Sample records for global sea surface

  1. GLOBAL PATTERN OF MESOSCALE VARIABILITY IN SEA SURFACE HEIGHT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaplan, Alexey

    GLOBAL PATTERN OF MESOSCALE VARIABILITY IN SEA SURFACE HEIGHT AND ITS DYNAMICAL CAUSES Alexey separate the mesoscale variability of sea surface heights into its spatial and temporal components of mesoscale variability in different areas to dynamical causes. Major portion of it can be explained

  2. Response of tropical sea surface temperature, precipitation, and tropical cyclone-related variables to changes in global and local forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sobel, Adam

    A single-column model is used to estimate the equilibrium response of sea surface temperature (SST), precipitation, and several variables related to tropical cyclone (TC) activity to changes in both local and global forcing. ...

  3. GSOD Based Daily Global Mean Surface Temperature and Mean Sea Level Air Pressure (1982-2011)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xuan Shi, Dali Wang

    2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This data product contains all the gridded data set at 1/4 degree resolution in ASCII format. Both mean temperature and mean sea level air pressure data are available. It also contains the GSOD data (1982-2011) from NOAA site, contains station number, location, temperature and pressures (sea level and station level). The data package also contains information related to the data processing methods

  4. GSOD Based Daily Global Mean Surface Temperature and Mean Sea Level Air Pressure (1982-2011)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Xuan Shi, Dali Wang

    This data product contains all the gridded data set at 1/4 degree resolution in ASCII format. Both mean temperature and mean sea level air pressure data are available. It also contains the GSOD data (1982-2011) from NOAA site, contains station number, location, temperature and pressures (sea level and station level). The data package also contains information related to the data processing methods

  5. A KNOWLEDGE DISCOVERY STRATEGY FOR RELATING SEA SURFACE TEMPERATURES TO FREQUENCIES OF TROPICAL STORMS AND GENERATING PREDICTIONS OF HURRICANES UNDER 21ST-CENTURY GLOBAL WARMING SCENARIOS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Race, Caitlin [University of Minnesota; Steinbach, Michael [University of Minnesota; Ganguly, Auroop R [ORNL; Semazzi, Fred [North Carolina State University; Kumar, Vipin [University of Minnesota

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The connections among greenhouse-gas emissions scenarios, global warming, and frequencies of hurricanes or tropical cyclones are among the least understood in climate science but among the most fiercely debated in the context of adaptation decisions or mitigation policies. Here we show that a knowledge discovery strategy, which leverages observations and climate model simulations, offers the promise of developing credible projections of tropical cyclones based on sea surface temperatures (SST) in a warming environment. While this study motivates the development of new methodologies in statistics and data mining, the ability to solve challenging climate science problems with innovative combinations of traditional and state-of-the-art methods is demonstrated. Here we develop new insights, albeit in a proof-of-concept sense, on the relationship between sea surface temperatures and hurricane frequencies, and generate the most likely projections with uncertainty bounds for storm counts in the 21st-century warming environment based in turn on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Special Report on Emissions Scenarios. Our preliminary insights point to the benefits that can be achieved for climate science and impacts analysis, as well as adaptation and mitigation policies, by a solution strategy that remains tailored to the climate domain and complements physics-based climate model simulations with a combination of existing and new computational and data science approaches.

  6. Global Warming and Caspian Sea Level Fluctuations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ardakanian, Reza

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coastal regions have a high social, economical and environmental importance. Due to this importance the sea level fluctuations can have many bad consequences. In this research the correlation between the increasing trend of temperature in coastal stations due to Global Warming and the Caspian Sea level has been established. The Caspian Sea level data has been received from the Jason-1 satellite. It was resulted that the monthly correlation between the temperature and sea level is high and also positive and almost the same for all the stations. But the yearly correlation was negative. It means that the sea level has decreased by the increase in temperature.

  7. Rising Sea Levels Due to Global Warming Are Unstoppable

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rising Sea Levels Due to Global Warming Are Unstoppable Rising Sea Levels Due to Global Warming Are Unstoppable Mitigation can slow down but not prevent sea level rise for...

  8. GLOBAL BIOGEOCHEMICAL CYCLES, VOL. , NO. , PAGES 17, Mesoscale variability of sea surface pCO2: What does it

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahadevan, Amala

    of wind, heat flux and phytoplankton produc- tion. The effect of upwelled DIC on surface pCO2 is largely offset by the lower temper- ature of the upwelled water and the consumption of DIC by phytoplankton value computed from a regional mean of the variables could be somewhat different than the mean regional

  9. The multimillennial sea-level commitment of global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marzeion, Ben

    The multimillennial sea-level commitment of global warming Anders Levermanna,b,1 , Peter U. Clarkc Board June 13, 2013 (received for review November 7, 2012) Global mean sea level has been steadily for different levels of global mean temperature increase above preindustrial levels. Although sea- level rise

  10. Surface Impedance Tomography for Antarctic Sea Ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    Surface Impedance Tomography for Antarctic Sea Ice C. Sampsona , K. M. Goldena , A. Gullya , A. P, Australia Abstract During the 2007 SIPEX expedition in pack ice off the coast of East Antarctica, we measured the electrical conductivity of sea ice via surface impedance tomography. Resistance data from

  11. HYBRID DECADE-MEAN GLOBAL SEA LEVEL WITH MESOSCALE RESOLUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HYBRID DECADE-MEAN GLOBAL SEA LEVEL WITH MESOSCALE RESOLUTION Nikolai A. Maximenko1 and Pearn P of twin-satellite mission GRACE and mesoscale sea level tilt derived from the momentum balance as seen 55 #12;sea level exhibits excellent accuracy on mesoscale, but may contain significant systematic

  12. Sea surface wave reconstruction from marine radar images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qi, Yusheng, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The X-band marine radar is one type of remote sensing technology which is being increasingly used to measure sea surface waves nowadays. In this thesis, how to reconstruct sea surface wave elevation maps from X-band marine ...

  13. SEA SURFACE CURRENT FIELDS IN THE BALTIC SEA DERIVED FROM MULTI-SENSOR SATELLITE DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamburg,.Universität

    -sensor, algae blooms, surface currents, optical flow ABSTRACT: Mesoscale dynamic sea surface features demonstrate the use of multi- sensor / multi-channel satellite images for the computation of mesoscale surface

  14. atlantic sea surface: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    reduce the solar energy in the atmospheric layer could also contribute to reduce the solar energy reach- ing the sea surface thus leading Antoine, David 28 Five year...

  15. HARMONIC FUNCTIONS FOR SEA-SURFACE TEMPERATURES AND SALINITIES, KOKO HEAD, OAHU, 1956-69, AND SEA-SURFACE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HARMONIC FUNCTIONS FOR SEA-SURFACE TEMPERATURES AND SALINITIES, KOKO HEAD, OAHU, 1956-69, AND SEA-SURFACE TEMPERATURES, CHRISTMAS ISLAND, 1954-69 GUNTHER It SECKEL' AND MARIAN Y. Y. YONG' ABSTRACT Harmonic functions, with daily sampling, are on average 0.07° C. Harmonic analysis spanning the entire sampling duration shows

  16. The dynamic response of high Arctic glaciers to global warming and their contribution to sea-level rise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lam, J.K.W. [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom). Scott Polar Research Inst.; Dowdeswell, J.A. [Univ. of Wales (United Kingdom)

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simulations with General Circulation Models have indicated that global warming will be enhanced at high latitudes. Regions in the high Arctic are highly sensitive to increased concentrations of greenhouse gases, with an amplified theoretical rise of 8--14 C predicted to take place in winter and a negligible rise of 2 C in summer. Wetter conditions in these regions are quite plausible with global warming due to warmer sea surface temperatures, melting of sea ice and a greater moisture holding capacity of the atmosphere. Recent observations show a marked increase in precipitation in the high Arctic regions during the past decades, particularly in the winters. The notion of whether the increased melting of snow due to global warming would be offset by increased snowfall is investigated in this study. To make reliable predictions of the response of high Arctic glaciers to global warming and hence their contribution to sea-level rise, a numerical model has been developed to investigate the interactions of the glaciers with climate change induced by global warming. The model is a one-dimensional numerical ice-flow model coupled with a surface balance model. Accumulation and ablation at the glacier surface are determined by the surface balance model using an energy balance approach.

  17. Observed and CAM3 GCM Sea Surface Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zender, Charles

    Observed and CAM3 GCM Sea Surface Wind Speed Distributions: Characterization, Comparison, and Bias climatological surface wind speed probability density functions (PDFs) estimated from observations and use them to evaluate, for the first time, contemporaneous wind PDFs predicted by a GCM. The ob- servations include NASA

  18. Sea surface exchanges of momentum, heat, and freshwater determined by satellite remote sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Lisan

    1 Sea surface exchanges of momentum, heat, and freshwater determined by satellite remote sensing Freshwater flux Latent heat flux Longwave radiation Satellite remote sensing Sea surface flux estimation Sensible heat flux Shortwave radiation Surface wind fields 2 #12;Sea surface exchanges of momentum, heat

  19. Lidar fluorosensing of mineral oil spills on the sea surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Carl von Ossietzky Universität

    be discriminated from heavy fuel, and from less harmful substances like fish oil or vegetable oil, Fig. 3, whichLidar fluorosensing of mineral oil spills on the sea surface Theo Hengstermann and Rainer Reuter Airborne .fluorosensor measurements over maritime oil spills show that this method enables a sensitive

  20. Comment on 'Discussions on common errors in analyzing sea level accelerations, solar trends and global warming'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benestad, R E

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Comment on Scafetta, Nicola. 'Discussion on Common Errors in Analyzing Sea Level Accelerations, Solar Trends and Global Warming.' arXiv:1305.2812 (May 13, 2013a). doi:10.5194/prp-1-37-2013.

  1. Preliminary global assessment of terrestrial biodiversity consequences of sea level rise mediated by climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menon, Shaily; Soberó n, Jorge; Li, Xingong; Peterson, A. Townsend

    2010-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Considerable attention has focused on the climatic effects of global climate change on biodiversity, but few analyses and no broad assessments have evaluated the effects of sea level rise on biodiversity. Taking advantage of new maps of marine...

  2. Harmonic analysis of climatological sea surface salinity Tim P. Boyer and Sydney Levitus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harmonic analysis of climatological sea surface salinity Tim P. Boyer and Sydney Levitus Ocean: Boyer, T. P., and S. Levitus, Harmonic analysis of climatological sea surface salinity, J. Geophys. Res

  3. Sea Ice in the Global Climate System Kenneth M. Golden1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    Sea Ice in the Global Climate System Kenneth M. Golden1 , Elizabeth Hunke2 , Cecilia Bitz3 Figure 2. The Antarctic sea ice pack with an open lead in the distance. (K. M. Golden) Figure 1. Pancake ice in the Southern Ocean off the coast of East Antarctica. (K. M. Golden

  4. Warming of Global Abyssal and Deep Southern Ocean Waters between the 1990s and 2000s: Contributions to Global Heat and Sea Level Rise Budgets*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Gregory C.

    Warming of Global Abyssal and Deep Southern Ocean Waters between the 1990s and 2000s: Contributions of recent warming of these regions in global heat and sea level budgets. The authors 1) compute warming produces a 0.053 (60.017) mm yr21 increase in global average sea level and the deep warming south

  5. Constraining Wind Stress Products with Sea Surface Height Observations and Implications for Pacific Ocean Sea Level Trend Attribution*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    England, Matthew

    Ocean Sea Level Trend Attribution* SHAYNE MCGREGOR, ALEXANDER SEN GUPTA, AND MATTHEW H. ENGLAND Climate are available that are commonly used to examine climate vari- ability or trends and as boundary conditions.e., upper ocean heat content redistribution) versus global mean sea level change (i.e., including

  6. The Global Topography of Mars and Implications for Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hauck II, Steven A.

    The Global Topography of Mars and Implications for Surface Evolution David E. Smith,1 * Maria T the mar- tian surface. Before the MGS mission, models of mar- tian topography were derived from Earth- accuracy global map of the topography of Mars. Dominant features include the low northern hemisphere

  7. Rapid Rise of Sea Level 19,000 Years Ago and Its Global Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    Rapid Rise of Sea Level 19,000 Years Ago and Its Global Implications Peter U. Clark,1* A. Marshall of an abrupt rise in sea level (meltwater pulse) at 19,000 years before the present (B.P.). Climate records level rise of 10 to 15 m at 19,000 years B.P. (1) (Fig. 1). (Unless otherwise indicated, all ages

  8. Loggerhead sea turtles are circum-global, inhabiting temperate, sub-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    waters of the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans. In the Pacific, loggerhead sea turtles have been in the North Pacific Ocean occurs in Japan; there is no known nesting in the east- ern North Pacific (Márquez in the oceanic realm of the central North Pacific Ocean are of Japanese stock (Dutton et al., 1998). Tagging

  9. A Global View on the Wind Sea and Swell Climate and Variability from ERA-40 ALVARO SEMEDO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    A Global View on the Wind Sea and Swell Climate and Variability from ERA-40 ALVARO SEMEDO 2010) ABSTRACT In this paper a detailed global climatology of wind-sea and swell parameters, based on the 45-yr European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Re-Analysis (ERA-40) wave reanalysis

  10. The Intra-Americas Sea springtime surface temperature anomaly dipole as fingerprint of remote influences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chunzai

    The Intra-Americas Sea springtime surface temperature anomaly dipole as fingerprint of remote anomaly dipole we find that the dipole forms mostly in response to changes in the air-sea heat fluxes. The changes in shortwave radiation also contribute to the dipole of net air-sea heat flux. The changes

  11. Reconciling multidecadal land-sea global temperature with rising CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pratt, Vaughan

    Reconciling multidecadal land-sea global temperature with rising CO2 Vaughan Pratt Stanford CO2 1 / 35 #12;Goal Additional insight into 1 Similarity of the 1860-1880 & 1910-1940 rises to 1970-2000. 2 The recent pause 3 No sign of 3 C per doubling of CO2. Some applicable audiences: Average reader

  12. Reconciling multidecadal land-sea global temperature with rising CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pratt, Vaughan

    Reconciling multidecadal land-sea global temperature with rising CO2 Vaughan Pratt Stanford CO2 1 / 29 #12;Goal Additional insight into 1 Similarity of the 1860-1880 & 1910-1940 rises to 1970-2000. 2 The recent pause (2001-2013). 3 No sign of 3 C per doubling of CO2. Simple reasoning (no opaque

  13. On the global oxygen anomaly and air-sea flux Hernan E. Garcia1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a global extratropical carbon new production during the outgassing season of 3.7 Pg C (1 Pg = 1015 g by wind, waves, or small-scale breaking (i.e., bubble injection and spray), and aeolian inputs of labile are to delimit sources and sinks of photosynthetic carbon production and air-sea exchange of CO2 [e.g., Keeling

  14. Correlations between hurricane numbers and sea surface temperature: why does the correlation disappear at landfall?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laepple, T; Jewson, S; Nzerem, K; Laepple, Thomas; Bellone, Enrica; Jewson, Stephen; Nzerem, Kechi

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is significant correlation between main development region sea surface temperature and the number of hurricanes that form in the Atlantic basin. The correlation between the same sea surface temperatures and the number of \\emph{landfalling} hurricanes is much lower, however. Why is this? Do we need to consider complex physical hypotheses, or is there a simple statistical explanation?

  15. Relationships between Pacific and Atlantic ocean sea surface temperatures and U.S. streamflow variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piechota, Thomas C.

    Relationships between Pacific and Atlantic ocean sea surface temperatures and U.S. streamflow March 2006; published 19 July 2006. [1] An evaluation of Pacific and Atlantic Ocean sea surface by an interdecadal-temporal evaluation for the Pacific (Atlantic) Ocean based on the phase of the Pacific Decadal

  16. Global Sea Level Stabilization-Sand Dune Fixation: A Solar-powered Sahara Seawater Textile Pipeline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viorel Badescu; Richard B. Cathcart; Alexander A. Bolonkin

    2007-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Could anthropogenic saturation with pumped seawater of the porous ground of active sand dune fields in major deserts (e.g., the westernmost Sahara) cause a beneficial reduction of global sea level? Seawater extraction from the ocean, and its deposition on deserted sand dune fields in Mauritania and elsewhere via a Solar-powered Seawater Textile Pipeline (SSTP) can thwart the postulated future global sea level. Thus, Macro-engineering offers an additional cure for anticipated coastal change, driven by global sea level rise, that could supplement, or substitute for (1) stabilizing the shoreline with costly defensive public works (armoring macroprojects) and (2) permanent retreat from the existing shoreline (real and capital property abandonment). We propose Macro-engineering use tactical technologies that sculpt and vegetate barren near-coast sand dune fields with seawater, seawater that would otherwise, as commonly postulated, enlarge Earth seascape area! Our Macro-engineering speculation blends eremology with hydrogeology and some hydromancy. We estimate its cost at 1 billion dollars - about 0.01 per sent of the USA 2007 Gross Domestic Product.

  17. Modeling Abrupt Change in Global Sea Level Arising from Ocean - Ice-Sheet Interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David M Holland

    2011-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    It is proposed to develop, validate, and apply a coupled ocean ice-sheet model to simulate possible, abrupt future change in global sea level. This research is to be carried out collaboratively between an academic institute and a Department of Energy Laboratory (DOE), namely, the PI and a graduate student at New York University (NYU) and climate model researchers at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The NYU contribution is mainly in the area of incorporating new physical processes into the model, while the LANL efforts are focused on improved numerics and overall model development. NYU and LANL will work together on applying the model to a variety of modeling scenarios of recent past and possible near-future abrupt change to the configuration of the periphery of the major ice sheets. The project's ultimate goal is to provide a robust, accurate prediction of future global sea level change, a feat that no fully-coupled climate model is currently capable of producing. This proposal seeks to advance that ultimate goal by developing, validating, and applying a regional model that can simulate the detailed processes involved in sea-level change due to oceanÃ?Â? ice-sheet interaction. Directly modeling ocean ice-sheet processes in a fully-coupled global climate model is not a feasible activity at present given the near-complete absence of development of any such causal mechanism in these models to date.

  18. Basin patterns of global sea level changes for 20042007 You-Soon Chang , Anthony J. Rosati, Gabriel A. Vecchi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basin patterns of global sea level changes for 2004­2007 You-Soon Chang , Anthony J. Rosati (density-related) components. The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite was launched

  19. A FETCH DEPENDENT MODEL OF SEA SURFACE ROUGHNESS FOR OFFSHORE WIND POWER UTILISATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    , Resources, Roughness, Coastal Sea Areas, Waves, Rødsand 1 INTRODUCTION Large offshore wind farms are beingA FETCH DEPENDENT MODEL OF SEA SURFACE ROUGHNESS FOR OFFSHORE WIND POWER UTILISATION Bernhard Lange wind conditions of offshore sites, since the higher energy yield has to compensate the additional

  20. The southern Caribbean upwelling system: Sea surface temperature, wind forcing and chlorophyll concentration patterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Steven D.

    The southern Caribbean upwelling system: Sea surface temperature, wind forcing and chlorophyll Accepted 22 April 2013 Available online 29 April 2013 Keywords: Coastal upwelling SST Caribbean Sea Ekman, 1994­2009) were used to characterize the southern Caribbean upwelling system. This system extends from

  1. Z .Global and Planetary Change 20 1999 93123 Global sea level rise and glacial isostatic adjustment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peltier, W. Richard

    adjustment W.R. Peltier ) Department of Physics, UniÕersity of Toronto, 60 St. George Street, Toronto-mail: peltier@atmosp.physics.utoronto.ca Z .rather recently Peltier and Tushingham, 1989 , it was not clearly;( )W.R. PeltierrGlobal and Planetary Change 20 1999 93­12394 Z .existed at that time e.g., Peltier

  2. Sea surface temperature for climate from the along-track scanning radiometers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Embury, Owen

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes the construction of a sea surface temperature (SST) dataset from Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (ATSR) observations suitable for climate applications. The algorithms presented here are now used at ...

  3. Free and forced tropical variability: role of the wind-evaporation-sea surface temperature (WES) feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahajan, Salil

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Wind-Evaporation-Sea Surface Temperature (WES) feedback is believedto play an important role in the tropics, where climate variability is governed byatmosphere-ocean coupled interactions. This dissertation reports on studies to distinctlyisolate...

  4. Sub-surface dissolution of evaporites in the Eastern Mediterranean sea 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camerlenghi, Angelo Alessandro

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SUB-SURFACE DISSOLUTION OF EVAPORITES IN THE EASTERN MEDITERRANEAN SEA A Thesis by ANGELO ALESSANDRO CAMERLENGHI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1988 Major Subject: Oceanography SUB-SURFACE DISSOLUTION OF EVAPORITES IN THE EASTERN MEDITERRANEAN SEA A Thesis by ANGELO ALESSANDRO CAMERLENGHI Approved as to style and content by: Pl&DWa~rg~~~ William R. Bryair...

  5. What Global Warming Looks Like The July 2010 global map of surface temperature anomalies (Figure 1), relative to the average

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    What Global Warming Looks Like The July 2010 global map of surface temperature anomalies (Figure 1 anomalies an example of what we can expect global warming to look like? Maps of temperature anomalies, such as Figure 1, are useful for helping people understand the role of global warming in extreme events

  6. Global warming and hurricane intensity and frequency: The debate continues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kareem, Ahsan

    Global warming and hurricane intensity and frequency: The debate continues Megan Mc of these changes. Some scientists believe that global warming and increased sea surface temperatures are to blame, global warming and increased sea surface temperatures do appear to have influenced hurricane frequency

  7. Global warming and United States landfalling hurricanes Chunzai Wang1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chunzai

    Global warming and United States landfalling hurricanes Chunzai Wang1 and Sang-Ki Lee2 Received 18] A secular warming of sea surface temperature occurs almost everywhere over the global ocean. Here we use observational data to show that global warming of the sea surface is associated with a secular increase

  8. Observed and CAM3 GCM Sea Surface Wind Speed Distributions: Characterization, Comparison, and Bias Reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zender, Charles

    resources force the use of coarse-resolution GCMs, which do not resolve finer-scale wind speed fluctuationsObserved and CAM3 GCM Sea Surface Wind Speed Distributions: Characterization, Comparison, and Bias (Manuscript received 10 December 2007, in final form 8 April 2008) ABSTRACT Climatological surface wind speed

  9. Impact of the Southern ocean winds on sea-ice - ocean interaction and its associated global ocean circulation in a warming world

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheon, Woo Geunn

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation discusses a linkage between the Southern Ocean (SO) winds and the global ocean circulation in the framework of a coarse-resolution global ocean general circulation model coupled to a sea-ice model. In addition to reexamination...

  10. Estimated solar contribution to the global surface warming using the ACRIM TSI satellite composite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scafetta, Nicola

    Estimated solar contribution to the global surface warming using the ACRIM TSI satellite composite minimally contributed $10­30% of the global surface temperature warming over the period 1980­2002. Citation: Scafetta, N., and B. J. West (2005), Estimated solar contribution to the global surface warming using

  11. THE USE OF SPATIAL CONSTRAINTS IN THE DERIVATION OF MESOSCALE SEA SURFACE CURRENT FIELDS FROM MULTI-SENSOR SATELLITE DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamburg,.Universität

    THE USE OF SPATIAL CONSTRAINTS IN THE DERIVATION OF MESOSCALE SEA SURFACE CURRENT FIELDS FROM MULTI images are used for the computation of mesoscale surface currents in the Northern and Southern Baltic for the derivation of mesoscale sea surface currents using multi-sensor / multi-channel satellite images by means

  12. THE ROLE OF ODP IN UNDERSTANDING THE CAUSESTHE ROLE OF ODP IN UNDERSTANDING THE CAUSESTHE ROLE OF ODP IN UNDERSTANDING THE CAUSESTHE ROLE OF ODP IN UNDERSTANDING THE CAUSESTHE ROLE OF ODP IN UNDERSTANDING THE CAUSES AND EFFECTS OF GLOBAL SEA LEVEL CHANGEA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    profound impacts on the distribution of sediments sources of mineral and water resources the stability IN UNDERSTANDING THE CAUSES AND EFFECTS OF GLOBAL SEA LEVEL CHANGEAND EFFECTS OF GLOBAL SEA LEVEL CHANGEAND EFFECTS OF GLOBAL SEA LEVEL CHANGEAND EFFECTS OF GLOBAL SEA LEVEL CHANGEAND EFFECTS OF GLOBAL SEA LEVEL CHANGE "Much

  13. alternative global climate: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Information Sciences Websites Summary: A Statistical Analysis of Global Inter-Annual Climate Anomalies in Monthly Sea Surface Temperature Records. Jian Huang and Finbarr...

  14. This Letter presented projections of future sea-level rise based on simulations of the past 22,000 years of sea-level history using a simple, empirical model linking sea-level rise to global mean-temperature anomalies. One of the main conclusions of the L

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddall, Mark

    This Letter presented projections of future sea-level rise based on simulations of the past 22,000 years of sea-level history using a simple, empirical model linking sea-level rise to global mean of sea-level rise during the twenty-first century that are reported in the Fourth Assessment Report

  15. Sea-surface topography of the Gulf of Mexico, based on ship drift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linn, Johnnie Burdette

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SEA-SURFACE TOPOGRAPHY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO, BASED ON SHIP DRIFT A Thesis JOHNNIE BURDETTE LINN III Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER QF SCIENCE May... 1975 Major Subject: Oceanography SEA-SURFACE TOPOGRAPHY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO, BASED ON SHIP DRIFT A Thesi. s by JOHNNIE BURDETTE LINN III Approved as to style and content by: ( airman of Committee) (Head of Department) (Memb er) Xl~ VJ !'i...

  16. Enhancing the resolution of sea ice in long-term global ocean general circulation model (gcm) integrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Joong Tae

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Open water in sea ice, such as leads and polynyas, plays a crucial role in determining the formation of deep- and bottom-water, as well as their long-term global properties and circulation. Ocean general circulation models (GCMs) designed...

  17. Global Distribution and Density of Constructed Impervious Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elvidge, Christopher D. [NOAA National Geophysical Data Center,; Tuttle, Benjamin T. [NOAA National Geophysical Data Center,; Sutton, Paul S. [University of Denver; Baugh, Kimberly E. [NOAA National Geophysical Data Center,; Howard, Ara T. [NOAA National Geophysical Data Center,; Milesi, Christina [Foundation of California State University, Monterey Bay, California.; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL; Nemani, Ramakrishna R [NASA Ames Research Center

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first global inventory of the spatial distribution and density of constructed impervious surface area (ISA). Examples of ISA include roads, parking lots, buildings, driveways, sidewalks and other manmade surfaces. While high spatial resolution is required to observe these features, the product we made is at one km2 resolution and is based on two coarse resolution indicators of ISA. Inputs into the product include the brightness of satellite observed nighttime lights and population count. The reference data used in the calibration were derived from 30 meter resolution ISA estimates of the USA from the U.S. Geological Survey. Nominally the product is for the years 2000-01 since both the nighttime lights and reference data are from those two years. We found that 1.05% of the United States land area is impervious surface (83,337 km2) and 0.43 % of the world's land surface (579,703 km2) is constructed impervious surface. China has more ISA than any other country (87,182 km2), but has only 67 m2 of ISA per person, compared to 297 m2 per person in the USA. Hyrdologic and environmental impacts of ISA begin to be exhibited when the density of ISA reaches 10% of the land surface. An examination of the areas with 10% or more ISA in watersheds finds that with the exception of Europe, the majority of watershed areas have less than 0.4% of their area at or above the 10% ISA threshold. The authors believe the next step for improving the product is to include reference ISA data from many more areas around the world.

  18. The global energy balance from a surface perspective Martin Wild Doris Folini Christoph Schar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    The global energy balance from a surface perspective Martin Wild · Doris Folini · Christoph Scha of the global energy balance, the radiative energy exchanges between Sun, Earth and space are now accurately to constrain the global energy balance not only from space, but also from the surface. We combine

  19. Year-ahead Prediction of Hurricane Season Sea Surface Temperature in the Tropical Atlantic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meagher, J; Meagher, Jonathan; Jewson, Stephen

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One possible method for the year-ahead prediction of hurricane numbers would be to make a year-ahead prediction of sea surface temperature (SST), and then to apply relationships that link SST to hurricane numbers. As a first step towards setting up such a system this article compares three simple statistical methods for the year-ahead prediction of the relevant SSTs.

  20. Modelling of a captive unmanned aerial system teledetecting oil pollution on sea surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    -Water Horizon crisis in the Gulf of Mexico, numerous aerial means were used to detect oil pollution locationsModelling of a captive unmanned aerial system teledetecting oil pollution on sea surface F. Muttin-spill, detection, dynamic modelling, winch, maritime pollution. 1 Introduction During 2010, and the Deep

  1. Submitted to Journal of Physical Oceanography Sea Surface Temperature Variability Along the Path of the Antarctic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Czaja, Arnaud

    level pressure and air-sea heat fluxes. It is found that a significant fraction of SST variability) and remote forcing by ENSO. The physical mechanisms rely on the interplay between atmospheric variability the South Pa- cific, inducing surface heat fluxes (Fs) and Ekman heat advection (Fek) anomalies. A simple

  2. Importance of thermal effects and sea surface roughness for offshore wind resource assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    sites. The first large offshore wind farms are currently being built in several countries in EuropeImportance of thermal effects and sea surface roughness for offshore wind resource assessment National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark Abstract The economic feasibility of offshore wind power utilisation

  3. Why are climate models reproducing the observed global surface warming so well?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    Why are climate models reproducing the observed global surface warming so well? Reto Knutti1 global surface warming so well?, Geophys. Res. Lett., 35, L18704, doi:10.1029/ 2008GL034932. 1 models reproduce the observed surface warming better than one would expect given the uncertainties

  4. Predicting hurricane numbers from Sea Surface Temperature: closed form expressions for the mean, variance and standard error of the number of hurricanes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jewson, S

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One way to predict hurricane numbers would be to predict sea surface temperature, and then predict hurricane numbers as a function of the predicted sea surface temperature. For certain parametric models for sea surface temperature and the relationship between sea surface temperature and hurricane numbers, closed-form solutions exist for the mean and the variance of the number of predicted hurricanes, and for the standard error on the mean. We derive a number of such expressions.

  5. The historical global sea-level budget J.C. MOORE,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, John

    -level contributions from glaciers and small ice caps, the Greenland ice sheet and thermosteric sea level are available unsurveyed high-latitude small glaciers and ice caps. The sea-level budget from 1850 is estimated using because it takes $50 times more energy to raise sea level by ocean heating than by ice melting (Trenberth

  6. The Transient Circulation Response to Radiative Forcings and Sea Surface Warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staten, Paul; Reichler, Thomas; Lu, Jian

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Tropospheric circulation shifts have strong potential to impact surface climate. But the magnitude of these shifts in a changing climate, and the attending regional hydrological changes, are difficult to project. Part of this difficulty arises from our lack of understanding of the physical mechanisms behind the circulation shifts themselves. In order to better delineate circulation shifts and their respective causes, we decompose the circulation response into (1) the "direct" response to radiative forcings themselves, and (2) the "indirect" response to changing sea surface temperatures. Using ensembles of 90-day climate model simulations with immediate switch-on forcings, including perturbed greenhouse gas concentrations, stratospheric ozone concentrations, and sea surface temperatures, we document the direct and indirect transient responses of the zonal mean general circulation, and investigate the roles of previously proposed mechanisms in shifting the midlatitude jet. We find that both the direct and indirect wind responses often begin in the lower stratosphere. Changes in midlatitude eddies are ubiquitous and synchronous with the midlatitude zonal wind response. Shifts in the critical latitude of wave absorption on either flank of the jet are not indicted as primary factors for the poleward shifting jet, although we see some evidence for increasing equatorward wave reflection over the southern hemisphere in response to sea surface warming. Mechanisms for the northern hemisphere jet shift are less clear.

