Sample records for global terrestrial net

  1. Quantifying the role of fire in the Earth system - Part 2: Impact on the net carbon balance of global terrestrial ecosystems for the 20th century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Fang; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Levis, Samuel

    2014-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Fire is the primary terrestrial ecosystem disturbance agent on a global scale. It affects carbon balance of global terrestrial ecosystems by emitting carbon to atmosphere directly and immediately from biomass burning (i.e., fire direct effect), and by changing net ecosystem productivity and land-use carbon loss in post-fire regions due to biomass burning and fire-induced vegetation mortality (i.e., fire indirect effect). Here, we provide the first quantitative assessment about the impact of fire on the net carbon balance of global terrestrial ecosystems for the 20th century, and investigate the roles of fire direct and indirect effects. This study is done by quantifying the difference between the 20th century fire-on and fire-off simulations with NCAR community land model CLM4.5 as the model platform. Results show that fire decreases net carbon gain of the global terrestrial ecosystems by 1.0 Pg C yr-1 average across the 20th century, as a results of fire direct effect (1.9 Pg C yr-1) partly offset by indirect effect (-0.9 Pg C yr-1). Fire generally decreases the average carbon gains of terrestrial ecosystems in post-fire regions, which are significant over tropical savannas and part of forests in North America and the east of Asia. The general decrease of carbon gains in post-fire regions is because fire direct and indirect effects have similar spatial patterns and the former (to decrease carbon gain) is generally stronger. Moreover, the effect of fire on net carbon balance significantly declines prior to ~1970 with trend of 8 Tg C yr-1 due to increasing fire indirect effect and increases afterward with trend of 18 Tg C yr-1 due to increasing fire direct effect.

  2. China's terrestrial carbon balance: Contributions from multiple global change factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montana, University of

    China's terrestrial carbon balance: Contributions from multiple global change factors Hanqin Tian,1 to be investigated. China is important in determining the global carbon balance in terms of both carbon emission change) on net carbon balance in terrestrial ecosystems of China for the period 1961≠2005 were modeled

  3. North America's net terrestrial carbon exchange with the atmosphere 1990-2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, Anthony W.; Andres, Robert; Davis, Kenneth J.; Hafer, M.; Hayes, Daniel J.; Huntzinger, Deborah N.; de Jong, Bernardus; Kurz, Werner; McGuire, A. David; Vargas, Rodrigo; Wei, Yaxing; West, Tristram O.; Woodall, Chris W.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scientific understanding of the global carbon cycle is required for developing national and international policy to mitigate fossil-fuel CO2 emissions by managing terrestrial carbon uptake. Toward that understanding and as a contribution to the REgional Carbon Cycle Assessment and Processes (RECCAP) project, this paper provides a synthesis of net land-atmosphere CO2 exchange for North America over the period (1990-2009). This synthesis is based on results from three different methods: atmospheric inversion, inventory-based methods and terrestrial biosphere modeling. All methods indicate that the North America land surface was a sink for atmospheric CO2, with a net transfer from atmosphere to land. Estimates ranged from -890 to -280 Tg C yr-1, where the atmospheric inversion estimate forms the lower bound of that range (a larger land-sink) and the inventory-based estimate the upper (a smaller land sink). Integrating across estimates, a ďbestĒ estimates (i.e., measures of central tendency) are -472 Ī 281 Tg C yr-1 based on the mean and standard deviation of the distribution and -360 Tg C yr-1 (with an interquartile range of -496 to -337) based on the median. Considering both the fossil-fuel emissions source and the land sink, our analysis shows that North America was, however, a net contributor to the growth of CO2 in the atmosphere in the late 20th and early 21st century. The continentís CO2 source to sink ratio for this time period was likely in the range of 4:1 to 3:1.

  4. Global terrestrial biogeochemistry: Perturbations, interactions, and time scales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braswell, B.H. Jr.

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Global biogeochemical processes are being perturbed by human activity, principally that which is associated with industrial activity and expansion of urban and agricultural complexes. Perturbations have manifested themselves at least since the beginning of the 19th Century, and include emissions of CO{sub 2} and other pollutants from fossil fuel combustion, agricultural emissions of reactive nitrogen, and direct disruption of ecosystem function through land conversion. These perturbations yield local impacts, but there are also global consequences that are the sum of local-scale influences. Several approaches to understanding the global-scale implications of chemical perturbations to the Earth system are discussed. The lifetime of anthropogenic CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere is an important concept for understanding the current and future commitment to an altered atmospheric heat budget. The importance of the terrestrial biogeochemistry relative to the lifetime of excess CO{sub 2} is demonstrated using dynamic, aggregated models of the global carbon cycle.

  5. Sensitivity of Global Terrestrial Gross Primary Production to Hydrologic States Simulated by the Community Land Model Using Two Runoff Parameterizations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lei, Huimin; Huang, Maoyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Yang, Dawen; Shi, Xiaoying; Mao, Jiafu; Hayes, Daniel J.; Schwalm, C.; Wei, Yaxing; Liu, Shishi

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The terrestrial water and carbon cycles interact strongly at various spatio-temporal scales. To elucidate how hydrologic processes may influence carbon cycle processes, differences in terrestrial carbon cycle simulations induced by structural differences in two runoff generation schemes were investigated using the Community Land Model 4 (CLM4). Simulations were performed with runoff generation using the default TOPMODEL-based and the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model approaches under the same experimental protocol. The comparisons showed that differences in the simulated gross primary production (GPP) are mainly attributed to differences in the simulated leaf area index (LAI) rather than soil moisture availability. More specifically, differences in runoff simulations can influence LAI through changes in soil moisture, soil temperature, and their seasonality that affect the onset of the growing season and the subsequent dynamic feedbacks between terrestrial water, energy, and carbon cycles. As a result of a relative difference of 36% in global mean total runoff between the two models and subsequent changes in soil moisture, soil temperature, and LAI, the simulated global mean GPP differs by 20.4%. However, the relative difference in the global mean net ecosystem exchange between the two models is small (2.1%) due to competing effects on total mean ecosystem respiration and other fluxes, although large regional differences can still be found. Our study highlights the significant interactions among the water, energy, and carbon cycles and the need for reducing uncertainty in the hydrologic parameterization of land surface models to better constrain carbon cycle modeling.

  6. Quantifying global terrestrial methanol emissions using1 observations from the TES satellite sensor2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    1 Quantifying global terrestrial methanol emissions using1 observations from the TES Figure S1. December-January-Febuary (DJF, top) and June-July-August (JJA, bottom) biogenic3 methanol 1 Figure S4. Regions employed for quantifying terrestrial methanol fluxes (red) and for2

  7. Assessing net ecosystem carbon exchange of U S terrestrial ecosystems by integrating eddy covariance flux measurements and satellite observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhuang, Qianlai [Purdue University; Law, Beverly E. [Oregon State University; Baldocchi, Dennis [University of California, Berkeley; Ma, Siyan [University of California, Berkeley; Chen, Jiquan [University of Toledo, Toledo, OH; Richardson, Andrew [Harvard University; Melillo, Jerry [Marine Biological Laboratory; Davis, Ken J. [Pennsylvania State University; Hollinger, D. [USDA Forest Service; Wharton, Sonia [University of California, Davis; Falk, Matthias [University of California, Davis; Paw, U. Kyaw Tha [University of California, Davis; Oren, Ram [Duke University; Katulk, Gabriel G. [Duke University; Noormets, Asko [North Carolina State University; Fischer, Marc [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Verma, Shashi [University of Nebraska; Suyker, A. E. [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Cook, David R. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Sun, G. [USDA Forest Service; McNulty, Steven G. [USDA Forest Service; Wofsy, Steve [Harvard University; Bolstad, Paul V [University of Minnesota; Burns, Sean [University of Colorado, Boulder; Monson, Russell K. [University of Colorado, Boulder; Curtis, Peter [Ohio State University, The, Columbus; Drake, Bert G. [Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, Edgewater, MD; Foster, David R. [Harvard University; Gu, Lianhong [ORNL; Hadley, Julian L. [Harvard University; Litvak, Marcy [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; Martin, Timothy A. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Matamala, Roser [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Meyers, Tilden [NOAA, Oak Ridge, TN; Oechel, Walter C. [San Diego State University; Schmid, H. P. [Indiana University; Scott, Russell L. [USDA ARS; Torn, Margaret S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    More accurate projections of future carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere and associated climate change depend on improved scientific understanding of the terrestrial carbon cycle. Despite the consensus that U.S. terrestrial ecosystems provide a carbon sink, the size, distribution, and interannual variability of this sink remain uncertain. Here we report a terrestrial carbon sink in the conterminous U.S. at 0.63 pg C yr 1 with the majority of the sink in regions dominated by evergreen and deciduous forests and savannas. This estimate is based on our continuous estimates of net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE) with high spatial (1 km) and temporal (8-day) resolutions derived from NEE measurements from eddy covariance flux towers and wall-to-wall satellite observations from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). We find that the U.S. terrestrial ecosystems could offset a maximum of 40% of the fossil-fuel carbon emissions. Our results show that the U.S. terrestrial carbon sink varied between 0.51 and 0.70 pg C yr 1 over the period 2001 2006. The dominant sources of interannual variation of the carbon sink included extreme climate events and disturbances. Droughts in 2002 and 2006 reduced the U.S. carbon sink by 20% relative to a normal year. Disturbances including wildfires and hurricanes reduced carbon uptake or resulted in carbon release at regional scales. Our results provide an alternative, independent, and novel constraint to the U.S. terrestrial carbon sink.

  8. Mycorrhizal fungi mediation of terrestrial ecosystem responses to global change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohan, Jacqueline E.

    . Plants often shift carbon allocation belowground and the activities of mycorrhizal associates responding to global change is not well understood. We emphasize the need for more research in this emerging scientific disciplines and society. ™ 2014 Elsevier Ltd and The British Mycological Society. * Corresponding

  9. An ensemble CCDAS method to derive the full probabilityAn ensemble CCDAS method to derive the full probability distribution of the global net COdistribution of the global net CO22 fluxflux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    probability distribution of the global net COdistribution of the global net CO22 fluxflux Tilo Ziehn, Marko to their a priori mean and standard deviation. This provides us with monthly fields of the net primary productivity are propagated forward using the Jacobian model code to obtain the uncertainty in the net ecosystem productivity

  10. adaptive global net: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of contaminants discharged dispersion coefficient to be 70.1 ( 4.3 m2 s-1. Temporal evolution of the SF6 inventory indicates an average Ho, David 499 Building Bayes Nets with...

  11. Global Emissions of Terpenoid VOCs from Terrestrial Vegetation in the Last Millennium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acosta Navarro, J. C.; Smolander, S.; Struthers, H.; Zorita, E.; Ekman, A. M.; Kaplan, J. O.; Guenther, Alex B.; Arneth, A.; Riipinen, I.

    2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated the millennial variability of global BVOC emissions by using two independent numerical models: The Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN), for isoprene, monoterpene and sesquiterpene and Lund-Potsdam-Jena General Ecosystem Simulator (LPJ8 GUESS), for isoprene and monoterpenes. We found the millennial trends of global isoprene emissions to be mostly affected by land cover and atmospheric carbon dioxide changes, whereas monoterpene and sesquiterpene emission were dominated by temperature change. Isoprene emissions declined substantially in regions with large and rapid land cover change. In addition, isoprene emission sensitivity to drought proved to have signicant short term global effects. By the end of the past millennium MEGAN isoprene emissions were 634 TgC yr-1 (13% and 19% less than during during 1750-1850 and 1000- 15 1200, respectively) and LPJ-GUESS emissions were 323 TgC yr-1 (15% and 20% less than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively). Monoterpene emissions were 89 TgC yr-1 (10% and 6% higher than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively) in MEGAN, and 24 TgC yr-1 (2% higher and 5% 19 20 less than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively) in LPJ-GUESS. MEGAN sesquiterpene emissions were 36 TgC yr-1 (10% and 4% higher than during1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively). Although both models capture similar We investigated the millennial variability of global BVOC emissions by using two independent numerical models: The Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN), for isoprene, monoterpene and sesquiterpene and Lund-Potsdam-Jena General Ecosystem Simulator (LPJ8GUESS), for isoprene and monoterpenes. We found the millennial trends ofglobal isoprene emissions to be mostly a*ected by land cover and atmospheric carbon dioxide changes, whereas monoterpene and sesquiterpene emission were dominated by temperature change. Isoprene emissions declined substantially in regions with large and rapid land cover change. In addition, isoprene emission sensitivity to drought proved to have signifcant short term global effects. By the end of the past millennium MEGAN isoprene emissions were 634 TgC yr-1 (13% and 19% less than during during 1750-1850 and 1000- 1200, respectively) and LPJ-GUESS emissions were 323 TgC yr-1 (15% and 16 17 20% less than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively). Monoterpene emissions were 89 TgC yr-1 (10% and 6% higher than during 1750-1850 and 18 1000-1200, respectively) in MEGAN, and 24 TgC yr-1 (2% higher and 5% less than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively) in LPJ-GUESS. MEGAN sesquiterpene emissions were 36 TgC yr-1 (10% and 4% higher than during1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively). Although both models capture similar emission trends, the magnitude of the emissions are different. This highlights the importance of building better constraints on VOC emissions from terrestrial vegetation.emission trends, the magnitude of the emissions are different. This highlights the importance of building better constraints on VOC emissions from terrestrial vegetation.

  12. Homotopy of posets, net-cohomology and superselection sectors in globally hyperbolic spacetimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giuseppe Ruzzi

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We study sharply localized sectors, known as sectors of DHR-type, of a net of local observables, in arbitrary globally hyperbolic spacetimes with dimension $\\geq 3$. We show that these sectors define, has it happens in Minkowski space, a $\\mathrm{C}^*-$category in which the charge structure manifests itself by the existence of a tensor product, a permutation symmetry and a conjugation. The mathematical framework is that of the net-cohomology of posets according to J.E. Roberts. The net of local observables is indexed by a poset formed by a basis for the topology of the spacetime ordered under inclusion. The category of sectors, is equivalent to the category of 1-cocycles of the poset with values in the net. We succeed to analyze the structure of this category because we show how topological properties of the spacetime are encoded in the poset used as index set: the first homotopy group of a poset is introduced and it is shown that the fundamental group of the poset and the one of the underlying spacetime are isomorphic; any 1-cocycle defines a unitary representation of these fundamental groups. Another important result is the invariance of the net-cohomology under a suitable change of index set of the net.

  13. Influence of Dynamic Land Use and Land Cover Change on Simulated Global Terrestrial Carbon and Nitrogen Cycles, Climate-carbon Cycle Feedbacks, and Interactions with Rising CO2 and Anthropogenic Nitrogen Deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Hurtt, George C [University of Hew Hampshire

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous work has demonstrated the sensitivity of terrestrial net carbon exchange to disturbance history and land use patterns at the scale of individual sites or regions. Here we show the influence of land use and land cover dynamics over the historical period 1850-present on global-scale carbon, nutrient, water, and energy fluxes. We also explore the spatial and temporal details of interactions among land use and disturbance history, rising atmospheric carbon dioxide consentation, and increasing anthropogenic nitrogen deposition. Our simulations show that these interactions are significant, and that their importance grows over time, expressed as a fraction of the independent forcing terms. We conclude with an analysis of the influence of these interactions on the sign and magnitude of global climate-carbon cycle feedbacks.

  14. Preliminary global assessment of terrestrial biodiversity consequences of sea level rise mediated by climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menon, Shaily; Soberó n, Jorge; Li, Xingong; Peterson, A. Townsend

    2010-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Considerable attention has focused on the climatic effects of global climate change on biodiversity, but few analyses and no broad assessments have evaluated the effects of sea level rise on biodiversity. Taking advantage of new maps of marine...

  15. A global analysis of soil microbial biomass carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus in terrestrial ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Xiaofeng [ORNL; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Soil microbes play a pivotal role in regulating land-atmosphere interactions; the soil microbial biomass carbon (C), nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and C:N:P stoichiometry are important regulators for soil biogeochemical processes; however, the current knowledge on magnitude, stoichiometry, storage, and spatial distribution of global soil microbial biomass C, N, and P is limited. In this study, 3087 pairs of data points were retrieved from 281 published papers and further used to summarize the magnitudes and stoichiometries of C, N, and P in soils and soil microbial biomass at global- and biome-levels. Finally, global stock and spatial distribution of microbial biomass C and N in 0-30 cm and 0-100 cm soil profiles were estimated. The results show that C, N, and P in soils and soil microbial biomass vary substantially across biomes; the fractions of soil nutrient C, N, and P in soil microbial biomass are 1.6% in a 95% confidence interval of (1.5%-1.6%), 2.9% in a 95% confidence interval of (2.8%-3.0%), and 4.4% in a 95% confidence interval of (3.9%-5.0%), respectively. The best estimates of C:N:P stoichiometries for soil nutrients and soil microbial biomass are 153:11:1, and 47:6:1, respectively, at global scale, and they vary in a wide range among biomes. Vertical distribution of soil microbial biomass follows the distribution of roots up to 1 m depth. The global stock of soil microbial biomass C and N were estimated to be 15.2 Pg C and 2.3 Pg N in the 0-30 cm soil profiles, and 21.2 Pg C and 3.2 Pg N in the 0-100 cm soil profiles. We did not estimate P in soil microbial biomass due to data shortage and insignificant correlation with soil total P and climate variables. The spatial patterns of soil microbial biomass C and N were consistent with those of soil organic C and total N, i.e. high density in northern high latitude, and low density in low latitudes and southern hemisphere.

  16. Greening the terrestrial biosphere: simulated feedbacks on atmospheric heat and energy circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cowling, Sharon A.

    Greening the terrestrial biosphere: simulated feedbacks on atmospheric heat and energy circulation on atmospheric exchange of heat and moisture. Our CONTROL simulation had a mean global net primary production (NPP) of 56.3 GtCyr-1 which is half that of our scenario value of 115.1 GtCyr-1 . LAI and latent energy

  17. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 6, 31153129, 2006 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/6/3115/2006/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universitť de

    without OAD. Using the ECHAM4 climate model we estimate the global net radiative effect caused terrestrial radiation (Baker, 1997). A change in cirrus cloud coverage may significantly alter the global radiation balance and hence the Earth's climate. The exact mechanisms of cirrus cloud formation is still

  18. Groundwater and Terrestrial Water Storage,†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodell, M; Chambers, D P; Famiglietti, J S

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biomass burning occurs in all vegetated terrestrial central Europe, andEurope in Table 2.6 and F ig . 2.67. Climatological global biomass

  19. Variations in coral reef net community calcification and aragonite saturation state on local and global scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Whitney Nicole

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Predicting the response of net community calcification (NCC) to ocean acidification OA and declining aragonite saturation state [Omega]a requires a thorough understanding of controls on NCC. The diurnal control of light ...

  20. Global Patterns of Ecological Productivity and Tropical Forest Biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    those measurements in addition to climate data to construct a suite of empirical models of NPP productivity (NPP) on a global scale and biomass accumulation across thee tropics. Scientists have been model of terrestrial net primary productivity (NPP), and its simplicity and relative accuracy has led

  1. Terrestrial sequestration

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Charlie Byrer

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Terrestrial sequestration is the enhancement of CO2 uptake by plants that grow on land and in freshwater and, importantly, the enhancement of carbon storage in soils where it may remain more permanently stored. Terrestrial sequestration provides an opportunity for low-cost CO2 emissions offsets.

  2. Terrestrial sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charlie Byrer

    2008-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Terrestrial sequestration is the enhancement of CO2 uptake by plants that grow on land and in freshwater and, importantly, the enhancement of carbon storage in soils where it may remain more permanently stored. Terrestrial sequestration provides an opportunity for low-cost CO2 emissions offsets.

  3. Post-doctoral Position Title Quantify the net global climate impacts of past and future land-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pouyanne, Nicolas

    objective is to make this protocol widely available so that other earth system modeling groups outside uses and land use changes in global earth system models, and test the impact of various implementation

  4. Effect of Terrestrial and Marine Organic Aerosol on Regional and Global Climate: Model Development, Application, and Verification with Satellite Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meskhidze, Nicholas; Zhang, Yang; Kamykowski, Daniel

    2012-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In this DOE project the improvements to parameterization of marine primary organic matter (POM) emissions, hygroscopic properties of marine POM, marine isoprene derived secondary organic aerosol (SOA) emissions, surfactant effects, new cloud droplet activation parameterization have been implemented into Community Atmosphere Model (CAM 5.0), with a seven mode aerosol module from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)√?¬?√?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?s Modal Aerosol Model (MAM7). The effects of marine aerosols derived from sea spray and ocean emitted biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) on microphysical properties of clouds were explored by conducting 10 year CAM5.0-MAM7 model simulations at a grid resolution 1.9√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬į√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?2.5√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬į with 30 vertical layers. Model-predicted relationship between ocean physical and biological systems and the abundance of CCN in remote marine atmosphere was compared to data from the A-Train satellites (MODIS, CALIPSO, AMSR-E). Model simulations show that on average, primary and secondary organic aerosol emissions from the ocean can yield up to 20% increase in Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) at 0.2% Supersaturation, and up to 5% increases in droplet number concentration of global maritime shallow clouds. Marine organics were treated as internally or externally mixed with sea salt. Changes associated with cloud properties reduced (absolute value) the model-predicted short wave cloud forcing from -1.35 Wm-2 to -0.25 Wm-2. By using different emission scenarios, and droplet activation parameterizations, this study suggests that addition of marine primary aerosols and biologically generated reactive gases makes an important difference in radiative forcing assessments. All baseline and sensitivity simulations for 2001 and 2050 using global-through-urban WRF/Chem (GU-WRF) were completed. The main objective of these simulations was to evaluate the capability of GU-WRF for an accurate representation of the global atmosphere by exploring the most accurate configuration of physics options in GWRF for global scale modeling in 2001 at a horizontal grid resolution of 1√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬į x 1√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬į. GU-WRF model output was evaluated using observational datasets from a variety of sources including surface based observations (NCDC and BSRN), model reanalysis (NCEP/ NCAR Reanalysis and CMAP), and remotely-sensed data (TRMM) to evaluate the ability of GU-WRF to simulate atmospheric variables at the surface as well as aloft. Explicit treatment of nanoparticles produced from new particle formation in GU-WRF/Chem-MADRID was achieved by expanding particle size sections from 8 to 12 to cover particles with the size range of 1.16 nm to 11.6 √?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ķm. Simulations with two different nucleation parameterizations were conducted for August 2002 over a global domain at a 4√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬ļ by 5√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬ļ horizontal resolution. The results are evaluated against field measurement data from the 2002 Aerosol Nucleation and Real Time Characterization Experiment (ANARChE) in Atlanta, Georgia, as well as satellite and reanalysis data. We have also explored the relationship between √?¬?√?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?clean marine√?¬?√?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ě aerosol optical properties and ocean surface wind speed using remotely sensed data from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) on board the CALIPSO satellite and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) on board the AQUA satellite. Detailed data analyses

  5. Reconciling estimates of the contemporary North American carbon balance among terrestrial biosphere models, atmospheric inversions and a new approach for estimating net ecosystem exchange from inventory-based data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayes, Daniel J [ORNL; Turner, David P [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Stinson, Graham [Pacific Forestry Centre, Canadian Forest Service; Mcguire, David [University of Alaska; Wei, Yaxing [ORNL; West, Tristram O. [Joint Global Change Research Institute, PNNL; Heath, Linda S. [USDA Forest Service; De Jong, Bernardus [ECOSUR; McConkey, Brian G. [Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada; Birdsey, Richard A. [U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service; Kurz, Werner [Canadian Forest Service; Jacobson, Andrew [NOAA ESRL and CIRES; Huntzinger, Deborah [University of Michigan; Pan, Yude [U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Cook, Robert B [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop an approach for estimating net ecosystem exchange (NEE) using inventory-based information over North America (NA) for a recent 7-year period (ca. 2000 2006). The approach notably retains information on the spatial distribution of NEE, or the vertical exchange between land and atmosphere of all non-fossil fuel sources and sinks of CO2, while accounting for lateral transfers of forest and crop products as well as their eventual emissions. The total NEE estimate of a 327 252 TgC yr1 sink for NA was driven primarily by CO2 uptake in the Forest Lands sector (248 TgC yr1), largely in the Northwest and Southeast regions of the US, and in the Crop Lands sector (297 TgC yr1), predominantly in the Midwest US states. These sinks are counteracted by the carbon source estimated for the Other Lands sector (+218 TgC yr1), where much of the forest and crop products are assumed to be returned to the atmosphere (through livestock and human consumption). The ecosystems of Mexico are estimated tobe a small net source (+18 TgC yr1) due to land use change between 1993 and 2002. We compare these inventorybased estimates with results from a suite of terrestrial biosphere and atmospheric inversion models, where the mean continental-scale NEE estimate for each ensemble is 511 TgC yr1 and 931 TgC yr1, respectively. In the modeling approaches, all sectors, including Other Lands, were generally estimated to be a carbon sink, driven in part by assumed CO2 fertilization and/or lack of consideration of carbon sources from disturbances and product emissions. Additional fluxes not measured by the inventories, although highly uncertain, could add an additional 239 TgC yr1 to the inventory-based NA sink estimate, thus suggesting some convergence with the modeling approaches.

  6. Past and Future Effects of Ozone on Net Primary Production and Carbon Sequestration Using a Global Biogeochemical Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felzer, Benjamin Seth.

    Exposure of plants to ozone inhibits photosynthesis and therefore reduces vegetation production and carbon sequestration. Simulations with the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM) for the historical period (1860-1995) show ...

  7. 2, 183201, 2005 Global terrestrial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    dioxide (CO2) L. Sandoval-Soto 1 , M. Stanimirov 2 , M. von Hobe 3 , V. Schmitt 4 , J. Valdes 5 , A. Wild Discussion EGU 4 Institute for General Botany, University of Mainz, M¨ullerweg 6, 55128 Mainz, Germany 5

  8. The Australian terrestrial carbon budget

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Australian terrestrial carbon budget Open Access 3 , G. P.The Australian terrestrial carbon budget Luo, C. , Mahowald,terrestrial carbon budget Richards, G. P. , Borough, C. ,

  9. Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In April 2008, Kentucky enacted legislation that expanded its net metering law by requiring utilities to offer net metering to customers that generate electricity with photovoltaic (PV), wind,...

  10. The global carbon dioxide budget

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sundquist, E.T. (Geological Survey, Woods Hole, MA (United States))

    1993-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The increase in atmospheric CO[sub 2] levels during the last deglaciation was comparable in magnitude to the recent historical increase. However, global CO[sub 2] budgets for these changes reflect fundamental differences in rates and in sources and sinks. The modern oceans are a rapid net CO[sub 2] sink, whereas the oceans were a gradual source during the deglaciation. Unidentified terrestrial CO[sub 2] sinks are important uncertainties in both the deglacial and recent CO[sub 2] budgets. The deglacial CO[sub 2] budget represents a complexity of long-term dynamic behavior that is not adequately addressed by current models used to forecast future atmospheric CO[sub 2] levels.

  11. Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In Massachusetts, the state's investor-owned utilities must offer net metering. Municipal utilities are not obligated to offer net metering, but they may do so voluntarily. (There are no electric...

  12. Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission (IURC) adopted rules for net metering in September 2004, requiring the state's investor-owned utilities (IOUs) to offer net metering to all electric...

  13. MathNet MathNet Mathematical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MathNet MathNet MathNet Mathematical Preprint Servers Mathematical Preprint Servers Jonas Gomes Janeiro IMPA ­ Rio de Janeiro #12; MathNet MathNet MathNet Preprint Server Preprint Server . . What Atlas: Topology Atlas: http://www.unipissing.ca/topology/ http://www.unipissing.ca/topology/ #12; MathNet

  14. fi net

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Weihong

    Electronic Publishing House. All rights reserved. http://www.cnki.net #12;, , , ¬∑ ¬Ľ ¬Ľ , , , ¬°¬Ę ¬Ľ ¬°fi Journal Electronic Publishing House. All rights reserved. http://www.cnki.net #12;, ¬°¬£¬°¬£ , ¬Ľ , ¬Į ¬°/ ¬° , ¬°¬Ę ¬°¬Ę ¬© 1994-2008 China Academic Journal Electronic Publishing House. All rights reserved. http://www.cnki.net

  15. Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) - Usually at utility's avoided cost (a wholesale rate) or a negotiated rate * New Mexico o REC Ownership: Utility owns RECs o Net...

  16. Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New Jersey's net-metering rules apply to all residential, commercial and industrial customers of the state's investor-owned utilities and energy suppliers (and certain competitive municipal...

  17. Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wyoming enacted legislation in February 2001 that established statewide net metering. The law applies to investor-owned utilities, electric cooperatives and irrigation districts. Eligible...

  18. Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Net metering has been available in Oklahoma since 1988 under Oklahoma Corporation Commission (OCC) Order 326195. The OCC's rules require investor-owned utilities and electric cooperatives under...

  19. Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Missouri enacted legislation in June 2007 (S.B. 54)* requiring all electric utilities -- investor-owned utilities, municipal utilities and electric cooperatives -- to offer net metering to...

