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1

ORNL DAAC, global soil respiration rates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

W. Raich and W. H. Schlesinger, the newly released data set contains soil respiration rates from sites in terrestrial and wetland ecosystems as reported in scientific literature...

2

A Global Database of Soil Respiration Data, Version 2.0  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Data > Regional/Global > Soil Collections > Guide Document Home > Data > Regional/Global > Soil Collections > Guide Document A Global Database of Soil Respiration Data, Version 2.0 Get Data Revision date: February 24, 2012 Summary This data set provides an updated soil respiration database (SRDB), a near-universal compendium of published soil respiration (RS) data. Soil respiration, the flux of autotrophically- and heterotrophically-generated CO2 from the soil to the atmosphere remains the least well-constrained component of the terrestrial C cycle. The database encompasses all published studies that report at least one of the following data measured in the field (not laboratory): annual RS, mean seasonal RS, a seasonal or annual partitioning of RS into its sources fluxes, RS temperature response (Q10), or RS at 10 degrees C. SRDB's orientation is thus to seasonal and

3

Interannual Variability in Global Soil Respiration on a 0.5 Degree...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

D. Bhagawati. 2003. Interannual Variability in Global Soil Respiration on a 0.5 Degree Grid Cell Basis (1980-1994). NDP-081. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, U.S....

4

Interannual Variability in Global Soil Respiration on a 0.5 Degree...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interannual Variability in Global Soil Respiration on a 0.5 Degree Grid Cell Basis (1980-1994) (NDP-081) DOI: 10.3334CDIAClue.ndp081 PDF PDF Contributors James W. Raich 1,...

5

Interannual Variability in Global Soil Respiration on a 0.5 Degree...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

D. Bhagawati. 2003. Interannual Variability in Global Soil Respiration on a 0.5 Degree Grid Cell Basis (1980-1994). ORNLCDIAC-144, NDP-081. Available on-line http:...

6

Relationship of Soil Respiration to Crop and Landscape in the Walnut Creek Watershed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soil respiration is an important component of the carbon dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems. Many factors exert controls on soil respiration, including temperature, soil water content, organic matter, soil texture, and plant root activity. This ...

T. B. Parkin; T. C. Kaspar; Z. Senwo; J. H. Prueger; J. L. Hatfield

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Multi-Year Lags between Forest Browning and Soil Respiration at High Northern Latitudes  

SciTech Connect

High-latitude northern ecosystems are experiencing rapid climate changes, and represent a large potential climate feedback because of their high soil carbon densities and shifting disturbance regimes. A significant carbon flow from these ecosystems is soil respiration (RS, the flow of carbon dioxide, generated by plant roots and soil fauna, from the soil surface to atmosphere), and any change in the high-latitude carbon cycle might thus be reflected in RS observed in the field. This study used two variants of a machine-learning algorithm and least squares regression to examine how remotely-sensed canopy greenness (NDVI), climate, and other variables are coupled to annual RS based on 105 observations from 64 circumpolar sites in a global database. The addition of NDVI roughly doubled model performance, with the best-performing models explaining ~62% of observed RS variability

Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Bunn, Andrew G.; Thomson, Allison M.

2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

8

Global net primary production and heterotrophic respiration for 1987  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An ecosystem process model, BIOME-BGC, was parameterized and used to simulate the actual net primary production and heterotrophic respiration using daily climatic data, land cover type, leaf area index gridded to 1{degree} latitude by 1{degree} longitude grid cells for the year 1987. Global net primary production was 52 Pg C. These estimates were validated directly by two different methods. First, the grid cells were aggregated and used as inputs to a 3D atmospheric transport model, to compare CO{sub 2} station data with predictions. We simulated the intra-annual variation of atmospheric CO{sub 2} well for the northern hemisphere, but not for the southern hemisphere. Second, we calculated the net {sup 13}C uptake of vegetation, which is a function of water use efficiency. The {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratios agreed with measured data, indicating a strong limitation of global primary processes by the hydrologic cycle, especially precipitation. These are different from other global carbon models as we can simulate the year-to-year variation of climate, including El Nino, on the global carbon cycle.

Hunt, R.E. Jr.; Piper, S.C.; Nemani, R. [Univ. of Montana, Missoula, MT (United States)]|[Scripps Institute of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA (United States)] [and others

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

POST OAK SAVANNA IN TRANSITION: JUNIPER ENCROACHMENT AND CLIMATE CHANGE ALTER GRASSLAND SOIL RESPIRATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The amount of carbon flux from soils on a global scale is estimated at over 75 x 1015 g C yr-1. Climate change is projected to affect regional environmental conditions, raising temperatures and altering precipitation patterns. The semi-arid environment of the post oak savannah is an ecotone in transition. As juniper encroachment replaces native grasses, changes in species composition may affect carbon cycling. Given that water is limiting in this warm-temperate climate, changing precipitation patterns coupled with higher temperatures may alter function in addition to the structure of savanna ecosystems. The Texas Warming and Rainfall Manipulation (Texas WaRM) experiment is designed to test global climate change factors and the responses of the dominant tree, eastern red cedar (Juniperus virginiana) and grass species, little blue stem (Schizachyrium scoparium). We compared respiratory carbon losses of soils between eastern red cedar and little blue stem plots subjected to warming (1.5 °C) and summer drought treatments to determine the effects of climate change on integrated below-ground CO2 efflux. During the June to August months, soil CO2 efflux rates were determined and compared among treatments in relation to soil temperature and moisture. Overall, juniper and grass plots had relatively equal CO2 respiratory flux, although it generally has more associated roots and microbial biomass. Soil respiration in grass plots appeared more responsive to changes in soil moisture, while juniper maintained more consistent respiration under increasing heat and declining moisture conditions during summer drought. With equivalent soil CO2 efflux and reduced responsiveness to warming or drought, coupled with increased woody biomass, juniper encroachment might have positive effects on the carbon cycle of this transitional biome through increased carbon sequestration. Determining these transitional characteristics of a changing carbon budget will aid in projecting climate change impacts on carbon cycling and provide management options for native and managed vegetation.

Thompson, Bennie

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Characterizing the impact of diffusive and advective soil gas transport on the measurement and interpretation of the isotopic signal of soil respiration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-state transport models. The affect of natural fluctuations in advective soil gas transport was little to nonCharacterizing the impact of diffusive and advective soil gas transport on the measurement signature of soil respiration, we seek to learn the isotopic composition of the carbon respired in the soil

Bond, Barbara J.

11

The effect of young biochar on soil respiration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The low temperature pyrolysis of organic material produces biochar, a charcoal like substance. Biochar is being promoted as a soil amendment to enhance soil quality, it is also seen as a mechanism of lomg-term sequestration of carbon. Our experiments tested the hypothesis that biochar is inert in soil. However, we measured an increase in CO2 production from soils after biochar amendment which increased with increasing rates of biochar. The ?13C signature of the CO2 evolved in the first several days of the incubation was the same as the ?13C signature of the biochar, confirming that biochar contributed to the CO2 flux. This effect diminished by day 6 of the incubation suggesting that most of the biochar C is slowly decomposing. Thus, aside from this short term mineralization increasing soil C with biochar may indeed be a long term C storage mechanism.

Smith, Jeffery L.; Collins, Harold P.; Bailey, Vanessa L.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Global Soil Data Release, Dec. 20, 2000  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Soil Data Available The ORNL DAAC has released a data set entitled "Global Gridded Surfaces of Selected Soil Characteristics (IGBP-DIS)." The data surfaces were generated by the...

13

Global Soils Data, Sept. 5, 2000  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Soils Data, Sept. 5 Soils Data, Sept. 5 The ORNL DAAC expanded its global data holdings to include the three additional data sets related to soil characteristics. "Global Soil Profile Data (ISRIC-WISE)" This data set consists of homogenized data for 1125 soil profiles, including soil classification, site data, soil horizon data, source of data, and methods used for determining analytical data. The profiles were derived from the World Inventory of Soil Emissions Potentials (WISE) project. The data set contains a selection of 665 profiles from the Natural Resources Conservation Service, 250 profiles from the Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) of the United Nations, and 210 profiles from the reference collection of the International Soil Reference and Information

14

Anthropogenic impacts on global storage and emissions of mercury from terrestrial soils: Insights from a new global  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[1] We develop a mechanistic global model of soil mercury storage and emissions that ties the lifetime of mercury in soils to the lifetime of the organic carbon pools it is associated with. We explore the implications of considering terrestrial mercury cycling in the framework of soil carbon cycling and suggest possible avenues of future research to test our assumptions and constrain this type of model. In our simulation, input of mercury to soil is by atmospheric deposition, in part through leaf uptake and subsequent litter fall, and is moderated by surface photoreduction and revolatilization. Once bound to organic carbon, mercury is transferred along a succession of short?lived to long?lived carbon pools and is ultimately reemitted by respiration of these pools. We examine the legacy of anthropogenic influence on global mercury storage and emissions and estimate that storage of mercury in organic soils has increased by ?20 % since preindustrial times, while soil emissions have increased by a factor of 3 (2900 Mg yr ?1 versus 1000 Mg yr ?1). At steady state, mercury accumulates in the most recalcitrant soil carbon pools and has an overall lifetime against respiration of 630 years. However, the impact of anthropogenic emissions since preindustrial times has been concentrated in more labile pools, so that the mean lifetime of present?day anthropogenic mercury in all pools is ?80 years. Our analysis suggests that reductions in anthropogenic emissions would lead to immediate and large reductions in secondary soil mercury emissions.

Nicole V Smith?downey; Elsie M. Sunderl; Daniel J. Jacob

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Heterotrophic Soil Respiration in Warming Experiments: Using Microbial Indicators to Partition Contributions from Labile and Recalcitrant Soil Organic Carbon. Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The central objective of the proposed work was to develop a genomic approach (nucleic acid-based) that elucidates the mechanistic basis for the observed impacts of experimental soil warming on forest soil respiration. The need to understand the mechanistic basis arises from the importance of such information for developing effective adaptation strategies for dealing with projected climate change. Specifically, robust predictions of future climate will permit the tailoring of the most effective adaptation efforts. And one of the greatest uncertainties in current global climate models is whether there will be a net loss of carbon from soils to the atmosphere as climate warms. Given that soils contain approximately 2.5 times as much carbon as the atmosphere, a net loss could lead to runaway climate warming. Indeed, most ecosystem models predict that climate warming will stimulate microbial decomposition of soil carbon, producing such a positive feedback to rising global temperatures. Yet the IPCC highlights the uncertainty regarding this projected feedback. The uncertainty arises because although warming-experiments document an initial increase in the loss of carbon from soils, the increase in respiration is short-lived, declining to control levels in a few years. This attenuation could result from changes in microbial physiology with temperature. We explored possible microbial responses to warming using experiments and modeling. Our work advances our understanding of how soil microbial communities and their activities are structured, generating insight into how soil carbon might respond to warming. We show the importance of resource partitioning in structuring microbial communities. Specifically, we quantified the relative abundance of fungal taxa that proliferated following the addition of organic substrates to soil. We added glycine, sucrose, cellulose, lignin, or tannin-protein to soils in conjunction with 3-bromo-deoxyuridine (BrdU), a nucleotide analog. Active microbes absorb BrdU from the soil solution; if they multiply in response to substrate additions, they incorporate the BrdU into their DNA. After allowing soils to incubate, we extracted BrdU-labeled DNA and sequenced the ITS regions of fungal rDNA. Fungal taxa that proliferated following substrate addition were likely using the substrate as a resource for growth. We found that the structure of active fungal communities varied significantly among substrates. The active fungal community under glycine was significantly different from those under other conditions, while the active communities under sucrose and cellulose were marginally different from each other and the control. These results indicate that the overall community structure of active fungi was altered by the addition of glycine, sucrose, and cellulose and implies that some fungal taxa respond to changes in resource availability. The community composition of active fungi is also altered by experimental warming. We found that glycine-users tended to increase under warming, while lignin-, tannin/protein-, and sucrose-users declined. The latter group of substrates requires extracellular enzymes for use, but glycine does not. It is possible that warming selects for fungal species that target, in particular, labile substrates. Linking these changes in microbial communities and resource partitioning to soil carbon dynamics, we find that substrate mineralization rates are, in general, significantly lower in soils exposed to long-term warming. This suggests that microbial use of organic substrates is impaired by warming. Yet effects are dependent on substrate identity. There are fundamental differences in the metabolic capabilities of the communities in the control and warmed soils. These differences might relate to the changes in microbial community composition, which appeared to be associated with groups specialized on different resources. We also find that functional responses indicate temperature acclimation of the microbial community. There are distinct seasonal patterns and to long-term soil warming, with

Bradford, M A; Melillo, J M; Reynolds, J F; Treseder, K K; Wallenstein, M D

2010-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

16

Global Soil Data on CD-ROM, Nov. 2000  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Available on CD-ROM Available on CD-ROM The ORNL DAAC now offers a CD-ROM with global soil data prepared by the Global Soil Data Task for the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme (IGBP) Data and Information Services (DIS). The CD is entitled "Global Soil Data Products CD-ROM (IGBP-DIS)." The new CD includes the IGBP's SoilData System, which links the Global Pedon Database to the FAO/UNESCO Digital Soil Map of the World. The system allows users to generate maps and data sets for a range of original and derived soil parameters for any part of the world at soil depths and resolutions selected by the user. The CD also contains 1125 soil profiles that provide information about fundamental soil properties (e.g., depth, particle size distribution, bulk density, extractable nutrient composition) for soil classes based on FAO

17

Using a Bayesian framework and global sensitivity analysis to identify strengths and weaknesses of two process-based models differing in representation of autotrophic respiration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Process-based models are powerful tools for sustainable and adaptive forest management. Bayesian statistics and global sensitivity analysis allow to reduce uncertainties in parameters and outputs, and they provide better insight of model behaviour. In ... Keywords: 3-PG, Bayesian calibration, Bayesian model comparison, Carbon cycle, Global sensitivity analysis, Morris screening, Net primary production, Respiration, Uncertainty analysis

F. Minunno; M. Van Oijen; D. R. Cameron; S. Cerasoli; J. S. Pereira; M. Tomé

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

1. INTRODUCTION Global biomass and soil carbon estimate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1. INTRODUCTION Global biomass and soil carbon estimate Sahoko Yui and Sonia Yeh Institute peatland carbon data. 2. FOREST BIOMASS CARBON Table 1: Reclassification of Land Cover Types IGBP RFS 2 is to create spatially explicit global database of biomass and soil carbon stock and the emission factors

California at Davis, University of

19

The Global Soil Moisture Data Bank  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soil moisture is an important variable in the climate system. Understanding and predicting variations of surface temperature, drought, and flood depend critically on knowledge of soil moisture variations, as do impacts of climate change and ...

Alan Robock; Konstantin Y. Vinnikov; Govindarajalu Srinivasan; Jared K. Entin; Steven E. Hollinger; Nina A. Speranskaya; Suxia Liu; A. Namkhai

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

EFFECTS OF ELEVATED CO2 ON ROOT FUNCTION AND SOIL RESPIRATION IN A MOJAVE DESERT ECOSYSTEM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Increases in atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration during the last 250 years are unequivocal, and CO{sub 2} will continue to increase at least for the next several decades (Houghton et al. 2001, Keeling & Whorf 2002). Arid ecosystems are some of the most important biomes globally on a land surface area basis, are increasing in area at an alarming pace (Dregne 1991), and have a strong coupling with regional climate (Asner & Heidebrecht 2005). These water-limited ecosystems also are predicted to be the most sensitive to elevated CO{sub 2}, in part because they are stressful environments where plant responses to elevated CO{sub 2} may be amplified (Strain & Bazzaz 1983). Indeed, all C{sub 3} species examined at the Nevada Desert FACE Facility (NDFF) have shown increased A{sub net} under elevated CO{sub 2} (Ellsworth et al. 2004, Naumburg et al. 2003, Nowak et al. 2004). Furthermore, increased shoot growth for individual species under elevated CO{sub 2} was spectacular in a very wet year (Smith et al. 2000), although the response in low to average precipitation years has been smaller (Housman et al. 2006). Increases in perennial cover and biomass at the NDFF are consistent with long term trends in the Mojave Desert and elsewhere in the Southwest, indicating C sequestration in woody biomass (Potter et al. 2006). Elevated CO{sub 2} also increases belowground net primary production (BNPP), with average increases of 70%, 21%, and 11% for forests, bogs, and grasslands, respectively (Nowak et al. 2004). Although detailed studies of elevated CO{sub 2} responses for desert root systems were virtually non-existent prior to our research, we anticipated that C sequestration may occur by desert root systems for several reasons. First, desert ecosystems exhibit increases in net photosynthesis and primary production at elevated CO{sub 2}. If large quantities of root litter enter the ecosystem at a time when most decomposers are inactive, significant quantities of carbon may be stored belowground in relatively recalcitrant forms. Indeed, a model-based analysis predicted that the arid/semiarid southwestern bioclimatic region had one of the highest rates of net carbon storage in the United States over the past century (Schimel et al. 2000). Second, root systems of desert plants are often extensive (Foxx et al. 1984, Hartle et al. 2006) with relatively large proportions of roots deep in the soil (Schenk & Jackson 2002). Thus, an understanding of belowground processes in desert ecosystems provides information on the potential for terrestrial carbon sequestration in desert ecosystems.

Nowak, Robert S.

2007-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global soil respiration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Toxicity of lead to soil respiration: mediation by clay minerals, humic acids, and compost  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since Pb has no known biological function, elevated levels of Pb in soils and in other natural environments may adversely affect the indigenous biota, including the microbiota. Elevated levels of Pb in soil may also adversely affect microbemediated ecologic processes. There is, however, relatively little information on the mediating influence of the physicochemical factors of the recipient environment on the toxicity of Pb to microbe-mediated ecologic processes. This present study evaluated the influence of the clay minerals, kaolinite and montmorillonite, particulate humic acids, and compost on the degradation of glucose in soil.

Debosz, K.; Babich, H.; Stotzky, G.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Assessing Evapotranspiration Estimates from the Second Global Soil Wetness Project (GSWP-2) Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study assesses the simulations of global-scale evapotranspiration from the second Global Soil Wetness Project (GSWP-2) within a global water budget framework. The scatter in the GSWP-2 global evapotranspiration estimates from various land ...

C. Adam Schlosser; Xiang Gao

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Global Soil Moisture from Satellite Observations, Land Surface Models, and Ground Data: Implications for Data Assimilation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three independent surface soil moisture datasets for the period 1979–87 are compared: 1) global retrievals from the Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR), 2) global soil moisture derived from observed meteorological forcing using the ...

Rolf H. Reichle; Randal D. Koster; Jiarui Dong; Aaron A. Berg

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Soil Moisture Memory in AGCM Simulations: Analysis of Global Land–Atmosphere Coupling Experiment (GLACE) Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soil moisture memory is a key aspect of land–atmosphere interaction and has major implications for seasonal forecasting. Because of a severe lack of soil moisture observations on most continents, existing analyses of global-scale soil moisture ...

Sonia I. Seneviratne; Randal D. Koster; Zhichang Guo; Paul A. Dirmeyer; Eva Kowalczyk; David Lawrence; Ping Liu; David Mocko; Cheng-Hsuan Lu; Keith W. Oleson; Diana Verseghy

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Soils Collections Project Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Soil Collections Soil Collections Soil Collections Overview Soil covers a major portion of the Earth's surface, and is an important natural resource that either directly or indirectly supports most of the planet's life. Soil is a mixture of mineral and organic materials plus air and water. The contents of soil vary by location and are constantly changing. The ORNL DAAC Soil Collections archive contains data on the physical and chemical properties of soils, including: soil carbon and nitrogen soil water-holding capacity soil respiration soil texture Most data sets are globally gridded, while a few are of a regional nature. Get Soils Data Find and order data sets: See list of data sets and download data Browse Soils Data Holdings by selected attributes Retrieve Soils data by FTP browse

26

Long-term effects of soil warming on labile carbon availability and microbial community respiration and composition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

warmed soils from the Harvard Forest in Petersham, MA were analyzed as to the long-term effects. Soil warming has been going on in large 30x30m plots at the Harvard Forest (Petersham, MA) for the past in the Barre Woods of the Slab City Tract of the Harvard Forest, Petersham, MA. This is a mixed deciduous

Vallino, Joseph J.

27

A global analysis of soil microbial biomass carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus in terrestrial ecosystems  

SciTech Connect

Soil microbes play a pivotal role in regulating land-atmosphere interactions; the soil microbial biomass carbon (C), nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and C:N:P stoichiometry are important regulators for soil biogeochemical processes; however, the current knowledge on magnitude, stoichiometry, storage, and spatial distribution of global soil microbial biomass C, N, and P is limited. In this study, 3087 pairs of data points were retrieved from 281 published papers and further used to summarize the magnitudes and stoichiometries of C, N, and P in soils and soil microbial biomass at global- and biome-levels. Finally, global stock and spatial distribution of microbial biomass C and N in 0-30 cm and 0-100 cm soil profiles were estimated. The results show that C, N, and P in soils and soil microbial biomass vary substantially across biomes; the fractions of soil nutrient C, N, and P in soil microbial biomass are 1.6% in a 95% confidence interval of (1.5%-1.6%), 2.9% in a 95% confidence interval of (2.8%-3.0%), and 4.4% in a 95% confidence interval of (3.9%-5.0%), respectively. The best estimates of C:N:P stoichiometries for soil nutrients and soil microbial biomass are 153:11:1, and 47:6:1, respectively, at global scale, and they vary in a wide range among biomes. Vertical distribution of soil microbial biomass follows the distribution of roots up to 1 m depth. The global stock of soil microbial biomass C and N were estimated to be 15.2 Pg C and 2.3 Pg N in the 0-30 cm soil profiles, and 21.2 Pg C and 3.2 Pg N in the 0-100 cm soil profiles. We did not estimate P in soil microbial biomass due to data shortage and insignificant correlation with soil total P and climate variables. The spatial patterns of soil microbial biomass C and N were consistent with those of soil organic C and total N, i.e. high density in northern high latitude, and low density in low latitudes and southern hemisphere.

Xu, Xiaofeng [ORNL; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

A History and Review of the Global Soil Wetness Project (GSWP)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Global Soil Wetness Project (GSWP) is an international land surface modeling research effort involving dataset production, validation, model comparison, and scientific investigation in the areas of land surface hydrology and climatology. GSWP ...

Paul A. Dirmeyer

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Global Patterns of Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Soils on a 0...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Potter. 1996. Global Patterns of Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Soils on a 0.5 Degree Grid Cell Basis. DB-1015. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, U.S. Department of...

30

Evaluation of Soil Moisture in the NCEP–NCAR and NCEP–DOE Global Reanalyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study compares soil moisture analyses from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction–National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP–NCAR) global reanalysis (R-1) and the later NCEP– Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Model ...

Cheng-Hsuan Lu; Masao Kanamitsu; John O. Roads; Wesley Ebisuzaki; Kenneth E. Mitchell; Dag Lohmann

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Comparison, Validation, and Transferability of Eight Multiyear Global Soil Wetness Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The characteristics of eight global soil wetness products, three produced by land surface model calculations, three from coupled land–atmosphere model reanalyses, and two from microwave remote sensing estimates, have been examined. The goal of ...

Paul A. Dirmeyer; Zhichang Guo; Xiang Gao

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Chemistry of organic carbon in soil with relationship to the global carbon cycle  

SciTech Connect

Various ecosystem disturbances alter the balances between production of organic matter and its decomposition and therefore change the amount of carbon in soil. The most severe perturbation is conversion of natural vegetation to cultivated crops. Conversion of natural vegetation to cultivated crops results in a lowered input of slowly decomposing material which causes a reduction in overall carbon levels. Disruption of soil matrix structure by cultivation leads to lowered physical protection of organic matter resulting in an increased net mineralization rate of soil carbon. Climate change is another perturbation that affects the amount and composition of plant production, litter inputs, and decomposition regimes but does not affect soil structure directly. Nevertheless, large changes in soil carbon storage are probable with anticipated CO2 induced climate change, particularly in northern latitudes where anticipated climate change will be greatest (MacCracken and Luther 1985) and large amounts of soil organic matter are found. It is impossible, given the current state of knowledge of soil organic matter processes and transformations to develop detailed process models of soil carbon dynamics. Largely phenomenological models appear to be developing into predictive tools for understanding the role of soil organic matter in the global carbon cycle. In particular, these models will be useful in quantifying soil carbon changes due to human land-use and to anticipated global climate and vegetation changes. 47 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

Post, W.M. III

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Soil Organic Carbon Sequestration by Tillage and Crop Rotation: A Global  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tillage and Crop Rotation Tillage and Crop Rotation Soil Organic Carbon Sequestration by Tillage and Crop Rotation: A Global Data Analysis DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/tcm.002 PDF file Full text Soil Science Society of America Journal 66:1930-1946 (2002) CSITE image Tristram O. West and Wilfred M. Post DOE Center for Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) Environmental Sciences Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory P.O. Box 2008 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6290 U.S.A. Sponsor: U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research Program Abstract Global map Changes in agricultural management can potentially increase the accumulation rate of soil organic carbon (SOC), thereby sequestering CO2 from the atmosphere. This study was conducted to quantify potential soil

34

Soil Degradation and Global Change: Role of Soil Erosion and Deposition in Carbon Sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and M.  York.  1999.  Carbon  Sequestration Research and of soil movement on  carbon sequestration in agricultural and deposition in  carbon sequestration  Asmeret  Asefaw 

Berhe, Asmeret Asefaw; Harden, Jennifer W.; Harte, John; Torn, Margaret S.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

A dynamic soil chamber system coupled with a tunable diode laser for online measurements of delta-13C, delta-18O, and efflux rate of soil respired CO2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High frequency observations of the stable isotopic composition of CO(2) effluxes from soil have been sparse due in part to measurement challenges. We have developed an open-system method that utilizes a flow-through chamber coupled to a tunable diode laser (TDL) to quantify the rate of soil CO(2) efflux and its delta(13)C and delta(18)O values (delta(13)C(R) and delta(18)O(R), respectively). We tested the method first in the laboratory using an artificial soil test column and then in a semi-arid woodland. We found that the CO(2) efflux rates of 1.2 to 7.3 micromol m(-2) s(-1) measured by the chamber-TDL system were similar to measurements made using the chamber and an infrared gas analyzer (IRGA) (R(2) = 0.99) and compared well with efflux rates generated from the soil test column (R(2) = 0.94). Measured delta(13)C and delta(18)O values of CO(2) efflux using the chamber-TDL system at 2 min intervals were not significantly different from source air values across all efflux rates after accounting for diffusive enrichment. Field measurements during drought demonstrated a strong dependency of CO(2) efflux and isotopic composition on soil water content. Addition of water to the soil beneath the chamber resulted in average changes of +6.9 micromol m(-2) s(-1), -5.0 per thousand, and -55.0 per thousand for soil CO(2) efflux, delta(13)C(R) and delta(18)O(R), respectively. All three variables initiated responses within 2 min of water addition, with peak responses observed within 10 min for isotopes and 20 min for efflux. The observed delta(18)O(R) was more enriched than predicted from temperature-dependent H(2)O-CO(2) equilibration theory, similar to other recent observations of delta(18)O(R) from dry soils (Wingate L, Seibt U, Maseyk K, Ogee J, Almeida P, Yakir D, Pereira JS, Mencuccini M. Global Change Biol. 2008; 14: 2178). The soil chamber coupled with the TDL was found to be an effective method for capturing soil CO(2) efflux and its stable isotope composition at high temporal frequency.

Powers, Heath H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mcdowell, Nate [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hanson, David [UNM; Hunt, John [LANDCARE RESEARCH

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Estimating nocturnal ecosystem respiration from the vertical turbulent flux and change in storage of CO2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Micrometeorological measurements of nighttime ecosystem respiration can be systematically biased when stable atmospheric conditions lead to drainage flows associated with decoupling of air flow above and within plant canopies. The associated horizontal and vertical advective fluxes cannot be measured using instrumentation on the single towers typically used at micrometeorological sites. A common approach to minimize bias is to use a threshold in friction velocity, u*, to exclude periods when advection is assumed to be important, but this is problematic in situations when in-canopy flows are decoupled from the flow above. Using data from 25 flux stations in a wide variety of forest ecosystems globally, we examine the generality of a novel approach to estimating nocturnal respiration developed by van Gorsel et al. (van Gorsel, E., Leuning, R., Cleugh, H.A., Keith, H., Suni, T., 2007. Nocturnal carbon efflux: reconciliation of eddy covariance and chamber measurements using an alternative to the u*-threshold filtering technique. Tellus 59B, 397 403, Tellus, 59B, 307-403). The approach is based on the assumption that advection is small relative to the vertical turbulent flux (FC) and change in storage (FS) of CO2 in the few hours after sundown. The sum of FC and FS reach a maximum during this period which is used to derive a temperature response function for ecosystem respiration. Measured hourly soil temperatures are then used with this function to estimate respiration RRmax. The new approach yielded excellent agreement with (1) independent measurements using respiration chambers, (2) with estimates using ecosystem light-response curves of Fc + Fs extrapolated to zero light, RLRC, and (3) with a detailed process-based forest ecosystem model, Rcast. At most sites respiration rates estimated using the u*-filter, Rust, were smaller than RRmax and RLRC. Agreement of our approach with independent measurements indicates that RRmax provides an excellent estimate of nighttime ecosystem respiration

Gu, Lianhong [ORNL; Van Gorsel, Eva [CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research; Leuning, Ray [CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research; Delpierre, Nicolas [Universite Paris XI, Orsay, France; Black, Andy [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Chen, Baozhang [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Munger, J. William [Harvard University; Wofsy, Steve [Harvard University; Aubinet, M. [Faculte Universitaire des Sciences Agronomiques de Gembloux

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Global Trends and Variability in Soil Moisture and Drought Characteristics, 1950–2000, from Observation-Driven Simulations of the Terrestrial Hydrologic Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global and regional trends in drought for 1950–2000 are analyzed using a soil moisture–based drought index over global terrestrial areas, excluding Greenland and Antarctica. The soil moisture fields are derived from a simulation of the ...

Justin Sheffield; Eric F. Wood

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Global Fields of Soil Moisture and Land Surface Evapotranspiration Derived from Observed Precipitation and Surface Air Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The global fields of normal monthly soil moisture and land surface evapotranspiration are derived with a simple water budget model that has precipitation and potential evapotranspiration as inputs. The precipitation is observed and the potential ...

Y. Mintz; G. K. Walker

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Teaching cell respiration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

I am tearing my hair out trying to teach the subject of Cell Respiration and photosynthesis to students that are in some cases on a basic skills level of understanding. How...

40

Global Patterns of Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Soils on a 0.5 Degree Grid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Patterns of Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Soils on a 0.5 Degree Grid Global Patterns of Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Soils on a 0.5 Degree Grid Cell Basis (DB-1015) DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/lue.db1015 This data has been updated. Please see NDP-081. Contributed by: James W. Raich 1 and Christopher S. Potter2 1Department of Botany Iowa State University Ames, IA 50011 USA Email: jraich@iastate.edu 2NASA Ames Research Center MS 242-2 Moffett Field, CA 94035 USA Email: cpotter@gaia.arc.nasa.gov Prepared by L.M. Olsen. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Date Published: March, 1996 (Revised for the web: 2002) The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center is a part of the Environmental Sciences Division of the OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY (ORNL) and is located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6290. The ORNL is managed by University of Tennessee-Battelle, LLC for the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global soil respiration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Soil Moisture Analyses at ECMWF: Evaluation Using Global Ground-Based In Situ Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In situ soil moisture from 117 stations across the world and under different biome and climate conditions are used to evaluate two soil moisture products from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF)—namely, the operational ...

C. Albergel; P. de Rosnay; G. Balsamo; L. Isaksen; J. Muñoz-Sabater

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Skill and Global Trend Analysis of Soil Moisture from Reanalyses and Microwave Remote Sensing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In situ soil moisture measurements from 2007 to 2010 for 196 stations from five networks across the world (United States, France, Spain, China, and Australia) are used to determine the reliability of three soil moisture products: (i) a revised ...

C. Albergel; W. Dorigo; R. H. Reichle; G. Balsamo; P. de Rosnay; J. Muñoz-Sabater; L. Isaksen; R. de Jeu; W. Wagner

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Testing the Effects of a New Land Surface Scheme and of Initial Soil Moisture Conditions in the Canadian Global Forecast Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new land surface scheme developed for the Canadian general circulation model has been introduced into the Canadian global forecast model and tested for a summer case. It features three soil layers, a snow layer, and a vegetation layer; its ...

Yves Delage; Diana Verseghy

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Storing Carbon in Agricultural Soils to Help Head-Off Global Warming and to Combat Desertification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We know for sure that addition of organic matter to soil increases water-holding capacity, imparts fertility with the addition of nutrients, increases soil aggregation and improves tilth. Depeing on it's type, organic matter contains between 40 and 60% carbon. Using agricultural management practices to increase the amount of organic matter and carbon in soils can be an effective strategy to offset carbon dioxide emissions to the atmosphere as well as to improve the quality of the soil and slow or prevent desertification.

Rosenberg, Norman J.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.

2001-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

45

Improved Ground Hydrology Calculations for Global Climate Models (GCMs): Soil Water Movement and Evapotranspiration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A physically based ground hydrology model is developed to improve the land-surface sensible and latent heat calculations in global climate models (GCMs). The processes of transpiration, evaporation from intercepted precipitation and dew, ...

F. Abramopoulos; C. Rosenzweig; B. Choudhury

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

A Comparison of Soil-Moisture Sensitivity in Two Global Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Area-averaged surface hydrological processes from two global spectral general circulation climate models coupled to simple slab-ocean mixed layers are compared for the climates simulated with present-day (control) and increased atmospheric carbon ...

Gerald A. Meehl; Warren M. Washington

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Soil  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Soil carbon sequestration and land-use change: processes and potential W . M . P O S T * and K . C . K W O N * Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory,...

48

Global Soil Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

clay, rock), bulk density, cation exchange capacity, aluminum content, thermal and hydraulic conductivity, C, N (NH4, NO3 )content, N mineralization, N fixation,...

49

Global Retrospective Estimation of Soil Moisture Using the Variable Infiltration Capacity Land Surface Model, 1980–93  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A daily set of surface meteorological forcings, model-derived surface moisture fluxes, and state variables for global land areas for the period of 1979–93 is described. The forcing dataset facilitates global simulations and evaluation of land ...

Bart Nijssen; Reiner Schnur; Dennis P. Lettenmaier

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

THE RELATION OF PHOTOSYNTHESIS TO RESPIRATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

eng-@ The Relation of Photosynthesis t o Respiration J.W.y independent paths i n photosynthesis am3 l i g h t ~ e s pup vphotosynthatesfl, 3 . Photosynthesis proceeds a t a

Weigl, J.W.; Warrington, P.M.; Calvin, M.

1950-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Bayesian hierarchical models for soil CO{sub 2} flux and leak detection at geologic sequestration sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proper characterizations of background soil CO{sub 2} respiration rates are critical for interpreting CO{sub 2} leakage monitoring results at geologic sequestration sites. In this paper, a method is developed for determining temperature-dependent critical values of soil CO{sub 2} flux for preliminary leak detection inference. The method is illustrated using surface CO{sub 2} flux measurements obtained from the AmeriFlux network fit with alternative models for the soil CO{sub 2} flux versus soil temperature relationship. The models are fit first to determine pooled parameter estimates across the sites, then using a Bayesian hierarchical method to obtain both global and site-specific parameter estimates. Model comparisons are made using the deviance information criterion (DIC), which considers both goodness of fit and model complexity. The hierarchical models consistently outperform the corresponding pooled models, demonstrating the need for site-specific data and estimates when determining relationships for background soil respiration. A hierarchical model that relates the square root of the CO{sub 2} flux to a quadratic function of soil temperature is found to provide the best fit for the AmeriFlux sites among the models tested. This model also yields effective prediction intervals, consistent with the upper envelope of the flux data across the modeled sites and temperature ranges. Calculation of upper prediction intervals using the proposed method can provide a basis for setting critical values in CO{sub 2} leak detection monitoring at sequestration sites.

Yang, Ya-Mei; Small, Mitchell J.; Junker, Brian; Bromhal, Grant S.; Strazisar, Brian; Wells, Arthur

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Influence of the Realistic Description of Soil Water-Holding Capacity on the Global Water Cycle in a GCM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sensitivity of the hydrological cycle to soil water-holding capacity (WHC) is investigated using the Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique General Circulation Model (LMD GCM) coupled to a land surface model (LSM). A reference simulation (REF),...

