Sample records for global soil respiration

  1. Temperature-associated increases in the global soil respiration record

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Thomson, Allison M.

    2010-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Soil respiration (RS), the flux of CO2 from the soil surface to the atmosphere, comprises the second-largest terrestrial carbon flux, but its dynamics are incompletely understood, and the global flux remains poorly constrained. Ecosystem warming experiments, modelling analyses, and biokinetics all suggest that RS should change with climate. This has been difficult to confirm observationally because of the high spatial variability of RS, inaccessibility of the soil medium, and inability of remote sensing instruments to measure large-scale RS fluxes. Given these constraints, is it possible to discern climate-driven changes in regional or global RS fluxes in the extant four-decade record of RS chamber measurements? Here we use a database of worldwide RS observations, matched with high-resolution historical climate data, to show a previously unknown temporal trend in the RS record after accounting for mean annual climate, leaf area, nitrogen deposition, and changes in CO2 measurement technique. Air temperature anomaly (deviation from the 1961-1990 mean) is significantly and positively correlated with changes in RS fluxes; both temperature and precipitation anomalies exert effects in specific biomes. We estimate that the current (2008) annual global RS flux is 98±12 Pg and has increased 0.1 Pg yr-1 over the last 20 years, implying a global RS temperature response (Q10) of 1.5. An increasing global RS flux does not necessarily constitute a positive feedback loop to the atmosphere; nonetheless, the available data are consistent with an acceleration of the terrestrial carbon cycle in response to global climate change.

  2. Soil organic matter stability and the temperature sensitivity of soil respiration 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burns, Nancy Rosalind

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Soil respiration is an important source of atmospheric CO2, with the potential for large positive feedbacks with global warming. The size of these feedbacks will depend on the relative sensitivity to temperature of very ...

  3. Z .Geoderma 82 1998 83114 The isotopic composition of soil and soil-respired

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amundson, Ronald

    investigated for the past three decades by earth2 scientists in a variety of disciplines. Carbon dioxide due to the magnitude of soil2 respiration on a global scale, and its role in the processes controlling.V. All rights reserved. Z .PII S0016-7061 97 00098-0 #12;( )R. Amundson et al.rGeoderma 82 1998 83

  4. Summary Soil respiration is controlled by soil temperature, soil water, fine roots, microbial activity, and soil physical and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Ronald C.

    content, and root density and activity, and thus changes soil respiration. We measured soil respiration of thin- ning. Thinning did not change the sensitivity of soil respiration to temperature or to water content, and soil physi- cal and chemical properties, result in high variability in and sensitivity

  5. Responses of soil respiration to elevated CO2, air warming, and changing soil water availability in an old-field grassland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wan, Shiqiang [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Norby, Richard J [ORNL; Childs, Joanne [ORNL; Weltzin, Jake [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Responses of soil respiration to atmospheric and climatic change will have profound impacts on ecosystem and global C cycling in the future. This study was conducted to examine effects on soil respiration of the concurrent driving factors of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration, rising temperature, and changing precipitation in a constructed old-field grassland in eastern Tennessee, USA. Model ecosystems of seven old-field species in 12 open-top chambers (4 m in diameter) were treated with two CO2 (ambient and ambient plus 300 ppm) and two temperature (ambient and ambient plus 3 C) levels. Two split plots with each chamber were assigned with high and low soil moisture levels. During the 19-month experimental period from June 2003 to December 2004, higher CO2 concentration and soil water availability significantly increased mean soil respiration by 35.8% and 15.7%, respectively. The effects of air warming on soil respiration varied seasonally from small reductions to significant increases to no response, and there was no significant main effect. In the wet side of elevated CO2 chambers, air warming consistently caused increases in soil respiration, whereas in other three combinations of CO2 and water treatments, warming tended to decrease soil respiration over the growing season but increase it over the winter. There were no interactive effects on soil respiration among any two or three treatment factors irrespective of testing time period. Temperature sensitivity of soil respiration was reduced by air warming, lower in the wet than the dry side, and not affected by CO2 treatment. Variations of soil respiration responses with soil temperature and soil moisture ranges could be primarily attributable to the seasonal dynamics of plant growth and its responses to the three treatments. Using a conceptual model to interpret the significant relationships of treatment-induced changes in soil respiration with changes in soil temperature and moisture observed in this study, we conclude that elevated CO2, air warming, and changing soil water availability had both direct and indirect effects on soil respiration via changes in the three controlling factors: soil temperature, soil moisture, and C substrate. Our results demonstrate that the response of soil respiration to climatic warming should not be represented in models as a simple temperature response function. A more mechanistic understanding of the direct and indirect impacts of concurrent global change drivers on soil respiration is needed to facilitate the interpretation and projection of ecosystem and global C cycling in response to atmospheric and climate change.

  6. Thermal adaptation of soil microbial respiration to elevated temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohan, Jacqueline E.

    LETTER Thermal adaptation of soil microbial respiration to elevated temperature Mark A. Bradford,1 within a few years (Jarvis & Linder 2000; Oechel et al. 2000; Luo et al. 2001; Rustad et al. 2001

  7. Elevated CO2 stimulates grassland soil respiration by increasing carbon inputs rather than by enhancing soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Elevated CO2 stimulates grassland soil respiration by increasing carbon inputs rather than It is not clear whether the consistent positive effect of elevated CO2 on soil respiration (soil carbon flux, SCF) results from increased plant and microbial activity due to (i) greater C availability through CO2-induced

  8. Modeling soil respiration based on carbon, nitrogen, and root mass across diverse Great Lake forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jiquan

    . Introduction Linkages between atmospheric carbon dioxide and global thermal properties have forcedModeling soil respiration based on carbon, nitrogen, and root mass across diverse Great Lake the examination of biospheric carbon flows and pools. Variability in carbon storage or the net ecosystem exchange

  9. Physical controls on the isotopic composition of soil-respired CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Physical controls on the isotopic composition of soil-respired CO2 Nick Nickerson1 and Dave Risk1] Measurement of the isotopic composition of soil and soil-respired CO2 (d13 CO2) has become an invaluable tool in understanding the effects of diffusive transport on soil CO2 isotopic composition, it is crucial

  10. Soil respiration at mean annual temperature predicts annual total across vegetation types and biomes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3.0 License. Biogeosciences Soil respiration at mean annualI. L. , and Carvalho, J. E. M. : Effects of soil watercontent on soil res- piration in forests and cattle pastures

  11. Multi-Year Lags between Forest Browning and Soil Respiration at High Northern Latitudes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Bunn, Andrew G.; Thomson, Allison M.

    2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    High-latitude northern ecosystems are experiencing rapid climate changes, and represent a large potential climate feedback because of their high soil carbon densities and shifting disturbance regimes. A significant carbon flow from these ecosystems is soil respiration (RS, the flow of carbon dioxide, generated by plant roots and soil fauna, from the soil surface to atmosphere), and any change in the high-latitude carbon cycle might thus be reflected in RS observed in the field. This study used two variants of a machine-learning algorithm and least squares regression to examine how remotely-sensed canopy greenness (NDVI), climate, and other variables are coupled to annual RS based on 105 observations from 64 circumpolar sites in a global database. The addition of NDVI roughly doubled model performance, with the best-performing models explaining ~62% of observed RS variability

  12. CO2 efflux from Amazonian headwater streams represents a significant fate for deep soil respiration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehmann, Johannes

    CO2 efflux from Amazonian headwater streams represents a significant fate for deep soil respiration amounts of CO2 to the atmosphere, while the magnitude of CO2 degassing from small streams remains a major was as terrestrially-respired CO2 dissolved within soils, over 90% of which evaded to the atmosphere within headwater

  13. MICROBIAL RESPIRATION RESPONSE TO C, N, AND P AVAILABILITY IN LOBLOLLY PINE FOREST SOILS 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whisenant, Justin

    2011-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    MICROBIAL RESPIRATION RESPONSE TO N AND P AVAILABILITY IN LOBLOLLY PINE FOREST SOILS Major: Forest Management Spatial Science April 2011 Submitted to the Office of Undergraduate Research Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the designation as UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH SCHOLAR A Senior Scholars Thesis by JUSTIN M. WHISENANT A Senior Scholars Thesis by JUSTIN M. WHISENANT MICROBIAL RESPIRATION RESPONSE TO N AND P AVAILABILITY...

  14. MICROBIAL RESPIRATION RESPONSE TO C, N, AND P AVAILABILITY IN LOBLOLLY PINE FOREST SOILS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whisenant, Justin

    2011-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    to an ecosystem by plants is commonly known as net primary production (NPP). Some of this C, having first been converted to sugars, is returned to the atmosphere directly by the plants as a result of normal metabolism (i.e. respiration). Much of the remainder... and the NPP of an ecosystem is largely due to soil microbial respiration. Decomposition of soil organic matter (SOM) by microbes is a metabolic process that results in a release of CO2 gas. Combined with the CO2 emitted by plant roots, this is known...

  15. Soil respiration and microbial biomass in a savanna parkland landscape: spatio-temporal variation and environmental controls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCulley, Rebecca Lynne

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) in this region. The objective of this study was to quantify variation in soil respiration, soil microbial biomass (SMB), and potential C and N mineralization rates in relation to landscape heterogeneity and woody plant encroachment in this region. In addition...

  16. Soil respiration in perennial grass and shrub ecosystems: Linking environmental controls with plant and microbial sources on seasonal and diel timescales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbone, Mariah S; Winston, Gregory C; Trumbore, Susan E

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    R. Vargas (2008), Automated soil respiration measure- ments:and J. M. Wraith (2007), Diurnal hysteresis between soil CO2 and soil temperature is controlled by soil water content,

  17. Short-Term Effects of Experimental Burning and Thinning on Soil Respiration in an Old-Growth,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North, Malcolm

    sustainability and CO2 sequestration, we evaluated the effects of burning and thin- ning treatments on soil application of these forest management practices. Soil respiration, including autotrophic and hetero- trophic and Schlesinger 1992), forest management activities, such as burning and thinning, can also change soil environ

  18. Heterotrophic Soil Respiration in Warming Experiments: Using Microbial Indicators to Partition Contributions from Labile and Recalcitrant Soil Organic Carbon. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradford, M A; Melillo, J M; Reynolds, J F; Treseder, K K; Wallenstein, M D

    2010-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The central objective of the proposed work was to develop a genomic approach (nucleic acid-based) that elucidates the mechanistic basis for the observed impacts of experimental soil warming on forest soil respiration. The need to understand the mechanistic basis arises from the importance of such information for developing effective adaptation strategies for dealing with projected climate change. Specifically, robust predictions of future climate will permit the tailoring of the most effective adaptation efforts. And one of the greatest uncertainties in current global climate models is whether there will be a net loss of carbon from soils to the atmosphere as climate warms. Given that soils contain approximately 2.5 times as much carbon as the atmosphere, a net loss could lead to runaway climate warming. Indeed, most ecosystem models predict that climate warming will stimulate microbial decomposition of soil carbon, producing such a positive feedback to rising global temperatures. Yet the IPCC highlights the uncertainty regarding this projected feedback. The uncertainty arises because although warming-experiments document an initial increase in the loss of carbon from soils, the increase in respiration is short-lived, declining to control levels in a few years. This attenuation could result from changes in microbial physiology with temperature. We explored possible microbial responses to warming using experiments and modeling. Our work advances our understanding of how soil microbial communities and their activities are structured, generating insight into how soil carbon might respond to warming. We show the importance of resource partitioning in structuring microbial communities. Specifically, we quantified the relative abundance of fungal taxa that proliferated following the addition of organic substrates to soil. We added glycine, sucrose, cellulose, lignin, or tannin-protein to soils in conjunction with 3-bromo-deoxyuridine (BrdU), a nucleotide analog. Active microbes absorb BrdU from the soil solution; if they multiply in response to substrate additions, they incorporate the BrdU into their DNA. After allowing soils to incubate, we extracted BrdU-labeled DNA and sequenced the ITS regions of fungal rDNA. Fungal taxa that proliferated following substrate addition were likely using the substrate as a resource for growth. We found that the structure of active fungal communities varied significantly among substrates. The active fungal community under glycine was significantly different from those under other conditions, while the active communities under sucrose and cellulose were marginally different from each other and the control. These results indicate that the overall community structure of active fungi was altered by the addition of glycine, sucrose, and cellulose and implies that some fungal taxa respond to changes in resource availability. The community composition of active fungi is also altered by experimental warming. We found that glycine-users tended to increase under warming, while lignin-, tannin/protein-, and sucrose-users declined. The latter group of substrates requires extracellular enzymes for use, but glycine does not. It is possible that warming selects for fungal species that target, in particular, labile substrates. Linking these changes in microbial communities and resource partitioning to soil carbon dynamics, we find that substrate mineralization rates are, in general, significantly lower in soils exposed to long-term warming. This suggests that microbial use of organic substrates is impaired by warming. Yet effects are dependent on substrate identity. There are fundamental differences in the metabolic capabilities of the communities in the control and warmed soils. These differences might relate to the changes in microbial community composition, which appeared to be associated with groups specialized on different resources. We also find that functional responses indicate temperature acclimation of the microbial community. There are distinct seasonal patterns and to long-term soil warming, with

  19. Soil degradation, global warming and climate impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feddema, Johannes J.; Freire, Sergio Carneiro

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    will demonstrate one methodology for assessing the potential large-scale impacts of soil degradation on African climates and water resources. In addition it will compare and contrast these impacts to those expected from global warming and compare impacts for differ...- ent watershed regions on the continent. 2. METHODS In order to make a similar comparison between pro- jected climate change scenarios due to global warming © Inter-Research 2001 *E-mail: feddema@ku.edu Soil degradation, global warming and climate...

  20. Global Soil Change: Land Use, Soil and Water SWS4231C, SWS5234

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    of the soil system to withstand global-scale perturbations (e.g., climate or land use change, spread Properties 4. Land Use Change Impacts on Soils 5. Land Use and Agriculture (Irrigation and Fertilization In Soil) 6. Land Use and Soil Erosion 7. Climate Change Impacts on Soils 8. Land Use-Climate

  1. Oxygen isotope content of CO2 in nocturnal ecosystem respiration: 2. Short-term dynamics of foliar and soil component fluxes in an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ehleringer, Jim

    Oxygen isotope content of CO2 in nocturnal ecosystem respiration: 2. Short-term dynamics of foliar; accepted 29 October 2003; published 23 December 2003. [1] The oxygen isotope contents (d18 O) of soil showed enrichment over a 2-week sampling period as the weather became hot and dry (leaves 0.9 to 15

  2. anaerobic respiring bacteria: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of locomotion, feeding and respiration (Weiss, 1950; von Holst, 1973; Hildebrand, 1980 Wainwright, Peter C. 55 Automated soil respiration measurements: new information,...

  3. Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies 1 WHY ARE TOTAL SOIL RESPIRATION MEASUREMENTS HIGHER IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovett, Gary M.

    . The results show that faunal (earthworm) biomass is higher in urban sites than in rural sites. Higher TSR is dependent on: topography, root density, quantity and quality of soil organic matter, microbial biomass, soil FORESTS THAN RURAL FORESTS? RUSSELL D. AUWAE University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA MENTOR

  4. Extraction, Degradation, and Microbial Respiration Effects of Mesotrione in Selected Texas Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romero, Madahy B

    2014-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    ecological processes. The primary objectives of this research were to: 1) determine the optimal conditions to extract mesotrione from four soils with varying physical and chemical characteristics using Accelerated Solvent Extraction (ASE); 2) study the effect...

  5. Mycorrhizal status influences the rate but not the temperature sensitivity of soil respiration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    subjected to various mycorrhizal treatments, and their root and soil systems were enclosed in chambers that continuously monitored belowground (root+mycorrhizal+heterotrophic) CO2 production during plant growth, death matured, an increase that was in proportion to the mycorrhizal stimulation of plant growth. Living

  6. Plant-soil interactions and acclimation to temperature of microbial-mediated soil respiration may affect predictions of soil CO2 efflux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curiel Yuste, J.; Ma, S.; Baldocchi, D. D.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    shifts in microbial communities due to soil warming.Soil Sci Soc Am J 61:475–481to an important portion of soil CO 2 ef?ux (Hanson et al.

  7. University of Rochester Respirator Training

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahon, Bradford Z.

    (SCBA) UofR Respirator Training 8 #12;Air Purifying Respirators (Particulate) Tight-fitting respirator

  8. Global Change Biology (2000) 6, 317328 Soil Carbon Sequestration and Land-Use Change: Processes and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Post, Wilfred M.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Global Change Biology (2000) 6, 317­328 Soil Carbon Sequestration and Land-Use Change: Processes in enhanced soil carbon sequestration with changes in land-use and soil management. We review literature, and indicates the relative importance of some factors that influence the rates of organic carbon sequestration

  9. A global analysis of soil microbial biomass carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus in terrestrial ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Xiaofeng [ORNL; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Soil microbes play a pivotal role in regulating land-atmosphere interactions; the soil microbial biomass carbon (C), nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and C:N:P stoichiometry are important regulators for soil biogeochemical processes; however, the current knowledge on magnitude, stoichiometry, storage, and spatial distribution of global soil microbial biomass C, N, and P is limited. In this study, 3087 pairs of data points were retrieved from 281 published papers and further used to summarize the magnitudes and stoichiometries of C, N, and P in soils and soil microbial biomass at global- and biome-levels. Finally, global stock and spatial distribution of microbial biomass C and N in 0-30 cm and 0-100 cm soil profiles were estimated. The results show that C, N, and P in soils and soil microbial biomass vary substantially across biomes; the fractions of soil nutrient C, N, and P in soil microbial biomass are 1.6% in a 95% confidence interval of (1.5%-1.6%), 2.9% in a 95% confidence interval of (2.8%-3.0%), and 4.4% in a 95% confidence interval of (3.9%-5.0%), respectively. The best estimates of C:N:P stoichiometries for soil nutrients and soil microbial biomass are 153:11:1, and 47:6:1, respectively, at global scale, and they vary in a wide range among biomes. Vertical distribution of soil microbial biomass follows the distribution of roots up to 1 m depth. The global stock of soil microbial biomass C and N were estimated to be 15.2 Pg C and 2.3 Pg N in the 0-30 cm soil profiles, and 21.2 Pg C and 3.2 Pg N in the 0-100 cm soil profiles. We did not estimate P in soil microbial biomass due to data shortage and insignificant correlation with soil total P and climate variables. The spatial patterns of soil microbial biomass C and N were consistent with those of soil organic C and total N, i.e. high density in northern high latitude, and low density in low latitudes and southern hemisphere.

  10. Global diversity and geography of soil fungi: minus one widespread group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL; Rosling, Anna [Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IN THEIR RESEARCH ARTICLE Global diversity and geography of soil fungi Tedersoo et al. (28 November, 2014) present a compelling study regarding patterns of biodiversity of fungi, at a scale unprecedented to date for fungal biogeographical studies. The study demonstrates strong global biogeographic patterns in richness and community composition of soil fungi, what concerns us with the study is what we don t see. Unfortunately this study underestimates fungal diversity of at least one key group of soil fungi due to reliance on a single traditional primer with known flaws, and as a consequence the overall relative abundance of fungal groups may also be skewed.

  11. The trade-off between growth rate and yield in microbial communities and the consequences for under-snow soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Steven K.

    at the ecosystem and global scales, representing about half of total CO2 flux from soils (Hanson et al. 2000 of soil microbial communities. In particular, the rate and efficiency of growth determine how much CO2 unit substrate consumed) convert a larger fraction of substrate into CO2 during growth, and so respire

  12. Soil microbial responses to fire and interacting global change factors in a California annual grassland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bohannan, Brendan

    and ecosystem control. Regional and global climate changes that affect aboveground biomass will alter fire and total microbial biomass were not influenced by fire. Diagnostic microbial lipid biomarkers, including- Madison, 1525 Observatory Drive, Madison, WI 53706, USA T. C. Balser Department of Soil and Water Science

  13. The effects of harvesting intensity on soil CO2 efflux and carbon content in an east Texas bottomland hardwood ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Londo, Andrew James

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -harvested control. I hypothesized that respiration rates would vary directly with harvest intensity. The sodalime absorption technique was used for determining in situ respiration and the wet alkali method was used for measuring mineral soil respiration in the lab...

  14. Changes in soil carbon and nitrogen associated with switchgrass production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lobo Alonzo, Porfirio Jose

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    .), other forage grasses, cultivated crops, and forest were collected seasonally at six locations. Soil organic C (SOC), total N, soil microbial biomass C (SMBC) and N (SMBN), soil mineralizable C and N, and basal soil respiration (BSR) were in general...

  15. Fabrication of microfluidic devices for artificial respiration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Hyesung, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We are developing elastomeric polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic devices incorporated with photoactive thin films to create an implantable artificial respiration platform. Whereas state-of-the-art respiration support ...

  16. The Role of Alternative Respiration Pathways and the Effect of Nutrient Loading on Peat Decomposition in Plum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    1 The Role of Alternative Respiration Pathways and the Effect of Nutrient Loading on Peat by stimulating soil metabolism and increasing translocation of belowground resources to aboveground plant biomass

  17. Reduction of forest floor respiration by fertilization on both carbon dioxide-enriched and reference 17-year-old

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oren, Ram

    be best applied to aggrading forest systems where soil resources have not been fully exploited (Mikan et affect the available C pool and impact microbial activity. When N amendments are added to peat soils, Canada. Amador JA, Jones RD (1993) Nutrient limitations on microbial respiration in peat soils

  18. June 2011 Page 1 of 3 Respirator Request Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilcock, William

    INDUSTRIAL HYGIENE ASSESSMENT 18. Respirator(s) Selected Half-Face cartridge Full-Face cartridge PAPR SCBA

  19. Response of global soil consumption of atmospheric methane to changes in atmospheric climate and nitrogen deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuang, Qianlai

    Soil consumption of atmospheric methane plays an important secondary role in regulating the atmospheric CH4 budget, next to the dominant loss mechanism involving reaction with the hydroxyl radical (OH). Here we used a ...

  20. Oxygen isotope content of CO2 in nocturnal ecosystem respiration: 1. Observations in forests along a precipitation transect in Oregon,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ehleringer, Jim

    in the vapor pressure deficit of air that caused isotopic enrichment of soil and leaf water. The enriched soil to evaporative enrichment overshadowed the original isotopic composition of precipitation as a first orderOxygen isotope content of CO2 in nocturnal ecosystem respiration: 1. Observations in forests along

  1. Crop and Soil Science Degree Checklist Name: ____________________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grünwald, Niklaus J.

    and Soil Science Degree Checklist Name: ____________________________ ID Intensive (SOIL 325) (3) _______ HHS 231 ­ Lifetime Fitness for Health (2. Global Issues (3) (*soil science electives meeting requirement) _______ Science

  2. Advances in Photosynthesis and Respiration Series Editor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Govindjee "Gov"

    Springer Advances in Photosynthesis and Respiration Series Editor: Govindjee, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA Volume 29 Photosynthesis in silico Understanding Complexity from Molecules to Ecosystems Edited by; A. Laisk, L. Nedbal, and Govindjee Photosynthesis in silico

  3. Soil Biology & Biochemistry 38 (2006) 30653082 Soil carbon turnover in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wall, Diana

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Soil Biology & Biochemistry 38 (2006) 3065­3082 Soil carbon turnover in the McMurdo Dry Valleys Valleys are among the most inhospitable soil environments on Earth due to climate and substrate because likely sources of organic matter are 102 ­104 yrs old and in situ soil respiration is typically

  4. Global Ecology and Biogeography, (Global Ecol. Biogeogr.) (2013) 22, 470482, DOI: 10.1111/geb.12012 Soil water balance performs better than climatic water variables in tree species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1 Global Ecology and Biogeography, (Global Ecol. Biogeogr.) (2013) 22, 470­482, DOI: 10.1111/geb water balance indices to predict the ecological niches of forest tree species. Location: France Methods aiming to determine the ecological niches of plant species and their responses to climate change. Key

  5. Variability in the carbon isotopic composition of foliage carbon pools (soluble carbohydrates, waxes) and respiration fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Timothy

    , waxes) and respiration fluxes in southeastern U.S. pine forests Behzad Mortazavi,1,2,3 Maureen H. ConteCSC), and waxes (dCW)) and respiratory carbon (foliage (dCFR), soil (dCSR) and ecosystem 13 CO2 (dCER)) for two-alkanoic acid wax molecular cluster was twice that observed for dCOM and the predominant C22­26 compound cluster

  6. Development of conformal respirator monitoring technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shonka, J.J.; Weismann, J.J.; Logan, R.J. [and others

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of a Small Business Innovative Research Phase II project to develop a modular, surface conforming respirator monitor to improve upon the manual survey techniques presently used by the nuclear industry. Research was performed with plastic scintillator and gas proportional modules in an effort to find the most conducive geometry for a surface conformal, position sensitive monitor. The respirator monitor prototype developed is a computer controlled, position-sensitive detection system employing 56 modular proportional counters mounted in molds conforming to the inner and outer surfaces of a commonly used respirator (Scott Model 801450-40). The molds are housed in separate enclosures and hinged to create a {open_quotes}waffle-iron{close_quotes} effect so that the closed monitor will simultaneously survey both surfaces of the respirator. The proportional counter prototype was also designed to incorporate Shonka Research Associates previously developed charge-division electronics. This research provided valuable experience into pixellated position sensitive detection systems. The technology developed can be adapted to other monitoring applications where there is a need for deployment of many traditional radiation detectors.

  7. Announcement Advances in Photosynthesis and Respiration: Focus on Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Govindjee "Gov"

    Announcement Advances in Photosynthesis and Respiration: Focus on Plant Respiration I am delighted to announce the publication, in the Advances in Photosynthesis and Respiration (AIPH) series, of two books, Michael T. Madigan and Carl E. Bauer, editors, 1995); 3. Biophysical Techniques in Photosynthesis (Jan

  8. annual soil respiration: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: in forests from cold climates can significantly influence the annual carbon budget. We explored the magnitude the footprint of a flux tower in a subalpine...

  9. Long-term soil warming and Carbon Cycle Feedbacks to the Climate System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melillo, Jerry M.

    2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of the proposed research was to quantify and explain the effects of a sustained in situ 5oC soil temperature increase on net carbon (C) storage in a northeastern deciduous forest ecosystem. The research was done at an established soil warming experiment at the Harvard Forest in central Massachusetts – Barre Woods site established in 2001. In the field, a series of plant and soil measurements were made to quantify changes in C storage in the ecosystem and to provide insights into the possible relationships between C-storage changes and nitrogen (N) cycling changes in the warmed plots. Field measurements included: 1) annual woody increment; 2) litterfall; 3) carbon dioxide (CO2) efflux from the soil surface; 4) root biomass and respiration; 5) microbial biomass; and 6) net N mineralization and net nitrification rates. This research was designed to increase our understanding of how global warming will affect the capacity of temperate forest ecosystems to store C. The work explored how soil warming changes the interactions between the C and N cycles, and how these changes affect land-atmosphere feedbacks. This core research question framed the project – What are the effects of a sustained in situ 5oC soil temperature increase on net carbon (C) storage in a northeastern deciduous forest ecosystem? A second critical question was addressed in this research – What are the effects of a sustained in situ 5{degrees}C soil temperature increase on nitrogen (N) cycling in a northeastern deciduous forest ecosystem?

  10. Sensitivity of Global Terrestrial Gross Primary Production to Hydrologic States Simulated by the Community Land Model Using Two Runoff Parameterizations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lei, Huimin; Huang, Maoyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Yang, Dawen; Shi, Xiaoying; Mao, Jiafu; Hayes, Daniel J.; Schwalm, C.; Wei, Yaxing; Liu, Shishi

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The terrestrial water and carbon cycles interact strongly at various spatio-temporal scales. To elucidate how hydrologic processes may influence carbon cycle processes, differences in terrestrial carbon cycle simulations induced by structural differences in two runoff generation schemes were investigated using the Community Land Model 4 (CLM4). Simulations were performed with runoff generation using the default TOPMODEL-based and the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model approaches under the same experimental protocol. The comparisons showed that differences in the simulated gross primary production (GPP) are mainly attributed to differences in the simulated leaf area index (LAI) rather than soil moisture availability. More specifically, differences in runoff simulations can influence LAI through changes in soil moisture, soil temperature, and their seasonality that affect the onset of the growing season and the subsequent dynamic feedbacks between terrestrial water, energy, and carbon cycles. As a result of a relative difference of 36% in global mean total runoff between the two models and subsequent changes in soil moisture, soil temperature, and LAI, the simulated global mean GPP differs by 20.4%. However, the relative difference in the global mean net ecosystem exchange between the two models is small (2.1%) due to competing effects on total mean ecosystem respiration and other fluxes, although large regional differences can still be found. Our study highlights the significant interactions among the water, energy, and carbon cycles and the need for reducing uncertainty in the hydrologic parameterization of land surface models to better constrain carbon cycle modeling.

  11. Soil microbial biomass: an estimator of soil development in reclaimed lignite mine soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swanson, Eric Scott

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A two-year study was conducted at the Big Brown lignite mine in Fairfield, Texas, to determine the rate and extent of recovery of the soil microbial biomass (SMB) in mixed overburden. The relationships between SMB carbon (SMBC), basal respiration...

  12. Diffusion in biofilms respiring on electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renslow, Ryan S.; Babauta, Jerome T.; Majors, Paul D.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this study was to measure spatially and temporally resolved effective diffusion coefficients (De) in biofilms respiring on electrodes. Two model electrochemically active biofilms, Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, were investigated. A novel nuclear magnetic resonance microimaging perfusion probe capable of simultaneous electrochemical and pulsed-field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance (PFG-NMR) techniques was used. PFG-NMR allowed for noninvasive, nondestructive, high spatial resolution in situ De measurements in living biofilms respiring on electrodes. The electrodes were polarized so that they would act as the sole terminal electron acceptor for microbial metabolism. We present our results as both two-dimensional De heat maps and surface-averaged relative effective diffusion coefficient (Drs) depth profiles. We found that (1) Drs decreases with depth in G. sulfurreducens biofilms, following a sigmoid shape; (2) Drs at a given location decreases with G. sulfurreducens biofilm age; (3) average De and Drs profiles in G. sulfurreducens biofilms are lower than those in S. oneidensis biofilms—the G. sulfurreducens biofilms studied here were on average 10 times denser than the S. oneidensis biofilms; and (4) halting the respiration of a G. sulfurreducens biofilm decreases the De values. Density, reflected by De, plays a major role in the extracellular electron transfer strategies of electrochemically active biofilms.

  13. Dissolved inorganic carbon in soil and shallow groundwater, Konza Prairie LTER Site, NE Kanas, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsypin, Mikhail

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    cycles of soil air CO2, groundwater DIC, and isotope characteristics showed a strong dependency on weather conditions and soil respiration. Soil air CO2 reached its annual maximum in the middle of the growing season, when moisture was not limiting to soil...