  20. Terrestrial Water Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodell, M; Chambers, D P; Famiglietti, Jay

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    T. E. Reilly, 2002: Flow and storage in groundwater systems.storage ..2013: Global ocean storage of anthropogenic carbon.

  1. Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Net excess generation (NEG) is treated as a kilowatt-hour (kWh) credit or other compensation on the customer's following bill.* When an annual period ends, a utility will purchase unused credits...

  2. Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Illinois enacted legislation in August 2007 (S.B. 680) requiring investor-owned utilities in Illinois to begin offering net metering by April 1, 2008. In May 2008, the Illinois Commerce Commissio...

  3. Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NOTE: In December 15, 2014 the New York Public Service Commission (PSC) issued an order directing the investor owned utilities in the State to file net metering tariff revisions doubling the agg...

  4. Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Nevada's original net-metering law for renewable-energy systems was enacted in 1997 and amended in 2001, 2003, 2005, 2007, 2011, 2013, and 2015. Systems up to one megawatt (MW) in capacity that...

  5. Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: The program web site listed above links to the Maryland Public Service Commission's Net Metering Working Group page, which contains a variety of information resources related to the ongoing...

  6. Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    [http://nebraskalegislature.gov/FloorDocs/101/PDF/Final/LB436.pdf LB 436], signed in May 2009, established statewide net metering rules for all electric utilities in Nebraska. The rules apply to...

  7. Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The North Carolina Utilities Commission (NCUC) requires the stateís three investor-owned utilities -- Duke Energy, Progress Energy and Dominion North Carolina Power -- to make net metering...

  8. Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Net metering is available to all "qualifying facilities" (QFs), as defined by the federal Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA)*, which pertains to systems up to 80 megawatts (MW)...

  9. Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Montana's net-metering law, enacted in July 1999, applies to all customers of investor-owned utilities. Systems up to 50 kilowatts (kW) in capacity that generate electricity using solar, wind or...

  10. Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Public Service Commission of Wisconsin (PSC) issued an order on January 26, 1982 requiring all regulated utilities to file tariffs allowing net metering to customers that generate electricity...

  11. Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rhode Island allows net metering for systems up to five megawatts (MW) in capacity that are designed to generate up to 100% of the electricity that a home or other facility uses. Systems that...

  12. Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    '''''Note: In March 2011, Virginia enacted HB 1983, which increased the residential net-metering limit to 20 kW. However, residential facilities with a capacity of greater than 10 kW must pay a...

  13. Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Net metering in West Virginia is available to all retail electricity customers. System capacity limits vary depending on the customer type and electric utility type, according to the following...

  14. Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    North Dakota's net-metering policy, adopted in 1991 by the state Public Service Commission (PSC), applies to renewable-energy systems and combined heat and power (CHP) systems up to 100 kilowatts ...

  15. Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Oregon has established separate net-metering programs for the state's primary investor-owned utilities (PGE and PacifiCorp), and for its municipal utilities and electric cooperatives.

  16. Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    '''''The MPSC is reviewing state interconnection and net metering policies in [http://efile.mpsc.state.mi.us/efile/viewcase.php?casenum=15919&submit.x=... Case U-15919].'''''...

  17. Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    '''''NOTE: Legislation enacted in 2011 and 2012 (S.B. 1652, H.B. 3036, and S.B. 3811) has changed several aspects of net metering in Illinois. For customers in competitive classes as of July 1,...

  18. Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Utah law requires their only investor-owned utility, Rocky Mountain Power (RMP), and most electric cooperatives* to offer net metering to customers who generate electricity using solar energy, wind...

  19. Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Washington's net-metering law applies to systems up to 100 kilowatts (kW) in capacity that generate electricity using solar, wind, hydro, biogas from animal waste, or combined heat and power...

  20. Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    '''''Note: H.F. 729, enacted in May 2013, includes many changes to Minnesota's net metering law. These changes are described above, but most will not take effect until rules are implemented at the...

  1. Object Petri Nets Using the Nets-within-Nets Paradigm.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamburg.Universit√?¬§t

    Object Petri Nets Using the Nets-within-Nets Paradigm. R√ľdiger Valk. revised version from J√∂rg Desel, Wolfgang Reisig, and Grzegorz Rozenberg, editors, Advances in Petri Nets: Lectures on Concurrency and Petri Nets, volume 3098 of Lecture Notes in Compu- ter Science, pages 819-848. Springer-Verlag, Berlin

  2. Palau- Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Palau Net Metering Act of 2009 established net metering on the Island of Palau. Net metering was implemented in order to:

  3. Antarctic terrestrial ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walton, D.W.H.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Maritime and Continental Antarctic terrestrial ecosystems are considered in the context of environmental impacts - habitat destruction, alien introductions, and pollution. Four types of pollution are considered: nutrients, radionuclides, inert materials, and noxious chemicals. Their ability to recover from perturbation is discussed in the light of present scientific knowledge, and the methods used to control impacts are reviewed. It is concluded that techniques of waste disposal are still inadequate, adequate training in environmental and conservation principles for Antarctic personnel in many countries is lacking, and scientific investigations may be a much more serious threat than tourism to the integrity of these ecosystems. Some priorities crucial to future management are suggested.

  4. SOLAR PHYSICS AND TERRESTRIAL EFFECTS Solar-Terrestrial Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    SOLAR PHYSICS AND TERRESTRIAL EFFECTS Chapter 4 Chapter 4 Solar-Terrestrial Interactions from the charged particles that reach the planet steadily as part of the solar wind and the much it will be deflected into a circular or spiral path by the Lorentz Force. Most charged particles in the solar wind

  5. Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    '''''Note: In July 2012, the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio (PUCO) opened a docket ([http://dis.puc.state.oh.us/CaseRecord.aspx?CaseNo=12-2050-EL-ORD Case 12-0250-EL-RDR]) to review the net...

  6. 1, 167193, 2004 Terrestrial carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universitť de

    BGD 1, 167≠193, 2004 Terrestrial carbon budget at country-scale I. A. Janssens et al. Title Page Biogeosciences Discussions is the access reviewed discussion forum of Biogeosciences The carbon budget.janssens@ua.ac.be) 167 #12;BGD 1, 167≠193, 2004 Terrestrial carbon budget at country-scale I. A. Janssens et al. Title

  7. Net production of oxygen in the subtropical ocean Stephen C. Riser1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riser, Stephen C.

    LETTERS Net production of oxygen in the subtropical ocean Stephen C. Riser1 & Kenneth S. Johnson2% of the global ocean surface area, are net producers or consumers of oxygen and fixed carbon is a key uncertainty in the global carbon cycle1,2 . Direct measurements in bottle experiments indicate net oxygen con- sumption

  8. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Quantification of net primary production of Chinese

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Tonglin

    Abstract Net primary production (NPP) of terrestrial ecosystems provides food, fiber, construction to rising population and biofuel uses. Assessing national forest NPP is of importance to best use forest resources in China. To date, most estimates of NPP are based on process-based ecosystem modeling, forestry

  9. Kansas- Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kansas adopted the Net Metering and Easy Connection Act in May 2009 (see K.S.A. 66-1263 through 66-1271), establishing net metering for customers of investor-owned utilities in Kansas. Net metering...

  10. Terrestrial Carbon Observations: Protocols for Vegetation Sampling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GTOS GTOS 55 Terrestrial Carbon Observations: Protocols for Vegetation Sampling and Data Submission Shashi Verma #12;(intentionally blank) #12;Terrestrial Carbon Observations: Protocols for Vegetation Forestry University, Bejing 100083, China 5 University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 6 Microsoft Research

  11. MathNetMathNetMathNet Mathematical Preprint ServersMathematical Preprint Servers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MathNetMathNetMathNet Mathematical Preprint ServersMathematical Preprint Servers Jonas GomesIMPA - Rio de Janeiro #12;MathNetMathNetMathNet Preprint ServerPreprint Server ·· What is a Preprint server;MathNetMathNetMathNet Preprint ServerPreprint Server ·· DatabaseDatabase ·· Store preprints

  12. Avista Utilities- Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Idaho does not have a statewide net-metering policy. However, each of the state's three investor-owned utilities -- Avista Utilities, Idaho Power and Rocky Mountain Power -- has developed a net...

  13. Idaho Power- Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Idaho does not have a statewide net-metering policy. However, each of the state's three investor-owned utilities -- Avista Utilities, Idaho Power and Rocky Mountain Power -- has developed a net...

  14. Progress Energy- Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In August 2009, the South Carolina Public Service Commission issued an order mandating net metering be made available by the regulated electric utilities; the order incorporates a net metering...

  15. Net Metering Rules (Arkansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Net Metering Rules are promulgated under the authority of the Arkansas Public Service Commission. These rules are created to establish rules for net energy metering and interconnection. These...

  16. Duke Energy- Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In August 2009, the South Carolina Public Service Commission issued an order mandating net metering be made available by the regulating utilities; the order incorporates a net metering settlement...

  17. Dynamics of Airfoil Separation Control Using Zero-Net Mass-Flux Forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mittal, Rajat

    Dynamics of Airfoil Separation Control Using Zero-Net Mass-Flux Forcing Reni Raju and Rajat Mittal, Gainesville, Florida 32611 DOI: 10.2514/1.37147 Zero-net mass-flux jet based control of flow separation over using zero-net mass-flux actuation can either control/delay boundary layer separation or lead to global

  18. Terrestrial and Subsurface Ecosystems Postdoctoral Appointment...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    "seeks to improve the representation of terrestrial ecosystem processes in Earth system models thereby, improving the quality of climate model projections and providing the...

  19. ORIGINAL PAPER Estimation of tree biomass, carbon pool and net primary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universitť de

    et al. 2008). Determination of carbon sequestration potential in terrestrial ecosystems throughORIGINAL PAPER Estimation of tree biomass, carbon pool and net primary production of an old Science+Business Media B.V. 2011 Abstract & Background The data on carbon pool and biomass distribution

  20. Net Energy Metering (NEM)

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the Arizona Public Service Co. (APS) request for a charge on future rooftop solar panel installations connected to the grid under the state's net energy metering (NEM)...

  1. Net Energy Billing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    All of Maine's electric utilities -- investor-owned utilities (IOUs), consumer-owned utilities (COUs), which include municipal utilities and electric cooperatives -- must offer net energy billing...

  2. kpro-net.inf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ... us and help promote the Kaypro as the best portable computer today. Any Sysop's wishing to join the K-Net please contact Steve Sanders through this system.

  3. Automatic building modeling from terrestrial laser scanning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pu, Shi

    Automatic building modeling from terrestrial laser scanning Shi Pu International Institute for Geo hard to recover 3D building structures from 2D image. Recent studies ([2] [6]) show that laser scanning imagery, airborne and terrestrial laser scanning give explicit 3D information, which enables the rapid

  4. PSEG Long Island- Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Although PSEG Long Islandís net metering policy is not governed by the Stateís net metering law, the provisions are similar to the State law. Net metering is available for residential, non-reside...

  5. Climate control of terrestrial carbon exchange across biomes and continents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi, C.; Ricciuota, D.; Goulden, M. L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    control, terrestrial carbon sequestration, temperature,on terrestrial carbon sequestration (Nemani et al 2003, Xiaodeposition and forest carbon sequestration Glob. Change

  6. Methodology for assessing coastal change using terrestrial laser scanning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsen, Michael J.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Michelangelo Project: 3D Scanning of Large Statues,Ē Proc.for terrestrial laser scanning of long cliff sections inPress). Terrestrial laser scanning based structural damage

  7. Methodology for assessing coastal change using terrestrial laser scanning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsen, Michael James

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for terrestrial laser scanning of long cliff sections inPress). Terrestrial laser scanning based structural damageresolution 3d laser scanning to slope stability studies. Ē

  8. Thermoelectrics: From Space Power Systems to Terrestrial Waste...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermoelectrics: From Space Power Systems to Terrestrial Waste Heat Recovery Applications Thermoelectrics: From Space Power Systems to Terrestrial Waste Heat Recovery Applications...

  9. Terrestrial Climate Change and Ecosystem Response Recorded in...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Terrestrial Climate Change and Ecosystem Response Recorded in Lake Sediments and Related Deposits Reconstruction of past terrestrial climate and ecosystem response relies on...

  10. Global Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crow, Ben D

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1996). Globalization in Question: International Economy andGlobalization; Justice; Poverty; Underground Economy; United

  11. Washington City Power- Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Washington City adopted a net-metering program, including interconnection procedures, in January 2008.* Net metering is available to residential and commercial customers that generate electricity...

  12. Earth and Terrestrial Planet Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobson, Seth A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The growth and composition of Earth is a direct consequence of planet formation throughout the Solar System. We discuss the known history of the Solar System, the proposed stages of growth and how the early stages of planet formation may be dominated by pebble growth processes. Pebbles are small bodies whose strong interactions with the nebula gas lead to remarkable new accretion mechanisms for the formation of planetesimals and the growth of planetary embryos. Many of the popular models for the later stages of planet formation are presented. The classical models with the giant planets on fixed orbits are not consistent with the known history of the Solar System, fail to create a high Earth/Mars mass ratio, and, in many cases, are also internally inconsistent. The successful Grand Tack model creates a small Mars, a wet Earth, a realistic asteroid belt and the mass-orbit structure of the terrestrial planets. In the Grand Tack scenario, growth curves for Earth most closely match a Weibull model. The feeding zon...

  13. DOE Manual Studies Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    There is considerable opportunity and growing technical sophistication to make terrestrial carbon sequestration both practical and effective, according to the latest carbon capture and storage "best practices" manual issued by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  14. Guam- Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Guam's Public Utilities Commission (PUC) reviewed net metering and interconnection during a regular meeting in February 2009 (Docket 08-10). Please contact the [http://www.guampuc.com/ Guam PUC]...

  15. LADWP- Net Metering (California)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    LADWP allows its customers to net meter their photovoltaic (PV), wind, and hybrid systems with a capacity of not more than one megawatt. LADWP will provide the necessary metering equipment unless...

  16. Net Metering (Ontario, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ontario's net metering regulation allows you to send electricity generated from renewable sources to the electrical grid for a credit toward your energy costs. Here's how it works. Your utility...

  17. Puerto Rico- Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Puerto Rico enacted net-metering legislation in August 2007, allowing customers of Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA) to use electricity generated by solar, wind or "other" renewable...

  18. LADWP- Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    LADWP allows its customers to net meter their photovoltaic (PV), wind, and hybrid systems with a capacity of not more than one megawatt. LADWP will provide the necessary metering equipment unless...

  19. Ashland Electric- Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 1996, Ashland adopted a net-metering program that includes simple interconnection guidelines. The program encourages the adoption of renewable-energy systems by committing the city to purchase,...

  20. Timeline for Net Requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    x By July 31 of each Forecast Year, BPA publishes all Load Following customers' Net Requirements data for the two years of the upcoming Rate Period. 17.6.1 7312010 Yes...

  1. The potential to mitigate global warming with no-tillage management is only realized when practised in the long term

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Six, J; Ogle, S M; Breidt, F J; Conant, R T; Mosier, A R; Paustian, K

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential to mitigate global warming with no-tillageNT adoption reduces the net global warming potential (GWP)soil for purposes of global warming mitigation. Our results

  2. N=2 superconformal nets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sebastiano Carpi; Robin Hillier; Yasuyuki Kawahigashi; Roberto Longo; Feng Xu

    2014-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide an Operator Algebraic approach to N=2 chiral Conformal Field Theory and set up the Noncommutative Geometric framework. Compared to the N=1 case, the structure here is much richer. There are naturally associated nets of spectral triples and the JLO cocycles separate the Ramond sectors. We construct the N=2 superconformal nets of von Neumann algebras in general, classify them in the discrete series cnets with cnet representations.

  3. RENEWABLES 2007 GLOBAL STATUS REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    RENEWABLES 2007 GLOBAL STATUS REPORT www.ren21.net #12;Renewable Energy Policy Network for the 21st renewable energy. It provides a forum for leadership and exchange in international policy processes. It bolsters appropriate policies that increase the wise use of renewable energies in developing

  4. RENEWABLES 2005 GLOBAL STATUS REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    to renewable energy. The establishment of a global policy network was embraced in the Political Declaration Research Institute Chinese Renewable Energy Industries Association China Susan McDade Energy Environment Institute Lead Author: Eric Martinotwww.ren21.net #12;Renewable Energy Policy Network for the 21st Century

  5. Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 13, 595604, 2009 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/13/595/2009/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Troch, Peter

    Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 13, 595≠604, 2009 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/13/595/2009/ © Author, Switzerland Received: 21 October 2008 ≠ Published in Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss.: 6 January 2009 Revised latitudes under the influence of climate change and resulting changes in terrestrial hydrol- ogy. Increasing

  6. Management Opportunities for Enhancing Terrestrial Carbon Dioxide Sinks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Post, W. M.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; West, Tristram O.; Liebig, Mark A.; King, Anthony W.

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential for mitigating increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations through the use of terrestrial biological carbon (C) sequestration is substantial. Here, we estimate the amount of C being sequestered by natural processes at global, North American, and national US scales. We present and quantify, where possible, the potential for deliberate human actions Ė through forestry, agriculture, and use of biomass-based fuels Ė to augment these natural sinks. Carbon sequestration may potentially be achieved through some of these activities but at the expense of substantial changes in land-use management. Some practices (eg reduced tillage, improved silviculture, woody bioenergy crops) are already being implemented because of their economic benefits and associated ecosystem services. Given their cumulative greenhouse-gas impacts, other strategies (eg the use of biochar and cellulosic bioenergy crops) require further evaluation to determine whether widespread implementation is warranted.

  7. Modeling impacts of carbon sequestration on net greenhouse gas emissions from agricultural soils in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling impacts of carbon sequestration on net greenhouse gas emissions from agricultural soils impacts of carbon sequestration on net greenhouse gas emissions from agricultural soils in China, Global Biogeochem. Cycles, 23, GB1007, doi:10.1029/2008GB003180. 1. Introduction [2] Carbon (C) sequestration has

  8. 2007 NET SYSTEM POWER REPORT STAFFREPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION 2007 NET SYSTEM POWER REPORT STAFFREPORT April 2008 CEC-200 .................................................................................................................. 1 Net System Power Findings.............................................................................................. 4 Net System Power and Sources of California Electric Generation

  9. Geosci. Model Dev., 5, 185191, 2012 www.geosci-model-dev.net/5/185/2012/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universitť de

    12Carnegie Institution of Washington, Department of Global Ecology, 260 Panama St., Stanford, CA the Supplement to include these new reconstructions and correct a minor typographic error in the net radiative

  10. Global energy and global precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    terms) Atmosphere Net top of atmosphere incoming flux (N) 1 W/m2 Net surface flux (Rs) 100 W/m2 Sensible fluxes must sum to zero. Thus: S+LP+N-Rs=0 So LP=Rs-N-S 80 W/m2 (convert to Kg/m2/day by scaling by ~ 0? Atmosphere Change in Net top of atmosphere incoming flux ( N) 4 W/m2 Change in Net surface flux ( Rs) 1 W/m2

  11. MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, Andrew

    indicate that carbon sequestration by terrestrial ecosystems in a world with an atmosphere richer in carbonMIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change Consequences of Considering Carbon/Nitrogen Interactions on the Feedbacks between Climate and the Terrestrial Carbon Cycle Andrei P. Sokolov, David W

  12. Carbon Sequestration and Its Role in the Global Carbon Cycle Geophysical Monograph Series 183

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    73 Carbon Sequestration and Its Role in the Global Carbon Cycle Geophysical Monograph Series 183. Blaine Metting2 The purpose of this chapter is to review terrestrial biological carbon sequestration Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington, USA. #12;74 TERRESTRIAL BIOLOGICAL CARBON SEqUESTRATION

  13. The Net Environmental Effects of Carbon Dioxide Reduction Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of policy measures have been proposed to reduce the emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2). However, policies which reduce CO2 emissions will also decrease the emissions of greenhouse-relevant gases methane are overlooked the net effect of CO2 reduction policies on global warming is understated. Thus, emissions of all

  14. N. Mariana Islands- Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: The Commonwealth Utility Corporation issued a moratorium on net metering. However, Public Law 18-62 signed September 6, 2014 states that net metering should be available to all residential...

  15. Rocky Mountain Power- Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Idaho does not have a statewide net-metering policy. However, each of the state's three investor-owned utilities -- Avista Utilities, Idaho Power and Rocky Mountain Power -- has a net-metering...

  16. SCE&G- Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In August 2009, the South Carolina Public Service Commission issued an order mandating net metering be made available by the regulated electric utilities; the order incorporates a net metering...

  17. Globalization Nationalized

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazlish, Bruce

    Globalism and globalization have been seen as competitors to other allegiances, namely regionalism and nationalism. A look at recent efforts at reconceptualizing global history in China, Korea and the U.S., however, suggests ...

  18. Center for Research on Enhancing Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Center for Research on Enhancing Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems Personnel. Blaine Metting #12;vii Abstract The Center for Research on Enhancing Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial needed to evaluate the feasibility of environmentally sound strategies for enhancing carbon sequestration

  19. Petri Nets (for Planners) ICAPS 2009 --

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haslum, Patrik

    Petri Nets (for Planners) ICAPS 2009 -- Introduction 1-Safe Petri Nets: Basic Definitions Transition Systems Petri Nets Petri Nets for Planning Unfolding Transition Systems Products and Petri Nets in Product Systems Directed Unfolding Planning via Unfolding & Concurrency From Planning Problem to Petri Net

  20. Understanding and predicting global leaf phenology using satellite observations of vegetation†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caldararu, Silvia

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Leaf phenology refers to the timing of leaf life cycle events and is essential to our understanding of the earth system as it impacts the terrestrial carbon and water cycles and indirectly global climate through changes ...

  1. The Behaviour ofIodine in the Terrestrial Environment.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Behaviour ofIodine in the Terrestrial Environment. An Investigation of the Possible Roskilde, Denmark Febtuary 1990 #12;1 RisÝ-M-2851 THE BEHAVIOUR OF IODINE IN THE TERRESTRIAL ENVIRONMENT influence the migration behaviour of iodine in the terrestrial environment. It is stated that the organic

  2. Gainful Employment Program Information Certificate Name Global Health 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scharfstein, Daniel

    Credential Level PostBaccalaureate Certificate Occupations and SOC Codes View O*Net occupational profiles countries and interested in expanding their global health skills and knowledge. It is also offered

  3. Impact of satellite based PAR on estimates of terrestrial net primary productivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montana, University of

    ), as derived from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) observations on TIROS-N, was used) is the rate at which plants capture and store atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) to generate oxygen and energy is released back into the atmosphere, representing the use of a small part of the stored energy

  4. North American Carbon Program (NACP) Regional Interim Synthesis: Terrestrial Biospheric Model Intercomparision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huntzinger, Deborah [University of Michigan; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Michalak, Anna [University of Michigan; West, Tristram O. [Joint Global Change Research Institute, PNNL; Jacobson, Andrew [NOAA ESRL and CIRES; Baker, Ian [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Chen, Jing M. [University of Toronto; Davis, Kenneth [Pennsylvania State University; Hayes, Daniel J [ORNL; Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Jain, Atul [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Liu, Shuguang [United States Geological Survey, Center for Earth Resources Observation and Science (USGS EROS); Mcguire, David [University of Alaska; Neilson, Ronald [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Poulter, Ben [Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Potsdam, Germany; Tian, Hanqin [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Tomelleri, Enrico [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry; Viovy, Nicolas [National Center for Scientific Research, Gif-sur-Yvette, France; Xiao, Jingfeng [Purdue University; Cook, Robert B [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding of carbon exchange between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere can be improved through direct observations and experiments, as well as through modeling activities. Terrestrial biosphere models (TBMs) have become an integral tool for extrapolating local observations and understanding to much larger terrestrial regions. Although models vary in their specific goals and approaches, their central role within carbon cycle science is to provide a better understanding of the mechanisms currently controlling carbon exchange. Recently, the North American Carbon Program (NACP) organized several interim-synthesis activities to evaluate and inter-compare models and observations at local to continental scales for the years 2000-2005. Here, we compare the results from the TBMs collected as part of the regional and continental interim-synthesis (RCIS) activities. The primary objective of this work is to synthesize and compare the 19 participating TBMs to assess current understanding of the terrestrial carbon cycle in North America. Thus, the RCIS focuses on model simulations available from analyses that have been completed by ongoing NACP projects and other recently published studies. The TBM flux estimates are compared and evaluated over different spatial (1{sup o} x 1{sup o} and spatially aggregated to different regions) and temporal (monthly and annually) scales. The range in model estimates of net ecosystem productivity (NEP) for North America is much narrower than estimates of productivity or respiration, with estimates of NEP varying between -0.7 and 2.2 PgC yr{sup -1}, while gross primary productivity and heterotrophic respiration vary between 12.2 and 32.9 PgC yr{sup -1} and 5.6 and 13.2 PgC yr{sup -1}, respectively. The range in estimates from the models appears to be driven by a combination of factors, including the representation of photosynthesis, the source and of environmental driver data and the temporal variability of those data, as well as whether nutrient limitation is considered in soil carbon decomposition. The disagreement in current estimates of carbon flux across North America, including whether North America is a net biospheric carbon source or sink, highlights the need for further analysis through the use of model runs following a common simulation protocol, in order to isolate the influences of model formulation, structure, and assumptions on flux estimates.

  5. Net Metering (New Brunswick, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The NB Power Net Metering program provides customers with the option to connect their own environmentally sustainable generation unit to NB Power's distribution system. The program allows customers...

  6. Road to Net Zero (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glover, B.

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A PowerPoint presentation on NREL's Research Support Facility (RSF) and the road to achieving net zero energy for new construction.

  7. Interleaving Semantics of Petri Nets Concurrency Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    √Ābrah√°m, Erika

    Interleaving Semantics of Petri Nets Concurrency Theory Interleaving Semantics of Petri Nets Joost/47 Interleaving Semantics of Petri Nets Overview 1 Introduction 2 Basic net concepts 3 The interleaving semantics of Petri nets 4 Sequential runs 5 Summary Joost-Pieter Katoen and Thomas Noll Concurrency Theory 2

  8. Weekly Blender Net Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 Oil demand expected toallBlender Net

  9. Feasibility of Achieving a Zero-Net-Energy, Zero-Net-Cost Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feasibility of Achieving a Zero-Net-Energy, Zero-Net-Cost Homes 1 fey, 1David Feasibility of Achieving a ZeroNetEnergy, ZeroNetCost Homes 1 #12;2 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The material reduction, by requiring design entries to meet "zero net energy" and "zero net cost" criteria

  10. EHS-Net Cooling Study EHS-Net Cooling Study Protocol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EHS-Net Cooling Study 1 EHS-Net Cooling Study Protocol 1. Title EHS-Net Cooling Study 2. Research (EHS-Net) special study. EHS-Net is a collaboration involving the Centers for Disease Control confirmed foodborne outbreaks in the US (unpublished FoodNet data). These data clearly indicate

  11. 1, 275309, 2004 Net ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universitť de

    respiration rates are 5 Ķmol m-2 s-1 . Net annual sequestration of carbon (C) was estimated at 1.7 (Ī0.5) ton the short intense growing season. The associated cost to the sequestration of carbon may be another C ha-1 in 2001. The net carbon exchange of the forest was extremely sensitive to small changes

  12. Global integrated drought monitoring and prediction system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimball, Sarah

    for a global drought early warning system1 . Drought effects are incremental and happen over a long period food to avoid food crises requires advanced drought early warning and prediction systems. In particular for International Development (USAID) Famine Early Warning System Network (FEWS Net)11 , United States Drought

  13. Wednesday, 21 September Global Energy Challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Imamoglu, Atac

    Wuppertal Net Zero Energy Buildings ≠ Definition, Load Matching and Grid Interaction 10:30 ≠ 11:10 Jan #12;Thursday, 22 September Session 3 Smart Energy Strategies for Buildings and Cities 09:00 ≠ 09Wednesday, 21 September Session 1 Global Energy Challenges: Demand, Access, Environment

  14. Frontiers in Global Change Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frontiers in Global Change Seminar Series Aerosol-Cloud Interactions: The Elusive Component particles ("aerosols") exert a net cooling effect by directly scattering and absorption of solar radiation (the "aerosol direct climatic effect"). Aerosols also affect clouds by acting as the seed for droplet

  15. WSDOT highway maintenance: environmental compliance for protected terrestrial species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OíBrien, Tracie; Carey, Marion; Forrester, Bret

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the WSDOT Highway Maintenance: Environmental Complianceand the Highway Maintenance Manual for Terrestrial Species.to impacts from routine maintenance activities. In response

  16. accumulating terrestrial plant: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Keith Green, Megan Murphy, Jenna Pathways for Terrestrial Vertebrates. In Carlton, J., G. Ruiz, and R. Mack (Eds.), Invasive species: vectors and management strategies (pp....

  17. Terrestrial applications of the heatpipe power system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houts, M.G.; Poston, D.I.

