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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global sea surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Scaling Behaviors of Global Sea Surface Temperature  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Temporal scaling properties of the monthly sea surface temperature anomaly (SSTA) in global ocean basins are examined by the power spectrum and detrended fluctuation analysis methods in this paper. Analysis results show that scaling behaviors of ...

Ming Luo; Yee Leung; Yu Zhou; Wei Zhang

2

Testing for Deterministic Trends in Global Sea Surface Temperature  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Long-term variability in global sea surface temperature (SST) is often quantified by the slope from a linear regression fit. Attention is then focused on assessing the statistical significance of the derived slope parameter, but the adequacy of ...

Susana M. Barbosa

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Amazon Basin climate under global warming: the role of the sea surface temperature  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Amazon Basin climate under global warming: the role of the sea surface...temperature|carbon cycle|global warming| 1. Introduction First-generation...further into two components: a global mean warming (MW) and gridbox local anomalies...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Dynamically balanced absolute sea level of the global ocean derived from near-surface velocity observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dynamically balanced absolute sea level of the global ocean derived from near-surface velocity distribution of the global ocean is computed for the first time from observations of near-surface velocity distribution. NCEP reanalysis winds are used to compute the force due to Ekman currents. The mean sea level

5

A Simple Analytical Model for Understanding the Formation of Sea Surface Temperature Patterns under Global Warming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

How sea surface temperature (SST) changes under global warming is critical for future climate projection because SST change affects atmospheric circulation and rainfall. Robust features derived from 17 models of phase 5 of the Coupled Model ...

Lei Zhang; Tim Li

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Coral reef bleaching and sea surface temperature anomalies: 1991-1996 global patterns  

SciTech Connect

Global spatio-temporal patterns of mass coral reef bleaching during the first half of the 1990s continued to show the strong temperature correlations which first became established in the 1980s. Satellite sea surface temperature data and field observations were used to track thermal bleaching events in real time. Most bleaching events followed warm season sea surface temperature anomalies of around +1 degree celsius above historical means. Global bleaching patterns appear to have been strongly affected by worldwide cooling which followed eruption of Mount Pinatubo in June 1991. High water temperatures and mass coral reef bleaching took place in the Caribbean, Indian Ocean, and South Pacific in 1991, but there were few thermal anomalies or bleaching events in 1992 and 1993, years which were markedly cooler worldwide. Following the settling of Mount Pinatubo aerosols and resumption of global warming trends, extensive ocean thermal hot spots and bleaching events resumed in the South Pacific, South Atlantic, and Indian Oceans in 1994. Bleaching again took place in hot spots in the Indian Ocean and Caribbean in 1995, and in the South Atlantic, Caribbean, South Pacific, North Pacific, and Persian Gulf in 1996. Coral reefs worldwide are now very close to their upper temperature tolerance limits. This sensitivity, and the fact that the warmest ecosystems have no source of immigrant species pre-adapted to warmer conditions, may make coral reef ecosystems the first to be severely impacted if global temperatures and sea levels remain at current values or increase further.

Goreau, T.J.; Hayes, R.L.; Strong, A.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

7

Response of tropical sea surface temperature, precipitation, and tropical cyclone-related variables to changes in global and local forcing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A single-column model is used to estimate the equilibrium response of sea surface temperature (SST), precipitation, and several variables related to tropical cyclone (TC) activity to changes in both local and global forcing. ...

Sobel, Adam

8

GSOD Based Daily Global Mean Surface Temperature and Mean Sea Level Air Pressure (1982-2011)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

This data product contains all the gridded data set at 1/4 degree resolution in ASCII format. Both mean temperature and mean sea level air pressure data are available. It also contains the GSOD data (1982-2011) from NOAA site, contains station number, location, temperature and pressures (sea level and station level). The data package also contains information related to the data processing methods

Xuan Shi, Dali Wang

9

GSOD Based Daily Global Mean Surface Temperature and Mean Sea Level Air Pressure (1982-2011)  

SciTech Connect

This data product contains all the gridded data set at 1/4 degree resolution in ASCII format. Both mean temperature and mean sea level air pressure data are available. It also contains the GSOD data (1982-2011) from NOAA site, contains station number, location, temperature and pressures (sea level and station level). The data package also contains information related to the data processing methods

Xuan Shi, Dali Wang

2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

10

Assessment of composite global sampling: Sea surface wind speed Huai-Min Zhang,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. These statistics provide practical guidance to produce reliable blended products for different applications regulate the Earth's water and energy cycles. Advances in understanding this coupled system and air-sea fluxes, as documented in several World Meteorological Organization (WMO) programs [e.g., World

11

ARM - Measurement - Sea surface temperature  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsSea surface temperature govMeasurementsSea surface temperature ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Sea surface temperature The temperature of sea water near the surface. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. External Instruments ECMWF : European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts Model Data Field Campaign Instruments ECMWF : European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts Model Data MIRAI : JAMSTEC Research Vessel Mirai

12

Global Warming and Caspian Sea Level Fluctuations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coastal regions have a high social, economical and environmental importance. Due to this importance the sea level fluctuations can have many bad consequences. In this research the correlation between the increasing trend of temperature in coastal stations due to Global Warming and the Caspian Sea level has been established. The Caspian Sea level data has been received from the Jason-1 satellite. It was resulted that the monthly correlation between the temperature and sea level is high and also positive and almost the same for all the stations. But the yearly correlation was negative. It means that the sea level has decreased by the increase in temperature.

Ardakanian, Reza

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

ARM - Sea Surface and Sea Level  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at a site over long period of time, typically decades. It is non-periodic tendency of sea level to rise, fall, or remain stationary with time. Typically a trend, technically,...

14

Rising Sea Levels Due to Global Warming Are Unstoppable  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rising Sea Levels Rising Sea Levels Due to Global Warming Are Unstoppable Rising Sea Levels Due to Global Warming Are Unstoppable Mitigation can slow down but not prevent sea level rise for centuries to come August 5, 2013 Contact: Linda Vu, Lvu@lbl.gov, +1 510 495 2402 washington.jpg Because seawater absorbs heat more slowly than the atmosphere above it, our oceans won't feel the full impact of the greenhouse gases already in the air for hundreds of years. Warm water expands, raising sea levels. (Courtesy W. Washington) Select to enlarge. A reduction in greenhouse gas emissions could greatly lessen the impacts of climate change. However, the gases already added to the atmosphere ensure a certain amount of sea level rise to come, even if future emissions are reduced. A study by National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)

15

Rising Sea Levels Due to Global Warming Are Unstoppable  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Levels Due to Global Warming Are Unstoppable Mitigation can slow down but not prevent sea level rise for centuries to come August 5, 2013 Contact: Linda Vu, Lvu@lbl.gov, +1 510 495...

16

Global sea-to-air flux climatology for bromoform, dibromomethane and methyl iodide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global sea-to-air flux climatology Ko, M. K. W. , Poulet,Global sea-to-air flux climatology Vogt, R. , Sander, R. ,sea-to-air flux climatology for bromoform, dibromomethane

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Estimating air-sea fluxes of heat, freshwater, and momentum through global ocean data assimilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimating air-sea fluxes of heat, freshwater, and momentum through global ocean data assimilation of surface flux adjustments made to the initial NCEP re-analysis-1 products. During the state estimation the boundary current regions, they are consistent with known large-scale deficiencies in the NCEP products

18

Assessing the Uncertainty in Projecting Local Mean Sea Level from Global Temperature  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The process of moving from an ensemble of global climate model temperature projections to local sea level projections requires several steps. Sea level was estimated in Olympia, Washington (a city that is very concerned with sea level rise because ...

Peter Guttorp; Alex Januzzi; Marie Novak; Harry Podschwit; Lee Richardson; Colin D. Sowder; Aaron Zimmerman; David Bolin; Aila Särkkä

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

The sea surface directional wave spectrum and forward scattering from the sea surface  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An influence of the directional wave spectrum on acoustic forward scattering from the sea surface is difficult to measure. Here we present results of an experiment to measure vertical spatialcoherence from an acoustic path interacting once with the sea surface at two different angles with respect to the wave direction. The measurements were part of the Shallow-Water 2006 program that took place off the coast of New Jersey in August 2006. An acoustic source was deployed at depth 40 m and signals were recorded on a moored receiving system consisting of two 1.4 m long vertical line arrays centered at depths 25 and 50 m. Measurements were made over four source-receiver bearing angles separated by 90° during which sea surface conditions remained stable and characterized by an rms waveheight of 0.17 m and a mixed swell and wind-wave field originating from different directions. The measurements show a statistically significant difference depending on source-receiver bearing when the acoustic frequency is less than about 10 kHz; a result not observed at higher frequencies. This paper will present field observations along with modeling based on a rough surface parabolic wave equation utilizing synthetic sea surfaces. [Research supported by ONR Ocean Acoustics].

