National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for global sea surface

  1. GLOBAL PATTERN OF MESOSCALE VARIABILITY IN SEA SURFACE HEIGHT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaplan, Alexey

    GLOBAL PATTERN OF MESOSCALE VARIABILITY IN SEA SURFACE HEIGHT AND ITS DYNAMICAL CAUSES Alexey separate the mesoscale variability of sea surface heights into its spatial and temporal components of mesoscale variability in different areas to dynamical causes. Major portion of it can be explained

  2. Global Drifter Program (GDP) Drifting buoy measurements of Sea Surface Temperature,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global Drifter Program (GDP) Drifting buoy measurements of Sea Surface Temperature, Mixed Layer Currents, Atmospheric Pressure and Winds http://www.aoml.noaa.gov/phod/dac/gdp.html 26th Data Buoy: the principal component of the Global Surface Drifting Buoy Array, a branch of NOAA's Global Ocean Observing

  3. Coral reef bleaching and sea surface temperature anomalies: 1991-1996 global patterns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goreau, T.J.; Hayes, R.L.; Strong, A.

    1997-12-31

    Global spatio-temporal patterns of mass coral reef bleaching during the first half of the 1990s continued to show the strong temperature correlations which first became established in the 1980s. Satellite sea surface temperature data and field observations were used to track thermal bleaching events in real time. Most bleaching events followed warm season sea surface temperature anomalies of around +1 degree celsius above historical means. Global bleaching patterns appear to have been strongly affected by worldwide cooling which followed eruption of Mount Pinatubo in June 1991. High water temperatures and mass coral reef bleaching took place in the Caribbean, Indian Ocean, and South Pacific in 1991, but there were few thermal anomalies or bleaching events in 1992 and 1993, years which were markedly cooler worldwide. Following the settling of Mount Pinatubo aerosols and resumption of global warming trends, extensive ocean thermal hot spots and bleaching events resumed in the South Pacific, South Atlantic, and Indian Oceans in 1994. Bleaching again took place in hot spots in the Indian Ocean and Caribbean in 1995, and in the South Atlantic, Caribbean, South Pacific, North Pacific, and Persian Gulf in 1996. Coral reefs worldwide are now very close to their upper temperature tolerance limits. This sensitivity, and the fact that the warmest ecosystems have no source of immigrant species pre-adapted to warmer conditions, may make coral reef ecosystems the first to be severely impacted if global temperatures and sea levels remain at current values or increase further.

  4. Response of tropical sea surface temperature, precipitation, and tropical cyclone-related variables to changes in global and local forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sobel, Adam

    A single-column model is used to estimate the equilibrium response of sea surface temperature (SST), precipitation, and several variables related to tropical cyclone (TC) activity to changes in both local and global forcing. ...

  5. GSOD Based Daily Global Mean Surface Temperature and Mean Sea Level Air Pressure (1982-2011)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Xuan Shi, Dali Wang

    This data product contains all the gridded data set at 1/4 degree resolution in ASCII format. Both mean temperature and mean sea level air pressure data are available. It also contains the GSOD data (1982-2011) from NOAA site, contains station number, location, temperature and pressures (sea level and station level). The data package also contains information related to the data processing methods

  6. GSOD Based Daily Global Mean Surface Temperature and Mean Sea Level Air Pressure (1982-2011)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Xuan Shi, Dali Wang

    2014-05-05

    This data product contains all the gridded data set at 1/4 degree resolution in ASCII format. Both mean temperature and mean sea level air pressure data are available. It also contains the GSOD data (1982-2011) from NOAA site, contains station number, location, temperature and pressures (sea level and station level). The data package also contains information related to the data processing methods

  7. MESOSCALE VARIABILITIES IN SEA SURFACE CURRENT FIELDS DERIVED THROUGH MULTI-SENSOR TRACKING OF SEA SURFACE FILMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamburg,.Universität

    MESOSCALE VARIABILITIES IN SEA SURFACE CURRENT FIELDS DERIVED THROUGH MULTI-SENSOR TRACKING OF SEA have already shown that it is possible to derive mesoscale sea surface current fields by tracking of the `global' currents. 1. INTRODUCTION The investigation of mesoscale turbulent sea surface currents

  8. A KNOWLEDGE DISCOVERY STRATEGY FOR RELATING SEA SURFACE TEMPERATURES TO FREQUENCIES OF TROPICAL STORMS AND GENERATING PREDICTIONS OF HURRICANES UNDER 21ST-CENTURY GLOBAL WARMING SCENARIOS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Race, Caitlin; Steinbach, Michael; Ganguly, Auroop R; Semazzi, Fred; Kumar, Vipin

    2010-01-01

    The connections among greenhouse-gas emissions scenarios, global warming, and frequencies of hurricanes or tropical cyclones are among the least understood in climate science but among the most fiercely debated in the context of adaptation decisions or mitigation policies. Here we show that a knowledge discovery strategy, which leverages observations and climate model simulations, offers the promise of developing credible projections of tropical cyclones based on sea surface temperatures (SST) in a warming environment. While this study motivates the development of new methodologies in statistics and data mining, the ability to solve challenging climate science problems with innovative combinations of traditional and state-of-the-art methods is demonstrated. Here we develop new insights, albeit in a proof-of-concept sense, on the relationship between sea surface temperatures and hurricane frequencies, and generate the most likely projections with uncertainty bounds for storm counts in the 21st-century warming environment based in turn on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Special Report on Emissions Scenarios. Our preliminary insights point to the benefits that can be achieved for climate science and impacts analysis, as well as adaptation and mitigation policies, by a solution strategy that remains tailored to the climate domain and complements physics-based climate model simulations with a combination of existing and new computational and data science approaches.

  9. Global Warming and Caspian Sea Level Fluctuations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ardakanian, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Coastal regions have a high social, economical and environmental importance. Due to this importance the sea level fluctuations can have many bad consequences. In this research the correlation between the increasing trend of temperature in coastal stations due to Global Warming and the Caspian Sea level has been established. The Caspian Sea level data has been received from the Jason-1 satellite. It was resulted that the monthly correlation between the temperature and sea level is high and also positive and almost the same for all the stations. But the yearly correlation was negative. It means that the sea level has decreased by the increase in temperature.

  10. MEASURING THE GLOBAL OCEAN SURFACE CIRCULATION WITH SATELLITE AND IN SITU OBSERVATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , resolve eddy kinetic energy, coastal processes, and deploying ancillary sensors for surface salinity and scatterometer winds, have provided a detailed resolution of the global sea surface velocity (SSV) and its and temporal variability of the global surface currents from satellite sea surface topography and vector wind

  11. HYBRID DECADE-MEAN GLOBAL SEA LEVEL WITH MESOSCALE RESOLUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HYBRID DECADE-MEAN GLOBAL SEA LEVEL WITH MESOSCALE RESOLUTION Nikolai A. Maximenko1 and Pearn P of twin-satellite mission GRACE and mesoscale sea level tilt derived from the momentum balance as seen 55 #12;sea level exhibits excellent accuracy on mesoscale, but may contain significant systematic

  12. The multimillennial sea-level commitment of global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levermann, Anders

    The multimillennial sea-level commitment of global warming Anders Levermanna,b,1 , Peter U. Clarkc of as much as several meters per degree of warming during previous intervals of Earth history when global. Moore, College of Global Change and Earth System Science, Beijing, China, and accepted by the Editorial

  13. ORNL/CDIAC-152 GLOBAL OCEAN SURFACE WATER PARTIAL PRESSURE OF CO2 DATABASE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ORNL/CDIAC-152 NDP-088r GLOBAL OCEAN SURFACE WATER PARTIAL PRESSURE OF CO2 DATABASE: MEASUREMENTS .....................................................................................................................................9 #12;#12;v LIST OF FIGURES 1 Location of LDEO master database of sea surface pCO2 observations. .............................................2 LIST OF TABLES 1 List of data contributors to the global surface water pCO2 LDEO database

  14. From Multi-Sensor Tracking of Sea Surface Films to Mesoscale and Sub-Mesoscale Sea Surface Current Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamburg,.Universität

    From Multi-Sensor Tracking of Sea Surface Films to Mesoscale and Sub-Mesoscale Sea Surface Current, Bundesstr. 53, 20146 Hamburg, Germany ABSTRACT The knowledge about mesoscale and sub-mesoscale sea surface to investigate mesoscale and sub-mesoscale turbulent features like eddies, particularly in coastal waters

  15. Monitoring Sea Surface temperature change at the Caribbean Sea, using AVHRR images.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    1 Monitoring Sea Surface temperature change at the Caribbean Sea, using AVHRR images. Y. Santiago 9017, Mayagüez, P.R. 00681 Abstract The Caribbean Sea is influenced by rivers, currents and winds which of three major rivers, the Amazonas, Orinoco and Magdalena, which impacts the sea at different year

  16. Neural Network forecasts of the tropical Pacific sea surface temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsieh, William

    Neural Network forecasts of the tropical Pacific sea surface temperatures Aiming Wu, William W Tang Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, USA Neural Networks (in press) December 11, 2005 title: Forecast of sea surface temperature 1 #12;Neural Network forecasts of the tropical Pacific sea

  17. Lorentzian Spectral Geometry for Globally Hyperbolic Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felix Finster; Olaf Müller

    2015-07-28

    The fermionic signature operator is analyzed on globally hyperbolic Lorentzian surfaces. The connection between the spectrum of the fermionic signature operator and geometric properties of the surface is studied. The findings are illustrated by simple examples and counterexamples.

  18. SEA SURFACE CURRENT FIELDS IN THE BALTIC SEA DERIVED FROM MULTI-SENSOR SATELLITE DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamburg,.Universität

    -sensor, algae blooms, surface currents, optical flow ABSTRACT: Mesoscale dynamic sea surface features demonstrate the use of multi- sensor / multi-channel satellite images for the computation of mesoscale surface

  19. Global sea-salt modeling: Results and validation against multicampaign shipboard measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global sea-salt modeling: Results and validation against multicampaign shipboard measurements of sea-salt concentrations from five different campaigns are used to validate the sea-salt). The validity of the sea-salt parameterizations is tested by employing a global forecasting model and transport

  20. HARMONIC FUNCTIONS FOR SEA-SURFACE TEMPERATURES AND SALINITIES, KOKO HEAD, OAHU, 1956-69, AND SEA-SURFACE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HARMONIC FUNCTIONS FOR SEA-SURFACE TEMPERATURES AND SALINITIES, KOKO HEAD, OAHU, 1956-69, AND SEA-SURFACE TEMPERATURES, CHRISTMAS ISLAND, 1954-69 GUNTHER It SECKEL' AND MARIAN Y. Y. YONG' ABSTRACT Harmonic functions, with daily sampling, are on average 0.07° C. Harmonic analysis spanning the entire sampling duration shows

  1. Tectonics, global changes in sea level and their relationship to stratigraphical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watts, A. B. "Tony"

    Tectonics, global changes in sea level and their relationship to stratigraphical sequences. Keywords: Sea level; Stratigraphy; Tectonics The development of stratigraphical modelling techni- ques have al., 1982) have focussed on modelling the stratigraphy of rifted Atlantic-type continental margin

  2. The Effect of Diurnal Sea Surface Temperature Warming on Climatological Air–Sea Fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clayson, Carol Anne

    Diurnal sea surface warming affects the fluxes of latent heat, sensible heat, and upwelling longwave radiation. Diurnal warming most typically reaches maximum values of 3°C, although very localized events may reach 7°–8°C. ...

  3. Observed and CAM3 GCM Sea Surface Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zender, Charles

    Observed and CAM3 GCM Sea Surface Wind Speed Distributions: Characterization, Comparison, and Bias climatological surface wind speed probability density functions (PDFs) estimated from observations and use them to evaluate, for the first time, contemporaneous wind PDFs predicted by a GCM. The ob- servations include NASA

  4. Earth's surface fluid variations and deformations from GPS and GRACE in global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Shuanggen; Feng, Guiping

    2011-01-01

    Global warming is affecting our Earth's environment. For example, sea level is rising with thermal expansion of water and fresh water input from the melting of continental ice sheets due to human-induced global warming. However, observing and modeling Earth's surface change has larger uncertainties in the changing rate and the scale and distribution of impacts due to the lack of direct measurements. Nowadays, the Earth observation from space provides a unique opportunity to monitor surface mass transfer and deformations related to climate change, particularly the global positioning system (GPS) and the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) with capability of estimating global land and ocean water mass. In this paper, the Earth's surface fluid variations and deformations are derived and analyzed from global GPS and GRACE measurements. The fluids loading deformation and its interaction with Earth system, e.g., Earth Rotation, are further presented and discussed.

  5. Impact of wind gusts on sea surface height in storm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vries, Hans de

    Impact of wind gusts on sea surface height in storm surge situations. Jonsmod, May 2010 Rikke van der Grinten (KNMI/IMAU) Hans de Vries (KNMI) Huib de Swart (IMAU) #12;2 Jonsmod, May 2010 Wind forcing winds from HiRLAM Drag relation, Charnock relation: with: #12;Jonsmod, May 2010 Wind stress · Assumption

  6. Lidar fluorosensing of mineral oil spills on the sea surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Carl von Ossietzky Universität

    be discriminated from heavy fuel, and from less harmful substances like fish oil or vegetable oil, Fig. 3, whichLidar fluorosensing of mineral oil spills on the sea surface Theo Hengstermann and Rainer Reuter Airborne .fluorosensor measurements over maritime oil spills show that this method enables a sensitive

  7. Comment on 'Discussions on common errors in analyzing sea level accelerations, solar trends and global warming'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benestad, R E

    2013-01-01

    Comment on Scafetta, Nicola. 'Discussion on Common Errors in Analyzing Sea Level Accelerations, Solar Trends and Global Warming.' arXiv:1305.2812 (May 13, 2013a). doi:10.5194/prp-1-37-2013.

  8. SMALL-SCALE VARIABILITY IN SEA SURFACE HEIGHTS AND SURFACE WINDS: IMPLICATIONS FOR ERRORS IN OCEAN MODELS AND OBSERVATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaplan, Alexey

    SMALL-SCALE VARIABILITY IN SEA SURFACE HEIGHTS AND SURFACE WINDS: IMPLICATIONS FOR ERRORS IN OCEAN on dispersion relationship of planetary waves 4. Small-scale variability in surface winds and sea surface of model and observational data sets. Imperfect parameterization of the small-scale variability (SSV

  9. Loggerhead sea turtles are circum-global, inhabiting temperate, sub-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    waters of the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans. In the Pacific, loggerhead sea turtles have been in the North Pacific Ocean occurs in Japan; there is no known nesting in the east- ern North Pacific (Márquez in the oceanic realm of the central North Pacific Ocean are of Japanese stock (Dutton et al., 1998). Tagging

  10. The multimillennial sea-level commitment of global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marzeion, Ben

    ,i a Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, 14473 Potsdam, Germany; b Institute of Physics, Potsdam University, University Park, PA 16802; g University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z4; h in the climate and global carbon system, however, causes the global mean temperature to decline slowly even after

  11. Global Sea Level Stabilization-Sand Dune Fixation: A Solar-powered Sahara Seawater Textile Pipeline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Badescu, Viorel; Bolonkin, Alexander A

    2007-01-01

    Could anthropogenic saturation with pumped seawater of the porous ground of active sand dune fields in major deserts (e.g., the westernmost Sahara) cause a beneficial reduction of global sea level? Seawater extraction from the ocean, and its deposition on deserted sand dune fields in Mauritania and elsewhere via a Solar-powered Seawater Textile Pipeline (SSTP) can thwart the postulated future global sea level. Thus, Macro-engineering offers an additional cure for anticipated coastal change, driven by global sea level rise, that could supplement, or substitute for (1) stabilizing the shoreline with costly defensive public works (armoring macroprojects) and (2) permanent retreat from the existing shoreline (real and capital property abandonment). We propose Macro-engineering use tactical technologies that sculpt and vegetate barren near-coast sand dune fields with seawater, seawater that would otherwise, as commonly postulated, enlarge Earth seascape area! Our Macro-engineering speculation blends eremology with...

  12. Sea surface exchanges of momentum, heat, and freshwater determined by satellite remote sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Lisan

    1 Sea surface exchanges of momentum, heat, and freshwater determined by satellite remote sensing Sensible heat flux Shortwave radiation Surface wind fields 2 #12;Sea surface exchanges of momentum, heat and the atmosphere communicate through the interfacial exchanges of heat, freshwater, and momentum. While

  13. The polarized emissivity of a wind-roughened sea surface: A Monte Carlo model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theiler, James

    The polarized emissivity of a wind-roughened sea surface: A Monte Carlo model Bradley G. Henderson-infrared emissivity of a wind-roughened sea surface. The model includes the effects of both shadowing and the reflected component of surface emission. By using Stokes vectors to quantify the radiation along a given ray

  14. Development of Global Sea Ice 6.0 CICE configuration for the Met Office Global Coupled Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rae, J. G. L. [Met Office Hadley Centre; Hewitt, H. T. [Met Office Hadley Centre; Keen, A. B. [Met Office Hadley Centre; Ridley, J. K. [Met Office Hadley Centre; West, A. E. [Met Office Hadley Centre; Harris, C. M. [Met Office Hadley Centre; Hunke, E. C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545, USA; Walters, D. N. [Met Office Hadley Centre

    2015-01-01

    The new sea ice configuration GSI6.0, used in the Met Office global coupled configuration GC2.0, is described and the sea ice extent, thickness and volume are compared with the previous configuration and with observationally-based datasets. In the Arctic, the sea ice is thicker in all seasons than in the previous configuration, and there is now better agreement of the modelled concentration and extent with the HadISST dataset. In the Antarctic, a warm bias in the ocean model has been exacerbated at the higher resolution of GC2.0, leading to a large reduction in ice extent and volume; further work is required to rectify this in future configurations.

  15. Development of global sea ice 6.0 CICE configuration for the Met Office global coupled model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rae, J. . G. L; Hewitt, H. T.; Keen, A. B.; Ridley, J. K.; West, A. E.; Harris, C. M.; Hunke, E. C.; Walters, D. N.

    2015-03-05

    The new sea ice configuration GSI6.0, used in the Met Office global coupled configuration GC2.0, is described and the sea ice extent, thickness and volume are compared with the previous configuration and with observationally-based datasets. In the Arctic, the sea ice is thicker in all seasons than in the previous configuration, and there is now better agreement of the modelled concentration and extent with the HadISST dataset. In the Antarctic, a warm bias in the ocean model has been exacerbated at the higher resolution of GC2.0, leading to a large reduction in ice extent and volume; further work is requiredmore »to rectify this in future configurations.« less

  16. The Global Topography of Mars and Implications for Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hauck II, Steven A.

    The Global Topography of Mars and Implications for Surface Evolution David E. Smith,1 * Maria T- accuracy global map of the topography of Mars. Dominant features include the low northern hemisphere-wavelength effect that has been shaped by an internal mechanism. The topography of Tharsis consists of two broad

  17. Observed hemispheric asymmetry in global sea ice changes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cavalieri, D.J.; Gloersen, P.; Parkinson, C.L.; Comiso, J.C.; Zwally, H.J.

    1997-11-07

    From November 1978 through December 1996, the areal extent of sea ice decreased by 2.9 {+-} 0.4 percent decade in the Arctic and increased by 1.3 {+-} 0.2 percent per decade in the Antarctic. The observed hemispheric asymmetry in these trends is consistent with a modeled response to a carbon dioxide-induced climate warming. The interannual variations, which are 2.3 percent of the annual mean in the Arctic, with a predominant period of about 5 years, and 3.4 percent of the annual mean in the Antarctic, with a predominant period of about 3 years, are uncorrelated. 29 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Rising Sea Levels Due to Global Warming Are Unstoppable

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultiday ProductionDesigningResourcesfeed-image Digg:Rising Sea Levels

  19. Multiscale models of atmospheric mercury: bromine chemistry, air-sea exchange, and global transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holmes, Christopher D.

    by atomic bromine (Br) in the tropo- sphere by combining kinetic data for the Hg-Br system with modeledMultiscale models of atmospheric mercury: bromine chemistry, air-sea exchange, and global transport rights reserved. #12;iii Dissertation Advisor Author Professor Daniel J. Jacob Christopher D. Holmes

  20. Reconciling multidecadal land-sea global temperature with rising CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pratt, Vaughan

    Reconciling multidecadal land-sea global temperature with rising CO2 Vaughan Pratt Stanford CO2 1 / 29 #12;Goal Additional insight into 1 Similarity of the 1860-1880 & 1910-1940 rises to 1970-2000. 2 The recent pause (2001-2013). 3 No sign of 3 C per doubling of CO2. Simple reasoning (no opaque

  1. Relationships between Pacific and Atlantic ocean sea surface temperatures and U.S. streamflow variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piechota, Thomas C.

    Relationships between Pacific and Atlantic ocean sea surface temperatures and U.S. streamflow March 2006; published 19 July 2006. [1] An evaluation of Pacific and Atlantic Ocean sea surface by an interdecadal-temporal evaluation for the Pacific (Atlantic) Ocean based on the phase of the Pacific Decadal

  2. Correlations between hurricane numbers and sea surface temperature: why does the correlation disappear at landfall?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laepple, T; Jewson, S; Nzerem, K; Laepple, Thomas; Bellone, Enrica; Jewson, Stephen; Nzerem, Kechi

    2007-01-01

    There is significant correlation between main development region sea surface temperature and the number of hurricanes that form in the Atlantic basin. The correlation between the same sea surface temperatures and the number of \\emph{landfalling} hurricanes is much lower, however. Why is this? Do we need to consider complex physical hypotheses, or is there a simple statistical explanation?

  3. Global Sea Level Stabilization-Sand Dune Fixation: A Solar-powered Sahara Seawater Textile Pipeline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viorel Badescu; Richard B. Cathcart; Alexander A. Bolonkin

    2007-07-21

    Could anthropogenic saturation with pumped seawater of the porous ground of active sand dune fields in major deserts (e.g., the westernmost Sahara) cause a beneficial reduction of global sea level? Seawater extraction from the ocean, and its deposition on deserted sand dune fields in Mauritania and elsewhere via a Solar-powered Seawater Textile Pipeline (SSTP) can thwart the postulated future global sea level. Thus, Macro-engineering offers an additional cure for anticipated coastal change, driven by global sea level rise, that could supplement, or substitute for (1) stabilizing the shoreline with costly defensive public works (armoring macroprojects) and (2) permanent retreat from the existing shoreline (real and capital property abandonment). We propose Macro-engineering use tactical technologies that sculpt and vegetate barren near-coast sand dune fields with seawater, seawater that would otherwise, as commonly postulated, enlarge Earth seascape area! Our Macro-engineering speculation blends eremology with hydrogeology and some hydromancy. We estimate its cost at 1 billion dollars - about 0.01 per sent of the USA 2007 Gross Domestic Product.

  4. A FETCH DEPENDENT MODEL OF SEA SURFACE ROUGHNESS FOR OFFSHORE WIND POWER UTILISATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    A FETCH DEPENDENT MODEL OF SEA SURFACE ROUGHNESS FOR OFFSHORE WIND POWER UTILISATION Bernhard Lange, Resources, Roughness, Coastal Sea Areas, Waves, Rødsand 1 INTRODUCTION Large offshore wind farms are being wind conditions of offshore sites, since the higher energy yield has to compensate the additional

  5. Sea surface temperature for climate from the along-track scanning radiometers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Embury, Owen

    2014-06-30

    This thesis describes the construction of a sea surface temperature (SST) dataset from Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (ATSR) observations suitable for climate applications. The algorithms presented here are now used at ...

  6. Z .Global and Planetary Change 20 1999 93123 Global sea level rise and glacial isostatic adjustment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peltier, W. Richard

    adjustment W.R. Peltier ) Department of Physics, UniÕersity of Toronto, 60 St. George Street, Toronto-mail: peltier@atmosp.physics.utoronto.ca Z .rather recently Peltier and Tushingham, 1989 , it was not clearly;( )W.R. PeltierrGlobal and Planetary Change 20 1999 93­12394 Z .existed at that time e.g., Peltier

  7. Instruments and Methods Surface circulation in the Nordic Seas from clustered drifters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LaCasce, Joseph H.

    Instruments and Methods Surface circulation in the Nordic Seas from clustered drifters I. Koszalka Accepted 18 January 2011 Available online 31 January 2011 Keywords: Surface drifters Lagrangian methods estimates where the data is sparse. Clustering the available surface drifter data, extended by recent

  8. Global surface temperature changes since the 1850s

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, P.D.

    1996-12-31

    Temperature data from land and marine areas form the basis for many studies of climatic variations on local, regional and hemispheric scales, and the global mean temperature is a fundamental measure of the state of the climate system. In this paper it is shown that the surface temperature of the globe has warmed by about 0.5{degrees}C since the mid-nineteenth century. This is an important part of the evidence in the {open_quote}global warming{close_quote} debate. How certain are we about the magnitude of the warming? Where has it been greatest? In this paper, these and related issues will be addressed.

  9. Sub-surface dissolution of evaporites in the Eastern Mediterranean sea 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camerlenghi, Angelo Alessandro

    1988-01-01

    SUB-SURFACE DISSOLUTION OF EVAPORITES IN THE EASTERN MEDITERRANEAN SEA A Thesis by ANGELO ALESSANDRO CAMERLENGHI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1988 Major Subject: Oceanography SUB-SURFACE DISSOLUTION OF EVAPORITES IN THE EASTERN MEDITERRANEAN SEA A Thesis by ANGELO ALESSANDRO CAMERLENGHI Approved as to style and content by: Pl&DWa~rg~~~ William R. Bryair...

  10. What Global Warming Looks Like The July 2010 global map of surface temperature anomalies (Figure 1), relative to the average

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    What Global Warming Looks Like The July 2010 global map of surface temperature anomalies (Figure 1 anomalies an example of what we can expect global warming to look like? Maps of temperature anomalies, such as Figure 1, are useful for helping people understand the role of global warming in extreme events

  11. Fingerprints of anthropogenic and natural variability in global-mean surface temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallace, J.M.; Zhang, Yuan

    1997-11-01

    This paper presents an analysis designed to detect greenhouse warming by distinguishing between temperature rises induced by increasing atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases and those induced by background variability that are present without changes in atmospheric composition. The strategy is based on the surface temperature field. At each observation time, the projection of the anomalous temperature field on the presumed anthropogenic fingerprint is removed in order to obtain a temperature deviation field; i.e., the temperature anomalies in the phase space orthogonal to the anthropogenic fingerprint, which are presumed to be entirely natural. The time series of the expansion coefficients of the fingerprint a(t) is then regressed on this temperature deviation field to identify the axis in the orthogonal phase space along which the variations are most strongly correlated, and an index n(t) of the temporal variations along that axis is generated. The index a(t) is then regressed upon n(t) and the resulting least squares fit is regarded as the component of a(t) that can be ascribed to natural causes. The analysis was performed for monthly global surface temperature anomaly fields for the period 1900-95. Results indicate that two well defined patterns of natural variability contribute to variations in global mean temperature: the synthetic cold ocean-warm land (COWL) pattern and the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). In domains that include surface air temperature over Eurasia and North America, the COWL pattern tends to be dominant. The ENSO signature emerges as the pattern most strongly linearly correlated with global sea surface temperature and with tropospheric layer-averaged temperatures. 24 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Derivation of global hyperspectral resolution surface emissivity spectra from advanced infrared sounder radiance measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jun

    Derivation of global hyperspectral resolution surface emissivity spectra from advanced infrared 9 July 2008; published 6 August 2008. [1] The global IR surface emissivity spectra are very. In this study, global IR surface emissivity spectra have been generated by using AIRS radiance measurements from

  13. THE USE OF SPATIAL CONSTRAINTS IN THE DERIVATION OF MESOSCALE SEA SURFACE CURRENT FIELDS FROM MULTI-SENSOR SATELLITE DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamburg,.Universität

    THE USE OF SPATIAL CONSTRAINTS IN THE DERIVATION OF MESOSCALE SEA SURFACE CURRENT FIELDS FROM MULTI images are used for the computation of mesoscale surface currents in the Northern and Southern Baltic for the derivation of mesoscale sea surface currents using multi-sensor / multi-channel satellite images by means

  14. Global warming and United States landfalling hurricanes Chunzai Wang1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chunzai

    Global warming and United States landfalling hurricanes Chunzai Wang1 and Sang-Ki Lee2 Received 18] A secular warming of sea surface temperature occurs almost everywhere over the global ocean. Here we use observational data to show that global warming of the sea surface is associated with a secular increase

  15. Enhancing the resolution of sea ice in long-term global ocean general circulation model (gcm) integrations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Joong Tae

    2007-09-17

    Open water in sea ice, such as leads and polynyas, plays a crucial role in determining the formation of deep- and bottom-water, as well as their long-term global properties and circulation. Ocean general circulation models (GCMs) designed...

  16. Importance of thermal effects and sea surface roughness for offshore wind resource assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    Importance of thermal effects and sea surface roughness for offshore wind resource assessment National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark Abstract The economic feasibility of offshore wind power utilisation depends on the favourable wind conditions offshore compared to sites on land, which have to compensate

  17. Modeling the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Wind Response to Mesoscale Sea Surface Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    Modeling the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Wind Response to Mesoscale Sea Surface Temperature The wind speed response to mesoscale SST variability is investigated over the Agulhas Return Current region-Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS) atmospheric models. The SST-induced wind response is assessed from

  18. Modeling the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Wind Response to Mesoscale Sea Surface Temperature Perturbations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    Modeling the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Wind Response to Mesoscale Sea Surface Temperature received 25 October 2013, in final form 24 July 2014) ABSTRACT The wind speed response to mesoscale SST Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model and the U.S. Navy Coupled Ocean­Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System

  19. Tropical Atlantic coral oxygen isotopes: glacialinterglacial sea surface temperatures and climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fairbanks, Richard G.

    isotope time-series from the fossil coral reefs from offshore Barbados. The Barbados coral-based record glacial maximum (Guilderson et al., 1994). Colder sea surface temperatures (SSTs) at Barbados (138N, 59 a smaller glacial±interglacial amplitude than the Barbados Marine Geology 172 (2001) 75±89 0025

  20. Bias reduction in the Sea Surface Temperature (SST) forecasts based on GOES satellite data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    Bias reduction in the Sea Surface Temperature (SST) forecasts based on GOES satellite data Based on comparisons with infrared (GOES) and microwave (AMSE-R) satellite data, our coastal ocean forecast model set circulation model and satellite data helps to improve forecasting of ocean conditions (esp. currents and SST

  1. MONImRING THE SEA SURFACE CHWROPHYLL CONCENTRATION IN THE TROPICAL PACIFIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OF THE 1982·83 EL NINO YVES DANDONNEAU1 ABSTRACT The sea surface chlorophyll concentration (SSCC) is routinely quarterly charts of SSCC which cover the 1982-83 EI Nino episode. The usually enriched belt which -1983, spreading westwards to long. 170o E. During the mature phase of EI Nino (October 1982-June 1983

  2. Decadal variability of sea surface temperatures off North Iceland over the last Marie-Alexandrine Sicrea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Decadal variability of sea surface temperatures off North Iceland over the last 2000 yrs Marie@lsce.cnrsgif.fr; Yiou@cea.fr b University of Iceland, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland. jeir@hi.is c Department of Earth millennia at unprecedented temporal resolution (2 to 5 years), from a marine core located off North Iceland

  3. Investigation of transport processes across the sea surface microlayer by infrared imagery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garbe, Christoph S.

    mechanism at medium and high wind speeds. The scale space analysis of the temperature patterns at the sea velocities, whereas small-scale turbulence is more dominant at higher wind friction. The skin function based on a surface renewal model. Periodic heat flux switching in the wind-wave flume delivers

  4. Year-ahead Prediction of Hurricane Season Sea Surface Temperature in the Tropical Atlantic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meagher, J; Meagher, Jonathan; Jewson, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    One possible method for the year-ahead prediction of hurricane numbers would be to make a year-ahead prediction of sea surface temperature (SST), and then to apply relationships that link SST to hurricane numbers. As a first step towards setting up such a system this article compares three simple statistical methods for the year-ahead prediction of the relevant SSTs.

  5. The annual cycle in equatorial convection and sea surface temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, T.P.; Wallace, J.M. (Washington Univ., Seattle (United States) NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States))

    1992-10-01

    The coupled atmosphere-ocean system in the equatorial eastern Pacific and Atlantic exhibits a distinct annual cycle that is reflected in contrasting conditions at the times of the two equinoxes. The contrasts are so strong that they dominate the annual march of zonally averaged outgoing long wave radiation for the equatorial belt. The March equinox corresponds to the warm season when the equatorial cold tongues in the eastern Pacific and Atlantic area absent. With the onset of summer monsoon convection over Colombia, Central America, and West Africa in May-June, northward surface winds strengthen over the eastern Pacific and Atlantic, the equatorial cold tongues reappear, and the marine convection shifts from the equatorial belt to the intertropical convergence zones (ITCZs) along 8 deg N. On the basis of observational evidence concerning the timing and year-to-year regularity of the surface wind changes during the development of the cold tongues, it is argued that (1) the increase in the northward surface winds in response to the onset of the northern summer monsoon may be instrumental in reestablishing the cold tongues, and (2) positive feedbacks involving both the zonal and meridional wind components contribute to the remarkable robustness of the cold tongue-ITCZs complexes in both oceans. 36 refs.

  6. Increase of global monsoon area and precipitation under global warming: A robust signal?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Tim

    Increase of global monsoon area and precipitation under global warming: A robust signal? Pang future sea surface temperature (SST) warming patterns. The results show that the global monsoon area. Zhao (2012), Increase of global monsoon area and precipitation under global warming: A robust signal

  7. Predicting hurricane numbers from Sea Surface Temperature: closed form expressions for the mean, variance and standard error of the number of hurricanes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jewson, S

    2007-01-01

    One way to predict hurricane numbers would be to predict sea surface temperature, and then predict hurricane numbers as a function of the predicted sea surface temperature. For certain parametric models for sea surface temperature and the relationship between sea surface temperature and hurricane numbers, closed-form solutions exist for the mean and the variance of the number of predicted hurricanes, and for the standard error on the mean. We derive a number of such expressions.

  8. The Transient Circulation Response to Radiative Forcings and Sea Surface Warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staten, Paul; Reichler, Thomas; Lu, Jian

    2014-12-15

    Tropospheric circulation shifts have strong potential to impact surface climate. But the magnitude of these shifts in a changing climate, and the attending regional hydrological changes, are difficult to project. Part of this difficulty arises from our lack of understanding of the physical mechanisms behind the circulation shifts themselves. In order to better delineate circulation shifts and their respective causes, we decompose the circulation response into (1) the "direct" response to radiative forcings themselves, and (2) the "indirect" response to changing sea surface temperatures. Using ensembles of 90-day climate model simulations with immediate switch-on forcings, including perturbed greenhouse gas concentrations, stratospheric ozone concentrations, and sea surface temperatures, we document the direct and indirect transient responses of the zonal mean general circulation, and investigate the roles of previously proposed mechanisms in shifting the midlatitude jet. We find that both the direct and indirect wind responses often begin in the lower stratosphere. Changes in midlatitude eddies are ubiquitous and synchronous with the midlatitude zonal wind response. Shifts in the critical latitude of wave absorption on either flank of the jet are not indicted as primary factors for the poleward shifting jet, although we see some evidence for increasing equatorward wave reflection over the southern hemisphere in response to sea surface warming. Mechanisms for the northern hemisphere jet shift are less clear.