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A terrestrial reactor that uses the same design approach as the Heatpipe Power System (HPS) may have applications both on earth and on other planetary surfaces. The baseline HPS is a potential, near-term, low-cost space fission power system. The system will be composed of independent modules, and all components operate within the existing database. The HPS has relatively few system integration issues; thus, the successful development of a module is a significant step toward verifying system feasibility and performance estimates. A prototypic, refractory-metal HPS module is being fabricated, and testing is scheduled to begin in November 1996. A successful test will provide high confidence that the HPS can achieve its predicted performance. An HPS incorporating superalloys will be better suited for some terrestrial or planetary applications. Fabrication and testing of a superalloy HPS module should be less challenging than that of the refractory metal module. A superalloy HPS core capable of delivering > 100 kWt to a power conversion subsystem could be fabricated for about $500k (unfueled). Tests of the core with electric heat (used to simulate heat from fission) could demonstrate normal and off-normal operation of the core, including the effects of heatpipe failure. A power conversion system also could be coupled to the core to demonstrate full system operation.

  18. Courtesy of Sandro Ierovante Distributed by WWW.LENSINC.NET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleinfeld, David

    Courtesy of Sandro Ierovante Distributed by WWW.LENSINC.NET #12;Distributed by WWW.LENSINC.NET #12;Distributed by WWW.LENSINC.NET #12;Distributed by WWW.LENSINC.NET #12;Distributed by WWW.LENSINC.NET #12;Distributed by WWW.LENSINC.NET #12;Distributed by WWW.LENSINC.NET #12;Distributed by WWW.LENSINC.NET #12

  19. Global Cooling: Effect of Urban Albedo on Global Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, Hashem; Menon, Surabi; Rosenfeld, Arthur

    2007-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In many urban areas, pavements and roofs constitute over 60% of urban surfaces (roof 20-25%, pavements about 40%). The roof and the pavement albedo can be increased by about 0.25 and 0.10, respectively, resulting in a net albedo increase for urban areas of about 0.1. Many studies have demonstrated building cooling-energy savings in excess of 20% upon raising roof reflectivity from an existing 10-20% to about 60%. We estimate U.S. potential savings in excess of $1 billion (B) per year in net annual energy bills. Increasing albedo of urban surfaces can reduce the summertime urban temperature and improve the urban air quality. Increasing the urban albedo has the added benefit of reflecting more of the incoming global solar radiation and countering the effect of global warming. We estimate that increasing albedo of urban areas by 0.1 results in an increase of 3 x 10{sup -4} in Earth albedo. Using a simple global model, the change in air temperature in lowest 1.8 km of the atmosphere is estimated at 0.01K. Modelers predict a warming of about 3K in the next 60 years (0.05K/year). Change of 0.1 in urban albedo will result in 0.01K global cooling, a delay of {approx}0.2 years in global warming. This 0.2 years delay in global warming is equivalent to 10 Gt reduction in CO2 emissions.

  20. SESILwww.nordSESIL.net NordSESIL.net

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Nord SESILwww.nordSESIL.net Many communities in the Nordic region have: · remote locations · small populations · isolated energy systems · high enegy costs · high relative energy demands (heating

  1. Conformal nets II: conformal blocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arthur Bartels; Christopher L. Douglas; Andrť Henriques

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Conformal nets provide a mathematical formalism for conformal field theory. Associated to a conformal net with finite index, we give a construction of the `bundle of conformal blocks', a representation of the mapping class groupoid of closed topological surfaces into the category of finite-dimensional projective Hilbert spaces. We also construct infinite-dimensional spaces of conformal blocks for topological surfaces with smooth boundary. We prove that the conformal blocks satisfy a factorization formula for gluing surfaces along circles, and an analogous formula for gluing surfaces along intervals. We use this interval factorization property to give a new proof of the modularity of the category of representations of a conformal net.

  2. Twentieth-Century Droughts and Their Impacts on Terrestrial Carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Jingfeng

    Twentieth-Century Droughts and Their Impacts on Terrestrial Carbon Cycling in China Jingfeng Xiao droughts had significant effects on terrestrial carbon cycling in China, although future studies should Lafayette, Indiana @ Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China

  3. LOCOMOTION (TERRESTRIAL AND AERIAL) AND COMMUNICATION OF AUTONOMOUS ROBOT NETWORKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    , flying robots, micro-air vehicles, robot communication, autonomous robot networks. #12;2 1. TERRESTRIAL1 LOCOMOTION (TERRESTRIAL AND AERIAL) AND COMMUNICATION OF AUTONOMOUS ROBOT NETWORKS Arvin Agah vehicles, next generation robotic platforms, platform mechanics and materials, winterization of robotic

  4. Ice Storm Damage Greater Along the Terrestrial-Aquatic Interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kraft, Clifford E.

    Ice Storm Damage Greater Along the Terrestrial-Aquatic Interface in Forested Landscapes Andrew A- tems. In 1998, a severe ice storm damaged over ten million hectares of forest across northern New York investigated the spatial arrangement of forest damage at the terrestrial-aquatic interface, an ecological edge

  5. China-US Collaborative Research on Life in Terrestrial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Symposium: China-US Collaborative Research on Life in Terrestrial Geothermal Springs Information, Agenda, and Abstracts June 26-28, 2013, Kunming, China #12;Symposium: China-US Collaborative Research on Life in Terrestrial Geothermal Springs Kunming, China June 26-28, 2013 Information, Agenda

  6. Slide 1 (of 42) Observations of Terrestrial Planet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shumway, John

    formation epoch and occurrence rate of rocky terrestrial planets around solar- and intermediate- mass Observatory/Lynette Cook Zuckerman et al. (2008) #12;Slide 6 (of 42) What does Terrestrial mean 42) HD 15407A Gemini Observatory/Lynette Cook Melis et al. 2010, ApJ Letters #12;Slide 16 (of 42

  7. Solar magnetic fields and terrestrial climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georgieva, Katya; Kirov, Boian

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar irradiance is considered one of the main natural factors affecting terrestrial climate, and its variations are included in most numerical models estimating the effects of natural versus anthropogenic factors for climate change. Solar wind causing geomagnetic disturbances is another solar activity agent whose role in climate change is not yet fully estimated but is a subject of intense research. For the purposes of climate modeling, it is essential to evaluate both the past and the future variations of solar irradiance and geomagnetic activity which are ultimately due to the variations of solar magnetic fields. Direct measurements of solar magnetic fields are available for a limited period, but can be reconstructed from geomagnetic activity records. Here we present a reconstruction of total solar irradiance based on geomagnetic data, and a forecast of the future irradiance and geomagnetic activity relevant for the expected climate change.

  8. 2004 NET SYSTEM POWER CALCULATION COMMISSIONREPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION 2004 NET SYSTEM POWER CALCULATION COMMISSIONREPORT April 2005 CEC-300 on net system power [Senate Bill 1305, (Sher), Chapter 796, Statute of 1997]1 . Net system power in California. Net system power plays a role in California's retail disclosure program, which requires every

  9. Global aspects of radiation memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Winicour

    2014-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Gravitational radiation has a memory effect represented by a net change in the relative positions of test particles. Both the linear and nonlinear sources proposed for this radiation memory are of the "electric" type, or E mode, as characterized by the even parity of the polarization pattern. Although "magnetic" type, or B mode, radiation memory is mathematically possible, no physically realistic source has been identified. There is an electromagnetic counterpart to radiation memory in which the velocity of charged particles obtain a net "kick". Again, the physically realistic sources of electromagnetic radiation memory that have been identified are of the electric type. In this paper, a global null cone description of the electromagnetic field is applied to establish the non-existence of B mode radiation memory and the non-existence of E mode radiation memory due to a bound charge distribution.

  10. Valley Electric Association- Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Board of Directors for Valley Electric Association (VEA) approved net metering in April 2008. The rules apply to systems up to 30 kW, though owners of larger systems may be able to negotiate...

  11. Net Zero Energy Installations (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booth, S.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A net zero energy installation (NZEI) is one that produces as much energy from on-site renewable sources as it consumes. NZEI assessment provides a systematic approach to energy projects.

  12. Austin Energy- Net Metering (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Austin Energy, the municipal utility of Austin Texas, offers net metering for renewable energy systems up to 20 kilowatts (kW) to its non-residential retail electricity customers. The definition of...

  13. NET-ZERO CARBON MANUFACTURING AT NET-ZERO COST Dustin Pohlman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kissock, Kelly

    1 NET-ZERO CARBON MANUFACTURING AT NET-ZERO COST Dustin Pohlman Industrial Assessment Center energy in manufacturing plants that results in net-zero carbon emissions at net-zero costs. The paper begins by reviewing the economics of net- zero energy buildings and discussing why a different approach

  14. EHS-Net Tomato Handling Study EHS-Net Tomato Handling Study Protocol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EHS-Net Tomato Handling Study 1 EHS-Net Tomato Handling Study Protocol I. Project Overview Title EHS-Net Tomato Handling Study Protocol Summary Few studies have examined in detail the nature Health Specialists Network (EHS-Net) special study. EHS- Net is a collaboration involving the Centers

  15. Generating Code Structures for Petri NetBased Agent Interaction Protocols Using Net Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamburg.Universit√?¬§t

    Generating Code Structures for Petri Net­Based Agent Interaction Protocols Using Net Components@informatik.uni­hamburg.de July 31, 2003 Abstract In this paper we introduce a straight forward approach for generating Petri Net of net components which provide basic tasks and the structure for Petri Nets. Agent interaction protocol

  16. Generating Code Structures for Petri Net-Based Agent Interaction Protocols Using Net Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamburg.Universit√?¬§t

    Generating Code Structures for Petri Net-Based Agent Interaction Protocols Using Net Components@informatik.uni-hamburg.de March 31, 2004 Abstract In this paper we introduce a straight forward approach for generating Petri Net of net components which provide basic tasks and the structure for Petri Nets. Agent interaction protocol

  17. THE COMPOSITIONAL DIVERSITY OF EXTRASOLAR TERRESTRIAL PLANETS. II. MIGRATION SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter-Bond, Jade C. [School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Kensington, NSW 2052 (Australia); O'Brien, David P. [Planetary Science Institute, 1700 East Fort Lowell, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Raymond, Sean N., E-mail: j.bond@unsw.edu.au [Observatoire Aquitain des Sciences de l'Univers, Universite de Bordeaux, 2 rue de l'Observatoire, BP 89, F-33271 Floirac Cedex (France)

    2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Prior work has found that a variety of terrestrial planetary compositions are expected to occur within known extrasolar planetary systems. However, such studies ignored the effects of giant planet migration, which is thought to be very common in extrasolar systems. Here we present calculations of the compositions of terrestrial planets that formed in dynamical simulations incorporating varying degrees of giant planet migration. We used chemical equilibrium models of the solid material present in the disks of five known planetary host stars: the Sun, GJ 777, HD4203, HD19994, and HD213240. Giant planet migration has a strong effect on the compositions of simulated terrestrial planets as the migration results in large-scale mixing between terrestrial planet building blocks that condensed at a range of temperatures. This mixing acts to (1) increase the typical abundance of Mg-rich silicates in the terrestrial planets' feeding zones and thus increase the frequency of planets with Earth-like compositions compared with simulations with static giant planet orbits, and (2) drastically increase the efficiency of the delivery of hydrous phases (water and serpentine) to terrestrial planets and thus produce waterworlds and/or wet Earths. Our results demonstrate that although a wide variety of terrestrial planet compositions can still be produced, planets with Earth-like compositions should be common within extrasolar planetary systems.

  18. The significance of the erosion-induced terrestrial carbonsink

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berhe, A.A.; Harte, J.; Harden, J.W.; Torn, M.S.

    2006-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Estimating carbon (C) balance in erosional and depositionallandscapes is complicated by the effects of soil redistribution on bothnet primary productivity (NPP) and decomposition. Recent studies arecontradictory as to whether soil erosion does or does not constitute a Csink. Here we clarify the conceptual basis for how erosion can constitutea C sink. Specifically, the criterion for an erosional C sink is thatdynamic replacement of eroded C, and reduced decomposition rates indepositional sites, must together more than compensate for erosionallosses. This criterion is in fact met in many erosional settings, andthus erosion and deposition can make a net positive contribution to Csequestration. We show that, in a cultivated Mississippi watershed and acoastal California watershed, the magnitude of the erosion-induced C sinkis likely to be on the order of 1 percent of NPP and 16 percent of erodedC. Although soil erosion has serious environmental impacts, the annualerosion-induced C sink offsets up to 10 percent of the global fossil fuelemissions of carbon dioxide for 2005.

  19. Factors associated with mosquito net use by individuals in households owning nets in Ethiopia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graves, Patricia M; Ngondi, Jeremiah M; Hwang, Jimee; Getachew, Asefaw; Gebre, Teshome; Mosher, Aryc W; Patterson, Amy E; Shargie, Estifanos B; Tadesse, Zerihun; Wolkon, Adam; Reithinger, Richard; Emerson, Paul M; Richards, Frank O Jr

    2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract Background Ownership of insecticidal mosquito nets has dramatically increased in Ethiopia since 2006, but the proportion of persons with access to such nets who use them has declined. It is important to understand individual level net use...

  20. Net ecosystem production: A comprehensive measure of net carbon accumulation by ecosystems.†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Randerson, J. T; Chapin, F. S; Harden, J. W; Neff, J. C; Harmon, M. E

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and F A. Bazzaz. August 2002 NET ECOSYSTEM PRODUCTION 1993.Net exchange of CO2 in a mid-latitude forest. ScienceN. , and E. -D. Schulze. 1999. Net CO, and H,O fluxes from

  1. import java.io.IOException; import java.net.URI;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricci, Laura

    import java.io.IOException; import java.net.URI; import java.util.Enumeration; import net.jxta.discovery.DiscoveryService; import net.jxta.document.AdvertisementFactory; import net.jxta.document.Element; import net.jxta.document.MimeMediaType; import net.jxta.document.StructuredDocument; import net.jxta.document.StructuredDocumentFactory; import

  2. BABCOCK INSTITUTE DISCUSSION PAPER An Evaluation of The Impact of Globalization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    Demand Factors 4 Supply Factors 4 WILD CARDS 7 Currency (Exchange rates) 7 Oil Price 8 Shift to Lower forecasts that net global import demand for dairy products will grow faster than net export supply at least through the next decade. The strong import demand growth is projected to come mainly from develop- ing

  3. World Net Nuclear Electric Power Generation, 1980-2007 - Datasets...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    U.S. Energy Information ... World Net Nuclear Electric ... Dataset Activity Stream World Net Nuclear Electric Power Generation, 1980-2007 International data showing world net...

  4. Conference for Biomass and Energy, Copenhagen, 1996 published by Elsevier BIOMASS ENERGY PRODUCTION: THE GLOBAL POTENTIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keeling, Stephen L.

    9th Conference for Biomass and Energy, Copenhagen, 1996 ≠ published by Elsevier 1 BIOMASS ENERGY PRODUCTION: THE GLOBAL POTENTIAL AND THE NET INFLUENCE ON THE CO2 CONCENTRATION G. AHAMER Austrian Federal

  5. Isotope powered Stirling generator for terrestrial applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tingey, G.L.; Sorensen, G.C. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Ross, B.A. [Stirling Technology Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electric power supply, small enough to be man-portable, is being developed for remote, terrestrial applications. This system is designed for an operating lifetime of five years without maintenance or refueling. A small Radioisotope Stirling Generator (RSG) has been developed. The energy source of the generator is a 60 watt plutonium-238 fuel clad used in the General Purpose Heat Sources (GPHS) developed for space applications. A free piston Stirling Engine drives a linear alternator to convert the heat to power. The system weighs about 7.5 kg and produces 11 watts AC power with a conversion efficiency of 18.5%. Two engine models have been designed, fabricated, and tested to date: (a) a developmental model instrumented to confirm and test parameters, and (b) an electrically heated model with an electrical heater equipped power input leads. Critical components have been tested for 10,000 to 20,000 hours. One complete generator has been operating for over 11,000 hours. Radioisotope heated prototypes are expected to be fabricated and tested in late 1995.

  6. Hybrid APNT: Terrestrial Radionavigation to Support Future Aviation Needs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    University and the director of the Stanford GPS Laboratory. 1. INTRODUCTION The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Alternative Positioning Navigation & Timing (APNT) program is developing and examining1 Hybrid APNT: Terrestrial Radionavigation to Support Future Aviation Needs Sherman Lo, Yu

  7. Remote sensing of terrestrial tropospheric aerosols from aircraft and satellites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Remote sensing of terrestrial tropospheric aerosols from aircraft and satellites M I Mishchenko1 instruments suitable for aerosol remote sensing and give examples of aerosol retrievals obtained forcing directly by absorbing and reflecting sunlight, thereby cooling or heating the atmosphere

  8. The Goal of Net Zero

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronquillo, M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Goal of Net Zero CATEE 2014 Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference Andrew T. Cronberg, PE Interim Water Director City of Fort Worth, Texas November 19, 2014 Dallas, Texas ESL-KT-14-11-47 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency... Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 ē10 Journey to Net Zero began in the 1960ís ēDigester Gas fueled Engine Blowers & Generators ēSome heat recovery for anaerobic digesters ESL-KT-14-11-47 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas...

  9. NetCDF at NERSC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparency VisitSilverNepheline crystallization inNetCDF NetCDF

  10. Economic and Physical Modeling of Land Use in GCAM 3.0 and an Application to Agricultural Productivity, Land, and Terrestrial Carbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wise, Marshall A.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Kyle, G. Page; Luckow, Patrick; Edmonds, James A.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the impact of changes in agricultural productivity on global land use and terrestrial carbon using the new agriculture and land use modeling approach developed for Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM) version 3.0. This approach models economic land use decisions with regional, physical, and technological specificity while maintaining economic and physical integration with the rest of the GCAM model. Physical land characteristics and quantities are tracked explicitly, and crop production practices are modeled discretely to facilitate coupling with physical models. Economic land allocation is modeled with non-linear functions in a market equilibrium rather than through a constrained optimization. In this paper, we explore three scenarios of future agriculture productivity in all regions of the globe over this century, ranging from a high growth to a zero growth level. The higher productivity growth scenario leads to lower crop prices, increased production of crops in developing nations, preservation of global forested lands and lower terrestrial carbon emissions. The scenario with no productivity improvement results in higher crop prices, an expansion of crop production in the developed world, loss of forested lands globally, and higher terrestrial carbon emissions.

  11. Ocean Sci., 3, 461482, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/461/2007/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Ocean Sci., 3, 461­482, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/461/2007/ © Author(s) 2007. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Ocean Science Effects of mesoscale eddies on global ocean Environment Laboratories, International Atomic Energy Agency, Monaco *now at: Institute of Biogeochemistry

  12. Cosmic Rays and Global Warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sloan, T. [Physics Department, University of Lancaster, Lancaster, UK (United Kingdom); Wolfendale, A. W. [Physics Department, Durham University, Durham (United Kingdom)

    2008-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Some workers have claimed that the observed temporal correlations of (low level) terrestrial cloud cover with the cosmic ray intensity changes, due to solar modulation, are causal. The possibility arises, therefore, of a connection between cosmic rays and Global Warming. If true, the implications would be very great. We have examined this claim in some detail. So far, we have not found any evidence in support and so our conclusions are to doubt it. From the absence of corroborative evidence we estimate that less than 15% at the 95% confidence level, of the 11-year cycle warming variations are due to cosmic rays and less than 2% of the warming over the last 43 years is due to this cause. The origin of the correlation itself is probably the cycle of solar irradiance although there is, as yet, no certainty.

  13. Cosmic Rays and Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Sloan; A W Wolfendale

    2007-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been claimed by others that observed temporal correlations of terrestrial cloud cover with `the cosmic ray intensity' are causal. The possibility arises, therefore, of a connection between cosmic rays and Global Warming. If true, the implications would be very great. We have examined this claim to look for evidence to corroborate it. So far we have not found any and so our tentative conclusions are to doubt it. Such correlations as appear are more likely to be due to the small variations in solar irradiance, which, of course, correlate with cosmic rays. We estimate that less than 15% of the 11-year cycle warming variations are due to cosmic rays and less than 2% of the warming over the last 35 years is due to this cause.

  14. Tidal heating in multilayered terrestrial exoplanets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henning, Wade G.; Hurford, Terry, E-mail: wade.g.henning@nasa.gov [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The internal pattern and overall magnitude of tidal heating for spin-synchronous terrestrial exoplanets from 1 to 2.5 R{sub E} is investigated using a propagator matrix method for a variety of layer structures. Particular attention is paid to ice-silicate hybrid super-Earths, where a significant ice mantle is modeled to rest atop an iron-silicate core, and may or may not contain a liquid water ocean. We find multilayer modeling often increases tidal dissipation relative to a homogeneous model, across multiple orbital periods, due to the ability to include smaller volume low viscosity regions, and the added flexure allowed by liquid layers. Gradations in parameters with depth are explored, such as allowed by the Preliminary Earth Reference Model. For ice-silicate hybrid worlds, dramatically greater dissipation is possible beyond the case of a silicate mantle only, allowing non-negligible tidal activity to extend to greater orbital periods than previously predicted. Surface patterns of tidal heating are found to potentially be useful for distinguishing internal structure. The influence of ice mantle depth and water ocean size and position are shown for a range of forcing frequencies. Rates of orbital circularization are found to be 10-100 times faster than standard predictions for Earth-analog planets when interiors are moderately warmer than the modern Earth, as well as for a diverse range of ice-silicate hybrid super-Earths. Circularization rates are shown to be significantly longer for planets with layers equivalent to an ocean-free modern Earth, as well as for planets with high fractions of either ice or silicate melting.

  15. Long Island Power Authority- Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    : Note: In October 2012 the LIPA Board of Trustees adopted changes to the utility's net metering tariff that permit remote net metering for non-residential solar and wind energy systems, and farm...

  16. AN ECONOMETRIC ANALYSIS OF NET INVESTMENT IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOTES AN ECONOMETRIC ANALYSIS OF NET INVESTMENT IN GULF SHRIMP FISHING VESSELS1 The major capital to the Gulf shrimp fishery. The purpose of this study is to estimate an econometric model of annual real net

  17. City of St. George- Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The St. George City Council adopted a [http://www.sgcity.org/wp/power/NetMeteringPolicy.pdf net-metering program for area utilities], including interconnection procedures, in October 2005.* The...

  18. Feasibility of Achieving Net-Zero-Energy Net-Zero-Cost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Feasibility of Achieving Net- Zero-Energy Net-Zero-Cost Homes I.S. Walker, Al-Beaini, SSimjanovic,JohnStanley,BretStrogen,IainWalker FeasibilityofAchieving ZeroNetEnergy,Zero NetCostHomes #12;4 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

  19. Using WordNet to Extend FrameNet Coverage Richard Johansson and Pierre Nugues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nugues, Pierre

    Using WordNet to Extend FrameNet Coverage Richard Johansson and Pierre Nugues Department to address the prob- lem of sparsity in the FrameNet lexical database. The first method is based on the idea using a WordNet- based variant of the Lesk metric. The sec- ond method uses the sequence of synsets

  20. .NET DEVELOPER PROGRAM A ten-week comprehensive program covering Microsoft .NET technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaefer, Marcus

    .NET DEVELOPER PROGRAM A ten-week comprehensive program covering Microsoft¬ģ .NET technologies DePaul University's .NET Developer Program is designed to provide programmers with an intensive and comprehensive introduction to all essential aspects of the technologies, techniques and principles of Microsoft .NET

  1. Algebraic Higher-Order Nets: Graphs and Petri Nets as Tokens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mossakowski, Till - Deutschen Forschungszentrum f√ľr K√ľnstliche Intelligenz & Fachbereich 3

    Algebraic Higher-Order Nets: Graphs and Petri Nets as Tokens Kathrin Hoffmann1 and Till Mossakowski 2 BISS, Department of Computer Science University of Bremen Abstract. Petri nets and Algebraic High-Level Nets are well-known to model parallel and concurrent systems. In this paper, we introduce the concept

  2. Reconfigurable Nets, a Class of High Level Petri Nets Supporting Dynamic Changes?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpuente, María

    Reconfigurable Nets, a Class of High Level Petri Nets Supporting Dynamic Changes. E-mail: fjoliver@dsic.upv.es. Abstract.We introduce a class of high level Petri nets, called reconfig- urable nets, that can dynamically modify their own structure by rewrit- ing

  3. Algebraic HigherOrder Nets: Graphs and Petri Nets as Tokens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mossakowski, Till - Deutschen Forschungszentrum f√ľr K√ľnstliche Intelligenz & Fachbereich 3

    Algebraic Higher­Order Nets: Graphs and Petri Nets as Tokens Kathrin Ho#mann 1 and Till Mossakowski 2 BISS, Department of Computer Science University of Bremen Abstract. Petri nets and Algebraic High­Level Nets are well­known to model parallel and concurrent systems. In this paper, we introduce the concept

  4. The CloudNets Network Virtualization Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmid, Stefan

    Nets Network Virtualization Architecture Johannes Grassler jgrassler@inet.tu-berlin.de 05. Februar, 2014 Johannes Grassler jgrassler@inet.tu-berlin.de The CloudNets Network Virtualization Architecture #12;..... . .... . .... . ..... . .... . .... . .... . ..... . .... . .... . .... . ..... . .... . .... . .... . ..... . .... . ..... . .... . .... . Johannes Grassler jgrassler@inet.tu-berlin.de The CloudNets Network Virtualization Architecture #12

  5. 2006 NET SYSTEM POWER REPORT COMMISSIONREPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION 2006 NET SYSTEM POWER REPORT COMMISSIONREPORT April 2007 CEC-300 This report provides the California Energy Commission's annual calculation of net system power as required by state law (Public Utilities Code, § 398.1 - 398.5). The report also defines net system power

  6. Representations of Petri net interactions Pawel Sobocinski

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sobocinski, Pawel

    Representations of Petri net interactions Pawel Soboci¬īnski ECS, University of Southampton, UK Abstract. We introduce a novel compositional algebra of Petri nets, as well as a stateful extension In part owing to their intuitive graphical representation, Petri nets [28] are of- ten used both

  7. Generalised Soundness of Workflow Nets is Decidable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sidorova, Natalia

    Generalised Soundness of Workflow Nets is Decidable Kees van Hee, Natalia Sidorova, and Marc investigate the decidability of the problem of generalised soundness for Workflow nets: ``Every marking with considering simple correctness criteria for Workflow nets and reduce them to the check of structural

  8. NET SYSTEM POWER: A SMALL SHARE OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION NET SYSTEM POWER: A SMALL SHARE OF CALIFORNIA'S POWER MIX IN 2005 the California Energy Commission's annual calculation of net system power as required by state law (Public Utilities Code, ß 398.1 - 398.5). The report also defines net system power and explains how

  9. EXTENDED SIMPLE COLORED PETRI NETS: A TOOL FOR PLANT SIMULATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coglio, Alessandro

    EXTENDED SIMPLE COLORED PETRI NETS: A TOOL FOR PLANT SIMULATION Antonio Camurri and Alessandro, I­16145 Genova, Italy {music, tokamak}@dist.unige.it ABSTRACT Extended Simple Colored Petri Nets (ESCP­nets) are a new class of High­level Petri Nets conceived as a good trade­off between Petri Nets (P­nets

  10. Global Health Research | 2 Global Health Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    Global Health Research | 2 Global Health Research Supporting researchers in low- and middle-income countries to carry out health- related research within their own countries. Gl bal Health #12;3 | Global Health Research #12;Global Health Research | 4 We are a global charitable foundation dedicated

  11. Terrestrial Carbon Management Data from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    CDIAC products are indexed and searchable through a customized interface powered by ORNL's Mercury search engine. Products include numeric data packages, publications, trend data, atlases, and models and can be searched for by subject area, keywords, authors, product numbers, time periods, collection sites, spatial references, etc. Some of the collections may also be included in the CDIAC publication Trends Online: A Compendium of Global Change Data. Most data sets, many with numerous data files, are free to download from CDIAC's ftp area. Collections under the broad heading of Terrestrial Carbon Management are organized as Carbon Accumulation with Cropland Management, Carbon Accumulation with Grassland Management, Carbon Loss Following Cultivation, Carbon Accumulation Following Afforestation, and Carbon Sources and Sinks Associated with U.S. Cropland Production.

  12. DIAGNOSING, BENCHMARKING AND TRANSFORMING THE LEED CERTIFIED FIU SIPA BUILDING INTO A NET-ZERO-ENERGY BUILDING (NET-ZEB)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pala, Nezih

    INTO A NET-ZERO-ENERGY BUILDING (NET-ZEB) Thomas Spiegelhalter Florida International University-neutral or Net-Zero-Energy buildings until 2030. (1) The topic of Net-Zero-Energy-Buildings (Net-ZEBs) has the performance with passive and active strategies towards a Net-Zero-Energy Building. (Fig. 1, 2) 1.1 SIPA

  13. Understanding Global Capitalism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, William I.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sociology; globalization; political economy; development;economy fueled through 700 billion dollars injected into globalizationGlobalization Studies, also called CGS. I would economy and

  14. Terrestrial Planet Formation in Extra-Solar Planetary Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sean N. Raymond

    2008-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Terrestrial planets form in a series of dynamical steps from the solid component of circumstellar disks. First, km-sized planetesimals form likely via a combination of sticky collisions, turbulent concentration of solids, and gravitational collapse from micron-sized dust grains in the thin disk midplane. Second, planetesimals coalesce to form Moon- to Mars-sized protoplanets, also called "planetary embryos". Finally, full-sized terrestrial planets accrete from protoplanets and planetesimals. This final stage of accretion lasts about 10-100 Myr and is strongly affected by gravitational perturbations from any gas giant planets, which are constrained to form more quickly, during the 1-10 Myr lifetime of the gaseous component of the disk. It is during this final stage that the bulk compositions and volatile (e.g., water) contents of terrestrial planets are set, depending on their feeding zones and the amount of radial mixing that occurs. The main factors that influence terrestrial planet formation are the mass and surface density profile of the disk, and the perturbations from giant planets and binary companions if they exist. Simple accretion models predicts that low-mass stars should form small, dry planets in their habitable zones. The migration of a giant planet through a disk of rocky bodies does not completely impede terrestrial planet growth. Rather, "hot Jupiter" systems are likely to also contain exterior, very water-rich Earth-like planets, and also "hot Earths", very close-in rocky planets. Roughly one third of the known systems of extra-solar (giant) planets could allow a terrestrial planet to form in the habitable zone.

