to investi¬gate the potential impacts on the Hanford unconfined aquifer that would result from leakage from the proposed Black Rock Reservoir to the west. Although impacts on groundwater flow and contaminant transport were quantified based on numerical simulation results, the investigation represented a quali¬tative assessment of the potential lateral recharge that could result in adverse effects on the aquifer. Because the magnitude of the potential leakage is unknown, hypothetical bounding calculations were performed. When a quantitative analysis of the magnitude of the potential recharge from Black Rock Reservoir is obtained, the hydrologic impacts analysis will be revisited. The analysis presented in this report represent initial bounding calculations. A maximum lateral recharge (i.e., upland flux) was determined in the first part of this study by executing steady-state flow simulations that raised the water table no higher than the elevation attained in the Central Plateau during the Hanford operational period. This metric was selected because it assumed a maximum remobilization of contaminants that existed under previous fully saturated conditions. Three steady-state flow fields were then used to analyze impacts to transient contaminant transport: a maximum recharge (27,000 acre-ft/yr), a no additional flux (365 acre-ft/yr), and an intermediate recharge case (16,000 acre-ft/yr). The transport behavior of four radionuclides was assessed for a 300 year simula¬tion period with the three flow fields. The four radionuclides are current contaminants of concern (COCs) in the Central Plateau and include tritium, iodine-129, technetium-99, and uranium-238. Transient flow and transport simulations were used to establish hypothetical concentration distributions in the subsurface. Using the simulated concentration distributions in 2005 as initial condi¬tions for steady-state flow runs, simulations were executed to investigate the relative effects on contam¬inant transport from the increased upland fluxes. Contaminant plumes were analyzed for 1) peak concen¬trations and arrival times at downstream points of compliance, 2) the area of the aquifer contaminated at or above the drinking water standard (DWS), and 3) the total activity remaining in the domain at the end of the simulation. In addition to this analysis, unit source release simulations from a hypothetical tracer were executed to determine relative travel times from the Central Plateau. The results of this study showed that increases in the upland boundary fluxes 1) had little impact on regional flow directions and 2) accelerated contaminant transport. Although contaminant concentrations have initially increased for the more mobile contaminants (tritium, technetium-99, and iodine-129), the accelerated transport caused dilution and a more rapid decline in concentrations relative to the Base Case (no additional flux). For the low-mobility uranium-238, higher upland fluxes caused increases in concentration, but these concentrations never exceeded the DWS. No significant effects on contaminant concentrations were identified at the Core Zone, Columbia River, or buffer zone area separating these two compliance boundaries. When lateral recharge at the upland boundaries was increased, more mass was transported out of the aquifer and discharged into the Columbia River. These concentrations, however, were diluted with respect to the Base Case, where no potential leakage from the proposed reservoir was considered.

  18. Thermal energy storage in a confined aquifer: Experimental results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Molz, F. J.; Parr, Alfred D.; Andersen, P. F.; Lucido, V. D.; Warman, J. C.

    1979-12-01

    . The dominant heat dissipation mechanisms appeared to be hydrodynamic thermal dispersion and possible mixing of cold and hot water induced by clogging and unclogging of the injection-production well. On the basis of laboratory and field studies, it was concluded...

  19. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF TRACER TESTS IN HETEROGENEOUS AQUIFER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    of the hydraulic conductivity using borehole flowmeters in a total of 49 fully penetrating wells, Rehfeldt et al. is simulated using three-dimensional (3D) hydraulic conductivity distributions derived from the borehole flow- meter test data. The simulated plume is more sensitive to the way the hydraulic conductivity field

  20. Interactions of microbes in terrestrial systems Initial studies on terrestrial systems focused on aquifer material that was analyzed for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Upchurch, Gary - Department of Biology, Texas State University

    for the significance of toluene-degrading isolates in diesel fuel contaminated aquifer on the interaction between microorganisms (i.e. bacteria, mycorrhizae, protozoa) and plants- or petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated environments, and analyzed their interaction

  1. Heat, 10B-Enriched Boric Acid, and Bromide as Recycled Groundwater Tracers for Managed Aquifer Recharge: Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, J F

    2015-01-01

    water tracer. ” Ground Water, Bassett, R. L. (1990). “ Atemperature sensing. ” Ground Water, 51(5), 670–678. Becker,acid as recycled ground- water tracers for managed aquifer

  2. High Resolution Simulation and Characterization of Density-Driven Flow in CO2 Storage in Saline Aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are routinely used to study the process of carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration in saline aquifers. In this paper TOUGH2-MP. 1. Introduction Geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration involves injecting CO2

  3. Stream aquifer interactions: analytical solution to estimate stream depletions caused by stream stage fluctuations and pumping wells near streams 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Intaraprasong, Trin

    2009-05-15

    This dissertation is composed of three parts of contributions. Systems of a fully penetrating pumping well in a confined aquifer near a fully penetrating stream with and without streambeds are discussed in Chapter II. In ...

  4. Hydrogeologic characterization of the Hickory Sandstone Aquifer near Camp Air in northern Mason and southern McCulloch counties, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaney, Cynthia Daphine

    1990-01-01

    HYDROGEOLOGIC CHARACTERIZATION OF THE HICKORY SANDSTONE AQUIFER NEAR CAMP AIR IN NORTHERN MASON AND SOUTHERN MCCULLOCH COUNTIES, TEXAS A Thesis by CYNTHIA DAPHINE DELANEY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University... in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1990 Major Subject: Geology HYDROGEOLOGIC CHARACTERIZATION OF THE HICKORY SANDSTONE AQUIFER NEAR CAMP AIR IN NORTHERN MASON AND SOUTHERN MCCULLOCH COUNTIES, TEXAS A...

  5. The construction and use of aquifer influence functions in determining original gas in place for water-drive gas reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gajdica, Ronald Joseph

    1986-01-01

    THE CONSTRUCTION AND USE OF AQUIFER INFLUENCE FUNCTIONS IN DETERMINING ORIGINAL GAS IN PLACE FOR WATER-DRIVE GAS RESERVOIRS A Thesis by RONALD JOSEPH GAJDICA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1986 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering THE CONSTRUCTION AND USE OF AQUIFER INFLUENCE FUNCTIONS IN DETERMINING ORIGINAL GAS IN PLACE FOR MATER-DRIVE GAS RESERVOIRS A Thesis by RONALD JOSEPH...

  6. Options, knowledge, and satisfaction of Texas residents affected by Edwards Aquifer issues: implications for education and government 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinney, Amy Suzette

    1994-01-01

    OPINIONS, KNOWLEDGE, AND SATISFACTION OF TEXAS RESIDENTS AFFECTED BY EDWARDS AQUIFER ISSUES: IMPLICATIONS FOR EDUCATION AND GOVERNMENT A Thesis by AMY SUZETTE KINNEY Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... Education ABSTRACT Opinions, Knowledge, and Satisfaction of Texas Residents Affected by Edwards Aquifer Issues: Implications for Education and Government. (December 1994) Amy Suzette Kinney, B. S. , Tarleton State University Chair of Advisory Committee...

  7. Geostatistical Simulation of Hydrofacies Heterogeneity of the West Thessaly Aquifer Systems in Greece

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Modis, K. Sideri, D.

    2013-06-15

    Integrating geological properties, such as relative positions and proportions of different hydrofacies, is of highest importance in order to render realistic geological patterns. Sequential indicator simulation (SIS) and Plurigaussian simulation (PS) are alternative methods for conceptual and deterministic modeling for the characterization of hydrofacies distribution. In this work, we studied the spatial differentiation of hydrofacies in the alluvial aquifer system of West Thessaly basin in Greece. For this, we applied both SIS and PS techniques to an extensive set of borehole data from that basin. Histograms of model versus experimental hydrofacies proportions and indicative cross sections were plotted in order to validate the results. The PS technique was shown to be more effective in reproducing the spatial characteristics of the different hydrofacies and their distribution across the study area. In addition, the permeability differentiations reflected in the PS model are in accordance to known heterogeneities of the aquifer capacity.

  8. Field Guide Field Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    and demand in the U.S., with only part of the demand being met by U.S. production. Canola oil has achieved1 1 June 2011 A-1280 Canola Production Field Guide Canola Production Field Guide 2 2 Edited.....................................101 · Contributors to Canola Production Field Guide........102 · Resource Contact Information

  9. Monitoring CO 2 sequestration into deep saline aquifer and associated salt intrusion using coupled multiphase flow modeling and time lapse electrical resistivity tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chuan Lu; CHI Zhang; Hai Hanag; Timothy C. Johnson

    2014-04-01

    Successful geological storage and sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2) require efficient monitoring of the migration of CO2 plume during and after large-scale injection in order to verify the containment of the injected CO2 within the target formation and to evaluate potential leakage risk. Field studies have shown that surface and cross-borehole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) can be a useful tool in imaging and characterizing solute transport in heterogeneous subsurface. In this synthetic study, we have coupled a 3-D multiphase flow model with a parallel 3-D time-lapse ERT inversion code to explore the feasibility of using time-lapse ERT for simultaneously monitoring the migration of CO2 plume in deep saline formation and potential brine intrusion into shallow fresh water aquifer. Direct comparisons of the inverted CO2 plumes resulting from ERT with multiphase flow simulation results indicate the ERT could be used to delineate the migration of CO2 plume. Detailed comparisons on the locations, sizes and shapes of CO2 plume and intruded brine plumes suggest that ERT inversion tends to underestimate the area review of the CO2 plume, but overestimate the thickness and total volume of the CO2 plume. The total volume of intruded brine plumes is overestimated as well. However, all discrepancies remain within reasonable ranges. Our study suggests that time-lapse ERT is a useful monitoring tool in characterizing the movement of injected CO2 into deep saline aquifer and detecting potential brine intrusion under large-scale field injection conditions.

  10. Geophysical Fault Mapping Using the Magnetic Method at Hickory Sandstone Aquifer, Llano Uplift, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pereira, Antonio Do Nascimento

    2013-04-05

    FAULT MAPPING USING THE MAGNETIC METHOD AT HICKORY SANDSTONE AQUIFER, LLANO UPLIFT, TEXAS A Thesis by ANT ONIO DO NASCIMENTO PEREIRA Submitted to the O ce of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial ful llment of the requirements... Magnetic eld or, Magnetic induction or, Magnetic eld density or, Magnetic ux density E Electric eld intensity H Magnetic eld intensity J Magnetizing eld, 0 Permeability of free space M Magnetic moment U Scalar potential v TABLE OF CONTENTS...

  11. Spatial Drought Risk Assessment Using Standardized Precipitation Index and Effective Drought Index: Edwards Aquifer Region 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yildirim, Gokhan

    2015-01-20

    , Edwards Aquifer, Texas .............................. 40 Figure 13. Time series of SPI values for station Blanco for (a) 12-month, (b) 24- month between 1948-2013............................................................................... 46 Figure... 14. Time series of SPI values for Blanco station in the EA region for (a) 1- month, (b) 3-month, (c) 6-month, (d) 9-month, (e) 12-month, (f) 24- month SPI, and (g) 36- month SPI time scales...

  12. Metabolic interdependencies between phylogenetically novel fermenters and respiratory organisms in an unconfined aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wrighton, Kelly C.; Castelle, Cindy; Wilkins, Michael J.; Hug, Laura A.; Sharon, I.; Thomas, Brian C.; Handley, Kim M.; Mullin, Sean W.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Singh, Andrea; Lipton, Mary S.; Long, Philip E.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2014-07-08

    Fermentation-based metabolism is an important ecosystem function often associated with environments rich in organic carbon, such as wetlands, sewage sludge, and the mammalian gut. The diversity of microorganisms and pathways involved in carbon and hydrogen cycling in sediments and aquifers and the impacts of these processes on other biogeochemical cycles remain poorly understood. Here we used metagenomics and proteomics to characterize microbial communities sampled from an aquifer adjacent to the Colorado River at Rifle, Colorado, USA, and document interlinked microbial roles in geochemical cycling. The organic carbon content in the aquifer was elevated via two acetate-based biostimulation treatments. Samples were collected at three time points, with the objective of extensive genome recovery to enable metabolic reconstruction of the community. Fermentative community members include genomes from a new phylum (ACD20), phylogenetically novel members of the Chloroflexi and Bacteroidetes, as well as candidate phyla genomes (OD1, BD1-5, SR1, WWE3, ACD58, TM6, PER, and OP11). These organisms have the capacity to produce hydrogen, acetate, formate, ethanol, butyrate, and lactate, activities supported by proteomic data. The diversity and expression of hydrogenases suggests the importance of hydrogen currency in the subsurface. Our proteogenomic data further indicate the consumption of fermentation intermediates by Proteobacteria can be coupled to nitrate, sulfate, and iron reduction. Thus, fermentation carried out by previously unstudied members of sediment microbial communities may be an important driver of diverse subsurface biogeochemical cycles.

  13. The INL and the Snake River Plain Aquifer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S.Week Day Year(active tab)FrustratedThe Higgs: Not theThe INL

  14. Geochemical Impacts of Leaking CO2 from Subsurface Storage Reservoirs to an Unconfined Oxidizing Carbonate Aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Guohui; Qafoku, Nikolla; Lawter, Amanda R.; Bowden, Mark E.; Harvey, Omar; Sullivan, E. C.; Brown, Christopher F.

    2015-07-15

    A series of batch and column experiments combined with solid phase characterization studies (i.e., quantitative x-ray diffraction and wet chemical extractions) were conducted to address a variety of scientific issues and evaluate the impacts of the potential leakage of carbon dioxide (CO2) from deep subsurface storage reservoirs. The main objective was to gain an understanding of how CO2 gas influences: 1) the aqueous phase pH; and 2) mobilization of major, minor, and trace elements from minerals present in an aquifer overlying potential CO2 sequestration subsurface repositories. Rocks and slightly weathered rocks representative of an unconfined, oxidizing carbonate aquifer within the continental US, i.e., the Edwards aquifer in Texas, were used in these studies. These materials were exposed to a CO2 gas stream or were leached with a CO2-saturated influent solution to simulate different CO2 gas leakage scenarios, and changes in aqueous phase pH and chemical composition were measured in the liquid samples collected at pre-determined experimental times (batch experiments) or continuously (column experiments). The results from the strong acid extraction tests confirmed that in addition to the usual elements present in most soils, rocks, and sediments, the Edward aquifer samples contain As, Cd, Pb, Cu, and occasionally Zn, which may potentially be mobilized from the solid to the aqueous phase during or after exposure to CO2. The results from the batch and column experiments confirmed the release of major chemical elements into the contacting aqueous phase (such as Ca, Mg, Ba, Sr, Si, Na, and K); the mobilization and possible rapid immobilization of minor elements (such as Fe, Al, and Mn), which are able to form highly reactive secondary phases; and sporadic mobilization of only low concentrations of trace elements (such as As, Cd, Pb, Cu, Zn, Mo, etc.). The results from this experimental research effort will help in developing a systematic understanding of how CO2 leakage is likely to influence pertinent geochemical processes (e.g., dissolution/precipitation, sorption/desorption) in the aquifer sediments and will support site selection, risk assessment, policy-making, and public education efforts associated with geologic carbon sequestration.

  15. Appendix B. Glossary Appendix B. Glossary B-3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    transmit significant quantities of water under ordinary hydraulic gradients. aquitard -- A geologic unit with the matter. accuracy -- The closeness of the result of a measurement to the true value of the quantity. ACM -- A measure of the buffering capacity of water, and because pH has a direct effect on organisms as well

  16. Appendix B. Glossary Appendix B. Glossary B-3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    quantities of water under ordinary hydraulic gradients. aquitard -- A geologic unit that inhibits the flow by interaction with the matter. accuracy -- The closeness of the result of a measurement to the true value. alkalinity -- A measure of the buffering capacity of water, and because pH has a direct effect on organisms

  17. Appendix B: Glossary Appendix B: Glossary B-3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    by the vapor. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) -- A federal agency created in 1946 to manage the development, use, atomic -- The process by which the number and energy of particles or photons entering a body of matter of the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission). #12;Oak Ridge Reservation B-4

  18. Appendix B: Glossary Appendix B: Glossary B-3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    the absorbance of light by the vapor. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) -- A federal agency created in 1946, atomic -- The process by which the number and energy of particles or photons entering a body of matter Administration (now part of the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission). base

  19. Appendix B: Glossary Appendix B: Glossary B-3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    . Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) -- A federal agency created in 1946 to manage the development, use of the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission). base/neutral and acid -- The process by which the number and energy of particles or photons entering a body of matter is reduced

  20. Appendix B: Glossary Appendix B: Glossary B-3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    particle emitted from the nucleus of an atom; it has the same charge and mass as that of a helium nucleus detection limit -- The lowest reasonably accurate concentration of an analyte that can be detected

  1. Predevelopment Water-Level Contours for Aquifers in the Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain area of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph M. Fenelon; Randell J. Laczniak; and Keith J. Halford

    2008-06-24

    Contaminants introduced into the subsurface of the Nevada Test Site at Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain by underground nuclear testing are of concern to the U.S. Department of Energy and regulators responsible for protecting human health and safety. Although contaminants were introduced into low-permeability rocks above the regional flow system, the potential for contaminant movement away from the underground test areas and into the accessible environment is greatest by ground-water transport. The primary hydrologic control on this transport is evaluated and examined through a series of contour maps developed to represent the water-level distribution within each of the major aquifers underlying the area. Aquifers were identified and their extents delineated by merging and analyzing multiple hydrostratigraphic framework models developed by other investigators from existing geologic information. The contoured water-level distribution in each major aquifer was developed from a detailed evaluation and assessment of available water-level measurements. Multiple spreadsheets that accompany this report provide pertinent water-level and geologic data by well or drill hole. Aquifers are mapped, presented, and discussed in general terms as being one of three aquifer types—volcanic aquifer, upper carbonate aquifer, or lower carbonate aquifer. Each of these aquifer types was subdivided and mapped as independent continuous and isolated aquifers, based on the continuity of its component rock. Ground-water flow directions, as related to the transport of test-generated contaminants, were developed from water-level contours and are presented and discussed for each of the continuous aquifers. Contoured water-level altitudes vary across the study area and range from more than 5,000 feet in the volcanic aquifer beneath a recharge area in the northern part of the study area to less than 2,450 feet in the lower carbonate aquifer in the southern part of the study area. Variations in water-level altitudes within any single continuous aquifer range from a few hundred feet in a lower carbonate aquifer to just more than 1,100 feet in a volcanic aquifer. Flow directions throughout the study area are dominantly southward with minor eastward or westward deviations. Primary exceptions are westward flow in the northern part of the volcanic aquifer and eastward flow in the eastern part of the lower carbonate aquifer. Northward flow in the upper and lower carbonate aquifers in the northern part of the study area is possible but cannot be substantiated because data are lacking. Interflow between continuous aquifers is evaluated and mapped to define major flow paths. These flow paths delineate tributary flow systems, which converge to form the regional ground-water flow system. The implications of these tributary flow paths in controlling transport away from the underground test areas at Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain are discussed. The obvious data gaps contributing to uncertainties in the delineation of aquifers and development of water-level contours are identified and evaluated.