Agnès Ducharne; Katia Laval

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

New Vegetation Albedo Parameters and Global Fields of Soil Background Albedo Derived from MODIS for Use in a Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New values are derived for snow-free albedo of five plant functional types (PFTs) and the soil/litter substrate from data acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensors on board Terra and Aqua. The derived albedo ...

Caroline J. Houldcroft; William M. F. Grey; Mike Barnsley; Christopher M. Taylor; Sietse O. Los; Peter R. J. North

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

The Relation of Quantum Requirement in Photosynthesis to Respiration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

QUANTUM REQUIREMENT IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS TO RESPIRATION J a m eQUANTUM REQUIREMENT IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS Contents I n t r oducQUANTUM REQUIREMENT IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS TO RESPIRATION J a m e

Bassham, James A.; Shibata, Kazuo; Calvin, M.

1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Y-12 Respirator Flow Cycle Time Reduction Project  

SciTech Connect

In mid-July 2000, a Cycle Time Reduction (CTR) project was initiated by senior management to improve the flow and overall efficiency of the respirator distribution process at Y-12. A cross-functional team was formed to evaluate the current process and to propose necessary changes for improvement. Specifically, the team was challenged to make improvements that would eliminate production work stoppages due to the unavailability of respirators in Y-12 Stores. Prior to the team initiation, plant back orders for a specific model respirator were averaging above 600 and have been as high as 750+. The Cycle Time Reduction team segmented the respirator flow into detailed steps, with the focus and emphasis primarily being on the movement of dirty respirators out of work areas, transportation to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Laundry, and return back to Y-12 Stores inventory. The team selected a popular model respirator, size large, to track improvements. Despite a 30 percent increase in respirator usage for the same period of time in the previous year, the team has reduced the back orders by 89% with a steady trend downward. Summary of accomplishments: A 47 percent reduction in the average cycle time for dirty respirators to be laundered and stocked for reuse at the Y-12 Complex; A 73 percent reduction in the average cycle time for dirty respirators to be laundered and stocked for reuse specifically for major users: Enriched Uranium Operations (EUO) and Facilities Maintenance Organization (FMO); Development of a performance measure for tracking back orders; An 89 percent reduction in the number of laundered respirators on back order; Implementation of a tracking method to account for respirator loss; Achievement of an annual cost savings/avoidance of $800K with a one-time cost of $20K; Implementation of a routine pick-up schedule for EUO (major user of respirators); Elimination of activities no longer determined to be needed; Elimination of routine complaint calls to Stores requesting respirators; and Recommendation of improvements at the supplier (ORNL Laundry and Quality groups).

Hawk, C.T.; Rogers, P.E.

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Direct measurement of the deep soil respiration accompanying seasonal thawing of a boreal forest soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Saskatchewan and Manitoba, Canada, J. Geophys. Res. ,Spruce site in Northern Manitoba, Canada (NSA-OBS or NOBS,

Hirsch, Adam I.; Trumbore, Susan E.; Goulden, Michael L.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

The effects of harvesting intensity on soil CO2 efflux and carbon content in an east Texas bottomland hardwood ecosystem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soil respiration rates have been used as an indicator of soil community activity around the world. An increasing number of studies have been performed using soil respiration rates as a measure of man's impacts on the environment, including forest land. I examined the effects of harvest intensity on in situ and mineral soil respiration, along with total soil and soluble organic carbon, were examined in a bottomland hardwood forest. Treatments included a clearcut, a partial cut, and a non-harvested control. I hypothesized that respiration rates would vary directly with harvest intensity. The sodalime absorption technique was used for determining in situ respiration and the wet alkali method was used for measuring mineral soil respiration in the lab. Soil temperature and moisture content were also measured. Sampling occurred between 6 and 22 months after harvesting. Total soil and soluble organic carbon analyses were performed every three sampling periods beginning with period 6. Total soil organic carbon content was determined by the Walkley-Black method, an acid digest procedure. Soluble organic carbon content was determined from cold-water extracts analyzed with a total organic carbon analyzer. Results indicated that harvesting significantly (a=0.05) increased in situ respiration during most sampling periods. This effect was attributed to the revegetation of the site creating an increase in live root and associated microflora activity in the soil following harvesting. In situ respiration varied directly with soil temperature and inversely with soil moisture. Harvesting effects on mineral soil respiration were less clear and showed trends in only some months. Harvesting significantly (a=0.05) increased the amount of total organic carbon in the top 15 cm, whereas overall soluble organic carbon levels were not significantly affected. I feel that even though harvesting has significantly effected soil respiration rates, this increase will not adversely affect atmospheric C02 levels. Published data show that when temperate forests are allowed to regrow immediately after harvest, carbon assimilated in growing vegetation is greater than the C02 lost from the soil.

Londo, Andrew James

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Soils and the greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

This book contains the following topics; Global distribution of the major soils and land cover types, Geographic quantification of soil and changes on their properties, Sources and sinks of greenhouse gases, Partitioning of solar energy, Soils, Greenhouse gasfluxes: Carbon dioxide, Greenhouse gasfluxes: Methane.

Bouwman, A.F.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

An Improved Method for Estimating Global Evapotranspiration Based on Satellite Determination of Surface Net Radiation, Vegetation Index, Temperature, and Soil Moisture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple and accurate method to estimate regional or global latent heat of evapotranspiration (ET) from remote sensing data is essential. The authors proposed a method in an earlier study that utilized satellite-determined surface net radiation (...

Kaicun Wang; Shunlin Liang

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

The Path of Carbon in Photosynthesis VII. Respiration and Photosynthesis  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

The relationship of respiration to photosynthesis in barley seedling leaves and the algae, Chlorella and Scenedesmus, has been investigated using radioactive carbon dioxide and the techniques of paper chromatography and radioautography. The plants are allowed to photosynthesize normally for thirty seconds in c{sup 14}O{sub 2} after which they are allowed to respire in air or helium in the light or dark. Respiration of photosynthetic intermediates as evidenced by the appearance of labeled glutomic, isocitric, fumaric and succinic acids is slower in the light than in the dark. Labeled glycolic acid is observed in barley and algae. It disappears rapidly in the dark and is maintained and increased in quantity in the light in C0{sub 2}-free air.

Benson, A. A.; Calvin, M.

1949-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global soil respiration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

A Global Dataset of Palmer Drought Severity Index for 1870–2002: Relationship with Soil Moisture and Effects of Surface Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A monthly dataset of Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) from 1870 to 2002 is derived using historical precipitation and temperature data for global land areas on a 2.5° grid. Over Illinois, Mongolia, and parts of China and the former Soviet ...

Aiguo Dai; Kevin E. Trenberth; Taotao Qian

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Surface Soil  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

operations Why we sample surface soil Soil sampling is performed to: Determine radionuclide and chemical concentrations in soil and compare these results to regional...

63

Soil microbial biomass: an estimator of soil development in reclaimed lignite mine soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A two-year study was conducted at the Big Brown lignite mine in Fairfield, Texas, to determine the rate and extent of recovery of the soil microbial biomass (SMB) in mixed overburden. The relationships between SMB carbon (SMBC), basal respiration and soil organic carbon (SOC) accretion was evaluated using the respiratory quotient (qCO2) and the ratio of the SMB to SOC (SMBC:SOC ratio). Newly leveled, 1-, 3-, 5-, 10-, 15-, and 23-year-old reclaimed mixed overburden as well as an unmined soil were sampled bimonthly to measure SMIBC and other parameters. Three methods [chloroform fumigation incubation (FI), chloroform fumigation extraction (FE), and substrate-induced respiration (SIR)] were used to measure SMB and compared as estimators of SMB in reclaimed mine soils. Basal respiration (CO2 evolved from untreated soil), metabolic quotient (i.e. specific respiratory activity; qCO2; C02 produced per unit mass of SMB), and the SMBC:SOC ratio (the abundance of SMB relative to SOC) were used to determine trends in microbial biomass dynamics relative to SOC accumulation. A nearly linear increase in SMB was observed over the chronosequence of mine soils (r--O.98 to 0.99) for each of the three biomass methods. Mean values of SMB from 12 sample dates ranged from 41 pg SMIBC g-1 at the 0-year site to 291 ptg SMBC g-' at the 23-year site. The unmined reference soil averaged 84 jig SMBC g-1 through the period of the study. The qCO2 declined from 0.24 to 0. 12 Mg C02-C Mg SMBC d-' during the first year and tended to stabilize near 0.06 to 0.09 as reclaimed sites matured. The ratios of SMBC:SOC increased linearly with age of site through 23 years (r--O. 97). A substantial amount of seasonal variation in SMB was observed during the two-year study. Older sites (15-and 23-years) showed significant fluctuations of SMB that correlated well with the growing season of Coastal bermudagrass. Microbial biomass peaked during mid to late summer and declined to a minimum during the cold, wet winter months. Younger sites were less affected by seasonal influences, and changes at these sites appeared more related to changes in soil moisture.

Swanson, Eric Scott

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

ORNL researchers improve soil carbon cycling models | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

researchers improve soil carbon cycling models researchers improve soil carbon cycling models January 01, 2013 ORNL's new carbon cycling model could help scientists understand the role of soil microbes (MBC) in climate change by tracking extracellular enzymes (ENZ) that break down carbon-rich soil materials (SOC) into forms that microbes can respire (DOC). A more robust model of the soil carbon cycle developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) improves understanding of carbon residence time in soils and enables scientists to make more accurate climate predictions. The model does a better job than previous models of accounting for how microbes in the soil break down carbon-rich materials and release carbon dioxide. "Soil is a big reservoir of carbon," said co-author Melanie Mayes of the Environmental Sciences Division and the Climate Change Science

65

Ozone removal capability of a welding fume respirator containing activated charcoal  

SciTech Connect

Development of air purifying respirators for protection against ozone has been slowed by concerns about oxidation of charcoal and other available sorbents. The suitability of a charcoal sorbent for low concentrations of ozone was evaluated as a part of the development of a half-mask air purifying respirator designed for welding fumes and ozone. Testing of the respirator confirmed that charcoal can be a suitable sorbent for low levels of ozone. Where the respirator is properly selected, fit tested, and worn, respirator use against welding fumes and ozone at concentrations not exceeding 10 times the permissible exposure limit had been recommended.

Johnston, A.R.; Dyrud, J.F.; Shih, Y.T. (Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division, St. Paul, MN (USA))

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Soil Classification Using GATree  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper details the application of a genetic programming framework for classification of decision tree of Soil data to classify soil texture. The database contains measurements of soil profile data. We have applied GATree for generating classification decision tree. GATree is a decision tree builder that is based on Genetic Algorithms (GAs). The idea behind it is rather simple but powerful. Instead of using statistic metrics that are biased towards specific trees we use a more flexible, global metric of tree quality that try to optimize accuracy and size. GATree offers some unique features not to be found in any other tree inducers while at the same time it can produce better results for many difficult problems. Experimental results are presented which illustrate the performance of generating best decision tree for classifying soil texture for soil data set.

Bhargavi, P

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Regional and Global Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Products > Regional/Global Products > Regional/Global Regional and Global Data Biogeochemical Dynamics Data Regional and global biogeochemical dynamics data can be used to improve our understanding of the structure and function of various ecosystems; to enable prediction across spatial and temporal scales; and to parameterize and validate terrestrial ecosystem models. The ORNL DAAC compiles, archives, and distributes more than 150 products from the following projects: Climate Collections Hydroclimatology Collections ISLSCP II Project Net Primary Productivity (NPP) River Discharge (RIVDIS) Russian Land Cover (RLC) Soil Collections Vegetation Collections Vegetation-Ecosystem Modeling (VEMAP) Climate Collections Climate collections include measured and modeled values for variables such as temperature, precipitation, humidity, radiation, wind velocity, and

68

Global Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Security Global Security LANL's mission is to develop and apply science and technology to ensure the safety, security, and effectiveness of the U.S. nuclear deterrent;...

69

The Soil Moisture Active and Passive Mission (SMAP): Science and Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The soil moisture active and passive mission (SMAP) will provide global maps of soil moisture content and surface freeze/thaw state. Global measurements of these variables are critical for terrestrial water and carbon cycle ...

Entekhabi, Dara

70

Stored carbon partly fuels fine-root respiration but is not used for production of new fine roots  

SciTech Connect

The relative use of new photosynthate compared to stored C for the production and maintenance of fine roots, and the rate of C turnover in heterogeneous fine-root populations, are poorly understood. We followed the relaxation of a 13C tracer in fine roots in a Liquidambar styraciflua plantation at the conclusion of a free-air CO2 enrichment experiment. Goals included quantifying the relative fractions of new photosynthate versus stored C used in root growth and root respiration, as well as the turnover rate of fine-root C fixed during [CO2] fumigation. New fine-root growth was largely from recent photosynthate, while nearly one-quarter of respired C was from a storage pool. Changes in the isotopic composition of the fine-root population over two full growing seasons indicated heterogeneous C pools; less than 10% of root C had a residence time < 3 months, while a majority of root C had a residence time > 2 years. Compared to a 1-pool model, a 2-pool model for C turnover in fine roots (with 5 and 0.37 yr-1 turnover times) doubles the fine-root contribution to forest NPP (9-13%) and supports the 50% root-to-soil transfer rate often used in models.

Lynch, Douglas J [ORNL; Matamala-Paradeda, Roser [ORNL; Iversen, Colleen M [ORNL; Norby, Richard J [ORNL; Gonzalez-Meler, Miguel A [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Respirator studies for the AEC Division of Operational Safety. Progress report, January 1--June 30, 1973  

SciTech Connect

The LASL Respirator Research and Development Section, Industrial Hygiene Group, performed studies and conducted training for the Division of Operational Safety (DOS) during the second half of FY 1973. The major work involved development and initiation of a training course for AEC contractors and AEC personnel; writing a Respirator Manual for use by the AEC and their contractors; providing consulting services for the DOS and contractors; man testing several respirators; and holding a three-day Respirator Symposium jointly sponsored by the DOS, the Directorate of Regulatory Standards, and LASL. (auth)

Hyatt, E.C.; Held, B.J.; Bevis, D.J.; Moore, T.O.

1973-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Soil Organic Carbon Sequestration by Tillage and Crop Rotation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Descriptions Soil Organic Carbon Sequestration by Tillage and Crop Rotation: A Global Data Analysis (Site Descriptions) West, T.O., and W.M. Post. 2002. Soil Organic Carbon...

73

Global climate change and pedogenic carbonates  

SciTech Connect

Global Climate Change summarizes what is known about soil inorganic carbon and develops strategies that could lead to the retention of more carbon in the soil. It covers basic concepts, analytical methods, secondary carbonates, and research and development priorities. With this book one will get a better understanding of the global carbon cycle, organic and inorganic carbon, and their roles, or what is known of them, in the greenhouse effect.

Lal, R.; Kimble, J.M.; Stewart, B.A.; Eswaran, H. [eds.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Surface Soil  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Surface Soil Surface Soil Surface Soil We compare local soil samples with samples collected from northern New Mexico locations that are beyond the range of potential influence from normal Laboratory operations. April 12, 2012 Farm soil sampling Two LANL environmental field team members take soil samples from a farm. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Measurements are compared to samples from the regional sites and compared to averages over time to see if there are changes in concentrations. Monitoring surface soil LANL has monitored surface soils since the early 1970s. Institutional surface soil samples are collected from 17 on-site, 11 perimeter, and six regional (background) locations every three years.

75

Novel methods for respirable dust removal. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Two novel devices with potential for controlling emissions of dust particles in the respirable size range (0.3 to 3 microns) are the electrostatically enhanced cyclone (or electrocyclone) and acoustic agglomeration. The electrocyclone combines electrostatic, inertial forces and larger unit size compared to conventional cyclones to achieve improved performance. The acoustic agglomerator uses an oscillating acoustic flow field to cause particle collision and agglomeration. The resulting large particles are then more readily separable by conventional methods. The application of these novel methods to respirable dust control in pressurized fluidized-bed combustion and conventional pulverized coal combustion for electric power generation is explored in this study. In a PFBC power plant, dust particles entrained in the combustion gases must be removed at high temperature and pressure in order to protect a gas turbine from erosion. A key technical issue in this application is whether the hot gas cleanup equipment can satisfy the NSPS, or whether supplementary stack gas cleanup, such as a baghouse, is required downstream of the gas turbine. The potential of both the electrocyclone and the acoustic agglomerator for achieving NSPS ahead of the gas turbine has been assessed. In conventional PC power plants, particulate cleanup is normally accomplished with electrostatic precipitators. However, plants burning low sulfur western coals have experienced difficulty achieving adequate particulate emissions control with electrostatic precipitators, due to the high resistivity of the coal ash. For these applications the electrocyclone or an acoustic agglomerator coupled with either an electrocyclone or more conventional removal technique, might prove attractive. The principal conclusions drawn from the work performed and the recommendations based on the results are detailed. (LTN)

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Sampling – Soil  

INL has developed a method for sampling soil to determine the presence of extremely fine particles such as absorbents.

77

Soil Data Release, Aug. 18, 2000  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Release, Aug. 18 The ORNL DAAC now offers a data set entitled "Global Distribution of Plant-Extractable Water Capacity of Soil (Dunne)." The data set was added to the holdings in...

78

The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission is one of the first Earth observation satellites being developed by NASA in response to the National Research Council's Decadal Survey. SMAP will make global measurements of ...

Entekhabi, Dara

79

Organic amendments increase soil solution phosphate concentrations in an acid soil: A controlled environment study  

SciTech Connect

Soil acidification affects at least 4 million hectares of agricultural land in Victoria, Australia. Low soil pH can inhibit plant growth through increased soluble aluminum (Al) concentrations and decreased available phosphorus (P). The addition of organic amendments may increase P availability through competition for P binding sites, solubilization of poorly soluble P pools, and increased solution pH. The effect of two organic amendments (lignite and compost) on P solubility in an acid soil was determined through controlled environment (incubation) studies. Three days after the addition of lignite and compost, both treatments increased orthophosphate and total P measured in soil solution, with the compost treatments having the greatest positive effect. Increased incubation time (26 days) increased soil solution P concentrations in both untreated and amended soils, with the greatest effect seen in total P concentrations. The measured differences in solution P concentrations between the lignite- and compost-amended treatments were likely caused by differences in solution chemistry, predominantly solution pH and cation dynamics. Soil amendment with lignite or compost also increased microbial activity in the incubation systems, as measured by carbon dioxide respiration. Based on the results presented, it is proposed that the measured increase in soil solution P with amendment addition was likely caused by both chemical and biological processes, including biotic and abiotic P solubilization reactions, and the formation of soluble organic-metal complexes.

Schefe, C.R.; Patti, A.F.; Clune, T.S.; Jackson, R. [Rutgers Centre, Rutherglen, Vic. (Australia)

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

80

Soil Minerals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Soil Minerals Soil Minerals Nature Bulletin No. 707 March 2, 1963 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor SOIL MINERALS We all depend upon the land Our food is obtained from plants and animals -- bread and meat, potatoes and fish, fruit and eggs and milk and the rest of it. Our livestock feed on plants and plant products such as grass and grain. Plants, by means of their root systems, take moisture and nutrients from the soils on which they grow. Their food values, for us or for animals that furnish us food, depend upon the available nutrients in those soils. Soils contain solids, water and air. The solids, the bulk of a soil -- except in purely organic types such as peat and muck -- are mostly mineral materials. Ordinarily they also contain some organic material: decayed and decaying remains of plants and animals.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global soil respiration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Airborne release fractions/rates and respirable fractions for nonreactor nuclear facilities. Volume 2, Appendices  

SciTech Connect

This document contains compiled data from the DOE Handbook on Airborne Release Fractions/Rates and Respirable Fractions for Nonreactor Nuclear facilities. Source data and example facilities utilized, such as the Plutonium Recovery Facility, are included.

Not Available

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Bioavailable organic carbon in wetland soils across a broad climogeographic area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soils from a broad climogeographic region of the U.S., ranging from Alaska to Louisiana and Texas, were obtained from the NRCS National Soils Laboratory in Lincoln, Nebraska. Soils were also collected in the summer of 1996 from upland and poorly drained areas in northern Alaska for comparison of biological properties and to determine the effects of drying on estimation of microbial biomass and activity. Air-dried soils were moistened and incubated 48 h, during which time CO? evolution was measured. Following the preincubation, microbial biomass was determined using a modification of the chloroform-fumigation-incubation method to accommodate limited sample quantity. Carbohydrates were determined using bicinchoninic acid reagent and total extractable carbon was determined by analysis of 0.5-M K?SO? extracts with a total carbon analyzer. The objectives of this study were to elucidate geographical trends and meaningful relationships between the bioavailable C parameters. Soil microbial biomass, determined by chloroform fumigation incubation, correlated best with organic C and basal respiration with subtraction of unfumigated controls. Extraction of C with hot water was a rapid, simple procedure that provided the best predictor of soil respiration. Potassium sulfate-extractable carbon was consistently lower than hot water extractable C. Soils from northern states tended to contain more organic carbon than soils in southern states, however, not necessarily more bioavailable C. Detecting geographical trends for bioavailable C proved more difficult due to numerous factors such as topographic position, surface vegetation, climate, and land use.

Baker, Andrew Dwight

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

A Novel Method for Quantifying Value in Spaceborne Soil Moisture Retrievals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel methodology is introduced for quantifying the added value of remotely sensed soil moisture products for global land surface modeling applications. The approach is based on the assimilation of soil moisture retrievals into a simple surface ...

Wade T. Crow

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Storm Precipitation in the United States. Part II: Soil Erosion Characteristics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soil erosion is a major global challenge. An increased understanding of the mechanisms driving soil erosion, especially the storms that produce it, is vital to reducing the impact on agriculture and the environment. The objective of this work was ...

James R. Angel; Michael A. Palecki; Steven E. Hollinger

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

The Path of Carbon in Photosynthesis VII Respiration andPhotosynthesis  

SciTech Connect

The relationship of respiration to photosynthesis in barley seedling leaves and the algae, Chlorella and Scenedesmus, has been investigated using radioactive carbon dioxide and the techniques of paper chromatography and radioautography. The plants are allowed to photosynthesize normally for thirty seconds in c{sup 14}O{sub 2} after which they are allowed to respire in air or helium in the light or dark. Respiration of photosynthetic intermediates as evidenced by the appearance of labeled glutomic, isocitric, fumaric and succinic acids is slower in the light than in the dark. Labeled glycolic acid is observed in barley and algae. It disappears rapidly in the dark and is maintained and increased in quantity in the light in C0{sub 2}-free air.

Benson, A.A.; Calvin, M.

1949-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

86

Changes in soil carbon and nitrogen associated with switchgrass production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greater knowledge of the short- and long-term effects of biomass production practices on soil biological and chemical properties is needed to determine influences on sustainable land management. Soil samples under switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.), other forage grasses, cultivated crops, and forest were collected seasonally at six locations. Soil organic C (SOC), total N, soil microbial biomass C (SMBC) and N (SMBN), soil mineralizable C and N, and basal soil respiration (BSR) were in general greatest under long-term coastal bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.] pasture (>40 years), second highest under Alamo switchgrass and kleingrass (Panicum coloratum L.) planted in 1992 and forest, followed by Alamo switchgrass planted in 1997, and was lowest under the cultivated soils. Soil organic C at 0-5 cm was 42-220% greater in soils under Alamo switchgrass planted in 1992 than cultivated soils, except at College Station where SOC values under Alamo planted in 1992 and the cultivated rotation were not significantly different. Although the rotation treatment is cultivated at this location, two high residue crops are used, wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench.]. Similar trends were noted for total N, SMBC, SMBN, mineralizable C and N, BSR, and the ratio of SMBC/SOC. Insufficient information was collected in this study to determine whether the parameters evaluated for forest and switchgrass were different. In addition to its high yield potential, adaptation to marginal sites and tolerance to water and nutrient limitations, switchgrass appeared to be a competitive crop in terms of land sustainability, resulting in enhanced soil quality characteristics compared to long-term cultivated soils.

Lobo Alonzo, Porfirio Jose

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

GLOBAL BIOGEOCHEMICAL CYCLES, VOL. 7, NO. 3, PAGES 557-597, SEPTEMBER 1993 GLOBAL ANALYSIS OF THE POTENTIAL FOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the controls are derived from global gridded (løxl ø resolution) data basesof soil type, soil texture, NDVI uncertainty regarding the distribution and magnitude of the sourcesthemselves. For sometime it was thought #12 was combustion of fossil fuels, in particular, coalburning power plantsproducing electricity [Hao et al., 1987

Fridlind, Ann

88

Estimation of Global Ground Heat Flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the use of a previously published algorithm for estimating ground heat flux (GHF) at the global scale. The method is based on an analytical solution of the diffusion equation for heat transfer in a soil layer and has been ...

William B. Bennett; Jingfeng Wang; Rafael L. Bras

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Impacts of Shewanella oneidensis c-type cytochromes on aerobic and anaerobic respiration  

SciTech Connect

Shewanella are renowned for their ability to utilize a wide range of electron acceptors (EA) for respiration, which has been partially accredited to the presence of a large number of the c-type cytochromes. To investigate the involvement of c-type cytochrome proteins in aerobic and anaerobic respiration of Shewanella oneidensis Mr -1, 36 in-frame deletion mutants, among possible 41 predicted, c-type cytochrome genes were obtained. The potential involvement of each individual c-type cytochrome in the reduction of a variety of EAs was assessed individually as well as in competition experiments. While results on the wellstudied c-type cytochromes CymA(SO4591) and MtrC(SO1778) were consistent with previous findings, collective observations were very interesting: the responses of S. oneidensis Mr -1 to low and highly toxic metals appeared to be significantly different; CcoO, CcoP and PetC, proteins involved in aerobic respiration in various organisms, played critical roles in both aerobic and anaerobic respiration with highly toxic metals as EA. In addition, these studies also suggested that an uncharacterized c-type cytochrome (SO4047) may be important to both aerobiosis and anaerobiosis.

Gao, Haichun; Barua, Soumitra; Liang, Yili; Wu, Lianming; Dong, Yangyang; Reed, Samantha B.; Chen, Jingrong; Culley, David E.; Kennedy, David W.; Yang, Yunfeng; He, Zhili; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Tiedje, James M.; Romine, Margaret F.; Zhou, Jizhong

2010-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

90

Effects of p-Cresol on photosynthetic and respiration rates of a filamentous green alga (spirogyra)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of spilled phenols and cresols from coal gasification plants on the green alga SPIROYRA was investigated in experimental streams built by the US EPA near Monticello, Minnesota. P-Cresol at low concentrations inhibited photosynthesis and increased algal respiration rates. (JMT)

Stout, J. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing); Kilham, S.S.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Soil Carbon Sequestration and Land-Use Change: Processes and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sequestration and Land-Use Change Soil Carbon Sequestration and Land-Use Change: Processes and Potential PDF file Full text Global Change Biology 6:317-327 (2000) Wilfred M. Post...

92

Impact of Initial Soil Wetness on Seasonal Atmospheric Prediction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the importance of initial soil wetness in seasonal predictions with dynamical models. Two experiments are performed, each consisting of two ensembles of global climate model integrations initialized from early June ...

M. J. Fennessy; J. Shukla

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Impact of Hillslope-Scale Organization of Topography, Soil Moisture, Soil Temperature, and Vegetation on Modeling Surface Microwave Radiation Emission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microwave radiometry will emerge as an important tool for global remote sensing of near-surface soil moisture in the coming decade. In this modeling study, we find that hillslope-scale topography (tens of meters) influences ...

Flores, Alejandro N.

94

Surface Soil Moisture Retrieval and Mapping Using High-Frequency Microwave Satellite Observations in the Southern Great Plains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Studies have shown the advantages of low-frequency (<5 GHz) microwave sensors for soil moisture estimation. Although higher frequencies have limited soil moisture retrieval capabilities, there is a vast quantity of systematic global high-...

Thomas J. Jackson; Ann Y. Hsu; Peggy E. O'Neill

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Soil Erosion and Sediment Control Act, Soil and Water Conservation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Act, Soil and Water Conservation District, and Council on Soil and Water Conservation Regulations (Connecticut) Soil Erosion and Sediment Control Act, Soil and Water Conservation...

96

Selection of respirator test panels representative of U.S. adult facial sizes  

SciTech Connect

As requested by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory Respirator Research and Development Section, Industrial Hygiene Group, has prepared anthropometric specifications for subjects to test the fit of half-mask, quarter-mask, and full- facepiece respirators. A facial survey of 200 males was conducted, with results similar to those of a recent survey of some 4000 U. S. airmen. Subjects were selected on the basis of face length and face width to wear full-face masks in tests. For testing halfand quarter-masks, face length and lip length were used. Test panels containing 25 male-and-female subjects were used to represent a majority of the working population. A sequential sampling scheme was developed to reduce the amount of testing required to determine if a mask provides adequate protection for diffurent facial sizes. Examples of man test results are given. (auth)

Hack, A.; Hyatt, E.C.; Held, B.J.; Moore, T.O.; Richards, C.P.; McConville, J.T.

1973-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Heterotrophic respiration in disturbed forests: A review with examples from North America  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heterotrophic respiration (RH), the oxidation of organic matter to carbon dioxide by free-living microorganisms, is one of three major processes releasing carbon to the atmosphere, the other two being autotrophic respiration (RA) and combustion. Over long times and large spatial extents these three fluxes roughly equal the amount of carbon being fixed by photosynthesis, at least in upland ecosystems (Frey and Smith 2005). Over short period of time or within small areas changes in the strength of these fluxes can determine when and where an ecosystem is a source or sink of carbon relative to the atmosphere (reference from Hurtt disturbance paper). Thus, the understanding of the biophysical factors that regulate the strength of these fluxes is a current topic of research.

Harmon, Mark; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Tang, Jianwu; Vargas, Rodrigo

2011-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

98

Apparatus and method for collection and concentration of respirable particles into a small fluid volume  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for the collection of respirable particles and concentration of such particles into a small fluid volume. The apparatus captures and concentrates small (1-10 .mu.m) respirable particles into a sub-millileter volume of fluid. The method involves a two step operation, collection and concentration: wherein collection of particles is by a wetted surface having small vertical slits that act as capillary channels; and concentration is carried out by transfer of the collected particles to a small volume (sub-milliliter) container by centrifugal force whereby the particles are forced through the vertical slits and contact a non-wetted wall surface, and are deflected to the bottom where they are contained for analysis, such as a portable flow cytometer or a portable PCR DNA analysis system.

Simon, Jonathan N. (San Leandro, CA); Brown, Steve B. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Persistence of soil organic matter as an ecosystem property  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Globally, soil organic matter (SOM) contains more than three times as much carbon as either the atmosphere or terrestrial vegetation. Yet it remains largely unknown why some SOM persists for millennia whereas other SOM decomposes readily—and this limits our ability to predict how soils will respond to climate change. Recent analytical and experimental advances have demonstrated that molecular structure alone does not control SOM stability: in fact, environmental and biological controls predominate. Here we propose ways to include this understanding in a new generation of experiments and soil carbon models, thereby improving predictions of the SOM response to global warming.

Schmidt, M.W.; Torn, M. S.; Abiven, S.; Dittmar, T.; Guggenberger, G.; Janssens, I.A.; Kleber, M.; Kögel-Knabner, I.; Lehmann, J.; Manning, D.A.C.; Nannipieri, P.; Rasse, D.P.; Weiner, S.; Trumbore, S.E.

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

100

Microbial metal reduction by members of the genus Shewanella: novel strategies for anaerobic respiration  

SciTech Connect

Metal-reducing members of the genus Shewanella are important components of the microbial community residing in redox-stratified freshwater and marine environments. Metal-reducing gram-negative bacteria such as Shewanella, however, are presented with a unique physiological challenge: they are required to respire anaerobically on terminal electron acceptors which are either highly insoluble (Fe(III)- and Mn(IV)-oxides) and reduced to soluble end-products or highly soluble (U(VI) and Tc(VII)) and reduced to insoluble end-products. To overcome physiological problems associated with metal solubility, metal-respiring Shewanella are postulated to employ a variety of novel respiratory strategies not found in other gram-negative bacteria which respire on soluble electron acceptors such as O2, NO3 and SO4. The following chapter highlights the latest findings on the molecular mechanism of Fe(III), U(VI) and Tc(VII) reduction by Shewanella, with particular emphasis on electron transport chain physiology.

Dichristina, Thomas; Bates, David J.; Burns, Justin L.; Dale, Jason R.; Payne, Amanda N.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global soil respiration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Computer-Controlled Scanning Electron Microscopy (CCSEM) Investigation of Respirable Quartz in Air Samples Collected During Power Plant Maintenance Activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reliable methods of determining the amount of respirable, crystalline silica (quartz) in coal fly ash (CFA) are clearly of interest in order to satisfy Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations and to accurately assess the potential risks of workers with prolonged CFA exposure to certain respiratory diseases. Earlier EPRI-sponsored research focused on development of a new method for determining the amount of respirable quartz in bulk CFA samples using computer-controlled scanning e...

2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

102

Soil organic carbon – A Western Australian perspective Soil organic carbon A Western Australian perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sequestering carbon in soils is being investigated worldwide as a way to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and provide land managers with extra income from the sale of carbon offsets or credits. In theory, the opportunity exists for farmers and other land managers to be paid via voluntary trades or carbon trading schemes to implement land management changes that sequester soil carbon, with additional benefits gained in improving the biological, chemical and physical health of their soils. The concept of increasing soil organic carbon is very attractive because it seemingly provides a ‘win-win’ situation in which farmers earn extra income for removing greenhouse gas emissions from the atmosphere while simultaneously lifting the productivity of arable soils. But how realistic is this concept and what opportunities and risks does it present to farmers? Soil organic carbon is part of the global carbon cycle The soil can either represent an enormous ‘source’ or ‘sink ’ of carbon – with more carbon contained in the soil than in the world’s vegetation and atmosphere combined. Soil organic carbon represents a critical component

Janet Paterson; Dr. Fran Hoyle; Department Of Agriculture

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Cosmic global strings  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the following topics: Global Strings; The Gravitational field of a straight global string; How do global strings behave The axion cosmological energy density; Computer simulations of the motion and decay of global strings; and Electromagnetic radiation from the conversion of Nambu-Goldstone bosons in astrophysical magnetic fields.

Sikivie, P. (Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (USA). Dept. of Physics)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Hillslope-scale soil moisture estimation with a physically-based ecohydrology model and L-band microwave remote sensing observations from space  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soil moisture is a critical hydrosphere state variable that links the global water, energy, and carbon cycles. Knowledge of soil moisture at scales of individual hillslopes (10's to 100's of meters) is critical to advancing ...

Flores, Alejandro Nicolas

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Environmental Soil Chemistry Second Edition Environmental Soil Chemistry illustrates fundamental principles of soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental Soil Chemistry Second Edition Environmental Soil Chemistry illustrates fundamental principles of soil chemistry with respect to environmental reactions between soils and other natural contemporary training in the basics of soil chemistry and applications to real-world environmental concerns

Sparks, Donald L.