  15. UC Santa Cruz GlobalVillageCafe@gmail.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    at the GVC, we are committed to providing fresh, local, organic cuisine while minimizing our carbon footprint celebrate global cuisines and enhance food awareness. Please enjoy our carefully selected products chosen through food. www.slowfoodusa.org www.agroecology.org www.healthyfoodinschools.org www.fairtrade.net Find

  16. Global Warming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.NewofGeothermal Heat Pump Basics31/2007 TeppeiProgramsGlobal1

  17. Academy for Global Engagement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Academy for Global Engagement 2013-2014 Global Fellows #12;Meredith Gore and Wildlife #12;Global Research Interests · risk percepHon and public support and Agricultural Engineering #12;Global Research Interests · catalyHc conversion of biomass

  18. global warming's six indias

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, Gary L.

    global warming's six indias: An Audience Segmentation Analysis #12;Global Warming's Six Indias 1............................................................................................................................................20 2. Global Warming Beliefs and Attitudes................................................................................ 21 Knowledge about global warming varies widely by group

  19. GR Focus Review Impacts of global warming on Permo-Triassic terrestrial ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benton, Michael

    with long-term aridification and short-term bursts of warming and acid rain. Wildfires at the Permo have succumbed primarily to acid rain, mass wasting, and aridification. Plants may have been more

  20. Global terrestrial uranium supply and its policy implications : a probabilistic projection of future uranium costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthews, Isaac A

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An accurate outlook on long-term uranium resources is critical in forecasting uranium costresource relationships, and for energy policy planning as regards the development and deployment of nuclear fuel cycle alternatives. ...

  1. Isoprene emission from terrestrial ecosystems in response to global change: minding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FACE apparatus (FACEp; 707 m2 ) was constructed in 1993, 10 years after planting, on a moderate (NPP) under CO2 e may be limited by nutrient availability (Ceulemans et al., 1999; Oren et al., 2001. Although CO2 e often increases NPP, it can also result in greater losses of C (relative to CO2 a ) via soil

  2. Forest biomes are major reserves for terrestrial carbon, and major components of global primary productivity.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malhi, Yadvinder

    that encompasses land-use change processes such as forest regrowth resulting from abandon- ment of agricultural & Hall 1998), the sink is thought to be largely in the world's forests, which are large reservoirs

  3. Natural migration rates of trees: Global terrestrial carbon cycle implications. Book chapter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solomon, A.M.

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper discusses the forest-ecological processes which constrain the rate of response by forests to rapid future environmental change. It establishes a minimum response time by natural tree populations which invade alien landscapes and reach the status of a mature, closed canopy forest when maximum carbon storage is realized. It considers rare long-distance and frequent short-distance seed transport, seedling and tree establishment, sequential tree and stand maturation, and spread between newly established colonies.

  4. Climate Effects of Global Land Cover Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbard, S G; Caldeira, K; Bala, G; Phillips, T; Wickett, M

    2005-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    There are two competing effects of global land cover change on climate: an albedo effect which leads to heating when changing from grass/croplands to forest, and an evapotranspiration effect which tends to produce cooling. It is not clear which effect would dominate in a global land cover change scenario. We have performed coupled land/ocean/atmosphere simulations of global land cover change using the NCAR CAM3 atmospheric general circulation model. We find that replacement of current vegetation by trees on a global basis would lead to a global annual mean warming of 1.6 C, nearly 75% of the warming produced under a doubled CO{sub 2} concentration, while global replacement by grasslands would result in a cooling of 0.4 C. These results suggest that more research is necessary before forest carbon storage should be deployed as a mitigation strategy for global warming. In particular, high latitude forests probably have a net warming effect on the Earth's climate.

  5. Eutrophication: impacts of excess nutrient inputs on freshwater, marine, and terrestrial ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Eutrophication: impacts of excess nutrient inputs on freshwater, marine, and terrestrial ecosystems enrichment, or eutrophication, can lead to highly undesirable changes in ecosystem structure and function eutrophication in freshwater, marine, and terrestrial ecosystems. We present two brief case studies (one

  6. BIG BEAR SOLAR OBSERVATORY CENTER FOR SOLAR-TERRESTRIAL RESEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BIG BEAR SOLAR OBSERVATORY CENTER FOR SOLAR-TERRESTRIAL RESEARCH Faculty Position in Solar Physics, New Jersey Institute of Technology A tenure track faculty position in solar physics is available of NJIT's program in solar physics, visit http://solar.njit.edu. Applicants are required to have a Ph

  7. CHAPTER TWELVE Effects of Pathogens on Terrestrial Ecosystem Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eviner, Valerie

    -1-- 0-- +1-- -1-- 0-- +1-- CHAPTER TWELVE Effects of Pathogens on Terrestrial Ecosystem Function. A more limited set of studies suggests that pathogens can alter a wide range of ecosystem functions in terres- trial systems; however, we are lacking a framework to predict the type and magnitude of ecosystem

  8. Estimating terrestrial uranium and thorium by antineutrino flux measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mcdonough, William F.

    Estimating terrestrial uranium and thorium by antineutrino flux measurements Stephen T. Dye, and approved November 16, 2007 (received for review July 11, 2007) Uranium and thorium within the Earth produce of uranium and thorium concentrations in geological reservoirs relies largely on geochemi- cal model

  9. Carbon dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems on the Tibetan Plateau

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Jingfeng

    RESEARCH PAPER Carbon dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems on the Tibetan Plateau during the 20th tundra to evergreen tropics. Its soils are dominated by permafrost and are rich in organic carbon. Its, the carbon dynamics of the Tibetan Plateau have not been well quantified under changes of climate and per

  10. Threats from Climate Change to Terrestrial Vertebrate Hotspots in Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimmermann, Niklaus E.

    Threats from Climate Change to Terrestrial Vertebrate Hotspots in Europe Luigi Maiorano1 to extreme climates. Our results outline that the Mediterranean basin represents both an important hotspot change projected to occur over the coming decades, especially in the Mediterranean bioregion, posing

  11. Regional carbon dynamics in monsoon Asia and its implications for the global carbon cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGuire, A. David

    Regional carbon dynamics in monsoon Asia and its implications for the global carbon cycle Hanqin of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China c The Ecosystems Center, Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, MA 02543 Accepted 25 July 2002 Abstract Data on three major determinants of the carbon storage in terrestrial

  12. NASA Net Zero Energy Buildings Roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pless, S.; Scheib, J.; Torcellini, P.; Hendron, B.; Slovensky, M.

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In preparation for the time-phased net zero energy requirement for new federal buildings starting in 2020, set forth in Executive Order 13514, NASA requested that the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to develop a roadmap for NASA's compliance. NASA detailed a Statement of Work that requested information on strategic, organizational, and tactical aspects of net zero energy buildings. In response, this document presents a high-level approach to net zero energy planning, design, construction, and operations, based on NREL's first-hand experience procuring net zero energy construction, and based on NREL and other industry research on net zero energy feasibility. The strategic approach to net zero energy starts with an interpretation of the executive order language relating to net zero energy. Specifically, this roadmap defines a net zero energy acquisition process as one that sets an aggressive energy use intensity goal for the building in project planning, meets the reduced demand goal through energy efficiency strategies and technologies, then adds renewable energy in a prioritized manner, using building-associated, emission- free sources first, to offset the annual energy use required at the building; the net zero energy process extends through the life of the building, requiring a balance of energy use and production in each calendar year.

  13. Farmington Electric Utility System- Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Net metering rules developed by the New Mexico Public Regulation Commission (PRC) apply to the state's investor-owned utilities and electric cooperatives. Municipal utilities, which are not...

  14. Zero-Safe Nets: Modeling Transactions via Transition Synchronization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruni, Roberto

    Zero-Safe Nets: Modeling Transactions via Transition Synchronization Roberto Bruni and Ugo of the same zero-safe net. Zero-safe nets (ZS nets) have been introduced in [BM97] to provide a basic called stable places), ZS nets include a set of zero places. These are idealized resources that remain in

  15. Presented by SensorNet: The New Science of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .S. Department of Energy DeNap_SensorNet_SC10 SensorNet Collection Processing DisseminationSecurity Knowledge requirements Regulations Technology Intelligent Real world #12;3 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy DeNap_SensorNet_SC10 SensorNet SensorNet is ORNL's research in sensor network interoperability

  16. Overfitting in Neural Nets: Backpropagation, Conjugate Gradient, and Early Stopping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caruana, Rich

    Overfitting in Neural Nets: Backpropagation, Conjugate Gradient, and Early Stopping Rich Caruana is that backprop nets with excess hidden units generalize poorly. We show that nets with excess capacity generalize) Regardless of size, nets learn task subcomponents in similar sequence. Big nets pass through stages similar

  17. Partial Order Semantics of Types of Nets Robert Lorenz1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Desel, Jörg

    Partial Order Semantics of Types of Nets Robert Lorenz1 , Gabriel Juh¬īas2 , and Sebastian Mauser3 1 of types of nets. Types of nets are a parametric definition of Petri nets originally developed for a general presentation of the synthesis of Petri nets from (step) transition systems. Partial order

  18. Structural and Dynamic Changes in Concurrent Systems: Reconfigurable Petri Nets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpuente, María

    Structural and Dynamic Changes in Concurrent Systems: Reconfigurable Petri Nets Marisa Llorens subject to dynamic changes using extensions of Petri nets. We begin by introducing the notion of net rewriting system. In a net rewriting system, a system configuration is described as a Petri net and a change

  19. Executability of Scenarios in Petri Nets Robert Lorenz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Desel, Jörg

    Executability of Scenarios in Petri Nets Robert Lorenz Lehrstuhl f¨ur Angewandte Informatik whether a scenario is an execution of a Petri net. This holds for a wide variety of Petri net classes, ranging from elementary nets to general inhibitor nets. Scenarios are given by causal structures

  20. Radio emissions from terrestrial gamma-ray flashes Joseph R. Dwyer1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummer, Steven A.

    . Introduction 1.1. TGF Theory Overview [2] Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are bright bursts of gamma raysRadio emissions from terrestrial gamma-ray flashes Joseph R. Dwyer1 and Steven A. Cummer2 Received frequency (RF) emissions by terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) is developed. These radio emissions, which

  1. Measurements and implications of the relationship between lightning and terrestrial gamma ray flashes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummer, Steven A.

    the discovery of short bursts of gamma rays originating from Earth, called terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFsMeasurements and implications of the relationship between lightning and terrestrial gamma ray associated with 26 terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFs) recorded by the RHESSI satellite over the Caribbean

  2. Semi-Immersive Space Mission Design and Visualization: Case Study of the "Terrestrial Planet Finder" Mission.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Semi-Immersive Space Mission Design and Visualization: Case Study of the "Terrestrial Planet Finder of Technology Pasadena, CA 91125 Abstract This paper addresses visualization issues of the Terrestrial Planet the visualization of the Terrestrial Planet Finder Mission (TPF) as a case study to identify and analyze

  3. International Conference on Machine Control & Guidance 2008 1 Kinematic Surface Analysis by Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by Terrestrial Laser Scanning Hans-Martin ZOGG*, David GRIMM* ETH Zurich, Switzerland Abstract This paper presents terrestrial laser scanning with emphasis on kinematic surface analysis. Besides an overview of terrestrial laser scanning in general, the 2D-laser scanner SICK LMS200-30106 is introduced as well

  4. Sustainability of terrestrial carbon sequestration: A case study in Duke Forest with inversion approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLucia, Evan H.

    Sustainability of terrestrial carbon sequestration: A case study in Duke Forest with inversion of terrestrial carbon (C) sequestration is critical for the success of any policies geared toward stabilizing. Ellsworth, A. Finzi, J. Lichter, and W. H. Schlesinger, Sustainability of terrestrial carbon sequestration

  5. Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Stan D. Wullschleger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Stan D. Wullschleger://csite.eds.ornl.gov PROJECT DESCRIPTION The Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) project conducts research of switchgrass growing in the field. #12;Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) tion of inputs

  6. EHS-Net Hand Hygiene Study EHS-Net Hand Hygiene Study Protocol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EHS-Net Hand Hygiene Study 1 EHS-Net Hand Hygiene Study Protocol I. Project Overview Title EHS-Net Hand Hygiene Study Protocol Summary Good hand hygiene is of critical importance in preventing of personal hygiene policies and practices in food service establishments. The purpose of this study

  7. Net alkalinity and net acidity 2: Practical considerations Carl S. Kirby a,*, Charles A. Cravotta III b,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, Carl S.

    Net alkalinity and net acidity 2: Practical considerations Carl S. Kirby a,*, Charles A. Cravotta of the sample. The Hot Acidity directly measures net acidity (=√?net alkalinity). Samples that had near-neutral p in their alkalinities and dissolved Fe, Mn, and Al concentrations. Hot Acidity was approximately equal to net acidity

  8. Net Benefits to Agriculture from the Trinity River Project, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fish, B.; Williford, G.; Elling, H.; Lacewell, R. D.; Hosch, P.; Griffin, W.; Reddell, D. L.; Hiler, E. A.; Bausch, W.

    by applying published seasonal flood damage factors and flood frequency as developed from a producer survey to annual gross returns. Annual net benefits were calculated as net returns with flood protection less net returns without flood protection...

  9. New constraints on Northern Hemisphere growing season net flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AL. : LARGER NORTH HEMISPHERE NET ECOSYSTEM EXCHANGE L12807AL. : LARGER NORTH HEMISPHERE NET ECOSYSTEM EXCHANGE Levin,Northern Hemisphere growing season net flux Z. Yang, 1 R. A.

  10. A .NET ASSEMBLY FOR EPICS SIMPLE CHANNEL ACCESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timossi, Christopher A.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Application Development Using .NETĒ, PCAPAC [5] H. NishimuraA .NET ASSEMBLY FOR EPICS SIMPLE CHANNEL ACCESS* C. Timossi,interface software using the .NET platform and the C#

  11. Particle Tracking and Simulation on the .NET Framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nishimura, Hiroshi; Scarvie, Tom

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    can use IronPython[10] to access .NET assemblies directly atTRACKING AND SIMULATION ON THE .NET FRAMEWORK * H. Nishimurathe effectiveness of the .NET framework by converting a C++

  12. EPICS SCA CLIENTS ON THE .NET X64 PLATFORM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timossi, Chris; Nishimura, Hiroshi

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EPICS SCA CLIENTS ON THE .NET X64 PLATFORM* C. Timossi 1 andAbstract We have developed a .NET assembly, which we callCa.dll) are categorized by .NET as unmanaged because they

  13. Supported by GreenNet-EU27

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Figueiredo Integration costs of wind due to changed system operation and investment decisions in GermanySupported by GreenNet-EU27 EIE/04/049/S07.38561 GreenNet-EU27 GUIDING A LEAST COST GRID INTEGRATION cost and grid extension cost caused by intermittent RES-E grid integration Derk Jan Swider (Ed

  14. THalumni.net Trinity Hall's online community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lasenby, Joan

    THalumni.net Trinity Hall's online community Joining THalumni.net allows members to: ∑ Check or location and send a private message to other Trinity Hall members. ∑ Join the careers directory if you or loca- tion and send Trinity Hall members a private message. ∑ Book and pay for events online and see

  15. Tidal effects on net ecosystem exchange of carbon in an estuarine wetland Haiqiang Guo a,c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noormets, Asko

    Tidal effects on net ecosystem exchange of carbon in an estuarine wetland Haiqiang Guo a,c , Asko, Shanghai, China b Southern Global Change Program, USDA Forest Service, Raleigh, NC, USA c Department concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) have stimulated great interest in studying the carbon

  16. Net Zero Design Yields Positive Results "Net zero" is used to describe a building designed to provide as

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waliser, Duane E.

    Net Zero Design Yields Positive Results "Net zero" is used to describe a building designed federal buildings in the planning process as of 2020 or later must be designed to meet net zero standards

  17. Energy Department Helps University of California Develop Net...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Transition Initiative Energy Department Helps University of California Develop Net-Zero Campus Energy Department Helps University of California Develop Net-Zero Campus...

  18. Best Practices for Controlling Capital Costs in Net Zero Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Best Practices for Controlling Capital Costs in Net Zero Energy Design and Construction - 2014 BTO Peer Review Best Practices for Controlling Capital Costs in Net Zero Energy...

  19. Designing Hawaii's First LEED Platinum Net Zero Community: Kaupuni...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Designing Hawaii's First LEED Platinum Net Zero Community: Kaupuni Village Designing Hawaii's First LEED Platinum Net Zero Community: Kaupuni Village U.S. Department of Energy...

  20. Net Zero Waste - Tools and Technical Support ...and other observations...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Net Zero Waste - Tools and Technical Support ...and other observations Net Zero Waste - Tools and Technical Support ...and other observations Presentation at Waste-to-Energy using...

  1. NREL: Continuum Magazine - Net-Zero Building Technologies Create...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Net-Zero Building Technologies Create Substantial Energy Savings Issue 6 Print Version Share this resource Net-Zero Building Technologies Create Substantial Energy Savings...

  2. Aspinall Courthouse: GSA's Historic Preservation and Net-Zero...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Aspinall Courthouse: GSA's Historic Preservation and Net-Zero Renovation Aspinall Courthouse: GSA's Historic Preservation and Net-Zero Renovation Aspinall Courthouse: GSA's...

  3. Lessons Learned from Net Zero Energy Assessments and Renewable...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lessons Learned from Net Zero Energy Assessments and Renewable Energy Projects at Military Installations Lessons Learned from Net Zero Energy Assessments and Renewable Energy...

  4. U-074: Microsoft .NET Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    4: Microsoft .NET Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Commands, Access User Accounts, and Redirect Users U-074: Microsoft .NET Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Commands,...

  5. US Crude Oil Production Surpasses Net Imports | Department of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    US Crude Oil Production Surpasses Net Imports US Crude Oil Production Surpasses Net Imports Source: Energy Information Administration Short Term Energy Outlook. Chart by Daniel...

  6. assessing bed net: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Net Environmental Benefit Analysis: A New Assessment Methodology R. A. Efroymson 4 Assessing Debris Flow Hazard by Credal Nets A. Antonucci1 Computer Technologies and...

  7. Trends and Future Challenges in Sampling the Deep Terrestrial Biosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilkins, Michael J.; Daly, Rebecca; Mouser, Paula J.; Trexler, Ryan; Sharma, Shihka; Cole, David R.; Wrighton, Kelly C.; Biddle , Jennifer F.; Denis, Elizabeth; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Kieft, Thomas L.; Onstott, T. C.; Peterson, Lee; Pfiffner, Susan M.; Phelps, Tommy J.; Schrenk, Matthew O.

    2014-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Research in the deep terrestrial biosphere is driven by interest in novel biodiversity and metabolisms, biogeochemical cycling, and the impact of human activities on this ecosystem. As this interest continues to grow, it is important to ensure that when subsurface investigations are proposed, materials recovered from the subsurface are sampled and preserved in an appropriate manner to limit contamination and ensure preservation of accurate microbial, geochemical, and mineralogical signatures. On February 20th, 2014, a workshop on ďTrends and Future Challenges in Sampling The Deep SubsurfaceĒ was coordinated in Columbus, Ohio by The Ohio State University and West Virginia University faculty, and sponsored by The Ohio State University and the Sloan Foundationís Deep Carbon Observatory. The workshop aims were to identify and develop best practices for the collection, preservation, and analysis of terrestrial deep rock samples. This document summarizes the information shared during this workshop.

  8. CO2 stabilization, climate change and the terrestrial carbon sink

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Andrew

    CO2 stabilization, climate change and the terrestrial carbon sink A N D R E W W H I T E , * M E L V, Hybrid v4.1, with a subdaily timestep, was driven by increasing CO2 and transient climate output from scenarios were used: (i) IS92a, giving 790 ppm CO2 by 2100, (ii) CO2 stabilization at 750 ppm by 2225

  9. Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph (TPF-C) Flight Baseline Concept

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Marie; Shaklan, S; Kasting, J; Traub, W; Alexander, J; Angel, R; Blaurock, C; Brown, M; Brown, R; Burrows, C; Clampin, M; Cohen, E; Content, D; Dewell, L; Dumont, P; Egerman, R; Ferguson, H; Ford, V; Greene, J; Guyon, O; Hammel, H; Heap, S; Ho, T; Horner, S; Hunyadi, S; Irish, S; Jackson, C; Kasdin, J; Kissil, A; Krim, M; Kuchner, M; Kwack, E; Lillie, C; Lin, D; Liu, A; Marchen, L; Marley, M; Meadows, V; Mosier, G; Mouroulis, P; Noecker, M; Ohl, R; Oppenheimer, B; Pitman, J; Ridgway, S; Sabatke, E; Seager, S; Shao, M; Smith, A; Soummer, R; Stapelfeldt, K; Tenerell, D; Trauger, J; Vanderbei, R

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph (TPF-C) mission presented here is an existence proof for a flagship-class internal coronagraph space mission capable of detecting and characterizing Earth-like planets and planetary systems at visible wavelengths around nearby stars, using an existing launch vehicle. TPF-C will use spectroscopy to measure key properties of exoplanets including the presence of atmospheric water or oxygen, powerful signatures in the search for habitable worlds.

  10. Leptogenesis, neutrinoless double beta decay and terrestrial CP violation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Rodejohann

    2001-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Leptogenesis in left-right symmetric theories is studied. The usual see-saw mechanism is modified by the presence of a left-handed Higgs triplet. A simple connection between the properties of the light left-handed and heavy right-handed neutrinos is found. Predictions of this scenario for neutrinoless double beta decay and terrestrial CP violation in long-baseline experiments are given. These observables can in principle distinguish different realizations of the model.

  11. Bull. U. 5. F. C.1892. Fykc Nets. (To face page 299.) PLATELXXII. &-THE FYKE NETS AND FYKE-NET FISHERIES OF THE UNITED STATES,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bull. U. 5. F. C.1892. Fykc Nets. (To face page 299.) PLATELXXII. ti P W n W a Y .- W Y >LL a 0 0: n W Y tLL Y 0 0 n m #12;&-THE FYKE NETS AND FYKE-NET FISHERIES OF THE UNITED STATES, WITH NOTES ON THE FYKE NETS OF OTHER COUNTRIES. BY HUGH M. SMITH, M. D. DEFINITION OF THE FYKE NET. The inquirer who goes

  12. Influence of massive planet scattering on nascent terrestrial planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dimitri Veras; Philip J. Armitage

    2005-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In most extrasolar planetary systems, the present orbits of known giant planets admit the existence of stable terrestrial planets. Those same giant planets, however, have typically eccentric orbits that hint at violent early dynamics less benign for low mass planet formation. Under the assumption that massive planet eccentricities are the end point of gravitational scattering in multiple planet systems, we study the evolution of the building blocks of terrestrial planets during the scattering process. We find that typically, evolutionary sequences that result in a moderately eccentric giant planet orbiting at a ~ 2.5 AU eject over 95% of the material initially present within the habitable zone. Crossing orbits largely trigger the ejection, and leave the surviving material with a wide dispersion in semi-major axis, eccentricity and inclination. Based on these results, we predict that radial velocity follow-up of terrestrial planet systems found by Kepler will find that these are anti-correlated with the presence of eccentric giant planets orbiting at a few AU.

  13. On the Survival of Short-Period Terrestrial Planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosemary A. Mardling; D. N. C. Lin

    2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The currently feasible method of detection of Earth-mass planets is transit photometry, with detection probability decreasing with a planet's distance from the star. The existence or otherwise of short-period terrestrial planets will tell us much about the planet formation process, and such planets are likely to be detected first if they exist. Tidal forces are intense for short-period planets, and result in decay of the orbit on a timescale which depends on properties of the star as long as the orbit is circular. However, if an eccentric companion planet exists, orbital eccentricity ($e_i$) is induced and the decay timescale depends on properties of the short-period planet, reducing by a factor of order $10^5 e_i^2$ if it is terrestrial. Here we examine the influence companion planets have on the tidal and dynamical evolution of short-period planets with terrestrial structure, and show that the relativistic potential of the star is fundamental to their survival.

  14. High-Level Nets with Nets and Rules as Tokens Kathrin Ho mann 1 , Hartmut Ehrig 1 , and Till Mossakowski 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mossakowski, Till - Deutschen Forschungszentrum f√ľr K√ľnstliche Intelligenz & Fachbereich 3

    High-Level Nets with Nets and Rules as Tokens Kathrin Ho#11;mann 1 , Hartmut Ehrig 1 , and Till-Level net models following the paradigm \

  15. The effects of potential changes in United States beef production on global grazing systems and greenhouse gas emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    and greenhouse gas emissions Jerome Dumortier1 , Dermot J Hayes2 , Miguel Carriquiry2 , Fengxia Dong3 , Xiaodong in the U.S. causes a net increase in GHG emissions on a global scale. We couple a global agricultural production in the United States. The effects on emissions from agricultural production (i.e., methane

  16. QUESTIONS ABOUT GLOBAL WARMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    QUESTIONS ABOUT GLOBAL WARMING •IS IT REAL? •IS IT IMPORTANT? •WHAT IS IT DUE TO? •HOW MUCH MORE in the atmosphere, giving Earth its temperate climate. Global Atmosphere, Global Warming GLOBAL TEMPERATURE TREND IS THIS CARBON DIOXIDE COMING FROM? Other sources are home heating and electric power production. WE ARE ALL

  17. Global Health Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Ophir

    Bay Area Global Health Seminar Series Moving beyond millennium targets in global health: The challenges of investing in health and universal health coverage Although targets can help to focus global health efforts, they can also detract attention from deeper underlying challenges in global health

  18. Global Warming Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schofield, Jeremy

    Global Warming Observations: 1. Global temperature has been gradually rising in recent years #15 in range 8000 12000 nm { CFC's, methane and N 2 O important for global warming even though concentra- tions in concentration of \\greenhouse gases" like CO 2 What determines global temperature? Energy budget of earth: 1

  19. Mid-Course Review: NetCDF in the Current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    architecture Improved performance Generic tools NetCDF-4 adoption Standards endorsements Gridspec APICDF/libcf, netCDF-Java, CDM, TDS, NcML, CF conventions Adopt, develop, and promote open standards, conventions for observational data Improve compatibility between netCDF APIs and OPeNDAP protocols Improve netCDF performance

  20. NON-DOUBLE-COUPLE EARTHQUAKES: NET FORCES AND UNCERTAINTIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foulger, G. R.

    NON-DOUBLE-COUPLE EARTHQUAKES: NET FORCES AND UNCERTAINTIES G.R. Foulger, B.R. Julian University-980) to include net forces in the mechanisms. Net forces are theoretically required to describe earthquakes) waves cannot resolve sources such as vertical dipoles. When source mechanisms include net forces, even

  1. A Theory of Operational Equivalence for Interaction Nets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fern√°ndez, Maribel

    A Theory of Operational Equivalence for Interaction Nets Maribel Fern‚??andez 1 and Ian Mackie 2 1. In this paper we apply these (now standard) techniques to interactions nets, a graphical programming language in interaction nets since it can be applied to untyped systems, thus all systems of interaction nets are captured

  2. Rewriting Logic as a Unifying Framework for Petri Nets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meseguer, José

    Rewriting Logic as a Unifying Framework for Petri Nets Mark-Oliver Stehr, Jos#19;e Meseguer as a unifying framework for a wide range of Petri nets models. We treat in detail place/transition nets that \\Petri nets are monoids" suggested by Meseguer and Montanari we de#12;ne a rewriting semantics that maps

  3. Putting high-level Petri nets to work in industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Aalst, Wil

    Putting high-level Petri nets to work in industry W.M.P. van der Aalst Department of Mathematics Petri nets exist for over 30 years. Especially in the last decade Petri nets have been put into practice extensively. Thanks to several useful ex- tensions and the availability of computer tools, Petri nets have

  4. U.S. Virgin Islands- Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In February 2007, the U.S. Virgin Islands Public Services Commission approved a limited net-metering program for residential and commercial photovoltaic (PV), wind-energy or other renewable energ...

  5. Murray City Power- Net Metering Pilot Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Under a pilot program, Murray City Power offers net metering to customers that generate electricity using photovoltaic (PV), wind-electric or hydroelectric systems with a maximum capacity of 10...