  7. Global-local Structural Optimization Using Response Surfaces of Local Optimization Margins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumaier, Arnold

    1 Global-local Structural Optimization Using Response Surfaces of Local Optimization Margins Boyang optimization problems. First, a large number of component optimizations for maximization of margins are performed. Response surface approximations (RSA) for maximum margins of component optimization

  8. The Global Historical Climatology Network: Long-term monthly temperature, precipitation, sea level pressure, and station pressure data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vose, R.S. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment and Resources Center; Schmoyer, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Steurer, P.M.; Peterson, T.C.; Heim, R.; Karl, T.R. [National Climatic Data Center, Asheville, NC (United States); Eischeid, J.K. [Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (United States). Cooperative Inst. for Research in Environmental Sciences

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interest in global climate change has risen dramatically during the last several years. In a similar fashion, the number of data sets available to study global change has also increased. Unfortunately, these data sets have been compiled by many different organizations/researchers, making it confusing and time consuming for individual researchers to acquire the ``best`` data. In response to this rapid growth in the number of global data sets, the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) and the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) commenced the Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN) project. The purpose of this project is to compile an improved global base-line data set of long-term monthly mean temperature, precipitation, sea level pressure, and station pressure for a dense network. of worldwide meteorological stations. Specifically, the GHCN project seeks to consolidate the numerous preexisting national-, regional-, and global-scale data sets into a single global climate data base that can be updated, enhanced, and distributed at regular intervals. The first version of the GHCN data base was completed during the summer of 1992. It contains 6039 temperature, 7533 precipitation, 1883 sea level pressure, and 1873 station pressure stations. All stations have at least 10 years of data, 40% have more than 50 years of data, and 10% have more than 100 years of data. Spatial coverage is good over most of the globe, particularly for the United States and central Europe. In comparison to other major global data sets, dramatic improvements are evident over South America, Africa, and Asia. The GHCN data base is available as a Numeric Data Package (NDP) from CDIAC. The NDP consists of this document and two magnetic tapes that contain machine-readable data files and accompanying retrieval codes. This document describes, in detail, both the GHCN data base and the contents of the magnetic tap

  9. The Global Historical Climatology Network: Long-term monthly temperature, precipitation, sea level pressure, and station pressure data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vose, R.S. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment and Resources Center); Schmoyer, R.L. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Steurer, P.M.; Peterson, T.C.; Heim, R.; Karl, T.R. (National Climatic Data Center, Asheville, NC (United States)); Eischeid, J.K. (Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (United States). Cooperative Inst. for Research in Environmental Sciences)

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interest in global climate change has risen dramatically during the last several years. In a similar fashion, the number of data sets available to study global change has also increased. Unfortunately, these data sets have been compiled by many different organizations/researchers, making it confusing and time consuming for individual researchers to acquire the best'' data. In response to this rapid growth in the number of global data sets, the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) and the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) commenced the Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN) project. The purpose of this project is to compile an improved global base-line data set of long-term monthly mean temperature, precipitation, sea level pressure, and station pressure for a dense network. of worldwide meteorological stations. Specifically, the GHCN project seeks to consolidate the numerous preexisting national-, regional-, and global-scale data sets into a single global climate data base that can be updated, enhanced, and distributed at regular intervals. The first version of the GHCN data base was completed during the summer of 1992. It contains 6039 temperature, 7533 precipitation, 1883 sea level pressure, and 1873 station pressure stations. All stations have at least 10 years of data, 40% have more than 50 years of data, and 10% have more than 100 years of data. Spatial coverage is good over most of the globe, particularly for the United States and central Europe. In comparison to other major global data sets, dramatic improvements are evident over South America, Africa, and Asia. The GHCN data base is available as a Numeric Data Package (NDP) from CDIAC. The NDP consists of this document and two magnetic tapes that contain machine-readable data files and accompanying retrieval codes. This document describes, in detail, both the GHCN data base and the contents of the magnetic tap

  10. Impact of a Warm Ocean Eddy's Circulation on Hurricane-Induced Sea Surface Cooling with Implications for Hurricane Intensity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhode Island, University of

    Impact of a Warm Ocean Eddy's Circulation on Hurricane-Induced Sea Surface Cooling with Implications for Hurricane Intensity RICHARD M. YABLONSKY AND ISAAC GINIS Graduate School of Oceanography) ABSTRACT Upper oceanic heat content (OHC) in advance of a hurricane is generally superior to prestorm sea

  11. Global optimization-based deformable meshes for surface extraction from medical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumaier, Arnold

    (GAGR). By global optimization of the energy of the de- formable models, we are capable of reducingGlobal optimization-based deformable meshes for surface extraction from medical images Jussi Tohka, Dual surface minimization (DSM) and a hybrid of real-coded genetic algorithms and a greedy algorithm

  12. Sea-surface topography of the Gulf of Mexico, based on ship drift 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linn, Johnnie Burdette

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The monthly sea-surface topography of the Gulf of Mexico is calculated from ship-drift observations. A correction for wind effect is determined from the part of the surface current velocity field estimated to result from the stress of the wind.... The topo- graphy i. s found to agree qualitatively with results of studies based on in situ measurements. The contribution of the wind effect is significant. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I wish to express my appreciation to Mr. John D. Cochrane for his guidance...

  13. J1.15 PARAMETERIZING THE TURBULENT SURFACE FLUXES OVER SUMMER SEA ICE Edgar L Andreas1*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Persson, Ola

    1 of 9 J1.15 PARAMETERIZING THE TURBULENT SURFACE FLUXES OVER SUMMER SEA ICE Edgar L Andreas1* , P- * Corresponding author address: Edgar L Andreas, U.S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory, 72

  14. Discussion on common errors in analyzing sea level accelerations, solar trends and global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scafetta, Nicola

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Errors in applying regression models and wavelet filters used to analyze geophysical signals are discussed: (1) multidecadal natural oscillations (e.g. the quasi 60-year Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO), North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO)) need to be taken into account for properly quantifying anomalous accelerations in tide gauge records such as in New York City; (2) uncertainties and multicollinearity among climate forcing functions prevent a proper evaluation of the solar contribution to the 20th century global surface temperature warming using overloaded linear regression models during the 1900-2000 period alone; (3) when periodic wavelet filters, which require that a record is pre-processed with a reflection methodology, are improperly applied to decompose non-stationary solar and climatic time series, Gibbs boundary artifacts emerge yielding misleading physical interpretations. By correcting these errors and using optimized regression models that reduce multico...

  15. An investigation of sea surface temperature patterns in the Gulf of Mexico as determined by an airborne infrared sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drennan, Kirby Lee

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AN INVESTIGATION OF SEA SURFACE TF"PERATURE PATTERNS IN THE GULF OF IKXICO AS DETERMINED BY AN AIRBORNE INFRARED SENSOR A Thesis by KIRBY IEE DRENNAN Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas API University in partial tulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of 14IASTER OF SCIENCE August 1967 Physical Oceanography AN INVESTIGATION OF SEA SURFACE TEMPERATURE PATIERNS IN THE GULF OF MEXICO AS DETERMINED BY AN AIRBORNE INFRARED SENSOR A Thesis by KIRBY LEE DRENNAN Approved...

  16. Global ocean wind power sensitivity to surface layer stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capps, Scott B; Zender, Charles S

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2005), Evaluation of global wind power, J. Geophys. Res. ,Pryor (2003), Can satellite sampling of offshore wind speedsrealistically represent wind speed distributions? , J. Appl.

  17. Global ocean wind power sensitivity to surface layer stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capps, Scott B; Zender, Charles S

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluation of global wind power, J. Geophys. Res. , 110,W. Tang, and X. Xie (2008), Wind power distribution over theApproach to Short-Term Wind Power Prediction, 1st ed. ,

  18. Polar versus temperate grounding-line sedimentary systems and marine glacier stability during sea level rise by global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, R.D. (Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States). Geology Dept.); Pyne, A.R. (Victoria Univ., Wellington (New Zealand). Antarctic Research Center); Hunter, L.E.; Rynes, N.R.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Marine-ending glaciers may retreat with global warming as sea level rises by ocean thermal expansion. If the sea floor rises by sediment accumulation, then glaciers may not feel the effect of sea level rise. A submersible ROV and other techniques have been used to collect data from temperate and polar glaciers to compare sediment production and mass balance of their grounding-line systems. Temperature Alaskan valley glaciers flow at about 0.2--2 km/a and have high volumes of supraglacial, englacial and subglacial debris. However, most sediment contributed to the base of their tidewater cliffs comes from subglacial streams or squeezing out subglacial sediment and pushing it with other marine sediment into a morainal bank. Blue Glacier, a thin, locally fed polar glacier in Antarctica, flows slowly and has minimal glacial debris. The grounding-line system at the tidewater cliff is a morainal bank that forms solely by pushing of marine sediment. An Antarctic polar outlet glacier, Mackay Glacier, terminating as a floating glacier-tongue, has similar volumes of basal debris to Alaskan temperature glaciers and flows at 250 m/a. However, no subglacial streams issued from Mackay's grounding line and all sedimentation was by rockfall and grainfall rainout from seawater undermelt of the tongue. A grounding-line wedge of glacimarine diamicton is deposited over subglacial (lodgement ) till. Although Antarctic grounding-line accumulation rates are three orders of magnitude smaller than Alaskan rates, both are capable of compensating for predicted rises in sea level by thermal heating from global warming.

  19. GLOBAL EXISTENCE FOR A TRANSLATING NEAR-CIRCULAR HELE-SHAW BUBBLE WITH SURFACE TENSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanveer, Saleh

    GLOBAL EXISTENCE FOR A TRANSLATING NEAR-CIRCULAR HELE-SHAW BUBBLE WITH SURFACE TENSION J. YE1 AND S for any nonzero surface tension despite the fact that a local planar approximation near the front problem, Dissipative equations, Hele-Shaw prob- lem, Translating bubbles, Surface tension Mathematics

  20. Anomalous sea surface temperatures of the North Pacific Ocean and their relationship to precipitation in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atkinson, Garey Cecil

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the North Pacific and precip1tation in the ten climatic divisions of Texas, concurrently, and for t1me lags of up to six months. Anomalous sea surface temperatures for the 20 year period, 1947-1966, were correlated to prec1 pi tation totals that were... reported for the ten climatic divisions of Texas. An examination of the levels of significance for each correlat1on coeffic1ent was conducted. Correlation coefficients with high levels of significance were studied for patterns and peak frequencies...

  1. Equilibrium Tides Along with surface gravity waves, the predictable rise and fall of sea level at the coast are

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, LuAnne

    depth (say 10 m) is converted to an equivalent sea level using the hydrostatic equation. · Radar level in the deep ocean is now measured globally. A network of tide gauges at island stations with the altimeter to improve the radar's calibration, as well as to improve the tide estimates. Currently estimates

  2. A surface renewal model to analyze infrared image sequences of the ocean surface for the study of air-sea heat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garbe, Christoph S.

    A surface renewal model to analyze infrared image sequences of the ocean surface for the study of air-sea heat and gas exchange C. S. Garbe Interdisciplinary Center for Scientific Computing renewal, the net heat flux, and the heat transfer velocity during nighttime. The techniques are based

  3. Wintertime high-altitude surface energy balance of a Bolivian glacier, Illimani, 6340 m above sea level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berthier, Etienne

    Wintertime high-altitude surface energy balance of a Bolivian glacier, Illimani, 6340 m above sea] The objective of this study is to evaluate the surface energy balance (SEB) of a cold, high-altitude tropical, high altitude, sublimation, turbulent fluxes, net all-wave radiation, energy balance Citation: Wagnon

  4. Inferring surface heat flux distributions guided by a global seismic model: particular application to Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Nikolai

    -flow measurements are rare or entirely absent. This will result in a smooth global heat-flow map that may proveInferring surface heat flux distributions guided by a global seismic model: particular application to Antarctica Nikolai M. Shapiro*, Michael H. Ritzwoller Department of Physics, Center for Imaging the Earth

  5. Comparison of different global information sources used in surface radiative flux calculation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ), the Laboratoire de Me´te´orologie Dynamique, NOAA/NASA Pathfinder Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer project Spectroradiometer product, the NASA Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment Surface Radiation Budget project surface albedos in the near-infrared remain poorly constrained (highly uncertain), they do not cause too

  6. Predicting landfalling hurricane numbers from sea surface temperature: a theoretical comparison of direct and indirect methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nzerem, K; Laepple, T; Nzerem, Kechi; Jewson, Stephen; Laepple, Thomas

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider two ways that one might convert a prediction of sea surface temperature (SST) into a prediction of landfalling hurricane numbers. First, one might regress historical numbers of landfalling hurricanes onto historical SSTs, and use the fitted regression relation to predict future landfalling hurricane numbers given predicted SSTs. We call this the direct approach. Second, one might regress \\emph{basin} hurricane numbers onto historical SSTs, estimate the proportion of basin hurricanes that make landfall, and use the fitted regression relation and estimated proportion to predict future landfalling hurricane numbers. We call this the \\emph{indirect} approach. Which of these two methods is likely to work better? We answer this question in the context of a simple abstract model.

  7. Statistical Modelling of the Relationship Between Main Development Region Sea Surface Temperature and Atlantic Basin Hurricane Numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Binter, R; Khare, S; Binter, Roman; Jewson, Stephen; Khare, Shree

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We are building a hurricane number prediction scheme that relies, in part, on statistical modelling of the empirical relationship between Atlantic sea surface temperatures and Atlantic basin hurricane numbers. We test out a number of simple statistical models for this relationship, using data from 1900 to 2005 and data from 1950 to 2005, and for both all hurricane numbers and intense hurricane numbers.

  8. Algal biomass and sea surface temperature in the Mediterranean Basin Intercomparison of data from various satellite sensors, and implications for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bricaud, Annick

    Algal biomass and sea surface temperature in the Mediterranean Basin Intercomparison of data from and to increasing anthropogenic inputs, is an appropriate test site for observing the evolution of algal biomass progress in the knowledge of spatial and temporal variations in algal biomass in various regions

  9. Role of the tropical Atlantic sea surface temperature in the decadal change of the summer North Atlantic Oscillation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    pattern exhibited a traditional distribution with two centers over the North Atlantic. Citation: Sun, JRole of the tropical Atlantic sea surface temperature in the decadal change of the summer North Atlantic Oscillation Jianqi Sun,1,2 Huijun Wang,1,2 and Wei Yuan2,3 Received 1 May 2009; revised 11 July

  10. Correlating Radioactive Material to Sea Surface Temperature off the Coast of Japan: The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Disaster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    Correlating Radioactive Material to Sea Surface Temperature off the Coast of Japan: The Fukushima on the island. One of the most devastating results of this was the damage to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, Fukushima INTRODUCTION On March 11, 2011, Japan suffered a devastating 9.0 Mw earthquake, now known

  11. Arctic catastrophes in an idealized sea ice model Ian Eisenman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eisenman, Ian

    thermodynamics, varying open water fraction, an energy balance atmosphere, and scalable CO2. We find that summer.e., reflectiveness) between sea ice and the open water that is exposed when it melts. Bare or snow-covered sea ice reflects most sunlight back to space, while the dark ocean surface absorbs most incident light. Global

  12. Supplemental Information for "Regional to global assessments of phytoplankton dynamics from the SeaWiFS mission" by D.A. Siegel and others.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, David A.

    . This water-leaving radiance, Lw(), is solar radiation that penetrated the ocean surface, interacted the SeaWiFS mission" by D.A. Siegel and others. Satellite Ocean Color Data Processing: Ocean color sensors are designed to measure the spectral distribution of visible radiation upwelling from beneath the ocean surface

  13. Surface Urban Heat Island Across 419 Global Big Cities Shushi Peng,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myneni, Ranga B.

    aspects of human impacts on the earth system. Here we assess the diurnal and seasonal variation of surface of human impact on the earth system.1 It is well-known that urban centers experience higher temperatures-11 this urban heat island effect has gained in importance.3,4 In the context of global warming it has been

  14. Method for using global optimization to the estimation of surface-consistent residual statics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reister, David B. (Knoxville, TN); Barhen, Jacob (Oak Ridge, TN); Oblow, Edward M. (Knoxville, TN)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An efficient method for generating residual statics corrections to compensate for surface-consistent static time shifts in stacked seismic traces. The method includes a step of framing the residual static corrections as a global optimization problem in a parameter space. The method also includes decoupling the global optimization problem involving all seismic traces into several one-dimensional problems. The method further utilizes a Stochastic Pijavskij Tunneling search to eliminate regions in the parameter space where a global minimum is unlikely to exist so that the global minimum may be quickly discovered. The method finds the residual statics corrections by maximizing the total stack power. The stack power is a measure of seismic energy transferred from energy sources to receivers.

  15. Influence of Ice Particle Surface Roughening on the Global Cloud Radiative Effect BINGQI YI,* PING YANG,* BRYAN A. BAUM,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baum, Bryan A.

    Influence of Ice Particle Surface Roughening on the Global Cloud Radiative Effect BINGQI YI,* PING locally by more than 10 W m22 over a range of effective diameters. The global-averaged SW cloud radiative but nonnegligible increase in the global LW cloud radiative effect. 1. Introduction Ice clouds significantly

  16. Modelling of a captive unmanned aerial system teledetecting oil pollution on sea surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muttin, Frédéric

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent major oil-spills were tracked using observations with sufficient altitudes over the sea surface, to detect oil slick locations. For oil-spill responders, we propose a captive Unmanned Aerial System, UAS acting like a periscope over a ship or supply vessel. The system is composed of an umbilical deployed from ship deck, and there are few studies that have examined elasticity within cable dynamic during take-off or landing (TOL) and normal flight phases. Therefore, the safest approach for the control-commands of the system is through umbilical dynamic modelling. We give a time-dependant finite-element formulation, using improved elastic non-linear cable elements. Two kinds of boundary condition, natural or essential, are discussed for roll-in or roll-out of the umbilical. A numerical convergence and a validation with an exact solution are provided, using two examples for the flight parameters. Finally, sensitivity of the model potentially extends its capacity for the system equilibrium prediction, under ...

  17. Statistical Modelling of the Relationship Between Main Development Region Sea Surface Temperature and \\emph{Landfalling} Atlantic Basin Hurricane Numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Binter, R; Khare, S; Binter, Roman; Jewson, Stephen; Khare, Shree

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We are building a hurricane number prediction scheme that relies, in part, on statistical modelling of the empirical relationship between Atlantic sea surface temperatures and landfalling hurricane numbers. We test out a number of simple statistical models for that relationship, using data from 1900 to 2005 and data from 1950 to 2005, and for both all hurricane numbers and intense hurricane numbers. The results are very different from the corresponding analysis for basin hurricane numbers.

  18. The relationship of sea surface temperatures of the Gulf of Mexico and adjacent Atlantic Ocean to precipitation in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamberger, Lawrence Wayne

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    +?&1 -24 +23 -39 +39 -36 9 36 -30 -I-30 -57 +58 -28 +30 -31 r32 -48 +48 -29 +29 -54 +53 -28 +27 -35 +35 ? 39 +40 -43 +43 -2. 3 -2. 8 -2. 2 +0. 2 +0. 4 +0. 3 -62. 2 +3. 5 +2. 5 +0. 5 -0. 2 -1. 9 -2. 4 +0. 3 +?. 7 -0. 5 -28.... ACKNOVLEDGNENTS TABI, E OF CONTENTS LIST OP TABLES. I. IST OF FIGURES 1NTRODUCTION. viii Identiix ing thc Investivat ion. ~Oh 'oct ives Lit r: t?rc Pcview, DATA SOURCES AND ACCURACY Sea Surfac e Temperature Data 18 Accurac~ of Sca Surface Te~m erarurc...

  19. Surface tension of the core-crust interface of neutron stars with global charge neutrality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jorge A. Rueda; Remo Ruffini; Yuan-Bin Wu; She-Sheng Xue

    2014-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been shown recently that taking into account strong, weak, electromagnetic, and gravitational interactions, and fulfilling the global charge neutrality of the system, a transition layer will happen between the core and crust of neutron stars, at the nuclear saturation density. We use relativistic mean field theory together with the Thomas-Fermi approximation to study the detailed structure of this transition layer and calculate its surface and Coulomb energy. We find that the surface tension is proportional to a power-law function of the baryon number density in the core bulk region. We also analyze the influence of the electron component and the gravitational field on the structure of the transition layer and the value of the surface tension to compare and contrast with known phenomenological results in nuclear physics. Based on the above results we study the instability against Bohr-Wheeler surface deformations in the case of neutron stars obeying global charge neutrality. Assuming the core-crust transition at nuclear density $\\rho_{core}\\approx 2.7 * 10^{14}$ g cm$^{-3}$, we find that the instability sets the upper limit to the crust density, $\\rho_{crust}^{crit}\\approx 1.2 * 10^{14}$ g cm$^{-3}$. This result implies a nonzero lower limit to the maximum electric field of the core-crust transition surface and makes inaccessible a limit of quasilocal charge neutrality in the limit $\\rho_{crust}=\\rho_{core}$. The general framework presented here can be also applied to study the stability of sharp phase transitions in hybrid stars as well as in strange stars, both bare and with outer crust. The results of this work open the way to a more general analysis of the stability of these transition surfaces, accounting for other effects such as gravitational binding, centrifugal repulsion, magnetic field induced by rotating electric field, and therefore magnetic dipole-dipole interactions.

  20. Could the Earth's surface Ultraviolet irradiance be blamed for the global warming? A new effect may exist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jilong; Zhao, Juan; Zheng, Yujun

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Whether natural factors could interpret the rise of the Earth's surface temperature is still controversial. Though numerous recent researches have reported apparent correlations between solar activity and the Earth's climate, solar activity has encountered a big problem when describing the rapid global warming after 1970s. Our investigation shows the good positive correlations between the Earth's surface Ultraviolet irradiance (280-400 nm) and the Earth's surface temperature both in temporal and spatial variations by analyzing the global surface Ultraviolet irradiance (280-400 nm) and global surface temperature data from 1980-1999. The rise of CO$_2$ cannot interpret the good positive correlations, and we could even get an opposite result to the good correlations when employing the rise of CO$_2$ to describe the relation between them. Based on the good positive correlations, we suggest a new effect, named "Highly Excited Water Vapor" (HEWV) effect, which can interpret how the Sun influences the Earth's surfac...

  1. To appear in: Proc. CVPR'94, Seattle, WA Global Surface Reconstruction by Purposive Control of Observer Motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jepson, Allan D.

    To appear in: Proc. CVPR'94, Seattle, WA Global Surface Reconstruction by Purposive Control Department University of Wisconsin Madison, Wisconsin 53706 Abstract What real-time, qualitative viewpoint-control markings, building a global model of an arbitrary object, or recognizing an object? In this paper we

  2. Investigating the local atmospheric response to a5 realistic shift in the Oyashio sea surface6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newman, Matthew

    , where extratropical SST forcing produces31 shallow anomalous heating balanced by strong equatorward cold the atmosphere, beyond basic thermodynamic air-sea coupling via59 turbulent boundary layer heat flux exchange, most of the SST anomaly induced diabatic heating ( ) is balanced by29 poleward transient eddy heat

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: Arctic sea ice

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Arctic sea ice Sierra Unmanned Aerial Vehicle to Begin Flights Over Arctic Sea Ice On July 25, 2013, in Climate, Customers & Partners, Global, Monitoring, News, News & Events,...

  4. International Lige Colloquium on Ocean Dynamics, GAS TRANSFER AT WATER SURFACES, May 2 -6 2005 Estimation of air-sea gas and heat fluxes from infrared imagery and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaehne, Bernd

    2005 Estimation of air-sea gas and heat fluxes from infrared imagery and surface wave measurements and much higher heat fluxes. In addition, the infrared imagery analysis reveals potentially significant the infrared images. It is also shown that the difference in the surface boundary conditions for heat and gas

  5. A New Model to Construct Ice Stream Surface Elevation Profiles and Calculate Contributions to Sea-Level Rise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adachi, Yosuke

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to 21st-Century Sea-Level Rise. Science, 321, 1340; DOI:in the Face of Sea-Level Rise: A Hybrid Modeling Approachof ice sheets to sea-level rise. Bibliography Alcamo, J. et

  6. Sensitivity of global tropical climate to land surface processes: Mean state and interannual variability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Hsi-Yen; Xiao, Heng; Mechoso, C. R.; Xue, Yongkang

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examines the sensitivity of global tropical climate to land surface processes (LSP) using an atmospheric general circulation model both uncoupled (with prescribed SSTs) and coupled to an oceanic general circulation model. The emphasis is on the interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes, which have first order influence on the surface energy and water budgets. The sensitivity to those processes is represented by the differences between model simulations, in which two land surface schemes are considered: 1) a simple land scheme that specifies surface albedo and soil moisture availability, and 2) the Simplified Simple Biosphere Model (SSiB), which allows for consideration of interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical process. Observational datasets are also employed to assess the reality of model-revealed sensitivity. The mean state sensitivity to different LSP is stronger in the coupled mode, especially in the tropical Pacific. Furthermore, seasonal cycle of SSTs in the equatorial Pacific, as well as ENSO frequency, amplitude, and locking to the seasonal cycle of SSTs are significantly modified and more realistic with SSiB. This outstanding sensitivity of the atmosphere-ocean system develops through changes in the intensity of equatorial Pacific trades modified by convection over land. Our results further demonstrate that the direct impact of land-atmosphere interactions on the tropical climate is modified by feedbacks associated with perturbed oceanic conditions ("indirect effect" of LSP). The magnitude of such indirect effect is strong enough to suggest that comprehensive studies on the importance of LSP on the global climate have to be made in a system that allows for atmosphere-ocean interactions.

  7. An updated global grid point surface air temperature anomaly data set: 1851--1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sepanski, R.J.; Boden, T.A.; Daniels, R.C.

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents land-based monthly surface air temperature anomalies (departures from a 1951--1970 reference period mean) on a 5{degree} latitude by 10{degree} longitude global grid. Monthly surface air temperature anomalies (departures from a 1957--1975 reference period mean) for the Antarctic (grid points from 65{degree}S to 85{degree}S) are presented in a similar way as a separate data set. The data were derived primarily from the World Weather Records and the archives of the United Kingdom Meteorological Office. This long-term record of temperature anomalies may be used in studies addressing possible greenhouse-gas-induced climate changes. To date, the data have been employed in generating regional, hemispheric, and global time series for determining whether recent (i.e., post-1900) warming trends have taken place. This document also presents the monthly mean temperature records for the individual stations that were used to generate the set of gridded anomalies. The periods of record vary by station. Northern Hemisphere station data have been corrected for inhomogeneities, while Southern Hemisphere data are presented in uncorrected form. 14 refs., 11 figs., 10 tabs.

  8. Variability of zooplankton and sea surface temperature in the Southern Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verdy, Ariane

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interactions between physical and biological processes in the Southern Ocean have significant impacts on local ecosystems as well as on global climate. In this thesis, I present evidence that the Southern Ocean circulation ...

  9. Global estimation of evapotranspiration using a leaf area index-based surface energy and water balance model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Timothy

    using Advanced Very High Res- olution Radiometer Lai data, Climate Research Unit climate dataGlobal estimation of evapotranspiration using a leaf area index-based surface energy and water-relative-humidity-based two-source (ARTS) E model that simulates the surface energy balance, soil water balance

  10. Reply to comment by J. L. Lean on ``Estimated solar contribution to the global surface warming using the ACRIM TSI satellite composite''

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scafetta, Nicola

    Reply to comment by J. L. Lean on ``Estimated solar contribution to the global surface warming contributed at least 10­30% of the 0.40 ± 0.04 K global surface warming) depends crucially on the adoption, because it lacks any upward trend between solar cycles 21­23, the solar contribution to the global warming

  11. NOAA Technical Report NESDIS 143 NOAA Coral Reef Watch 50 km Satellite Sea Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and solar-terrestrial sciences. From these sources, it develops and disseminates environmental data, energy development and distribution, global food supplies, and the development of natural resources. Mark Eakin1 William Skirving2,3 Tyler R. L. Christensen1,2 Alan E. Strong1,2 Jianke Li1,2 1 NOAA Coral

  12. Role of AirSea Interaction in the Long Persistence of El Nin~oInduced North Indian Ocean Warming*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Shang-Ping

    Walker circulation adjustments, causing a sustained SST warming in the tropical southwest IO (SWIO) where in the equatorial Pacific with pro- found influences on the global climate. For example, El Nin~o causes sea surfaceRole of Air­Sea Interaction in the Long Persistence of El Nin~o­Induced North Indian Ocean Warming

  13. Is the basinwide warming in the North Atlantic Ocean related to atmospheric carbon dioxide and global warming?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chunzai

    to atmospheric carbon dioxide and global warming? Chunzai Wang1 and Shenfu Dong1,2 Received 31 January 2010 is controversial. Some studies argued that the warming is due to global warming in association with the secular sea surface temperature. Here we show that both global warming and AMO variability make a contribution

  14. COMPARISON OF SEA SURFACE ROUGHNESS MODELS FOR OFFSHORE WIND POWER UTILISATION Bernhard Lange(1), Jrgen Hjstrup(2), Sren Larsen(2), Rebecca Barthelmie(2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    Large offshore wind farms are being built in several countries in Europe. The economic viabilityCOMPARISON OF SEA SURFACE ROUGHNESS MODELS FOR OFFSHORE WIND POWER UTILISATION Bernhard Lange(1 of such projects depends on the favourable wind conditions of offshore sites, since the higher energy yield has

  15. A Simple Tool for Automatic Extraction of Moroccan Coastal Upwelling from Sea Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    of northeasterly wind and the persistence of Ekman transport along the Moroccan coastline, the surface waters upwelling front, separating the cold waters near the coast and warmer offshore waters [14]. Several in order to extract the upwelling area from the remaining offshore waters. The objective of this paper

  16. Investigation of transport processes across the sea surface microlayer by infrared imagery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garbe, Christoph S.

    the ratio of the kinematic viscosity of water n and D the diffusion coefficient of the dissolved gas function based on a surface renewal model. Periodic heat flux switching in the wind-wave flume delivers versus wind speed indicates that not only the wind shear but also other processes such as the wave field

  17. A global model simulation for 3-D radiative transfer impact on surface hydrology over Sierra Nevada and Rocky Mountains

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lee, W.-L.; Gu, Y.; Liou, K. N.; Leung, L. R.; Hsu, H.-H.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate 3-D mountain effects on solar flux distributions and their impact on surface hydrology over the Western United States, specifically the Rocky Mountains and Sierra Nevada using CCSM4 (CAM4/CLM4) global model with a 0.23° × 0.31° resolution for simulations over 6 years. In 3-D radiative transfer parameterization, we have updated surface topography data from a resolution of 1 km to 90 m to improve parameterization accuracy. In addition, we have also modified the upward-flux deviation [3-D ? PP (plane-parallel)] adjustment to ensure that energy balance at the surface is conserved in global climate simulations based on 3-D radiation parameterization.more »We show that deviations of the net surface fluxes are not only affected by 3-D mountains, but also influenced by feedbacks of cloud and snow in association with the long-term simulations. Deviations in sensible heat and surface temperature generally follow the patterns of net surface solar flux. The monthly snow water equivalent (SWE) deviations show an increase in lower elevations due to reduced snowmelt, leading to a reduction in cumulative runoff. Over higher elevation areas, negative SWE deviations are found because of increased solar radiation available at the surface. Simulated precipitation increases for lower elevations, while decreases for higher elevations with a minimum in April. Liquid runoff significantly decreases in higher elevations after April due to reduced SWE and precipitation.« less

  18. aral sea region: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    modification. Valeriy Barannik; Olena Borysova; Felix Stolberg 2004-01-01 8 Causes of Global and Regional Sea Level CiteSeer Summary: Rising sea level poses significant...