106

SOIL HEALTH AND SOIL QUALITY: A REVIEW  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soil health is defined as the continued capacity of soil to function as a vital living system, by recognizing that it contains biological elements that are key to ecosystem function within land-use boundaries (Doran and Zeiss, 2000; Karlen et al., 2001). These functions are able to sustain biological productivity of soil, maintain the quality of surrounding air and water environments, as well as promote plant, animal, and human health (Doran et al., 1996). The concept of soil quality emerged in the literature in the early 1990s (Doran and Safely, 1997; Wienhold et al., 2004), and the first official application of the term was approved by the Soil Science Society of America Ad Hoc Committee on Soil Quality (S-581) and discussed by Karlen et al., (1997). Soil quality was been defined as ‘‘the capacity of a reference soil to function, within natural or managed ecosystem boundaries, to sustain plant and animal productivity, maintain or enhance water and air quality, and support human health and habitation.’ ’ Subsequently the two terms are used interchangeably (Karlen et al., 2001) although it is important to distinguish that, soil quality is related to soil function (Karlen et al., 2003; Letey et al, 2003), whereas soil

James Kinyangi

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Validation of protection provided by one brand of filtering facepiece respirator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A previous laboratory study of a widely used disposable dust / mist (D/M) respirator (3M{trademark}8710) utilized a challenge agent that had high penetration values for D/M filter media. Therefore, measured protection factors (PFs) reflected both filter and faceseal penetration, and would be lower than that expected for faceseal penetration only. The purpose of this study was to determine a PF for this brand of disposable D/M respirator using a challenge agent that has low filter penetration for this type of filter. Methodology involved qualitatively (QLFT) and quantitatively (QNFT) fit testing 15 males and 15 females while wearing the respirator. One QLFT was done per subject using the saccharin method. Three QNFTs were performed on each subject utilizing a 2.5 {mu}m mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) monodisperse challenge aerosol. Measured PF`s were corrected for lung deposition of this size aerosol. The average fit for each subject was the arithmetic mean of the three PFs. The PFs were found to be approximately log-normally distributed, so logs of PFs were used in the statistical analysis. The exponent of the 95% lower tolerance level (LTL) of the fifth percentile of the log PFs was 50. This compares to an exponent of the 95% LTL of the fifth percentile of the log PFs of two determined in a previous study and to the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Assigned Protection Factor (APF) of ten. No significant difference of average fit between males and females was found. The sensitivity of the saccharin QLFT was 42.9%, and specificity could not be evaluated.

Peacock, J.R. [Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham, AL (United States). Dept. of Environmental Health Sciences

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Reading Comprehension - Soil  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Soil Soil What Is Soil? Soil is the loose top layer of Earth's surface. Plants depend on soil. It holds them up. It provides them with food and water. Soil is made of _________ fungi humus particles . These very small pieces mostly come from rocks broken down by weathering. Other soil particles come from rotting remains of plants and animals. The part of soil that comes from living things is called _________ loam organic matter texture . Soil Life Many small organisms live in soil. They include worms, bacteria, and fungi. _________ Fungi Humus Particles are like plants, but they aren't green. And they have no leaves, flowers, or roots. The organisms feed on dead plants and animals. They cause them to _________ decay loam particles , or break down. The decayed plant and animal matter is called _________ fungi humus

109

Inhibition of respiration in cats by ELF electric fields. [Felis domestica  

SciTech Connect

Cats (Felis domestica) were exposed acutely to electric fields in the frequency range from 0.1 to 50 Hz using contact electrodes. A marked reduction in respiration rate was observed. The maximum sensitivity was of the order of 1 V/m at frequencies of 0.5-2 Hz. Using multiple electrode sites, it was found that the primary locus of action was near the first vertebra. No effects on cardiac frequency were observed at any frequency with fields up to those which caused visible neuromuscular stimulation.

Lockard, J.W. Jr.; Carstensen, E.L.; Morris, T.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

A Global Database of Land Surface Parameters at 1-km Resolution in Meteorological and Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ecoclimap, a new complete surface parameter global dataset at a 1-km resolution, is presented. It is intended to be used to initialize the soil–vegetation–atmosphere transfer schemes (SVATs) in meteorological and climate models (at all horizontal ...

Valéry Masson; Jean-Louis Champeaux; Fabrice Chauvin; Christelle Meriguet; Roselyne Lacaze

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Review: Globalization of Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review: Globalization of Water: Sharing the Planet’sAshok K. Globalization of Water: Sharing the Planet’s140) liters of virtual water (p. 15). This is one of the

Tennant, Matthew Aaron

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Development and validation of a citrate synthase directed quantitative PCR marker for soil bacterial communities  

SciTech Connect

Molecular innovations in microbial ecology are allowing scientists to correlate microbial community characteristics to a variety of ecosystem functions. However, to date the majority of soil microbial ecology studies target phylogenetic rRNA markers, while a smaller number target functional markers linked to soil processes. We validated a new primer set targeting citrate synthase (gtlA), a central enzyme in the citric acid cycle linked to aerobic respiration. Primers for a 225 bp fragment suitable for qPCR were tested for specificity and assay performance verified on multiple soils. Clone libraries of the PCR-amplified gtlA gene exhibited high diversity and recovered most major groups identified in a previous 16S rRNA gene study. Comparisons among bacterial communities based on gtlA sequencing using UniFrac revealed differences among the experimental soils studied. Conditions for gtlA qPCR were optimized and calibration curves were highly linear (R2 > 0.99) over six orders of magnitude (4.56 10^5 to 4.56 10^11 copies), with high amplification efficiencies (>1.7). We examined the performance of the gtlA qPCR across a variety of soils and ecosystems, spanning forests, old fields and agricultural areas. We were able to amplify gtlA genes in all tested soils, and detected differences in gtlA abundance within and among environments. These results indicate that a fully developed gtlA-targeted qPCR approach may have potential to link microbial community characteristics with changes in soil respiration.

Castro Gonzalez, Hector F [ORNL; Classen, Aimee T [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Austin, Emily E [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Crawford, Kerri M [Rice University; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Global Energy Perspectives  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Global Energy Perspectives: Supply Security, Economic Development and Sustainability The Annual Energy Policy Conference of the National Capital Area ...

114

Global Security 2009  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Security *Intelligence *Hyper Innovation Global Security Weapons & Complex Integration NIF Office of Strategic Outcomes Operations & Business Lawrence Livermore National...

115

Homeowner Soil Sample Information Form  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Homeowners should submit this form with their soil samples when requesting a soil test from the Texas A&M Soil Testing Laboratory.

Provin, Tony

2007-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

116

Mass Transport within Soils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contaminants in soil can impact human health and the environment through a complex web of interactions. Soils exist where the atmosphere, hydrosphere, geosphere, and biosphere converge. Soil is the thin outer zone of the earth's crust that supports rooted plants and is the product of climate and living organisms acting on rock. A true soil is a mixture of air, water, mineral, and organic components. The relative proportions of these components determine the value of the soil for agricultural and for other human uses. These proportions also determine, to a large extent, how a substance added to soil is transported and/or transformed within the soil (Spositio, 2004). In mass-balance models, soil compartments play a major role, functioning both as reservoirs and as the principal media for transport among air, vegetation, surface water, deeper soil, and ground water (Mackay, 2001). Quantifying the mass transport of chemicals within soil and between soil and atmosphere is important for understanding the role soil plays in controlling fate, transport, and exposure to multimedia pollutants. Soils are characteristically heterogeneous. A trench dug into soil typically reveals several horizontal layers having different colors and textures. As illustrated in Figure 1, these multiple layers are often divided into three major horizons: (1) the A horizon, which encompasses the root zone and contains a high concentration of organic matter; (2) the B horizon, which is unsaturated, lies below the roots of most plants, and contains a much lower organic carbon content; and (3) the C horizon, which is the unsaturated zone of weathered parent rock consisting of bedrock, alluvial material, glacial material, and/or soil of an earlier geological period. Below these three horizons lies the saturated zone - a zone that encompasses the area below ground surface in which all interconnected openings within the geologic media are completely filled with water. Similarly to the unsaturated zone with three major horizons, the saturated zone can be further divided into other zones based on hydraulic and geologic conditions. Wetland soils are a special and important class in which near-saturation conditions exist most of the time. When a contaminant is added to or formed in a soil column, there are several mechanisms by which it can be dispersed, transported out of the soil column to other parts of the environment, destroyed, or transformed into some other species. Thus, to evaluate or manage any contaminant introduced to the soil column, one must determine whether and how that substance will (1) remain or accumulate within the soil column, (2) be transported by dispersion or advection within the soil column, (3) be physically, chemically, or biologically transformed within the soil (i.e., by hydrolysis, oxidation, etc.), or (4) be transported out of the soil column to another part of the environment through a cross-media transfer (i.e., volatilization, runoff, ground water infiltration, etc.). These competing processes impact the fate of physical, chemical, or biological contaminants found in soils. In order to capture these mechanisms in mass transfer models, we must develop mass-transfer coefficients (MTCs) specific to soil layers. That is the goal of this chapter. The reader is referred to other chapters in this Handbook that address related transport processes, namely Chapter 13 on bioturbation, Chapter 15 on transport in near-surface geological formations, and Chapter 17 on soil resuspention. This chapter addresses the following issues: the nature of soil pollution, composition of soil, transport processes and transport parameters in soil, transformation processes in soil, mass-balance models, and MTCs in soils. We show that to address vertical heterogeneity in soils in is necessary to define a characteristic scaling depth and use this to establish process-based expressions for soil MTCs. The scaling depth in soil and the corresponding MTCs depend strongly on (1) the composition of the soil and physical state of the soil, (2) the chemical and physic

McKone, Thomas E.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Global Climate Change Links  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Climate Change Links Global Climate Change Links This page provides links to web pages that we at CDIAC feel do a responsible job of presenting information and discussion pertinent to the science behind the global climate change ("global warming") debate. These sites include those on both sides of the debate; some asserting that global warming is a clear and present danger, and others that might be labeled global warming "skeptics." Some of these sites don't take a position per se; they exist to offer the public objective scientific information and results on our present understanding of the climate system. The list is not intended to be comprehensive, by any means. We hope it will be especially helpful for those who may be just beginning their research into global

118

Comparison of the response of bacterial luminescence and mitochondrial respiration to the effluent of an oil refinery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of oil refinery effluents on rat mitochondrial respiration and on the luminescence of the bacterium Photobacterium phosphoreum were compared. Mitochondria from male Wistar rat livers were exposed to different concentrations of refinery effluents in a semiclosed 3-ml reaction vessel. Respiration was measured polarographically with an oxygen electrode. Effects on P. phosphoreum were measured by the standard test developed by Microbics. The mitochondrial method showed EC50s in the range from 1 to 7.5%, while Microtox gave EC50 in the range from 30 to 42%. The higher sensitivity of mitochondria may be exploited in the development of a sensitive biosensor for toxicity of oil refinery effluents.

Riisberg, M.; Bratlie, E.; Stenersen, J. [Univ. of Oslo (Norway)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Airborne release fractions/rates and respirable fractions for nonreactor nuclear facilities. Volume 1, Analysis of experimental data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This handbook contains (1) a systematic compilation of airborne release and respirable fraction experimental data for nonreactor nuclear facilities, (2) assessments of the data, and (3) values derived from assessing the data that may be used in safety analyses when the data are applicable. To assist in consistent and effective use of this information, the handbook provides: identification of a consequence determination methodology in which the information can be used; discussion of the applicability of the information and its general technical limits; identification of specific accident phenomena of interest for which the information is applicable; and examples of use of the consequence determination methodology and airborne release and respirable fraction information.

Not Available

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

THE INFLUENCE OF CYSTEINEAMINE ON THE RESPIRATION AND BLOOD PRESSURE (TO THE MECHANISM OF THE PROTECTIVE ACTION OF CYSTEINEAMINE  

SciTech Connect

The influence of a therapeutic dose of cysteineamine on the blood pressure and respiration was studied. The investigations, staged on cats irradiated with 500 and 700 r, revealed that the best protective effect following the administration of cysteineamine took place when the dose amounted to 75 mg/kg. All the cysteineamine doses studied (30, 50, 75, and 100 mg/kg) produce a drop in the blood pressure and stimulation of respiration. The respiratory stimulation caused by cysteineamine introduction is weakened by cutting of the vagus nerves, denervation of carotid sinuses, or preliminary introduction of hexonium. (auth)

Smorodintseva, G.I.

1959-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global soil respiration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

2013 Global Carbon Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2013 Global Carbon Project 2013 Global Carbon Project DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/GCP_2013_V1.1 image 2013 Budget v1.1 (November 2013) image 2013 Budget v1.3 (December 2013, contains typographical corrections to 2011 Australia emissions from v1.1 and corrections to the 2011 Australia transfer and consumption emissions from v1.2) image image image image Global Carbon Dioxide Emissions to Reach 36 Billion Tonnes in 2013 Global emissions of carbon dioxide from the combustion of fossil fuels will reach 36 billion tonnes for the year 2013. "This is a level unprecedented in human history," says CSIRO's Dr Pep Canadell, Executive-Director of the Global Carbon Project (GCP) and co-author of a new report. Global emissions due to fossil fuel alone are set to grow this year at a slightly lower pace of 2.1% than the average 3.1% since 2000, reaching 36

122

Regional and Global Data in Mercury, December 2000  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regional and Global Data in Mercury Regional and Global Data in Mercury Regional and global biogeochemical dynamics data can now be located and acquired through a metadata search system at the ORNL DAAC. Climate, hydroclimatology, soil, and vegetation data held by data centers around the world are available through a Web-based system called "Mercury." Mercury allows users to search metadata files to identify data sets of interest, and it directs the users to the data. The data sets indexed in Mercury were chosen by the ORNL DAAC's User Working Group as important to the global change research community for understanding the function of terrestrial ecosystems and for examining patterns across temporal and spatial scales. The following types of regional and global data are currently indexed in

123

Determining Soil Moisture from Geosynchronous Satellite Infrared Data: A Feasibility Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the absence of a current capability for global routine daily soil moisture observation, an infrared technique using existing instrumentation is sought. Numerical modeling results are reported from a pilot study, the purpose of which was to ...

Peter J. Wetzel; David Atlas; Robert H. Woodward

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Modeling land surface processes of the midwestern United States : predicting soil moisture under a warmer climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation seeks to quantify the response of soil moisture to climate change in the midwestern United States. To assess this response, a dynamic global vegetation model, Integrated Biosphere Simulator, was coupled ...

Winter, Jonathan (Jonathan Mark)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Global Oil Geopolitics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Iran-Iraq War . Iranian revolution . Arab Oil Embargo . Asian financial crisis . capacity exhausted . Global financial collapse . 9-11 attacks . OPEC cuts targets 1.7 ...

126

Process Modeling of Global Soil Nitrous Oxide Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nitrous oxide is an important greenhouse gas and is a major ozone-depleting substance. To understand and

Saikawa, E.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Airborne Release Fractions/Rates and Respirable Fractions for Nonreactor Nuclear Facilities, Volume II  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TS NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-3010-94 December 1994 Reaffirmed 2013 DOE HANDBOOK AIRBORNE RELEASE FRACTIONS/RATES AND RESPIRABLE FRACTIONS FOR NONREACTOR NUCLEAR FACILITIES Volume II - Appendices U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 37831; (615) 576-8401. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 487-4650. Order No. DE95004711 DOE-HDBK-3010-94

128

Exploring the biochemistry at the extracellular redox frontier of bacterial mineral Fe(III) respiration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many species of the bacterial Shewanella genus are notable for their ability to respire in anoxic environments utilizing insoluble minerals of Fe(III) and Mn(IV) as extracellular electron acceptors. In Shewanella oneidensis, the process is dependent on the decahaem electron-transport proteins that lie at the extracellular face of the outer membrane where they can contact the insoluble mineral substrates. These extracellular proteins are charged with electrons provided by an inter-membrane electron-transfer pathway that links the extracellular face of the outer membrane with the inner cytoplasmic membrane and thereby intracellular electron sources. In the present paper, we consider the common structural features of two of these outermembrane decahaem cytochromes, MtrC and MtrF, and bring this together with biochemical, spectroscopic and voltammetric data to identify common and distinct properties of these prototypical members of different clades of the outer-membrane decahaem cytochrome superfamily.

Richardson, David J.; Edwards, Marcus; White, Gaye F.; Baiden, Nanakow; Hartshorne, Robert S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Shi, Liang; Zachara, John M.; Gates, Andrew J.; Butt, Julea N.; Clarke, Thomas

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Airborne Release Fractions/Rates and Respirable Fractions for Nonreactor Nuclear Facilities, Volume 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TS NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-3010-94 December 1994 Reaffirmed 2013 DOE HANDBOOK AIRBORNE RELEASE FRACTIONS/RATES AND RESPIRABLE FRACTIONS FOR NONREACTOR NUCLEAR FACILITIES Volume I - Analysis of Experimental Data U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 37831; (615) 576-8401. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 487-4650.

130

Cleantech Professional Resource Global Limited CPR Global | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Professional Resource Global Limited CPR Global Professional Resource Global Limited CPR Global Jump to: navigation, search Name Cleantech Professional Resource Global Limited (CPR Global) Place London, United Kingdom Zip EC4M 9DN Product Cleantech Professional Resource is a resource management consultancy focusing on the cleantech sector in the UK and Europe. References Cleantech Professional Resource Global Limited (CPR Global)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Cleantech Professional Resource Global Limited (CPR Global) is a company located in London, United Kingdom . References ↑ "Cleantech Professional Resource Global Limited (CPR Global)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Cleantech_Professional_Resource_Global_Limited_CPR_Global&oldid=343687

131

NASA/Ames Global Emissions Data Set (GLEMIS) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NASA/Ames Global Emissions Data Set (GLEMIS) NASA/Ames Global Emissions Data Set (GLEMIS) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: NASA/Ames Global Emissions Data Set (GLEMIS) Agency/Company /Organization: National Aeronautics and Space Administration Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry, Agriculture Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Dataset, Maps Website: gcmd.nasa.gov/records/GCMD_NASA_AMES_GLEMIS.html NASA/Ames Global Emissions Data Set (GLEMIS) Screenshot References: NASA/Ames Global Emissions Data Set (GLEMIS)[1] "NASA-CASA data sets include global maps for predicted fluxes of soil nitrogen gases (N2O and NO), methane (CH4), and carbon monoxide (CO), plus predictions of net primary production (NPP) and carbon storage in leaf, wood, root, litter, and surface soil pools. Others data sets will follow.

132

Involvement of a Membrane-Bound Class III Adenylate Cyclase in Regulation of Anaerobic Respiration in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unlike other bacteria that use FNR to regulate anaerobic respiration, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 uses the cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) for this purpose. Three putative genes, cyaA, cyaB, and cyaC, predicted to encode class I, class IV, and class III adenylate cyclases, respectively, have been identified in the genome sequence of this bacterium. Functional validation through complementation of an Escherichia coli cya mutant confirmed that these genes encode proteins with adenylate cyclase activities. Chromosomal deletion of either cyaA or cyaB did not affect anaerobic respiration with fumarate, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), or Fe(III), whereas deletion of cyaC caused deficiencies in respiration with DMSO and Fe(III) and, to a lesser extent, with fumarate. A phenotype similar to that of a crp mutant, which lacks the ability to grow anaerobically with DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III), was obtained when both cyaA and cyaC were deleted. Microarray analysis of gene expression in the crp and cyaC mutants revealed the involvement of both genes in the regulation of key respiratory pathways, such as DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III) reduction. Additionally, several genes associated with plasmid replication, flagellum biosynthesis, and electron transport were differentially expressed in the cyaC mutant but not in the crp mutant. Our results indicated that CyaC plays a major role in regulating anaerobic respiration and may contribute to additional signaling pathways independent of CRP.

Charania, M.; Brockman, K. L.; Zhang, Y.; Banerjee, A.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Saffarini, Daad

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Involvement of a Membrane-Bound Class III Adenylate Cyclase in Regulation of Anaerobic Respiration in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unlike other bacteria that use FNR to regulate anaerobic respiration, S. oneidensis MR-1 uses the cAMP receptor protein, CRP, for this purpose. Three putative genes, cyaA, cyaB, and cyaC, predicted to encode class I, class IV, and class III adenylate cyclases respectively, have been identified in the genome sequence of this bacterium. Functional validation through complementation of an E. coli cya mutant confirmed that these genes encode proteins with adenylate cyclase activities. Chromosomal deletion of either cyaA or cyaB did not affect anaerobic respiration with fumarate, DMSO, or Fe(III), whereas the deletion of cyaC caused deficiencies in respiration with DMSO and Fe(III), and to a lesser extent with fumarate. A phenotype similar to that of a crp mutant, which lacks the ability to grow anaerobically with DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III), was obtained when both cyaA and cyaC were deleted. Microarray analysis of gene expression in the crp and the cyaC mutants revealed the involvement of both genes in the regulation of key respiratory pathways such as DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III) reduction. Additionally, several genes associated with plasmid replication, flagella biosynthesis, and electron transport, were differentially expressed in the cyaC mutant, but not in the crp mutant. Our results indicated that CyaC plays a major role in regulating anaerobic respiration, and may contribute to additional signaling pathways independent of CRP.

Charania, M.; Brockman, K.; Zhang, Yang; Banerjee, A.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Saffarini, Daad

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Effects of light on respiration and development of photosynthetic cells. Renewal application and progress report, March 1-November 1, 1980  

SciTech Connect

The oxyhydrogen reaction in the presence and absence of CO/sub 2/ was studied in H/sub 2/- adapted Scenedesmus obliquus by monitoring the initial rates of H/sub 2/, O/sub 2/, and /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ uptake and the effect of inhibitors on these rates. Glucose and acetate respiration was competitive with H/sub 2/ uptake. KCN inhibited equally respiration and the oxyhydrogen reaction in the presence and absence of CO/sub 2/. It was concluded that the oxyhydrogen reaction both in the absence and presence of CO/sub 2/ has properties in common with components of respiration and photosynthesis. Participation of these two processes in the oxyhydrogen reaction would require a closely linked shuttle between mitochondrion and chloroplast. Protoplasts and chloroplasts will be isolated from a H/sub 2/-adapted alga in order to elucidate the cooperation between the two organelles. Acetate was shown to stimulate H/sub 2/ photoproduction in H/sub 2/-adapted algae even more so than an uncoupler of electron transport. The role of these compounds will be evaluated either in terms of the glyoxylate cycle or electron acceptors resulting in formation of alcohols. The term chloroplast respiration was proposed to account for the breakdown of polyglucan within the chloroplast. A means of reoxidizing reduced pyridine nucleotide was required to complete the cycle. A new enzyme ascorbic acid reduced pyridine nucleotide peroxidase was isolated from the chloroplast. The characterization of this enzyme will continue.

Gibbs, M.

1980-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

135

Continuous, Non-Invasive, In-Field Soil Carbon Scanning System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Continuous, Non-Invasive, In-Field Soil Continuous, Non-Invasive, In-Field Soil Carbon Scanning System Background Earth generates and emits an enormous amount of carbon dioxide into the atmos- phere from its deep energy resources, its near-surface processes, and biotic activi- ties. Although anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions increase global warming, global warming is also alleviated by human activities in sequestering carbon into the terrestrial ecosystem and injecting carbon dioxide deep into geological formations,

136

Soil Organic Carbon Change Monitored Over Large Areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Managing agricultural soils to increase SOC storage is a significant, immediately available, low-cost option for mitigating CO2 emissions, with the technical potential to sequester as much as 800 Tg CO2/yr in the US (~13% of US CO2 emissions) [Lal et al., 2003] and 5000 Tg CO2/yr globally (~17% of global CO2 emissions) [Smith et al., 2007].

Brown, David J.; Hunt, Earle R.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Paustian, Keith H.; Rice, Charles W.; schumaker, Bonny L.; West, Tristram O.

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

137

Experimental unsaturated soil mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this general report, experimental systems and procedures of investigating the hydro-mechanical behaviour of unsaturated soils are presented. The water retention properties of unsaturated soils are commented and linked to various physical parameters and properties of the soils. Techniques of controlling suction are described together with their adaptation in various laboratory testing devices. Some typical features of the mechanical behaviour of unsaturated soils are presented within an elasto-plastic framework. An attempt to describe the numerous and significant recent advances in the investigation of the behaviour of unsaturated soils, including the contributions to this Conference, is proposed.

Delage, Pierre

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Biotic prognostications: Global warming and biological diversity  

SciTech Connect

This book focuses on the impacts of the greenhouse effect on biological diversity and on natural ecosystems. Included are chapters which include the following topics: government attitudes to climate change problems; general conclusions and deficiencies of general circulation models; impacts of past climate changes on global biota; effects of climate on vegetation, soils, wildlife diversity, animal physiology, ecology, behavior, migration, and parasites and diseases; arctic mariene ecosystems and coasta marine zones; tropical forests; arctic tundra; western North American forests, etc.; indirect linkages and snyergisms among climate change, biodiversity, geosphere, and anthropogenic stresses.

Peters, R.L.; Lovejoy, T.E. [eds.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

139

ARM - Measurement - Soil moisture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

moisture moisture ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Soil moisture The moisture of the soil measured near the surface. This includes soil wetness and soil water potential. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AMC : Ameriflux Measurement Component CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems SOIL : Soil Measurement from the SGP SWATS : Soil Water and Temperature System SEBS : Surface Energy Balance System

140

Rigorous evaluation of a soil heat transfer model for mesoscale climate change impact studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of Climate Change on plant development as well as on carbon and nitrogen cycling in soils is an important research topic for Global Change impact assessment at the regional scale. These changes affect the availability and quality of ground ... Keywords: Energy balance, GLOWA-Danube, Land surface, Mesoscale, Soil temperature

Markus Muerth; Wolfram Mauser

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global soil respiration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Computer demonstration of an interactive modeling system for the study of global change and biogeochemistry  

SciTech Connect

There is a need for visually oriented materials to aid in the study of global ecological science. Analysis of the carbon cycle is key to understanding Potential climate change. We have used satellite imagery along with global climate and soil texture data sets to simulate seasonal patterns in net carbon fixation and soil CO[sub 2] production. An interactive computer system is used to illustrate graphical results from various model scenarios of climate warming and land use change. These include global animations of monthly gridded CO[sub 2] exchange between the atmosphere and the terrestrial biosphere. This modeling demonstration highlights the importance of annual CO[sub 2] fluxes in tropical forests (40% of global totals) and the large carbon storage potential in boreal and arctic soils.

Klooster, S.A.; Potter, S. (NASA-Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA (United States)); Randerson, J. (Carnegie Institution of Washington, Stanford, CA (United States))

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

IMPORTED SOIL OR SOIL-FORMING MATERIALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

depending on local availability. An automated version of the soil textural classification triangle shownNeill, J. (1994). Reclaiming disturbed land for forestry. Forestry Commission Bulletin 110. HMSO, London

143

Plant and Soil An International Journal on Plant-Soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 23 Plant and Soil An International Journal on Plant-Soil Relationships ISSN 0032-079X Plant Soil DOI 10.1007/s11104-012-1353-x Seedling growth and soil nutrient availability in exotic and native tree growth and soil nutrient availability in exotic and native tree species: implications for afforestation

Neher, Deborah A.

144

Soil Organic Carbon Change Monitored Over Large Areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soils account for the largest fraction of terrestrial carbon (C); thus, they are critically important in determining global C cycle dynamics. In North America, conversion of native prairies to agricultural land use over 150 years ago released 30-50% of the soil organic carbon (SOC). Improved agricultural practices have the capacity to recover much of this SOC, storing it in biomass and soil and thereby removing billions of tons of atmospheric CO2. These practices involve increasing C inputs to soil (e.g., by crop rotations, increased use of higher biomass crops, perennial crops) and decreased losses (e.g., reduced tillage intensity) [Janzen et al., 1998; Lal et al., 2003; Smith et al., 2007]. Managing agricultural soils to increase SOC storage is a significant, immediately available, low-cost option for mitigating CO2 emissions, with a technical potential to offset as much as 800 Tg CO2/yr in the US (~13% of US CO2 emissions) [Lal et al., 2003] and 5000 Tg CO2/yr globally (~17% of global CO2 emissions) [Smith et al., 2007].

Brown, David J.; Hunt, E. Raymond; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Paustian, Keith H.; Rice, Charles W.; West, Tristram O.; Schumaker, Bonny L.

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

145

Global Renewable Power International Global RPI | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

RPI) Place Spain Sector Wind energy Product Spain-based developer of wind projects in Poland, Croatia and Chile. References Global Renewable Power International (Global RPI)1...

146

Respiration Induced Heart Motion and Indications of Gated Delivery for Left-Sided Breast Irradiation  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To investigate respiration-induced heart motion for left-sided breast irradiation using a four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) technique and to determine novel indications to assess heart motion and identify breast patients who may benefit from a gated treatment. Methods and Materials: Images of 4DCT acquired during free breathing for 20 left-sided breast cancer patients, who underwent whole breast irradiation with or without regional nodal irradiation, were analyzed retrospectively. Dose distributions were reconstructed in the phases of 0%, 20%, and 50%. The intrafractional heart displacement was measured in three selected transverse CT slices using D{sub LAD} (the distance from left ascending aorta to a fixed line [connecting middle point of sternum and the body] drawn on each slice) and maximum heart depth (MHD, the distance of the forefront of the heart to the line). Linear regression analysis was used to correlate these indices with mean heart dose and heart dose volume at different breathing phases. Results: Respiration-induced heart displacement resulted in observable variations in dose delivered to the heart. During a normal free-breathing cycle, heart-induced motion D{sub LAD} and MHD changed up to 9 and 11 mm respectively, resulting in up to 38% and 39% increases of mean doses and V{sub 25.2} for the heart. MHD and D{sub LAD} were positively correlated with mean heart dose and heart dose volume. Respiratory-adapted gated treatment may better spare heart and ipsilateral-lung compared with the conventional non-gated plan in a subset of patients with large D{sub LAD} or MHD variations. Conclusion: Proposed indices offer novel assessment of heart displacement based on 4DCT images. MHD and D{sub LAD} can be used independently or jointly as selection criteria for respiratory gating procedure before treatment planning. Patients with great intrafractional MHD variations or tumor(s) close to the diaphragm may particularly benefit from the gated treatment.

Qi, X. Sharon, E-mail: xiangrong.qi@ucdenver.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States); Hu, Angela [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States); Wang Kai [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Newman, Francis [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States); Crosby, Marcus; Hu Bin; White, Julia; Li, X. Allen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Pax Global, Inc.,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pax Global, Inc., Pax Global, Inc., (freezers) Issued: April 2, 2013 BEFORE THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Washington, D.C. 20585 ) ) ) ) ) Case Number: 2013-SE-L413 NOTICE OF NONCOMPLIANCE DETERMINATION Manufacturers and private labelers are prohibited from distributing covered products in the United States that do not comply with applicable federal energy conservation standards. 10 C.F.R. § 429.102; 42 U.S.C. § 6302. Pax Global, Inc. ("Pax Global") is a private labeler and uses the "Crosley" and "Daewoo" brands to distribute freezers in the United States. TESTING l. The U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE") tested four privately labeled units o basic model numbe , manufactured , 1 that had been distributed in the United States by a third-pa1iy private labeler.

148

The Global Grid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper puts forward the vision that a natural future stage of the electricity network could be a grid spanning the whole planet and connecting most of the large power plants in the world: this is the "Global Grid". The main driving force behind the Global Grid will be the harvesting of remote renewable sources, and its key infrastructure element will be the high capacity long transmission lines. Wind farms and solar power plants will supply load centers with green power over long distances. This paper focusses on the introduction of the concept, showing that a globally interconnected network can be technologically feasible and economically competitive. We further highlight the multiple opportunities emerging from a global electricity network such as smoothing the renewable energy supply and electricity demand, reducing the need for bulk storage, and reducing the volatility of the energy prices. We also discuss possible investment mechanisms and operating schemes. Among others, we envision in such a system...

Chatzivasileiadis, Spyros; Andersson, Göran

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Estimated Global Hydrographic Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An estimate is made of the three-dimensional global oceanic temperature and salinity variability, omitting the seasonal cycle, both as a major descriptive element of the ocean circulation and for use in the error estimates of state estimation. ...

Gaël Forget; Carl Wunsch

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

KRFTWRK – Global Human Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power Network 2.1.1 Virtual Power Plants The Global Powernetwork, based on "Virtual Power Plants", called "VPP". A "participant runs a virtual human power plant. Per every "

Prohaska, Rainer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Global Ocean Meridional Overturning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A decade-mean global ocean circulation is estimated using inverse techniques, incorporating air–sea fluxes of heat and freshwater, recent hydrographic sections, and direct current measurements. This information is used to determine mass, heat, ...

Rick Lumpkin; Kevin Speer

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Global Warming, Soot, Ice  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Warming, Soot, Ice Speaker(s): James Hansen Date: November 7, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Irreversible "dangerous anthropogenic interference" with the climate system...

153

Earth's Global Energy Budget  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An update is provided on the Earth's global annual mean energy budget in the light of new observations and analyses. In 1997, Kiehl and Trenberth provided a review of past estimates and performed a number of radiative computations to better ...

Kevin E. Trenberth; John T. Fasullo; Jeffrey Kiehl

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Global Climate Change  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

When President Bush announced his Global Climate Change Initiative in February 2002, he committed the United States to a new strategy to cut greenhouse gas emissions over the next...

155

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

21, 2008. Ying, Wang. “ China, Venezuela firms to co-developoilfields. ” China Daily (27 August 2005) http://David and Bi Jianhai. “China’s Global Hunt for Energy. ”

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nations began to seek out oil reserves around the world. 3on the limited global oil reserves and spiking prices. Manyto the largest proven oil reserves, making up 61 percent of

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

APPENDIX K: SOILS INFORMATION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

limitations affecting various uses. Soil scientists observed the steepness, length, and shape of the slopes; the general pattern of drainage; the kinds of crops and native plants;...

159

Building Fertile Soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

soil amendments such as compost, manure, cover crops, andare some readily available sources: j Compost is rich inorganic matter, and making compost is a great way to recycle

Lindsey, Ann

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing Countries Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture Topics: Resource assessment, Background analysis Website: www.fao.org/climatechange/micca/en/ References: FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing Countries[1] "The aim of the project is to help realise the substantial mitigation potential of agriculture, especially that of smallholders in developing countries. If the right changes are implemented in production systems, emissions can be reduced and sinks created in biomass and soils while

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global soil respiration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Remote sensing of heart rate and patterns of respiration on a stationary subject using 94 GHz millimeter wave interferometry.  

SciTech Connect

Using continuous wave, 94-GHz millimeter-wave interferometry, a signal representing chest wall motion can be obtained that contains both the heart rate and respiration patterns of a human subject. These components have to be separated from each other in the received signal. Our method was to use the quadrature and in-phase components of the signal, after removing the mean of each, to find the phase, unwrap it, and convert it to a displacement measurement. Using this, the power spectrum was examined for peaks, which corresponded to the heart rate and respiration rate. The displacement waveform of the chest was also analyzed for discrete heartbeats using a novel wavelet decomposition technique.

Mikhelson, I. V.; Bakhtiari, S.; Elmer, T. W.; Sahakian, A. V. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (Northwestern University)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Evaluation of Microwave Steam Bags for the Decontamination of Filtering Facepiece Respirators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reusing filtering facepiece respirators (FFRs) has been suggested as a strategy to conserve available supplies for home and healthcare environments during an influenza pandemic. For reuse to be possible, used FFRs must be decontaminated before redonning to reduce the risk of virus transmission; however, there are no approved methods for FFR decontamination. An effective method must reduce the microbial threat, maintain the function of the FFR, and present no residual chemical hazard. The method should be readily available, inexpensive and easily implemented by healthcare workers and the general public. Many of the general decontamination protocols used in healthcare and home settings are unable to address all of the desired qualities of an efficient FFR decontamination protocol. The goal of this study is to evaluate the use of two commercially available steam bags, marketed to the public for disinfecting infant feeding equipment, for FFR decontamination. The FFRs were decontaminated with microwave generated steam following the manufacturers ’ instructions then evaluated for water absorption and filtration efficiency for up to three steam exposures. Water absorption of the FFR was found to be model specific as FFRs constructed with hydrophilic materials absorbed more water. The steam had little effect on FFR performance as filtration efficiency of the treated FFRs remained above 95%. The decontamination efficacy of the steam bag was assessed using bacteriophage MS2 as a surrogate for a pathogenic virus. The tested steam bags were found to be 99.9 % effective for inactivating MS2 on FFRs; however, more research is required to

Edward M. Fisher; Jessica L. Williams; Ronald E. Shaffer

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Urinary 1-hydroxypyrene concentrations in Chinese coke oven workers relative to job category, respirator usage, and cigarette smoking  

SciTech Connect

1-Hydroxypyrene (1-OHP) is a biomarker of recent exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). We investigated whether urinary 1-OHP concentrations in Chinese coke oven workers (COWs) are modulated by job category, respirator usage, and cigarette smoking. The present cross-sectional study measured urinary 1-OHP concentrations in 197 COWs from Coking plant I and 250 COWs from Coking plant II, as well as 220 unexposed referents from Control plant I and 56 referents from Control plant II. Urinary 1-OHP concentrations (geometric mean, {mu}mol/mol creatinine) were 5.18 and 4.21 in workers from Coking plants I and II, respectively. The highest 1-OHP levels in urine were found among topside workers including lidmen, tar chasers, and whistlers. Benchmen had higher 1-OHP levels than other workers at the sideoven. Above 75% of the COWs exceeded the recommended occupational exposure limit of 2.3 {mu}mol/mol creatinine. Respirator usage and increased body mass index (BMI) slightly reduced 1-OHP levels in COWs. Cigarette smoking significantly increased urinary 1-OHP levels in unexposed referents but had no effect in COWs. Chinese COWs, especially topside workers and benchmen, are exposed to high levels of PAHs. Urinary 1-OHP concentrations appear to be modulated by respirator usage and BMI in COWs, as well as by smoking in unexposed referents.