  6. SIXTH FRAMEWORK PROGRAMME PRIORITY "ERA-NET"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Co-ordination Action to Establish a Hydrogen and Fuel Cell ERA-Net, Hydrogen Co- ordination Work.....................................................................34 4.5 Hydrogen conversion ­ Fuel cells......................................................................36 4.6 Application of hydrogen and fuel cell technology

  7. Definition of a 'Zero Net Energy' Community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlisle, N.; Van Geet, O.; Pless, S.

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a definition for a net zero-energy community. A community that offsets all of its energy use from renewables available within the community's built environment.

  8. Microsoft Word - Net Requirements Transparency Process_09302014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 As part of its Net Requirements Transparency process, on July 31, 2014 BPA published the SliceBlock and Block customers' FY2013 and forecast FY2015 Total Retail Load (TRL) and...

  9. Hydro-Quťbec Net Metering (Quebec, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In line with Hydro-Quťbec's commitment to the environment and sustainable development, Hydro-Quťbec is supporting self-generation with a new rate offering: the net metering option. This option...

  10. City of New Orleans- Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In May 2007, the New Orleans City Council adopted net-metering rules that are similar to rules adopted by the Louisiana Public Service Commission (PSC) in November 2005. The City Council's rules...

  11. Freeze-out conditions from net-proton and net-charge fluctuations at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paolo Alba; Wanda Alberico; Rene Bellwied; Marcus Bluhm; Valentina Mantovani Sarti; Marlene Nahrgang; Claudia Ratti

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate ratios of higher-order susceptibilities quantifying fluctuations in the number of net protons and in the net-electric charge using the Hadron Resonance Gas (HRG) model. We take into account the effect of resonance decays, the kinematic acceptance cuts in rapidity, pseudo-rapidity and transverse momentum used in the experimental analysis, as well as a randomization of the isospin of nucleons in the hadronic phase. By comparing these results to the latest experimental data from the STAR collaboration, we determine the freeze-out conditions from net-electric charge and net-proton distributions and discuss their consistency.

  12. On Global Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaac Siwale

    2015-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    one of the operands of the inner product is zero at any instance; but in this case, the ..... at: http://www.researchgate.net or at: http://www.optimization-online.org.

  13. .NET WEB DEVELOPER PROGRAM A ten-week comprehensive program covering web development using Microsoft .NET technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaefer, Marcus

    .NET WEB DEVELOPER PROGRAM A ten-week comprehensive program covering web development using Microsoft¬ģ .NET technologies DePaul University's .NET Web Developer Program is designed to provide, techniques and principles of Microsoft .NET. The program stresses an understanding of the relevant

  14. Temperature-associated increases in the global soil respiration record

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Thomson, Allison M.

    2010-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Soil respiration (RS), the flux of CO2 from the soil surface to the atmosphere, comprises the second-largest terrestrial carbon flux, but its dynamics are incompletely understood, and the global flux remains poorly constrained. Ecosystem warming experiments, modelling analyses, and biokinetics all suggest that RS should change with climate. This has been difficult to confirm observationally because of the high spatial variability of RS, inaccessibility of the soil medium, and inability of remote sensing instruments to measure large-scale RS fluxes. Given these constraints, is it possible to discern climate-driven changes in regional or global RS fluxes in the extant four-decade record of RS chamber measurements? Here we use a database of worldwide RS observations, matched with high-resolution historical climate data, to show a previously unknown temporal trend in the RS record after accounting for mean annual climate, leaf area, nitrogen deposition, and changes in CO2 measurement technique. Air temperature anomaly (deviation from the 1961-1990 mean) is significantly and positively correlated with changes in RS fluxes; both temperature and precipitation anomalies exert effects in specific biomes. We estimate that the current (2008) annual global RS flux is 98Ī12 Pg and has increased 0.1 Pg yr-1 over the last 20 years, implying a global RS temperature response (Q10) of 1.5. An increasing global RS flux does not necessarily constitute a positive feedback loop to the atmosphere; nonetheless, the available data are consistent with an acceleration of the terrestrial carbon cycle in response to global climate change.

  15. Responses of terrestrial ecosystems and carbon budgets to current and future environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moorcroft, Paul R.

    to a wide range of environmental variations. Photosynthesis is a nonlinear function of solar radiationResponses of terrestrial ecosystems and carbon budgets to current and future environmental

  16. NetCDF-4: Combining the Strengths of NetCDF and HDF5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and simplicity of netCDF ≠ Generality and performance of HDF5 ∑ Preserve format and API compatibility for net Standardization ∑ DOD Joint Technical Architecture "Emerging" standard for Application Specific Data Interchange;Community Standards Based on HDF5 ∑ HDF-EOS5 ∑ DOE Defense Labs libsheaf (meshes) ∑ Nexus (neutron

  17. Terrestrial Planet Formation in Disks with Varying Surface Density Profiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sean N. Raymond; Thomas Quinn; Jonathan I. Lunine

    2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The ``minimum-mass solar nebula'' (MMSN) model estimates the surface density distribution of the protoplanetary disk by assuming the planets to have formed in situ. However, significant radial migration of the giant planets likely occurred in the Solar system, implying a distortion in the values derived by the MMSN method. The true density profiles of protoplanetary disks is therefore uncertain. Here we present results of simulations of late-stage terrestrial accretion, each starting from a disk of planetary embryos. We assume a power-law surface density profile that varies with heliocentric distance r as r^-alpha, and vary alpha between 1/2 and 5/2 (alpha = 3/2 for the MMSN model). We find that for steeper profiles (higher values of alpha), the terrestrial planets (i) are more numerous, (ii) form more quickly, (iii) form closer to the star, (iv) are more massive, (v) have higher iron contents, and (vi) have lower water contents. However, the possibility of forming potentially habitable planets does not appear to vary strongly with alpha.

  18. Terrestrial habitat mapping of the Oak Ridge Reservation: 1996 Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington-Allen, R.A.; Ashwood, T.L.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US DOE is in the process of remediating historical contamination on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Two key components are ecological risk assessment and monitoring. In 1994 a strategy was developed and a specific program was initiated to implement the strategy for the terrestrial biota of the entire ORR. This document details results of the first task: development of a habitat map and habitat models for key species of interest. During the last 50 years ORR has been a relatively protected island of plant and animal habitats in a region of rapidly expanding urbanization. A preliminary biodiversity assessment of the ORR by the Nature Conservancy in 1995 noted 272 occurrences of significant plant and animal species and communities. Field surveys of threatened and endangered species show that the ORR contains 20 rare plant species, 4 of which are on the state list of endangered species. The rest are either on the state list of threatened species or listed as being of special concern. The ORR provides habitat for some 60 reptilian and amphibian species; more than 120 species of terrestrial birds; 32 species of waterfowl, wading birds, and shorebirds; and about 40 mammalian species. The ORR is both a refuge for rare species and a reservoir of recruitment for surrounding environments and wildlife management areas. Cedar barrens, river bluffs, and wetlands have been identified as the habitat for most rare vascular plant species on the ORR.

  19. Using Ant Communities For Rapid Assessment Of Terrestrial Ecosystem Health

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wike, L

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurement of ecosystem health is a very important but often difficult and sometimes fractious topic for applied ecologists. It is important because it can provide information about effects of various external influences like chemical, nuclear, and physical disturbance, and invasive species. Ecosystem health is also a measure of the rate or trajectory of degradation or recovery of systems that are currently suffering impact or those where restoration or remediation have taken place. Further, ecosystem health is the single best indicator of the quality of long term environmental stewardship because it not only provides a baseline condition, but also the means for future comparison and evaluation. Ecosystem health is difficult to measure because there are a nearly infinite number of variables and uncertainty as to which suites of variables are truly indicative of ecosystem condition. It would be impossible and prohibitively expensive to measure all those variables, or even all the ones that were certain to be valid indicators. Measurement of ecosystem health can also be a fractious topic for applied ecologists because there are a myriad of opinions as to which variables are the most important, most easily measured, most robust, and so forth. What is required is an integrative means of evaluating ecosystem health. All ecosystems are dynamic and undergo change either stochastically, intrinsically, or in response to external influences. The basic assumption about change induced by exogenous antropogenic influences is that it is directional and measurable. Historically measurements of surrogate parameters have been used in an attempt to quantify these changes, for example extensive water chemistry data in aquatic systems. This was the case until the 1980's when the Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI) (Karr et al. 1986), was developed. This system collects an array of metrics and fish community data within a stream ecosystem and develops a score or rating for the relative health of the ecosystem. The IBI, though originally for Midwestern streams, has been successfully adapted to other ecoregions and taxa (macroinvertebrates, Lombard and Goldstein, 2004) and has become an important tool for scientists and regulatory agencies alike in determining health of stream ecosystems. The IBI is a specific type of a larger group of methods and procedures referred to as Rapid Bioassessment (RBA). These protocols have the advantage of directly measuring the organisms affected by system perturbations, thus providing an integrated evaluation of system health because the organisms themselves integrate all aspects of their environment and its condition. In addition to the IBI, the RBA concept has also been applied to seep wetlands (Paller et al. 2005) and terrestrial systems (O'Connell et al. 1998, Kremen et al. 1993, Rodriguez et al. 1998, Rosenberg et al. 1986). Terrestrial RBA methods have lagged somewhat behind those for aquatic systems because terrestrial systems are less distinctly defined and seem to have a less universal distribution of an all-inclusive taxon, such as fish in the IBI, upon which to base an RBA. In the last decade, primarily in Australia, extensive development of an RBA using ant communities has shown great promise. Ants have the same advantage for terrestrial RBAs that fish do for aquatic systems in that they are an essential and ubiquitous component of virtually all terrestrial ecosystems. They occupy a broad range of niches, functional groups, and trophic levels and they possess one very important characteristic that makes them ideal for RBA because, similar to the fishes, there is a wide range of tolerance to conditions within the larger taxa. Within ant communities there are certain groups, genera, or species that may be very robust and abundant under even the harshest impacts. There are also taxa that are very sensitive to disturbance and change and their presence or absence is also indicative of the local conditions. Also, as with the aquatic RBAs using macroinvertebrates, ants have a wide variety of functional foragi

  20. Globalization of biopharmaceutical manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pande, Rachna

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The biomanufacturing industry is changing due to increasing globalization. However, it is changing differently from other high tech industries like software/ semiconductor/ automobiles. In this study we use global ...

  1. Global Environmental Course Title

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takada, Shoji

    : Environmental discourses, Environment and development in Africa, Environmental conservation and Ainu people Department Global Environmental Studies Room Course Title Frontier of Sustainability Science Instructor Akihisa MORI, Global Environmental Studies Satoshi KONISHI, Institute of Advanced

  2. Nonsingular static global string

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Sen; N. Banerjee

    2000-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A new solution for the spacetime outside the core of a U(1) static global string has been presented which is nonsingular. This is the first example of a nonsingular spacetime around a static global string.}}

  3. Review: Globalization of Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennant, Matthew Aaron

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review: Globalization of Water: Sharing the PlanetísAshok K. Globalization of Water: Sharing the Planetís140) liters of virtual water (p. 15). This is one of the

  4. Cows Causing Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi

    2008-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Broadcast Transcript: Remember when President Reagan blamed trees for air pollution? Well now the Japanese are blaming cows for global warming. Apparently, the methane emissions from burping cows account for 5% of all global greenhouse gases. Simple...

  5. Warming, eutrophication, and predator loss amplify subsidies between aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palen, Wendy J.

    , Canada, Department of Forest Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada predators on the flux of biomass between aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. We demonstrated that predatory., 2009), and also become detri- tus inputs that supply carbon and nitrogen to terrestrial plants (Gratton

  6. Insignificant solar-terrestrial triggering of earthquakes Jeffrey J. Love1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Jeremy N.

    that solar-terrestrial interaction, as measured by sunspots, solar wind velocity, and geomagnetic activity by the corresponding rank of annual, monthly, and daily averages of the solar-terrestrial variables. We measure, 1963; Gribbin, 1971]. Alternatively, magnetic storms might induce eddy electric currents in rocks along

  7. Sulfur Cycling in the Terrestrial Subsurface: Commensal Interactions, Spatial Scales, and Microbial Heterogeneity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossman, Ethan L.

    Sulfur Cycling in the Terrestrial Subsurface: Commensal Interactions, Spatial Scales, and Microbial microbial processes in the terrestrial subsurface. Previous geochemical studies suggested that sulfide environment in shallow sediments (5 m), and produces acidic waters (pH 3.8) that are rich in sulfate (28 m

  8. Compton scattering effects on the duration of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasko, Victor

    ; published 18 January 2012. [1] Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are gamma-ray bursts detected from space) recently discovered by the gamma-ray burst monitor (GBM) aboard the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. Introduction [2] Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are bursts of high-energy photons originating from

  9. Heat partitioning in terrestrial planets during core formation by negative diapirism H. Samuel a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evonuk, Martha

    in terrestrial planets. We model the dynamic evolution of an iron diapir, sinking through a solid silicate proto experiments. This model can be applied to determine the heat distribution within terrestrial planets-like planets by conversion of potential into thermal energy via viscous heating (Rubie et al., 2007; Solomon

  10. To What Extent Does Terrestrial Life ``Follow The Water''? Eriita G. Jones and Charles H. Lineweaver

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lineweaver, Charles H.

    uninhabited, we present empirical pressure-temperature (P-T ) phase diagrams of water, Earth, and terrestrial. This potentially uninhabited terrestrial liquid water includes (i) hot and deep regions of Earth where some combination of high temperature (T > 1228C) and restrictions on pore space, nu- trients, and energy

  11. Thompson March 2003 -1STEREO -Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory Mission STEREO GS PR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson ­ March 2003 - 1STEREO - Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory Mission STEREO GS PR STEREO Science Center (SSC) William T. Thompson STEREO Science Center Code 682, NASA-Goddard (William.T.Thompson@gsfc.nasa.gov 301-286-2040) #12;Thompson ­ March 2003 - 2STEREO - Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory Mission

  12. App D_Terrestrial Tech App.doc 1 Protection, Restoration, and Management of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Restoration, Management 83 2.4.6 Compatibility of Wetland Management and Stream Management 84 2 2.5.5 Protection, Restoration, Management 103 2.5.6 Compatibility of Pond Management and StreamApp D_Terrestrial Tech App.doc 1 Protection, Restoration, and Management of Terrestrial Habitats

  13. An efficient numerical terrestrial scheme (ENTS) for fast earth system modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williamson, Mark

    An efficient numerical terrestrial scheme (ENTS) for fast earth system modelling Mark Williamson Working Paper 83 #12;An efficient numerical terrestrial scheme (ENTS) for fast earth system modelling Mark for long time period simulations and large ensemble studies in Earth system models of intermediate

  14. Source altitudes of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes produced by lightning leaders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasko, Victor

    ; published 18 April 2012. [1] Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are energetic photon bursts observed fromSource altitudes of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes produced by lightning leaders Wei Xu,1 Sebastien. Pasko (2012), Source altitudes of terres- trial gamma-ray flashes produced by lightning leaders, Geophys

  15. The future of terrestrial mammals in the Mediterranean basin under climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimmermann, Niklaus E.

    Research The future of terrestrial mammals in the Mediterranean basin under climate change Luigi climate change model outputs for two climate scenarios. Overall, a substantial number of Mediterranean in climate. For 181 terrestrial mammals (68% of all Mediterranean mammals), we used an ensemble forecasting

  16. Elements of comparison between Martian and terrestrial mesoscale meteorological phenomena: Katabatic winds and boundary layer convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spiga, Aymeric

    Elements of comparison between Martian and terrestrial mesoscale meteorological phenomena Keywords: Mesoscale meteorology Katabatic winds Boundary layer convection Comparative planetology a b s t r a c t Terrestrial and Martian atmospheres are both characterised by a large variety of mesoscale

  17. Chapter 17: Estimating Net Savings: Common Practices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Violette, D. M.; Rathbun, P.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter focuses on the methods used to estimate net energy savings in evaluation, measurement, and verification (EM&V) studies for energy efficiency (EE) programs. The chapter provides a definition of net savings, which remains an unsettled topic both within the EE evaluation community and across the broader public policy evaluation community, particularly in the context of attribution of savings to particular program. The chapter differs from the measure-specific Uniform Methods Project (UMP) chapters in both its approach and work product. Unlike other UMP resources that provide recommended protocols for determining gross energy savings, this chapter describes and compares the current industry practices for determining net energy savings, but does not prescribe particular methods.

  18. Net-Baryon Physics: Basic Mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Alvarez-Muniz; R. Conceicao; J. Dias de Deus; M. C. Espirito Santo; J. G. Milhano; M. Pimenta

    2007-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    It is well known that, in nuclear collisions, a sizable fraction of the available energy is carried away by baryons. As the baryon number is conserved, the net-baryon $B-\\bar{B}$ retains information on the energy-momentum carried by the incoming nuclei. A simple but consistent model for net-baryon production in high energy hadron-hadron, hadron-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions is presented. The basic ingredients of the model are valence string formation based on standard PDFs with QCD evolution and string fragmentation via the Schwinger mechanism. The results of the model are presented and compared with both data and existing models. These results show that a good description of the main features of net-baryon data is possible on the framework of a simplistic model, with the advantage of making the fundamental production mechanisms manifest.

  19. Conformal nets III: fusion of defects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arthur Bartels; Christopher L. Douglas; Andrť Henriques

    2015-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Conformal nets provides a mathematical model for conformal field theory. We define a notion of defect between conformal nets, formalizing the idea of an interaction between two conformal field theories. We introduce an operation of fusion of defects, and prove that the fusion of two defects is again a defect, provided the fusion occurs over a conformal net of finite index. There is a notion of sector (or bimodule) between two defects, and operations of horizontal and vertical fusion of such sectors. Our most difficult technical result is that the horizontal fusion of the vacuum sectors of two defects is isomorphic to the vacuum sector of the fused defect. Equipped with this isomorphism, we construct the basic interchange isomorphism between the horizontal fusion of two vertical fusions and the vertical fusion of two horizontal fusions of sectors.

  20. Climate Mitigation Policy Implications for Global Irrigation Water Demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Wise, Marshall A.

    2013-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy, water and land are scarce resources, critical to humans. Developments in each affect the availability and cost of the others, and consequently human prosperity. Measures to limit greenhouse gas concentrations will inevitably exact dramatic changes on energy and land systems and in turn alter the character, magnitude and geographic distribution of human claims on water resources. We employ the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), an integrated assessment model to explore the interactions of energy, land and water systems in the context of alternative policies to limit climate change to three alternative levels: 2.5 Wm-2 (445 ppm CO2-e), 3.5 Wm-2 (535 ppm CO2-e) and 4.5 Wm-2 (645 ppm CO2-e). We explore the effects of alternative land-use emissions mitigation policy optionsóone which values terrestrial carbon emissions equally with fossil fuel and industrial emissions, and an alternative which places no penalty on land-use change emissions. We find that increasing populations and economic growth could be anticipated to lead to increased demand for water for agricultural systems (+200%), even in the absence of climate change. In general policies to mitigate climate change will increase agricultural demands for water, regardless of whether or not terrestrial carbon is valued or not. Burgeoning demands for water are driven by the demand for bioenergy in response to emissions mitigation policies. We also find that the policy matters. Increases in the demand for water when terrestrial carbon emissions go un-prices are vastly larger than when terrestrial system carbon emissions are prices at the same rate as fossil fuel and industrial emissions. Our estimates for increased water demands when terrestrial carbon systems go un-priced are larger than earlier studies. We find that the deployment of improved irrigation delivery systems could mitigate some of the increase in water demands, but cannot reverse the increases in water demands when terrestrial carbon emissions go un-priced. Finally we estimates that the geospatial pattern of water demands could stress some parts of the world, e.g. China, India and other countries in south and east Asia, earlier and more intensely than in other parts of the world, e.g. North America.

  1. Fermi GBM Observations of Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Briggs, Michael S. [CSPAR, NSSTC, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States)

    2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes are short pulses of energetic radiation associated with thunderstorms and lightning. While the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on Fermi was designed to observe gamma-ray bursts, its large BGO detectors are excellent for observing TGFs. Using GBM, TGF pulses are seen to either be symmetrical or have faster rise time than fall times. Some TGFs are resolved into double, partially overlapping pulses. Using ground-based radio observations of lightning from the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN), TGFs and their associated lightning are found to be simultaneous to {approx_equal}40 {mu} s. The lightning locations are typically within 300 km of the sub-spacecraft point.

  2. On the dynamics and thermodynamics of terrestrial planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patton, Regan L

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A model for terrestrial planets, inclusive of viscous fluid behavior and featuring finite normal stress differences, is developed. This work offers new insights for the interpretation of planetary survey data. Evolution equations for poloidal and toroidal motions include gradients of density, viscosity, and two normal stress moduli. The poloidal field exhibits gradients in the cubic dilation, which couple non-isotropic pressures to the combined deformation field. In contrast, the toroidal field exhibits vorticity gradients with magnitudes proportional to the natural time. This holds even in the absence of material gradients. Consequently, viscosity gradients are not required to drive toroidal motions. The toroidal field is governed by an inhomogeneous diharmonic equation, exhibiting dynamic shear localization. The strain-energy density for this model, as a function of temperature, is found via thermodynamics. Assuming heat transfer with characteristic diffusivity, a radial model parameterized by thermomechani...

  3. System, method, and apparatus for remote measurement of terrestrial biomass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Patrick W (Jefferson, MD)

    2011-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A system, method, and/or apparatus for remote measurement of terrestrial biomass contained in vegetative elements, such as large tree boles or trunks present in an area of interest, are provided. The method includes providing an airborne VHF radar system in combination with a LiDAR system, overflying the area of interest while directing energy toward the area of interest, using the VHF radar system to collect backscatter data from the trees as a function of incidence angle and frequency, and determining a magnitude of the biomass from the backscatter data and data from the laser radar system for each radar resolution cell. A biomass map is generated showing the magnitude of the biomass of the vegetative elements as a function of location on the map by using each resolution cell as a unique location thereon. In certain preferred embodiments, a single frequency is used with a linear array antenna.

  4. Water Balance in Terrestrial PlantsWater Balance in Terrestrial Plants Water Regulation on LandWater Regulation on Land --PlantsPlants WWipip= W= Wrr + W+ Waa --WWtt --WWss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cochran-Stafira, D. Liane

    1 Water Balance in Terrestrial PlantsWater Balance in Terrestrial Plants Water Regulation on LandWater waters internal water WWrr =Roots=Roots WWaa = Air= Air WWtt = Transpiration= Transpiration WWss = Secretions= Secretions Water Regulation on Land - Plants Water Balance in Terrestrial PlantsWater Balance

  5. Global climate processes: Role of cirrus clouds for present and future PI: Ulrike Lohmann

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    26 P 2.2 CCC Global climate processes: Role of cirrus clouds for present and future climate PI nuclei affect cirrus clouds in the present and future climate? Does mineral dust lead to cirrus clouds the longwave radiation and could lead to a net cooling. Thus, it is important to better understand the role

  6. Estimate of the global distribution of stratiform supercooled liquid water clouds using the LITE lidar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hogan, Robin

    them to generally have a greater effect on the net radiative fluxes than any ice clouds in the profileEstimate of the global distribution of stratiform supercooled liquid water clouds using the LITE layers that have a much larger radiative impact than ice clouds of the same water content because

  7. Compositional construction and analysis of Petri net systems†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rojas, Isabel C.

    Most Petri net (PN) based modelling formalisms represent the system modelled as a flat net. This may not clearly reflect the elements that participate in the system and the way they communicate or interact. It can also ...

  8. UMTC Climate Action Plan: Roadmap to Net Zero

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    UMTC Climate Action Plan: Roadmap to Net Zero Emissions Co-chairs of UMTC Sustainability Committee changes ∑ Goal: Develop a plan for achieving net zero greenhouse gas emissions #12;UMTC Greenhouse Gas

  9. NetPal: A Dynamic Network Administration Knowledge Base

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milios, Evangelos E.

    NetPal: A Dynamic Network Administration Knowledge Base Ashley George, Adetokunbo Makanju system designed to assist network administra- tors in their troubleshooting tasks, in recall- ing hosting environments, Net- pal summarises network data and and supports retrieval of relevant

  10. Net Zero Energy Military Installations: A Guide to Assessment...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Net Zero Energy Military Installations: A Guide to Assessment and Planning Net Zero Energy Military Installations: A Guide to Assessment and Planning In 2008, DoD and DOE defined a...

  11. Zero Net Energy Myths and Modes of Thought

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajkovich, Nicholas B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    buildings, see the Zero Energy Buildings Database at http://2009). "Net-Zero Energy Commercial Buildings Initiative."a target of zero net energy (ZNE) in buildings by 2030. One

  12. Design Editorial Globalization and Internationalism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papalambros, Panos

    ; especially, the development of an increasingly integrated global economy marked especially by free tradeJournal of Mechanical Design Editorial Globalization and Internationalism There has always been and Strabo, but to Friedman's empirical observations of globalization. According to Wikipedia, "globalization

  13. ENHANCEMENT OF TERRESTRIAL CARBON SINKS THROUGH RECLAMATION OF ABANDONED MINE LANDS IN THE APPALACHIAN REGION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary D. Kronrad

    2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S.D.I. Office of Surface Mining (OSM) estimates that there are approximately 1 million acres of abandoned mine land (AML) in the Appalachian region. AML lands are classified as areas that were inadequately reclaimed or were left unreclaimed prior to the passage of the 1977 Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act, and where no federal or state laws require any further reclamation responsibility to any company or individual. Reclamation and afforestation of these sites have the potential to provide landowners with cyclical timber revenues, generate environmental benefits to surrounding communities, and sequester carbon in the terrestrial ecosystem. Through a memorandum of understanding, the OSM and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) have decided to investigate reclaiming and afforesting these lands for the purpose of mitigating the negative effects of anthropogenic carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. This study determined the carbon sequestration potential of northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.), one of the major reclamation as well as commercial species, planted on West Virginia AML sites. Analyses were conducted to (1) calculate the total number of tons that can be stored, (2) determine the cost per ton to store carbon, and (3) calculate the profitability of managing these forests for timber production alone and for timber production and carbon storage together. The Forest Management Optimizer (FORMOP) was used to simulate growth data on diameter, height, and volume for northern red oak. Variables used in this study included site indices ranging from 40 to 80 (base age 50), thinning frequencies of 0, 1, and 2, thinning percentages of 20, 25, 30, 35, and 40, and a maximum rotation length of 100 years. Real alternative rates of return (ARR) ranging from 0.5% to 12.5% were chosen for the economic analyses. A total of 769,248 thinning and harvesting combinations, net present worths, and soil expectation values were calculated in this study. Results indicate that the cost per ton to sequester carbon ranges from $6.54 on site index 80 land at a 12.5% ARR to $36.68 on site index 40 land at an ARR of 0.5%. Results also indicate that the amount of carbon stored during one rotation ranges between 38 tons per acre on site index 40 land to 58 tons per acre on site index 80 land. The profitability of afforestation on these AML sites in West Virginia increases as the market price for carbon increases from $0 to $100 per ton.

  14. http://www.revistaecosistemas.net/articulo.asp?Id=724 INVESTIGACIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    Inventarios Forestales (BIOTREE-NET) en Mesoamérica: avances, retos y perspectivas futuras L. Cayuela 1, L

  15. International Conference on Machine Control & Guidance, June 24-26, 2008 Kinematic Surface Analysis by Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giger, Christine

    Analysis by Terrestrial Laser Scanning Hans-Martin Zogg* David Grimm* ETH Zurich, Switzerland [zogg, grimm]@geod.baug.ethz.ch Abstract This paper presents terrestrial laser scanning with emphasis on kinematic surface analysis. Besides an overview of terrestrial laser scanning in general, the 2D-laser scanner SICK LMS200

  16. Terrestrial gamma ray flashes with energies up to 100 MeV produced by nonequilibrium acceleration of electrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasko, Victor

    . Introduction [2] Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are bursts of high-energy photons originating fromTerrestrial gamma ray flashes with energies up to 100 MeV produced by nonequilibrium accelerationV) of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs). This analysis provides the first direct evidence that TGFs are produced

  17. The economics of net metering Larry Hughes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, Larry

    . In jurisdictions that permit net metering, the owners of these facilities (the customer-generators) can supply of financial compensation on the selection of generation equipment from the perspective of the customer that generate electricity intermittently (typically renewables such as wind and solar) need not be concerned

  18. The BLOOMhouse:Zero Net Energy Housing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garrison, M.; Krepart, R.; Randall, S.; Novoselac, A.

    The 2007 University of Texas Solar Decathlon House is called the BLOOMhouse because it represents the ďseedĒ of new ideas for zero net energy housing. The University of Texas student team developed a prefabricated 7.9 kW stand-alone solar-powered...