Peter H. Dahl; David R. Dall'Osto; William J. Plant

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Extended Reconstructed Sea Surface Temperature version 4 (ERSST.v4), Part I. Upgrades and Intercomparisons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The monthly Extended Reconstructed Sea Surface Temperature (ERSST) dataset, available on global 2°×2° grids, has been revised herein to version 4 (v4) from v3b. Major revisions include: updated and substantially more complete input data from the ...

Boyin Huang; Viva F. Banzon; Eric Freeman; Jay Lawrimore; Wei Liu; Thomas C. Peterson; Thomas M. Smith; Peter W. Thorne; Scott D. Woodruff; Huai-Min Zhang

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global sea surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Influences of Sea Surface Temperature Gradients and Surface Roughness Changes on the Motion of Surface Oil: A Simple Idealized Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The authors' modeling shows that changes in sea surface temperature (SST) gradients and surface roughness between oil-free water and oil slicks influence the motion of the slick. Physically significant changes occur in surface wind speed, surface ...

Yangxing Zheng; Mark A. Bourassa; Paul Hughes

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

On the Dependence of Sea Surface Roughness on Wind Waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The influence of wind waves on the momentum transfer (wind stress) between the atmosphere and sea surface was studied using new measured data from the RASEX experiment and other datasets compiled by Donelan et al.

H. K. Johnson; J. Højstrup; H. J. Vested; S. E. Larsen

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Sensitivity of sea ice to physical parameterizations in the GISS global climate model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

absorbed by the polar regions. Second, sea ice has a strong insulating effect on the under- lying oceanSensitivity of sea ice to physical parameterizations in the GISS global climate model Jiping Liu,1 coupled model is used to investigate the sensitivity of sea ice to each of the following parameterizations

24

The Effect of Diurnal Sea Surface Temperature Warming on Climatological Air–Sea Fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diurnal sea surface warming affects the fluxes of latent heat, sensible heat, and upwelling longwave radiation. Diurnal warming most typically reaches maximum values of 3°C, although very localized events may reach 7°–8°C. ...

Clayson, Carol Anne

25

Global ocean wind power sensitivity to surface layer stability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2009 Global ocean wind power sensitivity to surface layer1 May 2009. [ 1 ] Global ocean wind power has recently beenincreases mean global ocean wind power by +58% and À4%,

Capps, Scott B; Zender, Charles S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

The wavelet analysis of satellite sea surface temperature in the South China Sea and the Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using wavelet transform, the sea surface temperature (SST) during the period of 1982–1999 of the South China Sea and the equatorial Pacific, from datasets of NOAA/AVHRR, was analyzed. It is shown that there ar...

Jiwei Tian; Jinshan Xu; Enbo Wei

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Sea surface temperature as an indicator of ocean currents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SEA SURFACE TEMPERATURE AS AN INDICATOR OF OCEAN CURRENT'S A Thesis By LIEUTENANT GEOFFREY L. CHE BROUGH UNITED STAT'ES NAUY Suhn!i tted to the Graduate Colle-e of the Tesas A&!'I Uuive -sity iz'. parti;!I fu. l f il l-. ent of' the re...;, , uir!!net!ts for the oe:-rce OF SCZENCE "lay l967 ' SEA SURFACE TENPERATURE AS AN INDICATOR OF OCEAN CURRENTS A Thesis LIEUTENANT GEOFl"REY L . CHESBROUGH UN1TED STATES NAVY Ap, proved as to style and content by: J j. H ac 0 I Do f&at tine J...

Chesbrough, Geoffrey Lynn

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

28

DOE-Sponsored Beaufort Sea Expedition Studies Methane's Role in Global  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Beaufort Sea Expedition Studies Methane's Role in Beaufort Sea Expedition Studies Methane's Role in Global Climate Cycle DOE-Sponsored Beaufort Sea Expedition Studies Methane's Role in Global Climate Cycle October 29, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- Increased understanding of methane's role in the global climate cycle and the potential of methane hydrate as a future energy resource could result from a recent joint research expedition off the coast of northeastern Alaska involving the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Link to the project web siteThe Beaufort Sea expedition, which included research partners from the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory and Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research, gathered a wealth of data to help understand "fluxes," or changes in the concentration of methane within and

29

DOE-Sponsored Beaufort Sea Expedition Studies Methane's Role in Global  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-Sponsored Beaufort Sea Expedition Studies Methane's Role in DOE-Sponsored Beaufort Sea Expedition Studies Methane's Role in Global Climate Cycle DOE-Sponsored Beaufort Sea Expedition Studies Methane's Role in Global Climate Cycle October 29, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- Increased understanding of methane's role in the global climate cycle and the potential of methane hydrate as a future energy resource could result from a recent joint research expedition off the coast of northeastern Alaska involving the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Link to the project web siteThe Beaufort Sea expedition, which included research partners from the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory and Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research, gathered a wealth of data to help understand "fluxes," or changes in the concentration of methane within and

30

Comment on 'Discussions on common errors in analyzing sea level accelerations, solar trends and global warming'  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comment on Scafetta, Nicola. 'Discussion on Common Errors in Analyzing Sea Level Accelerations, Solar Trends and Global Warming.' arXiv:1305.2812 (May 13, 2013a). doi:10.5194/prp-1-37-2013.

Benestad, R E

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Preliminary global assessment of terrestrial biodiversity consequences of sea level rise mediated by climate change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Considerable attention has focused on the climatic effects of global climate change on biodiversity, but few analyses and no broad assessments have evaluated the effects of sea level rise on biodiversity. Taking advantage of new maps of marine...

Menon, Shaily; Soberó n, Jorge; Li, Xingong; Peterson, A. Townsend

2010-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

32

Response of the Northern Hemisphere sea ice to greenhouse forcing in a global climate model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in summer, in part because of the reductions in ice cover and thickness that insulate the winter atmosphereResponse of the Northern Hemisphere sea ice to greenhouse forcing in a global climate model Larissa warming of about 4³C for doubled CO2. Enhanced warming is found at higher latitudes near sea-ice margins

33

Sea surface exchanges of momentum, heat, and freshwater determined by satellite remote sensing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Sea surface exchanges of momentum, heat, and freshwater determined by satellite remote sensing Freshwater flux Latent heat flux Longwave radiation Satellite remote sensing Sea surface flux estimation Sensible heat flux Shortwave radiation Surface wind fields 2 #12;Sea surface exchanges of momentum, heat

Yu, Lisan

34

Warming of Global Abyssal and Deep Southern Ocean Waters between the 1990s and 2000s: Contributions to Global Heat and Sea Level Rise Budgets*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Warming of Global Abyssal and Deep Southern Ocean Waters between the 1990s and 2000s: Contributions of recent warming of these regions in global heat and sea level budgets. The authors 1) compute warming produces a 0.053 (60.017) mm yr21 increase in global average sea level and the deep warming south

Johnson, Gregory C.

35

Fitting Multidimensional Global Potential Energy Surfaces with Neural Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Albuquerque, New Mexico, 87131, USA Potential energy surfaces Mexico. Our method enforces the nuclear permutation symmetry by introducing multiple symmetry Fitting Multidimensional Global Potential Energy Surfaces with Neural Networks Bin Jiang

Maccabe, Barney

36

Rapid Rise of Sea Level 19,000 Years Ago and Its Global Implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rapid Rise of Sea Level 19,000 Years Ago and Its Global Implications Peter U. Clark,1* A. Marshall of an abrupt rise in sea level (meltwater pulse) at 19,000 years before the present (B.P.). Climate records level rise of 10 to 15 m at 19,000 years B.P. (1) (Fig. 1). (Unless otherwise indicated, all ages

Kurapov, Alexander

37

HYBRID DECADE-MEAN GLOBAL SEA LEVEL WITH MESOSCALE RESOLUTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. INTRODUCTION Shape of the sea level determines geostrophic currents in the upper ocean, which play important. Niiler2 1 International Pacific Research Center, School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology in drifter, satellite altimeter and wind data. Hybrid product reveals complex structures of main currents

38

Loggerhead sea turtles are circum-global, inhabiting temperate, sub-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

waters of the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans. In the Pacific, loggerhead sea turtles have been in the North Pacific Ocean occurs in Japan; there is no known nesting in the east- ern North Pacific (Márquez in the oceanic realm of the central North Pacific Ocean are of Japanese stock (Dutton et al., 1998). Tagging

39

Wind Speed Retrieval Based on Sea Surface Roughness Measurements from Spaceborne Microwave Radiometers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wind speed is the main factor responsible for the increase in ocean thermal emission because sea surface emissivity strongly depends on surface roughness. An alternative approach to estimate the surface wind speed (SWS) as a function of surface ...