Bo Chen; Yunping Hu; Lixing Zheng; Qiangyi Wang; Yuanfen Zhou; Taiyi Jin [Fudan University, Shanghai (China). School of Public Health

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

164

NETL: Global Environmental Benefits  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Environmental Benefits Global Environmental Benefits Gasification Systems Global Environmental Benefits Environmental performance for future energy production systems is a much greater factor as emission standards tighten in the United States and worldwide. The outstanding environmental performance of gasification systems makes it an excellent technology for the clean production of electricity and other products. In addition, the reduction of CO2 emissions is one of the major challenges facing industry in response to global climate change. Other countries with coal reserves might potentially import technologies developed in the United States to enable low-cost gasification with carbon capture and EOR or sequestration. Not only will this benefit the U.S. gasification technology industry, but it will also result in a global environmental benefit through more affordable control of greenhouse gases (GHGs). See the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) link below for a summary of the impact of fossil fuels without carbon capture on CO2 emissions, on the GHG contributions of different countries, and of the projected impact of developing countries to 2030:

165

Soil samples at the APS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

harmful pests or diseases. Examples of soil are: topsoil, forest litter, wood or plant compost, humus, and earthworm castings." 3. What is not soil? Materials free of organic...

166

Soil and Water Conservation (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Indiana Association of Soil and Water Conservation Districts is an association of the 92 soil and water conservation districts, each representing one of the 92 Indiana counties.

167

Fine Particles in Soils  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fine Particles in Soils Fine Particles in Soils Nature Bulletin No. 582 November 28, 1959 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist FINE PARTICLES IN SOILS If a farmer, while plowing, is visited in the field by another farmer, invariably the visitor will pick up a handful of turned over earth and knead it with his fingers while they talk. The "feel" of it tells him a lot about the texture and structure of that soil. He knows that both are important factors in the growth of plants and determine the crops that may be obtained from the land. Soil is a combination of three different things About half of it is solid matter; the other half consists of air and water The solid portion is composed of organic and inorganic materials.

168

Soil Organic Carbon Change Monitored Over Large Areas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Soils account for the largest fraction of terrestrial carbon (C) and thus are critically important in determining global cycle dynamics. In North America, conversion of native prairies to agriculture over the past 150 years released 30- 50% of soil organic carbon (SOC) stores [Mann, 1986]. Improved agricultural practices could recover much of this SOC, storing it in biomass and soil and thereby sequestering billions of tons of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2). These practices involve increasing C inputs to soil (e.g., through crop rotation, higher biomass crops, and perennial crops) and decreasing losses (e.g., through reduced tillage intensity) [Janzen et al., 1998; Lal et al., 2003; Smith et al., 2007].

Brown, David J.; Hunt, E. Raymond; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Paustian, Keith H.; Rice, Charles W.; Schumaker, Bonny L.; West, Tristram O.

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

169

The Partitioning of Evapotranspiration into Transpiration, Soil Evaporation, and Canopy Evaporation in a GCM: Impacts on Land–Atmosphere Interaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although the global partitioning of evapotranspiration (ET) into transpiration, soil evaporation, and canopy evaporation is not well known, most current land surface schemes and the few available observations indicate that transpiration is the ...

David M. Lawrence; Peter E. Thornton; Keith W. Oleson; Gordon B. Bonan

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

global | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

global global Dataset Summary Description GIS data for offshore wind speed (meters/second). Specified to Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZ).Wind resource based on NOAA blended sea winds and monthly wind speed at 30km resolution, using a 0.11 wind sheer to extrapolate 10m - 90m. Annual average >= 10 months of data, no nulls. Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords GIS global NOAA NREL offshore wind wind speed Data application/zip icon Download Shapefile (zip, 18.5 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Please cite NREL and NOAA Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata

171

Global ice sheet modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The University of Maine conducted this study for Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of a global climate modeling task for site characterization of the potential nuclear waste respository site at Yucca Mountain, NV. The purpose of the study was to develop a global ice sheet dynamics model that will forecast the three-dimensional configuration of global ice sheets for specific climate change scenarios. The objective of the third (final) year of the work was to produce ice sheet data for glaciation scenarios covering the next 100,000 years. This was accomplished using both the map-plane and flowband solutions of our time-dependent, finite-element gridpoint model. The theory and equations used to develop the ice sheet models are presented. Three future scenarios were simulated by the model and results are discussed.

Hughes, T.J.; Fastook, J.L. [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States). Institute for Quaternary Studies

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Global crop yield losses from recent warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global yields of the world-s six most widely grown crops--wheat, rice, maize, soybeans, barley, sorghum--have increased since 1961. Year-to-year variations in growing season minimum temperature, maximum temperature, and precipitation explain 30% or more of the variations in yield. Since 1991, climate trends have significantly decreased yield trends in all crops but rice, leading to foregone production since 1981 of about 12 million tons per year of wheat or maize, representing an annual economic loss of $1.2 to $1.7 billion. At the global scale, negative impacts of climate trends on crop yields are already apparent. Annual global temperatures have increased by {approx}0.4 C since 1980, with even larger changes observed in several regions (1). While many studies have considered the impacts of future climate changes on food production (2-5), the effects of these past changes on agriculture remain unclear. It is likely that warming has improved yields in some areas, reduced them in others, and had negligible impacts in still others; the relative balance of these effects at the global scale is unknown. An understanding of this balance would help to anticipate impacts of future climate changes, as well as to more accurately assess recent (and thereby project future) technologically driven yield progress. Separating the contribution of climate from concurrent changes in other factors--such as crop cultivars, management practices, soil quality, and atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) levels--requires models that describe the response of yields to climate. Studies of future global impacts of climate change have typically relied on a bottom-up approach, whereby field scale, process-based models are applied to hundreds of representative sites and then averaged (e.g., ref 2). Such approaches require input data on soil and management conditions, which are often difficult to obtain. Limitations on data quality or quantity can thus limit the utility of this approach, especially at the local scale (6-8). At the global scale, however, many of the processes and impacts captured by field scale models will tend to cancel out, and therefore simpler empirical/statistical models with fewer input requirements may be as accurate (8, 9). Empirical/statistical models also allow the effects of poorly modeled processes (e.g., pest dynamics) to be captured and uncertainties to be readily quantified (10). Here we develop new, empirical/statistical models of global yield responses to climate using datasets on broad-scale yields, crop locations, and climate variability. We focus on global average yields for the six most widely grown crops in the world: wheat, rice, maize, soybeans, barley, and sorghum. Production of these crops accounts for over 40% of global cropland area (11). 55% of non-meat calories, and over 70% of animal feed (12).

Lobell, D; Field, C

2006-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

173

Principal Associate Director - Global Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Principal Associate Director - Global Security Principal Associate Director - Global Security As Principal Associate Director for Global Security, Wallace leads Laboratory programs with special focus on developing and applying the scientific and engineering capabilities to address complex national and global security threats. Contact Operator Los Alamos National Laboratory (505 667-5061 Wallace's expertise is forensic seismology, a highly specialized discipline focusing on detection and quantification of nuclear tests. Terry C. Wallace, Jr. Principal Associate Director for Global Security Terry C. Wallace, Jr., Principal Associate Director for Global Security As Principal Associate Director for Global Security, Wallace leads Laboratory programs with a focus on applying scientific and engineering capabilities

174

Impaired mitochondrial respiration and protein nitration in the rat hippocampus after acute inhalation of combustion smoke  

SciTech Connect

Survivors of massive inhalation of combustion smoke endure critical injuries, including lasting neurological complications. We have previously reported that acute inhalation of combustion smoke disrupts the nitric oxide homeostasis in the rat brain. In this study, we extend our findings and report that a 30-minute exposure of awake rats to ambient wood combustion smoke induces protein nitration in the rat hippocampus and that mitochondrial proteins are a sensitive nitration target in this setting. Mitochondria are central to energy metabolism and cellular signaling and are critical to proper cell function. Here, analyses of the mitochondrial proteome showed elevated protein nitration in the course of a 24-hour recovery following exposure to smoke. Mass spectrometry identification of several significantly nitrated mitochondrial proteins revealed diverse functions and involvement in central aspects of mitochondrial physiology. The nitrated proteins include the ubiquitous mitochondrial creatine kinase, F1-ATP synthase {alpha} subunit, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3), succinate dehydrogenase Fp subunit, and voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC1) protein. Furthermore, acute exposure to combustion smoke significantly compromised the respiratory capacity of hippocampal mitochondria. Importantly, elevated protein nitration and reduced mitochondrial respiration in the hippocampus persisted beyond the time required for restoration of normal oxygen and carboxyhemoglobin blood levels after the cessation of exposure to smoke. Thus, the time frame for intensification of the various smoke-induced effects differs between blood and brain tissues. Taken together, our findings suggest that nitration of essential mitochondrial proteins may contribute to the reduction in mitochondrial respiratory capacity and underlie, in part, the brain pathophysiology after acute inhalation of combustion smoke.

Lee, Heung M.; Reed, Jason; Greeley, George H. [Department of Surgery, University of Texas Medical Branch (United States); Englander, Ella W. [Department of Surgery, University of Texas Medical Branch (United States); Shriners Hospitals for Children, Galveston, TX (United States)], E-mail: elenglan@utmb.edu

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Procedures to predict vertical differential soil movement for expansive soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Damage to lightly loaded structures, paving and service piping in areas of expansive clay soils has occurred throughout the world. The cause of this damage has been the inability to accurately model expansive soil movement so that foundations are adequately designed to withstand the movement. The amount and rate of differential soil movement for expansive soils is due to a combination of soil characteristics, namely: suction compression index, unsaturated permeability, and diffusivity. Currently, geotechnical engineers run tests to measure the soil properties required to estimate differential soil movements. However, there seems to be apprehension toward attempting these soil movement calculations due to the perceived complexity of the calculations or a simple lack of understanding of the theory. The procedures delineating the step by step process used to calculate suction profiles and volume strains of expansive soils is presented. These procedures include the methodology to predict soil heave and shrink underneath shallow foundations which generate maximum center lift and maximum edge lift slab distortion modes. The main contributions of this research are: equations and procedures to calculate the equilibrium suction profile and depth to constant suction for a particular soil profile and location, equations to calculate the horizontal velocity flow of water in unsaturated soils, the methodology to predict differential soil movement shortly after a slab has been constructed and before the soil under the slab has reached an equilibrium moisture content, and the procedures to apply differential soil movement theory to soil profiles with shallow foundation design.

Naiser, Donald David

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Genome sequences for six Rhodanobacter strains isolated from soils and the terrestrial subsurface with variable denitrification capabilities  

SciTech Connect

We report the first genome sequences for six strains of Rhodanobacter species isolated from a variety of soil and subsurface environments. Three of these strains are capable of complete denitrification and three others are not. However, all six strains contain most of the genes required for the respiration of nitrate to gaseous nitrogen. The nondenitrifying members of the genus lack only the gene for nitrate reduction, the first step in the full denitrification pathway. The data suggest that the environmental role of bacteria from the genus Rhodanobacter should be reevaluated.

Kostka, Joel [Florida State University; Green, Stefan [Florida State University; Rishishwar, Lavanya [Georgia Institute of Technology; Prakash, Om [National Centre for Cell Science, Pune, India; Katz, Lee [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia; Marino-Ramirez, Leonardo [National Center for Biotechnology Information, National Institutes of Health; Jordan, King [Georgia Institute of Technology; Munk, Christine [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, Natalia [United States Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Watson, David B [ORNL; Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL; Brooks, Scott C [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Global Hunger Index  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of halving the proportion of hungry people between 1990 and 2015, we are nowhere near meeting that target. The percentage of undernourished people fell from 20 percent in 1990–92 to 16 percent in 2004–06. In recent years, however, the number of hungry people has actually been increasing. In 2009, on the heels of a global food price

Heidi Fritschel; Yisehac Yohannes

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Sustainable biochar to mitigate global climate change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Production of biochar (the carbon-rich solid formed by pyrolysis of biomass), in combination with its storage in soils, has been suggested as a means to abate anthropogenic climate change, while simultaneously increasing crop yields. The climate mitigation potential stems primarily from the highly recalcitrant nature of biochar, which slows the rate at which photosynthetically fixed carbon is returned to the atmosphere. Significant uncertainties exist, however, regarding the impact, capacity, and sustainability of biochar for carbon capture and storage when scaled to the global level. Previous estimates, based on simple assumptions, vary widely. Here we show that, subject to strict environmental and modest economic constraints on biomass procurement and biochar production methods, annual net emissions of CO2, CH4 and N2O could be reduced by 1.1 - 1.9 Pg CO2-C equivalent (CO2-Ce)/yr (7 - 13% of current anthropogenic CO2-Ce emissions; 1Pg = 1 Gt). Over one century, cumulative net emissions of these gases could be reduced by 72-140 Pg CO2-Ce. The lower end of this range uses currently untapped residues and wastes; the upper end requires substantial alteration to global biomass management, but would not endanger food security, habitat or soil conservation. Half the avoided emissions are due to the net C sequestered as biochar, one-quarter to replacement of fossil-fuel energy by pyrolysis energy, and one-quarter to avoided emissions of CH4 and N2O. The total mitigation potential is 18-30% greater than if the same biomass were combusted to produce energy. Despite limited data for the decomposition rate of biochar in soils and the effects of biochar additions on soil greenhouse-gas fluxes, sensitivity within realistic ranges of these parameters is small, resulting in an uncertainty of ±8% (±1 s.d.) in our estimates. Achieving these mitigation results requires, however, that biochar production be performed using only low-emissions technologies and feedstocks obtained sustainably, with minimal carbon debt incurred from land-use change.

Woolf, Dominic; Amonette, James E.; Street-Perrott, F. A.; Lehmann, Johannes C.; Joseph, Stephen

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

179

Role of organic soils in the world carbon cycle: problem analysis and research needs  

SciTech Connect

In May 1979, The Institute of Ecology held a workshop to determine the role of organic soils in the global carbon cycle and to ascertain their past, present and future significance in world carbon flux. Wetlands ecologists and soil scientists who participated in the workshop examined such topics as Soils as Sources of Atmospheric CO/sub 2/, Organic Soils, Primary Production and Growth of Wetlands Ecosystems, and Management of Peatlands. The major finding of the workshop is that the organic soils are important in the overall carbon budget. Histosols and Gleysols, the major organic soil deposits of the world, normally sequester organic carbon fixed by plants. They may now be releasing enough carbon to account for nearly 10% of the annual rise in atmospheric content of CO/sub 2/.

Armentano, T.V. (ed.)

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Storage and turnover of organic matter in soil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Historically, attention on soil organic matter (SOM) has focused on the central role that it plays in ecosystem fertility and soil properties, but in the past two decades the role of soil organic carbon in moderating atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations has emerged as a critical research area. This chapter will focus on the storage and turnover of natural organic matter in soil (SOM), in the context of the global carbon cycle. Organic matter in soils is the largest carbon reservoir in rapid exchange with atmospheric CO{sub 2}, and is thus important as a potential source and sink of greenhouse gases over time scales of human concern (Fischlin and Gyalistras 1997). SOM is also an important human resource under active management in agricultural and range lands worldwide. Questions driving present research on the soil C cycle include: Are soils now acting as a net source or sink of carbon to the atmosphere? What role will soils play as a natural modulator or amplifier of climatic warming? How is C stabilized and sequestered, and what are effective management techniques to foster these processes? Answering these questions will require a mechanistic understanding of how and where C is stored in soils. The quantity and composition of organic matter in soil reflect the long-term balance between plant carbon inputs and microbial decomposition, as well as other loss processes such as fire, erosion, and leaching. The processes driving soil carbon storage and turnover are complex and involve influences at molecular to global scales. Moreover, the relative importance of these processes varies according to the temporal and spatial scales being considered; a process that is important at the regional scale may not be critical at the pedon scale. At the regional scale, SOM cycling is influenced by factors such as climate and parent material, which affect plant productivity and soil development. More locally, factors such as plant tissue quality and soil mineralogy affect decomposition pathways and stabilization. These factors influence the stability of SOM in part by shaping its molecular characteristics, which play a fundamental role in nearly all processes governing SOM stability but are not the focus of this chapter. We review here the most important controls on the distribution and dynamics of SOM at plot to global scales, and methods used to study them. We also explore the concepts of controls, processes, and mechanisms, and how they operate across scales. The concept of SOM turnover, or mean residence time, is central to this chapter and so it is described in some detail. The Appendix details the use of radiocarbon ({sup 14}C), a powerful isotopic tool for studying SOM dynamics. Much of the material here was originally presented at a NATO Advanced Study Institute on 'Soils and Global Change: Carbon Cycle, Trace Gas Exchange and Hydrology', held June 16-27, 1997, at the Chateau de Bonas, France.

Torn, M.S.; Swanston, C.W.; Castanha, C.; Trumbore, S.E.

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global soil respiration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Joint Variability of Global Runoff and Global Sea Surface Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global land surface runoff and sea surface temperatures (SST) are analyzed to identify the primary modes of variability of these hydroclimatic data for the period 1905–2002. A monthly water-balance model first is used with global monthly ...

Gregory J. McCabe; David M. Wolock

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

The Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) is internationally recognized as a key NASA resource for the global assessment of terrestrial water and energy conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, evapotranspiration, streamflow, soil moisture, etc.) is being used to improve water resource and Hydro-energy NASA resource for the global assessment of terrestrial water and energy conditions and fluxes results to address multiple national application solutions. Knowledge of terrestrial water, energy

Houser, Paul R.

183

Global Climate Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data Data The climate data at the ORNL DAAC are used primarily as driving variables in terrestrial biogeochemistry models. These models typically use data on temperature (min,max), precipitation, humidity (relative humidity, vapor pressure deficit, dew point), radiation (PFD in PAR, shortwave, direct/diffuse, and UV radiation, daylength), and wind velocity. Climate / meteorology data are required at hourly to monthly time scales, either point or gridded, at spatial scales ranging from regional to continental to global. The ORNL DAAC currently distributes climate data from several related projects: VEMAP-1 Hydroclimatology, and Global Historical Climatology Network. We are also now distributing climate data developed at the East Anglia Climate Research Unit and the Potsdam Institute for Climate Research.

184

Global Insight Energy Group  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Outlook Outlook Mary Novak Managing Director IHS Global Insight Copyright © 2010 IHS Global Insight, Inc. Overview: Energy Sector Transformation Underway * The recession has hit energy demand hard, and aggregate energy demand is not expected to return to 2007 levels until 2018. * Oil and natural gas prices will both rise over the long-term, but the price trends will diverge with natural gas prices rising slowly due to the development of shale gas. * This forecast does not include a GHG cap-and-trade program. However, it is assumed that there will be continued improvement in equipment, appliance and building efficiencies that will reduce carbon emissions relative to past projections. * The forecast also includes the more than 30 state- level programs to increase efficiency and reduce

185

Global Climate & Energy ProjectGlobal & Energy Project STANFORD UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from plants and animals to energy, and to determine the best conditions for doing so (see below). #12, and processes may have an enormous impact on the world's future energy consumption and environment. In orderGlobal Climate & Energy ProjectGlobal & Energy Project STANFORD UNIVERSITY Global Energy Climate

Nur, Amos

186

Global hydrological cycle response to rapid and slow global warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We analyze the response of global water vapor to global warming in a series of fully coupled climate model simulations. We find that a roughly 7% per Kelvin rate of increase of water vapor with global surface temperature is robust only for rapid ...

Larissa Back; Karen Russ; Zhengyu Liu; Kuniaki Inoue; Jiaxu Zhang; Bette Otto-Bliesner

187

Global climate feedbacks  

SciTech Connect

The important physical, chemical, and biological events that affect global climate change occur on a mesoscale -- requiring high spatial resolution for their analysis. The Department of Energy has formulated two major initiatives under the US Global Change Program: ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurements), and CHAMMP (Computer Hardware Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics). ARM is designed to use ground and air-craft based observations to document profiles of atmospheric composition, clouds, and radiative fluxes. With research and models of important physical processes, ARM will delineate the relationships between trace gases, aerosol and cloud structure, and radiative transfer in the atmosphere, and will improve the parameterization of global circulation models. The present GCMs do not model important feedbacks, including those from clouds, oceans, and land processes. The purpose of this workshop is to identify such potential feedbacks, to evaluate the uncertainties in the feedback processes (and, if possible, to parameterize the feedback processes so that they can be treated in a GCM), and to recommend research programs that will reduce the uncertainties in important feedback processes. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases.

Manowitz, B.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Global residential appliance standards  

SciTech Connect

In most countries, residential electricity consumption typically ranges from 20% to 40% of total electricity consumption. This energy is used for heating, cooling, refrigeration and other end-uses. Significant energy savings are possible if new appliance purchases are for models with higher efficiency than that of existing models. There are several ways to ensure or encourage such an outcome, for example, appliance rebates, innovative procurement, and minimum efficiency standards. This paper focuses on the latter approach. At the present time, the US is the only country with comprehensive appliance energy efficiency standards. However, many other countries, such as Australia, Canada, the European Community (EC), Japan and Korea, are considering enacting standards. The greatest potential impact of minimum efficiency standards for appliances is in the developing countries (e.g., China and India), where saturations of household appliances are relatively low but growing rapidly. This paper discusses the potential savings that could be achieved from global appliance efficiency standards for refrigerators and freezers. It also could be achieved from global appliance efficiency standards for refrigerators and freezers. It also discusses the impediments to establishing common standards for certain appliance types, such as differing test procedures, characteristics, and fuel prices. A methodology for establishing global efficiency standards for refrigerators and freezers is described.

Turiel, I.; McMahon, J.E. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (US); Lebot, B. [Agence Francaise pour la Maitrise de l`Energie, Valbonne (FR)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Creation of the WATCH Forcing Data and Its Use to Assess Global and Regional Reference Crop Evaporation over Land during the Twentieth Century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Water and Global Change (WATCH) project evaluation of the terrestrial water cycle involves using land surface models and general hydrological models to assess hydrologically important variables including evaporation, soil moisture, and runoff. ...

G. P. Weedon; S. Gomes; P. Viterbo; W. J. Shuttleworth; E. Blyth; H. Österle; J. C. Adam; N. Bellouin; O. Boucher; M. Best

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Global and Continental Drought in the Second Half of the Twentieth Century: Severity–Area–Duration Analysis and Temporal Variability of Large-Scale Events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using observation-driven simulations of global terrestrial hydrology and a cluster algorithm that searches for spatially connected regions of soil moisture, the authors identified 296 large-scale drought events (greater than 500 000 km2 and ...

J. Sheffield; K. M. Andreadis; E. F. Wood; D. P. Lettenmaier

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Soil Erosion and Sediment Control Act, Soil and Water Conservation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Sediment Control Act, Soil and Water Conservation and Sediment Control Act, Soil and Water Conservation District, and Council on Soil and Water Conservation Regulations (Connecticut) Soil Erosion and Sediment Control Act, Soil and Water Conservation District, and Council on Soil and Water Conservation Regulations (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity

192

GoGlobal Fall 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Policy and Social Welfare at the UCLA School of Public Affairs, and Visiting Professor of Global & International

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Straw Compost and Bioremediated Soil as Inocula for the Bioremediation of Chlorophenol-Contaminated Soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Straw compost and bioremediated soil as inocula for the bioremediation of chlorophenol-contaminated soil.

M M Laine; K S Jorgensen; M. Minna; Laine; Kirsten S. Jørgensen

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Soil mechanics and analysis of soils overlying cavitose bedrock  

SciTech Connect

The stability of the residual soils existing at the West Chestnut Ridge Site, Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee, was evaluated. The weathered bedrock below this residual soil contains numerous solution cavities, and several karst features were identified. The West Chestnut Ridge site was evaluated with respect to deformation and collapse of the residual soil into the bedrock cavities. A finite element analysis investigated the effects of bedrock cavity radius, thickness of soil overburden, and surface surcharge upon the deformational and stability characteristics of the residual soil. The results indicate that for small cavity radii, the thickness of the soil cover has little effect on the zone of yielded soil. For large cavity radii, a smaller zone of distressed soil occurs under thick soil cover than under thin soil cover. Dimensionless curves are presented to enable the prediction of the vertical extent of the zone of yielded soil for a range of site geometries. Although the thick soil deposits (100 feet or greater) typically found on the ridges result in high stresses adjacent to the cavity, the area of the distressed or yielded soil is small and unlikely to extend to the surface. In addition, the surface deformation or subsidence is expected to be minimal. Thus, the siting of waste facilities on the ridges where the overburden is maximum would tend to reduce the effects of deformation into the cavities. 29 refs., 37 figs., 7 tabs.

Drumm, E.C.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Soil Carbon Dynamics Along an Elevation Gradient in the Southern Appalachian Mountains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of soil C dynamics in the exchange of CO{sub 2} between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere is at the center of many science questions related to global climate change. The purpose of this report is to summarize measured trends in environmental factors and ecosystem processes that affect soil C balance along elevation gradients in the southern Appalachian Mountains of eastern Tennessee and western North Carolina, USA. Three environmental factors that have potentially significant effects on soil C dynamics (temperature, precipitation, and soil N availability) vary in a predictable manner with altitude. Forest soil C stocks and calculated turnover times of labile soil C increase with elevation, and there is an apparent inverse relationship between soil C storage and mean annual temperature. Relationships between climate variables and soil C dynamics along elevation gradients must be interpreted with caution because litter chemistry, soil moisture, N availability, and temperature are confounded; all potentially interact in complex ways to regulate soil C storage through effects on decomposition. Some recommendations are presented for untangling these complexities. It is concluded that past studies along elevation gradients have contributed to a better but not complete understanding of environmental factors and processes that potentially affect soil C balance. Furthermore, there are advantages linked to the use of elevation gradients as an approach to climate change research when hypotheses are placed in a strong theoretical or mechanistic framework. Climate change research along elevation gradients can be both convenient and economical. More importantly, ecosystem processes and attributes affecting soil C dynamics along elevation gradients are usually the product of the long-term interactions between climate, vegetation, and soil type. Investigations along elevation gradients are a useful approach to the study of environmental change, and its effect on soil processes, which can complement data obtained from controlled, large-scale, field experiments as well as other empirical and theoretical approaches to climate change research.

Garten Jr., C.T.

2004-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

196

Continuous, Non-Invasive, In-Field Soil Carbon Scanning System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Continuous, non-invasive, in-Field soil Continuous, non-invasive, in-Field soil Carbon sCanning system Background Vegetation and soils serve as carbon storage sinks for the approximately 2 billion tons of carbon absorbed annually by the global biosphere. While global warming is promoted by anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions into the atmosphere, it is partially mitigated by carbon sequestration in the terrestrial ecosystem. However, a better understanding and monitoring of the underground carbon processes is necessary for evaluating various strategies for terrestrial carbon sequestration and quantification of the carbon stores for carbon credits. Description Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has developed a multi-elemental scanning instrument for determining carbon analysis in soil. The method is based on inelastic

197

Simulating Soil Carbon Dynamics, Erosion and Tillage with EPIC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Simulating Soil Carbon Dynamics, Erosion Simulating Soil Carbon Dynamics, Erosion and Tillage with EPIC 1 R. C. Izaurralde (cesar.izaurralde@pnl.gov; 202-646-5227) Joint Global Change Research Institute (JGCRI) Pacific Northwest Nat'l Lab. - Univ. of Maryland 901 D St. S.W., Suite 900 Washington, DC 20024-2115 J. R. Williams (williams@brc.tamus.edu; 254-774-6124) Texas A&M University Blackland Research Center 808 East Blackland Road Temple, TX 76502 W. B. McGill (mcgill@unbc.ca) Faculty of Science and Management University of Northern British Columbia 3333 University Way, Prince George, BC V2N 4Z9 N. J. Rosenberg (nj.rosenberg@pnl.gov; 202-646-5029) Joint Global Change Research Institute (JGCRI) Pacific Northwest Nat'l Lab. - Univ. of Maryland 901 D St. S.W., Suite 900 Washington, DC 20024-2115

198

Global Fossil Fuel Carbon Emissions - Graphics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Global Graphics Global Fossil-Fuel Carbon Emissions - Graphics Carbon Emission Estimates image image Global Per Capita Carbon Emission Estimates...

199

New Soil Property Database Improves Oklahoma Mesonet Soil Moisture Estimates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soil moisture data from the Oklahoma Mesonet are widely used in research efforts spanning many disciplines within Earth Sciences. These soil moisture estimates are derived by translating measurements of matric potential into volumetric water ...

Bethany L. Scott; Tyson E. Ochsner; Bradley G. Illston; Christopher A. Fiebrich; Jeffery B. Basara; Albert J. Sutherland

200

Arrhenius and global warming  

SciTech Connect

Although concern about global atmospheric warming has intensified in recent decades, research into the greenhouse effect actually began in the 19th century. Fourier and other scientists appreciated that without heat-absorbing gases in the atmosphere, the temperature on the ground would be considerably lower, making life as we know it impossible. In 1896, the Swedish scientist Svante Arrhenius was the first to make a quantitative link between changes in carbon dioxide concentration and climate. Publication of his paper was celebrated at a recent Swedish workshop. 13 refs., 1 fig.

Uppenbrink, J.

1996-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global soil respiration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Global Laser Enrichment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

APPLICATION – PUBLIC RESPONSES GE-Hitachi Global Laser Enrichment LLC (GLE) hereby submits the additional information requested in the November 19, 2009 letter. Enclosure 1 of this letter contains the responses the questions. A separate letter has been submitted that contains a non-public version of these responses, which contains Export-Controlled and Security-Related Information. If there are any questions regarding this letter and its contents, please do not hesitate to contact myself, or Julie Olivier of my staff at 910-819-4799 or at Julie.Olivier@ge.com.

Uranium Enrichment Branch; Albert E. Kennedy; Albert E. Kennedy; Tammy Orr (gle

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Global Laser Enrichment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PUBLIC VERSION GE-Hitachi Global Laser Enrichment LLC (GLE) hereby submits revision 2 of the GLE License Application. Enclosure 1 contains revised Request for Additional Information responses. Enclosure 2 contains revised chapters 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, and 11 of the GLE License Application. Enclosure 3 contains the revised pubic version of the Decommissioning Funding Plan. Non-Public versions of the revised License Application and the Decommissioning Funding Plan have been prepared and will be submitted under separate enclosure. If there are any questions regarding this letter and its contents, please do not hesitate to contact me at 910-819-4799 or at

Julie Olivier; Brian Smith Chief; Uranium Enrichment Branch; Julie Olivier; Tim Johnson (nrc; Tammy Orr (gle; Lori Butler (geh; Jerry Head (geh; Patricia Campbell (geh; Bob Crate (gle; Ken Givens (gle; Tom Owens (gle

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

The Global Energy Challenge  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The expected doubling of global energy demand by 2050 challenges our traditional patterns of energy production, distribution and use. The continued use of fossil fuels raises concerns about supply, security, environment and climate. New routes are needed for the efficient conversion of energy from chemical fuel, sunlight, and heat to electricity or hydrogen as an energy carrier and finally to end uses like transportation, lighting, and heating. Opportunities for efficient new energy conversion routes based on nanoscale materials will be presented, with emphasis on the sustainable energy technologies they enable.

Crabtree, George (ANL)

2007-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

204

Plant Communities, Soil Carbon, and Soil Nitrogen Properties in a ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Brye KR, Kucharik CJ (2003) Carbon and nitrogen sequestration in two prairie topochronosequences on contrasting soils in Southern. Wisconsin. American ...

205

Study Climate and Global Change  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What We Study How We Study Prepare The Nation For Change Assess the U.S. Climate Make Our Science Accessible Link Climate Change & Health Provide Data and Tools Coordinate Internationally Study Climate and Global Change Print E-mail Deforestation What is global change? "Global change" refers to changes in the global environment that may alter the capacity of the Earth to sustain life. This includes alterations in: Climate Land productivity Oceans or other water resources Atmospheric chemistry Ecological systems Demographic and socioeconomic trends What is global change research? According to the Global Change Research Act of 1990, "Global change research" refers to the study, monitoring, assessment, prediction, and information management activities used to describe and understand the:

206

Global Scratch Upgrade in Progress  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Scratch Gets Global Scratch Gets an Upgrade Global Scratch Gets an Upgrade Improvements Will Include Higher Data Output Rates, Connection to PDSF October 29, 2013 The most used file system at the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC)-global scratch-just got an upgrade. As a result, some users may see their data output to global scratch reach up to 80 gigabytes per second. Although users will probably not see their 20-terabyte storage quotas increase, the upgrade ensures that global scratch remains flexible and paves the way for PDSF to eventually use the file system Because of the upgrade, users will also be able to better access their temporary data files or "scratch data" from any NERSC system, not just the one that generated it. Prior to the upgrade, Global scratch typically

207

Soil carbon model Yasso07 graphical user interface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this article, we present a graphical user interface software for the litter decomposition and soil carbon model Yasso07 and an overview of the principles and formulae it is based on. The software can be used to test the model and use it in simple applications. Yasso07 is applicable to upland soils of different ecosystems worldwide, because it has been developed using data covering the global climate conditions and representing various ecosystem types. As input information, Yasso07 requires data on litter input to soil, climate conditions, and land-use change if any. The model predictions are given as probability densities representing the uncertainties in the parameter values of the model and those in the input data - the user interface calculates these densities using a built-in Monte Carlo simulation.

Tuomi, Mikko; Repo, Anna; Vanhala, Pekka; Liski, Jari

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Sensitivity of the Global Water Cycle to the Water-Holding Capacity of Land  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sensitivity of the global water cycle to the water-holding capacity of the plant-root zone of continental soils is estimated by simulations using a mathematical model of the general circulation of the atmosphere, with prescribed ocean surface ...

P. C. D. Milly; K. A. Dunne

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Effects of Urban Surfaces and White Roofs on Global and Regional Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land use, vegetation, albedo, and soil-type data are combined in a global model that accounts for roofs and roads at near their actual resolution to quantify the effects of urban surface and white roofs on climate. In 2005, ~0.128% of the ...

Mark Z. Jacobson; John E. Ten Hoeve

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Sampling – Soil - Energy Innovation Portal  

INL has developed a method for sampling soil to determine the presence of extremely fine particles such as asbestos.

211

BBSLA – Kazakhstan (032610) Kazakh (Global Version ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BBSLA – Kazakhstan (032610) Kazakh (Global Version 031010) 1 BLACKBERRY SOLUTION ??????????? ???????? ????????????? ...

212

BBSLA - Kazakhstan (032610) Russian (Global Version ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BBSLA - Kazakhstan (032610) Russian (Global Version 031010) 1 ???????????? ?????????? ?? ????????????? ??????? ...

213

Global Threat Reduction Initiative  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nonproliferation Nonproliferation U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 1 The Current Status of Gap and U.S.-Origin Nuclear Fuel Removals 2011 Jeff Galan, Deputy Project Manager U.S.-Origin Nuclear Remove Program National Nuclear Security Administration Global Threat Reduction Initiative Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 2 GTRI Mission and Goals GTRI is: A part of President Obama's comprehensive strategy to prevent nuclear terrorism; and The key organization responsible for implementing the U.S. HEU minimization policy. GTRI MISSION Reduce and protect vulnerable nuclear and radiological material located at civilian sites worldwide. DOE STRATEGIC GOAL 2.2 Prevent the acquisition of nuclear and radiological materials for use in weapons of mass destruction and other

214

Global emissions inventories  

SciTech Connect

Atmospheric chemistry determines the concentrations of most of the important greenhouse gases except for carbon dioxide. The rate of removal of the greenhouse gases from the atmosphere is also controlled by atmospheric chemistry. The indirect effects of chemical forcing resulting from the chemical interactions of other species can also affect the concentrations of radiatively important gases such as ozone. In order to establish the contribution of any possible climatic change attributable to individual greenhouse gases, spatially and temporally resolved estimates of their emissions need to be established. Unfortunately, for most of the radiatively important species the global magnitudes of their individual fluxes are not known to better than a factor of two and their spatial distributions are even more poorly characterized. Efforts to estimate future projections of potential impacts and to monitor international agreements will require continued research to narrow the uncertainties of magnitude and geographical distribution of emissions.