  19. Bayes Nets Representation: joint distribution and conditional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell, Tom

    Bayes Nets Representation: joint distribution and conditional independence Yi Zhang 10-701, Machine joint distribution of BNs Infer C. I. from factored joint distributions D-separation (motivation) 2 structure All about the joint distribution of variables ! Conditional independence assumptions are useful

  20. NET-ZERO ENERGY HIGH PERFORMANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    , University of Nebraska­Lincoln · Denise Kuehn, Manager, Demand Side and Sustainable Management, Omaha Public was that the largest potential for enhancing energy supplies in this country is making buildings more efficient. "-- Harvey Perlman, UNL Chancellor #12;Net-Zero Energy, High-Performance Green Buildings | 1 INTRODUCTION

  1. Feasibility of Achieving a Zero-Net-Energy, Zero-Net-Cost Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Beaini, S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    near†zeroĒ†energy†definitions†exist. †† EnEV†Compliant†to†differing†definitions†of†zero† energy,†methods†for†cost†to†the†ďnet†zeroĒ†definitions,†a†range†of†ďlow†energyĒ†or†ď

  2. Plutonium Isotopes in the Terrestrial Environment at the Savannah River Site, USA: A Long-Term Study

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Armstrong, Christopher R.; Brant, Heather A.; Nuessle, Patterson R.; Hall, Gregory; Halverson, Justin E.; Cadieux, James R.

    2015-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This work presents the findings of a long term plutonium study at Savannah River Site (SRS) conducted between 2003 and 2013. Terrestrial environmental samples were obtained at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) in A-area. Plutonium content and isotopic abundances were measured over this time period by alpha spectrometry and three stage thermal ionization mass spectrometry (3STIMS). Here we detail the complete sample collection, radiochemical separation, and measurement procedure specifically targeted to trace plutonium in bulk environmental samples. Total plutonium activities were determined to be not significantly above atmospheric global fallout. However, the 238Pu/239+240Pu activity ratios attributed to SRS are above atmospheric global fallout ranges. The 240Pu/239Pu atom ratios are reasonably consistent from year to year and are lower than fallout, while the 242Pu/239Pu atom ratios are higher than fallout values. Overall, the plutonium signatures obtained in this study reflect a mixture of weapons-grade, higher burn-up, and fallout material. This study provides a blue print for long term low level monitoring of plutonium in the environment.

  3. Net Zero Energy Military Installations: A Guide to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Net Zero Energy Military Installations: A Guide to Assessment and Planning Samuel Booth, John;Technical Report Net Zero Energy Military NREL/TP-7A2-48876 Installations: A Guide to August 2010 Assessment .......................................................................................................................................1 1 Introduction: Net Zero Energy In DoD Context

  4. ERDCTR-14-2 Army Net Zero Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ERDCTR-14-2 Army Net Zero Program Composting Assessment for Organic Solid Waste at Fort Polk/client/default. #12;Army Net Zero Program ERDC TR-14-2 April 2014 Composting Assessment for Organic Solid Waste for other technical reports published by ERDC, visit the ERDC online library at http://acwc.sdp.sirsi.net

  5. Net Zero Residential Test Facility Gaithersburg, MD Solar Photovoltaic Panels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    1 Net Zero Residential Test Facility Gaithersburg, MD Solar Photovoltaic Panels Solar Thermal;NZERTF Gaithersburg, MD 3 Objectives Demonstrate Net-Zero Energy for a home similar in nature: ∑ Demonstrate Net-Zero Energy Usage ∑ Measure All Building Loads (Sensible and Latent) ∑ Operate Dedicated

  6. Materials and Methods Strain construction, materials, and Net1 mutagenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shou, Wenying

    Materials and Methods Strain construction, materials, and Net1 mutagenesis All strains used and destruction boxes (Clb2C2DK100)HA3 was used in over-expression experiments with Clb2 (1). Net1 mutant constructs were created as previously described (2). Briefly, a wild type NET1-myc9 epitope tagged construct

  7. SELECTIVITY OF TOWED-NET SAMPLERS RICHARD A. BARKLEY'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SELECTIVITY OF TOWED-NET SAMPLERS RICHARD A. BARKLEY' ABSTRACf The ideal sampler for plankton theoretical analysis of one aspect of selectivity, avoidance of towed-net samplers. The theory is evaluated against three sets of paired samples obtained by different nets at different speeds to provide absolute

  8. HEALTH NET PHARMACY BENEFITS Plan codes WEE, WKK, WQQ1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mullins, Dyche

    HEALTH NET PHARMACY BENEFITS Plan codes WEE, WKK, WQQ1 The following is a brief description of your Health Net Pharmacy benefits. PRESCRIPTIONS BY MAIL If your prescription is for a maintenance medication III. For complete information, log on as a Health Net member at www.healthnet.com > View prescription

  9. PNGT'04 Preliminary Version A congruence for Petri nets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sobocinski, Pawel

    PNGT'04 Preliminary Version A congruence for Petri nets Vladimiro Sassone University of Sussex Pawel Soboci¬īnski Universit`a di Pisa Abstract We introduce a way of viewing Petri nets as open systems. This is done by considering a bicategory of cospans over a category of p/t nets and embeddings. We derive

  10. True Concurrency Semantics of Petri Nets (I) Concurrency Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    √Ābrah√°m, Erika

    True Concurrency Semantics of Petri Nets (I) Concurrency Theory True Concurrency Semantics of Petri Nets (I) Joost-Pieter Katoen and Thomas Noll Lehrstuhl f√ľr Informatik 2 Software Modeling and Thomas Noll Concurrency Theory 1/48 True Concurrency Semantics of Petri Nets (I) Overview 1 Introduction

  11. The Compositionality of Abstraction for Coloured Petri Nets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lakos, Charles

    The Compositionality of Abstraction for Coloured Petri Nets Charles Lakos, Electrical Engineering.Lakos@utas.edu.au Abstract: An earlier paper considered the appropriate properties for abstract net components in the Coloured Petri Net formalism. This paper extends that earlier work in refining some definitions

  12. The Individual and Collective Token Interpretations of Petri Nets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pratt, Vaughan

    The Individual and Collective Token Interpretations of Petri Nets Rob van Glabbeek National ICT@cs.stanford.edu Abstract. Starting from the opinion that the standard firing rule of Petri nets embodies the collective token interpretation of nets rather than their individual token interpretation, I propose a new firing

  13. INFORMATION SYSTEMS MODELLING USING LOOPN++, AN OBJECT PETRI NET SCHEME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lakos, Charles

    INFORMATION SYSTEMS MODELLING USING LOOPN++, AN OBJECT PETRI NET SCHEME Chris Keen and Charles, object petri nets, information systems modelling, ontological expressiveness Abstract There have been formalisms based on petri nets. In particular, the application of object­based design principles have

  14. Complexity Results for 1-safe Nets Allan Cheng

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palsberg, Jens

    Complexity Results for 1-safe Nets Allan Cheng Computer Science Department, Aarhus University Ny@daimi.aau.dk Abstract We study the complexity of several standard problems for 1-safe Petri nets and some of its subclasses. We prove that reachability, liveness, and deadlock are all PSPACE-complete for 1-safe nets. We

  15. The Individual and Collective Token Interpretations of Petri Nets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pratt, Vaughan

    The Individual and Collective Token Interpretations of Petri Nets@cs.stanford.edu Abstract. Starting from the opinion that the standard firing rule of Petri nets embodies the collective token interpretation of nets rather than their individual token interpretation, I propose

  16. The Object Orientation of Object Petri Nets Charles Lakos,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lakos, Charles

    The Object Orientation of Object Petri Nets Charles Lakos, Computer Science Department, University informally introduces Object Petri Nets (OPNs) with a number of examples and discusses how this kind of Petri Net addresses a number of issues pertinent to Concurrent Object­Oriented Programming Languages. OPNs

  17. INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS &INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS &INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS & THE GLOBAL ECONOMYTHE GLOBAL ECONOMYTHE GLOBAL ECONOMY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krylov, Anna I.

    GLOBAL ECONOMYTHE GLOBAL ECONOMY This major offers students rigorous interdisciplinary training 331: The Global Economy 2030 -- Examination of key ideas from economics, demography and technology. Guest lecturers illuminate possible conditions of the global economy in 2030. IR 454: International

  18. Adaptation policies to increase terrestrial ecosystem resilience: potential utility of a multicriteria approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Bremond, Ariane; Engle, Nathan L.

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate change is rapidly undermining terrestrial ecosystem resilience and capacity to continue providing their services to the benefit of humanity and nature. Because of the importance of terrestrial ecosystems to human well-being and supporting services, decision makers throughout the world are busy creating policy responses that secure multiple development and conservation objectives- including that of supporting terrestrial ecosystem resilience in the context of climate change. This article aims to advance analyses on climate policy evaluation and planning in the area of terrestrial ecosystem resilience by discussing adaptation policy options within the ecology-economy-social nexus. The paper evaluates these decisions in the realm of terrestrial ecosystem resilience and evaluates the utility of a set of criteria, indicators, and assessment methods, proposed by a new conceptual multi-criteria framework for pro-development climate policy and planning developed by the United Nations Environment Programme. Potential applications of a multicriteria approach to climate policy vis-A -vis terrestrial ecosystems are then explored through two hypothetical case study examples. The paper closes with a brief discussion of the utility of the multi-criteria approach in the context of other climate policy evaluation approaches, considers lessons learned as a result efforts to evaluate climate policy in the realm of terrestrial ecosystems, and reiterates the role of ecosystem resilience in creating sound policies and actions that support the integration of climate change and development goals.

  19. FishNet: Finding and Maintaining Information on the Net Paul De Bra 1 and Pim Lemmens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Bra, Paul

    FishNet: Finding and Maintaining Information on the Net Paul De Bra 1 and Pim Lemmens Department whether links are still valid and whether documents they point to have been modified or moved. ffl Fish of a given set of (addresses of) documents. FishNet keeps track of the evolution of a domain of interest

  20. Making a Place for Seniors on the Net: SeniorNet, Senior Identity, and the Digital Divide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ito, Mimi

    Making a Place for Seniors on the Net: SeniorNet, Senior Identity, and the Digital Divide Mizuko Ito1 , Vicki L. O'Day2 , Annette Adler3 , Charlotte Linde4 , Elizabeth D. Mynatt5 Expanding the Story of the Digital Divide The most recent edition of the annual "Falling Through the Net" report from the U

  1. A Portable Rocket-Net System for Capturing Wildlife Construction, use, and safety of a portable rocket-net system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Portable Rocket-Net System for Capturing Wildlife Construction, use, and safety of a portable rocket-net system for use in wildlife capture are described, including the standard 3-rocket system, are presented. Keywords: Rocket net, wildlife capture, trapping, bald eagle, Haliaeetus leucocephalus, Arizona

  2. Engineering the global ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stringfellow, William T.; Jain, Ravi

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of humans deliberately engineering agricultural landscapes.010-0302-8 EDITORIAL Engineering the global ecosystemtale about human explorers engineering the ecosystem of Mars

  3. Global climatic change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houghton, R.A.; Woodwell, G.M.

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews the climatic effects of trace gases such as carbon dioxide and methane. It discusses the expected changes from the increases in trace gases and the extent to which the expected changes can be found in the climate record and in the retreat of glaciers. The use of ice cores in correlating atmospheric composition and climate is discussed. The response of terrestrial ecosystems as a biotic feedback is discussed. Possible responses are discussed, including reduction in fossil-fuel use, controls on deforestation, and reforestation. International aspects, such as the implications for developing nations, are addressed.

  4. Estimation of Net Ecosystem Carbon Exchange for the Conterminous UnitedStates by Combining MODIS and AmeriFlux Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Jingfeng; Zhuang, Qianlai; Baldocchi, Dennis D.; Law, Beverly E.; Richardson, Andrew D.; Chen, Jiquan; Oren, Ram; Starr, Gregory; Noormets, Asko; Ma, Siyan; Verma, Shashi B.; Wharton, Sonia; Wofsy, Steven C.; Bolstad, Paul V.; Burns, Sean P.; Cook, David R.; Curtis, Peter S.; Drake, Bert G.; Falk, Matthias; Fischer, Marc L.; Foster, David R.; Gu, Lianhong; Hadley, Julian L.; Hollinger, David Y.; Katul, Gabriel G.; Litvak, Marcy; Martin, Timothy A.; Matamala, Roser; McNulty, Steve; Meyers, Tilden P.; Monson, Russell K.; Munger, J. William; Oechel, Walter C.; U, Kyaw Tha Paw; Schmid, Hans Peter; Scott, Russell L.; Sun, Ge; Suyker, Andrew E.; Torn, Margaret S.

    2009-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Eddy covariance flux towers provide continuous measurements of net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE) for a wide range of climate and biome types. However, these measurements only represent the carbon fluxes at the scale of the tower footprint. To quantify the net exchange of carbon dioxide between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere for regions or continents, flux tower measurements need to be extrapolated to these large areas. Here we used remotely-sensed data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) instrument on board NASA's Terra satellite to scale up AmeriFlux NEE measurements to the continental scale. We first combined MODIS and AmeriFlux data for representative U.S. ecosystems to develop a predictive NEE model using a regression tree approach. The predictive model was trained and validated using NEE data over the periods 2000-2004 and 2005-2006, respectively. We found that the model predicted NEE reasonably well at the site level. We then applied the model to the continental scale and estimated NEE for each 1 km x 1 km cell across the conterminous U.S. for each 8-day period in 2005 using spatially-explicit MODIS data. The model generally captured the expected spatial and seasonal patterns of NEE. Our study demonstrated that our empirical approach is effective for scaling up eddy flux NEE measurements to the continental scale and producing wall-to-wall NEE estimates across multiple biomes. Our estimates may provide an independent dataset from simulations with biogeochemical models and inverse modeling approaches for examining the spatiotemporal patterns of NEE and constraining terrestrial carbon budgets for large areas.

  5. Estimation of net ecosystem carbon exchange for the conterminous United States by combining MODIS and AmeriFlux data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Jingfeng; Zhuang, Qianlai; Baldocchi, Dennis D.; Bolstad, Paul V.; Burns, Sean P.; Chen, Jiquan; Cook, David R.; Curtis, Peter S.; Drake, Bert G.; Foster, David R.; Gu, Lianhong; Hadley, Julian L.; Hollinger, David Y.; Katul, Gabriel G.; Law, Beverly E.; Litvak, Marcy; Ma, Siyan; Martin, Timothy A.; Matamala, Roser; McNulty, Steve; Meyers, Tilden P.; Monson, Russell K.; Munger, J. William; Noormets, Asko; Oechel, Walter C.; Oren, Ram; Richardson, Andrew D.; Schmid, Hans Peter; Scott, Russell L.; Starr, Gregory; Sun, Ge; Suyker, Andrew E.; Torn, Margaret S.; Paw, Kyaw; Verma, Shashi B.; Wharton, Sonia; Wofsy, Steven C.

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Eddy covariance flux towers provide continuous measurements of net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE) for a wide range of climate and biome types. However, these measurements only represent the carbon fluxes at the scale of the tower footprint. To quantify the net exchange of carbon dioxide between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere for regions or continents, flux tower measurements need to be extrapolated to these large areas. Here we used remotely sensed data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) instrument on board the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Terra satellite to scale up AmeriFlux NEE measurements to the continental scale. We first combined MODIS and AmeriFlux data for representative U.S. ecosystems to develop a predictive NEE model using a modified regression tree approach. The predictive model was trained and validated using eddy flux NEE data over the periods 2000-2004 and 2005-2006, respectively. We found that the model predicted NEE well (r = 0.73, p < 0.001). We then applied the model to the continental scale and estimated NEE for each 1 km x 1 km cell across the conterminous U.S. for each 8-day interval in 2005 using spatially explicit MODIS data. The model generally captured the expected spatial and seasonal patterns of NEE as determined from measurements and the literature. Our study demonstrated that our empirical approach is effective for scaling up eddy flux NEE measurements to the continental scale and producing wall-to-wall NEE estimates across multiple biomes. Our estimates may provide an independent dataset from simulations with biogeochemical models and inverse modeling approaches for examining the spatiotemporal patterns of NEE and constraining terrestrial carbon budgets over large areas.

  6. Net-baryon-, net-proton-, and net-charge kurtosis in heavy-ion collisions within a relativistic transport approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marlene Nahrgang; Tim Schuster; Michael Mitrovski; Reinhard Stock; Marcus Bleicher

    2012-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the potential of net-baryon, net-proton and net-charge kurtosis measurements to investigate the properties of hot and dense matter created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. Contrary to calculations in a grand canonical ensemble we explicitly take into account exact electric and baryon charge conservation on an event-by-event basis. This drastically limits the width of baryon fluctuations. A simple model to account for this is to assume a grand-canonical distribution with a sharp cut-off at the tails. We present baseline predictions of the energy dependence of the net-baryon, net-proton and net-charge kurtosis for central ($b\\leq 2.75$ fm) Pb+Pb/Au+Au collisions from $E_{lab}=2A$ GeV to $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200$ GeV from the UrQMD model. While the net-charge kurtosis is compatible with values around zero, the net-baryon number decreases to large negative values with decreasing beam energy. The net-proton kurtosis becomes only slightly negative for low $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$.

  7. USING ANT COMMUNITIES FOR RAPID ASSESSMENT OF TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEM HEALTH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wike, L; Doug Martin, D; Michael Paller, M; Eric Nelson, E

    2007-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Ecosystem health with its near infinite number of variables is difficult to measure, and there are many opinions as to which variables are most important, most easily measured, and most robust, Bioassessment avoids the controversy of choosing which physical and chemical parameters to measure because it uses responses of a community of organisms that integrate all aspects of the system in question. A variety of bioassessment methods have been successfully applied to aquatic ecosystems using fish and macroinvertebrate communities. Terrestrial biotic index methods are less developed than those for aquatic systems and we are seeking to address this problem here. This study had as its objective to examine the baseline differences in ant communities at different seral stages from clear cut back to mature pine plantation as a precursor to developing a bioassessment protocol. Comparative sampling was conducted at four seral stages; clearcut, 5 year, 15 year and mature pine plantation stands. Soil and vegetation data were collected at each site. All ants collected were preserved in 70% ethyl alcohol and identified to genus. Analysis of the ant data indicates that ants respond strongly to the habitat changes that accompany ecological succession in managed pine forests and that individual genera as well as ant community structure can be used as an indicator of successional change. Ants exhibited relatively high diversity in both early and mature seral stages. High ant diversity in the mature seral stages was likely related to conditions on the forest floor which favored litter dwelling and cool climate specialists.

  8. Globalization: Ecological Consequences of Global-Scale Connectivity in People,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    11 Globalization: Ecological Consequences of Global-Scale Connectivity in People, Resources of the global mineral aerosol load (Tanaka & Chiba, 2006). #12;The Systemic Dimension of Globalization212 of Agriculture ­ Agricultural Research Service, Las Cruces, New Mexico USA 1. Introduction Globalization

  9. global warming's six americas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, Gary L.

    Energy Sources 17 Subsidies for Fossil Fuel and Renewable Energy Industries 18 Support for a Carbon Tax and Costs of Reducing Fossil Fuel Use and Global Warming 8 The Alarmed 9 The Concerned 10 The Cautious 11 the spring and fall of 2012. Perceived Benefits and Costs of Reducing Fossil Fuel Use and Global Warming

  10. Global Change Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    Global Change and Sustainability Center The GCSC is an inclusionary and interdisciplinary hub that promotes, coordinates, and conducts local to global environmental- and sustainability-related research to complex environmental and sustainability issues and challenges. 2012 Annual Report #12;1GCSC 2012 ANNUAL

  11. Global Development Our Responsibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of expertise cover urgent global issues such as food production, energy supply, climate change, biodiversity e ort to address urgent global issues particularly a ecting developing countries e.g. climate change of Communication, 2012 · Project Leader: Karin Nilsson · Graphic Design: Viktor Wrange & Michael Kvick Cover Photo

  12. CHILLING CONSIDERATIONS GLOBAL WARMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    (millionsofsquarekilometers) 30 20 10 MELTING OF GREENLAND ICE CAP Satellite determination of maximum extent of glacial melt Complete melt of the Greenland ice sheet would raise the level of the global ocean 23 feet. ASAN Steffen IS INCREASING Global carbon dioxide concentration over the last thousand years Polar ice cores #12;Mann et al

  13. Utilizing Vertebrates to Understand the Factors that Influence Terrestrial Ecosystem Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redman, Cory

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Debbie J. Thomas Frances Gelwick Head of Department, J. Rick Giardino May 2012 Major Subject: Geology iii ABSTRACT Utilizing Vertebrates to Understand the Factors that Influence Terrestrial Ecosystem Structure. (May...

  14. Studies of plume condensation contamination upon surfaces of the Terrestrial Planet Finder spacecraft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pigeon, Timothy David

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are two competing concepts for the Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) mission, one which involves a single spacecraft, and another comprised of a five craft formation. In addition, there are several propulsion options ...

  15. A Process-based Analysis of Methane Exchanges Between Alaskan Terrestrial Ecosystems and the Atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuang, Qianlai.

    We developed and used a new version of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM) to study how rates of methane (CH4) emissions and consumption in Alaskan soils have changed over the past century in response to observed changes ...

  16. Atmospheric photochemistry, surface features, and potential biosignature gases of terrestrial exoplanets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Renyu, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The endeavor to characterize terrestrial exoplanets warrants the study of chemistry in their atmospheres. Here I present a comprehensive one-dimensional photochemistry-thermochemistry model developed from the ground up for ...

  17. Interactions of Water and Energy Mediate Responses of High-Latitude Terrestrial Ecosystems to Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subin, Zachary Marc

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    remote ocean temperatures to respond, while a terrestrial cooling,summer cooling at 850 hPa. Significant remote changescooling due to a change in ocean circulation would imply a compensating remote

  18. PHOTOCHEMISTRY IN TERRESTRIAL EXOPLANET ATMOSPHERES. I. PHOTOCHEMISTRY MODEL AND BENCHMARK CASES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Renyu

    We present a comprehensive photochemistry model for exploration of the chemical composition of terrestrial exoplanet atmospheres. The photochemistry model is designed from the ground up to have the capacity to treat all ...

  19. Determination of Longitudinal Dispersion Coefficient and Net

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho, David

    with a Large-Scale, High Resolution SF6 Tracer Release Experiment D A V I D T . H O , * , P E T E R S C H L O into rivers. In the following, we report results from a large-scale SF6 tracer release experiment conducted in the tidal Hudson River to examine longitudinal dispersion and net advection. SF6 was injected

  20. ARM - Measurement - Net broadband total irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDCnarrowband upwelling irradiance ARM DatagovMeasurementsNet

  1. Next Update: October 2010 Net Internal

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthrough 1996) inThousandWithdrawals (MillionNine Mile Pointper0 0 Net

  2. Effect of the terrestrial magnetic field on direct-current measurements in underground pipelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dzhala, R.M.; Dikmarova, L.P.; Kornienko, V.Yu.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of the secondary field of an underground pipeline, magnetized by the terrestrial magnetic field, on noncontacting measurements of direct current flowing in it is discussed. The systematic errors of three known measurement methods are compared. A method based on the measurement of the difference between the field components parallel to the terrestrial field component orthogonal to the pipline is identified as the most accurate. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  3. Relative importance of multiple factors on terrestrial loading of DOC to Arctic river networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kicklighter, David W. [Ecosystem Center, The] [Ecosystem Center, The; Hayes, Daniel J [ORNL] [ORNL; Mcclelland, James W [University of Texas] [University of Texas; Peterson, Bruce [Marine Biological Laboratory] [Marine Biological Laboratory; Mcguire, David [University of Alaska] [University of Alaska; Melillo, Jerry [Marine Biological Laboratory] [Marine Biological Laboratory

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Terrestrial carbon dynamics influence the contribution of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to river networks in addition to controlling carbon fluxes between the land surface and the atmosphere. In this study, we use a biogeochemical process model to simulate the lateral transfer of DOC from land to the Arctic Ocean via riverine transport. We estimate that the pan-arctic watershed has contributed, on average, 32 Tg C/yr of DOC to the Arctic Ocean over the 20th century with most coming from the extensive area of boreal deciduous needle-leaved forests and forested wetlands in Eurasian watersheds. We also estimate that the rate of terrestrial DOC loading has been increasing by 0.037 Tg C/yr2 over the 20th century primarily as a result of increases in air temperatures and precipitation. These increases have been partially compensated by decreases in terrestrial DOC loading caused by wildfires. Other environmental factors (CO2 fertilization, ozone pollution, atmospheric nitrogen deposition, timber harvest, agriculture) are estimated to have relatively small effects on terrestrial DOC loading to arctic rivers. The effects of the various environmental factors on terrestrial carbon dynamics have both compensated and enhanced concurrent effects on hydrology to influence terrestrial DOC loading. Future increases in riverine DOC concentrations and export may occur from warming-induced increases in terrestrial DOC production associated with enhanced microbial metabolism and the exposure of additional organic matter from permafrost degradation along with decreases in water yield associated with warming-induced increases in evapotranspiration. Improvements in simulating terrestrial DOC loading to pan-arctic rivers in the future will require better information on the spatial distribution of precipitation and its temporal trends, carbon dynamics of larch-dominated ecosystems in eastern Siberia, and the role of industrial organic effluents on carbon budgets of rivers in western Russia.

  4. Method for net-shaping using aerogels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brinker, C. Jeffrey (Albuquerque, NM); Ashey, Carol S. (Albuquerque, NM); Reed, Scott T. (Albuquerque, NM); Sriram, Chunangad S. (Indianapolis, IN); Harris, Thomas M. (Tulsa, OK)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of net-shaping using aerogel materials is provided by first forming a sol, aging the sol to form a gel, with the gel having a fluid component and having been formed into a medium selected from the group consisting of a powder, bulk material, or granular aerobeads, derivatizing the surface of the gel to render the surface unreactive toward further condensation, removing a portion of the fluid component of the final shaped gel to form a partially dried medium, placing the medium into a cavity, wherein the volume of said medium is less that the volume of the cavity, and removing a portion of the fluid component of the medium. The removal, such as by heating at a temperature of approximately less than 50.degree. C., applying a vacuum, or both, causes the volume of the medium to increase and to form a solid aerogel. The material can be easily removed by exposing the material to a solvent, thereby reducing the volume of the material. In another embodiment, the gel is derivatized and then formed into a shaped medium, where subsequent drying reduces the volume of the shaped medium, forming a net-shaping material. Upon further drying, the material increases in volume to fill a cavity. The present invention is both a method of net-shaping and the material produced by the method.

  5. Global warming, bad weather, insurance losses and the global economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Low, N.C. [UOB Life Assurance Ltd., Singapore (Singapore); Shen, S. [Global Warming International Center, Woodridge, IL (United States)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Global warming causes extremely bad weather in the near term. The impact on the insurance industry is described. Why global warming in the near term causes very bad weather is explained. The continuing trend of very bad weather and the future impact on the insurance industry is explored. How very bad weather can affect the global financial market is explained. Taking a historical view of the development of the modern economy, the authors describe in the near term the impact of global warming on the global economy. The long term impact of global warming on the global economy and the human race is explored. Opportunities presented by global warming are described.

  6. Global Evaluation of the ISBA-TRIP Continental Hydrological System. Part I: Comparison to GRACE Terrestrial Water Storage Estimates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribes, Aurťlien

    In earth system models, the partitioning of precipitation among the variations of continental water storage climate system sim- ulated by earth system models (ESMs). The continental freshwater reservoirs represent

  7. A Causal Net Approach to Relativistic Quantum Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. D. Bateson

    2012-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we discuss a causal network approach to describing relativistic quantum mechanics. Each vertex on the causal net represents a possible point event or particle observation. By constructing the simplest causal net based on Reichenbach-like conjunctive forks in proper time we can exactly derive the 1+1 dimension Dirac equation for a relativistic fermion and correctly model quantum mechanical statistics. Symmetries of the net provide various quantum mechanical effects such as quantum uncertainty and wavefunction, phase, spin, negative energy states and the effect of a potential. The causal net can be embedded in 3+1 dimensions and is consistent with the conventional Dirac equation. In the low velocity limit the causal net approximates to the Schrodinger equation and Pauli equation for an electromagnetic field. Extending to different momentum states the net is compatible with the Feynman path integral approach to quantum mechanics that allows calculation of well known quantum phenomena such as diffraction.

  8. China's Global Oil Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Bryan G

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    21, 2008. Ying, Wang. ď China, Venezuela firms to co-developoilfields. Ē China Daily (27 August 2005) http://David and Bi Jianhai. ďChinaís Global Hunt for Energy. Ē

  9. Global Cool Cities Alliance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is currently supporting the Global Cool Cities Alliance (GCCA), a non-profit organization that works with cities, regions, and national governments to speed the...

  10. China's Global Oil Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Bryan G

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    nations began to seek out oil reserves around the world. 3on the limited global oil reserves and spiking prices. Manyto the largest proven oil reserves, making up 61 percent of

  11. Global warming elucidated

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, S. [Global Warming International Center, Woodridge, IL (United States)

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The meaning of global warming and its relevance to everyday life is explained. Simple thermodynamics is used to predict an oscillatory nature of the change in climate due to global warming. Global warming causes extreme events and bad weather in the near term. In the long term it may cause the earth to transition to another equilibrium state through many oscillation in climatic patterns. The magnitudes of these oscillations could easily exceed the difference between the end points. The author further explains why many no longer fully understands the nature and magnitudes of common phenomena such as storms and wind speeds because of these oscillations, and the absorptive properties of clouds. The author links the increase in duration of the El Nino to global warming, and further predicts public health risks as the earth transitions to another equilibrium state in its young history.