Sungwook Hong; Inchul Shin

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Measurements of air-sea gas exchange at high wind speeds in the Southern Ocean: Implications for global parameterizations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

August 2006. [1] The SOLAS Air-Sea Gas Exchange (SAGE) Experiment was conducted in the western Pacific of air-sea gas exchange. Globally, the dominant control of air-sea gas exchange is turbulent energy as the primary source of energy for the atmospheric and oceanic molecular boundary layers have been derived from

Ho, David

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global sea surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

The colour of the Mediterranean Sea: Global versus regional bio-optical algorithms evaluation and implication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

measurements, covering most of the trophic regimes of the basin, we validated two existing regional algorithms algorithm, the MedOC4. Using an independent set of in situ chlorophyll data, we quantified the uncertaintiesThe colour of the Mediterranean Sea: Global versus regional bio-optical algorithms evaluation

42

Reconciling multidecadal land-sea global temperature with rising CO2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reconciling multidecadal land-sea global temperature with rising CO2 Vaughan Pratt Stanford CO2 1 / 29 #12;Goal Additional insight into 1 Similarity of the 1860-1880 & 1910-1940 rises to 1970-2000. 2 The recent pause (2001-2013). 3 No sign of 3 C per doubling of CO2. Simple reasoning (no opaque

Pratt, Vaughan

43

Reconciling multidecadal land-sea global temperature with rising CO2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reconciling multidecadal land-sea global temperature with rising CO2 Vaughan Pratt Stanford CO2 1 / 35 #12;Goal Additional insight into 1 Similarity of the 1860-1880 & 1910-1940 rises to 1970-2000. 2 The recent pause 3 No sign of 3 C per doubling of CO2. Some applicable audiences: Average reader

Pratt, Vaughan

44

Global Surface Temperature Measurement for Hypersonic Flight Vehicles.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This dissertation describes the use of permanent-change thermal paints as a technique for global surface temperature measurements on short-duration hypersonic flight vehicles. The thermal paints… (more)

Choudhury, Rishabh

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Seakeeping response of a Surface Effect Ship in near-shore transforming seas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Scale model tests are conducted of a Surface Effect Ship in a near-shore developing sea. A beach is built and installed in a wave tank,… (more)

Kindel, Michael.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Edward S. Van Vleet, Peter M. Williams. Sampling sea surface films ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

May 21, 1979 ... tive of naturally occurring films. Stainless steel .... rally occuring sea surface films present in uncontaminated areas ... radiation; an-. HAM. 1979.

2000-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

47

Seasonal and ENSO variability in global ocean phytoplankton chlorophyll derived from 4 years of SeaWiFS measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a possible 184 modes, which explain 67% of the total temporal variability associated with the global meanSeasonal and ENSO variability in global ocean phytoplankton chlorophyll derived from 4 years of Sea and other sources of phytoplankton variability on global scales, which is an important component

Yoder, James S.

48

Seasonal variability in coastal fronts and its influence on sea surface wind in the Northern South China Sea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract High-resolution reanalysis data of Sea Surface Temperature (SST) show pronounced seasonal variations in oceanic fronts in the coastal area of the Northern South China Sea (NSCS), which are accompanied by the seasonality of monsoons. The NSCS oceanic fronts cover a wider area of the coastal sea in winter than in summer as strong winter monsoons progress. Nonetheless, the average SST gradients of the frontal area in both seasons are comparable. The response of surface wind to SST perturbations attributed to oceanic fronts in the NSCS coastal area has also been investigated by the observation data of satellite borne scatterometers and the simulation data of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Both the satellite observations and the simulations of the WRF model show apparent positive linear SST-wind coupling for most months in 2008, indicating the local influence of coastal SST fronts on the sea surface wind in the NSCS. The SST-wind coupling coefficients in the NSCS coastal sea are larger than those observed at mid-latitude oceans but smaller than those observed near equatorial oceans. It is also found that the influence of topography on the sea surface wind could be more important than that of the SST front at the southern end of the Taiwan Strait in winter. The transition of the monsoon could also affect the SST-wind coupling in the NSCS.

Rui Shi; Xinyu Guo; Dongxiao Wang; LiLi Zeng; Ju Chen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Relationships between Pacific and Atlantic ocean sea surface temperatures and U.S. streamflow variability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Relationships between Pacific and Atlantic ocean sea surface temperatures and U.S. streamflow March 2006; published 19 July 2006. [1] An evaluation of Pacific and Atlantic Ocean sea surface by an interdecadal-temporal evaluation for the Pacific (Atlantic) Ocean based on the phase of the Pacific Decadal

Piechota, Thomas C.

50

Solar activity and global sea-surface temperatures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......variations in incoming solar radiation. A physical...small varia- tions in the solar energy output (0.1%) can...consortium. SOHO is a project of international cooperation...between ESA and NASA.) The solar model produced smaller......

Rasmus E Benestad

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Z .Global and Planetary Change 20 1999 93123 Global sea level rise and glacial isostatic adjustment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

adjustment W.R. Peltier ) Department of Physics, Uni�ersity of Toronto, 60 St. George Street, Toronto-mail: peltier@atmosp.physics.utoronto.ca Z .rather recently Peltier and Tushingham, 1989 , it was not clearly;( )W.R. PeltierrGlobal and Planetary Change 20 1999 93­12394 Z .existed at that time e.g., Peltier

Peltier, W. Richard

52

Impact of Atmosphere and Land Surface Initial Conditions on Seasonal Forecasts of Global Surface Temperature  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The impact of land surface and atmosphere initialization on the forecast skill of a seasonal prediction system is investigated, and an effort to disentangle the role played by the individual components to the global predictability is done, via a ...

Stefano Materia; Andrea Borrelli; Alessio Bellucci; Andrea Alessandri; Pierluigi Di Pietro; Panagiotis Athanasiadis; Antonio Navarra; Silvio Gualdi

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Simultaneous acoustic and microwave backscattering from the sea surface  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Simultaneous and coincident measurements of acoustic and microwavebackscatter from the air/sea interface were obtained during Phase II of the SAXON-FPN experiment in December 1992 and again in March 1993. The acoustic and microwave grazing angles were both set to 17° and the wavelengths were matched being set to 2.14 3.00 and 5.66 cm corresponding to respectively acoustic frequencies of 26.5 50 and 70 kHz and microwave frequencies of 5.3 10 and 14 GHz. Backscattering cross sections normalized by ensonified area for the acoustic (? 0 a ) and microwave (? 0 m ) returns were determined and their dependence on wind speed was investigated. The acoustic scattering strength is defined as 10? log 10 (? 0 a ) and the microwavescattering strength is defined as 10? log 10 (? 0 m )?10? log 10 (4?). The results of these experiments show that the two scattering strengths are comparable at wind speeds below about 3 m/s but that the acoustic scattering strength increases much faster than the microwavescattering strength with increasing wind speed until reaching saturation. If these wind-speed dependencies are represented by a power law U n then n is 5–6 for ? 0 a and 2–4 for ? 0 m for wind speeds between 2 and 7 m/s. This difference is ascribed to the effect of bubbles on the acoustic backscatter. The more rapid increase of ? 0 a compared to ? 0 m implies that for our 17° grazing angle acoustic scattering from the surface is negligible at all but the lowest wind speeds. Therefore a simple model is used for bubble scattering to fit the acoustic data as a function of wind speed for all three acoustic frequencies. The bubble densities required to fit the data agree well with previous measurements of near-surface bubble distributions. The model predicts an overshoot of the acoustic scattering strength (above the saturation level) at moderate wind speeds which is clearly seen in the data at 26.5 and 70 kHz. Finally a composite surface scatteringmodel is utilized for the pure surface scattering component along with the bubble model to predict the wind-speed dependence of the acoustic scattering strength at a 45° grazing angle and compare the results with earlier measurements.

Peter H. Dahl; William J. Plant; Bernd Nützel; Anke Schmidt; Heinz Herwig; Eugene A. Terray

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Testing a Dynamical Model for Mid-Latitude Sea Surface Temperature Anomalies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A slab model of the oceanic mixed layer is used to predict the statistical characteristics of the sea surface temperature anomalies that are forced by day-to-day changes in air-sea fluxes in the presence of a mean current. Because of the short ...

Claude Frankignoul; Richard W. Reynolds

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

On Sea Surface Roughness Parameterization and Its Effect on Tropical Cyclone Structure and Intensity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On Sea Surface Roughness Parameterization and Its Effect on Tropical Cyclone Structure and Earth Science and Technology, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 Yihong Duan National 10, 2009 (Revised) Dateline Revised for Advances in Atmospheric Sciences Corresponding author

Wang, Yuqing

56

Ocean Currents and Sea Surface Heights Estimated across the West Florida Shelf  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The across-shelf structures of the ocean circulation and the associated sea surface height (SSH) variability are examined on the west Florida shelf (WFS) for the 3-yr interval from September 1998 to December 2001. Five sets of characteristic ...

Yonggang Liu; Robert H. Weisberg

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Annual Variability of Sea Surface Height and Upper Layer Thickness in the Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The annual variabilities of the sea surface height in the Pacific Ocean were investigated by analyzing the TOPEX/POSEIDON ... the model results suggests that the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean is relatively cal...

Yoshinobu Wakata; Shouko Kitaya

58

Trace metal cycling in the surface water of the South China Sea ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ABSTRACT: We deployed floating traps in the surface waters of the South China Sea on four occasions at depths of 30 m, 100 m, and 160 m from 2006 to 2007 ...