Dignon, J.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Global Energy Management System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exxon Mobil Corporation has undertaken voluntary actions to continuously improve energy efficiency in our operations for many years. From 1973 to 1999, we improved the energy efficiency of our refineries and chemical plants by over 35 percent - saving the cumulative equivalent of 1.8 billion barrels of oil and reducing carbon dioxide emissions by over 200 million tonnes. In 2000, we redoubled our efforts with deployment of our Global Energy Management System (GEMS), which utilizes international best practices and benchmarking to identify energy efficiencies at each of our refineries and chemical plants. Thus far, we have identified opportunities to improve the energy efficiency of these facilities by an additional 15 to 20 percent. At full implementation, savings are expected to total $500 million to $1 billion per year, with an associated reduction in carbon dioxide emissions of about 10 million tonnes per year - roughly equivalent to removing 1.5 million cars from the world's roads.

Eidt, B. D.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Global Natural Gas Market Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report examines the characteristics of global gas markets. These markets have entered a period of supplier strength and high prices as global demand growth has outpaced supply growth. The report systematically evaluates developments in global liquefaction andfor the principal consuming nationsin domestic production, market growth, pipelines, and regasification. While containing a great deal of detail, the report probes myriad announcements of commercial activities to help interpret the evolving comp...

2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

217

NIST Global Standards Information Staff  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Ileana Martinez. Global standards & trade, Europe, Americas, e-Accessibility, biofuels, accreditation. ileana.martinez@nist.gov 301-975-2766. ...

218

Machine Learning for Global Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

approach for global optimization in which machine learning is used to predict ..... In Figure 1 we show the level curves of the 2–dimensional Rastrigin function.

219

DOE-HDBK-3010-94; Airborne Release Fractions/Rates and Respirable Fractions for Nonreactor Nuclear Facilities, Volume II  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3010-94 3010-94 December 1994 DOE HANDBOOK AIRBORNE RELEASE FRACTIONS/RATES AND RESPIRABLE FRACTIONS FOR NONREACTOR NUCLEAR FACILITIES Volume II - Appendices U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 37831; (615) 576-8401. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 487-4650. Order No. DE95004711 DOE-HDBK-3010-94 Page i VOLUME II: APPENDICES APPENDIX A

220

Global warming and global dioxide emission: An empirical study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the dynamic relationship between global surface temperature (global warming) and global carbon dioxide emission (CO{sub 2}) is modelled and analyzed by causality and spectral analysis in the time domain and frequency domain, respectively. Historical data of global CO{sub 2} emission and global surface temperature anomalies over 129 years from 1860-1988 are used in this study. The causal relationship between the two phenomena is first examined using the Sim and Granger causality test in the time domain after the data series are filtered by ARIMA models. The Granger causal relationship is further scrutinized and confirmed by cross-spectral and multichannel spectral analysis in the frequency domain. The evidence found from both analyses proves that there is a positive causal relationship between the two variables. The time domain analysis suggests that Granger causality exists between global surface temperature and global CO{sub 2} emission. Further, CO{sub 2} emission causes the change in temperature. The conclusions are further confirmed by the frequency domain analysis, which indicates that the increase in CO{sub 2} emission causes climate warming because a high coherence exists between the two variables. Furthermore, it is proved that climate changes happen after an increase in CO{sub 2} emission, which confirms that the increase in CO{sub 2} emission does cause global warming. 27 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

Linyan Sun [Xian Jiaotong Univ., Shaanxi (China); Wang, M. [Saint Mary`s Univ., Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global soil respiration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Chinese demand drives global deforestation Chinese demand drives global deforestation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chinese demand drives global deforestation Chinese demand drives global deforestation By Tansa Musa zones and do not respect size limits in their quest for maximum financial returns. "I lack words economy. China's demand for hardwood drives illegal logging says "Both illegal and authorized

222

Pyruvate and Lactate Metabolism by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under Fermentation, Oxygen Limitation, and Fumarate Respiration Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a facultative anaerobe that derives energy by coupling organic matter oxidation to the reduction of wide range of electron acceptors. Here, we quantitatively assessed lactate and pyruvate metabolism of MR-1 under three distinct conditions: electron acceptor limited growth on lactate with O2; lactate with fumarate; and pyruvate fermentation. The latter does not support growth but provides energy for cell survival. Using physiological and genetic approaches combined with flux balance analysis, we showed that the proportion of ATP produced by substrate-level phosphorylation varied from 33% to 72.5% of that needed for growth depending on the electron acceptor nature and availability. While being indispensible for growth, respiration of fumarate does not contribute significantly to ATP generation and likely serves to remove formate, a product of pyruvate formate-lyase-catalyzed pyruvate disproportionation. Under both tested respiratory conditions S. oneidensis MR-1 carried out incomplete substrate oxidation, whereby the TCA cycle did not contribute significantly. Pyruvate dehydrogenase was not involved in lactate metabolism under O2 limitation but was required for anaerobic growth likely by supplying reducing equivalents for biosynthesis. The results suggest that pyruvate fermentation by S. oneidensis MR-1 cells represents a combination of substrate-level phosphorylation and respiration, where pyruvate serves as electron donor and electron acceptor. Pyruvate reduction to lactate at the expense of formate oxidation is catalyzed by recently described new type of oxidative NAD(P)H independent D-lactate dehydrogenase (Dld-II). The results further indicate that pyruvate reduction coupled to formate oxidation may be accompanied by proton motive force generation.

Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Geydebrekht, Oleg V.; Hill, Eric A.; Reed, Jennifer L.; Konopka, Allan; Beliaev, Alex S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Report on the Best Available Technology (BAT) for the treatment of the INEL Central Laundry and Respirator Facility (CFA-617)  

SciTech Connect

The Central Laundry and Respirator Facility (CLRF) designated by the building number of CFA-617 has been addressed as a potential source of contamination to the Central Facilities Area (CFA) subsurface drainage field which also receives waste water from the current CFA Sewage Treatment Plant (STP). Currently, discharges from the CLRF have been below set guidelines, DCG. A new STP has been proposed for the CFA. Since the CLRF has been designated as a potential source of contamination, a Best Available Technology (BAT) assessment was requested to determine what action should be taken in respect to the aqueous discharges from the CLRF. The BAT assessment involved source definition, technology evaluation, BAT matrix development, BAT selection, and BAT documentation. The BAT for the Central laundry and Respirator Facility selected the treatment which would impact the CLRF and the new STP the least in all aspects considered and was the system of filtration and a lined pond for natural evaporation of the water. The system will provide an isolation of this waste stream from all other CFA waste water which will be treated at the new STP. Waste minimization possibilities exist within the laundry process and are considered. These minimization actions will reduce the amount of waste water being released, but will result in raising the contaminate's concentrations (the total mass will remain the same). The second option was the use of ion exchange to remove the contaminates and recycle the water back to the wash and rinse cycles in the laundry. 3 refs., 9 figs., 11 tabs.

Miyasaki, D.H.; Heiser, D.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Pneumatic soil removal tool  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A soil removal tool is provided for removing radioactive soil, rock and other debris from the bottom of an excavation, while permitting the operator to be located outside of a containment for that excavation. The tool includes a fixed jaw, secured to one end of an elongate pipe, which cooperates with a movable jaw pivotably mounted on the pipe. Movement of the movable jaw is controlled by a pneumatic cylinder mounted on the pipe. The actuator rod of the pneumatic cylinder is connected to a collar which is slidably mounted on the pipe and forms part of the pivotable mounting assembly for the movable jaw. Air is supplied to the pneumatic cylinder through a handle connected to the pipe, under the control of an actuator valve mounted on the handle, to provide movement of the movable jaw.

Neuhaus, John E. (Newport News, VA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Pneumatic soil removal tool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A soil tool is provided for removing radioactive soil, rock and debris from the bottom of an excavation, while permitting the operator to be located outside of a containment for that excavation. The tool includes a fixed jaw, secured to one end of an elongate pipe, which cooperates with a movable jaw pivotably mounted on the pipe. Movement of the movable jaw is controlled by a pneumatic cylinder on the pipe. The actuator rod of the pneumatic cylinder is connected to a collar which is slidably on the pipe and forms part of the pivotable mounting assembly for the movable jaw. Air is supplied to the pneumatic cylinder through a handle connected to the pipe, under the control of an actuator value mounted on the handle, to provide movement of the movable jaw.

Neuhaus, J.F.

1991-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

226

Pneumatic soil removal tool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A soil removal tool is provided for removing radioactive soil, rock and other debris from the bottom of an excavation, while permitting the operator to be located outside of a containment for that excavation. The tool includes a fixed jaw, secured to one end of an elongate pipe, which cooperates with a movable jaw pivotably mounted on the pipe. Movement of the movable jaw is controlled by a pneumatic cylinder mounted on the pipe. The actuator rod of the pneumatic cylinder is connected to a collar which is slidably mounted on the pipe and forms part of the pivotable mounting assembly for the movable jaw. Air is supplied to the pneumatic cylinder through a handle connected to the pipe, under the control of an actuator valve mounted on the handle, to provide movement of the movable jaw. 3 figs.

Neuhaus, J.E.

1992-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

227

Interactions between organic amendments and phosphate fertilizers modify phosphate sorption processes in an acid soil  

SciTech Connect

To determine how organic amendments and phosphate fertilizers interact to modify P sorption processes, three phosphate fertilizers were applied to lignite- and compost-amended acid soil and incubated for either 3 or 26 days. The fertilizers applied were potassium dihydrogen phosphate, triple superphosphate, and diammonium phosphate (DAP). After 3 days of incubation, sorption of all three P sources was decreased in the lignite-amended treatments, whereas P sorption was increased in the compost-amended treatments. Increased incubation time (26 days) resulted in significantly decreased P sorption when DAP was added to lignite-amended treatments. Addition of triple superphosphate increased P sorption in lignite- and compost-amended treatments and decreased solution pH compared with DAP application. In addition to the effect of P source, differences in P sorption between the lignite- and compost-amended treatments were driven by differences in solution chemistry, predominantly solution pH and cation dynamics. Soil amendment and fertilizer addition also increased microbial activity in the incubation systems, as measured by carbon dioxide respiration. It is proposed that the combination of lignite and DAP may contribute to decreased P sorption in acid soils, with the positive effects likely caused by both chemical and biological processes, including the formation of soluble organic-metal complexes.

Sckefe, C.R.; Patti, A.F.; Clune, T.S.; Jackson, W.R. [Rutherglen Center, Rutherglen, Vic. (Australia)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

228

Statistical global metabolic control analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work introduces the concept of global sensitivity based on simultaneous variation of a complete set of enzymes, metabolite concentrations, and cofactors in finite ranges of concentrations. Perturbations are defined by finite ranges of concentrations ... Keywords: MCA metabolic control analysis, flux control coefficients, global sensitivity, homeostasis

Zelimir Kurtanjek

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Global and Regional Solutions Directorate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at Pacific NW National Lab (PNNL) ­ Founding Director Joint Global Change Research Institute (PNNL/UMd) ­ ALD (PNNL) ­ Environmental and Health Sciences Directorate; Emerging Technologies ­ Chief Scientist ­ Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program ­ Director ­ PNNL Global Studies Program ­ Other (PNNL): Center

Homes, Christopher C.

230

GLOBAL IMPACT FROM THE HEART  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GLOBAL IMPACT FROM THE HEART OF NORTHERN IRELAND #12;#12;CHANCELLOR'S WELCOME 4 VICE: INNOVATIVE AND WORLD-CLASS 18 CONTACT 26 CONTENTS 3GLOBAL IMPACT FROM THE HEART OF NORTHERN IRELAND #12;Queen THE HEART OF NORTHERN IRELANDGLOBAL IMPACT FROM THE HEART OF NORTHERN IRELAND CHANCELLOR'S WELCOME

Müller, Jens-Dominik

231

Educational Global Climate Change Links  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Educational Global Climate Change Links Educational Global Climate Change Links Evidence of the importance of global climate change to the future generation is reflected in the increasing number of queries CDIAC receives from students and educators, from a range of educational levels. We have compiled a listing of some sites that we hope will be of interest and of use to those looking for information, fun, ideas, and ways that they can make a difference. These links were chosen because we have found them useful in responding to those with inquiring minds. These links will take the user outside of CDIAC, and are by no means comprehensive. We are not responsible for the content or intent of these outside links. Tools you can use! NOAA's Global Climate Dashboard - The Global Climate Dashboard is

232

Frequently Asked Global Change Questions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Asked Global Change Questions Asked Global Change Questions This page lists global change questions that have been received at CDIAC and the answers that were provided to a diverse audience. If you have a question relating to carbon dioxide and global change and cannot find the answer you need here, you can "Ask Us a Question", and we will be glad to try to help you. Questions Should we grow trees to remove carbon in the atmosphere? What are the present tropospheric concentrations, global warming potentials (100 year time horizon), and atmospheric lifetimes of CO2, CH4, N2O, CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113, CCl4, methyl chloroform, HCFC-22, sulphur hexafluoride, trifluoromethyl sulphur pentafluoride, perfluoroethane, and surface ozone? Where can I find information on the naming of halocarbons?

233

Automated Soil Gas Monitoring Chamber - Oak Ridge National ...  

Automated Soil Gas Monitoring Chamber ... A chamber for trapping soil gases as they evolve from the soil without disturbance to the soil and to the natural

234

Global production through 2005  

SciTech Connect

Two companion studies released recently should provide great food for thought among geo-political strategists and various national governments. If predictions contained in these Petroconsultants studies of oil and gas production trends for the next 10 years are realized, there will be great repercussions for net exporters and importers, alike. After analyzing and predicting trends within each of the world`s significant producing nations for the 1996--2005 period, the crude oil and condensate report concludes tat global production will jump nearly 24%. By contrast, worldwide gas output will leap 40%. The cast of characters among producers and exporters that will benefit from these increases varies considerably for each fuel. On the oil side, Russia and the OPEC members, particularly the Persian Gulf nations, will be back in the driver`s seat in terms of affecting export and pricing patterns. On the gas side, the leading producers will be an interesting mix of mostly non-OPEC countries. The reemergence of Persian Gulf oil producers, coupled with an anticipated long-term decline among top non-OPEC producing nations should present a sobering picture to government planners within large net importers, such as the US. They are likely to find themselves in much the same supply trap as was experienced in the 1970s, only this time the dependence on foreign oil supplies will be much worse. Gas supplies will not be similarly constrained, and some substitution for oil is probable. Here, two articles, ``World oil industry is set for transition`` and ``Worldwide gas surges forward in next decade,`` present a summary of the findings detailed in Petroconsultants` recent studies.

Foreman, N.E. [Petroconsultants, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Predicting Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Soil Carbon from Changing Pasture to an Energy Crop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Predicting Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Soil Carbon from Changing Pasture to an Energy Crop biogeochemical cycles and global greenhouse gas budgets. Energy cane (Saccharum officinarum L.) is a sugarcane changing land from grazed pasture to energy cane would affect greenhouse gas (CO2, CH4 and N2O) fluxes

DeLucia, Evan H.

236

Soil Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Soil Sampling Soil Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Soil Sampling Details Activities (10) Areas (9) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Can reveal relatively high permeability zones Hydrological: Thermal: Used to locate active hydrothermal systems Dictionary.png Soil Sampling: Soil sampling is a method that can be used for exploration of geothermal resources that lack obvious surface manifestations. Soils that are above or adjacent to a "hidden" hydrothermal system will have a unique chemistry that can be indicative of a hydrothermal system at depth and a zone of

237

Wireless sensor networks for soil science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wireless sensor networks can revolutionise soil ecology by providing measurements at temporal and spatial granularities previously impossible. This paper presents our first steps towards fulfilling that goal by developing and deploying two experimental ... Keywords: WSNs, environmental monitoring, soil moisture, soil monitoring, soil science, soil temperature, urban forests, web services, wireless networks, wireless sensor networks

Andreas Terzis; Razvan Musaloiu-E.; Joshua Cogan; Katalin Szlavecz; Alexander Szalay; Jim Gray; Stuart Ozer; Chieh-Jan Mike Liang; Jayant Gupchup; Randal Burns

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Why Sequence Permafrost Soil Microbiota?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Research Principal Investigators: Mark Waldrop, US Geological Services Program: CSP 2010 Home > Sequencing > Why Sequence Permafrost Soil Microbiota? UC logo DOE logo...

239

Why sequence soil bacterial communities?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

as part of this project. Principal Investigators: Stephanie Eichorst, Los Alamos National Laboratory Program: CSP 2011 Home > Sequencing > Why sequence soil bacterial communities...

240

Carbon Sequestration in European Soils  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Preliminary Estimates for Five Scenarios Potential for Carbon Sequestration in European Soils: Preliminary Estimates for Five Scenarios Using Results from Long-Term Experiments...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global soil respiration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Treatment of Waste Soils / Solids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About the 1996 International Symposium on Extraction and Processing for the Treatment and Minimization of Wastes: Treatment of Waste Soils / Solids ...

242

Global Warming: Physics and Facts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains papers on: A tutorial on global atmospheric energetics and the greenhouse effect; global climate models: what and how; comparison of general circulation models; climate and the earth`s radiation budget; temperature and sea level change; short-term climate variability and predictions; the great ocean conveyor; trace gases in the atmosphere: temporal and spatial trends; the geochemical carbon cycle and the uptake of fossil fuel CO{sub 2}; forestry and global warming; the physical and policy linkages; policy implications of greenhouse warming; options for lowering US carbon dioxide emissions; options for reducing carbon dioxide emissions; and science and diplomacy: a new partnership to protect the environment.

Levi, B.G. [Physics Today, New York, NY (United States); Hafemeister, D. [Committee on Foreign Relations (U.S. Senate), Washington, DC (United States); Scribner, R. [Georgetown Univ., Washington, DC (United States)] [eds.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Global Warming: Physics and Facts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains papers on: A tutorial on global atmospheric energetics and the greenhouse effect; global climate models: what and how; comparison of general circulation models; climate and the earth's radiation budget; temperature and sea level change; short-term climate variability and predictions; the great ocean conveyor; trace gases in the atmosphere: temporal and spatial trends; the geochemical carbon cycle and the uptake of fossil fuel CO{sub 2}; forestry and global warming; the physical and policy linkages; policy implications of greenhouse warming; options for lowering US carbon dioxide emissions; options for reducing carbon dioxide emissions; and science and diplomacy: a new partnership to protect the environment.

Levi, B.G. (Physics Today, New York, NY (United States)); Hafemeister, D. (Committee on Foreign Relations (U.S. Senate), Washington, DC (United States)); Scribner, R. (Georgetown Univ., Washington, DC (United States)) (eds.)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Flux of carbon from 14C-enriched leaf litter throughout a forest soil mesocosm  

SciTech Connect

The role of DOC for the build-up of soil organic carbon pools is still not well known, but it is thought to play a role in the transport of carbon to a greater depth where it becomes more stable. The aim of this study was to elucidate within-year dynamics of carbon transport from litter to the O (Oe and Oa) and A horizons. Mesocosms with constructed soil profiles were used to study dynamics of C transport from 14C-enriched (about 1000 ) leaf litter to the Oe/Oa and A horizons as well as the mineralization of leaf litter. The mesocosms were placed in the field for 17 months during which time fluxes and 14C content of DOC and CO2 were measured. Changes in 14C in leaf litter and bulk soil C pools were also recorded. Significant simultaneous release and immobilization of DOC occurring in both the O and A horizons was hypothesized. Contrary to our hypothesis, DOC released from the labeled Oi horizon was not retained within the Oe/Oa layer. DOC originating in the unlabeled Oe/Oa layer was also released for transport. Extensive retention of DOC occurred in the A horizon. DOC leaching from A horizon consisted of a mix of DOC from different sources, with a main fraction originating in the A horizon and a smaller fraction leached from the overlaying horizons. The C and 14C budget for the litter layer also indicated a surprisingly large amount of carbon with ambient ?14C-signature to be respired from this layer. Data for this site also suggested significant contributions from throughfall to dissolved organic carbon (DOC) transport into and respiration from the litter layer. The results from this study showed that DOC retentionwas low in the O horizon and therefore not important for the O horizon carbon budget. In the A horizon DOC retention was extensive, but annual DOC input was small compared to C stocks and therefore not important for changes in soil C on an annual timescale.

Froberg, Mats J. [Sveriges Lantbruksuniversitet; Hanson, Paul J [ORNL; Trumbore, Susan E. [University of California, Irvine; Swanston, Christopher W. [USFS; Todd Jr, Donald E [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Global Warming and Extreme Weather  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Warming and Extreme Weather Global Warming and Extreme Weather Speaker(s): Michael Wehner Date: November 28, 2006 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Surabi Menon Extreme weather events can have serious impacts on human and ecological systems. Changes in the magnitude and frequency of extreme weather associated with changes in the mean climate are likely the most serious consequence of human induced global warming. Understanding what the future portends is vital if society hopes to adapt to the very different world that awaits. In this talk, we will exploit simple extreme value theory to make predictions about the late 21st century climate. Current work on the relationship between global warming and the hurricane cycle will also be presented. The bottom line is that events that are considered rare today

246

BPL Global | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BPL Global BPL Global Jump to: navigation, search Name BPL Global Place Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Zip 15222 Product BPL Global is a Pittburgh based company that uses broadband over powerline (BPL) to intergrate offerings of advanced metering infrastructure and broadband internet. Coordinates 40.438335°, -79.997459° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.438335,"lon":-79.997459,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

247

Endeavor Global | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Endeavor Global Endeavor Global Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Endeavor Global Name Endeavor Global Address 900 Broadway Place New York, New York Zip 10003 Coordinates 40.7391824°, -73.9897252° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.7391824,"lon":-73.9897252,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

248

Global Circuit Model with Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud data from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) database have been introduced into the global circuit model developed by Tinsley and Zhou. Using the cloud-top pressure data and cloud type information, the authors ...

Limin Zhou; Brian A. Tinsley

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Puzzles from the First Globalization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the first globalization, 1870-1914, as in our own times, debates raged over the impact on domestic life of free movement across borders of goods, people, and capital. Then as today in the hard times that have followed ...

Berger, Suzanne

250

EPS Global International Cancer Conference  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sept.10-12th, 2010 Suzhou, China Welcome Message Dear Colleagues and Friends, It is my pleasure to announce that EPS Global International Cancer Conference will be held on...

251

The Psychology of Global Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The evidence in support of global warming and the lack of significant published evidence to the contrary provides an extraordinarily strong foundation for the scientific community's call for action on greenhouse gas emissions. However, public ...

Ben R. Newell; Andrew J. Pitman

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Magnitude correlations in global seismicity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By employing natural time analysis, we analyze the worldwide seismicity and study the existence of correlations between earthquake magnitudes. We find that global seismicity exhibits nontrivial magnitude correlations for earthquake magnitudes greater than M{sub w}6.5.

Sarlis, N. V. [Solid State Section and Solid Earth Physics Institute, Physics Department, University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, Zografos GR-157 84, Athens (Greece)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

253

THE GLOBAL NUCLEAR ENERGY PARTNERSHIP:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GLOBAL NUCLEAR ENERGY PARTNERSHIP: GLOBAL NUCLEAR ENERGY PARTNERSHIP: Greater Energy Security in a Cleaner, Safer World The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) is a comprehensive strategy to increase U.S. and global energy security, encourage clean development around the world, reduce the risk of nuclear proliferation, and improve the environment. A plentiful, reliable supply of energy is the cornerstone of sustained economic growth and prosperity. Nuclear power is the only proven technology that can provide abundant supplies of base load electricity reliably and without air pollution or emissions of greenhouse gasses. In order to help meet growing demand for energy at home and encourage the growth of prosperity around the globe, GNEP provides for the safe, extensive expansion of clean nuclear power.

254

Soil Moisture Memory in Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water balance considerations at the soil surface lead to an equation that relates the autocorrelation of soil moisture in climate models to 1) seasonality in the statistics of the atmospheric forcing, 2) the variation of evaporation with soil ...

Randal D. Koster; Max J. Suarez

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Point Probability Distributions of Frozen Soil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In some areas of the Pacific Northwest, frozen soils play a major role in surface runoff, soil erosion and sedimentation, but quantitative descriptions of the frequency and severity of soil frost are lacking.

J. F. Zuzel; J. L. Pikul Jr.; R. N. Greenwalt

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Microbial Carbon Cycling in Permafrost-Affected Soils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Arctic plays a key role in Earth s climate system as global warming is predicted to be most pronounced at high latitudes and because one third of the global carbon pool is stored in ecosystems of the northern latitudes. In order to improve our understanding of the present and future carbon dynamics in climate sensitive permafrost ecosystems, present studies concentrate on investigations of microbial controls of greenhouse gas fluxes, on the activity and structure of the involved microbial communities, and on their response to changing environmental conditions. Permafrost-affected soils can function as both a source and a sink for carbon dioxide and methane. Under anaerobic conditions, caused by flooding of the active layer and the effect of backwater above the permafrost table, the mineralization of organic matter can only be realized stepwise by specialized microorganisms. Important intermediates of the organic matter decomposition are hydrogen, carbon dioxide and acetate, which can be further reduced to methane by methanogenic archaea. Evolution of methane fluxes across the subsurface/atmosphere boundary will thereby strongly depend on the activity of anaerobic methanogenic archaea and obligately aerobic methane oxidizing proteobacteria, which are known to be abundant and to significantly reduce methane emissions in permafrost-affected soils. Therefore current studies on methane-cycling microorganisms are the object of particular attention in permafrost studies, because of their key role in the Arctic methane cycle and consequently of their significance for the global methane budget.

Vishnivetskaya, T. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Liebner, Susanne [University of Tromso, Norway; Wilhelm, Ronald [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec; Wagner, Dirk [Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Potsdam, Germany

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

NERSC Calculations Provide Independent Confirmation of Global...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NERSC Calculations Provide Independent Confirmation of Global Land Warming Since 1901 NERSC Calculations Provide Independent Confirmation of Global Land Warming Since 1901...

258

The Private Regulation of Global Corporate Conduct  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ameliorate the negative social impacts of global markets isenvironmental and social impacts and the royalty paymentscriticisms of the social impact of economic globalization

Vogel, David

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Building Technologies Office: Global Superior Energy Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Superior Energy Global Superior Energy Performance Partnership to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Global Superior Energy Performance Partnership on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Global Superior Energy Performance Partnership on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Global Superior Energy Performance Partnership on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Global Superior Energy Performance Partnership on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Global Superior Energy Performance Partnership on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Global Superior Energy Performance Partnership on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities 179d Tax Calculator Advanced Energy Design Guides Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides

260

Global Environment Facility (GEF) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edit with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Global Environment Facility (GEF) Jump to: navigation, search Name Global Environment Facility Address...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global soil respiration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Global Energias Renovables SL | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energias Renovables SL Jump to: navigation, search Name Global Energias Renovables SL Place Madrid, Spain Sector Wind energy Product Spanish wind power developer. References Global...

262

Global Celsius SL | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Celsius SL Jump to: navigation, search Name Global Celsius SL Place Madrid, Spain Sector Wind energy Product Spanish wind project developer. References Global Celsius SL1...

263

Global Alternative Fuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alternative Fuels Jump to: navigation, search Name Global Alternative Fuels Place El Paso, Texas Zip 79922 Product Global Alternative Fuels processes virgin oils (palm, soybean,...

264

Global Green Partners | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Global Green Partners Jump to: navigation, search Name Global Green Partners Place Los Altos,...

265

Sunrise Global Solar Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Sunrise Global Solar Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name Sunrise Global Solar Energy Place Taoyuan County, Taiwan Zip...

266

Global Fossil Fuel Carbon Emissions - Graphics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Global Graphics Global Fossil-Fuel Carbon Emissions - Graphics Data graphic Data (ASCII, Fixed Format) Data graphic Data (ASCII, Comma-delimited)...

267

DOE-HDBK-3010-94; DOE Handbook Airborne Release Fractions/Rates and Respirable Fractions for Nonreactor Nuclear Facilities, Volume 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10-94 10-94 December 1994 CHANGE NOTICE NO. 1 March 2000 DOE HANDBOOK AIRBORNE RELEASE FRACTIONS/RATES AND RESPIRABLE FRACTIONS FOR NONREACTOR NUCLEAR FACILITIES Volume I - Analysis of Experimental Data U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. Change Notice No. 1 DOE-HDBK-3010-94 March 2000 Airborne Release Fractions/Rates and Respirable Fractions

268

Natural mercury isotope variation in coal deposits and organic soils  

SciTech Connect

There is a need to distinguish among sources of Hg to the atmosphere in order to more fully understand global Hg pollution. In this study we investigate whether coal deposits within the United States, China, and Russia-Kazakhstan, which are three of the five greatest coal-producing regions, have diagnostic Hg isotopic fingerprints that can be used to discriminate among Hg sources. We also investigate the Hg isotopic composition of modern organic soil horizons developed in areas distant from point sources of Hg in North America. Mercury stored in coal deposits displays a wide range of both mass dependent fractionation and mass independent fractionation. {delta}{sup 202}Hg varies in coals by 3{per_thousand} and {Delta}{sup 201}Hg varies by 0.9{per_thousand}. Combining these two Hg isotope signals results in what may be a unique isotopic 'fingerprint' for many coal deposits. Mass independent fractionation of mercury has been demonstrated to occur during photochemical reactions of mercury. This suggests that Hg found in most coal deposits was subjected to photochemical reduction near the Earth's surface prior to deposition. The similarity in MDF and MIF of modern organic soils and coals from North America suggests that Hg deposition from coal may have imprinted an isotopic signature on soils. This research offers a new tool for characterizing mercury inputs from natural and anthropogenic sources to the atmosphere and provides new insights into the geochemistry of mercury in coal and soils. 35 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Abir, Biswas; Joel D. Blum; Bridget A. Bergquist; Gerald J. Keeler; Zhouqing Xie [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Department of Geological Sciences

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

269

Compost Application Practices for Revegetating Disturbed Soils.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Urban development alters the physical and chemical properties of soil which presents challenges for vegetation establishment. Compost, when applied as a soil amendment, can help… (more)

Dunifon, Shea Nicole

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Worldwide Organic Soil Carbon and Nitrogen Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of soil samples from California. Additional data came from soil surveys of Italy, Greece, Iran, Thailand, Vietnam, various tropical Amazonian areas, and U.S. forests and from...

271

ARM - Measurement - Soil surface temperature  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

surface temperature surface temperature ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Soil surface temperature The temperature of the soil measured near the surface. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AMC : Ameriflux Measurement Component CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems SOIL : Soil Measurement from the SGP SWATS : Soil Water and Temperature System MET : Surface Meteorological Instrumentation

272

Genetic modification of alternative respiration in Nicotiana benthamiana affects basal and salicylic acid-induced resistance to potato virus X  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

seed, agar media were supplemented with kana- mycin (50 ?g.ml-1), hygromycin B (29 ?g.ml-1), or both antibiotics as appropriate. After transfer to soil, all plants were maintained in a growth room (Conviron Ltd., Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada) under a 16 h...

Lee, Wing-Sham; Fu, Shih-Feng; Verchot-Lubicz, Jeanmarie; Carr, John P

2011-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

273

The Global Policeman and Subic Base  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the storage of U.S. nuclear weapons on Philippine soil andper­ mission required—of nuclear weapons on U.S. warships inwhich prohibits nuclear weapons on Philippine soil, wa­

Schirmer, Daniel Boone

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Advanced Assay Systems for Radionuclide Contamination in Soils  

SciTech Connect

Through the support of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) Technical Assistance Program, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed and deployed a suite of systems that rapidly scan, characterize, and analyze surface soil contamination. The INL systems integrate detector systems with data acquisition and synthesis software and with global positioning technology to provide a real-time, user-friendly field deployable turn-key system. INL real-time systems are designed to characterize surface soil contamination using methodologies set forth in the Multi-Agency Radiation Surveys and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM). MARSSIM provides guidance for planning, implementing, and evaluating environmental and facility radiological surveys conducted to demonstrate compliance with a dose or risk-based regulation and provides real-time information that is immediately available to field technicians and project management personnel. This paper discusses the history of the development of these systems and describes some of the more recent examples and their applications.

J. R. Giles; L. G. Roybal; M. V. Carpenter; C. P. Oertel; J. A. Roach

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) An article that examines the global nuclear energy partnership. The Global Nuclear Energy...

276

Characterization of Pu-contaminated soils from Nuclear Site 201 at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

Distribution and characteristics of Pu-bearing radioactive particles throughout five soil profiles from Nuclear Site (NS) 201 were investigated. Concentrations of /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu and /sup 241/Am decreased with depth and most of the contamination was contained in the top 5 cm except in profile 4 where it extended to 10 cm. The mean activity ratio of /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu to /sup 241/Am and its standard error were 5.8 +- 0.3 (N=42). Most of the total radioactivity of the soils was contributed by 0.25 to 2 mm sand size fraction which comprised 20 to 50% by weight of the soils. The radioactive particles in the 0.25 to 2 mm size fraction occurred as spherical glass particles or as glass coatings on sand particles. The glass coatings had gas voids in the matrix but were not as porous as the radioactive particles from NS 219. After impact grinding the >0.25-mm size fractions for one hour, 85% of the initial activity in a NS 201 sample remained with the particles on the 0.25 mm sieve, whereas in the NS 219 sample only 10% remained. The results show that the radioactive particles from NS 201 were much more stable against the impact grinding force than those from NS 219. Therefore, the NS 201 soils would be expected to have a lower probability of producing respirable-size radioactive particles by saltation during wind erosion. 19 references, 3 figures, 3 tables.

Lee, S.Y.; Tamura, T.; Larsen, I.L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Global Cooling: Effect of Urban Albedo on Global Temperature  

SciTech Connect

In many urban areas, pavements and roofs constitute over 60% of urban surfaces (roof 20-25%, pavements about 40%). The roof and the pavement albedo can be increased by about 0.25 and 0.10, respectively, resulting in a net albedo increase for urban areas of about 0.1. Many studies have demonstrated building cooling-energy savings in excess of 20% upon raising roof reflectivity from an existing 10-20% to about 60%. We estimate U.S. potential savings in excess of $1 billion (B) per year in net annual energy bills. Increasing albedo of urban surfaces can reduce the summertime urban temperature and improve the urban air quality. Increasing the urban albedo has the added benefit of reflecting more of the incoming global solar radiation and countering the effect of global warming. We estimate that increasing albedo of urban areas by 0.1 results in an increase of 3 x 10{sup -4} in Earth albedo. Using a simple global model, the change in air temperature in lowest 1.8 km of the atmosphere is estimated at 0.01K. Modelers predict a warming of about 3K in the next 60 years (0.05K/year). Change of 0.1 in urban albedo will result in 0.01K global cooling, a delay of {approx}0.2 years in global warming. This 0.2 years delay in global warming is equivalent to 10 Gt reduction in CO2 emissions.

Akbari, Hashem; Menon, Surabi; Rosenfeld, Arthur

2007-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

278

A Coupled Soil Moisture and Surface Temperature Prediction Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model for soil moisture and soil surface temperature prediction for bare soil is considered in this paper. In describing evaporation rate. soil structure and moisture were taken into account as much as possible. Soil moisture prediction was ...

F. Ács; D. T. Mihailovi?; B. Rajkovi?

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

FINGERPRINTING SOILS – A PROOF OF CONCEPT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forensic soil characterization is an under-explored field in the forensic sciences. One aspect of forensic sciences is Locard’s Exchange Principle, which states that every contact leaves a trace. As soil characterization technology improves, applications of soil forensics can more accurately identify if a soil sample collected from a suspect corresponds to samples collected at a crime scene. This research focuses on the use of visible near and infrared, diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (VNIR DRS) to develop spectral “fingerprints” of soils. Our hypothesis is that VNIR spectra of soils from a crime scene are unique from other soils, even soils of the same soil series. If soil spectra from a crime scene are unique, this data can be used to accurately assess Locard’s Exchange Principle. Soil samples were collected within in a thirty-mile radius of a designated “crime scene” in the Brazos River floodplain near Texas A

Kobylinski, Catherine

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Making Global Illumination User Friendly  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Making Global Illumination User Friendly Making Global Illumination User Friendly Title Making Global Illumination User Friendly Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBL-37860 Year of Publication 1995 Authors Ward, Gregory J. Conference Name 6th Eurographics Workshop on Rendering Date Published 06/1995 Conference Location Dublin, Ireland Call Number LBL-37860 Abstract Global illumination researchers tend to think in terms of mesh density and sampling frequency, and their software reflects this in its user interface. Advanced rendering systems are rife with long command lines and parameters for tuning the sample densities, thresholds and other algorithm-specific variables, and the novice user is quickly lost in a sea of possibilities. This paper details a successful effort of making one such global illumination system usable by people who understand their problems, even if they do not understand the methods needed to solve them, through an assisted oracle approach. A single program is introduced to map a small set of intuitive control variables to the rendering commands and parameter settings needed to produce the desired output in a reasonable time. This new executive program then serves as the basis for a graphical user interface that is both friendly in its appearance and reliable in its performance. Finally, we conclude with some future directions for improving this interface.