  14. Land use change and soil nutrient transformations in the Los Haitises region of the Dominican Republic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Templer, Pamela

    . Potential denitrification, microbial biomass C and N, and microbial respiration gK1 dry soil were mineralization, net nitrification, microbial biomass C, and microbial respiration were all significantly greater activity and C storage through its effect on SOM quality and quantity. While agriculture can significantly

  15. Modeling nighttime ecosystem respiration from measured CO2 concentration and air temperature profiles using inverse methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling nighttime ecosystem respiration from measured CO2 concentration and air temperature ecosystem carbon budgets from micrometeorological methods remains nighttime ecosystem respiration theory to infer the two components of ecosystem respiration (aboveground and forest floor) from measured

  16. A nonparametric method for separating photosynthesis and respiration components in CO2 flux measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A nonparametric method for separating photosynthesis and respiration components in CO2 flux dependence of photosynthesis and respiration. This observation provides empirical validation of efforts consideration of the temperature dependence of respiration and photosynthesis are likely to carry significant

  17. Announcement Advances in Photosynthesis and Respiration, Volume 24

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Govindjee "Gov"

    Announcement Advances in Photosynthesis and Respiration, Volume 24 (Photosystem I) I am delighted to announce, in Advances in Photosynthesis and Respiration (AIPH) Series, the publication of Volume 24; ISBN: 0-7923-3682-8); · Volume 3: Biophysical Techniques in Photosynthesis (24 chapters; 411 pages

  18. Announcement Advances in Photosynthesis and Respiration, Volume 19: `Chlorophyll a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Govindjee "Gov"

    Announcement Advances in Photosynthesis and Respiration, Volume 19: `Chlorophyll a Fluorescence: A Signature of Photosynthesis', edited by George C. Papageorgiou and Govindjee I am delighted to announce the publication, in the Advances in Photosynthesis and Respiration (AIPH) series, of the first book that focuses

  19. Coupling of Photosynthesis and Respiration Phloem Transport is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, Emmanuel

    Coupling of Photosynthesis and Respiration ­ Phloem Transport is still a Mystery Arthur Gessler1 sources and sinks VanBel(2003) sugars water growth temperature nutrients photosynthesis light CO2 water #12;The coupling between photosynthesis and respiration 13C plant biomass and phloem 13C

  20. Soil CO2 production and surface flux at four climate observatories in eastern Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soil CO2 production and surface flux at four climate observatories in eastern Canada David Risk the climatic controls on soil respiration. We use subsurface CO2 concentrations, surface CO2 flux and detailed physical monitoring of the subsurface regime to examine physical controls on soil CO2 production. Results

  1. Molecular Characterization of Bacterial Respiration on Minerals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blake, Robert C.

    2013-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall aim of this project was to contribute to our fundamental understanding of proteins and biological processes under extreme environmental conditions. We sought to define the biochemical and physiological mechanisms that underlie biodegradative and other cellular processes in normal, extreme, and engineered environments. Toward that end, we sought to understand the substrate oxidation pathways, the electron transport mechanisms, and the modes of energy conservation employed during respiration by bacteria on soluble iron and insoluble sulfide minerals. In accordance with these general aims, the specific aims were two-fold: To identify, separate, and characterize the extracellular biomolecules necessary for aerobic respiration on iron under strongly acidic conditions; and to elucidate the molecular principles whereby these bacteria recognize and adhere to their insoluble mineral substrates under harsh environmental conditions. The results of these studies were described in a total of nineteen manuscripts. Highlights include the following: 1. The complete genome of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans ATCC 23270 (type strain) was sequenced in collaboration with the DOE Joint Genome Institute; 2. Genomic and mass spectrometry-based proteomic methods were used to evaluate gene expression and in situ microbial activity in a low-complexity natural acid mine drainage microbial biofilm community. This was the first effort to successfully analyze a natural community using these techniques; 3. Detailed functional and structural studies were conducted on rusticyanin, an acid-stable electron transfer protein purified from cell-free extracts of At. ferrooxidans. The three-dimensional structure of reduced rusticyanin was determined from a combination of homonuclear proton and heteronuclear 15N- and 13C-edited NMR spectra. Concomitantly, the three-dimensional structure of oxidized rusticyanin was determined by X-ray crystallography to a resolution of 1.9 A by multiwavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD) phasing; 4. An acid-stable red cytochrome with a novel absorbance peak at 579 nm was purified from cell-free extracts of L. ferriphilum. Functional studies demonstrated that this cytochrome was an important component of the aerobic iron respiratory chain in this organism; 5. The specific adhesion of At. ferrooxidans to pyrite is mediated by an extracellular protein that was identified as aporusticyanin. The adhesion of At. ferrooxidans to minerals was characterized by high affinity binding that exhibited a high specificity for pyrite over other sulfide minerals. The principal biopolymer involved in this high-affinity adhesion to pyrite was isolated by mineral affinity chromatography and identified as aporusticyanin. The adhesion of purified aporusticyanin to minerals was observed to adhere to different mineral with a pattern of reactivity identical to that observed with the intact bacterium. Further, preincubation of pyrite with excess exogenous aporusticyanin served to inhibit the adherence of intact cells to the surface of the mineral, indicating that the protein and the cells adhered to the pyrite in a mutually exclusive manner. Taken together, these observations support a model where aporusticyanin located on the surface of the bacterial cell acts as a mineral-specific receptor for the initial adherence of At. ferrooxidans to solid pyrite; 6. The specific adhesion of L. ferriphilum to pyrite was mediated by a different acid-stable extracellular protein than aporusticyanin; and 7. A prototype integrating cavity absorption meter (ICAM) was assembled to determine whether this novel spectrophotometer could be used to study cellular respiration in situ.

  2. The effect of temperature and humidity on respirator fit 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niekerk, Gary

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE AND HUMIDITY ON RESPIRATOR FIT A Thesis by GARY NIEKERK Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1986 Maj... or Subject: Industr ial Hygiene THE EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE AND HUMIDITY ON RESPIRATOR FIT A Thesis by Gary Niekerk Approved as to style and content by: c . o n ( Chairman of Coami ttee) a . e non (Member) anie . ones (Member) e an . an (Head...

  3. RESEARCH ARTICLE A novel soil organic C model using climate, soil type

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    RESEARCH ARTICLE A novel soil organic C model using climate, soil type and management data-Verlag, France 2012 Abstract This report evidences factors controlling soil or- ganic carbon at the national scale by modelling data of 2,158 soil samples from France. The global soil carbon amount, of about 1

  4. Root-derived CO2 efflux via xylem stream rivals soil CO2 efflux.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubrey, Doug, P.; Teskey, Robert, O.

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Respiration consumes a large portion of annual gross primary productivity in forest ecosystems and is dominated by belowground metabolism. Here, we present evidence of a previously unaccounted for internal CO2 flux of large magnitude from tree roots through stems. If this pattern is shown to persist over time and in other forests, it suggests that belowground respiration has been grossly underestimated. • Using an experimental Populus deltoides plantation as a model system, we tested the hypothesis that a substantial portion of the CO2 released from belowground autotrophic respiration remains within tree root systems and is transported aboveground through the xylem stream rather than diffusing into the soil atmosphere. • On a daily basis, the amount of CO2 that moved upward from the root system into the stem via the xylem stream (0.26 mol CO2 m?2 d?1) rivalled that which diffused from the soil surface to the atmosphere (0.27 mol CO2 m?2 d?1). We estimated that twice the amount of CO2 derived from belowground autotrophic respiration entered the xylem stream as diffused into the soil environment. • Our observations indicate that belowground autotrophic respiration consumes substantially more carbohydrates than previously recognized and challenge the paradigm that all root-respired CO2 diffuses into the soil atmosphere.

  5. Comparing nocturnal eddy covariance measurements to estimates of ecosystem respiration made by scaling chamber measurements at six coniferous boreal sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    construction respiration estimated as 0.25 times wood NPP [construction respiration estimated as 0.25 E times foliage NPP (construction respiration was 1.6-3.6 times greater than 0.25 times wood NPP

  6. Comparing local vs. global visible and near-infrared (VisNIR) diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) calibrations for the prediction of soil clay, organic C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    ) calibrations for the prediction of soil clay, organic C and inorganic C Joel B. Sankey a, , David J. Brown b,1 samples for VisNIR-DRS predictions of soil clay content (clay), organic carbon content (SOC of Prediction (SEP)= 3.8, 6.7, and 26.2 g kg- 1 ]. This was similarly true for clay (SEP=95.3 and 102.5 g kg- 1

  7. Effect of soil freezing on particulate resuspension

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duce, S.W.; Shaw, P.G.; Winberg, M.R.

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of small scale laboratory tests that were conducted to determine the effect of soil freezing on soil resuspension. Nontransuranic contaminated soil form the Radioactive Waste Management Complex was subjected to a series of test conditions to determine respirable and nonrespirable fractions of airborne dust. A separate fraction of the same soil was spiked with Pu-239 and subjected to the same test conditions. Concentrations of resuspended soil and Pu in air were determined. Test results show that: (a) the largest fraction of soil resuspended is in the nonrespirable size fraction, (b) the concentration of resuspended soil in air is highly dependent on surface air velocity, and (c) freezing is not as effective at reducing resuspension of fine dry soil as it is with coarse soil, and (d) artificially prepared Pu contaminated soil has a high proportion of the total activity distributed on ultrafine material, reacts inversely to the mass movement of soil, and does not adequately imitate Pu movement in an actual contaminated soil. 26 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. The effect of temperature and humidity on respirator fit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niekerk, Gary

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of atmosphere- supplying respirator is the self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA). These devices are not connected to a stationary air source, such as a compressor. Instead, air is supplied from a compressed air or oxygen tank carried on the person...

  9. Measurement of chlorite dismutase activities in perchlorate respiring bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    concentration (0.6 mM) to four other perchlorate respiring bacteria (PRB), and to one non-PRB (Pseudomonas aeruginosa). Chlorate-grown cultures of the five PRB strains had CD activities ranging from 25 to 50 U/mg of cell dry weight (DW), while aerobically grown cultures of the PRB had much lower CD activities (0.5­4 U

  10. ACCLIMATION OF PHOTOSYNTHESIS AND RESPIRATION TO INCREASING TEMPERATURES IN TREES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teskey, Robert O.

    ACCLIMATION OF PHOTOSYNTHESIS AND RESPIRATION TO INCREASING TEMPERATURES IN TREES by JASON ERIC in mean growing season temperature. This allowed us to determine whether net photosynthesis and dark rates of net photosynthesis were similar among seedlings when compared to their respective mean site

  11. Ecosystem Respiration in a Cool Temperate Bog Depends on Peat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roulet, Nigel T.

    Ecosystem Respiration in a Cool Temperate Bog Depends on Peat Temperature But Not Water Table P-summer (July-August). As anticipated, there was a strong relationship between ER and peat temperatures (r2 = 0-table depth (r2 = 0.11). A laboratory incubation of peat cores at different moisture contents showed that CO2

  12. Sediment Respiration and Nitrogen Cycling along a Eutrophic Gradient in a Shallow, Coastal Estuary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    Sediment Respiration and Nitrogen Cycling along a Eutrophic Gradient in a Shallow, Coastal Estuary Respiration and Nitrogen Cycling along a Eutrophic Gradient in a Shallow, Coastal Estuary Semester and denitrification potentials. We found that the more eutrophic sites had higher respiration and ammonification. Our

  13. Surface Soil

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Surface Soil Surface Soil We compare local soil samples with samples collected from northern New Mexico locations that are beyond the range of potential influence from normal...

  14. Variations of the Respiration Signals for Respiratory-Gated Radiotherapy Using the Video Coached Respiration Guiding System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Hyun Jeong; Oh, Se An

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Respiratory-gated radiation therapy (RGRT) has been used to minimize the dose to normal tissue in lung-cancer radiotherapy. The present research aims to improve the regularity of respiration in RGRT using a video coached respiration guiding system. In the study, 16 patients with lung cancer were evaluated. The respiration signals of the patients were measured by a real-time position management (RPM) Respiratory Gating System (Varian, USA) and the patients were trained using the video coached respiration guiding system. The patients performed free breathing and guided breathing, and the respiratory cycles were acquired for ~5 min. Then, Microsoft Excel 2010 software was used to calculate the mean and standard deviation for each phase. The standard deviation was computed in order to analyze the improvement in the respiratory regularity with respect to the period and displacement. The standard deviation of the guided breathing decreased to 65.14% in the inhale peak and 71.04% in the exhale peak compared with the...

  15. Global Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crow, Ben D

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1996). Globalization in Question: International Economy andGlobalization; Justice; Poverty; Underground Economy; United

  16. The assessment of greenhouse gas emissions from soils requires an accurate knowledge on the fate of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    that NIRS can help to take up. Keywords NIRS; soil organic matter pools; soil carbon sequestration; soil on the fate of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) in soils. This know- ledge shouldn't be limited to C and N stocks on carbon stocks (CS) in soils at a global scale. Increasing carbon stocks in soils is possible through

  17. PHOTOSYNTHESIS AND GLOBAL CHANGE CAN CLIMATE DRIVEN CHANGES IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barron-Gafford, Greg

    PHOTOSYNTHESIS AND GLOBAL CHANGE CAN CLIMATE DRIVEN CHANGES IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS BE USED TO PREDICT in photosynthesis, and thus substrate supply, influence the rate of ecosystem respiration (Re). Further- more in photosynthesis might result in concomitant changes in both the rate, and temperature-sensitivity, of Re. Re

  18. The energetics of growth, respiration, and egestion of juvenile striped mullet, Mugil cephalus Linnaeus 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muska, Carl Frank

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    not have yielded useful results due to the effect of ration size on the water, protein, and caloric content of the fish. This study demonstrates the desirability of measuring growth in terms of changes in total protein and calories. Partial energy.... . . . . . . RESULTS. Experiment 1 Growth Caloric Analyses. Respiration. Unmeasured Energy Loss. Experiment 2. Growth. Caloric and Protein Analyses. Respiration. Egestion. DISCUSSION. Experiment l. Growth. Respiration Energy Budgets and Growth...

  19. The Soil Moisture Active and Passive Mission (SMAP): Science and Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Entekhabi, Dara

    The soil moisture active and passive mission (SMAP) will provide global maps of soil moisture content and surface freeze/thaw state. Global measurements of these variables are critical for terrestrial water and carbon cycle ...

  20. air-purifying respirator cartridges: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    360 RESPIRATION RATES AND LOW-OXYGEN TOLERANCE LIMITS IN SKIPJACK TUNA, KATSUWONUS PELAMIS Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: that skipjack tuna ofall sizes...

  1. Metabolic spatial variability in electrode-respiring Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renslow, Ryan S.; Babauta, Jerome T.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Boyanov, Maxim I.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Majors, Paul D.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Certain bacteria are capable of transferring electrons derived from respiratory metabolism to solid extracellular electron-accepting materials1-4. This ability allows the organisms to use conductive substrata as their sole electron sink, generating electricity that is available for practical applications5-7. Geobacter is a biofilm-forming genus capable of this extracellular electron transfer8-11. Evidence in the literature suggests that Geobacter cells produce a conductive matrix to gain access to electron-accepting surfaces12,13. It has been hypothesized that cells that are more than tens of microns from the electron-accepting surface cannot respire because of electrical resistance in the matrix and thus remain metabolically inactive14-16. To test this hypothesis, we sought to determine whether the entire biofilm remains metabolically active and able to respire on an electron-accepting surface as the biofilm thickness increases. We developed and used a novel electrochemical-nuclear magnetic resonance (EC-NMR) microimaging system capable of sustaining an electrochemically active biofilm on a polarized electrode inside a superconducting magnet, allowing for simultaneous NMR and electrochemical investigation of a biofilm for the first time. Here, we show that Geobacter biofilms can grow to several hundred microns thick while respiring on an electrode and that the top of the biofilm remains metabolically active. This is only possible if the cells near the top are able to transfer electrons through the initial biofilm matrix to the electrode. We used X-ray absorption spectroscopy to verify electron transfer to uranium ions by metabolically active cells near the top of the biofilm. Our results reveal that extracellular electron transfer is not prevented by electrical resistance, even when the biofilm is hundreds of microns thick. Furthermore, the electron donor may be the limiting factor for respiration and the base of the biofilm may be less active despite being in close proximity to the electrode. Long-range electron transfer across metabolically inactive regions within Geobacter biofilms adds a novel facet to our comprehension of electrochemically active biology.

  2. Artificial Soiling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    pigments found in soils throughout the United States roughly following the USDA soil taxonomy 11. Ensuring a repeatable test formulation was straightforward when using...

  3. Stability of Biomass-derived Black Carbon in Soils . | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stability of Biomass-derived Black Carbon in Soils . Stability of Biomass-derived Black Carbon in Soils . Abstract: Black carbon (BC) may play an important role in the global C...

  4. Permafrost soils and carbon cycling

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ping, C. L.; Jastrow, J. D.; Jorgenson, M. T.; Michaelson, G. J.; Shur, Y. L.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Knowledge of soils in the permafrost region has advanced immensely in recent decades, despite the remoteness and inaccessibility of most of the region and the sampling limitations posed by the severe environment. These efforts significantly increased estimates of the amount of organic carbon stored in permafrost-region soils and improved understanding of how pedogenic processes unique to permafrost environments built enormous organic carbon stocks during the Quaternary. This knowledge has also called attention to the importance of permafrost-affected soils to the global carbon cycle and the potential vulnerability of the region's soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks to changing climatic conditions. Inmore »this review, we briefly introduce the permafrost characteristics, ice structures, and cryopedogenic processes that shape the development of permafrost-affected soils, and discuss their effects on soil structures and on organic matter distributions within the soil profile. We then examine the quantity of organic carbon stored in permafrost-region soils, as well as the characteristics, intrinsic decomposability, and potential vulnerability of this organic carbon to permafrost thaw under a warming climate. Overall, frozen conditions and cryopedogenic processes, such as cryoturbation, have slowed decomposition and enhanced the sequestration of organic carbon in permafrost-affected soils over millennial timescales. Due to the low temperatures, the organic matter in permafrost soils is often less humified than in more temperate soils, making some portion of this stored organic carbon relatively vulnerable to mineralization upon thawing of permafrost.« less

  5. Soils Soil Series

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz9MorganYou areInnovation Portal Software0SoilSoils

  6. Soils Soil Series

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz9MorganYou areInnovation Portal Software0SoilSoils0

  7. Summary We estimated total ecosystem respiration from a ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws.) plantation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Ronald C.

    Summary We estimated total ecosystem respiration from a ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex, 1998. We apportioned ecosystem respi- ration among heterotrophic, root, stem and foliage based on re respiration component at selected sampling points, and scaled the mea- surements up to the ecosystem based

  8. Stem respiration in tropical forests along an elevation gradient in the Amazon and Andes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malhi, Yadvinder

    Stem respiration in tropical forests along an elevation gradient in the Amazon and Andes A M A N D metabolism, resulting in the release of carbon dioxide as a by-product. Little is known of how autotrophic respiration components vary across environmental gradients, particularly in tropical ecosystems. Here, we

  9. A satellite-based biosphere parameterization for net ecosystem CO2 exchange: Vegetation Photosynthesis and Respiration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, John Chun-Han

    Photosynthesis and Respiration Model (VPRM) Pathmathevan Mahadevan,1 Steven C. Wofsy,1 Daniel M. Matross,1 12 April 2008. [1] We present the Vegetation Photosynthesis and Respiration Model (VPRM), a satellite of ecosystem photosynthesis, and annual sum of NEE at all eddy flux sites for which it is optimized

  10. Analysis of the effects of a proposed rule for the enforcement of respirable dust standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Britton, Robert Grant

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of a rule for the enforcement of respirable dust standards proposed by the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) has been evaluated. Respirable coal dust sample data collected over a three year period by a mining company were used...

  11. Redefinition and Global Estimation of Basal Ecosystem1 Respiration Rate2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leclerc, Monique Y.

    Division, Technical University of Denmark, Risř National Laboratory for50 Sustainable Energy, 2800 Kgs, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI 53706, USA28 11 Institute for Environment and Sustainability, Climate Geography and Ecosystems Analysis, Lund University,54 Lund S-22100, Sweden55 27 Department of Physics

  12. R E V I E W Plant respiration and photosynthesis in global-scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dukes, Jeffrey

    2012 Introduction The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) uses the output of Earth system models (ESMs; Collins et al., 2011) to make projections of future rates of climate change. These models

  13. Diel patterns of soil respiration in a tropical forest after Hurricane Wilma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vargas, Rodrigo; Allen, Michael F.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and A. E. Lugo (1992), Hurricane Hugo - Damage to a Tropicaldecomposition following hurricane litter inputs in severalforest to 10 years of hurricanes and droughts, Ecol.

  14. Acclimatization of soil respiration to warming in a tall grass prairie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to climatic warming2±4 . The feedback mechanism is usually based on the assumption that observed sensitivity feedbacks into the climatic system. Climatic warming, on one hand, potentially stimulates nutrient) since 21 November 1999 to study respiratory sensitivity to climate change. We also used clipping

  15. POST OAK SAVANNA IN TRANSITION: JUNIPER ENCROACHMENT AND CLIMATE CHANGE ALTER GRASSLAND SOIL RESPIRATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Bennie

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    -arid environment of the post oak savannah is an ecotone in transition. As juniper encroachment replaces native grasses, changes in species composition may affect carbon cycling. Given that water is limiting in this warm-temperate climate, changing precipitation...

  16. Globalization Nationalized

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazlish, Bruce

    Globalism and globalization have been seen as competitors to other allegiances, namely regionalism and nationalism. A look at recent efforts at reconceptualizing global history in China, Korea and the U.S., however, suggests ...

  17. The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Entekhabi, Dara

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission is one of the first Earth observation satellites being developed by NASA in response to the National Research Council's Decadal Survey. SMAP will make global measurements of ...

  18. Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--Soil Biota

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--Soil Biota USDA, Natural Resources Conservation Service May 2001 Rangeland Sheet 8 What are soil biota? Soil biota, the biologically active powerhouse of soil, include an incredible diversity of organisms. Tons of soil biota, including micro

  19. RESPIRATION RATES AND LOW-OXYGEN TOLERANCE LIMITS IN SKIPJACK TUNA, KATSUWONUS PELAMIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RESPIRATION RATES AND LOW-OXYGEN TOLERANCE LIMITS IN SKIPJACK TUNA, KATSUWONUS PELAMIS REGINALD M of voluntarily active skipjack tuna, Katsuwonus pelamis, at 23°_24° C were measured in the laboratory from

  20. 7, 38373857, 2007 Global transports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and 180 are still transporting into soil and water. It is found that lighter PCBs have more long range international concern with identifying and managing environmentally persistent substances that are bothACPD 7, 3837­3857, 2007 Global transports and budgets of PCBs P. Huang et al. Title Page Abstract

  1. Soil erosion and agricultural sustainability David R. Montgomery*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montgomery, David R.

    Soil erosion and agricultural sustainability David R. Montgomery* Department of Earth and Space conventionally plowed agricultural fields average 1­2 orders of magnitude greater than rates of soil production indicates that, considered globally, hill- slope soil production and erosion evolve to balance geologic

  2. The potential to mitigate global warming with no-tillage management is only realized when practised in the long term

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Six, J; Ogle, S M; Breidt, F J; Conant, R T; Mosier, A R; Paustian, K

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential to mitigate global warming with no-tillageNT adoption reduces the net global warming potential (GWP)soil for purposes of global warming mitigation. Our results

  3. IMPORTED SOIL OR SOIL-FORMING MATERIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IMPORTED SOIL OR SOIL-FORMING MATERIALS PLACEMENT BPG NOTE 5 Best Practice Guidance for Land of heavy industry. Soil material initially present on a site may have been removed or stored in bunds the original soil that has been stored or importing a soil from elsewhere or using a soil-forming material

  4. APBI 402 / SOIL 502 SUSTAINABLE SOIL MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Anthony P.

    1 APBI 402 / SOIL 502 SUSTAINABLE SOIL MANAGEMENT TERM 1 - 2014/15 Lead Instructors*: Maja Krzic indicators to assess sustainability of land management practices. Characterize the soil chemical environment 402-Sustainable Soil Management SOIL 502-Advanced Sustainable Soil Management Final exam 35% Final

  5. Soils and Environment Soil fertility and soil processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Feifei

    be removed without blasting. Definition of soil #12; Land use planning, urbanization, timber management, landslides, and earthquakes Soils often carry a climatic signal Soil properties related to environmental soil. The fertile soils formed on glacial deposits in the mid-western United States are transported

  6. The heritability of daily ranges in rectal temperature, respiration rate, and pulse rate in lactating cows 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vega C., Eduardo Humberto

    1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the data were oolleoted. K. ghly significant oorrelations of temperature with stags of lactation and of respiration with stage of lactation were found among Jerseys, among Holsteins highly significant correlations were found as follows: temperature... in rectal temperature can be expla. 'mod on '. hs basis of the regression of this variable on stage of lactation~ while 10. 5T of the variation in the daily range in respiration rate ca; be explain. d on the basis of the regress'. i n of dai&~ range...

  7. ECE 331 -Biomedical Instrumentation Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, UBC EKG Derived Respiration / Rate (EDR/R)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pulfrey, David L.

    EKG Derived Respiration / Rate (EDR/R) Due: Start of NEXT Class (collect all data during lab) An EKG between the cardiac vector and the EKG pads. This change modifies the amplitude of the EKG signal. EDR which is respiration. EDR is monitored using the IVY patient monitor by selecting "Impedance

  8. Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality-- Physical and Biological Soil Crusts USDA, Natural Resources Conservation Service May 2001 Rangeland Sheet 7 What are soil crusts? A physical crust is a thin layer with reduced porosity and increased density at the surface of the soil. A biological crust

  9. Warming and Intensified Summer Drought Influence Leaf Dark Respiration and Related Plant Traits in Three Dominant Species of the Southern Oak Savanna

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindgren, Kourtnee Marr

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The short-term temperature-response of dark respiration may be altered by climate warming through temperature acclimation; however the role of drought in influencing thermal acclimation is not known. We hypothesized that leaf dark respiration...

  10. Summary Forest soils store an immense quantity of labile carbon (C) and a may be a large potential sink for atmos-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Rodney J.

    Summary Forest soils store an immense quantity of labile carbon (C) and a may be a large potential the same time period. Compared with control seedlings, total root biomass was 27% greater in fertilized toward the end of the study were a result of increased respiring root biomass. We conclude that fertiliza

  11. Fishery Bulletin, Vol. 79, No. 1 Gooding, Reginald M., William H. Neill, and Andrew E. Dizon, "Respiration rates and low-oxygen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , "Respiration rates and low-oxygen tolerance limits in skipjack tuna, Katsuwonus pelamis:' p. 31-48. 1) Page 31

  12. A deeper respired carbon pool in the glacial equatorial Pacific Ocean L.I. Bradtmiller a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sachs, Julian P.

    A deeper respired carbon pool in the glacial equatorial Pacific Ocean L.I. Bradtmiller a, , R in paleoceanography. We present evidence from ten equatorial Pacific Ocean sediment cores to show that the deep Pacific Ocean likely stored more carbon during the last glacial period than the Holocene

  13. I am delighted to announce the publication, in Ad-vances in Photosynthesis and Respiration (AIPH)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Govindjee "Gov"

    I am delighted to announce the publication, in Ad- vances in Photosynthesis and Respiration (AIPH-Clermont and Sabeeha Mer- chant); and Volume 14 (Photosynthesis in Algae, edited by Anthony Larkum, Susan Douglas-7923-3682-8); Volume 3: Biophysical Techniques in Photosynthesis (24 Chapters; 411 pages; 1996; edited by the late Jan

  14. Photosynthesis & Respiration 2009 1 Minority Science Programs School of Biological Sciences University of California, Irvine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Michael R.

    Photosynthesis & Respiration 2009 1 Minority Science Programs ­ School of Biological Sciences" hetero = "another" 2. During photosynthesis, plants and phytoplankton use energy from the sun to combine: An anacharis plant in water produces oxygen when it photosynthesizes. 3. Photosynthesis takes place within

  15. Decomposition of peat from upland boreal forest: Temperature dependence and sources of respired carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Litvak, Marcy

    Decomposition of peat from upland boreal forest: Temperature dependence and sources of respired boreal peat under black spruce forest with sphagnum and feather moss understory using incubation increments. At temperatures below 0°C, significant decomposition was observed in feather moss peat

  16. Microbial Respiration and Its Consequences on Oxygen Availability in Peat Substrate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    91 Microbial Respiration and Its Consequences on Oxygen Availability in Peat Substrate R. Naasz, J to Horticulture 2, rue Le Nôtre, F-49045 Angers Cedex 01 France Keywords: peat, oxygen uptake, microorganisms (Sphagnum peat) on oxygen transport and availability to the root. This is why, a one-dimensional transfer

  17. ECG-Derived Respiration: Comparison and New Measures for Respiratory Variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    During ECG recording, several methods can be applied to derive a respiratory signal from the ECG (EDR signal). In this paper 4 EDR methods, including ECG filtering, R and RS amplitude based techniques-derived respiration or EDR signals and arise from the movement of electrodes with respect to the heart during

  18. Application of Kernel Principal Component Analysis for Single Lead ECG-Derived Respiration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    signal from ECGs. In this study, an improved ECG-derived respiration (EDR) algorithm based on kernel PCA function (RBF) kernel performs the best when deriving EDR signals. Further improvement is carried outPCA is assessed by comparing the EDR signals to a reference respiratory signal, using the correlation

  19. Use of MAG-1 spectacles with positive- and negative-pressure respirators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, K.A.; Moore, T.O.

    1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of testing conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Personnel Protection Studies Section, using MAG-1 spectacles in conjunction with positive- and negative-pressure full-facepiece respirators, are reported. The purpose of the three-phase study was to determine if the specially constructed strap of the MAG-1s affected the protection factors (PFs) of the respirators or the cylinder life of selected self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA). The following respirators were tested with the MAG-1s: (1) Phases I and II, positive-pressure full facepiece: Presur-Pak II SCBA (pressure-demand) Scottoramic facepiece, MSA 401 Air Mask Ultravue facepiece (medium), Survivair pressure-demand SCBA/silicone full facepiece, MSA powered air-purifying respirator/Ultravue facepiece (medium); and (2) Phase III, negative-pressure full facepiece: MSA Ultravue (small, medium, large), MSA Ultra-twin (small, medium, large), Norton Series 7600 (one size only). Statistical analysis and review of the test data from Phases I and II indicated little, if any, variation with and without the MAG-1s with most protection factors greater than 10,000. Test data also indicated little, if any, difference in the cylinder life with and without the MAG-1s, except the Scott Presur-Pak II SCBA used with the Scottoramic facepiece. Statistical analysis of the quantitative fit test data indicated no difference in PFs for the negative-pressure devices for the Ultravue negative-pressure respirator, but a significance at the 0.05 and 0.01 levels for the Ultra-twin and Norton full facepieces, respectively.

  20. Surface Soil

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructure ofIndustrialSupportingAlbedo at theSurface Soil Surface Soil

  1. Measuring spatial variability in soil characteristics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoskinson, Reed L. (Rigby, ID); Svoboda, John M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sawyer, J. Wayne (Hampton, VA); Hess, John R. (Ashton, ID); Hess, J. Richard (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides systems and methods for measuring a load force associated with pulling a farm implement through soil that is used to generate a spatially variable map that represents the spatial variability of the physical characteristics of the soil. An instrumented hitch pin configured to measure a load force is provided that measures the load force generated by a farm implement when the farm implement is connected with a tractor and pulled through or across soil. Each time a load force is measured, a global positioning system identifies the location of the measurement. This data is stored and analyzed to generate a spatially variable map of the soil. This map is representative of the physical characteristics of the soil, which are inferred from the magnitude of the load force.