  2. Dynamics of Microbial Community Composition and Function during In Situ Bioremediation of a Uranium-Contaminated Aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Nostrand, Dr. Joy D. [Oklahoma University; Wu, Liyou [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Wu, Weimin [Stanford University; Huang, Zhijian [Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, China; Gentry, Terry J [ORNL; Deng, Ye [University of Oklahoma; Carley, Jack M [ORNL; Carroll, Sue L [ORNL; He, Zhili [University of Oklahoma; Gu, Baohua [ORNL; Luo, Jian [Georgia Institute of Technology; Criddle, Craig [Stanford University; Watson, David B [ORNL; Jardine, Philip M [ORNL; Marsh, Terence [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Tiedje, James [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Hazen, Terry [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Zhou, Jizhong [University of Oklahoma, Norman

    2011-01-01

    A pilot-scale system was established to examine the feasibility of in situ U(VI) immobilization at a highly contaminated aquifer (U.S. DOE Integrated Field Research Challenge site, Oak Ridge, TN). Ethanol was injected intermittently as an electron donor to stimulate microbial U(VI) reduction, and U(VI) concentrations fell to below the Environmental Protection Agency drinking water standard (0.03 mg liter 1). Microbial communities from three monitoring wells were examined during active U(VI) reduction and maintenance phases with GeoChip, a high-density, comprehensive functional gene array. The overall microbial community structure exhibited a considerable shift over the remediation phases examined. GeoChip-based analysis revealed that Fe(III)-reducing bacterial (FeRB), nitrate-reducing bacterial (NRB), and sulfate-reducing bacterial (SRB) functional populations reached their highest levels during the active U(VI) reduction phase (days 137 to 370), in which denitrification and Fe(III) and sulfate reduction occurred sequentially. A gradual decrease in these functional populations occurred when reduction reactions stabilized, suggesting that these functional populations could play an important role in both active U(VI) reduction and maintenance of the stability of reduced U(IV). These results suggest that addition of electron donors stimulated the microbial community to create biogeochemical conditions favorable to U(VI) reduction and prevent the reduced U(IV) from reoxidation and that functional FeRB, SRB, and NRB populations within this system played key roles in this process.

  3. Electrodic voltages accompanying stimulated bioremediation of a uranium-contaminated aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, K.H.; N'Guessan, A.L.; Druhan, J.; Long, P.E.; Hubbard, S.S.; Lovley, D.R.; Banfield, J.F.

    2009-11-15

    The inability to track the products of subsurface microbial activity during stimulated bioremediation has limited its implementation. We used spatiotemporal changes in electrodic potentials (EP) to track the onset and persistence of stimulated sulfate-reducing bacteria in a uranium-contaminated aquifer undergoing acetate amendment. Following acetate injection, anomalous voltages approaching -900 mV were measured between copper electrodes within the aquifer sediments and a single reference electrode at the ground surface. Onset of EP anomalies correlated in time with both the accumulation of dissolved sulfide and the removal of uranium from groundwater. The anomalies persisted for 45 days after halting acetate injection. Current-voltage and current-power relationships between measurement and reference electrodes exhibited a galvanic response, with a maximum power density of 10 mW/m{sup 2} during sulfate reduction. We infer that the EP anomalies resulted from electrochemical differences between geochemically reduced regions and areas having higher oxidation potential. Following the period of sulfate reduction, EP values ranged from -500 to -600 mV and were associated with elevated concentrations of ferrous iron. Within 10 days of the voltage decrease, uranium concentrations rebounded from 0.2 to 0.8 {mu}M, a level still below the background value of 1.5 {mu}M. These findings demonstrate that EP measurements provide an inexpensive and minimally invasive means for monitoring the products of stimulated microbial activity within aquifer sediments and are capable of verifying maintenance of redox conditions favorable for the stability of bioreduced contaminants, such as uranium.

  4. Prickett and Lonnquist aquifer simulation program for the Apple II minicomputer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hull, L.C.

    1983-02-01

    The Prickett and Lonnquist two-dimensional groundwater model has been programmed for the Apple II minicomputer. Both leaky and nonleaky confined aquifers can be simulated. The model was adapted from the FORTRAN version of Prickett and Lonnquist. In the configuration presented here, the program requires 64 K bits of memory. Because of the large number of arrays used in the program, and memory limitations of the Apple II, the maximum grid size that can be used is 20 rows by 20 columns. Input to the program is interactive, with prompting by the computer. Output consists of predicted lead values at the row-column intersections (nodes).

  5. Geochemical Impacts of Carbon Dioxide, Brine, Trace Metal and Organic Leakage into an Unconfined, Oxidizing Limestone Aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bacon, Diana H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dai, Zhenxue [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Zheng, Liange [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-12-31

    An important risk at CO2 storage sites is the potential for groundwater quality impacts. As part of a system to assess the potential for these impacts a geochemical scaling function has been developed, based on a detailed reactive transport model of CO2 and brine leakage into an unconfined, oxidizing carbonate aquifer. Stochastic simulations varying a number of geochemical parameters were used to generate a response surface predicting the volume of aquifer that would be impacted with respect to regulated contaminants. The brine was assumed to contain several trace metals and organic contaminants. Aquifer pH and TDS were influenced by CO2 leakage, while trace metal concentrations were most influenced by the brine concentrations rather than adsorption or desorption on calcite. Organic plume sizes were found to be strongly influenced by biodegradation.

  6. Geochemical Impacts of Carbon Dioxide, Brine, Trace Metal and Organic Leakage into an Unconfined, Oxidizing Limestone Aquifer

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bacon, Diana H.; Dai, Zhenxue; Zheng, Liange

    2014-12-31

    An important risk at CO2 storage sites is the potential for groundwater quality impacts. As part of a system to assess the potential for these impacts a geochemical scaling function has been developed, based on a detailed reactive transport model of CO2 and brine leakage into an unconfined, oxidizing carbonate aquifer. Stochastic simulations varying a number of geochemical parameters were used to generate a response surface predicting the volume of aquifer that would be impacted with respect to regulated contaminants. The brine was assumed to contain several trace metals and organic contaminants. Aquifer pH and TDS were influenced by CO2more »leakage, while trace metal concentrations were most influenced by the brine concentrations rather than adsorption or desorption on calcite. Organic plume sizes were found to be strongly influenced by biodegradation.« less

  7. METHANE AND METHANOTROPHY IN TEXAS AQUIFERS ETHAN L. GROSSMAN,1 CHUANLUN ZHANG,1* JAMES W. AMMERMAN,2 AND MARTHA J. D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossman, Ethan L.

    1 METHANE AND METHANOTROPHY IN TEXAS AQUIFERS ETHAN L. GROSSMAN,1 CHUANLUN ZHANG,1* JAMES W-occurring methane-oxidizing bacteria (methanotrophs) have been shown to degrade the halogenated hydrocarbons, especially for deep pristine aquifers. Many Texas groundwaters contain significant to abundant methane

  8. Well injectivity during CO2 storage operations in deep saline aquifers6 1: Experimental investigation of drying effects, salt precipitation and7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is a technique than can potentially limit the accumulation29-17Jan2014 #12;3 1. Introduction51 52 Geological sequestration of CO2 into deep saline aquifers studied54 much less than mature oil & gas reservoirs. Injection of carbon dioxide into saline aquifers55

  9. The Next-Generation Massively Parallel Reactive Flow and Transport Code PFLOTRAN: Application to CO2 Storage in Saline Aquifers P. Lichtner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Richard

    aquifers as a possible solution to reduce green house gas emissions. Dissolution of supercritical CO2-term fate of a supercritical CO2 plume will be resolved with high-resolution numerical simulations into a relatively deep saline aquifer above the critical point where CO2 exists as a supercritical fluid (Tcrit =31

  10. Glossary of Metals Antimony Manganese

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of some types of glass, and formulation of pesticides and fungicides. Inorganic arsenic compounds also can into food, or blow on the wind in arsenic-containing soil. Arsenic can get into plants when their roots take

  11. Microsoft Word - glossary.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the Weldon Spring, Missouri,MSE CoresFinding of

  12. Microsoft Word - Glossary_2015.docx

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963Residential2, 2014 MEMORANDUMProvedFeet) Year (2002/03)3Adopted

  13. Energy Efficiency Report--Glossary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul1998,(Million CubicEnd Use:‹Home Page

  14. Geothermal Glossary | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nA Guide to Tapping intoandMinimaland theThe overarchingSystem(Factterms

  15. Glossary of Nuclear Waste Terms

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFESOpportunitiesNERSC Getting Started at14 at 12:00Globus at theof

  16. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Glossary

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Digg FindPortsas aEthanolAFDC Printable Version Share

  17. BEDES Glossary | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergy Webinar:I Due DateOpportunityManual Audit»BackgroundFAQs

  18. Hydrogen Chemistry of Basalt Aquifers --Treiman et al. 282 (5397): 21... http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/282/5397/2194e?maxtosh... 1 of 2 2/19/2008 1:26 PM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovley, Derek

    Hydrogen Chemistry of Basalt Aquifers -- Treiman et al. 282 (5397): 21... http. 2194 DOI: 10.1126/science.282.5397.2194e LETTERS Hydrogen Chemistry of Basalt Aquifers In their report "Evidence against hydrogen-based microbial ecosystems in basalt aquifers" (14 Aug., p. 976), Robert T

  19. Desorption Behavior of Trichloroethene and Tetrachloroethene in U.S. Department of Energy Savannah River Site Unconfined Aquifer Sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, Robert G.; Szecsody, Jim E.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Brown, Christopher F.

    2006-06-21

    The DOE Savannah River Site (SRS) is evaluating the potential applicability of the monitored natural attenuation (MNA) process as a contributor to the understanding of the restoration of its unconfined groundwater aquifer known to be contaminated with the chlorinated hydrocarbon compounds trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE). This report discusses the results from aqueous desorption experiments on SRS aquifer sediments from two different locations at the SRS (A/M Area; P-Area) with the objective of providing technically defensible TCE/PCE distribution coefficient (Kd) data and data on TCE/PCE reversible and irreversible sorption behavior needed for further MNA evaluation.

  20. Analysis of temperatures and water levels in wells to estimatealluvial aquifer hydraulic conductivities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Su, Grace W.; Jasperse, James; Seymour, Donald; Constantz, Jim

    2003-06-19

    Well water temperatures are often collected simultaneously with water levels; however, temperature data are generally considered only as a water quality parameter and are not utilized as an environmental tracer. In this paper, water levels and seasonal temperatures are used to estimate hydraulic conductivities in a stream-aquifer system. To demonstrate this method, temperatures and water levels are analyzed from six observation wells along an example study site, the Russian River in Sonoma County, California. The range in seasonal ground water temperatures in these wells varied from <0.28C in two wells to {approx}88C in the other four wells from June to October 2000. The temperature probes in the six wells are located at depths between 3.5 and 7.1 m relative to the river channel. Hydraulic conductivities are estimated by matching simulated ground water temperatures to the observed ground water temperatures. An anisotropy of 5 (horizontal to vertical hydraulic conductivity) generally gives the best fit to the observed temperatures. Estimated conductivities vary over an order of magnitude in the six locations analyzed. In some locations, a change in the observed temperature profile occurred during the study, most likely due to deposition of fine-grained sediment and organic matter plugging the streambed. A reasonable fit to this change in the temperature profile is obtained by decreasing the hydraulic conductivity in the simulations. This study demonstrates that seasonal ground water temperatures monitored in observation wells provide an effective means of estimating hydraulic conductivities in alluvial aquifers.

  1. Hydraulic interference testbetween several doublets in the Dogger aquifer in Ile-de-France region (Val-de-Marne)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydraulic interference testbetween several doublets in the Dogger aquifer in Ile-de-France region of the "thermal breakthrough".One uncertainty of these models is the hydraulic interference between the different of the hydraulic test whichwas carried out in September 2013.The test included 5 geothermal doublets (Cachan 1

  2. Origin of groundwater salinity and hydrogeochemical processes in the confined Quaternary aquifer of the Pearl River Delta, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    Origin of groundwater salinity and hydrogeochemical processes in the confined Quaternary aquifer of groundwater salinity and the major hydrogeochemical processes controlling the groundwater evolution­2009, and groundwater samples were collected for major ion (Ca2þ ; Mg2þ ; Naþ ; Kþ ; NHþ 4 ; Cl À ; SO2À 4 and HCOÀ 3

  3. CROSSWELL SEISMIC REFLECTION IMAGING OF A SHALLOW COBBLE-AND-SAND AQUIFER: AN EXAMPLE FROM THE BOISE HYDROGEOPHYSICAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    CROSSWELL SEISMIC REFLECTION IMAGING OF A SHALLOW COBBLE-AND- SAND AQUIFER: AN EXAMPLE FROM Crosswell seismic data contain first-arrival information for velocity inversion and reflec- tions for seismic stratigraphic analysis. Seismic velocity information is useful for directly com- paring to

  4. Using batch experiments to quantify the potential of North Sea saline aquifers to leach contaminants upon injection of CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    contaminants upon injection of CO2 Kit Carruthers MSc, Dr. Mark Wilkinson, Dr. Katriona Edlmann · Saline aquifer CO2 storage limited by water and pore compressibilities · Pressure relief via water production · CO2 acidifies water upon dissolution, promoting leaching of heavy metals into solution

  5. Aquifer Characteristics Data Report for the Weldon Spring Site chemical plant/raffinate pits and vicinity properties for the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-11-01

    This report describes the procedures and methods used, and presents the results of physical testing performed, to characterize the hydraulic properties of the shallow Mississippian-Devonian aquifer beneath the Weldon Spring chemical plant, raffinate pits, and vicinity properties. The aquifer of concern is composed of saturated rocks of the Burlington-Keokuk Limestone which constitutes the upper portion of the Mississippian-Devonian aquifer. This aquifer is a heterogeneous anisotropic medium which can be described in terms of diffuse Darcian flow overlain by high porosity discrete flow zones and conduits. Average hydraulic conductivity for all wells tested is 9.6E-02 meters/day (3.1E-01 feet/day). High hydraulic conductivity values are representative of discrete flow in the fractured and weathered zones in the upper Burlington-Keokuk Limestone. They indicate heterogeneities within the Mississippian-Devonian aquifer. Aquifer heterogeneity in the horizontal plane is believed to be randomly distributed and is a function of fracture spacing, solution voids, and preglacial weathering phenomena. Relatively high hydraulic conductivities in deeper portions of the aquifer are though to be due to the presence of widely spaced fractures. 44 refs., 27 figs., 9 tabs.

  6. Possible Impacts of Global Warming on Hydrology of the Ogallala Aquifer Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenberg, Norman J. ); Epstein, Daniel J. ); Wang, Dahong; Vail, Lance W. ); Srinivasan, Ragahvan; Arnold, J G.

    1998-12-01

    The Ogallala or High Plains aquifer provides water for about 20% of the irrigated land in the United States. About 20 km{sup 3} (16.6 million acre-feet) of water are withdrawn annually from this aquifer. In general, recharge has not compensated for withdrawals since major irrigation development began in this region in the 1940s. The mining of the Ogallala has been pictured as an analogue to climate change in that many GCMs predict a warmer and drier future for this region. We anticipate the possible impacts of climate change on the sustainability of the aquifer as a source of water for irrigation and other purposes in the region. We have applied HUMUS, the Hydrologic Unit Model of the U.S. to the Missouri and Arkansas-White-Red water resource regions that overlie the Ogallala. We have imposed three general circulation model (GISS, UKTR and BMRC) projections of future climate change on this region and simulated the changes that may be induced in water yields (runoff plus lateral flow) and ground water recharge. Each GCM was applied to HUMUS at three levels of global mean temperature (GMT) to represent increasing severity of climate change (a surrogate for time). HUMUS was also run at three levels of atmospheric CO2 concentration (hereafter denoted by[CO2]) in order to estimate the impacts of direct CO2 effects on photosynthesis and evapotranspiration. Since the UKTR and GISS GCMs project increased precipitation in the Missouri basin, water yields increase there. The BMRC GCM predicts sharply decreased precipitation and, hence, reduced water yields. Precipitation reductions are even greater in the Arkansas basin under BMRC as are the consequent water yield losses. GISS and UKTR climates lead to only moderate yield losses in the Arkansas. CO2-fertilization reverses these losses and yields increase slightly. CO2 fertilization increases recharge in the base (no climate change) case in both basins. Recharge is reduced under all three GCMs and severities of climate change.