  9. Global-local Structural Optimization Using Response Surfaces of Local Optimization Margins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumaier, Arnold

    1 Global-local Structural Optimization Using Response Surfaces of Local Optimization Margins Boyang optimization problems. First, a large number of component optimizations for maximization of margins are performed. Response surface approximations (RSA) for maximum margins of component optimization

  10. Developing the global exploration roadmap: An example using the humans to the lunar surface theme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Developing the global exploration roadmap: An example using the humans to the lunar surface theme C: Space exploration Lunar exploration Global exploration roadmap Test bed a b s t r a c t The development of the Global Exploration Roadmap (GER) by 12 space agencies participating in the International Space

  11. Global surface cooling: the atmospheric fast feedback response to a collapse of the thermohaline circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drijfhout, Sybren

    Global surface cooling: the atmospheric fast feedback response to a collapse of the thermohaline thermohaline circulation results in a global surface cooling of 0.72 K. The mechanisms that are responsible for this cooling are investigated. Additional experiments were performed with a one-dimensional radiative

  12. Impact of a Warm Ocean Eddy's Circulation on Hurricane-Induced Sea Surface Cooling with Implications for Hurricane Intensity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhode Island, University of

    Impact of a Warm Ocean Eddy's Circulation on Hurricane-Induced Sea Surface Cooling with Implications for Hurricane Intensity RICHARD M. YABLONSKY AND ISAAC GINIS Graduate School of Oceanography) ABSTRACT Upper oceanic heat content (OHC) in advance of a hurricane is generally superior to prestorm sea

  13. Sea-surface topography of the Gulf of Mexico, based on ship drift 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linn, Johnnie Burdette

    1975-01-01

    The monthly sea-surface topography of the Gulf of Mexico is calculated from ship-drift observations. A correction for wind effect is determined from the part of the surface current velocity field estimated to result from the stress of the wind.... The topo- graphy i. s found to agree qualitatively with results of studies based on in situ measurements. The contribution of the wind effect is significant. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I wish to express my appreciation to Mr. John D. Cochrane for his guidance...

  14. Global ocean wind power sensitivity to surface layer stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capps, Scott B; Zender, Charles S

    2009-01-01

    2005), Evaluation of global wind power, J. Geophys. Res. ,Pryor (2003), Can satellite sampling of offshore wind speedsrealistically represent wind speed distributions? , J. Appl.

  15. Global sea-to-air flux climatology for bromoform, dibromomethane and methyl iodide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    cess Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Open Accessvon Glasow, R. : Atmospheric chemistry – sun, sea and ozoneUK 4 Marine and Atmospheric Chemistry, Rosenstiel School of

  16. A model of the threedimensional evolution of Arctic melt ponds on firstyear and multiyear sea ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feltham, Daniel

    A model of the threedimensional evolution of Arctic melt ponds on firstyear and multiyear sea ice F in Arctic melt ponds on the surface of sea ice. An accurate estimate of the fraction of the sea ice surface covered in melt ponds is essential for a realistic estimate of the albedo for global climate models. We

  17. Discussion on common errors in analyzing sea level accelerations, solar trends and global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scafetta, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    Errors in applying regression models and wavelet filters used to analyze geophysical signals are discussed: (1) multidecadal natural oscillations (e.g. the quasi 60-year Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO), North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO)) need to be taken into account for properly quantifying anomalous accelerations in tide gauge records such as in New York City; (2) uncertainties and multicollinearity among climate forcing functions prevent a proper evaluation of the solar contribution to the 20th century global surface temperature warming using overloaded linear regression models during the 1900-2000 period alone; (3) when periodic wavelet filters, which require that a record is pre-processed with a reflection methodology, are improperly applied to decompose non-stationary solar and climatic time series, Gibbs boundary artifacts emerge yielding misleading physical interpretations. By correcting these errors and using optimized regression models that reduce multico...

  18. Global ocean wind power sensitivity to surface layer stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capps, Scott B; Zender, Charles S

    2009-01-01

    Evaluation of global wind power, J. Geophys. Res. , 110,W. Tang, and X. Xie (2008), Wind power distribution over theApproach to Short-Term Wind Power Prediction, 1st ed. ,

  19. Deep-Sea Research II 48 (2001) 1823}1836 Covariation of mesoscale ocean color and sea-surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGillicuddy Jr., Dennis J.

    2001-01-01

    Deep-Sea Research II 48 (2001) 1823}1836 Covariation of mesoscale ocean color and sea Department of Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA and result in the accumulation of biomass in the overlying waters (McGillicuddy et al., 1999). Shipboard

  20. Accurate ab initio-based adiabatic global potential energy surface...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the double many-body expansion potential energy surface of larger nitrogenhydrogen containing systems. In turn, a preliminary theoretical study of the reaction N(sup...

  1. Effects of global eustatic sea level variations and tectonism on stratigraphy of Iraq

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gawarecki, S.L.; Schamel, S.

    1986-05-01

    The stratigraphy of Iraq is marked by complex vertical and lateral facies sequences controlled predominantly by two factors: (1) eustatic sea level variations, and (2) tectonic movements. Analysis of the sedimentary cycles provides a framework for evaluating the relative economic importance of transgressive versus regressive facies within the Iraq stratigraphic succession. Most reservoir rocks, principally reefal and neritic limestones and to a lesser extent deltaic facies, were deposited during relatively high sea level stands. Source rock depositional environments in Iraq were typically either deep subsiding or shallow restricted intrashelf basins. These environments were not controlled by sea level, but primarily by local tectonics. Applying modern theories of plate tectonics and sea level control of facies to this well-studied petroleum province allows new interpretations of the region's geologic evolution.

  2. The global energy balance from a surface perspective Martin Wild Doris Folini Christoph Schar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    of the global energy balance, the radiative energy exchanges between Sun, Earth and space are now accuratelyThe global energy balance from a surface perspective Martin Wild · Doris Folini · Christoph Scha quantified from new satellite missions. Much less is known about the magnitude of the energy flows within

  3. How well-connected is the surface of the global ocean? Gary Froyland,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Froyland, Gary

    currents, attracting set, basin of attraction, almost-invariant set, Markov chain, transfer operator OceanHow well-connected is the surface of the global ocean? Gary Froyland,1 Robyn M. Stuart,1 and Erik dynamics of the ocean surface circulation is known to contain attracting regions such as the great oceanic

  4. Direct Painting Software for Tracing on 3D Brain Surfaces with Global Conformal Parameterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Paul

    Direct Painting Software for Tracing on 3D Brain Surfaces with Global Conformal Parameterization-resolution models proves difficult, and often requires expensive visualization or animation software. We therefore developed a convenient software toolkit that enables users to draw curves and label surface subregions

  5. A COMPARISON BETWEEN GLOBAL SOLAR MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC AND POTENTIAL FIELD SOURCE SURFACE MODEL RESULTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    A COMPARISON BETWEEN GLOBAL SOLAR MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC AND POTENTIAL FIELD SOURCE SURFACE MODEL of the solar corona are (1) potential field source surface (PFSS) models, and (2) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD ABSTRACT The large-scale, steady-state magnetic field configuration of the solar corona is typically

  6. Predicting landfalling hurricane numbers from sea surface temperature: a theoretical comparison of direct and indirect methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nzerem, K; Laepple, T; Nzerem, Kechi; Jewson, Stephen; Laepple, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    We consider two ways that one might convert a prediction of sea surface temperature (SST) into a prediction of landfalling hurricane numbers. First, one might regress historical numbers of landfalling hurricanes onto historical SSTs, and use the fitted regression relation to predict future landfalling hurricane numbers given predicted SSTs. We call this the direct approach. Second, one might regress \\emph{basin} hurricane numbers onto historical SSTs, estimate the proportion of basin hurricanes that make landfall, and use the fitted regression relation and estimated proportion to predict future landfalling hurricane numbers. We call this the \\emph{indirect} approach. Which of these two methods is likely to work better? We answer this question in the context of a simple abstract model.

  7. Global regularity for the minimal surface equation in Minkowskian geometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanov, Atanas

    2011-05-05

    ) the minimizers must satisfy the Euler–Lagrange equation @i #18; @L @ P#30;i #19; #0; @L @#30; D 0: Since @L@#30; D 0 and @L @ P#30;i D gji @j#30; 2 p 1C gkm.x/@k#30;@m#30; ; we get the minimal surface equation @i gji @j#30;p 1C gkm.x/@k#30;@m#30; D 0: (1....3) One should note that (1.3) is not guaranteed to be a hyperbolic equation, if kr#30;kL1 is not small. A local well-posedness theory for (1.3) (without smallness assumptions) can be built from the methods developed in [5], see also [13], [2]. Basically...

  8. Multiscale Variability of the River Runoff System in China and Its Long-Term Link to Precipitation and Sea Surface Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Yongkang

    and Sea Surface Temperature YONGKANG XUE,*, SHUFEN SUN,# K.-M. LAU,@ JINJUN JI,*, ISABELLE POCCARD,* RENHE with precipitation and sea surface temperature (SST) at the continental scale. Monthly mean data from 72 runoff­north dipole anomaly patterns for the first two runoff EOF's spatial distributions have been identified

  9. Algal biomass and sea surface temperature in the Mediterranean Basin Intercomparison of data from various satellite sensors, and implications for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bricaud, Annick

    Algal biomass and sea surface temperature in the Mediterranean Basin Intercomparison of data from and to increasing anthropogenic inputs, is an appropriate test site for observing the evolution of algal biomass progress in the knowledge of spatial and temporal variations in algal biomass in various regions

  10. Wintertime high-altitude surface energy balance of a Bolivian glacier, Illimani, 6340 m above sea level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berthier, Etienne

    glacier, Illimani (16°390 S; 67°470 W, 6340 m above sea level (asl)), where a 137 m ice core was drilled snow surfaces of the intermediate slopes of Antarctica. INDEX TERMS: 0342 Atmospheric Composition experiments were conducted on the drilling site of Illimani (6340 m asl, 16°390 S; 67°470 W) during 6 days

  11. Validation of the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for the Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) sea surface temperature in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sprintall, Janet

    Validation of the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for the Earth Observing System (AMSR; published 5 April 2006. [1] Satellite sea surface temperature (SST) measurements from Advanced Microwave. Sprintall, and C. Gentemann (2006), Validation of the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for the Earth

  12. Role of the tropical Atlantic sea surface temperature in the decadal change of the summer North Atlantic Oscillation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    pattern exhibited a traditional distribution with two centers over the North Atlantic. Citation: Sun, JRole of the tropical Atlantic sea surface temperature in the decadal change of the summer North Atlantic Oscillation Jianqi Sun,1,2 Huijun Wang,1,2 and Wei Yuan2,3 Received 1 May 2009; revised 11 July

  13. Received 5 Mar 2014 | Accepted 11 Jul 2014 | Published 18 Aug 2014 Sea surface temperature contributes to marine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benton, Michael

    ARTICLE Received 5 Mar 2014 | Accepted 11 Jul 2014 | Published 18 Aug 2014 Sea surface temperature,3 & Michael J. Benton1 During the Mesozoic and Cenozoic, four distinct crocodylomorph lineages colonized most probably ectothermic reptiles, these lineages colonized the marine realm and diversified during

  14. Statistical Modelling of the Relationship Between Main Development Region Sea Surface Temperature and Atlantic Basin Hurricane Numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Binter, R; Khare, S; Binter, Roman; Jewson, Stephen; Khare, Shree

    2007-01-01

    We are building a hurricane number prediction scheme that relies, in part, on statistical modelling of the empirical relationship between Atlantic sea surface temperatures and Atlantic basin hurricane numbers. We test out a number of simple statistical models for this relationship, using data from 1900 to 2005 and data from 1950 to 2005, and for both all hurricane numbers and intense hurricane numbers.

  15. Revision of the global carbon budget due to changing air-sea oxygen fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stocker, Thomas

    -derived relationship between changes in atmospheric O2/N2 due to oceanic outgassing and heat fluxes to estimate ocean O2 outgassing. The inferred terrestrial carbon sink for the 1990s is reduced by a factor of two: global carbon budget, changes in ocean heat content, oceanic oxygen outgassing, ocean and land sinks

  16. Supplemental Information for "Regional to global assessments of phytoplankton dynamics from the SeaWiFS mission" by D.A. Siegel and others.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, David A.

    . This water-leaving radiance, Lw(), is solar radiation that penetrated the ocean surface, interacted the SeaWiFS mission" by D.A. Siegel and others. Satellite Ocean Color Data Processing: Ocean color sensors are designed to measure the spectral distribution of visible radiation upwelling from beneath the ocean surface

  17. Temporal controls on global dust emissions: The role of surface S. Engelstaedter1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington, Richard

    in the atmosphere will not be realistic either. While climatically important atmospheric gases such as CO2 are well with constraining dust emissions spatially came with the `preferred source' concept following analysis of the firstTemporal controls on global dust emissions: The role of surface gustiness S. Engelstaedter1 and R

  18. Method for using global optimization to the estimation of surface-consistent residual statics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reister, David B. (Knoxville, TN); Barhen, Jacob (Oak Ridge, TN); Oblow, Edward M. (Knoxville, TN)

    2001-01-01

    An efficient method for generating residual statics corrections to compensate for surface-consistent static time shifts in stacked seismic traces. The method includes a step of framing the residual static corrections as a global optimization problem in a parameter space. The method also includes decoupling the global optimization problem involving all seismic traces into several one-dimensional problems. The method further utilizes a Stochastic Pijavskij Tunneling search to eliminate regions in the parameter space where a global minimum is unlikely to exist so that the global minimum may be quickly discovered. The method finds the residual statics corrections by maximizing the total stack power. The stack power is a measure of seismic energy transferred from energy sources to receivers.

  19. Modelling of a captive unmanned aerial system teledetecting oil pollution on sea surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muttin, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    Recent major oil-spills were tracked using observations with sufficient altitudes over the sea surface, to detect oil slick locations. For oil-spill responders, we propose a captive Unmanned Aerial System, UAS acting like a periscope over a ship or supply vessel. The system is composed of an umbilical deployed from ship deck, and there are few studies that have examined elasticity within cable dynamic during take-off or landing (TOL) and normal flight phases. Therefore, the safest approach for the control-commands of the system is through umbilical dynamic modelling. We give a time-dependant finite-element formulation, using improved elastic non-linear cable elements. Two kinds of boundary condition, natural or essential, are discussed for roll-in or roll-out of the umbilical. A numerical convergence and a validation with an exact solution are provided, using two examples for the flight parameters. Finally, sensitivity of the model potentially extends its capacity for the system equilibrium prediction, under ...

  20. Combined surface solar brightening and increasing greenhouse effect support recent intensification of the global land-based hydrological cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    Combined surface solar brightening and increasing greenhouse effect support recent intensification of the global land-based hydrological cycle Martin Wild,1 Ju¨rgen Grieser,2 and Christoph Scha¨r1 Received 30 radiation (surface radiation balance) is the key driver behind the global hydrological cycle. Here we

  1. Statistical Modelling of the Relationship Between Main Development Region Sea Surface Temperature and \\emph{Landfalling} Atlantic Basin Hurricane Numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Binter, R; Khare, S; Binter, Roman; Jewson, Stephen; Khare, Shree

    2007-01-01

    We are building a hurricane number prediction scheme that relies, in part, on statistical modelling of the empirical relationship between Atlantic sea surface temperatures and landfalling hurricane numbers. We test out a number of simple statistical models for that relationship, using data from 1900 to 2005 and data from 1950 to 2005, and for both all hurricane numbers and intense hurricane numbers. The results are very different from the corresponding analysis for basin hurricane numbers.

  2. Centennial-Scale Sea Surface Temperature and Salinity Variability in the Florida Straits During the Early Holocene 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinlein, William

    2012-10-19

    Change from ?18Oseawater Changes in continental ice volume also affect global ?18OSW on glacial- interglacial time scales. If this can effect can be accounted for, the resulting ice volume 9 free ?18OSW record can be used to estimate regional... salinity change. Sea level has risen by ~25 m over the last 10 kyr due to the melting of polar ice sheets [Bard et al., 1990; Cutler et al. 2003; Edwards et al., 1993]. Because continental ice is isotopically depleted in ?18O, addition...

  3. A Statistical Analysis of Global Inter-Annual Climate Anomalies in Monthly Sea Surface Temperature Records.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schellekens, Michel P.

    reports have examined connections between these so-called El-Nino and La-Nina events and anomalies the anomalies and established indices of SST climate variations, such as the El-Nino Southern Oscillation in determining weather conditions(Chelton et. al.[4, 5]). The warm (El-Nino) and cold (La-Nina) deviations from

  4. Refinement of a semi-empirical model for the microwave emissivity of the sea surface as a function of wind speed 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohn, David Jacob

    1995-01-01

    In 1979, Wilheit introduced a sea surface emissivity model for microwave frequencies. This model is used in a radiative transfer model (RTM) to obtain simulated brightness temperatures for various atmospheric conditions. ...

  5. Could the Earth's surface Ultraviolet irradiance be blamed for the global warming? A new effect may exist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jilong; Zhao, Juan; Zheng, Yujun

    2014-01-01

    Whether natural factors could interpret the rise of the Earth's surface temperature is still controversial. Though numerous recent researches have reported apparent correlations between solar activity and the Earth's climate, solar activity has encountered a big problem when describing the rapid global warming after 1970s. Our investigation shows the good positive correlations between the Earth's surface Ultraviolet irradiance (280-400 nm) and the Earth's surface temperature both in temporal and spatial variations by analyzing the global surface Ultraviolet irradiance (280-400 nm) and global surface temperature data from 1980-1999. The rise of CO$_2$ cannot interpret the good positive correlations, and we could even get an opposite result to the good correlations when employing the rise of CO$_2$ to describe the relation between them. Based on the good positive correlations, we suggest a new effect, named "Highly Excited Water Vapor" (HEWV) effect, which can interpret how the Sun influences the Earth's surfac...

  6. A tropical influence on global climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, E.K.; Kirtman, B.P.; Lindzen, R.S.

    1997-05-15

    A potential influence of tropical sea surface temperature on the global climate response to a doubling of the CO{sub 2} concentration is tested using an atmospheric general circulation model coupled to a slab mixed layer ocean. The warming is significantly reduced when sea surface temperatures in the eastern equatorial Pacific cold tongue region between latitudes 2.25{degrees}N and 2.25{degrees}S are held at the control simulation values. Warming of the global mean temperature outside of the cold tongue region is reduced from 2.4{degrees}C in the unconstrained case to 1.9{degrees}C when the sea surface temperature constraint is applied. The decrease in the warming results from a positive net heat flux into the ocean cold tongue region and implicit heat storage in the subsurface ocean, induced by horizontal atmospheric heat fluxes. The reduced surface temperature warming outside of the cold tongue region is due to reduction in the downward longwave radiative flux at the surface, caused in turn by reduced atmospheric temperature and moisture. The global mean surface temperature responds to the heat storage in the ocean as if the global mean radiative forcing due to the doubled CO{sub 2} (approximately 4 W m{sup {minus}2}) was reduced by the value of the global mean heat flux into the ocean. This mechanism also provides a possible explanation for the observed high correlation on interannual timescales between the global mean tropospheric temperature and sea surface temperature in the eastern tropical Pacific. The results emphasize the importance of correctly modeling the dynamical processes in the ocean and atmosphere that help determine the sea surface temperature in the equatorial eastern Pacific, in addition to the thermodynamical processes, in projecting global warming. 23 refs., 8 figs.

  7. Effects of 20002050 changes in climate and emissions on global tropospheric ozone and the policy-relevant background surface ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shiliang

    Effects of 2000­2050 changes in climate and emissions on global tropospheric ozone and the policy-relevant background surface ozone in the United States Shiliang Wu,1 Loretta J. Mickley,1 Daniel J. Jacob,1 David Rind) on the global tropospheric ozone budget and on the policy-relevant background (PRB) ozone in the United States

  8. What influence will future solar activity changes over the 21st century have on projected global near-surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lockwood, Mike

    What influence will future solar activity changes over the 21st century have on projected global underestimate the response to solar variations, then there is a potential for a reduction in solar activity will future solar activity changes over the 21st century have on projected global near-surface temperature

  9. Biogeochemistry in Sea Ice: CICE model developments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffery, Nicole; Hunke, Elizabeth; Elliott, Scott; Turner, Adrian

    2012-06-18

    Polar primary production unfolds in a dynamic sea ice environment, and the interactions of sea ice with ocean support and mediate this production. In spring, for example, fresh melt water contributes to the shoaling of the mixed layer enhancing ice edge blooms. In contrast, sea ice formation in the fall reduces light penetration to the upper ocean slowing primary production in marine waters. Polar biogeochemical modeling studies typically consider these types of ice-ocean interactions. However, sea ice itself is a biogeochemically active medium, contributing a significant and, possibly, essential source of primary production to polar regions in early spring and fall. Here we present numerical simulations using the Los Alamos Sea Ice Model (CICE) with prognostic salinity and sea ice biogeochemistry. This study investigates the relationship between sea ice multiphase physics and sea ice productivity. Of particular emphasis are the processes of gravity drainage, melt water flushing, and snow loading. During sea ice formation, desalination by gravity drainage facilitates nutrient exchange between ocean and ice maintaining ice algal blooms in early spring. Melt water flushing releases ice algae and nutrients to underlying waters limiting ice production. Finally, snow loading, particularly in the Southern Ocean, forces sea ice below the ocean surface driving an upward flow of nutrient rich water into the ice to the benefit of interior and freeboard communities. Incorporating ice microphysics in CICE has given us an important tool for assessing the importance of these processes for polar algal production at global scales.

  10. Free and forced tropical variability: role of the wind-evaporation-sea surface temperature (WES) feedback 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahajan, Salil

    2009-05-15

    of the equator over the Atlantic during El-Nino events. Comparative studies between Last GlacialMaximum (LGM) equivalent imposed northern hemispheric sea-ice experiments withthe WES-off model and the standard model indicate a dominant role for the WESfeedback...

  11. Sensitivity of global tropical climate to land surface processes: Mean state and interannual variability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Hsi-Yen; Xiao, Heng; Mechoso, C. R.; Xue, Yongkang

    2013-03-01

    This study examines the sensitivity of global tropical climate to land surface processes (LSP) using an atmospheric general circulation model both uncoupled (with prescribed SSTs) and coupled to an oceanic general circulation model. The emphasis is on the interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes, which have first order influence on the surface energy and water budgets. The sensitivity to those processes is represented by the differences between model simulations, in which two land surface schemes are considered: 1) a simple land scheme that specifies surface albedo and soil moisture availability, and 2) the Simplified Simple Biosphere Model (SSiB), which allows for consideration of interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical process. Observational datasets are also employed to assess the reality of model-revealed sensitivity. The mean state sensitivity to different LSP is stronger in the coupled mode, especially in the tropical Pacific. Furthermore, seasonal cycle of SSTs in the equatorial Pacific, as well as ENSO frequency, amplitude, and locking to the seasonal cycle of SSTs are significantly modified and more realistic with SSiB. This outstanding sensitivity of the atmosphere-ocean system develops through changes in the intensity of equatorial Pacific trades modified by convection over land. Our results further demonstrate that the direct impact of land-atmosphere interactions on the tropical climate is modified by feedbacks associated with perturbed oceanic conditions ("indirect effect" of LSP). The magnitude of such indirect effect is strong enough to suggest that comprehensive studies on the importance of LSP on the global climate have to be made in a system that allows for atmosphere-ocean interactions.

  12. An updated global grid point surface air temperature anomaly data set: 1851--1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sepanski, R.J.; Boden, T.A.; Daniels, R.C.

    1991-10-01

    This document presents land-based monthly surface air temperature anomalies (departures from a 1951--1970 reference period mean) on a 5{degree} latitude by 10{degree} longitude global grid. Monthly surface air temperature anomalies (departures from a 1957--1975 reference period mean) for the Antarctic (grid points from 65{degree}S to 85{degree}S) are presented in a similar way as a separate data set. The data were derived primarily from the World Weather Records and the archives of the United Kingdom Meteorological Office. This long-term record of temperature anomalies may be used in studies addressing possible greenhouse-gas-induced climate changes. To date, the data have been employed in generating regional, hemispheric, and global time series for determining whether recent (i.e., post-1900) warming trends have taken place. This document also presents the monthly mean temperature records for the individual stations that were used to generate the set of gridded anomalies. The periods of record vary by station. Northern Hemisphere station data have been corrected for inhomogeneities, while Southern Hemisphere data are presented in uncorrected form. 14 refs., 11 figs., 10 tabs.

  13. Seismic Velocity Structure and Depth-Dependence of Anisotropy in the Red Sea and Arabian Shield from Surface Wave Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, S; Gaherty, J; Schwartz, S; Rodgers, A; Al-Amri, A

    2007-07-25

    We investigate the lithospheric and upper mantle structure as well as the depth-dependence of anisotropy along the Red Sea and beneath the Arabian Peninsula using receiver function constraints and phase velocities of surface waves traversing two transects of stations from the Saudi Arabian National Digital Seismic Network. Frequency-dependent phase delays of fundamental-mode Love and Rayleigh waves, measured using a cross-correlation procedure, require very slow shear velocities and the presence of anisotropy throughout the upper mantle. Linearized inversion of these data produce path-averaged 1D radially anisotropic models with about 4% anisotropy in the lithosphere, increasing to about 4.8% anisotropy across the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB). Models with reasonable crustal velocities in which the mantle lithosphere is isotropic cannot satisfy the data. The lithospheric lid, which ranges in thickness from about 70 km near the Red Sea coast to about 90 km beneath the Arabian Shield, is underlain by a pronounced low-velocity zone with shear velocities as low as 4.1 km/s. Forward models, which are constructed from previously determined shear-wave splitting estimates, can reconcile surface and body wave observations of anisotropy. The low shear velocity values are similar to many other continental rift and oceanic ridge environments. These low velocities combined with the sharp velocity contrast across the LAB may indicate the presence of partial melt beneath Arabia. The anisotropic signature primarily reflects a combination of plate- and density-driven flow associated with active rifting processes in the Red Sea.

  14. Interannual variability of the onset of the South China Sea summer monsoon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luo, Ming; Leung, Yee; Graf, Hans-F.; Herzog, Michael; Zhang, Wei

    2015-05-19

    . Theoretical and Applied Climatology, 73: 151–168. Rayner, N. A., D. E. Parker, E. B. Horton, C. K. Folland, L. V. Alexander, D. P. Rowell, E. C. Kent, and A. Kaplan, 2003. Global analyses of sea surface temperature, sea ice, and night marine air...

  15. Global estimation of evapotranspiration using a leaf area index-based surface energy and water balance model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Timothy

    -relative-humidity-based two-source (ARTS) E model that simulates the surface energy balance, soil water balanceGlobal estimation of evapotranspiration using a leaf area index-based surface energy and water balance model H. Yan a, , S.Q. Wang b , D. Billesbach c , W. Oechel d , J.H. Zhang e , T. Meyers f , T

  16. Author's personal copy Sea ice extent and seasonality for the Early Pliocene northern Weddell Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schöne, Bernd R.

    the significance of a warming 21st century global climate and its influence on high latitude sea surface.6 Ma) spans a time when the Earth experienced a transition from relatively warm conditions to a cooling (Haywood et al., 2009). The warm interglacial climates of the Pliocene may be plausible comparative

  17. Global

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Low LETUseful LinksGlass Stronger thanGlenn T.4Global

  18. COMPARISON OF SEA SURFACE ROUGHNESS MODELS FOR OFFSHORE WIND POWER UTILISATION Bernhard Lange(1), Jrgen Hjstrup(2), Sren Larsen(2), Rebecca Barthelmie(2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    COMPARISON OF SEA SURFACE ROUGHNESS MODELS FOR OFFSHORE WIND POWER UTILISATION Bernhard Lange(1 Large offshore wind farms are being built in several countries in Europe. The economic viability of such projects depends on the favourable wind conditions of offshore sites, since the higher energy yield has

  19. Impact of dynamic feedbacks between sedimentation, sea-level rise, and biomass production on near-surface marsh stratigraphy and carbon accumulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mudd, Simon Marius

    -surface marsh stratigraphy and carbon accumulation Simon M. Mudd a,*, Susan M. Howell b , James T. Morris c model we explore how marsh stratigraphy responds to sediment supply and the rate of sea- level rise. It is calibrated and tested using an extensive data set of both marsh stratigraphy and measurements of vegetation

  20. A Bayesian Approach to Assess the Importance of Crustal Corrections in Global Anisotropic Surface Wave Tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xing, Z; Beghein, C

    2015-01-01

    from measurements of surface wave phase velocity anomalies,boundary from surface wave dispersion data, J. Geophys.radially anisotropic surface wave tomography, J. Geophys.

  1. Is the basinwide warming in the North Atlantic Ocean related to atmospheric carbon dioxide and global warming?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chunzai

    to atmospheric carbon dioxide and global warming? Chunzai Wang1 and Shenfu Dong1,2 Received 31 January 2010 is controversial. Some studies argued that the warming is due to global warming in association with the secular sea surface temperature. Here we show that both global warming and AMO variability make a contribution

  2. A global model simulation for 3-D radiative transfer impact on surface hydrology over Sierra Nevada and Rocky Mountains

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lee, W. -L.; Gu, Y.; Liou, K. N.; Leung, L. R.; Hsu, H. -H.

    2014-12-15

    We investigate 3-D mountain effects on solar flux distributions and their impact on surface hydrology over the Western United States, specifically the Rocky Mountains and Sierra Nevada using CCSM4 (CAM4/CLM4) global model with a 0.23° × 0.31° resolution for simulations over 6 years. In 3-D radiative transfer parameterization, we have updated surface topography data from a resolution of 1 km to 90 m to improve parameterization accuracy. In addition, we have also modified the upward-flux deviation [3-D - PP (plane-parallel)] adjustment to ensure that energy balance at the surface is conserved in global climate simulations based on 3-D radiation parameterization.more »We show that deviations of the net surface fluxes are not only affected by 3-D mountains, but also influenced by feedbacks of cloud and snow in association with the long-term simulations. Deviations in sensible heat and surface temperature generally follow the patterns of net surface solar flux. The monthly snow water equivalent (SWE) deviations show an increase in lower elevations due to reduced snowmelt, leading to a reduction in cumulative runoff. Over higher elevation areas, negative SWE deviations are found because of increased solar radiation available at the surface. Simulated precipitation increases for lower elevations, while decreases for higher elevations with a minimum in April. Liquid runoff significantly decreases in higher elevations after April due to reduced SWE and precipitation.« less

  3. Final Report DE-EE0005380: Assessment of Offshore Wind Farm Effects on Sea Surface, Subsurface and Airborne Electronic Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ling, Hao; Hamilton, Mark F.; Bhalla, Rajan; Brown, Walter E.; Hay, Todd A.; Whitelonis, Nicholas J.; Yang, Shang-Te; Naqvi, Aale R.

    2013-09-30

    Offshore wind energy is a valuable resource that can provide a significant boost to the US renewable energy portfolio. A current constraint to the development of offshore wind farms is the potential for interference to be caused by large wind farms on existing electronic and acoustical equipment such as radar and sonar systems for surveillance, navigation and communications. The US Department of Energy funded this study as an objective assessment of possible interference to various types of equipment operating in the marine environment where offshore wind farms could be installed. The objective of this project was to conduct a baseline evaluation of electromagnetic and acoustical challenges to sea surface, subsurface and airborne electronic systems presented by offshore wind farms. To accomplish this goal, the following tasks were carried out: (1) survey electronic systems that can potentially be impacted by large offshore wind farms, and identify impact assessment studies and research and development activities both within and outside the US, (2) engage key stakeholders to identify their possible concerns and operating requirements, (3) conduct first-principle modeling on the interactions of electromagnetic signals with, and the radiation of underwater acoustic signals from, offshore wind farms to evaluate the effect of such interactions on electronic systems, and (4) provide impact assessments, recommend mitigation methods, prioritize future research directions, and disseminate project findings. This report provides a detailed description of the methodologies used to carry out the study, key findings of the study, and a list of recommendations derived based the findings.

  4. Global heat transfer analysis in Czochralski silicon furnace with radiation on curved specular surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Zhixiong "James"

    Global heat transfer analysis in Czochralski silicon furnace with radiation on curved specular method are adopted to solve the global heat transfer and the radiative heat exchange, respectively rate QJ diffuse radiation heat transfer rate QX net rate of radiative heat loss QT heat generation rate

  5. Variability and Predictability of West African Droughts: A Review on the Role of Sea Surface Temperature Anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    study in climate and desertification. J. Hydrol. , 188– 189,regional climate? Global Desertification: Do Humans Cause

  6. A global model simulation for 3-D radiative transfer impact on surface hydrology over the Sierra Nevada and Rocky Mountains

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lee, W.-L.; Gu, Y.; Liou, K. N.; Leung, L. R.; Hsu, H.-H.

    2015-05-19

    We investigate 3-D mountain effects on solar flux distributions and their impact on surface hydrology over the western United States, specifically the Rocky Mountains and the Sierra Nevada, using the global CCSM4 (Community Climate System Model version 4; Community Atmosphere Model/Community Land Model – CAM4/CLM4) with a 0.23° × 0.31° resolution for simulations over 6 years. In a 3-D radiative transfer parameterization, we have updated surface topography data from a resolution of 1 km to 90 m to improve parameterization accuracy. In addition, we have also modified the upward-flux deviation (3-D–PP (plane-parallel)) adjustment to ensure that the energy balance atmore »the surface is conserved in global climate simulations based on 3-D radiation parameterization. We show that deviations in the net surface fluxes are not only affected by 3-D mountains but also influenced by feedbacks of cloud and snow in association with the long-term simulations. Deviations in sensible heat and surface temperature generally follow the patterns of net surface solar flux. The monthly snow water equivalent (SWE) deviations show an increase in lower elevations due to reduced snowmelt, leading to a reduction in cumulative runoff. Over higher-elevation areas, negative SWE deviations are found because of increased solar radiation available at the surface. Simulated precipitation increases for lower elevations, while it decreases for higher elevations, with a minimum in April. Liquid runoff significantly decreases at higher elevations after April due to reduced SWE and precipitation.« less

  7. Global study of lake surface water temperature (LSWT) behaviour and the tuning of a 1-dimensional model to determine the LSWTs of large lakes worldwide 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Layden, Aisling

    2014-11-27

    Lake surface water temperatures (LSWTs) of 246 globally distributed large lakes were derived from Along-Track Scanning Radiometers (ATSR) for the period 1991 to 2011. These LSWTs, derived in a systematic manner, presents ...

  8. 2008 Global Surface Temperature in GISS Analysis James Hansen, Makiko Sato, Reto Ruedy, Ken Lo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    of the year. La Nina and El Nino are opposite phases of a natural oscillation of tropical temperatures, La oscillation is made clear by the average temperature anomaly over the global ocean (Figure 2, bottom). The "El Nino of the century", in 1997-98, stands out, as well as the recent La Nina. Figure 3 compares 2008

  9. A surface renewal model to analyze infrared image sequences of the ocean surface for the study of air-sea heat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garbe, Christoph S.