  2. Impact of Hillslope-Scale Organization of Topography, Soil Moisture, Soil Temperature, and Vegetation on Modeling Surface Microwave Radiation Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flores, Alejandro N.

    Microwave radiometry will emerge as an important tool for global remote sensing of near-surface soil moisture in the coming decade. In this modeling study, we find that hillslope-scale topography (tens of meters) influences ...

  3. Soil organic carbon sequestration potential of cropland in China Zhangcai Qin,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pittendrigh, Barry

    Soil organic carbon sequestration potential of cropland in China Zhangcai Qin,1,2 Yao Huang,1), Soil organic carbon sequestration potential of cropland in China, Global Biogeochem. Cycles, 27, doi:10 carbon (SOC) in cropland is of great importance to the global carbon (C) balance and to agricultural

  4. Warming accelerates decomposition of decades-old carbon in forest soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ). Although there are no global estimates of decadal-aged C, it makes up the majority of C in mineral soils, CA 94720; and d Energy and Resources Group, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 Edited (received for review January 10, 2012) Global climate carbon-cycle models predict acceleration of soil

  5. Global Health Research | 2 Global Health Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    Global Health Research | 2 Global Health Research Supporting researchers in low- and middle-income countries to carry out health- related research within their own countries. Gl bal Health #12;3 | Global Health Research #12;Global Health Research | 4 We are a global charitable foundation dedicated

  6. The effect of respiration heat of sorghum grain on the design of conditioned-air storage systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haile, Danel Gene

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE EFFECT OF RESPIRATION HEAT OF SORGHUM GRAIN ON THE DESIGN OF CONDITIONED-AIR STORAGE SYSTEMS A Thesis by DANEL GENE HAILE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AIM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1967 Major Subject: Agricultural Engineering THE EFFECT OF RESPIRATION HEAT OF SORGHUM GRAIN ON THE DESIGN OF CONDITIONED-AIR STORAGE SYSTEMS A Thesis by DANEL GENE HAILE Approved as to style and content by: C airman...

  7. Effects of drinking water temperature on water consumption, respiration rates, and body temperatures of lactating Holstein cows in summer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lanham, Jeffrey Kent

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECTS OF DRINKING WATER TEMPERATURE ON WATER CONSUMPTION, RESPIRATION RATES, AND BODY TEMPERATURES OF LACTATING HOLSTEIN COWS IN SUMMER A Thesis by JEFFREY KENT LANHAM Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1985 Major Subject: Nutrition EFFECTS OF DRINKING WATER TEMPERATURE ON WATER CONSUMPTION, RESPIRATION RATES, AND BODY TEMPERATURES OF LACTATING HOLSTEIN COWS IN SUMMER A Thesis...

  8. air-purifying respirator performance: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for 25-30 % of the worlds soil carbon (C), mainly due to large carbon stocks in deep peat and frozen soil layers. While peatlands have served as historical sinks of carbon,...

  9. Understanding Global Capitalism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, William I.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sociology; globalization; political economy; development;economy fueled through 700 billion dollars injected into globalizationGlobalization Studies, also called CGS. I would economy and

  10. Persistence of soil organic matter as an ecosystem property

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, M.W.; Torn, M. S.; Abiven, S.; Dittmar, T.; Guggenberger, G.; Janssens, I.A.; Kleber, M.; Kögel-Knabner, I.; Lehmann, J.; Manning, D.A.C.; Nannipieri, P.; Rasse, D.P.; Weiner, S.; Trumbore, S.E.

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Globally, soil organic matter (SOM) contains more than three times as much carbon as either the atmosphere or terrestrial vegetation. Yet it remains largely unknown why some SOM persists for millennia whereas other SOM decomposes readily—and this limits our ability to predict how soils will respond to climate change. Recent analytical and experimental advances have demonstrated that molecular structure alone does not control SOM stability: in fact, environmental and biological controls predominate. Here we propose ways to include this understanding in a new generation of experiments and soil carbon models, thereby improving predictions of the SOM response to global warming.

  11. Soil Series

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz9MorganYou areInnovation Portal Software0 Soil

  12. Building Fertile Soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindsey, Ann

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Backyard Guide to Healthy Soil and Higher Yields, by JohnInstitute. Start with the Soil, by Grace Gershuny. Emmaus,Institute. 1993. The Soul of Soil: A Guide to Ecological

  13. The mobility of water soluble organic compounds in soils from the land application of petroleum waste sludge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Gordon Barcus

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of gas oil. Fertilizer effects. The nutrient balance further af- fects deterioration of oil. For instance, petroleum sludges have a high C:N ratio which can serve to limit microbial respiration to well below its potential. Addi- tion of nitrogen... an API oil-water separator sludge. Three soils, Bastrop sandy loam, Nacogdoches clay loam, and Norwood loam, were chosen to be representative of potential disposal sites. A sludge containing 41/ water and 10/ solvent extractable hydrocarbons...

  14. Global Warming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.NewofGeothermal Heat Pump Basics31/2007 TeppeiProgramsGlobal1

  15. Academy for Global Engagement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Academy for Global Engagement 2013-2014 Global Fellows #12;Meredith Gore and Wildlife #12;Global Research Interests · risk percepHon and public support and Agricultural Engineering #12;Global Research Interests · catalyHc conversion of biomass

  16. global warming's six indias

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, Gary L.

    global warming's six indias: An Audience Segmentation Analysis #12;Global Warming's Six Indias 1............................................................................................................................................20 2. Global Warming Beliefs and Attitudes................................................................................ 21 Knowledge about global warming varies widely by group

  17. Extractable soil phosphorus in Blackland Prairie soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byrd, Robert Claude

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CONCLUSIONS . REFERENCES. . APPENDIX. 92 . 94 99 . . 104 Vlh Table LIST OF TABLES Page Extractable soil P ratings for the TAEX, Bray I, Olsen, and TAEX 3 soil P extractants 18 Chemical properties of preliminary soil sample (Fall 1992) taken from..., and 8 0). The authors, however, noted that Olsen and TAEX extractable P also resulted in acceptable correlation values All the above extractants were highly correlated (r& 0. 94) with total P uptake for both the calcareous soil and the slightly acidic...

  18. CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Soybean Breeding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Soybean Breeding Committee Membership Dr. Joseph Bouton - committee chair Dr. Brian Schwartz Department of Crop & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University of Georgia University of Georgia Center

  19. CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Forage Breeding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Forage Breeding Committee Membership Dr. Joseph Bouton - committee chair Dr. Brian Schwartz Department of Crop & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University of Georgia University of Georgia Center

  20. Hillslope-scale soil moisture estimation with a physically-based ecohydrology model and L-band microwave remote sensing observations from space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flores, Alejandro Nicolas

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Soil moisture is a critical hydrosphere state variable that links the global water, energy, and carbon cycles. Knowledge of soil moisture at scales of individual hillslopes (10's to 100's of meters) is critical to advancing ...

  1. Validation of protection provided by one brand of filtering facepiece respirator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peacock, J.R. [Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham, AL (United States). Dept. of Environmental Health Sciences

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A previous laboratory study of a widely used disposable dust / mist (D/M) respirator (3M{trademark}8710) utilized a challenge agent that had high penetration values for D/M filter media. Therefore, measured protection factors (PFs) reflected both filter and faceseal penetration, and would be lower than that expected for faceseal penetration only. The purpose of this study was to determine a PF for this brand of disposable D/M respirator using a challenge agent that has low filter penetration for this type of filter. Methodology involved qualitatively (QLFT) and quantitatively (QNFT) fit testing 15 males and 15 females while wearing the respirator. One QLFT was done per subject using the saccharin method. Three QNFTs were performed on each subject utilizing a 2.5 {mu}m mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) monodisperse challenge aerosol. Measured PF`s were corrected for lung deposition of this size aerosol. The average fit for each subject was the arithmetic mean of the three PFs. The PFs were found to be approximately log-normally distributed, so logs of PFs were used in the statistical analysis. The exponent of the 95% lower tolerance level (LTL) of the fifth percentile of the log PFs was 50. This compares to an exponent of the 95% LTL of the fifth percentile of the log PFs of two determined in a previous study and to the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Assigned Protection Factor (APF) of ten. No significant difference of average fit between males and females was found. The sensitivity of the saccharin QLFT was 42.9%, and specificity could not be evaluated.

  2. Environmental Soil Chemistry Second Edition Environmental Soil Chemistry illustrates fundamental principles of soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Environmental Soil Chemistry Second Edition Environmental Soil Chemistry illustrates fundamental principles of soil chemistry with respect to environmental reactions between soils and other natural contemporary training in the basics of soil chemistry and applications to real-world environmental concerns

  3. Influence of temperature on respiration of excised tissues from citrus seedlings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peynado, Ascension

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) To observe the change in respiration as the tissue was freeze-injured, dry flasks were loaded with 96 leaf disks per flask and placed in -26 C freezer for intervals of 5 to 30 minutes. After the freezing tests, the flasks were prepared for normal C02..., Washington, D. C. Some plants will withstand more cold than others, as evidenced by their distribution (3, 13, 50, 53). Frost resistance studies have revealed that although plants cannot tolerate intercellular ice formation? some plants will tolerate...

  4. Soil Testing and Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ciocan-Fontanine, Ionut

    Soil Testing and Research Analytical Laboratory Copyright © 2014 University of Minnesota Soil Testing and Research Analytical Laboratory Department of Soil, Water and Climate College of Food payable to the University of Minnesota We also accept the following credit cards: Soil Testing

  5. Indiana Soil and Landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holland, Jeffrey

    Indiana Soil and Landscape Evaluation Manual Version 1.0 D.P. Franzmeier G.C. Steinhardt D soil scientists to be the state soil. The scale on the gray panel is in decimeters and feet. The upper 18 inches (46 cm) of the soil formed in Wisconsinan age loess, and the lower part formed

  6. Is it safe to wear contact lenses with a full-facepiece respirator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Da Roza, R.A.; Weaver, C.

    1985-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Federal OSHA regulation that prohibits the wearing of contact lenses while using a respirator is being challenged by users. We surveyed 9100 fire fighters around the US and Canada to determine if the wearing of contacts while using a self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) had caused any serious problems to warrant this strict regulation. Of the 1405 questionnaires returned, 403 fire fighters do wear contacts with SCBA, despite the regulation. Of these, only six responded that contact-lens related problems had caused them to remove the facepiece in an environment in which the facepiece would normally be worn. In contrast, the safety-related problems caused by eyeglasses in SCBA - which are legal - are proportionately higher. Over half of the supervisors returning the questionnaire admitted that some of their employees wear contacts with SCBA; however, these supervisors knew of only eight cases when contact-lens problems had caused the facepiece to be removed when it should not have been. Our investigation has indicated that these problems were not significantly hazardous. We believe that the use of contacts with a respirator should not be prohibited. 7 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  7. Spatial distribution of an uranium-respiring betaproteobacterium at the rifle, CO field research site

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Koribanics, Nicole M.; Tuorto, Steven J.; Lopez-Chiaffarelli, Nora; McGuinness, Lora R.; Häggblom, Max M.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Long, Philip E.; Kerkhof, Lee J.; Morais, Paula V

    2015-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy’s Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Site (IFRC) at Rifle, Colorado was created to address the gaps in knowledge on the mechanisms and rates of U(VI) bioreduction in alluvial sediments. Previous studies at the Rifle IFRC have linked microbial processes to uranium immobilization during acetate amendment. Several key bacteria believed to be involved in radionuclide containment have been described; however, most of the evidence implicating uranium reduction with specific microbiota has been indirect. Here, we report on the cultivation of a microorganism from the Rifle IFRC that reduces uranium and appears to utilize it as a terminalmore »electron acceptor for respiration with acetate as electron donor. Furthermore, this bacterium constitutes a significant proportion of the subsurface sediment community prior to biostimulation based on TRFLP profiling of 16S rRNA genes. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicates that the microorganism is a betaproteobacterium with a high similarity to Burkholderia fungorum. This is, to our knowledge, the first report of a betaproteobacterium capable of uranium respiration. Our results indicate that this microorganism occurs commonly in alluvial sediments located between 3-6 m below ground surface at Rifle and may play a role in the initial reduction of uranium at the site.« less

  8. Spatial distribution of an uranium-respiring betaproteobacterium at the rifle, CO field research site

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Koribanics, Nicole M. [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Tuorto, Steven J. [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Lopez-Chiaffarelli, Nora [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); McGuinness, Lora R. [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Häggblom, Max M. [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Williams, Kenneth H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Long, Philip E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Kerkhof, Lee J. [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Morais, Paula V [Univ. of Coimbra (Portugal)

    2015-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy’s Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Site (IFRC) at Rifle, Colorado was created to address the gaps in knowledge on the mechanisms and rates of U(VI) bioreduction in alluvial sediments. Previous studies at the Rifle IFRC have linked microbial processes to uranium immobilization during acetate amendment. Several key bacteria believed to be involved in radionuclide containment have been described; however, most of the evidence implicating uranium reduction with specific microbiota has been indirect. Here, we report on the cultivation of a microorganism from the Rifle IFRC that reduces uranium and appears to utilize it as a terminal electron acceptor for respiration with acetate as electron donor. Furthermore, this bacterium constitutes a significant proportion of the subsurface sediment community prior to biostimulation based on TRFLP profiling of 16S rRNA genes. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicates that the microorganism is a betaproteobacterium with a high similarity to Burkholderia fungorum. This is, to our knowledge, the first report of a betaproteobacterium capable of uranium respiration. Our results indicate that this microorganism occurs commonly in alluvial sediments located between 3-6 m below ground surface at Rifle and may play a role in the initial reduction of uranium at the site.

  9. Soil washing technology evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suer, A.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental Restoration Engineering (ERE) continues to review innovative, efficient, and cost effective technologies for SRS soil and/or groundwater remediation. As part of this effort, this technical evaluation provides review and the latest information on the technology for SRS soil remediation. Additional technology evaluation reports will be issued periodically to update these reports. The purpose of this report is to review the soil washing technology and its potential application to SRS soil remediation. To assess whether the Soil Washing technology is a viable option for SRS soil remediation, it is necessary to review the technology/process, technology advantages/limitations, performance, applications, and cost analysis.

  10. Soil Test P vs. Total P in Wisconsin Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balser, Teri C.

    Soil Test P vs. Total P in Wisconsin Soils Larry G. Bundy & Laura W. Good Department of Soil Science University of Wisconsin-Madison #12;Introduction · Soil test P is often measured · Little information is available on total P content of soils · Why do we care about total P now? ­ Soil total P

  11. Aquatic respiration in many fishes is a mechanical ballet in which water is pumped from the oropharyngeal chamber,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Summers, Adam P.

    pattern at the three openings into the respiratory system: (1) in through the spiracle only, (2Aquatic respiration in many fishes is a mechanical ballet in which water is pumped from of discontinuous flow into the mouth and out of the gill slit(s). The blood flow in the respiratory structures

  12. Diurnal and seasonal variation in the carbon isotope composition of leaf dark-respired CO2 in velvet mesquite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, David G.

    Diurnal and seasonal variation in the carbon isotope composition of leaf dark-respired CO2 82071, USA ABSTRACT We evaluated diurnal and seasonal patterns of carbon isotope composition of leaf- ing that progressive 13 C enrichment of the CO2 evolved by darkened leaves during the daytime mainly

  13. Subarctic Pacific evidence for a glacial deepening of the oceanic respired carbon pool S.L. Jaccard a,d,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Subarctic Pacific evidence for a glacial deepening of the oceanic respired carbon pool S.L. Jaccard of the overturning circulation. Volumetrically the Pacific Ocean dominates the world ocean (it is three times larger of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, USA c Department of Geosciences, Princeton

  14. PVDF microbelts for harvesting energy from respiration Chengliang Sun, Jian Shi, Dylan J. Bayerl and Xudong Wang*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xudong

    PVDF microbelts for harvesting energy from respiration Chengliang Sun, Jian Shi, Dylan J. Bayerl the energy from low-speed air flow to electricity via their resonant oscillation. The micrometre thick PVDF microbelts were able to generate sufficient electrical energy from low speed air flow for the sustained

  15. Production, oxygen respiration rates, and sinking velocity of copepod fecal pellets: Direct measurements of ballasting by opal and calcite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthews, Adrian

    Production, oxygen respiration rates, and sinking velocity of copepod fecal pellets: Direct of copepod fecal pellets egested by Temora longicornis were measured using a nanoflagellate (Rhodomonas sp pellet production varied between 0.8 pellets ind21 h21 and 3.8 pellets ind21 h21 and was significantly

  16. Exploring the biochemistry at the extracellular redox frontier of bacterial mineral Fe(III) respiration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richardson, David J.; Edwards, Marcus; White, Gaye F.; Baiden, Nanakow; Hartshorne, Robert S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Shi, Liang; Zachara, John M.; Gates, Andrew J.; Butt, Julea N.; Clarke, Thomas

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many species of the bacterial Shewanella genus are notable for their ability to respire in anoxic environments utilizing insoluble minerals of Fe(III) and Mn(IV) as extracellular electron acceptors. In Shewanella oneidensis, the process is dependent on the decahaem electron-transport proteins that lie at the extracellular face of the outer membrane where they can contact the insoluble mineral substrates. These extracellular proteins are charged with electrons provided by an inter-membrane electron-transfer pathway that links the extracellular face of the outer membrane with the inner cytoplasmic membrane and thereby intracellular electron sources. In the present paper, we consider the common structural features of two of these outermembrane decahaem cytochromes, MtrC and MtrF, and bring this together with biochemical, spectroscopic and voltammetric data to identify common and distinct properties of these prototypical members of different clades of the outer-membrane decahaem cytochrome superfamily.

  17. Nitrification in Texas Soils.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1920-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    have a high nitrificati is the balmcing of these extremes which redlices the average le between acid ancl non-acid soils. C03TPOSITION OF SOILS TVITFI LOW AND HIGH NITRIFIC-4TION. Table 11 contains the chemical composition of soils having low nitl... are subsoils. Subsoils thus possess nnu~nally high and unusually low nitrification. Table 11.-Chemical composition of soils with nitrification below 10 . I Average .............................. Nitri- fication 7164 7090 4596' 5710 4645 3976 3657 3...

  18. Managing Soil Salinity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provin, Tony; Pitt, John L.

    2001-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    helps the water move downward through the soil. While deep tillage will help temporarily, the parts of the soil not permanently broken up may reseal. Leaching: Leaching can be used to reduce the salts in soils. You must add enough low-salt water...

  19. UNSATURATED SOIL MECHANICS IMPLEMENTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    UNSATURATED SOIL MECHANICS IMPLEMENTATION DURING PAVEMENT CONSTRUCTION QUALITY ASSURANCE Mn !! Performance Based Construction QA !! Unsaturated Soil Mechanics !! What We've Learned !! Next Steps #12.6-6.0 5 - 7 19 0.8 5 7 - 9 24 1.1 4 9 - 11 28 1.2 4 #12;Unsaturated Soil Mechanics #12;Fundamentals

  20. Assessment of contrast enhanced respiration managed cone-beam CT for image guided radiotherapy of intrahepatic tumors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Nikolaj K. G., E-mail: nkyj@regionsjaelland.dk [Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6A3K7 (Canada)] [Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6A3K7 (Canada); Stewart, Errol [Radiology, St. Joseph's Health Care, London, Ontario N6A 4V2 (Canada) [Radiology, St. Joseph's Health Care, London, Ontario N6A 4V2 (Canada); Imaging Research Lab, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A 5B7 (Canada); Imaging Program, Lawson Health Research Institute, London, Ontario N6C 2R5 (Canada); Lock, Michael; Fisher, Barbara [Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6A3K7 (Canada) [Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6A3K7 (Canada); Department of Oncology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 4L6 (Canada); Kozak, Roman [Radiology, St. Joseph's Health Care, London, Ontario N6A 4V2 (Canada)] [Radiology, St. Joseph's Health Care, London, Ontario N6A 4V2 (Canada); Chen, Jeff [Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6A3K7 (Canada) [Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6A3K7 (Canada); Department of Oncology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 4L6 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5C1 (Canada); Lee, Ting-Yim [Radiology, St. Joseph's Health Care, London, Ontario N6A 4V2 (Canada) [Radiology, St. Joseph's Health Care, London, Ontario N6A 4V2 (Canada); Imaging Research Lab, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A 5B7 (Canada); Imaging Program, Lawson Health Research Institute, London, Ontario N6C 2R5 (Canada); Department of Oncology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 4L6 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5C1 (Canada); Wong, Eugene [Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6A3K7 (Canada) [Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6A3K7 (Canada); Department of Oncology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 4L6 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5C1 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Contrast enhancement and respiration management are widely used during image acquisition for radiotherapy treatment planning of liver tumors along with respiration management at the treatment unit. However, neither respiration management nor intravenous contrast is commonly used during cone-beam CT (CBCT) image acquisition for alignment prior to radiotherapy. In this study, the authors investigate the potential gains of injecting an iodinated contrast agent in combination with respiration management during CBCT acquisition for liver tumor radiotherapy. Methods: Five rabbits with implanted liver tumors were subjected to CBCT with and without motion management and contrast injection. The acquired CBCT images were registered to the planning CT to determine alignment accuracy and dosimetric impact. The authors developed a simulation tool for simulating contrast-enhanced CBCT images from dynamic contrast enhanced CT imaging (DCE-CT) to determine optimal contrast injection protocols. The tool was validated against contrast-enhanced CBCT of the rabbit subjects and was used for five human patients diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma. Results: In the rabbit experiment, when neither motion management nor contrast was used, tumor centroid misalignment between planning image and CBCT was 9.2 mm. This was reduced to 2.8?mm when both techniques were employed. Tumors were not visualized in clinical CBCT images of human subjects. Simulated contrast-enhanced CBCT was found to improve tumor contrast in all subjects. Different patients were found to require different contrast injections to maximize tumor contrast. Conclusions: Based on the authors’ animal study, respiration managed contrast enhanced CBCT improves IGRT significantly. Contrast enhanced CBCT benefits from patient specific tracer kinetics determined from DCE-CT.

  1. QUESTIONS ABOUT GLOBAL WARMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    QUESTIONS ABOUT GLOBAL WARMING ĄIS IT REAL? ĄIS IT IMPORTANT? ĄWHAT IS IT DUE TO? ĄHOW MUCH MORE in the atmosphere, giving Earth its temperate climate. Global Atmosphere, Global Warming GLOBAL TEMPERATURE TREND IS THIS CARBON DIOXIDE COMING FROM? Other sources are home heating and electric power production. WE ARE ALL

  2. Global Health Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Ophir

    Bay Area Global Health Seminar Series Moving beyond millennium targets in global health: The challenges of investing in health and universal health coverage Although targets can help to focus global health efforts, they can also detract attention from deeper underlying challenges in global health

  3. Global Warming Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schofield, Jeremy

    Global Warming Observations: 1. Global temperature has been gradually rising in recent years #15 in range 8000 12000 nm { CFC's, methane and N 2 O important for global warming even though concentra- tions in concentration of \\greenhouse gases" like CO 2 What determines global temperature? Energy budget of earth: 1

  4. SOIL MICROBIAL COMMUNITY CARBON AND NITROGEN DYNAMICS WITH ALTERED PRECIPITATION REGIMES AND SUBSTRATE AVAILABILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tiemann, Lisa K.

    2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the nature and extent of the feedback between soil microorganisms and ecosystem processes is of great concern as we are faced with multiple elements of global environmental change. In this dissertation, I explore how anthropogenically...

  5. Modeling land surface processes of the midwestern United States : predicting soil moisture under a warmer climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winter, Jonathan (Jonathan Mark)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation seeks to quantify the response of soil moisture to climate change in the midwestern United States. To assess this response, a dynamic global vegetation model, Integrated Biosphere Simulator, was coupled ...

  6. Iodine in Texas Soils.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach); Fudge, J. F. (Joseph Franklin)

    1939-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , while the quantity of iodine in spinach bore a close relation to the quantity of iodine in the soil. The action. of the added iodine differed with the kind of soil. Hercus and Roberts (12) state that loam has a marked retentive power for soluble... in surface soils by soil types High 1 0 1 p. *. rn. Low p. p. m. .- 1.1 ........ 1.6 2.5 0.8 1.5 ........ ........ 1.1 ........ 2.0 East Texas Timber Country Upland soils with friable subsoils: Bowie fine sandy loam...

  7. Summary report, California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection evaluation of full-face air-purifying respirators for wildland fire fighting use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beason, D.G.; Johnson, J.S.; Foote, K.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Weaver, W.A. [California Dept. of Forestry and Fire Protection, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wildland fire suppression personnel employed by the CDF do not currently have the equipment to protect themselves from the short-term acute affects of smoke from wildland fires. In addition, no regulations exist that specify appropriate respiratory protection and the current air-purifying respirator technology and carbon monoxide monitoring has not been adapted to fit wildland fire suppression requirements. This three-year limited study evaluated the ability of wildland fire fighters to perform their normal job function while wearing full-face air-purifying respirators. In the first two years of this study we designed, developed and field tested a prototype ``smart`` air-purifying respirator which incorporated a real-time carbon monoxide monitor into a commercial full-face respirator.` Data on carbon monoxide exposure while fighting wildland fires was collected. During the third year of this study we evaluated eight different commercially available full-face air-purifying respirators equipped with a variety of cartridges. Apparatus to aid the fire fighter in carrying the respirator and carbon monoxide personal monitor was designed and fabricated. A smoke exposure test method was developed and a laboratory study on the penetration of smoke through respirator cartridges was conducted.

  8. Production of CO2 in Soil Profiles of a California Annual Grassland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fierer, Noah

    Production of CO2 in Soil Profiles of a California Annual Grassland Noah Fierer,1 * Oliver A play a key role in the global cycling of carbon (C), storing organic C, and releasing CO2 to the atmosphere. Although a large number of studies have focused on the CO2 flux at the soil­air inter- face

  9. Modeling impacts of carbon sequestration on net greenhouse gas emissions from agricultural soils in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling impacts of carbon sequestration on net greenhouse gas emissions from agricultural soils impacts of carbon sequestration on net greenhouse gas emissions from agricultural soils in China, Global Biogeochem. Cycles, 23, GB1007, doi:10.1029/2008GB003180. 1. Introduction [2] Carbon (C) sequestration has

  10. R E V I E W Mineral soil carbon fluxes in forests and implications for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    not considered in accounting for global C fluxes because mineral soil C is commonly thought to be relativelyR E V I E W Mineral soil carbon fluxes in forests and implications for carbon balance assessments of Environment and Natural Resources, 209 Hills Building, University of Vermont, 81 Carrigan Drive, Burlington

  11. Overview of different aspects of climate change effects on soils.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qafoku, Nikolla

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate change [i.e., high atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations (?400 ppm); increasing air temperatures (2-4°C or greater); significant and/or abrupt changes in daily, seasonal, and inter-annual temperature; changes in the wet/dry cycles; intensive rainfall and/or heavy storms; extended periods of drought; extreme frost; heat waves and increased fire frequency] is and will significantly affect soil properties and fertility, water resources, food quantity and quality, and environmental quality. Biotic processes that consume atmospheric CO2 and create organic carbon (C) that is either reprocessed to CO2 or stored in soils, are the subject of active current investigations with great concern over the influence of climate change. In addition, abiotic C cycling and its influence on the inorganic C pool in soils is a fundamental global process in which acidic atmospheric CO2 participates in the weathering of carbonate and silicate minerals, ultimately delivering bicarbonate and Ca2+ or other cations that precipitate in the form of carbonates in soils or are transported to the rivers, lakes, and oceans. Soil responses to climate change will be complex, and there are many uncertainties and unresolved issues. The objective of the review is to initiate and further stimulate a discussion about some important and challenging aspects of climate-change effects on soils, such as accelerated weathering of soil minerals and resulting C and elemental fluxes in and out of soils, soil/geo-engineering methods used to increase C sequestration in soils, soil organic matter (SOM) protection, transformation and mineralization, and SOM temperature sensitivity. This review reports recent discoveries and identifies key research needs required to understand the effects of climate change on soils.

  12. Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--Introduction USDA, Natural Resources of the soil, the vegetation, the water, and the air as well as the ecological processes of the rangeland ecosystem are balanced and sustained. What is soil? Soil is a dynamic resource that supports plants

  13. Soil Horizons Some Noteworthy Soil Science in Wisconsin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mladenoff, David

    Soil Horizons Some Noteworthy Soil Science in Wisconsin Alfred E. Hartemink The impact and benefits of soil science have only partly been documented. Here I highlight four noteworthy soil science achievements from the state of Wisconsin that took place between 1870 and the early 1980s: (i) the first soil

  14. Respiration Induced Heart Motion and Indications of Gated Delivery for Left-Sided Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qi, X. Sharon, E-mail: xiangrong.qi@ucdenver.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States); Hu, Angela [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States); Wang Kai [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Newman, Francis [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States); Crosby, Marcus; Hu Bin; White, Julia; Li, X. Allen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate respiration-induced heart motion for left-sided breast irradiation using a four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) technique and to determine novel indications to assess heart motion and identify breast patients who may benefit from a gated treatment. Methods and Materials: Images of 4DCT acquired during free breathing for 20 left-sided breast cancer patients, who underwent whole breast irradiation with or without regional nodal irradiation, were analyzed retrospectively. Dose distributions were reconstructed in the phases of 0%, 20%, and 50%. The intrafractional heart displacement was measured in three selected transverse CT slices using D{sub LAD} (the distance from left ascending aorta to a fixed line [connecting middle point of sternum and the body] drawn on each slice) and maximum heart depth (MHD, the distance of the forefront of the heart to the line). Linear regression analysis was used to correlate these indices with mean heart dose and heart dose volume at different breathing phases. Results: Respiration-induced heart displacement resulted in observable variations in dose delivered to the heart. During a normal free-breathing cycle, heart-induced motion D{sub LAD} and MHD changed up to 9 and 11 mm respectively, resulting in up to 38% and 39% increases of mean doses and V{sub 25.2} for the heart. MHD and D{sub LAD} were positively correlated with mean heart dose and heart dose volume. Respiratory-adapted gated treatment may better spare heart and ipsilateral-lung compared with the conventional non-gated plan in a subset of patients with large D{sub LAD} or MHD variations. Conclusion: Proposed indices offer novel assessment of heart displacement based on 4DCT images. MHD and D{sub LAD} can be used independently or jointly as selection criteria for respiratory gating procedure before treatment planning. Patients with great intrafractional MHD variations or tumor(s) close to the diaphragm may particularly benefit from the gated treatment.

  15. Globalization of biopharmaceutical manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pande, Rachna

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The biomanufacturing industry is changing due to increasing globalization. However, it is changing differently from other high tech industries like software/ semiconductor/ automobiles. In this study we use global ...