59

Coupled Impacts of the Diurnal Cycle of Sea Surface Temperature on the Madden–Julian Oscillation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study quantifies, from a systematic set of regional ocean–atmosphere coupled model simulations employing various coupling intervals, the effect of subdaily sea surface temperature (SST) variability on the onset and intensity of Madden–Julian ...

Hyodae Seo; Aneesh C. Subramanian; Arthur J. Miller; Nicholas R. Cavanaugh

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Modeling the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Wind Response to Mesoscale Sea Surface Temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(WRF) and COAMPS atmospheric models. The SST-induced wind response is assessed from eight simulations of the surface wind relative to the SST gradient. #12;3 1. Introduction Positive correlations of local surfaceModeling the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Wind Response to Mesoscale Sea Surface Temperature Natalie

Kurapov, Alexander

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Modeling the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Wind Response to Mesoscale Sea Surface Temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to local SST perturbations decreases rapidly with height to near-zero at 150-300m. The simulated wind speed of local SST perturbations, and the orientation of the surface wind to the SST gradient. #12;3 1. Introduction Positive correlations of local surface wind anomalies with sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies

62

Impact of the Southern ocean winds on sea-ice - ocean interaction and its associated global ocean circulation in a warming world  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation discusses a linkage between the Southern Ocean (SO) winds and the global ocean circulation in the framework of a coarse-resolution global ocean general circulation model coupled to a sea-ice model. In addition to reexamination...

Cheon, Woo Geunn

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

63

Global warming and hurricane intensity and frequency: The debate continues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global warming and hurricane intensity and frequency: The debate continues Megan Mc of these changes. Some scientists believe that global warming and increased sea surface temperatures are to blame, global warming and increased sea surface temperatures do appear to have influenced hurricane frequency

Kareem, Ahsan

64

Global warming and United States landfalling hurricanes Chunzai Wang1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global warming and United States landfalling hurricanes Chunzai Wang1 and Sang-Ki Lee2 Received 18] A secular warming of sea surface temperature occurs almost everywhere over the global ocean. Here we use observational data to show that global warming of the sea surface is associated with a secular increase

Wang, Chunzai

65

Seasonal dynamics of sea surface salinity off Panama: The far Eastern Pacific Fresh Pool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seasonal dynamics of sea surface salinity off Panama: The far Eastern Pacific Fresh Pool Gaël Alory is confined between Panama's west coast and 85 W in December and extends westward to 95 W in April. Strong SSS at the surface, along with hydrographic profiles. The fresh pool appears off Panama due to the strong summer

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

66

This Letter presented projections of future sea-level rise based on simulations of the past 22,000 years of sea-level history using a simple, empirical model linking sea-level rise to global mean-temperature anomalies. One of the main conclusions of the L  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Letter presented projections of future sea-level rise based on simulations of the past 22,000 years of sea-level history using a simple, empirical model linking sea-level rise to global mean of sea-level rise during the twenty-first century that are reported in the Fourth Assessment Report

Siddall, Mark

67

Deep-Sea Research II 53 (2006) 741770 A comparison of global estimates of marine primary production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Deep-Sea Research II 53 (2006) 741­770 A comparison of global estimates of marine primary Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Dr, Pasadena, CA 91101-8099, USA b Marine Lab, 135 Duke Marine Lab Rd, Beaufort, NC 28516, USA i Department of Botany and Plant Pathology

Antoine, David

68

Enhancing the resolution of sea ice in long-term global ocean general circulation model (gcm) integrations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Open water in sea ice, such as leads and polynyas, plays a crucial role in determining the formation of deep- and bottom-water, as well as their long-term global properties and circulation. Ocean general circulation models (GCMs) designed...

Kim, Joong Tae

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

69

Global ocean wind power sensitivity to surface layer stability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the first time, the global ocean 80 m wind power and tofirst time, wind power at 80 m (typical wind turbine hub height) above the global ocean

Capps, Scott B; Zender, Charles S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Detecting anthropogenic influences on climate with an atmospheric model forced with observed variations in sea surface temperature  

SciTech Connect

Six ensembles of four simulations with the Hadley Centre atmospheric general circulation model (HADAM2a) have been carried out for late 1948 to the end of 1994 with different specified atmospheric forcing distributions. These simulations are being used to understand the role of different forcing processes in determining the observed climate variations during the second half of the twentieth century. All ensembles started from different initial conditions and were forced with specified global observed monthly sea ice and sea surface temperature distributions using the GISST1.1 data set. The approach used deterministic sampling of observed variations in climate rather than a coupled model. The technique was also different in that it looked at the smaller residual climate signal due to direct anthropogenic over and above those captured in ocean surface temperatures. The results indicate that this method is a useful complement to approaches based on coupled models, aided by the fact that some of the residual climate signals are almost as large as the full signals seen in coupled models, particularly in the stratosphere. 9 refs., 4 figs.

Folland, C.K.; Sexton, D. [Hadley Centre, Bracknell (United Kingdom); Karoly, D. [Monash Univ., Victoria (Australia)] [and others

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Why are climate models reproducing the observed global surface warming so well?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Why are climate models reproducing the observed global surface warming so well? Reto Knutti1 global surface warming so well?, Geophys. Res. Lett., 35, L18704, doi:10.1029/ 2008GL034932. 1 models reproduce the observed surface warming better than one would expect given the uncertainties

Fischlin, Andreas

72

Sea Surface Temperature Variability at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography Pier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sea surface temperature (SST) has been measured from near the end of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO) pier daily since 1916. It is one of the world’s longest instrumental time series of SST. It is widely used in studies of climate and ...

David M. Checkley Jr.; Martin Lindegren

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Feedbacks of sea surface temperature to wintertime storm tracks in the North Atlantic  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study the lagged maximum covariance analysis is performed on winter storm-track anomalies, represented by the meridional heat flux by synoptic-scale (2-8 days) transient eddies, and sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies in the North ...

Bolan Gan; Lixin Wu

74

The contribution of Indian Ocean sea surface temperature anomalies on Australian summer rainfall  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Indian Ocean extratropics that induces an anomalous anticyclone in the Great Australian Bight. #12 1 The contribution of Indian Ocean sea surface temperature anomalies on Australian Wales, NSW, Australia Harry H. Hendon Centre for Australian Weather and Climate Research, Bureau

England, Matthew

75

Influence of Sea Surface Temperature on Humidity and Temperature in the Outflow of Tropical Deep Convection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Service Aircraft (MOZAIC) project are analyzed in the vicinity of deep convective outflow to study the variationsInfluence of Sea Surface Temperature on Humidity and Temperature in the Outflow of Tropical Deep upper-tropospheric temperature and humidity by the Mea- surement of Ozone and Water Vapor by Airbus In

Johnson, Richard H.

76

A KNOWLEDGE BASED FRAMEWORK FOR THE DETECTION OF MEASUREMENT UNCERTAINTIES IN DERIVED SEA SURFACE CURRENT FIELDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A KNOWLEDGE BASED FRAMEWORK FOR THE DETECTION OF MEASUREMENT UNCERTAINTIES IN DERIVED SEA SURFACE University of Technology, STS Institute, Hamburg, Germany 3 University of Hamburg, Centre for Marine with the currents to be measured. Optical flow due to other image features, e.g. ship wakes, does not correspond

Hamburg,.Universität

77

Sea surface temperature control on the stable isotopic composition of rainfall in Panama  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sea surface temperature control on the stable isotopic composition of rainfall in Panama Matthew S investigated. Analysis of a 30-year time series of d18 Orain in Panama was used to test the hypothesis that d18) in the bordering tropical oceans. The results show that d18 Orain values in Panama are positively (negatively

Lachniet, Matthew S.

78

Submitted to Journal of Physical Oceanography Sea Surface Temperature Variability Along the Path of the Antarctic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

level pressure and air-sea heat fluxes. It is found that a significant fraction of SST variability) and remote forcing by ENSO. The physical mechanisms rely on the interplay between atmospheric variability the South Pa- cific, inducing surface heat fluxes (Fs) and Ekman heat advection (Fek) anomalies. A simple

Czaja, Arnaud

79

An investigation of sea surface temperature patterns in the Gulf of Mexico as determined by an airborne infrared sensor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

radiation from the sea surface may be used to delineate reliable horizontal patterns of surface temperature. The airborne data nave revealed horizontal temperature changes of 1. 5C to 4. 0C across the boundary of the major current systems in the Gulf... Surface Temperature. . . . Radiation Characteristics of the Sea Surface. . . Atmospheric Attenuation and Emission of Long-Nave Radiation. III. INSTRPilEK'TATION AND AIRBORNE PLATFORvh . 16 General Radiometer 16 16 Aircraft and Navigational System...

Drennan, Kirby Lee

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

80

Surface Analysis Over the Oceans—Searching for Sea Truth  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For the Atlantic storms in ERICA IOP 1–5, NMC operational surface analyses, both manual and automated, were compared with two sets of research analyses prepared later. The positions of cyclone centers agreed within 100 km on average only between ...