    A surface renewal model to analyze infrared image sequences of the ocean surface for the study on a model of surface renewal. Through the use of digital image processing techniques, temporally in which the surface renewal model is applicable. Experimental evidence is presented for the probability

  10. Estimating the Economic Cost of Sea-Level Rise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sugiyama, Masahiro.

    To improve the estimate of economic costs of future sea-level rise associated with global climate change,

  11. Shipboard Measurements and Estimations of AirSea Fluxes in the Western Tropical Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Irvine, University of

    Ship­board Measurements and Estimations of Air­Sea Fluxes in the Western Tropical Pacific Ocean E dur­ ing the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere (TOGA) Coupled Ocean and Atmospheric Response of the surface­layer turbulence properties are compared with those from previous land and ocean results. Momentum

  12. Use of North American and European air quality networks to evaluate global chemistry-climate modeling of surface ozone

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Schnell, J. L.; Prather, M. J.; Josse, B.; Naik, V.; Horowitz, L. W.; Cameron-Smith, P.; Bergmann, D.; Zeng, G.; Plummer, D. A.; Sudo, K.; et al

    2015-04-16

    We test the current generation of global chemistry-climate models in their ability to simulate observed, present-day surface ozone. Models are evaluated against hourly surface ozone from 4217 stations in North America and Europe that are averaged over 1° × 1° grid cells, allowing commensurate model-measurement comparison. Models are generally biased high during all hours of the day and in all regions. Most models simulate the shape of regional summertime diurnal and annual cycles well, correctly matching the timing of hourly (~ 15:00) and monthly (mid-June) peak surface ozone abundance. The amplitude of these cycles is less successfully matched. The observedmore »summertime diurnal range (~ 25 ppb) is underestimated in all regions by about 7 ppb, and the observed seasonal range (~ 21 ppb) is underestimated by about 5 ppb except in the most polluted regions where it is overestimated by about 5 ppb. The models generally match the pattern of the observed summertime ozone enhancement, but they overestimate its magnitude in most regions. Most models capture the observed distribution of extreme episode sizes, correctly showing that about 80% of individual extreme events occur in large-scale, multi-day episodes of more than 100 grid cells. The observed linear relationship showing increases in ozone by up to 6 ppb for larger-sized episodes is also matched.« less

  13. Impacts of ocean albedo alteration on Arctic sea ice restoration and Northern Hemisphere climate

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cvijanovic, Ivana; Caldeira, Ken; MacMartin, Douglas G.

    2015-04-01

    The Arctic Ocean is expected to transition into a seasonally ice-free state by mid-century, enhancing Arctic warming and leading to substantial ecological and socio-economic challenges across the Arctic region. It has been proposed that artificially increasing high latitude ocean albedo could restore sea ice, but the climate impacts of such a strategy have not been previously explored. Motivated by this, we investigate the impacts of idealized high latitude ocean albedo changes on Arctic sea ice restoration and climate. In our simulated 4xCO? climate, imposing surface albedo alterations over the Arctic Ocean leads to partial sea ice recovery and a modestmore »reduction in Arctic warming. With the most extreme ocean albedo changes, imposed over the area 70°–90°N, September sea ice cover stabilizes at ~40% of its preindustrial value (compared to ~3% without imposed albedo modifications). This is accompanied by an annual mean Arctic surface temperature decrease of ~2 °C but no substantial global mean temperature decrease. Imposed albedo changes and sea ice recovery alter climate outside the Arctic region too, affecting precipitation distribution over parts of the continental United States and Northeastern Pacific. For example, following sea ice recovery, wetter and milder winter conditions are present in the Southwest United States while the East Coast experiences cooling. We conclude that although ocean albedo alteration could lead to some sea ice recovery, it does not appear to be an effective way of offsetting the overall effects of CO? induced global warming.« less

  14. Use of North American and European air quality networks to evaluate global chemistry–climate modeling of surface ozone

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Schnell, J. L.; Prather, M. J.; Josse, B.; Naik, V.; Horowitz, L. W.; Cameron-Smith, P.; Bergmann, D.; Zeng, G.; Plummer, D. A.; Sudo, K.; et al

    2015-09-25

    We test the current generation of global chemistry–climate models in their ability to simulate observed, present-day surface ozone. Models are evaluated against hourly surface ozone from 4217 stations in North America and Europe that are averaged over 1° × 1° grid cells, allowing commensurate model–measurement comparison. Models are generally biased high during all hours of the day and in all regions. Most models simulate the shape of regional summertime diurnal and annual cycles well, correctly matching the timing of hourly (~ 15:00 local time (LT)) and monthly (mid-June) peak surface ozone abundance. The amplitude of these cycles is less successfullymore »matched. The observed summertime diurnal range (~ 25 ppb) is underestimated in all regions by about 7 ppb, and the observed seasonal range (~ 21 ppb) is underestimated by about 5 ppb except in the most polluted regions, where it is overestimated by about 5 ppb. The models generally match the pattern of the observed summertime ozone enhancement, but they overestimate its magnitude in most regions. Most models capture the observed distribution of extreme episode sizes, correctly showing that about 80 % of individual extreme events occur in large-scale, multi-day episodes of more than 100 grid cells. The models also match the observed linear relationship between episode size and a measure of episode intensity, which shows increases in ozone abundance by up to 6 ppb for larger-sized episodes. We conclude that the skill of the models evaluated here provides confidence in their projections of future surface ozone.« less

  15. PUBLISHED ONLINE: 18 MARCH 2012 | DOI: 10.1038/NCLIMATE1455 Assessing confidence in Pliocene sea surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that planetary warming is well underway, the climate research community looks to palaeoclimate research for a ground-truthing measure with which to test the accuracy of future climate simulations. Model experiments be considered in such an exercise. The most recent period of sustained global warmth similar to what

  16. Real-time Global Flood Estimation using Satellite-based Precipitation and a Coupled Land Surface and Routing Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Huan; Adler, Robert F.; Tian, Yudong; Huffman, George; Li, Hongyi; Wang, Jianjian

    2014-04-09

    A community land surface model, the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model, is coupled with a newly developed hierarchical dominant river tracing-based runoff-routing model to form the Dominant river tracing-Routing Integrated with VIC Environment (DRIVE) model system, which serves as the new core of the real-time Global Flood Monitoring System (GFMS). The GFMS uses real-time satellite-based precipitation to derive flood-monitoring parameters for the latitude-band 50{degree sign}N-50{degree sign}S at relatively high spatial (~12km) and temporal (3-hourly) resolution. Examples of model results for recent flood events are computed using the real-time GFMS (http://flood.umd.edu). To evaluate the accuracy of the new GFMS, the DRIVE model is run retrospectively for 15 years using both research-quality and real-time satellite precipitation products. Statistical results are slightly better for the research-quality input and significantly better for longer duration events (three-day events vs. one-day events). Basins with fewer dams tend to provide lower false alarm ratios. For events longer than three days in areas with few dams, the probability of detection is ~0.9 and the false alarm ratio is ~0.6. In general, these statistical results are better than those of the previous system. Streamflow was evaluated at 1,121 river gauges across the quasi-global domain. Validation using real-time precipitation across the tropics (30ºS-30ºN) gives positive daily Nash-Sutcliffe Coef?cients for 107 out of 375 (28%) stations with a mean of 0.19 and 51% of the same gauges at monthly scale with a mean of 0.33. There were poorer results in higher latitudes, probably due to larger errors in the satellite precipitation input.

  17. ARM - Sea Surface and Sea Level

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska OutreachCalendarPressExtended Facility SGPScienceScienceLevel

  18. *Smith, J. A., 1999: Observations of wind, waves, and the mixed layer: the scaling of surface motion. In The Wind-Driven Air-Sea Interface, edited by M. L. Banner, pp. 231-238. Published

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Jerome A.

    *Smith, J. A., 1999: Observations of wind, waves, and the mixed layer: the scaling of surface motion. In The Wind-Driven Air-Sea Interface, edited by M. L. Banner, pp. 231-238. Published by University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia, ISBN 0 7334 0586 X. Observations of wind, waves

  19. Arctic Sea Ice Hits Record Low--Extreme Weather to Come? Global warming to blame for highest observed decline, scientists say.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    South Bohemia, University of

    at the U.S. National Snow and Ice Data Center said the rate of Arctic sea ice decline is now the highest." Climate models used by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) also predict that Arctic at a historic rate, scientists say. In fact, a recent analysis of satellite data "utterly obliterates

  20. Accurate high level ab initio-based global potential energy surface and dynamics calculations for ground state of CH{sub 2}{sup +}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Y. Q.; Zhang, P. Y.; Han, K. L.

    2015-03-28

    A global many-body expansion potential energy surface is reported for the electronic ground state of CH{sub 2}{sup +} by fitting high level ab initio energies calculated at the multireference configuration interaction level with the aug-cc-pV6Z basis set. The topographical features of the new global potential energy surface are examined in detail and found to be in good agreement with those calculated directly from the raw ab initio energies, as well as previous calculations available in the literature. In turn, in order to validate the potential energy surface, a test theoretical study of the reaction CH{sup +}(X{sup 1}?{sup +})+H({sup 2}S)?C{sup +}({sup 2}P)+H{sub 2}(X{sup 1}?{sub g}{sup +}) has been carried out with the method of time dependent wavepacket on the title potential energy surface. The total integral cross sections and the rate coefficients have been calculated; the results determined that the new potential energy surface can both be recommended for dynamics studies of any type and as building blocks for constructing the potential energy surfaces of larger C{sup +}/H containing systems.

  1. Enceladus's measured physical libration requires a global subsurface ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, P C; Tiscareno, M S; Burns, J A; Joseph, J; Loredo, T J; Helfenstein, P; Porco, C

    2015-01-01

    Several planetary satellites apparently have subsurface seas that are of great interest for, among other reasons, their possible habitability. The geologically diverse Saturnian satellite Enceladus vigorously vents liquid water and vapor from fractures within a south polar depression and thus must have a liquid reservoir or active melting. However, the extent and location of any subsurface liquid region is not directly observable. We use measurements of control points across the surface of Enceladus accumulated over seven years of spacecraft observations to determine the satellite's precise rotation state, finding a forced physical libration of 0.120 $\\pm$ 0.014{\\deg} (2{\\sigma}). This value is too large to be consistent with Enceladus's core being rigidly connected to its surface, and thus implies the presence of a global ocean rather than a localized polar sea. The maintenance of a global ocean within Enceladus is problematic according to many thermal models and so may constrain satellite properties or requ...

  2. Correlations of the first and second derivatives of atmospheric CO2 with global surface temperature and the El Nino-Southern Oscillation respectively

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leggett, L M W

    2014-01-01

    Understanding current global climate requires an understanding of trends both in Earth's atmospheric temperature and the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), a characteristic large-scale distribution of warm water in the tropical Pacific Ocean and the dominant mode of year-to-year climate variability (Holbrook et al. 2009. However, despite much effort, the average projection of current climate models has become statistically significantly different from the observed 21st century global surface temperature trend (Fyfe 2013)and has failed to reflect the statistically significant evidence that annual-mean global temperature has not risen in the 21st century (Fyfe 2013, Kosaka 2013). Modelling also provides a wide range of predictions for future ENSO variability, some showing an increase, others a decrease and some no change (Guilyardi, et al. 2012; Bellenger, 2013). Here we present correlations which include the current era and do not have these drawbacks. The correlations arise as follows. First it has been sho...

  3. Quantifying the Difference Between the Flux-Tube Expansion Factor at the Source Surface and at the Alfv\\'en Surface Using A Global MHD Model for the Solar Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Ofer

    2015-01-01

    The potential field approximation has been providing a fast, and computationally inexpensive estimation for the solar corona's global magnetic field geometry for several decades. In contrast, more physics-based global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models have been used for a similar purpose, while being much more computationally expensive. Here, we investigate the difference in the field geometry between a global MHD model and the potential field source surface model (PFSSM) by tracing individual magnetic field lines in the MHD model from the Alfven surface (AS), through the source surface (SS), all the way to the field line footpoint, and then back to the source surface in the PFSSM. We also compare the flux-tube expansion at two points at the SS and the AS along the same radial line. We study the effect of solar cycle variations, the order of the potential field harmonic expansion, and different magnetogram sources. We find that the flux-tube expansion factor is consistently smaller at the AS than at the SS for...

  4. Arctic Sea ice model sensitivities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Kara J.; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston; Paskaleva, Biliana Stefanova

    2010-12-01

    Arctic sea ice is an important component of the global climate system and, due to feedback effects, the Arctic ice cover is changing rapidly. Predictive mathematical models are of paramount importance for accurate estimates of the future ice trajectory. However, the sea ice components of Global Climate Models (GCMs) vary significantly in their prediction of the future state of Arctic sea ice and have generally underestimated the rate of decline in minimum sea ice extent seen over the past thirty years. One of the contributing factors to this variability is the sensitivity of the sea ice state to internal model parameters. A new sea ice model that holds some promise for improving sea ice predictions incorporates an anisotropic elastic-decohesive rheology and dynamics solved using the material-point method (MPM), which combines Lagrangian particles for advection with a background grid for gradient computations. We evaluate the variability of this MPM sea ice code and compare it with the Los Alamos National Laboratory CICE code for a single year simulation of the Arctic basin using consistent ocean and atmospheric forcing. Sensitivities of ice volume, ice area, ice extent, root mean square (RMS) ice speed, central Arctic ice thickness,and central Arctic ice speed with respect to ten different dynamic and thermodynamic parameters are evaluated both individually and in combination using the Design Analysis Kit for Optimization and Terascale Applications (DAKOTA). We find similar responses for the two codes and some interesting seasonal variability in the strength of the parameters on the solution.

  5. Estimation of methane and carbon dioxide surface fluxes using a 3-D global atmospheric chemical transport model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yu-Han, 1973-

    2004-01-01

    Methane (CH?) and carbon dioxide (CO?) are the two most radiatively important greenhouse gases attributable to human activity. Large uncertainties in their source and sink magnitudes currently exist. We estimate global ...

  6. Impact of the Southern ocean winds on sea-ice - ocean interaction and its associated global ocean circulation in a warming world 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheon, Woo Geunn

    2009-05-15

    to the northern NA, and instead increases the NADW outflow substantially. To sum up, with respect to the SO winds perturbed by the global warming, the SH overturning cell and the NADW outflow increase, leading to an increase in the volume transport of the ACC....

  7. Global ocean response to orbital forcing in the Holocene Center for Climatic Research, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch-Stieglitz, Jean

    : Oceans (4203); 1650 Global Change: Solar variability; KEYWORDS: Holocene climate, ocean, sea surface such as the Last Glacial Maximum [CLIMAP Project Members, 1981], Holocene SST changes have been suggested to have a significant impact on the terrestrial climate, such as the North Africa monsoon [Kutzbach and Liu, 1997

  8. int. j. remote sensing, 2001, vol. 22, no. 11, 21712191 Characterizing land surface anisotropy from AVHRR data at a global

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Shunlin

    from AVHRR data at a global scale using high performance computing S. N. V. KALLURI*, Z. ZHANG, J. JA Re ectance Distribution Function (BRDF ) using high performance computing techniques. Three di the computational requirements and optimize the algorithm implementation using high performance computational

  9. ARM - Measurement - Sea surface temperature

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska Outreach Homepolarization ARM Data Discovery Browse

  10. The effect of surface irradiance on the absorption spectrum of chromophoric dissolved organic matter in the global ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, David A.

    The effect of surface irradiance on the absorption spectrum of chromophoric dissolved organic 2012 Keywords: Marine CDOM Solar irradiation Surface Photobleaching Photoproduction a b s t r a c Oceans were irradiated over several days with full-spectrum light under a solar simulator at in situ

  11. GLOBAL WARMING THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    GLOBAL WARMING THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT AND YOUR FAMILY'S CONTRIBUTION TO IT Stephen E. Schwartz://www.grida.no/climate/ipcc_tar/wg1/ #12;EVIDENCE OF GLOBAL WARMING OTHER THAN SURFACE TEMPERATURE ANOMALY The global ocean has warmed latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere. #12;MORE EVIDENCE OF GLOBAL WARMING OTHER THAN SURFACE TEMPERATURE

  12. Could the Earth's surface Ultraviolet irradiance be blamed for the global warming? (II) ----Ozone layer depth reconstruction via HEWV effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jilong; Zheng, Yujun

    2014-01-01

    It is suggested by Chen {\\it et al.} that the Earth's surface Ultraviolet irradiance ($280-400$ nm) could influence the Earth's surface temperature variation by "Highly Excited Water Vapor" (HEWV) effect. In this manuscript, we reconstruct the developing history of the ozone layer depth variation from 1860 to 2011 based on the HEWV effect. It is shown that the reconstructed ozone layer depth variation correlates with the observational variation from 1958 to 2005 very well ($R=0.8422$, $P>99.9\\%$). From this reconstruction, we may limit the spectra band of the surface Ultraviolet irradiance referred in HEWV effect to Ultraviolet B ($280-320$ nm).

  13. Testing for the Possible Influence of Unknown Climate Forcings upon Global Temperature Increases from 1950-2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Bruce T.; Knight, Jeff R.; Ringer, Mark A.; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Cherchi, Annalisa

    2012-10-15

    Global-scale variations in the climate system over the last half of the twentieth century, including long-term increases in global-mean near-surface temperatures, are consistent with concurrent human-induced emissions of radiatively active gases and aerosols. However, such consistency does not preclude the possible influence of other forcing agents, including internal modes of climate variability or unaccounted for aerosol effects. To test whether other unknown forcing agents may have contributed to multidecadal increases in global-mean near-surface temperatures from 1950 to 2000, data pertaining to observed changes in global-scale sea surface temperatures and observed changes in radiatively active atmospheric constituents are incorporated into numerical global climate models. Results indicate that the radiative forcing needed to produce the observed long-term trends in sea surface temperatures—and global-mean near-surface temperatures—is provided predominantly by known changes in greenhouse gases and aerosols. Further, results indicate that less than 10% of the long-term historical increase in global-mean near-surface temperatures over the last half of the twentieth century could have been the result of internal climate variability. In addition, they indicate that less than 25%of the total radiative forcing needed to produce the observed long-term trend in global-mean near-surface temperatures could have been provided by changes in net radiative forcing from unknown sources (either positive or negative). These results, which are derived from simple energy balance requirements, emphasize the important role humans have played in modifying the global climate over the last half of the twentieth century.

  14. Mixed Layer Lateral Eddy Fluxes Mediated by Air-Sea Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shuckburgh, Emily

    The modulation of air–sea heat fluxes by geostrophic eddies due to the stirring of temperature at the sea surface is discussed and quantified. It is argued that the damping of eddy temperature variance by such air–sea ...

  15. SCIENTIFIC EVIDENCE GLOBAL WARMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    SCIENTIFIC EVIDENCE FOR GLOBAL WARMING Stephen E. Schwartz Jefferson's Ferry Public Affairs century. The warmest year of the millennium was 1998. #12;EVIDENCE OF GLOBAL WARMING OTHER THAN SURFACE TEMPERATURE ANOMALY The global ocean has warmed significantly since the late 1940s: more than half

  16. Integrated assessment of global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ott, K.O.

    1996-12-31

    The anomalies of sea surface temperatures, which show a warming trend since the 1850s through the decade 1960/70 of {Delta}SST {approximately} 0.3 C, are complemented by changes of the ground surface temperature ({Delta}GST). The global surface temperature change, based on these data, allows an integrated assessment of the associated increase in black-body irradiance and a comparison with the enhanced greenhouse-gas back-scattering. Information on the GST history is obtained from unfolding analyses of underground temperature distributions measured in 90 boreholes in Alaskan permafrost and Canadian bedrock. These analyses show GST increases ({Delta}GST) since the 19th century through 1960/70 of 3 C on average, with standard deviations of +1.8 C and {minus}0.9 C on the high and low end respectively. The onset of the warming trend, which is uncertain in the GST data, is timed more accurately by detailed length records of large valley glaciers in the US and the Alps. Evaluation of the heat capacities and heat transfer indicates that the temperature response to an increase in radiative forcing must be much larger on land than on the sea. Conversely, the observed large ratio of {Delta}GST and {Delta}SST can only be explained by increased radiative forcing. From 1960/70 through the warmest decade on record, 1980/90, global {Delta}SST and {Delta}SAT have further increased to 0.6 C and 0.8 C respectively, But, the most recent GST data are not accurate enough to extend the comparison through 1990. Calculation of the increase of radiative forcing from back-scattering of greenhouse gases for 1850 to 1970 yields 1.3 W/cm{sup 2}. The increase in black-body irradiance from 3.6 C warming on land and 0.3 C on sea provides the required balance. The warming on land of 3.6 C is larger than the average value of 3.0 C, but well within the observed range.

  17. Mathematics Of Ice To Aid Global Warming Forecasts Mathematics Of Ice To Aid Global Warming Forecasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    Mathematics Of Ice To Aid Global Warming Forecasts Mathematics Of Ice To Aid Global Warming forecasts of how global warming will affect polar icepacks. See also: Earth & Climate q Global Warming q the effects of climate warming, and its presence greatly reduces solar heating of the polar oceans." "Sea ice

  18. AN INTEGRATED GLOBAL OBSERVING SYSTEM FOR SEA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and variability from observa- tional data, but it does not include attribution of the causes of climate change and Reynolds--NOAA/ National Climatic Data Center, Asheville, North Carolina; lumpkin several NOAA offices: theClimateProgramOffice(CPO)in SilverSpring,Maryland;theNational Climatic Data

  19. Global Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crow, Ben D

    2006-01-01

    of Globalization: Statistics Weiss, L. (1997). "of Globalization: Statistics Milanovic, B. (1999). Truethe focus of global statistics, particularly in relation to

  20. Modeling sea level changes and geodetic variations by glacial isostasy: the improved SELEN code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spada, Giorgio; Galassi, Gaia; Colleoni, Florence

    2012-01-01

    We describe the basic features of SELEN, an open source Fortran 90 program for the numerical solution of the so-called "Sea Level Equation" for a spherical, layered, non-rotating Earth with Maxwell viscoelastic rheology. The Sea Level Equation was introduced in the 70s to model the sea level variations in response to the melting of late-Pleistocene ice-sheets, but it can be also employed for predictions of geodetic quantities such as vertical and horizontal surface displacements and gravity variations on a global and a regional scale. SELEN (acronym of SEa Level EquatioN solver) is particularly oriented to scientists at their first approach to the glacial isostatic adjustment problem and, according to our experience, it can be successfully used in teaching. The current release (2.9) considerably improves the previous versions of the code in terms of computational efficiency, portability and versatility. In this paper we describe the essentials of the theory behind the Sea Level Equation, the purposes of SELEN...

  1. Sea Mammals:

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C O M1 the RFSOGorPLEASE5Sea Mammals:

  2. Incorporation of a physically based melt pond scheme into the sea ice component of a climate model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feltham, Daniel

    Incorporation of a physically based melt pond scheme into the sea ice component of a climate model and evolution of melt ponds. Melt ponds accumulate on the surface of sea ice from snow and sea ice melt, melt ponds cover up to 50% of the sea ice surface. We have developed a melt pond evolution theory. Here

  3. Reducing uncertainty in high-resolution sea ice models.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Kara J.; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston

    2013-07-01

    Arctic sea ice is an important component of the global climate system, reflecting a significant amount of solar radiation, insulating the ocean from the atmosphere and influencing ocean circulation by modifying the salinity of the upper ocean. The thickness and extent of Arctic sea ice have shown a significant decline in recent decades with implications for global climate as well as regional geopolitics. Increasing interest in exploration as well as climate feedback effects make predictive mathematical modeling of sea ice a task of tremendous practical import. Satellite data obtained over the last few decades have provided a wealth of information on sea ice motion and deformation. The data clearly show that ice deformation is focused along narrow linear features and this type of deformation is not well-represented in existing models. To improve sea ice dynamics we have incorporated an anisotropic rheology into the Los Alamos National Laboratory global sea ice model, CICE. Sensitivity analyses were performed using the Design Analysis Kit for Optimization and Terascale Applications (DAKOTA) to determine the impact of material parameters on sea ice response functions. Two material strength parameters that exhibited the most significant impact on responses were further analyzed to evaluate their influence on quantitative comparisons between model output and data. The sensitivity analysis along with ten year model runs indicate that while the anisotropic rheology provides some benefit in velocity predictions, additional improvements are required to make this material model a viable alternative for global sea ice simulations.

  4. HIGH-RESOLUTION CALCULATION OF THE SOLAR GLOBAL CONVECTION WITH THE REDUCED SPEED OF SOUND TECHNIQUE. II. NEAR SURFACE SHEAR LAYER WITH THE ROTATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hotta, H.; Rempel, M. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Yokoyama, T., E-mail: hotta@ucar.edu [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2015-01-01

    We present a high-resolution, highly stratified numerical simulation of rotating thermal convection in a spherical shell. Our aim is to study in detail the processes that can maintain a near surface shear layer (NSSL) as inferred from helioseismology. Using the reduced speed of sound technique, we can extend our global convection simulation to 0.99 R {sub ?} and include, near the top of our domain, small-scale convection with short timescales that is only weakly influenced by rotation. We find the formation of an NSSL preferentially in high latitudes in the depth range of r = 0.95-0.975 R {sub ?}. The maintenance mechanisms are summarized as follows. Convection under the weak influence of rotation leads to Reynolds stresses that transport angular momentum radially inward in all latitudes. This leads to the formation of a strong poleward-directed meridional flow and an NSSL, which is balanced in the meridional plane by forces resulting from the ?v{sub r}{sup ?}v{sub ?}{sup ?}? correlation of turbulent velocities. The origin of the required correlations depends to some degree on latitude. In high latitudes, a positive correlation ?v{sub r}{sup ?}v{sub ?}{sup ?}? is induced in the NSSL by the poleward meridional flow whose amplitude increases with the radius, while a negative correlation is generated by the Coriolis force in bulk of the convection zone. In low latitudes, a positive correlation ?v{sub r}{sup ?}v{sub ?}{sup ?}? results from rotationally aligned convection cells ({sup b}anana cells{sup )}. The force caused by these Reynolds stresses is in balance with the Coriolis force in the NSSL.

  5. Adapting to sea-level rise in the US Southeast: The influence of built infrastructure and biophysical factors on the inundation of coastal areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniels, R.C. |; Gornitz, V.M.; Mehta, A.J.; Lee, Saychong; Cushman, R.M.

    1992-11-01

    The earth` s global mean surface air temperature has increased by 0.5{degrees}C over the past 100 years. This warming trend has occurred concurrently with increases in the concentration and number of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. These gases may cause this trend to accelerate in the future and result in a net increase in the earth`s global mean surface air temperature of 1.5 to 4.5{degrees}C by the year 2100. An increase of this magnitude could cause sea surface temperatures to increase would cause sea levels to rise -from thermal expansion of the sea, and the addition of melt waters from alpine glaciers and continental ice sheets. To allow for the cost-effective analysis of the impacts that sea-level rise may have on the US Southeast, a method is needed that will allow sites that are potentially at risk to be identified for study. Previously, no objective method was available to identify such sites. This project addresses this problem by using a geographic data base with information on both physical and climatological factors to identify coastal areas of the US Southeast that are at risk to inundation or accelerated erosion due to sea-level rise. The following six areas were selected for further study from the many identified as being at high risk: Galveston, Texas; Caminada Pass, Louisiana; Bradenton Beach, Florida; Daytona Beach, Florida; McClellanville, South Carolina; and Nags Head, North Carolina. For each study area the amount of land, by land use type, in danger from inundation from three sea-level-rise scenarios was calculated. The calculated values were based on elevation alone.

  6. Adapting to sea-level rise in the US Southeast: The influence of built infrastructure and biophysical factors on the inundation of coastal areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniels, R. C.; Gornitz, V. M.; Mehta, A. J.; Lee, Saychong

    1992-11-01

    The earth' s global mean surface air temperature has increased by 0.5°C over the past 100 years. This warming trend has occurred concurrently with increases in the concentration and number of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. These gases may cause this trend to accelerate in the future and result in a net increase in the earth's global mean surface air temperature of 1.5 to 4.5°C by the year 2100. An increase of this magnitude could cause sea surface temperatures to increase would cause sea levels to rise -from thermal expansion of the sea, and the addition of melt waters from alpine glaciers and continental ice sheets. To allow for the cost-effective analysis of the impacts that sea-level rise may have on the US Southeast, a method is needed that will allow sites that are potentially at risk to be identified for study. Previously, no objective method was available to identify such sites. This project addresses this problem by using a geographic data base with information on both physical and climatological factors to identify coastal areas of the US Southeast that are at risk to inundation or accelerated erosion due to sea-level rise. The following six areas were selected for further study from the many identified as being at high risk: Galveston, Texas; Caminada Pass, Louisiana; Bradenton Beach, Florida; Daytona Beach, Florida; McClellanville, South Carolina; and Nags Head, North Carolina. For each study area the amount of land, by land use type, in danger from inundation from three sea-level-rise scenarios was calculated. The calculated values were based on elevation alone.

  7. Globalization Nationalized

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazlish, Bruce

    Globalism and globalization have been seen as competitors to other allegiances, namely regionalism and nationalism. A look at recent efforts at reconceptualizing global history in China, Korea and the U.S., however, suggests ...

  8. History of Asian eolian input to the West Philippine Sea over the last one million years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clift, Peter

    History of Asian eolian input to the West Philippine Sea over the last one million years Shiming East Asian monsoon Clay minerals Glacial­interglacial West Philippine Sea International Marine Past the International Marine Past Global Change (IMAGES) Core MD06-3050 from the West Philippine Sea in order to trace

  9. Impact of global dimming and brightening on global warming Martin Wild,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    Impact of global dimming and brightening on global warming Martin Wild,1 Atsumu Ohmura,1 and Knut February 2007. [1] Speculations on the impact of variations in surface solar radiation on global warming was responsible for the observed warming. To disentangle surface solar and greenhouse influences on global warming

  10. Examination of the Effects of Sea Salt Aerosols on Southeast Texas Ozone and Secondary Organic Aerosol 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benoit, Mark David

    2013-02-06

    of this research is to examine sea salt aerosols and their impact on polluted environments. Sea salt aerosols act as Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) as well as providing a surface for heterogeneous reactions. Such reactions have implications for trace gases...

  11. Effects of Drake Passage on a strongly eddying global ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viebahn, Jan P; Bars, Dewi Le; Dijkstra, Henk A

    2015-01-01

    The climate impact of ocean gateway openings during the Eocene-Oligocene transition is still under debate. Previous model studies employed grid resolutions at which the impact of mesoscale eddies has to be parameterized. We present results of a state-of-the-art eddy-resolving global ocean model with a closed Drake Passage, and compare with results of the same model at non-eddying resolution. An analysis of the pathways of heat by decomposing the meridional heat transport into eddy, horizontal, and overturning circulation components indicates that the model behavior on the large scale is qualitatively similar at both resolutions. Closing Drake Passage induces (i) sea surface warming around Antarctica due to changes in the horizontal circulation of the Southern Ocean, (ii) the collapse of the overturning circulation related to North Atlantic Deep Water formation leading to surface cooling in the North Atlantic, (iii) significant equatorward eddy heat transport near Antarctica. However, quantitative details sign...

  12. Measuring important parameters for air-sea heat exchange Christoph S. Garbeab, Uwe Schimpfab and Bernd Jhneab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garbe, Christoph S.

    Measuring important parameters for air-sea heat exchange Christoph S. Garbeab, Uwe Schimpfab Exchange, Heat flux, Digital Image Processing, Surface Renewal 1. INTRODUCTION Thermographic techniques-water heat exchange. A driving force in air sea interactions is the net sea surface heat flux. It is a vital

  13. Marine Fisheries On the cover: Sea surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -81 Encounters of Hawaiian Monk Seals With Fishing Gear at Lisianski Island, 1982 Paired Open Beach Seines

  14. Greenland Ice Sheet "Sliding" a Small Contributor to Future Sea...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    team determined that additional sea-level rise resulting from lubrication is small (8 mm) in comparison with that from experiments forced only by changes in surface mass balance...

  15. Thermoregulation in Steller sea lions: an experimental approach 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willis, Kate

    2004-01-01

    captive Steller sea lions using heat flux sensors (HFSs) with embedded thermistors. Optimal sensor placement was determined using infrared thermography to measure the major pathways of heat flow along the surface of the animals. Experiments were...

  16. Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas (SOCAT) gridded data products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabine, Christopher; Hankin, S.; Koyuk, H; Bakker, D C E; Pfeil, B; Olsen, A; Metzl, N; Fassbender, A; Manke, A; Malczyk, J; Akl, J; Alin, S R; Bellerby, R G J; Borges, A; Boutin, J; Cai, W-J; Chavez, F P; Chen, A; Cosa, C; Feely, R A; Gonzalez-Davila, M; Goyet, C; Hardman-Mountford, N; Heinze, C; Hoppema, M; Hunt, C W; Hydes, D; Ishii, M; Johannessen, T; Key, R M; Kortzinger, A; Landschutzer, P; Lauvset, S K; Lefevre, N; Lourantou, A; Mintrop, L; Miyazaki, C; Murata, A; Nakadate, A; Nakano, Y; Nakaoka, S; Nojiri, Y; et al.

    2013-01-01

    A well documented, publicly available, global data set for surface ocean carbon dioxide (CO2) parameters has been called for by international groups for nearly two decades. The Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas (SOCAT) project was initiated by the international marine carbon science community in 2007 with the aim of providing a comprehensive, publicly available, regularly updated, global data set of marine surface CO2, which had been subject to quality control (QC). SOCAT version 1.5 was made public in September 2011 and holds 6.3 million quality controlled surface CO2 data from the global oceans and coastal seas, spanning four decades (1968 2007). The SOCAT gridded data is the second data product to come from the SOCAT project. Recognizing that some groups may have trouble working with millions of measurements, the SOCAT gridded product was generated to provide a robust regularly spaced fCO2 product with minimal spatial and temporal interpolation which should be easier to work with for many applications. Gridded SOCAT is rich with information that has not been fully explored yet, but also contains biases and limitations that the user needs to recognize and address.

  17. Global Predictions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swyden, Courtney

    2006-01-01

    stream_source_info Global Predictions.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 7503 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Global Predictions.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Every morning... drought index is based on a daily water balance, where a drought factor is calculated with precipitation and soil moisture,? Srinivasan said. Global Predictions Story by Courtney Swyden Global Predictions Lab uses advanced technologies to forecast...

  18. North Sea platforms revamped

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Hare, J.

    1999-12-01

    Many of the early North Sea platforms are reaching their end-of-field life. Most are still equipped with their original drilling package. In a few cases the package has either been removed or decommissioned. The early installations were designed for much simpler and less demanding wells than the horizontal, extended-reach or designer wells common today. Extended-reach wells now can be drilled realistically from ageing platforms, without incurring massive capital expenditure. This can be achieved using the existing drilling package to the limit of its capabilities and supplementing where necessary with relatively minor upgrades or the use of temporary equipment. Drilling even a few more wells from existing platforms not only prolongs field life, it enables any surplus processing capacity to be made available to develop near-field potential with extended-reach drilling (ERD) or by tying back subsea satellite wells, or for processing third-party fluids. The paper describes well design, surface equipment, mud pumps, shakers and solids control equipment, drill cuttings disposal systems, derrick and hoisting system, top drive and drillstring, downhole equipment, well planning, casing wear, logistics, rig preparations, and ERD vs. subsea tie-backs.