  16. Global Environmental Course Title

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takada, Shoji

    : Environmental discourses, Environment and development in Africa, Environmental conservation and Ainu people Department Global Environmental Studies Room Course Title Frontier of Sustainability Science Instructor Akihisa MORI, Global Environmental Studies Satoshi KONISHI, Institute of Advanced

  17. Nonsingular static global string

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Sen; N. Banerjee

    2000-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A new solution for the spacetime outside the core of a U(1) static global string has been presented which is nonsingular. This is the first example of a nonsingular spacetime around a static global string.}}

  18. Review: Globalization of Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennant, Matthew Aaron

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review: Globalization of Water: Sharing the Planet’sAshok K. Globalization of Water: Sharing the Planet’s140) liters of virtual water (p. 15). This is one of the

  19. Cows Causing Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi

    2008-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Broadcast Transcript: Remember when President Reagan blamed trees for air pollution? Well now the Japanese are blaming cows for global warming. Apparently, the methane emissions from burping cows account for 5% of all global greenhouse gases. Simple...

  20. Remote sensing of heart rate and patterns of respiration on a stationary subject using 94 GHz millimeter wave interferometry.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mikhelson, I. V.; Bakhtiari, S.; Elmer, T. W.; Sahakian, A. V. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (Northwestern University)

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using continuous wave, 94-GHz millimeter-wave interferometry, a signal representing chest wall motion can be obtained that contains both the heart rate and respiration patterns of a human subject. These components have to be separated from each other in the received signal. Our method was to use the quadrature and in-phase components of the signal, after removing the mean of each, to find the phase, unwrap it, and convert it to a displacement measurement. Using this, the power spectrum was examined for peaks, which corresponded to the heart rate and respiration rate. The displacement waveform of the chest was also analyzed for discrete heartbeats using a novel wavelet decomposition technique.

  1. Department of Crop and Soil Sciences PhD Graduate Research Assistantship: Soil Science/Soil Quality/Soil Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flury, Markus

    Department of Crop and Soil Sciences PhD Graduate Research Assistantship: Soil Science/Soil Quality/Soil Physics Position Summary: Plastic mulches are used in agriculture to conserve water, suppress weeds, and increase soil temperatures. However, plastic mulches need to be disposed off at the end

  2. TheSoil Moisture ActivePassive (SMAP) Mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montana, University of

    will allow signifi- cantly improved estimates of water, energy, and carbon transfers between the land latitudes. The SMAP mission concept will utilize L-band radar and radiometer instruments sharing a rotating 6-m mesh reflector antenna to provide high- resolution and high-accuracy global maps of soil

  3. Atmosphere-soil-stream greenhouse gas fluxes from peatlands 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dinsmore, Kerry J.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Peatlands cover approximately 2-3% of the world’s land area yet represent approximately a third of the worlds estimated total soil carbon pool. They therefore play an important role in regulating global atmospheric CO2 and CH4 concentrations...

  4. An exploratory study of heart rate, respiration, and galvanic skin response as they relate to affective rating of recorded music

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruner, Gordon Carl

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that because of the autonomic equilibrium maintained in the body, it is impossible to stimulate a system, no matter how mildly, without some evidence of the disturbance being produced. So the question faced by the researcher was not whether the body... of autonomic reactivity (heart rate, respiration, and galvanic skin response) and the level at which a person rated a song. Further, the main product of the study is a statement oi some of the salient issues and factors involved in the testing...

  5. Macrobenthic community structure and total sediment respiration at cold hydrocarbon seeps in the northern Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nunnally, Clifton Charles

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    respiration should signal clear differentiation between macrobenthic communities at seeps and those away from seeps. These changes could possibly be exhibited in a gradient separating seep locales from the background benthic... pathway that metabolizes methane and other hydrocarbons results with the production of hydrogen sulfide (Boetius et al., 2000; DeLong, 2000; Hansen et al., 1998; Hoehler et al., 1994). This occurs in a coupled reaction of anaerobic methane oxidation...

  6. Building Fertile Soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindsey, Ann

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    soil amendments such as compost, manure, cover crops, andare some readily available sources: j Compost is rich inorganic matter, and making compost is a great way to recycle

  7. Does an elevated CO2 concentration decrease dark respiration in trees? Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, Stephen [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (US)

    2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Averaged across many previous investigations, doubling the CO2 concentration ([CO2]) has frequently been reported to cause an instantaneous reduction of leaf dark respiration measured as CO2 efflux. No known mechanism accounts for this effect. While four recent studies have shown that the measurement of respiratory CO2 efflux is prone to experimental artifacts that could account for the reported response, papers published since the start of the current research continue to report an instantaneous depression of respiratory CO2 efflux by elevation of [CO2]. Here, these artifacts are avoided by use of a high-resolution dual channel oxygen analyzer within an open gas exchange system to measure respiratory 02 uptake in normal air. Leaf 02 uptake was determined in response to instantaneous elevation of [CO2] in nine contrasting species and to long-term elevation in seven species from four of the DOE-sponsored long-term elevated [CO2] field experiments. Over one thousand separate measurements of respiration failed to reveal any decrease in respiratory 02 uptake with an instantaneous increase in [CO2]. Respiration was found insensitive not only to doubling [CO2], but also to a five-fold increase and to decrease to zero.

  8. Urinary 1-hydroxypyrene concentrations in Chinese coke oven workers relative to job category, respirator usage, and cigarette smoking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bo Chen; Yunping Hu; Lixing Zheng; Qiangyi Wang; Yuanfen Zhou; Taiyi Jin [Fudan University, Shanghai (China). School of Public Health

    2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    1-Hydroxypyrene (1-OHP) is a biomarker of recent exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). We investigated whether urinary 1-OHP concentrations in Chinese coke oven workers (COWs) are modulated by job category, respirator usage, and cigarette smoking. The present cross-sectional study measured urinary 1-OHP concentrations in 197 COWs from Coking plant I and 250 COWs from Coking plant II, as well as 220 unexposed referents from Control plant I and 56 referents from Control plant II. Urinary 1-OHP concentrations (geometric mean, {mu}mol/mol creatinine) were 5.18 and 4.21 in workers from Coking plants I and II, respectively. The highest 1-OHP levels in urine were found among topside workers including lidmen, tar chasers, and whistlers. Benchmen had higher 1-OHP levels than other workers at the sideoven. Above 75% of the COWs exceeded the recommended occupational exposure limit of 2.3 {mu}mol/mol creatinine. Respirator usage and increased body mass index (BMI) slightly reduced 1-OHP levels in COWs. Cigarette smoking significantly increased urinary 1-OHP levels in unexposed referents but had no effect in COWs. Chinese COWs, especially topside workers and benchmen, are exposed to high levels of PAHs. Urinary 1-OHP concentrations appear to be modulated by respirator usage and BMI in COWs, as well as by smoking in unexposed referents.

  9. Effects of drinking water temperature on respiration rates, body temperatures, dry matter intake, and milk production in lactating Holstein cows in summer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milam, Kyle Zohn

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECTS OF DRINKING WATER TEMPERATURE ON RESPIRATION RATES, BODY TEMPERATURES, DRY MATTER INTAKE, AND MILK PRODUCTION IN LACTATING HOLSTEIN COWS IN SUMMER A Thesis by KYLE ZOHN MILAM Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University... in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1985 Major Subject: Nutrition EFFECTS OF DRINKING WATER TEMPERATURE ON RESPIRATION RATES, BODY TEMPERATURES, DRY MATTER INTAKE, AND MILK PRODUCTION IN LACTATING HOLSTEIN...

  10. Process Modeling of Global Soil Nitrous Oxide Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saikawa, E.

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nitrous oxide is an important greenhouse gas and is a major ozone-depleting substance. To understand and

  11. SOIL TEST INTERPRETATIONS RECOMMENDATIONS HANDBOOK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, James S.

    1 SOIL TEST INTERPRETATIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS HANDBOOK Originally written 1983 By Daryl D..................................................20 SOIL ACIDITY AND LIMESTONE...............................................27 EXCHANGEABLE MAGNESIUM No. Page No. I. Nitrogen rate adjustments based upon soil texture, organic matter, and time of major

  12. Soil and Water Conservation (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Soil and water conservation districts (SWCDs) were established in the 1930s to develop comprehensive programs and plans to conserve soil resources, control and prevent soil erosion, prevent floods...

  13. Soil and Water Conservation (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board is established to encourage and oversee soil-conserving land-use practices, and to provide for the conservation of soil and related resources and...

  14. Design Editorial Globalization and Internationalism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papalambros, Panos

    ; especially, the development of an increasingly integrated global economy marked especially by free tradeJournal of Mechanical Design Editorial Globalization and Internationalism There has always been and Strabo, but to Friedman's empirical observations of globalization. According to Wikipedia, "globalization

  15. Chapter 14 Geology and Soils

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in bold and acronyms are defined in Chapter 32, Glossary and Acronyms. Chapter 14 Geology and Soils This chapter describes existing geological and soil conditions in the...

  16. Soil and Water Conservation (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Indiana Association of Soil and Water Conservation Districts is an association of the 92 soil and water conservation districts, each representing one of the 92 Indiana counties.

  17. Soil Conservation Districts Law (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation establishes a soil and water conservation division within the Iowa Department of Agriculture, as well as local soil and water conservation districts. The regulations accompanying...

  18. On-Farm Soil Monitoring for Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holland, Jeffrey

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Soil quality and soil management resources the air which helps build soil organic matter and tilth, and sustains the soil resource for future generations and other species. Improving and protecting soil quality can help support sustainable crop

  19. INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS &INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS &INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS & THE GLOBAL ECONOMYTHE GLOBAL ECONOMYTHE GLOBAL ECONOMY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krylov, Anna I.

    GLOBAL ECONOMYTHE GLOBAL ECONOMY This major offers students rigorous interdisciplinary training 331: The Global Economy 2030 -- Examination of key ideas from economics, demography and technology. Guest lecturers illuminate possible conditions of the global economy in 2030. IR 454: International

  20. Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    roots, rills, gullies, wind scours, and soil deposition reflect such processes as runoff and erosion. Waterflow patterns X X 3. Pedestals and/or terracettes X X 4. Bare ground X X 5. Gullies X X 6. Wind. Compaction layer X X X 12. Functional/structural groups X 13. Plant mortality/ decadence X 14. Litter amount

  1. Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--Compaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--Compaction USDA, Natural Resources Conservation Service May 2001 Rangeland Sheet 4 What is compaction? Soil compaction occurs when moist or wet soil aggregates are pressed together and the pore space between them is reduced. Compaction changes

  2. Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--Water Erosion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--Water Erosion USDA, Natural Resources and removal of soil material by water. The process may be natural or accelerated by human activity. The rate of erosion may be very slow to very rapid, depending on the soil, the local landscape, and weather conditions

  3. Beth Brockett SOIL 502 Soil Quality Analysis -Chemistry Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beth Brockett SOIL 502 Soil Quality Analysis - Chemistry Case Study "Sustainability Street are represented by the Podzolic Order, and more specifically form part of the Bose Soil Management Group) with a limited decomposer community dominated by fungi. Any remnants of native soil at the Sustainability Street

  4. SoilSciSubjAreas.doc September 12, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balser, Teri C.

    ) Soldat, Douglas J. (turfgrass and urban soils) Soil Pedology Bockheim, James G. (pedology/forest soils

  5. The effect of soil water upon soil albedo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graser, Elizabeth Annette

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE EFFECT OF SOIL WATER UPON SOIL ALBEDO A Thesis by ELIZABETH ANNETTE GRASER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A/M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 19S1 Major Sub...]ect: Soil Science THE EFFECT OF SOIL WATER UPON SOIL ALBEDO A Thesis by ELI ZABETH ANNETTE GRASER Approved as to style and content by: arrman of Committee Mem er Rem er ea o epar nt August 1981 The Effect of Soil Water upon Soil Albedo. (August...

  6. Engineering the global ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stringfellow, William T.; Jain, Ravi

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of humans deliberately engineering agricultural landscapes.010-0302-8 EDITORIAL Engineering the global ecosystemtale about human explorers engineering the ecosystem of Mars

  7. UNDERSTANDING SOIL Larry G. Bundy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balser, Teri C.

    available for plant uptake, extraction, or measured by soil test. #12;Phosphorus (P) Loss Processes slowly soluble compounds: Sorbed P ·Clays ·Al and Fe oxides Secondary P minerals (precipitation #12;Effect of soil extraction time on water extractable soil P concentration for two soils. 22 24 26

  8. CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Irrigation Specialist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Irrigation Specialist Committee Membership Dr. John Beasley - committee chair Dr. Jared Whitaker Department of Crop & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University: (229) 386-7308 Fax: (912) 681-0376 Dr. Robert Carrow Dr. Mark Risse Department of Crop & Soil Sciences

  9. Digital Soil Mapping: Interactions with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grunwald, Sabine

    Chapter 21 Digital Soil Mapping: Interactions with and Applications for Hydropedology J.A. Thompson,1, * S. Roecker,2 S. Grunwald3 and P.R. Owens4 ABSTRACT Spatial information on soils, particularly hydrologic and hydromorphic soil properties, is used to understand and assess soil water retention, flooding

  10. CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Quantitative Genomics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Quantitative Genomics Committee Membership Dr. Scott Jackson - committee chair Dr. Peng-Wah Chee Department of Crop & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University of Horticulture Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University of Georgia University of Georgia 2360 Rainwater Rd

  11. The response of soil CO2 ux to changes in atmospheric CO2, nitrogen supply and plant diversity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    The response of soil CO2 Żux to changes in atmospheric CO2, nitrogen supply and plant diversity J O. Paul, MN 55108 USA Abstract We measured soil CO2 Żux over 19 sampling periods that spanned two growing three major anthropogenic global changes: atmos- pheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration, nitrogen (N

  12. Cs deposition and vertical migration in soils from Argentina J. Juri Ayub, M. Rizzotto, J. Toso, H. Velasco

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

    1 137 Cs deposition and vertical migration in soils from Argentina J. Juri Ayub, M. Rizzotto, J), Universidad Nacional de San Luis. CONICET. Ejército de los Andes 950, 5700 San Luis, Argentina Abstract. Vertical migration of 137 Cs global fallout was studied in soils from Argentina. The sampling area

  13. Husnjak et al., 2004. Soil inventory and soil classification in Croatia ISRIC World Soil Information Country Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossiter, D G "David"

    Husnjak et al., 2004. Soil inventory and soil classification in Croatia Page 1 ISRIC World Soil Information Country Series Soil inventory and soil classification in Croatia: historical review, current classification in Croatia Page 2 Summary An historical overview of soil survey and soil classification activities

  14. Geochemical Cycling of Iodine Species in Soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Q; Moran, J E; Blackwood, V

    2007-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Iodine is an important element in studies of environmental protection and human health, global-scale hydrologic processes and nuclear nonproliferation. Biogeochemical cycling of iodine in soils is complex, because iodine occurs in multiple oxidation states and as inorganic and organic species that may be hydrophilic, atmophilic, and biophilic. In this study, we applied new analytical techniques to study the content and speciation of stable iodine in representative surface soils, and sorption and transport behavior of iodine species (iodide, iodate, and 4-iodoaniline) in sediments collected at numerous nuclear facilities in the United States, where anthropogenic {sup 129}I from prior nuclear fuel processing activities poses an environmental risk. The surface soil samples were chosen for their geographic locations (e.g., near the ocean or nuclear facilities) and for their differing physico-chemical characteristics (organic matter, texture, etc). Extracted solutions were analyzed by IC and ICP-MS methods to determine iodine concentrations and to examine iodine speciation (iodide, iodate, and organic iodine). In natural soils, iodine is mostly (nearly 90% of total iodine) present as organic species, while inorganic iodine becomes important (up to 50%) only in sediments with low organic matter. Results from laboratory column studies, aimed at examining transport of different iodine species, showed much greater retardation of 4-iodoaniline than iodide or iodate. Careful attention must be given to potential interconversion among species when interpreting the biogeochemical behavior of iodine in the environment. In addition to speciation, input concentration and residence time effects will influence the biogeochemical cycling of anthropogenic 129I deposited on surface soils.

  15. Determination of respirable mass concentration using a high volume air sampler and a sedimentation method for fractionation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, J.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A preliminary study of a new method for determining respirable mass concentration is described. This method uses a high volume air sampler and subsequent fractionation of the collected mass using a particle sedimentation technique. Side-by-side comparisons of this method with cyclones were made in the field and in the laboratory. There was good agreement among the samplers in the laboratory, but poor agreement in the field. The effect of wind on the samplers` capture efficiencies is the primary hypothesized source of error among the field results. The field test took place at the construction site of a hazardous waste landfill located on the Hanford Reservation.

  16. Soil Erosion (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Board of Water and Soil Resources has adopted a model ordinance to serve as the minimum standard for local governments, which are asked to implement standards and administrative procedures...

  17. Globalization: Ecological Consequences of Global-Scale Connectivity in People,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    11 Globalization: Ecological Consequences of Global-Scale Connectivity in People, Resources of the global mineral aerosol load (Tanaka & Chiba, 2006). #12;The Systemic Dimension of Globalization212 of Agriculture ­ Agricultural Research Service, Las Cruces, New Mexico USA 1. Introduction Globalization

  18. Automated soil gas monitoring chamber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Edwards, Nelson T.; Riggs, Jeffery S.

    2003-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A chamber for trapping soil gases as they evolve from the soil without disturbance to the soil and to the natural microclimate within the chamber has been invented. The chamber opens between measurements and therefore does not alter the metabolic processes that influence soil gas efflux rates. A multiple chamber system provides for repetitive multi-point sampling, undisturbed metabolic soil processes between sampling, and an essentially airtight sampling chamber operating at ambient pressure.

  19. global warming's six americas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, Gary L.

    Energy Sources 17 Subsidies for Fossil Fuel and Renewable Energy Industries 18 Support for a Carbon Tax and Costs of Reducing Fossil Fuel Use and Global Warming 8 The Alarmed 9 The Concerned 10 The Cautious 11 the spring and fall of 2012. Perceived Benefits and Costs of Reducing Fossil Fuel Use and Global Warming

  20. Global Change Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    Global Change and Sustainability Center The GCSC is an inclusionary and interdisciplinary hub that promotes, coordinates, and conducts local to global environmental- and sustainability-related research to complex environmental and sustainability issues and challenges. 2012 Annual Report #12;1GCSC 2012 ANNUAL

  1. Global Development Our Responsibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of expertise cover urgent global issues such as food production, energy supply, climate change, biodiversity e ort to address urgent global issues particularly a ecting developing countries e.g. climate change of Communication, 2012 · Project Leader: Karin Nilsson · Graphic Design: Viktor Wrange & Michael Kvick Cover Photo

  2. CHILLING CONSIDERATIONS GLOBAL WARMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    (millionsofsquarekilometers) 30 20 10 MELTING OF GREENLAND ICE CAP Satellite determination of maximum extent of glacial melt Complete melt of the Greenland ice sheet would raise the level of the global ocean 23 feet. ASAN Steffen IS INCREASING Global carbon dioxide concentration over the last thousand years Polar ice cores #12;Mann et al

  3. Soil Biology & Biochemistry 38 (2006) 22922299 Modifications of degradation-resistant soil organic matter by soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miksik, Ivan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Soil Biology & Biochemistry 38 (2006) 2292­2299 Modifications of degradation-resistant soil organic matter by soil saprobic microfungi Veronika R eza´ c ova´ a,b,Ă, Hana Hrs elova´ a , Hana Gryndlerova in their solutions and in sterile soil by microfungal species and two well-known HA degraders were studied

  4. Saving our soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grandy, A. Stuart; Billings, Sharon A.; Richter Dan

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    when we consider how important the world’s soils are to human civilization. Within the next several decades, about 9–10 billion people will increasingly require food, timber, fiber, and bioenergy, as well as related ecosystem ser- vices... producers, motivated by short-term finances, increase inputs of fertilizers and pesticides to maximize yields, frequently with adverse environmental impacts. Subsistence farmers coax decreasing crop yields from soils that can no longer be managed sustainably...

  5. Storage and turnover of organic matter in soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torn, M.S.; Swanston, C.W.; Castanha, C.; Trumbore, S.E.

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Historically, attention on soil organic matter (SOM) has focused on the central role that it plays in ecosystem fertility and soil properties, but in the past two decades the role of soil organic carbon in moderating atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations has emerged as a critical research area. This chapter will focus on the storage and turnover of natural organic matter in soil (SOM), in the context of the global carbon cycle. Organic matter in soils is the largest carbon reservoir in rapid exchange with atmospheric CO{sub 2}, and is thus important as a potential source and sink of greenhouse gases over time scales of human concern (Fischlin and Gyalistras 1997). SOM is also an important human resource under active management in agricultural and range lands worldwide. Questions driving present research on the soil C cycle include: Are soils now acting as a net source or sink of carbon to the atmosphere? What role will soils play as a natural modulator or amplifier of climatic warming? How is C stabilized and sequestered, and what are effective management techniques to foster these processes? Answering these questions will require a mechanistic understanding of how and where C is stored in soils. The quantity and composition of organic matter in soil reflect the long-term balance between plant carbon inputs and microbial decomposition, as well as other loss processes such as fire, erosion, and leaching. The processes driving soil carbon storage and turnover are complex and involve influences at molecular to global scales. Moreover, the relative importance of these processes varies according to the temporal and spatial scales being considered; a process that is important at the regional scale may not be critical at the pedon scale. At the regional scale, SOM cycling is influenced by factors such as climate and parent material, which affect plant productivity and soil development. More locally, factors such as plant tissue quality and soil mineralogy affect decomposition pathways and stabilization. These factors influence the stability of SOM in part by shaping its molecular characteristics, which play a fundamental role in nearly all processes governing SOM stability but are not the focus of this chapter. We review here the most important controls on the distribution and dynamics of SOM at plot to global scales, and methods used to study them. We also explore the concepts of controls, processes, and mechanisms, and how they operate across scales. The concept of SOM turnover, or mean residence time, is central to this chapter and so it is described in some detail. The Appendix details the use of radiocarbon ({sup 14}C), a powerful isotopic tool for studying SOM dynamics. Much of the material here was originally presented at a NATO Advanced Study Institute on 'Soils and Global Change: Carbon Cycle, Trace Gas Exchange and Hydrology', held June 16-27, 1997, at the Chateau de Bonas, France.

  6. SOIL QUALITY AND CROP Dick Wolkowski

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balser, Teri C.

    Protection Soil pH Crop residue Tillage intensity Soil test P and K Water availability Bulk density Soil SOIL QUALITY Inherent properties Texture Organic matter Aggregation Water holding capacity - Nutrient cycling - 1 g of soil has 100,000,000 bacteria #12;Water Soil particle Plant root SOIL IS HABITAT

  7. acids soils ph: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Soil Sciences PhD Graduate Research Assistantship: Soil ScienceSoil QualitySoil Physics Environmental Management and Restoration Websites Summary: Department of Crop and Soil...

  8. Cross-shift peak expiratory flow changes are unassociated with respirable coal dust exposure among South African coal miners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naidoo, R.N.; Robins, T.G.; Becklake, M.; Seixas, N.; Thompson, M.L. [University of KwaZulu Natal, Durban (South Africa)

    2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    he objectives of this study were to determine whether cross-shift changes in peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) were related to respirable dust exposure in South African coalminers. Fifty workers were randomly selected from a cohort of 684 miners from 3 bituminous coal mines in Mpumalanga, South Africa. Peak expiratory efforts were measured prior to the commencement of the shift, and at the end of the shift on at least two occasions separated by at least 2 weeks, with full shift personal dust sampling being conducted on each occasion for each participant. Interviews were conducted, work histories were obtained and cumulative exposure estimates were constructed. Regression models examined the associations of cross-shift changes in PEFR with current and cumulative exposure, controlling for shift, smoking and past history of tuberculosis. There were marginal differences in cross-shift PEFR (ranging from 0.1 to 2 L/min). Linear regression analyses showed no association between cross-shift change in PEFR and current or cumulative exposure. The specific shift worked by participants in the study showed no effect. Our study showed no association between current respirable dust exposure and cross-shift changes in PEFR. There was a non-significant protective effect of cumulative dust exposure on the outcome, suggesting the presence of a 'healthy worker survivor effect' in this data.

  9. Global warming, bad weather, insurance losses and the global economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Low, N.C. [UOB Life Assurance Ltd., Singapore (Singapore); Shen, S. [Global Warming International Center, Woodridge, IL (United States)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Global warming causes extremely bad weather in the near term. The impact on the insurance industry is described. Why global warming in the near term causes very bad weather is explained. The continuing trend of very bad weather and the future impact on the insurance industry is explored. How very bad weather can affect the global financial market is explained. Taking a historical view of the development of the modern economy, the authors describe in the near term the impact of global warming on the global economy. The long term impact of global warming on the global economy and the human race is explored. Opportunities presented by global warming are described.

  10. Procedures to predict vertical differential soil movement for expansive soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naiser, Donald David

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Damage to lightly loaded structures, paving and service piping in areas of expansive clay soils has occurred throughout the world. The cause of this damage has been the inability to accurately model expansive soil movement so that foundations...

  11. China's Global Oil Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Bryan G

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    21, 2008. Ying, Wang. “ China, Venezuela firms to co-developoilfields. ” China Daily (27 August 2005) http://David and Bi Jianhai. “China’s Global Hunt for Energy. ”

  12. Global Cool Cities Alliance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is currently supporting the Global Cool Cities Alliance (GCCA), a non-profit organization that works with cities, regions, and national governments to speed the...

  13. China's Global Oil Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Bryan G

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    nations began to seek out oil reserves around the world. 3on the limited global oil reserves and spiking prices. Manyto the largest proven oil reserves, making up 61 percent of

  14. Global warming elucidated

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, S. [Global Warming International Center, Woodridge, IL (United States)

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The meaning of global warming and its relevance to everyday life is explained. Simple thermodynamics is used to predict an oscillatory nature of the change in climate due to global warming. Global warming causes extreme events and bad weather in the near term. In the long term it may cause the earth to transition to another equilibrium state through many oscillation in climatic patterns. The magnitudes of these oscillations could easily exceed the difference between the end points. The author further explains why many no longer fully understands the nature and magnitudes of common phenomena such as storms and wind speeds because of these oscillations, and the absorptive properties of clouds. The author links the increase in duration of the El Nino to global warming, and further predicts public health risks as the earth transitions to another equilibrium state in its young history.

  15. Systems integration for global sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Le, A. Z. Khan, Improving integration for integrated coastal347 ISSUE 6225 Systems integration for global sustainabilitySUSTAINABILITY Systems integration for global sustainability

  16. Global climatic catastrophes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Budyko, M.I.; Golitsyn, G.S.; Izrael, A

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work inquires into global climatic catastrophes of the past, presenting data not easily available outside of the Socialist Countries, and applies these results to the study of future climatic developments, especially as they threaten in case of Nuclear Warfare - Nuclear Winter. The authors discuss probable after effects from the Soviet point of view on the basis of research, stressing the need to avoid all conflict which might lead to the next and final Global Climatic Catastrophy.

  17. Substrate and environmental controls on microbial assimilation of soil organic carbon: a framework for Earth System Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Xiaofeng [ORNL] [ORNL; Schimel, Joshua [University of California, Santa Barbara] [University of California, Santa Barbara; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL] [ORNL; Song, Xia [ORNL] [ORNL; Yuan, Fengming [ORNL] [ORNL; Goswami, Santonu [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microbial assimilation of soil organic carbon is one of the fundamental processes of global carbon cycling and it determines the magnitude of microbial biomass in soils. Mechanistic understanding of microbial assimilation of soil organic carbon and its controls is important for to improve Earth system models ability to simulate carbon-climate feedbacks. Although microbial assimilation of soil organic carbon is broadly considered to be an important parameter, it really comprises two separate physiological processes: one-time assimilation efficiency and time-dependent microbial maintenance energy. Representing of these two mechanisms is crucial to more accurately simulate carbon cycling in soils. In this study, a simple modeling framework was developed to evaluate the substrate and environmental controls on microbial assimilation of soil organic carbon using a new term: microbial annual active period (the length of microbes remaining active in one year). Substrate quality has a positive effect on microbial assimilation of soil organic carbon: higher substrate quality (lower C:N ratio) leads to higher ratio of microbial carbon to soil organic carbon and vice versa. Increases in microbial annual active period from zero stimulate microbial assimilation of soil organic carbon; however, when microbial annual active period is longer than an optimal threshold, increasing this period decreases microbial biomass. The simulated ratios of soil microbial biomass to soil organic carbon are reasonably consistent with a recently compiled global dataset at the biome-level. The modeling framework of microbial assimilation of soil organic carbon and its controls developed in this study offers an applicable ways to incorporate microbial contributions to the carbon cycling into Earth system models for simulating carbon-climate feedbacks and to explain global patterns of microbial biomass.

  18. Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--Wind Erosion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and to be blown away. A cover of plants disrupts the force of the wind. Soils are more susceptible to wind erosionSoil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--Wind Erosion USDA, Natural Resources Conservation Service May 2001 Rangeland Sheet 10 What is wind erosion? Wind erosion is the physical wearing

  19. soils.ifas.ufl.edu Soil & Water Science Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    interested in courses that emphasize sustainability, resource management, valuation of ecosystem servicessoils.ifas.ufl.edu UF/IFAS Soil & Water Science Department DISTANCE EDUCATION GRADUATE PROGRAMS #12;SOIL AND WATER SCIENCE DEPARTMENT The Soil and Water Science Department at the University of Florida

  20. Soils in the Riparian Incorporating Soil Dynamics into

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    distribution (salt moves with water) ­Anaerobic conditions ­Ponding and flooding #12;Dynamics of Soil Wetness environment · Salinity is transient, but moves slowest through clayey sediments (as does the water) · System in riparian areas #12;Soil Map Reliability · Soils in riparian settings (level, near water) often dramatically

  1. Soil and Water Conservation (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Florida’s 62 Soil and Water Conservation Districts were established in 1937 under Chapter 582 Florida Statutes. The law was based on federal model legislation to establish Soil and Water...

  2. Fernald Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwater...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Fernald Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Fernald Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Fernald...

  3. Miamisburg Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwate...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Miamisburg Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Miamisburg Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports...

  4. Intergrating Magnetotellurics, Soil Gas Geochemistry and Structural...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Intergrating Magnetotellurics, Soil Gas Geochemistry and Structural Analysis to Identify Hidden, High Enthalpy, Extensional Geothermal Systems Intergrating Magnetotellurics, Soil...