Frederick Sanders

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global sea surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

An updated climatology of surface dimethlysulfide concentrations and emission fluxes in the global ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and a profile?based climatology, J. Geophys. Res. , 109,2011 An updated climatology of surface dimethlysulfideof a global climatology of oceanic dimethylsulfide (DMS)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Global surface currents: a high-resolution product for investigating ocean dynamics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A global 1/4° resolution product of surface currents has been developed by the Centre de ... Océans et de l’Hydrosphère. The surface current is calculated from a combination of Ekman currents derived from wind es...

Joel Sudre; Rosemary A. Morrow

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Global-local Structural Optimization Using Response Surfaces of Local Optimization Margins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Global-local Structural Optimization Using Response Surfaces of Local Optimization Margins Boyang optimization problems. First, a large number of component optimizations for maximization of margins are performed. Response surface approximations (RSA) for maximum margins of component optimization

Neumaier, Arnold

84

Modeling shallow?water propagation with an appropriate sea?surface roughness spectrum  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Predictions for shallow?water acoustic propagation are usually accomplished assuming a deep?water spectrum for the sea surface roughness. In addition the effect of surface roughness is normally included through a loss mechanism. However for waveguide propagation the surface roughness mainly causes a redistribution of energy and therefore the use of an accurate model to handle roughness is essential to obtaining accurate results. In order to properly model shallow?water surface roughness the parametric spectrum GONO [Sanders and Bruinsma Wave Dynamics and Radio Probing of the Ocean Surface edited by O. M. Phillips and K. Hassemann (Plenum New York 1986) pp. 615–637] has been implemented. This spectrum is appropriate for wind?driven surfaces in waters ranging in depth from 15 to 100 m. To investigate the impact that different spectra has on the propagating field predictions using GONO and Pierson–Moskowitz spectra are compared for different environments and at frequencies typical of active and passive sonars. An acoustic propagationmodel which includes a conformal mapping algorithm to properly handle sea surface roughness [Norton et al. J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 97 2173–2180 (1995)] is used to generate the numerical results. [Work supported by ONR.

Guy V. Norton; Jorge C. Novarini

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Global relationships of total alkalinity with salinity and temperature in surface waters of the world's oceans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global relationships of total alkalinity with salinity and temperature in surface waters, R. A. Feely, and R. M. Key (2006), Global relationships of total alkalinity with salinity 35)2 + d (SST Ã? 20) + e (SST Ã? 20)2 fits surface total alkalinity (AT) data for each of five

86

Phenomenological solar contribution to the 19002000 global surface N. Scafetta1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Phenomenological solar contribution to the 1900­2000 global surface warming N. Scafetta1 and B. J 2006. [1] We study the role of solar forcing on global surface temperature during four periods on four scale-dependent empirical climate sensitive parameters to solar variations. We use two alternative

Scafetta, Nicola

87

Discussion on common errors in analyzing sea level accelerations, solar trends and global warming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Errors in applying regression models and wavelet filters used to analyze geophysical signals are discussed: (1) multidecadal natural oscillations (e.g. the quasi 60-year Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO), North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO)) need to be taken into account for properly quantifying anomalous accelerations in tide gauge records such as in New York City; (2) uncertainties and multicollinearity among climate forcing functions prevent a proper evaluation of the solar contribution to the 20th century global surface temperature warming using overloaded linear regression models during the 1900-2000 period alone; (3) when periodic wavelet filters, which require that a record is pre-processed with a reflection methodology, are improperly applied to decompose non-stationary solar and climatic time series, Gibbs boundary artifacts emerge yielding misleading physical interpretations. By correcting these errors and using optimized regression models that reduce multico...

Scafetta, Nicola

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

High-Latitude Ocean and Sea Ice Surface Fluxes: Challenges for Climate Research Mark A. Bourassa1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the Wilkins Ice Shelf collapsed equally quickly (Scambos et al. 2009). Ocean heat content is rising rapidlyHigh-Latitude Ocean and Sea Ice Surface Fluxes: Challenges for Climate Research Mark A. Bourassa1 conditions for the measurement and estimation of air­sea and ice fluxes, limiting understanding of related

Gille, Sarah T.

89

High-Latitude Ocean and Sea Ice Surface Fluxes: Challenges for Climate Research1 Mark A. Bourassa1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

), and in 2008, the Wilkins Ice Shelf51 collapsed equally quickly (Scambos et al. 2009). Ocean heat content1 High-Latitude Ocean and Sea Ice Surface Fluxes: Challenges for Climate Research1 2 Mark A conditions for the measurement and estimation of air­27 sea and ice fluxes, limiting understanding of related

Gille, Sarah T.

90

High-Latitude Ocean and Sea Ice Surface Fluxes: Requirements and Challenges for Climate Mark Bourassa1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

temperatures, seasonal sea ice, and the remoteness of the regions all conspire to make observations difficult latitudes - the vertical exchanges of heat, momentum and material between the ocean, atmosphere and ice1 High-Latitude Ocean and Sea Ice Surface Fluxes: Requirements and Challenges for Climate Research

Gille, Sarah T.

91

Sea-surface topography of the Gulf of Mexico, based on ship drift  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The monthly sea-surface topography of the Gulf of Mexico is calculated from ship-drift observations. A correction for wind effect is determined from the part of the surface current velocity field estimated to result from the stress of the wind.... The topo- graphy i. s found to agree qualitatively with results of studies based on in situ measurements. The contribution of the wind effect is significant. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I wish to express my appreciation to Mr. John D. Cochrane for his guidance...

Linn, Johnnie Burdette

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Extended Reconstructed Sea Surface Temperature version 4 (ERSST.v4): Part II. Parametric and Structural Uncertainty Estimations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Described herein is the parametric and structural uncertainty quantification for monthly Extended Reconstructed Sea Surface Temperature (ERSST) version 4 (v4). A Monte Carlo ensemble approach was adopted to characterize parametric uncertainty ...

Wei Liu; Boyin Huang; Peter W. Thorne; Viva F. Banzon; Huai-Min Zhang; Eric Freeman; Jay Lawrimore; Thomas C. Peterson; Thomas M. Smith; Scott D. Woodruff

93

Method and apparatus for the remote detection, recognition, and quantitative analysis of oil spills on a sea surface  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Many years of research in oil films and background formations on a sea surface, using IR apparatus for remote probing, have made it possible to establish a method for round-the-clock...

Mel’nikov, G S; Samkov, V M; Tovbin, B S; Derin, O A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Application of the Seasat Altimeter Data for Estimations of Sea Surface Height and Ocean Tide in the Northwest Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For the study of effects of oceanic load upon the solid Earth, the SEASAT altimeter data were analyzed to estimate variations of the sea surface height including the ocean tide. Instrumental error, orbital eph...

K. Sato; M. Ooe; T. Teramoto

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

North Australian Sea Surface Temperatures and the El Niño–Southern Oscillation in the CMIP5 Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Aspects of the climate of Australia are linked to interannual variability of the sea surface temperatures (SSTs) to the north of the country. SST anomalies in this region have been shown to exhibit strong, seasonally varying links to ENSO and ...

Jennifer L. Catto; Neville Nicholls; Christian Jakob

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Global ocean wind power sensitivity to surface layer stability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evaluation of global wind power, J. Geophys. Res. , 110,W. Tang, and X. Xie (2008), Wind power distribution over theApproach to Short-Term Wind Power Prediction, 1st ed. ,

Capps, Scott B; Zender, Charles S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

J1.15 PARAMETERIZING THE TURBULENT SURFACE FLUXES OVER SUMMER SEA ICE Edgar L Andreas1*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the surface heat budget for that year at several sites around the SHEBA ice camp (Andreas et al. 1999; Persson1 of 9 J1.15 PARAMETERIZING THE TURBULENT SURFACE FLUXES OVER SUMMER SEA ICE Edgar L Andreas1* , P to study the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) lasted for a year (Uttal et al. 2002). Our

Persson, Ola

98

Effects of global eustatic sea level variations and tectonism on stratigraphy of Iraq  

SciTech Connect

The stratigraphy of Iraq is marked by complex vertical and lateral facies sequences controlled predominantly by two factors: (1) eustatic sea level variations, and (2) tectonic movements. Analysis of the sedimentary cycles provides a framework for evaluating the relative economic importance of transgressive versus regressive facies within the Iraq stratigraphic succession. Most reservoir rocks, principally reefal and neritic limestones and to a lesser extent deltaic facies, were deposited during relatively high sea level stands. Source rock depositional environments in Iraq were typically either deep subsiding or shallow restricted intrashelf basins. These environments were not controlled by sea level, but primarily by local tectonics. Applying modern theories of plate tectonics and sea level control of facies to this well-studied petroleum province allows new interpretations of the region's geologic evolution.