  19. 3, 435470, 2006 Improved surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    OSD 3, 435­470, 2006 Improved surface wind resolution A. Bentamy et al. Title Page Abstract near real time surface wind resolution over the Mediterranean Sea A. Bentamy, H.-L. Ayina, P Improved surface wind resolution A. Bentamy et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Conclusions References

  20. On the Interaction between Marine Boundary Layer Cellular Cloudiness and Surface Heat Fluxes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kazil, J.; Feingold, G.; Wang, Hailong; Yamaguchi, T.

    2014-01-02

    The interaction between marine boundary layer cellular cloudiness and surface uxes of sensible and latent heat is investigated. The investigation focuses on the non-precipitating closed-cell state and the precipitating open-cell state at low geostrophic wind speed. The Advanced Research WRF model is used to conduct cloud-system-resolving simulations with interactive surface fluxes of sensible heat, latent heat, and of sea salt aerosol, and with a detailed representation of the interaction between aerosol particles and clouds. The mechanisms responsible for the temporal evolution and spatial distribution of the surface heat fluxes in the closed- and open-cell state are investigated and explained. It is found that the horizontal spatial structure of the closed-cell state determines, by entrainment of dry free tropospheric air, the spatial distribution of surface air temperature and water vapor, and, to a lesser degree, of the surface sensible and latent heat flux. The synchronized dynamics of the the open-cell state drives oscillations in surface air temperature, water vapor, and in the surface fluxes of sensible and latent heat, and of sea salt aerosol. Open-cell cloud formation, cloud optical depth and liquid water path, and cloud and rain water path are identified as good predictors of the spatial distribution of surface air temperature and sensible heat flux, but not of surface water vapor and latent heat flux. It is shown that by enhancing the surface sensible heat flux, the open-cell state creates conditions by which it is maintained. While the open-cell state under consideration is not depleted in aerosol, and is insensitive to variations in sea-salt fluxes, it also enhances the sea-salt flux relative to the closed-cell state. In aerosol-depleted conditions, this enhancement may replenish the aerosol needed for cloud formation, and hence contribute to the perpetuation of the open-cell state as well. Spatial homogenization of the surface fluxes is found to have only a small effect on cloud properties in the investigated cases. This indicates that sub-grid scale spatial variability in the surface flux of sensible and latent heat and of sea salt aerosol may not be required in large scale and global models to describe marine boundary layer cellular cloudiness.

  1. Accurate ab initio-based adiabatic global potential energy surface for the 2{sup 2}A? state of NH{sub 2} by extrapolation to the complete basis set limit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Y. Q.; Ma, F. C.; Sun, M. T.

    2013-10-21

    A full three-dimensional global potential energy surface is reported first time for the title system, which is important for the photodissociation processes. It is obtained using double many-body expansion theory and an extensive set of accurate ab initio energies extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. Such a work can be recommended for dynamics studies of the N({sup 2}D) + H{sub 2} reaction, a reliable theoretical treatment of the photodissociation dynamics and as building blocks for constructing the double many-body expansion potential energy surface of larger nitrogen/hydrogen containing systems. In turn, a preliminary theoretical study of the reaction N({sup 2}D)+H{sub 2}(X{sup 1}?{sub g}{sup +})(?=0,j=0)?NH(a{sup 1}?)+H({sup 2}S) has been carried out with the method of quasi-classical trajectory on the new potential energy surface. Integral cross sections and thermal rate constants have been calculated, providing perhaps the most reliable estimate of the integral cross sections and the rate constants known thus far for such a reaction.

  2. Global energy and global precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Global energy and global precipitation or Why doesn't precipitation increase as Clausias expect precipitation to increase at the same rate. · Rest of this brief talk is to show you why Heat Flux (S) 20 W/m2 Atmospheric heating from precipitation LP Atmosphere has small heat capacity. So

  3. The Role of Oceans and Sea Ice in Abrupt Transitions between Multiple Climate States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Brian E. J.

    The coupled climate dynamics underlying large, rapid, and potentially irreversible changes in ice cover are studied. A global atmosphere–ocean–sea ice general circulation model with idealized aquaplanet geometry is forced ...

  4. Swell : a proposition for coastal metropolises in the age of rising seas and distributed centralization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorsey, Talia (Talia H.)

    2006-01-01

    Premised upon the certain realities of the rise of urban sprawl, globalized dynamic networks, and sea levels, this thesis seeks to question these forces and mobilize the inherent potentials that lie within their intersections. ...

  5. Deep-Sea Research I 49 (2002) 681705 Modification and pathways of Southern Ocean Deep Waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naveira Garabato, Alberto

    2002-01-01

    Deep-Sea Research I 49 (2002) 681­705 Modification and pathways of Southern Ocean Deep Waters of the deep water masses flowing through the region, and to quantify changes in their properties as they cross and pathways of deep water masses in the Scotia Sea had remained poorly documented despite their global

  6. Global distribution and climate forcing of marine organic aerosol: 1. Model improvements and evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meskhidze, N.; Xu, J.; Gantt, Brett; Zhang, Yang; Nenes, Athanasios; Ghan, Steven J.; Liu, Xiaohong; Easter, Richard C.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

    2011-11-23

    Marine organic aerosol emissions have been implemented and evaluated within the National Center of Atmospheric Research (NCAR)'s Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5) with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's 7-mode Modal Aerosol Module (MAM-7). Emissions of marine primary organic aerosols (POA), phytoplanktonproduced isoprene- and monoterpenes-derived secondary organic aerosols (SOA) and methane sulfonate (MS{sup -}) are shown to affect surface concentrations of organic aerosols in remote marine regions. Global emissions of submicron marine POA is estimated to be 7.9 and 9.4 Tg yr{sup -1}, for the Gantt et al. (2011) and Vignati et al. (2010) emission parameterizations, respectively. Marine sources of SOA and particulate MS{sup -} (containing both sulfur and carbon atoms) contribute an additional 0.2 and 5.1 Tg yr{sup -1}, respectively. Widespread areas over productive waters of the Northern Atlantic, Northern Pacific, and the Southern Ocean show marine-source submicron organic aerosol surface concentrations of 100 ngm{sup -3}, with values up to 400 ngm{sup -3} over biologically productive areas. Comparison of long-term surface observations of water insoluble organic matter (WIOM) with POA concentrations from the two emission parameterizations shows that despite revealed discrepancies (often more than a factor of 2), both Gantt et al. (2011) and Vignati et al. (2010) formulations are able to capture the magnitude of marine organic aerosol concentrations, with the Gantt et al. (2011) parameterization attaining better seasonality. Model simulations show that the mixing state of the marine POA can impact the surface number concentration of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The largest increases (up to 20 %) in CCN (at a supersaturation (S) of 0.2 %) number concentration are obtained over biologically productive ocean waters when marine organic aerosol is assumed to be externally mixed with sea-salt. Assuming marine organics are internally-mixed with sea-salt provides diverse results with increases and decreases in the concentration of CCN over different parts of the ocean. The sign of the CCN change due to the addition of marine organics to seasalt aerosol is determined by the relative significance of the increase in mean modal diameter due to addition of mass, and the decrease in particle hygroscopicity due to compositional changes in marine aerosol. Based on emerging evidence for increased CCN concentration over biologically active surface ocean areas/periods, our study suggests that treatment of sea spray in global climate models (GCMs) as an internal mixture of marine organic aerosols and sea-salt will likely lead to an underestimation in CCN number concentration.

  7. Far-infrared surface emissivity and climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feldman, Daniel R.; Collins, William D.; Pincus, Robert; Huang, Xianglei; Chen, Xiuhong

    2014-11-03

    Presently, there are no global measurement constraints on the surface emissivity at wavelengths longer than 15 ?m, even though this surface property in this far-IR region has a direct impact on the outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) and infrared cooling rates where the column precipitable water vapor (PWV) is less than 1 mm. Such dry conditions are common for high-altitude and high-latitude locations, with the potential for modeled climate to be impacted by uncertain surface characteristics. This paper explores the sensitivity of instantaneous OLR and cooling rates to changes in far-IR surface emissivity and how this unconstrained property impacts climate model projections. At high latitudes and altitudes, a 0.05 change in emissivity due to mineralogy and snow grain size can cause a 1.8–2.0 W m?² difference in the instantaneous clear-sky OLR. A variety of radiative transfer techniques have been used to model the far-IR spectral emissivities of surface types defined by the International Geosphere-Biosphere Program. Incorporating these far-IR surface emissivities into the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 8.5 scenario of the Community Earth System Model leads to discernible changes in the spatial patterns of surface temperature, OLR, and frozen surface extent. The model results differ at high latitudes by as much as 2°K, 10 W m?², and 15%, respectively, after only 25 y of integration. The calculated difference in far-IR emissivity between ocean and sea ice of between 0.1 and 0.2, suggests the potential for a far-IR positive feedback for polar climate change.

  8. Far-infrared surface emissivity and climate

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Feldman, Daniel R.; Collins, William D.; Pincus, Robert; Huang, Xianglei; Chen, Xiuhong

    2014-11-03

    Presently, there are no global measurement constraints on the surface emissivity at wavelengths longer than 15 ?m, even though this surface property in this far-IR region has a direct impact on the outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) and infrared cooling rates where the column precipitable water vapor (PWV) is less than 1 mm. Such dry conditions are common for high-altitude and high-latitude locations, with the potential for modeled climate to be impacted by uncertain surface characteristics. This paper explores the sensitivity of instantaneous OLR and cooling rates to changes in far-IR surface emissivity and how this unconstrained property impacts climate modelmore »projections. At high latitudes and altitudes, a 0.05 change in emissivity due to mineralogy and snow grain size can cause a 1.8–2.0 W m?² difference in the instantaneous clear-sky OLR. A variety of radiative transfer techniques have been used to model the far-IR spectral emissivities of surface types defined by the International Geosphere-Biosphere Program. Incorporating these far-IR surface emissivities into the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 8.5 scenario of the Community Earth System Model leads to discernible changes in the spatial patterns of surface temperature, OLR, and frozen surface extent. The model results differ at high latitudes by as much as 2°K, 10 W m?², and 15%, respectively, after only 25 y of integration. The calculated difference in far-IR emissivity between ocean and sea ice of between 0.1 and 0.2, suggests the potential for a far-IR positive feedback for polar climate change.« less

  9. Three-Year Global Survey of Coronal Null Points from Potential-Field-Source-Surface (PFSS) Modeling and Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freed, Michael; McKenize, David

    2014-01-01

    This article compiles and examines a comprehensive coronal magnetic-null-point survey created by potential-field-source-surface (PFSS) modeling and Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA) observations. The locations of 582 potential magnetic null points in the corona were predicted from the PFSS model between Carrington Rotations (CR) 2098 (June 2010) and 2139 (July 2013). These locations were manually inspected, using contrast-enhanced SDO/AIA images in 171 angstroms at the east and west solar limb, for structures associated with nulls. A Kolmogorov--Smirnov (K--S) test showed a statistically significant difference between observed and predicted latitudinal distributions of null points. This finding is explored further to show that the observability of null points could be affected by the Sun's asymmetric hemisphere activity. Additional K--S tests show no effect on observability related to eigenvalues associated with the fan and spine structure surrounding null points or to the orie...

  10. Sea bed mechanics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sleath, J.F.A.

    1984-01-01

    This book provides a discussion on sea bed processes with engineering applications. It brings together the material currently available only in technical reports of research papers. It provides formulae and background references necessary for design calculation of problems such as sea bed or coastal erosion, and sub-marine pipeline stability. It also covers dissipation of wave energy, formation of ripples and dunes, and the transportation of sediments.

  11. Global warming, global research, and global governing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preining, O.

    1997-12-31

    The anticipated dangers of Global Warming can be mitigated by reducing atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations, especially CO{sub 2}. To reach acceptable, constant levels within the next couple of centuries it might be necessary to accept stabilization levels higher than present ones, The annual CO{sub 2} emissions must be reduced far below today`s values. This is a very important result of the models discussed in the 1995 IPCC report. However, any even very modest scenario for the future must take into account a substantial increase in the world population which might double during the 21st century, There is a considerable emission reduction potential of the industrialized world due to efficiency increase, However, the demand for energy services by the growing world population will, inspite of the availability of alternative energy resources, possibly lead to a net increase in fossil fuel consumption. If the climate models are right, and the science community believes they are, we will experience a global warming of the order of a couple of degrees over the next century; we have to live with it. To be prepared for the future it is essential for us to use new research techniques embracing not only the familiar fields of hard sciences but also social, educational, ethical and economic aspects, We must find a way to build up the essential intellectual capacities needed to deal with these kinds of general problems within all nations and all societies. But this is not Although, we also have to find the necessary dynamical and highly flexible structures for a global governing using tools such as the environmental regime. The first step was the Framework Convention On Climate Change, UN 1992; for resolution of questions regarding implementations the Conference of the Parties was established.

  12. Global Solutions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you not findGeoscience/EnvironmentGlobal Security Global Security

  13. Global Warming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Low LETUseful LinksGlass StrongerGlobalOn1 Global

  14. Morphology and seismic stratigraphy of the Toyama deep sea fan 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shepherd, David Barton

    1990-01-01

    with a surface area greater than 108, 000 square kilometers. Deposits of this Quaternary turbidite system range in thickness from less than 150 m to more than 750 m. The meandering Toyama Deep Sea Channel extends northward from the central coast.... The Toyama Deep Sea Channel is a remarkable feature, extending 550 km in a northerly direction from the central coast of Honshu. Seismic and bathymetry data collected over the past two decades are used to provide the most accurate description to date...

  15. Harbingers and agents of global warming The rapid retreat of mountain glaciers makes them an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berthier, Etienne

    Harbingers and agents of global warming The rapid retreat of mountain glaciers makes them of the many reasons why we should keep a close eye on these harbingers and agents of global warming. Our one-third (approx. 1 mm/year) to the total rise in the global mean sea level of 3 mm/year. Locally

  16. A nine-dimensional ab initio global potential energy surface for the H{sub 2}O{sup +} + H{sub 2} ? H{sub 3}O{sup +} + H reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Anyang; Guo, Hua

    2014-06-14

    An accurate full-dimensional global potential energy surface (PES) is developed for the title reaction. While the long-range interactions in the reactant asymptote are represented by an analytical expression, the interaction region of the PES is fit to more than 81?000 of ab initio points at the UCCSD(T)-F12b/AVTZ level using the permutation invariant polynomial neural network approach. Fully symmetric with respect to permutation of all four hydrogen atoms, the PES provides a faithful representation of the ab initio points, with a root mean square error of 1.8 meV or 15 cm{sup ?1}. The reaction path for this exoergic reaction features an attractive and barrierless entrance channel, a submerged saddle point, a shallow H{sub 4}O{sup +} well, and a barrierless exit channel. The rate coefficients for the title reaction and kinetic isotope effect have been determined on this PES using quasi-classical trajectories, and they are in good agreement with available experimental data. It is further shown that the H{sub 2}O{sup +} rotational enhancement of reactivity observed experimentally can be traced to the submerged saddle point. Using our recently proposed Sudden Vector Projection model, we demonstrate that a rotational degree of freedom of the H{sub 2}O{sup +} reactant is strongly coupled with the reaction coordinate at this saddle point, thus unraveling the origin of the pronounced mode specificity in this reaction.

  17. Review: Global Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    introduction to global climate change, the greenhouseReview: Global Climate Change: A Primer By Orrin H PilkeyPilkey, Keith C. Global Climate Change: a primer. Durham,

  18. A Physically Based Framework for Modelling the Organic Fractionation of Sea Spray Aerosol from Bubble Film Langmuir Equilibria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burrows, Susannah M.; Ogunro, O.; Frossard, Amanda; Russell, Lynn M.; Rasch, Philip J.; Elliott, S.

    2014-12-19

    The presence of a large fraction of organic matter in primary sea spray aerosol (SSA) can strongly affect its cloud condensation nuclei activity and interactions with marine clouds. Global climate models require new parameterizations of the SSA composition in order to improve the representation of these processes. Existing proposals for such a parameterization use remotely-sensed chlorophyll-a concentrations as a proxy for the biogenic contribution to the aerosol. However, both observations and theoretical considerations suggest that existing relationships with chlorophyll-a, derived from observations at only a few locations, may not be representative for all ocean regions. We introduce a novel framework for parameterizing the fractionation of marine organic matter into SSA based on a competitive Langmuir adsorption equilibrium at bubble surfaces. Marine organic matter is partitioned into classes with differing molecular weights, surface excesses, and Langmuir adsorption parameters. The classes include a lipid-like mixture associated with labile dissolved organic carbon (DOC), a polysaccharide-like mixture associated primarily with semi-labile DOC, a protein-like mixture with concentrations intermediate between lipids and polysaccharides, a processed mixture associated with recalcitrant surface DOC, and a deep abyssal humic-like mixture. Box model calculations have been performed for several cases of organic adsorption to illustrate the underlying concepts. We then apply the framework to output from a global marine biogeochemistry model, by partitioning total dissolved organic carbon into several classes of macromolecule. Each class is represented by model compounds with physical and chemical properties based on existing laboratory data. This allows us to globally map the predicted organic mass fraction of the nascent submicron sea spray aerosol. Predicted relationships between chlorophyll-\\textit{a} and organic fraction are similar to existing empirical parameterizations, but can vary between biologically productive and non-productive regions, and seasonally within a given region. Major uncertainties include the bubble film thickness at bursting and the variability of organic surfactant activity in the ocean, which is poorly constrained. In addition, marine colloids and cooperative adsorption of polysaccharides may make important contributions to the aerosol, but are not included here. This organic fractionation framework is an initial step towards a closer linking of ocean biogeochemistry and aerosol chemical composition in Earth system models. Future work should focus on improving constraints on model parameters through new laboratory experiments or through empirical fitting to observed relationships in the real ocean and atmosphere, as well as on atmospheric implications of the variable composition of organic matter in sea spray.

  19. National Sea Grant Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Sea Grant Library The New Library System and Publication Submittals Communications Staff;Publication Submittals · Publication types consolidated here for searching purposes · Editor field added Link Type · Document Is default Add link title · "View PDF" = PDFs · "View Document" = other docs

  20. DELIVERABLE Central North Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haszeldine, Stuart

    of intermittency which is inevitable with wind power, thereby helping to address the need for energy security International Energy Agency Energy Technology Perspectives 2012 #12;4 Central North Sea ­ CO2 Storage Hub within the UK and EU. CCS development zones can also attract new energy intensive industries to locate

  1. Maps, Networks and a Sea That Won’t Conform: Thinking Critically About Marine Spatial Planning in Scotland 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Glen

    Scotland has adopted marine spatial planning (MSP) as a key instrument of its National Marine Plan. This follows a global trend in shifting marine governance techniques. MSP is turn away from sectoral governance of the sea ...

  2. A sensitivity study of the thermodynamic environment on GFDL model hurricane intensity: Implications for global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, W.; Tuleya, R.E.; Ginis, I.

    2000-01-01

    In this study, the effect of thermodynamic environmental changes on hurricane intensity is extensively investigated with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory hurricane model for a suite of experiments with different initial upper-tropospheric temperature anomalies up to {+-}4 C and sea surface temperatures ranging from 26 to 31 C given the same relative humidity profile. The results indicate that stabilization in the environmental atmosphere and sea surface temperature (SST) increase cause opposing effects on hurricane intensity. The offsetting relationship between the effects of atmospheric stability increase (decrease) and SST increase (decrease) is monotonic and systematic in the parameter space. This implies that hurricane intensity increase due to a possible global warming associated with increased CO{sub 2} is considerably smaller than that expected from warming of the oceanic waters alone. The results also indicate that the intensity of stronger (weaker) hurricanes is more (less) sensitive to atmospheric stability and SST changes. The model-attained hurricane intensity is found to be well correlated with the maximum surface evaporation and the large-scale environmental convective available potential energy. The model-attained hurricane intensity if highly correlated with the energy available from wet-adiabatic ascent near the eyewall relative to a reference sounding in the undisturbed environment for all the experiments. Coupled hurricane-ocean experiments show that hurricane intensity becomes less sensitive to atmospheric stability and SST changes since the ocean coupling causes larger (smaller) intensity reduction for stronger (weaker) hurricanes. This implies less increase of hurricane intensity related to a possible global warming due to increased CO{sub 2}.

  3. Linear analysis of surface temperature dynamics and climate sensitivity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Wei

    2007-04-25

    Spectral properties of global surface temperature and uncertainties of global climate sensitivity are explored in this work through the medium of Energy Balance Climate Models (EBCMs) and observational surface temperature ...

  4. Deep and Surface Circulation in the Northwest Indian Ocean from Argo, Surface Drifter, Satellite, and In Situ Profiling Current Observations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stryker, Sarah

    2012-10-19

    , but little is understood about the Sea of Oman. This thesis incorporated observations from Argo floats, surface drifters and satellite imagery to study the deep and surface circulation in the northwest Indian Ocean. An assessment of four independent moorings...

  5. Rising Sea Levels Due to Global Warming Are Unstoppable

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to enlarge. A reduction in greenhouse gas emissions could greatly lessen the impacts of climate change. However, the gases already added to the atmosphere ensure a certain amount...

  6. Development, sensitivity analysis, and uncertainty quantification of high-fidelity arctic sea ice models.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Kara J.; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston; Paskaleva, Biliana S.

    2010-09-01

    Arctic sea ice is an important component of the global climate system and due to feedback effects the Arctic ice cover is changing rapidly. Predictive mathematical models are of paramount importance for accurate estimates of the future ice trajectory. However, the sea ice components of Global Climate Models (GCMs) vary significantly in their prediction of the future state of Arctic sea ice and have generally underestimated the rate of decline in minimum sea ice extent seen over the past thirty years. One of the contributing factors to this variability is the sensitivity of the sea ice to model physical parameters. A new sea ice model that has the potential to improve sea ice predictions incorporates an anisotropic elastic-decohesive rheology and dynamics solved using the material-point method (MPM), which combines Lagrangian particles for advection with a background grid for gradient computations. We evaluate the variability of the Los Alamos National Laboratory CICE code and the MPM sea ice code for a single year simulation of the Arctic basin using consistent ocean and atmospheric forcing. Sensitivities of ice volume, ice area, ice extent, root mean square (RMS) ice speed, central Arctic ice thickness, and central Arctic ice speed with respect to ten different dynamic and thermodynamic parameters are evaluated both individually and in combination using the Design Analysis Kit for Optimization and Terascale Applications (DAKOTA). We find similar responses for the two codes and some interesting seasonal variability in the strength of the parameters on the solution.

  7. MODIS Collection 5 global land cover: Algorithm refinements and characterization of new datasets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    information is required to parameterize land surface processes in regional-to-global scale Earth system models

  8. Periodic fluctuations in deep water formation due to sea ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saha, Raj

    2015-01-01

    During the last ice age several quasi-periodic abrupt warming events took place. Known as Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events their effects were felt globally, although the North Atlantic experienced the largest temperature anomalies. Paleoclimate data shows that the fluctuations often occurred right after massive glacial meltwater releases in the North Atlantic and in bursts of three or four with progressively decreasing strengths. In this study a simple dynamical model of an overturning circulation and sea ice is developed with the goal of understanding the fundamental mechanisms that could have caused the DO events. Interaction between sea ice and the overturning circulation in the model produces self-sustained oscillations. Analysis and numerical experiments reveal that the insulating effect of sea ice causes the ocean to periodically vent out accumulated heat in the deep ocean into the atmosphere. Subjecting the model to idealized freshwater forcing mimicking Heinrich events causes modulation of the natural p...

  9. Ising model for melt ponds on Arctic sea ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Y -P; Golden, K M

    2014-01-01

    The albedo of melting Arctic sea ice, a key parameter in climate modeling, is determined by pools of water on the ice surface. Recent observations show an onset of pond complexity at a critical area of about 100 square meters, attended by a transition in pond fractal dimension. To explain this behavior and provide a statistical physics approach to sea ice modeling, we introduce a two dimensional Ising model for pond evolution which incorporates ice-albedo feedback and the underlying thermodynamics. The binary magnetic spin variables in the Ising model correspond to the presence of melt water or ice on the sea ice surface. The model exhibits a second-order phase transition from isolated to clustered melt ponds, with the evolution of pond complexity in the clustered phase consistent with the observations.

  10. Urban Surfaces and Heat Island Mitigation Potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, Hashem

    2008-01-01

    Finster. 2000. “The Urban Heat Island, Photochemical Smog,2001. “EPA/NASA Urban Heat Island Pilot Project,” GlobalSystem Urban Surfaces and Heat Island Mitigation Potentials

  11. 2 Internal melting in Antarctic sea ice: Development of ``gap layers'' 3 S. F. Ackley,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at San Antonio, University of

    accelerate melting by 63increasing the absorption of solar radiation within the sea 64ice. Algal blooms only in the Antarctic to date. 48 In contrast, massive surface melt, resulting in the complete 49 loss

  12. Research papers The genesis of sea level variability in the Barents Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and terrestrial origin. The present study explores the nature of sea level variability in the Barents Sea to the steric sea level along the pathways of the Atlantic inflow into the Barents Sea. The relative

  13. Implementation of global energy sustainability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grob, G.R.

    1998-02-01

    The term energy sustainability emerged from the UN Conference on Environment and Development in Rio 1992, when Agenda 21 was formulated and the Global Energy Charter proclaimed. Emission reductions, total energy costing, improved energy efficiency, and sustainable energy systems are the four fundamental principles of the charter. These principles can be implemented in the proposed financial, legal, technical, and education framework. Much has been done in many countries toward the implementation of the Global Energy Charter, but progress has not been fast enough to ease the disastrous effects of the too many ill-conceived energy systems on the environment, climate, and health. Global warming is accelerating, and pollution is worsening, especially in developing countries with their hunger for energy to meet the needs of economic development. Asian cities are now beating all pollution records, and greenhouse gases are visibly changing the climate with rising sea levels, retracting glaciers, and record weather disasters. This article presents why and how energy investments and research money have to be rechanneled into sustainable energy, rather than into the business-as-usual of depleting, unsustainable energy concepts exceeding one trillion dollars per year. This largest of all investment sectors needs much more attention.

  14. Aliens among us SEA-MONKEYS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    Aliens among us SEA-MONKEYS® FUN FACTS Did you know? Sea-Monkeys® · breathe through their legs, so adults have three. W hat is the connection between Sea-Monkeys® and aliens? Be- lieve it or not NASA scientists think it is possible that some alien life might resemble Sea-Monkeys®. Sea

  15. A model of global net ecosystem production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potter, C.S.; Matson, P.A. (NASA-Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA (United States)); Field, C.B.; Randerson, J. (Carnegie Institution of Washington, Stanford, CA (United States)); Vitousek, P.M.; Mooney, H.A. (Stanford Univ., CA (United States))

    1993-06-01

    We present an ecosystem modeling approach to resolve global climate and edaphic controls on seasonal NEP patterns. Global remote sensing, climate and land surface data sets are used as inputs to drive a terrestrial carbon cycle model at 1[degrees]lat/lon resolution. monthly net primary productivity (NPP) is calculated using surface radiation and NDVI to determine photosynthesis, which is subsequently adjusted by temperature, water and nitrogen stress factors. Total nitrogen availability is coupled to net mineralization rates from litter soil carbon pools. Soil respiration and NPP balance one another globally at around 60 Gt C yr[sup [minus]1]. The seasonal amplitude of global NEP is 1.2 Gt C. Although substantial month-to-month variation is observed for tropical forest areas, seasonal amplitude is driven globally by boreal and temperate forest ecosystems between 650 and 30[degrees] N latitude.

  16. Global hydrological cycle response to rapid and slow global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuang, Zhiming

    Global hydrological cycle response to rapid and slow global warming and Jiaxu Zhang #12;· Anthropogenic global warming causes "robust" changes in the global in the global hydrological cycle due to anthropogenic global warming Atmospheric radiative

  17. Towards Direct Simulation of Future Tropical Cyclone Statistics in a High-Resolution Global Atmospheric Model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wehner, Michael F.; Bala, G.; Duffy, Phillip; Mirin, Arthur A.; Romano, Raquel

    2010-01-01

    We present a set of high-resolution global atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) simulations focusing on the model's ability to represent tropical storms and their statistics. We find that the model produces storms of hurricane strength with realistic dynamical features. We also find that tropical storm statistics are reasonable, both globally and in the north Atlantic, when compared to recent observations. The sensitivity of simulated tropical storm statistics to increases in sea surface temperature (SST) is also investigated, revealing that a credible late 21st century SST increase produced increases in simulated tropical storm numbers and intensities in all ocean basins. Whilemore »this paper supports previous high-resolution model and theoretical findings that the frequency of very intense storms will increase in a warmer climate, it differs notably from previous medium and high-resolution model studies that show a global reduction in total tropical storm frequency. However, we are quick to point out that this particular model finding remains speculative due to a lack of radiative forcing changes in our time-slice experiments as well as a focus on the Northern hemisphere tropical storm seasons.« less

  18. THE SEALS, SEA-LIONS, AND SEA OTTER OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    hispida (RINGED SEAL) Erignathus barbatus (BEARDED SEAL) Monachus schauinslandi (HAWAIIAN MONK SEAL the title implies that these animals are to be found along the Pacific Coast, one species, the monk sealTHE SEALS, SEA-LIONS, AND SEA OTTER OF THE PACIFIC COAST Marine Biological Laboratory OODS HOLE

  19. Global Cooling: Effect of Urban Albedo on Global Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, Hashem; Menon, Surabi; Rosenfeld, Arthur

    2007-05-22

    In many urban areas, pavements and roofs constitute over 60% of urban surfaces (roof 20-25%, pavements about 40%). The roof and the pavement albedo can be increased by about 0.25 and 0.10, respectively, resulting in a net albedo increase for urban areas of about 0.1. Many studies have demonstrated building cooling-energy savings in excess of 20% upon raising roof reflectivity from an existing 10-20% to about 60%. We estimate U.S. potential savings in excess of $1 billion (B) per year in net annual energy bills. Increasing albedo of urban surfaces can reduce the summertime urban temperature and improve the urban air quality. Increasing the urban albedo has the added benefit of reflecting more of the incoming global solar radiation and countering the effect of global warming. We estimate that increasing albedo of urban areas by 0.1 results in an increase of 3 x 10{sup -4} in Earth albedo. Using a simple global model, the change in air temperature in lowest 1.8 km of the atmosphere is estimated at 0.01K. Modelers predict a warming of about 3K in the next 60 years (0.05K/year). Change of 0.1 in urban albedo will result in 0.01K global cooling, a delay of {approx}0.2 years in global warming. This 0.2 years delay in global warming is equivalent to 10 Gt reduction in CO2 emissions.

  20. Global Segmentation and Curvature Analysis of Volumetric Data Sets Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rivlin, Ehud

    Global Segmentation and Curvature Analysis of Volumetric Data Sets Using Trivariate B presents a method to globally segment volumetric images into regions that contain convex or concave (elliptic) iso-surfaces, planar or cylindrical (parabolic) iso-surfaces, and volumetric regions with saddle

  1. graphic analysis, where hypothesized global-ly synchronous sea level cycles form the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Robert M.

    of the popular paradigm of sequence stratigraphy. REFERENCES AND NOTES ___________________________ 1. As opposed, 1988). 5. , Ed., Numerical Dating in Stratigraphy (Wiley- Interscience, New York, 1982), part 1, pp

  2. Improved Global Bathymetry, Global Sea Floor Roughness, and Deep Ocean Mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becker, Joseph J

    2008-01-01

    Significant dissipation of tidal energy in the deep ocean2001), Estimates of M-2 tidal energy dissipation from TOPEX/Significant dissipation of tidal energy in the deep ocean

  3. Improved global bathymetry, global sea floor roughness, and deep ocean mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becker, Joseph Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    Significant dissipation of tidal energy in the deep ocean2001), Estimates of M-2 tidal energy dissipation from TOPEX/Significant dissipation of tidal energy in the deep ocean

  4. Toward resolution-independent dust emissions in global models: Impacts on the seasonal and spatial distribution of dust

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, J. R.

    Simulating the emission of mineral dust and sea-salt aerosol is nonlinear with surface winds and therefore requires accurate representation of surface winds. Consequently, the resolution of a simulation affects emission ...

  5. in press, Global Biogeochemical Cycles, April 18, 2007 Carbon dioxide and oxygen fluxes in the Southern Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Czaja, Arnaud

    in press, Global Biogeochemical Cycles, April 18, 2007 Carbon dioxide and oxygen fluxes College, London, UK Abstract. We analyze the variability of air-sea fluxes of carbon dioxide and oxygen. The Southern Annular Mode (SAM), known to impact the variability of air-sea fluxes of carbon dioxide, is also

  6. ARM - Lesson Plans: Surface Currents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska Outreach Home Room News PublicationsClimatePast SeaSeaSurface

  7. Global Warming Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schofield, Jeremy

    Global Warming Observations: 1. Global temperature has been gradually rising in recent years #15 in range 8000 12000 nm { CFC's, methane and N 2 O important for global warming even though concentra- tions in concentration of \\greenhouse gases" like CO 2 What determines global temperature? Energy budget of earth: 1

  8. Global Health Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Ophir

    Bay Area Global Health Seminar Series Moving beyond millennium targets in global health: The challenges of investing in health and universal health coverage Although targets can help to focus global health efforts, they can also detract attention from deeper underlying challenges in global health

  9. Forecasting the response of Earth's surface to future climatic and land use changes: A review of methods and research needs: FORECASTING EARTH'S SURFACE RESPONSE

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pelletier, Jon D.; Brad Murray, A.; Pierce, Jennifer L.; Bierman, Paul R.; Breshears, David D.; Crosby, Benjamin T.; Ellis, Michael; Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi; Heimsath, Arjun M.; Houser, Chris; et al

    2015-07-14

    In the future, Earth will be warmer, precipitation events will be more extreme, global mean sea level will rise, and many arid and semiarid regions will be drier. Human modifications of landscapes will also occur at an accelerated rate as developed areas increase in size and population density. We now have gridded global forecasts, being continually improved, of the climatic and land use changes (C&LUC) that are likely to occur in the coming decades. However, besides a few exceptions, consensus forecasts do not exist for how these C&LUC will likely impact Earth-surface processes and hazards. In some cases, we havemore »the tools to forecast the geomorphic responses to likely future C&LUC. Fully exploiting these models and utilizing these tools will require close collaboration among Earth-surface scientists and Earth-system modelers. This paper assesses the state-of-the-art tools and data that are being used or could be used to forecast changes in the state of Earth's surface as a result of likely future C&LUC. We also propose strategies for filling key knowledge gaps, emphasizing where additional basic research and/or collaboration across disciplines are necessary. The main body of the paper addresses cross-cutting issues, including the importance of nonlinear/threshold-dominated interactions among topography, vegetation, and sediment transport, as well as the importance of alternate stable states and extreme, rare events for understanding and forecasting Earth-surface response to C&LUC. Five supplements delve into different scales or process zones (global-scale assessments and fluvial, aeolian, glacial/periglacial, and coastal process zones) in detail.« less

  10. Deep-Sea Research II 55 (2008) 309322 Variability in the freshwater balance of northern Marguerite Bay,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renfrew, Ian

    2008-01-01

    of glacial ice melt, is the dominant freshwater source, accounting for up to 5% of the near-surface ocean 1 m of sea-ice formed from this same water column. The predominance of glacial melt is significant. Keywords: Western Antarctic Peninsula; Freshwater; Glacial melt; Sea ice melt 1. Introduction During

  11. The Relative Importance of Clouds and Sea Ice for the Solar Energy Budget of the Southern Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warren, Stephen

    The Relative Importance of Clouds and Sea Ice for the Solar Energy Budget of the Southern Ocean) ABSTRACT The effects of clouds and sea ice on the solar radiation budget are determined for the Southern and for altered surface and cloud conditions. Poleward of 68°S in spring, ice causes a greater reduction of solar

  12. Water, salt, and energy balances of the Dead Sea N. G. Lensky, Y. Dvorkin, and V. Lyakhovsky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyakhovsky, Vladimir

    Water, salt, and energy balances of the Dead Sea N. G. Lensky, Y. Dvorkin, and V. Lyakhovsky, and energy balances of the Dead Sea, Water Resour. Res., 41, W12418, doi:10.1029/2005WR004084. 1 is less than that from a freshwater surface because the dissolved salts lower the free energy of the water

  13. Periodic fluctuations in deep water formation due to sea ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raj Saha

    2015-02-21

    During the last ice age several quasi-periodic abrupt warming events took place. Known as Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events their effects were felt globally, although the North Atlantic experienced the largest temperature anomalies. Paleoclimate data shows that the fluctuations often occurred right after massive glacial meltwater releases in the North Atlantic and in bursts of three or four with progressively decreasing strengths. In this study a simple dynamical model of an overturning circulation and sea ice is developed with the goal of understanding the fundamental mechanisms that could have caused the DO events. Interaction between sea ice and the overturning circulation in the model produces self-sustained oscillations. Analysis and numerical experiments reveal that the insulating effect of sea ice causes the ocean to periodically vent out accumulated heat in the deep ocean into the atmosphere. Subjecting the model to idealized freshwater forcing mimicking Heinrich events causes modulation of the natural periodicity and produces burst patterns very similar to what is observed in temperature proxy data. Numerical experiments with the model also suggests that the characteristic period of 1,500 years is due to the geometry, or the effective heat capacity, of the ocean that comes under sea ice cover.