  5. Flow Partitioning in Fully Saturated Soil Aggregates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Xiaofan; Richmond, Marshall C.; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Perkins, William A.; Resat, Haluk

    2014-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Microbes play an important role in facilitating organic matter decomposition in soils, which is a major component of the global carbon cycle. Microbial dynamics are intimately coupled to environmental transport processes, which control access to labile organic matter and other nutrients that are needed for the growth and maintenance of microorganisms. Transport of soluble nutrients in the soil system is arguably most strongly impacted by preferential flow pathways in the soil. Since the physical structure of soils can be characterized as being formed from constituent micro aggregates which contain internal porosity, one pressing question is the partitioning of the flow among the “inter-aggregate” and “intra-aggregate” pores and how this may impact overall solute transport within heterogeneous soil structures. The answer to this question is particularly important in evaluating assumptions to be used in developing upscaled simulations based on highly-resolved mechanistic models. We constructed a number of diverse multi-aggregate structures with different packing ratios by stacking micro-aggregates containing internal pores and varying the size and shape of inter-aggregate pore spacing between them. We then performed pore-scale flow simulations using computational fluid dynamics methods to determine the flow patterns in these aggregate-of-aggregates structures and computed the partitioning of the flow through intra- and inter-aggregate pores as a function of the spacing between the aggregates. The results of these numerical experiments demonstrate that soluble nutrients are largely transported via flows through inter-aggregate pores. Although this result is consistent with intuition, we have also been able to quantify the relative flow capacity of the two domains under various conditions. For example, in our simulations, the flow capacity through the aggregates (intra-aggregate flow) was less than 2% of the total flow when the spacing between the aggregates was larger than 18 micron. Inter-aggregate pores continued to be the dominant flow pathways even at much smaller spacing; intra-aggregate flow was less than 10% of the total flow when the inter- and intra-aggregate pore sizes were comparable. Such studies are making it possible to identify which model upscaling assumptions are realistic and what computational methods are required for detailed numerical investigation of microbial carbon cycling dynamics in soil systems.

  6. Soil protection major Prof. Dani Or

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giger, Christine

    1 Soil protection major Prof. Dani Or Soil and Terrestrial Environmental Physics CHN F 29.1 Universitätstrasse 16 8092 Zürich dani.or@env.ethz.ch +41 44 633 60 15 Objectives of soil protection major · understand composition and structure of soil · study key processes in soils and their relation to soil

  7. SOIL INFORMATION Last Lime Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    production. Send samples, forms, and payment to Virginia Tech Soil Testing Lab, 145 Smyth Hall (MC 0465), 185 Industrial Lawns - Bermudagrass Routine (soil pH, P, K, Ca, Mg, Zn, Mn, Cu, Fe, B, and estimated CEC) $10, Virginia Tech." COST PER SAMPLE IN-STATE OUT-OF-STATE SOIL TEST DESIRED AND FEES SAMPLE IDENTIFICATION Your

  8. UNDERSTANDING SOIL Larry G. Bundy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balser, Teri C.

    available for plant uptake, extraction, or measured by soil test. #12;Phosphorus (P) Loss Processes slowly soluble compounds: § Sorbed P · Clays · Al and Fe oxides § Secondary P minerals (precipitation/Lancaster/Madison (r2 = 0.65) n = 119 #12;Effect of soil extraction time on water extractable soil P concentration

  9. LUNAR SOIL SIMULATION TRAFFICABILITY PARAMETERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    LUNAR SOIL SIMULATION and TRAFFICABILITY PARAMETERS by W. David Carrier, III Lunar Geotechnical.0 RECOMMENDED LUNAR SOIL TRAFFICABILITY PARAMETERS Table 9.14 in the Lunar Sourcebook (Carrier et al. 1991, p. 529) lists the current recommended lunar soil trafficability parameters: bc = 0.017 N/cm2 bN = 35° K

  10. GUIDE TO GRADUATE SOIL SCIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guiltinan, Mark

    GUIDE TO GRADUATE PROGRAMS in AGRONOMY and SOIL SCIENCE Updated July 2011 THE DEPARTMENT OF CROP AND SOIL SCIENCES THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY PARK, PA #12;iiii Guide to Graduate Programs in Agronomy and Soil Science Table of Contents Introduction

  11. GLOBAL LEADERSHIP PROGRAM MISSION STATEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saidak, Filip

    GLOBAL LEADERSHIP PROGRAM MISSION STATEMENT The Global Leadership Program at UNCG will afford. Leadership, citizenship and cross-cultural understanding have taken on new meanings and have become essential for the successful citizen of the new globalized world. The Global Leadership Program (GLP) is open to all domestic

  12. Original article Predicted global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Original article Predicted global warming and Douglas-fir chilling requirements DD McCreary1 DP to predicted global warming. Douglas-fir / chilling / global warming / bud burst / reforestation Résumé offer evidence that mean global warming of 3-4 °C could occur within the next century, particularly

  13. Soil Remediation Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manlapig, D. M.; Williamsws

    2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Soils contaminated with petroleum by-products can now be effectively remediated using a variety of technologies. Among these are in-situ bioremediation, land farming, and landfill/replacing of soil. The range of efficiencies and cost effectiveness of these technologies has been well documented. Exsorbet Plus is showing promise as an in-situ bioremediation agent. It is made of naturally grown Spaghnum Peat Moss which has been activated for encapsulation and blended with nitrogen-rich fertilizer. In its initial field test in Caracas, Venezuela, it was able to remediate crude oil-contaminated soil in 90 days at less than half of the cost of competing technologies. Waste Solutions, Corp and the US Department of Energy signed a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement to test Exsorbet Plus at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center near Casper, Wyoming. As part of the test, soil contaminated with crude oil was treated with Exsorbet Plus to aid the in-situ bioremediation process. Quantitative total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) measurements were acquired comparing the performance of Exsorbet Plus with an adjacent plot undergoing unaided in-situ bioremediation.

  14. Use of a directional spray system design to control respirable dust and free gas concentrations around a continuous mining machine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodman, G.V.R.; Pollock, D.E. [NIOSH, Pittsburgh, PA (US). Pittsburgh Research Lab.

    2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A laboratory study assessed the impacts of water spray pressure, face ventilation quantity, and line brattice setback distance on respirable dust and SF6 tracer gas concentrations around a continuous mining machine using a sprayfan or directional spray system. Dust levels were measured at locations representing the mining machine operator and the standard and off standard shuttle car operators, and in the return airway. The results showed that changes in all three independent variables significantly affected log-transformed dust levels at the three operator sampling locations. Changes in setback distance impacted return airway dust levels. Laboratory testing also identified numerous variable interactions affecting dust levels. Tracer gas levels were measured on the left and right sides of the cutting drum and in the return. Untransformed gas levels around the cutting drum were significantly affected by changes in water pressure, face ventilation quantity, and setback distance. Return gas levels measured at the low curtain quantity were generally unaffected by changes in water pressure or curtain setback distance. At the high curtain quantity, return airway gas levels were affected by curtain setback distance. A field study was conducted to assess the impact of these parameters in an actual mining operation. These data showed that respirable dust levels may have been impacted by a change in water pressure and, to a lesser extent, by an increase in curtain setback distance. A series of tracer gas pulse tests were also conducted during this study. The results showed that effectiveness of the face ventilation was impacted by changes in curtain flow quantity and setback distance.

  15. A study of respiration-correlated cone-beam CT scans to correct target positioning errors in radiotherapy of thoracic cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santoro, J. P.; McNamara, J.; Yorke, E.; Pham, H.; Rimner, A.; Rosenzweig, K. E.; Mageras, G. S. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: There is increasingly widespread usage of cone-beam CT (CBCT) for guiding radiation treatment in advanced-stage lung tumors, but difficulties associated with daily CBCT in conventionally fractionated treatments include imaging dose to the patient, increased workload and longer treatment times. Respiration-correlated cone-beam CT (RC-CBCT) can improve localization accuracy in mobile lung tumors, but further increases the time and workload for conventionally fractionated treatments. This study investigates whether RC-CBCT-guided correction of systematic tumor deviations in standard fractionated lung tumor radiation treatments is more effective than 2D image-based correction of skeletal deviations alone. A second study goal compares respiration-correlated vs respiration-averaged images for determining tumor deviations. Methods: Eleven stage II-IV nonsmall cell lung cancer patients are enrolled in an IRB-approved prospective off-line protocol using RC-CBCT guidance to correct for systematic errors in GTV position. Patients receive a respiration-correlated planning CT (RCCT) at simulation, daily kilovoltage RC-CBCT scans during the first week of treatment and weekly scans thereafter. Four types of correction methods are compared: (1) systematic error in gross tumor volume (GTV) position, (2) systematic error in skeletal anatomy, (3) daily skeletal corrections, and (4) weekly skeletal corrections. The comparison is in terms of weighted average of the residual GTV deviations measured from the RC-CBCT scans and representing the estimated residual deviation over the treatment course. In the second study goal, GTV deviations computed from matching RCCT and RC-CBCT are compared to deviations computed from matching respiration-averaged images consisting of a CBCT reconstructed using all projections and an average-intensity-projection CT computed from the RCCT. Results: Of the eleven patients in the GTV-based systematic correction protocol, two required no correction, seven required a single correction, one required two corrections, and one required three corrections. Mean residual GTV deviation (3D distance) following GTV-based systematic correction (mean {+-} 1 standard deviation 4.8 {+-} 1.5 mm) is significantly lower than for systematic skeletal-based (6.5 {+-} 2.9 mm, p= 0.015), and weekly skeletal-based correction (7.2 {+-} 3.0 mm, p= 0.001), but is not significantly lower than daily skeletal-based correction (5.4 {+-} 2.6 mm, p= 0.34). In two cases, first-day CBCT images reveal tumor changes-one showing tumor growth, the other showing large tumor displacement-that are not readily observed in radiographs. Differences in computed GTV deviations between respiration-correlated and respiration-averaged images are 0.2 {+-} 1.8 mm in the superior-inferior direction and are of similar magnitude in the other directions. Conclusions: An off-line protocol to correct GTV-based systematic error in locally advanced lung tumor cases can be effective at reducing tumor deviations, although the findings need confirmation with larger patient statistics. In some cases, a single cone-beam CT can be useful for assessing tumor changes early in treatment, if more than a few days elapse between simulation and the start of treatment. Tumor deviations measured with respiration-averaged CT and CBCT images are consistent with those measured with respiration-correlated images; the respiration-averaged method is more easily implemented in the clinic.

  16. IUSS 2006. PO Box 353, 6700 AJ Wageningen, The Netherlands. The Future of Soil Science / edited by Alfred E Hartemink. Wageningen: IUSS International Union of Soil Sciences.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grunwald, Sabine

    management, sustainable land resource management, carbon sequestration and global climate change and others, sustainability and integrity. These services are diverse ranging from physical (e.g. best management practicesIUSS 2006. PO Box 353, 6700 AJ Wageningen, The Netherlands. The Future of Soil Science / edited

  17. Global ice sheet modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, T.J.; Fastook, J.L. [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States). Institute for Quaternary Studies

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The University of Maine conducted this study for Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of a global climate modeling task for site characterization of the potential nuclear waste respository site at Yucca Mountain, NV. The purpose of the study was to develop a global ice sheet dynamics model that will forecast the three-dimensional configuration of global ice sheets for specific climate change scenarios. The objective of the third (final) year of the work was to produce ice sheet data for glaciation scenarios covering the next 100,000 years. This was accomplished using both the map-plane and flowband solutions of our time-dependent, finite-element gridpoint model. The theory and equations used to develop the ice sheet models are presented. Three future scenarios were simulated by the model and results are discussed.

  18. The Basicity of Texas Soils.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach); Carlyle, E. C. (Elmer Cardinal)

    1929-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    basicity is here used to mean the bases which neutralize dilute nitric acid, sulphuric acid or similar acids, as measured by titra- tion of the acid after contact with the soil. It is recognized that this does not correctly represent the real basicity... of the soil and other circumstances. The use of nitrate of soda on acid soils tends to reduce the acidity. A mixture of nitrate of soda and sulphate of ammonia in proper proportions will not affect the acidity of the soil. THE BASICITY OF TEXAS SOILS 7...

  19. Long range global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rolle, K.C.; Pulkrabek, W.W.; Fiedler, R.A. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Platteville, WI (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper explores one of the causes of global warming that is often overlooked, the direct heating of the environment by engineering systems. Most research and studies of global warming concentrate on the modification that is occurring to atmospheric air as a result of pollution gases being added by various systems; i.e., refrigerants, nitrogen oxides, ozone, hydrocarbons, halon, and others. This modification affects the thermal radiation balance between earth, sun and space, resulting in a decrease of radiation outflow and a slow rise in the earth`s steady state temperature. For this reason the solution to the problem is perceived as one of cleaning up the processes and effluents that are discharged into the environment. In this paper arguments are presented that suggest, that there is a far more serious cause for global warming that will manifest itself in the next two or three centuries; direct heating from the exponential growth of energy usage by humankind. Because this is a minor contributor to the global warming problem at present, it is overlooked or ignored. Energy use from the combustion of fuels and from the output of nuclear reactions eventually is manifest as warming of the surroundings. Thus, as energy is used at an ever increasing rate the consequent global warming also increases at an ever increasing rate. Eventually this rate will become equal to a few percent of solar radiation. When this happens the earth`s temperature will have risen by several degrees with catastrophic results. The trends in world energy use are reviewed and some mathematical models are presented to suggest future scenarios. These models can be used to predict when the global warming problem will become undeniably apparent, when it will become critical, and when it will become catastrophic.

  20. Global Scale Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asphaug, Erik; Jutzi, Martin

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Global scale impacts modify the physical or thermal state of a substantial fraction of a target asteroid. Specific effects include accretion, family formation, reshaping, mixing and layering, shock and frictional heating, fragmentation, material compaction, dilatation, stripping of mantle and crust, and seismic degradation. Deciphering the complicated record of global scale impacts, in asteroids and meteorites, will lead us to understand the original planet-forming process and its resultant populations, and their evolution in time as collisions became faster and fewer. We provide a brief overview of these ideas, and an introduction to models.

  1. INTERNATIONAL RELATIONSINTERNATIONAL RELATIONSINTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (GLOBAL BUSINESS)(GLOBAL BUSINESS)(GLOBAL BUSINESS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krylov, Anna I.

    INTERNATIONAL RELATIONSINTERNATIONAL RELATIONSINTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (GLOBAL BUSINESS)(GLOBAL BUSINESS)(GLOBAL BUSINESS) Future leaders in business, government, and law need to understand how global, and internship opportunities, it is an ideal major for those interested in entering the realms of business

  2. Global Compact for Higher Education Institutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global Compact for Higher Education Institutions Communicating on Progress for Université Laval Guide to the United Nations Global Compact for Higher Education Institutions: Implementing the Global to the United Nations Global Compact for Higher Education Institutions: Implementing the Global Compact

  3. GLOBAL TAXONOMY INITIATIVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant, Taran

    #12;THE GLOBAL TAXONOMY INITIATIVE: Using Systematic Inventories to Meet Country and Regional Needs International #12;Table of Contents Introduction 1 I. Using Inventories to Build Capacity and Advance the GTI 2 for systematic inventories. A major component of the workshop addressed how systematic inventories can serve

  4. Global Vision Study Abroad

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    Finding a Global Vision Study Abroad Students Visit South Africa Philosophy in the Community arts sculpture of South Africa's late pop diva Brenda Fassie. More on Page 4 #12;At every post energy and passion for his work. At the same time, I would also like to express my sincere gratitude

  5. WORKPLACE GUIDES GLOBAL WORKING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roelleke, Thomas

    of Stonewall good practice publications ­ profiles some of the employers paving the way for gay staff to work do arise. This guide provides clear, practical tips on how gay employees can access internationalWORKPLACE GUIDES GLOBAL WORKING Supporting lesbian, gay and bisexual staff on overseas assignments

  6. Global Health Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Ophir

    Bay Area Global Health Seminar Series Monday, January 27, 2014 2:30pm ­ 4:00pm (Reception to follow at the Center for Health Policy and the Woods Institute for the Environment. He studies how economic, political, and natural environments affect population health in developing countries using a mix of experimental

  7. Global Climate & Catastrophic Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Global Climate & Catastrophic Risk Forum 2012 A Joint Program with LA RIMS Education Day Rethinking Catastrophic Risk in Risk Management: Earthquake-Related Challenges Featuring: Keynote Speaker Dr. Frank Beuthin, Willis Group Holdings Plc. Yohei Miyamoto, Aon Risk Solutions Curtis deVera, Marsh

  8. Pneumatic soil removal tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neuhaus, J.E.

    1992-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A soil removal tool is provided for removing radioactive soil, rock and other debris from the bottom of an excavation, while permitting the operator to be located outside of a containment for that excavation. The tool includes a fixed jaw, secured to one end of an elongate pipe, which cooperates with a movable jaw pivotably mounted on the pipe. Movement of the movable jaw is controlled by a pneumatic cylinder mounted on the pipe. The actuator rod of the pneumatic cylinder is connected to a collar which is slidably mounted on the pipe and forms part of the pivotable mounting assembly for the movable jaw. Air is supplied to the pneumatic cylinder through a handle connected to the pipe, under the control of an actuator valve mounted on the handle, to provide movement of the movable jaw. 3 figs.

  9. Pneumatic soil removal tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neuhaus, John E. (Newport News, VA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A soil removal tool is provided for removing radioactive soil, rock and other debris from the bottom of an excavation, while permitting the operator to be located outside of a containment for that excavation. The tool includes a fixed jaw, secured to one end of an elongate pipe, which cooperates with a movable jaw pivotably mounted on the pipe. Movement of the movable jaw is controlled by a pneumatic cylinder mounted on the pipe. The actuator rod of the pneumatic cylinder is connected to a collar which is slidably mounted on the pipe and forms part of the pivotable mounting assembly for the movable jaw. Air is supplied to the pneumatic cylinder through a handle connected to the pipe, under the control of an actuator valve mounted on the handle, to provide movement of the movable jaw.

  10. Variation in soil moisture and N availability modulates carbon and water exchange in a California grassland experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    St. Clair, S.B.; Sudderth, E.; Fischer, M.L.; Torn, M.S.; Stuart, S.; Salve, R.; Eggett, D.; Ackerly, D.

    2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Variability in the magnitude and timing of precipitation is predicted to change under future climate scenarios. The primary objective of this study was to understand how variation in precipitation patterns consisting of soil moisture pulses mixed with intermittent dry down events influence ecosystem gas fluxes. We characterized the effects of precipitation amount and timing, N availability, and plant community composition on whole ecosystem and leaf gas exchange in a California annual grassland mesocosm study system that allowed precise control of soil moisture conditions. Ecosystem CO2 and fluxes increased significantly with greater precipitation and were positively correlated with soil moisture. A repeated 10 day dry down period following 11 days of variable precipitation inputs strongly depressed net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) across a range of season precipitation totals, and plant community types. Ecosystem respiration (Re), evapotranspiration (ET) and leaf level photosynthesis (Amax) showed greatest sensitivity to dry down periods in low precipitation plots. Nitrogen additions significantly increased NEE, Re and Amax, particularly as water availability was increased. These results demonstrate that N availability and intermittent periods of soil moisture deficit (across a wide range of cumulative season precipitation totals) strongly modulate ecosystem gas exchange.

  11. Compacted Soil Liner Interface Strength Importance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Case Study Compacted Soil Liner Interface Strength Importance Timothy D. Stark, F.ASCE1 ; Hangseok interface is not the geomembrane (GM)/compacted low-permeability soil liner (LPSL) but a soil­soil interface placing the cover soil from bottom to top. DOI: 10.1061/(ASCE)GT.1943-5606 .0000556. © 2012 American

  12. CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Cotton Physiologist Tifton campus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Cotton Physiologist ­ Tifton campus Committee Membership Dr. Stanley Culpepper - committee chair Dr. John Beasley Department of Crop & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University of Georgia-SE District University

  13. In-situ vitrification of soil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brouns, Richard A. (Kennewick, WA); Buelt, James L. (Richland, WA); Bonner, William F. (Richland, WA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of vitrifying soil at or below a soil surface location. Two or more conductive electrodes are inserted into the soil for heating of the soil mass between them to a temperature above its melting temperature. Materials in the soil, such as buried waste, can thereby be effectively immobilized.

  14. CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Water Policy and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Water Policy and Management Committee Membership Dr. David Radcliffe - committee chair Dr. George Vellidis Department of Crop & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University of Georgia University of Georgia Stripling

  15. Electric Vehicles Global Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sóbester, András

    Hot Topics Electric Vehicles Global Climate Change Green Building Hydraulic Fracturing Nuclear to global warming. The UKgovernment has just announced it is investing $1 billion in their development Green Living Industry Regulation Remediation Research and Technology Sustainability Waste Water Products

  16. Global and Regional Solutions Directorate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    at Pacific NW National Lab (PNNL) ­ Founding Director Joint Global Change Research Institute (PNNL/UMd) ­ ALD (PNNL) ­ Environmental and Health Sciences Directorate; Emerging Technologies ­ Chief Scientist ­ Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program ­ Director ­ PNNL Global Studies Program ­ Other (PNNL): Center

  17. Methoxy-serratenes in a soil under conifers and their potential use as biomarkers of Pinaceae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    or peat would thus help in unravelling the timing of forestry activity. Keywords: pentacyclic triterpenes. The timing and extent of the impact of such unsustainable use of natural resources on the global carbon cycle civilization was linked to over exploitation of natural resources, among them intensive deforestation and soil

  18. Soil structure interaction for shrink-swell soils a new design procedure for foundation slabs on shrink-swell soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdelmalak, Remon Melek

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    diffusion soil volume change model starts with proposing a new laboratory test to determine the coefficient of unsaturated diffusivity for intact soils. Then, it introduces the development of a cracked soil diffusion factor, provides a chart for it...

  19. Soil samples at the APS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    movement into and about the country. A permit from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) is required to receive these soils unless they are sterilized. More complete...

  20. Plant and Soil VIII, no. 3 March 1957 PROBLEMS OF SOIL TESTING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Plant and Soil VIII, no. 3 March 1957 PROBLEMS OF SOIL TESTING ON CALCAREOUS SOILS by DAN H. YAALON The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel Chemically and mineralogically the soils of arid and semiarid of limestone, most of the soils are calcareous. Extensive leaching may have removed the CaCO3 from the soil

  1. Original article Soil CO2 efflux in a beech forest: dependence on soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Original article Soil CO2 efflux in a beech forest: dependence on soil temperature and soil water 1998) Abstract - Our objective was to quantify the annual soil carbon efflux in a young beech forest in north-eastern France (Hesse Forest, Euroflux site FR02) from measurements of soil CO, efflux. Soil CO

  2. Recommended Academic Plan for the Environmental Resource Management -Soil Science Option (E R M/SOIL)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Omiecinski, Curtis

    Recommended Academic Plan for the Environmental Resource Management - Soil Science Option (E R M/SOIL of Calculus I or MATH 140* (GQ) Calculus With Analytic Geometry I 4 SOILS 101 (GN) Introductory Soil Science 3 AG 150S (First-Year Seminar) Be a Master Student! 2 SOILS 102 Introductory Soil Science Laboratory 1

  3. 2, 921942, 2002 Global ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ACPD 2, 921­942, 2002 Global ozone forecasting H. J. Eskes et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Geophysical Society 2002 Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Global ozone forecasting based on ERS-2 July 2002 Correspondence to: H. J. Eskes (eskes@knmi.nl) 921 #12;ACPD 2, 921­942, 2002 Global ozone

  4. Globalization, Labor, Transformation of Work

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in an Increasingly Global Economy Edited by Jonathan H. Westover THE ORGANISATION #12;First published in Australia in an increasingly global economy Jonathan H. Westover (editor) Bibliography. 978 1 86335 660 2 (pbk.) 978 1 86335 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 Economic Globalization and Caribbean Economies, Syed H. Akhter, Paul Pounder

  5. GLOBAL WARMING THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    GLOBAL WARMING THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT AND YOUR FAMILY'S CONTRIBUTION TO IT Stephen E. Schwartz GREENHOUSE EFFECT #12;GLOBAL ENERGY BALANCE Global and annual average energy fluxes in watts per square meter about it.But nobody does anything about it. ­ Mark Twain­ Mark Twain Now with the greenhouse effect, we

  6. Global Warming: Connecting the Dots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    Global Warming: Connecting the Dots from Causes to Solutions* Jim Hansen 26 February 2007 National://www.columbia.edu/~jeh1/worldwatch_nov2006.pdf) 5. Communicating dangers and opportunities in global warming, Amer-16, 2006. (http://pubs.giss.nasa.gov/docs/2006/2006_Hansen.pdf) 8. Global warming: Connecting the dots from

  7. 4, 10591092, 2007 Global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    BGD 4, 1059­1092, 2007 Global warming potential of agro-ecosystems S. Lehuger et al. Title Page Predicting the global warming potential of agro-ecosystems S. Lehuger, B. Gabrielle, E. Larmanou, P. Laville Correspondence to: S. Lehuger (simon.lehuger@grignon.inra.fr) 1059 #12;BGD 4, 1059­1092, 2007 Global warming

  8. Visualizing Global Inequality on the Web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Ian; Lodha, S K; Crow, Ben D; Fulfrost, Brian

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on Mapping Global Inequality, University of California,Visualizing Global Inequality on the Web Ian Myers 1 ,for mapping global inequality by (i) creating a simple user

  9. Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlson, Ann E.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation Ann E. Carlson*2008]HEAT WAVES, GLOBAL WARMING, AND MITIGATION 175 stroke2001). 2008]HEAT WAVES, GLOBAL WARMING, AND MITIGATION 177

  10. Global Warming, endogenous risk and irreversibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Anthony C.; Narain, Urvashi

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The economics of global warming, Institute for InternationalEconomic Models of Global Warming, Cambridge, Mass. MITstochastic losses from global warming, Risk Analysis 16(2):

  11. Soils | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |RippeyInformationSoda Springs, Idaho:Soil Sampling

  12. Collection Policy: Crop and Soil Sciences Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angenent, Lars T.

    silage utilization by dairy cows o Phytoremediation of heavy metal and radionuclide contaminated soils/environmental biophysics related to soil quality and fertility o Mechanisms by which soil minerals can decompose or modify

  13. Climatic influences on hillslope soil transport efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schurr, Naomi D. (Naomi Danika)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The soil transport coefficient D represents the relationship between local topographical gradient and soil flux in the landscape evolution model. This work presents new estimates of the soil transport coefficient D at 9 ...

  14. Soil Conservation Districts Law (North Dakota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter aims to provide for the conservation of the soil and soil resources of this state and for the control and prevention of soil erosion, and to preserve the state's natural resources,...

  15. Soil stabilization properties of flexible intruders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luginbuhl, Katharine

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In many locations, soil is held in place by the roots of plants. When these plants are removed or die, the soil loses its cohesive strength and erodes away. We seek to create artificial soil stabilizers that use the same ...

  16. Evaluation of the modified Anderson sampler for determining particle size distributions and respirable concentrations of particulate matter present in the working environment of cottonseed oil mills

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matlock, Stanley Wayne

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EVALUATION OF THE MODIFIED ANDERSON SAMPLER FOR DETERMINING PARTICLE SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS AND RESPIRABLE CONCENTRATIONS OF PARTICULATE MATTER PRESENT IN THE WORKING ENVIRONMENT OF COTTONSEED OIL MILLS A Thesis by STANLEY WAYNE MATLOCK Submitted... to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1976 Major Subject: Agricultural Engineering FVALUATION OF THE MODIFIED ANDERSON SAMPLER FOR DETERMINING PARTICLE SIZE...

  17. Microbial Carbon Cycling in Permafrost-Affected Soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vishnivetskaya, T. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Liebner, Susanne [University of Tromso, Norway; Wilhelm, Ronald [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec; Wagner, Dirk [Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Potsdam, Germany

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Arctic plays a key role in Earth s climate system as global warming is predicted to be most pronounced at high latitudes and because one third of the global carbon pool is stored in ecosystems of the northern latitudes. In order to improve our understanding of the present and future carbon dynamics in climate sensitive permafrost ecosystems, present studies concentrate on investigations of microbial controls of greenhouse gas fluxes, on the activity and structure of the involved microbial communities, and on their response to changing environmental conditions. Permafrost-affected soils can function as both a source and a sink for carbon dioxide and methane. Under anaerobic conditions, caused by flooding of the active layer and the effect of backwater above the permafrost table, the mineralization of organic matter can only be realized stepwise by specialized microorganisms. Important intermediates of the organic matter decomposition are hydrogen, carbon dioxide and acetate, which can be further reduced to methane by methanogenic archaea. Evolution of methane fluxes across the subsurface/atmosphere boundary will thereby strongly depend on the activity of anaerobic methanogenic archaea and obligately aerobic methane oxidizing proteobacteria, which are known to be abundant and to significantly reduce methane emissions in permafrost-affected soils. Therefore current studies on methane-cycling microorganisms are the object of particular attention in permafrost studies, because of their key role in the Arctic methane cycle and consequently of their significance for the global methane budget.

  18. Homeowner Soil Sample Information Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provin, Tony

    2007-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    this step 8 to 10 times in the lawn or garden which is being considered for testing. ? Mix all collected soil thoroughly, removing any roots or other visible plant materials and place 2-3 cups of soil in a quart-sized re-sealable plastic bag. Air...

  19. The Global Energy Challenge

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    George Crabtree

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The expected doubling of global energy demand by 2050 challenges our traditional patterns of energy production, distribution and use.   The continued use of fossil fuels raises concerns about supply, security, environment and climate.  New routes are needed for the efficient conversion of energy from chemical fuel, sunlight, and heat to electricity or hydrogen as an energy carrier and finally to end uses like transportation, lighting, and heating. Opportunities for efficient new energy conversion routes based on nanoscale materials will be presented, with emphasis on the sustainable energy technologies they enable.

  20. Global Threat Reduction Initiative

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked Questions for DOE FY 2011Talley,GENIIFY14 BudgetHollettGive UsDepartment ofGlobal

  1. Sandia Energy - Global

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementing Nonlinear757 (1)Tara46EnergyPower Systems Glitter-SizedGlobal

  2. Natural mercury isotope variation in coal deposits and organic soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abir, Biswas; Joel D. Blum; Bridget A. Bergquist; Gerald J. Keeler; Zhouqing Xie [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Department of Geological Sciences

    2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a need to distinguish among sources of Hg to the atmosphere in order to more fully understand global Hg pollution. In this study we investigate whether coal deposits within the United States, China, and Russia-Kazakhstan, which are three of the five greatest coal-producing regions, have diagnostic Hg isotopic fingerprints that can be used to discriminate among Hg sources. We also investigate the Hg isotopic composition of modern organic soil horizons developed in areas distant from point sources of Hg in North America. Mercury stored in coal deposits displays a wide range of both mass dependent fractionation and mass independent fractionation. {delta}{sup 202}Hg varies in coals by 3{per_thousand} and {Delta}{sup 201}Hg varies by 0.9{per_thousand}. Combining these two Hg isotope signals results in what may be a unique isotopic 'fingerprint' for many coal deposits. Mass independent fractionation of mercury has been demonstrated to occur during photochemical reactions of mercury. This suggests that Hg found in most coal deposits was subjected to photochemical reduction near the Earth's surface prior to deposition. The similarity in MDF and MIF of modern organic soils and coals from North America suggests that Hg deposition from coal may have imprinted an isotopic signature on soils. This research offers a new tool for characterizing mercury inputs from natural and anthropogenic sources to the atmosphere and provides new insights into the geochemistry of mercury in coal and soils. 35 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  3. How Soil Organic Matter Composition Controls Hexachlorobenzene-Soil-Interactions: Adsorption Isotherms and Quantum Chemical Modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmed, Ashour; Kühn, Oliver

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hazardous persistent organic pollutants (POPs) interact in soil with the soil organic matter (SOM) but this interaction is insufficiently understood at the molecular level. We investigated the adsorption of hexachlorobenzene (HCB) on soil samples with systematically modified SOM. These samples included the original soil, the soil modified by adding a hot water extract (HWE) fraction (soil+3 HWE and soil+6 HWE), and the pyrolyzed soil. The SOM contents increased in the order pyrolyzed soil soil soil+3 HWE soil+6 HWE. For the latter three samples this order was also valid for the HCB adsorption. The pyrolyzed soil adsorbed more HCB than the other samples at low initial concentrations, but at higher concentrations the HCB adsorption became weaker than in the samples with HWE addition. This adsorption behaviour combined with the differences in the chemical composition between the soil samples suggested that alkylated aromatic, phenol, and lignin monomer compounds contributed most to the HC...