  12. Systems integration for global sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Le, A. Z. Khan, Improving integration for integrated coastal347 ISSUE 6225 Systems integration for global sustainabilitySUSTAINABILITY Systems integration for global sustainability

  13. Global fish production and climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brander, K.M. [International Council for the Exploration of the Sea, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Current global fisheries production of {approx}160 million tons is rising as a result of increases in aquaculture production. A number of climate-related threats to both capture fisheries and aquaculture are identified, but there is low confidence in predictions of future fisheries production because of uncertainty over future global aquatic net primary production and the transfer of this production through the food chain to human consumption. Recent changes in the distribution and productivity of a number of fish species can be ascribed with high confidence to regional climate variability, such as the El Nino-Southern Oscillation. Future production may increase in some high-latitude regions because of warming and decreased ice cover, but the dynamics in low-latitude regions are giverned by different processes, and production may decline as a result of reduced vertical mixing of the water column and, hence, reduced recycling of nutrients. There are strong interactions between the effects of fishing and the effects of climate because fishing reduces the age, size, and geographic diversity of populations and the biodiversity of marine ecosystems, making both more sensitive to additional stresses such as climate change. Inland fisheries are additionally threatened by changes in precipiation and water management. The frequency and intensity of extreme climate events is likely to have a major impact on future fisheries production in both inland and marine systems. Reducing fishing mortality in the majority of fisheries, which are currently fully exploited or overexploited, is the pricipal feasible means of reducing the impacts of climate change.

  14. Global climatic catastrophes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Budyko, M.I.; Golitsyn, G.S.; Izrael, A

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work inquires into global climatic catastrophes of the past, presenting data not easily available outside of the Socialist Countries, and applies these results to the study of future climatic developments, especially as they threaten in case of Nuclear Warfare - Nuclear Winter. The authors discuss probable after effects from the Soviet point of view on the basis of research, stressing the need to avoid all conflict which might lead to the next and final Global Climatic Catastrophy.

  15. Optimal Planning with Global Numerical State Constraints Franc Ivankovic, Patrik Haslum, Sylvie Thiebaux, Vikas Shivashankar and Dana S. Nau

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thiťbaux, Sylvie

    , transport systems and water net- works. Smart use of this information, using automated plan- ningOptimal Planning with Global Numerical State Constraints Franc Ivankovic, Patrik Haslum, Sylvie Thi.last@anu.edu.au {svikas,nau}@cs.umd.edu Abstract Automating the operations of infrastructure networks such as energy grids

  16. Net Zero Energy Military Installations: A Guide to Assessment...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Net Zero Energy Military Installations: A Guide to Assessment and Planning Samuel Booth, John Barnett, Kari Burman, Josh Hambrick and Robert Westby Technical Report NREL...

  17. Lessons Learned from Net Zero Energy Assessments and Renewable...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Lessons Learned from Net Zero Energy Assessments and Renewable Energy Projects at Military Installations Michael Callahan, Kate Anderson, Sam Booth, Jessica Katz, and Tim Tetreault...

  18. Hydro-Quťbec Net Metering (Quebec, Canada) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Canada) Policy Type Net Metering Affected Technologies Geothermal Electric, Solar Photovoltaics Active Policy Yes Implementing Sector Utility Funding Source Hydro-Quebec Primary...

  19. The Intersection of Net Metering and Retail Choice: An Overview...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and utilities provide net metering options for their customers. They then provided case studies to illustrate the models. Date December 2010 Topic Financing, Incentives &...

  20. Deep Energy Efficiency and Getting to Net Zero

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers energy efficiency and getting to net zero and is given at the Spring 2011 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting.

  1. Scotia Energy Electricity- Net Metering Program (Nova Scotia, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Nova Scotia Power Inc. Net Metering allows residential and commercial customers to connect small, renewable energy generating units to the provincial power grid.

  2. Designing Hawaiiźs First LEED Platinum Net Zero Community: ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Kaupuni Village Department of Hawaiian Home Lands Designing Hawaii's first LEED Platinum Net Zero Community GUIDING PRINCIPALS *Pihapono *Hoa ina *Mlama ina Enable Native...

  3. Net bundles over posets and K-theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. E. Roberts; G. Ruzzi; E. Vasselli

    2012-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We continue studying net bundles over partially ordered sets (posets), defined as the analogues of ordinary fibre bundles. To this end, we analyze the connection between homotopy, net homology and net cohomology of a poset, giving versions of classical Hurewicz theorems. Focusing our attention on Hilbert net bundles, we define the K-theory of a poset and introduce functions over the homotopy groupoid satisfying the same formal properties as Chern classes. As when the given poset is a base for the topology of a space, our results apply to the category of locally constant bundles.

  4. Net Requirements Transparency Process for Slice/Block Customers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4, 2012 Net Requirements Transparency Process for SliceBlock Customers Description of Changes and a Response to Comments September 24, 2012 Background and Description of Changes:...

  5. Maritime Electric- Net Metering (Prince Edward Island, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In December 2005 The Renewable Energy Act and associated Regulations came into effect. A Government policy objective incorporated in the Act was the introduction of net metering for...

  6. Exact entanglement renormalization for string-net models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Koenig; Ben W. Reichardt; Guifre Vidal

    2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct an explicit renormalization group (RG) transformation for Levin and Wen's string-net models on a hexagonal lattice. The transformation leaves invariant the ground-state "fixed-point" wave function of the string-net condensed phase. Our construction also produces an exact representation of the wave function in terms of the multi-scale entanglement renormalization ansatz (MERA). This sets the stage for efficient numerical simulations of string-net models using MERA algorithms. It also provides an explicit quantum circuit to prepare the string-net ground-state wave function using a quantum computer.

  7. Zero Net Energy Myths and Modes of Thought

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajkovich, Nicholas B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2009). "Net-Zero Energy Commercial Buildings Initiative."Goetzler, W. (2008). Zero Energy Homes: Implications forcommercial buildings, see the Zero Energy Buildings Database

  8. artificial neural nets: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Adaptive Engineering Websites Summary: Neural Nets for Adaptive Filtering and Adaptive Pattern Recognition Bernard Widrow, Stanford elements, on the other hand, arethe building...

  9. A Method for Correcting Catches of Fish Larvae For the Size Selection of Plankton Nets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    corrected by determining the ratio between a stan- dard net and a test net with either zero extrusion or. . zero avoidance. However, when avoidance of the test net with zero extrusion or when extrusion through test net with zero avoidance differs from the stan- dard net, then the usual method of correcting

  10. Transactions and Zero-Safe Nets Roberto Bruni and Ugo Montanari

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruni, Roberto

    Transactions and Zero-Safe Nets Roberto Bruni and Ugo Montanari Dipartimento di Informatica present an approach to the modeling of transactions based on zero-safe nets. They extend ordinary PT nets be uniformly adapted to zero-safe nets. In particular, we show that each zero-safe net has two associated PT

  11. Process Semantics of General Inhibitor Nets1 H. C. M. Kleijn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newcastle upon Tyne, University of

    Process Semantics of General Inhibitor Nets1 H. C. M. Kleijn LIACS, Leiden University P.O.Box 9512 a causality semantics of Place/Transition nets with weighted inhibitor arcs (PTI-nets). We extend the standard approach to defining the partial order semantics of Place/Transition nets (PT-nets) based on the process

  12. Non-Abelian String-Net Ladders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. D. Schulz; S. Dusuel; J. Vidal

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the string-net model with a string tension for non-Abelian particles in the ladder geometry. Focusing on the simplest non-Abelian theory with a total quantum dimension larger than two, we find evidence for a "russian doll" spectrum featuring size-independent energy levels. Contrary to Fibonacci and Ising ladders, the spectrum is found to be gapped at the self-dual points and low-energy excitations in the ground-state sector consist in two-quasiparticle bound states that are discussed in the weak-tension limit. We argue that such properties are prototypical of theories containing more than one non-Abelian particle.

  13. Wire-Net | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwideWTEDBird,Wilsonville,Winneconne,WinslowWinthrop,Wire-Net Jump to:

  14. net_energy_load_2006.xls

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year199873.4 66.1 56.2 50.4415 6833 (ThousandMean1. Net Energy

  15. net_energy_load_2010.xls

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year199873.4 66.1 56.2 50.4415 6833 (ThousandMean1. Net

  16. Working and Net Available Shell Storage Capacity

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Energy I I'26,282.1chemical compounds composed of113) MonthlyP FNetNet

  17. Millenial Net Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio:Menomonee|Mililani Town, Hawaii:Mille Lacs County,Millenial Net

  18. Motivation Elastic Net Computation Elastic-Net and algorithms for computing the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Recht, Ben

    Solution Lemma Given data set (y, X) and (1, 2), define an artificial data set (y, X) by X (n+p)√?p = (1 + 2 compute the elastic-net estimator ^(enet), and then we construct the adaptive weights by ^wj = (|^j

  19. Community Net Energy Metering: How Novel Policies Expand Benefits of Net Metering to Non-Generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, James; Varnado, Laurel

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As interest in community solutions to renewable energy grows, more states are beginning to develop policies that encourage properties with more than one meter to install shared renewable energy systems. State net metering policies are evolving to allow the aggregation of multiple meters on a customer√?¬?√?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?s property and to dissolve conventional geographical boundaries. This trend means net metering is expanding out of its traditional function as an enabling incentive to offset onsite customer load at a single facility. This paper analyzes community net energy metering (CNEM) as an emerging vehicle by which farmers, neighborhoods, and municipalities may more easily finance and reap the benefits of renewable energy. Specifically, it aims to compare and contrast the definition of geographical boundaries among different CNEM models and examine the benefits and limitations of each approach. As state policies begin to stretch the geographic boundaries of net metering, they allow inventive solutions to encourage renewable energy investment. This paper attempts to initiate the conversation on this emerging policy mechanism and offers recommendations for further development of these policies.

  20. Terrestrial Background Reduction in RPM Systems by Direct Internal Shielding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, Sean M.; Ashbaker, Eric D.; Schweppe, John E.

    2008-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma-ray detection systems that are close to the earth or other sources of background radiation often require shielding, especially when trying to detect a relatively weak source. One particular case of interest that we address in this paper is that encountered by the Radiation Portal Monitors (RPMs) systems placed at border-crossing Ports of Entry (POE). These RPM systems are used to screen for illicit radiological materials, and they are often placed in situations where terrestrial background is large. In such environments, it is desirable to consider simple physical modifications that could be implemented to reduce the effects from background radiation without affecting the flow of traffic and the normal operation of the portal. Simple modifications include adding additional shielding to the environment, either inside or outside the apparatus. Previous work [2] has shown the utility of some of these shielding configurations for increasing the Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) of gross-counting RPMs. Because the total cost for purchasing and installing RPM systems can be quite expensive, in the range of hundreds of thousands of dollars for each cargo-screening installation, these shielding variations may offer increases in detection capability for relatively small cost. Several modifications are considered here in regard to their real-world applicability, and are meant to give a general idea of the effectiveness of the schemes used to reduce background for both gross-counting and spectroscopic detectors. These scenarios are modeled via the Monte-Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code package [1] for ease of altering shielding configurations, as well as enacting unusual scenarios prior to prototyping in the field. The objective of this paper is to provide results representative of real modifications that could enhance the sensitivity of this, as well as the next generation of radiation detectors. The models used in this work were designed to provide the most general results for an RPM. These results are therefore presented as general guidance on what shielding configurations will be the most valuable for a generalized RPM, considered in light of their economic and geometric possibility in the real world.

  1. Predicting Planets in Known Extra-Solar Planetary Systems III: Forming Terrestrial Planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sean N. Raymond; Rory Barnes; Nathan A. Kaib

    2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent results have shown that many of the known extrasolar planetary systems contain regions which are stable for both Earth-mass and Saturn-mass planets. Here we simulate the formation of terrestrial planets in four planetary systems -- 55 Cancri, HD 38529, HD 37124, and HD 74156 -- under the assumption that these systems of giant planets are complete and that their orbits are well-determined. Assuming the giant planets formed and migrated quickly, then terrestrial planets may form from a second generation of planetesimals. In each case, Moon- to Mars-sized planetary embryos are placed in between the giant planets and evolved for 100 Myr. We find that planets form relatively easily in 55 Cnc, with masses up to 0.6 Earth masses and in some cases substantial water contents and orbits in the habitable zone. HD 38529 is likely to support an asteroid belt but no terrestrial planets of significant mass. No terrestrial planets form in HD 37124 and HD 74156, although in some cases 1-2 lone embryos survive for 100 Myr. If migration occurred later, depleting the planetesimal disk, then massive terrestrial planets are unlikely to form in any of these systems.

  2. GLOBAL LEADERSHIP PROGRAM MISSION STATEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saidak, Filip

    GLOBAL LEADERSHIP PROGRAM MISSION STATEMENT The Global Leadership Program at UNCG will afford. Leadership, citizenship and cross-cultural understanding have taken on new meanings and have become essential for the successful citizen of the new globalized world. The Global Leadership Program (GLP) is open to all domestic

  3. Original article Predicted global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Original article Predicted global warming and Douglas-fir chilling requirements DD McCreary1 DP to predicted global warming. Douglas-fir / chilling / global warming / bud burst / reforestation R√©sum√© offer evidence that mean global warming of 3-4 ¬įC could occur within the next century, particularly

  4. http://agbioresearch.msu.edu/centers/nwmihort/nwmihort_northern_michigan_fruit_net http://agbioresearch.msu.edu/centers/nwmihort/nwmihort_northern_michigan_fruit_net

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 http://agbioresearch.msu.edu/centers/nwmihort/nwmihort_northern_michigan_fruit_net #12;2 http://agbioresearch.msu.edu/centers/nwmihort/nwmihort_northern_michigan_fruit_net #12;3 http://agbioresearch.msu.edu/centers/nwmihort/nwmihort_northern_michigan_fruit_net #12;4 http://agbioresearch.msu.edu/centers/nwmihort/nwmihort_northern_michigan_fruit_net #12;5 http

  5. Fact #736: July 16, 2012 Total Petroleum Imports and Net Petroleum...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the 1970s the difference between total and net imports was minor. However, as the U.S. exports more petroleum, the gap between total imports and net imports grows. In 2011, net...

  6. Ethnically diverse patients' perceptions of clinician computer use in a safety-net clinic.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ratanawongsa, Neda; Barton, Jennifer L; Schillinger, Dean; Yelin, Edward H; Hettema, Jennifer E; Lum, Paula J

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    computer use in a safety-net clinic Neda Ratanawongsa, MD,populations. Safety-net clinics adopting EHRs should measureUse †in †a †Safety-≠?net †Clinic. †J †Health †Care †Poor †

  7. Optimal Technology Investment and Operation in Zero-Net-Energy Buildings with Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Operation in Zero-Net- Energy Buildings with Demand ResponseOperation in Zero-Net-Energy Buildings with Demand Responsemicrogrid, storage, zero- net energy buildings, zero-carbon

  8. Global ice sheet modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, T.J.; Fastook, J.L. [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States). Institute for Quaternary Studies

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The University of Maine conducted this study for Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of a global climate modeling task for site characterization of the potential nuclear waste respository site at Yucca Mountain, NV. The purpose of the study was to develop a global ice sheet dynamics model that will forecast the three-dimensional configuration of global ice sheets for specific climate change scenarios. The objective of the third (final) year of the work was to produce ice sheet data for glaciation scenarios covering the next 100,000 years. This was accomplished using both the map-plane and flowband solutions of our time-dependent, finite-element gridpoint model. The theory and equations used to develop the ice sheet models are presented. Three future scenarios were simulated by the model and results are discussed.

  9. Survival of Terrestrial Planets in the Presence of Giant Planet Migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avi M. Mandell; Steinn Sigurdsson

    2003-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of ``Hot Jupiters'', Jovian mass planets with very short orbital periods orbiting nearby main sequence stars, has been proposed to be primarily due to the orbital migration of planets formed in orbits initially much further from the parent star. The migration of giant planets would have profound effects on the evolution of inner terrestrial planets in these systems, and previous analyses have assumed that no terrestrial planets survive after migration has occurred. We present numerical simulations showing that a significant fraction of terrestrial planets could survive the migration process, eventually returning to circular orbits relatively close to their original positions. A fraction of the final orbits are in the Habitable Zone, suggesting that planetary systems with close-in giant planets are viable targets for searches for Earth-like habitable planets around other stars.

  10. Metal accumulation in terrestrial pulmonates at a lead/zinc smelter site in Arnoldstein, Austria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabitsch, W.B. [Univ. of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)] [Univ. of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently,the suitability of terrestrial gastropods was reviewed as quantitative indicator organisms for environmental metal pollution. The peculiar metal accumulation capabilities in molluscs have been known in detail for decades, but {open_quotes}only few data are available for terrestrial pulmonates{close_quotes}. Furthermore, data are restricted to only a few species, and despite similarities in metabolic pathways, species-specific properties in metal-budget strategies exist. Information concerning the potential range of metal burden in these animals form the field are, therefore, of ecophysical relevance. Snails satisfy a basic demand as quantitative indicators of the bioavailable fraction of terrestrial metal pollution. In this study concentrations of lead, cadmium, copper and zinc were measured in tissues of 4 species of snails collected in the vicinity of a lead/zinc smelter with a long history of pollution. 23 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Targeting Net Zero Energy for Military Installations (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burman, K.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Targeting Net Zero Energy for Military Installations in Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii. A net zero energy installation (NZEI) is one that produces as much energy from on-site renewable sources as it consumes. NZEI assessment provides a systematic approach to energy projects.

  12. Is Net Ecosystem Production Equal to Ecosystem Carbon Accumulation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pace, Michael L.

    COMMENTARY Is Net Ecosystem Production Equal to Ecosystem Carbon Accumulation? Gary M. Lovett,* Jonathan J. Cole, and Michael L. Pace Institute of Ecosystem Studies, Millbrook, New York 12545, USA ABSTRACT Net ecosystem production (NEP), defined as the difference between gross primary production

  13. Predicting Daily Net Radiation Using Minimum Climatological Data1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Predicting Daily Net Radiation Using Minimum Climatological Data1 S. Irmak, M.ASCE2 ; A. Irmak3 ; J Abstract: Net radiation (Rn) is a key variable for computing reference evapotranspiration and is a driving for predicting daily Rn have been widely used. However, when the paucity of detailed climatological data

  14. Net Balanced Floorplanning Based on Elastic Energy Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nannarelli, Alberto

    Net Balanced Floorplanning Based on Elastic Energy Model Wei Liu and Alberto Nannarelli Dept variations can introduce extra signal skew, it is desirable to have floorplans with balanced net delays based on the elastic energy model. The B*-tree, which is based on an ordered binary tree, is used

  15. Artificial Neural Nets and Cylinder Pressures in Diesel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharkey, Amanda

    Artificial Neural Nets and Cylinder Pressures in Diesel Engine Fault Diagnosis * Gopi O diagnosis system for a diesel engine, which uses artificial neural nets to identify faults on the basis cylinder Ruston AP 230, medium speed Diesel engine was simulated. When tested on new data previously unseen

  16. Net Environmental Benefit Analysis: A New Assessment Methodology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Net Environmental Benefit Analysis: A New Assessment Methodology R. A. Efroymson, efroymsonra.S. Department of Energy Dec-05 Net Environmental Benefit Analysis: A New Assessment Methodology R. A. Efroymson environmental assessment methodologies such as risk assessment, by explicitly considering benefits (not just

  17. artificial neural net: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    neural net First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 On Combining Artificial Neural Nets CiteSeer...

  18. Net energy ratio of photobiohydrogen generation G. Burgessa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Net energy ratio of photobiohydrogen generation G. Burgessa and J.G. FernŠndez the energy content, the operational energy inputs, and the net energy ratio (NER) of an industrial tubular photobioreactor used for the photosynthetic production of H2 by microalgae. The calculated H2 output

  19. Changing Communication Environments in MosquitoNet Mary G. Baker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Mary G.

    Changing Communication Environments in MosquitoNet Mary G. Baker Computer Science and Electrical is funded in part by the Center for Telecom- munications at Stanford University, the Reid and Polly Anderson- mary goal of MosquitoNet, a new project at Stanford Uni- versity for investigating operating system

  20. Long range global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rolle, K.C.; Pulkrabek, W.W.; Fiedler, R.A. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Platteville, WI (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper explores one of the causes of global warming that is often overlooked, the direct heating of the environment by engineering systems. Most research and studies of global warming concentrate on the modification that is occurring to atmospheric air as a result of pollution gases being added by various systems; i.e., refrigerants, nitrogen oxides, ozone, hydrocarbons, halon, and others. This modification affects the thermal radiation balance between earth, sun and space, resulting in a decrease of radiation outflow and a slow rise in the earth`s steady state temperature. For this reason the solution to the problem is perceived as one of cleaning up the processes and effluents that are discharged into the environment. In this paper arguments are presented that suggest, that there is a far more serious cause for global warming that will manifest itself in the next two or three centuries; direct heating from the exponential growth of energy usage by humankind. Because this is a minor contributor to the global warming problem at present, it is overlooked or ignored. Energy use from the combustion of fuels and from the output of nuclear reactions eventually is manifest as warming of the surroundings. Thus, as energy is used at an ever increasing rate the consequent global warming also increases at an ever increasing rate. Eventually this rate will become equal to a few percent of solar radiation. When this happens the earth`s temperature will have risen by several degrees with catastrophic results. The trends in world energy use are reviewed and some mathematical models are presented to suggest future scenarios. These models can be used to predict when the global warming problem will become undeniably apparent, when it will become critical, and when it will become catastrophic.

  1. Global Scale Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asphaug, Erik; Jutzi, Martin

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Global scale impacts modify the physical or thermal state of a substantial fraction of a target asteroid. Specific effects include accretion, family formation, reshaping, mixing and layering, shock and frictional heating, fragmentation, material compaction, dilatation, stripping of mantle and crust, and seismic degradation. Deciphering the complicated record of global scale impacts, in asteroids and meteorites, will lead us to understand the original planet-forming process and its resultant populations, and their evolution in time as collisions became faster and fewer. We provide a brief overview of these ideas, and an introduction to models.

  2. INTERNATIONAL RELATIONSINTERNATIONAL RELATIONSINTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (GLOBAL BUSINESS)(GLOBAL BUSINESS)(GLOBAL BUSINESS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krylov, Anna I.

    INTERNATIONAL RELATIONSINTERNATIONAL RELATIONSINTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (GLOBAL BUSINESS)(GLOBAL BUSINESS)(GLOBAL BUSINESS) Future leaders in business, government, and law need to understand how global, and internship opportunities, it is an ideal major for those interested in entering the realms of business

  3. Biogeosciences, 3, 539556, 2006 www.biogeosciences.net/3/539/2006/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universitť de

    terrestrial carbon uptake or release loose information due to air mix- ing in the firn before bubble enclosure. The Keeling plot analysis is an interpretation method widely used in terrestrial carbon cycle research to quantify exchange processes of carbon between terrestrial reservoirs and the atmosphere. Here, we analyse

  4. Quantum computational tensor network on string-net condensate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomoyuki Morimae

    2011-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The string-net condensate is a new class of materials which exhibits the quantum topological order. In order to answer the important question, "how useful is the string-net condensate in quantum information processing?", we consider the most basic example of the string-net condensate, namely the $Z_2$ gauge string-net condensate on the two-dimensional hexagonal lattice, and show that the universal measurement-based quantum computation (in the sense of the quantum computational webs) is possible on it by using the framework of the quantum computational tensor network. This result implies that even the most basic example of the string-net condensate is equipped with the correlation space that has the capacity for the universal quantum computation.

  5. NetSeed User Manual NetSeed is a toolkit for identifying the seed set of networks, available as an online tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Elhanan

    of Washington and is available online at http://elbo.gs.washington.edu/tools/NetSeed/. NetSeed>Web NetSeed>Web allows researchers to calculate the seed set of a network online and requires only a web browser. The NetSeed>Web and functional analysis options. Overview of use To determine the seed set of a network using NetSeed>Web

  6. Global Compact for Higher Education Institutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global Compact for Higher Education Institutions Communicating on Progress for Universitť Laval Guide to the United Nations Global Compact for Higher Education Institutions: Implementing the Global to the United Nations Global Compact for Higher Education Institutions: Implementing the Global Compact

  7. Targeting Net Zero Energy at Marine Corps Base Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Targeting Net Zero Energy at Marine Corps Base Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii: Assessment and Recommendations Targeting Net Zero Energy at Marine Corps Base Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii: Assessment...

  8. Predictions for net-proton and net-kaon distributions at LHC energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yacine Mehtar-Tani; Georg Wolschin

    2010-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate baryon and charge transport in relativistic heavy-ion collisions, compare with Au + Au RHIC data at sqrt(s_NN)=0.2 TeV, and make predictions for net-proton rapidity distributions in central Pb + Pb collisions at CERN LHC energies of sqrt(s_NN)=2.8, 3.9, and 5.5 TeV. We use the gluon saturation model and put special emphasis on the midrapidity valley |y|Net-kaon distributions are calculated and compared to BRAHMS Au + Au data at RHIC energies of sqrt(s_NN)= 0.2 TeV, and predicted for Pb + Pb at 5.5 TeV.

  9. GLOBAL TAXONOMY INITIATIVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant, Taran

    #12;THE GLOBAL TAXONOMY INITIATIVE: Using Systematic Inventories to Meet Country and Regional Needs International #12;Table of Contents Introduction 1 I. Using Inventories to Build Capacity and Advance the GTI 2 for systematic inventories. A major component of the workshop addressed how systematic inventories can serve

  10. Global Vision Study Abroad

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    Finding a Global Vision Study Abroad Students Visit South Africa Philosophy in the Community arts sculpture of South Africa's late pop diva Brenda Fassie. More on Page 4 #12;At every post energy and passion for his work. At the same time, I would also like to express my sincere gratitude

  11. WORKPLACE GUIDES GLOBAL WORKING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roelleke, Thomas

    of Stonewall good practice publications ≠ profiles some of the employers paving the way for gay staff to work do arise. This guide provides clear, practical tips on how gay employees can access internationalWORKPLACE GUIDES GLOBAL WORKING Supporting lesbian, gay and bisexual staff on overseas assignments

  12. Global Health Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Ophir

    Bay Area Global Health Seminar Series Monday, January 27, 2014 2:30pm ≠ 4:00pm (Reception to follow at the Center for Health Policy and the Woods Institute for the Environment. He studies how economic, political, and natural environments affect population health in developing countries using a mix of experimental

  13. Global Climate & Catastrophic Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Global Climate & Catastrophic Risk Forum 2012 A Joint Program with LA RIMS Education Day Rethinking Catastrophic Risk in Risk Management: Earthquake-Related Challenges Featuring: Keynote Speaker Dr. Frank Beuthin, Willis Group Holdings Plc. Yohei Miyamoto, Aon Risk Solutions Curtis deVera, Marsh

  14. Terrestrial Carbon Cycle Dynamics under Recent and Future Climate Change H. DAMON MATTHEWS, ANDREW J. WEAVER, AND KATRIN J. MEISSNER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meissner, Katrin Juliane

    extensive research over the past several years, the uncertainty range on estimates of terrestrial carbonTerrestrial Carbon Cycle Dynamics under Recent and Future Climate Change H. DAMON MATTHEWS, ANDREW, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada (Manuscript received 18 June 2004, in final form 21 October 2004

  15. Dynamics of metal-silicate separation in a terrestrial magma Tobias Hoink, Jorg Schmalzl, and Ulrich Hansen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmalzl, Jörg

    Dynamics of metal-silicate separation in a terrestrial magma ocean Tobias Ho¨ink, Jo¨rg Schmalzl-48149 Mu¨nster, Germany (hoeink@earth.uni-muenster.de) [1] In a terrestrial magma ocean, the metal-silicate the separation of metal droplets from the liquid silicate, occurs on a characteristic timescale, which

  16. Remote Terrestrial Sites as Operational/Logistics Analogs for Moon/Mars Bases: the Haughton Mars Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    Remote Terrestrial Sites as Operational/Logistics Analogs for Moon/Mars Bases: the Haughton Mars coordinating the logistics and resupply of far-flung planetary bases. A number of logistics methods have been terrestrial logistics methods were tested in the context of (analog) planetary exploration. A comprehensive

  17. Characteristics of broadband lightning emissions associated with terrestrial gamma ray flashes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummer, Steven A.