  19. Final Report DE-EE0005380: Assessment of Offshore Wind Farm Effects on Sea Surface, Subsurface and Airborne Electronic Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ling, Hao [The University of Texas at Austin] [The University of Texas at Austin; Hamilton, Mark F. [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories] [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories; Bhalla, Rajan [Science Applications International Corporation] [Science Applications International Corporation; Brown, Walter E. [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories] [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories; Hay, Todd A. [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories] [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories; Whitelonis, Nicholas J. [The University of Texas at Austin] [The University of Texas at Austin; Yang, Shang-Te [The University of Texas at Austin] [The University of Texas at Austin; Naqvi, Aale R. [The University of Texas at Austin] [The University of Texas at Austin

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Offshore wind energy is a valuable resource that can provide a significant boost to the US renewable energy portfolio. A current constraint to the development of offshore wind farms is the potential for interference to be caused by large wind farms on existing electronic and acoustical equipment such as radar and sonar systems for surveillance, navigation and communications. The US Department of Energy funded this study as an objective assessment of possible interference to various types of equipment operating in the marine environment where offshore wind farms could be installed. The objective of this project was to conduct a baseline evaluation of electromagnetic and acoustical challenges to sea surface, subsurface and airborne electronic systems presented by offshore wind farms. To accomplish this goal, the following tasks were carried out: (1) survey electronic systems that can potentially be impacted by large offshore wind farms, and identify impact assessment studies and research and development activities both within and outside the US, (2) engage key stakeholders to identify their possible concerns and operating requirements, (3) conduct first-principle modeling on the interactions of electromagnetic signals with, and the radiation of underwater acoustic signals from, offshore wind farms to evaluate the effect of such interactions on electronic systems, and (4) provide impact assessments, recommend mitigation methods, prioritize future research directions, and disseminate project findings. This report provides a detailed description of the methodologies used to carry out the study, key findings of the study, and a list of recommendations derived based the findings.

  20. LETTER doi:10.1038/nature12156 Signature of ocean warming in global fisheries catch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pauly, Daniel

    LETTER doi:10.1038/nature12156 Signature of ocean warming in global fisheries catch William W. L changes in sea surface temperature5 . This study shows that ocean warming has already affected global. Cheung1 , Reg Watson2 & Daniel Pauly3 Marine fishes and invertebrates respond to ocean warming through

  1. Polymers near Metal Surfaces: Selective Adsorption and Global Conformations L. Delle Site,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alavi, Ali

    of a polycarbonate melt near a nickel surface as a model system for the interaction of polymers with metal surfaces- level modeling of polymers near metal surfaces. Liquid polycarbonate near a nickel surface is taken.g., production of compact disks). We combine ab initio calculations for the interaction of fragments of bisphenol-A-polycarbonate

  2. A global model simulation for 3-D radiative transfer impact on surface hydrology over the Sierra Nevada and Rocky Mountains

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lee, W.-L.; Gu, Y.; Liou, K. N.; Leung, L. R.; Hsu, H.-H.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate 3-D mountain effects on solar flux distributions and their impact on surface hydrology over the western United States, specifically the Rocky Mountains and the Sierra Nevada, using the global CCSM4 (Community Climate System Model version 4; Community Atmosphere Model/Community Land Model – CAM4/CLM4) with a 0.23° × 0.31° resolution for simulations over 6 years. In a 3-D radiative transfer parameterization, we have updated surface topography data from a resolution of 1 km to 90 m to improve parameterization accuracy. In addition, we have also modified the upward-flux deviation (3-D–PP (plane-parallel)) adjustment to ensure that the energy balance atmore »the surface is conserved in global climate simulations based on 3-D radiation parameterization. We show that deviations in the net surface fluxes are not only affected by 3-D mountains but also influenced by feedbacks of cloud and snow in association with the long-term simulations. Deviations in sensible heat and surface temperature generally follow the patterns of net surface solar flux. The monthly snow water equivalent (SWE) deviations show an increase in lower elevations due to reduced snowmelt, leading to a reduction in cumulative runoff. Over higher-elevation areas, negative SWE deviations are found because of increased solar radiation available at the surface. Simulated precipitation increases for lower elevations, while it decreases for higher elevations, with a minimum in April. Liquid runoff significantly decreases at higher elevations after April due to reduced SWE and precipitation.« less

  3. Optimal Estimation of the Surface Fluxes of Chloromethanes Using a 3-D Global Atmospheric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (CH2Cl2), chloroform (CHCl3), and carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), are chlorine-containing gases concentrations of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases. The Center for Global Change Science at MIT

  4. A New Model to Construct Ice Stream Surface Elevation Profiles and Calculate Contributions to Sea-Level Rise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adachi, Yosuke

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    melting is responsible for, 60% comes from glaciers and ice caps.and ice caps will continue to be the dominant contributor to sea-level rise from the land ice-melting

  5. Assessment of Seawater Intrusion Potential From Sea-level Rise in Coastal Aquifers of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loáiciga, Hugo A; Pingel, Thomas J; Garcia, Elizabeth S

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2009). Impact of Sea-Level Rise on Sea Water Intrusion inC. (1997). Global Sea Level Rise: A Redetermination. Surveys2007). Effects of sea-level rise on groundwater flow in a

  6. Global study of lake surface water temperature (LSWT) behaviour and the tuning of a 1-dimensional model to determine the LSWTs of large lakes worldwide 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Layden, Aisling

    2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Lake surface water temperatures (LSWTs) of 246 globally distributed large lakes were derived from Along-Track Scanning Radiometers (ATSR) for the period 1991 to 2011. These LSWTs, derived in a systematic manner, presents ...

  7. Estimating the Economic Cost of Sea-Level Rise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sugiyama, Masahiro.

    To improve the estimate of economic costs of future sea-level rise associated with global climate change,

  8. An investigation of the relationships between rainfall in northeast Brazil and sea surface temperatures of the equatorial regions of the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cochrane, Marvin Arthur

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ;"V IL FEST? GATION OF THE R). LATIONSHIPS BET))'EFN RATNFAI. L IN NOR'I'llL 'EST BRAZIL AND SEA SL'Rl'ACE TFI!PERAT)JRES CF TIIF. Eq?IA'I'ORIA), RFGIONS OF THE PACIFIC AVL' ATLANITIC OCEANS A TI?csiS OV M "u?'v'I N ARTIIL)R COCHRANE Suhrafr...Mcmli c r) / ~g. ember) (Member) May 1977 ABSTRACT An Investigation of the Relationships between Rainfall in Northeast Brazil and Sca Surface Temperatures of the Equatorial Rcgi. ons of the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans (IJay 1977) . Marvin Arthur...

  9. Cross-spectral study of the spatial relationships in the North Pacific sea-surface temperature anomaly field. Report No. 23

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Middleton, J.W.

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cross-spectral analysis is used to examine the dependence of the temporal covariation of sea-surface temperature (SST) anomalies at pairs of spatially separated points in the North Pacific on (1) the time scale of the variations, (2) the relative displacement of the points and (3) their location within the North Pacific basin. Spatial scales considered here range from 1000 kilometers up to the width of the basin. The study focuses on cross-spectral estimates for the interannual frequency band, 0.125-0.75 yr/sup -1/ although estimates for three other bands spanning higher frequencies are also examined.

  10. Shipboard Measurements and Estimations of AirSea Fluxes in the Western Tropical Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Irvine, University of

    Ship­board Measurements and Estimations of Air­Sea Fluxes in the Western Tropical Pacific Ocean E dur­ ing the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere (TOGA) Coupled Ocean and Atmospheric Response of the surface­layer turbulence properties are compared with those from previous land and ocean results. Momentum

  11. GLOBAL PROPERTIES OF M31'S STELLAR HALO FROM THE SPLASH SURVEY. I. SURFACE BRIGHTNESS PROFILE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilbert, Karoline M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195-1580 (United States); Guhathakurta, Puragra [UCO/Lick Observatory, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Beaton, Rachael L.; Majewski, Steven R.; Ostheimer, James C.; Patterson, Richard J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Bullock, James; Tollerud, Erik J. [Center for Cosmology, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California at Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Geha, Marla C. [Astronomy Department, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Kalirai, Jason S. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Kirby, Evan N. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Tanaka, Mikito; Chiba, Masashi, E-mail: kgilbert@astro.washington.edu [Astronomical Institute, Tohoku University, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan)

    2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the surface brightness profile of M31's stellar halo out to a projected radius of 175 kpc. The surface brightness estimates are based on confirmed samples of M31 red giant branch stars derived from Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopic observations. A set of empirical spectroscopic and photometric M31 membership diagnostics is used to identify and reject foreground and background contaminants. This enables us to trace the stellar halo of M31 to larger projected distances and fainter surface brightnesses than previous photometric studies. The surface brightness profile of M31's halo follows a power law with index -2.2 {+-} 0.2 and extends to a projected distance of at least {approx}175 kpc ({approx}2/3 of M31's virial radius), with no evidence of a downward break at large radii. The best-fit elliptical isophotes have b/a = 0.94 with the major axis of the halo aligned along the minor axis of M31's disk, consistent with a prolate halo, although the data are also consistent with M31's halo having spherical symmetry. The fact that tidal debris features are kinematically cold is used to identify substructure in the spectroscopic fields out to projected radii of 90 kpc and investigate the effect of this substructure on the surface brightness profile. The scatter in the surface brightness profile is reduced when kinematically identified tidal debris features in M31 are statistically subtracted; the remaining profile indicates that a comparatively diffuse stellar component to M31's stellar halo exists to large distances. Beyond 90 kpc, kinematically cold tidal debris features cannot be identified due to small number statistics; nevertheless, the significant field-to-field variation in surface brightness beyond 90 kpc suggests that the outermost region of M31's halo is also comprised to a significant degree of stars stripped from accreted objects.

  12. Droplets on Inclined Plates: Local and Global Hysteresis of Pinned Capillary Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michiel Musterd; Volkert van Steijn; Chris R. Kleijn; Michiel T. Kreutzer

    2014-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Local contact line pinning prevents droplets from rearranging to minimal global energy, and models for droplets without pinning cannot predict their shape. We show that experiments are much better described by a theory, developed herein, that does account for the constrained contact line motion, using as example droplets on tilted plates. We map out their shapes in suitable phase spaces. For 2D droplets, the critical point of maximum tilt depends on the hysteresis range and Bond number. In 3D, it also depends on the initial width, highlighting the importance of the deposition history.

  13. A continuous satellitederived global record of land surface evapotranspiration from 1983 to 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montana, University of

    using advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) GIMMS NDVI, NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis (NNR) daily climatologies, terrestrial water, and energy budgets and longterm water cycle changes. Citation: Zhang, K., J. S a critical link between terrestrial water, carbon, and surface energy exchanges. The world has experienced

  14. Deep-Sea Research I 53 (2006) 15811600 Seasonal variability of the surface chlorophyll in the western

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the western tropical Pacific from SeaWiFS data Monique Messie´ Ã, Marie-He´ le` ne Radenac Laboratoire d was done for the 1999­2004 years in order to exclude the consequences of the major 1997­1998 El Nin~ o.06.007 ÃCorresponding author. Tel.: +33 5 61 33 30 06; fax: +33 5 61 25 32 05. E-mail address: monique

  15. Reprintedfrom: SEAS AT THE MILLENNIIUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prestwich, Ken

    they are classed as Critically Endangered, Endangered or Vulnerable . Human impacts include both purposeful and global warming. Because all sea turtle populations have distributions comprising multipl e range states

  16. Sea Level Changes in the Southeastern United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronquist, Fredrik

    Summary...................................................................................................ii What Is Sea Level, What Causes It to Change, and What Can We Measure?..1 The Global Context, then the sea level appears to be rising, and vice versa. Also, even if the oceans are globally warming climate change are usu- ally focused on sea level rise rather than on warming. In Florida most long

  17. The impact of tropical cyclones (TC) on global climate is still debated. They rapidly mix the water column beneath them, bringing cold water to the surface.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Peter JS

    of Climate, 21, 638 Sriver & Huber, 2007, Observational evidence for an ocean heat pump induced by tropicalThe impact of tropical cyclones (TC) on global climate is still debated. They rapidly mix the water column beneath them, bringing cold water to the surface. One way to parameterise this process

  18. ARM - Sea Surface and Sea Level

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP :ProductsVaisala CL51InstrumentsCentralScienceLevel and Climate

  19. Contemporary Sea Level Rise Anny Cazenave and William Llovel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, David A.

    warming Abstract Measuring sea level change and understanding its causes has considerably improved, as oceans respond to global warming, sea waters warm and expand, and thus sea level rises. Coupled next discuss the most recent progress made in quantifying the processes causing sea level change

  20. Impact of dynamic feedbacks between sedimentation, sea-level rise, and biomass production on near-surface marsh stratigraphy and carbon accumulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Impact of dynamic feedbacks between sedimentation, sea-level rise, and biomass production on near Keywords: salt marsh organic sediments accretion sea-level rise belowground biomass carbon storage a b model we explore how marsh stratigraphy responds to sediment supply and the rate of sea- level rise

  1. An Integrated Experimental and Computational Investigation into the Dynamic Loads and Free-surface Wave-Field Perturbations Induced by Head-Sea Regular Waves on a 1/8.25 Scale-Model of the R/V ATHENA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ratcliffe, Toby; O'Shea, Thomas T; Fu, Thomas; Russell, Lauren; Dommermuth, Douglas G

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 1/8.25 scale-model of the U.S. Navy Research Vessel ATHENA was tested in regular head-sea waves to obtain data for validation of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) predictive tools. The experiments were performed in the David Taylor Model Basin at the Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC). With the model towed fixed in head-seas, horizontal and vertical loads on the model were obtained at two Froude numbers, $F_r=0.25$ and $F_r=0.43$. The model was run at two conditions of head-sea wavelengths corresponding to $\\lambda=2L_o$ and $\\lambda=1/2L_o$ with $H/\\lambda=0.03$, where $L_o$ is the length of the model and $H=2 a$ is the wave height. The wave field perturbations induced by the head-sea waves were quantified from free-surface images generated by a laser light sheet. Predictions of the horizontal and vertical loads on the model in regular head sea waves were made with the Numerical Flow Analysis (NFA) code. Numerical predictions of the wave-field perturbations were compared with the experimental data and th...

  2. Subsidence, Sea Level Rise, and Seismicity in the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mount, Jeffrey; Twiss, Robert

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    butions to global sea level rise. Nature 428:406-409. Mount420. Reed DJ. 2002a. Sea-level rise and coastal marsh sus-MARCH 2005 Subsidence, Sea Level Rise, and Seismicity in the

  3. accelerated sea-level rise: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of sea level rise Although sea level rise is one of the most certain consequences of global warming, yet it remains one Courchamp, Franck 6 Virginia Wetlands Report Sea Level...

  4. Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeMaio, Ernest Vincent, 1964-

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surfaces is a collection of four individual essays which focus on the characteristics and tactile qualities of surfaces within a variety of perceived landscapes. Each essay concentrates on a unique surface theme and purpose; ...

  5. Coastal flood damage and adaptation costs under 21st century sea-level rise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marzeion, Ben

    Coastal flood damage and adaptation costs under 21st century sea-level rise Jochen Hinkela,1st century sea-level rise are assessed on a global scale taking into account a wide range- ment and sea-level rise. Uncertainty in global mean and regional sea level was derived from four

  6. Combined surface solar brightening and increasing greenhouse effect support recent intensification of the global land-based hydrological cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    Combined surface solar brightening and increasing greenhouse effect support recent intensification. Scha¨r (2008), Combined surface solar brightening and increasing greenhouse effect support recent

  7. Quantifying the Difference Between the Flux-Tube Expansion Factor at the Source Surface and at the Alfv\\'en Surface Using A Global MHD Model for the Solar Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Ofer

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential field approximation has been providing a fast, and computationally inexpensive estimation for the solar corona's global magnetic field geometry for several decades. In contrast, more physics-based global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models have been used for a similar purpose, while being much more computationally expensive. Here, we investigate the difference in the field geometry between a global MHD model and the potential field source surface model (PFSSM) by tracing individual magnetic field lines in the MHD model from the Alfven surface (AS), through the source surface (SS), all the way to the field line footpoint, and then back to the source surface in the PFSSM. We also compare the flux-tube expansion at two points at the SS and the AS along the same radial line. We study the effect of solar cycle variations, the order of the potential field harmonic expansion, and different magnetogram sources. We find that the flux-tube expansion factor is consistently smaller at the AS than at the SS for...

  8. arctic kara sea: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    climate connection, total solar irradiance, Atlantic meridional overturning circulation, climate variability. Willie W. -h. Soon 2009-01-01 373 2003: Global analyses of sea...

  9. arctic seas assessment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    climate connection, total solar irradiance, Atlantic meridional overturning circulation, climate variability. Willie W. -h. Soon 2009-01-01 398 2003: Global analyses of sea...

  10. aqaba red sea: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is uncertain due to global warming and repeated bleaching a century. Keywords: climate change, coral bleaching, coral reefs, Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea Received 9 January. The latter,...

  11. Institutionalizing Unsustainability: The Paradox of Global Climate Governance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevenson, Hayley

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    results in 4° C global warming, sea level rise, specieslevels of greenhouse gases are responsible for incremental global warming.levels as that of the developing countries, the world would not today have faced the threat of global warming.

  12. Estimation of methane and carbon dioxide surface fluxes using a 3-D global atmospheric chemical transport model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yu-Han, 1973-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methane (CH?) and carbon dioxide (CO?) are the two most radiatively important greenhouse gases attributable to human activity. Large uncertainties in their source and sink magnitudes currently exist. We estimate global ...

  13. Environmental changes in the central Baltic Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dippner, Joachim W.

    Any evaluation of human impact on the Baltic Sea environment as well as the possible ecological effects of future global warming has to be based on knowledge of the natural conditions and natural

  14. Mathematics of Sea Ice K. M. Golden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    , the sharp decline of the summer Arc- tic sea ice pack is probably the most dramatic. For example, the area and 1990's. While global climate models generally predict de- clines in the polar sea ice packs over the 21, such as the growth and decay of seasonal ice, the evolu- tion of ice pack reflectance, and biomass build

  15. Testing for the Possible Influence of Unknown Climate Forcings upon Global Temperature Increases from 1950-2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Bruce T.; Knight, Jeff R.; Ringer, Mark A.; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Cherchi, Annalisa

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Global-scale variations in the climate system over the last half of the twentieth century, including long-term increases in global-mean near-surface temperatures, are consistent with concurrent human-induced emissions of radiatively active gases and aerosols. However, such consistency does not preclude the possible influence of other forcing agents, including internal modes of climate variability or unaccounted for aerosol effects. To test whether other unknown forcing agents may have contributed to multidecadal increases in global-mean near-surface temperatures from 1950 to 2000, data pertaining to observed changes in global-scale sea surface temperatures and observed changes in radiatively active atmospheric constituents are incorporated into numerical global climate models. Results indicate that the radiative forcing needed to produce the observed long-term trends in sea surface temperatures—and global-mean near-surface temperatures—is provided predominantly by known changes in greenhouse gases and aerosols. Further, results indicate that less than 10% of the long-term historical increase in global-mean near-surface temperatures over the last half of the twentieth century could have been the result of internal climate variability. In addition, they indicate that less than 25%of the total radiative forcing needed to produce the observed long-term trend in global-mean near-surface temperatures could have been provided by changes in net radiative forcing from unknown sources (either positive or negative). These results, which are derived from simple energy balance requirements, emphasize the important role humans have played in modifying the global climate over the last half of the twentieth century.

  16. ICE SHEET SOURCES OF SEA LEVEL RISE AND FRESHWATER DISCHARGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlson, Anders

    ICE SHEET SOURCES OF SEA LEVEL RISE AND FRESHWATER DISCHARGE DURING THE LAST DEGLACIATION Anders E the sources of sea level rise and freshwater dis- charge to the global oceans associated with retreat of ice­10 m sea level rise at 19.0­19.5 ka, sourced largely from Northern Hemisphere ice sheet retreat

  17. int. j. remote sensing, 2001, vol. 22, no. 11, 21712191 Characterizing land surface anisotropy from AVHRR data at a global

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Shunlin

    from AVHRR data at a global scale using high performance computing S. N. V. KALLURI*, Z. ZHANG, J. JA Re ectance Distribution Function (BRDF ) using high performance computing techniques. Three di the computational requirements and optimize the algorithm implementation using high performance computational

  18. ARM - Measurement - Sea surface temperature

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDCnarrowband upwellingpolarization ARM Data

  19. Variations of surface water extent and water storage in large river basins: A comparison of different global data sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of the spatio-temporal variations of total terrestrial water storage (the sum of ground water, soil water1 Variations of surface water extent and water storage in large river basins: A comparison mass variations monitored by GRACE, simulated surface and total water storage from WGHM, water levels

  20. Mixed Layer Lateral Eddy Fluxes Mediated by Air-Sea Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shuckburgh, Emily

    The modulation of air–sea heat fluxes by geostrophic eddies due to the stirring of temperature at the sea surface is discussed and quantified. It is argued that the damping of eddy temperature variance by such air–sea ...

  1. Could the Earth's surface Ultraviolet irradiance be blamed for the global warming? (II) ----Ozone layer depth reconstruction via HEWV effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jilong; Zheng, Yujun

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is suggested by Chen {\\it et al.} that the Earth's surface Ultraviolet irradiance ($280-400$ nm) could influence the Earth's surface temperature variation by "Highly Excited Water Vapor" (HEWV) effect. In this manuscript, we reconstruct the developing history of the ozone layer depth variation from 1860 to 2011 based on the HEWV effect. It is shown that the reconstructed ozone layer depth variation correlates with the observational variation from 1958 to 2005 very well ($R=0.8422$, $P>99.9\\%$). From this reconstruction, we may limit the spectra band of the surface Ultraviolet irradiance referred in HEWV effect to Ultraviolet B ($280-320$ nm).

  2. Computer modeling of the global warming effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington, W.M. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The state of knowledge of global warming will be presented and two aspects examined: observational evidence and a review of the state of computer modeling of climate change due to anthropogenic increases in greenhouse gases. Observational evidence, indeed, shows global warming, but it is difficult to prove that the changes are unequivocally due to the greenhouse-gas effect. Although observational measurements of global warming are subject to ``correction,`` researchers are showing consistent patterns in their interpretation of the data. Since the 1960s, climate scientists have been making their computer models of the climate system more realistic. Models started as atmospheric models and, through the addition of oceans, surface hydrology, and sea-ice components, they then became climate-system models. Because of computer limitations and the limited understanding of the degree of interaction of the various components, present models require substantial simplification. Nevertheless, in their present state of development climate models can reproduce most of the observed large-scale features of the real system, such as wind, temperature, precipitation, ocean current, and sea-ice distribution. The use of supercomputers to advance the spatial resolution and realism of earth-system models will also be discussed.

  3. SEA ICE MAPPING ALGORITHM FOR QUIKSCAT AND SEAWINDS Quinn P. Remund and David G. Long

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    SEA ICE MAPPING ALGORITHM FOR QUIKSCAT AND SEAWINDS Quinn P. Remund and David G. Long Brigham Young@ee.byu.edu Abstruct- Polar sea ice extent is an important input to global climate models and is considered are sensitive to the pres- ence of sea ice. An algorithm has been developed for sea ice extent detection using

  4. ELSEVIER Marine Geology 124 (1995) 137-159 A sea-level rise curve

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royer, Dana

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ELSEVIER Marine Geology 124 (1995) 137-159 A sea-level rise curve Koren R. Nydick, Alison B. from emissions of greenhouse gases. 1. Introduction 1.1. Climate and sea-level rise Global sea level has been of peat deposits in salt marshes provide insight into the rates of relative sea-level rise (RSLR

  5. PALeo-constraints on SEA-level rise (PALSEA) -a PAGES/IMAGES working group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddall, Mark

    PALeo-constraints on SEA-level rise (PALSEA) - a PAGES/IMAGES working group Coordinators: Mark for the reduction in ice sheets and subsequent rise in sea level over the next century are highly uncertain rise. Interglacial sea levels constrain the global sensitivity of sea-level to radiative forcing. Well

  6. Evaluating Tidal Marsh Sustainability in the Face of Sea-Level Rise: A Hybrid Modeling Approach Applied to San Francisco Bay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Maggi

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wetland losses due to sea-level rise: regional and global2009) The impact of sea level rise on developing countries:Coastal impacts due to sea-level rise. Annu Rev Earth Pl Sc

  7. Global Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crow, Ben D

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1996). Globalization in Question: International Economy andGlobalization; Justice; Poverty; Underground Economy; United

  8. Sea-Level and Climate Change: Should I Sell My Shore House? Kenneth G. Miller,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    affects global sea level. The melting of mountain glaciers explains ~20% of the modern global rise. New sheets. Satellite data shows that Greenland and Antarctic glaciers are melting faster than previously is accelerating. The position of the shoreline is controlled by changes in global sea level, subsidence

  9. adriatic sea water: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: Energy - Matter Interactions: Water 12;Open water covers about 74% of the earth's surface. Oceans, inorganic matter, sea...

  10. atlantic sea scallop: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    coral oxygen isotopes: glacialinterglacial sea surface temperatures and climate change Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: such as the Younger Dryas...

  11. Sea Ice Enhancements to Polar WRF* Keith M. Hines1**

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    of Arctic multi-year ice is30 decreasing with more of the ice pack represented by seasonal sea iceSea Ice Enhancements to Polar WRF* Keith M. Hines1** , David H. Bromwich,1,2 , Lesheng Bai1 to6 WRF Version 3.4 include modified Noah land surface model sea ice treatment, allowing7 specified

  12. Effect of Sea Level Rise on Energy Infrastructure in Four Major...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to identify energy facilities exposed to sea level rise (SLR) through 2100 that is flexible and scalable, uses existing and robust data sources, accounts for global and local...

  13. New Pilot Study on Sea Level Rise Offers Approach That Can Help...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to identify energy facilities exposed to sea level rise (SLR) through 2100 that is flexible and scalable, uses existing and robust data sources, accounts for global and local...

  14. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 40, NO. 7, JULY 2002 1605 Surface Roughness Characterizations of Sea Ice and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    , surface roughness data from airborne laser altimeter transects correlate well with MISR-derived estimates of surface roughness. In Antarctica, ablation-related blue-ice areas, which are difficult to distinguish from bare ice exposed by crevasses, are easily detected using multiangular data. These unusual ablation

  15. Reducing uncertainty in high-resolution sea ice models.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Kara J.; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Arctic sea ice is an important component of the global climate system, reflecting a significant amount of solar radiation, insulating the ocean from the atmosphere and influencing ocean circulation by modifying the salinity of the upper ocean. The thickness and extent of Arctic sea ice have shown a significant decline in recent decades with implications for global climate as well as regional geopolitics. Increasing interest in exploration as well as climate feedback effects make predictive mathematical modeling of sea ice a task of tremendous practical import. Satellite data obtained over the last few decades have provided a wealth of information on sea ice motion and deformation. The data clearly show that ice deformation is focused along narrow linear features and this type of deformation is not well-represented in existing models. To improve sea ice dynamics we have incorporated an anisotropic rheology into the Los Alamos National Laboratory global sea ice model, CICE. Sensitivity analyses were performed using the Design Analysis Kit for Optimization and Terascale Applications (DAKOTA) to determine the impact of material parameters on sea ice response functions. Two material strength parameters that exhibited the most significant impact on responses were further analyzed to evaluate their influence on quantitative comparisons between model output and data. The sensitivity analysis along with ten year model runs indicate that while the anisotropic rheology provides some benefit in velocity predictions, additional improvements are required to make this material model a viable alternative for global sea ice simulations.

  16. Summertime Clouds over the Chukchi Sea Paquita Zuidema

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuidema, Paquita

    conditions (Persson et al. 2003)* : *"Pack ice surface energy changes at SHEBA initiated by late summer a combination of pack ice, meltponds and leads, with no snow cover. Albedo ~0.5, surface temp. ~ 0 C #12;NSIDC Sea ice concentration anomalies Much of recent Arctic sea ice thinning has occurred

  17. Adapting to sea-level rise in the US Southeast: The influence of built infrastructure and biophysical factors on the inundation of coastal areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniels, R.C. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment and Resources Center Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Gornitz, V.M. (National Aeronautics and Space Administration, New York, NY (United States). Goddard Inst. for Space Studies); Mehta, A.J.; Lee, Saychong (Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (United States). Dept. of Coastal and Oceanographic Engineering)

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The earth' s global mean surface air temperature has increased by 0.5[degrees]C over the past 100 years. This warming trend has occurred concurrently with increases in the concentration and number of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. These gases may cause this trend to accelerate in the future and result in a net increase in the earth's global mean surface air temperature of 1.5 to 4.5[degrees]C by the year 2100. An increase of this magnitude could cause sea surface temperatures to increase would cause sea levels to rise -from thermal expansion of the sea, and the addition of melt waters from alpine glaciers and continental ice sheets. To allow for the cost-effective analysis of the impacts that sea-level rise may have on the US Southeast, a method is needed that will allow sites that are potentially at risk to be identified for study. Previously, no objective method was available to identify such sites. This project addresses this problem by using a geographic data base with information on both physical and climatological factors to identify coastal areas of the US Southeast that are at risk to inundation or accelerated erosion due to sea-level rise. The following six areas were selected for further study from the many identified as being at high risk: Galveston, Texas; Caminada Pass, Louisiana; Bradenton Beach, Florida; Daytona Beach, Florida; McClellanville, South Carolina; and Nags Head, North Carolina. For each study area the amount of land, by land use type, in danger from inundation from three sea-level-rise scenarios was calculated. The calculated values were based on elevation alone.

  18. Adapting to sea-level rise in the US Southeast: The influence of built infrastructure and biophysical factors on the inundation of coastal areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniels, R.C. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment and Resources Center]|[Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Gornitz, V.M. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, New York, NY (United States). Goddard Inst. for Space Studies; Mehta, A.J.; Lee, Saychong [Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (United States). Dept. of Coastal and Oceanographic Engineering; Cushman, R.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The earth` s global mean surface air temperature has increased by 0.5{degrees}C over the past 100 years. This warming trend has occurred concurrently with increases in the concentration and number of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. These gases may cause this trend to accelerate in the future and result in a net increase in the earth`s global mean surface air temperature of 1.5 to 4.5{degrees}C by the year 2100. An increase of this magnitude could cause sea surface temperatures to increase would cause sea levels to rise -from thermal expansion of the sea, and the addition of melt waters from alpine glaciers and continental ice sheets. To allow for the cost-effective analysis of the impacts that sea-level rise may have on the US Southeast, a method is needed that will allow sites that are potentially at risk to be identified for study. Previously, no objective method was available to identify such sites. This project addresses this problem by using a geographic data base with information on both physical and climatological factors to identify coastal areas of the US Southeast that are at risk to inundation or accelerated erosion due to sea-level rise. The following six areas were selected for further study from the many identified as being at high risk: Galveston, Texas; Caminada Pass, Louisiana; Bradenton Beach, Florida; Daytona Beach, Florida; McClellanville, South Carolina; and Nags Head, North Carolina. For each study area the amount of land, by land use type, in danger from inundation from three sea-level-rise scenarios was calculated. The calculated values were based on elevation alone.