  4. Ethics in collaborative global health researchhealth research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    in developing countries ­Global health inequalities­Global health inequalities ­Disproportionate burden

  5. Global tree network for computing structures enabling global processing operations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blumrich; Matthias A. (Ridgefield, CT); Chen, Dong (Croton-On-Hudson, NY); Coteus, Paul W. (Yorktown Heights, NY); Gara, Alan G. (Mount Kisco, NY); Giampapa, Mark E. (Irvington, NY); Heidelberger, Philip (Cortlandt Manor, NY); Hoenicke, Dirk (Ossining, NY); Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D. (Mount Kisco, NY); Takken, Todd E. (Mount Kisco, NY); Vranas, Pavlos M. (Bedford Hills, NY)

    2010-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for enabling high-speed, low-latency global tree network communications among processing nodes interconnected according to a tree network structure. The global tree network enables collective reduction operations to be performed during parallel algorithm operations executing in a computer structure having a plurality of the interconnected processing nodes. Router devices are included that interconnect the nodes of the tree via links to facilitate performance of low-latency global processing operations at nodes of the virtual tree and sub-tree structures. The global operations performed include one or more of: broadcast operations downstream from a root node to leaf nodes of a virtual tree, reduction operations upstream from leaf nodes to the root node in the virtual tree, and point-to-point message passing from any node to the root node. The global tree network is configurable to provide global barrier and interrupt functionality in asynchronous or synchronized manner, and, is physically and logically partitionable.

  6. Advanced Assay Systems for Radionuclide Contamination in Soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. R. Giles; L. G. Roybal; M. V. Carpenter; C. P. Oertel; J. A. Roach

    2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Through the support of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) Technical Assistance Program, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed and deployed a suite of systems that rapidly scan, characterize, and analyze surface soil contamination. The INL systems integrate detector systems with data acquisition and synthesis software and with global positioning technology to provide a real-time, user-friendly field deployable turn-key system. INL real-time systems are designed to characterize surface soil contamination using methodologies set forth in the Multi-Agency Radiation Surveys and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM). MARSSIM provides guidance for planning, implementing, and evaluating environmental and facility radiological surveys conducted to demonstrate compliance with a dose or risk-based regulation and provides real-time information that is immediately available to field technicians and project management personnel. This paper discusses the history of the development of these systems and describes some of the more recent examples and their applications.

  7. Evaluation of soil washing for radiologically contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gombert, D. II

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Soil washing has been applied internationally to decontaminate soils due to the widespread increase in environmental awareness manifested in the United States by promulgation of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act, yet we continue to lack understanding on why the technique works in one application and not in another. A soil washing process typically integrates a variety of modules, each designed to decontaminate the matrix by destroying a particular phase or segregating a particle size fraction in which the contaminants are concentrated. The more known about how the contaminants are fixed, the more likely the process will succeed. Much can be learned from bioavailability studies on heavy metals in soils. Sequential extraction experiments designed to destroy one fixation mechanism at a time can be used to determine how contaminants are bound. This knowledge provides a technical basis for designing a processing strategy to efficiently decontaminate soil while creating a minimum of secondary wastes. In this study, a soil from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory was physically and chemically characterized, then sequentially extracted to determine if soil washing could be effectively used to remove cesium, cobalt and chromium.

  8. Global Studies Course List Fall 2010 (2111) COURSE LIST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Huiqiang

    2111-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ...........................................................................5 2. Global Economy and Global Governance .................................................9 3 from one of six Global Concentrations (Sustainable Development; Global Economy and Global GovernanceGlobal Studies Course List ­ Fall 2010 (2111) Page 1 COURSE LIST Fall 2010 (2111) Global Studies

  9. Structural characterization of a family of cytochromes c{sub 7} involved in Fe(III) respiration by Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pokkuluri, P. R.; Londer, Y. Y.; Yang, X.; Duke, N. E. C.; Erickson, J.; Orshonsky, V.; Johnson, G.; Schiffer, M.; Biosciences Division

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Periplasmic cytochromes c{sub 7} are important in electron transfer pathway(s) in Fe(III) respiration by Geobacter sulfurreducens. The genome of G. sulfurreducens encodes a family of five 10-kDa, three-heme cytochromes c{sub 7}. The sequence identity between the five proteins (designated PpcA, PpcB, PpcC, PpcD, and PpcE) varies between 45% and 77%. Here, we report the high-resolution structures of PpcC, PpcD, and PpcE determined by X-ray diffraction. This new information made it possible to compare the sequences and structures of the entire family. The triheme cores are largely conserved but are not identical. We observed changes, due to different crystal packing, in the relative positions of the hemes between two molecules in the crystal. The overall protein fold of the cytochromes is similar. The structure of PpcD differs most from that of the other homologs, which is not obvious from the sequence comparisons of the family. Interestingly, PpcD is the only cytochrome c{sub 7} within the family that has higher abundance when G. sulfurreducens is grown on insoluble Fe(III) oxide compared to ferric citrate. The structures have the highest degree of conservation around 'heme IV'; the protein surface around this heme is positively charged in all of the proteins, and therefore all cytochromes c{sub 7} could interact with similar molecules involving this region. The structures and surface characteristics of the proteins near the other two hemes, 'heme I' and 'heme III', differ within the family. The above observations suggest that each of the five cytochromes c{sub 7} could interact with its own redox partner via an interface involving the regions of heme I and/or heme III; this provides a possible rationalization for the existence of five similar proteins in G. sulfurreducens.

  10. A real-time respiration position based passive breath gating equipment for gated radiotherapy: A preclinical evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu Weigang; Xu Anjie; Li Guichao; Zhang Zhen; Housley, Dave; Ye Jinsong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center and Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Swedish Cancer Institute, Seattle, Washington 98104 (United States)

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To develop a passive gating system incorporating with the real-time position management (RPM) system for the gated radiotherapy. Methods: Passive breath gating (PBG) equipment, which consists of a breath-hold valve, a controller mechanism, a mouthpiece kit, and a supporting frame, was designed. A commercial real-time positioning management system was implemented to synchronize the target motion and radiation delivery on a linear accelerator with the patient's breathing cycle. The respiratory related target motion was investigated by using the RPM system for correlating the external markers with the internal target motion while using PBG for passively blocking patient's breathing. Six patients were enrolled in the preclinical feasibility and efficiency study of the PBG system. Results: PBG equipment was designed and fabricated. The PBG can be manually triggered or released to block or unblock patient's breathing. A clinical workflow was outlined to integrate the PBG with the RPM system. After implementing the RPM based PBG system, the breath-hold period can be prolonged to 15-25 s and the treatment delivery efficiency for each field can be improved by 200%-400%. The results from the six patients showed that the diaphragm motion caused by respiration was reduced to less than 3 mm and the position of the diaphragm was reproducible for difference gating periods. Conclusions: A RPM based PBG system was developed and implemented. With the new gating system, the patient's breath-hold time can be extended and a significant improvement in the treatment delivery efficiency can also be achieved.

  11. Environmental Regulation, Globalization, and Innovation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashford, Nicholas

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This essay explores the complex relationship between environmental regulation, innovation, and sustainable development within the context of an increasingly globalizing economy. It will be argued that industrial policy, ...

  12. Machine Learning for Global Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    schoen,,,

    Noname manuscript No. (will be inserted by the editor). Machine Learning for Global Optimization. A. Cassioli?. · D. Di Lorenzo. ?. · M. Locatelli. ??. · F. Schoen.

  13. Global Optimization via Slack Variables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaac Siwale

    2015-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    London. England e-mail: ike_siwale@hotmail.com. Abstract. This paper presents a method for finding global optima to constrained nonlinear programs via slack ...

  14. Uranium soils integrated demonstration: Soil characterization project report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cunnane, J.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Gill, V.R. [Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States); Lee, S.Y. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Morris, D.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Nickelson, M.D. [HAZWRAP, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Perry, D.L. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Tidwell, V.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An Integrated Demonstration Program, hosted by the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), has been established for investigating technologies applicable to the characterization and remediation of soils contaminated with uranium. Critical to the design of relevant treatment technologies is detailed information on the chemical and physical characteristics of the uranium waste-form. To address this need a soil sampling and characterization program was initiated which makes use of a variety of standard analytical techniques coupled with state-of-the-art microscopy and spectroscopy techniques. Sample representativeness is evaluated through the development of conceptual models in an effort to identify and understand those geochemical processes governing the behavior of uranium in FEMP soils. Many of the initial results have significant implications for the design of soil treatment technologies for application at the FEMP.

  15. Soil and Water Conservation Spring 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    of agricultural soil drainage on them. Define water harvesting and give examples. #12;2 Basic Course1 SWS 4233 Soil and Water Conservation 3 Credits Spring 2014 Instructor Susan Curry scurry resources: soil and water. Topics discussed include: Soil/water resources, historical erosions and sediment

  16. CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Extension Peanut Agronomist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Extension Peanut Agronomist Committee Membership Dr. J. Michael Moore - committee chair Dr. Clint Waltz Department of Crop & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences-7300 Fax: (229) 386-7308 Fax: (770) 412-4734 Dr. Eric Prostko Dr. Guy Collins Department of Crop & Soil

  17. CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Small Grain Breeding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Small Grain Breeding Committee Membership Dr. Paul Raymer - committee chair Dr. Scott Jackson Department of Crop & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University & Soil Sciences Department of Horticulture University of Georgia University of Georgia 2360 Rainwater Rd

  18. KSInglett Page 1 MATH FOR SOIL SCIENTISTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    skills that are most relevant to graduate courses in environmental science including Soil and Water transport 9. Soil temperature, heat capacity and conductivity Unit 3 PROBLEM SOLVING IN SOIL BIOCHEMISTRY 10 and gas fluxes Unit 5 PROBLEM SOLVING IN SOIL CHEMISTRY, FERTILITY, and MANAGEMENT (optional) 19. p

  19. MICHIGAN'S SOIL NITRATE TEST FOR CORN MSU SOIL AND PLANT NUTRIENT LAB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    MICHIGAN'S SOIL NITRATE TEST FOR CORN MSU SOIL AND PLANT NUTRIENT LAB Michigan State University Extension Crop and Soil Sciences Department Michigan State University WHY TEST SOIL FOR NITRATES Nitrate testing of soil is an excellent and inexpensive way of evaluating the available nitrogen (N) status

  20. Impact of Soil Type and Compaction Conditions on Soil Water Characteristic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Sheng-Tao

    Impact of Soil Type and Compaction Conditions on Soil Water Characteristic C. J. Miller, M.ASCE1 the variation of water content and pore water suction for compacted clayey soils. The soils had varying amounts of clay fraction with plasticities ranging from low to high plasticity. The unsaturated soil behavior

  1. Part I. Ecological Sites and Soil Part II. A Framework for Soil and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Part I. Ecological Sites and Soil Survey Part II. A Framework for Soil and Vegetation Dynamics Arlene Tugel, Soil Scientist Liaison to ARS, USDA-NRCS Las Cruces, NM and the Soils-ESD Advisory Group #12;What makes a site a site? Soil forming factors: climate, parent, material, biotic factors

  2. Soil Test Report The following information is being provided for farmers. For consumer soil test report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    Soil Test Report The following information is being provided for farmers. For consumer soil test fertility status of the soil in each field can invest wisely in fertilizer and lime to produce the most economical crop yields. A soil test provides the needed information about soil pH, lime need and available

  3. Soil drainage as an active agent of recent soil evolution: a David Montagnea,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Soil drainage as an active agent of recent soil evolution: a review* David Montagnea,b , Sophie on pedogenesis mainly focuses on the long-term soil formation and most often neglects recent soil evolution drainage on soil evolution. Artificial drainage is considered as an example of the impact of recent changes

  4. Soil Aggregate Size Affects Phosphorus Desorption from Highly Weathered Soils and Plant Growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Kessel, Chris

    Soil Aggregate Size Affects Phosphorus Desorption from Highly Weathered Soils and Plant Growth X of P around soil aggregates (Gunary et al., 1964; Linquist etfrom soil, understanding P desorption from soils may improve the precision of P diagnosis and fertilization recommendations. Many al., 1997

  5. CLIMATE CHANGE GLOBAL ECONOMY How to decarbonise the global economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLIMATE CHANGE · GLOBAL ECONOMY How to decarbonise the global economy Today's report on deep efforts of independent experts from 15 countries to find national pathways to making economies based-zero emissions sometime in the second half of this century. This deep cut should occur in a growing world economy

  6. Global warming and global dioxide emission: An empirical study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linyan Sun [Xian Jiaotong Univ., Shaanxi (China); Wang, M. [Saint Mary`s Univ., Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada)

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, the dynamic relationship between global surface temperature (global warming) and global carbon dioxide emission (CO{sub 2}) is modelled and analyzed by causality and spectral analysis in the time domain and frequency domain, respectively. Historical data of global CO{sub 2} emission and global surface temperature anomalies over 129 years from 1860-1988 are used in this study. The causal relationship between the two phenomena is first examined using the Sim and Granger causality test in the time domain after the data series are filtered by ARIMA models. The Granger causal relationship is further scrutinized and confirmed by cross-spectral and multichannel spectral analysis in the frequency domain. The evidence found from both analyses proves that there is a positive causal relationship between the two variables. The time domain analysis suggests that Granger causality exists between global surface temperature and global CO{sub 2} emission. Further, CO{sub 2} emission causes the change in temperature. The conclusions are further confirmed by the frequency domain analysis, which indicates that the increase in CO{sub 2} emission causes climate warming because a high coherence exists between the two variables. Furthermore, it is proved that climate changes happen after an increase in CO{sub 2} emission, which confirms that the increase in CO{sub 2} emission does cause global warming. 27 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Worldwide organic soil carbon and nitrogen data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zinke, P.J.; Stangenberger, A.G. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Forestry and Resource Management; Post, W.M.; Emanual, W.R.; Olson, J.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the research presented in this package was to identify data that could be used to estimate the size of the soil organic carbon pool under relatively undisturbed soil conditions. A subset of the data can be used to estimate amounts of soil carbon storage at equilibrium with natural soil-forming factors. The magnitude of soil properties so defined is a resulting nonequilibrium values for carbon storage. Variation in these values is due to differences in local and geographic soil-forming factors. Therefore, information is included on location, soil nitrogen content, climate, and vegetation along with carbon density and variation.

  8. Soil Washing Experiment for Decontamination of Contaminated NPP Soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Son, J.K.; Kang, K.D.; Kim, K.D.; Ha, J.H.; Song, M.J. [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Company, P.O. Box 149, Yuseong, Daejeon, 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The preliminary experiment was performed to obtain the operating conditions of soil washing decontamination process such as decontamination agent, decontamination temperature, decontamination time and ratio of soil and decontamination agent. To estimate decontamination efficiency, particle size of soil was classified into three categories; {>=} 2.0 mm, 2.0 {approx} 0.21 mm and {<=} 0.21 mm. Major target of this experiment was decontamination of Cs-137. The difference of decontamination efficiency using water and neutral salts as decontamination agent is not high. It is concluded that the best temperature of decontamination agent is normal temperature and the best decontamination time was about 60 minutes. And the best ratio of soil and decontamination agent is 1:10. In case of Cs decontamination for fine soils, the decontamination results using neutral salts such as Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and Na{sub 3}PO{sub 4} shows some limits while using strong acid such as sulfuric acid or hydrochloric acid shows high decontamination efficiency ({>=}90%). But we conclude that decontamination using strong acid is also inappropriate because of the insufficiency of decontamination efficiency for highly radioactive fine soils and the difficulty for treatment of secondary liquid waste. It is estimated that the best decontamination process is to use water as decontamination agent for particles which can be decontaminated to clearance level, after particle size separation. (authors)

  9. Global Calibration Claudio Albanese 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albanese, Claudio

    Global Calibration Claudio Albanese 1 September 13, 2009 Abstract Current technology advances calibration strategies. Although the industry is largely based on local calibration, we argue that global calibration is nowadays emerging as technically feasible and represents a useful complement to existing method

  10. GLOBAL WARMING THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    GLOBAL WARMING THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT AND YOUR FAMILY'S CONTRIBUTION TO IT Stephen E. Schwartz September 22, 2004 http://www.ecd.bnl.gov/steve/schwartz.html #12;#12;THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT #12;GLOBAL does anything about it. ­ Mark Twain­ Mark Twain Now with the greenhouse effect, we ARE doing something

  11. GLOBAL IMPACT FROM THE HEART

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Jens-Dominik

    GLOBAL IMPACT FROM THE HEART OF NORTHERN IRELAND #12;#12;CHANCELLOR'S WELCOME 4 VICE: INNOVATIVE AND WORLD-CLASS 18 CONTACT 26 CONTENTS 3GLOBAL IMPACT FROM THE HEART OF NORTHERN IRELAND #12;Queen THE HEART OF NORTHERN IRELANDGLOBAL IMPACT FROM THE HEART OF NORTHERN IRELAND CHANCELLOR'S WELCOME

  12. Effects of soil rewetting and thawing on soil gas fluxes: a review of current literature and suggestions for future research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Dong-Gill; Vargas, Rodrigo; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Turetsky, Merritt

    2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Rewetting of dry soils and thawing of frozen soils are short-term, transitional phenomena in terms of hydrology and thermodynamics in soil systems. The impact of these short-term phenomena on larger-scale ecosystem fluxes has only recently been fully appreciated, and a growing number of studies show that these events affect various biogeochemical processes including fluxes of biogenic gases such as carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), methane (CH{sub 4}), nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), ammonia (NH{sub 3}) and nitric oxide (NO). Global climate models predict that future climatic change is likely to alter the frequency and intensity of drying-rewetting events and thawing of frozen soils, highlighting the importance of understanding how rewetting and thawing will influence biogenic gas fluxes. Here we summarize findings in an acquired database from 338 studies conducted from 1956-2010, and propose future research questions. Studies have reported conflicting results, ranging from large increases in gas fluxes to non-significant changes following rewetting and thawing in various terrestrial ecosystems. An analysis of published data revealed that CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O, NO and NH{sub 3} fluxes increase 7.6 (standard error 1.1) times following rewetting and thawing with no significant difference between these events. We explore possible mechanisms and controls that regulate flux responses, and note that there is a lack of studies on variation of CH{sub 4}, NO and NH{sub 3} fluxes following rewetting and thawing events. High temporal resolution of flux measurements is critical to capture rapid changes in the gas fluxes after these soil perturbations. Finally, we propose that future studies should investigate the interactions between biological (i.e., microbial community) and physical (i.e., gas production, flux, and dissolution) changes in biogenic gas fluxes, and explore synergistic experimental and modelling approaches.

  13. Soil Organic Matter of Natural and Restored Coastal Wetland Soils in Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elgin, Barbara K.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of natural and created marsh soils. J. Exp. Mar. Biol. Ecol.2007. Freshwater Input Structures Soil Properties, VerticalS.S. , Hoover, K.L. 1996. Soil properties of reference

  14. Organic soil phosphorus is plant-available but is neglected by routine soil-testing methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steffens, Diedrich; Leppin, Thomas; Schubert, Sven

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    microorganisms. Biol. Fertil. Soils 1988; 5: 308-312 Van derplant species and to evaluate different soil-testing methodsin measuring organic soil-P. Material and Methods This

  15. Global versus Nuclear Starbursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francoise Combes

    2001-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The strongest starbursts are observed towards galaxy nuclei, or circumnuclear regions. However in interacting galaxies, star formation is also triggered in overlap regions far from nuclei, in spiral arms and sometimes in tidal tails. What is the relative importance of these starbursts? What kind of starformation is dominating, as a function of redshift? These different starbursts occur in different dynamical conditions (global and local): gravitational instabilities, density waves, radial flows, shear, cloud collisions, density accumulations, and they have been investigated with the help of numerical simulations. Gravitational instabilities are necessary to initiate star formation, but they are not sufficient; galactic disks are self-regulated through these instabilities to have their Toomre Q parameter of the order of 1, and thus this criterium is in practice unable to predict the onset of intense star formation. Super star clusters are a characteristic SF mode in starbursts, and might be due to the rapid formation of large gas complexes. Star formation can propagate radially inwards, due to gravity torques and gas inflow, but also outwards, due to superwinds, and energy outflows: both expanding or collapsing waves are observed in circumnuclear regions. Mergers are more efficient in forming stars at high redshift, because of larger gas content, and shorter dynamical times. The relation between nuclear starbursts and nuclear activity is based on the same fueling mechanisms, but also on reciprocal triggering and regulations.

  16. Global estimation of evapotranspiration using a leaf area index-based surface energy and water balance model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Timothy

    using Advanced Very High Res- olution Radiometer Lai data, Climate Research Unit climate dataGlobal estimation of evapotranspiration using a leaf area index-based surface energy and water-relative-humidity-based two-source (ARTS) E model that simulates the surface energy balance, soil water balance

  17. Effects of drinking water temperature on respiration rates, body temperatures, dry matter intake, and milk production in lactating Holstein cows in summer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milam, Kyle Zohn

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . 1, and 1. 4X potassium respectively, with CR 2 fed during the barn adjustment and SP. Cows were fed ad libitum in individual tie-stalls twice daily from 0600 to 0900 h and from 1800 to 2100 h with access to barn water temperature (ca 28 C...EFFECTS OF DRINKING WATER TEMPERATURE ON RESPIRATION RATES, BODY TEMPERATURES, DRY MATTER INTAKE, AND MILK PRODUCTION IN LACTATING HOLSTEIN COWS IN SUMMER A Thesis by KYLE ZOHN MILAM Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University...

  18. Assimilation and respiration of radioactive ethylene glycol, in the presence of high sodium chloride concentrations, by a sodium chloride requiring bacterium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez, Carlos Francisco

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and the contents distilled over into 5 ml of a 2X boric acid solution containing 3 ml of a O. l%%d ethanolic solution of methyl red and 5. 7 ml of a 0. 1X ethanolic 29 solution of brom cresol green. The samples were titrated, with 0. 1N HC1 using a... limits. Sodium requirement Effect of pH on growth Utilization of carbon sources. Respiration studies. Quantitation of ethylene glycol carbon Disappearance of. glucose and ammonia-nitrogen from cultures of Bacterium T-52. Possible pathways...

  19. The effects of soil moisture on pecan weevil emergence and predicting drought delay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schraer, Stephen Martin

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    soils. Drought conditions, induced on soil plots, as well as natural soil conditions were used to assess the effects of soil particle size distribution and soil moisture on soil hardness. Soil hardness can be determined by the following: 572...

  20. air water soil: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Basic soil physical and biological properties Soil erosion Land application of waste Water management Irrigation and drainage Water quality 12;Soil...

  1. air soil water: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Basic soil physical and biological properties Soil erosion Land application of waste Water management Irrigation and drainage Water quality 12;Soil...

  2. An investigation into the reactions of biochar in soil. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    investigation into the reactions of biochar in soil. An investigation into the reactions of biochar in soil. Abstract: Interactions between biochar, soil, microbes and plant roots...

  3. amended soil microcosms: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Amendment Effects on Soil Phosphorus Stabilization in Poultry Litter Amended Sandy Soils. Environmental Management and Restoration Websites Summary: Litter Amended Sandy Soils....

  4. Soil Water and Temperature System (SWATS) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond, D

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The soil water and temperature system (SWATS) provides vertical profiles of soil temperature, soil-water potential, and soil moisture as a function of depth below the ground surface at hourly intervals. The temperature profiles are measured directly by in situ sensors at the Central Facility and many of the extended facilities of the SGP climate research site. The soil-water potential and soil moisture profiles are derived from measurements of soil temperature rise in response to small inputs of heat. Atmospheric scientists use the data in climate models to determine boundary conditions and to estimate the surface energy flux. The data are also useful to hydrologists, soil scientists, and agricultural scientists for determining the state of the soil.

  5. affecting soil microbial: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Q10 values could be explained by the relative rate of microbial respiration per unit organic C Minnesota, University of 33 Gene Expression by Microbial Communities in Response to...

  6. altered soil microbial: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in Q10 values could be explained by the relative rate of microbial respiration per unit organic C Minnesota, University of 36 Gene Expression by Microbial Communities in Response...

  7. alters microbial soil: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in Q10 values could be explained by the relative rate of microbial respiration per unit organic C Minnesota, University of 36 Gene Expression by Microbial Communities in Response...

  8. Resisting globalization- ATTAC in France: local discourses, global terrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard, Marie des Neiges

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The debate over the "globalization" process has been influenced by the emergence of social movements who deplore this process. This research focuses on the French social movement ATTAC (Action for a Tobin Tax for the Aid of Citizens...

  9. Specific Examples of Global Activities Environmental assessment in Azerbaijan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , global warming, and global entrepreneurship. Discovery Park works syner- gistically with the Office competitiveness, global energy security, global warming, and global entrepreneurship. Discovery Park worksSpecific Examples of Global Activities · Environmental assessment in Azerbaijan · Study abroad

  10. Effect of Increasing Nitrogen Deposition on Soil Microbial Communities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Shengmu; Xue, Kai; He, Zhili; VanNostrand, Joy D.; Liu, Jianshe; Hobbie, Sarah E.; Reich, Peter B.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Increasing nitrogen deposition, increasing atmospheric CO2, and decreasing biodiversity are three main environmental changes occurring on a global scale. The BioCON (Biodiversity, CO2, and Nitrogen) ecological experiment site at the University of Minnesota's Cedar Creek Ecosystem Science Reserve started in 1997, to better understand how these changes would affect soil systems. To understand how increasing nitrogen deposition affects the microbial community diversity, heterogeneity, and functional structure impact soil microbial communities, 12 samples were collected from the BioCON plots in which nitrogenous fertilizer was added to simulate the effect of increasing nitrogen deposition and 12 samples from without added fertilizer. DNA from the 24 samples was extracted using a freeze-grind protocol, amplified, labeled with a fluorescent dye, and then hybridized to GeoChip, a functional gene array containing probes for genes involved in N, S and C cycling, metal resistance and organic contaminant degradation. Detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) of all genes detected was performed to analyze microbial community patterns. The first two axes accounted for 23.5percent of the total variation. The samples fell into two major groups: fertilized and non-fertilized, suggesting that nitrogenous fertilizer had a significant impact on soil microbial community structure and diversity. The functional gene numbers detected in fertilized samples was less that detected in non-fertilizer samples. Functional genes involving in the N cycling were mainly discussed.

  11. The China-in-Global Energy Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qi, T.

    The China-in-Global Energy Model (C-GEM) is a global Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) model that captures the interaction of production, consumption and trade among multiple global regions and sectors – including five ...

  12. The Private Regulation of Global Corporate Conduct

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vogel, David

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is a major goal of the UN Global Compact as well as severalindustry codes. The UN Global Compact has more than 2,300exploit. For the UN, the Global Compact provides a vehicle

  13. Detection of explosives in soils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chambers, William B. (Edgewood, NM); Rodacy, Philip J. (Albuquerque, NM); Phelan, James M. (Bosque Farms, NM); Woodfin, Ronald L. (Sandia Park, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for detecting explosive-indicating compounds in subsurface soil. The apparatus has a probe with an adsorbent material on some portion of its surface that can be placed into soil beneath the ground surface, where the adsorbent material can adsorb at least one explosive-indicating compound. The apparatus additional has the capability to desorb the explosive-indicating compound through heating or solvent extraction. A diagnostic instrument attached to the probe detects the desorbed explosive-indicating compound. In the method for detecting explosive-indicating compounds in soil, the sampling probe with an adsorbent material on at least some portion of a surface of the sampling probe is inserted into the soil to contact the adsorbent material with the soil. The explosive-indicating compounds are then desorbed and transferred as either a liquid or gas sample to a diagnostic tool for analysis. The resulting gas or liquid sample is analyzed using at least one diagnostic tool selected from the group consisting of an ion-mobility spectrometer, a gas chromatograph, a high performance liquid chromatograph, a capillary electrophoresis chromatograph, a mass spectrometer, a Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer and a Raman spectrometer to detect the presence of explosive-indicating compounds.

  14. The Strategic Significance of Global InequalityThe Strategic Significance of Global InequalityThe Strategic Significance of Global InequalityThe Strategic Significance of Global InequalityThe Strategic Significance of Global Inequality By Jeffrey D. Sachs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    27 The Strategic Significance of Global InequalityThe Strategic Significance of Global InequalityThe Strategic Significance of Global InequalityThe Strategic Significance of Global InequalityThe Strategic

  15. Epidemiological-environmental study of diesel bus garage workers: acute effects of NO/sub 2/ and respirable particulate on the respiratory system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gamble, J.; Jones, W.; Minshall, S.

    1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Personal samples of nitrogen dioxide (NO/sub 2/) and respirable particulate (RP) were collected over the shift on 232 workers in four diesel bus garages. Response was assessed by an acute respiratory questionnaire and before and after shift spirometry. Measures of exposure to NO/sub 2/ and RP were associated with work-related symptoms of cough; itching, burning, or watering eyes; difficult or labored breathing; chest tightness; and wheeze. The prevalence of burning eyes, headaches, difficult or labored breathing, nausea, and wheeze experienced at work were higher in the diesel bus garage workers than in a comparison population of battery workers, while the prevalence of headaches was reduced. Mean reductions in forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1), peak flow, and flows at 50 and 75% of FVC were not obviously different from zero. There was no detectable association of exposure to NO/sub 2/ or respirable particulate and acute reductions in pulmonary function. Workers who often had respiratory work-related symptoms generally had a slightly greater mean acute reduction in FEV1 and FEF50 than did those who did not have these symptoms, but these differences were not statistically significant.

  16. Comparative Genomics Analysis and Phenotypic Characterization of Shewanella putrefaciens W3-18-1: Anaerobic Respiration, Bacterial Microcompartments, and Lateral Flagella

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qiu, D.; Tu, Q.; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Respiratory versatility and psychrophily are the hallmarks of Shewanella. The ability to utilize a wide range of electron acceptors for respiration is due to the large number of c-type cytochrome genes present in the genome of Shewanella strains. More recently the dissimilatory metal reduction of Shewanella species has been extensively and intensively studied for potential applications in the bioremediation of radioactive wastes of groundwater and subsurface environments. Multiple Shewanella genome sequences are now available in the public databases (Fredrickson et al., 2008). Most of the sequenced Shewanella strains were isolated from marine environments and this genus was believed to be of marine origin (Hau and Gralnick, 2007). However, the well-characterized model strain, S. oneidensis MR-1, was isolated from the freshwater lake sediment of Lake Oneida, New York (Myers and Nealson, 1988) and similar bacteria have also been isolated from other freshwater environments (Venkateswaran et al., 1999). Here we comparatively analyzed the genome sequence and physiological characteristics of S. putrefaciens W3-18-1 and S. oneidensis MR-1, isolated from the marine and freshwater lake sediments, respectively. The anaerobic respirations, carbon source utilization, and cell motility have been experimentally investigated. Large scale horizontal gene transfers have been revealed and the genetic divergence between these two strains was considered to be critical to the bacterial adaptation to specific habitats, freshwater or marine sediments.