  7. Simulation of Coupled Processes of Flow, Transport, and Storage of CO2 in Saline Aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Chen, Zizhong; Kazemi, Hossein; Yin, Xiaolong; Pruess, Karsten; Oldenburg, Curt; Winterfeld, Philip; Zhang, Ronglei

    2014-09-30

    This report is the final scientific one for the award DE- FE0000988 entitled “Simulation of Coupled Processes of Flow, Transport, and Storage of CO2 in Saline Aquifers.” The work has been divided into six tasks. In task, “Development of a Three-Phase Non-Isothermal CO2 Flow Module,” we developed a fluid property module for brine-CO2 mixtures designed to handle all possible phase combinations of aqueous phase, sub-critical liquid and gaseous CO2, supercritical CO2, and solid salt. The thermodynamic and thermophysical properties of brine-CO2 mixtures (density, viscosity, and specific enthalpy of fluid phases; partitioning of mass components among the different phases) use the same correlations as an earlier fluid property module that does not distinguish between gaseous and liquid CO2-rich phases. We verified the fluid property module using two leakage scenarios, one that involves CO2 migration up a blind fault and subsequent accumulation in a secondary “parasitic” reservoir at shallower depth, and another investigating leakage of CO2 from a deep storage reservoir along a vertical fault zone. In task, “Development of a Rock Mechanical Module,” we developed a massively parallel reservoir simulator for modeling THM processes in porous media brine aquifers. We derived, from the fundamental equations describing deformation of porous elastic media, a momentum conservation equation relating mean stress, pressure, and temperature, and incorporated it alongside the mass and energy conservation equations from the TOUGH2 formulation, the starting point for the simulator. In addition, rock properties, namely permeability and porosity, are functions of effective stress and other variables that are obtained from the literature. We verified the simulator formulation and numerical implementation using analytical solutions and example problems from the literature. For the former, we matched a one-dimensional consolidation problem and a two-dimensional simulation of the Mandel-Cryer effect. For the latter, we obtained a good match of temperature and gas saturation profiles, and surface uplift, after injection of hot fluid into a model of a caldera structure. In task, “Incorporation of Geochemical Reactions of Selected Important Species,” we developed a novel mathematical model of THMC processes in porous and fractured saline aquifers, simulating geo-chemical reactions associated with CO2 sequestration in saline aquifers. Two computational frameworks, sequentially coupled and fully coupled, were used to simulate the reactions and transport. We verified capabilities of the THMC model to treat complex THMC processes during CO2 sequestration by analytical solutions and we constructed reactive transport models to analyze the THMC process quantitatively. Three of these are 1D reactive transport under chemical equilibrium, a batch reaction model with equilibrium chemical reactions, and a THMC model with CO2 dissolution. In task “Study of Instability in CO2 Dissolution-Diffusion-Convection Processes,” We reviewed literature related to the study of density driven convective flows and on the instability of CO2 dissolution-diffusion-convection processes. We ran simulations that model the density-driven flow instability that would occur during CO2 sequestration. CO2 diffused through the top of the system and dissolved in the aqueous phase there, increasing its density. Density fingers formed along the top boundary, and coalesced into a few prominent ones, causing convective flow that forced the fluid to the system bottom. These simulations were in two and three dimensions. We ran additional simulations of convective mixing with density contrast caused by variable dissolved CO2 concentration in saline water, modeled after laboratory experiments in which supercritical CO2 was circulated in the headspace above a brine saturated packed sand in a pressure vessel. As CO2 dissolved into the upper part of the saturated sand, liquid phase density increases causing instability and setting off convective mixing. We obtained good agreement

  8. Abiotic/Biotic Degradation and Mineralization of N-Nitrosodimethylamine in Aquifer Sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szecsody, James E.; McKinley, James P.; Breshears, Andrew T.; Crocker, Fiona H.

    2008-10-14

    The N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) degradation rate and mineralization rate were measured in two aquifer sediments that received treatments to create oxic, reducing, and sequential reducing/oxic environments. Chemically reduced sediments rapidly abiotically degraded NDMA to nontoxic dimethylamine (DMA) to parts per trillion levels, then degraded to further products. NDMA was partially mineralized in reduced sediments (6 to 28 percent) at a slow rate (half-life 3,460 h) by an unknown abiotic/biotic pathway. In contrast, NDMA was mineralized more rapidly (half-life 342 h) and to a greater extent (30 to 81 percent) in oxic sediments with propane addition, likely by a propane monooxygenase pathway. NDMA mineralization in sequential reduced sediment followed by oxic sediment treatment did result in slightly more rapid mineralization and a greater mineralization extent relative to reduced systems. These increases were minor, so aerobic NDMA mineralization with oxygen and propane addition was the most viable in situ NDMA mineralization strategy.

  9. System-Scale Model of Aquifer, Vadose Zone, and River Interactions for the Hanford 300 Area - Application to Uranium Reactive Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rockhold, Mark L.; Bacon, Diana H.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Parker, Kyle R.; Waichler, Scott R.; Williams, Mark D.

    2013-10-01

    This report represents a synthesis and integration of basic and applied research into a system-scale model of the Hanford 300 Area groundwater uranium plume, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Richland Operations (DOE-RL) office. The report integrates research findings and data from DOE Office of Science (DOE-SC), Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM), and DOE-RL projects, and from the site remediation and closure contractor, Washington Closure Hanford, LLC (WCH). The three-dimensional, system-scale model addresses water flow and reactive transport of uranium for the coupled vadose zone, unconfined aquifer, and Columbia River shoreline of the Hanford 300 Area. The system-scale model of the 300 Area was developed to be a decision-support tool to evaluate processes of the total system affecting the groundwater uranium plume. The model can also be used to address “what if” questions regarding different remediation endpoints, and to assist in design and evaluation of field remediation efforts. For example, the proposed cleanup plan for the Hanford 300 Area includes removal, treatment, and disposal of contaminated sediments from known waste sites, enhanced attenuation of uranium hot spots in the vadose and periodically rewetted zone, and continued monitoring of groundwater with institutional controls. Illustrative simulations of polyphosphate infiltration were performed to demonstrate the ability of the system-scale model to address these types of questions. The use of this model in conjunction with continued field monitoring is expected to provide a rigorous basis for developing operational strategies for field remediation and for defining defensible remediation endpoints.

  10. The Footprint of the CO[subscript 2] Plume during Carbon Dioxide Storage in Saline Aquifers: Storage Efficiency for Capillary Trapping at the Basin Scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juanes, Ruben

    We study a sharp-interface mathematical model of CO[subscript 2] migration in deep saline aquifers, which accounts for gravity override, capillary trapping, natural groundwater flow, and the shape of the plume during the ...

  11. AN EVALUATION OF HYDROSTRATIGRAPHIC CHARACTERIZATION METHODS BASED ON WELL LOGS FOR GROUNDWATER MODELING OF THE HIGH PLAINS AQUIFER IN SOUTHWEST KANSAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreitzer, Sarah R.

    2011-04-27

    The Ogallala portion of the High Plains aquifer is the primary source of water for irrigation and municipal purposes in southwestern Kansas. The spatial variability and connectivity of permeable and non-permeable deposits influence local ground...

  12. Analysis of Chemical Storage and Transit Times to Characterize Water Movement Through a Thick Unsaturated Zone Overlying the High Plains Aquifer, Northwestern Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katz, Britney S.

    2014-12-31

    not associated to precipitation or pumping. This indicated a previously unknown source of recharge to the aquifer and the need to further investigate water movement processes through the thick unsaturated zone above it. The roles of irrigation, land use...

  13. In situ treatment of arsenic contaminated groundwater by aquifer iron coating: Experimental Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Xianjun; Wang, Yanxin; Pi, Kunfu; Liu, Chongxuan; Li, Junxia; Liu, Yaqing; Wang, Zhiqiang; Duan, Mengyu

    2015-09-15

    In situ arsenic removal from groundwater by an iron coating method has great potential to be a cost effective and simple groundwater remediation technique, especially in rural and remote areas where groundwater is used as the main source of drinking water. The in situ arsenic removal technique was first optimized by simulating arsenic removal in various quartz sand columns under anoxic conditions., Its effectiveness was then evaluated in an actual high-arsenic groundwater environment. The mechanism of arsenic removal by the iron coating was investigated under different conditions using scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/X-ray absorption spectroscopy, an electron microprobe, and Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy. A 4-step alternative cycle aquifer iron coating method was developed. A continuous injection of 5 mmol/L FeSO4 and 2.5 mmol/L NaClO for 96 hours can create a uniform coating of crystalline goethite on the surface of quartz sand in the columns without causing clogging. At a flow rate of 0.45 cm/min of the injection reagents (vi), the time for arsenic (as Na2HAsO4) to pass through the iron-coated quartz sand column was approximately 35 hours, which was much longer than that for tracer fluorescein sodium (approximately 2 hours). The retardation factor of arsenic was 23, and its adsorption capacity was 0.11 mol As per mol Fe, leading to an excellent arsenic removal. In situ arsenic removal from groundwater in an aquifer was achieved by simultaneous injections of As (V) and Fe (II) reagents. When the arsenic content in the groundwater was 233 ?g/L, the aqueous phase arsenic was completely removed with an arsenic adsorption of 0.05 mol As per mol Fe. Arsenic fixation resulted from a process of adsorption/co-precipitation, in which arsenic and iron likely formed the arsenic-bearing iron mineral phases with poor crystallinity by way of bidentate binuclear complexes. Thus, the high arsenic removal efficiency of the technique likely resulted from the expanded specific iron oxide/hydroxide surface area with poor crystallinity and from coprecipitation.

  14. Sensitivity study of CO2 storage capacity in brine aquifers withclosed boundaries: Dependence on hydrogeologic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Q.; Birkholzer, J.; Rutqvist, J.; Tsang, C-F.

    2007-02-07

    In large-scale geologic storage projects, the injected volumes of CO{sub 2} will displace huge volumes of native brine. If the designated storage formation is a closed system, e.g., a geologic unit that is compartmentalized by (almost) impermeable sealing units and/or sealing faults, the native brine cannot (easily) escape from the target reservoir. Thus the amount of supercritical CO{sub 2} that can be stored in such a system depends ultimately on how much pore space can be made available for the added fluid owing to the compressibility of the pore structure and the fluids. To evaluate storage capacity in such closed systems, we have conducted a modeling study simulating CO{sub 2} injection into idealized deep saline aquifers that have no (or limited) interaction with overlying, underlying, and/or adjacent units. Our focus is to evaluate the storage capacity of closed systems as a function of various reservoir parameters, hydraulic properties, compressibilities, depth, boundaries, etc. Accounting for multi-phase flow effects including dissolution of CO{sub 2} in numerical simulations, the goal is to develop simple analytical expressions that provide estimates for storage capacity and pressure buildup in such closed systems.

  15. Fractured rock aquifer tests in the Western Siberian Basin, Ozyorsk, Russia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nichols, R.L.; Looney, B.B.; Eddy-Dilek, C.A.

    1997-10-01

    A series of multi-zone pumping tests was conducted in a contaminated fractured rock aquifer in the Western Siberian Basin, Ozyorsk, Russia. The tests were conducted adjacent to the Mishelyak River floodplain in fractured Paleozoic porphyrites, tufts, tuff breccia, and lava typical of the Ural mountain complex. Geophysical logs, borehole photography, core samples, and results from previous borehole contamination studies were used to identify the zones to be tested. A network of three uncased wells was tested using a system of inflatable packers, pressure transducers and data loggers. Seven zones were isolated and monitored in two of the uncased wells. A straddle packer assembly was used to isolate individual zones within the pumping well. Eight constant rate pumping tests were conducted. Results of the testing indicate that shallow groundwater migrates primarily in two intervals that are separated by an interval with low lateral conductivity. The water bearing intervals have moderate to high specific capacities (1.3 and 30 L/min/m). Several processes are responsible for fracturing present in the lower interval. The network of compound fractures produced a complex array of fracture intersections yielding a fractured media with hydraulic behavior similar to porous media. Models used for the analysis of pumping tests in porous media provide a good estimation of the hydraulic response of the lower interval to pumping. Future work will include more complex analysis of the data to determine hydraulic conductivity ellipses.

  16. Single-cell genomics reveal metabolic strategies for microbial growth and survival in an oligotrophic aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilkins, Michael J.; Kennedy, David W.; Castelle, Cindy; Field, Erin; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Konopka, Allan

    2014-02-01

    Bacteria from the genus Pedobacter are a major component of microbial assemblages at Hanford Site and have been shown to significantly change in abundance in response to the subsurface intrusion of Columbia River water. Here we employed single cell genomics techniques to shed light on the physiological niche of these microorganisms. Analysis of four Pedobacter single amplified genomes (SAGs) from Hanford Site sediments revealed a chemoheterotrophic lifestyle, with the potential to exist under both aerobic and microaerophilic conditions via expression of both aa3­?type and cbb3-type cytochrome c oxidases. These SAGs encoded a wide-range of both intra-and extra­-cellular carbohydrate-active enzymes, potentially enabling the degradation of recalcitrant substrates such as xylan and chitin, and the utilization of more labile sugars such as mannose and fucose. Coupled to these enzymes, a diversity of transporters and sugar-binding molecules were involved in the uptake of carbon from the extracellular local environment. The SAGs were enriched in TonB-dependent receptors (TBDRs), which play a key role in uptake of substrates resulting from degradation of recalcitrant carbon. CRISPR-Cas mechanisms for resisting viral infections were identified in all SAGs. These data demonstrate the potential mechanisms utilized for persistence by heterotrophic microorganisms in a carbon-limited aquifer, and hint at potential linkages between observed Pedobacter abundance shifts within the 300 Area subsurface and biogeochemical shifts associated with Columbia River water intrusion.

  17. Guidelines for conceptual design and evaluation of aquifer thermal energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, C.F.; Hauz, W.

    1980-10-01

    Guidelines are presented for use as a tool by those considering application of a new technology, aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES). The guidelines will assist utilities, municipalities, industries, and other entities in the conceptual design and evaluation of systems employing ATES. The potential benefits of ATES are described, an overview is presented of the technology and its applications, and rules of thumb are provided for quickly judging whether a proposed project has sufficient promise to warrant detailed conceptual design and evaluation. The characteristics of sources and end uses of heat and chill which are seasonally mismatched and may benefit from ATES (industrial waste heat, cogeneration, solar heat, and winter chill, for space heating and air conditioning) are discussed. Storage and transport subsystems and their expected performance and cost are described. A 10-step methodology is presented for conceptual design of an ATES system and evaluation of its technical and economic feasibility in terms of energy conservation, cost savings, fuel substitution, improved dependability of supply, and abatement of pollution, with examples, and the methodology is applied to a hypothetical proposed ATES system, to illustrate its use.

  18. Tachyonic field interacting with Scalar (Phantom) Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Surajit Chattopadhyay; Ujjal Debnath

    2009-01-29

    In this letter, we have considered the universe is filled with the mixture of tachyonic field and scalar or phantom field. If the tachyonic field interacts with scalar or phantom field, the interaction term decays with time and the energy for scalar field is transferred to tachyonic field or the energy for phantom field is transferred to tachyonic field. The tachyonic field and scalar field potentials always decrease, but phantom field potential always increases.

  19. Ground-water flow and recharge in the Mahomet Bedrock Valley Aquifer, east-central Illinois: A conceptual model based on hydrochemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panno, S.V.; Hackley, K.C.; Cartwright, K.; Liu, C.L. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

    1994-04-01

    Major-ion and isotopic analyses of ground water have been used to develop a conceptual model of flow and recharge to the Mahomet Bedrock Valley Aquifer (MVA). The MVA is composed of clean, permeable sands and gravels and forms a basal'' fill up to 60 m thick in a buried, west-trending bedrock valley. A thick succession of glacial tills, some containing interbedded lenses of sand and gravel, covers the MVA. Three regions within the MVA have hydrochemically distinct ground-water types. A fourth ground-water type was found at the confluence of the MVA and the Mackinaw Bedrock Valley Aquifer (MAK) to the west.

  20. Analysis of Aquifer Response, Groundwater Flow, and PlumeEvolution at Site OU 1, Former Fort Ord, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, Preston D.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Su, Grace W.

    2005-02-24

    This report presents a continuation from Oldenburg et al. (2002) of analysis of the hydrogeology, In-Situ Permeable Flow Sensor (ISPFS) results, aquifer response, and changes in the trichloroethylene (TCE) groundwater plume at Operational Unit 1 (OU 1) adjacent to the former Fritzsche Army Airfield at the former Fort Ord Army Base, located on Monterey Bay in northern Monterey County. Fuels and solvents were burned on a portion of OU 1 called the Fire Drill Area (FDA) during airport fire suppression training between 1962 and 1985. This activity resulted in soil and groundwater contamination in the unconfined A-aquifer. In the late 1980's, soil excavation and bioremediation were successful in remediating soil contamination at the site. Shortly thereafter, a groundwater pump, treat, and recharge system commenced operation. This system has been largely successful at remediating groundwater contamination at the head of the groundwater plume. However, a trichloroethylene (TCE) groundwater plume extends approximately 3000 ft (900 m) to the northwest away from the FDA. In the analyses presented here, we augment our prior work (Oldenburg et al., 2002) with new information including treatment-system totalizer data, recent water-level and chemistry data, and data collected from new wells to discern trends in contaminant migration and groundwater flow that may be useful for ongoing remediation efforts. Some conclusions from the prior study have been modified based on these new analyses, and these are pointed out clearly in this report.

  1. Hydraulic interactions between fractures and bedding planes in a carbonate aquifer studied by means of experimentally induced water-table fluctuations (Coaraze

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Hydraulic interactions between fractures and bedding planes in a carbonate aquifer studied high and low permeability regions are controlled by the hydraulic head gradient. Past studies have addressed this problem mainly considering steady- state hydraulic conditions. To study such exchanges during

  2. Ground-water geochemistry and radionuclide activity in the Cambrian-Ordovician aquifer of Dodge and Fond du Lac counties, Wisconsin. Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weaver, T.R.; Bahr, J.M.; Anderson, M.P.

    1990-01-01

    Analyses of groundwater from wells in the Cambrian-Ordovician aquifer of eastern Wisconsin indicate that regions of the aquifer contain elevated concentrations of dissolved solids, chloride and sulfate. Groundwater from several wells in the area also approach or exceed the current drinking water standard for combined radium activity. Significant changes in groundwater chemistry occur where the aquifer becomes confined by the Maquoketa shale. Concentrations of Cl(-), SO4(2-) and Na(+) increase in the confined region, and the highest combined radium activities are typically observed in the area. Geochemical modeling implies that the observed changes in major ion groundwater chemistry occur in response to the presence of the confining unit which may act as a source of SO4(2-), through gypsum dissolution, and Na(+), through cation exchange. A finite difference groundwater flow model was linked to a particle tracking routine to determine groundwater flow paths and residence times in the aquifer near the boundary between unconfined and confined conditions. Results suggest that the presence of the confining unit produces a vertically stratified flow regime in the confined region.