  19. September Arctic sea ice predicted to disappear near 2 warming above present

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    September Arctic sea ice predicted to disappear near 2 C global warming above present Irina; published 24 March 2012. [1] The decline of Arctic sea ice is one of the most visible signs of climate change over the past several decades. Arctic sea ice area shows large interannual variability due

  20. Thermosteric sea level rise, 19552003 J. I. Antonov, S. Levitus, and T. P. Boyer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thermosteric sea level rise, 1955­­2003 J. I. Antonov, S. Levitus, and T. P. Boyer National/year to global sea level rise. About half of this thermosteric trend is due to warming of the Atlantic Ocean), Thermosteric sea level rise, 1955­2003, Geophys. Res. Lett., 32, L12602, doi:10.1029/2005GL023112. 1

  1. Meteorologically driven trends in sea level rise Alexander S. Kolker1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hameed, Sultan

    Meteorologically driven trends in sea level rise Alexander S. Kolker1 and Sultan Hameed2 Received] Determining the rate of global sea level rise (GSLR) during the past century is critical to understanding a suite of coastal oceanographic processes. These findings reduce variability in regional sea level rise

  2. Svalbard glacier elevation changes and contribution to sea level rise Christopher Nuth,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kääb, Andreas

    Svalbard glacier elevation changes and contribution to sea level rise Christopher Nuth,1 Geir contribution to global sea level rise of 0.026 mm yrÀ1 sea level equivalent. Citation: Nuth, C., G. Moholdt, J level rise, J. Geophys. Res., 115, F01008, doi:10.1029/2008JF001223. 1. Introduction [2] The most recent

  3. 20E 60E 100E 140E 180 140W 60W100W 20W Sea-surface oxygen anomaly (mmol m-3)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    sulphur hexafluoride (SF6) during the Southern Ocean Iron Enrichment Experiment (SOIREE) provided confirmed that the SF6 patch was well constrained by surface mapping, with the decline in total SF6 showing to calculate the mean effective vertical diffusivity Kz from the diapycnal transfer of SF6, with complementary

  4. Earth'sFuture Sea level rise and its coastal impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    causes, highlighting the regional variability that superimposes the global mean rise. We also present sea rise. 1. Introduction In the recent years, sea level rise induced by global warming and its impacts and public. It is now well established that the Earth's climate is warming and that the main cause

  5. Globalization Nationalized

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazlish, Bruce

    Globalism and globalization have been seen as competitors to other allegiances, namely regionalism and nationalism. A look at recent efforts at reconceptualizing global history in China, Korea and the U.S., however, suggests ...

  6. Impact of global dimming and brightening on global warming Martin Wild,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    Impact of global dimming and brightening on global warming Martin Wild,1 Atsumu Ohmura,1 and Knut February 2007. [1] Speculations on the impact of variations in surface solar radiation on global warming was responsible for the observed warming. To disentangle surface solar and greenhouse influences on global warming

  7. 3, 435470, 2006 Improved surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    related to off-shore activities require the knowledge of accurate sur- face winds and sea states on fineOSD 3, 435­470, 2006 Improved surface wind resolution A. Bentamy et al. Title Page Abstract near real time surface wind resolution over the Mediterranean Sea A. Bentamy, H.-L. Ayina, P

  8. The Rising Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Ryder W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the thick of a sea level rise. After reading the evidencepredictive figure for ocean level rise by the turn of thethat a 7-foot (2 m) sea level rise by the year 2100 should

  9. Scientist warns against overselling climate change Climate change forecasters should admit that they cannot predict how global warming will affect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevenson, Paul

    that they cannot predict how global warming will affect individual countries, a leading physicist has said-of-deaths-from-ozone-predicted.html) Antarctic sea floor gives clues about effects of future global warming (/earth/environment/climatechange /5279223/Antarctic-sea-floor-gives-clues-about-affects-of-future-global-warming.html) The Vanishing Face

  10. Modeling and detection of oil in sea water Angeliki Xenakia)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerstoft, Peter

    -water owing to either natural processes (e.g., biogenic oil) or human-induced pollution (e.g., oil slicks focused on monitoring and characterizing oil pollution on the sea surface. Remote sens- ing methods fromModeling and detection of oil in sea water Angeliki Xenakia) Department of Applied Mathematics

  11. Dynamical suppression of sea level rise along the Pacific coast of North America: Indications for imminent acceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bromirski, Peter D.

    Dynamical suppression of sea level rise along the Pacific coast of North America: Indications changes in global mean sea level (MSL) rise have important practical implications for shoreline and beach occurred after the mid1970s regime shift, can account for the suppression of regional sea level rise along

  12. Global Warming: Is There Still Time to Avoid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    Global Warming: Is There Still Time to Avoid Disastrous Human -Made Climate Change? i.e. Have We simulations. (B) Simulated and observed surface temperature change. #12;21st Century Global Warming Climate) Simulated Global Warming Warming

  13. Modeling the topography of the salar de Uyuni, Bolivia as an equipotential surface of Earth’s gravity field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borsa, Adrian

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    study on the sea surface topography, Geophysical Journalequipotential surface estimated above with topography fromBills (2004), Topography of the flattest surface on Earth:

  14. Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas (SOCAT) gridded data products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabine, Christopher [NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory; Hankin, S. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Koyuk, H [Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean, University of Washington; Bakker, D C E [School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK; Pfeil, B [Geophysical Institute, University of Bergen; Uni Research AS, Bergen, Norway; Olsen, A [Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research, UNIFOB AS, Bergen, Norway; Metzl, N [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, LOCEAN/IPSL, Paris, France; Kozyr, Alexander [ORNL; Fassbender, A [School of Oceanography, University of Washington, Seattle, WA; Manke, A [Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; Malczyk, J [Jetz Laboratory, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Yale University; Akl, J [CSIRO Wealth from Oceans Flagship, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia; Alin, S R [Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; Bellerby, R G J [Geophysical Institute, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Borges, A [University of Liege, Chemical Oceanography Unit, Institut de Physique, Liege, Belgium; Boutin, J [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, LOCEAN/IPSL, Paris, France; Brown, P J [School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK; Cai, W-J [Department of Marine Sciences, University of Georgia; Chavez, F P [Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, Moss Landing, CA; Chen, A [Institute of Marine Geology and Chemistry, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; Cosa, C [Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; Feely, R A [Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; Gonzalez-Davila, M [Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Facultad de Ciencias del Mar, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria,; Goyet, C [Institut de Modélisation et d'Analyse en Géo-Environnement et Santé, Université de Perpignan; Hardman-Mountford, N [CSIRO, Marine and Atmospheric Research, Wembley, Western Australia, Australia; Heinze, C [Geophysical Institute, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Hoppema, M [Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven, Germany; Hunt, C W [Ocean Process Analysis Lab, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire; Hydes, D [National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, UK; Ishii, M [Japan Meteorological Agency, Meteorological Research Institute, Tsukuba, Japan; Johannessen, T [Geophysical Institute, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Key, R M [Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey; Kortzinger, A [GEOMAR, Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research, Kiel, Germany; Landschutzer, P [School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK; Lauvset, S K [Geophysical Institute, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Lefevre, N [Université Pierre et Marie Curie, LOCEAN/IPSL, Paris, France; Lenton, A [Centre for Australian Weather and Climate Research, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia; Lourantou, A [Université Pierre et Marie Curie, LOCEAN/IPSL, Paris, France; Merlivat, L [Université Pierre et Marie Curie, LOCEAN/IPSL, Paris, France; Midorikawa, T [Nagasaki Marine Observatory, Nagasaki, Japan; Mintrop, L [MARIANDA, Kiel, Germany; Miyazaki, C [Faculty of Environmental Earth Science, Hokkaido University, Hokkaido, Japan; Murata, A [Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, Yokosuka, Japan; Nakadate, A [Marine Division, Global Environment and Marine Department, Japan Meteorological Agency, Tokyo, Japan; Nakano, Y [Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, Yokosuka, Japan; Nakaoka, S [National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES), Tsukuba, Japan; Nojiri, Y [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Japan; et al.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A well documented, publicly available, global data set for surface ocean carbon dioxide (CO2) parameters has been called for by international groups for nearly two decades. The Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas (SOCAT) project was initiated by the international marine carbon science community in 2007 with the aim of providing a comprehensive, publicly available, regularly updated, global data set of marine surface CO2, which had been subject to quality control (QC). SOCAT version 1.5 was made public in September 2011 and holds 6.3 million quality controlled surface CO2 data from the global oceans and coastal seas, spanning four decades (1968 2007). The SOCAT gridded data is the second data product to come from the SOCAT project. Recognizing that some groups may have trouble working with millions of measurements, the SOCAT gridded product was generated to provide a robust regularly spaced fCO2 product with minimal spatial and temporal interpolation which should be easier to work with for many applications. Gridded SOCAT is rich with information that has not been fully explored yet, but also contains biases and limitations that the user needs to recognize and address.

  15. Global warming and global dioxide emission: An empirical study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linyan Sun [Xian Jiaotong Univ., Shaanxi (China); Wang, M. [Saint Mary`s Univ., Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada)

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, the dynamic relationship between global surface temperature (global warming) and global carbon dioxide emission (CO{sub 2}) is modelled and analyzed by causality and spectral analysis in the time domain and frequency domain, respectively. Historical data of global CO{sub 2} emission and global surface temperature anomalies over 129 years from 1860-1988 are used in this study. The causal relationship between the two phenomena is first examined using the Sim and Granger causality test in the time domain after the data series are filtered by ARIMA models. The Granger causal relationship is further scrutinized and confirmed by cross-spectral and multichannel spectral analysis in the frequency domain. The evidence found from both analyses proves that there is a positive causal relationship between the two variables. The time domain analysis suggests that Granger causality exists between global surface temperature and global CO{sub 2} emission. Further, CO{sub 2} emission causes the change in temperature. The conclusions are further confirmed by the frequency domain analysis, which indicates that the increase in CO{sub 2} emission causes climate warming because a high coherence exists between the two variables. Furthermore, it is proved that climate changes happen after an increase in CO{sub 2} emission, which confirms that the increase in CO{sub 2} emission does cause global warming. 27 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. On the Interaction between Marine Boundary Layer Cellular Cloudiness and Surface Heat Fluxes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kazil, J.; Feingold, G.; Wang, Hailong; Yamaguchi, T.

    2014-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The interaction between marine boundary layer cellular cloudiness and surface uxes of sensible and latent heat is investigated. The investigation focuses on the non-precipitating closed-cell state and the precipitating open-cell state at low geostrophic wind speed. The Advanced Research WRF model is used to conduct cloud-system-resolving simulations with interactive surface fluxes of sensible heat, latent heat, and of sea salt aerosol, and with a detailed representation of the interaction between aerosol particles and clouds. The mechanisms responsible for the temporal evolution and spatial distribution of the surface heat fluxes in the closed- and open-cell state are investigated and explained. It is found that the horizontal spatial structure of the closed-cell state determines, by entrainment of dry free tropospheric air, the spatial distribution of surface air temperature and water vapor, and, to a lesser degree, of the surface sensible and latent heat flux. The synchronized dynamics of the the open-cell state drives oscillations in surface air temperature, water vapor, and in the surface fluxes of sensible and latent heat, and of sea salt aerosol. Open-cell cloud formation, cloud optical depth and liquid water path, and cloud and rain water path are identified as good predictors of the spatial distribution of surface air temperature and sensible heat flux, but not of surface water vapor and latent heat flux. It is shown that by enhancing the surface sensible heat flux, the open-cell state creates conditions by which it is maintained. While the open-cell state under consideration is not depleted in aerosol, and is insensitive to variations in sea-salt fluxes, it also enhances the sea-salt flux relative to the closed-cell state. In aerosol-depleted conditions, this enhancement may replenish the aerosol needed for cloud formation, and hence contribute to the perpetuation of the open-cell state as well. Spatial homogenization of the surface fluxes is found to have only a small effect on cloud properties in the investigated cases. This indicates that sub-grid scale spatial variability in the surface flux of sensible and latent heat and of sea salt aerosol may not be required in large scale and global models to describe marine boundary layer cellular cloudiness.

  17. Observed Feedback between Winter Sea Ice and the North Atlantic Oscillation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strong, Courtenay; Magnusdottir, Gudrun; Stern, Hal

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    variability and climate feedbacks in a global coupled model.Ocean JOURNAL OF CLIMATE feedback on the North Atlantic2009 STRONG ET AL. Observed Feedback between Winter Sea Ice

  18. 2013. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. Is land subsidence increasing the exposure to sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    by global warming models used in impact studies. Through a combined analysis of GPS and persistent scatterer Natural Hazards: Human impact. Keywords: Sea level; coastal subsidence; Alexandria; GPS; InSAR; satellite

  19. Swell : a proposition for coastal metropolises in the age of rising seas and distributed centralization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorsey, Talia (Talia H.)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Premised upon the certain realities of the rise of urban sprawl, globalized dynamic networks, and sea levels, this thesis seeks to question these forces and mobilize the inherent potentials that lie within their intersections. ...

  20. The Role of Oceans and Sea Ice in Abrupt Transitions between Multiple Climate States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Brian E. J.

    The coupled climate dynamics underlying large, rapid, and potentially irreversible changes in ice cover are studied. A global atmosphere–ocean–sea ice general circulation model with idealized aquaplanet geometry is forced ...

  1. 1 Global Change Research for Sustainable Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    , ecological zones are shifting, the seas are warming and ice caps are melting. Forced adaptation to climate several countries or regions of the world are affected. Most promi- nent among these processes is climate change, which is often perceived as today's most important global threat, affecting the environment

  2. Sea level rise implications on shoreline changes: expectations from a retrospective analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Sea level rise implications on shoreline changes: expectations from a retrospective analysis Gonéri de Recherche et de Formation en Calcul Scientifique (Cerfacs) Sea level rise is a major consequence level rise is up to 3 times the global mean rate (estimated as 3.5 mm per year since the early 1990s

  3. CLIMATE CHANGE SCENARIO FOR THE MEDITERRANEAN SEA. F. Sevault, S. Somot, M. Dqu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribes, Aurélien

    CLIMATE CHANGE SCENARIO FOR THE MEDITERRANEAN SEA. F. Sevault, S. Somot, M. Déqué METEO.somot@meteo.fr michel.deque@meteo.fr ABSTRACT The question of the evolution of the Mediterranean Sea under the climatic is in consequence affected. 1. INTRODUCTION Climate change is scientifically established and globally described

  4. Accurate ab initio-based adiabatic global potential energy surface for the 2{sup 2}A? state of NH{sub 2} by extrapolation to the complete basis set limit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Y. Q.; Ma, F. C. [Department of Physics, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China)] [Department of Physics, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China); Sun, M. T. [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)] [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2013-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A full three-dimensional global potential energy surface is reported first time for the title system, which is important for the photodissociation processes. It is obtained using double many-body expansion theory and an extensive set of accurate ab initio energies extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. Such a work can be recommended for dynamics studies of the N({sup 2}D) + H{sub 2} reaction, a reliable theoretical treatment of the photodissociation dynamics and as building blocks for constructing the double many-body expansion potential energy surface of larger nitrogen/hydrogen containing systems. In turn, a preliminary theoretical study of the reaction N({sup 2}D)+H{sub 2}(X{sup 1}?{sub g}{sup +})(?=0,j=0)?NH(a{sup 1}?)+H({sup 2}S) has been carried out with the method of quasi-classical trajectory on the new potential energy surface. Integral cross sections and thermal rate constants have been calculated, providing perhaps the most reliable estimate of the integral cross sections and the rate constants known thus far for such a reaction.

  5. Instructions for use Energy Crisis as Global Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tachizawa, Kazuya

    because of political changes in energy-supplying Mideast countries. In 1978 the Iranian revolutionInstructions for use #12;Energy Crisis as Global Problem - 165 - Energy Crisis as Global Problem NAKAMURA Kenichi 1. The Energy Crisis · Floating on a Sea of Oil At night the Japanese islands sparkle

  6. The Scientific and Social Challenges of Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiehl, Jeff

    ) · Snow cover (decrease) · Sea ice cover (decrease) · Ocean heat (increase) · Ocean acidity (increase) (AD 2200-2300?) High Climate Sensitivity Low Climate Sensitivity (Geol. Data) (No Arctic/Greenland ice in Technology · Changes in Consumption #12;10/16/07 30 US is 5% of global population, but 25% of global

  7. The Aleutian Low and Winter Climatic Conditions in the Bering Sea. Part I: Classification*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    this relationship through a tendency of individual storm sys- tems that preferentially pump warm air poleward as a primary determinant of surface air temperature (SAT) variability in the Bering Sea during the winter- sition of the low is important to the Bering Sea through its impact on circulation, surface heat fluxes

  8. Global distribution and climate forcing of marine organic aerosol: 1. Model improvements and evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meskhidze, N.; Xu, J.; Gantt, Brett; Zhang, Yang; Nenes, Athanasios; Ghan, Steven J.; Liu, Xiaohong; Easter, Richard C.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

    2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Marine organic aerosol emissions have been implemented and evaluated within the National Center of Atmospheric Research (NCAR)'s Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5) with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's 7-mode Modal Aerosol Module (MAM-7). Emissions of marine primary organic aerosols (POA), phytoplanktonproduced isoprene- and monoterpenes-derived secondary organic aerosols (SOA) and methane sulfonate (MS{sup -}) are shown to affect surface concentrations of organic aerosols in remote marine regions. Global emissions of submicron marine POA is estimated to be 7.9 and 9.4 Tg yr{sup -1}, for the Gantt et al. (2011) and Vignati et al. (2010) emission parameterizations, respectively. Marine sources of SOA and particulate MS{sup -} (containing both sulfur and carbon atoms) contribute an additional 0.2 and 5.1 Tg yr{sup -1}, respectively. Widespread areas over productive waters of the Northern Atlantic, Northern Pacific, and the Southern Ocean show marine-source submicron organic aerosol surface concentrations of 100 ngm{sup -3}, with values up to 400 ngm{sup -3} over biologically productive areas. Comparison of long-term surface observations of water insoluble organic matter (WIOM) with POA concentrations from the two emission parameterizations shows that despite revealed discrepancies (often more than a factor of 2), both Gantt et al. (2011) and Vignati et al. (2010) formulations are able to capture the magnitude of marine organic aerosol concentrations, with the Gantt et al. (2011) parameterization attaining better seasonality. Model simulations show that the mixing state of the marine POA can impact the surface number concentration of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The largest increases (up to 20 %) in CCN (at a supersaturation (S) of 0.2 %) number concentration are obtained over biologically productive ocean waters when marine organic aerosol is assumed to be externally mixed with sea-salt. Assuming marine organics are internally-mixed with sea-salt provides diverse results with increases and decreases in the concentration of CCN over different parts of the ocean. The sign of the CCN change due to the addition of marine organics to seasalt aerosol is determined by the relative significance of the increase in mean modal diameter due to addition of mass, and the decrease in particle hygroscopicity due to compositional changes in marine aerosol. Based on emerging evidence for increased CCN concentration over biologically active surface ocean areas/periods, our study suggests that treatment of sea spray in global climate models (GCMs) as an internal mixture of marine organic aerosols and sea-salt will likely lead to an underestimation in CCN number concentration.

  9. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 24, NO.12, PAGES 1503-1506, JUNE 15, 1997 Spatial variations in the rate of sea level rise caused by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conrad, Clint

    in the rate of sea level rise caused by the present-day melting of glaciers and ice sheets Clinton P. Conrad. Becausemostlong duration tide gaugesarein.the northernhemisphere,if the sources of sea level rise are unbalanced between the two hemispheres,estimates of global sea level rise could be in error by 10 to 20%. Individual

  10. Sea level change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, M.F. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) 1995 Scientific Assessment, Chapter 7. Sea Level Change, presents a modest revision of the similar chapter in the 1990 Assessment. Principal conclusions on observed sea-level change and the principal terms in the sea-level equation (ocean thermal expansion, glaciers, ice sheets, and land hydrology), including our knowledge of the present-day (defined as the 20th Century) components of sea-level rise, and projections of these for the future, are presented here. Some of the interesting glaciological problems which are involved in these studies are discussed in more detail. The emphasis here is on trends over decades to a century, not on shorter variations nor on those of the geologic past. Unfortunately, some of the IPCC projections had not been agreed at the time of writing of this paper, and these projections will not be given here. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Studies of dynamical processes affecting global climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, C.; Cooper, D.; Eichinger, W. [and others

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The main objective was, by a combined theoretical and observational approach, to develop improved models of dynamic processes in the oceans and atmosphere and to incorporate them into large climate codes, chiefly in four main areas: numerical physics, chemistry, water vapor, and ocean-atmosphere interactions. Main areas of investigation included studies of: cloud parameterizations for global climate codes, Lidar and the planetary boundary layer, chemistry, climate variability using coupled ocean-atmospheric models, and numerical physical methods. This project employed a unique approach that included participation of a number of University of California faculty, postdoctoral fellows and graduate students who collaborated with Los Alamos research staff on specific tasks, thus greatly enhancing the research output. Overall accomplishments during the sensing of the atmospheric planetary were: (1) first two- and three-dimensional remote sensing of the atmospheric planetary boundary layer using Lidars, (2) modeling of 20-year cycle in both pressure and sea surface temperatures in North Pacific, (3) modeling of low frequency internal variability, (4) addition of aerosols to stratosphere to simulate Pinatubo effect on ozone, (5) development of fast, comprehensive chemistry in the troposphere for urban pollution studies, (6) new prognostic cloud parameterization in global atmospheric code remedied problems with North Pacific atmospheric circulation and excessive equatorial precipitation, (7) development of a unique aerosol analysis technique, the aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS), which allows real-time analysis of the size and chemical composition of individual aerosol particles, and (8) numerical physics applying Approximate Inertial Manifolds to ocean circulation. 14 refs., 6 figs.

  12. Trace metal composition of particulate matter of the Danube River and Turkish rivers draining into the Black Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murray, James W.

    into the Black Sea Ouz Yiiterhan a,, James W. Murray b,1 a Institute of Marine Sciences, Middle East Technical several rivers entering the Black Sea as part of a broader study of the composition of suspended matter and sediments in the Black Sea. Suspended matter and surface sediment samples were collected from the Danube

  13. Earth'sFuture Multidecadal global cooling and unprecedented ozone loss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    Earth'sFuture Multidecadal global cooling and unprecedented ozone loss following a regional nuclear inertia and albedo effects in the ocean and expanded sea ice. The combined cooling and enhanced UV would put significant pressures on global food supplies and could trigger a global nuclear famine. Knowledge

  14. Global Health Research | 2 Global Health Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    Global Health Research | 2 Global Health Research Supporting researchers in low- and middle-income countries to carry out health- related research within their own countries. Gl bal Health #12;3 | Global Health Research #12;Global Health Research | 4 We are a global charitable foundation dedicated

  15. Misrepresentations of Sargasso Sea temperatures by Arthur B. Robinson et al.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keigwin, Lloyd (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Woods Hole, MA); Boslough, Mark Bruce Elrick

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Keigwin (Science 274:1504-1508, 1996) reconstructed the sea surface temperature (SST) record in the northern Sargasso Sea to document natural climate variability in recent millennia. The annual average SST proxy used {delta}{sup 18}O in planktonic foraminifera in a radiocarbon-dated 1990 Bermuda Rise box core. Keigwin's Fig. 4B (K4B) shows a 50-year-averaged time series along with four decades of SST measurements from Station S near Bermuda, demonstrating that the Sargasso Sea is now at its warmest in more than 400 years, and well above the most recent box-core temperature. Taken together, Station S and paleo-temperatures suggest there was an acceleration of warming in the 20th century, though this was not an explicit conclusion of the paper. Keigwin concluded that anthropogenic warming may be superposed on a natural warming trend. In an unpublished paper circulated with the anti-Kyoto 'Oregon Petition,' Robinson et al. ('Environmental Effects of Increased Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide,' 1998) reproduced K4B but (1) omitted Station S data, (2) incorrectly stated that the time series ended in 1975, (3) conflated Sargasso Sea data with global temperature, and (4) falsely claimed that Keigwin showed global temperatures 'are still a little below the average for the past 3,000 years.' Keigwin's Fig. 2 showed that {delta}{sup 18}O has increased over the past 6000 years, so SSTs calculated from those data would have a long term decrease. Thus, it is inappropriate to compare present-day SST to a long term mean unless the trend is removed. Slight variations of Robinson et al. (1998) have been repeatedly published with different author rotations. Various mislabeled, improperly-drawn, and distorted versions of K4B have appeared in the Wall Street Journal, in weblogs, and even as an editorial cartoon-all supporting baseless claims that current temperatures are lower than the long-term mean, and traceable to Robinson's misrepresentation with Station S data removed. In 2007, Robinson added a fictitious 2006 temperature that is significantly lower than the measured data. This doctored version of K4B with fabricated data was reprinted in a 2008 Heartland Institute advocacy report, 'Nature, Not Human Activity, Rules the Climate.'

  16. average daily global: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    14,000 1 31 61 91 121 151 181 211 241 271 301 331 361 Year Oregon, University of 14 What Global Warming Looks Like The July 2010 global map of surface temperature anomalies...

  17. average detecting global: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    arises in imple- menting the most basic command of a debugging system Garg, Vijay 13 What Global Warming Looks Like The July 2010 global map of surface temperature anomalies...

  18. A Physically Based Framework for Modelling the Organic Fractionation of Sea Spray Aerosol from Bubble Film Langmuir Equilibria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burrows, Susannah M.; Ogunro, O.; Frossard, Amanda; Russell, Lynn M.; Rasch, Philip J.; Elliott, S.

    2014-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of a large fraction of organic matter in primary sea spray aerosol (SSA) can strongly affect its cloud condensation nuclei activity and interactions with marine clouds. Global climate models require new parameterizations of the SSA composition in order to improve the representation of these processes. Existing proposals for such a parameterization use remotely-sensed chlorophyll-a concentrations as a proxy for the biogenic contribution to the aerosol. However, both observations and theoretical considerations suggest that existing relationships with chlorophyll-a, derived from observations at only a few locations, may not be representative for all ocean regions. We introduce a novel framework for parameterizing the fractionation of marine organic matter into SSA based on a competitive Langmuir adsorption equilibrium at bubble surfaces. Marine organic matter is partitioned into classes with differing molecular weights, surface excesses, and Langmuir adsorption parameters. The classes include a lipid-like mixture associated with labile dissolved organic carbon (DOC), a polysaccharide-like mixture associated primarily with semi-labile DOC, a protein-like mixture with concentrations intermediate between lipids and polysaccharides, a processed mixture associated with recalcitrant surface DOC, and a deep abyssal humic-like mixture. Box model calculations have been performed for several cases of organic adsorption to illustrate the underlying concepts. We then apply the framework to output from a global marine biogeochemistry model, by partitioning total dissolved organic carbon into several classes of macromolecule. Each class is represented by model compounds with physical and chemical properties based on existing laboratory data. This allows us to globally map the predicted organic mass fraction of the nascent submicron sea spray aerosol. Predicted relationships between chlorophyll-\\textit{a} and organic fraction are similar to existing empirical parameterizations, but can vary between biologically productive and non-productive regions, and seasonally within a given region. Major uncertainties include the bubble film thickness at bursting and the variability of organic surfactant activity in the ocean, which is poorly constrained. In addition, marine colloids and cooperative adsorption of polysaccharides may make important contributions to the aerosol, but are not included here. This organic fractionation framework is an initial step towards a closer linking of ocean biogeochemistry and aerosol chemical composition in Earth system models. Future work should focus on improving constraints on model parameters through new laboratory experiments or through empirical fitting to observed relationships in the real ocean and atmosphere, as well as on atmospheric implications of the variable composition of organic matter in sea spray.

  19. Maps, Networks and a Sea That Won’t Conform: Thinking Critically About Marine Spatial Planning in Scotland 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Glen

    Scotland has adopted marine spatial planning (MSP) as a key instrument of its National Marine Plan. This follows a global trend in shifting marine governance techniques. MSP is turn away from sectoral governance of the sea ...

  20. Understanding Global Capitalism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, William I.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sociology; globalization; political economy; development;economy fueled through 700 billion dollars injected into globalizationGlobalization Studies, also called CGS. I would economy and

  1. Sea Level Rise Media Release

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Aixue

    Sea Level Rise Media Release Coverage Report 07/06/2009 Melting Ice Could Lead to Massive Waves 06/11/2009 Rising sea levels could see U.S. Atlantic coast cities make hard choices; Where to let Baltimore Chronicle & Sentinel, The 06/08/2009 Rapid rise in sea levels on East Coast predicted Pittsburgh

  2. The area and volume of sea ice in the Arc-tic Ocean is decreasing, with some predict-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Bernard

    , while loss of sea ice could cause stress for polar bears. Moreover, global climate may be affected ice forms in winter,which melts and/or gets exported out of the Arctic. The recent decrease in summer of this community is evi- dence that the sea ice cap has not disap- peared during the Quaternary. The remains

  3. A sensitivity study of the thermodynamic environment on GFDL model hurricane intensity: Implications for global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, W.; Tuleya, R.E.; Ginis, I.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, the effect of thermodynamic environmental changes on hurricane intensity is extensively investigated with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory hurricane model for a suite of experiments with different initial upper-tropospheric temperature anomalies up to {+-}4 C and sea surface temperatures ranging from 26 to 31 C given the same relative humidity profile. The results indicate that stabilization in the environmental atmosphere and sea surface temperature (SST) increase cause opposing effects on hurricane intensity. The offsetting relationship between the effects of atmospheric stability increase (decrease) and SST increase (decrease) is monotonic and systematic in the parameter space. This implies that hurricane intensity increase due to a possible global warming associated with increased CO{sub 2} is considerably smaller than that expected from warming of the oceanic waters alone. The results also indicate that the intensity of stronger (weaker) hurricanes is more (less) sensitive to atmospheric stability and SST changes. The model-attained hurricane intensity is found to be well correlated with the maximum surface evaporation and the large-scale environmental convective available potential energy. The model-attained hurricane intensity if highly correlated with the energy available from wet-adiabatic ascent near the eyewall relative to a reference sounding in the undisturbed environment for all the experiments. Coupled hurricane-ocean experiments show that hurricane intensity becomes less sensitive to atmospheric stability and SST changes since the ocean coupling causes larger (smaller) intensity reduction for stronger (weaker) hurricanes. This implies less increase of hurricane intensity related to a possible global warming due to increased CO{sub 2}.

  4. National Sea Grant Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Sea Grant Library The New Library System and Publication Submittals Communications Staff;Publication Submittals · Publication types consolidated here for searching purposes · Editor field added Link Type · Document Is default Add link title · "View PDF" = PDFs · "View Document" = other docs

  5. DELIVERABLE Central North Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haszeldine, Stuart

    International Energy Agency Energy Technology Perspectives 2012 #12;4 Central North Sea ­ CO2 Storage Hub within the UK and EU. CCS development zones can also attract new energy intensive industries to locate of intermittency which is inevitable with wind power, thereby helping to address the need for energy security

  6. *Smith, J. A., 1999: Observations of wind, waves, and the mixed layer: the scaling of surface motion. In The Wind-Driven Air-Sea Interface, edited by M. L. Banner, pp. 231-238. Published

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Jerome A.

    velocity scale measured by Doppler sonar to wind friction velocity and the surface Stokes' drift, velocity profiles, and surface fields of radial velocity and acoustic backscatter intensity have been made effects of improved understanding and measurement techniques. The fluxes are linked to both wave dynamics

  7. Development, sensitivity analysis, and uncertainty quantification of high-fidelity arctic sea ice models.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Kara J.; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston; Paskaleva, Biliana S.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Arctic sea ice is an important component of the global climate system and due to feedback effects the Arctic ice cover is changing rapidly. Predictive mathematical models are of paramount importance for accurate estimates of the future ice trajectory. However, the sea ice components of Global Climate Models (GCMs) vary significantly in their prediction of the future state of Arctic sea ice and have generally underestimated the rate of decline in minimum sea ice extent seen over the past thirty years. One of the contributing factors to this variability is the sensitivity of the sea ice to model physical parameters. A new sea ice model that has the potential to improve sea ice predictions incorporates an anisotropic elastic-decohesive rheology and dynamics solved using the material-point method (MPM), which combines Lagrangian particles for advection with a background grid for gradient computations. We evaluate the variability of the Los Alamos National Laboratory CICE code and the MPM sea ice code for a single year simulation of the Arctic basin using consistent ocean and atmospheric forcing. Sensitivities of ice volume, ice area, ice extent, root mean square (RMS) ice speed, central Arctic ice thickness, and central Arctic ice speed with respect to ten different dynamic and thermodynamic parameters are evaluated both individually and in combination using the Design Analysis Kit for Optimization and Terascale Applications (DAKOTA). We find similar responses for the two codes and some interesting seasonal variability in the strength of the parameters on the solution.