Gawarecki, S.L.; Schamel, S.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

GLOBAL EXISTENCE FOR A TRANSLATING NEAR-CIRCULAR HELE-SHAW BUBBLE WITH SURFACE TENSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GLOBAL EXISTENCE FOR A TRANSLATING NEAR-CIRCULAR HELE-SHAW BUBBLE WITH SURFACE TENSION J. YE1 AND S for any nonzero surface tension despite the fact that a local planar approximation near the front problem, Dissipative equations, Hele-Shaw prob- lem, Translating bubbles, Surface tension Mathematics

Tanveer, Saleh

100

Global surface wave resonances of the earth magnetosphere and their possible manifestation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper global surface wave modes supported by plasma discontinuities at both the magnetopause and the plasmapause are considered. The ionosphere at the ends of the magnetic field lines of the earth outer magnetosphere is considered as reflecting boundaries of the surface waves that propagate along the plasma boundaries. As a result a standing wave structure along the magnetic field fluxes of the outer magnetosphere, i.e. surface wave resonance structure can be formed. Due to quantized wavenumbers along the magnetic field lines, the surface wave resonance possesses quantified frequencies in a following way: f = nfres, where fres is frequency of the corresponding fundamental surface wave resonance and n is an integer. Global Pc5 pulsations have been observed and interpreted mostly as cavity modes of the earth magnetosphere. The global Pc5 pulsations however could alternatively be interpreted as ultra low-frequency surface wave resonances of the earth magnetosphere that do not necessarily involve the cavi...

Nenovski, Petko

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global sea surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Antarctic and Southern Ocean influences on Late Pliocene global cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, followed by a coastal sea surface temperature cooling of 2.5 °C, a stepwise expansion of sea ice as a 4 °C cooling in deep ocean temperature (3) with 80 m of sea level equivalent ice volumeAntarctic and Southern Ocean influences on Late Pliocene global cooling Robert McKaya,1 , Tim

102

The low?frequency radiation and scattering of sound from bubbly mixtures near the sea surface  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Microbubble plumes are produced when waves break and are convected to depth. What role these microbubble plumes have in the production of sound and the scattering of sound near the sea surface from the low? (20?Hz) to mid? (2?kHz) frequency range? Ocean ambient noise shows a dramatic increase in midfrequency levels when wave breaking occurs. Measurements of scattering from the sea surface have a different characteristic than expected by Bragg scattering from gravity waves i.e. a large zero Doppler component. If microbubbleclouds and plumes with void fractions greater than 0.0001 act as collective resonant oscillators then noise can be produced and scattering can occur with little Doppler shift but ample spread. This hypothesis was based on the theory that the mixture properties determine the radiation and scattering from such a compact region. Experimental results show that the far field radiation of sound from a compact region can be described by monopole volume pulsation beneath a pressure release surface with the natural frequency described by a modified Minneart formula. Scattering measurements from submerged bubble clouds show a significant low frequency scattering. Experimental evidence and theoretical formulations are consistent with collective phenomenon. [Work supported by ONR.

William M. Carey; Ronald A. Roy

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Concentration and toxicity of sea-surface contaminants in Puget Sound  

SciTech Connect

The Marine Research Laboratory conducted studies during CY 1985 to evaluate the effects of sea-surface contamination on the reproductive success of a valued marine species. Microlayer and bulk water samples were collected from a rural bay, central Puget Sound, and three urban bays and analyzed for a number of metal and organic contaminants as well as for densities of neuston and plankton organisms. Fertilized neustonic eggs of sand sole (Psettichthys melanostictus) were exposed to the same microlayer samples during their first week of embryonic and larval development. Also, we evaluated the effects of microlayer extracts on the growth of trout cell cultures. Compared to rural sites, urban bays generally contained lower densities of neustonic flatfish eggs during the spawning season. Also, in contrast to the rural sites or the one central Puget Sound site, approximately half of the urban bay microlayer samples resulted in significant increases in embryo mortality (up to 100%), kyphosis (bent spine abnormalities) in hatched larvae, increased anaphase aberrations in developing embryos, and decreased trout cell growth. The toxic samples generally contained high concentrations of polycyclic aromatic and/or chlorinated hydrocarbons and/or potentially toxic metals. In some cases, concentrations of contaminants on the sea surface exceeded water-quality criteria by several orders of magnitude. Several samples of subsurface bulk water collected below highly contaminated surfaces showed no detectable contamination or toxicity.

Hardy, J.T.; Crecelius, E.A.; Kocan, R.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Global and regional exposure to large rises in sea-level: a sensitivity analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, but investment in the protection is required. While the costs of sea-level rise increase due to greater damage protection, investment is diverted from other uses. Much research remains to refine our understanding International Max Planck Research School on Earth System Modelling, Hamburg, Germany Research Unit

Watson, Andrew

105

Project EARTH-11-ABW1: Plate flexure, dynamic topography and global changes in sea-level  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of relatively low amplitude (~120 m) during the Late Cretaceous and curves based on continental flooding consequence of this is that even a modest rise in sea-level could result in extensive continental flooding at the University of Colorado (Boulder) and University Pierre Marie Curie (Paris), will involve the analysis

Henderson, Gideon

106

A Nano Surface Icephobic Coating Delays Ice Formation | GE Global...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

health-monitoring sensors, non-icing surfaces, nano-enabled media storage and optoelectronic devices. She enjoys time with her son, exercise and reading. Recent Posts by This...

107

High-Latitude Ocean and Sea Ice Surface Fluxes: Challenges for Climate Research1 Mark A. Bourassa1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

), and in 2008, the Wilkins Ice Shelf51 collapsed equally quickly (Scambos et al. 2009). Ocean heat content1 High-Latitude Ocean and Sea Ice Surface Fluxes: Challenges for Climate Research1 2 Mark A-latitude surface fluxes will require close collaboration among meteorologists,33 oceanographers, ice physicists

Gille, Sarah T.

108

How well-connected is the surface of the global ocean? Gary Froyland,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). Keywords: Ocean currents, attracting set, basin of attraction, almost-invariant set, Markov chain, transferHow well-connected is the surface of the global ocean? Gary Froyland,1 Robyn M. Stuart,1 and Erik dynamics of the ocean surface circulation is known to contain attracting regions such as the great oceanic

Froyland, Gary

109

Impact of Pacific and Atlantic sea surface temperatures on interannual and decadal variations of GRACE land water storage in tropical South America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

re season severity in South America using sea surface tem-storage in tropical South America, J. Geophys. Res. Atmos. ,hydroclimatology of tropical South America is characterized

de Linage, Caroline; Kim, Hyungjun; Famiglietti, James S; Yu, Jin-Yi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Global Wind-Induced Change of Deep-Sea Sediment Budgets, New Ocean Production and CO$_2$ Reservoirs ca. 3.3-2.35 Ma BP  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...29 April 1988 research-article Global Wind-Induced Change of Deep-Sea Sediment...patterns we may conclude that (trade-) wind-induced upwelling zones and upwelling...stable isotopes stratigraphy upwelling winds 1987 02 25 The past three million years...

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

The variability of high-frequency acoustic backscatter from the region near the sea surface  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The temporal variability of acoustic backscattering from the region near the sea surface is examined for frequencies in the 30–70 kHz range. A variance spectrum of the scattering strength exhibits effects associated with three different processes. Below about 0.1 Hz the spectrum contains a large contribution associated with temporal variations in the advection of bubble clouds through the measurement volume by large-scale processes. At high frequencies the spectrum asymptotes to a level characteristic of a Gaussian backscatteredpressure field from randomly moving bubbles within the scattering volume. The overall variability is treated as a slow modulation of this Gaussian process by larger-scale processes and a probability density function is derived for the scattering strength using Bayes’ theorem. Finally in some cases the spectrum exhibits a peak at the frequency of the dominant surface waves. Attempts to compute coherence functions between the backscattered acoustic power and surface wave orbital velocities measured by a microwave system observing the same spot as the acoustic system resulted in very low values. This leads to the belief that the wave-induced peak in the acoustic backscatter variance spectrum is caused by highly nonlinear processes. A time series of acoustic backscatter from a vertically pointing system confirms the existence of this modulation at the dominant wave frequency and also suggests its nonlinear character.