  14. Doppler characteristics of sea clutter.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raynal, Ann Marie; Doerry, Armin Walter

    2010-06-01

    Doppler radars can distinguish targets from clutter if the target's velocity along the radar line of sight is beyond that of the clutter. Some targets of interest may have a Doppler shift similar to that of clutter. The nature of sea clutter is different in the clutter and exo-clutter regions. This behavior requires special consideration regarding where a radar can expect to find sea-clutter returns in Doppler space and what detection algorithms are most appropriate to help mitigate false alarms and increase probability of detection of a target. This paper studies the existing state-of-the-art in the understanding of Doppler characteristics of sea clutter and scattering from the ocean to better understand the design and performance choices of a radar in differentiating targets from clutter under prevailing sea conditions.

  15. Carbonyl sulfide: No remedy for global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taubman, S.J.; Kasting, J.F. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)] [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1995-04-01

    The authors look at the possibility of counteracting global warming forces by the injection of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) into the stratosphere at levels high enough to balance the impact say of a doubling of carbon dioxide concentrations, which are projected to result in a global 3{degrees} C warming. OCS injections at densities to provide such cooling will result a 30 percent impact of global ozone, whereas the carbon dioxide only made a 5% impact. In addition levels which would be found on the earths surface would be in the range 10 ppmv which is questionable as a safe exposure limit for humans, in addition to its impact on the ph of rainwater.

  16. Weakening of the Stratospheric Polar Vortex by Arctic Sea-Ice Loss

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Baek-Min; Son, Seok-Woo; Min, Seung-Ki; Jeong, Jee-Hoon; Kim, Seong-Joong; Zhang, Xiangdong; Shim, Taehyoun; Yoon, Jin-Ho

    2014-09-02

    Successive cold winters of severely low temperatures in recent years have had critical social and economic impacts on the mid-latitude continents in the Northern Hemisphere. Although these cold winters are thought to be partly driven by dramatic losses of Arctic sea ice, the mechanism that links sea ice loss to cold winters remains a subject of debate. Here, by conducting observational analyses and model experiments, we show how Arctic sea ice loss and cold winters in extra-polar regions are dynamically connected through the polar stratosphere. We find that decreased sea ice cover during early winter months (November-December), especially over the Barents-Kara seas, enhance the upward propagation of planetary-scale waves with wavenumbers of 1 and 2, subsequently weakening the stratospheric polar vortex in mid-winter (January- February). The weakened polar vortex preferentially induces a negative phase of Arctic Oscillation at the surface, resulting in low temperatures in mid-latitudes.

  17. Global Focus Microscope The Global Health Challenge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . To address this need, we developed the Global Focus Microscope (GFM): a portable, battery- powered, inverted digi- tal images, the Global Focus Microscope comes with shelf for an iPhone 4. Figure 1. From left to right: Malaria parasites imaged at 1000x in bright field mode, tuberculosis imaged at 400x in bright

  18. Discriminating robust and non-robust atmospheric circulation responses to global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Discriminating robust and non-robust atmospheric circulation responses to global warming Michael response to global warming in a set of atmospheric general circulation models (AGCMs) is investigated. The global-warmed climate is forced by a global pattern of warmed ocean surface temperatures

  19. The Global Brain is Neither Global nor a Brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rocha, Luis

    The Global Brain is Neither Global nor a Brain Adaptive Webs for Heterarchies Luis Mateus Rocha-organism or a global brain? The Global Brain Is Neither Global nor a Brain #12;!Disembodied Brain Disembodied brains on symbol-matter requirements for open-ended evolution) The Global Brain Is Neither Global Nor a Brain #12

  20. Show menu | ScienceDaily home page RSS feeds | Free newsletter MODIS satellite image of the Aegean Sea. (Credit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohling, Eelco

    by the occurrence of organic compounds synthesized by green sulphur bacteria that require both sulphide and light productivity occurs. However, releases of freshwater to the ocean reduce the sea surface density, which in turn

  1. State estimation of the Labrador Sea with a coupled sea ice-ocean adjoint model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fenty, Ian Gouverneur

    2010-01-01

    Sea ice (SI) and ocean variability in marginal polar and subpolar seas are closely coupled. SI variability in the Labrador Sea is of climatic interest because of its relationship to deep convection/mode water formation, ...

  2. Direct Painting Software for Tracing on 3D Brain Surfaces with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Direct Painting Software for Tracing on 3D Brain Surfaces with Global Conformal Parameterization 1 4 Illustrates tracing on the brain surface with the direct painting software. (a) shows the global

  3. Before House Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Global Human...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    House Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Global Human Rights, and International Organizations, Committee on Foreign Affairs Before House Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health,...

  4. A simple object-oriented and open-source model for scientific and policy analyses of the global climate system – Hector v1.0

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hartin, Corinne A.; Patel, Pralit L.; Schwarber, Adria; Link, Robert P.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin

    2015-04-01

    Simple climate models play an integral role in the policy and scientific communities. They are used for climate mitigation scenarios within integrated assessment models, complex climate model emulation, and uncertainty analyses. Here we describe Hector v1.0, an open source, object-oriented, simple global climate carbon-cycle model. This model runs essentially instantaneously while still representing the most critical global-scale earth system processes. Hector has a three-part main carbon cycle: a one-pool atmosphere, land, and ocean. The model's terrestrial carbon cycle includes primary production and respiration fluxes, accommodating arbitrary geographic divisions into, e.g., ecological biomes or political units. Hector actively solves the inorganicmore »carbon system in the surface ocean, directly calculating air–sea fluxes of carbon and ocean pH. Hector reproduces the global historical trends of atmospheric [CO2], radiative forcing, and surface temperatures. The model simulates all four Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) with equivalent rates of change of key variables over time compared to current observations, MAGICC (a well-known simple climate model), and models from the 5th Coupled Model Intercomparison Project. Hector's flexibility, open-source nature, and modular design will facilitate a broad range of research in various areas.« less

  5. A simple object-oriented and open source model for scientific and policy analyses of the global climate system–Hector v1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartin, Corinne A.; Patel, Pralit L.; Schwarber, Adria; Link, Robert P.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Simple climate models play an integral role in policy and scientific communities. They are used for climate mitigation scenarios within integrated assessment models, complex climate model emulation, and uncertainty analyses. Here we describe Hector, an open source, object-oriented, simple global climate carbon-cycle model. This model runs essentially instantaneously while still representing the most critical global scale earth system processes. Hector has three main carbon pools: an atmosphere, land, and ocean. The model’s terrestrial carbon cycle includes respiration and primary production, accommodating arbitrary geographic divisions into, e.g., ecological biomes or political units. Hector’s actively solves the inorganic carbon system in the surface ocean, directly calculating air-sea fluxes of carbon and ocean pH. Hector reproduces the global historical trends of atmospheric [CO2] and surface temperatures. The model simulates all four Representative Concentration Pathways with high correlations (R >0.7) with current observations, MAGICC (a well-known simple climate model), and the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project version 5. Hector is freely available under an open source license, and its modular design will facilitate a broad range of research in various areas.

  6. Cows Causing Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi

    2008-08-06

    Broadcast Transcript: Remember when President Reagan blamed trees for air pollution? Well now the Japanese are blaming cows for global warming. Apparently, the methane emissions from burping cows account for 5% of all global greenhouse gases. Simple...

  7. Review: Globalization of Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennant, Matthew Aaron

    2009-01-01

    Review: Globalization of Water: Sharing the Planet’sAshok K. Globalization of Water: Sharing the Planet’s140) liters of virtual water (p. 15). This is one of the

  8. Globalization of biopharmaceutical manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pande, Rachna

    2011-01-01

    The biomanufacturing industry is changing due to increasing globalization. However, it is changing differently from other high tech industries like software/ semiconductor/ automobiles. In this study we use global ...

  9. CHILLING CONSIDERATIONS GLOBAL WARMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    CHILLING CONSIDERATIONS REGARDING GLOBAL WARMING Stephen E. Schwartz http IS INCREASING Global carbon dioxide concentration over the last thousand years Polar ice cores #12;Mann et al 1000-1850) 1998 THE TEMPERATURE'S RISING #12;GLOBAL ANNUAL TEMPERATURE ANOMALY, 1880-2008 0.8 0.6 0.4 0

  10. Carbon Dioxide & Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    Carbon Dioxide & Global Warming University of MiaMi rosenstiel sChool of Marine anD atMospheriC s , organic carbon, and other chemicals that contribute to global warming in a variety of studies. DownCienCe 4600 rickenbacker Causeway Miami, florida 33149 http://www.rsmas.miami.edu the Chemistry of Global

  11. Global Information Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keromytis, Angelos D.

    Global Information Technologies: Concepts, Methodologies, Tools, and Applications Felix B. Tan in the United States of America by Information Science Reference (an imprint of IGI Global) 701 E. Chocolate (an imprint of IGI Global) 3 Henrietta Street Covent Garden London WC2E 8LU Tel: 44 20 7240 0856 Fax

  12. Meteorology as Infrastructural Globalism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Paul N.

    the history of a global governance institution, the World Me- teorological Organization (WMO), from its (from the 1967 inauguration of the Intelsat system) and global environmental monitoring (from the UN Confer- ence on the Human Environment, 1972). Throughout, Hewson sees global governance institutions

  13. GLOBAL TAXONOMY INITIATIVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant, Taran

    #12;THE GLOBAL TAXONOMY INITIATIVE: Using Systematic Inventories to Meet Country and Regional Needs (COP) to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) has endorsed a GlobalTaxonomy Initiative (GTI workshop, The Global Taxonomy Initiative: Shortening the Distance between Discovery and Delivery, made

  14. Cenozoic stratigraphic evolution, North Sea and Labrador Sea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gradstein, F.M.; Grant, A.C.; Mudford, B.S. ); Berggren, W.A. ); Kaminski, M.A. ); D'Lorio, M.A. ); Cloetingh, S. ); Griffiths, C.M. )

    1990-05-01

    The authors are studying Cenozoic correlation patterns, burial trends, and subsidence history of the Central North Sea, Labrador, and Orphan basins. The authors objectives are (1) to detail intraregional mid-high latitude biozonations using noise filtering and probabilistic zonation techniques; (2) to detail paleobathymetric trends from basin margins to centers; (3) to apply this knowledge to model basin evolution, in the perspective of the evolving North Atlantic Ocean; (4) to evaluate causes for the occurrence of major hiatuses and rapid changes of subsidence; and (5) to relate rapid changes in sedimentation in the last few millions of years to model observed undercompaction trends. Cenozoic microfossil assemblages in these basins are similar, related to similarities in sedimentary and paleoeceanographic conditions. In more basinal wells, flysch-type agglutinated foraminiferal assemblages occur, also known from Carpathians, Trinidad, and Moroccan foredeeps. Over 90% of agglutinated taxa are common between these basins, although local stratigraphic ranges vary sufficiently to rely on the concept of average ranges, rather than total ones for correlations. Cenozoic stratigraphic resolution in the North Sea and Labrador basins generally is in 3-5-Ma units. and paleobathymetric zonations define a minimum of five niches, from inner shelf to middle slope regimes. Significant hiatuses occurred in the late Eocene through the Miocene, particularly in northern Labrador and northern North Sea. Subsidence in the Labrador/Grand Banks passive margin half grabens was strongly influenced by Labrador Sea opening between anomalies 34 (Campanian) and 13 (early Oligocene), when subsidence exceeded sedimentation and bathyal conditions prevailed along the margin. Thermally induced subsidence in the central North Sea grabens was considerable in the late Paleocene, when the Norwegian Sea started to open.

  15. Production Mechanism, Number Concentration, Size Distribution, Chemical Composition, and Optical Properties of Sea Spray Aerosols Workshop, Summer 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meskhidze, Nicholas [NCSU] [NCSU

    2013-10-21

    The objective of this workshop was to address the most urgent open science questions for improved quantification of sea spray aerosol-radiation-climate interactions. Sea spray emission and its influence on global climate remains one of the most uncertain components of the aerosol-radiation-climate problem, but has received less attention than other aerosol processes (e.g. production of terrestrial secondary organic aerosols). Thus, the special emphasis was placed on the production flux of sea spray aerosol particles, their number concentration and chemical composition and properties.

  16. Laboratory studies on CO? transfer across the simulated sea surface 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sugiura, Yoshiro

    1960-01-01

    of the value of K with revolution speed 35 36 37 38 39 41 42 43 44 45 16 Dependency ef the exchange rate constant K upon chlorinity 46 17 Dependency of the exchange rate constant K upon temperature 47 18 Estimation of the value of the ratio, (kfk...-value and revolution speed 52 Apparatus for determination of atmospheric CO2 concentration by the Van Slyhe's manometric method 66 Absorption chamber for determination of atmospheric CO2 concentration 68 Two devices for protection of NaOH solution against...

  17. Health effects of global warming: Problems in assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Longstreth, J.

    1993-06-01

    Global warming is likely to result in a variety of environmental effects ranging from impacts on species diversity, changes in population size in flora and fauna, increases in sea level and possible impacts on the primary productivity of the sea. Potential impacts on human health and welfare have included possible increases in heat related mortality, changes in the distribution of disease vectors, and possible impacts on respiratory diseases including hayfever and asthma. Most of the focus thus far is on effects which are directly related to increases in temperature, e.g., heat stress or perhaps one step removed, e.g., changes in vector distribution. Some of the more severe impacts are likely to be much less direct, e.g., increases in migration due to agricultural failure following prolonged droughts. This paper discusses two possible approaches to the study of these less-direct impacts of global warming and presents information from on-going research using each of these approaches.

  18. Environmental screening tools for assessment of infrastructure plans based on biodiversity preservation and global warming (PEIT, Spain)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia-Montero, Luis G.

    2010-04-15

    Most Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) research has been concerned with SEA as a procedure, and there have been relatively few developments and tests of analytical methodologies. The first stage of the SEA is the 'screening', which is the process whereby a decision is taken on whether or not SEA is required for a particular programme or plan. The effectiveness of screening and SEA procedures will depend on how well the assessment fits into the planning from the early stages of the decision-making process. However, it is difficult to prepare the environmental screening for an infrastructure plan involving a whole country. To be useful, such methodologies must be fast and simple. We have developed two screening tools which would make it possible to estimate promptly the overall impact an infrastructure plan might have on biodiversity and global warming for a whole country, in order to generate planning alternatives, and to determine whether or not SEA is required for a particular infrastructure plan.

  19. Surface Soil

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Surface Soil Surface Soil We compare local soil samples with samples collected from northern New Mexico locations that are beyond the range of potential influence from normal...

  20. Back to basics: Measuring rainfall at sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quartly, Graham

    Back to basics: Measuring rainfall at sea: Part 1 - In situ sensors G. D. Quartly, T. H. Guymer-320 #12;#12;Back to basics: Measuring rainfall at sea: Part 1 ± In situ sensors G. D. Quartly, T. H

  1. Human Impacts on Seals, Sea Lions, and Sea Otters: Integrating Archaeology and Ecology of the Northeast Pacific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierotti, Raymond

    2013-03-07

    Review of Human Impacts on Seals, Sea Lions, and Sea Otters: Integrating Archaeology and Ecology of the Northeast Pacific.

  2. Engineering the global ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stringfellow, William T.; Jain, Ravi

    2010-01-01

    of humans deliberately engineering agricultural landscapes.010-0302-8 EDITORIAL Engineering the global ecosystemtale about human explorers engineering the ecosystem of Mars

  3. Global Change Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    Global Change and Sustainability Center The GCSC is an inclusionary and interdisciplinary hub that promotes, coordinates, and conducts local to global environmental- and sustainability-related research to complex environmental and sustainability issues and challenges. 2012 Annual Report #12;1GCSC 2012 ANNUAL

  4. The contribution of cosmic rays to global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sloan, Terry

    2011-01-01

    A search has been made for a contribution of the changing cosmic ray intensity to the global warming observed in the last century. The cosmic ray intensity shows a strong 11 year cycle due to solar modulation and the overall rate has decreased since 1900. These changes in cosmic ray intensity are compared to those of the mean global surface temperature to attempt to quantify any link between the two. It is shown that, if such a link exists, the changing cosmic ray intensity contributes less than 8% to the increase in the mean global surface temperature observed since 1900.

  5. Modeling the summertime evolution of sea-ice melt ponds rsted-DTU, Electromagnetic Systems, Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, Denmark

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feltham, Daniel

    Modeling the summertime evolution of sea-ice melt ponds M. Lu¨thje Ørsted-DTU, Electromagnetic of sea ice. We simulate the evolution of melt ponds and determine area coverage and total surface rate beneath the melt ponds, vertical seepage, and horizontal permeability. The model is initialized

  6. Forecasting the response of Earth's surface to future climatic and land use changes: A review of methods and research needs

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pelletier, Jon D.; Murray, A. Brad; Pierce, Jennifer L.; Bierman, Paul R.; Breshears, David D.; Crosby, Benjamin T.; Ellis, Michael; Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi; Heimsath, Arjun M.; Houser, Chris; et al

    2015-07-14

    In the future, Earth will be warmer, precipitation events will be more extreme, global mean sea level will rise, and many arid and semiarid regions will be drier. Human modifications of landscapes will also occur at an accelerated rate as developed areas increase in size and population density. We now have gridded global forecasts, being continually improved, of the climatic and land use changes (C&LUC) that are likely to occur in the coming decades. However, besides a few exceptions, consensus forecasts do not exist for how these C&LUC will likely impact Earth-surface processes and hazards. In some cases, we havemore »the tools to forecast the geomorphic responses to likely future C&LUC. Fully exploiting these models and utilizing these tools will require close collaboration among Earth-surface scientists and Earth-system modelers. This paper assesses the state-of-the-art tools and data that are being used or could be used to forecast changes in the state of Earth's surface as a result of likely future C&LUC. We also propose strategies for filling key knowledge gaps, emphasizing where additional basic research and/or collaboration across disciplines are necessary. The main body of the paper addresses cross-cutting issues, including the importance of nonlinear/threshold-dominated interactions among topography, vegetation, and sediment transport, as well as the importance of alternate stable states and extreme, rare events for understanding and forecasting Earth-surface response to C&LUC. Five supplements delve into different scales or process zones (global-scale assessments and fluvial, aeolian, glacial/periglacial, and coastal process zones) in detail.« less

  7. Effect of Sea Level Rise

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|DepartmentStatementofApril 25,EVthe next generationEffect of Sea Level

  8. Greenland and Antarctic mass balances for present and doubled atmospheric CO{sub 2} from the GENESIS version-2 global climate model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, S.L.; Pollard, D.

    1997-05-01

    As anthropogenic greenhouse warming occurs in the next century, changes in the mass balances of Greenland and Antarctica will probably accelerate and may have significant effects on global sea level. Recent trends and possible future changes in these mass balances have received considerable attention in the glaciological literature, but until recently relatively few general circulation modeling (GCM) studies have focused on the problem. However, there are two significant problems in using GCMs to predict mass balance distributions on ice sheets: (i) the relatively coarse GCM horizontal resolution truncates the topography of the ice-sheet flanks and smaller ice sheets such as Greenland, and (ii) the snow and ice physics in most GCMs does not include ice-sheet-specific processes such as the refreezing of meltwater. Two techniques are described that attack these problems, involving (i) an elevation-based correction to the surface meteorology and (ii) a simple a posteriori correction for the refreezing of meltwater following Pfeiffer et al. Using these techniques in a new version 2 of the Global Environmental and Ecological Simulation of Interactive Systems global climate model, the authors present global climate and ice-sheet mass-balance results from two equilibrated runs for present and doubled atmospheric CO{sub 2}. This GCM is well suited for ice-sheet mass-balance studies because (a) the surface can be represented at a finer resolution (2{degrees} lat x 2{degrees} long) than the atmospheric GCM, (b) the two correction techniques are included as part of the model, and the model`s mass balances for present-day Greenland and Antarctica are realistic. 131 refs., 23 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Millennial-scale stable oscillations between sea ice and convective deep water formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saha, Raj

    2015-01-01

    During the last ice age there were several quasi-periodic abrupt warming events. The climatic effects of the so-called Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events were felt globally, although the North Atlantic experienced the largest and most abrupt temperature anomalies. Similar but weaker oscillations also took place during the interglacial period. This paper proposes an auto-oscillatory mechanism between sea ice and convective deep water formation in the north Atlantic as the source of the persistent cycles. A simple dynamical model is constructed by coupling and slightly modifying two existing models of ocean circulation and sea ice. The model exhibits mixed mode oscillations, consisting of decadal scale small amplitude oscillations, and a large amplitude relaxation fluctuation. The decadal oscillations occur due to the insulating effect of sea ice and leads to periodic ventilation of heat from the polar ocean. Gradually an instability builds up in the polar column and results in an abrupt initiation of convection an...

  10. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 28, NO. 8, APRIL15, PAGES 1507-1510, 2001 Tropical Atlantic air-sea interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCreary Jr., Julian P.

    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 28, NO. 8, APRIL15, PAGES 1507-1510, 2001 Tropical Atlantic air- quate at this time, and it is currently under debate whether it represents a mode of air-sea interaction to the extratropics. 2. GCM experiments The global AGCM is a Japanese community model de- scribed by Numaguti [1999

  11. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 28, NO. 8, PAGES 1507-1510, APRIL 15, 2001 Tropical Atlantic air-sea interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Shang-Ping

    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 28, NO. 8, PAGES 1507-1510, APRIL 15, 2001 Tropical Atlantic air- quate at this time, and it is currently under debate whether it represents a mode of air-sea interaction to the extratropics. 2. GCM experiments The global AGCM is a Japanese community model de- scribed by Numaguti [1999

  12. Oxygen and Carbon Isotopes and Coral Growth in the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea as Environmental and Climate Indicators 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Amy Jo

    2011-02-22

    to the Department of Energy Global Change Education Program (GCEP) Graduate Research Environmental Fellowship (GREF) for funding my graduate work and the Texas Sea Grant for providing the funding for this research. Much thanks goes to the crew of the M/V Fling...

  13. Wave Glider Autonomous Surface Vehicle Applications and Missions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Wave Glider Autonomous Surface Vehicle Applications and Missions Jamie Griffith & Kyle Vanderlugt and logistical challenge. To address these challenges, Liquid Robotics (LRI) has developed the Wave Glider, an autonomous, mobile remote sensing solution. The Wave Glider is a hybrid sea-surface and underwater vehicle

  14. Analysis of the scattering by an unbounded rough surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-11-10

    Jun 7, 2012 ... outdoor ground and sea surfaces, optical scattering from the surface of materials in near-field optics or nano-optics, and detection of underwater ... ined by researchers in the engineering community. .... A simple calculation yields an explicit characterization of the norm in ...... Wave Motion 1996; 24:421–433.

  15. Analysis of the Scattering by an Unbounded Rough Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-11-12

    eling acoustic and electromagnetic wave propagation over outdoor ground and sea surfaces, optical scattering from the ... been intensively examined by researchers in the engineering community. ..... explicit characterization of the norm in H1(?) via Fourier coefficient: ...... rough surfaces, Wave Motion, 24 (1996)

  16. A global warning for global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paepe, R.

    1996-12-31

    The problem of global warming is a complex one not only because it is affecting desert areas such as the Sahel leading to famine disasters of poor rural societies, but because it is an even greater threat to modern well established industrial societies. Global warming is a complex problem of geographical, economical and societal factors together which definitely are biased by local environmental parameters. There is an absolute need to increase the knowledge of such parameters, especially to understand their limits of variance. The greenhouse effect is a global mechanism which means that in changing conditions at one point of the Earth, it will affect all other regions of the globe. Industrial pollution and devastation of the forest are quoted as similar polluting anthropogenic activities in far apart regions of the world with totally different societies and industrial compounds. The other important factor is climatic cyclicity which means that droughts are bound to natural cycles. These natural cycles are numerous as is reflected in the study of geo-proxydata from several sequential geological series on land, ice and deepsea. Each of these cycles reveals a drought cycle which occasionally interfere at the same time. It is believed that the present drought might well be a point of interference between the natural cycles of 2,500 and 1,000 years and the man induced cycle of the last century`s warming up. If the latter is the only cycle involved, man will be able to remediate. If not, global warming will become even more disastrous beyond the 21st century.

  17. A Large Ozone-Circulation Feedback & Its Implications for Global Warming Assessments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Sophie

    Peer A Large Ozone-Circulation Feedback & Its Implications for Global Warming Assessments PeerCO2, b T by 4xCO2, c T by O3 and d water vapour by O3. 4. GLOBAL WARMING RESPONSE 0 50 100 150 200 250) Figure 1 | Temporal evolution of the annual and global mean surface tem- perature anomalies. Interactive

  18. Natural biogeochemical cycle of mercury in a global three-dimensional ocean tracer model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyatt Jaeglé

    (HgP aq). Our Hg parameterization takes into account redox chemistry in ocean waters, air-sea exchange global mean concentrations of 0.16 pM for total Hg, partitioned as 80% HgII aq, 14% Hg0 aq, and 6% HgP aq

  19. Critical Mechanisms for the Formation of Extreme Arctic Sea-Ice Extent in the Summers of 2007 and 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, Xiquan; Zib, Benjamin J.; Xi, Baike; Stanfield, Ryan; Deng, Yi; Zhang, Xiangdong; Lin, B.; Long, Charles N.

    2014-07-29

    A warming Arctic climate is undergoing significant e 21 nvironmental change, most evidenced by the reduction of Arctic sea-ice extent during the summer. In this study, we examine two extreme anomalies of September sea-ice extent in 2007 and 1996, and investigate the impacts of cloud fraction (CF), atmospheric precipitable water vapor (PWV), downwelling longwave flux (DLF), surface air temperature (SAT), pressure and winds on the sea-ice variation in 2007 and 1996 using both satellite-derived sea-ice products and MERRA reanalysis. The area of the Laptev, East Siberian and West Chukchi seas (70-90oN, 90-180oE) has experienced the largest variation in sea-ice extent from year-to-year and defined here as the Area Of Focus (AOF). The record low September sea-ice extent in 2007 was associated with positive anomalies 30 of CF, PWV, DLF, and SAT over the AOF. Persistent anti-cyclone positioned over the Beaufort Sea coupled with low pressure over Eurasia induced easterly zonal and southerly meridional winds. In contrast, negative CF, PWV, DLF and SAT anomalies, as well as opposite wind patterns to those in 2007, characterized the 1996 high September sea-ice extent. Through this study, we hypothesize the following positive feedbacks of clouds, water vapor, radiation and atmospheric variables on the sea-ice retreat during the summer 2007. The record low sea-ice extent during the summer 2007 is initially triggered by the atmospheric circulation anomaly. The southerly winds across the Chukchi and East Siberian seas transport warm, moist air from the north Pacific, which is not only enhancing sea-ice melt across the AOF, but also increasing clouds. The positive cloud feedback results in higher SAT and more sea-ice melt. Therefore, 40 more water vapor could be evaporated from open seas and higher SAT to form more clouds, which will enhance positive cloud feedback. This enhanced positive cloud feedback will then further increase SAT and accelerate the sea-ice retreat during the summer 2007.

  20. Photo Identification, Summer Activity Pattern, Estimated Field Metabolic Rate and Territory Quality of Adult Male Sea Otters (Enhydra lutris) in Simpson Bay, Prince William Sound, Alaska 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finerty, Shannon E.

    2010-07-14

    . Six behaviors (foraging, grooming, interacting with other otters, patrolling, resting, and surface swimming) were observed during four time periods (dawn, day, dusk, night) to create 24-hr activity budgets. Male sea otters spent 27% of their time...

  1. Estimated global ocean wind power potential from QuikSCAT observations, accounting for turbine characteristics and siting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capps, Scott B; Zender, Charles S

    2010-01-01

    Evaluation of global wind power, J. Geophys. Res. , 110,2009), Global ocean wind power sensitivity to surface layerCO 2 reductions via offshore wind power matched to inherent

  2. Ensemble 1-Year predictions of Arctic sea ice for the spring and summer of 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinlun

    waters in the Chukchi, East Siberian, and Beaufort seas, where amplified surface absorption of solar during the spring and summer of 2008 as part of the International Polar Year activities and an outlook hydrographic and other measurements are to be taken there? An outlook will also be useful for planning other

  3. Heterogeneous patterns of availability for detection during visual surveys: spatiotemporal variation in sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dill, Lawrence M.

    variation in sea turtle dive­surfacing behaviour on a feeding ground Jordan A. Thomson1 *, Andrew B. Cooper2.g. marine mammals and mar- ine turtles), a proportion of animals present will be missed because their uncertainty. We used these predictions to quantify variation in availability correction factors, which were

  4. Sea-Level Rise and Subsidence: Implications for Flooding in New Orleans, Louisiana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    Sea-Level Rise and Subsidence: Implications for Flooding in New Orleans, Louisiana By Virginia R with relatively high rates of land subsidence. Land-surface altitude data collected in the leveed areas of the New subsidence of 5 millimeters per year. Preliminary results of other studies detecting the regional movement

  5. Some Thoughts on the Freezing and Melting of Sea Ice and Their Effects on the Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Some Thoughts on the Freezing and Melting of Sea Ice and Their Effects on the Ocean K. Aagaard. The high-latitude freezing and melting cycle can variously result in haline con- vection, freshwater of this process is that water distilled at the surface of the Arctic Ocean by freezing ends up at mid

  6. Warm ocean anomaly, air sea fluxes, and the rapid intensification of tropical cyclone Nargis (2008)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    Profile Program) data base are searched to depict the detail UOTS structure. Sea surface height anom- aly are available. The cyclone track and intensity data is from the Unisys Weather (http://weather to Monthly Weather Review, 2008], in this work we investigate the role of upper ocean thermal structure (UOTS

  7. www.sea.co.uk a Cohort plc company Lunar Lander Science payload

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anand, Mahesh

    www.sea.co.uk a Cohort plc company Lunar Lander ­ Science payload Capability · Instrument design and on planetary surfaces Heritage · ExoMars Phase A/B (TAS-I) · Payload operations scenarios · EarthCARE BBR Prime market · Requires in-flight operation before becoming acceptable to commercial customers · ESA mission

  8. SPECTRAL DEPENDENCE OF THE RESPONSE TIME OF SEA STATE TO LOCAL WIND FORCING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruf, Christopher

    resonant backscatter from the ocean, which is related to the wind- generated capillary wavesSPECTRAL DEPENDENCE OF THE RESPONSE TIME OF SEA STATE TO LOCAL WIND FORCING David D. Chen1 , Scott to respond to surface winds, propagate further before decaying, and are generally less directly coupled

  9. Spatial variability of sea level rise due to water impoundment behind dams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conrad, Clint

    dams Julia W. Fiedler1 and Clinton P. Conrad2 Received 29 March 2010; revised 12 May 2010; accepted 18 May 2010; published 19 June 2010. [1] Dams have impounded 10,800 km3 of water since 1900, reducing depresses the earth's surface near dams and elevates the geoid, which locally increases relative sea level

  10. Transport and Entrainment in the Red Sea Outflow Plume SILVIA MATT AND WILLIAM E. JOHNS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    Transport and Entrainment in the Red Sea Outflow Plume SILVIA MATT AND WILLIAM E. JOHNS Division, it entrains significantly less-dense near-surface water, which itself varies on seasonal time scales. High entrainment of Gulf of Aden Water. The outflow transport exhibits a maximum in winter of about 0.29 Sv (Sv 106

  11. A sea drag relation for hurricane wind speeds N. C. Zweers,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vries, Hans de

    A sea drag relation for hurricane wind speeds N. C. Zweers,1 V. K. Makin,1 J. W. de Vries,1 and G, the surface drag is overestimated in NWP models for hurricane wind speeds and the intensity of hurricane winds is tested in an NWP model. Two hurricanes in the Caribbean are modeled: Ivan (2004) and Katrina (2005

  12. Global Cool Cities Alliance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is currently supporting the Global Cool Cities Alliance (GCCA), a non-profit organization that works with cities, regions, and national governments to speed the...

  13. Global Energy Management System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eidt, B. D.

    2005-01-01

    commitment to Stanford University's Global Climate and Energy Project (GCEP). The overarching goal of this program is the accelerated development of commercially viable energy technologies that can substantially reduce greenhouse gas emissions on a...

  14. The Global Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chatzivasileiadis, Spyros; Andersson, Göran

    2012-01-01

    This paper puts forward the vision that a natural future stage of the electricity network could be a grid spanning the whole planet and connecting most of the large power plants in the world: this is the "Global Grid". The main driving force behind the Global Grid will be the harvesting of remote renewable sources, and its key infrastructure element will be the high capacity long transmission lines. Wind farms and solar power plants will supply load centers with green power over long distances. This paper focusses on the introduction of the concept, showing that a globally interconnected network can be technologically feasible and economically competitive. We further highlight the multiple opportunities emerging from a global electricity network such as smoothing the renewable energy supply and electricity demand, reducing the need for bulk storage, and reducing the volatility of the energy prices. We also discuss possible investment mechanisms and operating schemes. Among others, we envision in such a system...