  8. Global Warming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.NewofGeothermal Heat Pump Basics31/2007 TeppeiProgramsGlobal1

  9. Academy for Global Engagement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Academy for Global Engagement 2013-2014 Global Fellows #12;Meredith Gore and Wildlife #12;Global Research Interests · risk percepHon and public support and Agricultural Engineering #12;Global Research Interests · catalyHc conversion of biomass

  10. global warming's six indias

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, Gary L.

    global warming's six indias: An Audience Segmentation Analysis #12;Global Warming's Six Indias 1............................................................................................................................................20 2. Global Warming Beliefs and Attitudes................................................................................ 21 Knowledge about global warming varies widely by group

  11. Rising Sea Levels Due to Global Warming Are Unstoppable

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements RecentlyElectronicResources Resources About1 SignG.5 $ infeed-image

  12. SOME CHILLING CONSIDERATIONS ABOUT GLOBAL WARMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    of Arizona #12;Weiss and Overpeck, University of Arizona #12;MELTING OF GREENLAND ICE CAP Satellite Complete melt of the Greenland ice sheet would raise the level of the global ocean 7 meters. #12 thousand years Polar ice cores #12;GREENHOUSE GAS FORCING AND CHANGE IN GLOBAL MEAN SURFACE TEMPERATURE

  13. Linear analysis of surface temperature dynamics and climate sensitivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Wei

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectral properties of global surface temperature and uncertainties of global climate sensitivity are explored in this work through the medium of Energy Balance Climate Models (EBCMs) and observational surface temperature data. In part I, a complete...

  14. Linear analysis of surface temperature dynamics and climate sensitivity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Wei

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectral properties of global surface temperature and uncertainties of global climate sensitivity are explored in this work through the medium of Energy Balance Climate Models (EBCMs) and observational surface temperature data. In part I, a complete...

  15. apres irradiation globale: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    necessary for the evaluation of global irradiance on inclined surface which is needed for photovoltaic Boyer, Edmond 7 Caractristiques lectriques de diodes Au-Si(N) ralises aprs...

  16. Periodic fluctuations in deep water formation due to sea ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saha, Raj

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the last ice age several quasi-periodic abrupt warming events took place. Known as Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events their effects were felt globally, although the North Atlantic experienced the largest temperature anomalies. Paleoclimate data shows that the fluctuations often occurred right after massive glacial meltwater releases in the North Atlantic and in bursts of three or four with progressively decreasing strengths. In this study a simple dynamical model of an overturning circulation and sea ice is developed with the goal of understanding the fundamental mechanisms that could have caused the DO events. Interaction between sea ice and the overturning circulation in the model produces self-sustained oscillations. Analysis and numerical experiments reveal that the insulating effect of sea ice causes the ocean to periodically vent out accumulated heat in the deep ocean into the atmosphere. Subjecting the model to idealized freshwater forcing mimicking Heinrich events causes modulation of the natural p...

  17. MODIS Collection 5 global land cover: Algorithm refinements and characterization of new datasets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    information is required to parameterize land surface processes in regional-to-global scale Earth system models

  18. Global energy and global precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    terms) Atmosphere Net top of atmosphere incoming flux (N) 1 W/m2 Net surface flux (Rs) 100 W/m2 Sensible fluxes must sum to zero. Thus: S+LP+N-Rs=0 So LP=Rs-N-S 80 W/m2 (convert to Kg/m2/day by scaling by ~ 0? Atmosphere Change in Net top of atmosphere incoming flux ( N) 4 W/m2 Change in Net surface flux ( Rs) 1 W/m2

  19. Climate Change in the Cenozoic as Seen in Deep Sea Sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berger, Wolf

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Asymmetry of interoceanic fresh-water and heat fluxes. Proc.2002. Sea-level and deep water temperature changes derivedwind forcing and surface water advection. In: G. Wefer et

  20. Deep-Sea Research II 49 (2002) 59695990 Phytoplankton growth, microzooplankton herbivory and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bering Sea coccolithophorid bloom. We found that reduced microzooplankton grazing mortality is a key), eddies, and wind-driven vertical mixing of nutrients into surface waters, provide the compo- nents

  1. "Half Seas Over": The Impact of Sea Level Rise on International Law and Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menefee, Samuel Pyeatt

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    other ramifications of sea level rise. As the overview ofintro. 1960). SEA LEVEL RISE beneath the sea, immersedZONE ACTIVmES AND SEA LEVEL RISE I (Envi- ronment and Policy

  2. Life Cycle of Sea-Ice Frazil, or grease ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    of Sea Ice away from surface, long crystals as congelation ice (frozen on from below) Brine Channels within the ice (~width of human hair) Brine rejected from ice (4-10psu), but concentrates in brine from AWI #12;Brine Volume and Salinity From Thomas and Dieckmann 2002, Science .... adapted from papers

  3. Sea Breeze characteristics during a high ozone event over Houston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naumann, Stephanie Alaine

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During August 29 through September 2, 2000, high surface ozone levels were observed over Houston, Texas. Observational and MM5 model data were used to evaluate the land/sea breeze event that occurred each day. The model did well in accurately...

  4. Calcareous nannofossils of the Bonaire Trench-Caribbean Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henry, Mitchell Earl

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    approaches the normal to the sea surface. The number of photosynthetic cells below 150 meters was found by Hasle (1959) to be unimportant in relation to the number in the euphotic zone. Reproduction in coccolithophorids may be either a binary fission...

  5. Implementation of global energy sustainability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grob, G.R. [CMDC, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The term energy sustainability emerged from the UN Conference on Environment and Development in Rio 1992, when Agenda 21 was formulated and the Global Energy Charter proclaimed. Emission reductions, total energy costing, improved energy efficiency, and sustainable energy systems are the four fundamental principles of the charter. These principles can be implemented in the proposed financial, legal, technical, and education framework. Much has been done in many countries toward the implementation of the Global Energy Charter, but progress has not been fast enough to ease the disastrous effects of the too many ill-conceived energy systems on the environment, climate, and health. Global warming is accelerating, and pollution is worsening, especially in developing countries with their hunger for energy to meet the needs of economic development. Asian cities are now beating all pollution records, and greenhouse gases are visibly changing the climate with rising sea levels, retracting glaciers, and record weather disasters. This article presents why and how energy investments and research money have to be rechanneled into sustainable energy, rather than into the business-as-usual of depleting, unsustainable energy concepts exceeding one trillion dollars per year. This largest of all investment sectors needs much more attention.

  6. Modeling of Antarctic sea ice in a general circulation model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Xingren; Budd, W.F. [Antarctic Cooperative Research Centre, Tasmania (Australia)] [Antarctic Cooperative Research Centre, Tasmania (Australia); Simmonds, I. [School of Earth Sciences, Victoria (Australia)] [School of Earth Sciences, Victoria (Australia)

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A dynamic-thermodynamic sea ice model is developed and coupled with the Melbourne University general circulation model to simulate the seasonal cycle of the Antarctic sea ice distributions The model is efficient, rapid to compute, and useful for a range of climate studies. The thermodynamic part of the sea ice model is similar to that developed by Parkinson and Washington, the dynamics contain a simplified ice rheology that resists compression. The thermodynamics is based on energy conservation at the top surface of the ice/snow, the ice/water interface, and the open water area to determine the ice formation, accretion, and ablation. A lead parameterization is introduced with an effective partitioning scheme for freezing between and under the ice floes. The dynamic calculation determines the motion of ice, which is forced with the atmospheric wind, taking account of ice resistance and rafting. The simulated sea ice distribution compares reasonably well with observations. The seasonal cycle of ice extent is well simulated in phase as well as in magnitude. Simulated sea ice thickness and concentration are also in good agreement with observations over most regions and serve to indicate the importance of advection and ocean drift in the determination of the sea ice distribution. 64 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Polar Sea Ice Mapping Using SeaWinds Data Hyrum S. Anderson and David G. Long

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    Polar Sea Ice Mapping Using SeaWinds Data Hyrum S. Anderson and David G. Long Brigham Young for mapping polar sea ice extent. In this study, a new al- gorithm for polar sea ice mapping is developed of Bayes detection to produce sea ice extent maps. Statistical models for sea ice and ocean are represented

  8. Continental margin architecture : sea level and climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jenna Catherine

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J. , 2006. Rapid sea-level rise and Holocene climate in theJ. , 2006. Rapid sea-level rise and Holocene climate in theby deceleration of sea-level rise. Science, 265: 228-231.

  9. Global Cooling: Effect of Urban Albedo on Global Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, Hashem; Menon, Surabi; Rosenfeld, Arthur

    2007-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In many urban areas, pavements and roofs constitute over 60% of urban surfaces (roof 20-25%, pavements about 40%). The roof and the pavement albedo can be increased by about 0.25 and 0.10, respectively, resulting in a net albedo increase for urban areas of about 0.1. Many studies have demonstrated building cooling-energy savings in excess of 20% upon raising roof reflectivity from an existing 10-20% to about 60%. We estimate U.S. potential savings in excess of $1 billion (B) per year in net annual energy bills. Increasing albedo of urban surfaces can reduce the summertime urban temperature and improve the urban air quality. Increasing the urban albedo has the added benefit of reflecting more of the incoming global solar radiation and countering the effect of global warming. We estimate that increasing albedo of urban areas by 0.1 results in an increase of 3 x 10{sup -4} in Earth albedo. Using a simple global model, the change in air temperature in lowest 1.8 km of the atmosphere is estimated at 0.01K. Modelers predict a warming of about 3K in the next 60 years (0.05K/year). Change of 0.1 in urban albedo will result in 0.01K global cooling, a delay of {approx}0.2 years in global warming. This 0.2 years delay in global warming is equivalent to 10 Gt reduction in CO2 emissions.

  10. Evaluation of global wind power Cristina L. Archer and Mark Z. Jacobson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    here are representative of the global distribution of winds, global wind power generated at locations or greater) and can therefore be considered suitable for low-cost wind power generation. This estimate in northern Europe along the North Sea, the southern tip of the South American continent, the island

  11. On the non-linear response of the ocean thermohaline circulation to global deforestation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renssen, Hans

    On the non-linear response of the ocean thermohaline circulation to global deforestation H. Renssen-dimensional coupled atmosphere-sea-ice- ocean-vegetation model to study the transient effect of global deforestation deforestation, Geophys. Res. Lett., 30(2), 1061, doi:10.1029/ 2002GL016155, 2003. 1. Introduction [2] It has

  12. Quantitative evaluation of bioturbation on the deep sea floor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guinasso, Norman Louis

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Bowen (1973) reported measurements of plutonium in six cores taken in 1969 through 1971 in the Atlantic Ocean and Mediterran- ean Sea. Measurable amounts of plutonium were found at depths of the order of 10 cm below the surface in five of these cores... between 1 and 10 cd kyr r by invoking the assumption that mixing is proportional to biomass. Plutonium distributions in deep sea sedi- ments (Noshkin and Bowcn, 1973) indicate abyssal mixing rates ranging from 100-400 cmP kyr r . AC KN OWLE DGEMEN TS...

  13. Synoptic analysis of near surface and subsurface temperatures in the Atlantic Ocean following hurricane BETSY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landis, Robert Clarence

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    pressures Sea Surface Temperature Pattern before Hurricane Betsy 26 Sea Surface Temperature Pattern after Hur ricane Betsy 27 Seven-Day Average Sea Surface Temperatures; 23 - 29 August 1965 28 Seven-Day Average Sea Surface Temperatures; 8 - 14.... SHIIDEO ARE o IS / / / WATER 79'-80' F 73' 72' 71' BT NO. Ie 28 38 48 58 BETSY FIG, IB. SUBSURFACE THERMAL STRUCTURE BEFORE HURRICANE BETSY ALONG SECTION A. 204 21' 22' NORTH LATITUDE 23' 24' 25' 26 27' 28' 82. 5' 80. 5' 100 I 200 IJI IJI IJ...

  14. Shelf-sea ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, J J

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis of the food chain dynamics of the Oregon, Alaskan, and New York shelves is made with respect to differences in physical forcing of these ecosystems. The world's shelves are 10% of the area of the ocean, yield 99% of the world's fish catch, and may be a major sink in the global CO/sub 2/ budget.

  15. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 38, NO. 4, JULY 2000 1843 An Iterative Approach to Multisensor Sea Ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 38, NO. 4, JULY 2000 1843 An Iterative play a critical role in the global climate, the remote sensing community has had a keen interest in the variability of polar sea ice characteris- tics. Sea ice influences heat transfer between the warmer ocean

  16. Toward resolution-independent dust emissions in global models: Impacts on the seasonal and spatial distribution of dust

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, J. R.

    Simulating the emission of mineral dust and sea-salt aerosol is nonlinear with surface winds and therefore requires accurate representation of surface winds. Consequently, the resolution of a simulation affects emission ...

  17. Modeling the summertime evolution of sea-ice melt ponds rsted-DTU, Electromagnetic Systems, Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, Denmark

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feltham, Daniel

    ablation. The model predictions are tested for sensitivity to the melt rate of unponded ice, enhanced melt with surface topographies derived from laser altimetry corresponding to first-year sea ice and multiyear sea ice are important in determining the total surface ablation and area covered by melt ponds. Citation

  18. Improved global bathymetry, global sea floor roughness, and deep ocean mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becker, Joseph Jeffrey

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    dissipation of tidal energy in the deep ocean inferred fromdissipation of tidal energy in the deep ocean inferred fromthe amount of energy conversion in an ocean of finite depth

  19. Improved Global Bathymetry, Global Sea Floor Roughness, and Deep Ocean Mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becker, Joseph J

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    dissipation of tidal energy in the deep ocean inferred fromdissipation of tidal energy in the deep ocean inferred fromthe amount of energy conversion in an ocean of finite depth

  20. Improved global bathymetry, global sea floor roughness, and deep ocean mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becker, Joseph Jeffrey

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Azores and the Canary Islands suggests that [Egbert andsouth of the Azores and the Canary Islands are strong point

  1. Improved Global Bathymetry, Global Sea Floor Roughness, and Deep Ocean Mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becker, Joseph J

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Azores and the Canary Islands suggests that [Egbert andsouth of the Azores and the Canary Islands are strong point

  2. QUESTIONS ABOUT GLOBAL WARMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    QUESTIONS ABOUT GLOBAL WARMING ¥IS IT REAL? ¥IS IT IMPORTANT? ¥WHAT IS IT DUE TO? ¥HOW MUCH MORE in the atmosphere, giving Earth its temperate climate. Global Atmosphere, Global Warming GLOBAL TEMPERATURE TREND IS THIS CARBON DIOXIDE COMING FROM? Other sources are home heating and electric power production. WE ARE ALL

  3. Global Health Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Ophir

    Bay Area Global Health Seminar Series Moving beyond millennium targets in global health: The challenges of investing in health and universal health coverage Although targets can help to focus global health efforts, they can also detract attention from deeper underlying challenges in global health

  4. Global Warming Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schofield, Jeremy

    Global Warming Observations: 1. Global temperature has been gradually rising in recent years #15 in range 8000 12000 nm { CFC's, methane and N 2 O important for global warming even though concentra- tions in concentration of \\greenhouse gases" like CO 2 What determines global temperature? Energy budget of earth: 1

  5. Effects of tropical cyclones on large-scale circulation and ocean heat transport in the South China Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    transport. Secondly, TCs pump surface heat downward to the thermocline, increasing the heat injection from cyclone Á Heat transport Á Air-sea interaction 1 Introduction The South China Sea (SCS) is the largestEffects of tropical cyclones on large-scale circulation and ocean heat transport in the South China

  6. Periodic fluctuations in deep water formation due to sea ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raj Saha

    2015-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    During the last ice age several quasi-periodic abrupt warming events took place. Known as Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events their effects were felt globally, although the North Atlantic experienced the largest temperature anomalies. Paleoclimate data shows that the fluctuations often occurred right after massive glacial meltwater releases in the North Atlantic and in bursts of three or four with progressively decreasing strengths. In this study a simple dynamical model of an overturning circulation and sea ice is developed with the goal of understanding the fundamental mechanisms that could have caused the DO events. Interaction between sea ice and the overturning circulation in the model produces self-sustained oscillations. Analysis and numerical experiments reveal that the insulating effect of sea ice causes the ocean to periodically vent out accumulated heat in the deep ocean into the atmosphere. Subjecting the model to idealized freshwater forcing mimicking Heinrich events causes modulation of the natural periodicity and produces burst patterns very similar to what is observed in temperature proxy data. Numerical experiments with the model also suggests that the characteristic period of 1,500 years is due to the geometry, or the effective heat capacity, of the ocean that comes under sea ice cover.

  7. Doppler characteristics of sea clutter.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raynal, Ann Marie; Doerry, Armin Walter

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Doppler radars can distinguish targets from clutter if the target's velocity along the radar line of sight is beyond that of the clutter. Some targets of interest may have a Doppler shift similar to that of clutter. The nature of sea clutter is different in the clutter and exo-clutter regions. This behavior requires special consideration regarding where a radar can expect to find sea-clutter returns in Doppler space and what detection algorithms are most appropriate to help mitigate false alarms and increase probability of detection of a target. This paper studies the existing state-of-the-art in the understanding of Doppler characteristics of sea clutter and scattering from the ocean to better understand the design and performance choices of a radar in differentiating targets from clutter under prevailing sea conditions.

  8. FNOV SEA-2015-01

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2282a.(c)(3). Sincerely, Enclosure: Final Notice of Violation - SEA-2015-01 (FNOV) cc: Jeffrey Harrell, NA-SN Michael Hazen, Sandia Gabriel King, Sandia Enclosure Final...

  9. Discriminating robust and non-robust atmospheric circulation responses to global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Discriminating robust and non-robust atmospheric circulation responses to global warming Michael response to global warming in a set of atmospheric general circulation models (AGCMs) is investigated. The global-warmed climate is forced by a global pattern of warmed ocean surface temperatures

  10. Tectonic velocities, dynamic topography, and relative sea level Laurent Husson1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Husson, Laurent

    ] Dynamic topography is the vertical component of the response of an interface, like the surface may decrease dynamic topography amplitudes at the surface [Hager, 1984]. Thus, our use of a mantleTectonic velocities, dynamic topography, and relative sea level Laurent Husson1,2 and Clinton P

  11. Production flux of sea spray aerosol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Leeuw, G.; Lewis, E.; Andreas, E. L.; Anguelova, M. D.; Fairall, C. W.; O’Dowd, C.; Schulz, M.; Schwartz, S. E.

    2011-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Knowledge of the size- and composition-dependent production flux of primary sea spray aerosol (SSA) particles and its dependence on environmental variables is required for modeling cloud microphysical properties and aerosol radiative influences, interpreting measurements of particulate matter in coastal areas and its relation to air quality, and evaluating rates of uptake and reactions of gases in sea spray drops. This review examines recent research pertinent to SSA production flux, which deals mainly with production of particles with r{sub 80} (equilibrium radius at 80% relative humidity) less than 1 {micro}m and as small as 0.01 {micro}m. Production of sea spray particles and its dependence on controlling factors has been investigated in laboratory studies that have examined the dependences on water temperature, salinity, and the presence of organics and in field measurements with micrometeorological techniques that use newly developed fast optical particle sizers. Extensive measurements show that water-insoluble organic matter contributes substantially to the composition of SSA particles with r{sub 80} < 0.25 {micro}m and, in locations with high biological activity, can be the dominant constituent. Order-of-magnitude variation remains in estimates of the size-dependent production flux per white area, the quantity central to formulations of the production flux based on the whitecap method. This variation indicates that the production flux may depend on quantities such as the volume flux of air bubbles to the surface that are not accounted for in current models. Variation in estimates of the whitecap fraction as a function of wind speed contributes additional, comparable uncertainty to production flux estimates.

  12. State estimation of the Labrador Sea with a coupled sea ice-ocean adjoint model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fenty, Ian Gouverneur

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sea ice (SI) and ocean variability in marginal polar and subpolar seas are closely coupled. SI variability in the Labrador Sea is of climatic interest because of its relationship to deep convection/mode water formation, ...

  13. A simple object-oriented and open source model for scientific and policy analyses of the global climate system–Hector v1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartin, Corinne A.; Patel, Pralit L.; Schwarber, Adria; Link, Robert P.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simple climate models play an integral role in policy and scientific communities. They are used for climate mitigation scenarios within integrated assessment models, complex climate model emulation, and uncertainty analyses. Here we describe Hector, an open source, object-oriented, simple global climate carbon-cycle model. This model runs essentially instantaneously while still representing the most critical global scale earth system processes. Hector has three main carbon pools: an atmosphere, land, and ocean. The model’s terrestrial carbon cycle includes respiration and primary production, accommodating arbitrary geographic divisions into, e.g., ecological biomes or political units. Hector’s actively solves the inorganic carbon system in the surface ocean, directly calculating air-sea fluxes of carbon and ocean pH. Hector reproduces the global historical trends of atmospheric [CO2] and surface temperatures. The model simulates all four Representative Concentration Pathways with high correlations (R >0.7) with current observations, MAGICC (a well-known simple climate model), and the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project version 5. Hector is freely available under an open source license, and its modular design will facilitate a broad range of research in various areas.

  14. Small-scale features of temperature and salinity surface fields in the Christophe Maes,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    the onset and build-up phases of El Ni~no/ Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events in coupled numerical modelsSmall-scale features of temperature and salinity surface fields in the Coral Sea Christophe Maes,1 August 2013; accepted 11 August 2013. [1] The small-scale features in sea surface temperature

  15. Globalization of biopharmaceutical manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pande, Rachna

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The biomanufacturing industry is changing due to increasing globalization. However, it is changing differently from other high tech industries like software/ semiconductor/ automobiles. In this study we use global ...

  16. Global Environmental Course Title

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takada, Shoji

    : Environmental discourses, Environment and development in Africa, Environmental conservation and Ainu people Department Global Environmental Studies Room Course Title Frontier of Sustainability Science Instructor Akihisa MORI, Global Environmental Studies Satoshi KONISHI, Institute of Advanced

  17. Nonsingular static global string

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Sen; N. Banerjee

    2000-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A new solution for the spacetime outside the core of a U(1) static global string has been presented which is nonsingular. This is the first example of a nonsingular spacetime around a static global string.}}

  18. Review: Globalization of Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennant, Matthew Aaron

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review: Globalization of Water: Sharing the Planet’sAshok K. Globalization of Water: Sharing the Planet’s140) liters of virtual water (p. 15). This is one of the

  19. Cows Causing Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi

    2008-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Broadcast Transcript: Remember when President Reagan blamed trees for air pollution? Well now the Japanese are blaming cows for global warming. Apparently, the methane emissions from burping cows account for 5% of all global greenhouse gases. Simple...

  20. Production Mechanism, Number Concentration, Size Distribution, Chemical Composition, and Optical Properties of Sea Spray Aerosols Workshop, Summer 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meskhidze, Nicholas [NCSU] [NCSU

    2013-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this workshop was to address the most urgent open science questions for improved quantification of sea spray aerosol-radiation-climate interactions. Sea spray emission and its influence on global climate remains one of the most uncertain components of the aerosol-radiation-climate problem, but has received less attention than other aerosol processes (e.g. production of terrestrial secondary organic aerosols). Thus, the special emphasis was placed on the production flux of sea spray aerosol particles, their number concentration and chemical composition and properties.

  1. The role of US agricultural and forest activities in global climate change mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, En

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2005 the highest global surface temperature ever was recorded. A virtual consensus exists today among scientists that global warming is underway and that human greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are a significant cause. Possible mitigation of climate...

  2. A transitioning Arctic surface energy budget: the impacts of solar zenith angle, surface albedo and cloud radiative forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shupe, Matthew

    A transitioning Arctic surface energy budget: the impacts of solar zenith angle, surface albedo Springer-Verlag 2010 Abstract Snow surface and sea-ice energy budgets were measured near 87.5°N during indicated four distinct tempera- ture regimes, characterized by varying cloud, thermody- namic and solar

  3. A transitioning Arctic surface energy budget: the impacts of solar zenith angle, surface albedo and cloud radiative forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brooks, Ian M.

    A transitioning Arctic surface energy budget: the impacts of solar zenith angle, surface albedo surface and sea-ice energy budgets were measured near 87.5°N during the Arctic Summer Cloud Ocean Study regimes, characterized by varying cloud, thermody- namic and solar properties. An initial warm, melt

  4. Environmental screening tools for assessment of infrastructure plans based on biodiversity preservation and global warming (PEIT, Spain)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia-Montero, Luis G., E-mail: luisgonzaga.garcia@upm.e [Dept. Forest Engineering, E.T.S. Ingenieros de Montes, Technical University of Madrid (UPM), Ciudad Universitaria s/n, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Lopez, Elena, E-mail: elopez@caminos.upm.e [TRANSyT, E.T.S. Ingenieros de Caminos, Technical University of Madrid (UPM), Avda. Profesor Aranguren s/n, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Monzon, Andres, E-mail: amonzon@caminos.upm.e [TRANSyT, E.T.S. Ingenieros de Caminos, Technical University of Madrid (UPM), Avda. Profesor Aranguren s/n, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Otero Pastor, Isabel, E-mail: isabel.otero@upm.e [TRANSyT, E.T.S. Ingenieros de Caminos, Technical University of Madrid (UPM), Avda. Profesor Aranguren s/n, Madrid 28040 (Spain)

    2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Most Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) research has been concerned with SEA as a procedure, and there have been relatively few developments and tests of analytical methodologies. The first stage of the SEA is the 'screening', which is the process whereby a decision is taken on whether or not SEA is required for a particular programme or plan. The effectiveness of screening and SEA procedures will depend on how well the assessment fits into the planning from the early stages of the decision-making process. However, it is difficult to prepare the environmental screening for an infrastructure plan involving a whole country. To be useful, such methodologies must be fast and simple. We have developed two screening tools which would make it possible to estimate promptly the overall impact an infrastructure plan might have on biodiversity and global warming for a whole country, in order to generate planning alternatives, and to determine whether or not SEA is required for a particular infrastructure plan.

  5. 4, 35833626, 2007 An integrated global

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    around the world. The integrated model closes both energy and water balances on land surfaces. Global approximately 70% of total water withdrawal in the world. The estimated crop calendar showed good agreement water withdrawal also15 showed fair agreement with country statistics, but tended to underestimate

  6. Design Editorial Globalization and Internationalism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papalambros, Panos

    ; especially, the development of an increasingly integrated global economy marked especially by free tradeJournal of Mechanical Design Editorial Globalization and Internationalism There has always been and Strabo, but to Friedman's empirical observations of globalization. According to Wikipedia, "globalization

  7. Back to basics: Measuring rainfall at sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quartly, Graham

    Back to basics: Measuring rainfall at sea: Part 1 - In situ sensors G. D. Quartly, T. H. Guymer-320 #12;#12;Back to basics: Measuring rainfall at sea: Part 1 ± In situ sensors G. D. Quartly, T. H

  8. Chloride Depletion in Aged Sea Salt Particles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chloride Depletion in Aged Sea Salt Particles Chloride Depletion in Aged Sea Salt Particles Print Wednesday, 06 February 2013 00:00 Particles or aerosols can be directly released...

  9. Johnson, G.C., and S.E. Wijffels. 2011. Ocean density change contributions to sea level rise. Oceanography 24(2):112121, doi:10.5670/oceanog.2011.31.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Gregory C.

    Se a l e V e l ocean Density change contributions to Sea level Rise By G R e G o Ry c . J o h N S o N a N D Su S a N e . W i J f f e l S aBStRact. Ocean warming contributes to global mean sea level rise sea level rise of ocean freshening by land-ice melt is overwhelmed by the effect of the addition

  10. Seasonal variation of upwelling in the Alaskan Beaufort Sea: Impact of sea ice cover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pickart, Robert S.

    [2] It has long been known that upwelling takes place in the western Arctic Ocean along the edgesSeasonal variation of upwelling in the Alaskan Beaufort Sea: Impact of sea ice cover Lena M to characterize differences in upwelling near the shelf break in the Alaskan Beaufort Sea due to varying sea ice

  11. Laboratory studies on CO? transfer across the simulated sea surface 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sugiura, Yoshiro

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the value of K with revolution speed 35 36 37 38 39 41 42 43 44 45 16 Dependency ef the exchange rate constant K upon chlorinity 46 17 Dependency of the exchange rate constant K upon temperature 47 18 Estimation of the value of the ratio, (kfk...-value and revolution speed 52 Apparatus for determination of atmospheric CO2 concentration by the Van Slyhe's manometric method 66 Absorption chamber for determination of atmospheric CO2 concentration 68 Two devices for protection of NaOH solution against...

  12. EFFECTS OF CLIMATOLOGICAL DISTURBANCES ON THE SEA SURFACE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    during 1999. The storm was formed on Campeche bay and hit the city of Corpus Christi and Brownsville

  13. Neural Network forecasts of the tropical Pacific sea surface temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsieh, William

    . Hsieh Dept. of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of British Columbia Vancouver, BC, Canada Benyang, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada; Phone: (604) 822- 2821, Fax: (604) 822-6088; Email: whsieh@eos.ubc.ca Running and decadal changes in the prediction skills in the NL and LR models were also studied. Keywords: neural

  14. Laboratory studies on CO? transfer across the simulated sea surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sugiura, Yoshiro

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . At the beginning of the experiment kA~W'As, so ~dA -v-a- a kAa 4 -k A at ? ~ ? o agd (~) ~-kEg~dt where a: specific activity of CO2 in dps/gm of CO&, E; counting efficiency decay constant of carbon-14 According to the gas low, pv ~ n k T~ where n denotes... the number of molecules and k is the Boltsman constant. When v and T are constant, Dp'v man k T Then, EL Q (weight in gm of CO2) Therefore, agdQ~ -kEZ dt VD D According to the definition of the invasion coefficient a, dQ - a S Z p dt where S denotes...