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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281

(Chemistry of the global atmosphere)  

SciTech Connect

The traveler attended the conference The Chemistry of the Global Atmosphere,'' and presented a paper on the anthropogenic emission of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) to the atmosphere. The conference included meetings of the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry (IGAC) programme, a core project of the International Geosphere/Biosphere Programme (IGBP) and the traveler participated in meetings on the IGAC project Development of Global Emissions Inventories'' and agreed to coordinate the working group on CO{sub 2}. Papers presented at the conference focused on the latest developments in analytical methods, modeling and understanding of atmospheric CO{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O, SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, NMHCs, CFCs, and aerosols.

Marland, G.

1990-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

282

BBSLA – Malaysia (032410) English (Global Version 031010) ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BBSLA – Malaysia (032410) English (Global Version 031010) 1 BLACKBERRY SOLUTION LICENSE AGREEMENT PLEASE READ THIS ...

283

BBSLA – Argentina (031710) Spanish (Global Version ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BBSLA – Argentina (031710) Spanish (Global Version 031010) CONTRATO DE LICENCIA DE SOLUCIÓN BLACKBERRY FAVOR LEER ESTE ...

284

BBSLA – Pakistan (032310) English (Global Version 031010) ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BBSLA – Pakistan (032310) English (Global Version 031010) 1 BLACKBERRY SOLUTION LICENSE AGREEMENT PLEASE READ THIS ...

285

BBSLA – Thailand (032410) English (Global Version 031010) ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BBSLA – Thailand (032410) English (Global Version 031010) 1 BLACKBERRY SOLUTION LICENSE AGREEMENT PLEASE READ THIS ...

286

BBSLA - South Africa (031910) English (Global Version ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BBSLA - South Africa (031910) English (Global Version 031010) 1 BLACKBERRY SOLUTION LICENSE AGREEMENT PLEASE READ THIS ...

287

and Implications for the Global Carbon Cycle Executive Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

North America is currently a net source of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere, contributing to the global buildup of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere and associated changes in the earth’s climate. In 2003, North America emitted nearly two billion metric tons of carbon to the atmosphere as carbon dioxide. North America’s fossil fuel emissions in 2003 (1856 million metric tons of carbon ±10 % with 95 % certainty) were 27 % of global emissions. Approximately 85 % of those emissions were from the United States, 9 % from Canada and 6 % from Mexico. The conversion of fossil fuels to energy (primarily electricity) is the single largest contributor, accounting for approximately 42 % of North American fossil emissions in 2003. Transportation is the second largest, accounting for 31 % of total emissions. There are also globally important carbon sinks in North America. In 2003, growing vegetation in North America removed approximately 530 million tons of carbon per year ( ± 50%) from the atmosphere and stored it as plant material and soil organic matter. This land sink is equivalent to approximately 30 % of the fossil fuel emissions from North America. The imbalance between the fossil fuel source and the sink on land is a net release to the atmosphere of 1335 million metric tons of carbon per year ( ± 25%). Approximately 50 % of North America’s terrestrial sink is due to the regrowth of forests in the United

Lisa Dilling (co-lead; David M. Fairman; Richard A. Houghton; Gregg H. Marl; Adam Z. Rose; Thomas J. Wilbanks

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Uranium soils integrated demonstration: Soil characterization project report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An Integrated Demonstration Program, hosted by the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), has been established for investigating technologies applicable to the characterization and remediation of soils contaminated with uranium. Critical to the design of relevant treatment technologies is detailed information on the chemical and physical characteristics of the uranium waste-form. To address this need a soil sampling and characterization program was initiated which makes use of a variety of standard analytical techniques coupled with state-of-the-art microscopy and spectroscopy techniques. Sample representativeness is evaluated through the development of conceptual models in an effort to identify and understand those geochemical processes governing the behavior of uranium in FEMP soils. Many of the initial results have significant implications for the design of soil treatment technologies for application at the FEMP.

Cunnane, J.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Gill, V.R. [Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States); Lee, S.Y. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Morris, D.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Nickelson, M.D. [HAZWRAP, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Perry, D.L. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Tidwell, V.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Global warming: A Northwest perspective  

SciTech Connect

The Northwest Power Planning Council convened a symposium in Olympia, Washington, on the subject of global climate change ( the greenhouse effect'') and its potential for affecting the Pacific Northwest. The symposium was organized in response to a need by the Power Council to understand global climate change and its potential impacts on resource planning and fish and wildlife planning for the region, as well as a need to understand national policy developing toward climate change and the Pacific Northwest's role in it. 40 figs., 15 tabs.

Scott, M.J.; Counts, C.A. (eds.)

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Global change: Acronyms and abbreviations  

SciTech Connect

This list of acronyms and abbreviations is compiled to provide the user with a ready reference to dicipher the linguistic initialisms and abridgements for the study of global change. The terms included in this first edition were selected from a wide variety of sources: technical reports, policy documents, global change program announcements, newsletters, and other periodicals. The disciplinary interests covered by this document include agriculture, atmospheric science, ecology, environmental science, oceanography, policy science, and other fields. In addition to its availability in hard copy, the list of acronyms and abbreviations is available in DOS-formatted diskettes and through CDIAC`s anonymous File Transfer Protocol (FTP) area on the Internet.

Woodard, C.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Stoss, F.W. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment and Resources Center

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Global Scratch File System at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scratch Scratch Global Scratch File System Overview The global scratch file system (or "global scratch") can be accessed by multiple NERSC systems. Its default quota is much larger than the Global Home quota, so it can be used to temporarily store large amounts of data. This file system is periodically purged. Platforms Using Global Scratch The global scratch file system is available on all NERSC systems except PDSF. Quotas Default global scratch quotas are 20 TB and 2,000,000 inodes. If you need more than that, fill out the Disk Quota Change Request Form. Purging Yes, files in global scratch file system are subject to purging. Backup No, Files in global scratch file system are not backed up. Environment Variable You can reference your personal scratch directory in global scratch as

292

A real-time respiration position based passive breath gating equipment for gated radiotherapy: A preclinical evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To develop a passive gating system incorporating with the real-time position management (RPM) system for the gated radiotherapy. Methods: Passive breath gating (PBG) equipment, which consists of a breath-hold valve, a controller mechanism, a mouthpiece kit, and a supporting frame, was designed. A commercial real-time positioning management system was implemented to synchronize the target motion and radiation delivery on a linear accelerator with the patient's breathing cycle. The respiratory related target motion was investigated by using the RPM system for correlating the external markers with the internal target motion while using PBG for passively blocking patient's breathing. Six patients were enrolled in the preclinical feasibility and efficiency study of the PBG system. Results: PBG equipment was designed and fabricated. The PBG can be manually triggered or released to block or unblock patient's breathing. A clinical workflow was outlined to integrate the PBG with the RPM system. After implementing the RPM based PBG system, the breath-hold period can be prolonged to 15-25 s and the treatment delivery efficiency for each field can be improved by 200%-400%. The results from the six patients showed that the diaphragm motion caused by respiration was reduced to less than 3 mm and the position of the diaphragm was reproducible for difference gating periods. Conclusions: A RPM based PBG system was developed and implemented. With the new gating system, the patient's breath-hold time can be extended and a significant improvement in the treatment delivery efficiency can also be achieved.

Hu Weigang; Xu Anjie; Li Guichao; Zhang Zhen; Housley, Dave; Ye Jinsong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center and Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Swedish Cancer Institute, Seattle, Washington 98104 (United States)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

293

Respiration-Correlated Image Guidance Is the Most Important Radiotherapy Motion Management Strategy for Most Lung Cancer Patients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to quantify the effects of four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT), 4D image guidance (4D-IG), and beam gating on calculated treatment field margins in a lung cancer patient population. Materials and Methods: Images were acquired from 46 lung cancer patients participating in four separate protocols at three institutions in Europe and the United States. Seven patients were imaged using fluoroscopy, and 39 patients were imaged using 4DCT. The magnitude of respiratory tumor motion was measured. The required treatment field margins were calculated using a statistical recipe (van Herk M, et al. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2000;474:1121-1135), with magnitudes of all uncertainties, except respiratory peak-to-peak displacement, the same for all patients, taken from literature. Required margins for respiratory motion management were calculated using the residual respiratory tumor motion for each patient for various motion management strategies. Margin reductions for respiration management were calculated using 4DCT, 4D-IG, and gated beam delivery. Results: The median tumor motion magnitude was 4.4 mm for the 46 patients (range 0-29.3 mm). This value corresponded to required treatment field margins of 13.7 to 36.3 mm (median 14.4 mm). The use of 4DCT, 4D-IG, and beam gating required margins that were reduced by 0 to 13.9 mm (median 0.5 mm), 3 to 5.2 mm (median 5.1 mm), and 0 to 7 mm (median 0.2 mm), respectively, to a total of 8.5 to 12.4 mm (median 8.6 mm). Conclusion: A respiratory management strategy for lung cancer radiotherapy including planning on 4DCT scans and daily image guidance provides a potential reduction of 37% to 47% in treatment field margins. The 4D image guidance strategy was the most effective strategy for >85% of the patients.

Korreman, Stine, E-mail: korreman@ruc.dk [Department of Science, Systems and Models, Roskilde University, Roskilde (Denmark); Department of Radiation Oncology, The Finsen Centre, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison (United States); Persson, Gitte; Nygaard, Ditte [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Finsen Centre, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Brink, Carsten [Laboratory of Radiation Physics, Odense University Hospital, Odense (Denmark); Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Southern Denmark, Odense (Denmark); Juhler-Nottrup, Trine [Department of Oncology, Herlev Hospital, Copenhagen (Denmark)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

294

MILESTONES IN SOIL CHEMISTRY Donald L. Sparks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MILESTONES IN SOIL CHEMISTRY Donald L. Sparks An array of pioneering research, dealing with various aspects of soil chemistry, has appeared in Soil Science for the past 90 years. In this review, two papers others that he published in Soil Science established the importance of variable or pH- dependent surface

Sparks, Donald L.

295

Worldwide organic soil carbon and nitrogen data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the research presented in this package was to identify data that could be used to estimate the size of the soil organic carbon pool under relatively undisturbed soil conditions. A subset of the data can be used to estimate amounts of soil carbon storage at equilibrium with natural soil-forming factors. The magnitude of soil properties so defined is a resulting nonequilibrium values for carbon storage. Variation in these values is due to differences in local and geographic soil-forming factors. Therefore, information is included on location, soil nitrogen content, climate, and vegetation along with carbon density and variation.

Zinke, P.J.; Stangenberger, A.G. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Forestry and Resource Management; Post, W.M.; Emanual, W.R.; Olson, J.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Why Sequence an Alaskan Soil?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the soil community examined through the lens of one function. Bringing to bear the sequencing power of JGI on this project will enable researchers to obtain a good test of the...

297

Motor vehicles and global warming  

SciTech Connect

Energy use in transportation is one of the contributors to the concern over global warming. The primary greenhouse gases released by the transportation sector are carbon dioxide and chlorofluorocarbons. When all greenhouse gases are considered, CO{sub 2} emissions from the operation of highway vehicles worldwide represent about 4.7% of global warming enhancement. CO{sub 2} emissions from U.S. highway vehicles along represent about 2 to 2.5% of worldwide greenhouse gases. The use of CFCs in automotive air conditioning, in blowing foams for seats and padding and in the manufacture of electronic circuit boards accounted for 15% of the global usage of CFC-12 in 1985 according to the U.S. EPA. The Motor Vehicle Manufacturers Association supports the phase-out of CFC use provided that safe substitutes are available and that adequate lead time is allowed for.They suggest that reduction of greenhouse gases would require planning on a global scope to be effective. One alternative they suggest for further study is a carbon fee for reducing emissions of carbon dioxide. This fee would be levied on each type of fossil fuel, proportional to its carbon content per unit of energy.

Halberstadt, M.L.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

RENEWABLES 2005 GLOBAL STATUS REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research Institute Chinese Renewable Energy Industries Association China Susan McDade Energy EnvironmentRENEWABLES 2005 GLOBAL STATUS REPORT Paper prepared for the REN21 Network by The Worldwatch Institute Lead Author: Eric Martinotwww.ren21.net #12;Renewable Energy Policy Network for the 21st Century

Kammen, Daniel M.

299

On globally Symmetric Finsler spaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper consider the symmetric of Finsler spaces. We give some conditions about globally symmetric Finsler spaces. Then we prove that these spaces can be written as a coset space of Lie group with an invariant Finsler metric. Finally, we prove that such a space must be Berwaldian

Khatamy, R Chavosh

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Moisture retention properties of a mycorrhizal soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The water relations of arbuscular mycorrhizal plants have been compared often, but virtually nothing is known about the comparative water relations of mycorrhizal and nonmycorrhizal soils. Mycorrhizal symbiosis typically affects soil structure, and soil structure affects water retention properties; therefore, it seems likely that mycorrhizal symbiosis may affect soil water relations. We examined the water retention properties of a Sequatchie fine sandy loam subjected to three treatments: seven months of root growth by (1) nonmycorrhizal Vigna unguiculata given low phosphorus fertilization, (2) nonmycorrhizal Vigna unguiculata given high phosphorus fertilization, (3) Vigna unguiculata colonized by Glomus intraradices and given low phosphorus fertilization. Mycorrhization of soil had a slight but significant effect on the soil moisture characteristic curve. Once soil matric potential (\\11m) began to decline, changes in \\II m per unit change in soil water content were smaller in mycorrhizal than in the two nonmycorrhizal soils. Within the range of about-1 to-5 MPa, the mycorrhizal soil had to dry more than the nonmycorrhizal soils to reach the same \\11m. Soil characteristic curves of non mycorrhizal soils were similar, whether they contained roots of plants fed high or low phosphorus. The mycorrhizal soil had significantly more water stable aggregates and substantially higher extraradical hyphal densities than the nonmycorrhizal soils. Importantly, we were able to factor out the possibly confounding influence of differential root growth among mycorrhizal and nonmycorrhizal

Robert M. Augel; Ann L. W. Stodola; Layme E. Tims; Arnold M. Saxton

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global soil respiration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

PNNL: Atmospheric Sciences & Global Change - Frontiers in Global Change  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Frontiers in Global Change Frontiers in Global Change Dr. Thanos Nenes Dr. Thanos Nenes Aerosol-Cloud Interactions: The Elusive Component of Climate Change Dr. Thanos Nenes Professor & Georgia Power Faculty Scholar, School of Earth & Atmospheric Sciences, School of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA Thursday, August 1, 2013 EMSL Auditorium 10:00AM The effect of human activities on climate is one of the most important issues facing society. Humans influence climate in many ways. Emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) tend to warm climate, by reducing the amount of infrared radiation that is emitted to space. Increased levels of suspended atmospheric particles ("aerosols") exert a net cooling effect by directly scattering and absorption of solar radiation (the "aerosol direct climatic

302

A Daily Soil Temperature Dataset and Soil Temperature Climatology of the Contiguous United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although affected by atmospheric circulations, variations in soil temperature result primarily from the radiation and sensible and latent heat exchanges at the surface and heat transfer in the soils of different thermal properties. Thus, soil ...

Qi Hu; Song Feng

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Using a Soil Hydrology Model to Obtain Regionally Averaged Soil Moisture Values  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Soil Hydrology Model (SHM) was modified, and daily simulations of soil volumetric water content were made at 38 Oklahoma Mesonet sites for July 1997. These model results were compared with soil moisture observations made at the mesonet sites ...

Todd M. Crawford; David J. Stensrud; Toby N. Carlson; William J. Capehart

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Soil Biology & Biochemistry 39 (2007) 21382149 Heterogeneity of soil nutrients and subsurface biota  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA). Acid-neutralizing potential (ANP, the combina- tion of soil constituents/Mn, ANP) and K availability, N (total ARTICLE IN PRESS Table 2 Soil chemistry by soil crust and microsite

Neher, Deborah A.

305

Estimating Soil Water Contents from Soil Temperature Measurements by Using an Adaptive Kalman Filter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple soil heat transfer model is used together with an adaptive Kalman filter to estimate the daily averaged soil volumetric water contents from diurnal variations of the soil temperatures measured at different depths. In this method, the ...

Shu-Wen Zhang; Chong-Jian Qiu; Qin Xu

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Comments on “Estimating Soil Water Contents from Soil Temperature Measurements by Using an Adaptive Kalman Filter”  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A scheme was proposed by Zhang et al. to estimate soil water content from soil temperature measurements by using an adaptive Kalman filter. Their scheme is based on the fact that soil heat capacity and thermal conductivity are a monotonic ...

Kun Yang; Toshio Koike

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Soil Atlas of Europe European Soil Bureau Network of the European Commission,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soil maps from the same area but different periods show how soils and their distribution were perceived and mapped over time. They tell a bit about developments in soil mapping and soil science in general. The first soil maps of Europe started to appear in the mid-1800s but it was not until the 1920s that a map for the whole continent was produced. Since that time several soil maps were published. In this review, I will first discuss the Soil Atlas of Europe, and then early generations of soil maps of Europe and how they compare. This first Soil Atlas of Europe is slightly bigger than my Times World Atlas but contains less than half of its pages. The primary aim is to provide comprehensive information about the soils of Europe and raising awareness of issues affecting soils; it is part of the European Soil Thematic Strategy that was adopted by the European Union in 2002. Another goal of the

Principal A. Jones; L. Montanarella; R. Jones

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Effects of Frozen Soil on Snowmelt Runoff and Soil Water Storage at a Continental Scale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The presence of ice in soil dramatically alters soil hydrologic and thermal properties. Despite this important role, many recent studies show that explicitly including the hydrologic effects of soil ice in land surface models degrades the ...

Guo-Yue Niu; Zong-Liang Yang

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

partnership profile: the global fund | 1 About the Global Fund to Fight AIDS,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Malaria The Global Fund to Fight aIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (Global Fund) is a global public-private international disbursements in 2010. as a public-private partnership representing governments, civil society

Derisi, Joseph

310

Sensitivity of Soil Moisture to Doubling of Carbon Dioxide in Climate Model Experiments. Part I: North America  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In anticipation of a global warming in the decades ahead due to an increased greenhouse effect from infrared-absorbing trace gases, it is not too early to enquire what this may mean in terms of changes in patterns of precipitation and soil ...

William W. Kellogg; Zong-Ci Zhao

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Respiration in Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to have oxygen as well as animals to release energy from the sugar they make from photosynthesis. They make more than they use and hence, we are able to survive. K. VanHoeck...

312

Vineyard nutrient needs vary with rootstocks and soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

drain nutrients from sandy soils. CALIFORNIA AGRICULTURE •Chardonnay on Egbert clay (sandy loam variant) soils at onewas Zinfandel on a Sierra sandy loam soil. At all three

Lambert, Jean-Jacques; Anderson, Michael M; Wolpert, J A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

ReproducedfromSoilScienceSocietyofAmericaJournal.PublishedbySoilScienceSocietyofAmerica.Allcopyrightsreserved. Rhizosphere Effects on Cesium Fixation Sites of Soil Containing Micaceous Clays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ReproducedfromSoilScienceSocietyofAmericaJournal.PublishedbySoilScienceSocietyofAmerica.Allcopyrightsreserved. Rhizosphere Effects on Cesium Fixation Sites of Soil Containing Micaceous Clays Laura A. Wendling,* James B) on rhizosphere soil as compared with bulk soil. This study The strongest association between Cs and the soil

Flury, Markus

314

Global warming continues in 1989  

SciTech Connect

Nineteen eight-nine ranks as one of the warmest years on record despite the chill of unusually cool water in the tropical Pacific. The continued robustness of the warming trend that began in the mid-1970s lends support to claims that an intensifying greenhouse effect is behind it all, although that case has not yet been made definitively. Even at the current rate of global warming it will take another 10 years or so to be confident that the greenhouse effect is with us. Although the global warming trend is consistent with an increasing contribution by the greenhouse effect, direct signs that the greenhouse effect is intensifying are still hard to come by in the temperature record. Greenhouse models agree that if that is happening, the temperature increase should be most pronounced around the Arctic. Alaska, northwestern Canada, and northern Siberia warmed sharply in the 1980s, but the region from eastern Canada through Greenland and into Scandinavia cooled markedly.

Kerr, R.A.

1990-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

315

Carbon dioxide and global change  

SciTech Connect

This book presents an analysis and review of the many potential consequences of the rapidly rising CO{sub 2} content of Earth's atmosphere. Covering both the physical (climatic) and biological effects of atmospheric CO{sub 2} enrichment, the book presents an overview of the interrelated aspects of this complex and demanding subject. Focus is on the search for evidence of global warming (the highly speculative climatic greenhouse effect) and global vegetative stimulation (the well established biological greenhouse effect). The pros and cons of all issues related to these phenomena are discussed. The author's estimate of where the world is headed as a result of mankind's great geophysical experiments is offered.

Idso, S.B. (Arizona State Univ. (US))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

global horizontal | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

87 87 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142278787 Varnish cache server global horizontal Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Documentation of the satellite-based high resolution solar resource assessment for Ghana provided by DLR. The high resolution solar data (10kmx10km) provide country maps of the annual and monthly sums of hourly global horizontal and direct normal irradiance (GHI and DNI) for the year 2000, 2001 and 2002. Additionally, for selected sites hourly values of GHI and DNI are provided.The Documentation gives an overview about the used input data and used methodology, shows example maps and describes a comparison with ground data (if provided by the country)

317

Global Technology Regulation and Potentially  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2000 Bill Joy proposed that the best way to prevent technological apocalypse was to "relinquish " emerging bio-, info- and nanotechnologies. His essay introduced many watchdog groups to the dangers that futurists had been warning of for decades. One such group, ETC, has called for a moratorium on all nanotechnological research until all safety issues can be investigated and social impacts ameliorated. In this essay I discuss the differences and similarities of regulating bio- and nanotechnological innovation to the efforts to regulate nuclear and biological weapons of mass destruction. I then suggest the creation of a global technology regulatory regime to ensure the safe and equitable diffusion of genetic, molecular and information technologies, and point out the principal political obstacles to implementing such a regime. Global Technology Regulation James J. Hughes 2

Fritz Allhoff; Patrick Lin; James Moor; John Weckert; J. Hughes Ph. D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Implementation of global energy sustainability  

SciTech Connect

The term energy sustainability emerged from the UN Conference on Environment and Development in Rio 1992, when Agenda 21 was formulated and the Global Energy Charter proclaimed. Emission reductions, total energy costing, improved energy efficiency, and sustainable energy systems are the four fundamental principles of the charter. These principles can be implemented in the proposed financial, legal, technical, and education framework. Much has been done in many countries toward the implementation of the Global Energy Charter, but progress has not been fast enough to ease the disastrous effects of the too many ill-conceived energy systems on the environment, climate, and health. Global warming is accelerating, and pollution is worsening, especially in developing countries with their hunger for energy to meet the needs of economic development. Asian cities are now beating all pollution records, and greenhouse gases are visibly changing the climate with rising sea levels, retracting glaciers, and record weather disasters. This article presents why and how energy investments and research money have to be rechanneled into sustainable energy, rather than into the business-as-usual of depleting, unsustainable energy concepts exceeding one trillion dollars per year. This largest of all investment sectors needs much more attention.

Grob, G.R. [CMDC, Zurich (Switzerland)

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Global Change Research Act of 1990  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Change Research Act of 1990 Print E-mail Global Change Research Act of 1990 Print E-mail The U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) was established by Presidential initiative in 1989 and mandated by Congress in the Global Change Research Act (GCRA) of 1990 in order to "assist the nation and the world to understand, assess, predict, and respond to human-induced and natural processes of global change." In consultation with White House officials and the Subcommittee on Global Change Research (SGCR), USGCRP's Executive Director ensures that the Program meets all mandated requirements which are summarized in the table below. Global Change Research Act of 1990 Requirements Please click on the buttons below for further details about the Global Change Research Act of 1990. Public Law 101-606(11/16/90) 104 Stat. 3096-3104

320

Change in Global Temperature: A Statistical Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates several issues relating to global climatic change using statistical techniques that impose minimal restrictions on the data. The main findings are as follows: 1) The global temperature increase since the last century is a ...

Gordon R. Richards

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global soil respiration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Human Footprints on the Global Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Footprints on the Global Environment. By Rosa A. Eugene,Footprints on the Global Environment. MIT Press, 2010. xi +of its own impact on the environment that surrounds its

Ferrara, Enzo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Ardour Global Indexes LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zip 10016 Product New-York based company that manages the Ardour Global Indexes, a set of alternative energy financial indicators. References Ardour Global Indexes LLC1 LinkedIn...

323

A Multinational Course on Global Climate Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel multinational course on global climate change was developed by East Carolina University in collaboration with five international universities and the U.S. Department of State. This course was developed to help foster the global conversation needed ...

Rosana Nieto Ferreira; Andrew Herdman; Scott Curtis; Rosina Chia; Elmer Poe; Robert Thompson; Biwu Yang

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

A University Perspective on Global Climate Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global atmospheric models are proliferating, in part because of the widespread availability of powerful computers. There are about two dozen global modeling groups at work in the United States today. These groups are put into four categories, ...

David A. Randall

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Re-embedding the global soul  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis proposes to "re-embed" the "global nomad" into the context of an increasingly globalized world at the room scale. I define re-embedding as the "plugging in" of social relationships to local contexts and their ...

Wang, Joy (Joy Yuk-Hwa), 1975-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Defining and Estimating Global Mean Temperature Anomalies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methods used to quantify temperature changes of the earth must he assessed relative to an appropriate definition of global mean temperature. In this paper, global mean temperature is defined and the adequacy of using weighted average anomalies to ...

Richard F. Gunst; Sabyasachi Basu; Robert Brunell

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Emerging Global Trends in Advanced Manufacturing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Emerging Global Trends in Advanced Manufacturing Stephanie S. Shipp, Project Leader Nayanee Gupta Bhavya Lal ...

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

328

Globally Solving Nonconvex Quadratic Programming Problems via ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mar 7, 2011 ... ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY. 9700 South Cass Avenue. Argonne, Illinois 60439. Globally Solving Nonconvex Quadratic ...

329

Soil structure interaction for shrink-swell soils a new design procedure for foundation slabs on shrink-swell soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Problems associated with shrink-swell soils are well known geotechnical problems that have been studied and researched by many geotechnical researchers for many decades. Potentially shrink-swell soils can be found almost anywhere in the world especially in the semi-arid regions of the tropical and temperate climate. Foundation slabs on grade on shrink-swell soils are one of the most efficient and inexpensive solutions for this kind of problematic soil. It is commonly used in residential foundations or any light weight structure on shrink-swell soils. Many design methods have been established for this specific problem such as Building Research Advisory Board (BRAB), Wire Reinforcement Institute (WRI), Post- Tensioning Institute (PTI), and Australian Standards (AS 2870) design methods. This research investigates most of these methods, and then, proposes a moisture diffusion soil volume change model, a soil-weather interaction model, and a soil-structure interaction model. The proposed moisture diffusion soil volume change model starts with proposing a new laboratory test to determine the coefficient of unsaturated diffusivity for intact soils. Then, it introduces the development of a cracked soil diffusion factor, provides a chart for it, and explains a large scale laboratory test that verifies the proposed moisture diffusion soil volume change model. The proposed soil-weather interaction model uses the FAO 56-PM method to simulate a weightless cover performance for six cities in the US that suffer significantly from shallow foundation problems on shrink-swell soils due to seasonal weather variations. These simulations provide more accurate weather site-specific parameters such as the range of surface suction variations. The proposed weather-site specific parameters will be input parameters to the soil structure models. The proposed soil-structure interaction model uses Mitchell (1979) equations for moisture diffusion under covered soil to develop a new closed form solution for the soil mound shape under the foundation slab. Then, it presents a parametric study by carrying out several 2D finite elements plane strain simulations for plates resting on a semiinfinite elastic continuum and resting on different soil mounds. The parametric study outcomes are then presented in design charts that end with a new design procedure for foundation slabs on shrink-swell soils. Finally, based on the developed weather-soil-structure interaction models, this research details two procedures of a proposed new design method for foundation slabs on grade on shrink-swell soils: a suction based design procedure and a water content based design procedure.

Abdelmalak, Remon Melek

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Soils and the greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

This work addresses the present status and future trends concerning the effect of soils and their cover on the fluxes of greenhouse gases, the surface energy balance and the water balance. Comprising the proceedings of the conference on soils and the greenhouse effect, the book reviews the background of existing research in the field, while also identifying significant gaps in our understanding of the scientific issues and pointing the way to future work. In addition, the contributors discuss a wide range of topics, including geographic quantification of soil properties involved in fluxes of greenhouse gases; measurement of fluxes and extrapolation to smaller scales; remote sensing of land use; and regional estimation of evaporation and energy fluxes. Throughout, the emphasis is on quantification of greenhouse gas fluxes, evapotranspiration, and energy fluxes.

Bouwman, A.F.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Comparative Genomics Analysis and Phenotypic Characterization of Shewanella putrefaciens W3-18-1: Anaerobic Respiration, Bacterial Microcompartments, and Lateral Flagella  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Respiratory versatility and psychrophily are the hallmarks of Shewanella. The ability to utilize a wide range of electron acceptors for respiration is due to the large number of c-type cytochrome genes present in the genome of Shewanella strains. More recently the dissimilatory metal reduction of Shewanella species has been extensively and intensively studied for potential applications in the bioremediation of radioactive wastes of groundwater and subsurface environments. Multiple Shewanella genome sequences are now available in the public databases (Fredrickson et al., 2008). Most of the sequenced Shewanella strains were isolated from marine environments and this genus was believed to be of marine origin (Hau and Gralnick, 2007). However, the well-characterized model strain, S. oneidensis MR-1, was isolated from the freshwater lake sediment of Lake Oneida, New York (Myers and Nealson, 1988) and similar bacteria have also been isolated from other freshwater environments (Venkateswaran et al., 1999). Here we comparatively analyzed the genome sequence and physiological characteristics of S. putrefaciens W3-18-1 and S. oneidensis MR-1, isolated from the marine and freshwater lake sediments, respectively. The anaerobic respirations, carbon source utilization, and cell motility have been experimentally investigated. Large scale horizontal gene transfers have been revealed and the genetic divergence between these two strains was considered to be critical to the bacterial adaptation to specific habitats, freshwater or marine sediments.

Qiu, D.; Tu, Q.; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong

2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

332

General pattern of global system conflicts and global threats of the 21st century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data on global conflicts took place from 750 B.C. up to now are analyzed and their general pattern is revealed. An attempt is made to foresee the next global conflict called the conflict of the 21st century. Its nature and main characteristics are analyzed. ... Keywords: Fibonacci sequence, cluster analysis, global system conflicts, global threats, scenarios

M. Z. Zgurovsky

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Global Futures: A Multithreaded Execution Model for Global Arrays-based Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present Global Futures (GF), an execution model extension to Global Arrays, which is based on a PGAS-compatible active message-based paradigm. We describe the design and implementation of Global Futures and illustrate its use in a computational chemistry ... Keywords: Global Arrays, multithreading, execution models

Daniel Chavarria-Miranda; Sriram Krishnamoorthy; Abhinav Vishnu

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Soil & Groundwater Remediation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Soil & Groundwater Soil & Groundwater Remediation Soil & Groundwater Remediation Soil & Groundwater Remediation The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) manages the largest groundwater and soil remediation effort in the world. The inventory at the DOE sites includes 6.5 trillion liters of contaminated groundwater, an amount equal to about four times the daily U.S. water consumption, and 40 million cubic meters of soil and debris contaminated with radionuclides, metals, and organics. The Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation is working with DOE site managers around the country regarding specific technical issues. At the large sites such as Hanford, Savannah River, and Oak Ridge, the Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation has conducted research and demonstration projects to test new technologies and remediation

335

Analytical Requirements for Petroleum Contaminated Soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analytical Requirements for Petroleum Contaminated Soils According to 20 NMAC 9.1.704 704. REQUIRED), or other applicable statutes. Page 1 of 1Analytical Requirements for Petroleum Contaminated Soils 4

336

Maryland Soil Conservation Districts Law (Maryland)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

It is the policy of the state to conserve the soil, water, and related resources of the state through establishing regulations for land-use practices related to soil erosion. This legislation...

337

Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) is a comprehensive strategy to increase U.S....

338

The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership A report on the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) is a comprehensive strategy to increase U.S....

339

CO2 Global Solutions International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Global Solutions International Jump to: navigation, search Name CO2 Global Solutions International Place Madrid, Spain Zip 28001 Sector Carbon Product CO2 Global Solutions is a...

340

Energy Crossroads: Global Climate Change | Environmental Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Climate Change Global Climate Change Suggest a Listing Best Global Warming Articles Global Warming Articles provides facts about the causes, effects and answers to global warming; the environment; energy conservation, climate change and more. Ecolytics As emissions requirements, climate change, financial markets, and risk management become increasingly interconnected, organizations are left with critical choices regarding greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions management. Ecolytics(tm), a comprehensive web-based software tool, can help organizations in the navigation of this complex area by providing an effective cataloging, strategic planning, economic analysis, and risk management solution. Enviro$en$e Funded by the Environmental Protection Agency and the Strategic

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global soil respiration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Economic Globalization and a Nuclear Renaissance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The phenomenon of globalization has become increasingly well recognized, documented, and analyzed in the last several years. Globalization, the integration of markets and intra-firm competition on a worldwide basis, involves complex behavioral and mindset changes within a firm that facilitate global competition. The changes revolve around efficient information flow and rapid deployment of technology. The objective of this report is to examine the probable characteristics of a global nuclear renaissance and its broad implications for industry structure and export control relative to nuclear technology. The question of how a modern renaissance would affect the trend toward globalization of the nuclear industry is addressed.

Wood, Thomas W.; Johnson, Wayne L.; Parker, Brian M.

2001-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

342

Global warming and biological diversity  

SciTech Connect

This book is based on presentations given at the World Wildlife Fund's Conference on Consequences of the Greenhouse Effect for Biological Diverisity in 1988, and includes updated literature citations. The general topics covered in the book include the following: overview; summary of past responses of plants to climatic change; general ecological and physiological responses; ecosystems in 4 specific regions (arctic marine, Alaskan North Slope, NW US forests, and Mediterranean); global warming's implications for conservation. Ideas and data from many ecosystems and information about the relationships between biodiversity and climatic change are brought together with a balance of factual information and defensible scientific prognostication.

Peters, R.L.; Lovejoy, T.E. (eds.)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Global Direct Cost of Corrosion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 8   Country-specific direct cost of corrosion for the year 2004...Basque region 1988 Pesetas, 75 100.00 0.75 1.9977 1.5 Czechoslovakia 1998 Koruna, 31.816 (f) 29.8600 1.0655 1.1006 1.17 Netherlands 1969 Guilders, 0.51441 3.6340 0.1416 8.2103 1.16 Sweden 1967 Kroner, 1 5.0000 0.2000 3.0284 0.61 Finland 1965 Markka, 0.175 (g) 3.2110 0.0545 2.0995 0.11 Global...

344

2010 19th World Congress of Soil Science, Soil Solutions for a Changing World  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

© 2010 19th World Congress of Soil Science, Soil Solutions for a Changing World 1 ­ 6 August 2010, Brisbane, Australia. Published on DVD. 160 Nickel Speciation in Serpentine Soils using Synchrotron Radiation Techniques Matthew Siebecker and Donald L Sparks 152 Townsend Hall, Department of Plant and Soil

Sparks, Donald L.