  15. KRFTWRK – Global Human Electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prohaska, Rainer

    2009-01-01

    Power Network 2.1.1 Virtual Power Plants The Global Powernetwork, based on "Virtual Power Plants", called "VPP". A "participant runs a virtual human power plant. Per every "

  16. Global Research Collaborations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    i Global Research Collaborations Merrill Series on The Research Mission..........................................................................................................9 Director, North America Office, German Research Foundation (Deutsch Forschungsgemeinschaft, DFG) International Research Collaboration: Just Nice to Have or Necessary? Panel 1: Research Administrators Prem

  17. On the connection between continental-scale land surface processes and the tropical climate in a coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Hsi-Yen; Mechoso, C. R.; Xue, Yongkang; Xiao, Heng; Neelin, David; Ji, Xuan

    2013-11-15

    The impact of global tropical climate to perturbations in land surface processes (LSP) are evaluated using perturbations given by different LSP representations of continental-scale in a global climate model that includes atmosphere-ocean interactions. One representation is a simple land scheme, which specifies climatological albedos and soil moisture availability. The other representation is the more comprehensive Simplified Simple Biosphere Model, which allows for interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes. The results demonstrate that LSP processes such as interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes have strong impacts on the seasonal mean states and seasonal cycles of global precipitation, clouds, and surface air temperature. The impact is especially significant over the tropical Pacific. To explore the mechanisms for such impact, different LSP representations are confined to selected continental-scale regions where strong interactions of climate-vegetation biophysical processes are present. We find that the largest impact is mainly from LSP perturbations over the tropical African continent. The impact is through anomalous convective heating in tropical Africa due to changes in the surface heat fluxes, which in turn affect basinwide teleconnections in the Pacific through equatorial wave dynamics. The modifications in the equatorial Pacific climate are further enhanced by strong air-sea coupling between surface wind stress and upwelling, as well as effect of ocean memory. Our results further suggest that correct representations of land surface processes, land use change and the associated changes in the deep convection over tropical Africa are crucial to reducing the uncertainty when performing future climate projections under different climate change scenarios.

  18. A study of mobile trough genesis over the Yellow Sea - East China Sea region 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Komar, Keith Nickolas

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the mechanisms responsible for the formation of mobile troughs over a prolific source region in the Yellow Sea and East China Sea. Two mobile troughs which intensified significantly after formation were...

  19. Systems integration for global sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    footprinting of global biofuel production. Appl. Energy 112,tion research because biofuel production and consumption as90% of the global biofuel production of 105 billion liters

  20. Forced and free variations of the surface temperature field in a general circulation model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    North, G.R.; Yip, K.J.J.; Laiyung Leung (Texas A M Univ., College Station (United States)); Chervin, R.M. (National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States))

    1992-03-01

    The concept of forced' and free' variations of large-scale surface temperature is examined by analyzing several long runs of the Community Climate Model (CCM0) with idealized boundary conditions and forcing. (1) The planet is all land with uniform sea-level topography and fixed soil moisture. (2) The planetary surface and prescribed ozone are reflection symmetric across the equator and there is no generation of snow. (3) The obliquity is set to zero so that the climate is for a perpetual equinox solar insolation (i.e., sun fixed over the equator). After examining some relevant aspects of the undisturbed climate (surface temperature field) such as temporal and spatial autocorrelations and the corresponding spectra, two types of changes in external forcing are imposed to study the model response: (1) sinusoidal changes of the solar constant (5%, 10%, 20%, and 40% amplitudes) at periods of 15 and 30 days (the latter is the autocorrelation time for the global average surface temperature) and 20% at 60 days and (2) insertion of steady heat sources (points and zonal bands) of variable strength at the surface. Then the temporal spectra of large scales for the periodically forced climate and the ensemble-averaged influence functions are examined for the point source disturbed climates. In each class of experiments the response of ensemble-averaged amplitudes was found to be proportional to the amplitude of the forcing. These results suggest that the lowest moments of the surface temperature field have a particularly simple dependence on forcing. Furthermore, the apparent finiteness of the variance spectrum at low frequencies suggest that estimates of long-term statistics are stable in this type of atmospheric general circulation model. 31 refs., 17 figs.

  1. Polar Sea Ice Mapping Using SeaWinds Data Hyrum S. Anderson and David G. Long

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    of Bayes detection to produce sea ice extent maps. Statistical models for sea ice and ocean are represented of their independence of solar illumination, their ability to penetrate to ever-present canopy of clouds in the polar of these same measure- ments. The A imagery exhibits good statistical contrast between sea ice and ocean

  2. Hydrate-phobic surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Jonathan David, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01

    Clathrate hydrate formation and subsequent plugging of deep-sea oil and gas pipelines represent a significant bottleneck for ultra deep-sea production. Current methods for hydrate mitigation focus on injecting thermodynamic ...

  3. Comment on "Global Genetic Change Tracks Global Climate Warming in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodríguez, Miguel Ángel

    Comment on "Global Genetic Change Tracks Global Climate Warming in Drosophila subobscura" Francisco in response to global warming. However, that conclusion is not adequately buttressed by their data, because that chromosomal inversion polymorphisms of Drosophila subobscura are evolving in response to global warming. (2

  4. Dipolar redistribution of summertime tropical cyclone genesis between the Philippine Sea and the northern South China Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    the Philippine Sea and the northern South China Sea and its possible mechanisms JooHong Kim,1 ChangHoi Ho,2 March 2010. [1] Recent observational records show that the dipole oscillation between the Philippine Sea redistribution of summertime tropical cyclone genesis between the Philippine Sea and the northern South China Sea

  5. Processes driving sea ice variability in the Bering Sea in an eddying ocean/sea ice model: Mean seasonal cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eisenman, Ian

    the southern ice edge, especially on the western side. The sea ice force balance analysis shows that sea ice air from northerly winds and ice motion away from the coast. South of St Lawrence Island, winds drive is important both climatically and economically. Understanding the processes that control the temporal

  6. ARKTOS: An intelligent system for SAR sea ice image classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soh, L. K.; Tsatsoulis, Costas; Gineris, D.; Bertoia, C.

    2004-01-01

    We present an intelligent system for satellite sea ice image analysis named Advanced Reasoning using Knowledge for T ping Of Sea ice (ARKTOS). ARKTOS performs fully automated analysis of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) sea ice images by mimicking...

  7. Effect of Terrestrial and Marine Organic Aerosol on Regional and Global Climate: Model Development, Application, and Verification with Satellite Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meskhidze, Nicholas; Zhang, Yang; Kamykowski, Daniel

    2012-03-28

    In this DOE project the improvements to parameterization of marine primary organic matter (POM) emissions, hygroscopic properties of marine POM, marine isoprene derived secondary organic aerosol (SOA) emissions, surfactant effects, new cloud droplet activation parameterization have been implemented into Community Atmosphere Model (CAM 5.0), with a seven mode aerosol module from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)���¢��������s Modal Aerosol Model (MAM7). The effects of marine aerosols derived from sea spray and ocean emitted biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) on microphysical properties of clouds were explored by conducting 10 year CAM5.0-MAM7 model simulations at a grid resolution 1.9�������°��������2.5�������° with 30 vertical layers. Model-predicted relationship between ocean physical and biological systems and the abundance of CCN in remote marine atmosphere was compared to data from the A-Train satellites (MODIS, CALIPSO, AMSR-E). Model simulations show that on average, primary and secondary organic aerosol emissions from the ocean can yield up to 20% increase in Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) at 0.2% Supersaturation, and up to 5% increases in droplet number concentration of global maritime shallow clouds. Marine organics were treated as internally or externally mixed with sea salt. Changes associated with cloud properties reduced (absolute value) the model-predicted short wave cloud forcing from -1.35 Wm-2 to -0.25 Wm-2. By using different emission scenarios, and droplet activation parameterizations, this study suggests that addition of marine primary aerosols and biologically generated reactive gases makes an important difference in radiative forcing assessments. All baseline and sensitivity simulations for 2001 and 2050 using global-through-urban WRF/Chem (GU-WRF) were completed. The main objective of these simulations was to evaluate the capability of GU-WRF for an accurate representation of the global atmosphere by exploring the most accurate configuration of physics options in GWRF for global scale modeling in 2001 at a horizontal grid resolution of 1�������° x 1�������°. GU-WRF model output was evaluated using observational datasets from a variety of sources including surface based observations (NCDC and BSRN), model reanalysis (NCEP/ NCAR Reanalysis and CMAP), and remotely-sensed data (TRMM) to evaluate the ability of GU-WRF to simulate atmospheric variables at the surface as well as aloft. Explicit treatment of nanoparticles produced from new particle formation in GU-WRF/Chem-MADRID was achieved by expanding particle size sections from 8 to 12 to cover particles with the size range of 1.16 nm to 11.6 �������µm. Simulations with two different nucleation parameterizations were conducted for August 2002 over a global domain at a 4�������º by 5�������º horizontal resolution. The results are evaluated against field measurement data from the 2002 Aerosol Nucleation and Real Time Characterization Experiment (ANARChE) in Atlanta, Georgia, as well as satellite and reanalysis data. We have also explored the relationship between ���¢��������clean marine���¢������� aerosol optical properties and ocean surface wind speed using remotely sensed data from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) on board the CALIPSO satellite and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) on board the AQUA satellite. Detailed data analyses

  8. Back to basics: Measuring rainfall at sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quartly, Graham

    Back to basics: Measuring rainfall at sea: Part 2 - Space-borne sensors G. D. Quartly, T. H. Guymer-366 & ii #12;#12;Back to basics: Measuring rainfall at sea: Part 2 ­ Space-borne sensors G. D. Quartly, T are present the measure- ment will correspond to the cloud-top tem- peratures (see Fig. 1, back cover

  9. SEAS Employee Council Meeting September 12, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Wei

    SEAS Employee Council Meeting September 12, 2012 Council Members Present: Natalie Edwards (CS to the SEAS employee listserv. Jayne Weber updated us on the Strategic Plan Advisory Committee Meeting goals and ask constituents if they want to be included in a job directory o The staff development day

  10. Aspects of Late Helladic sea trade 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bachhuber, Christoph Stephen

    2004-09-30

    ASPECTS OF LATE HELLADIC SEA TRADE A Thesis by CHRISTOPH... ASPECTS OF LATE HELLADIC SEA TRADE A Thesis by CHRISTOPH BACHHUBER Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF ARTS Approved as to style and content by...

  11. SeaPower Pacific subsidiary of Renewable Energy Holdings Plc...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    SeaPower Pacific subsidiary of Renewable Energy Holdings Plc Carnegie Corporation Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: SeaPower Pacific subsidiary of Renewable Energy Holdings Plc...

  12. Development of Sea Level Rise Scenarios for Climate Change Assessments...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Development of Sea Level Rise Scenarios for Climate Change Assessments of the Mekong Delta, Vietnam Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Development of Sea...

  13. The State and the Global Ecological Crisis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carchidi, Victoria

    2006-01-01

    acknowledges that global environmental governance oftenforms of global environmental governance” sitting between

  14. The Private Regulation of Global Corporate Conduct

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vogel, David

    2006-01-01

    issue annual reports Can Forest Certification Fill Gaps in the Global Forest Regime” Global Environmental Politics

  15. Long-range temporal correlations of ocean surface currents Yosef Ashkenazy1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashkenazy, Yossi "Yosef"

    Long-range temporal correlations of ocean surface currents Yosef Ashkenazy1 and Hezi Gildor2 of ocean surface currents, J. Geophys. Res., 114, C09009, doi:10.1029/2008JC005235. 1. Introduction [2 study the temporal correlations of sea surface currents at the Gulf of Eilat (also known as Gulf

  16. Deriving Mesoscale Surface Current Fields from Multi-Sensor Satellite Data , B. Seppke b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamburg,.Universität

    Deriving Mesoscale Surface Current Fields from Multi-Sensor Satellite Data M. Gade a , B. Seppke b of mesoscale surface currents in the southestern Baltic Sea (Southern Baltic Proper). Marine surface films of the two-dimensional data sets may therefore allow for the calculation of mesoscale ocean current fields

  17. Satellite observations of mesoscale ocean features and copropagating atmospheric surface fields in the tropical belt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Shang-Ping

    Satellite observations of mesoscale ocean features and copropagating atmospheric surface fields speed and sea surface temperature (SST) over mesoscale ocean features in certain frontal regions. The aim of this study is to determine to what extent mesoscale ocean dynamics modifies the surface wind

  18. Global Health Center (GHC) Website Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Michael S.

    Global Health Center (GHC) Website Architecture About Global Health Student Interest Group Contact) Leadership Electives (overview) PTGH Conversations in Global Health OHSU Global Health Grants Concentration in Global Health Studies Scholarship · Information · Awards · Reports News & Events Donate to the Center

  19. Global decarbonization strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Messner, S.

    1996-12-31

    The presentation covers a brief summary of the research activities of the Environmentally Compatible Energy Strategies Project (ECS) at IIASA. The overall research focuses on long-term global energy development and emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG). The ultimate goal is to analyze strategies that achieve decarbonization of global energy systems during the next century. The specific activities range from mitigation of GHG emissions to an integrated assessment of climate change. One focal point is the GHG mitigation technology inventory CO{sub 2}DB, which presently covers approximately 1,400 technologies related to energy and the greenhouse effect. Another integral part is the development of global energy and emissions scenarios, an effort involving a number of formal models to assess the implications. A large number of global scenarios for the next century has been developed, that could be grouped into three families. All of them include energy efficiency improvements and some degree of decarbonization in the world. They are based on different economic and technological development trajectories, and their emissions range from very high to a stabilization of atmospheric carbon dioxide emissions. The presentation will outline the salient characteristics of the three scenario families and provide some regional implications of these alternative futures.

  20. WORKPLACE GUIDES GLOBAL WORKING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roelleke, Thomas

    of Stonewall good practice publications ­ profiles some of the employers paving the way for gay staff to work do arise. This guide provides clear, practical tips on how gay employees can access internationalWORKPLACE GUIDES GLOBAL WORKING Supporting lesbian, gay and bisexual staff on overseas assignments

  1. Global Change at Edinburgh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenaway, Alan

    at Edinburgh | 2 The Global Change Group Human impacts on our planet are changing the atmosphere, climate, ice and to the CarboEurope programme. Cryosphere: field & remote observations & experiments on glacial erosion Biodiversity and the carbon cycle in Peru 10 Radiation penetration in forest stands 12 Genetics and Past

  2. GLOBALIZATION HAS EXISTED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Wei

    -tech and social spheres. Leading in our highly connected, dynamic and fast-changing world takes special skills that you will consider joining us in expanding and strengthening Darden's global community and impact. MARC countries with active alumni chapters around the globe. EXAMPLES India Mexico Brazil PARTNER SCHOOLS Darden

  3. Programmable surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Amy (Amy Teh-Yu)

    2012-01-01

    Robotic vehicles walk on legs, roll on wheels, are pulled by tracks, pushed by propellers, lifted by wings, and steered by rudders. All of these systems share the common character of momentum transport across their surfaces. ...

  4. Numerical modeling of roll structures in mesoscale vortexes over the Black Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iarova, D A

    2014-01-01

    This paper is a case study of horizontal atmospheric rolls that formed over the Black Sea on 16 August 2007. The rolls were discovered in WRF modeling results for a mesoscale cyclone that originated over the sea on 15 August 2007. The roll formation mechanisms, such as Rayleigh-Benard convective instability, dynamic instability, advection and stretching of vertical velocity field inhomogeneities, are considered. It is shown that indeed convective instability played an important role in the roll formation but dynamic instability did not occur. In order to distinguish other possible mechanisms of the roll formation numerical experiments were performed. In these experiments sea surface temperature in the initial conditions was decreased in order to prevent convective instability. Even though convective instability was suppressed roll-like structures still appeared in the modeling results, although their height and circulation velocity were smaller than in the control run. It was found that these structures were ...

  5. Global ocean wind power sensitivity to surface layer stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capps, Scott B; Zender, Charles S

    2009-01-01

    Can satellite sampling of offshore wind speeds realisticallydata to evaluate the offshore wind power resource of

  6. Nanotextured Anti-Icing Surfaces | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    researchers are developing super water-repellent coatings to improve moisture control in steam turbines to enable higher efficiency. They also are exploring these coatings for...

  7. Surface Analysis Techniques on Ceramic Materials | GE Global...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    12-v-robotic-crawler-inspection Robotic Crawler Inspects Wind Turbines a7-v-ceramic-matrix-composites Composites Automation Cuts Production Time Down to Hours ...

  8. Nanotextured Anti-Icing Surfaces | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJessework usesofPublications The NRELDemonstrate Promising Anti-icing Nano

  9. Global temperature deviations as a random walk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karner, O.

    1996-12-31

    Surface air temperature is the main parameter to represent the earth`s contemporary climate. Several historical temperature records on a global/monthly basis are available. Time-series analysis shows that they can be modelled via autoregressive moving average models closely connected to the classical random walk model. Fitted models emphasize a nonstationary character of the global/monthly temperature deviation from a certain level. The nonstationarity explains all trends and periods, found in the last century`s variability of global mean temperature. This means that the short-term temperature trends are inevitable and may have little in common with a currently increasing carbon dioxide amount. The calculations show that a reasonable understanding of the contemporary global mean climate is attainable, assuming random forcing to the climate system and treating temperature deviation as a response to it. The forcings occur due to volcanic eruptions, redistribution of cloudiness, variations in snow and ice covered areas, changes in solar output, etc. Their impact can not be directly estimated from changes of the earth`s radiation budget at the top of the atmosphere, because actual measurements represent mixture of the forcings and responses. Thus, it is impossible empirically to separate the impact of one particular forcing (e.g., that due to increase of CO{sub 2} amount) from the sequence of all existing forcings in the earth climate system. More accurate modelling involving main feedback loops is necessary to ease such a separation.

  10. Surface Topography Quantification by Integral and Feature-related Parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smid, Michiel

    Surface Topography Quantification by Integral and Feature-related Parameters Quantifizieren von microscopy, the topography of brittle fracture surfaces and wire- eroded surfaces was quantified. The global-related parameters in topographies, which uses methods of computational geometry. The software was tested using

  11. Generation of jets on K3 surfaces , S. Di Rocco

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, Thomas

    Generation of jets on K3 surfaces Th. Bauer , S. Di Rocco , T. Szemberg March 28, 1998 Appeared in give sharp bounds on n such that the global sections of nL simultaneously generate k-jets on X. 1991 surfaces, Seshadri constants, k-jet ampleness. 0. Introduction Consider a K3 surface X and an ample line

  12. Global interrupt and barrier networks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blumrich, Matthias A. (Ridgefield, CT); Chen, Dong (Croton-On-Hudson, NY); Coteus, Paul W. (Yorktown Heights, NY); Gara, Alan G. (Mount Kisco, NY); Giampapa, Mark E (Irvington, NY); Heidelberger, Philip (Cortlandt Manor, NY); Kopcsay, Gerard V. (Yorktown Heights, NY); Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D. (Mount Kisco, NY); Takken, Todd E. (Mount Kisco, NY)

    2008-10-28

    A system and method for generating global asynchronous signals in a computing structure. Particularly, a global interrupt and barrier network is implemented that implements logic for generating global interrupt and barrier signals for controlling global asynchronous operations performed by processing elements at selected processing nodes of a computing structure in accordance with a processing algorithm; and includes the physical interconnecting of the processing nodes for communicating the global interrupt and barrier signals to the elements via low-latency paths. The global asynchronous signals respectively initiate interrupt and barrier operations at the processing nodes at times selected for optimizing performance of the processing algorithms. In one embodiment, the global interrupt and barrier network is implemented in a scalable, massively parallel supercomputing device structure comprising a plurality of processing nodes interconnected by multiple independent networks, with each node including one or more processing elements for performing computation or communication activity as required when performing parallel algorithm operations. One multiple independent network includes a global tree network for enabling high-speed global tree communications among global tree network nodes or sub-trees thereof. The global interrupt and barrier network may operate in parallel with the global tree network for providing global asynchronous sideband signals.

  13. Globalization and the Middle Class

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stone, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    of Liberal Trade on the Middle Class There is considerableGlobalization and the Middle Class Katherine V.W. StoneGlobalization and the Middle Class ? Katherine V.W. Stone

  14. International Health Global Health Policy--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miyashita, Yasushi

    50 International Health Global Health Policy-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- http://www.ghp.m.u-tokyo.ac.jp Our mission is to improve population health by enhancing accountability and improving evidence base of global (both domestic and international) health programmes through the provision

  15. Global climate feedbacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manowitz, B.

    1990-10-01

    The important physical, chemical, and biological events that affect global climate change occur on a mesoscale -- requiring high spatial resolution for their analysis. The Department of Energy has formulated two major initiatives under the US Global Change Program: ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurements), and CHAMMP (Computer Hardware Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics). ARM is designed to use ground and air-craft based observations to document profiles of atmospheric composition, clouds, and radiative fluxes. With research and models of important physical processes, ARM will delineate the relationships between trace gases, aerosol and cloud structure, and radiative transfer in the atmosphere, and will improve the parameterization of global circulation models. The present GCMs do not model important feedbacks, including those from clouds, oceans, and land processes. The purpose of this workshop is to identify such potential feedbacks, to evaluate the uncertainties in the feedback processes (and, if possible, to parameterize the feedback processes so that they can be treated in a GCM), and to recommend research programs that will reduce the uncertainties in important feedback processes. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases.

  16. Warming of the arctic ice-ocean system is faster than the global average since the 1960s

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinlun

    Warming of the arctic ice-ocean system is faster than the global average since the 1960s Jinlun.203°C. The warming of the world ocean is associated with an increase in global surface air temperature heat flux. Citation: Zhang, J. (2005), Warming of the arctic ice-ocean system is faster than the global

  17. Response of precipitation extremes to idealized global warming in an aqua-planet climate model: Towards robust projection across different horizontal resolutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, F.; Collins, W.D.; Wehner, M.F.; Williamson, D.L.; Olson, J.G.

    2011-04-15

    Current climate models produce quite heterogeneous projections for the responses of precipitation extremes to future climate change. To help understand the range of projections from multimodel ensembles, a series of idealized 'aquaplanet' Atmospheric General Circulation Model (AGCM) runs have been performed with the Community Atmosphere Model CAM3. These runs have been analysed to identify the effects of horizontal resolution on precipitation extreme projections under two simple global warming scenarios. We adopt the aquaplanet framework for our simulations to remove any sensitivity to the spatial resolution of external inputs and to focus on the roles of model physics and dynamics. Results show that a uniform increase of sea surface temperature (SST) and an increase of low-to-high latitude SST gradient both lead to increase of precipitation and precipitation extremes for most latitudes. The perturbed SSTs generally have stronger impacts on precipitation extremes than on mean precipitation. Horizontal model resolution strongly affects the global warming signals in the extreme precipitation in tropical and subtropical regions but not in high latitude regions. This study illustrates that the effects of horizontal resolution have to be taken into account to develop more robust projections of precipitation extremes.

  18. Ravaging the wine dark sea: attacks on Crete by sea raiders during the Bronze Age 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, David James

    1997-01-01

    RAVAGING THK WINK DARK SEA: ATTACKS ON CRETE BY SEA RAIDERS DIJRING THE BRONZE AGE A Thesis by DAVID JAMES STEWART Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF ARTS May 1997 Major Subject: Anthropology RAVAGING THE WINE DARK SEA: ATTACKS ON CRETE BY SEA RAIDERS DURING THE BRONZE AGE A Thesis by DAVID JAMES STEWART Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  19. Introduction The Steller sea lion, Eumetopias

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (including Shantarsky and Sakhalin Distribution and Abundance of Steller Sea Lions, Eumetopias jubatus, but a new rookery was established at Tuleny Island on the east- ern coast of Sakhalin Island. We estimate

  20. PERSPECTIVE | FOCUS Fishing the Fermi sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    PERSPECTIVE | FOCUS Fishing the Fermi sea Paul C. Canfield is at Ames Laboratory, and Department feed villages and cities. Those skilled in the art of finding the `right place' to fish were deeply

  1. Circulation and convection in the Irminger Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Våge, Kjetil

    2010-01-01

    Aspects of the circulation and convection in the Irminger Sea are investigated using a variety of in-situ, satellite, and atmospheric reanalysis products. Westerly Greenland tip jet events are intense, small-scale wind ...

  2. The convective desalination of sea ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rees Jones, David

    2014-07-01

    in the interstices of an ice matrix. My focus is on one of the processes by which the salt content of sea ice decreases, namely convective desalination, which is also often called gravity drainage by geophysicists. Modelling convective desalination requires...

  3. Modeling convection in the Greenland Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhushan, Vikas

    1998-01-01

    A detailed examination of the development of a deep convection event observed in the Greenland Sea in 1988-89 is carried out through a combination of modeling, scale estimates, and data analysis. We develop a prognostic ...

  4. Surface Soil

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired Solar Fuel Production 1: TotalofSupplySurface Soil Surface Soil We

  5. CHILLING CONSIDERATIONS ABOUT GLOBAL WARMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    CHILLING CONSIDERATIONS ABOUT GLOBAL WARMING: GREENHOUSE GASES, AEROSOLS, RADIATIVE FORCING dioxide increase: sources, mixing ratio, forcing Global temperature change Climate sensitivity and time;#12;ATMOSPHERIC RADIATION Energy per area per time Power per area Unit: Watt per square meter W m-2 #12;GLOBAL

  6. CHILLING CONSIDERATIONS ABOUT GLOBAL WARMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    CHILLING CONSIDERATIONS ABOUT GLOBAL WARMING Stephen E. Schwartz Ethical Culture Society of Suffolk;ATMOSPHERIC RADIATION Energy per area per time Power per area Unit: Watt per square meter W m-2 #12;GLOBAL ENERGY BALANCE Global and annual average energy fluxes in watts per square meter 343 237 237 254K 390

  7. Forecasting phenology under global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silander Jr., John A.

    Forecasting phenology under global warming Ine´s Iba´n~ez1,*, Richard B. Primack2, Abraham J in phenology. Keywords: climate change; East Asia, global warming; growing season, hierarchical Bayes; plant is shifting, and these shifts have been linked to recent global warming (Parmesan & Yohe 2003; Root et al

  8. 2, 921942, 2002 Global ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ACPD 2, 921­942, 2002 Global ozone forecasting H. J. Eskes et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Geophysical Society 2002 Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Global ozone forecasting based on ERS-2 July 2002 Correspondence to: H. J. Eskes (eskes@knmi.nl) 921 #12;ACPD 2, 921­942, 2002 Global ozone

  9. Contrasting trends in North Atlantic deep-water formation in the Labrador Sea and Nordic Seas during the Holocene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renssen, Hans

    Contrasting trends in North Atlantic deep-water formation in the Labrador Sea and Nordic Seas deep-water formation is studied in a 9,000-year long simulation with a coupled climate model the experiment, deep-water formation in the Nordic Seas is reduced due to an enhanced influx of sea ice from

  10. On Surface Approximation using Developable Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, In-Kwon

    manufacturing, e.g. in shipbuilding. Keywords: computer aided design, computer aided manufacturing, surface ap- proximation, reverse engineering, surface of revolution, developable surface, shipbuilding. 2 #12

  11. Accepted for publication in Deep Sea Res. I (December 2005) 1 A SPECIES-DEPENDENT BIO-OPTICAL MODEL OF CASE I WATERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Accepted for publication in Deep Sea Res. I (December 2005) 1 A SPECIES-DEPENDENT BIO-OPTICAL MODEL OF CASE I WATERS FOR GLOBAL OCEAN COLOR PROCESSING S. Alvain1 , C. Moulin*1 , Y. Dandonneau2 , H. Loisel3 on the normalized water-leaving radiance (nLw) spectra, is applied to coincident in situ measurements of both

  12. Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlson, Ann E.

    2008-01-01

    Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation Ann E. Carlson*2008]HEAT WAVES, GLOBAL WARMING, AND MITIGATION 175 stroke2001). 2008]HEAT WAVES, GLOBAL WARMING, AND MITIGATION 177

  13. Global Warming, endogenous risk and irreversibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Anthony C.; Narain, Urvashi

    2002-01-01

    The economics of global warming, Institute for InternationalEconomic Models of Global Warming, Cambridge, Mass. MITstochastic losses from global warming, Risk Analysis 16(2):

  14. Global Warming Systemically Caused Hurricane Sandy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lakoff, George

    2012-01-01

    Global Warming Systemically Caused Hurricane Sandyby George Lakoff Yes, global warming systemically causedExplain to others why global warming systemically caused the

  15. A modeling study of coastal inundation induced by storm surge, sea-level rise, and subsidence in the Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Kraucunas, Ian P.; Rice, Jennie S.; Preston, Benjamin; Wilbanks, Thomas

    2013-12-10

    The northern coasts of the Gulf of Mexico are highly vulnerable to the direct threats of climate change, such as hurricane-induced storm surge, and such risks can be potentially exacerbated by land subsidence and global sea level rise. This paper presents an application of a coastal storm surge model to study the coastal inundation process induced by tide and storm surge, and its response to the effects of land subsidence and sea level rise in the northern Gulf coast. An unstructured-grid Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model was used to simulate tides and hurricane-induced storm surges in the Gulf of Mexico. Simulated distributions of co-amplitude and co-phase of semi-diurnal and diurnal tides are in good agreement with previous modeling studies. The storm surges induced by four historical hurricanes (Rita, Katrina, Ivan and Dolly) were simulated and compared to observed water levels at National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration tide stations. Effects of coastal subsidence and future global sea level rise on coastal inundation in the Louisiana coast were evaluated using a parameter “change of inundation depth” through sensitivity simulations that were based on a projected future subsidence scenario and 1-m global sea level rise by the end of the century. Model results suggested that hurricane-induced storm surge height and coastal inundation could be exacerbated by future global sea level rise and subsidence, and that responses of storm surge and coastal inundation to the effects of sea level rise and subsidence are highly nonlinear and vary on temporal and spatial scales.

  16. Drag coefficient for the air-sea exchange: foam impact in hurricane conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golbraikh, Ephim

    2014-01-01

    A physical model is proposed for the estimation of the foam impact on the variation of the effective drag coefficient, C_d, with reference to the wind speed U10 in stormy and hurricane conditions. In the present model C_d is approximated by partitioning the sea surface into foam-covered and foam-free areas. Based on the available optical and radiometric measurements of the fractional foam coverage and the characteristic roughness of the sea-surface in the saturation limit of the foam coverage, the model yields the resulting dependence of C_d vs U10. This dependence is in fair agreement with that evaluated from field measurements of the vertical variation of the mean wind speed.

  17. Global warming from HFC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, E.

    1998-11-01

    Using a variety of public sources, a computer model of hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerant emissions in the UK has been developed. This model has been used to estimate and project emissions in 2010 under three types of scenarios: (1) business as usual; (2) voluntary agreements to reduce refrigerant leakage; and (3) comprehensive regulations to reduce refrigerant leakage. This resulting forecast is that UK emissions of HFC refrigerants in 2010 will account for 2% to 4% of the UK`s 1990 baseline global warming contribution.

  18. The Global Energy Challenge

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Crabtree, George

    2010-01-08

    The expected doubling of global energy demand by 2050 challenges our traditional patterns of energy production, distribution and use.   The continued use of fossil fuels raises concerns about supply, security, environment and climate.  New routes are needed for the efficient conversion of energy from chemical fuel, sunlight, and heat to electricity or hydrogen as an energy carrier and finally to end uses like transportation, lighting, and heating. Opportunities for efficient new energy conversion routes based on nanoscale materials will be presented, with emphasis on the sustainable energy technologies they enable.

  19. Global carbon budget 2014

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Le Quéré, C.; Moriarty, R.; Andrew, R. M.; Peters, G. P.; Ciais, P.; Friedlingstein, P.; Jones, S. D.; Sitch, S.; Tans, P.; Arneth, A.; et al

    2015-05-08

    Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project future climate change. Here we describe data sets and a methodology to quantify all major components of the global carbon budget, including their uncertainties, based on the combination of a range of data, algorithms, statistics, and model estimates and their interpretation by a broad scientific community. We discuss changes compared to previous estimates, consistency within and among components, alongside methodology and data limitations. CO2 emissionsmore »from fossil fuel combustion and cement production (EFF) are based on energy statistics and cement production data, respectively, while emissions from land-use change (ELUC), mainly deforestation, are based on combined evidence from land-cover-change data, fire activity associated with deforestation, and models. The global atmospheric CO2 concentration is measured directly and its rate of growth (GATM) is computed from the annual changes in concentration. The mean ocean CO2 sink (SOCEAN) is based on observations from the 1990s, while the annual anomalies and trends are estimated with ocean models. The variability in SOCEAN is evaluated with data products based on surveys of ocean CO2 measurements. The global residual terrestrial CO2 sink (SLAND) is estimated by the difference of the other terms of the global carbon budget and compared to results of independent dynamic global vegetation models forced by observed climate, CO2, and land-cover-change (some including nitrogen–carbon interactions). We compare the mean land and ocean fluxes and their variability to estimates from three atmospheric inverse methods for three broad latitude bands. All uncertainties are reported as ±1?;, reflecting the current capacity to characterise the annual estimates of each component of the global carbon budget. For the last decade available (2004–2013), EFF was 8.9 ± 0.4 GtC yr?¹,ELUC 0.9 ± 0.5 GtC yr?¹, GATM 4.3 ± 0.1 GtC yr?¹, SOCEAN 2.6 ± 0.5 GtC yr?¹, and SLAND 2.9 ± 0.8 GtC yr?¹. For year 2013 alone, EFF grew to 9.9 ± 0.5 GtC yr?¹, 2.3% above 2012, continuing the growth trend in these emissions, ELUC was 0.9 ± 0.5 GtC yr?¹, GATM was 5.4 ± 0.2 GtC yr?¹, SOCEAN was 2.9 ± 0.5 GtC yr?¹, and SLAND was 2.5 ± 0.9 GtC yr?¹. GATM was high in 2013, reflecting a steady increase in EFF and smaller and opposite changes between SOCEAN and SLAND compared to the past decade (2004–2013). The global atmospheric CO2 concentration reached 395.31 ± 0.10 ppm averaged over 2013. We estimate that EFF will increase by 2.5% (1.3–3.5%) to 10.1 ± 0.6 GtC in 2014 (37.0 ± 2.2 GtCO2 yr?¹), 65% above emissions in 1990, based on projections of world gross domestic product and recent changes in the carbon intensity of the global economy. From this projection of EFF and assumed constant ELUC for 2014, cumulative emissions of CO2 will reach about 545 ± 55 GtC (2000 ± 200 GtCO2) for 1870–2014, about 75% from EFF and 25% from ELUC. This paper documents changes in the methods and data sets used in this new carbon budget compared with previous publications of this living data set (Le Quéré et al., 2013, 2014). All observations presented here can be downloaded from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (doi:10.3334/CDIAC/GCP_2014).« less

  20. Sandia Energy - Global

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis ofSample SULIColinEnergy PolicyLeaks inGlobal Home Analysis

  1. Global Threat Reduction Initiative

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nA Guide to Tapping intoandMinimaland(GTO)GetSafeguards |Global

  2. Global Home Filesystem

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFESOpportunitiesNERSC Getting Started at NERSCGitGlennGlobalofGlobal

  3. Critical heat flux maxima during boiling crisis on textured surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhillon, Navdeep Singh

    Enhancing the critical heat flux (CHF) of industrial boilers by surface texturing can lead to substantial energy savings and global reduction in greenhouse gas emissions, but fundamentally this phenomenon is not well ...

  4. Abatement of perfluorocompounds and chlorofluorocarbons using surface wave plasma technology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frantzen, Michelle E. Gunn

    2007-04-25

    Application of surface wave plasma technology for effective abatement of environmentally harmful gases such as perfluorocompounds and chlorofluorocarbons is investigated. Perfluorocompounds (PFCs) are gases that contribute to forced global warming...