  15. 3, 9991020, 2007 Summer sea ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    CPD 3, 999­1020, 2007 Summer sea ice during the early Holocene H. Goosse et al. Title Page Abstract on the early Holocene climate constrains the summer sea ice projections for the 21st century H. Goosse, E #12;CPD 3, 999­1020, 2007 Summer sea ice during the early Holocene H. Goosse et al. Title Page

  16. CHARACTERIZING UNCERTAIN SEA LEVEL RISE PROJECTIONS TO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    identifies scenarios where a decision to invest in near-term response to extreme sea level rise passes a cost. Keywords: Sea level rise, robust decision-making, climate change adaptation, cost-benefit analysis PleaseCHARACTERIZING UNCERTAIN SEA LEVEL RISE PROJECTIONS TO SUPPORT INVESTMENT DECISIONS

  17. Updating Maryland's Sea-level Rise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ezer,Tal

    Updating Maryland's Sea-level Rise Projections Scientific and Technical Working Group Maryland Climate Change Commission June 26, 2013 #12;Sea-level Rise Expert Group Donald F. Boesch* , University-author of the National Assessment Scenarios report Author of paper(s) on recent sea-level rise ~ Author contributing

  18. //FS/ELS/PAGINATION/ELSEVIER AMS/STPS/3B2/CH07-N2955.3D 75 [7592/18] 28.10.2006 10:40AM 7. Eustatic Sea Level During Past Interglacials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddall, Mark

    , The Australian National University, Canberra 0200, Australia 3 Institute for Isotope Geology and Mineral Resources, Department of Earth Sciences, ETH, Zurich, Switzerland ABSTRACT Eustatic sea-level variation is the primary index of global ice volume over glacial cycles. Here, we review recent studies of eustatic sea

  19. INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS &INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS &INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS & THE GLOBAL ECONOMYTHE GLOBAL ECONOMYTHE GLOBAL ECONOMY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krylov, Anna I.

    GLOBAL ECONOMYTHE GLOBAL ECONOMY This major offers students rigorous interdisciplinary training 331: The Global Economy 2030 -- Examination of key ideas from economics, demography and technology. Guest lecturers illuminate possible conditions of the global economy in 2030. IR 454: International

  20. Human Impacts on Seals, Sea Lions, and Sea Otters: Integrating Archaeology and Ecology of the Northeast Pacific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierotti, Raymond

    2013-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Review of Human Impacts on Seals, Sea Lions, and Sea Otters: Integrating Archaeology and Ecology of the Northeast Pacific.

  1. A diagnosis of the sea breeze surge and its inland penetration over Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bose, Banwari Lal

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . This is evident from data of 10 and 11 May 1961, On 12 May, however, when the prevailing wind was already from the sea, no such 38 Fig. 15. Surface winds at 0700 CST, 10 Yiay 1961. Approximate streamlines are indicated. 39 Fig. 16. Surface winds at 1500 CST... find the onset of the sea breeze at the same station to be at 1300 hours. On the 12 May when the prevailing wind was distinctly onshore, we find the onset, as revealed by the isochrones, to be still earlier. (On this day, data for GLS were missing...

  2. america surface temperature: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of global climate sensitivity are explored in this work through the medium of Energy Balance Climate Models (EBCMs) and observational surface temperature data. In part...

  3. Global minimizers for axisymmetric multiphase membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rustum Choksi; Marco Morandotti; Marco Veneroni

    2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a Canham-Helfrich-type variational problem defined over closed surfaces enclosing a fixed volume and having fixed surface area. The problem models the shape of multiphase biomembranes. It consists of minimizing the sum of the Canham-Helfrich energy, in which the bending rigidities and spontaneous curvatures are now phase-dependent, and a line tension penalization for the phase interfaces. By restricting attention to axisymmetric surfaces and phase distributions, we extend our previous results for a single phase (arXiv:1202.1979) and prove existence of a global minimizer.

  4. Figure 2 shows the time series for sea surface temperature (SST), sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to evaluate both wind and coastal forcing in that region. Preliminary results show long Rossby waves The eastern boundary of the South Pacific Ocean is a region of strong coastal upwelling with one of the highest levels of biological productivity of the world. The regular coastal upwelling is associated

  5. SEA screening of voluntary climate change plans: A story of non-compliant discretion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kørnøv, Lone, E-mail: lonek@plan.aau.dk; Wejs, Anja

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Screening within Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) is the first critical stage involving considerations on whether an assessment is carried out or not. Although legislation and guidance offer practitioners a legal and logical approach to the screening process, it is inevitable that discretionary judgement takes place and will impact on the screening decision. This article examines the results of discretion involved in screening of climate change plans (CCPs) in a Danish context. These years voluntary CCPs are developed as a response to the global and local emergence of both mitigation and adaptation, and the voluntary commitment by the local authorities is an indication of an emerging norm of climate change as an important issue. This article takes its point of departure in the observation that SEA is not undertaken for these voluntary CCPs. The critical analysis of this phenomenon rests upon a documentary study of Danish CCPs, interviews with a lawyer and ministerial key person and informal discussions between researchers, practitioners and lawyers on whether climate change plans are covered by SEA legislation and underlying reasons for the present practice. Based on a critical analysis of mandatory SEA and/or obligation to screen CCPs according to significance criteria, the authors find that 18 out of the 48 CCPs are mandatory to SEA and 9 would require a screening of significance and thereby potentially be followed by a SEA. In practice only one plan was screened and one was environmentally assessed. The legal, democratic and environmental consequences of this SEA practice are critically discussed. Hereunder is the missed opportunity to use the broad environmental scope of SEA to avoid a narrow focus on energy and CO{sub 2} in CCPs, and the question whether this practice in Denmark complies with the EU Directive. -- Highlights: ? It is inevitable that discretionary judgement takes place and will impact on the screening decision. ? The article hereby calls for greater awareness of the discretion and judgement involved in SEA screening. ? Practice seemingly reveals a lack of application of SEA within climate change planning and a lack of explicit screening. ? Absence of SEAs of voluntary plans such as CCPs, have legal consequences, as well as democratic and environmental consequences. ? The vague definition of ‘administrative provision’ seems to impose the lacking SEA.

  6. Engineering the global ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stringfellow, William T.; Jain, Ravi

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of humans deliberately engineering agricultural landscapes.010-0302-8 EDITORIAL Engineering the global ecosystemtale about human explorers engineering the ecosystem of Mars

  7. Generated using version 3.0 of the official AMS LATEX template Wind effects on past and future regional sea-level trends in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timmermann, Axel

    characteristics of projected regional sea-level rise. Wind-related changes in near- surface mass and heat transports. Depending on the sign of the related Ekman pumping velocity, warm water is either pumped down into the ocean which leads to a deepening of the tropical thermocline and an increase in local sea level, or cold

  8. Surface Soil

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Surface Soil Surface Soil We compare local soil samples with samples collected from northern New Mexico locations that are beyond the range of potential influence from normal...

  9. Greenland ice sheet surface mass-balance modeling in a 131-year perspective, 1950-2080

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mernild, Sebastian Haugard [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Liston, Glen [COLORADO STATE UNIV.; Hiemstra, Christopher [COLORADO STATE UNIV.; Christensen, Jens [DANISH METEOROLOGICAL INS.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluctuations in the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) surface mass-balance (SMB) and freshwater influx to the surrounding oceans closely follow climate fluctuations and are of considerable importance to the global eustatic sea level rise. SnowModel, a state-of-the-art snow-evolution modeling system, was used to simulate variations in the GrIS melt extent, surface water balance components, changes in SMB, and freshwater influx to the ocean. The simulations are based on the IPCC scenario AlB modeled by the HIRHAM4 RCM (using boundary conditions from ECHAM5 AOGCM) from 1950 through 2080. In-situ meteorological station (GC-Net and WMO DMI) observations from inside and outside the GrIS were used to validate and correct RCM output data before it was used as input for SnowModel. Satellite observations and independent SMB studies were used to validate the SnowModel output and confirm the model's robustness. We simulated a {approx}90% increase in end-of-summer surface melt extent (0.483 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2}) from 1950 to 2080, and a melt index (above 2,000-m elevation) increase of 138% (1.96 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} x days). The greatest difference in melt extent occured in the southern part of the GrIS, and the greatest changes in the number of melt days was seen in the eastern part of the GrIS ({approx}50-70%) and was lowest in the west ({approx}20-30%). The rate of SMB loss, largely tied to changes in ablation processes, lead to an enhanced average loss of 331 km{sup 3} from 1950 to 2080, an average 5MB level of -99 km{sup 3} for the period 2070-2080. GrIS surface freshwater runoff yielded an eustatic rise in sea level from 0.8 {+-} 0.1 (1950-1959) to 1.9 {+-} 0.1 mm (2070-2080) sea level equivalent (SLE) y{sup -1}. The accumulated GrIS freshwater runoff contribution from surface melting equaled 160 mm SLE from 1950 through 2080.

  10. Globalization: Ecological Consequences of Global-Scale Connectivity in People,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    11 Globalization: Ecological Consequences of Global-Scale Connectivity in People, Resources of the global mineral aerosol load (Tanaka & Chiba, 2006). #12;The Systemic Dimension of Globalization212 of Agriculture ­ Agricultural Research Service, Las Cruces, New Mexico USA 1. Introduction Globalization

  11. global warming's six americas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, Gary L.

    Energy Sources 17 Subsidies for Fossil Fuel and Renewable Energy Industries 18 Support for a Carbon Tax and Costs of Reducing Fossil Fuel Use and Global Warming 8 The Alarmed 9 The Concerned 10 The Cautious 11 the spring and fall of 2012. Perceived Benefits and Costs of Reducing Fossil Fuel Use and Global Warming

  12. Global Change Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    Global Change and Sustainability Center The GCSC is an inclusionary and interdisciplinary hub that promotes, coordinates, and conducts local to global environmental- and sustainability-related research to complex environmental and sustainability issues and challenges. 2012 Annual Report #12;1GCSC 2012 ANNUAL

  13. Global Development Our Responsibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of expertise cover urgent global issues such as food production, energy supply, climate change, biodiversity e ort to address urgent global issues particularly a ecting developing countries e.g. climate change of Communication, 2012 · Project Leader: Karin Nilsson · Graphic Design: Viktor Wrange & Michael Kvick Cover Photo

  14. CHILLING CONSIDERATIONS GLOBAL WARMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    (millionsofsquarekilometers) 30 20 10 MELTING OF GREENLAND ICE CAP Satellite determination of maximum extent of glacial melt Complete melt of the Greenland ice sheet would raise the level of the global ocean 23 feet. ASAN Steffen IS INCREASING Global carbon dioxide concentration over the last thousand years Polar ice cores #12;Mann et al

  15. PERGAMON Deep-Sea Research II DEEP-SEA RESEARCH PART II Internal Wave Excitation from a Collapsing Mixed Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Bruce

    Experiments, Numerical Simulations 1 Introduction Internal gravity waves (hereafter "IGW") trans- port energy-integrated zonal pressure gradient ap- proximately balances the surface zonal wind stress over seasonal or annual important global mecha- nism for IGW excitation. In particular, obser- vations in the Brazil Basin indicate

  16. Mathematical aspects of surface water waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craig, Walter

    questions remain. These have to do with the evolution of surface water waves, their approximation by model normally being chosen. Unless we are describing waves of a global extent, such as a tsunami, for our

  17. Millennial-scale stable oscillations between sea ice and convective deep water formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saha, Raj

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the last ice age there were several quasi-periodic abrupt warming events. The climatic effects of the so-called Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events were felt globally, although the North Atlantic experienced the largest and most abrupt temperature anomalies. Similar but weaker oscillations also took place during the interglacial period. This paper proposes an auto-oscillatory mechanism between sea ice and convective deep water formation in the north Atlantic as the source of the persistent cycles. A simple dynamical model is constructed by coupling and slightly modifying two existing models of ocean circulation and sea ice. The model exhibits mixed mode oscillations, consisting of decadal scale small amplitude oscillations, and a large amplitude relaxation fluctuation. The decadal oscillations occur due to the insulating effect of sea ice and leads to periodic ventilation of heat from the polar ocean. Gradually an instability builds up in the polar column and results in an abrupt initiation of convection an...

  18. Critical Mechanisms for the Formation of Extreme Arctic Sea-Ice Extent in the Summers of 2007 and 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, Xiquan; Zib, Benjamin J.; Xi, Baike; Stanfield, Ryan; Deng, Yi; Zhang, Xiangdong; Lin, B.; Long, Charles N.

    2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A warming Arctic climate is undergoing significant e 21 nvironmental change, most evidenced by the reduction of Arctic sea-ice extent during the summer. In this study, we examine two extreme anomalies of September sea-ice extent in 2007 and 1996, and investigate the impacts of cloud fraction (CF), atmospheric precipitable water vapor (PWV), downwelling longwave flux (DLF), surface air temperature (SAT), pressure and winds on the sea-ice variation in 2007 and 1996 using both satellite-derived sea-ice products and MERRA reanalysis. The area of the Laptev, East Siberian and West Chukchi seas (70-90oN, 90-180oE) has experienced the largest variation in sea-ice extent from year-to-year and defined here as the Area Of Focus (AOF). The record low September sea-ice extent in 2007 was associated with positive anomalies 30 of CF, PWV, DLF, and SAT over the AOF. Persistent anti-cyclone positioned over the Beaufort Sea coupled with low pressure over Eurasia induced easterly zonal and southerly meridional winds. In contrast, negative CF, PWV, DLF and SAT anomalies, as well as opposite wind patterns to those in 2007, characterized the 1996 high September sea-ice extent. Through this study, we hypothesize the following positive feedbacks of clouds, water vapor, radiation and atmospheric variables on the sea-ice retreat during the summer 2007. The record low sea-ice extent during the summer 2007 is initially triggered by the atmospheric circulation anomaly. The southerly winds across the Chukchi and East Siberian seas transport warm, moist air from the north Pacific, which is not only enhancing sea-ice melt across the AOF, but also increasing clouds. The positive cloud feedback results in higher SAT and more sea-ice melt. Therefore, 40 more water vapor could be evaporated from open seas and higher SAT to form more clouds, which will enhance positive cloud feedback. This enhanced positive cloud feedback will then further increase SAT and accelerate the sea-ice retreat during the summer 2007.

  19. On the non-linear response of the ocean thermohaline circulation to global deforestation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renssen, Hans

    deforestation leads to extensive sea-ice build-up and progressive cooling, followed by a non-linear response To study the impact of global deforestation on the climate system, we have performed a 1750-yr long At the end of our experiment, a maximum cooling of 20°C is present over the initial deep-convection site

  20. Z .Global and Planetary Change 31 2001 255264 www.elsevier.comrlocatergloplacha

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ingólfsson, �lafur

    changes on Yugorski Peninsula, Kara Sea, Russia, during the last 12,800 radiocarbon years a,) b ´ c dZ .Global and Planetary Change 31 2001 255­264 www.elsevier.comrlocatergloplacha Environmental vegetation. Climate was colder than today. Betula nana became dominant during the Early Preboreal period

  1. Sea-Level Rise, El Niño, And The Future Of The California Coastline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Nicole Lian

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    City of Santa Barbara Sea-Level Rise Vulnerability Study.Projecting future sea level rise. California Climate Changeand responses to sea level rise. In Understanding Sea Level

  2. Estimated global ocean wind power potential from QuikSCAT observations, accounting for turbine characteristics and siting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capps, Scott B; Zender, Charles S

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluation of global wind power, J. Geophys. Res. , 110,2009), Global ocean wind power sensitivity to surface layerCO 2 reductions via offshore wind power matched to inherent

  3. Global warming, bad weather, insurance losses and the global economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Low, N.C. [UOB Life Assurance Ltd., Singapore (Singapore); Shen, S. [Global Warming International Center, Woodridge, IL (United States)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Global warming causes extremely bad weather in the near term. The impact on the insurance industry is described. Why global warming in the near term causes very bad weather is explained. The continuing trend of very bad weather and the future impact on the insurance industry is explored. How very bad weather can affect the global financial market is explained. Taking a historical view of the development of the modern economy, the authors describe in the near term the impact of global warming on the global economy. The long term impact of global warming on the global economy and the human race is explored. Opportunities presented by global warming are described.

  4. Effect of the potential melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet on the Meridional Overturning Circulation and global climate in the future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Weiqing

    Effect of the potential melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet on the Meridional Overturning February 2011 Keywords: Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation Sea level Greenland Ice Sheet Global of the Greenland Ice Sheet since the mid-1990s. This increased ice sheet mass loss might be an evidence of global

  5. A sea drag relation for hurricane wind speeds N. C. Zweers,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vries, Hans de

    A sea drag relation for hurricane wind speeds N. C. Zweers,1 V. K. Makin,1 J. W. de Vries,1 and G, the surface drag is overestimated in NWP models for hurricane wind speeds and the intensity of hurricane winds is tested in an NWP model. Two hurricanes in the Caribbean are modeled: Ivan (2004) and Katrina (2005

  6. Spatial variability of sea level rise due to water impoundment behind dams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conrad, Clint

    dams Julia W. Fiedler1 and Clinton P. Conrad2 Received 29 March 2010; revised 12 May 2010; accepted 18 May 2010; published 19 June 2010. [1] Dams have impounded 10,800 km3 of water since 1900, reducing depresses the earth's surface near dams and elevates the geoid, which locally increases relative sea level

  7. Water vapor, cloud liquid water paths, and rain rates over northern high latitude open seas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuidema, Paquita

    longwave radiation caused by differences in cloud cover can produce an JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL-level stratus con- tribute the most to the total Arctic cloud cover of any cloud type according to surface presence during summertime but otherwise the Wentz internal sea-ice screening appears effective

  8. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL 104, NO C7, PAGES 15,66915,677, JULY 15, 1999 An energyconserving thermodynamic model of sea ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bitz, Cecilia

    of internal brine­pocket melting on surface ablation. Sea ice models that parameterize latent heat storage in brine pockets often fail to reduce the energy required for surface ablation in proportion leads to reduced heat conduction, less internal brine­pocket melting, and more surface ablation. 1

  9. Wave Glider Autonomous Surface Vehicle Applications and Missions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Wave Glider Autonomous Surface Vehicle Applications and Missions Jamie Griffith & Kyle Vanderlugt and logistical challenge. To address these challenges, Liquid Robotics (LRI) has developed the Wave Glider, an autonomous, mobile remote sensing solution. The Wave Glider is a hybrid sea-surface and underwater vehicle

  10. Subantarctic Mode Water formation : air-sea fluxes and cross-frontal exchange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holte, James

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Front in the southeast Pacific Ocean, with mean profilesCO2 in the Pacific ocean. Global Biogeochemical Cycles, 16.surface layer in the Pacific ocean. J. Geophysical Research-

  11. Climatic Impact of Global-Scale Deforestation: Radiative versus Nonradiative Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    Climatic Impact of Global-Scale Deforestation: Radiative versus Nonradiative Processes EDOUARD L­ocean­atmosphere GCM is used to explore the biogeophysical impact of large-scale deforestation on surface climate that the surface albedo increase owing to deforestation has a cooling effect of 21.36 K globally. On the other hand

  12. A study of mobile trough genesis over the Yellow Sea - East China Sea region 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Komar, Keith Nickolas

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to understand the mechanisms responsible for the formation of mobile troughs over a prolific source region in the Yellow Sea and East China Sea. Two mobile troughs which intensified significantly after formation were...

  13. A study of mobile trough genesis over the Yellow Sea - East China Sea region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Komar, Keith Nickolas

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to understand the mechanisms responsible for the formation of mobile troughs over a prolific source region in the Yellow Sea and East China Sea. Two mobile troughs which intensified significantly after formation were...

  14. 4, 107128, 2007 Sea-ice-drift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    OSD 4, 107­128, 2007 Sea-ice-drift dynamics and pack fracture A. Chmel et al. Title Page Abstract aspects of the sea-ice-drift dynamics and pack fracture A. Chmel 1 , V. N. Smirnov 2 , and L. V. Panov 2 1 to: A. Chmel (chmel@mail.ioffe.ru) 107 #12;OSD 4, 107­128, 2007 Sea-ice-drift dynamics and pack

  15. Inertial currents in the Caribbean Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saylor, James H

    1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    conveniently by applying boundary layer analysis to the vortlcity equation. Munk' s circulation theory divides naturally into two primary regions. I) An interior region in which the lateral-stress terms are negligible and ln which, for zonal winds... of the Problem The problem studied is that of the westward intensification of the wind-driven ocean circulation ln the Caribbean Sea, A rectangular sea is envisaged as representative of the Caribbean Sea with the eastern end in communication with the Atlantic...

  16. SeaVolt Technologies formerly Sea Power Associates | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd JumpInformationScotts Corners, New York: EnergySea SolarInformation

  17. On the connection between continental-scale land surface processes and the tropical climate in a coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Hsi-Yen; Mechoso, C. R.; Xue, Yongkang; Xiao, Heng; Neelin, David; Ji, Xuan

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact of global tropical climate to perturbations in land surface processes (LSP) are evaluated using perturbations given by different LSP representations of continental-scale in a global climate model that includes atmosphere-ocean interactions. One representation is a simple land scheme, which specifies climatological albedos and soil moisture availability. The other representation is the more comprehensive Simplified Simple Biosphere Model, which allows for interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes. The results demonstrate that LSP processes such as interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes have strong impacts on the seasonal mean states and seasonal cycles of global precipitation, clouds, and surface air temperature. The impact is especially significant over the tropical Pacific. To explore the mechanisms for such impact, different LSP representations are confined to selected continental-scale regions where strong interactions of climate-vegetation biophysical processes are present. We find that the largest impact is mainly from LSP perturbations over the tropical African continent. The impact is through anomalous convective heating in tropical Africa due to changes in the surface heat fluxes, which in turn affect basinwide teleconnections in the Pacific through equatorial wave dynamics. The modifications in the equatorial Pacific climate are further enhanced by strong air-sea coupling between surface wind stress and upwelling, as well as effect of ocean memory. Our results further suggest that correct representations of land surface processes, land use change and the associated changes in the deep convection over tropical Africa are crucial to reducing the uncertainty when performing future climate projections under different climate change scenarios.

  18. China's Global Oil Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Bryan G

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    21, 2008. Ying, Wang. “ China, Venezuela firms to co-developoilfields. ” China Daily (27 August 2005) http://David and Bi Jianhai. “China’s Global Hunt for Energy. ”

  19. Global Cool Cities Alliance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is currently supporting the Global Cool Cities Alliance (GCCA), a non-profit organization that works with cities, regions, and national governments to speed the...

  20. China's Global Oil Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Bryan G

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    nations began to seek out oil reserves around the world. 3on the limited global oil reserves and spiking prices. Manyto the largest proven oil reserves, making up 61 percent of

  1. Global warming elucidated

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, S. [Global Warming International Center, Woodridge, IL (United States)

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The meaning of global warming and its relevance to everyday life is explained. Simple thermodynamics is used to predict an oscillatory nature of the change in climate due to global warming. Global warming causes extreme events and bad weather in the near term. In the long term it may cause the earth to transition to another equilibrium state through many oscillation in climatic patterns. The magnitudes of these oscillations could easily exceed the difference between the end points. The author further explains why many no longer fully understands the nature and magnitudes of common phenomena such as storms and wind speeds because of these oscillations, and the absorptive properties of clouds. The author links the increase in duration of the El Nino to global warming, and further predicts public health risks as the earth transitions to another equilibrium state in its young history.

  2. Systems integration for global sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Le, A. Z. Khan, Improving integration for integrated coastal347 ISSUE 6225 Systems integration for global sustainabilitySUSTAINABILITY Systems integration for global sustainability

  3. Surface Topography Quantification by Integral and Feature-related Parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smid, Michiel

    Surface Topography Quantification by Integral and Feature-related Parameters Quantifizieren von microscopy, the topography of brittle fracture surfaces and wire- eroded surfaces was quantified. The globalÈche, Topometrie 1 Introduction Surface topographies contain information about their gen- eration processes

  4. Global climatic catastrophes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Budyko, M.I.; Golitsyn, G.S.; Izrael, A

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work inquires into global climatic catastrophes of the past, presenting data not easily available outside of the Socialist Countries, and applies these results to the study of future climatic developments, especially as they threaten in case of Nuclear Warfare - Nuclear Winter. The authors discuss probable after effects from the Soviet point of view on the basis of research, stressing the need to avoid all conflict which might lead to the next and final Global Climatic Catastrophy.

  5. INVESTIGATION OF SEASONAL SEA-ICE THICKNESS VARIABILITY IN THE ROSS SEA Beth A. Schellenberg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geiger, Cathleen

    archive consists of over 20,000 records over the Antarc- tic pack ice between 1980 and the presentINVESTIGATION OF SEASONAL SEA-ICE THICKNESS VARIABILITY IN THE ROSS SEA Beth A. Schellenberg P1.23 1. INTRODUCTION A number of studies suggest a connections between sea-ice variability

  6. A reassessment of the dispersion properties of 99 North Sea and the Norwegian Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drange, Helge

    northwards along the Norwegian coast heading towards the Arctic Ocean. Comparison with observational timeA reassessment of the dispersion properties of 99 Tc in the North Sea and the Norwegian Sea Steinar radionuclide Technetium-99 (99 Tc) in the North and Norwegian Seas have been simulated with a regional

  7. Deep-Sea Research I 49 (2002) 211243 On the Atlantic inflow to the Caribbean Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fratantoni, David

    Deep-Sea Research I 49 (2002) 211­243 On the Atlantic inflow to the Caribbean Sea William E. Johnsa description of the mean inflow distribution in the passages connecting the Atlantic Ocean with the Caribbean Sea. The total Caribbean inflow of 28 Sv is shown to be partitioned approximately equally between

  8. Unlocking a Sea Ice Secret

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Rachel Obbard

    2013-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Dr. Rachel Obbard and her research group from Dartmouth College traveled to the Antarctic to collect samples of sea ice. Next stop: the GeoSoilEnviroCARS x-ray beamline at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois. This U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science synchrotron x-ray research facility gave the Obbard team the frontier scientific tools they needed to study the path bromide takes as it travels from the ocean to the atmosphere.

  9. ARKTOS: An intelligent system for SAR sea ice image classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soh, L. K.; Tsatsoulis, Costas; Gineris, D.; Bertoia, C.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an intelligent system for satellite sea ice image analysis named Advanced Reasoning using Knowledge for T ping Of Sea ice (ARKTOS). ARKTOS performs fully automated analysis of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) sea ice images by mimicking...

  10. Food Consumption by Sea Lions: Existing Data and Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zealand sea lion (Phocarctos hookeri), South American sea lion (Otaria flavescens), and Steller sea lion, and the integration of data across scales and species. Our modeling exercise, in particular, identified the major

  11. Effect of Terrestrial and Marine Organic Aerosol on Regional and Global Climate: Model Development, Application, and Verification with Satellite Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meskhidze, Nicholas; Zhang, Yang; Kamykowski, Daniel

    2012-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In this DOE project the improvements to parameterization of marine primary organic matter (POM) emissions, hygroscopic properties of marine POM, marine isoprene derived secondary organic aerosol (SOA) emissions, surfactant effects, new cloud droplet activation parameterization have been implemented into Community Atmosphere Model (CAM 5.0), with a seven mode aerosol module from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)���¢��������s Modal Aerosol Model (MAM7). The effects of marine aerosols derived from sea spray and ocean emitted biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) on microphysical properties of clouds were explored by conducting 10 year CAM5.0-MAM7 model simulations at a grid resolution 1.9�������°��������2.5�������° with 30 vertical layers. Model-predicted relationship between ocean physical and biological systems and the abundance of CCN in remote marine atmosphere was compared to data from the A-Train satellites (MODIS, CALIPSO, AMSR-E). Model simulations show that on average, primary and secondary organic aerosol emissions from the ocean can yield up to 20% increase in Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) at 0.2% Supersaturation, and up to 5% increases in droplet number concentration of global maritime shallow clouds. Marine organics were treated as internally or externally mixed with sea salt. Changes associated with cloud properties reduced (absolute value) the model-predicted short wave cloud forcing from -1.35 Wm-2 to -0.25 Wm-2. By using different emission scenarios, and droplet activation parameterizations, this study suggests that addition of marine primary aerosols and biologically generated reactive gases makes an important difference in radiative forcing assessments. All baseline and sensitivity simulations for 2001 and 2050 using global-through-urban WRF/Chem (GU-WRF) were completed. The main objective of these simulations was to evaluate the capability of GU-WRF for an accurate representation of the global atmosphere by exploring the most accurate configuration of physics options in GWRF for global scale modeling in 2001 at a horizontal grid resolution of 1�������° x 1�������°. GU-WRF model output was evaluated using observational datasets from a variety of sources including surface based observations (NCDC and BSRN), model reanalysis (NCEP/ NCAR Reanalysis and CMAP), and remotely-sensed data (TRMM) to evaluate the ability of GU-WRF to simulate atmospheric variables at the surface as well as aloft. Explicit treatment of nanoparticles produced from new particle formation in GU-WRF/Chem-MADRID was achieved by expanding particle size sections from 8 to 12 to cover particles with the size range of 1.16 nm to 11.6 �������µm. Simulations with two different nucleation parameterizations were conducted for August 2002 over a global domain at a 4�������º by 5�������º horizontal resolution. The results are evaluated against field measurement data from the 2002 Aerosol Nucleation and Real Time Characterization Experiment (ANARChE) in Atlanta, Georgia, as well as satellite and reanalysis data. We have also explored the relationship between ���¢��������clean marine���¢������� aerosol optical properties and ocean surface wind speed using remotely sensed data from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) on board the CALIPSO satellite and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) on board the AQUA satellite. Detailed data analyses

  12. GLOBAL LEADERSHIP PROGRAM MISSION STATEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saidak, Filip

    GLOBAL LEADERSHIP PROGRAM MISSION STATEMENT The Global Leadership Program at UNCG will afford. Leadership, citizenship and cross-cultural understanding have taken on new meanings and have become essential for the successful citizen of the new globalized world. The Global Leadership Program (GLP) is open to all domestic

  13. Original article Predicted global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Original article Predicted global warming and Douglas-fir chilling requirements DD McCreary1 DP to predicted global warming. Douglas-fir / chilling / global warming / bud burst / reforestation Résumé offer evidence that mean global warming of 3-4 °C could occur within the next century, particularly

  14. 8, 7194, 2008 Sea salt aerosol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 8, 71­94, 2008 Sea salt aerosol refractive indices R. Irshad et al. Title Page Abstract Discussions Laboratory measurements of the optical properties of sea salt aerosol R. Irshad 1 , R. G. Grainger salt aerosol refractive indices R. Irshad et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Conclusions

  15. The convective desalination of sea ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rees Jones, David

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    containing both liquid brine and solid (pure water) ice. Frad is the flux of penetrating solar radiation. Thus the thermal properties of sea ice are composed of those of the solid and liquid phases that make up sea ice. Fixed-salinity models used in older...

  16. Back to basics: Measuring rainfall at sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quartly, Graham

    Back to basics: Measuring rainfall at sea: Part 2 - Space-borne sensors G. D. Quartly, T. H. Guymer-366 & ii #12;#12;Back to basics: Measuring rainfall at sea: Part 2 ­ Space-borne sensors G. D. Quartly, T are present the measure- ment will correspond to the cloud-top tem- peratures (see Fig. 1, back cover

  17. CHAPTER XVII FISHES AND SEA TURTLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Mexico is separated frOIn the Atlantic Ocean by the Straits of Florida, ~bout 110 nautical miles wide of the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea or the Atlantic Ocean through the Yucatan Channel and the Straits. On the other hand, H. humeralis and H. clupeola are very abundant in the Caribbean Sea but penetrate

  18. Lecture course on Sea level variations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    level rise from tide gauges "viewpoint of the solid Earth" "A tide staff" Rate is ~ 20 cm/century 7 Level rise between 1993 and 2010 by satellite ALTIMETRY Sea level is rising (by altimetry) "viewpoint of space" 1993-2010 8Friday, November 11, 2011 #12;Sea level will be rising (IPCC scenarios) Figure 11

  19. North Sea Whitefish Survey: 2010 Prepared by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;Executive summary The North Sea Whitefish (NSW) survey sailed on 31 May 2010, fishing operations began on 1North Sea Whitefish Survey: 2010 Prepared by Chris Darby, Danny Normandale, Matthew Parker the first two surveys are encouraging. The NSW recorded a good range of ages for all target species in all

  20. North Sea Whitefish Survey: 2011 Prepared by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;Executive summary The North Sea Whitefish (NSW) survey sailed on 11 June 2011, fishing operations beganNorth Sea Whitefish Survey: 2011 Prepared by Chris Darby, Danny Normandale, Matthew Parker the three NSW surveys are starting to provide a valuable evaluation of the dynamics of the three target

  1. North Sea Whitefish Survey: 2012 Prepared by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;2 Executive summary The North Sea Whitefish (NSW) survey sailed on 03 June 2012, fishing operations beganNorth Sea Whitefish Survey: 2012 Prepared by Chris Darby, Danny Normandale, Marta Soffker, Samantha samples were collected from cod, haddock and whiting for age determination. In 2009, throughout the survey

  2. aquaculture sea lice: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    P. 5 Sea lice and salmon population dynamics: effects of exposure time for migratory fish Mathematics Websites Summary: Sea lice and salmon population dynamics: effects of...