345

Soil Interfaces in a Changing World International Symposium of Interactions of Soil Minerals with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soil Interfaces in a Changing World 6th ISMOM International Symposium of Interactions of Soil Minerals with Organic Components and Microorganisms 3rd InterCongress of Commission 2.5 IUSS Soil chemical Ginder-Vogel, and Gautier Landrot Delaware Environmental Institute and Department of Plant and Soil

Sparks, Donald L.

346

Long-term Black Carbon Dynamics in Cultivated Soil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Black carbon (BC) is a quantitatively important C pool in the global carbon cycle due to its relative recalcitrance against decay compared with other C pools. However, how rapidly BC is oxidized and in what way the molecular structure changes during decomposition over decadal time scales, is largely unknown. In the present study, the long-term dynamics in quality and quantity of BC were investigated in cultivated soil using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier-Transform Infrared (FTIR) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) techniques. BC particles, obtained from soil samples at 8 conversion ages stretching over 100 years and from a forest soil sample from Kenya, were manually picked under a light microscope for characterization and quantification. BC contents rapidly decreased from 12.7 to 3.8 mg C g?¹ soil during the first 30 years since conversion, after which they slowly decreased to a steady state at 3.51 mg C g ?¹soil. BC-derived C losses over 100 years were estimated at 6000 kg C ha?¹ to a depth of 0.1 m. The initial rapid changes in BC stocks resulted in a mean residence time of only around 8.3 years, which was likely a function of both decomposition as well as transport processes. The molecular properties of BC changed more rapidly on surfaces than in the interior of BC particles and more rapidly during the first 30 years than during the following 70 years. The Oc/C ratios (Oc is O bound to C) and carbonyl groups (C=O) increased over time by 133 and 192 %, respectively, indicating oxidation was an important degradation process controlling BC quality. Al, Si, polysaccharides, and to a lesser extent Fe were rapidly adsorbed on BC particle surfaces within the first few years after BC deposition to soil. The protection by physical and chemical stabilization was apparently sufficient to not only minimize decomposition below detection between 30 and 100 years after deposition, but also physical export by erosion and vertical transport below 0.1 m.

Nguyen, Binh T.; Lehmann, Johannes C.; Kinyangi, James; Smernik, Ron; Riha, Susan J.; Engelhard, Mark H.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Raman Spectroscopy and instrumentation for monitoring soil carbon systems.  

SciTech Connect

This work describes developments in the application of Raman scattering and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) towards the assessment/characterization of carbon in soil. In the past, the nonspecific total carbon mass content of soil samples has generally been determined through mass loss techniques and elemental analysis. However, because of the concern over CO{sub 2} buildup in the atmosphere and its possible role in the ''Greenhouse Effect,'' there is a need for better-defined models of global cycling of carbon. As a means towards this end, there is a need to know more about the structure and functionality of organic materials in soil. Raman spectroscopy may therefore prove to be an exceptional tool in soil carbon analysis. Based on vibrational transitions of irradiated molecules, it provides structural information that is often suitable for sample identification. Furthermore, Raman scattering yields very fine spectral features which offer the potential for multicomponent sample analysis with minimal or no sample pretreatment. Although the intensity of Raman scattering is generally extremely low, the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect can greatly enhance Raman signals (10{sup 6}-10{sup 8} range) through the adsorption of compounds on specially roughened metal surfaces. In our laboratory, we have investigated copper, gold and silver as possible substrate metals in the fabrication of SERS substrates. These substrates have included metal-coated microparticles, metal island films, and redox-roughened metal foils. We have evaluated several laser excitation sources spanning the 515-785 nm range for both Raman and SERS analysis. For this particular study, we have selected fulvic and humic acids as models for establishing the feasibility of using Raman and SERS in soil carbon analysis. Our studies thus far have demonstrated that copper substrates perform best in the SERS detection of humic and fulvic acids, particularly when coupled to electrochemical processes that enhance adsorption of specific compounds. This effect not only yields a stronger signal, but can also impart selectivity in the analysis of complex samples such as soil.

Stokes, D.L.

2003-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

348

Influence of temperature, moisture, and organic carbon on the flux of H/sub 2/ and CO between soil and atmosphere: field studies in subtropical regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Production and deposition rates of atmospheric hydrogen and carbon monoxide were studied during field measurements in subtropical regions, i.e., Transvaal (South Africa), Andalusia (Spain), and the Karoo (South Africa). Measurements were carried out by applying static and equilibrium box techniques. The equilibrium technique has been introduced as a novel method to measure production and destruction rates simultaneously even when soil conditions (e.g., temperature) change during the course of the measurements. Deposition velocities of H/sub 2/ and CO were virtually independent of the soil temperature measured in 3- to 10-mm depths and agreed with those measured in the temperate regions. The deposition velocities were inhibited or stimulated by irrigation water depending on the conditions of the individual field sites. H/sub 2/ production by soil was not observed. By contrast, CO was produced by soil in a dark chemical reaction. Production rates increased exponentially with soil temperatures, giving activation energies of 57-110 kJ mol/sup -1/ and increased linearly with soil organic carbon content. CO production rates followed a diel rhythm parallel to soil surface temperatures. Production generally exceeded CO deposition during the hot hours of the day, so that arid subtropical soils act as a net source of atmospheric CO during this time. On a global basis, CO production by soil may reach source strengths of 30 Tg yr/sup -1/, which is considerably less than the global deposition of CO estimated to be 190-580 Tg yr/sup -1/. Global H/sub 2/ deposition rates were estimated to 70-110 Tg yr/sup -1/.

Conrad, R.; Seiler, W.

1985-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

349

Description, calibration and sensitivity analysis of the local ecosystem submodel of a global model of carbon and nitrogen cycling and the water balance in the terrestrial biosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have developed a geographically-distributed ecosystem model for the carbon, nitrogen, and water dynamics of the terrestrial biosphere TERRA. The local ecosystem model of TERRA consists of coupled, modified versions of TEM and DAYTRANS. The ecosystem model in each grid cell calculates water fluxes of evaporation, transpiration, and runoff; carbon fluxes of gross primary productivity, litterfall, and plant and soil respiration; and nitrogen fluxes of vegetation uptake, litterfall, mineralization, immobilization, and system loss. The state variables are soil water content; carbon in live vegetation; carbon in soil; nitrogen in live vegetation; organic nitrogen in soil and fitter; available inorganic nitrogen aggregating nitrites, nitrates, and ammonia; and a variable for allocation. Carbon and nitrogen dynamics are calibrated to specific sites in 17 vegetation types. Eight parameters are determined during calibration for each of the 17 vegetation types. At calibration, the annual average values of carbon in vegetation C, show site differences that derive from the vegetation-type specific parameters and intersite variation in climate and soils. From calibration, we recover the average C{sub v} of forests, woodlands, savannas, grasslands, shrublands, and tundra that were used to develop the model initially. The timing of the phases of the annual variation is driven by temperature and light in the high latitude and moist temperate zones. The dry temperate zones are driven by temperature, precipitation, and light. In the tropics, precipitation is the key variable in annual variation. The seasonal responses are even more clearly demonstrated in net primary production and show the same controlling factors.

Kercher, J.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Chambers, J.Q. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); [California Univ., Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Global Forest Resource Assessment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Global Forest Resource Assessment Global Forest Resource Assessment Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Global Forest Resource Assessment Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: Resource assessment Resource Type: Publications Website: www.fao.org/forestry/fra/fra2010/en/ Global Forest Resource Assessment Screenshot References: Global Forest Research Assessment[1] Overview "FAO, in cooperation with its member countries, has monitored the world's forests at 5 to 10 year intervals since 1946. These global assessments provide valuable information to policy-makers in countries, to international negotiations, arrangements and organizations related to forests and to the general public. The Global Forest Resources Assessment

351

Think Green Global Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Think Green Global Inc Think Green Global Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Think Green Global, Inc. Place New York, New York Zip 10010 Sector Renewable Energy Product New York-based investment bank and strategic development firm that is dedicated to enhancing the growth of renewable energy and clean technology companies. References Think Green Global, Inc.[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Think Green Global, Inc. is a company located in New York, New York . References ↑ "Think Green Global, Inc." Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Think_Green_Global_Inc&oldid=352225" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations

352

Global Industry Analysts | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Global Industry Analysts Global Industry Analysts Jump to: navigation, search Name Global Industry Analysts Address 6150 Hellyer Avenue Place San Jose, California Zip 95138 Product Market research services Year founded 1987 Number of employees 501-1000 Phone number (408) 528-9966 Website http://www.strategyr.com/ Region Bay Area References Global Industry Analysts[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! Global Industry Analysts Global Industry Analysts, Inc., (GIA) offers one of the world's largest portfolios of research reports in terms of topics covered, geographic regions analyzed, companies profiled, and pages published. The company's current portfolio consists of more than 900 Global Strategic Business Reports (large multi-client research programs); 45,000+ Market Trend

353

Soil Moisture: Empirical Data and Model Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A unique dataset of soil moisture in the upper 1-m soil layer at sites with natural plant cover in the Soviet Union is compared to simulations of soil moisture for the present climate by the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Oregon State ...

K. Ya Vinnikov; I. B. Yeserkepova

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics in Agricultural Soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics in Agricultural Soils Model Applications at Different Scales in Time Print: SLU Service/Repro, Uppsala 2012 #12;Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics in Agricultural Soils. Model Applications at Different Scales in Time and Space Abstract An understanding of soil organic carbon (C

355

SOILS--------Bacillus thuringiensis were spliced into  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SOILS-------- Bacillus thuringiensis were spliced into a maize hybrid, known as Bt corn, to create.geotimes.org Donald L. Sparks N oW is an exciting time to be a soil scientist. We face many chal lenges, the wise use of soil and ecosystems will become ever more important in meet ing food production needs

Sparks, Donald L.

356

A Soil Moisture Climatology of Illinois  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ten years of soil moisture measurements (biweekly from March through September and monthly during winter) within the top 1 m of soil at 17 grass-covered sites across Illinois are analyzed to provide a climatology of soil moisture for this ...

Steven E. Hollinger; Scott A. Isard

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Numerical simulation of unsaturated soil behaviour  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mechanical behaviour of unsaturated soils is one of the challenging topics in the field of geotechnical engineering. The use of finite element techniques is considered to be a promising method to solve settlement and heave problems, which are associated ... Keywords: FEM, constitutive modelling, finite element method, geotechnical engineering, mechanical behaviour, shallow foundation, shallow foundations, soil behaviour, suction variation, unsaturated soils

Ayman A. Abed; Pieter A. Vermeer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Review: Sensor systems for measuring soil compaction: Review and analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spatially variable soil compaction often causes inconsistent growing conditions in many fields. Various soil compaction sensor systems have been deployed to obtain georeferenced maps of certain state and behavioral properties (e.g., soil strength, water ... Keywords: Air permeability, Penetrometer, Sensor fusion, Soil compaction, Soil mechanical resistance, Soil mechanics, Water content

A. Hemmat; V. I. Adamchuk

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Soil Dynamics and Earthquake Engineering ] (  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agreement, STANAG 4569, [Protection for occupants of logistics and light-armored vehicles] defines the make- up and the conditions of sandy-gravel soil which is used for testing the ability of various armor. Introduction It is well-established that armor used on logistic and light-armored fighting military vehicles

Grujicic, Mica

360

Simulated biomass and soil carbon of loblolly pine and cottonwood plantations across a thermal gradient in southeastern United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changes in biomass and soil carbon with nitrogen fertilization were simulated for a 25-year loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) plantation and for three consecutive 7-year short-rotation cottonwood (Populus deltoides) stands. Simulations were conducted for 17 locations in the southeastern United States with mean annual temperatures ranging from 13.1 to 19.4 C. The LINKAGES stand growth model, modified to include the "RothC" soil C and soil N model, simulated tree growth and soil C status. Nitrogen fertilization significantly increased cumulative cottonwood aboveground biomass in the three rotations from a site average of 106 to 272 Mg/ha in 21 years, whereas the equivalent site averages for loblolly pine were unchanged at 176 and 184 Mg/ha in 25 years. Location results, compared on the annual sum of daily mean air temperatures above 5.5 C (growing-degree-days), showed contrasts. Loblolly pine biomass increased whereas cottonwood decreased with increasing growing-degree-days, particularly in cottonwood stands receiving N fertilization. The increment of biomass due to N addition per unit of control biomass (relative response) declined in both plantations with increase in growing-degree-days. Average soil C in loblolly pine stands increased from 24.3 to 40.4 Mg/ha in 25 years and in cottonwood soil C decreased from 14.7 to 13.7 Mg/ha after three 7-year rotations. Soil C did not decrease with increasing growing-degree-days in either plantation type suggesting that global warming may not initially affect soil C. Nitrogen fertilizer increased soil C slightly in cottonwood plantations and had no significant effect on the soil C of loblolly stands.

Luxmoore, Robert J [ORNL; Tharp, M Lynn [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global soil respiration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Understanding Spatio-Temporal Variability and Associated Physical Controls of Near-Surface Soil Moisture in Different Hydro-Climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Near-surface soil moisture is a key state variable of the hydrologic cycle and plays a significant role in the global water and energy balance by affecting several hydrological, ecological, meteorological, geomorphologic, and other natural processes in the land-atmosphere continuum. Presence of soil moisture in the root zone is vital for the crop and plant life cycle. Soil moisture distribution is highly non-linear across time and space. Various geophysical factors (e.g., soil properties, topography, vegetation, and weather/climate) and their interactions control the spatio-temporal evolution of soil moisture at various scales. Understanding these interactions is crucial for the characterization of soil moisture dynamics occurring in the vadose zone. This dissertation focuses on understanding the spatio-temporal variability of near-surface soil moisture and the associated physical control(s) across varying measurement support (point-scale and passive microwave airborne/satellite remote sensing footprint-scale), spatial extents (field-, watershed-, and regional-scale), and changing hydro-climates. Various analysis techniques (e.g., time stability, geostatistics, Empirical Orthogonal Function, and Singular Value Decomposition) have been employed to characterize near-surface soil moisture variability and the role of contributing physical control(s) across space and time. Findings of this study can be helpful in several hydrological research/applications, such as, validation/calibration and downscaling of remote sensing data products, planning and designing effective soil moisture monitoring networks and field campaigns, improving performance of soil moisture retrieval algorithm, flood/drought prediction, climate forecast modeling, and agricultural management practices.

Joshi, Champa

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Effects of soil type and farm management on soil ecological functional genes and microbial activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Relationships between soil microbial diversity and soil function are the subject of much debate. Process-level analyses have shown that microbial function varies with soil type and responds to soil management. However, such measurements cannot determine the role of community structure and diversity in soil function. The goal of this study was to investigate the role of gene frequency and diversity, measured by microarray analysis, on soil processes. The study was conducted in an agro-ecosystem characterized by contrasting management practices and soil types. Eight pairs of adjacent commercial organic and conventional strawberry fields were matched for soil type, strawberry variety, and all other environmental conditions. Soil physical, chemical and biological analyses were conducted including functional gene microarrays (FGA). Soil physical and chemical characteristics were primarily determined by soil textural type (coarse vs fine-textured), but biological and FGA measures were more influenced by management (organic vs conventional). Organically managed soils consistently showed greater functional activity as well as FGA signal intensity (SI) and diversity. Overall FGA SI and diversity were correlated to total soil microbial biomass. Functional gene group SI and/or diversity were correlated to related soil chemical and biological measures such as microbial biomass, cellulose, dehydrogenase, ammonium and sulfur. Management was the dominant determinant of soil biology as measured by microbial gene frequency and diversity, which paralleled measured microbial processes.

Reeve, Jennifer [Washington State University; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL; Carpenter-Boggs, Lynne [Washington State University; Kang, S. [University of Oklahoma; Zhou, Jizhong [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Reganold, John P. [Washington State University

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Woodland development and soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics and storage in a subtropical savanna ecosystem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Woody plant invasion of grasslands is prevalent worldwide, but the biogeochemical consequences of this vegetation shift remain largely unquantified. In the Rio Grande Plains, TX, grasslands and savannas dominated by C4 grasses have undergone succession over the past century to subtropical thorn woodlands dominated by C3 trees/shrubs. To elucidate mechanisms of soil organic carbon (SOC) and soil total N (STN) storage and dynamics in this ecosystem, I measured the mass and isotopic composition (?13C, ?15N) of C and N in whole-soil and soil size/density fractions in chronosequences consisting of remnant grasslands (Time 0) and woody plant stands ranging in age from 10-130 years. Rates of SOC and STN storage averaged 10-30 g C m-2yr-1 and 1-3 g N m-2yr-1, respectively. These accumulation rates increased soil C and N pools 80-200% following woody encroachment. Soil microbial biomass (SMB-C) also increased after woody invasion. Decreasing Cmic/C org and higher qCO2 in woodlands relative to grasslands suggests that woody litter is of poorer quality than grassland litter. Greater SOC and STN following woody invasion may also be due to increased protection of organic matter by stable soil structure. Soil aggregation increased following woody encroachment; however, most of the C and N accumulated in free particulate organic matter (POM) fractions not protected within aggregates. Mean residence times (MRTs) of soil fractions were calculated based on changes in their ?13C with time after woody encroachment. Free POM had the shortest average MRTs (30 years) and silt+clay the longest (360 years). Fine POM had MRTs of about 60 years, reflecting protection by location within aggregates. ?15N values of soil fractions were positively correlated with their MRTs, suggesting that higher ?15N values reflect an increased degree of humification. Increases in SOC and STN are probably being sustained by greater inputs, slower turnover of POM (some biochemical recalcitrance), and protection of organic matter in aggregates and association with silt and clay. Grassland-to-woodland conversion during the past century has been geographically extensive in grassland ecosystems worldwide, suggesting that changes in soil C and N dynamics and storage documented here could have significance for global C and N cycles.

Liao, Julia Den-Yue

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Soil Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Soil Gas Sampling Soil Gas Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Soil Gas Sampling Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Gas Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Identify concealed faults that act as conduits for hydrothermal fluids. Hydrological: Identify hydrothermal gases of magmatic origin. Thermal: Differentiate between amagmatic or magmatic sources heat. Dictionary.png Soil Gas Sampling: Soil gas sampling is sometimes used in exploration for blind geothermal resources to detect anomalously high concentrations of hydrothermal gases

365

A Multimodel Analysis, Validation, and Transferability Study of Global Soil Wetness Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multimodel ensemble forecasting has been shown to offer a systematic improvement in the skill of climate prediction with atmosphere and ocean circulation models. However, little such work has been done for the land surface component, an important ...

Xiang Gao; Paul A. Dirmeyer

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Demonstrate More...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Demonstrate More Proliferation-Resistant Recycling Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Demonstrate More...

367

Principal Associate Directorate for Global Security: Los National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Security's Future at Los Alamos Nuclear Nonproliferation Space Systems Intelligence Warfighter Support Counterterrorism Mass Effect Event Response Global...

368

Specification for soil multisensor and soil sampling cone penetrometer probes  

SciTech Connect

Specification requirements for engineering, fabrication, and performance of cone penetrometer (CP) soil multisensor and sampling probes (CP-probes) which are required to support contract procurement for services are presented. The specification provides a documented technical basis of quality assurance that is required to use the probes in an operating Hanford tank farm. The documentation cited in this specification will be incorporated into an operational fielding plan that will address all activities associated with the use of the CP-probes. The probes discussed in this specification support the Hanford Tanks Initiative AX-104 Tank Plume Characterization Sub-task. The probes will be used to interrogate soils and vadose zone surrounding tank AX-104.

Iwatate, D.F.

1997-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

369

Phytoremediation of Metal-Contaminated Soils  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent concerns regarding environmental contamination have necessitated the development of appropriate technologies to assess the presence and mobility of metals in soil and estimate possible ways to decrease the level of soil metal contamination. Phytoremediation is an emerging technology that may be used to cleanup contaminated soils. Successful application of phytoremediation, however, depends upon various factors that must be carefully investigated and properly considered for specific site conditions. To efficiently affect the metal removal from contaminated soils we used the ability of plants to accumulate different metals and agricultural practices to improve soil quality and enhance plant biomass. Pot experiments were conducted to study metal transport through bulk soil to the rhizosphere and stimulate transfer of the metals to be more available for plants' form. The aim of the experimental study was also to find fertilizers that could enhance uptake of metals and their removal from contaminated soil.

Shtangeeva, I.; Laiho, J.V-P.; Kahelin, H.; Gobran, G.R.

2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

370

Heard Island global warming test  

SciTech Connect

In late January and early February 1991, an international team will conduct an experiment to test the possibility of measuring global warming in the world's oceans. The goal is to provide early indications of warming caused by the so-called greenhouse effect, the atmospheric buildup of CO{sub 2} and other gases. The method is based on the principle that acoustic energy travels through water between a source and receiver at a speed determined primarily by the water temperature. Thus acoustic travel time can be used as a temperature gauge. The idea is an outgrowth of suggestions made by Professor Walter Munk of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography and Professor Carl Wunsch of MIT in the early 1980s to use long-range underwater acoustic transmissions to measure changes in the heat content of the oceans.

Spindel, R.C. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle (USA))

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Coal mine methane global review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the second edition of the Coal Mine Methane Global Overview, updated in the summer of 2008. This document contains individual, comprehensive profiles that characterize the coal and coal mine methane sectors of 33 countries - 22 methane to market partners and an additional 11 coal-producing nations. The executive summary provides summary tables that include statistics on coal reserves, coal production, methane emissions, and CMM projects activity. An International Coal Mine Methane Projects Database accompanies this overview. It contains more detailed and comprehensive information on over two hundred CMM recovery and utilization projects around the world. Project information in the database is updated regularly. This document will be updated annually. Suggestions for updates and revisions can be submitted to the Administrative Support Group and will be incorporate into the document as appropriate.

NONE

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Global Power Solutions LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Solutions LLC Power Solutions LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Global Power Solutions LLC Place Colorado Zip CO 80401 Sector Geothermal energy Product String representation "Global Power So ... sition support." is too long. References Global Power Solutions LLC[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Global Power Solutions LLC is a company located in Colorado . References ↑ "Global Power Solutions LLC" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Global_Power_Solutions_LLC&oldid=345917" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link

373

GTZ Global Energy Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GTZ Global Energy Program GTZ Global Energy Program Jump to: navigation, search Logo: GTZ Global Energy Program Name GTZ Global Energy Program Agency/Company /Organization GTZ Sector Energy Focus Area Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy Topics Background analysis Website http://www.gtz.de/en/praxis/95 Program Start 2008 Program End 2012 References GTZ projects [1] GTZ is working globally with countries on supply of energy technologies and services to households, SME and public utility institutions. Key products include access to modern energy services and promotion of new technologies. References ↑ "GTZ projects" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=GTZ_Global_Energy_Program&oldid=328691" Category: Programs What links here Related changes

374

Comparison of Near-field and Far-field Air Monitoring of Plutonium-contaminated Soils from the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Operation Roller Coaster, a series of nuclear material dispersal experiments, resulted in three areas (Clean Slates 1, 2, and 3) of widespread surface soil plutonium (Pu) contamination on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), located 225 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The State's Division of Environmental Protection raised concerns that dispersal of airborne Pu particles from the sites could result in undetected deposition further downwind that the background monitoring stations. Air monitoring data from different distances from the Clean Slate sites but during the same period of time were compared. From the available data, there is no indication that airborne PM10 particles are being transported to the farther distance,however, the data are statistically insufficient to conclude whether there is a difference in transport of respirable Pu particles to the closer verses the farther sites from the Clean Slate sites.

John L. Bowen; David S. Shafer

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Global change research: Science and policy  

SciTech Connect

This report characterizes certain aspects of the Global Change Research Program of the US Government, and its relevance to the short and medium term needs of policy makers in the public and private sectors. It addresses some of the difficulties inherent in the science and policy interface on the issues of global change. Finally, this report offers some proposals for improving the science for policy process in the context of global environmental change.

Rayner, S.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Global Threat Reduction Initiative | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Threat Reduction Initiative | National Nuclear Security Threat Reduction Initiative | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Global Threat Reduction Initiative Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Global Threat Reduction Initiative Global Threat Reduction Initiative The mission of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) is to reduce

377

Energy Options -- A Global Energy Perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the projected global carbon-free energy demand; and the challenges to the chemical sciences to enable the cost-effective production of carbon-free ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

378

Global Threat Reduction Initiative | National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Threat Reduction Initiative | National Nuclear Security Threat Reduction Initiative | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Global Threat Reduction Initiative Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Global Threat Reduction Initiative Global Threat Reduction Initiative The mission of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) is to reduce

379

Materials Sustainability: Digital Resource Center - Global Recycling ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 1, 2008 ... Global Recycling Network is an electronic information exchange that specializes in the trade of recyclables reclaimed in Municipal Solid Waste ...

380

Carbon Markets Global Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Carbon Markets Global Ltd Place London, United Kingdom Zip NW4 2HT Product Assist project originators develop and finance clean development...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global soil respiration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Pax Global: Compromise Agreement (2013-SE-1413)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE and Pax Global, Inc., entered into a Compromise Agreement to resolve a case involving the distribution in commerce of noncompliant freezers.

382

Global Security Directorate - Nonproliferation, Safeguards, and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home Centers & Programs Nonproliferation, Safeguards, and Security Programs click for full size image of Megatons to megawatts The Global Security and Nonproliferation Programs...

383

International Workshop on Nuclear Forensics Strengthens Global...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > International Workshop on Nuclear Forensics Strengthens Global Security...

384

Plenia Locatel Group: Globalizing from Venezuela  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2009 the founders and top executives of Plenia Locatel Group, a retail business in Venezuela specializing in health care products and services, were planning a global

Gibson, Cyrus

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

WEB RESOURCE: Global Nuclear Energy Partnership - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 16, 2007 ... This site provides general news and information on the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership, a U.S. initiative that seeks to develop worldwide ...

386

ARTICLES: Global Nuclear Energy Partnership - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jan 4, 2008 ... The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) was established to be an equal and voluntary international partnership for developing nuclear ...

387

Aquecimento Global e Mudança Climática na Amazônia:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

73 a 292. 1 Aquecimento Global e Mudana Climtica na Amaznia: Retroalimentao Clima-Vegetao e Impactos nos Recursos Hdricos Jos Marengo, 1 Carlos A. Nobre, 1...

388

Contour Global L P | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in under-served markets, such as that for renewable energy technologies and Combined Heat and Power (CHP), within developed economics. References Contour Global L.P.1...

389

Hotel energy use contributes to global warming.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Before learning about the consequences of global warming and the efforts hotels are making to reverse the effects, it is important to get a better… (more)

Faja, Christine

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

ARM - Measurement - Soil heat flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

heat flux heat flux ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Soil heat flux A quantity measured according to the formula B = {lambda}(dT/dz), where {lambda} is the conductivity of the soil that the heat is moving through. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems EBBR : Energy Balance Bowen Ratio Station SEBS : Surface Energy Balance System External Instruments

391

ARM - Measurement - Soil moisture flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

moisture flux moisture flux ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Soil moisture flux A quantity measured according to the formula B = {lambda}(dq/dz), where {lambda} is the conductivity of the soil that the moisture is moving through. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems External Instruments ECMWFDIAG : European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts

392

Innovative Vitrification for Soil Remediation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Vortec has successfully completed Phases 1 and 2 of a technology demonstration program for an ''Innovative Fossil Fuel Fired Vitrification Technology for Soil Remediation.'' The principal objective of the program is to demonstrate the ability of a Vortec Cyclone Melting System (CMS) to remediate DOE contaminated soils and other waste forms containing TM RCRA hazardous materials, low levels of radionuclides and TSCA (PCB) containing wastes. The demonstration program will verify the ability of this vitrification process to produce a chemically stable glass final waste form which passes both TCLP and PCT quality control requirements, while meeting all federal and state emission control regulations. The demonstration system is designed to process 36 ton/day of as-received drummed or bulk wastes. The processing capacity equates to approximately 160 barrels/day of waste materials containing 30% moisture at an average weight of 450 lbs./barrel.

Hnat, James G.; Patten, John S.; Jetta, Norman W.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

393

Global Vegetation Root Distribution for Land Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vegetation root distribution is one of the factors that determine the overall water holding capacity of the land surface and the relative rates of water extraction from different soil layers for vegetation transpiration. Despite its importance, ...

Xubin Zeng

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Deriving the Surface Soil Heat Flux from Observed Soil Temperature and Soil Heat Flux Profiles Using a Variational Data Assimilation Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel approach to infer surface soil heat fluxes from measured profiles of soil temperature, soil heat flux, and observations of the vegetation canopy temperature and the incoming shortwave radiation is evaluated for the Cabauw measurement ...

R. J. Ronda; F. C. Bosveld

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Global Circuit Response to Seasonal Variations in Global Surface Air Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Comparisons are made between the seasonal behavior of the global electrical circuit and the surface air temperature for the Tropics and for the globe. Positive correlations between global circuit parameters and temperature are identified on both ...

Earle R. Williams

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Joint Spatiotemporal Variability of Global Sea Surface Temperatures and Global Palmer Drought Severity Index Values  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dominant modes of individual and joint variability in global sea surface temperatures (SST) and global Palmer drought severity index (PDSI) values for the twentieth century are identified through a multivariate frequency domain singular value ...

Somkiat Apipattanavis; Gregory J. McCabe; Balaji Rajagopalan; Subhrendu Gangopadhyay

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Globalization at NTT DoCoMo : implementing global business management strategies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global business management has become one of the most important issues facing companies today, and global economic dynamics provide companies with both tremendous opportunities and formidable challenges. Countries are ...

Takagi, Katsuyuki, 1964-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Role of Outer Membrane C-Type Cytochromes MtrC and OmcA in Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1 Cell Production, Accumulation, and Detachment During Respiration on Hematite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solid phase iron oxides are considered to be important terminal electron acceptors for microbial respiration in many anoxic environments. Besides the knowledge that cells attach to and reduce these substrates, other aspects of surface-associated cell behavior and the related cell surface components that influence cell-mineral interactions are not well understood. In the present study, wild-type cells of the dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 formed thin biofilms one-to-two cell layers in thickness when respiring on natural specular hematite under flow conditions similar to those which exist in aquatic sediments and subsurface environments. The distribution of cells within the biofilm indicated that direct contact was not required for electron transfer from cells to the mineral surface. Detached biomass in the form of single cells represented >99% of the surface-associated wild-type cell production from respiration on hematite over the biofilm life cycle. A mutant deficient in the outer membrane c35 type cytochrome OmcA, while still able to respire and replicate on hematite, established a lower steady-state cell density on the mineral surface than that of the wild-type strain. A mutant deficient in MtrC, another outer membrane c-type cytochrome, and a mutant deficient in both cytochromes were unable to reduce sufficient amounts of hematite to support detectable growth on the mineral surface. When considered in the context of previous work, the results support a growing body of evidence that the relative importance of OmcA and MtrC to cell respiration and replication depends on the form of iron oxide available as terminal electron acceptor.

Mitchell, Andrew C.; Peterson, L.; Reardon, Catherine L.; Reed, Samantha B.; Culley, David E.; Romine, Margaret F.; Geesey, Gill G.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Increase of global monsoon area and precipitation under global warming: A robust signal?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increase of global monsoon area and precipitation under global warming: A robust signal? Pang 2012; revised 18 February 2012; accepted 20 February 2012; published 16 March 2012. [1] Monsoons of people around the world. The global monsoon precipitation had an increasing trend over the past three

Li, Tim

400

Soil carbon inventories under a bioenergy crop (switchgrass): Measurement limitations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Approximately 5 yr after planting, coarse root carbon (C) and soil organic C (SOC) inventories were compared under different types of plant cover at four switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) production field trials in the southeastern USA. There was significantly more coarse root C under switchgrass (Alamo variety) and forest cover than tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.), corn (Zea mays L.), or native pastures of mixed grasses. Inventories of SOC under switchgrass were not significantly greater than SOC inventories under other plant covers. At some locations the statistical power associated with ANOVA of SOC inventories was low, which raised questions about whether differences in SOC could be detected statistically. A minimum detectable difference (MDD) for SOC inventories was calculated. The MDD is the smallest detectable difference between treatment means once the variation, significance level, statistical power, and sample size are specified. The analysis indicated that a difference of {approx}50 mg SOC/cm{sup 2} or 5 Mg SOC/ha, which is {approx}10 to 15% of existing SOC, could be detected with reasonable sample sizes and good statistical power. The smallest difference in SOC inventories that can be detected, and only with exceedingly large sample sizes, is {approx}2 to 3%. These measurement limitations have implications for monitoring and verification of proposals to ameliorate increasing global atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations by sequestering C in soils.

Garten, C.T. Jr.; Wullschleger, S.D.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global soil respiration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Innovative approaches to integrated global change modelling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integrated models are important tools to investigate the interactions between planetary processes and the growing impacts of human populations - in short: global change. Current models still have significant shortcomings, notably in their representation ... Keywords: Global change, Innovative approaches, Integrated assessment, Modelling, Research priorities

Carlo Giupponi, Mark E. Borsuk, Bert J. M. De Vries, Klaus Hasselmann

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

LONDON'S GLOBAL UNIVERSITY THE GRAND CHALLENGE OF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on global-health challenges. We need your involvement, your energy and your disciplines' intellectual-poor settings, to foster innovative, relevant solutions to partner countries' particular experiences of global and environmental responsibility, working seamlessly with and within a wide range of countries and cultures. A UCL

Saunders, Mark

403

Confronting global issues: a multipurpose IR simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes an international relations simulation that focuses on threats of transnational insurgent organizations, the future of the Iraqi regime, and the effect of globalization on foreign policies. It contains both the Simulation Director's ... Keywords: Iraq, foreign policy, globalization, international conflict, international relations simulations, negotiation, terrorism

Stephen M. Shellman; Kürsad Turan

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

A New Global Water Vapor Dataset  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comprehensive and accurate global water vapor dataset is critical to the adequate understanding of water vapor's role in the earth's climate system. To begin to satisfy this need, the authors have produced a blended dataset made up of global, 5-...

David L. Randel; Thomas J. Greenwald; Thomas H. Vonder Haar; Graeme L. Stephens; Mark A. Ringerud; Cynthia L. Combs

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

GEO Secretariat Global Earth Observing System of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Secretariat Vegetation greenness profiles North America Vegetation Annual Greenness Profiles 100 120 140 160;© GEO Secretariat GEO 2009-11 Work Plan ­ Related Task DA-09-05: Global Carbon Observation and Analysis System Implement a global carbon observation and analysis system addressing the three components

406

Global illumination with radiance regression functions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present radiance regression functions for fast rendering of global illumination in scenes with dynamic local light sources. A radiance regression function (RRF) represents a non-linear mapping from local and contextual attributes of surface points, ... Keywords: global illumination, neural network, non-linear regression, real time rendering

Peiran Ren; Jiaping Wang; Minmin Gong; Stephen Lin; Xin Tong; Baining Guo

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

GLOBAL BIOFUELS OUTLOOK MAELLE SOARES PINTO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GLOBAL BIOFUELS OUTLOOK 2010-2020 MAELLE SOARES PINTO DIRECTOR BIOFUELS EUROPE & AFRICA WORLD BIOFUELS MARKETS, ROTTERDAM MARCH 23, 2011 #12;Presentation Overview · Global Outlook ­ Biofuels Mandates in 2010 ­ Total Biofuels Supply and Demand ­ Regional Supply and Demand Outlook to 2020 ­ Biofuels

408

Modeling global temperature changes with genetic programming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We use genetic programming (GP), a variant of evolutionary computation, to build interpretable models of global mean temperature as a function of natural and anthropogenic forcings. In contrast to the conventional approach, which engages models that ... Keywords: Data-driven modeling, Evolutionary computation, Genetic programming, Global temperature modeling, Unconstrained optimization

Karolina Stanislawska; Krzysztof Krawiec; Zbigniew W. Kundzewicz

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Bibliometric trend analysis on global graphene research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Graphene is a rising star as one of the promising materials with many applications. Its global literature increased fast in recent years. In this work, bibliometric analysis and knowledge visualization technology were applied to evaluate global scientific ... Keywords: Bibliometric analysis, Co-authorship, Co-words, Graphene, Knowledge mapping, Research trend

Peng Hui Lv; Gui-Fang Wang; Yong Wan; Jia Liu; Qing Liu; Fei-Cheng Ma

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Assimilation of Screen-Level Variables in ECMWF’s Integrated Forecast System: A Study on the Impact on the Forecast Quality and Analyzed Soil Moisture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In many operational numerical weather prediction applications, the soil moisture analysis is based on the modeled first-guess and screen-level variables; that is, 2-m temperature and 2-m relative humidity. A set of two global 61-day analysis/...