  3. Experimental Assessment of CO2Mineral-Toxic Ion Interactions in a Simplified Freshwater Aquifer: Implications for CO2 Leakage from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montes-Hernandez, German

    of hazardous trace elements via mineral dissolution and/or via desorption processes. In an effort to evaluate that remobilization of trace elements by CO2 intrusion is not a universal physicochemical effect. In fact goethite/or retention of hazardous trace elements (e.g., heavy metals and/or metalloids) contained in native aquifer

  4. Large-scale impact of CO2 storage in deep saline aquifers: A sensitivity study on pressure response in stratified systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Quanlin

    Large-scale impact of CO2 storage in deep saline aquifers: A sensitivity study on pressure response storage potential of all the geological CO2 storage options and are widely distributed throughout the globe in all sedimentary basins.ForCO2 storage tohaveasignificantimpact on atmospheric levels

  5. Impact of sedimentary provenance and weathering on arsenic distribution in aquifers of the Datong basin, China: Constraints from elemental geochemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Xianjun; Wang, Yanxin; Ellis, Andre; Liu, Chongxuan; Duan, Mengyu; Li, Junxia

    2014-11-01

    Arsenic (As)-contaminated aquifer sediments from Datong basin, China have been analyzed to infer the provenance and depositional environment related to As distribution in the aquifer sediments. The As content in the sediments ranged from 2.45 to 27.38 mg/kg with an average value of 9.54 mg/kg, which is comparable to the average value in modern unconsolidated sediments. However, minor variation in As concentration with depth has been observed in the core. There was a significant correlation between Fe, and Al and As, which was attributed to the adsorption or co-precipitation of As onto/with Fe oxides/hydroxides and/or Fe-coated clay minerals. Post-Archean Australian Shale (PAAS)-normalized REEs patterns of sediment samples along the borehole were constant, and the sediments had a notably restricted range of La-N/Yb-N ratios from 0.7 to 1.0. These results suggested that the provenance of the Datong basin remained similar throughout the whole depositional period. The analysis of major geochemical compositions confirmed that all core sediments were from the same sedimentary source and experienced significant sedimentary recycling. The co-variation of As, V/Al, Ni/Al and chemical index of alteration (CIA) values in the sediments along the borehole suggested that As distribution in the sediments was primarily controlled by weathering processes. The calculated CIA values of the sediments along the borehole indicate that a relative strong chemical weathering occurred during the deposition of sediments at depths of similar to 35 to 88 m, which was corresponding to the depth at which high As groundwater was observed at the site. Strong chemical weathering favored the deposition of Fe-bearing minerals including poorly crystalline and crystalline Fe oxide mineral phases and concomitant co-precipitation of As with these minerals in the sediments. Subsequent reductive dissolution of As-bearing poorly crystalline and crystalline Fe oxides would result in the enrichment of As in groundwater. In general, the chemical weathering during the deposition of the sediments governed the co-accumulation of Fe oxides and As in the aquifer sediments. And then, the reductive dissolution of Fe oxides/hydroxides is the mechanism of As enrichment in the groundwater in the Datong basin

  6. Effect of uncertain hydraulic conductivity on the fate and transport of BTEX compounds at a field site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Guoping; Zheng, Chunmiao; Wolfsberg, Andrew

    2002-01-05

    A Monte Carlo analysis was conducted to investigate the effect of uncertain hydraulic conductivity on the fate and transport of BTEX compounds (benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene, and xylene) at a field site on Hill Air Force Base, Utah. Microbially mediated BTEX degradation has occurred at the site through multiple terminal electron-accepting processes, including aerobic respiration, denitrification, Fe(III) reduction, sulfate reduction, and methanogenesis degradation. Multiple realizations of the hydraulic conductivity field were generated and substituted into a multispecies reactive transport model developed and calibrated for the Hill AFB site in a previous study. Simulation results show that the calculated total BTEX masses (released from a constant-concentration source) that remain in the aquifer at the end of the simulation period statistically follow a lognormal distribution. In the first analysis (base case), the calculated total BTEX mass varies from a minimum of 12% less and a maximum of 60% more than that of the previously calibrated model. This suggests that the uncertainty in hydraulic conductivity can lead to significant uncertainties in modeling the fate and transport of BTEX. Geometric analyses of calculated plume configurations show that a higher BTEX mass is associated with wider lateral spreading, while a lower mass is associated with longer longitudinal extension. More BTEX mass in the aquifer causes either a large depletion of dissolved oxygen (DO) and NO{sub 3}{sup -}, or a large depletion of DO and a large production of Fe{sup 2+}, with moderately depleted NO{sub 3}{sup -}. In an additional analysis, the effect of varying degrees of aquifer heterogeneity and associated uncertainty is examined by considering hydraulic conductivity with different variances and correlation lengths. An increase in variance leads to a higher average BTEX mass in the aquifer, while an increase in correlation length results in a lower average. This observation is explained by relevant partitioning of BTEX into the aquifer from the LNAPL source. Although these findings may only be applicable to the field conditions considered in this study, the methodology used and insights gained are of general interest and relevance to other fuel-hydrocarbon natural-attenuation sites.

  7. Natural Recharge to the Unconfined Aquifer System on the Hanford Site from the Greater Cold Creek Watershed: Progress Report 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waichler, Scott R.; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Coleman, Andre M.

    2004-09-14

    Movement of contaminants in groundwater at the Hanford Site is heavily dependent on recharge to the unconfined aquifer. As the effects of past artificial discharges dissipate, the water table is expected to return to more natural conditions, and natural recharge will become the driving force when evaluating future groundwater flow conditions and related contaminant transport. Previous work on the relationship of natural recharge to groundwater movement at the Hanford Site has focused on direct recharge from infiltrating rainfall and snowmelt within the area represented by the Sitewide Groundwater Model (SGM) domain. However, part of the groundwater recharge at Hanford is provided by flow from Greater Cold Creek watershed (GCC), a large drainage area on the western boundary of the Hanford Site that includes Cold Creek Valley, Dry Creek Valley, and the Hanford side of Rattlesnake Mountain. This study was undertaken to estimate the recharge from GCC, which is believed to enter the unconfined aquifer as both infiltrating streamflow and shallow subsurface flow. To estimate recharge, the Distributed Hydrology-Soil-Vegetation Model (DHSVM) was used to simulate a detailed water balance of GCC from 1956 to 2001 at a spatial resolution of 200~m and a temporal resolution of one hour. For estimating natural recharge to Hanford from watersheds along its western and southwestern boundaries, the most important aspects that need to be considered are 1)~distribution and relative magnitude of precipitation and evapotranspiration over the watershed, 2)~streamflow generation at upper elevations and infiltration at lower elevations during rare runoff events, and 3)~permeability of the basalt bedrock surface underlying the soil mantle.

  8. Evaluating Impacts of CO2 and CH4 Gas Intrusion into an Unconsolidated Aquifer: Fate of As and Cd

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawter, Amanda R.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Shao, Hongbo; Bacon, Diana H.; Brown, Christopher F.

    2015-07-10

    Abstract The sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in deep underground reservoirs has been identified as an important strategy to decrease atmospheric CO2 levels and mitigate global warming, but potential risks on overlying aquifers currently lack a complete evaluation. In addition to CO2, other gases such as methane (CH4) may be present in storage reservoirs. This paper explores for the first time the combined effect of leaking CO2 and CH4 gasses on the fate of major, minor and trace elements in an aquifer overlying a potential sequestration site. Emphasis is placed on the fate of arsenic (As) and cadmium (Cd) released from the sediments or present as soluble constituents in the leaking brine. Results from macroscopic batch and column experiments show that the presence of CH4 (at a concentration of 1 % in the mixture CO2/CH4) does not have a significant effect on solution pH or the concentrations of most major elements (such as Ca, Ba, and Mg). However, the concentrations of Mn, Mo, Si and Na are inconsistently affected by the presence of CH4 (i.e., in at least one sediment tested in this study). Cd is not released from the sediments and spiked Cd is mostly removed from the aqueous phase most likely via adsorption. The fate of sediment associated As [mainly sorbed arsenite or As(III) in minerals] and spiked As [i.e., As5+] is complex. Possible mechanisms that control the As behavior in this system are discussed in this paper. Results are significant for CO2 sequestration risk evaluation and site selection and demonstrate the importance of evaluating reservoir brine and gas stream composition during site selection to ensure the safest site is being chosen.

  9. Field Guide

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journal Article) | SciTechSubmittedEcologist for a Day Field Guide Program

  10. International energy annual, 1989. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-02-01

    This report is prepared annually and presents the latest information and trends on world energy production, consumption, reserves, trade, and prices for five primary energy sources: petroleum, natural gas, coal, hydroelectricity, and nuclear electricity. It also presents information on petroleum products. Since the early 1980's the world's total output of primary energy has increased steadily. The annual average growth rate of energy production during the decade was 1.9 percent. Throughout the 1980's, petroleum was the world's most heavily used type of energy. In 1989, three countries--the United States, the USSR, and China--were the leading producers and consumers of world energy. Together, these countries consumed and produced almost 50 percent of the world's total energy. Global production and consumption of crude oil and natural gas liquids increased during the 1980's, despite a decline in total production and demand in the early part of the decade. World production of dry natural gas continued to rise steadily in the 1980's. For the last several years, China has been the leading producer of coal, followed by the United States. In 1989, hydroelectricity supply declined slightly from the upward trend of the last 10 years. Nuclear power generation rose slightly from the 1988 level, compared with the marked growth in earlier years. Prices for major crude oils all increased between 1988 and 1989, but remained well below the price levels at the beginning of the decade. 26 figs., 36 tabs.

  11. International energy annual 1990. [Contains Glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1992-01-23

    The International Energy Annual presents current data and trends for production, consumption, imports, and exports of primary energy commodities in more than 190 countries, dependencies, and area of special sovereignty. Also included are prices on crude oil, petroleum products, natural gas, electricity, and coal in selected countries. (VC)

  12. Monthly energy review, January 1991. [Contains Glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-25

    This report presents current data on production, consumption, stocks, imports, exports, and prices of the principal energy commodities in the United States. Also included are data on international production of crude oil, consumption of petroleum products, petroleum stocks, and production of electricity from nuclear-powered facilities.

  13. Monthly energy review, October 1991. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-25

    This report presents current data on production, consumption, stocks, imports, exports, and prices of the principal energy commodities in the United States. Also included are data on international production of crude oil, consumption of petroleum products, petroleum stocks, and production of electricity from nuclear-powered facilities. 36 figs., 57 tabs.

  14. Monthly energy review, September 1991. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-26

    This publication presents current data on production, consumption, stocks, imports, exports, and prices of the principal energy commodities in the United States. Also included are data on international production of crude oil, consumption of petroleum products, petroleum stocks, and production of electricity from nuclear-powered facilities. 36 figs., 57 tabs.

  15. Petroleum marketing monthly, November 1991. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-11-07

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly is designed to give information and statistical data about a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication provides statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners' acquisition cost of crude oil. Sales data for motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane are presented. 12 figs., 53 tabs.

  16. Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals Project Glossary

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document contains key terms and definitions used in the Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals Project.

  17. Monthly energy review, September 1990. [Contains Glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-21

    This report presents current data on production, consumption, stocks, imports, exports, and prices of the principal energy commodities in the United States. Also included are data on international production of crude oil, consumption of petroleum products, petroleum stocks, and production of electricity from nuclear-powered facilities.

  18. Petroleum supply monthly, April 1993. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-04

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  19. Petroleum supply monthly, January 1993. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-27

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of three publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other two publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR) and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in Primary Supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections (1) the Summary Statistics and (2) the Detailed Statistics.

  20. Petroleum supply monthly, December 1992. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-29

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of three publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other two publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR) and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in Primary Supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections (1) the Summary Statistics and (2) the Detailed Statistics.

  1. Petroleum monthly supply, November 1992. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-11-30

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of three publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other two publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR) and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in Primary Supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections (1) the Summary Statistics and (2) the Detailed Statistics.

  2. 1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Glossary--Cooling...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    of cooling equipment in which there are four basic parts: (1) a condensing unit, (2) a cooling coil, (3) ductwork, and (4) a control mechanism, such as a thermostat. There are...

  3. 1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Glossary--Conservation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    feature consisting of a program of routine inspection and service for heating andor cooling equipment. The inspection is performed on a regular basis, even if there are no...

  4. Petroleum supply monthly, October 1991. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-30

    Data presented in this report describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in Primary Supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importer, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data are divided into two sections (1) the Summary Statistics and (2) the Detailed Statistics 14 figs., 56 tabs.

  5. Application Summary Glossary of Terms and Abbreviations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the purpose of strategic decision making. BLR Business Line Review : Formalized review and analysis by Premier's executive leaders of Business Units' strategic plans, considering historical and anticipated performance for Improvement," a proven breakthrough system, and brings together Premier Members who share a commitment

  6. Appendix B. Glossary Annual Site Environmental Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    significant quantities of water under ordinary hydraulic gradients. aquitard -- A geologic unit that inhibits of a measurement to the true value of the quantity. ACM -- Asbestos-containing materials. aliquot -- The quantity of sample being used for analysis. alkalinity -- A measure of the buffering capacity of water, and because p

  7. Stanford University Glossary of Clinical Trials Terms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puglisi, Joseph

    to participate in ongoing clinical trials. OFF-LABEL USE A drug prescribed for conditions other than those approved by the FDA. OPEN-LABEL TRIAL A clinical trial in which doctors & participants know which drug labeling. PHASE IV TRIALS Post-marketing studies to delineate additional information including the drug

  8. NISTIR 7298 Glossary of Key Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . For planning and transition purposes, Federal agencies may wish to closely follow the development of these new, technical, and physical standards and guidelines for the cost-effective security and privacy of other than. Since draft documents are not stable, we do not refer to terms/definitions in them. Each entry

  9. Human retroviruses and AIDS, 1991. [CONTAINS GLOSSARY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, G.; Korber, B. (eds.) (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Berzofsky, J.A.; Pavlakis, G.N. (eds.) (National Cancer Inst., Bethesda, MD (USA)); Smith, R.F. (ed.) (Harvard Univ. (USA))

    1991-05-01

    This compendium and the accompanying floppy diskettes are the result of an effort to compile and rapidly publish all relevant molecular data concerning the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) and related retroviruses.The scope of the compendium and database is best summarized by the five parts that it comprises: (1) HIV and SIV Nucleotide Sequences; (2) Amino Acid Sequences; (3) Analyses; (4) Related Sequences; and (5) Database Communications. Information within all the parts is updated at least twice in each year, which accounts for the modes of binding and pagination in the compendium.

  10. 1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Glossary--Lighting...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    produces light by passing electricity through mercury vapor, causing the fluorescent coating to glow, or fluoresce. Excluded are compact fluorescent light bulbs, which are listed...

  11. Natural gas monthly, September 1990. [Contains Glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-11-30

    This report highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. 7 figs., 33 tabs.

  12. Natural gas monthly, September 1991. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-18

    The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production distribution consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The data in this publication are collected on surveys conducted by the EIA to fulfill its responsibilities for gathering and reporting energy data. Some of the data are collected under the authority of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), an independent commission within the DOE, which has jurisdiction primarily in the regulation of electric utilities and the interstate natural gas industry. Geographic coverage is the 50 States and the District of Columbia.

  13. Natural gas monthly, October 1990. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-28

    This report highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. 7 figs., 34 tabs.

  14. Electric Power Monthly, September 1991. [CONTAINS GLOSSARY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-12

    This publication provides monthly statistics at the national, Census division, and state levels for net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, cost of fuel, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fuel are also displayed at the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) region level. Additionally, statistics at the company and plant level are published in the EPM on capability of new plants, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fuel. 4 figs., 63 tabs.

  15. Electric power monthly, January 1991. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-17

    This publication provides monthly statistics at the national, Census division, and state levels for net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, cost of fuel, electricity sales, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation are also displayed at the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) region level. Additionally, company and plant level information are published in the EPM on capability of new plants, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fuel. 4 figs., 48 tabs.

  16. Electric power monthly, October 1991. [CONTAINS GLOSSARY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-11

    This publication provides monthly statistics at the national, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, cost of fuel, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fuel are also displayed at the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) region level. Additionally, statistics at the company and plant level are published in the EPM on capability of new plants, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fuel. 4 figs., 63 tabs.

  17. Electric power monthly, September 1990. [Glossary included

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-17

    The purpose of this report is to provide energy decision makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues. The power plants considered include coal, petroleum, natural gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear power plants. Data are presented for power generation, fuel consumption, fuel receipts and cost, sales of electricity, and unusual occurrences at power plants. Data are compared at the national, Census division, and state levels. 4 figs., 52 tabs. (CK)

  18. NREL: Biomass Research - Glossary of Biomass Terms

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on771/6/14 Contact:News ReleasesChemical and Catalyst

  19. Microsoft Word - Glossary_2009April20.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963Residential2, 2014 MEMORANDUMProvedFeet) Year (2002/03)3Adopted by

  20. Glossary: Energy-Related Carbon Emissions

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYear Jan Feb Mar87.1CubicYear Jan Feb2.56 441

  1. Glossary of water terminology | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View New Pages RecentPlantMagma Energy Group JumpEnergyWaste to

  2. Project Financing Glossary | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested PartiesBuildingBudget | DepartmentLogistical ChallengesProjectFact

  3. Full Text Glossary | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof Energy Services »Information Resources » FuelDepartment ofFull Text

  4. Glossary and Acronyms | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof Energy Services »Information1 GeothermalTemperatures ||Initiatives »

  5. Glossary of Terms | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof Energy Services »Information1 GeothermalTemperatures ||Initiatives

  6. Microsoft Word - Glossary_Dec15.docx

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets See(STEO) Highlights1 M E R OU.S.296823

  7. Mineralogical and Microbial Controls on Iron Reduction in a Contaminated Aquifer-Wetland System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howson, Andrea Melissa

    2011-02-22

    19 Acetate Concentrations Throughout NOGEE Experimental Procedure..... 57 20 Bromide Concentrations Throughout NOGEE Experimental Procedure. .. 58 21 Concentration (?mol/L) of AVS Present in Each NOGEE. ....................... 60 22...) and 0.5 ml of 2N zinc acetate was used to preserve the iron (II) and H 2 S samples. The analysis for these samples was done using a Spectronic20D+ spectrophotometer (Thermo Spectronic, Rochester, NY), while in the field. Precision for iron (II...

  8. Field Evidence for Co-Metabolism of Trichloroethene Stimulated by Addition of Electron Donor to Groundwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conrad, Mark E.