  3. anoxic baltic sea: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ken 115 DELIVERABLE Central North Sea Fossil Fuels Websites Summary: International Energy Agency Energy Technology Perspectives 2012 12;4 Central North Sea - CO2 Storage...

  4. area baltic sea: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ken 146 DELIVERABLE Central North Sea Fossil Fuels Websites Summary: International Energy Agency Energy Technology Perspectives 2012 12;4 Central North Sea - CO2 Storage...

  5. aral sea basin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Index 141 DELIVERABLE Central North Sea Fossil Fuels Websites Summary: International Energy Agency Energy Technology Perspectives 2012 12;4 Central North Sea - CO2 Storage...

  6. SeaPower Pacific subsidiary of Renewable Energy Holdings Plc...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    SeaPower Pacific subsidiary of Renewable Energy Holdings Plc Carnegie Corporation Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: SeaPower Pacific subsidiary of Renewable Energy Holdings Plc...

  7. Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-299 Sea...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    99 Sea Breeze Pacific Regional Transmission System, INC Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-299 Sea Breeze Pacific Regional Transmission System, INC TBDApplication...

  8. aral sea: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ken 18 DELIVERABLE Central North Sea Fossil Fuels Websites Summary: International Energy Agency Energy Technology Perspectives 2012 12;4 Central North Sea - CO2 Storage Hub...

  9. Development of Sea Level Rise Scenarios for Climate Change Assessments...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sea Level Rise Scenarios for Climate Change Assessments of the Mekong Delta, Vietnam Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Development of Sea Level Rise...

  10. SEA-03: Special Environmental Analysis | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    SEA-03: Special Environmental Analysis SEA-03: Special Environmental Analysis Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Actions Taken in Response to the Cerro...

  11. Hydrate-phobic surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Jonathan David, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Clathrate hydrate formation and subsequent plugging of deep-sea oil and gas pipelines represent a significant bottleneck for ultra deep-sea production. Current methods for hydrate mitigation focus on injecting thermodynamic ...

  12. Ultraviolet radiation in the southern seas in early spring 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wendler, G.; Quakenbush, T. [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Science Foundation research vessel Nathaniel B. Palmer carried out a cruise to Antarctica in early spring of 1993. It left Punta Arenas, Chile, close to the tip of South America on 11 August 1993. sailed south for 3 days to the tip of The Antarctic Peninsula, stopping at O`Higgens and Palmer Stations, and from there went southwest and into the Bellingshausen sea. On 10 September, it reached the most southerly position, 71{degrees}S, some distance north of the Thurston Island. From there, it went as far as 110{degrees}W before returning to Punta Arenas. The main purpose of the cruise was to investigate the snow- and sea-ice thickness, properties, and structures in this part of the southern oceans. It also allowed us to carry out continuous radiation measurements. We measured the following fluxes: global radiation (Eppley PSP), infrared incoming radiation (Eppley Pyrgeometer PIR), ultraviolet-A radiation (Eppley UV meter), ultraviolet-B radiation (Yankee Environmental Systems), and pitch and roll of the ship (Lucas Sensing Systems, Inc.). All instruments were sampled twice per second (Campbell Scientific, Model 21 X), and a notebook computer (ASI Patriot) stored 1-minute averages of the radiation data and 1-minute standard deviation of the ship`s pitch and roll. Visual observations of cloud cover were also recorded. 2 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Global ice sheet modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, T.J.; Fastook, J.L. [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States). Institute for Quaternary Studies

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The University of Maine conducted this study for Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of a global climate modeling task for site characterization of the potential nuclear waste respository site at Yucca Mountain, NV. The purpose of the study was to develop a global ice sheet dynamics model that will forecast the three-dimensional configuration of global ice sheets for specific climate change scenarios. The objective of the third (final) year of the work was to produce ice sheet data for glaciation scenarios covering the next 100,000 years. This was accomplished using both the map-plane and flowband solutions of our time-dependent, finite-element gridpoint model. The theory and equations used to develop the ice sheet models are presented. Three future scenarios were simulated by the model and results are discussed.

  14. Proposed resource evaluation plan. Salton Sea scientific drilling program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report presents a plan for evaluating the deep geothermal resource in the Salton Sea area of Imperial County, California. The plan is divided into two testing programs, followed by the modeling and evaluation of the underground geothermal resource. The testing program related to geological data collection includes acquiring and analyzing the core, running geophysical and temperature/pressure logs in both the deep well and the injection well, and carrying out extensive mud-logging activities. The flow testing program includes temperature, pressure, and flow measurements made in the well and surface facilities. Sampling and analysis of fluid and scale both in the well and at the surface facilities will also be carried out. 6 refs., 7 figs., 7 tabs. (ACR)

  15. Characterizing Surface Temperature and Clarity of Kuwait's Seawaters Using Remotely Sensed Measurements and GIS Analyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alsahli, Mohammad M. M.

    2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Kuwait sea surface temperature (SST) and water clarity are important water characteristics that influence the entire Kuwait coastal ecosystem. The aim of this project was to study the spatial and temporal distributions of ...

  16. Long range global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rolle, K.C.; Pulkrabek, W.W.; Fiedler, R.A. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Platteville, WI (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper explores one of the causes of global warming that is often overlooked, the direct heating of the environment by engineering systems. Most research and studies of global warming concentrate on the modification that is occurring to atmospheric air as a result of pollution gases being added by various systems; i.e., refrigerants, nitrogen oxides, ozone, hydrocarbons, halon, and others. This modification affects the thermal radiation balance between earth, sun and space, resulting in a decrease of radiation outflow and a slow rise in the earth`s steady state temperature. For this reason the solution to the problem is perceived as one of cleaning up the processes and effluents that are discharged into the environment. In this paper arguments are presented that suggest, that there is a far more serious cause for global warming that will manifest itself in the next two or three centuries; direct heating from the exponential growth of energy usage by humankind. Because this is a minor contributor to the global warming problem at present, it is overlooked or ignored. Energy use from the combustion of fuels and from the output of nuclear reactions eventually is manifest as warming of the surroundings. Thus, as energy is used at an ever increasing rate the consequent global warming also increases at an ever increasing rate. Eventually this rate will become equal to a few percent of solar radiation. When this happens the earth`s temperature will have risen by several degrees with catastrophic results. The trends in world energy use are reviewed and some mathematical models are presented to suggest future scenarios. These models can be used to predict when the global warming problem will become undeniably apparent, when it will become critical, and when it will become catastrophic.

  17. Global Scale Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asphaug, Erik; Jutzi, Martin

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Global scale impacts modify the physical or thermal state of a substantial fraction of a target asteroid. Specific effects include accretion, family formation, reshaping, mixing and layering, shock and frictional heating, fragmentation, material compaction, dilatation, stripping of mantle and crust, and seismic degradation. Deciphering the complicated record of global scale impacts, in asteroids and meteorites, will lead us to understand the original planet-forming process and its resultant populations, and their evolution in time as collisions became faster and fewer. We provide a brief overview of these ideas, and an introduction to models.

  18. INTERNATIONAL RELATIONSINTERNATIONAL RELATIONSINTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (GLOBAL BUSINESS)(GLOBAL BUSINESS)(GLOBAL BUSINESS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krylov, Anna I.

    INTERNATIONAL RELATIONSINTERNATIONAL RELATIONSINTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (GLOBAL BUSINESS)(GLOBAL BUSINESS)(GLOBAL BUSINESS) Future leaders in business, government, and law need to understand how global, and internship opportunities, it is an ideal major for those interested in entering the realms of business

  19. Global Compact for Higher Education Institutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global Compact for Higher Education Institutions Communicating on Progress for Université Laval Guide to the United Nations Global Compact for Higher Education Institutions: Implementing the Global to the United Nations Global Compact for Higher Education Institutions: Implementing the Global Compact

  20. Satellite observations of mesoscale ocean features and copropagating atmospheric surface fields in the tropical belt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Shang-Ping

    Satellite observations of mesoscale ocean features and copropagating atmospheric surface fields speed and sea surface temperature (SST) over mesoscale ocean features in certain frontal regions. The aim of this study is to determine to what extent mesoscale ocean dynamics modifies the surface wind

  1. Deriving Mesoscale Surface Current Fields from Multi-Sensor Satellite Data , B. Seppke b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamburg,.Universität

    Deriving Mesoscale Surface Current Fields from Multi-Sensor Satellite Data M. Gade a , B. Seppke b of mesoscale surface currents in the southestern Baltic Sea (Southern Baltic Proper). Marine surface films of the two-dimensional data sets may therefore allow for the calculation of mesoscale ocean current fields

  2. Numerical modeling of roll structures in mesoscale vortexes over the Black Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iarova, D A

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is a case study of horizontal atmospheric rolls that formed over the Black Sea on 16 August 2007. The rolls were discovered in WRF modeling results for a mesoscale cyclone that originated over the sea on 15 August 2007. The roll formation mechanisms, such as Rayleigh-Benard convective instability, dynamic instability, advection and stretching of vertical velocity field inhomogeneities, are considered. It is shown that indeed convective instability played an important role in the roll formation but dynamic instability did not occur. In order to distinguish other possible mechanisms of the roll formation numerical experiments were performed. In these experiments sea surface temperature in the initial conditions was decreased in order to prevent convective instability. Even though convective instability was suppressed roll-like structures still appeared in the modeling results, although their height and circulation velocity were smaller than in the control run. It was found that these structures were ...

  3. GLOBAL TAXONOMY INITIATIVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant, Taran

    #12;THE GLOBAL TAXONOMY INITIATIVE: Using Systematic Inventories to Meet Country and Regional Needs International #12;Table of Contents Introduction 1 I. Using Inventories to Build Capacity and Advance the GTI 2 for systematic inventories. A major component of the workshop addressed how systematic inventories can serve

  4. Global Vision Study Abroad

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    Finding a Global Vision Study Abroad Students Visit South Africa Philosophy in the Community arts sculpture of South Africa's late pop diva Brenda Fassie. More on Page 4 #12;At every post energy and passion for his work. At the same time, I would also like to express my sincere gratitude

  5. WORKPLACE GUIDES GLOBAL WORKING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roelleke, Thomas

    of Stonewall good practice publications ­ profiles some of the employers paving the way for gay staff to work do arise. This guide provides clear, practical tips on how gay employees can access internationalWORKPLACE GUIDES GLOBAL WORKING Supporting lesbian, gay and bisexual staff on overseas assignments

  6. Global Health Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Ophir

    Bay Area Global Health Seminar Series Monday, January 27, 2014 2:30pm ­ 4:00pm (Reception to follow at the Center for Health Policy and the Woods Institute for the Environment. He studies how economic, political, and natural environments affect population health in developing countries using a mix of experimental

  7. Global Climate & Catastrophic Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Global Climate & Catastrophic Risk Forum 2012 A Joint Program with LA RIMS Education Day Rethinking Catastrophic Risk in Risk Management: Earthquake-Related Challenges Featuring: Keynote Speaker Dr. Frank Beuthin, Willis Group Holdings Plc. Yohei Miyamoto, Aon Risk Solutions Curtis deVera, Marsh

  8. Atlas of Japan (East) Sea hydrographic properties in summer, 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talley, Lynne D.

    Atlas of Japan (East) Sea hydrographic properties in summer, 1999 Lynne D. Talley a,*, Pavel properties from CTD and discrete bottle sample profiles covering the Japan (East) Sea in summer, 1999: Japan sea; Ocean chemistry; Ocean atlas; Marginal seas; Water masses 1. Introduction The Japan or East

  9. Sea Level Rise Adaptation: From Climate Chaos to Climate Resilience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohs, Remo

    Sea Level Rise Adaptation: From Climate Chaos to Climate Resilience Human Dimensions and Ocean, 2013 #12;Main Discussion Points · How do we incorporate Sea-Level Rise into planning and regulatory actions? · What Does the new NRC Report on Sea- Level Rise mean to Decision-makers? · How does Sea-Level

  10. Response of precipitation extremes to idealized global warming in an aqua-planet climate model: Towards robust projection across different horizontal resolutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, F.; Collins, W.D.; Wehner, M.F.; Williamson, D.L.; Olson, J.G.

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Current climate models produce quite heterogeneous projections for the responses of precipitation extremes to future climate change. To help understand the range of projections from multimodel ensembles, a series of idealized 'aquaplanet' Atmospheric General Circulation Model (AGCM) runs have been performed with the Community Atmosphere Model CAM3. These runs have been analysed to identify the effects of horizontal resolution on precipitation extreme projections under two simple global warming scenarios. We adopt the aquaplanet framework for our simulations to remove any sensitivity to the spatial resolution of external inputs and to focus on the roles of model physics and dynamics. Results show that a uniform increase of sea surface temperature (SST) and an increase of low-to-high latitude SST gradient both lead to increase of precipitation and precipitation extremes for most latitudes. The perturbed SSTs generally have stronger impacts on precipitation extremes than on mean precipitation. Horizontal model resolution strongly affects the global warming signals in the extreme precipitation in tropical and subtropical regions but not in high latitude regions. This study illustrates that the effects of horizontal resolution have to be taken into account to develop more robust projections of precipitation extremes.

  11. The Nereus Hybrid Underwater Robotic Vehicle for Global Ocean Science Operations to 11,000m Depth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitcomb, Louis L.

    The Nereus Hybrid Underwater Robotic Vehicle for Global Ocean Science Operations to 11,000m Depth-- This paper reports an overview of the new Nereus hybrid underwater vehicle and summarizes the vehicle's per hybrid underwater vehicle and summarizes its performance during its first sea trials. Nereus is a novel

  12. in press, Global Biogeochemical Cycles, April 18, 2007 Carbon dioxide and oxygen fluxes in the Southern Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marshall, John

    found to affect oxygen fluxes. We find that ENSO also plays an important role in generating interannualin press, Global Biogeochemical Cycles, April 18, 2007 Carbon dioxide and oxygen fluxes College, London, UK Abstract. We analyze the variability of air-sea fluxes of carbon dioxide and oxygen

  13. Electric Vehicles Global Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sóbester, András

    Hot Topics Electric Vehicles Global Climate Change Green Building Hydraulic Fracturing Nuclear to global warming. The UKgovernment has just announced it is investing $1 billion in their development Green Living Industry Regulation Remediation Research and Technology Sustainability Waste Water Products

  14. Global and Regional Solutions Directorate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    at Pacific NW National Lab (PNNL) ­ Founding Director Joint Global Change Research Institute (PNNL/UMd) ­ ALD (PNNL) ­ Environmental and Health Sciences Directorate; Emerging Technologies ­ Chief Scientist ­ Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program ­ Director ­ PNNL Global Studies Program ­ Other (PNNL): Center

  15. Continental margin architecture : sea level and climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jenna Catherine

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    origin and distribution of gas hydrates in marine sediments,rise: Associations with gas hydrates. Geology, 23: 89-92.sea-level lowstands above gas hydrate-bearing sediments.

  16. Circulation and convection in the Irminger Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Våge, Kjetil

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aspects of the circulation and convection in the Irminger Sea are investigated using a variety of in-situ, satellite, and atmospheric reanalysis products. Westerly Greenland tip jet events are intense, small-scale wind ...

  17. Modeling convection in the Greenland Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhushan, Vikas

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed examination of the development of a deep convection event observed in the Greenland Sea in 1988-89 is carried out through a combination of modeling, scale estimates, and data analysis. We develop a prognostic ...

  18. The nonlinear dynamics of the sea breeze

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, Kevin Robert

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The response of the land and sea breeze circulation to two highly simplified dynamical models is presented. The first dynamical model is the explicit specification of an oscillating interior heat source analogous to that from Rotunno (1983...

  19. Continental margin architecture : sea level and climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jenna Catherine

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    rise: Associations with gas hydrates. Geology, 23: 89-92.sea-level lowstands above gas hydrate-bearing sediments.salt diapirism and gas hydrate decomposition, In Schwab, W.

  20. Global regularity for the minimal surface equation in Minkowskian geometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanov, Atanas

    2011-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    of (3.7) by 22ks@t#30;k and integrate in the spatial variable x. We get 22ks #18;Z Rn .#3;#30;k/.@t#30;k/ dx #0; Z Q.#30;

  1. Global Minimum Cuts in Surface Embedded Graphs Jeff Erickson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erickson, Jeff

    contract no. DE-AC05-06OR23100. Portions of this work were done while this author was visiting Toyota

  2. Surface Analysis Techniques on Ceramic Materials | GE Global...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2-3-12-v-robotic-crawler-inspection Robotic Crawler Inspects Wind Turbines a7-v-ceramic-matrix-composites Composites Automation Cuts Production Time Down to Hours ...

  3. Nanotextured Anti-Icing Surfaces | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    researchers are developing super water-repellent coatings to improve moisture control in steam turbines to enable higher efficiency. They also are exploring these coatings for...

  4. A Surface Reconstruction Method Using Global Graph Cut Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris, Sylvain

    SAR (China) 1 sparis@csail.mit.edu -- Sylvain Paris has worked on this project during his PhD at ARTIS calibrated images mainly has been approached using local methods, either as a continuous optimization problem of a pixel. Index Terms Graph flow, graph cut, 3D reconstruction from calibrated cameras, discontinuities

  5. A Surface Reconstruction Method Using Global Graph Cut Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris, Sylvain

    SAR (China) 1sparis@csail.mit.edu ­ Sylvain Paris has worked on this project during his PhD at ARTIS calibrated images mainly has been approached using local methods, either as a continuous optimization problem of a pixel. Index Terms Graph flow, graph cut, 3D reconstruction from calibrated cameras, discontinuities

  6. A Surface Reconstruction Method Using Global Graph Cut Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    SAR (China) 1sparis@csail.mit.edu ­ Sylvain Paris has worked on this project during his PhD at ARTIS reconstruction from multiple calibrated images mainly has been approached using local methods, either to 1/10th of a pixel. Index Terms Graph flow, graph cut, 3D reconstruction from calibrated cameras

  7. Accurate ab initio-based adiabatic global potential energy surface...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (STIP) E-Link Science Research Connection DOE Science Resources - National Library of Energy Beta SciTech Connect DOE PAGESBeta DOE Data Explorer ScienceCinema DOepatents DOE...

  8. Nanotextured Anti-Icing Surfaces | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparency VisitSilver Toyota PriusNSRdiodesScience

  9. State authority in an expanded territorial sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fulbright, Michael Gene

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the United States in the disputed area. The 1950 Texas case concerned claims encompassing the entire extent of the continental shelf off the coast of Texas. Texas conceded that the federal aovernment had paramount powers over this area with respect to nav... development and current status of state authority in the territorial sea. The possi- bility of the United States expanding its territorial sea to twelve miles is then examined. This paper then proceeds with an examination of what types of authoritl...

  10. 2, 921942, 2002 Global ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ACPD 2, 921­942, 2002 Global ozone forecasting H. J. Eskes et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Geophysical Society 2002 Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Global ozone forecasting based on ERS-2 July 2002 Correspondence to: H. J. Eskes (eskes@knmi.nl) 921 #12;ACPD 2, 921­942, 2002 Global ozone

  11. Globalization, Labor, Transformation of Work

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in an Increasingly Global Economy Edited by Jonathan H. Westover THE ORGANISATION #12;First published in Australia in an increasingly global economy Jonathan H. Westover (editor) Bibliography. 978 1 86335 660 2 (pbk.) 978 1 86335 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 Economic Globalization and Caribbean Economies, Syed H. Akhter, Paul Pounder

  12. GLOBAL WARMING THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    GLOBAL WARMING THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT AND YOUR FAMILY'S CONTRIBUTION TO IT Stephen E. Schwartz GREENHOUSE EFFECT #12;GLOBAL ENERGY BALANCE Global and annual average energy fluxes in watts per square meter about it.But nobody does anything about it. ­ Mark Twain­ Mark Twain Now with the greenhouse effect, we

  13. Global Warming: Connecting the Dots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    Global Warming: Connecting the Dots from Causes to Solutions* Jim Hansen 26 February 2007 National://www.columbia.edu/~jeh1/worldwatch_nov2006.pdf) 5. Communicating dangers and opportunities in global warming, Amer-16, 2006. (http://pubs.giss.nasa.gov/docs/2006/2006_Hansen.pdf) 8. Global warming: Connecting the dots from

  14. 4, 10591092, 2007 Global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    BGD 4, 1059­1092, 2007 Global warming potential of agro-ecosystems S. Lehuger et al. Title Page Predicting the global warming potential of agro-ecosystems S. Lehuger, B. Gabrielle, E. Larmanou, P. Laville Correspondence to: S. Lehuger (simon.lehuger@grignon.inra.fr) 1059 #12;BGD 4, 1059­1092, 2007 Global warming

  15. A modeling study of coastal inundation induced by storm surge, sea-level rise, and subsidence in the Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Kraucunas, Ian P.; Rice, Jennie S.; Preston, Benjamin; Wilbanks, Thomas

    2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The northern coasts of the Gulf of Mexico are highly vulnerable to the direct threats of climate change, such as hurricane-induced storm surge, and such risks can be potentially exacerbated by land subsidence and global sea level rise. This paper presents an application of a coastal storm surge model to study the coastal inundation process induced by tide and storm surge, and its response to the effects of land subsidence and sea level rise in the northern Gulf coast. An unstructured-grid Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model was used to simulate tides and hurricane-induced storm surges in the Gulf of Mexico. Simulated distributions of co-amplitude and co-phase of semi-diurnal and diurnal tides are in good agreement with previous modeling studies. The storm surges induced by four historical hurricanes (Rita, Katrina, Ivan and Dolly) were simulated and compared to observed water levels at National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration tide stations. Effects of coastal subsidence and future global sea level rise on coastal inundation in the Louisiana coast were evaluated using a parameter “change of inundation depth” through sensitivity simulations that were based on a projected future subsidence scenario and 1-m global sea level rise by the end of the century. Model results suggested that hurricane-induced storm surge height and coastal inundation could be exacerbated by future global sea level rise and subsidence, and that responses of storm surge and coastal inundation to the effects of sea level rise and subsidence are highly nonlinear and vary on temporal and spatial scales.

  16. Visualizing Global Inequality on the Web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Ian; Lodha, S K; Crow, Ben D; Fulfrost, Brian

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on Mapping Global Inequality, University of California,Visualizing Global Inequality on the Web Ian Myers 1 ,for mapping global inequality by (i) creating a simple user

  17. Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlson, Ann E.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation Ann E. Carlson*2008]HEAT WAVES, GLOBAL WARMING, AND MITIGATION 175 stroke2001). 2008]HEAT WAVES, GLOBAL WARMING, AND MITIGATION 177

  18. Global Warming, endogenous risk and irreversibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Anthony C.; Narain, Urvashi

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The economics of global warming, Institute for InternationalEconomic Models of Global Warming, Cambridge, Mass. MITstochastic losses from global warming, Risk Analysis 16(2):

  19. Steady periodic gravity waves with surface tension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samuel Walsh

    2009-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we consider two-dimensional, stratified, steady water waves propagating over an impermeable flat bed and with a free surface. The motion is assumed to be driven by capillarity (that is, surface tension) on the surface and a gravitational force acting on the body of the fluid. We prove the existence of global continua of classical solutions that are periodic and traveling. This is accomplished by first constructing a 1-parameter family of laminar flow solutions, $\\mathcal{T}$, then applying bifurcation theory methods to obtain local curves of small amplitude solutions branching from $\\mathcal{T}$ at an eigenvalue of the linearized problem. Each solution curve is then continued globally by means of a degree theoretic theorem in the spirit of Rabinowitz. Finally, we complement the degree theoretic picture by proving an alternate global bifurcation theorem via the analytic continuation method of Dancer.

  20. Programmable surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Amy (Amy Teh-Yu)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Robotic vehicles walk on legs, roll on wheels, are pulled by tracks, pushed by propellers, lifted by wings, and steered by rudders. All of these systems share the common character of momentum transport across their surfaces. ...

  1. Use of a Nesting Platform by Gul-Billed Terns and Black Skimmers at the Salton Sea, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ... the optimum and (2) its unprotected location with respect to wind-driven waves on the surface of the Salton Sea coupled with the region’s ... larids have specifically addressed the causes of mortality of young terns on these artificial sites. In a comparison of the ...

  2. Acoustic remote sensing of the sea bed using propeller noise from a light aircraft Michael J. Buckingham

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buckingham, Michael

    - 1 - Acoustic remote sensing of the sea bed using propeller noise from a light aircraft Michael J instrumentation is deployed from a surface ship or, in near-coastal waters, fixed installations such as towers and piers. In certain circumstances, however, a conventional deployment platform is not practicable

  3. Amazon River water in the northeastern Caribbean Sea and its effect on larval reef fish assemblages during April 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amazon River water in the northeastern Caribbean Sea and its effect on larval reef fish assemblages.S.A. ABSTRACT During April to June 2009, a large bolus of Amazon River water impacted the northeastern Caribbean Ocean waters to the north, with Caribbean surface waters showing intermediate values. Plankton net tows

  4. SOLAS Mid Term Strategy Initiative "Air-sea gas fluxes at Eastern boundary upwelling and Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ) systems"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 SOLAS Mid Term Strategy Initiative "Air-sea gas fluxes at Eastern boundary upwelling and Oxygen Lachkar, ETH Zurich, Suisse Parv Suntharalingam, UEA, UK Martin Hernandez Ayon, UABC, Mexico +of course of SOLAS and to the Workshop Véronique Garçon 09:50 Surface (energy and water) fluxes at the air

  5. Interannual Variations of Arctic Cloud Types in Relation to Sea Ice RYAN EASTMAN AND STEPHEN G. WARREN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochberg, Michael

    longwave cloud radiative effect (CRE), sug- gesting that infrared radiation emitted toward the surface and cloud temperatures greater than 2318C. Cloud radiative effect over the Arctic likely varies seasonally of clouds have different effects on sea ice. Visual cloud reports from land and ocean regions of the Arctic

  6. arXiv:1408.2487v2[physics.ao-ph]22Aug2014 Ising model for melt ponds on Arctic sea ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    arXiv:1408.2487v2[physics.ao-ph]22Aug2014 Ising model for melt ponds on Arctic sea ice Yi-Ping Ma,1, USA The albedo of melting Arctic sea ice, a key parameter in climate modeling, is determined by pools of water on the ice surface. Recent observations show an onset of pond complexity at a critical area

  7. International conference on the role of the polar regions in global change: Proceedings. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weller, G.; Wilson, C.L.; Severin, B.A.B. [eds.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The International Conference on the Role of the Polar Regions in Global Change took place on the campus of the University of Alaska Fairbanks on June 11--15, 1990. The goal of the conference was to define and summarize the state of knowledge on the role of the polar regions in global change, and to identify gaps in knowledge. To this purpose experts in a wide variety of relevant disciplines were invited to present papers and hold panel discussions. While there are numerous conferences on global change, this conference dealt specifically with the polar regions which occupy key positions in the global system. These two volumes of conference proceedings include papers on (1) detection and monitoring of change; (2) climate variability and climate forcing; (3) ocean, sea ice, and atmosphere interactions and processes; and (4) effects on biota and biological feedbacks; (5) ice sheet, glacier and permafrost responses and feedbacks, (6) paleoenvironmental studies; and, (7) aerosol and trace gases.

  8. International conference on the role of the polar regions in global change: Proceedings. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weller, G.; Wilson, C.L.; Severin, B.A.B. [eds.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The International Conference on the Role of the Polar Regions in Global Change took place on the campus of the University of Alaska Fairbanks on June 11--15, 1990. The goal of the conference was to define and summarize the state of knowledge on the role of the polar regions in global change, and to identify gaps in knowledge. To this purpose experts in a wide variety of relevant disciplines were invited to present papers and hold panel discussions. While there are numerous conferences on global change, this conference dealt specifically with polar regions which occupy key positions in the global system. These two volumes of conference proceedings include papers on (1) detection and monitoring of change; (2) climate variability and climate forcing; (3) ocean, sea ice, and atmosphere interactions and processes; (4) effects on biota and biological feedbacks; (5) ice sheet, glacier and permafrost responses and feedbacks; (6) paleoenvironmental studies; and, (7) aerosols and trace gases.

  9. Standing Stocks and Faunal Zonation of Deep-Sea Benthos: Patterns and Predictions across Scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Chih-Lin

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    constructed from 24 oceanographic institutions worldwide within the Census of Marine Life (CoML) field projects. The machine-learning algorithm, Random Forests, was employed to model and predict seafloor standing stocks from surface primary production... variables: Decadal mean and standard deviation (S.D.) of monthly net primary production (NPP) models (cbpm, vgpm), and the data inputs for the NPP models (Behrenfeld & Falkowski 1997, Westberry et al. 2008) including chlorophyll concentration (chl), sea...

  10. Red Sea during the Last Glacial Maximum: Implications for sea level reconstruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peltier, W. Richard

    . Gildor,1 and W. R. Peltier2 Received 13 February 2007; revised 29 July 2007; accepted 30 October 2007 based on the ICE-5G (VM2) model. Citation: Biton, E., H. Gildor, and W. R. Peltier (2008), Red Sea sea level reduction for the LGM interval range between approximately 120 m [Peltier, 2004, 2002

  11. National Sea Grant College What Does the National Sea Grant College Program Do for the Nation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Accomplishments Sea Grant's work is helping coastal communities make efficient use of land, energy and water to develop a lowimpact development ordinance designed to balance multiple uses and optimize environmental stability. The ordinance was endorsed by the Los Angeles City Council and signed by the Mayor. Sea level

  12. Estimation of Air-Sea Gas Transfer Using Conically Scanning SeaWinds Scatterometer Normalized Backscatter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glover, David M.

    Backscatter David M. Glover Department of Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry Woods Hole Oceanographic 2001 -- 31 March 2005 FINAL REPORT #12;Estimation of Air-Sea Gas Transfer from Scatterometry; Glover et . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-23 #12;Estimation of Air-Sea Gas Transfer from Scatterometry; Glover et al. ii B Daily Non

  13. Seasonal variation of upwelling in the Alaskan Beaufort Sea: Impact of sea ice cover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pickart, Robert S.

    the shelfbreak.18 19 20 21 22 #12;2 INTRODUCTION23 It has long been known that upwelling takes place Seasonal variation of upwelling in the Alaskan Beaufort Sea: Impact of sea ice cover Lena M deployed from August 2002 ­ September 2004 are used to2 characterize differences in upwelling near

  14. The Global Energy Challenge

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    George Crabtree

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The expected doubling of global energy demand by 2050 challenges our traditional patterns of energy production, distribution and use.   The continued use of fossil fuels raises concerns about supply, security, environment and climate.  New routes are needed for the efficient conversion of energy from chemical fuel, sunlight, and heat to electricity or hydrogen as an energy carrier and finally to end uses like transportation, lighting, and heating. Opportunities for efficient new energy conversion routes based on nanoscale materials will be presented, with emphasis on the sustainable energy technologies they enable.