  5. ResearchI, Vol.Deep-Sea 44,No. 8, pp. 1427-1450, 1997 0 1997Ekvier Science Ltd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGillicuddy Jr., Dennis J.

    Pergamon ResearchI, Vol.Deep-Sea 44,No. 8, pp. 1427-1450, 1997 0 1997Ekvier Science Ltd PII:s0967 In the oligotrophic waters of the open ocean, the availability of nitrogenous nutrients limits phytoplankton and convectively driven vertical mixing punctures the nutricline, surface waters are generally nutrient depleted

  6. Cayman Turtles in the Eye of the Hurricane Two Cayman turtles survived Hurricane Wilma at sea, when

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exeter, University of

    Cayman Turtles in the Eye of the Hurricane Two Cayman turtles survived Hurricane Wilma at sea, when rode out the hurricane at depths of several hundred feet below the surface, though they must have nesting, they migrate back to feeding grounds 2) "Lost years" in the open ocean Turtle hatching drifting

  7. SOLAS Mid Term Strategy Initiative "Air-sea gas fluxes at Eastern boundary upwelling and Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ) systems"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 SOLAS Mid Term Strategy Initiative "Air-sea gas fluxes at Eastern boundary upwelling and Oxygen Lachkar, ETH Zurich, Suisse Parv Suntharalingam, UEA, UK Martin Hernandez Ayon, UABC, Mexico +of course of SOLAS and to the Workshop Véronique Garçon 09:50 Surface (energy and water) fluxes at the air

  8. Local and Global Casimir Energies for a Semitransparent Cylindrical Shell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ines Cavero-Pelaez; Kimball A. Milton; Klaus Kirsten

    2006-09-07

    The local Casimir energy density and the global Casimir energy for a massless scalar field associated with a $\\lambda\\delta$-function potential in a 3+1 dimensional circular cylindrical geometry are considered. The global energy is examined for both weak and strong coupling, the latter being the well-studied Dirichlet cylinder case. For weak-coupling,through $\\mathcal{O}(\\lambda^2)$, the total energy is shown to vanish by both analytic and numerical arguments, based both on Green's-function and zeta-function techniques. Divergences occurring in the calculation are shown to be absorbable by renormalization of physical parameters of the model. The global energy may be obtained by integrating the local energy density only when the latter is supplemented by an energy term residing precisely on the surface of the cylinder. The latter is identified as the integrated local energy density of the cylindrical shell when the latter is physically expanded to have finite thickness. Inside and outside the delta-function shell, the local energy density diverges as the surface of the shell is approached; the divergence is weakest when the conformal stress tensor is used to define the energy density. A real global divergence first occurs in $\\mathcal{O}(\\lambda^3)$, as anticipated, but the proof is supplied here for the first time; this divergence is entirely associated with the surface energy, and does {\\em not} reflect divergences in the local energy density as the surface is approached.

  9. Global dimming and brightening: A review Martin Wild1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    Global dimming and brightening: A review Martin Wild1 Received 14 November 2008; revised 6 March of solar radiation incident at the Earth's surface is not stable over the years but undergoes significant, their representation in climate models, and their potential implications for climate change. The various studies

  10. DEEP SEA RESEARCH PART II Circulation in the Eastern Bering Sea: Inferences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    of the North Pacific and Gulf of Alaska coastal currents connect with the Bering Sea basin and shelf through of Alaska, Fairbanks, Alaska, 99775, USA December 18, 2013, 1:54pm DRAFT #12;X - 2 DURSKI ET AL.: CIRC. EAST in determining the pattern of erosion of the water mass as the shelf warms and mixes. On the Bering Sea Shelf

  11. DEEP SEA RESEARCH PART II Circulation in the Eastern Bering Sea: Inferences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    of Alaska coastal currents connect with the Bering Sea basin and shelf through narrow island passes35 of Alaska, Fairbanks, Alaska, 99775, USA 4 National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, Russia of erosion of the water mass as the shelf warms and mixes. On the Bering Sea shelf, tidal motions

  12. Red Sea during the Last Glacial Maximum: Implications for sea level reconstruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peltier, W. Richard

    . Gildor,1 and W. R. Peltier2 Received 13 February 2007; revised 29 July 2007; accepted 30 October 2007 based on the ICE-5G (VM2) model. Citation: Biton, E., H. Gildor, and W. R. Peltier (2008), Red Sea sea level reduction for the LGM interval range between approximately 120 m [Peltier, 2004, 2002

  13. Relative Sea-Level Chanhes in Iceland 25 3. Relative Sea-Level Changes in Iceland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ingólfsson, Ólafur

    Relative Sea-Level Chanhes in Iceland 25 3. Relative Sea-Level Changes in Iceland: new Aspects of the Weichselian Deglaciation of Iceland Hreggviður Norðdahl1 and Halldór G. Pétursson2 1 University of Iceland, Science Institute, Dunhagi 3, IS-107 Reykjavik 2 Icelandic Institute of Natural History, IS-600 Akureyri 3

  14. International conference on the role of the polar regions in global change: Proceedings. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weller, G.; Wilson, C.L.; Severin, B.A.B.

    1991-12-01

    The International Conference on the Role of the Polar Regions in Global Change took place on the campus of the University of Alaska Fairbanks on June 11--15, 1990. The goal of the conference was to define and summarize the state of knowledge on the role of the polar regions in global change, and to identify gaps in knowledge. To this purpose experts in a wide variety of relevant disciplines were invited to present papers and hold panel discussions. While there are numerous conferences on global change, this conference dealt specifically with polar regions which occupy key positions in the global system. These two volumes of conference proceedings include papers on (1) detection and monitoring of change; (2) climate variability and climate forcing; (3) ocean, sea ice, and atmosphere interactions and processes; (4) effects on biota and biological feedbacks; (5) ice sheet, glacier and permafrost responses and feedbacks; (6) paleoenvironmental studies; and, (7) aerosols and trace gases.

  15. International conference on the role of the polar regions in global change: Proceedings. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weller, G.; Wilson, C.L.; Severin, B.A.B.

    1991-12-01

    The International Conference on the Role of the Polar Regions in Global Change took place on the campus of the University of Alaska Fairbanks on June 11--15, 1990. The goal of the conference was to define and summarize the state of knowledge on the role of the polar regions in global change, and to identify gaps in knowledge. To this purpose experts in a wide variety of relevant disciplines were invited to present papers and hold panel discussions. While there are numerous conferences on global change, this conference dealt specifically with the polar regions which occupy key positions in the global system. These two volumes of conference proceedings include papers on (1) detection and monitoring of change; (2) climate variability and climate forcing; (3) ocean, sea ice, and atmosphere interactions and processes; and (4) effects on biota and biological feedbacks; (5) ice sheet, glacier and permafrost responses and feedbacks, (6) paleoenvironmental studies; and, (7) aerosol and trace gases.

  16. Modeling the topography of the salar de Uyuni, Bolivia as an equipotential surface of Earth’s gravity field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borsa, Adrian

    2008-01-01

    A. A. , et al. (2008), Topography of the salar de Uyuni,and B. G. Bills (2004), Topography of the flattest surfacestudy on the sea surface topography, Geophysical Journal

  17. A Multivariate Baltic Sea Environmental Index Joachim W. Dippner, Georgs Kornilovs,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dippner, Joachim W.

    REPORT A Multivariate Baltic Sea Environmental Index Joachim W. Dippner, Georgs Kornilovs, Karin multivariate index for the Baltic Sea is developed and presented here. The multivariate Baltic Sea

  18. Global tree network for computing structures enabling global processing operations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blumrich; Matthias A. (Ridgefield, CT); Chen, Dong (Croton-On-Hudson, NY); Coteus, Paul W. (Yorktown Heights, NY); Gara, Alan G. (Mount Kisco, NY); Giampapa, Mark E. (Irvington, NY); Heidelberger, Philip (Cortlandt Manor, NY); Hoenicke, Dirk (Ossining, NY); Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D. (Mount Kisco, NY); Takken, Todd E. (Mount Kisco, NY); Vranas, Pavlos M. (Bedford Hills, NY)

    2010-01-19

    A system and method for enabling high-speed, low-latency global tree network communications among processing nodes interconnected according to a tree network structure. The global tree network enables collective reduction operations to be performed during parallel algorithm operations executing in a computer structure having a plurality of the interconnected processing nodes. Router devices are included that interconnect the nodes of the tree via links to facilitate performance of low-latency global processing operations at nodes of the virtual tree and sub-tree structures. The global operations performed include one or more of: broadcast operations downstream from a root node to leaf nodes of a virtual tree, reduction operations upstream from leaf nodes to the root node in the virtual tree, and point-to-point message passing from any node to the root node. The global tree network is configurable to provide global barrier and interrupt functionality in asynchronous or synchronized manner, and, is physically and logically partitionable.

  19. The Business of Global Environmental Governance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton-Smith, Elery

    2005-01-01

    The Business of Global Environmental Governance By David L.Business of Global Environmental Governance. Cambridge, MA :

  20. Ethics in collaborative global health researchhealth research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    in developing countries ­Global health inequalities­Global health inequalities ­Disproportionate burden

  1. GLOBAL HYDRLOGIC PERSPECTIVES ON THE MID-CRETACEOUS GREENHOUSE CLIMATE (APTIAN-ALBIAN)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suarez, Marina B.

    2009-01-03

    This dissertation examines the mid-Cretaceous greenhouse climate in the Aptian-Albian through the perspective of the global hydrologic cycle. Stable isotopic compositions of pedogenic and exposure surface carbonates presented ...

  2. Shifts in ENSO coupling processes under global warming Sjoukje Philip1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    state of the Pacific Ocean between the current climate and a high CO2 climate. Next, shifts in ENSO warming may shift the properties and dynamics of El Nin~o. We study the shifts in ENSO couplings in IPCC couplings between sea surface temperature (SST), thermocline depth and wind stress are discussed. Although

  3. Conceptual understanding of climate change with a globally resolved energy balance model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dommenget, Dietmar

    on the surface energy balance by very simple repre- sentations of solar and thermal radiation, the atmosphericConceptual understanding of climate change with a globally resolved energy balance model Dietmar will introduce a very simple, globally resolved energy bal- ance (GREB) model, which is capable of simulating

  4. Earthquake Location, Direct, Global-Search Methods E 2449 Earthquake Location,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Earthquake Location, Direct, Global-Search Methods E 2449 Earthquake Location, Direct, Global Kingdom Article Outline Glossary Definition of the Subject Introduction The Earthquake Location Problem or temporal av- erage of some characteristic of an earthquake, such as surface shaking intensity or moment

  5. Ecological Modelling 143 (2001) 227243 A globally applicable model of daily solar irradiance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt Jr., E. Raymond

    2001-01-01

    Ecological Modelling 143 (2001) 227­243 A globally applicable model of daily solar irradiance at many ground stations, the total daily solar irradiance (Rs) received at the earth's surface to measured solar irradiance. In a global comparison for the year 1987, VP-RAD-estimated and satellite

  6. Increasing global agricultural production by reducing ozone damages via methane emission controls and ozone-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauzerall, Denise

    Increasing global agricultural production by reducing ozone damages via methane emission controls demonstrate the significant potential to sustainably improve global agricultural production by decreasing O3 degradation poses a major challenge for agricultural production. Because surface ozone (O3) has a significant

  7. The northern wintertime divergence extrema at 200 hPa and surface cyclones as simulated in the AMIP integration of the ECMWF general circulation model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyle, J.S.

    1994-11-01

    Divergence and convergence centers at 200 hPa and mean sea level pressure (MSLP) cyclones were located every 6 hr for a 10-yr general circulation model (GCM) simulation with the ECMWF (Cycle 36) for the boreal winters from 1980 to 1988. The simulation used the observed monthly mean sea surface temperature (SST) for the decade. Analysis of the frequency, location, and strength of these centers and cyclones gives insight into the dynamical response of the model to the varying SST. The results indicate that (1) the model produces reasonable climatologies of upper-level divergence and MSLP cyclones; (2) the model distribution of anomalies of divergence and convergence centers and MSLP cyclones is consistent with observations for the 1982-83 and 1986-87 El Nifio events; (3) the tropical Indian Ocean is the region of greatest divergence activity and interannual variability in the model; (4) the variability of the divergence centers is greater than that of the convergence centers; (5) strong divergence centers occur chiefly over the ocean in the midlatitudes but are more land-based in the tropics, except in the Indian Ocean; and (6) locations of divergence and convergence centers can be a useful tool for the intercomparison of global atmospheric simulations.

  8. Atmospheric chemistry and global change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prather, MJ

    1999-01-01

    and particles. Thus Atmospheric Chemistry and Global Changethe future of atmospheric chemistry. BROWSINGS Tornadothe complexity of atmospheric chemistry well, but trips a

  9. Systems integration for global sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    air pollution, and energy security policy. Energy Policy 38,Mima, European climate–energy security nexus: A model based16). Coupling global energy security policy with climate

  10. Enlighten Your Research Global Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    your data Programs & Workshops CrossConnects Workshop Series Operating Innovative Networks Workshop Series Enlighten Your Research Global Program Science Requirements Reviews...

  11. Environmental Regulation, Globalization, and Innovation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashford, Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    This essay explores the complex relationship between environmental regulation, innovation, and sustainable development within the context of an increasingly globalizing economy. It will be argued that industrial policy, ...

  12. ARM - Lesson Plans: Sea Water and Agriculture

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska Outreach Home Room News PublicationsClimatePast SeaSea Water and

  13. Air-sea exchange in the global mercury cycle Sarah A. Strode,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Rokjin

    Research Council, 2000], as well as detrimental effects on wildlife [Wolfe et al., 1998]. Because mercury sources [Lindqvist et al., 1991]. [3] Mercury is emitted to the atmosphere from anthropo- genic sources al., 2003], with direct anthropogenic emissions representing approximately one third of the total

  14. Preliminary global assessment of terrestrial biodiversity consequences of sea level rise mediated by climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menon, Shaily; Soberó n, Jorge; Li, Xingong; Peterson, A. Townsend

    2010-02-25

    -desert 653010 0.26 0.03 1 0 1 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 South China-Vietnam subtropical evergreen forests 224929 2.48 0.41 33 6 27 32.9 33.0 32.9 33.0 South Iran Nubo-Sindian desert and semi-desert 352341 3.21 0.37 5 0 5 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 South Sakhalin-Kurile mixed...-desert 653010 0.26 0.03 1 0 1 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 South China-Vietnam subtropical evergreen forests 224929 2.48 0.41 33 6 27 32.9 33.0 32.9 33.0 South Iran Nubo-Sindian desert and semi-desert 352341 3.21 0.37 5 0 5 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 South Sakhalin-Kurile mixed...

  15. Global patterns of marine mammal, seabird, and sea turtle bycatch reveal taxa-specific and cumulative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewison, Rebecca

    . Moored , Tara Coxe , Ramunas Zydelisf , Sara McDonaldg , Andrew DiMatteoh , Daniel C. Dunni , Connie Y , Andre Boustanyg , Andrew J. Readi , Patrick Halping , W. J. Nicholso , and Carl Safinap a Department, NY 11794-5000 Edited by James A. Estes, University of California, Center for Ocean Health, Santa Cruz

  16. DOE-Sponsored Beaufort Sea Expedition Studies Methane's Role in Global

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i pStateDOEAnalysis, MarchALARAPRINCIPLES33-94 December 1994 DOEMay

  17. Deep-Sea Research II 52 (2005) 32813302 Sediment transport by sea ice in the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rigor, Ignatius G.

    2005-01-01

    with entrainment of frazil ice into deformed, multiple layers of rafted nilas, indicative of a flaw-lead resuspension and subsequent ice entrainment (420 m for the Chukchi Sea). Sediment loads averaged at 128 t km­2 deep for resuspension and entrainment) is at minimum 4 Â 106 t in the sampling area and is estimated

  18. The University of Hawai`i Sea Grant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seawater Air Conditioning UH Sea Grant joins the University of Hawai`i Economic Research organization seawater air conditioning. Sea Grant Contributions to Hawai`i: Signature Sustainable Coastal Tourism

  19. SEAS REACH BEYOND GROUNDS Commonwealth Center for Advanced Manufacturing (CCAM)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    .seas.virginia.edu/acad/faculty DEPARTMENTS Biomedical Engineering Chemical Engineering Civil & Environmental Engineering Computer Science Electrical & Computer Engineering Engineering & Society Materials Science & Engineering Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering Systems & Information Engineering www.seas.virginia.edu/acad/depts.php 2014 ­ 2015

  20. Thermoregulation in Steller Sea Lions: a modelling approach 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roscow, Emma Victoria Heather

    2001-01-01

    condition. Under the environmental conditions tested in water, Steller sea lions appear to require additional energy for thermoregulation, unless they are moving and generating additional heat as a result of the locomotion. While resting in air sea lions...

  1. Community-Based Sea Level Rise Projections Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This webinar will present a process for developing community-based sea level rise projections and facilitating their use.

  2. Accessing Future Flashpoints in the South China Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    KAPLAN, Brad

    2013-01-01

    capability and resolve. Brad KAPLAN served for 30 years inin the South China Sea Brad KAPLAN C SUMMARY onfrontations

  3. Migration and Global Environmental Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Migration and Global Environmental Change Future Challenges and Opportunities FINAL PROJECT REPORT and adaptation, and also developmental and humanitarian agendas. Migration and Global Environmental Change Future Environmental Change (2011) Final Project Report The Government Office for Science, London #12;3 A range

  4. GLOBAL WARMING THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    PercentofTotal US China Russia Japan Germany ANNUAL ENERGY CONSUMPTION Total Global Consum ENERGY BALANCE Global and annual average energy fluxes in watts per square meter 343 237 237 254K 390 RADIATION Energy per area per time Power per area Unit: Watt per square meter W m-2 #12;Everybody talks

  5. Short communication Satellite-derived surface water pCO2 and airsea CO2 fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short communication Satellite-derived surface water pCO2 and air­sea CO2 fluxes in the northern for the estimation of the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2) and air­sea CO2 fluxes in the northern South), respectively, the monthly pCO2 fields were computed. The derived pCO2 was compared with the shipboard pCO2

  6. Sea Oil Field Satellite Monitoring: An Opera3onal View

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    :on alone contains 54% of the sea's oil reserves and 45% of its gasSea Oil Field Satellite Monitoring: An Opera3onal View Maurizio, Camp Springs, MD 20746 #12;Outline Introduc:on Sea oil fields Synthe:c Aperture

  7. EXPERIMENTAL HARVEST OF THE STELLER SEA LION IN ALASKAN WATERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    371 EXPERIMENTAL HARVEST OF THE STELLER SEA LION IN ALASKAN WATERS Marine Biological LaboratoryKernan, Director EXPERIMENTAL HARVEST OF THE STELLER SEA LION IN ALASKAN WATERS by Fredrik V. Thorsteinson, Richard;#12;EXPERIMENTAL HARVEST OF THE STELLER SEA LION IN ALASKAN WATERS by Fredrik V. Thorsteinson, Bureau of Commercial

  8. Ka Pili KaiUniversity of Hawaii Sea Grant College Program Vol. 35, No. 4 Winter 2013 UH Sea Grant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ka Pili KaiUniversity of Hawaiÿi Sea Grant College Program Vol. 35, No. 4 Winter 2013 UH Sea Contents Vol 35, No. 4 In this issue of Ka Pili Kai... In general, people hate change. Change represents

  9. (Managing the global environment)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rayner, S.F.

    1989-10-03

    The conference was stimulated by concern that policy makers increasingly have to make environmental management decisions in the absence of solidly established scientific consensus about ecological processes and the consequences of human actions. Often, as in the case of climate change, some decisions may have to be made in the absence of information that is desirable but may not be available for years to come, if ever. Six topics were identified as running throughout the Congress. These were: the epistemology and history of the sciences or disciplines concerned with the environment, including the scientific basis of rationality and modes of dealing with uncertainty and complexity; the social, economic, and institutional conditions for the production of knowledge bearing on the environment, including the politics of research and the improvement of scientific data; the structuring and institutionalization of expert assessments on national and international levels, including the global distribution of expertise; the means of establishing scientific information, the role of the media in transmitting and processing knowledge about the environment, and the organization of public environmental debate; and decision making and management under conditions of uncertainty; and, finally the relationship between science and ethics. 13 refs.

  10. A Globally Unevolving Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meir Shimon

    2015-09-30

    A scalar-tensor theory of gravity is formulated in which $G$ and particle masses are allowed to vary. The theory yields a globally static cosmological model with no evolutionary timescales, no cosmological coincidences, and no flatness and horizon `problems'. It can be shown that the energy densities of dark energy ($\\rho_{DE}$) and non-relativistic baryons and dark matter ($\\rho_{M}$) are related by $\\rho_{DE}=2\\rho_{M}$, in agreement with current observations, if DE is associated with the canonical kinetic and potential energy densities of the scalar fields. Under general assumptions, the model favors light fermionic dark matter candidates (e.g., sterile neutrinos). The main observed features of the CMB are naturally explained in this model, including the spectral flatness of its perturbations on the largest angular scales, and the observed adiabatic and gaussian nature of density perturbations. More generally, we show that many of the cosmological observables, normally attributed to the dynamics of expanding space, could be of kinematic origin. In gravitationally bound systems, the values of G and particle masses spontaneously freeze out by a symmetry breaking of the underlying conformal symmetry, and the theory reduces to standard general relativity (with, e.g., all solar system tests satisfied).

  11. Deep-sea bioturbation and the role of the sea urchin Echinocrepis rostrata

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vardaro, Michael F.

    2008-01-01

    by a long-term time-lapse camera in the deep North Pacific.Deep-Sea Research I. 54(8): 1231-1240. Vardaro, M.F. ,time-lapse camera in the deep North Pacific. ASLO Aquatic

  12. Pollock Conservation Cooperative High Seas Catchers' Cooperative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisheries Act (AFA), in the North Pacific Fishery Management Council (NPFMC) October 1999 recommendation North Pacific Fishery Management Council March 28, 2012 #12;2 Table of Contents Pollock Conservation Catcher Vessel Inter-Cooperative Agreement Bering Sea Pollock Transfers and Directed Pollock Fishing

  13. DEEP SEA DRILLING PROJECT DATA FILE DOCUMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DEEP SEA DRILLING PROJECT DATA FILE DOCUMENTS Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Technical; however, republication of any portion requires the written consent of the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University Research Park, 1000 Discovery Drive, College Station, Texas 77840, as well

  14. An AeroCom Assessment of Black Carbon in Arctic Snow and Sea Ice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiao, C.; Flanner, M. G.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Bellouin, N.; Berntsen, T.; Bian, Huisheng; Carslaw, K. S.; Chin, Mian; De Luca, N.; Diehl, Thomas; Ghan, Steven J.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevag, A.; Koch, Dorothy; Liu, Xiaohong; Mann, G. W.; Penner, Joyce E.; Pitari, G.; Schulz, M.; Seland, O.; Skeie, R. B.; Steenrod, Stephen D.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, Kostas; van Noije, T.; Yun, Yuxing; Zhang, Kai

    2014-03-07

    Though many global aerosols models prognose surface deposition, only a few models have been used to directly simulate the radiative effect from black carbon (BC) deposition to snow and sea-ice. Here, we apply aerosol deposition fields from 25 models contributing to two phases of the Aerosol Comparisons between Observations and Models (AeroCom) project to simulate and evaluate within snow BC concentrations and radiative effect in the Arctic. We accomplish this by driving the offline land and sea-ice components of the Community Earth System Model with different deposition fields and meteorological conditions from 2004-2009, during which an extensive field campaign of BC measurements in Arctic snow occurred. We find that models generally underestimate BC concentrations in snow in northern Russia and Norway, while overestimating BC amounts elsewhere in the Arctic. Although simulated BC distributions in snow are poorly correlated with measurements, mean values are reasonable. The multi-model mean (range) bias in BC concentrations, sampled over the same grid cells, snow depths, and months of measurements, are -4.4 (-13.2 to +10.7) ng g?1 for an earlier Phase of AeroCom models (Phase I), and +4.1 (-13.0 to +21.4) ng g?1 for a more recent Phase of AeroCom models (Phase II), compared to the observational mean of 19.2 ng g?1. Factors determining model BC concentrations in Arctic snow include Arctic BC emissions, transport of extra-Arctic aerosols, precipitation, deposition efficiency of aerosols within the Arctic, and meltwater removal of particles in snow. Sensitivity studies show that the model–measurement evaluation is only weakly affected by meltwater scavenging efficiency because most measurements were conducted in non-melting snow. The Arctic (60-90?N) atmospheric residence time for BC in Phase II models ranges from 3.7 to 23.2 days, implying large inter-model variation in local BC deposition efficiency. Combined with the fact that most Arctic BC deposition originates from extra-Arctic emissions, these results suggest that aerosol removal processes are a leading source of variation in model performance. The multi-model mean (full range) of Arctic radiative effect from BC in snow is 0.15 (0.07-0.25) W m?2 and 0.18 (0.06-0.28) W m?2 in Phase I and Phase II models, respectively. After correcting for model biases relative to observed BC concentrations in different regions of the Arctic, we obtain a multi-model mean Arctic radiative effect of 0.17 W m?2 for the combined AeroCom ensembles. Finally, there is a high correlation between modeled BC concentrations sampled over the observational sites and the Arctic as a whole, indicating that the field campaign provided a reasonable sample of the Arctic.

  15. MAPPING HIGH-RESOLUTION LAND SURFACE RADIATIVE FLUXES FROM MODIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Shunlin

    Chapter 6 MAPPING HIGH-RESOLUTION LAND SURFACE RADIATIVE FLUXES FROM MODIS: ALGORITHMS.1007/978-1-4419-0050-0_6, #12;142 Mapping Radiative Fluxes There are several global radiative flux data sets derived from either. For example, the CERES team uses the predefined albedo and emissivity maps to calculate surface radiative

  16. The record of sea level rise by tidal sand bodies of the English Channel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berne, S; Lericolais, G. (Ifremer, Plouzane, (France)); Lafont, F. (Universite d'Orsay (France))

    1990-05-01

    Improvements of very high resolution seismic reflection provide new information about internal structures of modern sand bodies. This allows us to reconstruct their recent history, which is related to the Holocene sea level rise. A major distinction is found between inner shelf sand bodies, dominated by autocyclic processes, and outer shelf sand bodies, where allocyclic processes are invoked to explain the apparent contradiction between internal structures and present-day dynamics. On the inner shelf, evidence of the migration of tidal dunes (sand waves) has been obtained by repeated surveys using accurate positioning systems. Major bounding surfaces are thought to result from the action of tidal current and/or from episodic storms. A rough estimation of the age of these sand bodies can be proposed. On the outer shelf, some dunes of the English Channel exhibit cross-beds indicative of a past net bed-load transport at the opposite of present days dynamics, inherited from different tidal conditions when sea level was between 20 and 40 m lower. Some large tidal sand banks (e.g., the Sark Bank near the Channel Islands) display a more complicated pattern. The upper part of the sand bank is the result of the migration of very large dunes climbing at positive angles, whereas the lower part shows major erosional surfaces, attributed to the action of storms during lower sea levels.

  17. Deep-Sea Research I 53 (2006) 17621771 Gouge marks on deep-sea mud volcanoes in the eastern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hooker, Sascha K.

    2006-01-01

    Deep-Sea Research I 53 (2006) 1762­1771 Gouge marks on deep-sea mud volcanoes in the eastern in the eastern Mediterranean Sea. The marks consist of a central groove (about 10 cm deep and 1­2 m long like the deep-diving whales. The characteristic high acoustic backscatter of the mud volcanoes would

  18. Global production through 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foreman, N.E.

    1996-12-01

    Two companion studies released recently should provide great food for thought among geo-political strategists and various national governments. If predictions contained in these Petroconsultants studies of oil and gas production trends for the next 10 years are realized, there will be great repercussions for net exporters and importers, alike. After analyzing and predicting trends within each of the world`s significant producing nations for the 1996--2005 period, the crude oil and condensate report concludes tat global production will jump nearly 24%. By contrast, worldwide gas output will leap 40%. The cast of characters among producers and exporters that will benefit from these increases varies considerably for each fuel. On the oil side, Russia and the OPEC members, particularly the Persian Gulf nations, will be back in the driver`s seat in terms of affecting export and pricing patterns. On the gas side, the leading producers will be an interesting mix of mostly non-OPEC countries. The reemergence of Persian Gulf oil producers, coupled with an anticipated long-term decline among top non-OPEC producing nations should present a sobering picture to government planners within large net importers, such as the US. They are likely to find themselves in much the same supply trap as was experienced in the 1970s, only this time the dependence on foreign oil supplies will be much worse. Gas supplies will not be similarly constrained, and some substitution for oil is probable. Here, two articles, ``World oil industry is set for transition`` and ``Worldwide gas surges forward in next decade,`` present a summary of the findings detailed in Petroconsultants` recent studies.

  19. Global Asteroid Risk Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rumpf, Clemens

    2014-01-01

    Potentially impacting asteroids were analysed for their impact risk on the Earth. To this end, the Asteroid Risk Mitigation Optimization and Research (ARMOR) tool is currently being developed. The tool's modules are described and their validation is documented. Based on the asteroid ephemeris, the tool calculates the impact location probability distribution on the surface of the Earth (in the literature, occasionally referred to as risk corridor). NASA's Near Earth Object (NEO) risk list served as the source for asteroid ephemerides. The Line of Variation (LOV) method was employed to find virtual impactors. While offering a simple and fast way of identifying virtual impactors, the method provides a low impactor identification rate. This is because the search space is tightly constricted to the LOV and thus excludes virtual impactors located elsewhere in the asteroid position uncertainty region. The method's performance was evaluated and suggestions for improvements are provided. Application of the tool showed...

  20. Physically Based Global Downscaling: Regional Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghan, Steven J.; Shippert, Timothy R.; Fox, Jared

    2006-02-01

    The climate simulated by a global atmosphere/land model with a physically-based subgrid orography scheme is evaluated in ten selected regions. Climate variables simulated for each of multiple elevation classes within each grid cell are mapped according the high-resolution distribution of surface elevation in each region. Comparison of the simulated annual mean climate with gridded observations leads to the following conclusions. At low to moderate elevations the downscaling scheme correctly simulates increasing precipitation, decreasing temperature, and increasing snow with increasing elevation within regions smaller than 100 km. At high elevations the downscaling scheme correctly simulates a decrease in precipitation with increasing elevation. Too little precipitation is simulated on the windward side of mountain ranges and too much precipitation is simulated on the lee side. The simulated sensitivity of surface air temperature to surface elevation is too strong, particularly in valleys influenced by drainage circulations. Observations show little evidence of a “snow shadow”, so the neglect of the subgrid rainshadow does not produce an unrealistic simulation of the snow distribution. Summertime snow area, which is a proxy for land ice, is much larger than observed. Summertime snow water equivalent is far less than the observed thickness of glaciers because a 1 m upper bound on snow water is applied to the simulations and because snow transport by slides is neglected. The 1 m upper bound on snow water equivalent also causes an underestimate of seasonal snow water during late winter, compared with gridded station measurements. Potential solutions to these problems are discussed.

  1. Resisting globalization- ATTAC in France: local discourses, global terrain 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard, Marie des Neiges

    2007-04-25

    The debate over the "globalization" process has been influenced by the emergence of social movements who deplore this process. This research focuses on the French social movement ATTAC (Action for a Tobin Tax for the Aid of Citizens...

  2. The Footprint of Urban Areas on Global Climate as Characterized by MODIS MENGLIN JIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Menglin

    to specify the parameters needed by climate models to compute the impacts of urbanization. For this purpose such as the temperatures, hu- midity, and near-surface winds. Because both nonurban and urban surfaces are quite variedThe Footprint of Urban Areas on Global Climate as Characterized by MODIS MENGLIN JIN Department

  3. Surface Structure and Catalytic $CO$ Oxidation Oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Danielak; A. Perera; M. Moreau; M. Frankowicz; R. Kapral

    1996-02-13

    A cellular automaton model is used to describe the dynamics of the catalytic oxidation of $CO$ on a $Pt(100)$ surface. The cellular automaton rules account for the structural phase transformations of the $Pt$ substrate, the reaction kinetics of the adsorbed phase and diffusion of adsorbed species. The model is used to explore the spatial structure that underlies the global oscillations observed in some parameter regimes. The spatiotemporal dynamics varies significantly within the oscillatory regime and depends on the harmonic or relaxational character of the global oscillations. Diffusion of adsorbed $CO$ plays an important role in the synchronization of the patterns on the substrate and this effect is also studied.

  4. The China-in-Global Energy Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qi, T.

    The China-in-Global Energy Model (C-GEM) is a global Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) model that captures the interaction of production, consumption and trade among multiple global regions and sectors – including five ...

  5. MA in Globalization Studies Student Handbook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Michael

    MA in Globalization Studies Student Handbook 2014-15 Institute on Globalization and the Human://globalization.mcmaster.ca Meetings and materials are available in accessible formats on request #12;Table of Contents Welcome...................................................................................................................................................3 Selecting a Topic

  6. Toxicological and epidemiological aspects of global warming on human health

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ando, M.; Yamamoto, S.; Wakamatsu, K.; Kawahara, I.; Asanuma, S.

    1996-12-31

    Since human activities are responsible for anthropogenic greenhouse gases emissions, climate models project an increase in the global surface temperature of 0.9 C to 4.0 C by 2100. For human health, it is projected that global warming may have a critical effect on the increased periods of severe heat stress in summer throughout the world. Global warming may have a critical issue on the increased periods of severe heat stress that have a potential impact on peroxidative damage in humans and animals. Lipid peroxidative damage is markedly related to GSH peroxidase activities, therefore the study was carried out to analyze the relationship between biochemical adaptability and the lipid peroxidative damage especially intracellular structure, such as mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum depending on the exposure time of heat stress.

  7. Global Warming* The Perfect Storm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    Global Warming* The Perfect Storm Jim Hansen 29 January 2008 Health Implications of Climate Change opinion #12;Perfect Storm, Perfect Disaster 1. Great Inertia of Systems - Ocean: Half of Warming still "In

  8. Computational Differentiation in Global Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumaier, Arnold

    Computational Differentiation in Global Optimization Software This talk will present: 1. The general problem framework in optimization software. 2. An example of effectiveness of computational differentiation in optimization packages. 3. Particular importance of computational differentiation verified

  9. Global optimization in reduced space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsung, Achim

    2014-01-01

    Optimization is a key activity in any engineering discipline. Global optimization methods, in particular, strive to solve nonconvex problems, which often arise in chemical engineering, and deterministic algorithms such as ...

  10. Systems integration for global sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    of the global virtual water trade network. Proc. Natl. Acad.J. Wang et al. , China’s water–energy nexus: Greenhouse-gasand future trends in grey water footprints of anthropogenic

  11. Puzzles from the First Globalization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berger, Suzanne

    In the first globalization, 1870-1914, as in our own times, debates raged over the impact on domestic life of free movement across borders of goods, people, and capital. Then as today in the hard times that have followed ...