    2010-01-01

    Geologic setting of the Snake River Plain aquifer and vadosefacility located on the Snake River Plain of eastern Idaho (from the main Snake River Plain Aquifer by a continuous

  9. Summary of operations and performance of the Utica aquifer and North Lake Basin Wetlands restoration project in December 2009-November 2010.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

    2011-03-11

    This document summarizes the performance of the groundwater restoration systems installed by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Utica, Nebraska, during the sixth year of system operation, from December 1, 2009, until November 30, 2010. In the project at Utica, the CCC/USDA is cooperating with multiple state and federal agencies to remove carbon tetrachloride contamination from a shallow aquifer underlying the town and to provide supplemental treated groundwater for use in the restoration of a nearby wetlands area. Argonne National Laboratory has assisted the CCC/USDA by providing technical oversight for the aquifer restoration effort and facilities during this review period. This document presents overviews of the aquifer restoration facilities (Section 2) and system operations (Section 3), then describes groundwater production results (Section 4), groundwater treatment results (Section 5), and associated groundwater monitoring, system modifications, and costs during the review period (Section 6). Section 7 summarizes the present year of operation. Performance prior to December 1, 2009, has been reviewed previously (Argonne 2005, 2006, 2008, 2009a, 2010).

  10. Summary of operations and performance of the Utica aquifer and North Lake Basin Wetlands restoration project in December 2007-November 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Sedivy, R. A.; Environmental Science Division

    2009-01-23

    This document summarizes the performance of the groundwater restoration systems installed by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Utica, Nebraska, during the fourth year of system operation, from December 1, 2007, until November 30, 2008. Performance in earlier years was reported previously (Argonne 2005, 2006, 2008). In the project at Utica, the CCC/USDA is cooperating with multiple state and federal agencies to remove carbon tetrachloride contamination from a shallow aquifer underlying the town and to provide supplemental treated groundwater for use in the restoration of a nearby wetlands area. Argonne National Laboratory assisted the CCC/USDA by providing technical oversight for the aquifer restoration effort and facilities during this review period. This document presents overviews of the aquifer restoration facilities (Section 2) and system operations (Section 3). The report then describes groundwater production results (Section 4); groundwater treatment results (Section 5); and associated maintenance, system modifications, and costs during the review period (Section 6). Section 7 summarizes the present year of operation.

  11. Summary of operations and performance of the Utica aquifer and North Lake Basin wetlands restoration project in December 2008-November 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2010-05-25

    This document summarizes the performance of the groundwater restoration systems installed by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Utica, Nebraska, during the fifth year of system operation, from December 1, 2008, until November 30, 2009. Performance in earlier years was reported previously (Argonne 2005, 2006, 2008, 2009a). In the project at Utica, the CCC/USDA is cooperating with multiple state and federal agencies to remove carbon tetrachloride contamination from a shallow aquifer underlying the town and to provide supplemental treated groundwater for use in the restoration of a nearby wetlands area. Argonne National Laboratory has assisted the CCC/USDA by providing technical oversight for the aquifer restoration effort and facilities during this review period. This document presents overviews of the aquifer restoration facilities (Section 2) and system operations (Section 3), then describes groundwater production results (Section 4), groundwater treatment results (Section 5), and associated groundwater monitoring, system modifications, and costs during the review period (Section 6). Section 7 summarizes the present year of operation.

  12. Summary of operations and performance of the Utica aquifer and North Lake Basin wetlands restoration project in December 2005-November 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2006-12-21

    This document summarizes the performance of the groundwater restoration systems installed by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Utica, Nebraska, during the second year of system operation, from December 1, 2005, until November 31, 2006. In the project at Utica, the CCC/USDA is cooperating with multiple state and federal agencies to remove carbon tetrachloride contamination from a shallow aquifer underlying the town and to provide supplemental treated groundwater for use in the restoration of a nearby wetlands area. Argonne National Laboratory has assisted the CCC/USDA by providing technical oversight for the aquifer restoration effort and facilities during this review period. This document presents overviews of the aquifer restoration facilities (Section 2) and system operations (Section 3), then describes groundwater production results (Section 4), groundwater treatment results (Section 5), and associated groundwater monitoring, system modifications, and costs during the review period (Section 6). Section 7 summarizes the present year of operation.

  13. Kinetics of CO2-Fluid-Rock Reactions in a Basalt Aquifer, Soda Springs, Idaho

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maskell, Alexandra; Kampman, Niko; Chapman, Hazel; Condon, Daniel J.; Bickle, Mike

    2015-06-24

    the local geothermal gradient and spring temperatures. Values for ?G for plagioclase (?Gplagioclase) were determined using Eqn. 22, where a Keq value was calculated using SUPCRT92, using a plagioclase solid solution composition of Ca0.5Na0.5AlSi3O8... to the north (Armstrong et al., 1975; Hutsinpiller and Parry, 1985). 3. Hydrogeology and Flow Paths Numerous thermal CO2-rich springs, along with several artesian and abandoned geothermal exploration wells occur in the Blackfoot Volcanic Field...

  14. Sleuthing the Fate of Water in Ancient Aquifers and Ice Cores | U.S. DOE

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thIWalter H.4 »ProgrammingScience(SC)RegionalsDOEOffice

  15. Reduced-Order Model for the Geochemical Impacts of Carbon Dioxide, Brine and Trace Metal Leakage into an Unconfined, Oxidizing Carbonate Aquifer, Version 2.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bacon, Diana H.

    2013-03-31

    The National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) consists of 5 U.S DOE national laboratories collaborating to develop a framework for predicting the risks associated with carbon sequestration. The approach taken by NRAP is to divide the system into components, including injection target reservoirs, wellbores, natural pathways including faults and fractures, groundwater and the atmosphere. Next, develop a detailed, physics and chemistry-based model of each component. Using the results of the detailed models, develop efficient, simplified models, termed reduced order models (ROM) for each component. Finally, integrate the component ROMs into a system model that calculates risk profiles for the site. This report details the development of the Groundwater Geochemistry ROM for the Edwards Aquifer at PNNL. The Groundwater Geochemistry ROM for the Edwards Aquifer uses a Wellbore Leakage ROM developed at LANL as input. The detailed model, using the STOMP simulator, covers a 5x8 km area of the Edwards Aquifer near San Antonio, Texas. The model includes heterogeneous hydraulic properties, and equilibrium, kinetic and sorption reactions between groundwater, leaked CO2 gas, brine, and the aquifer carbonate and clay minerals. Latin Hypercube sampling was used to generate 1024 samples of input parameters. For each of these input samples, the STOMP simulator was used to predict the flux of CO2 to the atmosphere, and the volume, length and width of the aquifer where pH was less than the MCL standard, and TDS, arsenic, cadmium and lead exceeded MCL standards. In order to decouple the Wellbore Leakage ROM from the Groundwater Geochemistry ROM, the response surface was transformed to replace Wellbore Leakage ROM input parameters with instantaneous and cumulative CO2 and brine leakage rates. The most sensitive parameters proved to be the CO2 and brine leakage rates from the well, with equilibrium coefficients for calcite and dolomite, as well as the number of illite and kaolinite sorption sites proving to be of secondary importance. The Groundwater Geochemistry ROM was developed using nonlinear regression to fit the response surface with a quadratic polynomial. The goodness of fit was excellent for the CO2 flux to the atmosphere, and very good for predicting the volumes of groundwater exceeding the pH, TDS, As, Cd and Pb threshold values.

  16. Interpretation of Flow Logs from Nevada Test Site Boreholes to Estimate Hydraulic conductivity Using Numerical Simulations Constrained by Single-Well Aquifer Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, C. Amanda; Halford, Keith J.; Laczniak, Randell J.

    2010-02-12

    Hydraulic conductivities of volcanic and carbonate lithologic units at the Nevada Test Site were estimated from flow logs and aquifer-test data. Borehole flow and drawdown were integrated and interpreted using a radial, axisymmetric flow model, AnalyzeHOLE. This integrated approach is used because complex well completions and heterogeneous aquifers and confining units produce vertical flow in the annular space and aquifers adjacent to the wellbore. AnalyzeHOLE simulates vertical flow, in addition to horizontal flow, which accounts for converging flow toward screen ends and diverging flow toward transmissive intervals. Simulated aquifers and confining units uniformly are subdivided by depth into intervals in which the hydraulic conductivity is estimated with the Parameter ESTimation (PEST) software. Between 50 and 150 hydraulic-conductivity parameters were estimated by minimizing weighted differences between simulated and measured flow and drawdown. Transmissivity estimates from single-well or multiple-well aquifer tests were used to constrain estimates of hydraulic conductivity. The distribution of hydraulic conductivity within each lithology had a minimum variance because estimates were constrained with Tikhonov regularization. AnalyzeHOLE simulated hydraulic-conductivity estimates for lithologic units across screened and cased intervals are as much as 100 times less than those estimated using proportional flow-log analyses applied across screened intervals only. Smaller estimates of hydraulic conductivity for individual lithologic units are simulated because sections of the unit behind cased intervals of the wellbore are not assumed to be impermeable, and therefore, can contribute flow to the wellbore. Simulated hydraulic-conductivity estimates vary by more than three orders of magnitude across a lithologic unit, indicating a high degree of heterogeneity in volcanic and carbonate-rock units. The higher water transmitting potential of carbonate-rock units relative to volcanic-rock units is exemplified by the large difference in their estimated maximum hydraulic conductivity; 4,000 and 400 feet per day, respectively. Simulated minimum estimates of hydraulic conductivity are inexact and represent the lower detection limit of the method. Minimum thicknesses of lithologic intervals also were defined for comparing AnalyzeHOLE results to hydraulic properties in regional ground-water flow models.

  17. Behavior of nitrate-nitrogen movement around a pumping high-capacity well: A field example

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayers, J.F.; Chen, X.; Gosselin, D.C. [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States). Conservation and Survey Div.

    1998-03-01

    This study examines the near-field flow regime influencing the chemical composition of water samples collected form an irrigation well during short pumping periods. Data on the radial and vertical distribution of nitrate-nitrogen (NO{sub 3}-N) and on draw-down were collected from a closely spaced multi-level monitoring well network installed around an irrigation well. Aquifer properties were determined from grain-size analyses performed on samples collected from test holes drilled around the irrigation well and from drawdown data using the method of Neuman (1974). Grain-size characteristics were determined from cumulative distribution curves and used to construct vertical hydraulic conductivity (K) profiles based on frequently used empirical formulas applied to grain-size data for the determination of aquifer properties. Resultant vertical profiles show a general increase in K with depth. Results from the analysis of drawdown curves support the general trend of K determined form the grain-size data, drawdown-based K values, however, were 1.5 to 2 times greater than those determined form the empirical methods. Results from four pump-and-sample experiments at different times during the irrigation season indicate: (1) the distribution of NO{sub 3}-N around the irrigation well is complex and variable over time and space; (2) shapes of concentration-time curves for individual sample points are governed by the initial contaminant distribution, and shapes of concentration-time curves for the pumping well are governed by variables such as well screen position and hydrogeologic properties; (3) irrigation well samples underestimate the highest, as well as the average NO{sub 3}-N concentrations within the aquifer; and (4) a sampling strategy based on the behavioral characteristics of the well as reflected in concentration-time curves can improve the interpretation of water quality data collected from high-capacity wells.

  18. Environmental Controls on the Activity of Aquifer Microbial Communities in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konopka, Allan; Plymale, Andrew E.; Carvajal, Denny A.; Lin, Xueju; McKinley, James P.

    2013-11-06

    Aquifer microbes in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State, USA are periodically exposed to U(VI) concentrations that can range up to 10 ?M in small sediment fractures. Assays of 35 H-leucine incorporation indicated that both sediment-associated and planktonic microbes were metabolically active, and that organic C was growth-limiting in the sediments. Although bacteria suspended in native groundwater retained high activity when exposed to 100 ?M U(VI), they were inhibited by U(VI) < 1 ?M in synthetic groundwater that lacked added bicarbonate. Chemical speciation modeling suggested that positively-charged species and particularly (UO2)3(OH)5+ rose in concentration as more U(VI) was added to synthetic groundwater, but that carbonate complexes dominated U(VI) speciation in natural groundwater. U toxicity was relieved when increasing amounts of bicarbonate were added to synthetic groundwater containing 4.5 ?M U(VI). Pertechnetate, an oxyanion that is another contaminant of concern at the Hanford Site, was not toxic to groundwater microbes at concentrations up to 125 ?M.

  19. DESORPTION BEHAVIOR OF TRICHLOROETHENE AND TETRACHLOROETHENE IN U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SAVANNAH RIVER SITE UNCONFINED AQUIFER SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vangelas, K; Robert G. Riley, R; James E. Szecsody, J; A. V. Mitroshkov, A; C. F. Brown, C; Brian02 Looney, B

    2007-01-10

    Sorption is governed by the physico-chemical processes that partition solutes between the aqueous and solid phases in aquifers. For environmental systems, a linear equilibrium relationship between the amount of contaminant in the alternative phases is often assumed. In this traditional approach, the distribution coefficient, or K{sub d}, is a ratio of contaminant associated with the solid phase to the contaminant in the water phase. Recent scientific literature has documented time-dependant behaviors in which more contaminant mass is held in the solid phase than predicted by the standard model. Depending on the specific conceptualization, this has been referred to as nonlinear sorption, time-variable sorption, or ''irreversible sorption''. The potential impact of time-variable sorption may be beneficial or detrimental depending on the specific conditions and remediation goals. Researchers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have been studying this process to evaluate how various soil types will affect this process for sites contaminated with chlorinated solvents. The results described in this report evaluate sorption-desorption of trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) in Savannah River Site (SRS) soils. The results of this study will be combined with ongoing PNNL research to provide a more comprehensive look at this process and its impact on contaminant plume stability and sustainability. Importantly, while the results of the study documented differences in sorption properties between two tested SRS soils, the data indicated that ''irreversible sorption'' is not influencing the sorption-desorption behaviors of TCE and PCE for these soils.

  20. Internal split field generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thundat; Thomas George (Knoxville, TN); Van Neste, Charles W. (Kingston, TN); Vass, Arpad Alexander (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2012-01-03

    A generator includes a coil of conductive material. A stationary magnetic field source applies a stationary magnetic field to the coil. An internal magnetic field source is disposed within a cavity of the coil to apply a moving magnetic field to the coil. The stationary magnetic field interacts with the moving magnetic field to generate an electrical energy in the coil.

  1. REACTIVE MULTIPHASE BEHAVIOR OF CO2 IN SALINE AQUIFERS BENEATH THE COLORADO PLATEAU

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.G. Allis; J. Moore; S. White

    2003-06-30

    The six coal-fired power plants located in the Colorado Plateau and southern Rocky Mountain region of the U.S. produce 100 million tons of CO{sub 2} per year. Thick sequences of collocated sedimentary rocks represent potential sites for sequestration of the CO{sub 2}. Field and laboratory investigations of naturally occurring CO{sub 2}-reservoirs are being conducted to determine the characteristics of potential seal and reservoir units and the extent of the interactions that occur between the host rocks and the CO{sub 2} charged fluids. The results are being incorporated into a series of two-dimensional numerical models that represent the major chemical and physical processes induced by injection. During reporting period covered here (March 30 to June 30, 2003), the main achievements were: Presentation of three papers at the Second Annual Conference on Carbon Sequestration (May 5-8, Alexandria, Virginia); Presentation of a poster at the American Association of Petroleum Geologists meeting; Co-PI organized and chaired a special session on Geologic Carbon Dioxide Sequestration at the American Association of Petroleum Geologists annual convention in Salt Lake City (May 12-15).

  2. CO2 leakage impacts on shallow groundwater. Field-scale reactive-transport simulations informed by observations at a natural analog site

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Keating, Elizabeth H.; Hakala, J. Alexandra; Viswanathan, Hari; Carey, J. William; Pawar, Rajesh; Guthrie, George D.; Fessenden-Rahn, Julianna

    2013-03-01

    It is challenging to predict the degree to which shallow groundwater might be affected by leaks from a CO2 sequestration reservoir, particularly over long time scales and large spatial scales. In this study observations at a CO2 enriched shallow aquifer natural analog were used to develop a predictive model which is then used to simulate leakage scenarios. This natural analog provides the opportunity to make direct field observations of groundwater chemistry in the presence of elevated CO2, to collect aquifer samples and expose them to CO2 under controlled conditions in the laboratory, and to test the ability of multiphase reactivemore »transport models to reproduce measured geochemical trends at the field-scale. The field observations suggest that brackish water entrained with the upwelling CO2 are a more significant source of trace metals than in situ mobilization of metals due to exposure to CO2. The study focuses on a single trace metal of concern at this site: U. Experimental results indicate that cation exchange/adsorption and dissolution/precipitation of calcite containing trace amounts of U are important reactions controlling U in groundwater at this site, and that the amount of U associated with calcite is fairly well constrained. Simulations incorporating these results into a 3-D multi-phase reactive transport model are able to reproduce the measured ranges and trends between pH, pCO2, Ca, total C, U and Cl-at the field site. Although the true fluxes at the natural analog site are unknown, the cumulative CO2 flux inferred from these simulations are approximately equivalent to 37.8E-3 MT, approximately corresponding to a .001% leak rate for injection at a large (750 MW) power plant. The leakage scenario simulations suggest that if the leak only persists for a short time the volume of aquifer contaminated by CO2-induced mobilization of U will be relatively small, yet persistent over 100 a.« less

  3. Assessing the Impact of Animal Waste Lagoon Seepage on the Geochemistry of an Underlying Shallow Aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNab, W W; Singleton, M J; Moran, J E; Esser, B K

    2006-03-07

    Dairy facilities and similar confined animal operation settings pose a significant nitrate contamination threat via oxidation of animal wastes and subsequent transport to shallow groundwater. While nitrate contamination resulting from application of animal manure as fertilizer to fields is well recognized, the impact of manure lagoon leakage on groundwater quality is less well characterized. In this study, a dairy facility located in the southern San Joaquin Valley of California has been instrumented with monitoring wells as part of a two-year multidisciplinary study to evaluate nitrate loading and denitrification associated with facility operations. Among multiple types of data collected from the site, groundwater and surface water samples have been analyzed for major cations, anions, pH, oxidation-reduction potential, dissolved organic carbon, and selected dissolved gases (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}, Ar, Ne). Modeling of putative geochemical processes occurring within the dairy site manure lagoons shows substantial off-gassing of CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} in response to mineralization of organic matter. The gas ebullition appears to strip dissolved gases, including Ar and Ne, from the lagoon water leaving concentrations that are undersaturated with respect to the atmosphere. The resulting fractionated dissolved gas signature serves as an effective tracer for the lagoon water in the underlying shallow groundwater and can be used to constrain inverse geochemical models that assess mixing fractions of lagoon water and local groundwater water. Together with ion exchange and mineral equilibria reactions, identification of lagoon seepage helps explain key attributes of the local groundwater chemistry, including input and cycling of nitrogen, across the site.