Peter H. Dahl; William J. Plant

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Multiscale Variability of the River Runoff System in China and Its Long-Term Link to Precipitation and Sea Surface Temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Sea Surface Temperature YONGKANG XUE,*, SHUFEN SUN,# K.-M. LAU,@ JINJUN JI,*, ISABELLE POCCARD,* RENHE with precipitation and sea surface temperature (SST) at the continental scale. Monthly mean data from 72 runoff­north dipole anomaly patterns for the first two runoff EOF's spatial distributions have been identified

Xue, Yongkang

113

A New Method to Produce Sea Surface Temperature Using Satellite Data Assimilation into an AtmosphereOcean Mixed Layer Coupled Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A New Method to Produce Sea Surface Temperature Using Satellite Data Assimilation method of producing sea surface temperature (SST) data for numerical weather prediction is sug- gested, which is obtained from the assimilation of satellite-derived SST into an atmosphere­ocean mixed layer

Noh, Yign

114

Role of the tropical Atlantic sea surface temperature in the decadal change of the summer North Atlantic Oscillation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pattern exhibited a traditional distribution with two centers over the North Atlantic. Citation: Sun, JRole of the tropical Atlantic sea surface temperature in the decadal change of the summer North Atlantic Oscillation Jianqi Sun,1,2 Huijun Wang,1,2 and Wei Yuan2,3 Received 1 May 2009; revised 11 July

115

The sensitivity of the Late Saalian (140 ka) and LGM (21 ka) Eurasian ice sheets to sea surface conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the climatic cooling effect from the large ice sheet topography. Late Saalian SST are simulated using an AGCM-hemispheric asymmetry caused by the larger ice-albedo feedback, cooling climate. The resulting Late Saalian ice sheetThe sensitivity of the Late Saalian (140 ka) and LGM (21 ka) Eurasian ice sheets to sea surface

Jakobsson, Martin

116

Algal biomass and sea surface temperature in the Mediterranean Basin Intercomparison of data from various satellite sensors, and implications for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Algal biomass and sea surface temperature in the Mediterranean Basin Intercomparison of data from and to increasing anthropogenic inputs, is an appropriate test site for observing the evolution of algal biomass progress in the knowledge of spatial and temporal variations in algal biomass in various regions

Bricaud, Annick

117

Quantitative analysis of the influence of dust sea surface forcing on the primary production of the subtropical Atlantic Ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

] Dust aerosols that are not deposited over oceans are able to significantly reduce the solar energy in the atmospheric layer could also contribute to reduce the solar energy reach- ing the sea surface thus leading tendency (0.22% per year) is found near Africa in summer. Thus, dust aerosol events might induce a major

Antoine, David

118

Method for using global optimization to the estimation of surface-consistent residual statics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An efficient method for generating residual statics corrections to compensate for surface-consistent static time shifts in stacked seismic traces. The method includes a step of framing the residual static corrections as a global optimization problem in a parameter space. The method also includes decoupling the global optimization problem involving all seismic traces into several one-dimensional problems. The method further utilizes a Stochastic Pijavskij Tunneling search to eliminate regions in the parameter space where a global minimum is unlikely to exist so that the global minimum may be quickly discovered. The method finds the residual statics corrections by maximizing the total stack power. The stack power is a measure of seismic energy transferred from energy sources to receivers.

Reister, David B. (Knoxville, TN); Barhen, Jacob (Oak Ridge, TN); Oblow, Edward M. (Knoxville, TN)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Ebola Virus Glycoproteins Induce Global Surface Protein Down-Modulation and Loss of Cell Adherence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ARTICLE PATHOGENESIS AND IMMUNITY Ebola Virus Glycoproteins Induce Global Surface...Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6076 The Ebola virus envelope glycoprotein (GP) derived...rounding and detachment in 293T cells, Ebola virus GP did not cause an increase in cell...

Graham Simmons; Rouven J. Wool-Lewis; Frédéric Baribaud; Robert C. Netter; Paul Bates

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Effects of Urban Surfaces and White Roofs on Global and Regional Climate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Land use, vegetation, albedo, and soil-type data are combined in a global model that accounts for roofs and roads at near their actual resolution to quantify the effects of urban surface and white roofs on climate. In 2005, ~0.128% of the ...

Mark Z. Jacobson; John E. Ten Hoeve

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global sea surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

A COMPARISON BETWEEN GLOBAL SOLAR MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC AND POTENTIAL FIELD SOURCE SURFACE MODEL RESULTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT The large-scale, steady-state magnetic field configuration of the solar corona is typicallyA COMPARISON BETWEEN GLOBAL SOLAR MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC AND POTENTIAL FIELD SOURCE SURFACE MODEL computer resources, and can resolve structure on scales beyond those that can be handled by current MHD

California at Berkeley, University of

122

Combined surface solar brightening and increasing greenhouse effect support recent intensification of the global land-based hydrological cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combined surface solar brightening and increasing greenhouse effect support recent intensification of the global land-based hydrological cycle Martin Wild,1 Ju¨rgen Grieser,2 and Christoph Scha¨r1 Received 30 radiation (surface radiation balance) is the key driver behind the global hydrological cycle. Here we

Fischlin, Andreas

123

Vertical coherence and forward scattering from the sea surface and the relation to the directional wave spectrum  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Results of an experiment to measure vertical spatial coherence from acoustic paths interacting once with the sea surface but at perpendicular azimuth angles are presented. The measurements were part of the Shallow Water 2006 program that took place off the coast of New Jersey in August 2006. An acoustic source frequency range 6–20?kHz was deployed at depth 40?m and signals were recorded on a 1.4?m long vertical line array centered at depth 25?m and positioned at range 200?m. The vertical array consisted of four omni-directional hydrophones and vertical coherences were computed between pairs of these hydrophones. Measurements were made over four source–receiver bearing angles separated by 90 ° during which sea surface conditions remained stable and characterized by a root-mean-square wave height of 0.17?m and a mixture of swell and wind waves. Vertical coherences show a statistically significant difference depending on source–receiver bearing when the acoustic frequency is less than about 12?kHz with results tending to fade at higher frequencies. This paper presents field observations and comparisons of these observations with two modeling approaches one based on bistatic forward scattering and the other on a rough surface parabolic wave equation utilizing synthetic sea surfaces.

Peter H. Dahl; David R. Dall'Osto

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

An Improved Land Surface Emissivity Parameter for Land Surface Models Using Global Remote Sensing Observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Observations MENGLIN JIN Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science, University of Maryland, College Park Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) model that the assumption of the constant emissivity induces errors in modeling the surface energy budget, especially over

Liang, Shunlin

125

Intensive Sea Surface Microlayer Investigations of Open Leads in the Pack Ice during Arctic Ocean 2001 Expedition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

3-7 Studies of microlayer properties have been conducted on freshwater lakes, seas, and temperate open oceans. ... The wind factor (Pw) discussed is an approximate measure of the wind power during sampling collection, calculated as Pw = 1/2ld(U)3, where l is the estimated fetch distance (m), d is air density (approximated from air pressure in hPa), and U the average wind speed (m s-1) measured at Z = 36 m. ... Williams et al.12 reported reduction of oceanic surface tension in a comprehensive study of surface characteristics in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of California. ...

Johan C. Knulst; Dena Rosenberger; Brian Thompson; Jussi Paatero

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Removing Solar Radiative Effect from the VIIRS M12 Band at 3.7 ?m for Daytime Sea Surface Temperature Retrievals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Operational sea surface temperature (SST) retrieval algorithms are stratified into nighttime and daytime. The nighttime algorithm uses two split-window Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) bands—M15 and M16, centered at ~11 and ~12 m, ...

Quanhua Liu; Alexander Ignatov; Fuzhong Weng; XingMing Liang

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

The Effect of the Sea Ice Freshwater Flux on Southern Ocean Temperatures in CCSM3: Deep-Ocean Warming and Delayed Surface Warming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study explores the role of sea ice freshwater and salt fluxes in modulating twenty-first-century surface warming in the Southern Ocean via analysis of sensitivity experiments in the Community Climate System Model, version 3 (CCSM3). In ...

Clark H. Kirkman IV; Cecilia M. Bitz

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Measurements of Sea Surface Height Variability in the Eastern South Atlantic from Pressure Sensor-Equipped Inverted Echo Sounders: Baroclinic and Barotropic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Variability in sea surface height (SSH) can be decomposed into two contributions: one from changes in mass in the water column (barotropic) and the other from purely steric changes (baroclinic). Both contributions can be ...

Baker-Yeboah, Sheekela

129

Surface tension of the core-crust interface of neutron stars with global charge neutrality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It has been shown recently that taking into account strong, weak, electromagnetic, and gravitational interactions, and fulfilling the global charge neutrality of the system, a transition layer will happen between the core and crust of neutron stars, at the nuclear saturation density. We use relativistic mean field theory together with the Thomas-Fermi approximation to study the detailed structure of this transition layer and calculate its surface and Coulomb energy. We find that the surface tension is proportional to a power-law function of the baryon number density in the core bulk region. We also analyze the influence of the electron component and the gravitational field on the structure of the transition layer and the value of the surface tension to compare and contrast with known phenomenological results in nuclear physics. Based on the above results we study the instability against Bohr-Wheeler surface deformations in the case of neutron stars obeying global charge neutrality. Assuming the core-crust transition at nuclear density $\\rho_{core}\\approx 2.7 * 10^{14}$ g cm$^{-3}$, we find that the instability sets the upper limit to the crust density, $\\rho_{crust}^{crit}\\approx 1.2 * 10^{14}$ g cm$^{-3}$. This result implies a nonzero lower limit to the maximum electric field of the core-crust transition surface and makes inaccessible a limit of quasilocal charge neutrality in the limit $\\rho_{crust}=\\rho_{core}$. The general framework presented here can be also applied to study the stability of sharp phase transitions in hybrid stars as well as in strange stars, both bare and with outer crust. The results of this work open the way to a more general analysis of the stability of these transition surfaces, accounting for other effects such as gravitational binding, centrifugal repulsion, magnetic field induced by rotating electric field, and therefore magnetic dipole-dipole interactions.