Matthias Drusch; Pedro Viterbo

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Environment - Nano soil science | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment - Nano soil science Environment - Nano soil science Cross-disciplinary research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is yielding new insight into the carbon cycle, contaminated soils and soil fertility. An ORNL team is using a novel combination of neutron reflectometry experiments and supercomputer simulations to provide a detailed view of the interactions between organic matter and minerals in soil. The research suggests that relationships among these compounds are governed by simpler principles than previously thought. "It changes the whole way we think about how carbon, nutrients and contaminants interact with soils, which therefore affects fertility, water quality, and the terrestrial carbon cycle," said ORNL's Loukas Petridis. "We don't understand these topics very well because until now we haven't had the techniques capable

412

Soil Moisture Monitorization Using GNSS Reflected Signals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of GNSS signals as a source of opportunity for remote sensing applications, GNSS-R, has been a research area of interest for more than a decade. One of the possible applications of this technique is soil moisture monitoring. The retrieval of soil moisture with GNSS-R systems is based on the variability of the ground dielectric properties associated to soil moisture. Higher concentrations of water in the soil yield a higher dielectric constant and reflectivity, which incurs in signals that reflect from the Earth surface with higher peak power. Previous investigations have demonstrated the capability of GPS bistatic scatterometers to obtain high enough signal to noise ratios in order to sense small changes in surface reflectivity. Furthermore, these systems present some advantages with respect to others currently used to retrieve soil moisture. Upcoming satellite navigation systems, such as the European Galileo, will represent an excellent source of opportunity for soil moisture remote sensing for vario...

Egido, Alejandro; Caparrini, Marco; Martin, Cristina; Farres, Esteve; Banque, Xavier

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Global Home File System at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home Home Global Home Filesystem Overview Global home directories (or "global homes") provide a convenient means for a user to have access to source files, input files, configuration files, etc., regardless of the platform the user is logged in to. Wherever possible, you should refer to your home directory using the environment variable $HOME. The absolute path to your home directory (e.g., /u4/elvis/) may change, but the value of $HOME will always be correct. For security reasons, you should never allow "world write" access to your $HOME directory or your $HOME/.ssh directory. NERSC scans for such security weakness, and, if detected, will change the permissions on your directories. Platforms Utilizing Global Home The Global Home file system is available on all NERSC systems except PDSF.

414

The Global Carbon Bank | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » The Global Carbon Bank Jump to: navigation, search Name The Global Carbon Bank Place Houston, Texas Zip 77025 Sector Carbon, Services Product Houston-based provider of advisory and development services to utilities regarding carbon compliance and emissions offsets. References The Global Carbon Bank[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. The Global Carbon Bank is a company located in Houston, Texas . References ↑ "The Global Carbon Bank"

415

Harmonizing Global Metrics for Data Center Efficiency  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Page 1 Page 1 Harmonizing Global Metrics for Data Center Energy Efficiency Global Taskforce Reaches Agreement on Measurement Protocols for PUE - Continues Discussion of Additional Energy Efficiency Metrics February 28th, 2011 The data center has become an increasingly important part of most business operations in the twenty-first century. With escalating demand and rising energy prices, it is essential for the owners and operators of these mission critical facilities to assess and improve their performance with energy efficiency metrics. However, even with the global presence of many companies, these metrics are often not applied consistently at a global level. To address these inconsistencies, a group of global leaders has been meeting regularly to agree

416

Global Environment Fund GEF | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Environment Fund GEF Environment Fund GEF Jump to: navigation, search Name Global Environment Fund (GEF) Place Chevy Chase, Maryland Zip 20815 Product International investment management firm with around USD 800m under management. Invests in companies that make positive contributions to environmental quality, human health and sustainable management of resources. References Global Environment Fund (GEF)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Global Environment Fund (GEF) is a company located in Chevy Chase, Maryland . References ↑ "Global Environment Fund (GEF)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Global_Environment_Fund_GEF&oldid=345910"

417

Global Cool Cities Alliance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Global Cool Cities Alliance Global Cool Cities Alliance Global Cool Cities Alliance The Department of Energy (DOE) is currently supporting the Global Cool Cities Alliance (GCCA), a non-profit organization that works with cities, regions, and national governments to speed the worldwide installation of cool roofs, pavements, and other surfaces. GCCA is dedicated to advancing policies and actions that increase the solar reflectance of our buildings and pavements as a cost-effective way to promote cool buildings, cool cities, and to mitigate the effects of climate change through global cooling. The alliance was launched in June of 2011. Cool reflective surfaces are an important near-term strategy for improving city sustainability by delivering significant benefits such as increased building efficiency and comfort, improved urban health, and heat

418

Global Solar Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solar Energy Solar Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name Global Solar Energy Place Tucson, AZ Website http://www.globalsolarenergy.c References Global Solar Energy[1] Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Other Relationship Partnering Center within NREL National Center for Photovoltaics Partnership Year 2007 Link to project description http://www.nrel.gov/research_review/2007/deployment_thin_film.html LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! Global Solar Energy is a company located in Tucson, AZ. References ↑ "Global Solar Energy" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Global_Solar_Energy&oldid=381693" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies

419

Parameter Sensitivity in LSMs: An Analysis Using Stochastic Soil Moisture Models and ELDAS Soil Parameters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integration of simulated and observed states through data assimilation as well as model evaluation requires a realistic representation of soil moisture in land surface models (LSMs). However, soil moisture in LSMs is sensitive to a range of ...

Adriaan J. Teuling; Remko Uijlenhoet; Bart van den Hurk; Sonia I. Seneviratne

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Effects of Soil Moisture on the Responses of Soil Temperatures to Climate Change in Cold Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At high latitudes, changes in soil moisture could alter soil temperatures independently of air temperature changes by interacting with the snow thermal rectifier. The authors investigated this mechanism with model experiments in the Community Land ...

Zachary M. Subin; Charles D. Koven; William J. Riley; Margaret S. Torn; David M. Lawrence; Sean C. Swenson

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global soil respiration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

A Comparison of Soil Moisture Models Using Soil Climate Analysis Network Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because of the lack of field measurements, models are often used to monitor soil moisture conditions. Therefore, it is important to find a model that can accurately simulate soil moisture under a variety of land surface conditions. In this paper, ...

Lei Meng; Steven M. Quiring

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Effects of Weather Variability and Soil Parameter Uncertainty on the Soil-Crop-Climate System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The variability of crop and soil states due to uncertain climatic inputs and soil properties is quantified using a mathematical representation of the physiological, biochemical, hydrological, and physical processes related to plant growth. The ...

Angelos L. Protopapas; Rafael L. Bras

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

In-situ vitrification of soil. [Patent application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of vitrifying soil at or below a soil surface location. Two or more conductive electrodes are inserted into the soil for heating of the soil mass between them to a temperature above its melting temperature. Materials in the soil, such as buried waste, can thereby be effectively immobilized.

Brouns, R.A.; Buelt, J.L.; Bonner, W.F.

1981-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

424

Non-Traditional Soil Additives: Can They Improve Crop Production?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-traditional soil additives include soil conditioners such as organic materials and minerals, soil activators that claim to stimulate soil microbes or inoculate soil with new beneficial organisms, and wetting agents that may be marketed to improve crop yields. As this publication advises, growers should evaluate such products carefully and conduct field trials to determine their merit.

McFarland, Mark L.; Stichler, Charles; Lemon, Robert G.

2002-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

425

Landscape level differences in soil carbon and nitrogen: implications for soil carbon sequestration  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research was to understand how land cover and topography act, independently or together, as determinants of soil carbon and nitrogen storage over a complex terrain. Such information could help to direct land management for the purpose of carbon sequestration. Soils were sampled under different land covers and at different topographic positions on the mostly forested 14,000 ha Oak Ridge Reservation in Tennessee, USA. Most of the soil carbon stock, to a 40-cm soil depth, was found to reside in the surface 20 cm of mineral soil. Surface soil carbon and nitrogen stocks were partitioned into particulate ({ge}53 {micro}m) and mineral-associated organic matter (<53 {micro}m). Generally, soils under pasture had greater nitrogen availability, greater carbon and nitrogen stocks, and lower C:N ratios than soils under transitional vegetation and forests. The effects of topography were usually secondary to those of land cover. Because of greater soil carbon stocks, and greater allocation of soil carbon to mineral-associated organic matter (a long-term pool), we conclude that soil carbon sequestration, but not necessarily total ecosystem carbon storage, is greater under pastures than under forests. The implications of landscape-level variation in soil carbon and nitrogen for carbon sequestration are discussed at several different levels: (1) nitrogen limitations to soil carbon storage; (2) controls on soil carbon turnover as a result of litter chemistry and soil carbon partitioning; (3) residual effects of past land use history; and (4) statistical limitations to the quantification of soil carbon stocks.

Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Ashwood, Tom L [ORNL

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Soil Moisture Sensor - Home - Energy Innovation Portal  

Technology Marketing Summary In the agriculture industry, it is critical to know the water content in the soil in order to maintain the viability and profitability of ...

427

Samples of Soil from Arco, Idaho  

SciTech Connect

Samples from a single drilling made at Arco, Idaho were submitted to determine the adsorptive capacity of soil at Arco, Idaho for radioactive elements.

Stewart, G. D.

1949-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

428

Performance evaluation soil samples utilizing encapsulation technology  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Performance evaluation soil samples and method of their preparation uses encapsulation technology to encapsulate analytes which are introduced into a soil matrix for analysis and evaluation by analytical laboratories. Target analytes are mixed in an appropriate solvent at predetermined concentrations. The mixture is emulsified in a solution of polymeric film forming material. The emulsified solution is polymerized to form microcapsules. The microcapsules are recovered, quantitated and introduced into a soil matrix in a predetermined ratio to form soil samples with the desired analyte concentration. 1 fig.

Dahlgran, J.R.

1999-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

429

Performance evaluation soil samples utilizing encapsulation technology  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Performance evaluation soil samples and method of their preparation using encapsulation technology to encapsulate analytes which are introduced into a soil matrix for analysis and evaluation by analytical laboratories. Target analytes are mixed in an appropriate solvent at predetermined concentrations. The mixture is emulsified in a solution of polymeric film forming material. The emulsified solution is polymerized to form microcapsules. The microcapsules are recovered, quantitated and introduced into a soil matrix in a predetermined ratio to form soil samples with the desired analyte concentration.

Dahlgran, James R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Soil-Structure Interaction for Building Structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Explicit computational tools that can be used in engineering practice are provided ... For typical building structures on soil and weathered rock sites, h ...

2013-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

431

ASSESSMENT OF ABORIGINAL SMALLHOLDER SOILS FOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

interbed- ded shales, and granitic intrusions. Tointerbedded tuffs and shales of the same age. The Mendoi-terraces, the quartzite and shale-derived soils on the high

Kurt A. Schwabe

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Performance evaluation soil samples utilizing encapsulation technology  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Performance evaluation soil samples and method of their preparation are described using encapsulation technology to encapsulate analytes which are introduced into a soil matrix for analysis and evaluation by analytical laboratories. Target analytes are mixed in an appropriate solvent at predetermined concentrations. The mixture is emulsified in a solution of polymeric film forming material. The emulsified solution is polymerized to form microcapsules. The microcapsules are recovered, quantitated and introduced into a soil matrix in a predetermined ratio to form soil samples with the desired analyte concentration.

Dahlgran, James R.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Changes in Soil Carbon Following Afforestation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Report No. 20, Australian Greenhouse Office. Paule et al. (2003) Predicted change in soil carbon following afforestation or reforestation, and analysis of controlling factors by...

434

Soil-Web: An online soil survey for California, Arizona, and Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Digital soil survey products represent one of the largest and most comprehensive inventories of soils information currently available. The complex structure of these databases, intensive use of codes and scientific jargon make it difficult for non-specialists ... Keywords: Education, Online database, Outreach, Soil survey, Spatial database, Visualization

D. E. Beaudette; A. T. O'Geen

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Nitrogen Fixation and Leaching of Biological Soil Crust Communities in Mesic Temperate Soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microbial Ecology Nitrogen Fixation and Leaching of Biological Soil Crust Communities in Mesic Temperate Soils Roberta M. Veluci1,2 , Deborah A. Neher1,3 and Thomas R. Weicht1,3 (1) Department of Earth, FL 32611-0760, USA (3) Department of Plant and Soil Science, University of Vermont, 105 Carrigan Dr

Neher, Deborah A.

436

Bio-Char Soil Management on Highly Weathered Soils in the Humid Tropics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the original biomass,- biochar. This biochar can be returned to soil and not only make this type of bioenergy carbon-negative but also avoid soil degradation on bioenergy plantations. Biochar has a range of properties that make it a very efficient soil improver. Biochar is able to retain nutrients, keep them

Lehmann, Johannes

437

100 Area soil washing: Bench scale tests on 116-F-4 pluto crib soil  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a bench-scale treatability study on a pluto crib soil sample from 100 Area of the Hanford Site. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of physical separation (wet sieving), treatment processes (attrition scrubbing, and autogenous surface grinding), and chemical extraction methods as a means of separating radioactively-contaminated soil fractions from uncontaminated soil fractions. The soil washing treatability study was conducted on a soil sample from the 116-F-4 Pluto Crib that had been dug up as part of an excavation treatability study. Trace element analyses of this soil showed no elevated concentrations above typically uncontaminated soil background levels. Data on the distribution of radionuclide in various size fractions indicated that the soil-washing tests should be focused on the gravel and sand fractions of the 116-F-4 soil. The radionuclide data also showed that {sup 137}Cs was the only contaminant in this soil that exceeded the test performance goal (TPG). Therefore, the effectiveness of subsequent soil-washing tests for 116-F-4 soil was evaluated on the basis of activity attenuation of {sup 137}Cs in the gravel- and sand-size fractions.

Field, J.G.

1994-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

438

Global Simulation of Bioenergy Crop Productivity: Analytical Framework and Case Study for Switchgrass  

SciTech Connect

A global energy crop productivity model that provides geospatially explicit quantitative details on biomass potential and factors affecting sustainability would be useful, but does not exist now. This study describes a modeling platform capable of meeting many challenges associated with global-scale agro-ecosystem modeling. We designed an analytical framework for bioenergy crops consisting of six major components: (i) standardized natural resources datasets, (ii) global field-trial data and crop management practices, (iii) simulation units and management scenarios, (iv) model calibration and validation, (v) high-performance computing (HPC) simulation, and (vi) simulation output processing and analysis. The HPC-Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (HPC-EPIC) model simulated a perennial bioenergy crop, switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.), estimating feedstock production potentials and effects across the globe. This modeling platform can assess soil C sequestration, net greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, nonpoint source pollution (e.g., nutrient and pesticide loss), and energy exchange with the atmosphere. It can be expanded to include additional bioenergy crops (e.g., miscanthus, energy cane, and agave) and food crops under different management scenarios. The platform and switchgrass field-trial dataset are available to support global analysis of biomass feedstock production potential and corresponding metrics of sustainability.

Kang, Shujiang [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Nair, S. Surendran [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Nichols, Dr Jeff A [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Brandt, Craig C [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Wei, Yaxing [ORNL; Singh, Nagendra [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Soil Moisture Modeling Based on Multiyear Observations in the Sahel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two simple soil moisture models useful for drought monitoring and climate change studies were proposed, based on 4-yr ground observations of root-zone soil moisture in Sahelian Niger. One is a water balance model that calculates soil moisture ...

Y. Yamaguchi; M. Shinoda

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Comparison of Soil Hydraulic Parameterizations for Mesoscale Meteorological Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soil water contents, calculated with seven soil hydraulic parameterizations, that is, soil hydraulic functions together with the corresponding parameter sets, are compared with observational data. The parameterizations include the Campbell/Clapp–...

Frank J. Braun; Gerd Schädler

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global soil respiration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Sensible Heat Observations Reveal Soil-Water Evaporation Dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soil-water evaporation is important at scales ranging from microbial ecology to large-scale climate. Yet routine measurements are unable to capture rapidly shifting near-surface soil heat and water processes involved in soil-water evaporation. ...

J. L. Heitman; R. Horton; T. J. Sauer; T. M. DeSutter

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Operational Soil Moisture Estimation for the Midwestern United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An operational soil moisture monitoring capability for the midwestern United States is developed using a multilayer soil water balance model which incorporates daily weather data to calculate precipitation, soil evaporation, plant transpiration, ...

Kenneth E. Kunkel

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Simulating soil C dynamics with EPIC: Model description and testing against long-term data  

SciTech Connect

Soil carbon sequestration (SCS) has emerged as a technology with significant potential to help stabilize atmospheric CO2 concentrations and thus reduce the threat of global warming. Methods and models are needed to evaluate and recommend SCS practices based on their effects on carbon dynamics and environmental quality. EPIC (Environment Policy Integrated Climate) is a widely used and tested model for simulating many agroecosystem processes including plant growth, crop yield, tillage, wind and water erosion, runoff, soil density, and leaching. Here we describe new C and N modules developed in EPIC built on concepts from the Century model to connect the simulation of soil C dynamics to crop management, tillage methods, and erosion processes. The added C and N routines interact directly with soil moisture, temperature, erosion, tillage, soil density, leaching, and translocation functions in EPIC. Equations were also added to describe the effects of soil texture on soil C stabilization. Lignin concentration is modeled as a sigmoidal function of plant age. EPIC was tested against data from a Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) 6-yr experiment at five sites in three U.S. Great Plains states and a 61-y long-term agronomic experiment in Canada. Mean Square Deviations (MSD) calculated for CRP sites were less than 0.01 kg C2 m2, except for one site where it reached 0.025 kg2 C2 m. MSD values in the 61-y experiment ranged between 0.047 and 0.077 kg C2 m2. In conclusion, the version of the EPIC model presented and tested here contains the necessary algorithms to simulate SCS and improve understanding of the interactions among soil erosion, C dynamics, and tillage. A strength of the model as tested is its ability to explain the variability in crop production, C inputs and SOC and N cycling over a wised range soil, cropping and climatic conditions over periods from 6 to 61 years. For example, at the Breton site over 61 years, EPIC accounted for 69% of the variability in grain yields, 89 % of the variability in C inputs and 91 % of the variability in SOC content in the top 15 cm. Continued development is be needed is in understanding why it overpredicts at low SOC and underpredicts at high SOC. Possibilities now exit to connect the C and N cycling parts of EPIC to algorithms to describe denitrification as driven by C metabolism and oxygen availability.

Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Williams, Jimmy R.; Mcgill, William B.; Rosenberg, Norman J.; Quiroga Jakas, Maria C.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

ReproducedfromSoilScienceSocietyofAmericaJournal.PublishedbySoilScienceSocietyofAmerica.Allcopyrightsreserved. Hydraulic Properties in a Silt Loam Soil under Natural Prairie,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ReproducedfromSoilScienceSocietyofAmericaJournal.PublishedbySoilScienceSocietyofAmerica.Allcopyrightsreserved. Hydraulic Properties in a Silt Loam Soil under Natural Prairie, Conventional Till, and No-Till Juan P. Fuentes, Markus Flury,* and David F. Bezdicek ABSTRACT undergo this dramatic cyclic change in soil

Flury, Markus

445

Effect of Dead Algae on Soil Permeability  

SciTech Connect

Since existing basins support heavy growths of unicellular green algae which may be killed by temperature variation or by inadvertent pH changes in waste and then deposited on the basin floor, information on the effects of dead algae on soil permeability was needed. This study was designed to show the effects of successive algal kills on the permeability of laboratory soil columns.

Harvey, R.S.

2003-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

446

Irrigation Monitoring with Soil Water Sensors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Monitoring soil water content is essential if growers want to optimize production, conserve water, reduce environmental impacts and save money. This publication illustrates how soil moisture monitoring can improve irrigation decisions and how it also can prevent irrigating the crop too much or too little.

Enciso, Juan; Porter, Dana; Peries, Xavier

2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

447

Estimating the Soil Surface Specific Humidity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on the recent experiment results, a formula is proposed to be used in numerical weather-climate models to estimate the soil surface humidity. The formula has a very simple form and shows a smooth transition in the soil surface specific ...

Tsengdar J. Lee; Roger A. Pielke

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Mathematics: Food, Soil, Water, Air, Free Speech  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Atrazine in Contaminated Soils Using Dairy-Manure Biochar Xinde Cao,*, Lena Ma, Yuan Liang, Bin Gao, Florida 32611 bS Supporting Information ' INTRODUCTION Biochar is increasingly receiving attention, and crop residues have been used for biochar production.1 Biochar is produced as a soil amendment

Russo, Bernard

449

Data Mining Soil Characteristics Affecting Corn Yield  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ten soil characteristic variables and corn yield were measured in a field located in southeastern Boone County, Iowa. Measurements were made on a grid of 215 locations throughout the field. We use graphical and simple numerical methods to obtain an understanding of the relationship between the soil characteristics and corn yield.

William F. Christensen; Di Cook

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

NNSS Soils Monitoring: Plutonium Valley (CAU366)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Nevada Site Office (NSO), Environmental Restoration Soils Activity has authorized the Desert Research Institute (DRI) to conduct field assessments of potential sediment transport of contaminated soil from Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 366, Area 11 Plutonium Valley Dispersion Sites Contamination Area (CA) during precipitation runoff events.

Miller Julianne J.,Mizell Steve A.,Nikolich George, Campbell Scott

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Process for removing polychlorinated biphenyls from soil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a method of removing polychlorinated biphenyls from soil. The polychlorinated biphenyls are extracted from the soil by employing a liquid organic solvent dispersed in water in the ratio of about 1:3 to 3:1. The organic solvent includes such materials as short-chain hydrocarbons including kerosene or gasoline which are immiscible with water and are nonpolar. The organic solvent has a greater affinity for the PCB's than the soil so as to extract the PCB's from the soil upon contact. The organic solvent phase is separated from the suspended soil and water phase and distilled for permitting the recycle of the organic solvent phase and the concentration of the PCB's in the remaining organic phase. The present process can be satisfactorily practiced with soil containing 10 to 20% petroleum-based oils and organic fluids such as used in transformers and cutting fluids, coolants and the like which contain PCB's. The subject method provides for the removal of a sufficient concentration of PCB's from the soil to provide the soil with a level of PCB's within the guidelines of the Environmental Protection Agency.

Hancher, C.W.; Saunders, M.B.; Googin, J.M.

1984-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

452

The Influence of the Inclusion of Soil Freezing on Simulations by a Soil–Vegetation–Atmosphere Transfer Scheme  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interactions between the soil, biosphere, and atmosphere (ISBA) land surface parameterization scheme has been modified to include soil ice. The liquid water equivalent volumetric ice content is modeled using two reservoirs within the soil: a ...

A. Boone; V. Masson; T. Meyers; J. Noilhan

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Estimating Soil C Sequestration Potential in U.S. Agricultural Soils Using the IPCC Approach  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Estimating Soil C Sequestration Potential in U.S. Agricultural Soils Using Estimating Soil C Sequestration Potential in U.S. Agricultural Soils Using the IPCC Approach M. Sperow Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory, Colorado State University Fort Collins, CO 80523 M. Eve US Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service Soil Plant Nutrient Research Unit Fort Collins, Colorado 80522 K. Paustian Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory, Colorado State University Fort Collins, CO 80523 Abstract Field studies across the U.S. have been used to estimate soil C stock changes that result from changes in agricultural management. Data from these studies are not easily extrapolated to reflect changes at a national scale because soils and climate vary locally and regionally. These studies are also limited to addressing existing changes in

454

GlobalData | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GlobalData GlobalData Jump to: navigation, search Logo: GlobalData Name GlobalData Place New York, New York Coordinates 40.7142691°, -74.0059729° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.7142691,"lon":-74.0059729,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

455

Version 2 Global Fire Emissions Database Available  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Fire Emissions Database Available Global Fire Emissions Database Available The ORNL DAAC announces the release of the data set "Global Fire Emissions Database, Version 2 (GFEDv2)." This data set, which supersedes and replaces the Global Fire Emissions Database, Version 1 (GFEDv1), consists of 1 degree x 1 degree gridded monthly burned area, fuel loads, combustion completeness, and fire emissions of carbon (C), carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH4), non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC), molecular hydrogen (H2), nitrogen oxides (NOx), nitrous oxide (N2O), particulate matter (PM2.5), total particulate matter (TPM), total carbon (TC), organic carbon (OC), and black carbon (BC) for the time period January 1997 - December 2004. For more information or to access this data set, please see the Vegetation

456

Global Electric Motorcars | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Global Electric Motorcars Global Electric Motorcars Jump to: navigation, search Name Global Electric Motorcars Place Fargo, North Dakota Zip 58102 Sector Vehicles Product Global Electric Motorcars (GEM), a Chrysler Company, develops and manufactures electric vehicles. Coordinates 36.37617°, -99.622804° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.37617,"lon":-99.622804,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

457

Global Vegetation Data: Leaf Area Index  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Leaf Area Index Data Available The ORNL DAAC announces the availability of a global data set containing approximately 1000 estimates of leaf area index (LAI) for a variety of...

458

Near-Global Observations of Low Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper analyzes several near-global datasets of low cloud cover, including the the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) satellite observations, C. J. Hahn et al. surface-derived observations, and the National Centers for ...

Bryan C. Weare

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Diplomarbeit Test der Dynamik zweier globaler  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diplomarbeit Test der Dynamik zweier globaler Wettervorhersagemodelle des Deutschen Wetterdienstes: Der Held-Suarez Test vorgelegt von Christiane Jablonowski Bonn, September 1998 Meteorologisches.1 Tests von globalen Zirkulationsmodellen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 1.1.1 Test von

Jablonowski, Christiane

460

DNV Global Energy Concepts | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DNV Global Energy Concepts DNV Global Energy Concepts Jump to: navigation, search Name DNV Global Energy Concepts Place Seattle, Washington Zip 98101 Sector Services Product Global Energy Concepts LLC (GEC) is a multi-discipline engineering and technology consulting firm providing services to clients involved in the energy industry. Coordinates 47.60356°, -122.329439° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.60356,"lon":-122.329439,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global soil respiration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Amazonia and Global Change Portuguese translation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Amazonia and Global Change Portuguese translation Amazonia and Global Change Portuguese translation Amazonia and Global Change, the edited compilation of synthesis papers on the Large Scale Biosphere Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA), is now available in Portuguese and English. This book synthesizes the results of the LBA research, bringing together the most important new results and the new understanding of Amazonia that has resulted. Portuguese versions of the chapters are available here without restriction. The English versions of the chapters can be obtained from the AGU Web site for the book. The NASA Terrestrial Ecology Program funded this translation. LBA Amazonia and Global Change Contents Sumário Preface Prefácio John Gash, Michael Keller, Mercedes Bustamante e Pedro Silva Dias [English]* [Português]

462

Building Technologies Office: Global Superior Energy Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Superior Energy Performance Partnership Global Superior Energy Performance Partnership Graphic of Global Superior Energy Performance working groups, including energy management led by the United States, power led by Japan, combined heat and power led by Finland, steel led by Japan, cool roofs led by the United states, and cement led by Japan. GSEP, a multi-country effort to create and coordinate nationally accredited energy performance certification programs, comprises a number of working groups. Credit: DOE The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) supports the Superior Energy Performance (SEP) program, which provides industrial facilities and commercial buildings a framework for achieving continual improvement in energy efficiency while maintaining market competitiveness. SEP aims to provide a transparent, globally accepted system for energy management and continuous energy performance improvement.

463

Global Renewable Energy Database | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Global Renewable Energy Database Global Renewable Energy Database Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Global Renewable Energy Database Agency/Company /Organization: German Aerospace Center (DLR) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Solar, Wind Topics: Resource assessment Resource Type: Dataset, Maps Website: www.dlr.de/en/ References: DLR website [1] From 2009-2010 the German Aerospace Center (DLR) will inventory renewable energy resources for energy modeling in impact assessment models which will feed into a database of renewable energy resources in 0.45° spatial and 1h temporal resolution. References ↑ "DLR website" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Global_Renewable_Energy_Database&oldid=328731" Category: Tools What links here

464

Integrated decision support model for global sourcing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the last decade, the U.S. aircraft industry has experienced increasing levels of international integration as companies seek to access global talent and resources, cut production costs, spread financial risk, and ...

Mroczkowski, Victor A. (Victor Adam)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Operational support systems — the global dimension  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global activity in the telecommunications industry is increasing as operators look to expand into overseas markets, a trend that is currently being accelerated by the rationalisation of the information technology (IT), telecommunications and entertainment ...

H. Sundaresan

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Response to Skeptics of Global Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The majority of the scientific community involved in climate research is convinced of the reality of a current and future global warming due to the greenhouse effect, a change that must be largely caused by human activities. However, a minority ...

William W. Kellogg

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Overview of the Integrated Global Radiosonde Archive  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper provides a general description of the Integrated Global Radiosonde Archive (IGRA), a new radiosonde dataset from the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC). IGRA consists of radiosonde and pilot balloon observations at more than 1500 ...

Imke Durre; Russell S. Vose; David B. Wuertz

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Dynamics of global ocean heat transport variability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A state-of-the-art, high-resolution ocean general circulation model is used to estimate the time-dependent global ocean heat transport and investigate its dynamics. The north-south heat transport is the prime manifestation ...

Jayne, Steven Robert

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Evolving a global armaments logistics strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Few companies globally source and manage commercial transportation for frequent and high volumes of explosive cargo for the U. S. Department of Defense. U.S. regulations are strict and economically competitive options are ...

Peck, Nathan (Nathan W.)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

T Solar Global SA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Global SA Place Madrid, Spain Zip 28042 Product Spain-based thin-film silicon PV cell and module maker, using Applied Materials equipment. The firm is also a major project...

471

A Global Diagnostic of Interocean Mass Transfers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An objective and quantitative estimate of all mean annual interocean mass transfers together with a picture of the associated mean pathways is presented. The global ocean circulation transfers mass, heat, and salinity between the various ocean ...

B. Blanke; S. Speich; G. Madec; K. Döös

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Global Cloud Climatologies: A Historical Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate global cloud information is required for many climate studies, particularly for validation of climate model simulations. This paper reviews the cloud climatologies currently available, identifying and attempting to explain the ...

N. A. Hughes

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Global Hydroclimatological Teleconnections Resulting from Tropical Deforestation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Past studies have indicated that deforestation of the Amazon basin would result in an important rainfall decrease in that region but that this process had no significant impact on the global temperature or precipitation and had only local ...

Roni Avissar; David Werth

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Diabatic Heating Profiles in Recent Global Reanalyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Diabatic heating profiles are extremely important to the atmospheric circulation in the tropics and therefore to the earth’s energy and hydrological cycles. However, their global structures are poorly known because of limited information from in ...

Jian Ling; Chidong Zhang

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Improved Reconstruction of Global Precipitation since 1900  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An improved land–ocean global monthly precipitation anomaly reconstruction is developed for the period beginning in 1900. Reconstructions use the available historical data and statistics developed from the modern satellite-sampled period to ...

Thomas M. Smith; Phillip A. Arkin; Li Ren; Samuel S. P. Shen

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

The Global Land Data Assimilation System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) has been developed. Its purpose is to ingest satellite- and ground-based observational data products, using advanced land surface modeling and data assimilation techniques, in order to generate ...

M. Rodell; P. R. Houser; U. Jambor; J. Gottschalck; K. Mitchell; C-J. Meng; K. Arsenault; B. Cosgrove; J. Radakovich; M. Bosilovich; J. K. Entin*J. P. Walker; D. Lohmann; D. Toll

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Global Snow Cover Monitoring: An Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate monitoring of the large-scale dimensions of global snow cover is essential for understanding details of climate dynamics and climate change. Presently, such information is gathered individually from ground station networks and satellite ...

David A. Robinson; Kenneth F. Dewey; Richard R. Heim Jr.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Sulfuryl fluoride in the global atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The first calibrated high-frequency, high-precision, in situ atmospheric and archived air measurements of the fumigant sulfuryl fluoride (SO[subscript 2]F[subscript 2]) have been made as part of the Advanced Global Atmospheric ...

Muhle, J.

479

Interannual Variability of the Global Radiation Budget  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Interannual variability of the global radiation budget, regions that contribute to its variability, and what limits albedo variability are investigated using Clouds and the Earth’s Radiant Energy System (CERES) data taken from March 2000 through ...

Seiji Kato

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

TRENDS: Global and Hemispheric Temperature Anomalies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global and Hemispheric Temperature Anomalies - Land and Marine Instrumental Records graphics Graphics data Data Investigators P. D. Jones1, D. E. Parker2, T. J. Osborn1, and K. R....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global soil respiration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Estimates of Cabbeling in the Global Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Owing to the larger thermal expansion coefficient at higher temperatures, more buoyancy is put into the ocean by heating than is removed by cooling at low temperatures. The authors show that, even with globally balanced thermal and haline surface ...

Julian J. Schanze; Raymond W. Schmitt

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Operational Space Technology for Global Vegetation Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main goal of global agriculture and the grain sector is to feed 6 billion people. Frequent droughts causing grain shortages, economic disturbances, famine, and losses of life limit the ability to fulfill this goal. To mitigate drought ...

Felix N. Kogan

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Global Energy and Water Budgets in MERRA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reanalyses, retrospectively analyzing observations over climatological time scales, represent a merger between satellite observations and models to provide globally continuous data and have improved over several generations. Balancing the earth’s ...

Michael G. Bosilovich; Franklin R. Robertson; Junye Chen

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Global Ocean Warming: An Acoustic Measure?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Explosions of 300 lbs of TNT at 1 km depth off Perth, Australia were recorded on Bermuda hydrophones, demonstrating 30 years age the feasibility of global acoustic transmissions. Climate-induced changes in ocean temperature (and hence in sound ...

W. H. Munk; A. M. G. Forbes

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Global Changes of the Water Cycle Intensity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, numerical simulations of the twentieth-century climate are evaluated, focusing on the changes in the intensity of the global water cycle. A new model diagnostic of atmospheric water vapor cycling rate is developed and employed that ...

Michael G. Bosilovich; Siegfried D. Schubert; Gregory K. Walker

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Essays on global non-market strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation is centrally concerned with the management of a firm's global non-market environment. The non-market environment of a given firm is conceived as the set of relationships, confrontational or collaborative, ...

Lucea, Rafael

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

On Tidal Damping in Laplace's Global Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laplace's tidal equations are augmented by dissipation in a bottom boundary layer that is intermediate in character between those of Ekman and Stokes. Laplace's tidal equation for a global ocean remains second-order and self-adjoint, but the ...

John W. Miles

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Advanced global illumination using photon mapping  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Photon mapping provides a practical way of efficiently simulating global illumination including interreflections, caustics, color bleeding, participating media and subsurface scattering in scenes with complicated geometry and advanced material models. ...

Wojciech Jarosz; Henrik Wann Jensen; Craig Donner

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Work distribution in global product development organizations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The evolution of the internet, digital design tools, and more importantly, increasing access to global markets and workforce, has increased the interest of firms in offshoring their engineering and product development ...

Tripathy, Anshuman

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Sales & operations planning in a global business  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As companies become more global and begin to outsource manufacturing and other services, the uncertainty in the supply resource increases. Demand uncertainties increase as these same companies expand into new countries to ...

Honstain, Christopher Michael

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Global Fuel Economy Initiative | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Global Fuel Economy Initiative Global Fuel Economy Initiative Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Global Fuel Economy Initiative Agency/Company /Organization: FIA Foundation, International Energy Agency, International Transport Forum, United Nations Environment Programme Focus Area: Fuels & Efficiency Topics: Best Practices Website: www.globalfueleconomy.org/ The Global Fuel Economy Initiative has launched the 50by50 challenge to facilitate large reductions of greenhouse gas emissions and oil use through improvements in automotive fuel economy. The website provides access to working papers, a map showing countries with fuel economy standards, and other related information. How to Use This Tool This tool is most helpful when using these strategies: Avoid - Cut the need for travel

492

Statistics of the Global Tropopause Pressure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Statistics of the global tropopause pressure are evaluated for the period between 1979 and 1993. The analysis is based on gridded data as provided by the ECMWF reanalysis project. The thermal and dynamical definitions of the tropopause are ...

Klaus P. Hoinka

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z