  4. Update on the aquifer/wetlands restoration project at Utica, Nebraska, with recommendations for remapping of the carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2010-04-20

    In 1992-1993, Argonne National Laboratory investigated potential carbon tetrachloride contamination that might be linked to the former grain storage facility operated by the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) at Utica, Nebraska. These initial studies identified carbon tetrachloride in a plume of contaminated groundwater, extending approximately 3,500 ft southeastward from the former CCC/USDA facility, within a shallow upper aquifer that had been used previously as a municipal water source by the town (Figure 1.1). A deeper aquifer used as the current municipal water source was found to be free of carbon tetrachloride contamination. Although the shallow aquifer was no longer being used as a source of drinking water at Utica, additional studies indicated that the carbon tetrachloride could pose an unacceptable health threat to potential future residents who might install private wells along the expected downgradient migration pathway of the plume. On the basis of these findings, corrective action was recommended to decrease the carbon tetrachloride concentrations in the upper aquifer to acceptable levels (Argonne 1993a,b, 1995). Initial discussions with the Utica village board indicated that any restoration strategies involving nonbeneficial discharge of treated groundwater in the immediate vicinity of Utica would be unacceptable to the town. To address this concern, the CCC/USDA and Argonne, in cooperation with multiple federal and state regulatory and environmental agencies (Table 1.1) proposed a treatment strategy for the Utica groundwater employing groundwater extraction coupled with the seasonal use of agricultural spray irrigation equipment to simultaneously (1) remove carbon tetrachloride from the groundwater (by volatilization to the atmosphere) and (2) discharge the treated groundwater to enhance the development of wetlands in the North Lake Basin Wildlife Management Area, just north of the town (Argonne 2000). To develop this treatment approach, additional groundwater sampling was conducted to update the distribution of carbon tetrachloride in groundwater identified in the preliminary studies in 1992-1993. In March 1998, detailed mapping of the carbon tetrachloride plume was performed by using the Argonne cone penetrometer (CPT) vehicle to collect groundwater samples for analyses for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at 13 locations (PS01-PS09, PS12, PS16, PS17, PS19; Figure 1.2). The samples were collected in vertical profiles through the aquifer, at 10-ft intervals. The results of this 1998 study (Table 1.2) demonstrated that the three-dimensional distribution of carbon tetrachloride in the aquifer is complex, with multiple 'hot spots' occurring in the plume at various depths and distances along its length (Argonne 2000). In October 2002, the CCC/USDA requested that Argonne perform targeted groundwater sampling at Utica to document the migration of the carbon tetrachloride plume since the 1998 sampling event. In February 2003, vertical-profile groundwater sampling for VOCs analyses was conducted at 8 selected locations (PS01, PS04-PS07, PS12, PS19, PS20; Figure 1.2 and Table 1.3). The lateral and vertical configuration of the carbon tetrachloride plume, as identified in the 2003 study (Argonne 2003), is illustrated in Figures 1.3-1.7. On the basis of the 2003 groundwater sampling results, a remedial system employing four extraction wells (GWEX 1-GWEX 4), with groundwater treatment by spray irrigation and conventional air stripping, was implemented at Utica, with the concurrence of the CCC/USDA and the agencies identified in Table 1.1. The principal components of the Utica system (shown in Figure 1.8) are described briefly in Section 1.2. Operation of well GWEX4 and the associated air stripper began on October 29, 2004, and routine operation of wells GWEX1-GWEX3 and the spray irrigation treatment units began on November 22, 2004.

  5. A SEA FLOOR GRAVITY SURVEY OF THE SLEIPNER FIELD TO MONITOR CO2 MIGRATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Zuberge; Scott Nooner; Glenn Sasagawa

    2003-11-17

    Since 1996, excess CO{sub 2} from the Sleipner natural gas field has been sequestered and injected underground into a porous saline aquifer 1000 m below the seafloor. In 2002, we carried out a high precision micro-gravity survey on the seafloor in order to monitor the injected CO{sub 2}. A repeatability of 5 {micro}Gal in the station averages was observed. This is considerably better than pre-survey expectations. These data will serve as the baseline for time-lapse gravity monitoring of the Sleipner CO{sub 2} injection site. A three-week trip to Statoil Research Centre in Trondheim, Norway, was made in the summer of 2003. This visit consisted of gathering data and collaborating with scientists working on the Sleipner project. The trip ended with a presentation of the seafloor gravity results to date at a SACS2 (Saline Aquifer CO{sub 2} Storage 2) meeting. This meeting provided the perfect opportunity to meet and gather information from the world's experts on the Sleipner project.

  6. Geohydrologic data for the St. Charles County well field and public-water supply 1985-91, and projected public-water supply, 1995 and 2000, for St. Charles County, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mugel, D.N.

    1996-10-01

    Geohydrologic data for this well field and public water supply data for St. Charles County were compiled to assist US DOE in developing the St. Charles County well field contingency plan to ensure a supply of water in the event that the well field becomes contaminated from wastes (radioactive, nitroaromatic, other) stored in the Weldon Spring quarry. The well field consists of 8 wells penetrating the entire thickness of the Missouri River alluvial aquifer and is 98-116 feet deep. Aquifer tests were conducted on 3 occasions at 3 different locations in the well field. Calculated transmissivities range from 900 to 60,200 feet squared per day; hydraulic conductivities ranged from 23 to 602 feet/day. Calculated/estimated storage coefficients ranged from 0.005 to 0.2. Tracer test showed effective porosity of 0. 21-0.32. Point dilution showed a ground-water velocity of 0.83 foot/day. From 1985-91, ave daily water supply from the well field and water treatment plant increased from 5.76 to 10.23 Mgd; this is projected to increase to 11.0 Mgd in 1995 and to 12.2 Mgd in 2000. The water department`s projections of peak daily demands from customers indicate that these demands will exceed the capacity of the treatment plant in 1995 and will exceed the capacities of the well field and plant during 2000.

  7. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN APPLICATIONS FOR MODELING AND ASSESSING CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION IN SALINE AQUIFERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, John

    2014-08-31

    This project was a computer modeling effort to couple reservoir simulation and ED/RSM using Sensitivity Analysis, Uncertainty Analysis, and Optimization Methods, to assess geologic, geochemical, geomechanical, and rock-fluid effects and factors on CO2 injectivity, capacity, and plume migration. The project objective was to develop proxy models to simplify the highly complex coupled geochemical and geomechanical models in the utilization and storage of CO2 in the subsurface. The goals were to investigate and prove the feasibility of the ED/RSM processes and engineering development, and bridge the gaps regarding the uncertainty and unknowns of the many geochemical and geomechanical interacting parameters in the development and operation of anthropogenic CO2 sequestration and storage sites. The bottleneck in this workflow is the high computational effort of reactive transport simulation models and large number of input variables to optimize with ED/RSM techniques. The project was not to develop the reactive transport, geomechanical, or ED/RSM software, but was to use what was commercially and/or publically available as a proof of concept to generate proxy or surrogate models. A detailed geologic and petrographic mineral assemblage and geologic structure of the doubly plunging anticline was defined using the USDOE RMOTC formations of interest data (e.g., Lower Sundance, Crow Mountain, Alcova Limestone, and Red Peak). The assemblage of 23 minerals was primarily developed from literature data and petrophysical (well log) analysis. The assemblage and structure was input into a commercial reactive transport simulator to predict the effects of CO2 injection and complex reactions with the reservoir rock. Significant impediments were encountered during the execution phase of the project. The only known commercial reactive transport simulator was incapable of simulating complex geochemistry modeled in this project. Significant effort and project funding was expended to determine the limitations of both the commercial simulator and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) R&D simulator, TOUGHREACT available to the project. A simplified layer cake model approximating the volume of the RMOTC targeted reservoirs was defined with 1-3 minerals eventually modeled with limited success. Modeling reactive transport in porous media requires significant computational power. In this project, up to 24 processors were used to model a limited mineral set of 1-3 minerals. In addition, geomechanical aspects of injecting CO2 into closed, semi-open, and open systems in various well completion methods was simulated. Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) as a storage method was not modeled. A robust and stable simulation dataset or base case was developed and used to create a master dataset with embedded instructions for input to the ED/RSM software. Little success was achieved toward the objective of the project using the commercial simulator or the LBNL simulator versions available during the time of this project. Several hundred realizations were run with the commercial simulator and ED/RSM software, most having convergence problems and terminating prematurely. A proxy model for full field CO2 injection sequestration utilization and storage was not capable of being developed with software available for this project. Though the chemistry is reasonably known and understood, based on the amount of effort and huge computational time required, predicting CO2 sequestration storage capacity in geologic formations to within the program goals of ±30% proved unsuccessful.

  8. External split field generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thundat, Thomas George (Knoxville, TN); Van Neste, Charles W. (Kingston, TN); Vass, Arpad Alexander (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2012-02-21

    A generator includes a coil disposed about a core. A first stationary magnetic field source may be disposed on a first end portion of the core and a second stationary magnetic field source may be disposed on a second end portion of core. The first and second stationary magnetic field sources apply a stationary magnetic field to the coil. An external magnetic field source may be disposed outside the coil to apply a moving magnetic field to the coil. Electrical energy is generated in response to an interaction between the coil, the moving magnetic field, and the stationary magnetic field.

  9. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01

    time-varying solar energy inputs and thermal or powerthermal energy becomes apparent with the development of solar

  10. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01

    or (2) from solar energy collectors, and to retrieve the hotof Hot Water from Solar Energy Collectors," Proceedings of

  11. Field evaluation of ground water sampling devices for volatile organic compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muska, C F; Colven, W P; Jones, V D; Scogin, J T; Looney, B B; Price, V Jr

    1986-01-01

    Previous studies conducted under laboratory conditions demonstrated that the type of device used to sample ground water contaminated with volatile organic compounds can significantly influence and analytical results. The purpose of this study was to evaluate, under field conditions, both commercial and developmental ground water sampling devices as part of an ongoing ground water contamination investigation and remediation program at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). Ground water samples were collected using six types of sampling devices in monitoring wells of different depths and concentrations of volatile organic contaminants (primarily trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene). The study matrix was designed to statistically compare the reuslts of each sampling device under the test conditions. Quantitative and qualitative evaluation criteria were used to determine the relative performance of each device. Two categories of sampling devices were evaluated in this field study, positive displacement pumps and grab samplers. The positive displacement pumps consisted of a centrifugal (mechanical) pump and a bladder pump. The grab samples tested were a syringe sampler, a dual-check valve bailer, a surface bomb sampler, and a pressurized bailer. Preliminary studies were conducted to establish the analytical and sampling variability associated with each device. All six devices were then used to collect ground water samples in water table (unconfined), semi-confined aquifer, and confined aquifer monitoring wells. Results were evaluated against a set of criteria that included intrasampling device variability (precision), volatile organic concentration (accuracy), sampling and analytical logistics, and cost. The study showed that, by using careful and reproducible procedures, overall sampling variability is low regardless of sampling device.

  12. Transient groundwater dynamics in a coastal aquifer: The effects of tides, the lunar cycle, and the beach profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abarca, Elena

    Detailed field measurements are combined with a numerical modeling to characterize the groundwater dynamics beneath the discharge zone at Waquoit Bay, Massachusetts. Groundwater salinity values revealed a saline circulation ...

  13. BUFFERED WELL FIELD OUTLINES

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES FROM BUFFERED WELLS The VBA Code below builds oil & gas field boundary outlines (polygons) from buffered wells (points). Input well points layer must be a...

  14. Colorado/Transmission/Regulatory Roadmap | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wizard Best Practices Document Library NEPA Database Glossary TECHNOLOGIES Geothermal Solar Water Wind TOPICS Land Use Planning Land Access Exploration Well Field Power Plant...

  15. A sparse reconstruction method for the estimation of multiresolution emission fields via atmospheric inversion

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ray, J.; Lee, J.; Yadav, V.; Lefantzi, S.; Michalak, A. M.; van Bloemen Waanders, B.

    2014-08-20

    We present a sparse reconstruction scheme that can also be used to ensure non-negativity when fitting wavelet-based random field models to limited observations in non-rectangular geometries. The method is relevant when multiresolution fields are estimated using linear inverse problems. Examples include the estimation of emission fields for many anthropogenic pollutants using atmospheric inversion or hydraulic conductivity in aquifers from flow measurements. The scheme is based on three new developments. Firstly, we extend an existing sparse reconstruction method, Stagewise Orthogonal Matching Pursuit (StOMP), to incorporate prior information on the target field. Secondly, we develop an iterative method that uses StOMP tomore »impose non-negativity on the estimated field. Finally, we devise a method, based on compressive sensing, to limit the estimated field within an irregularly shaped domain. We demonstrate the method on the estimation of fossil-fuel CO2 (ffCO2) emissions in the lower 48 states of the US. The application uses a recently developed multiresolution random field model and synthetic observations of ffCO2 concentrations from a limited set of measurement sites. We find that our method for limiting the estimated field within an irregularly shaped region is about a factor of 10 faster than conventional approaches. It also reduces the overall computational cost by a factor of two. Further, the sparse reconstruction scheme imposes non-negativity without introducing strong nonlinearities, such as those introduced by employing log-transformed fields, and thus reaps the benefits of simplicity and computational speed that are characteristic of linear inverse problems.« less

  16. Aluto-Langano Geothermal Field, Ethiopian Rift Valley- Physical...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    along a deep, young NNE trending fault and is characterized by boiling. As a result, the deep upflow zone loses some water as steam and produces a cooler saline shallow aquifer....

  17. Tradeoffs in Brush Management for Water Yield and Habitat Management in Texas: Twin Buttes Drainage Area and Edwards Aquifer Recharge Zone 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narayanan, Christopher R.; Kreuter, Urs P.; Conner, J. Richard

    2002-08-14

    control planning, assessment, & feasibility study. 12 Edwards Aquifer Recharge Zone Data Table 1. EA Acreage EA Acreage 129 2 867.15 225.00 100.00 225.00 950.00 Valid Missing N Mean Median 25 50 75 Percentiles Table 2. Role at Property 109 83....2 83.8 83.8 8 6.1 6.2 90.0 4 3.1 3.1 93.1 2 1.5 1.5 94.6 7 5.3 5.4 100.0 130 99.2 100.0 1 .8 131 100.0 Make Most Management Decisions One of Key Decision Makers Spouse of Key Decision Maker Hired Manager Other Total Valid No ResponseMissing Total...

  18. Strong Field, Noncommutative QED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anton Ilderton; Joakim Lundin; Mattias Marklund

    2010-05-26

    We review the effects of strong background fields in noncommutative QED. Beginning with the noncommutative Maxwell and Dirac equations, we describe how combined noncommutative and strong field effects modify the propagation of fermions and photons. We extend these studies beyond the case of constant backgrounds by giving a new and revealing interpretation of the photon dispersion relation. Considering scattering in background fields, we then show that the noncommutative photon is primarily responsible for generating deviations from strong field QED results. Finally, we propose a new method for constructing gauge invariant variables in noncommutative QED, and use it to analyse the physics of our null background fields.

  19. Forces in electromagnetic field and gravitational field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zihua Weng

    2011-03-31

    The force can be defined from the linear momentum in the gravitational field and electromagnetic field. But this definition can not cover the gradient of energy. In the paper, the force will be defined from the energy and torque in a new way, which involves the gravitational force, electromagnetic force, inertial force, gradient of energy, and some other new force terms etc. One of these new force terms can be used to explain why the solar wind varies velocity along the magnetic force line in the interplanetary space between the sun and the earth.

  20. Assessment of Alaska's North Slope Oil Field Capacity to Sequester CO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Umekwe, Pascal; Mongrain, Joanna; Ahmadi, Mohabbat; Hanks, Catherine

    2013-03-15

    The capacity of 21 major fields containing more than 95% of the North Slope of Alaska's oil were investigated for CO{sub 2} storage by injecting CO{sub 2} as an enhanced oil recovery (EOR) agent. These fields meet the criteria for the application of miscible and immiscible CO{sub 2}-EOR methods and contain about 40 billion barrels of oil after primary and secondary recovery. Volumetric calculations from this study indicate that these fields have a static storage capacity of 3 billion metric tons of CO{sub 2}, assuming 100% oil recovery, re-pressurizing the fields to pre-fracturing pressure and applying a 50% capacity reduction to compensate for heterogeneity and for water invasion from the underlying aquifer. A ranking produced from this study, mainly controlled by field size and fracture gradient, identifies Prudhoe, Kuparuk, and West Sak as possessing the largest storage capacities under a 20% safety factor on pressures applied during storage to avoid over-pressurization, fracturing, and gas leakage. Simulation studies were conducted using CO{sub 2} Prophet to determine the amount of oil technically recoverable and CO{sub 2} gas storage possible during this process. Fields were categorized as miscible, partially miscible, and immiscible based on the miscibility of CO{sub 2} with their oil. Seven sample fields were selected across these categories for simulation studies comparing pure CO{sub 2} and water-alternating-gas injection. Results showed that the top two fields in each category for recovery and CO{sub 2} storage were Alpine and Point McIntyre (miscible), Prudhoe and Kuparuk (partially miscible), and West Sak and Lisburne (immiscible). The study concludes that 5 billion metric tons of CO{sub 2} can be stored while recovering 14.2 billion barrels of the remaining oil.

  1. Field emission electron source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter (Kensington, CA); Cohen, Marvin Lou (Berkeley, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A novel field emitter material, field emission electron source, and commercially feasible fabrication method is described. The inventive field emission electron source produces reliable electron currents of up to 400 mA/cm.sup.2 at 200 volts. The emitter is robust and the current it produces is not sensitive to variability of vacuum or the distance between the emitter tip and the cathode. The novel emitter has a sharp turn-on near 100 volts.