  17. Global Scratch Upgrade in Progress

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rates, Connection to PDSF October 29, 2013 The most used file system at the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC)-global scratch-just got an upgrade. As...

  18. Global Environment Facility Evaluation Office

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfaff, Alex

    Global Environment Facility Evaluation Office PROTECTED AREAS AND AVOIDED DEFORESTATION #12;Protected Areas and Avoided Deforestation: An Econometric Evaluation - i - TABLE OF CONTENTS 1................................................................................4 3.3 ESTIMATED EFFECTS OF PROTECTED AREAS ON DEFORESTATION

  19. Global optimization in reduced space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsung, Achim

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optimization is a key activity in any engineering discipline. Global optimization methods, in particular, strive to solve nonconvex problems, which often arise in chemical engineering, and deterministic algorithms such as ...

  20. NERSC Calculations Provide Independent Confirmation of Global...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Calculations Provide Independent Confirmation of Global Land Warming Since 1901 NERSC Calculations Provide Independent Confirmation of Global Land Warming Since 1901 September 9,...

  1. Major Nitrogen Loss Pathways in Upland Blueberry Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vano, Imre

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2 O production in an arable peat soil in Central KalimantanTateyama brown forest soil + peat moss (1:1), SC- Soil +the tropical and boreal peat soils have a wide fungal

  2. Vapor Transport in Dry Soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gee, Glendon W.; Ward, Anderson L.

    2001-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Water-vapor movement in soils is a complex process, controlled by both diffusion and advection and influenced by pressure and thermal gradients acting across tortuous flow paths. Wide-ranging interest in water-vapor transport includes both theoretical and practical aspects. Just how pressure and thermal gradients enhance water-vapor flow is still not completely understood and subject to ongoing research. Practical aspects include dryland farming (surface mulching), water harvesting (aerial wells), fertilizer placement, and migration of contaminants at waste-sites. The following article describes the processes and practical applications of water-vapor transport, with emphasis on unsaturated (dry) soil systems.

  3. Probabilistic Analysis of the Compressibility of Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jung, Byoung C.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    of surface loads or variable soil deposits. In current practice, the analysis to determine settlements is deterministic. It assumes that the soil profile at a site is uniform from location to location, and only allows limited consideration of the variations...

  4. Soil Carbon Sequestration and the Greenhouse Effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Archer, Steven R.

    Soil Carbon Sequestration and the Greenhouse Effect Second edition Rattan Lal & Ronald F. Follett. Printed in the United States of America. #12;181 Soil Carbon Sequestration and the Greenhouse Effect, 2nd

  5. Rainwater Harvesting: Soil Storage and Infiltration System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechell, Justin; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A soil storage and infiltration system collects rainfall runoff from the roofs of buildings and directs it underground where it infiltrates the soil. Such a system conserves water and protects it from surface pollution. This publication describes...

  6. FINGERPRINTING SOILS – A PROOF OF CONCEPT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kobylinski, Catherine

    2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Forensic soil characterization is an under-explored field in the forensic sciences. One aspect of forensic sciences is Locard’s Exchange Principle, which states that every contact leaves a trace. As soil characterization technology improves...

  7. Irrigation Monitoring with Soil Water Sensors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enciso, Juan; Porter, Dana; Peries, Xavier

    2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Monitoring soil water content is essential if growers want to optimize production, conserve water, reduce environmental impacts and save money. This publication illustrates how soil moisture monitoring can improve irrigation decisions and how...

  8. BIOCYCLE JUNE 2002 41 ETAL contaminated soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    where smelter emissions or mine wastes caused con- tamination and soils were acidic. Such metal toxic the location of the main lead smelter, over 2,000 yards of soils have been excavated and replaced with clean

  9. Maryland Soil Conservation Districts Law (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is the policy of the state to conserve the soil, water, and related resources of the state through establishing regulations for land-use practices related to soil erosion. This legislation...

  10. Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--Infiltration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    programs.) Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication of program information by infiltration. The infiltration rate can be restricted by poor management. Under these conditions, the water) and the infiltration rate. These are affected by vegetation and many soil properties. Residence time The length of time

  11. Differences in potassium forms between cutans and adjacent soil matrix in a Grey Clay Soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Differences in potassium forms between cutans and adjacent soil matrix in a Grey Clay Soil Fan Liu1 of cutans on potassium forms and their transformations were investigated for a Western Australian grey clay soil. Cutans and matrix soil had similar clay mineral associations with kaolinite, smectite and illite

  12. Soil Science Society of America Journal Revealing Soil Structure and Functional Macroporosity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wildenschild, Dorthe

    how fast water, greenhouse gases, vola- tile compounds, chemicals, and pollutants can enter and move ecosystem functions. In this study, soil physical measurements (soil-water retention and air permeability soil clay content, while significantly higher air permeability was observed for the l1 to l3 soils than

  13. Purdue AgronomyPurdue AgronomyCROP, SOIL, AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES Indiana Soils and Septic Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holland, Jeffrey

    the interactions of contaminants with soil mineral surfaces. For example, phosphate, a common constituent of minerals to pore space. Contaminants and solids in the effluent are trapped in the pore space between soil tank and soil absorption field. These systems rely on the soil to remove all contaminants -- including

  14. UNL Microgravity: Team Fast Project: Lunar soil is much different from terrestrial soil,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    UNL Microgravity: Team Fast Project: Lunar soil is much different from terrestrial soil, consisting of a large percentage of very fine particles. Lunar soil also contains very irregular and jagged particles formed from the sintering together of broked grains during micro-meteorite bombardment. NASA has soil

  15. Soil CO2 flux and photoautotrophic community composition in high-elevation, `barren' soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammerton, James

    Soil CO2 flux and photoautotrophic community composition in high-elevation, `barren' soil Kristen R of Colorado, Campus Box 450, Boulder, CO 80309, USA. Summary Soil-dominated ecosystems, with little-elevation, subnival zone soil (i.e. elevations higher than the zone of continuous vegetation), the structure

  16. Soil compaction: track induced soil stress isn't so positive in comparison with tyre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Soil compaction: track induced soil stress isn't so positive in comparison with tyre Ingeniors, Clermont-Ferrand, France Abstract This study concludes that, from the soil compaction point of view, using on all the contact area and induce overall less stress on the soil. Introduction As agricultural machines

  17. Holme et al. Soil Redox Sensor Networks RADIO FREQUENCY ENABLED SOIL REDOX POTENTIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubinstein, Benjamin

    Holme et al. Soil Redox Sensor Networks RADIO FREQUENCY ENABLED SOIL REDOX POTENTIAL SENSOR technologies that may be combined into a cost effective soil redox sensor network, discuss the merits of each as a component of said network, describe a prototype soil redox sensor network and perform basic laboratory

  18. Evaluating Soil Health Summary: Soil health can be measured, monitored and managed to increase sustainability and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    Evaluating Soil Health Summary: Soil health can be measured, monitored and managed to increaseResourcesNonmedia, Producers, Web. From Sara Adlington, (406) 994-4602 Filename: Eval Soil Health PR2014 Web: Ag, Extension with Montana State University and MSU Extension have recommendations for growers on evaluating soil quality

  19. Bio-Char Soil Management on Highly Weathered Soils in the Humid Tropics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehmann, Johannes

    therefore have to be applied each year to sustain soil productivity. Management of black carbon (C36 Bio-Char Soil Management on Highly Weathered Soils in the Humid Tropics Johannes Lehmann1), ColombiaQ1 CONTENTS 36.1 Bio-Char Management and Soil Nutrient Availability

  20. Long-term Black Carbon Dynamics in Cultivated Soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Binh T.; Lehmann, Johannes C.; Kinyangi, James; Smernik, Ron; Riha, Susan J.; Engelhard, Mark H.

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Black carbon (BC) is a quantitatively important C pool in the global carbon cycle due to its relative recalcitrance against decay compared with other C pools. However, how rapidly BC is oxidized and in what way the molecular structure changes during decomposition over decadal time scales, is largely unknown. In the present study, the long-term dynamics in quality and quantity of BC were investigated in cultivated soil using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier-Transform Infrared (FTIR) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) techniques. BC particles, obtained from soil samples at 8 conversion ages stretching over 100 years and from a forest soil sample from Kenya, were manually picked under a light microscope for characterization and quantification. BC contents rapidly decreased from 12.7 to 3.8 mg C g?ą soil during the first 30 years since conversion, after which they slowly decreased to a steady state at 3.51 mg C g ?ąsoil. BC-derived C losses over 100 years were estimated at 6000 kg C ha?ą to a depth of 0.1 m. The initial rapid changes in BC stocks resulted in a mean residence time of only around 8.3 years, which was likely a function of both decomposition as well as transport processes. The molecular properties of BC changed more rapidly on surfaces than in the interior of BC particles and more rapidly during the first 30 years than during the following 70 years. The Oc/C ratios (Oc is O bound to C) and carbonyl groups (C=O) increased over time by 133 and 192 %, respectively, indicating oxidation was an important degradation process controlling BC quality. Al, Si, polysaccharides, and to a lesser extent Fe were rapidly adsorbed on BC particle surfaces within the first few years after BC deposition to soil. The protection by physical and chemical stabilization was apparently sufficient to not only minimize decomposition below detection between 30 and 100 years after deposition, but also physical export by erosion and vertical transport below 0.1 m.

  1. Derivation of Soil Moisture Retention Characteristics from Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, C.P.

    systems require knowledge of the relationships between soil moisture content (), soil water pressure (h, and evapotranspiration. The soil factors include soil matric potential and water content relationship, saturated content of soil. The relation between matric potential and volumetric water content in a soil is termed

  2. 11:776:413 Soil Quality S. Murphy Page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Kuang-Yu

    : Soil Management & Sustainability, best management practices Week 4 Soil Degradation and resulting's dependence on soil To understand society's impact on soil and need for educated management To increase sequestration. Managing soil to build/maintain organic matter. Week 6 Chemical Indicators: soil pH, buffering

  3. FieldIndicators of Hydric Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    Soils, Version 5.01, 2003 Natural Resources Conservation Service Wetland Science Institute Soil on the right has mucky peat (hemic soil material) to a depth of about 8 cm. If indicator S2 (2.5 cm mucky peat or peat) or indicator S3 (5 cm mucky peat or peat) is not a concern, morphologies below 8 cm would

  4. The Needs of Texas Soils for Lime.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1919-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Department of Agriculture. STS PAGE ............................................. What lime does 5 ............................................. Acidity of soils 7 ............................................. Sources of lime 8... of Texas soils for lime, as far as our present information permits. WHST LIME DOES Lime performs sereral functions in the soil, some of which are favor- able to increased crops and the maintenance of fertility, some favorable to certain crops...

  5. Exploring the World of Plants and Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Exploring the World of Plants and Soils 4-H Plant , Soils, and Entomology Curriculum 18 U.S.C. 707 Project Book 2 Publication 380-021 2014 #12;Exploring the World of Plants and Soil: Stems and Stamens ................................................................................................................. 3 Activity 1 The Stages of a Plant's Life

  6. Chemical Composition of Soils of Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach); Fudge, J. F. (Joseph Franklin)

    1937-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    STATION Table 5. Analyses of soils of the Gulf Coast Prairie-Continued Type Name Flat marshy to semi-marshy soils ....................... Harr~e clay, surface.. Harris clay, subsoil. ........................ Harris fine sandy loam, surface.... ............. Harris fine sandy loam. subsoil.. ............. Tidal marsh. surface.. ...................... Tidal marsh. subsoil. ....................... Flat stream bottom soils Guadalupe clay. surface.. ................... Guadalupe clay, subsoil...

  7. Soil and Water Conservation Spring 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    on them. Define water harvesting and give examples. #12;Basic Course Requirements: 1. Exams consistSWS 4233 Soil and Water Conservation Spring 2014 Instructor Susan Curry scurry@ufl.edu 352 most valuable and most mistreated resources: soil and water. Topics discussed include: Soil/water

  8. Common Questions Why should I soil test?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    Common Questions Why should I soil test? Soil testing is an important diagnostic tool to evaluate nutrient imbalances and understand plant growth. The most important reason to soil test is to have a basis for intelligent application of fertilizer and lime. Testing also allows for growers and homeowners to maintain

  9. Soil Properties That Distinguish Ecological Sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soil Properties That Distinguish Ecological Sites Mike Duniway USGS-Southwest Biological Science of vegetation? Why do sites differ in response to disturbance & management? #12;Ecological Sites & Soil Properties · Within a climatic zone (e.g. MLRA), differentiation of ecological sites based on soil

  10. 4, 38293862, 2007 Mechanisms of soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    BGD 4, 3829­3862, 2007 Mechanisms of soil carbon storage S. Steinbeiss et al. Title Page Abstract Biogeosciences Discussions is the access reviewed discussion forum of Biogeosciences Mechanisms of soil carbon­3862, 2007 Mechanisms of soil carbon storage S. Steinbeiss et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction

  11. Soil Carbon Accumulation During Temperate Forest Succession

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grogan, Paul

    K7L 3N6, Canada ABSTRACT Carbon sequestration in soils that have previously beendepletedoforganic the soil carbon sequestration potential of such lands by sampling adjacent mature forest and agricultural abandonment is more important than soil type in determining the potential magnitude of carbon sequestration

  12. DIVISION S-6--SOIL & WATER MANAGEMENT & CONSERVATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DIVISION S-6--SOIL & WATER MANAGEMENT & CONSERVATION Soil Organic Carbon Sequestration Rates soil column within 20 yr following culti- Carbon sequestration rates, with a change from CT to NT, can in approximately 40 to and returning to the original land cover or other peren- 60 yr. Carbon sequestration rates

  13. 9, 1443714473, 2012 Soil carbon drivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ickert-Bond, Steffi

    BGD 9, 14437­14473, 2012 Soil carbon drivers and benchmarks in Earth system models K. E. O. Todd if available. Causes of variation in soil carbon predictions from CMIP5 Earth system models and comparison #12;BGD 9, 14437­14473, 2012 Soil carbon drivers and benchmarks in Earth system models K. E. O. Todd

  14. Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics in Agricultural Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics in Agricultural Soils Model Applications at Different Scales in Time Print: SLU Service/Repro, Uppsala 2012 #12;Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics in Agricultural Soils. Model Applications at Different Scales in Time and Space Abstract An understanding of soil organic carbon (C

  15. Rangeland Sheet 6 Soil Quality Information Sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    decomposition. Chemically stable organic matter gives soil its dark color and is generally the largest pool. Increasing levels of organic matter promote a higher water- holding capacity, which results in increasedRangeland Sheet 6 Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--Organic Matter USDA

  16. Sulfate induced heave in lime stabilized soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bredenkamp, Sanet

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The addition of hydrated lime to clay soils is one of the most common methods of soil stabilization. However, when sulfates are present in the soil, the calcium in the lime reacts with the sulfates to form ettringite, an expandable mineral...

  17. Agricultural Management Practices And Soil Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Agricultural Management Practices And Soil Quality: Measuring, assessing, and comparing laboratory and field test kit indicators of soil quality attributes. Publication 452-400 #12;Agricultural Management Associate, respectively, Crop and Soil Environmental Sciences, Virginia Tech #12;1 Introduction What makes

  18. Soil carbon sensitivity to temperature and carbon use efficiency compared across microbial-ecosystem models of varying complexity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Jianwei [University of Oklahoma] [University of Oklahoma; Wang, Gangsheng [ORNL] [ORNL; Allison, Steven D. [University of California, Irvine] [University of California, Irvine; Mayes, Melanie [ORNL] [ORNL; Luo, Yiqi [University of Oklahoma] [University of Oklahoma

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Global ecosystem models may require microbial components to accurately predict feedbacks between climate warming and soil decomposition, but it is unclear what parameters and levels of complexity are ideal for scaling up to the globe. Here we conducted a model comparison using a conventional model with first-order decay and three microbial models of increasing complexity that simulate short- to long-term soil carbon dynamics. We focused on soil carbon responses to microbial carbon use efficiency (CUE) and temperature. Three scenarios were implemented in all models: constant CUE (held at 0.31), varied CUE ( 0.016 C 1), and 50 % acclimated CUE ( 0.008 C 1). Whereas the conventional model always showed soil carbon losses with increasing temperature, the microbial models each predicted a temperature threshold above which warming led to soil carbon gain. The location of this threshold depended on CUE scenario, with higher temperature thresholds under the acclimated and constant scenarios. This result suggests that the temperature sensitivity of CUE and the structure of the soil carbon model together regulate the long-term soil carbon response to warming. Equilibrium soil carbon stocks predicted by the microbial models were much less sensitive to changing inputs compared to the conventional model. Although many soil carbon dynamics were similar across microbial models, the most complex model showed less pronounced oscillations. Thus, adding model complexity (i.e. including enzyme pools) could improve the mechanistic representation of soil carbon dynamics during the transient phase in certain ecosystems. This study suggests that model structure and CUE parameterization should be carefully evaluated when scaling up microbial models to ecosystems and the globe.

  19. Global Cooling: Effect of Urban Albedo on Global Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, Hashem; Menon, Surabi; Rosenfeld, Arthur

    2007-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In many urban areas, pavements and roofs constitute over 60% of urban surfaces (roof 20-25%, pavements about 40%). The roof and the pavement albedo can be increased by about 0.25 and 0.10, respectively, resulting in a net albedo increase for urban areas of about 0.1. Many studies have demonstrated building cooling-energy savings in excess of 20% upon raising roof reflectivity from an existing 10-20% to about 60%. We estimate U.S. potential savings in excess of $1 billion (B) per year in net annual energy bills. Increasing albedo of urban surfaces can reduce the summertime urban temperature and improve the urban air quality. Increasing the urban albedo has the added benefit of reflecting more of the incoming global solar radiation and countering the effect of global warming. We estimate that increasing albedo of urban areas by 0.1 results in an increase of 3 x 10{sup -4} in Earth albedo. Using a simple global model, the change in air temperature in lowest 1.8 km of the atmosphere is estimated at 0.01K. Modelers predict a warming of about 3K in the next 60 years (0.05K/year). Change of 0.1 in urban albedo will result in 0.01K global cooling, a delay of {approx}0.2 years in global warming. This 0.2 years delay in global warming is equivalent to 10 Gt reduction in CO2 emissions.

  20. Climate Models from the Joint Global Change Research Institute

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Staff at the Joint Institute develop and use models to simulate the economic and physical impacts of global change policy options. The GCAM, for example, gives analysts insight into how regional and national economies might respond to climate change mitigation policies including carbon taxes, carbon trading, and accelerated deployment of energy technology. Three available models are Phoenix, GCAM, and EPIC. Phoenix is a global, dynamic recursive, computable general equilibrium model that is solved in five-year time steps from 2005 through 2100 and divides the world into twenty-four regions. Each region includes twenty-six industrial sectors. Particular attention is paid to energy production in Phoenix. There are nine electricity-generating technologies (coal, natural gas, oil, biomass, nuclear, hydro, wind, solar, and geothermal) and four additional energy commodities: crude oil, refined oil products, coal, and natural gas. Phoenix is designed to answer economic questions related to international climate and energy policy and international trade. Phoenix replaces the Second Generation Model (SGM) that was formerly used for general equilibrium analysis at JGCRI. GCAM is the Global Change Assessment Model, a partial equilibrium model of the world with 14 regions. GCAM operates in 5 year time steps from 1990 to 2095 and is designed to examine long-term changes in the coupled energy, agriculture/land-use, and climate system. GCAM includes a 151-region agriculture land-use module and a reduced form carbon cycle and climate module in addition to its incorporation of demographics, resources, energy production and consumption. The model has been used extensively in a number of assessment and modeling activities such as the Energy Modeling Forum (EMF), the U.S. Climate Change Technology Program, and the U.S. Climate Change Science Program and IPCC assessment reports. GCAM is now freely available as a community model. The Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) Model is a process-based agricultural systems model composed of simulation components for weather, hydrology, nutrient cycling, pesticide fate, tillage, crop growth, soil erosion, crop and soil management and economics. Staff at PNNL have been involved in the development of this model by integrating new sub-models for soil carbon dynamics and nitrogen cycling.

  1. Soil Science Minor To earn a Soil Science minor, students must complete the following courses to total 27 credits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grünwald, Niklaus J.

    Soil Science Minor To earn a Soil Science minor, students must complete the following courses to total 27 credits: I. Soil Core A. ______SOIL 205.Soil Science (4) or ____ CSS 305. Principles of Soil Science (4) [Taught at EOU La Grande campus only

  2. Case Study #1 "The Global Warming Debate"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Christopher A.

    CHEM 001A Case Study #1 "The Global Warming Debate" Global warming is one of the most contentious issues of our time. There is an ongoing debate about whether global warming is caused by human activity.S., and because the scientific evidence used to determine if global warming is man-made is so difficult

  3. PRINT ONLY: GLOBAL WARMING Alexeev V. A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    PRINT ONLY: GLOBAL WARMING Alexeev V. A. Global Warming: 0.6°C or Less? [#1035] The peculiarities of global warming on the Earth during the last century are discussed. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXVIII (2007) full818.pdf #12;GLOBAL WARMING: 0.6 OR LESS? V.A.Alexeev; Vernadsky Institute of Geochemistry

  4. PARTNER, GLOBAL PUBLIC SECTOR DIRECTOR OF GLOBAL SALES STRATEGY & EXECUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    as never before. It reveals everything from large and systemic patterns--of global markets, workflows are best positioned to outperform in the "Decade of Smart." And as centers of business, culture and life, over pizza and drinks, we discuss how to solve the problems of the GLOBE, and our only home - planet

  5. Global change: Acronyms and abbreviations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodard, C.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Stoss, F.W. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment and Resources Center

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This list of acronyms and abbreviations is compiled to provide the user with a ready reference to dicipher the linguistic initialisms and abridgements for the study of global change. The terms included in this first edition were selected from a wide variety of sources: technical reports, policy documents, global change program announcements, newsletters, and other periodicals. The disciplinary interests covered by this document include agriculture, atmospheric science, ecology, environmental science, oceanography, policy science, and other fields. In addition to its availability in hard copy, the list of acronyms and abbreviations is available in DOS-formatted diskettes and through CDIAC`s anonymous File Transfer Protocol (FTP) area on the Internet.

  6. Making Globalization Work for Sustainable Human Development The Global Programme Paradigm : A Synthesis Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the best practices and strategies to manage their integration into the global economy and therefore bringMaking Globalization Work for Sustainable Human Development The Global Programme Paradigm-UNDP Global Programme on Globalization, Liberalization and Sustainable Human Development* Gabriela Tejada

  7. Unveiling Microbial Carbon Cycling Processes in Key U.S. Soils using “Omics”

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myrold, David D. [Oregon State University; Bottomely, Peter J. [Oregon State University; Jumpponen, Ari [Kansas State University; Rice, Charles W. [Kansas State University; Zeglin, Lydia H. [Kansas State University; David, Maude M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Jansson, Janet K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Prestat, Emmanuel [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Hettich, Robert L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    2014-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Soils process and store large amounts of C; however, considerable uncertainty still exists about the details of that influence microbial partitioning of C into soil C pools, and what are the main influential forces that control the fraction of the C input that is stabilized. The soil microbial community is genotypically and phenotypically diverse. Despite our ability to predict the kinds of regional environmental changes that will accompany global climate change, it is not clear how the microbial community will respond to climate-induced modification of precipitation and inter-precipitation intervals, and if this response will affect the fate of C deposited into soil by the local plant community. Part of this uncertainty lies with our ignorance of how the microbial community adapts genotypically and physiologically to changes in soil moisture brought about by shifts in precipitation. Our overarching goal is to harness the power of multiple meta-omics tools to gain greater understanding of the functioning of whole-soil microbial communities and their role in C cycling. We will do this by meeting the following three objectives: 1. Further develop and optimize a combination of meta-omics approaches to study how environmental factors affect microbially-mediated C cycling processes. 2. Determine the impacts of long-term changes in precipitation timing on microbial C cycling using an existing long-term field manipulation of a tallgrass prairie soil. 3. Conduct laboratory experiments that vary moisture and C inputs to confirm field observations of the linkages between microbial communities and C cycling processes. We took advantage of our state-of-the-art expertise in community “omics” to better understand the functioning soil C cycling within the Great Prairie ecosystem, including our ongoing Konza Prairie soil metagenome flagship project at JGI and the unique rainfall manipulation plots (RaMPs) established at this site more than a decade ago. We employed a systems biology approach, considering the complex soil microbial community as a functioning system and using state-of-the-art metatranscriptomic, metaproteomic, and metabolomic approaches. These omics tools were refined, applied to field experiments, and confirmed with controlled laboratory studies. Our experiments were designed to specifically identify microbial community members and processes that are instrumental players in processing of C in the prairie soils and how these processes are impacted by wetting and drying events. This project addresses a key ecosystem in the United States that current climate models predict will be subjected to dramatic changes in rainfall patterns as a result of global warming. Currently Mollisols, such as those of the tallgrass prairie, are thought to sequester more C than is released into the atmosphere, but it is not known what changes in rainfall patterns will have on future C fluxes. Through an analysis of the molecular response of the soil microbial community to shifts in precipitation cycles that are accompanied by phenologically driven changes in quality of plant C rhizodeposits, we gained deeper insight into how the metabolism of microbes has adapted to different precipitation regimes and the impact of this adaption on the fate of C deposited into soil. In doing so, we addressed key questions about the microbial cycling of C in soils that have been identified by the DOE.

  8. Vitrification testing of soil fines from contaminated Hanford 100 Area and 300 Area soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ludowise, J.D.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The suitability of Hanford soil for vitrification is well known and has been demonstrated extensively in other work. The tests reported here were carried out to confirm the applicability of vitrification to the soil fines (a subset of the Hanford soil potentially different in composition from the bulk soil) and to provide data on the performance of actual, vitrified soil fines. It was determined that the soil fines were generally similar in composition to the bulk Hanford soil, although the fraction <0.25 mm in the 100 Area soil sample appears to differ somewhat from the bulk soil composition. The soil fines are readily melted into a homogeneous glass with the simple additions of CaO and/or Na{sub 2}O. The vitrified waste (plus additives) occupies only 60% of the volume of the initial untreated waste. Leach testing has shown the glasses made from the soil fines to be very durable relative to natural and man-made glasses and has demonstrated the ability of the vitrified waste to greatly reduce the release of radionuclides to the environment. Viscosity and electrical conductivity measurements indicate that the soil fines will be readily processable, although with levels of additives slightly greater than used in the radioactive melts. These tests demonstrate the applicability of vitrification to the contaminated soil fines and the exceptional performance of the waste form resulting from the vitrification of contaminated Hanford soils.

  9. RENEWABLES 2007 GLOBAL STATUS REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    RENEWABLES 2007 GLOBAL STATUS REPORT www.ren21.net #12;Renewable Energy Policy Network for the 21st renewable energy. It provides a forum for leadership and exchange in international policy processes. It bolsters appropriate policies that increase the wise use of renewable energies in developing

  10. Agricultural Sciences for Global Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agricultural Sciences for Global Development ­ SLU's contribution Research Capacity building Provision of expertise The mission of the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU) is "to develop in rural areas, and agriculture plays an essential role in their livelihoods. Nevertheless, FAO estimates

  11. RENEWABLES 2005 GLOBAL STATUS REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    to renewable energy. The establishment of a global policy network was embraced in the Political Declaration Research Institute Chinese Renewable Energy Industries Association China Susan McDade Energy Environment Institute Lead Author: Eric Martinotwww.ren21.net #12;Renewable Energy Policy Network for the 21st Century

  12. Satellite Radio: Its Global Impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Udgaonkar, Jayant B.

    Satellite Radio: Its Global Impact TIFR Alumni Lecture By S.Rangarajan #12;1 A wonder called RADIO "No wonder so many physicists started as radio tinkers, and no wonder, before physicist became on Richard Feynmann We will stick to the definition of Radio as · Wireless Audio Delivery ·Listener cannot

  13. GLOBAL WOOD SUPPLY Sten Nilsson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GLOBAL WOOD SUPPLY Sten Nilsson Biomass and Resource Efficiency: the need for a supply led approach the wood come from? Western EU Deficit Eastern EU Deficit Rest of Eastern Europe Balanced Russia Rest of Eastern Europe Balanced Russia Is probably at production ceiling under current conditions Japan

  14. Conservation and Global Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landweber, Laura

    V.6 Conservation and Global Climate Change Diane M. Debinski and Molly S. Cross OUTLINE 1. Introduction 2. How climate is changing 3. Environmental responses to climate change 4. Consequences of climate the coming decades will be preserving biodiversity in the face of climate change. It has become increasingly

  15. ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' scientific report ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' scientific report ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' Team) : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 6 2.2 Anthropogenic climate change studies: scenario experiments (96) : : : : : : : : : 7 2 following its creation, the ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' team had to make its proofs in order

  16. COLUMBIA ENGINEERING WINTER GLOBAL EDUCATIONAL EXPERIENCE: EXPLORING GLOBAL ENGINEERING WITH CITY UNIVERSITY OF HONG KONG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hone, James

    COLUMBIA ENGINEERING WINTER GLOBAL EDUCATIONAL EXPERIENCE: EXPLORING GLOBAL ENGINEERING WITH CITY UNIVERSITY OF HONG KONG JANUARY 7th ­ 15TH , 2012 Program Features The Winter Global Educational Experience is open to Columbia Engineering

  17. Soil Erosion and Sediment Control Act, Soil and Water Conservation District, and Council on Soil and Water Conservation Regulations (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations establish Soil and Water Conservation Districts throughout the State of Connecticut. Each district has its own Board of Directors; membership and election procedures are defined...

  18. Soil macroaggregate dynamics in a mountain spatial climate gradient

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Soil macroaggregate dynamics in a mountain spatial climate gradient Lauric Cécillon1,2,* , Nilvania://lauric.cecillon.free.fr/ Key words: Mountain soils; Climate change; Soil aggregation; Soil organic matter; Near infrared reflectance spectroscopy; Soil threats Biogeochemistry 97: 31-43 (2010) http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10533

  19. Soil maps of Wisconsin Alfred E. Hartemink a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mladenoff, David

    Soil maps of Wisconsin Alfred E. Hartemink a, , Birl Lowery a , Carl Wacker b a University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Soil Science, FD Hole Soils Lab, 1525 Observatory Drive, Madison, WI 53706 May 2012 Accepted 15 May 2012 Available online xxxx Keywords: Soil maps Historical maps Digital soil

  20. CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Statewide Variety Testing Program Coordinator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Statewide Variety Testing Program Coordinator Committee Membership Dr. Jerry Johnson - committee chair Dr. Paul Raymer Department of Crop & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Department of Crop & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University of Georgia University

  1. Expanded Course Description for 11:776:413 Soil Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Kuang-Yu

    Soil Quality: soil management & sustainability, concept of best management practices (BMPs) Soil and restoration of desirable properties will be addressed. Management of our soil resource to maintain or improve soil quality and maximize ecosystem sustainability will be emphasized. Learning Goals: To gain full

  2. SOIL QUALITY (SWS 6134) 3 Credits-Fall 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    with basic concepts, principles, components, measurements, and evaluation of soil quality and its management for sustainable agriculture. Soil quality is the capacity of the soil to function within the ecosystem boundaries. In this course, state-of-the-art studies on soil quality and the principles, assessment and management of soil

  3. The Soils of Bowie, Denton, Freestone, and Red River Counties. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1928-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    lime, ground oyster shells, air-slaked lime, or ground limestone rock. A number of acid soils are found to occur in the counties described in this Bulletin. The acidity of some of the soils is slight, while that of others is high. Acidity... ........................................... 1.) .............................. Fertilizers for the Soils Studied 13 ........ ....................................... Use of Lime : 14 Soils of Bowie County ............................. ........ 14 .................. Pot Experiments on Soils...