    . Introduction [2] Brief (typically bursts of gamma rays with mean energies of 2 MeV originating from the Earth's atmosphere, referred to as terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFs), have been observed by the Burst et al., 2010; Briggs et al., 2010]. With spectra typically harder than cosmic gamma ray bursts

  18. Clay mineral variations in Holocene terrestrial sediments from the Indus Basin Anwar Alizai a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clift, Peter

    Clay mineral variations in Holocene terrestrial sediments from the Indus Basin Anwar Alizai a 23 February 2012 Keywords: XRD Clay mineralogy Monsoon Himalaya Indus Delta Floodplain Fluvial processes Large rivers We employed X-ray diffraction methods to quantify clay mineral assemblages

  19. Solar-Terrestrial Data Center, En-vironmental Data Service, National

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solar-Terrestrial Data Center, En- vironmental Data Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric.... ....Norman Doelling has been named manager of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Sea Grant Program as an energy source, conversion of waste water and sewage sludge into a resource, and others.... ....Hatchery

  20. Data Assimilation for Estimating the Terrestrial Water Budget Using a Constrained Ensemble Kalman Filter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Ming

    Data Assimilation for Estimating the Terrestrial Water Budget Using a Constrained Ensemble Kalman A procedure is developed to incorporate equality constraints in Kalman filters, including the Ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) and is referred to as the Constrained Ensemble Kalman Filter (CEnKF). The constraint

  1. Gas exchange in terrestrial environments comes at the cost of evaporative water loss from respiratory surfaces.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franz, Nico M.

    3477 Gas exchange in terrestrial environments comes at the cost of evaporative water loss from of gas exchange, both within and among species (Lighton, 1998; Shelton and Appel, 2001; Chown, 2002). The classical pattern is that of discontinuous gas exchange, or discontinuous gas-exchange cycles (DGC; Lighton

  2. Frontiers in Contaminant Speciation and Reactivity in Terrestrial Environments: The Role of Synchrotron Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    science. To delineate reaction mechanisms of contaminant reactions on soil minerals and in soils attenuation processes, speciation of metal(loid)s in heterogeneous soilslbiosolids/plants, and mineral/microbe/contaminant226 Frontiers in Contaminant Speciation and Reactivity in Terrestrial Environments: The Role

  3. On the formation of terrestrial planets in hot-Jupiter systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martyn J. Fogg; Richard P. Nelson

    2006-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a series of calculations aimed at examining how an inner system of planetesimals/protoplanets, undergoing terrestrial planet formation, evolves under the influence of a giant planet undergoing inward type II migration through the region bounded between 5 - 0.1 AU. We find that > 60% of the solids disk survives by being scattered by the giant planet into external orbits. Planetesimals are scattered outward almost as efficiently as protoplanets, resulting in the regeneration of a solids disk where dynamical friction is strong and terrestrial planet formation is able to resume. A simulation extended for a few Myr after the migration of the giant planet halted at 0.1 AU, resulted in an apparently stable planet of ~ 2 Earth masses forming in the habitable zone. Migration-induced mixing of volatile-rich material from beyond the `snowline' into the inner disk regions means that terrestrial planets that form there are likely to be water-rich. We predict that hot--Jupiter systems are likely to harbor water-rich terrestrial planets in their habitable zones. These planets may be detected by future planet search missions.

  4. Maternal Transfer of Contaminants and Reduced Reproductive Success of Southern Toads (Bufo [Anaxyrus] terrestris) Exposed to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkins, William A.

    ) residing in two locations: (1) an active coal combustion waste (CCW) disposal basin and adjacent 40-ha (Gastrophryne carolinensis) collected from a coal ash settling basin accumulated and transferred selenium (Se [Anaxyrus] terrestris) Exposed to Coal Combustion Waste Brian S. Metts,, * Kurt A. Buhlmann, Tracey D

  5. Volume estimates of trees with complex architecture from terrestrial laser scanning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lefsky, Michael

    consuming and can require destructive sampling. In this study we used a terrestrial lidar sensor; data was analyzed on the basis of branch size and the sampling pattern of the sensor. Two hundred and fifty. 2, 023521 (14 May 2008) © 2008 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers [DOI: 10

  6. Hydrogen isotopic variability in leaf waxes among terrestrial and aquatic plants around Blood Pond, Massachusetts (USA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Hydrogen isotopic variability in leaf waxes among terrestrial and aquatic plants around Blood Pond interpretation of the hydrogen isotope ratios of plant leaf waxes extracted from sediments requires a thor- ough at a single site to determine how leaf wax hydro- gen isotope (D/H) ratios differ in different plant types

  7. VISION-BASED TECHNIQUES FOR REFRACTION ANALYSIS IN APPLICATIONS OF TERRESTRIAL GEODESY Philipp FLACH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    levelling ABSTRACT: Imaging sensors are increasingly spread in geodetic instruments, because they enable the evaluation of digital image data for the determination of direction and height. Beyond this, the analysis aufzuzeigen. 1. INTRODUCTION Due to automation of tasks in terrestrial geodesy, image sensors and vision

  8. UNL Microgravity: Team Fast Project: Lunar soil is much different from terrestrial soil,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    UNL Microgravity: Team Fast Project: Lunar soil is much different from terrestrial soil, consisting of a large percentage of very fine particles. Lunar soil also contains very irregular and jagged particles formed from the sintering together of broked grains during micro-meteorite bombardment. NASA has soil

  9. Small reductions in forest cover weaken terrestrial-aquatic linkages in headwater streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosemond, Amy Daum

    assessed the impacts of deforestation on the energy base of headwater food webs in seven headwater streams. Standing crop of coarse particulate organic matter (CPOM) declined with deforestation at large scales (i.e. catchment deforestation and riparian deforestation at the entire stream network scale). Terrestrial plant

  10. TERRESTRIAL ROCK VARNISH: A KEY TO UNDERSTANDING THE SURFACE COMPOSITION OF MARS. J. G. Ward1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirkland, Laurel

    TERRESTRIAL ROCK VARNISH: A KEY TO UNDERSTANDING THE SURFACE COMPOSITION OF MARS. J. G. Ward1 , L produces a strong spectral band contrast. This also gives varnish its shiny appearance. On Earth rock varnish may have a microbial origin [3]. Clays are transported from an external source and deposited

  11. Population genetic structure reveals terrestrial affinities for a headwater stream insect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blouin, Michael S.

    ). Recent studies (e.g. McGlashan, Hughes & Bunn, 2001; Wishart & Hughes, 2003; Huey, Hughes & Baker, 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd 1 #12;terrestrial among-drainage dispersal even less likely (Hughes et al., 1999, 2003; Wishart & Hughes, 2001, 2003; Monaghan et al., 2002; Schultheis, Weight & Hendricks, 2002

  12. Historical Reconstruction of Terrestrial Organic Matter Inputs to Fiordland, NZ Over the Last ~500 Years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Richard

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    ........................................................................................ 92 OMfossil ....................................................................................... 96 Source Reconstruction: Marine, Terrestrial, Fossil ................... 99 Conclusion...) demonstrates that in peat and 9 soil-poor environments, the BIT Index does not provide similar estimates of %OMterr in Northern Hemisphere fjords as 8, 13C, and C/N analysis. Additionally, it has been shown that the soil and marine GDGTs may vary...

  13. Elevated Trace Element Concentrations in Southern Toads, Bufo terrestris, Exposed to Coal Combustion Waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkins, William A.

    Elevated Trace Element Concentrations in Southern Toads, Bufo terrestris, Exposed to Coal, and behavioral abnormalities in amphibians to coal combustion wastes (coal ash). Few studies, however, have determined trace element concentrations in amphibians exposed to coal ash. In the current study we compare

  14. Global Biogeochemistry Models and Global Carbon Cycle Research at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Covey, C; Caldeira, K; Guilderson, T; Cameron-Smith, P; Govindasamy, B; Swanston, C; Wickett, M; Mirin, A; Bader, D

    2005-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The climate modeling community has long envisioned an evolution from physical climate models to ''earth system'' models that include the effects of biology and chemistry, particularly those processes related to the global carbon cycle. The widely reproduced Box 3, Figure 1 from the 2001 IPCC Scientific Assessment schematically describes that evolution. The community generally accepts the premise that understanding and predicting global and regional climate change requires the inclusion of carbon cycle processes in models to fully simulate the feedbacks between the climate system and the carbon cycle. Moreover, models will ultimately be employed to predict atmospheric concentrations of CO{sub 2} and other greenhouse gases as a function of anthropogenic and natural processes, such as industrial emissions, terrestrial carbon fixation, sequestration, land use patterns, etc. Nevertheless, the development of coupled climate-carbon models with demonstrable quantitative skill will require a significant amount of effort and time to understand and validate their behavior at both the process level and as integrated systems. It is important to consider objectively whether the currently proposed strategies to develop and validate earth system models are optimal, or even sufficient, and whether alternative strategies should be pursued. Carbon-climate models are going to be complex, with the carbon cycle strongly interacting with many other components. Off-line process validation will be insufficient. As was found in coupled atmosphere-ocean GCMs, feedbacks between model components can amplify small errors and uncertainties in one process to produce large biases in the simulated climate. The persistent tropical western Pacific Ocean ''double ITCZ'' and upper troposphere ''cold pole'' problems are examples. Finding and fixing similar types of problems in coupled carbon-climate models especially will be difficult, given the lack of observations required for diagnosis and validation of biogeochemical processes.

  15. Electric Vehicles Global Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sůbester, AndrŠs

    Hot Topics Electric Vehicles Global Climate Change Green Building Hydraulic Fracturing Nuclear to global warming. The UKgovernment has just announced it is investing $1 billion in their development Green Living Industry Regulation Remediation Research and Technology Sustainability Waste Water Products

  16. Global and Regional Solutions Directorate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    at Pacific NW National Lab (PNNL) ≠ Founding Director Joint Global Change Research Institute (PNNL/UMd) ≠ ALD (PNNL) ≠ Environmental and Health Sciences Directorate; Emerging Technologies ≠ Chief Scientist ≠ Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program ≠ Director ≠ PNNL Global Studies Program ≠ Other (PNNL): Center

  17. 2, 921942, 2002 Global ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ACPD 2, 921≠942, 2002 Global ozone forecasting H. J. Eskes et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Geophysical Society 2002 Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Global ozone forecasting based on ERS-2 July 2002 Correspondence to: H. J. Eskes (eskes@knmi.nl) 921 #12;ACPD 2, 921≠942, 2002 Global ozone

  18. Globalization, Labor, Transformation of Work

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in an Increasingly Global Economy Edited by Jonathan H. Westover THE ORGANISATION #12;First published in Australia in an increasingly global economy Jonathan H. Westover (editor) Bibliography. 978 1 86335 660 2 (pbk.) 978 1 86335 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 Economic Globalization and Caribbean Economies, Syed H. Akhter, Paul Pounder

  19. GLOBAL WARMING THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    GLOBAL WARMING THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT AND YOUR FAMILY'S CONTRIBUTION TO IT Stephen E. Schwartz GREENHOUSE EFFECT #12;GLOBAL ENERGY BALANCE Global and annual average energy fluxes in watts per square meter about it.But nobody does anything about it. ≠ Mark Twain≠ Mark Twain Now with the greenhouse effect, we

  20. Global Warming: Connecting the Dots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    Global Warming: Connecting the Dots from Causes to Solutions* Jim Hansen 26 February 2007 National://www.columbia.edu/~jeh1/worldwatch_nov2006.pdf) 5. Communicating dangers and opportunities in global warming, Amer-16, 2006. (http://pubs.giss.nasa.gov/docs/2006/2006_Hansen.pdf) 8. Global warming: Connecting the dots from

  1. 4, 10591092, 2007 Global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    BGD 4, 1059­1092, 2007 Global warming potential of agro-ecosystems S. Lehuger et al. Title Page Predicting the global warming potential of agro-ecosystems S. Lehuger, B. Gabrielle, E. Larmanou, P. Laville Correspondence to: S. Lehuger (simon.lehuger@grignon.inra.fr) 1059 #12;BGD 4, 1059­1092, 2007 Global warming

  2. Visualizing Global Inequality on the Web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Ian; Lodha, S K; Crow, Ben D; Fulfrost, Brian

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on Mapping Global Inequality, University of California,Visualizing Global Inequality on the Web Ian Myers 1 ,for mapping global inequality by (i) creating a simple user

  3. Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlson, Ann E.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation Ann E. Carlson*2008]HEAT WAVES, GLOBAL WARMING, AND MITIGATION 175 stroke2001). 2008]HEAT WAVES, GLOBAL WARMING, AND MITIGATION 177

  4. Global Warming, endogenous risk and irreversibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Anthony C.; Narain, Urvashi

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The economics of global warming, Institute for InternationalEconomic Models of Global Warming, Cambridge, Mass. MITstochastic losses from global warming, Risk Analysis 16(2):

  5. Extending the Zero-Safe approach to Coloured, Recon gurable and Dynamic Nets ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruni, Roberto

    Extending the Zero-Safe approach to Coloured, Recon#12;gurable and Dynamic Nets ? Roberto Bruni their execution). Starting from zero-safe nets | a well-studied extension of Place/Transition Petri nets | we show how the zero-safe approach can be smoothly applied to a hierarchy of nets of increasing

  6. SOLAR ICE CREAM: ACHIEVING NET-ZERO THROUGH AN INTEGRATED RETROFIT Sara Tepfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SOLAR ICE CREAM: ACHIEVING NET-ZERO THROUGH AN INTEGRATED RETROFIT APPROACH Sara Tepfer-3). One such strategy is Net-zero energy design (NetZED), which can be applied to new construction and to develop a net-zero retrofit for this establishment which integrates onsite renewable energy sources

  7. Exploiting Covariate Similarity in Sparse Regression via the Pairwise Elastic Net

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low, Steven H.

    . Furthermore, un- like the Lasso, the Elastic Net can yield a sparse esti- mate with more than n non-zero477 Exploiting Covariate Similarity in Sparse Regression via the Pairwise Elastic Net Alexander to regression regulariza- tion called the Pairwise Elastic Net is pro- posed. Like the Elastic Net, it simultane

  8. Executing Transactions in Zero-Safe Nets ? Roberto Bruni and Ugo Montanari

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruni, Roberto

    Executing Transactions in Zero-Safe Nets ? Roberto Bruni and Ugo Montanari Dipartimento di in distributed systems by using zero-safe nets, which extend pt nets with a simple mechanism for transition synchronization. In particular, starting from the zero-safe net that represents a certain system, we give

  9. Exploiting Covariate Similarity in Sparse Regression via the Pairwise Elastic Net

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blei, David M.

    , the Elastic Net can yield a sparse esti- mate with more than n non-zero weights (Efron et al., 2004). One canExploiting Covariate Similarity in Sparse Regression via the Pairwise Elastic Net Alexander Lorbert- tion called the Pairwise Elastic Net is pro- posed. Like the Elastic Net, it simultane- ously performs

  10. Workflow Concerns and Workarounds of Readers in an Urban Safety Net Teleretinal Screening Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fish, Allison E

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    expanding uninsured and underinsured patient population, the United States relies on the health care safety net,

  11. Petri Nets and the Real World Ekkart Kindler and Frank Nillies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kindler, Ekkart

    . This allows us to control the plant directly by a Petri net (respectively by PNSim simulating the Petri net the simulation of tokens of the Petri net with these objects in the virtual 3D-world. In this paper, we take of the real world. This way, a Petri net can be used as a controller of some plant. In principle, this idea

  12. Modeling Physical Quantities in Industrial Systems using Fluid Stochastic Petri Nets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gribaudo, Marco

    of a case study, in which the quantity to be regulated is a real fluid quantity: the fuel demand in a gas: Start Fuel Controller 2 Fluid Stochastic Petri Nets Fluid Stochastic Petri Nets are Petri net basedModeling Physical Quantities in Industrial Systems using Fluid Stochastic Petri Nets M. Gribaudo

  13. CONTRIBUTION OF THE NET PLANKTON AND NANNOPLANKTON TO THE STANDING STOCKS AND PRIMARY PRODUCTIVITY IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONTRIBUTION OF THE NET PLANKTON AND NANNOPLANKTON TO THE STANDING STOCKS AND PRIMARY PRODUCTIVITY IN MONTEREY BAY, CALIFORNIA DURING THE UPWELLING SEASON DAVID L. GARRISON' ABSTRACT Net plankton by net plankton. Both fractions showed seasonal changes: the net plankton concentrations increased

  14. NET FEEDING IN MESOPELAGIC FISHES THOMAS L. HOPKINS AND RONALD C. BAIRD!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NET FEEDING IN MESOPELAGIC FISHES THOMAS L. HOPKINS AND RONALD C. BAIRD! ABSTRACT In an investigation of n'et feeding, 11 species of fish (5 gonostomatids, 6 myctophids) captured in a double-net Tucker trawl were examined. Stomach contents of fish retained by a coarse mesh "fish- catcher" in one net

  15. Comparison of acoustic and net sampling systems to determine patterns in zooplankton distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Stephen

    Comparison of acoustic and net sampling systems to determine patterns in zooplankton distribution and with predicted volume backscatter calculated from a coincident net tow. Spatially and temporally coincident data)) and from a 1 m2 Multiple Opening Closing Net and Environmental Sensing System (MOCNESS). The combined net

  16. Effects of Suspended Particles on Net-Tending Behaviors for Hydropsyche sparna (Trichoptera: Hydropsychidae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Notre Dame, University of

    BEHAVIOR Effects of Suspended Particles on Net-Tending Behaviors for Hydropsyche sparna to eliminate the confounding effects of √?ow on net-tending. Drift and mortalityrateswerealsomeasuredbutdidnotoccurintheexperimentalorcontrolpopulations.Four net-tending behaviors occurred that varied in the degree of √?lter net modi√?cation. One

  17. the results MFV Kerrie Marie BM172 (New Net MK 1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the results MFV Kerrie Marie BM172 (New Net MK 1) sea trials no4: ICES area VIIe Paul, the Skipper 2009 numbers of fish the nets the `new' net design (MK 1) used on the MFV Kerrie Marie The owner, skipper and crew of the Devon beam trawler `Kerrie Marie' have invested in new net designs and reduced

  18. Petri net based scheduling W.M.P. van der Aalst

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Aalst, Wil

    Petri net based scheduling W.M.P. van der Aalst Department of Mathematics and Computing Science 2474295, fax: -31 40 2463992, e-mail: wsinwa@win.tue.nl Abstract. Timed Petri nets can be used to model tasks, resources and constraints onto a timed Petri net. By mapping scheduling problems onto Petri nets

  19. Operational semantics for Petri Net components Jan Friso Groote and Marc Voorhoeve

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groote, Jan Friso

    Operational semantics for Petri Net components Jan Friso Groote and Marc Voorhoeve Eindhoven.Voorhoeve@tue.nl Abstract We develop a theory for net components with labeled interface places and transitions. Nets, fusion and relabeling as operators. Net terms with the step firing rule are given a Plotkin-style SOS

  20. Towards Analysing a Class of Object Petri Nets Sea Ling and Heinz W. Schmidt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Heinz

    Towards Analysing a Class of Object Petri Nets Sea Ling and Heinz W. Schmidt Department of Software,hwsg@sd.monash.edu.au Abstract The Petri net theory has been used to specify many types of systems, in particular, concurrent, distributed and non­ deterministic. A class of high­level, object­based Petri nets, OBJSA nets, is being used

  1. Submitted for publication to Acta Informatica. Reduction Rules for Time Petri Nets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buy, Ugo A.

    Submitted for publication to Acta Informatica. Reduction Rules for Time Petri Nets Robert H. Sloan at Chicago Abstract In this paper, we extend several rules for the reduction of ordinary Petri nets to work with time Petri nets. We introduce a notion of equivalence among time Petri nets, and prove that our

  2. Comparison of Different Algorithms to Synthesize a Petri Net from a Partial Language

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Desel, Jörg

    Comparison of Different Algorithms to Synthesize a Petri Net from a Partial Language Robin synthe- size a finite place/transition Petri net (p/t-net) from a finite set of labeled partial orders (a finite partial language). Either the synthesized p/t-net has exactly the non-sequential behavior

  3. RoboNet-II: Follow-up observations of microlensing events with a robotic network of telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Tsapras; R. Street; K. Horne; C. Snodgrass; M. Dominik; A. Allan; I. Steele; D. M. Bramich; E. S. Saunders; N. Rattenbury; C. Mottram; S. Fraser; N. Clay; M. Burgdorf; M. Bode; T. A. Lister; E. Hawkins; J. P. Beaulieu; P. Fouque; M. Albrow; J. Menzies; A. Cassan; D. Dominis-Prester

    2008-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    RoboNet-II uses a global network of robotic telescopes to perform follow-up observations of microlensing events in the Galactic Bulge. The current network consists of three 2m telescopes located in Hawaii and Australia (owned by Las Cumbres Observatory) and the Canary Islands (owned by Liverpool John Moores University). In future years the network will be expanded by deploying clusters of 1m telescopes in other suitable locations. A principal scientific aim of the RoboNet-II project is the detection of cool extra-solar planets by the method of gravitational microlensing. These detections will provide crucial constraints to models of planetary formation and orbital migration. RoboNet-II acts in coordination with the PLANET microlensing follow-up network and uses an optimization algorithm ("web-PLOP") to select the targets and a distributed scheduling paradigm (eSTAR) to execute the observations. Continuous automated assessment of the observations and anomaly detection is provided by the ARTEMiS system.

  4. Reticular Chemistry: Occurrence and Taxonomy of Nets and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaghi, Omar M.

    Reticular Chemistry: Occurrence and Taxonomy of Nets and Grammar for the Design of Frameworks to deduce a system of classification "taxonomy" for interpreting and rational- izing known MOF structures

  5. ,"New Mexico Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"3292015 10:08:54 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New Mexico Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5070NM2"...

  6. additional net gain: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of contaminants discharged dispersion coefficient to be 70.1 ( 4.3 m2 s-1. Temporal evolution of the SF6 inventory indicates an average Ho, David 369 Building Bayes Nets with...

  7. October 16, 2012, Webinar: Net-Zero-Energy Communities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This webinar was held October 16, 2012, and provided information on net-zero-energy communities in California and Hawaii. Download the presentations below, watch the webinar (WMV 159 MB), or view...

  8. Net Requirements Transparency Process for Slice/Block and Block...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 As part of its Net Requirements Transparency process, on July 31, 2013 BPA published the SliceBlock and Block customers' FY2012 and forecast FY2014 Total Retail Load (TRL) and...

  9. Super-KMS functionals for graded-local conformal nets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robin Hillier

    2014-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Motivated by a few preceding papers and a question of R. Longo, we introduce super-KMS functionals for graded translation-covariant nets over R with superderivations, roughly speaking as a certain supersymmetric modification of classical KMS states on translation-covariant nets over R, fundamental objects in chiral algebraic quantum field theory. Although we are able to make a few statements concerning their general structure, most properties will be studied in the setting of specific graded-local (super-) conformal models. In particular, we provide a constructive existence and partial uniqueness proof of super-KMS functionals for the supersymmetric free field, for certain subnets, and for the super-Virasoro net with central charge c>= 3/2. Moreover, as a separate result, we classify bounded super-KMS functionals for graded-local conformal nets over S^1 with respect to rotations.

  10. Sam, Booth, Targeting Net Zero DoD Project Review

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    TargeOng Net Zero DoD Project Review FUPWG Sam Booth NaOonal Renewable Energy Laboratory January 15 th , 2014 NREL is a naLonal laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office...

  11. ,"New York Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals (MMcf...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"2262015 9:16:55 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5070NY2"...

  12. Persistent Personal Names for Globally Connected Mobile Devices Bryan Ford, Jacob Strauss, Chris Lesniewski-Laas, Sean Rhea, Frans Kaashoek, Robert Morris

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Persistent Personal Names for Globally Connected Mobile Devices Bryan Ford, Jacob Strauss, Chris personal names. Users assign personal names through an ad hoc device introduction process requiring, and mobile personal devices usu- ally have dynamic IP addresses behind firewalls or net- work address

  13. Persistent Personal Names for Globally Connected Mobile Devices Bryan Ford, Jacob Strauss, Chris LesniewskiLaas, Sean Rhea, Frans Kaashoek, Robert Morris

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, Bryan

    Persistent Personal Names for Globally Connected Mobile Devices Bryan Ford, Jacob Strauss, Chris personal names. Users assign personal names through an ad hoc device introduction process requiring, and mobile personal devices usu­ ally have dynamic IP addresses behind firewalls or net­ work address

  14. Estimation of net primary productivity using a process-based model in Gansu Province, Northwest China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Peijuan; Xie, Donghui; Zhou, Yuyu; E, Youhao; Zhu, Qijiang

    2014-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The ecological structure in the arid and semi-arid region of Northwest China with forest, grassland, agriculture, Gobi, and desert, is complex, vulnerable, and unstable. It is a challenging and sustaining job to keep the ecological structure and improve its ecological function. Net primary productivity (NPP) modeling can help to improve the understanding of the ecosystem, and therefore, improve ecological efficiency. The boreal ecosystem productivity simulator (BEPS) model provides the possibility of NPP modeling in terrestrial ecosystem, but it has some limitations for application in arid and semi-arid regions. In this paper we improve the BEPS model, in terms of its water cycle by adding the processes of infiltration and surface runoff, to be applicable in arid and semi-arid regions. We model the NPP of forest, grass, and crop in Gansu Province as an experimental area in Northwest China in 2003 using the improved BEPS model, parameterized with moderate resolution remote sensing imageries and meteorological data. The modeled NPP using improved BEPS agrees better with the ground measurements in Qilian Mountain than that with original BEPS, with a higher R2 of 0.746 and lower root mean square error (RMSE) of 46.53 gC/m2 compared to R2 of 0.662 and RMSE of 60.19 gC/m2 from original BEPS. The modeled NPP of three vegetation types using improved BEPS show evident differences compared to that using original BEPS, with the highest difference ratio of 9.21% in forest and the lowest value of 4.29% in crop. The difference ratios between different vegetation types lie on the dependence on natural water sources. The modeled NPP in five geographic zones using improved BEPS are higher than those with original BEPS, with higher difference ratio in dry zones and lower value in wet zones.

  15. The Global Energy Challenge

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    George Crabtree

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The expected doubling of global energy demand by 2050 challenges our traditional patterns of energy production, distribution and use.†† The continued use of fossil fuels raises concerns about supply, security, environment and climate.† New routes are needed for the efficient conversion of energy from chemical fuel, sunlight, and heat to electricity or hydrogen as an energy carrier and finally to end uses like transportation, lighting, and heating. Opportunities for efficient new energy conversion routes based on nanoscale materials will be presented, with emphasis on the sustainable energy technologies they enable.

  16. Global Threat Reduction Initiative

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked Questions for DOE FY 2011Talley,GENIIFY14 BudgetHollettGive UsDepartment ofGlobal

  17. Sandia Energy - Global

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementing Nonlinear757 (1)Tara46EnergyPower Systems Glitter-SizedGlobal

  18. Ethics in collaborative global health researchhealth research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    in developing countries ­Global health inequalities­Global health inequalities ­Disproportionate burden

  19. Global tree network for computing structures enabling global processing operations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blumrich; Matthias A. (Ridgefield, CT); Chen, Dong (Croton-On-Hudson, NY); Coteus, Paul W. (Yorktown Heights, NY); Gara, Alan G. (Mount Kisco, NY); Giampapa, Mark E. (Irvington, NY); Heidelberger, Philip (Cortlandt Manor, NY); Hoenicke, Dirk (Ossining, NY); Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D. (Mount Kisco, NY); Takken, Todd E. (Mount Kisco, NY); Vranas, Pavlos M. (Bedford Hills, NY)

    2010-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for enabling high-speed, low-latency global tree network communications among processing nodes interconnected according to a tree network structure. The global tree network enables collective reduction operations to be performed during parallel algorithm operations executing in a computer structure having a plurality of the interconnected processing nodes. Router devices are included that interconnect the nodes of the tree via links to facilitate performance of low-latency global processing operations at nodes of the virtual tree and sub-tree structures. The global operations performed include one or more of: broadcast operations downstream from a root node to leaf nodes of a virtual tree, reduction operations upstream from leaf nodes to the root node in the virtual tree, and point-to-point message passing from any node to the root node. The global tree network is configurable to provide global barrier and interrupt functionality in asynchronous or synchronized manner, and, is physically and logically partitionable.

  20. Impact of Geoengineering Schemes on the Global Hydrological Cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bala, G; Duffy, P; Taylor, K

    2007-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The rapidly rising CO{sub 2} level in the atmosphere has led to proposals of climate stabilization via 'Geoengineering' schemes that would mitigate climate change by intentionally reducing the solar radiation incident on earth's surface. In this paper, we address the impact of these climate stabilization schemes on the global hydrological cycle, using equilibrium simulations from an atmospheric general circulation model coupled to a slab ocean model. We show that insolation reductions sufficient to offset global-scale temperature increases lead to a decrease in the intensity of the global hydrologic cycle. This occurs because solar forcing is more effective in driving changes in global mean evaporation than is CO{sub 2} forcing of a similar magnitude. In the model used here, the hydrologic sensitivity, defined as the percentage change in global mean precipitation per degree warming, is 2.4% for solar forcing, but only 1.5% for CO{sub 2} forcing. Although other models and the climate system itself may differ quantitatively from this result, the conclusion can be understood based on simple considerations of the surface energy budget and thus is likely to be robust. Compared to changing temperature by altering greenhouse gas concentrations, changing temperature by varying insolation results in larger changes in net radiative fluxes at the surface; these are compensated by larger changes in latent and sensible heat fluxes. Hence the hydrological cycle is more sensitive to temperature adjustment via changes in insolation than changes in greenhouse gases. This implies that an alteration in solar forcing might offset temperature changes or hydrological changes from greenhouse warming, but could not cancel both at once.