  2. The Ness field: An integrated field study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karasek, R.M.; Kean, K.R.; Richards, M.L. (Mobil North Sea Ltd., London (England))

    1990-05-01

    The Ness oil field, located in UK Block 9/13, was discovered in May 1986 by well 9/13b-28A. The field comprises a high-quality Middle Jurassic reservoir with an average 148-ft oil column trapped in a west-dipping, fault-bounded closure. The oil is substantially undersaturated. The field was brought on production as a subsea satellite development tied back to the Beryl B Platform. Oil was first delivered on August 11, 1987, just over a year from discovery. Initial producing rates from the 9/13B-28A well averaged about 10,000 BOPD. Since this well, another producer and water injector have been completed. Based on the frequent and accurate pressure data available from permanent downhole gauges installed in all three wells of the Ness field, material balance was used to calculate initial oil in place. These calculations gave an oil in place value consistent with recent calculations of 87 {times} 166 STB after less than 3% of the oil-in-place had been produced, compared with 55 {times} 106 STB initially mapped. Pressure monitoring enabled reservoir drive mechanisms to be tracked and a high offtake rate to be maintained by balancing water injection with withdrawals. A reevaluation of the mapped structure was prompted by a revision of the geological model following the 9/13b-38/38Z appraisal wells, together with the discrepancy between the oil in place from mapping and material balance. The seismic data was reinterpreted using the additional well control, and the field remapped. This resulted in a revised volume of 129 {times} 106 STB. Additional insight into the differentiation between oil and water volumes in this low compressibility system and a resolution of the differences between material balance and volumetrics were obtained through a black-oil simulation.

  3. Death Valley Lower Carbonate Aquifer Monitoring Program Wells Down Gradient of the Proposed Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository, U. S. Department of Energy Grant DE-RW0000233 2010 Project Report, prepared by The Hydrodynamics Group, LLC for Inyo County Yucca Mountain Repository Assessment Office

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, Michael J; Bredehoeft, John D., Dr.

    2010-09-03

    Inyo County completed the first year of the U.S. Department of Energy Grant Agreement No. DE-RW0000233. This report presents the results of research conducted within this Grant agreement in the context of Inyo County's Yucca Mountain oversight program goals and objectives. The Hydrodynamics Group, LLC prepared this report for Inyo County Yucca Mountain Repository Assessment Office. The overall goal of Inyo County's Yucca Mountain research program is the evaluation of far-field issues related to potential transport, by ground water, of radionuclide into Inyo County, including Death Valley, and the evaluation of a connection between the Lower Carbonate Aquifer (LCA) and the biosphere. Data collected within the Grant is included in interpretive illustrations and discussions of the results of our analysis. The centeral elements of this Grant prgoram was the drilling of exploratory wells, geophysical surveys, geological mapping of the Southern Funeral Mountain Range. The cullimination of this research was 1) a numerical ground water model of the Southern Funeral Mountain Range demonstrating the potential of a hydraulic connection between the LCA and the major springs in the Furnace Creek area of Death Valley, and 2) a numerical ground water model of the Amargosa Valley to evaluate the potential for radionuclide transport from Yucca Mountain to Inyo County, California. The report provides a description of research and activities performed by The Hydrodynamics Group, LLC on behalf of Inyo County, and copies of key work products in attachments to this report.

  4. Hot Pot Field Observations

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    2013-06-28

    Map of field observations including depressions, springs, evidence of former springs, travertine terraces and vegetation patterns. Map also contains interpretation of possible spring alignments.

  5. Hot Pot Field Observations

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    Map of field observations including depressions, springs, evidence of former springs, travertine terraces and vegetation patterns. Map also contains interpretation of possible spring alignments.

  6. Field emission chemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Panitz, J.A.

    1983-11-22

    A field emission chemical sensor for specific detection of a chemical entity in a sample includes a closed chamber enclosing two field emission electrode sets, each field emission electrode set comprising (a) an electron emitter electrode from which field emission electrons can be emitted when an effective voltage is connected to the electrode set; and (b) a collector electrode which will capture said electrons emitted from said emitter electrode. One of the electrode sets is passive to the chemical entity and the other is active thereto and has an active emitter electrode which will bind the chemical entity when contacted therewith.

  7. Magnetic Fields Analogous to electric field, a magnet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertulani, Carlos A. - Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A&M University

    Magnetic Fields Analogous to electric field, a magnet produces a magnetic field, B Set up a B field two ways: Moving electrically charged particles Current in a wire Intrinsic magnetic field Basic) Opposite magnetic poles attract like magnetic poles repel #12;Like the electric field lines

  8. Microfabricated Field Calibration Assembly

    Energy Innovation Portal (Marketing Summaries) [EERE]

    2013-03-19

    Reliable determination of the presence and/or quantity of a particular analyte in the field can be greatly enhanced if the analytical instrument is equipped with a time-of-use calibration standard. While proper calibration is necessary for reliability and accuracy, it can be challenging and cumbersome to provide such calibration in the field using conventional methods found in analytical laboratories....

  9. Scalar Field Inhomogeneous Cosmologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Feinstein; J. Ibáñez; P. Labraga

    1995-11-24

    Some exact solutions for the Einstein field equations corresponding to inhomogeneous $G_2$ cosmologies with an exponential-potential scalar field which generalize solutions obtained previously are considered. Several particular cases are studied and the properties related to generalized inflation and asymptotic behaviour of the models are discussed.

  10. Emergent Gauge Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter G. O. Freund

    2010-08-24

    Erik Verlinde's proposal of the emergence of the gravitational force as an entropic force is extended to abelian and non-abelian gauge fields and to matter fields. This suggests a picture with no fundamental forces or forms of matter whatsoever.

  11. Topological quantum field theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albert Schwarz

    2000-11-29

    Following my plenary lecture on ICMP2000 I review my results concerning two closely related topics: topological quantum field theories and the problem of quantization of gauge theories. I start with old results (first examples of topological quantum field theories were constructed in my papers in late seventies) and I come to some new results, that were not published yet.

  12. Analysis of Hydraulic Responses from the ER-6-1 Multiple-Well Aquifer Test, Yucca Flat FY 2004 Testing Program, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg Ruskauff

    2005-06-01

    This report documents the interpretation and analysis of the hydraulic data collected for the Fiscal Year (FY) 2004 Multiple-Well Aquifer Test-Tracer Test (MWAT-TT) conducted at the ER-6-1 Well Cluster in Yucca Flat Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 97, on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The MWAT-TT was performed to investigate CAU-scale groundwater flow and transport processes related to the transport of radionuclides from sources on the NTS through the Lower Carbonate Aquifer (LCA) Hydrostratigraphic Unit (HSU). The ER-6-1 MWAT-TT was planned and executed by contractor participants for the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project of the Environmental Restoration (ER) program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). Participants included Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), the Environmental Engineering Services Contractor; Bechtel Nevada (BN); the Desert Research Institute (DRI); Los Alamos National Laboratory; and the University of Nevada, Las Vegas-Harry Reid Center. The SNJV team consists of the S.M. Stoller Corporation, Navarro Research and Engineering, Battelle Memorial Institute, INTERA Inc., and Weston Solutions, Inc. The MWAT-TT was implemented according to the ''Underground Test Area Project, ER-6-1 Multi-Well Aquifer Test - Tracer Test Plan'' (SNJV, 2004a) issued in April 2004. The objective of the aquifer test was to determine flow processes and local hydraulic properties for the LCA through long-term constant-rate pumping at the well cluster. This objective was to be achieved in conjunction with detailed sampling of the composite tracer breakthrough at the pumping well, as well as with depth-specific sampling and logging at multiple wells, to provide information for the depth-discrete analysis of formation hydraulic properties, particularly with regard to fracture properties.

  13. THE GALACTIC MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jansson, Ronnie; Farrar, Glennys R. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States)

    2012-12-10

    With this Letter, we complete our model of the Galactic magnetic field (GMF), by using the WMAP7 22 GHz total synchrotron intensity map and our earlier results to obtain a 13-parameter model of the Galactic random field, and to determine the strength of the striated random field. In combination with our 22-parameter description of the regular GMF, we obtain a very good fit to more than 40,000 extragalactic Faraday rotation measures and the WMAP7 22 GHz polarized and total intensity synchrotron emission maps. The data call for a striated component to the random field whose orientation is aligned with the regular field, having zero mean and rms strength Almost-Equal-To 20% larger than the regular field. A noteworthy feature of the new model is that the regular field has a significant out-of-plane component, which had not been considered earlier. The new GMF model gives a much better description of the totality of data than previous models in the literature.

  14. Cosmology of Bifundamental Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanmay Vachaspati

    2008-12-17

    If a field theory contains gauged, non-Abelian, bi-fundamental fields i.e. fields that are charged under two separate non-Abelian gauge groups, the transition from a deconfined phase to a hadronic phase may be frustrated. Similar frustration may occur in non-Abelian gauge models containing matter only in higher dimensional representations e.g. models with pure glue, or if ordinary quarks are confined by two flux tubes, as implied in the triangular configuration of baryons within QCD. In a cosmological setting, such models can lead to the formation of a web of confining electric flux tubes that can potentially have observational signatures.

  15. dfield8 Direction Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-08-05

    dfield8 Direction Fields. • The routine dfield8 is already loaded on all ITaP machines as standard software. To access MAtlAB from any ITaP machine: Start

  16. Gravitational Field Tensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen M. Barnett

    2014-12-05

    We present a tensorial relative of the familiar affine connection and argue that it should be regarded as the gravitational field tensor. Remarkably, the Lagrangian density expressed in terms of this tensor has a simple form, which depends only on the metric and its first derivatives and, moreover, is a true scalar quantity. The geodesic equation, moreover, shows that our tensor plays a role that is strongly reminiscent of the gravitational field in Newtonian mechanics and this, together with other evidence, which we present, leads us to identify it as the gravitational field tensor. We calculate the gravitational field tensor for the Schwarzschild metric. We suggest some of the advantages to be gained from applying our tensor to the study of gravitational waves.

  17. Gauge Fields and Unparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Lewis Licht

    2008-02-03

    We show that a rigorous path integral method of introducing gauge fields in the UnParticle lagrangian leads to somewhat different and more complicated vertexes than those currently used.

  18. Quasi light fields: extending the light field to coherent radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wornell, Gregory W.

    Quasi light fields: extending the light field to coherent radiation Anthony Accardi1,2 and Gregory light field, and for coherent radiation using electromagnetic field theory. We present a model of coherent image formation that strikes a balance between the utility of the light field

  19. MULTIPLE WELL VARIABLE RATE WELL TEST ANALYSIS OF DATA FROM THE AUBURN UNIVERSITY THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doughty, Christine

    2012-01-01

    experimental Thermal energy storage in confined aquifers. ©lUNIVERSITY THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE PROGRM1 Christine Doughty,of aquifer thermal energy storage field experiments. ANALYZE

  20. Modeling basin- and plume-scale processes of CO2 storage for full-scale deployment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Q.

    2010-01-01

    models of Mt. Simon gas storage fields in the Illinoiscaprock in aquifer gas storage, 1: Caprock of infiniteEvaluation of underground gas storage conditions in aquifers

  1. Pulsed hybrid field emitter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sampayan, S.E.

    1998-03-03

    A hybrid emitter exploits the electric field created by a rapidly depoled ferroelectric material. Combining the emission properties of a planar thin film diamond emitter with a ferroelectric alleviates the present technological problems associated with both types of emitters and provides a robust, extremely long life, high current density cathode of the type required by emerging microwave power generation, accelerator technology and display applications. This new hybrid emitter is easy to fabricate and not susceptible to the same failures which plague microstructure field emitter technology. Local electrode geometries and electric field are determined independently from those for optimum transport and brightness preservation. Due to the large amount of surface charge created on the ferroelectric, the emitted electrons have significant energy, thus eliminating the requirement for specialized phosphors in emissive flat-panel displays. 11 figs.

  2. Pulsed hybrid field emitter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sampayan, Stephen E. (Manteca, CA)

    1998-01-01

    A hybrid emitter exploits the electric field created by a rapidly depoled ferroelectric material. Combining the emission properties of a planar thin film diamond emitter with a ferroelectric alleviates the present technological problems associated with both types of emitters and provides a robust, extremely long life, high current density cathode of the type required by emerging microwave power generation, accelerator technology and display applications. This new hybrid emitter is easy to fabricate and not susceptible to the same failures which plague microstructure field emitter technology. Local electrode geometries and electric field are determined independently from those for optimum transport and brightness preservation. Due to the large amount of surface charge created on the ferroelectric, the emitted electrons have significant energy, thus eliminating the requirement for specialized phosphors in emissive flat-panel displays.

  3. Porous media experience applicable to field evaluation for compressed air energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, R.D.; Gutknecht, P.J.

    1980-06-01

    A survey is presented of porous media field experience that may aid in the development of a compressed air energy storage field demonstration. Work done at PNL and experience of other groups and related industries is reviewed. An overall view of porous media experience in the underground storage of fluids is presented. CAES experience consists of site evaluation and selection processes used by groups in California, Kansas, and Indiana. Reservoir design and field evaluation of example sites are reported. The studies raised questions about compatibility with depleted oil and gas reservoirs, storage space rights, and compressed air regulations. Related experience embraces technologies of natural gas, thermal energy, and geothermal and hydrogen storage. Natural gas storage technology lends the most toward compressed air storage development, keeping in mind the respective differences between stored fluids, physical conditions, and cycling frequencies. Both fluids are injected under pressure into an aquifer to form a storage bubble confined between a suitable caprock structure and partially displaced ground water. State-of-the-art information is summarized as the necessary foundation material for field planning. Preliminary design criteria are given as recommendations for basic reservoir characteristics. These include geometric dimensions and storage matrix properties such as permeability. Suggested ranges are given for injection air temperature and reservoir pressure. The second step in developmental research is numerical modeling. Results have aided preliminary design by analyzing injection effects upon reservoir pressure, temperature and humidity profiles. Results are reported from laboratory experiments on candidate sandstones and caprocks. Conclusions are drawn, but further verification must be done in the field.

  4. Quantum field tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Steffens; C. A. Riofrío; R. Hübener; J. Eisert

    2014-11-06

    We introduce the concept of quantum field tomography, the efficient and reliable reconstruction of unknown quantum fields based on data of correlation functions. At the basis of the analysis is the concept of continuous matrix product states, a complete set of variational states grasping states in quantum field theory. We innovate a practical method, making use of and developing tools in estimation theory used in the context of compressed sensing such as Prony methods and matrix pencils, allowing us to faithfully reconstruct quantum field states based on low-order correlation functions. In the absence of a phase reference, we highlight how specific higher order correlation functions can still be predicted. We exemplify the functioning of the approach by reconstructing randomised continuous matrix product states from their correlation data and study the robustness of the reconstruction for different noise models. We also apply the method to data generated by simulations based on continuous matrix product states and using the time-dependent variational principle. The presented approach is expected to open up a new window into experimentally studying continuous quantum systems, such as encountered in experiments with ultra-cold atoms on top of atom chips. By virtue of the analogy with the input-output formalism in quantum optics, it also allows for studying open quantum systems.

  5. Sports Field Maintenance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duble, Richard L.

    1995-07-31

    by the ryegrasses adds to the enjoyment of the players and fans. To prepare for overseeding, thin the bermudagrass turf with a flail mower or dethatching mower. Sweep or vacuum the field after mowing to remove grass clip- pings and thatch. Where common bermudagrass...

  6. User manual for AQUASTOR: a computer model for cost analysis of aquifer thermal-energy storage oupled with district-heating or cooling systems. Volume II. Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huber, H.D.; Brown, D.R.; Reilly, R.W.

    1982-04-01

    A computer model called AQUASTOR was developed for calculating the cost of district heating (cooling) using thermal energy supplied by an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system. the AQUASTOR Model can simulate ATES district heating systems using stored hot water or ATES district cooling systems using stored chilled water. AQUASTOR simulates the complete ATES district heating (cooling) system, which consists of two prinicpal parts: the ATES supply system and the district heating (cooling) distribution system. The supply system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of thermal energy supplied to the distribution system by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the exploration, development, and operation of the ATES supply system. The distribution system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of heat (chill) delivered by the distribution system to the end-users by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the construction and operation of the distribution system. The model combines the technical characteristics of the supply system and the technical characteristics of the distribution system with financial and tax conditions for the entities operating the two systems into one techno-economic model. This provides the flexibility to individually or collectively evaluate the impact of different economic and technical parameters, assumptions, and uncertainties on the cost of providing district heating (cooling) with an ATES system. This volume contains all the appendices, including supply and distribution system cost equations and models, descriptions of predefined residential districts, key equations for the cooling degree-hour methodology, a listing of the sample case output, and appendix H, which contains the indices for supply input parameters, distribution input parameters, and AQUASTOR subroutines.

  7. Numerical simulation studies of the long-term evolution of a CO2 plume in a saline aquifer with a sloping caprock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pruess, K.; Nordbotten, J.

    2010-12-28

    We have used the TOUGH2-MP/ECO2N code to perform numerical simulation studies of the long-term behavior of CO{sub 2} stored in an aquifer with a sloping caprock. This problem is of great practical interest, and is very challenging due to the importance of multi-scale processes. We find that the mechanism of plume advance is different from what is seen in a forced immiscible displacement, such as gas injection into a water-saturated medium. Instead of pushing the water forward, the plume advances because the vertical pressure gradients within the plume are smaller than hydrostatic, causing the groundwater column to collapse ahead of the plume tip. Increased resistance to vertical flow of aqueous phase in anisotropic media leads to reduced speed of updip plume advancement. Vertical equilibrium models that ignore effects of vertical flow will overpredict the speed of plume advancement. The CO{sub 2} plume becomes thinner as it advances, yet the speed of advancement remains constant over the entire simulation period of up to 400 years, with migration distances of more than 80 km. Our simulations include dissolution of CO{sub 2} into the aqueous phase and associated density increase, and molecular diffusion. However, no convection develops in the aqueous phase because it is suppressed by the relatively coarse (sub-) horizontal gridding required in a regional-scale model. A first crude sub-grid-scale model was developed to represent convective enhancement of CO{sub 2} dissolution. This process is found to greatly reduce the thickness of the CO{sub 2} plume, but, for the parameters used in our simulations, does not affect the speed of plume advancement.