  4. Water Transfer from Soil to the Atmosphere as Related to Climate and Soil Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wendt, C. W.

    of the soil surface is the limiting parameter. Effects of Crude Oil on Evaporation - Crude oil applied to the wet soil surfaces of the lysimeters following rains suppressed evaporation immediately following the rains. However, the value of the crude oil...

  5. Airborne microwave remote sensing of soil moisture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Black, Quentin Robert

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Studies of Sampling Accuracy Soil Type Variation . Surface Conditions. Lawrence, 1976 Experiment. Finney County, 1976 Experiment Hand County, 1976 Experiment . 1 1 3 4 4 5 7 15 16 16 21 28 31 33 33 33 35 36 36 37 38 39 41 42... 1971 soil and temperature profiles using surface layers 0. 5 cm thick 56 22 Comparison of the response of coherent and noncoherent emissions models for several 1971 soil and temperature profiles using surface layers 1. 0 cm thick . . . . . . . . 57...

  6. Water as a Reagent for Soil Remediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jayaweera, Indira S.; Marti-Perez, Montserrat; Diaz-Ferrero, Jordi; Sanjurjo, Angel

    2003-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    SRI International conducted experiments in a two-year, two-phase process to develop and evaluate hydrothermal extraction technology, also known as hot water extraction (HWE) technology, for remediating petroleum-contaminated soils. The bench-scale demonstration of the process has shown great promise, and the implementation of this technology will revolutionize the conventional use of water in soil remediation technologies and provide a standalone technology for removal of both volatile and heavy components from contaminated soil.

  7. The Chemical Composition of Some Texas Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1907-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , nitrogen, and potash. keeps the soil from beconling acid, and has a favorable effect upon its physical character. Hence a deficiency of lime should be corracted by applications of quicklime, slaked lime, or ground limestone. Lime is lost in considerable... tne usquehanna clay appear to contain sufficient potash. The Lufkin and Sus- uehanna soils are low in lime. All the soils tested by pot experiments respond to phosphoric acid--the Norfolk fine sand, Norfolk fine sandy loam, Orangeburg fine sandy...

  8. Genetic Analysis in Populus Reveals Potential to Enhance Soil Carbon Sequestration In a paper published in the August, 2005 issue of Canadian Journal of Forest Research, scientists

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Genetic Analysis in Populus Reveals Potential to Enhance Soil Carbon Sequestration In a paper carbon sequestration by an estimated 0.35Gt carbon/year. This represents ca. 4% of global carbon in terrestrial ecosystems. This work is supported by research funded through the Carbon Sequestration Program

  9. Climate Science and Public Policy in Iowa The productive soils and favorable climate of Iowa underpin the economy of our State.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debinski, Diane M.

    Climate Science and Public Policy in Iowa The productive soils and favorable climate of Iowa in our contributions to national and global food security. Changes in rainfall patterns and other climate and livelihoods. Subtle changes in climate can have large effects on agriculture, making it a sensitive indicator

  10. Workforce Development in the Global Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, David

    Workforce Development in the Global Economy: LINKING SKILLS AND CAPABILITIES Phil Psilos & Competitiveness Duke University INTRODUCTION NOVEMBER 2011 #12;Workforce Development in the Global Economy competitiveness, and innovation in the knowledge economy. Duke CGGC works with a network of researchers

  11. Electronic Communities: Global Village or Cyberbalkans?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electronic Communities: Global Village or Cyberbalkans? Marshall Van Alstyne Erik Brynjolfsson Tel KEYWORDS: Information Economy (AD02), Economic Theory (AM), Economic Impacts (BA01), Computerization of Society (BD0101), Organizational Structure (DA03), Information Flows (DD07), Globalization (AF1301

  12. Risk in the Global Supply Chain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Datta, Shoumen

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon footprints are not on the priority list of risk analysts in operations management for at least half or more of global businesses. What are the other risks in the global supply chain?

  13. Global Pollution: How Much Is Too Much?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trevors, Jack T.; Saier, Milton H.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    009-0252-0 Global Pollution: How Much Is Too Much? Jack T.1) How much global pollution can our planet tolerate andThere is already more pollution on our planet than we can

  14. Global vorticity shedding for a vanishing foil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steele, Stephanie Chin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore several aspects of the phenomenon we call global vorticity shedding. Global vorticity shedding occurs when an object in viscous fluid suddenly vanishes, shedding the entire boundary layer vorticity into the wake ...

  15. Global Superdiffusion of Weak Chaos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Itzhack Dana

    2003-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A class of kicked rotors is introduced, exhibiting accelerator-mode islands (AIs) and {\\em global} superdiffusion for {\\em arbitrarily weak} chaos. The corresponding standard maps are shown to be exactly related to generalized web maps taken modulo an ``oblique cylinder''. Then, in a case that the web-map orbit structure is periodic in the phase plane, the AIs are essentially {\\em normal} web islands folded back into the cylinder. As a consequence, chaotic orbits sticking around the AI boundary are accelerated {\\em only} when they traverse tiny {\\em ``acceleration spots''}. This leads to chaotic flights having a quasiregular {\\em steplike} structure. The global weak-chaos superdiffusion is thus basically different in nature from the strong-chaos one in the usual standard and web maps.

  16. Dynamic Soil-Structure-Soil-Interaction Analysis of Structures in Dense Urban Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Katherine Carys

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    soil. International Journal of Geomechanics, 8(6), 336-346.International Journal of Geomechanics. Takewaki, I. (1998).

  17. Distribution of soil and leaf water potentials of mature grapefruit trees under three soil moisture regimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prathapar, Sanmugam Ahembaranathan

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DISTRIBUTION OF SOIL AND LEAF WATER POTENTIALS OF MATURE GRAPEFRUIT TREES UNDER THREE SOIL MOISTURE REGIMES A Thesis by SANMUGAM AHEMBARANATHAN PRATHAPAP, Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1982 Major Subject; Agricultural Engineering DISTRIBUTION OF SOIL AND LEAF WATER POTENTIALS OF MATURE GRAPEFRUIT TREES UNDER THREE SOIL MOISTURE REGIMES A Thesis by SANMUGAM AHEMBARANATHAN PRATHAPAR...

  18. An investigation of soil-tool interaction theories as they apply to a Lunar soil simulant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willman, Brian Michael

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AN INVESTIGATION OF SOIL - TOOL INTERACTION THEORIES AS THEY APPLY TO A LUNAR SOIL SIMULANT A Thesis by BRIAN MICHAEL WILLMAN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject: Civil Engineering AN INVESTIGATION OF SOIL - TOOL INTERACTION THEORIES AS THEY APPLY TO A LUNAR SOIL SIMULANT A Thesis by BRIAN MICHAEL WILLMAN Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial...

  19. Global

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.NewofGeothermal Heat Pump Basics

  20. Oxidation of Organic Compounds in the Soil.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1915-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    oxidized to nitrates. The direct study of the changes in organic matter or carbon in the soil is more satisfactory than any assumption. A considerable amount of work upon the oxidation of organic matter in the soil has been clone hy Wollny... cflpo8city, so the re1ati~-e power of the soil to support oxidizing organisms ma!r he termed its oxidafion cnpaciiy. The nitrif-ing capac- it" the oxidatioa capacity 'and the capacit~ of the soil to convert am- monia into nitrates and ammonia are to a...

  1. Tank farm backlog soil sample analysis plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahlers, J.D., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the measures to collect samples, perform testing on samples, and make decisions to obtain a Contained- in Determination for tank farms backlog soil.

  2. Generation and mobility of radon in soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Objectives of this research include: (1) To determine the processes that cause large seasonal and short-term changes in the radon (Rn) content of soil gases, and to develop methods of predicting and modeling these variations; (2) to evaluate the relation of Rn emanation coefficients to form of radium (Ra) and other U-series decay products, particularly the role of Ra in organic matter and Fe-oxides; (3) to evaluate the conditions in which convection of gas in soil and bedrock may affect soil gas radon availability in houses; and, (4) to collaborate with other DOE researchers on evaluation of Rn flux into houses, using our well characterized soil sites.

  3. Performance evaluation soil samples utilizing encapsulation technology

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dahlgran, J.R.

    1999-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Performance evaluation soil samples and method of their preparation uses encapsulation technology to encapsulate analytes which are introduced into a soil matrix for analysis and evaluation by analytical laboratories. Target analytes are mixed in an appropriate solvent at predetermined concentrations. The mixture is emulsified in a solution of polymeric film forming material. The emulsified solution is polymerized to form microcapsules. The microcapsules are recovered, quantitated and introduced into a soil matrix in a predetermined ratio to form soil samples with the desired analyte concentration. 1 fig.

  4. Performance evaluation soil samples utilizing encapsulation technology

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dahlgran, James R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Performance evaluation soil samples and method of their preparation using encapsulation technology to encapsulate analytes which are introduced into a soil matrix for analysis and evaluation by analytical laboratories. Target analytes are mixed in an appropriate solvent at predetermined concentrations. The mixture is emulsified in a solution of polymeric film forming material. The emulsified solution is polymerized to form microcapsules. The microcapsules are recovered, quantitated and introduced into a soil matrix in a predetermined ratio to form soil samples with the desired analyte concentration.

  5. Arsenic chemistry in soils and sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fendorf, S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    retention mechanisms on goethite. 1. Surface structure.ion adsorbed on synthetic goethite (?-FeOOH). Soil Sci. 35:of arsenic(III) on goethite: spectroscopic evidence for

  6. Energetic Consequences of nitrite stress in Desulfovibrio vulgarisHildenborough, inferred from global transcriptional analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Qiang; Huang, Katherine H.; He, Zhili; Alm, Eric J.; Fields,Matthew W.; Hazen, Terry C.; Arkin, Adam P.; Wall, Judy D.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2005-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Many of the proteins that are candidates for bioenergetic pathways involved with sulfate respiration in Desulfovibrio spp. have been studied, but complete pathways and overall cell physiology remain to be resolved for many environmentally relevant conditions. In order to understand the metabolism of these microorganisms under adverse environmental conditions for improved bioremediation efforts, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough was used as a model organism to study stress response to nitrite, an important intermediate in the nitrogen cycle. Previous physiological studies demonstrated that growth was inhibited by nitrite and that nitrite reduction was observed to be the primary mechanism of detoxification. Global transcriptional profiling with whole-genome microarrays revealed coordinated cascades of responses to nitrite in pathways of energy metabolism, nitrogen metabolism, oxidative stress response, and iron homeostasis. In agreement with previous observations, nitrite-stressed cells showed a decrease in the expression of genes encoding sulfate reduction functions in addition to respiratory oxidative phosphorylation and ATP synthase activity. Consequently, the stressed cells had decreased expression of the genes encoding ATP-dependent amino acid transporters and proteins involved in translation. Other genes up-regulated in response to nitrite include the genes in the Fur regulon, which is suggested to be involved in iron homeostasis, and genes in the Per regulon, which is predicted to be responsible for oxidative stress response.

  7. 4, 40694124, 2007 Global-scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    - water resources) that has been calculated by the most recent version of the WaterGAP Global Hydrology

  8. Global Sustainability: Toward Definition BECKY J. BROWN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,Madison,Wisconsin53705,USA. Science Program of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the Global

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: Global Climate & Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    20, 2013, in Advanced Materials Laboratory, Energy Efficiency, Facilities, Global Climate & Energy, Materials Science, Modeling, Modeling & Analysis, Partnership, Research &...

  10. Optimization Online - Machine Learning for Global Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrea Cassioli

    2009-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Jul 23, 2009 ... We propose to use a Support Vector Machine (although different machine ... Citation: Technical report - Global Optimization Laboratory, ...

  11. Implementation of global energy sustainability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grob, G.R. [CMDC, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The term energy sustainability emerged from the UN Conference on Environment and Development in Rio 1992, when Agenda 21 was formulated and the Global Energy Charter proclaimed. Emission reductions, total energy costing, improved energy efficiency, and sustainable energy systems are the four fundamental principles of the charter. These principles can be implemented in the proposed financial, legal, technical, and education framework. Much has been done in many countries toward the implementation of the Global Energy Charter, but progress has not been fast enough to ease the disastrous effects of the too many ill-conceived energy systems on the environment, climate, and health. Global warming is accelerating, and pollution is worsening, especially in developing countries with their hunger for energy to meet the needs of economic development. Asian cities are now beating all pollution records, and greenhouse gases are visibly changing the climate with rising sea levels, retracting glaciers, and record weather disasters. This article presents why and how energy investments and research money have to be rechanneled into sustainable energy, rather than into the business-as-usual of depleting, unsustainable energy concepts exceeding one trillion dollars per year. This largest of all investment sectors needs much more attention.

  12. EFFECTS OF COMPOST AND LIME APPLICATION ON SOIL CHEMICAL PROPERTIES, SOIL MICROBIAL COMMUNITY, AND FUSARIUM WILT IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    1 EFFECTS OF COMPOST AND LIME APPLICATION ON SOIL CHEMICAL PROPERTIES, SOIL MICROBIAL COMMUNITY compost as an antagonistic suppression approach to combat soil-borne disease effects on crop yields the effect of compost and lime on soil chemical properties, the soil microbial community (including Fusarium

  13. The production and degradation of trichloroacetic acid in soil: results from in situ soil column experiments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heal, Mathew R; Dickey, Catherine A; Heal, Kate V; Stidson, Ruth T; Matucha, Miroslav; Cape, J Neil

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    experiments with radioactively-labelled TCA and with irradiated (sterilised) soil columns. Control in situ forest soil columns showed evidence of net export (i.e. in situ production) of TCA, consistent with a net soil TCA production inferred from forest...

  14. Soil phosphorus status and fertilizer use in select agricutural soils in Nicaragua

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niemeyer, Patrick G

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . These soils contained high amounts of plant available P as indicated by four soil P testing methods, Texas A&M, Bray I, Mehlich III and Olsen. These same methods extracted less P from soils from Pacific coast volcanic lowlands and central highland uplands...

  15. Soil Science Society of America Journal Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J. 78:14581468

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Battles, John

    . Ithaca, NY 14853 John J. Battles Dep. of Environmental Science, Policy and Management Univ. of California was transported downward through the forest floor and upper mineral soil in a progressive fashion. By Year 11Soil Science Society of America Journal Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J. 78:1458­1468 doi:10.2136/sssaj2014

  16. The Emerging Chinese economy & its Global Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussex, University of

    The Emerging Chinese economy & its Global Impacts Department of Geography & IDS University of Sussex 5 February: The Emerging Chinese Economy & its Global Impacts + Decoding the Harmonious Socialist of Leicester 19 February: Global Production Network & the Chinese Economy Prof. John Humphrey, IDS 26 February

  17. Rangeland ecology: Key global research issues & questions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Rangeland ecology: Key global research issues & questions Robin Reid1 and Maria Fernandez Ecology Lab 2Associate Professor Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA Global Issues and Questions in Rangeland Ecology · Despite the focus here on global issues, we need to recognize that Mongolia

  18. Title: Global Distribution of Poverty Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Global Distribution of Poverty Data Creator / Copyright Owner: Center for International: N/A Publication Date: N/A Coverage Date(s): 1993 - 1998 Updates: N/A Abstract: The Global Poverty Mapping Project seeks to enhance current understanding of the global distribution of poverty

  19. Global optimization in inverse problem of scatterometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Global optimization in inverse problem of scatterometry Lekbir Afraites1,2 Jerome Hazard3 Patrick as a parametric optimization problem using the Least Square criterion. In this work, a design procedure for global robust optimization is developed using Kriging and global optimization approaches. Robustness

  20. An Explanation of Global Warming without Supercomputing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An Explanation of Global Warming without Supercomputing (revised version) K. Miyazaki E that the anthropogenic global warming is severely limited because the Earth is a water planet. 1 Introduction Now,2,3] on this anthropogenic global warming (AGW) is essentially based on the results of elaborate and enormous computer

  1. Global Warming: The Threat to the Planet*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    Global Warming: The Threat to the Planet* Jim Hansen 17 April 2007 2007 Leo Szilard Lecture. Graham Red Squirrel #12;Survival of Species 1. "Business-as-Usual" Scenario - Global Warming ~ 3ÂşC - Likely Extinctions ~ 50 percent 2. "Alternative" Scenario - Global Warming ~ 1ÂşC - Likely Extinctions

  2. An Explanation of Global Warming without Supercomputing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An Explanation of Global Warming without Supercomputing K. Miyazaki E-mail: miyazakiro that the climate sensitivity never exceeds 6 C. Consequently, the anthropogenic global warming is severely limited be calculated in simple terms. Global warming is like that." However, there will be not a few physicists who do

  3. How Minds Work Global Workspace Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Memphis, University of

    1 How Minds Work Global Workspace Theory Stan Franklin Computer Science Division & Institute for Intelligent Systems The University of Memphis #12;February 3, 2005 HMW: Global Workspace Theory 2 Global Workspace Theory · A Theory of Consciousness · A Theory of Cognition · A Theory of Mind #12;February 3

  4. Saskia Sassen and the Sociology of Globalization: A Critical Appraisal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, William I.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Economic globalization denationalizes national economies andGlobalization and the Postcolonial World: The New Political Economywidely on globalization from a political-economy approach.

  5. A Model of Success: The Carnegie Institute for Global Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weeks, Kirstin; Lehrer, David; Bean, Jonathan

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carnegie Institute for Global Ecology Kirstin Weeks, DavidInstitute for Global Ecology, the answer is an unquali? edremarkable about the Global Ecology building is not only how

  6. UNCORRECTEDPROOF 2 Requirements of a global near-surface soil moisture satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Jeff

    application when used as data assimilation input, else slight model forecast 15 degradation may result is vital to under- 26 standing the earth system water, energy, and carbon 27 cycles. Fluxes-sensitive socioeconomic 35 activities, such as water management, agriculture, flood 36 and drought monitoring, and policy

  7. Enhancing Cation-Exchange Capacity of Biochar for Soil Amendment and Global

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000ConsumptionInnovation Portal Industrial(2) Cu (3)

  8. Soil metagenomics and carbon cycling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz9MorganYou areInnovation Portal Software0Soil

  9. Soil Sampling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |RippeyInformationSoda Springs, Idaho:Soil Sampling Jump

  10. Experiment Hazard Class 15.2 - USDA Soil Permit

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    shipment, and disposal of regulated soil samples. A copy of the current APS USDA Soil Permit must accompany all samples. A copy of the home institution's soil permit is required...

  11. Production, Cost, and Soil Compaction Estimates for Two Western Juniper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dodson, Beth

    , Crook County Soil and Water Conservation District, Prineville, OR 97754. ABSTRACT: Harvesting trialsProduction, Cost, and Soil Compaction Estimates for Two Western Juniper Extraction Systems, production rates, and soil compaction impacts of two systems for harvesting western juniper (Juniperus

  12. Soil Disturbance from an Integrated Mechanical Forest Fuel Reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolding, M. Chad

    Soil Disturbance from an Integrated Mechanical Forest Fuel Reduction Operation in Southwest Oregon1 literature has quantified harvesting system effectiveness or soil disturbance concerns from such operations. This paper reports results of soil disturbance generated from an integrated forest harvesting

  13. Soil-landscape model helps predict potassium supply in vineyards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Geen, Anthony T; Pettygrove, Stuart; Southard, Randal; Minoshima, Hideomi; Verdegaal, Paul S.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for making and inter- preting soil surveys (2nd ed. ). USDA-K S, V, K Depth inches Color* moist soil Sand Silt Clay Claymineralogy† pH CEC cmol(+)/kg soil‡ Exchangeable K K

  14. Storage and turnover of organic matter in soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torn, M.S.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of organic carbon from peat soils. Nature 412 , 785. Fried,Plant Litter. Standard Soil Methods for Long-Term Ecological2007). Role of proteins in soil carbon and nitrogen storage:

  15. Soils Management, Site Productivity and Forest Nutrition: Nutrient Balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;#12;1) principals 2) strategies 3) implementation Sustainable Soil Management: #12;- maintenance of fertility soil management Strategies: #12;Examples of adaptive management models used for achieving sustainableSoils Management, Site Productivity and Forest Nutrition: Nutrient Balance and Availability

  16. Soil Hydraulic Characteristics of a Small Southwest Oregon Watershed Following

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    --------------------------------------------- Soil Hydraulic Characteristics of a Small Southwest by a high-intensity burn over areas of steep topography. The areal distribution of soil hydraulic of infiltration capacity, saturated hydraulic conductivity, and soil moisture characteristics. Also, measures

  17. Are global trade negotiations behind a fragmented world of "gated globalization"?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandyopadhyay, Antar

    Are global trade negotiations behind a fragmented world of "gated globalization"? James Lake In a very simple three country model where global trade negotiations precede a sequential Free Trade. Even though sequential FTA for- mation may lead to global free trade if governments have not previously

  18. Graduate Certificate in Global Health Fact Sheet College of Public Health GRADUATE EDUCATION IN GLOBAL HEALTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    Graduate Certificate in Global Health Fact Sheet · College of Public Health GRADUATE EDUCATION. Educational Objectives for the Graduate Certificate in Global Health Increase understanding of the global-disciplinary education in global health, electives and internships will be expected by student involvement with various

  19. Global Mineral Resource Assessment Potash--A Global Overview of Evaporite-Related Potash

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleskes, Joe

    Global Mineral Resource Assessment Potash--A Global Overview of Evaporite-Related Potash Resources intentionally left blank. #12;Global Mineral Resource Assessment Michael L. Zientek, Jane M. Hammarstrom, and Kathleen M. Johnson, editors Potash--A Global Overview of Evaporite-Related Potash Resources, Including

  20. United Nations Global Compact The UN Global Compact is a strategic policy initiative for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chatziantoniou, Damianos

    United Nations Global Compact The UN Global Compact is a strategic policy initiative for businesses in the world. The Global Compact pursues two complementary objectives: 1. Mainstream the ten principles the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). Participation in the Global Compact is open to degree-granting academic

  1. Impact of global dimming and brightening on global warming Martin Wild,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    Impact of global dimming and brightening on global warming Martin Wild,1 Atsumu Ohmura,1 and Knut February 2007. [1] Speculations on the impact of variations in surface solar radiation on global warming was responsible for the observed warming. To disentangle surface solar and greenhouse influences on global warming

  2. Global Biodiesel Market Trends,Global Biodiesel Market Trends, Outlook and OpportunitiesOutlook and Opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global Biodiesel Market Trends,Global Biodiesel Market Trends, Outlook and OpportunitiesPresident, Emerging Markets Online http://www.emerginghttp://www.emerging--markets.commarkets.com Author, Biodiesel 2020: A Global Market SurveyAuthor, Biodiesel 2020: A Global Market Survey Columnist

  3. About GE Global Research Center | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMForms About Become agovEducationWelcome toAboutAbout GE Global Research

  4. Women Engineers Lead Global Innovation in Bangalore | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsingWhat is abig worldFĂ©licieTeresa MathewsLead Global

  5. Economic Globalization and a Nuclear Renaissance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Thomas W.; Johnson, Wayne L.; Parker, Brian M.

    2001-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The phenomenon of globalization has become increasingly well recognized, documented, and analyzed in the last several years. Globalization, the integration of markets and intra-firm competition on a worldwide basis, involves complex behavioral and mindset changes within a firm that facilitate global competition. The changes revolve around efficient information flow and rapid deployment of technology. The objective of this report is to examine the probable characteristics of a global nuclear renaissance and its broad implications for industry structure and export control relative to nuclear technology. The question of how a modern renaissance would affect the trend toward globalization of the nuclear industry is addressed.

  6. Leachability of salmonella and fecal pollution indicator bacteria through soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fehrmann, Robert Clinton

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Factors controlling bs. cterial movement Movement of Salmonella in soils MATERIALS AND METHODS Soil ana1ysis Inoculum preparation Soil column preparation Bacterial adsorption to soil particles Ei'fects of different salts on the leaching of bacteria... Distribution of bacteria in soil columns Bacterial saturation of soils Break through curves Enumeration of bacteria Bacterial size 1. 4 17 17 18 18 1 9 19 20 Field studies Statistics RESULTS AND DISCUSSION 20 21 22 Filter selection...

  7. The moisture retention characteristic of four soils from Niger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landeck, Jonathon Keith

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gradient. Determination of the hydraulic gradient through unsatu- rated soil is best obtained by the "instantaneous profile method" (Hillel 1972) which requires frequent measurement of soil wetness and matric suction under conditions of internal...-drained, unsaturated, low-solute soil. Also known as soil-water suction, matric potential (M) is a function of the interaction between solid soil parti- cles and the soil water. The nature of these interactions is a function of the arrangement, sizes, and shapes...

  8. 19th World Congress of Soil Science, Soil solutions for a changing world, Brisbane, Australia 1-6 August 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ). The investigated ES were climate regulation through carbon sequestration in soil and biomass, soil conservation of these results are discussed. Key Words Land use change, socioeconomic drivers, carbon sequestration, soil

  9. Using soil sensing technology to examine interactions and controls between ectomycorrhizal growth and environmental factors on soil CO2 dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasselquist, Niles J.; Vargas, Rodrigo; Allen, Michael F.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plant Soil (2010) 331:17–29 DOI 10.1007/s11104-y REGULAR ARTICLE Using soil sensing technology to examineand environmental factors on soil CO 2 dynamics Niles J.

  10. Innovative vitrification for soil remediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jetta, N.W.; Patten, J.S.; Hnat, J.G. [Vortec Corp., Collegeville, PA (United States)

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this DOE demonstration program is to validate the performance and operation of the Vortec Cyclone Melting System (CMS{trademark}) for the processing of LLW contaminated soils found at DOE sites. This DOE vitrification demonstration project has successfully progressed through the first two phases. Phase I consisted of pilot scale testing with surrogate wastes and the conceptual design of a process plant operating at a generic DOE site. The objective of Phase 2, which is scheduled to be completed the end of FY 95, is to develop a definitive process plant design for the treatment of wastes at a specific DOE facility. During Phase 2, a site specific design was developed for the processing of LLW soils and muds containing TSCA organics and RCRA metal contaminants. Phase 3 will consist of a full scale demonstration at the DOE gaseous diffusion plant located in Paducah, KY. Several DOE sites were evaluated for potential application of the technology. Paducah was selected for the demonstration program because of their urgent waste remediation needs as well as their strong management and cost sharing financial support for the project.

  11. Statistical Characterization of Bare Soil Surface Microrelief

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to substrate movement, water infiltration or runoff, and soil erosion. It has been noted by many authors that most of the soil surface and water interaction processes have characteristic lengths in millimeter, fragmentation and water content) to obtain an optimal crop emergence. Seedbed preparation focuses

  12. DIGITAL SOIL RESOURCE INVENTORIES: STATUS AND PROSPECTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossiter, D G "David"

    DIGITAL SOIL RESOURCE INVENTORIES: STATUS AND PROSPECTS D G Rossiter Department of Earth Systems an inventory of digital soils data and supporting information available or publicized on the World Wide Web-scale inventories, especially using the SOTER methodology. Large-scale digital data are limited to the USA, Canada

  13. Soil Salinity Abatement Following Hurricane Ike 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mueller, Ryan

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    . The initial salt levels in November 2008 had an electrical conductivity (ECe) of the inundated soils as high as 26.7 dS/m. Fifty-four percent of the soils sampled in the 0-15 cm horizons and 9% in the 15-30 cm horizons of the edge area had an ECe >= 4 d...

  14. Analysis of large soil samples for actinides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maxwell, III; Sherrod L. (Aiken, SC)

    2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of analyzing relatively large soil samples for actinides by employing a separation process that includes cerium fluoride precipitation for removing the soil matrix and precipitates plutonium, americium, and curium with cerium and hydrofluoric acid followed by separating these actinides using chromatography cartridges.

  15. Forests and soil UK Forestry Standard Guidelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; forestry; soil; sustainable forest management; UK Forestry Standard. FCGL006/FC-GB(MMJ)/JCTP-2.5K/NOV11 for sustainable forest management Good forestry practice requirement Element of SFM Reference number LegalForests and soil UK Forestry Standard Guidelines #12;Key to symbols UKFS Requirements

  16. NNSS Soils Monitoring: Plutonium Valley (CAU366)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Julianne J.; Mizell, Steve A.; Nikolich, George; Campbell, Scott

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Nevada Site Office (NSO), Environmental Restoration Soils Activity has authorized the Desert Research Institute (DRI) to conduct field assessments of potential sediment transport of contaminated soil from Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 366, Area 11 Plutonium Valley Dispersion Sites Contamination Area (CA) during precipitation runoff events.

  17. Silicone as a soil stabilizing agent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunlap, Wayne Alan

    1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . This was aooomyliahed by adding concentrations of silioone of 0. 2 per oant, , 2 pmr sent, $ por sent, and 10 per cent to a soil being compacted for a class exercise. Although some ohango in soil oomyaotion properties were indicated, the results were too ?rratio...

  18. Sulfate induced heave in lime stabilized soil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bredenkamp, Sanet

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The electrical conductivity is then related to sulfate content in soils. Expansion tests were performed to determine the amount of expansion that occurs when lime is added to soils with different sulfate contents. A model that relates the amount of expansion...

  19. Process for removing polychlorinated biphenyls from soil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hancher, C.W.; Saunders, M.B.; Googin, J.M.

    1984-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a method of removing polychlorinated biphenyls from soil. The polychlorinated biphenyls are extracted from the soil by employing a liquid organic solvent dispersed in water in the ratio of about 1:3 to 3:1. The organic solvent includes such materials as short-chain hydrocarbons including kerosene or gasoline which are immiscible with water and are nonpolar. The organic solvent has a greater affinity for the PCB's than the soil so as to extract the PCB's from the soil upon contact. The organic solvent phase is separated from the suspended soil and water phase and distilled for permitting the recycle of the organic solvent phase and the concentration of the PCB's in the remaining organic phase. The present process can be satisfactorily practiced with soil containing 10 to 20% petroleum-based oils and organic fluids such as used in transformers and cutting fluids, coolants and the like which contain PCB's. The subject method provides for the removal of a sufficient concentration of PCB's from the soil to provide the soil with a level of PCB's within the guidelines of the Environmental Protection Agency.

  20. Detection of Low Volatility Organic Analytes on Soils Using Infrared...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Low Volatility Organic Analytes on Soils Using Infrared Reflection Spectroscopy. Detection of Low Volatility Organic Analytes on Soils Using Infrared Reflection Spectroscopy....