  12. Impact of Geoengineering Schemes on the Global Hydrological Cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bala, G; Duffy, P; Taylor, K

    2007-12-07

    The rapidly rising CO{sub 2} level in the atmosphere has led to proposals of climate stabilization via 'Geoengineering' schemes that would mitigate climate change by intentionally reducing the solar radiation incident on earth's surface. In this paper, we address the impact of these climate stabilization schemes on the global hydrological cycle, using equilibrium simulations from an atmospheric general circulation model coupled to a slab ocean model. We show that insolation reductions sufficient to offset global-scale temperature increases lead to a decrease in the intensity of the global hydrologic cycle. This occurs because solar forcing is more effective in driving changes in global mean evaporation than is CO{sub 2} forcing of a similar magnitude. In the model used here, the hydrologic sensitivity, defined as the percentage change in global mean precipitation per degree warming, is 2.4% for solar forcing, but only 1.5% for CO{sub 2} forcing. Although other models and the climate system itself may differ quantitatively from this result, the conclusion can be understood based on simple considerations of the surface energy budget and thus is likely to be robust. Compared to changing temperature by altering greenhouse gas concentrations, changing temperature by varying insolation results in larger changes in net radiative fluxes at the surface; these are compensated by larger changes in latent and sensible heat fluxes. Hence the hydrological cycle is more sensitive to temperature adjustment via changes in insolation than changes in greenhouse gases. This implies that an alteration in solar forcing might offset temperature changes or hydrological changes from greenhouse warming, but could not cancel both at once.

  13. Web Application for Modeling Global Antineutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew Barna; Steve Dye

    2015-10-19

    Electron antineutrinos stream freely from rapidly decaying fission products within nuclear reactors and from long-lived radioactivity within Earth. Those with energy greater than 1.8 MeV are regularly observed by several kiloton-scale underground detectors. These observations estimate the amount of terrestrial radiogenic heating, monitor the operation of nuclear reactors, and measure the fundamental properties of neutrinos. The analysis of antineutrino observations at operating detectors or the planning of projects with new detectors requires information on the expected signal and background rates. We present a web application for modeling global antineutrino energy spectra and detection rates for any surface location. Antineutrino sources include all registered nuclear reactors as well as the crust and mantle of Earth. Visitors to the website may model the location and power of a hypothetical nuclear reactor, copy energy spectra, and analyze the significance of a selected signal relative to background.

  14. AGM2015: Antineutrino Global Map 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Usman, Shawn M; Dye, Stephen T; McDonough, William F; Learned, John G

    2015-01-01

    Every second greater than $10^{25}$ antineutrinos radiate to space from Earth, shining like a faint antineutrino star. Underground antineutrino detectors have revealed the rapidly decaying fission products inside nuclear reactors, verified the long-lived radioactivity inside our planet, and informed sensitive experiments for probing fundamental physics. Mapping the anisotropic antineutrino flux and energy spectrum advance geoscience by defining the amount and distribution of radioactive power within Earth while critically evaluating competing compositional models of the planet. We present the Antineutrino Global Map 2015 (AGM2015), an experimentally informed model of Earth's surface antineutrino flux over the 0 to 11 MeV energy spectrum, along with an assessment of systematic errors. The open source AGM2015 provides fundamental predictions for experiments, assists in strategic detector placement to determine neutrino mass hierarchy, and aids in identifying undeclared nuclear reactors. We use cosmochemically a...

  15. Web Application for Modeling Global Antineutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barna, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Electron antineutrinos stream freely from rapidly decaying fission products within nuclear reactors and from long-lived radioactivity within Earth. Those with energy greater than 1.8 MeV are regularly observed by several kiloton-scale underground detectors. These observations estimate the amount of terrestrial radiogenic heating, monitor the operation of nuclear reactors, and measure the fundamental properties of neutrinos. The analysis of antineutrino observations at operating detectors or the planning of projects with new detectors requires information on the expected signal and background rates. We present a web application for modeling global antineutrino energy spectra and detection rates for any surface location. Antineutrino sources include all registered nuclear reactors as well as the crust and mantle of Earth. Visitors to the website may model the location and power of a hypothetical nuclear reactor, copy energy spectra, and analyze the significance of a selected signal relative to background.

  16. The Private Regulation of Global Corporate Conduct

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vogel, David

    2006-01-01

    Legitimacy in Global Environmental Governance,” Journal ofundermining of global environmental governance,” Review ofglobal scope of business activity into Robert Falkner, “Private Environmental Governance

  17. Engine Combustion Network (ECN): Global sensitivity analysis...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Engine Combustion Network (ECN): Global sensitivity analysis of Spray A for different combustion vessels Title Engine Combustion Network (ECN): Global sensitivity analysis of Spray...

  18. Energy Frontier Research Center | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    include GE Global Research, Yale University-Crabtree Group, Yale University-Batista Group, Stanford University and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. GE Global...

  19. Salton Sea Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk,Sage Resources Jump to:Ohio:Project Jump to:Salton Sea Geothermal

  20. Cold Weather I usually start my climate presentations with a chart showing maps of the surface temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    . The 10-11 year cycle of solar irradiance has a just barely detectable effect on global temperature in the Illinois Wesleyan presentation. A global warming much smaller than weather fluctuations has the potential. Figure 1. Global distributions of surface temperature anomalies of the last four months (GISS analysis

  1. A global map of urban extent from nightlights

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhou, Yuyu; Smith, Steven J.; Zhao, Kaiguang; Imhoff, Marc L.; Thomson, Allison M.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Asrar, Ghassem R.; Zhang, Xuesong; He, Chunyang; Elvidge, Christopher

    2015-05-13

    Urbanization, one of the major human induced land-cover and land-use changes, has a profound impact on the Earth system including biodiversity, the cycling of water and carbon and exchange of energy and water between Earth’s surface and atmosphere, all affecting weather and climate. Accurate information on urban areas and their spatial distribution at the regional and global scales is important for scientific understanding of their contribution to the changing Earth system, and for practical management and policy decisions. We developed a method to map the urban extent from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program/Operational Linescan System (DMSP/OLS) nighttime stable-light data atmore »the global level and derived a new global map of 1-km urban extent for year 2000. Based on this map, we found that globally, urban land area is about 0.5% of total land area but ranges widely at regional level from 0.1% in Oceania to 2.3% in Europe. At the country level, urban land area varies from lower than 0.01% to higher than 10%, but is lower than 1% for most (70%) countries. Urbanization follows land mass distribution, as anticipated, with the highest concentration found between 30°N to 45°N latitude and the largest longitudinal peak around 80°W. Based on a sensitivity analysis and comparison with other global urban area products, we found that our global product of urban area provides a reliable estimate of global urban areas and offer the potential of capturing more accurately their spatial and temporal dynamics.« less

  2. A possible relationship between Global Warming and Lightning Activity in India during the period 1998-2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felix Pereira B.; Priyadarsini G.; T. E. Girish

    2010-12-15

    Lightning activity on a global scale has been studied season wise using satellite data for the period from 1998 to 2009. Lightning activity shows an increasing trend during the period of study which is highly correlated with atmospheric warming. A similar increasing trend of lightning activity is observed in the Indian region during the pre-monsoon season which is correlated with global lightning trends and warming trends of surface temperature in India. Key words: Global warming, lightning activity, Solar cycle changes

  3. Global warming and its implications for conservation. 3. How does it work? Part two: atmospheric science and the layer model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Creel, Scott

    Global warming and its implications for conservation. 3. How does it work? Part two: atmospheric warms the surface of the planet as it moves toward an equilibrium of energy fluxes in and out. The layer

  4. Optimal estimation of ionosphere-induced group delays of global positioning satellite signals during launch, orbit and re-entry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Andrea Marie, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2007-01-01

    There are many sources of range error in a Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) signal that has traveled to a receiver near the earth's surface. Among these is the ionospheric group delay. In the past, a single-state, ...

  5. Impact of mesoscale eddies on water transport between the Pacific Ocean and the Bering Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prants, S V; Budyansky, M V; Uleysky, M Yu

    2013-01-01

    Sea surface height anomalies observed by satellites in 1993--2012 are combined with simulation and observations by surface drifters and Argo floats to study water flow pattern in the Near Strait (NS) connected the Pacific Ocean with the Bering Sea. Daily Lagrangian latitudinal maps, computed with the AVISO surface velocity field, and calculation of the transport across the strait show that the flow through the NS is highly variable and controlled by mesoscale and submesoscale eddies in the area. On the seasonal scale, the flux through the western part of the NR is negatively correlated with the flux through its eastern part ($r=-0.93$). On the interannual time scale, a significant positive correlation ($r=0.72$) is diagnosed between the NS transport and the wind stress in winter. Increased southward component of the wind stress decreases the northward water transport through the strait. Positive wind stress curl over the strait area in winter--spring generates the cyclonic circulation and thereby enhances the...

  6. PUBLISHED ONLINE: 29 JANUARY 2012 | DOI: 10.1038/NCLIMATE1353 Enhanced warming over the global subtropical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Bo

    surface ocean warming rate over the path of these currents is two to three times faster than the globalLETTERS PUBLISHED ONLINE: 29 JANUARY 2012 | DOI: 10.1038/NCLIMATE1353 Enhanced warming over the global subtropical western boundary currents Lixin Wu1 *, Wenju Cai2 , Liping Zhang1 , Hisashi Nakamura3

  7. Global 3-D model analysis of the seasonal cycle of atmospheric carbonyl sulfide: Implications for terrestrial vegetation uptake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob, Daniel J.

    Global 3-D model analysis of the seasonal cycle of atmospheric carbonyl sulfide: Implications of atmospheric carbonyl sulfide (COS) to interpret observations at a network of surface sites. We aim to identify, and D. J. Jacob (2008), Global 3-D model analysis of the seasonal cycle of atmospheric carbonyl sulfide

  8. arXiv:1408.2487v2[physics.ao-ph]22Aug2014 Ising model for melt ponds on Arctic sea ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    arXiv:1408.2487v2[physics.ao-ph]22Aug2014 Ising model for melt ponds on Arctic sea ice Yi-Ping Ma,1 of water on the ice surface. Recent observations show an onset of pond complexity at a critical area modeling, we introduce a two dimensional Ising model for pond evolution which incorporates ice

  9. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL 104, NO C7, PAGES 15,66915,677, JULY 15, 1999 An energyconserving thermodynamic model of sea ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bitz, Cecilia

    of internal brine­pocket melting on surface ablation. Sea ice models that parameterize latent heat storage season. Compared with our energy­conserving model, a nonconserving model underestimates top to brine pockets, which change size in order to remain in thermal equilibrium with the ice [Schwerdtfeger

  10. Case Study #1 "The Global Warming Debate"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Christopher A.

    CHEM 001A Case Study #1 "The Global Warming Debate" Global warming is one of the most contentious issues of our time. There is an ongoing debate about whether global warming is caused by human activity.S., and because the scientific evidence used to determine if global warming is man-made is so difficult

  11. PRINT ONLY: GLOBAL WARMING Alexeev V. A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    PRINT ONLY: GLOBAL WARMING Alexeev V. A. Global Warming: 0.6°C or Less? [#1035] The peculiarities of global warming on the Earth during the last century are discussed. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXVIII (2007) full818.pdf #12;GLOBAL WARMING: 0.6 OR LESS? V.A.Alexeev; Vernadsky Institute of Geochemistry

  12. Group Work: Global warming & natural variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allan, Richard P.

    Group Work: Global warming & natural variability Left: Global annual temperature departure from://skepticalscience.com/foster-and-rahmstorf-measure-global-warming-signal.html 2013 2012 2011 #12;: 1963-1964, 1982-83, 1991-93 1. How do these events affect the global annual temperature and can you

  13. Global warming debates: the reading course

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huybers, Peter

    Global warming debates: the reading course spring 2012 Instructors: Eli Tziperman and Peter Huybers Hurricanes due to global warming? Apr 7: Stratospheric cooling: Why is the stratosphere cooling? Apr 14: Mid will be the impact of global warming on agriculture? Apr 28: Final Debate: Take sides! Should we act to curb global

  14. Global warming debates: the reading course

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huybers, Peter

    Global warming debates: the reading course spring 2010 Instructors: Eli Tziperman and Peter Huybers Hurricanes due to global warming? Apr 7: Stratospheric cooling: Why is the stratosphere cooling? Apr 14: Mid will be the impact of global warming on agriculture? Apr 28: Final Debate: Take sides! Should we act to curb global

  15. Race and racism: Towards a global future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winant, H

    2006-01-01

    accomplishment of dismantling the various colonialSingh 1998). The global dismantling of European empire was

  16. Center for Innovation in GLOBAL HEALTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    Center for Innovation in GLOBAL HEALTH Conversations in Global Health Thursday, April 9, 2015 5 in integrated and innovative delivery, finding creative new ways to ensure solutions and products get and the Duke Global Health Institute. Sponsored by the Center for Innovation in Global Health (CIGH). The event

  17. Public Transport and Sustainable Urbanism: Global Lesson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cervero, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Public Transport and Sustainable Urbanism: Global Lessonsviable and sustainable form of urbanism. Notes J. Kenworthy

  18. Center for Innovation in GLOBAL HEALTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    Center for Innovation in GLOBAL HEALTH Center for Innovation in GLOBAL HEALTH Conversations in Global Health Gavin Yamey, MD, MPH, MA, MRCP with featured guest: Wednesday, March 4, 2015 4:00 - 5:00 p.m. Li Ka Shing Center, Room 120 A leading global health researcher and former journalist, Professor

  19. Intrinsic Charm Parton Distribution Functions from CTEQ-TEA Global Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dulat, Sayipjamal; Gao, Jun; Huston, Joey; Pumplin, Jon; Schmidt, Carl; Stump, Daniel; Yuan, C -P

    2013-01-01

    We study the possibility of intrinsic (non-perturbative) charm in parton distribution functions (PDF) of the proton, within the context of the CT10 next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) global analysis. Three models for the intrinsic charm (IC) quark content are compared: (i) $\\hat{c}(x) = 0$ (zero-IC model); (ii) $\\hat{c}(x)$ is parametrized by a valence-like parton distribution (BHPS model); (iii) $\\hat{c}(x)$ is parametrized by a sea-like parton distribution (SEA model). In these models, the intrinsic charm content, $\\hat{c}(x)$, is included in the charm PDF at the matching scale $Q_c=m_c=1.3$ GeV. The best fits to data are constructed and compared. Correlations between the value of $m_c$ and the amount of IC are also considered.

  20. Intrinsic Charm Parton Distribution Functions from CTEQ-TEA Global Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sayipjamal Dulat; Tie-Jiun Hou; Jun Gao; Joey Huston; Jon Pumplin; Carl Schmidt; Daniel Stump; C. -P. Yuan

    2014-08-19

    We study the possibility of intrinsic (non-perturbative) charm in parton distribution functions (PDF) of the proton, within the context of the CT10 next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) global analysis. Three models for the intrinsic charm (IC) quark content are compared: (i) $\\hat{c}(x) = 0$ (zero-IC model); (ii) $\\hat{c}(x)$ is parametrized by a valence-like parton distribution (BHPS model); (iii) $\\hat{c}(x)$ is parametrized by a sea-like parton distribution (SEA model). In these models, the intrinsic charm content, $\\hat{c}(x)$, is included in the charm PDF at the matching scale $Q_c=m_c=1.3$ GeV. The best fits to data are constructed and compared. Correlations between the value of $m_c$ and the amount of IC are also considered.

  1. The Probability Distribution of Land Surface Wind Speeds ADAM H. MONAHAN AND YANPING HE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Yanping

    , the Netherlands, and Los Alamos, New Mexico, demonstrate that lower-tropospheric wind speeds become moreThe Probability Distribution of Land Surface Wind Speeds ADAM H. MONAHAN AND YANPING HE School surface wind speeds is characterized using a global network of observations. Daytime surface wind speeds

  2. Electromagnetic and physical properties of sea ice formed in the presence of wave action

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Onstott, R. G.; Gogineni, Sivaprasad; Gow, A. J.; Grenfell, T. C.; Jezek, K. C.; Perovich, D. K.; Swift, C. T.

    1998-09-01

    of continuous sheets of newly formed ice. In addi- tion, because of the filtering action of frazil and ice pans, high wave energy and long ocean wavelengths are required to form large ice pans, and pans formed under these conditions have more complex surfaces... based on existing and future satellite technology is required. In this investigation, a wide range of sensor parameters are used to support the development of a ?broad spectral approach? to the problem of inverting sensor signal data to sea ice form...

  3. Global Climate Change and Agriculture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izaurralde, Roberto C.

    2009-01-01

    The Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released in 2007 significantly increased our confidence about the role that humans play in forcing climate change. There is now a high degree of confidence that the (a) current atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) far exceed those of the pre-industrial era, (b) global increases in CO2 arise mainly from fossil fuel use and land use change while those of CH4 and N2O originate primarily from agricultural activities, and (c) the net effect of human activities since 1750 has led to a warming of the lower layers of the atmosphere, with an increased radiative forcing of 1.6 W m-2. Depending on the scenario of human population growth and global development, mean global temperatures could rise between 1.8 and 4.0 °C by the end of the 21st century.

  4. The Genome of Deep-Sea Vent Chemolithoautotroph Thiomicrospiracrunogen...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Thiomicrospiracrunogena XCL-2 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Genome of Deep-Sea Vent Chemolithoautotroph Thiomicrospiracrunogena XCL-2 Presented here is the...

  5. The social values at risk from sea-level rise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, Sonia; Barnett, Jon; Fincher, Ruth; Hurlimann, Anna; Mortreux, Colette; Waters, Elissa

    2013-07-15

    Analysis of the risks of sea-level rise favours conventionally measured metrics such as the area of land that may be subsumed, the numbers of properties at risk, and the capital values of assets at risk. Despite this, it is clear that there exist many less material but no less important values at risk from sea-level rise. This paper re-theorises these multifarious social values at risk from sea-level rise, by explaining their diverse nature, and grounding them in the everyday practices of people living in coastal places. It is informed by a review and analysis of research on social values from within the fields of social impact assessment, human geography, psychology, decision analysis, and climate change adaptation. From this we propose that it is the ‘lived values’ of coastal places that are most at risk from sea-level rise. We then offer a framework that groups these lived values into five types: those that are physiological in nature, and those that relate to issues of security, belonging, esteem, and self-actualisation. This framework of lived values at risk from sea-level rise can guide empirical research investigating the social impacts of sea-level rise, as well as the impacts of actions to adapt to sea-level rise. It also offers a basis for identifying the distribution of related social outcomes across populations exposed to sea-level rise or sea-level rise policies.

  6. Global warming: A Northwest perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, M.J.; Counts, C.A.

    1990-02-01

    The Northwest Power Planning Council convened a symposium in Olympia, Washington, on the subject of global climate change ( the greenhouse effect'') and its potential for affecting the Pacific Northwest. The symposium was organized in response to a need by the Power Council to understand global climate change and its potential impacts on resource planning and fish and wildlife planning for the region, as well as a need to understand national policy developing toward climate change and the Pacific Northwest's role in it. 40 figs., 15 tabs.

  7. Global change: Acronyms and abbreviations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodard, C.T.; Stoss, F.W.

    1995-05-01

    This list of acronyms and abbreviations is compiled to provide the user with a ready reference to dicipher the linguistic initialisms and abridgements for the study of global change. The terms included in this first edition were selected from a wide variety of sources: technical reports, policy documents, global change program announcements, newsletters, and other periodicals. The disciplinary interests covered by this document include agriculture, atmospheric science, ecology, environmental science, oceanography, policy science, and other fields. In addition to its availability in hard copy, the list of acronyms and abbreviations is available in DOS-formatted diskettes and through CDIAC`s anonymous File Transfer Protocol (FTP) area on the Internet.

  8. Graduate Certificate in Global Health Fact Sheet College of Public Health GRADUATE EDUCATION IN GLOBAL HEALTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    Graduate Certificate in Global Health Fact Sheet · College of Public Health GRADUATE EDUCATION IN GLOBAL HEALTH Graduate Certificate in Global Health A UGA Graduate Program What is Global Health? Global health applies public health principles to solutions of health problems that transcend national

  9. Biogeophysical effects of CO2-fertilization on global climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bala, G; Caldeira, K; Mirin, A; Wickett, M; Delire, C; Phillips, T J

    2006-04-26

    CO{sub 2}-fertilization affects plant growth, which modifies surface physical properties, altering the surface albedo, and fluxes of sensible and latent heat. We investigate how such CO{sub 2}-fertilization effects on vegetation and surface properties would affect the climate system. Using a global three-dimensional climate-carbon model that simulates vegetation dynamics, we compare two multi-century simulations: a ''Control'' simulation with no emissions, and a ''Physiol-noGHG'' simulation where physiological changes occur as a result of prescribed CO{sub 2} emissions, but where CO{sub 2}-induced greenhouse warming is not included. In our simulations, CO{sub 2}-fertilization produces warming; we obtain an annual- and global-mean warming of about 0.65 K (and land-only warming of 1.4 K) after 430 years. This century-scale warming is mostly due to a decreased surface albedo associated with the expansion of the Northern Hemisphere boreal forests. On decadal time scales, the CO{sub 2} uptake by afforestation should produce a cooling effect that exceeds this albedo-based warming; but if the forests remain in place, the CO{sub 2}-enhanced-greenhouse effect would diminish as the ocean equilibrates with the atmosphere, whereas the albedo effect would persist. Thus, on century time scales, there is the prospect for net warming from CO{sub 2}-fertilization of the land biosphere. Further study is needed to confirm and better quantify our results.

  10. Satellite remote sensing of global rainfall using passive microwave radiometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferriday, J.G.

    1994-12-31

    Global rainfall over land and ocean is estimated using measurements of upwelling microwaves by a satellite passive microwave radiometer. Radiative transfer calculations through a cloud model are used to parameterize an inversion technique for retrieving rain rates from brightness temperatures measured by the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I). The rainfall retrieval technique is based on the interaction between multi-spectral microwave radiances and millimeter sized liquid and frozen hydrometeors distributed in the satellite`s field of view. The rain rate algorithm is sensitive to both hydrometeor emission and scattering while being relatively insensitive to extraneous atmospheric and surface effects. Separate formulations are used over ocean and land to account for different background microwave characteristics and the algorithm corrects for inhomogeneous distributions of rain rates within the satellite`s field of view. Estimates of instantaneous and climate scale rainfall are validated through comparisons with modeled clouds, surface radars, rain gauges and alternative satellite estimates. The accuracy of the rainfall estimates is determined from a combination of validation comparisons, theoretical sampling error calculations, and modeled sensitivity to variations in atmospheric and surface radiative properties. An error budget is constructed for both instantaneous rain rates and climate scale global estimates. At a one degree resolution, the root mean square errors in instantaneous rain rate estimates are 13% over ocean and 20% over land. The root mean square errors in global rainfall totals over a four month period are found to be 46% over ocean and 63% over land. Global rainfall totals are computed on a monthly scale for a three year period from 1987 to 1990. The time series is analyzed for climate scale rainfall distribution and variability.

  11. Observations of exchange between the South China Sea and the Sulu Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sprintall, Janet

    and freshwater balance within the Philippine archipelago. The upper layer in Mindoro Strait has a distinctly] The Philippine archipelago is an oceanographically unique environment with a varied and complex ocean bathymetry). The processes governing variability within the Philippine seas occur over a range of spatial and temporal scales

  12. State authority in an expanded territorial sea 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fulbright, Michael Gene

    1977-01-01

    . , University of West Florida Chairman of Advisory Committee: John L. Seymour The purpose of this thesis was to examine what types of state authority would extend to an expanded area of the territorial sea. This thesis first exa- mines the historical... miles ioso 82 facto for any Gulf State. State boundaries were to be determined by the historic action taken with respect to them jointly by Congress and the state itself. The authors of the SLA intended that such joint action wou~M fix the states...

  13. Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D BGene NetworkNuclearDNP 20082 P r o j e c t DClimateOcean and Sea

  14. ARM - Lesson Plans: Past Sea Level Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska Outreach Home Room News PublicationsClimatePast Sea Level Data

  15. E5 SEA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:of the NationalDynetek Europe GmbH JumpE+Co JumpSEA Jump to:

  16. SeaRoc Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'SHeavyAgency (IRENA)OptionsEquivalentBScira OffshoreSeaEnergy PLCSeaRoc

  17. Sea Power International AB | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-bRenewableSMUD WindISaveScripps Flume JumpSea Girt,

  18. SeaMicro | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-bRenewableSMUD WindISaveScripps Flume JumpSea

  19. Seven Seas Energy LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-bRenewableSMUDSectionalIndustriels de GeneveMileSeas

  20. Triton Sea Wave Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThin Film SolarTown(LECBP) | Open Energy InformationSea Wave

  1. Checkmate SeaEnergy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,CammackFLIR JumpMaine: Energy ResourcesTennessee:Checkmate SeaEnergy Jump

  2. The role of water vapor feedback in unperturbed climate variability and global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, A.; Manabe, Syukuro

    1999-08-01

    To understand the role of water vapor feedback in unperturbed surface temperature variability, a version of the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory coupled ocean-atmosphere model is integrated for 1,000 yr in two configurations, one with water vapor feedback and one without. To understand the role of water vapor feedback in global warming, two 500-yr integrations were also performed in which CO{sub 2} was doubled in both model configurations. The final surface global warming in the model with water vapor feedback is 3.38 C, while in the one without it is only 1.05 C. However, the model`s water vapor feedback has a larger impact on surface warming in response to a doubling of CO{sub 2} than it does on internally generated, low-frequency, global-mean surface temperature anomalies. Water vapor feedback`s strength therefore depends on the type of temperature anomaly it affects. Finally, the authors compare the local and global-mean surface temperature time series from both unperturbed variability experiments to the observed record. The experiment without water vapor feedback does not have enough global-scale variability to reproduce the magnitude of the variability in the observed global-mean record, whether or not one removes the warming trend observed over the past century. In contrast, the amount of variability in the experiment with water vapor feedback is comparable to that of the global-mean record, provided the observed warming trend is removed. Thus, the authors are unable to simulate the observed levels of variability without water vapor feedback.

  3. Global visibility of naked singularities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Giambo'

    2006-03-29

    Global visibility of naked singularities is analyzed here for a class of spherically symmetric spacetimes, extending previous studies - limited to inhomogeneous dust cloud collapse - to more physical valid situations in which pressures are non-vanishing. Existence of nonradial geodesics escaping from the singularity is shown, and the observability of the singularity from far-away observers is discussed.

  4. Excellence in Public & Global Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maizels, Rick

    countries · A positive and constructive working environment, shared by our diverse population of staff and supportive working environment based upon an ethos of respect and rigorous scientific enquiry. We health and health equity worldwide · Global reach and partnerships across high, medium and low income

  5. Satellite Radio: Its Global Impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Udgaonkar, Jayant B.

    Satellite Radio: Its Global Impact TIFR Alumni Lecture By S.Rangarajan #12;1 A wonder called RADIO "No wonder so many physicists started as radio tinkers, and no wonder, before physicist became on Richard Feynmann We will stick to the definition of Radio as · Wireless Audio Delivery ·Listener cannot

  6. RENEWABLES 2005 GLOBAL STATUS REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    to renewable energy. The establishment of a global policy network was embraced in the Political Declaration Research Institute Chinese Renewable Energy Industries Association China Susan McDade Energy Environment Institute Lead Author: Eric Martinotwww.ren21.net #12;Renewable Energy Policy Network for the 21st Century

  7. RENEWABLES 2007 GLOBAL STATUS REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    RENEWABLES 2007 GLOBAL STATUS REPORT www.ren21.net #12;Renewable Energy Policy Network for the 21st renewable energy. It provides a forum for leadership and exchange in international policy processes. It bolsters appropriate policies that increase the wise use of renewable energies in developing

  8. Global Temperature November 3, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    of instrumental temperature measurements occurred when the 1997-98 "El Nino of the century" occurred on the back of a strong two-decade warming trend; in addition, the global temperature impact of the El Nino, which typically lags the El Nino by a few months, coincided almost precisely with calendar year 1998. As a result

  9. Conservation and Global Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landweber, Laura

    V.6 Conservation and Global Climate Change Diane M. Debinski and Molly S. Cross OUTLINE 1. Introduction 2. How climate is changing 3. Environmental responses to climate change 4. Consequences of climate the coming decades will be preserving biodiversity in the face of climate change. It has become increasingly

  10. Global Information for Export Success

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    they are in a draft stage and subject to revision. In this way, international free trade, international transpar- encyGlobal Information for Export Success Notify U.S. is a service for U.S. exporters and trade and regulations that impact export market access · A daily report providing U.S. trade stakeholders

  11. Effects of PV Module Soiling on Glass Surface Resistance and Potential-Induced Degradation: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hacke, Peter; Burton, Patrick; Hendrickson, Alex; Spartaru, Sergiu; Glick, Stephen; Terwilliger, Kent

    2015-12-03

    The sheet resistance of three soil types (Arizona road dust, soot, and sea salt) on glass were measured by the transmission line method as a function of relative humidity (RH) between 39% and 95% at 60 degrees C. Sea salt yielded a 3.5 order of magnitude decrease in resistance on the glass surface when the RH was increased over this RH range. Arizona road dust showed reduced sheet resistance at lower RH, but with less humidity sensitivity over the range tested. The soot sample did not show significant resistivity change compared to the unsoiled control. Photovoltaic modules with sea salt on their faces were step-stressed between 25% and 95% RH at 60 degrees C applying -1000 V bias to the active cell circuit. Leakage current from the cell circuit to ground ranged between two and ten times higher than that of the unsoiled controls. Degradation rate of modules with salt on the surface increased with increasing RH and time.

  12. Ecosystem-Based Management Tools Network Webinar: Community-Based Sea Level Rise Projections

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Washington Sea Grant has partnered with the Jamestown S'Klallam Tribe and Adaptation International to develop local sea level rise projections and sea level scenario maps for the Jamestown S...

  13. Temperature-associated increases in the global soil respiration record

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Thomson, Allison M.

    2010-03-25

    Soil respiration (RS), the flux of CO2 from the soil surface to the atmosphere, comprises the second-largest terrestrial carbon flux, but its dynamics are incompletely understood, and the global flux remains poorly constrained. Ecosystem warming experiments, modelling analyses, and biokinetics all suggest that RS should change with climate. This has been difficult to confirm observationally because of the high spatial variability of RS, inaccessibility of the soil medium, and inability of remote sensing instruments to measure large-scale RS fluxes. Given these constraints, is it possible to discern climate-driven changes in regional or global RS fluxes in the extant four-decade record of RS chamber measurements? Here we use a database of worldwide RS observations, matched with high-resolution historical climate data, to show a previously unknown temporal trend in the RS record after accounting for mean annual climate, leaf area, nitrogen deposition, and changes in CO2 measurement technique. Air temperature anomaly (deviation from the 1961-1990 mean) is significantly and positively correlated with changes in RS fluxes; both temperature and precipitation anomalies exert effects in specific biomes. We estimate that the current (2008) annual global RS flux is 98±12 Pg and has increased 0.1 Pg yr-1 over the last 20 years, implying a global RS temperature response (Q10) of 1.5. An increasing global RS flux does not necessarily constitute a positive feedback loop to the atmosphere; nonetheless, the available data are consistent with an acceleration of the terrestrial carbon cycle in response to global climate change.

  14. Structural elements of the Sulu Sea, Philippines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinz, K.; Block, M.; Kudrass, H.R.; Meyer, H. , Hannover )

    1994-07-01

    The structure and tectonic history of the Sulu Sea are described on the basis of seismic reflection data combined with the findings of onshore and offshore geological studies, and the results of ODP Leg 124 drilling. Closing of a hypothetical Mesozoic proto-South China Sea associated with the formation of oceanic crustal splinters in the late Eocene followed by southward subduction and, in turn, progressive collision of the north Palawan continental terrane with the micro-continental Borneo plate since the middle Miocene, resulted in the formation of the structurally complex Sulu-Borneo collision belt. The latter comprises north Sabah, southern and central Palawan, and the northwest Sulu basin. Fracturing of the Borneo micro-continental plate into the Sulu and Cagayan ridges initiated the opening of the southeast Sulu basin during the late Oligocene through the early Miocene. Collision of the north Palawan continental terrane with Cagayan Ridge in the late early Miocene and oblique collision of these blocks with the central Philippines resulted in the still ongoing closing of the southeast Sulu basin since the middle or late Miocene. Closing of the southeast Sulu basin began with the formation of an oceanic crustal slab.

  15. Carbon Cycle Coastal Sensitivity to Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    For the Year 2000. Available online from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center [http to reduce carbon emissions from landuse change, and may also advance global terrestrial and climate an enormous 500 billion tones of carbon, more than 60 times annual anthropogenic carbon emissions

  16. Scaling law analysis of paraffin thin films on different surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dotto, M. E. R.; Camargo, S. S. Jr. [Engenharia Metalurgica e de Materials, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Cx. Postal 68505, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, CEP 21945-970 (Brazil)

    2010-01-15

    The dynamics of paraffin deposit formation on different surfaces was analyzed based on scaling laws. Carbon-based films were deposited onto silicon (Si) and stainless steel substrates from methane (CH{sub 4}) gas using radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The different substrates were characterized with respect to their surface energy by contact angle measurements, surface roughness, and morphology. Paraffin thin films were obtained by the casting technique and were subsequently characterized by an atomic force microscope in noncontact mode. The results indicate that the morphology of paraffin deposits is strongly influenced by substrates used. Scaling laws analysis for coated substrates present two distinct dynamics: a local roughness exponent ({alpha}{sub local}) associated to short-range surface correlations and a global roughness exponent ({alpha}{sub global}) associated to long-range surface correlations. The local dynamics is described by the Wolf-Villain model, and a global dynamics is described by the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang model. A local correlation length (L{sub local}) defines the transition between the local and global dynamics with L{sub local} approximately 700 nm in accordance with the spacing of planes measured from atomic force micrographs. For uncoated substrates, the growth dynamics is related to Edwards-Wilkinson model.

  17. Deep South China Sea circulation Guihua Wang,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Shang-Ping

    Deep South China Sea circulation Guihua Wang,1,2 ShangPing Xie,2,3 Tangdong Qu,2 and Rui Xin Huang4 Environment Model reveals a basin scale cyclonic circulation over the deep South China Sea (SCS). The cyclonic, and potential density in the deep SCS are consistent with the existence of the cyclonic circulation

  18. HABITAT PREFERENCES OF CALIFORNIA SEA LIONS: IMPLICATIONS FOR CONSERVATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerber, Leah R.

    , curvature of shoreline, and availability of shade, water pools, and resting areas--at 26 sites (7 islands) occupied by sea lions and 33 unused sites (8 islands) distributed throughout the Gulf of California, Mexico are likely to play a role in the prevention of heat stress in sea lions, suggesting that increases

  19. SEAS Employee Council Meeting Wednesday, November 11, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Wei

    SEAS Employee Council Meeting Wednesday, November 11, 2009 Present: Ricky Buchanan (ChE), Peggy Loyd on making changes to the SEC Website. The changes include adding a pictorial directory of members was forwarded to the Dean. Next Meeting: Please note that there will be a change in date: The next SEAS Employee

  20. USE OF ELECTRICITY IN THE CONTROL OF SEA LAMPREYS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of checking weirs 21 ( 2 Physical measurements 21 (3) Electrical measurements 23 Power consumption 23 VoltageUSE OF ELECTRICITY IN THE CONTROL OF SEA LAMPREYS Marine Biological Laboratory LIBRAKY APR 21 1153 Service, Albert M. Day, Director USE OF ELECTRICITY IN THE CONTROL OF SEA LAMPREYS: ELECTROMECHANICAL