  8. Glossary - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Informationmonthly gasoline price toStocks 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013Feet) Year Jan

  9. Glossary - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Informationmonthly gasoline price to fall to $3.43 by September1 716810, 2014 Gasolineshortcoal

  10. Glossary - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Informationmonthly gasoline price to fall to $3.43 by September1 716810, 2014

  11. Glossary - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Informationmonthly gasoline price to fall to $3.43 by September1 716810, 2014electricity Acid rain: Also

  12. Glossary - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Informationmonthly gasoline price to fall to $3.43 by September1 716810, 2014electricity Acid rain:

  13. Glossary - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Informationmonthly gasoline price to fall to $3.43 by September1 716810, 2014electricity Acid

  14. Glossary - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Informationmonthly gasoline price to fall to $3.43 by September1 716810, 2014electricity Acidpetroleum

  15. Historical monthly energy review, 1973--1988. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-17

    This publication presents monthly and annual data from 1973 through 1988 on production, consumption, stocks, imports, exports, and prices of the principal energy commodities in the United States. Also included are data on international production of crude oil, consumption of petroleum products, petroleum stocks, and production of electricity from nuclear-powered facilities. 55 tabs.

  16. D.C. WRRC Report No. GLOSSARY OF USEFUL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    District of Columbia, University of the

    , sometimes resulting in land build-up. acid mine drainage - the water discharge from coal mines, usually are held to their surface-until removed and physically or chemically degraded. Activated carbon removes

  17. The motor gasoline industry: Past, present, and future. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Motor gasoline constitutes the largest single component of US demand for petroleum products and is the Nation's most widely used transportation fuel. Because of its importance as a transportation fuel, motor gasoline has been the focus of several regulatory and tax policy initiatives in recent years. Much of the US refining capacity is specifically geared toward maximizing motor gasoline production, and future investments by the petroleum industry in refining infrastructure are likely to be made largely to produce larger volumes of clean motor gasoline. This report addresses major events and developments that have had an impact on motor gasoline supply, distribution, prices, and demand. The report provides historical perspective as well as analyses of important events from the 1970's and 1980's. Long-term forecasts are provided for the period from 1990 to 2010 in an effort to present and analyze possible future motor gasoline trends. Other forecasts examine the near-term impact of the invasion of Kuwait. 18 figs., 10 tabs.

  18. International petroleum statistics report, January 1992. [Contains Glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1992-01-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, consumption, imports, exports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil consumption and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1980, and monthly data for the most two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/consumption balance for the market economies (i.e., non-communist countries). This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, consumption, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD consumption data are for the years 1970 through 1990; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1990; and OECD trade from 1982 through 1990.

  19. A-1 2003 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT APPENDIX A: GLOSSARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    extraction ASL Analytical Services Laboratory (BNL) AST aboveground storage tank BAF Booster Applications Integrated Safety Management System ISO* International Organization for Standardization ISOCS In-Situ Object

  20. A-1 2001 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT APPENDIX A: GLOSSARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    Graphite Research Reactor BLIP Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer BMRR Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor Bq/L becquerel per liter BSA Brookhaven Science Associates Btu British thermal units CAA Clean Air Cs cesium CSF Central Steam Facility CT carbon tetrachloride CWA Clean Water Act CY calendar year DCA

  1. A-1 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT 2000 APPENDIX A: GLOSSARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    Graphite Research Reactor BLIP Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer BMRR Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor Bq/L becquerel per liter BSA Brookhaven Science Associates Btu British thermal units CAA Clean Air Steam Facility CT carbon tetrachloride CWA Clean Water Act CY calendar year DCA 1,1-dichloroethane DCE 1

  2. Plans, Implementation, and Results Glossary | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and barriers. Each office is also implementing procedures to conduct probabilistic risk analysis of potential RD&D activities. Broadly speaking, portfolio analysis is...

  3. Glossary of Energy-Related Terms | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    below the surface is used to condense the working fluid. Open-Cycle OTEC technologies use ocean water itself as the working fluid. Closed-Cycle OTEC systems circulate a working...

  4. A-1 2013 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT APPENDIX A: GLOSSARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Information Management System EISA Energy Independence and Security Act #12;A-22013 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT Laboratory EMP Environmental Monitoring Plan EMS* Environmental Management System EO Executive Order EPA* U dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene DDT dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane DMR Discharge Monitoring Report DOE* U.S. Department of Energy

  5. A-1 2004 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT APPENDIX A: GLOSSARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Measurements Laboratory EMP Environmental Monitoring Plan EMS* Environmental Management System EPA* U dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane DMR Discharge Monitoring Report DOE* U.S. Department of Energy DOE CH DOE Chicago Operations* Environmental Information Management System ELAP Environmental Laboratory Approval Program EML Environmental

  6. A-1 1999 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT APPENDIX A: GLOSSARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Organization LED Light Emitting Diode LIE Long Island Expressway LINAC Linear accelerator MACT Maximum

  7. DOE Policy for Digital Research Data Management: Glossary

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Data preservation means providing for the usability of data beyond the lifetime of the research activity that generated them.

  8. Contact Us -Glossary -Log out CUNY Hunter College

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Weigang

    in Social Studies No Advanced Certificate in Spanish No BA/MA in Biology No BA/MA in Chemistry No BA in Social Studies No Graduate Program in Spanish No Graduate Program in TESOL No Undergraduate Program Program in Russian Adol. Ed No Undergraduate Program in Spanish Adol. Ed No Total number of teacher

  9. MTL ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2015 Glossary 215 MIT ACRONYMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kastner, Marc A.

    Engineering Biology Department of Biology ChemE Department of Chemical Engineering CICS Center for Integrated Circuits and Systems CMSE Center for Materials Science and Engineering DMSE Department of Materials Science & Engineering EECS Department of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science KI David H. Koch Institute

  10. Energy consumption series: Lighting in commercial buildings. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-11

    Lighting represents a substantial fraction of commercial electricity consumption. A wide range of initiatives in the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Strategy have focused on commercial lighting as a potential source of energy conservation. This report provides a statistical profile of commercial lighting, to examine the potential for lighting energy conservation in commercial buildings. The principal conclusion from this analysis is that energy use for lighting could be reduced by as much as a factor of four using currently available technology. The analysis is based primarily on the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) 1986 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS). The more recent 1989 survey had less detail on lighting, for budget reasons. While changes have occurred in the commercial building stock since 1986, the relationships identified by this analysis are expected to remain generally valid. In addition, the analytic approach developed here can be applied to the data that will be collected in the 1992 CBECS.

  11. International nuclear fuel cycle fact book. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leigh, I.W.; Lakey, L.T.; Schneider, K.J.; Silviera, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    As the US Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors have become increasingly involved with other nations in nuclear fuel cycle and waste management cooperative activities, a need has developed for a ready source of information concerning foreign fuel cycle programs, facilities, and personnel. This Fact Book was compiled to meet that need. The information contained has been obtained from nuclear trade journals and newsletters; reports of foreign visits and visitors; CEC, IAEA, and OECD/NEA activities reports; proceedings of conferences and workshops; and so forth. Sources do not agree completely with each other, and the data listed herein does not reflect any one single source but frequently is a consolidation/combination of information. Lack of space as well as the intent and purpose of the Fact Book limit the given information to that pertaining to the Nuclear Fuel Cycle and to data considered of primary interest or most helpful to the majority of users.

  12. Appendix A. Glossary Annual Site Environmental Report--2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    significant quantities of water under ordinary hydraulic gradients. aquitard--A geologic unit that inhibits of a measurement to the true value of the quantity. ACM--Asbestos-containing materials. aliquot--The quantity of sample being used for analysis. alkalinity--A measure of the buffering capacity of water, and because p

  13. Solar Energy Education. Renewable energy: a background text. [Includes glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    Some of the most common forms of renewable energy are presented in this textbook for students. The topics include solar energy, wind power hydroelectric power, biomass ocean thermal energy, and tidal and geothermal energy. The main emphasis of the text is on the sun and the solar energy that it yields. Discussions on the sun's composition and the relationship between the earth, sun and atmosphere are provided. Insolation, active and passive solar systems, and solar collectors are the subtopics included under solar energy. (BCS)

  14. Funding Notice Glossary | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A comparison of the pension plan's assets (after subtracting credit balances) and Funding Target at a particular point in time. The plan's FTAP is higher when it is calculated...

  15. 218 Glossary MTL ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2014 MIT ACRONYMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, Rafael

    -MIT Alliance SMART Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (Center) SMART-LEES SMART Low Energy The City University of New York DARPA Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency DAHI DARPA Diverse

  16. GLOSSARY OF COMMITTEE ABBREVIATIONS: ACA: Advisory Committee on Athletics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    and Use SRC, FCC U Senate (info) Awards, Honors, and Recognition All-U Honors, SCC no Code/PACC F Senate (action) Reserve Officers Training Corps SCEP no Student Conduct Code SCSA U Senate (info) Gifts Received and Given by Regents and University Officials SCC

  17. Savannah River Site environmental report for 1991. [Contains Glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnett, M.W.; Karapatakis, L.K.; Mamatey, A.R.; Todd, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    This report describes environmental activities conducted on and in the vicinity of the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, S.C., from Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1991, with an update on compliance activities through April 1, 1992. The report is a single volume with a separate summary pamphlet highlighting the major findings for 1991. The report is divided into an executive summary and 14 chapters containing information on environmental compliance issues, environmental monitoring methods and programs, and environmental research activities for 1991, as well as historical data from previous years. Analytical results, figures, charts, and data tables relevant to the environmental monitoring program for 1991 at SRS are included.

  18. Glossary of Transmission Grid Integration Terms | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable UrbanKentucky:BoreOpenGilliamOhio:ChangeGlobalData JumpGlensTransmission

  19. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,Information MHKMHK5TransportManitouChangeMarcMarine and Hydrokinetic

  20. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,Information MHKMHK5TransportManitouChangeMarcMarine and

  1. Glossary 4.vp:CorelVentura 7.0

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYear Jan Feb Mar87.1CubicYear Jan Feb2.56 441

  2. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to: navigation, searchScotland Jump to: navigation, search Name:Marine

  3. NATURAL GAS FROM SHALE: Questions and Answers Shale Gas Glossary

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOEDepartment of Energy Motionshale gas? Basically, itKey Points:

  4. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOE Safetyof Energy ThisSites |and theDepartmentPROGRAM C L ENo.the

  5. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios TowardsInformationMarietta, Georgia:Marine MammalMarine and

  6. Plans, Implementation, and Results Glossary | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeVehicle Replacement U.S.Job&Energy DepartmentPast

  7. Glossary of Energy-Related Terms | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFinancial Opportunities FinancialofInformation Geothermal

  8. Glossary - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Reserves AdjustmentsDecadeSign up forHoliday

  9. Methane Hydrate Field Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-12-31

    This final report document summarizes the activities undertaken and the output from three primary deliverables generated during this project. This fifteen month effort comprised numerous key steps including the creation of an international methane hydrate science team, determining and reporting the current state of marine methane hydrate research, convening an international workshop to collect the ideas needed to write a comprehensive Marine Methane Hydrate Field Research Plan and the development and publication of that plan. The following documents represent the primary deliverables of this project and are discussed in summary level detail in this final report. • Historical Methane Hydrate Project Review Report • Methane Hydrate Workshop Report • Topical Report: Marine Methane Hydrate Field Research Plan • Final Scientific/Technical Report

  10. Phase Field Fracture Mechanics.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, Brett Anthony

    2015-11-01

    For this assignment, a newer technique of fracture mechanics using a phase field approach, will be examined and compared with experimental data for a bend test and a tension test. The software being used is Sierra Solid Mechanics, an implicit/explicit finite element code developed at Sandia National Labs in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The bend test experimental data was also obtained at Sandia Labs while the tension test data was found in a report online from Purdue University.

  11. Polymer Parametrised Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alok Laddha; Madhavan Varadarajan

    2008-05-02

    Free scalar field theory on 2 dimensional flat spacetime, cast in diffeomorphism invariant guise by treating the inertial coordinates of the spacetime as dynamical variables, is quantized using LQG type `polymer' representations for the matter field and the inertial variables. The quantum constraints are solved via group averaging techniques and, analogous to the case of spatial geometry in LQG, the smooth (flat) spacetime geometry is replaced by a discrete quantum structure. An overcomplete set of Dirac observables, consisting of (a) (exponentials of) the standard free scalar field creation- annihilation modes and (b) canonical transformations corresponding to conformal isometries, are represented as operators on the physical Hilbert space. None of these constructions suffer from any of the `triangulation' dependent choices which arise in treatments of LQG. In contrast to the standard Fock quantization, the non- Fock nature of the representation ensures that the algebra of conformal isometries as well as that of spacetime diffeomorphisms are represented in an anomaly free manner. Semiclassical states can be analysed at the gauge invariant level. It is shown that `physical weaves' necessarily underly such states and that such states display semiclassicality with respect to, at most, a countable subset of the (uncountably large) set of observables of type (a). The model thus offers a fertile testing ground for proposed definitions of quantum dynamics as well as semiclassical states in LQG.

  12. Field evaluation of a horizontal well recirculation system for groundwater treatment: Field demonstration at X-701B Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korte, N.; Muck, M.; Kearl, P.; Siegrist, R.; Schlosser, R.; Zutman, J.; Houk, T.

    1998-08-01

    This report describes the field-scale demonstration performed as part of the project, In Situ Treatment of Mixed Contaminants in Groundwater. This project was a 3{1/2} year effort comprised of laboratory work performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and fieldwork performed at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). The overall goal of the project was to evaluate in situ treatment of groundwater using horizontal recirculation coupled with treatment modules. Specifically, horizontal recirculation was tested because of its application to thin, interbedded aquifer zones. Mixed contaminants were targeted because of their prominence at DOE sites and because they cannot be treated with conventional methods. The project involved several research elements, including treatment process evaluation, hydrodynamic flow and transport modeling, pilot testing at an uncontaminated site, and full-scale testing at a contaminated site. This report presents the results of the work at the contaminated site, X-701B at PORTS. Groundwater contamination at X-701B consists of trichloroethene (TCE) (concentrations up to 1800 mg/L) and technetium-998 (Tc{sup 99}) (activities up to 926 pCi/L).

  13. Unbalanced field RF electron gun

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hofler, Alicia

    2013-11-12

    A design for an RF electron gun having a gun cavity utilizing an unbalanced electric field arrangement. Essentially, the electric field in the first (partial) cell has higher field strength than the electric field in the second (full) cell of the electron gun. The accompanying method discloses the use of the unbalanced field arrangement in the operation of an RF electron gun in order to accelerate an electron beam.

  14. Nature of Electric and Magnetic Fields; How the Fields Transform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ivezic, Tomislav

    2015-01-01

    In this paper the proofs are given that the electric and magnetic fields are properly defined vectors on the four-dimensional (4D) spacetime (the 4-vectors in the usual notation) and not the usual 3D fields. Furthermore, the proofs are presented that under the mathematically correct Lorentz transformations (LT), e.g., the electric field vector transforms as any other vector transforms, i.e., again to the electric field vector; there is no mixing with the magnetic field vector B, as in the usual transformations (UT) of the 3D fields. The derivations of the UT from some well-known textbooks are discussed and objected.

  15. Generalized Gravitational Entropy of Interacting Scalar Field and Maxwell Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wung-Hong Huang

    2014-11-11

    The generalized gravitational entropy proposed by Lewkowycz and Maldacena in recent is extended to the interacting real scalar field and Maxwell field system. Using the BTZ geometry we first investigate the case of free real scalar field and then show a possible way to calculate the entropy of the interacting scalar field. Next, we investigate the Maxwell field system. We exactly solve the wave equation and calculate the analytic value of the generalized gravitational entropy. We also use the Einstein equation to find the effect of backreaction of the Maxwell field on the area of horizon. The associated modified area law is consistent with the generalized gravitational entropy.

  16. Nature of Electric and Magnetic Fields; How the Fields Transform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomislav Ivezic

    2015-08-10

    In this paper the proofs are given that the electric and magnetic fields are properly defined vectors on the four-dimensional (4D) spacetime (the 4-vectors in the usual notation) and not the usual 3D fields. Furthermore, the proofs are presented that under the mathematically correct Lorentz transformations (LT), e.g., the electric field vector transforms as any other vector transforms, i.e., again to the electric field vector; there is no mixing with the magnetic field vector B, as in the usual transformations (UT) of the 3D fields. The derivations of the UT from some well-known textbooks are discussed and objected.

  17. U(VI) bioreduction with emulsified vegetable oil as the electron donor-Model application to a field test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Guoping; Watson, David B; Wu, Wei-min; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Parker, Jack C; Brooks, Scott C

    2013-01-01

    A one-time 2-hour emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) injection in a fast flowing aquifer decreased U discharge to a stream for over a year. Using a comprehensive biogeochemical model developed in the companion article based on microcosm tests, we approximately matched the observed acetate, nitrate, Fe, U, and sulfate concentrations, and described the major evolution trends of multiple microbial functional groups in the field test. While the lab-determined parameters were generally applicable in the field-scale simulation, the EVO hydrolysis rate constant was estimated to be an order of magnitude greater in the field than in the microcosms. The model predicted substantial biomass (sulfate reducers) and U(IV) accumulation near the injection wells and along the side boundaries of the treatment zone where electron donors (long-chain fatty acids) from the injection wells met electron acceptors (sulfate) from the surrounding environment. While EVO retention and hydrolysis characteristics were expected to control treatment longevity, modeling results indicated that electron acceptors such as sulfate may not only compete for electrons but also play a conducive role in degrading complex substrates and enhancing U(VI) reduction and immobilization. As a result, the spacing of the injection wells could be optimized for effective sustainable bioremediation.

  18. BUFFERED WELL FIELD OUTLINES

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Informationmonthly gasoline price to fall toUranium MarketingYear Jan Feb Mar OIL & GAS FIELD

  19. Hybrid conformal field theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco Bertolini; Ilarion V. Melnikov; M. Ronen Plesser

    2013-07-26

    We describe a class of (2,2) superconformal field theories obtained by fibering a Landau-Ginzburg orbifold CFT over a compact Kaehler base manifold. While such models are naturally obtained as phases in a gauged linear sigma model, our construction is independent of such an embedding. We discuss the general properties of such theories and present a technique to study the massless spectrum of the associated heterotic compactification. We test the validity of our method by applying it to hybrid phases of linear models and comparing spectra among the phases.

  20. ARM - AMIE Field Campaign

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve4AJ01) (See EnergyCurrent : 0.0 Waiting for0govField