  15. Global Threat Reduction Initiative

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked Questions for DOE FY 2011Talley,GENIIFY14 BudgetHollettGive UsDepartment ofGlobal

  16. Sandia Energy - Global

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementing Nonlinear757 (1)Tara46EnergyPower Systems Glitter-SizedGlobal

  17. Local and Global Casimir Energies for a Semitransparent Cylindrical Shell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ines Cavero-Pelaez; Kimball A. Milton; Klaus Kirsten

    2006-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The local Casimir energy density and the global Casimir energy for a massless scalar field associated with a $\\lambda\\delta$-function potential in a 3+1 dimensional circular cylindrical geometry are considered. The global energy is examined for both weak and strong coupling, the latter being the well-studied Dirichlet cylinder case. For weak-coupling,through $\\mathcal{O}(\\lambda^2)$, the total energy is shown to vanish by both analytic and numerical arguments, based both on Green's-function and zeta-function techniques. Divergences occurring in the calculation are shown to be absorbable by renormalization of physical parameters of the model. The global energy may be obtained by integrating the local energy density only when the latter is supplemented by an energy term residing precisely on the surface of the cylinder. The latter is identified as the integrated local energy density of the cylindrical shell when the latter is physically expanded to have finite thickness. Inside and outside the delta-function shell, the local energy density diverges as the surface of the shell is approached; the divergence is weakest when the conformal stress tensor is used to define the energy density. A real global divergence first occurs in $\\mathcal{O}(\\lambda^3)$, as anticipated, but the proof is supplied here for the first time; this divergence is entirely associated with the surface energy, and does {\\em not} reflect divergences in the local energy density as the surface is approached.

  18. Local and Global Casimir Energies for a Semitransparent Cylindrical Shell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milton, Kim

    Local and Global Casimir Energies for a Semitransparent Cylindrical Shell In´es Cavero the -function shell, the local energy density diverges as the surface of the shell is approached; the divergence by physical boundaries, such as the Casimir energy due to a perfectly conducting spherical shell [1], has been

  19. he global energy crisis has increased awareness of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jovanovic, Mihailo

    T he global energy crisis has increased awareness of the need for renewable energy generation to control turbu- lence via surface-mounted arrays of sensors and actuators are often prohibitively expensive are impacted by zero-mean oscillations. Their methodology avoids the need for expensive numerical simulations

  20. Voice of the Sea Wins Six Telly Awards Voice of the Sea television series, a signature project of the University of Hawai`i Sea Grant Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voice of the Sea Wins Six Telly Awards Voice of the Sea television series, a signature project Awards, which are the premier regional television awards honoring excellence in programming. Voice." Voice of the Sea won a silver Telly, the most prestigious award, for Cultural Programming. Voice

  1. THE GLOBAL COASTAL OCEAN: INTERDISCIPLINARY MULTISCALE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, Allan R.

    of Africa, Europe, Middle East, Oceania and Polar Regions. #12;Atkinson, et al., Vol. 13, THE SEA Processes

  2. Shifts in ENSO coupling processes under global warming Sjoukje Philip1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    state of the Pacific Ocean between the current climate and a high CO2 climate. Next, shifts in ENSO warming may shift the properties and dynamics of El Nin~o. We study the shifts in ENSO couplings in IPCC couplings between sea surface temperature (SST), thermocline depth and wind stress are discussed. Although

  3. Ethics in collaborative global health researchhealth research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    in developing countries ­Global health inequalities­Global health inequalities ­Disproportionate burden

  4. An examination of urban heat island characteristics in a global climate model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oleson, Keith W.; Bonan, Gordon B.; Feddema, Johannes J.; Jackson, Trisha L.

    2010-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A parameterization for urban surfaces has been incorporated into the Community Land Model as part of the Community Climate System Model. The parameterization allows global simulation of the urban environment, in particular the temperature of cities...

  5. GLOBAL HYDRLOGIC PERSPECTIVES ON THE MID-CRETACEOUS GREENHOUSE CLIMATE (APTIAN-ALBIAN)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suarez, Marina B.

    2009-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation examines the mid-Cretaceous greenhouse climate in the Aptian-Albian through the perspective of the global hydrologic cycle. Stable isotopic compositions of pedogenic and exposure surface carbonates presented ...

  6. Global tree network for computing structures enabling global processing operations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blumrich; Matthias A. (Ridgefield, CT); Chen, Dong (Croton-On-Hudson, NY); Coteus, Paul W. (Yorktown Heights, NY); Gara, Alan G. (Mount Kisco, NY); Giampapa, Mark E. (Irvington, NY); Heidelberger, Philip (Cortlandt Manor, NY); Hoenicke, Dirk (Ossining, NY); Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D. (Mount Kisco, NY); Takken, Todd E. (Mount Kisco, NY); Vranas, Pavlos M. (Bedford Hills, NY)

    2010-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for enabling high-speed, low-latency global tree network communications among processing nodes interconnected according to a tree network structure. The global tree network enables collective reduction operations to be performed during parallel algorithm operations executing in a computer structure having a plurality of the interconnected processing nodes. Router devices are included that interconnect the nodes of the tree via links to facilitate performance of low-latency global processing operations at nodes of the virtual tree and sub-tree structures. The global operations performed include one or more of: broadcast operations downstream from a root node to leaf nodes of a virtual tree, reduction operations upstream from leaf nodes to the root node in the virtual tree, and point-to-point message passing from any node to the root node. The global tree network is configurable to provide global barrier and interrupt functionality in asynchronous or synchronized manner, and, is physically and logically partitionable.

  7. Surface Soil

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructure ofIndustrialSupportingAlbedo at theSurface Soil Surface Soil

  8. AiR surface: AiR surface 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanaka, Jiro

    AiR surface: 1 PDA AiR surface 1 1: AiR surface () () 2 [1] [2] 3 AiR surface AiR surface surface surface surface 3.1 surface [3]( 3 ) surface 3.2 surface surface AiR surface 4 AiR surface surface AiR surface: Virtual Touch Panel

  9. Time-dependent inversion estimates of global biomass-burning CO emissions using Measurement of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT) measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arellano, Avelino F; Kasibhatla, Prasad S; Giglio, Louis; van der Werf, Guido R; Randerson, James T; Collatz, G. James

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monthly CO surface sources inventory based on the 2000 –of TRACE-P emission inventories from China using a regionaltrajectories, emission inventories, and global models, J.

  10. Global Studies Course List Fall 2010 (2111) COURSE LIST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Huiqiang

    2111-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ...........................................................................5 2. Global Economy and Global Governance .................................................9 3 from one of six Global Concentrations (Sustainable Development; Global Economy and Global GovernanceGlobal Studies Course List ­ Fall 2010 (2111) Page 1 COURSE LIST Fall 2010 (2111) Global Studies

  11. Global analysis of the intranuclear cascade model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braun, E.; Fraenkel, Z.

    1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis of the predictions of the intranuclear cascade model of Yariv-Fraenkel is made by means of global variables (flow angle and transverse momentum distributions). Signatures for the flow effect in the reaction are studied and the distributions of the shape of the events are determined, using the sphericity and coplanarity as shape parameters. The dependence of the results on two parameters of the model is investigated: the rearrangement of the particles in the Fermi sea after each particle-particle collision and the nuclear potential. The influence of the evaporation particles on the flow angle is checked. A comparison with the experimental results of the plastic ball/plastic wall group is made, using a simulation filter in order to take the experimental acceptance of the detector into account. The dependence of the flow angle on the mass of the colliding ions and on the bombarding energy is also studied. We find that the model predicts finite flow angles of the emitted particles. Slow rearrangement and a central potential cause larger flow angles. However, in all cases we find that the most probable calculated flow angle is smaller than the experimental one.

  12. Environmental Regulation, Globalization, and Innovation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashford, Nicholas

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This essay explores the complex relationship between environmental regulation, innovation, and sustainable development within the context of an increasingly globalizing economy. It will be argued that industrial policy, ...

  13. Machine Learning for Global Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    schoen,,,

    Noname manuscript No. (will be inserted by the editor). Machine Learning for Global Optimization. A. Cassioli?. · D. Di Lorenzo. ?. · M. Locatelli. ??. · F. Schoen.

  14. Global Optimization via Slack Variables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaac Siwale

    2015-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    London. England e-mail: ike_siwale@hotmail.com. Abstract. This paper presents a method for finding global optima to constrained nonlinear programs via slack ...

  15. ARM - Lesson Plans: Sea Water and Agriculture

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDC documentationBarrow, Alaska OutreachMakingPast SeaRate ofSea

  16. CLIMATE CHANGE GLOBAL ECONOMY How to decarbonise the global economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLIMATE CHANGE · GLOBAL ECONOMY How to decarbonise the global economy Today's report on deep efforts of independent experts from 15 countries to find national pathways to making economies based-zero emissions sometime in the second half of this century. This deep cut should occur in a growing world economy

  17. NOAA Fisheries Protocols For Sea Scallop Dredge Surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Fisheries Protocols For Sea Scallop Dredge Surveys January 7, 2004 Prepared by: Members..................................................................................................................................... 5 NOAA Fisheries Sea Scallop Dredge Survey Protocols............................................................................................................................. 10 Changes to Regional Scallop Dredge Protocols

  18. Sea Oil Field Satellite Monitoring: An Opera3onal View

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    through oil drilling. It is refined and separated, most easily by boiling In the oil industry, the term "North Sea" o`en includes areasSea Oil Field Satellite Monitoring: An Opera3onal View Maurizio

  19. area north sea: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    wave climate Conclusions & Discussion 12;NCK days 18 March 2011 model at KNMI Covers North Sea area Wind and sea level pressure results from the ESSENCE- Ensemble are not...

  20. aegean sea coast: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Assuming the Dirac sea is a physical reality, we have one imagination that a negative energy particle(s) in the sea and a usual positive energy particle(s) will form a neutral...

  1. U-101: Mozilla Firefox / Thunderbird / SeaMonkey XBL Binding...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    101: Mozilla Firefox Thunderbird SeaMonkey XBL Binding Use-After-Free Vulnerability U-101: Mozilla Firefox Thunderbird SeaMonkey XBL Binding Use-After-Free Vulnerability...

  2. air sea interaction: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    et al 27599 Abstract We study the effects of the coastal topography on the western shore of the Sea of Japan Scotti, Alberto 24 3, 183210, 2006 The role of air-sea Physics...

  3. Deep-Sea Research II 52 (2005) 32813302 Sediment transport by sea ice in the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rigor, Ignatius G.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with entrainment of frazil ice into deformed, multiple layers of rafted nilas, indicative of a flaw-lead resuspension and subsequent ice entrainment (420 m for the Chukchi Sea). Sediment loads averaged at 128 t km­2 deep for resuspension and entrainment) is at minimum 4 Â 106 t in the sampling area and is estimated

  4. Community-Based Sea Level Rise Projections Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This webinar will present a process for developing community-based sea level rise projections and facilitating their use.

  5. MFR PAPER 1283 Sea Scallop Resources off the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . scallops on Georges Bank and the Mid- dle Atlantic Shelf. Two sea scallop surveys on the RV Albatross IV

  6. Drowned carbonate platforms in the Bismarck Sea, Papua New Guinea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffmann, Gary; Silver, Eli; Day, Simon; Driscoll, Neal; Appelgate, Bruce

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    subsidence caused by G. Hoffmann (&) Á E. Silver UniversitySea, Papua New Guinea Gary Hoffmann • Eli Silver • Simon Day

  7. METABOLIC POTENTIAL OF DEEP-SEA ANIMALS: REGIONAL AND GLOBAL J. J. CHILDRESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thuesen, Erik V.

    ) and others have cited the need for an assessment of the role of animals in oceanic carbon flux (Bruland et al

  8. DOE-Sponsored Beaufort Sea Expedition Studies Methane's Role in Global

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No Significant6-2002 October5-99 February

  9. Sea-Level Rise OF THE EFFECTS OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change AND Sea-Level Rise IN Florida AN Update OF THE EFFECTS OF Climate Change ON FLORIDA to them. Florida Oceans and Coastal Council. 2010. Climate Change and Sea-Level Rise in Florida: An Update, sea-level rise, with the expectation that updates for increasing greenhouse gases, air temperature

  10. Deep-Sea Research I 49 (2002) 1307 Erratum to ``On the Atlantic inflow to the Caribbean Sea''

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deep-Sea Research I 49 (2002) 1307 Erratum Erratum to ``On the Atlantic inflow to the Caribbean Sea is printed below. Please accept our apologies for any inconvenience caused. Fig. 14. Comparison of Caribbean

  11. Global Calibration Claudio Albanese 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albanese, Claudio

    Global Calibration Claudio Albanese 1 September 13, 2009 Abstract Current technology advances calibration strategies. Although the industry is largely based on local calibration, we argue that global calibration is nowadays emerging as technically feasible and represents a useful complement to existing method

  12. GLOBAL WARMING THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    GLOBAL WARMING THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT AND YOUR FAMILY'S CONTRIBUTION TO IT Stephen E. Schwartz September 22, 2004 http://www.ecd.bnl.gov/steve/schwartz.html #12;#12;THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT #12;GLOBAL does anything about it. ­ Mark Twain­ Mark Twain Now with the greenhouse effect, we ARE doing something

  13. GLOBAL IMPACT FROM THE HEART

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Jens-Dominik

    GLOBAL IMPACT FROM THE HEART OF NORTHERN IRELAND #12;#12;CHANCELLOR'S WELCOME 4 VICE: INNOVATIVE AND WORLD-CLASS 18 CONTACT 26 CONTENTS 3GLOBAL IMPACT FROM THE HEART OF NORTHERN IRELAND #12;Queen THE HEART OF NORTHERN IRELANDGLOBAL IMPACT FROM THE HEART OF NORTHERN IRELAND CHANCELLOR'S WELCOME

  14. An AeroCom Assessment of Black Carbon in Arctic Snow and Sea Ice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiao, C.; Flanner, M. G.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Bellouin, N.; Berntsen, T.; Bian, Huisheng; Carslaw, K. S.; Chin, Mian; De Luca, N.; Diehl, Thomas; Ghan, Steven J.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevag, A.; Koch, Dorothy; Liu, Xiaohong; Mann, G. W.; Penner, Joyce E.; Pitari, G.; Schulz, M.; Seland, O.; Skeie, R. B.; Steenrod, Stephen D.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, Kostas; van Noije, T.; Yun, Yuxing; Zhang, Kai

    2014-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Though many global aerosols models prognose surface deposition, only a few models have been used to directly simulate the radiative effect from black carbon (BC) deposition to snow and sea-ice. Here, we apply aerosol deposition fields from 25 models contributing to two phases of the Aerosol Comparisons between Observations and Models (AeroCom) project to simulate and evaluate within snow BC concentrations and radiative effect in the Arctic. We accomplish this by driving the offline land and sea-ice components of the Community Earth System Model with different deposition fields and meteorological conditions from 2004-2009, during which an extensive field campaign of BC measurements in Arctic snow occurred. We find that models generally underestimate BC concentrations in snow in northern Russia and Norway, while overestimating BC amounts elsewhere in the Arctic. Although simulated BC distributions in snow are poorly correlated with measurements, mean values are reasonable. The multi-model mean (range) bias in BC concentrations, sampled over the same grid cells, snow depths, and months of measurements, are -4.4 (-13.2 to +10.7) ng g?1 for an earlier Phase of AeroCom models (Phase I), and +4.1 (-13.0 to +21.4) ng g?1 for a more recent Phase of AeroCom models (Phase II), compared to the observational mean of 19.2 ng g?1. Factors determining model BC concentrations in Arctic snow include Arctic BC emissions, transport of extra-Arctic aerosols, precipitation, deposition efficiency of aerosols within the Arctic, and meltwater removal of particles in snow. Sensitivity studies show that the model–measurement evaluation is only weakly affected by meltwater scavenging efficiency because most measurements were conducted in non-melting snow. The Arctic (60-90?N) atmospheric residence time for BC in Phase II models ranges from 3.7 to 23.2 days, implying large inter-model variation in local BC deposition efficiency. Combined with the fact that most Arctic BC deposition originates from extra-Arctic emissions, these results suggest that aerosol removal processes are a leading source of variation in model performance. The multi-model mean (full range) of Arctic radiative effect from BC in snow is 0.15 (0.07-0.25) W m?2 and 0.18 (0.06-0.28) W m?2 in Phase I and Phase II models, respectively. After correcting for model biases relative to observed BC concentrations in different regions of the Arctic, we obtain a multi-model mean Arctic radiative effect of 0.17 W m?2 for the combined AeroCom ensembles. Finally, there is a high correlation between modeled BC concentrations sampled over the observational sites and the Arctic as a whole, indicating that the field campaign provided a reasonable sample of the Arctic.

  15. Radiocarbon in the Weddell Sea as observed in a deep-sea coral and in Krill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michel, Robert L; Druffel, Ellen M

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    isotopic growth record in a reef coral from the Florida keysand a deep-sea coral from Blake Plateau, Science, thelower Suess. in banded corals: Conclusions Weddell of meters

  16. OREGON SEA GRANT | SUMMER 2014 | VOLUME 3 NO. 1 ChangeHow Oregon Sea Grant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    9 Adapting to Climate Change: Some Continuing Challenges Communicating about Climate Change: Reflections Bottom line: effective communication is critical 13 Climate Change in the Northwest Confluence's homes and business? In "Communicating about Climate Change: Reflections," Oregon Sea Grant

  17. Ocean Atmosphere Sea Ice Soil User's Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OASIS3 Ocean Atmosphere Sea Ice Soil User's Guide oasis3 prism 2­2, June 2004 Sophie Valcke 1 to realize a coupled simulation with OASIS3. The aim of OASIS3 is to provide a flexible and user friendly. OASIS3 synchronizes the exchanges of coupling fields between the models being coupled, and performs 2D

  18. Ocean Atmosphere Sea Ice Soil User's Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OASIS3 Ocean Atmosphere Sea Ice Soil User's Guide oasis3 prism 2­3, August 2004 Sophie Valcke 1 to realize a coupled simulation with OASIS3. The aim of OASIS3 is to provide a flexible and user friendly. OASIS3 synchronizes the exchanges of coupling fields between the models being coupled, and performs 2D

  19. Ocean Atmosphere Sea Ice Soil User's Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OASIS 2.0 Ocean Atmosphere Sea Ice Soil User's Guide and Reference Manual November 1995 Laurent for the straightforward use of OASIS 2.0. As far as we know, it is the best way to use it! The aim of OASIS is to provide been particularly emphasized in the OASIS design. The use of OASIS does not change the way the models

  20. EUTROPHICATION OF SWEDISH SEAS Donald Boesch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;EUTROPHICATION OF SWEDISH SEAS Donald Boesch Robert Hecky Charles O'Melia, Chair David and the water mass. In the in-depth evaluation of the environmental quality objective "Zero Eutrophication to achieve the environmental quality objective. An international panel of highly qualified eutrophication

  1. AQUACULTURE EXTENSION Illinois -Indiana Sea Grant Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by this bacterium primarily affects freshwater fish such as cattfish, several species of bass, and many species and Treatment of "Aeromonas hydrophila" Infection of Fish LaDon Swann Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant Program Purdue University Introduction Aeromonas hydrophila causes disease in fish known as "Motile Aeromonas Septicemia

  2. Structural Degradation in Mediterranean Sea Food Webs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, Ransom A.

    Structural Degradation in Mediterranean Sea Food Webs: Testing Ecological Hypotheses Using in species composition and abun- dance in marine ecosystems which translate into degradation of food of ecosystem degradation. We assembled species lists and ecological information for both re- gions and time

  3. Murchison project organization and control. [North Sea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lauren, P.K.; Hall, J.N.

    1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A description is given of the project management organization and the management control systems used for Conoco's Murchison field development in the North Sea. These systems created for Murchison proved largely successful and have been enhanced for use during the Hutton field development. Management concepts are described in the context of the cost control system. 3 refs.

  4. DEEP SEA DRILLING PROJECT DATA FILE DOCUMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the program is provided by the following agencies: Department of Energy, Mines and Resources (Canada) Deutsche&M University, as an account of work performed under the international Ocean Drilling Program which is managedDEEP SEA DRILLING PROJECT DATA FILE DOCUMENTS Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Technical

  5. Short communication Satellite-derived surface water pCO2 and airsea CO2 fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short communication Satellite-derived surface water pCO2 and air­sea CO2 fluxes in the northern for the estimation of the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2) and air­sea CO2 fluxes in the northern South), respectively, the monthly pCO2 fields were computed. The derived pCO2 was compared with the shipboard pCO2

  6. Global versus Nuclear Starbursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francoise Combes

    2001-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The strongest starbursts are observed towards galaxy nuclei, or circumnuclear regions. However in interacting galaxies, star formation is also triggered in overlap regions far from nuclei, in spiral arms and sometimes in tidal tails. What is the relative importance of these starbursts? What kind of starformation is dominating, as a function of redshift? These different starbursts occur in different dynamical conditions (global and local): gravitational instabilities, density waves, radial flows, shear, cloud collisions, density accumulations, and they have been investigated with the help of numerical simulations. Gravitational instabilities are necessary to initiate star formation, but they are not sufficient; galactic disks are self-regulated through these instabilities to have their Toomre Q parameter of the order of 1, and thus this criterium is in practice unable to predict the onset of intense star formation. Super star clusters are a characteristic SF mode in starbursts, and might be due to the rapid formation of large gas complexes. Star formation can propagate radially inwards, due to gravity torques and gas inflow, but also outwards, due to superwinds, and energy outflows: both expanding or collapsing waves are observed in circumnuclear regions. Mergers are more efficient in forming stars at high redshift, because of larger gas content, and shorter dynamical times. The relation between nuclear starbursts and nuclear activity is based on the same fueling mechanisms, but also on reciprocal triggering and regulations.

  7. State Sea Grant Program Federal Funding Match Funding Project Titles AK Alaska Sea Grant $255,010 $40,543

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Social Dimensions of Offshore Wind Power Development off the Delmarva Peninsula Extending modelsState Sea Grant Program Federal Funding Match Funding Project Titles AK Alaska Sea Grant $255 to Integrate Sea-Level Rise Adaptation into Existing Land Use Plans Marine Extension and Education Graduate

  8. Evaluating the substantive effectiveness of SEA: Towards a better understanding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doren, D. van [Copernicus Institute of Sustainable Development, Faculty of Geosciences, Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80115, 3508 TC Utrecht (Netherlands); Driessen, P.P.J., E-mail: p.driessen@uu.nl [Copernicus Institute of Sustainable Development, Faculty of Geosciences, Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80115, 3508 TC Utrecht (Netherlands); Schijf, B. [Netherlands Commission for Environmental Assessment, P.O. Box 2345, 3500 GH Utrecht (Netherlands); Runhaar, H.A.C. [Copernicus Institute of Sustainable Development, Faculty of Geosciences, Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80115, 3508 TC Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluating the substantive effectiveness of strategic environmental assessment (SEA) is vital in order to know to what extent the tool fulfills its purposes and produces expected results. However, the studies that have evaluated the substantive effectiveness of SEA produce varying outcomes as regards the tool's contribution to decision-making and have used a variety of approaches to appraise its effectiveness. The aim of this article is to discuss the theoretical concept of SEA substantive effectiveness and to present a new approach that can be applied for evaluation studies. The SEA effectiveness evaluation framework that will be presented is composed of concepts of, and approaches to, SEA effectiveness derived from SEA literature and planning theory. Lessons for evaluation can be learned from planning theory in particular, given its long history of analyzing and understanding how sources of information and decisions affect (subsequent) decision-making. Key concepts of this new approach are 'conformance' and 'performance'. In addition, this article presents a systematic overview of process and context factors that can explain SEA effectiveness, derived from SEA literature. To illustrate the practical value of our framework for the assessment and understanding of substantive effectiveness of SEA, three Dutch SEA case studies are examined. The case studies have confirmed the usefulness of the SEA effectiveness assessment framework. The framework proved helpful in order to describe the cumulative influence of the three SEAs on decision-making and the ultimate plan. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new framework to evaluate the substantive effectiveness of SEA is presented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The framework is based on two key concepts: 'conformance' and 'performance.' Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The practical applicability of the framework is demonstrated by three Dutch cases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The framework allows for a more systematic understanding of SEA effectiveness. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Finally, this paper presents explanations for SEA effectiveness.

  9. Monsoon-driven vertical fluxes of organic pollutants in the western Arabian Sea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dachs, J.; Bayona, J.M.; Ittekkot, V.; Albaiges, J.

    1999-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A time series of sinking particles from the western Arabian Sea was analyzed for aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, 4,4{prime}-DDT and 4,4{prime}-DDE, to assess the role of monsoons on their vertical flux in the Indian Ocean. Concurrently, molecular markers such as sterols and linear and branched alkanes were analyzed enabling the characterization of the biogenic sources and biogeochemical processes occurring during the sampling period. Hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) of the data set of concentrations and fluxes of these compounds confirmed a seasonal variability driven by the SW and NE monsoons. Moreover, the influence of different air masses is evidenced by the occurrence of higher concentrations of DDT, PCBs, and pyrolytic PAHs during the NE monsoon and of fossil hydrocarbons during the SW monsoon. Total annual fluxes to the deep Arabian Sea represent an important removal contribution of persistent organic pollutants, thus not being available for the global distillation process (volatilization and atmospheric transport from low or mid latitudes to cold areas). Therefore, monsoons may play a significant role on the global cycle of organic pollutants.

  10. A 28-ka history of sea surface temperature, primary productivity and planktonic community variability in the western Arabian Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    resulted in deep convective mixing, cold SSTs and enhanced primary productivity. In contrast, postdeglacial the northern Indian Ocean and central Asia is a major feature of the Earth's climate. During summer Africa to the Indian subcontinent. As the Tibetan Plateau is heated, a gradient of temperature

  11. Interaction between surface wind and ocean circulation in the Carolina Capes in a coupled low-order model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, L.; Pietrafesa, L.J.; Raman, S.

    1997-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Interactions between surface winds and ocean currents over an east-coast continental shelf are studied using a simple mathematical model. The model physics include cross-shelf advection of sea surface temperature (SST) by Ekman drift, upwelling due to Ekman transport divergence, differential heating of the low-level atmosphere by a cross-shelf SST gradient, and the Coriolis effect. Additionally, the effects of diabatic cooling of surface waters due to air-sea heat exchange and of the vertical density stratification on the thickness of the upper ocean Ekman layer are considered. The model results are qualitatively consistent with observed wind-driven coastal ocean circulation and surface wind signatures induced by SST. This simple model also demonstrates that two-way air-sea interaction plays a significant role in the subtidal frequency variability of coastal ocean circulation and mesoscale variability of surface wind fields over coastal waters.

  12. Physically Based Global Downscaling: Regional Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghan, Steven J.; Shippert, Timothy R.; Fox, Jared

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The climate simulated by a global atmosphere/land model with a physically-based subgrid orography scheme is evaluated in ten selected regions. Climate variables simulated for each of multiple elevation classes within each grid cell are mapped according the high-resolution distribution of surface elevation in each region. Comparison of the simulated annual mean climate with gridded observations leads to the following conclusions. At low to moderate elevations the downscaling scheme correctly simulates increasing precipitation, decreasing temperature, and increasing snow with increasing elevation within regions smaller than 100 km. At high elevations the downscaling scheme correctly simulates a decrease in precipitation with increasing elevation. Too little precipitation is simulated on the windward side of mountain ranges and too much precipitation is simulated on the lee side. The simulated sensitivity of surface air temperature to surface elevation is too strong, particularly in valleys influenced by drainage circulations. Observations show little evidence of a “snow shadow”, so the neglect of the subgrid rainshadow does not produce an unrealistic simulation of the snow distribution. Summertime snow area, which is a proxy for land ice, is much larger than observed. Summertime snow water equivalent is far less than the observed thickness of glaciers because a 1 m upper bound on snow water is applied to the simulations and because snow transport by slides is neglected. The 1 m upper bound on snow water equivalent also causes an underestimate of seasonal snow water during late winter, compared with gridded station measurements. Potential solutions to these problems are discussed.

  13. Deep-Sea Research II 51 (2004) 28892904 Internal wave excitation from a collapsing mixed region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flynn, Morris R.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reserved. 1. Introduction Internal gravity waves (hereafter ``IGW'') trans- port energy and momentum- proximately balances the surface zonal wind stress over seasonal or annual time scales. However, Dillon et al global mechanism for IGW excitation. In particular, observations in the Brazil Basin indicate that IGW

  14. Resisting globalization- ATTAC in France: local discourses, global terrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard, Marie des Neiges

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The debate over the "globalization" process has been influenced by the emergence of social movements who deplore this process. This research focuses on the French social movement ATTAC (Action for a Tobin Tax for the Aid of Citizens...

  15. Specific Examples of Global Activities Environmental assessment in Azerbaijan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , global warming, and global entrepreneurship. Discovery Park works syner- gistically with the Office competitiveness, global energy security, global warming, and global entrepreneurship. Discovery Park worksSpecific Examples of Global Activities · Environmental assessment in Azerbaijan · Study abroad

  16. (Reduce uncertainty in projection of future sea-level change due to ice wastage)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, M.F.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three basic goals were stated in the original proposal. These were: (1) develop an understanding of the heat and mass flow into subfreezing snow and firn, in order to model the evolution of the temperature distribution and the infiltration rates through the firn; (2) relate changes in climate, as given by general circulation model predictions, to changes in the surface mass and energy balances of glaciers; and (3) use the above results to analyze the effects of changed surface mass and energy balances on the flow of meltwater through snow and firn, and on the runoff from these glaciers, in a CO{sub 2}-affected climate. This final report summarizes our progress toward these goals. The primary product of this research program has been the communication of this progress in the form of publications in the scientific literature and presentations at scientific meetings. Our research activities in the past three years have provided a new basis for modeling of multiphase flow in subfreezing snow, new field data on the structural properties of arctic firn pertinent to hydrological modeling, and estimates of sea level change in response to changing patterns of runoff from the Greenland Ice Sheet. We conclude that forecasts of future sea level changes from all glacier runoff sources may be in error by amounts on the order of +8 cm over the next 150 years, due to the lag in generating runoff to the sea. Our specific research products include two distributed-parameter models of water flow through snow with melting and freezing, a theoretical model of wetting-front advance into subfreezing snow for inclusion in a future model, and a simple large-scale model of the response of Greenland runoff in a changing climate which provides estimates of the effect of melt water refreezing phenomena on sea level changes in response to a range of possible future climates.

  17. The China-in-Global Energy Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qi, T.

    The China-in-Global Energy Model (C-GEM) is a global Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) model that captures the interaction of production, consumption and trade among multiple global regions and sectors – including five ...

  18. The Private Regulation of Global Corporate Conduct

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vogel, David

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is a major goal of the UN Global Compact as well as severalindustry codes. The UN Global Compact has more than 2,300exploit. For the UN, the Global Compact provides a vehicle

  19. The Strategic Significance of Global InequalityThe Strategic Significance of Global InequalityThe Strategic Significance of Global InequalityThe Strategic Significance of Global InequalityThe Strategic Significance of Global Inequality By Jeffrey D. Sachs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    27 The Strategic Significance of Global InequalityThe Strategic Significance of Global InequalityThe Strategic Significance of Global InequalityThe Strategic Significance of Global InequalityThe Strategic

  20. Radiance in the ocean: effects of wave slope and raman scattering near the surface and at depths through the asymptotic region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slanker, Julie Marie

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Three investigations were conducted on the nature of the radiance field in clear ocean water. It is important to understand the sunlight intensity below the sea surface because this leads to an understanding of how ocean creatures navigate...