Jorge A. Rueda; Remo Ruffini; Yuan-Bin Wu; She-Sheng Xue

2014-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

130

Could the Earth's surface Ultraviolet irradiance be blamed for the global warming? A new effect may exist  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Whether natural factors could interpret the rise of the Earth's surface temperature is still controversial. Though numerous recent researches have reported apparent correlations between solar activity and the Earth's climate, solar activity has encountered a big problem when describing the rapid global warming after 1970s. Our investigation shows the good positive correlations between the Earth's surface Ultraviolet irradiance (280-400 nm) and the Earth's surface temperature both in temporal and spatial variations by analyzing the global surface Ultraviolet irradiance (280-400 nm) and global surface temperature data from 1980-1999. The rise of CO$_2$ cannot interpret the good positive correlations, and we could even get an opposite result to the good correlations when employing the rise of CO$_2$ to describe the relation between them. Based on the good positive correlations, we suggest a new effect, named "Highly Excited Water Vapor" (HEWV) effect, which can interpret how the Sun influences the Earth's surfac...

Chen, Jilong; Zhao, Juan; Zheng, Yujun

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Planetary boundary layer depth in Global climate models induced biases in surface climatology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Earth has warmed in the last century with the most rapid warming occurring near the surface in the arctic. This enhanced surface warming in the Arctic is partly because the extra heat is trapped in a thin layer of air near the surface due to the persistent stable-stratification found in this region. The warming of the surface air due to the extra heat depends upon the amount of turbulent mixing in the atmosphere, which is described by the depth of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). In this way the depth of the ABL determines the effective response of the surface air temperature to perturbations in the climate forcing. The ABL depth can vary from tens of meters to a few kilometers which presents a challenge for global climate models which cannot resolve the shallower layers. Here we show that the uncertainties in the depth of the ABL can explain up to 60 percent of the difference between the simulated and observed surface air temperature trends and 50 percent of the difference in temperature variability...

Davy, Richard

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Global Minimum Determination of the Born-Oppenheimer Surface within Density Functional Theory  

SciTech Connect

We present a novel method, which we refer to as the dual minima hopping method, that allows us to find the global minimum of the potential energy surface (PES) within density functional theory for systems where a fast but less accurate calculation of the PES is possible. This method can rapidly find the ground state configuration of clusters and other complex systems with present day computer power by performing a systematic search. We apply the new method to silicon clusters. Even though these systems have already been extensively studied by other methods, we find new global minimum candidates for Si{sub 16} and Si{sub 19}, as well as new low-lying isomers for Si{sub 16}, Si{sub 17}, and Si{sub 18}.

Goedecker, Stefan; Hellmann, Waldemar; Lenosky, Thomas [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, 4056 Basel (Switzerland); Physics Department, Ohio State University, 1040 Physics Research Building, 191 West Woodruff Avenue, Columbus, Ohio 43210-1117 (United States)

2005-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

133

Global existence for a translating near-circular Hele-Shaw bubble with surface tension  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper is concerned with proving global existence and stability of a translating bubble in a Hele-Shaw cell that is small relative to cell width. When the ratio of cell width to bubble dimension is sufficient large, the equations admit the steady translating near-circular bubble shape. We are concerned with global existence with the initial condition close to this steady shape. When the cell side walls effects are negligible, we show that the translating circular bubble is asymptotically stable for nonzero surface tension. With side walls effects, we obtain similar results for bubble shapes symmetric about the channel centerline. As with our prior work, we exploit a boundary integral approach that allows for a finite nonzero viscosity ratio between fluid inside and outside the bubble.

Ye, J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Sensitivity of Twenty-First-Century Global-Mean Steric Sea Level Rise to Ocean Model Formulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two comprehensive Earth system models (ESMs), identical apart from their oceanic components, are used to estimate the uncertainty in projections of twenty-first-century sea level rise due to representational choices in ocean physical formulation. ...

Robert Hallberg; Alistair Adcroft; John P. Dunne; John P. Krasting; Ronald J. Stouffer

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Sensitivity of global tropical climate to land surface processes: Mean state and interannual variability  

SciTech Connect

This study examines the sensitivity of global tropical climate to land surface processes (LSP) using an atmospheric general circulation model both uncoupled (with prescribed SSTs) and coupled to an oceanic general circulation model. The emphasis is on the interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes, which have first order influence on the surface energy and water budgets. The sensitivity to those processes is represented by the differences between model simulations, in which two land surface schemes are considered: 1) a simple land scheme that specifies surface albedo and soil moisture availability, and 2) the Simplified Simple Biosphere Model (SSiB), which allows for consideration of interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical process. Observational datasets are also employed to assess the reality of model-revealed sensitivity. The mean state sensitivity to different LSP is stronger in the coupled mode, especially in the tropical Pacific. Furthermore, seasonal cycle of SSTs in the equatorial Pacific, as well as ENSO frequency, amplitude, and locking to the seasonal cycle of SSTs are significantly modified and more realistic with SSiB. This outstanding sensitivity of the atmosphere-ocean system develops through changes in the intensity of equatorial Pacific trades modified by convection over land. Our results further demonstrate that the direct impact of land-atmosphere interactions on the tropical climate is modified by feedbacks associated with perturbed oceanic conditions ("indirect effect" of LSP). The magnitude of such indirect effect is strong enough to suggest that comprehensive studies on the importance of LSP on the global climate have to be made in a system that allows for atmosphere-ocean interactions.

Ma, Hsi-Yen; Xiao, Heng; Mechoso, C. R.; Xue, Yongkang

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Validation of Surface Current Measurements in the Northern Adriatic Sea from High-Frequency Radars  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The performances of a shore-based high-frequency (HF) radar network deployed along the coast of the Venice lagoon (northern Adriatic Sea) are discussed based on a comparison with a single bottom-mounted ADCP deployed in the shallow-water area ...

Simone Cosoli; Andrea Mazzoldi; Miroslav Ga?i?

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

A New Model to Construct Ice Stream Surface Elevation Profiles and Calculate Contributions to Sea-Level Rise  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to 21st-Century Sea-Level Rise. Science, 321, 1340; DOI:in the Face of Sea-Level Rise: A Hybrid Modeling Approachof ice sheets to sea-level rise. Bibliography Alcamo, J. et

Adachi, Yosuke

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Optimal Surface Salinity Perturbations of the Meridional Overturning and Heat Transport in a Global Ocean General Circulation Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

anomaly. This initial optimal perturbation corresponds to a zonal salinity gradient around 24°NOptimal Surface Salinity Perturbations of the Meridional Overturning and Heat Transport in a Global of surface salinity perturbations on the North Atlantic circulation over the past few decades. As a step

Huck, Thierry

139

The effect of gradients of temperature of the sea surface on moving groups of cumulus clouds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and 16N to 25N. Prom ship data, for the p . rticulax de+ca of inves;igat'on, i0, ", I, 'I2, nd 1H Inarch 1 9oH, a. map o f mean ai temperature v, as cons I ruc I? ed. . A map of sea-air temoerature differ ence vas ob- tained. Stabilii;y of . I...;he subclcud layer eras exam! ned. favorable areas and uafavorable a! cas f' or cloud dcv. i. lep- ment on the basis of' the sea-air Lemperaiure O'Lfference !vere de+ermined. Comparison?::ith an observed ?, . ? day com? posi+o cloud m . p shoved i irly good...

Stearns, John Robb

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

140

Surface and internal semidiurnal tides and tidally induced diapycnal diffusion in the Barents Sea: a numerical study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The simulation results for the surface and internal semidiurnal tides in the Barents Sea are presented. A modified version of the finite-element hydrostatic model QUODDY-4 is taken as a basis. The simulated surface tide agrees in a qualitative sense with the results obtained previously by other authors, but quantitative discrepancies are significant. The predicted internal tide belongs to the family of trapped waves. Their generation sites are located in regions of frequent internal tidal wave (ITW) detection by remote sensing. Here, the maximum baroclinic tidal velocities have a clear expressed mode-one (corresponding to the first baroclinic mode) vertical structure. This is also true for the averaged (over a tidal cycle) local density of baroclinic tidal energy. For the no-ice case, the averaged (over a tidal cycle) local rate of baroclinic tidal energy dissipation is enhanced as the bottom is approached. A comparison of the predicted tidally induced values of the depth-averaged diapycnal diffusivity with typical estimates of the combined vertical eddy diffusivity in oceans of mid- and lower latitudes, determined by the wind and thermohaline forcings, indicates that they either have the same order of magnitude or these values are larger than the latter. It follows that the contribution of tides is not negligible for the Barents Sea climate.

B.A. Kagan; E.V. Sofina

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global sea surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Reply to comment by J. L. Lean on ``Estimated solar contribution to the global surface warming using the ACRIM TSI satellite composite''  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reply to comment by J. L. Lean on ``Estimated solar contribution to the global surface warming contributed at least 10­30% of the 0.40 ± 0.04 K global surface warming) depends crucially on the adoption, because it lacks any upward trend between solar cycles 21­23, the solar contribution to the global warming

Scafetta, Nicola

142

Seventy-five-million-year-old tropical tetra-like fish from Canada tracks Cretaceous global warming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...4552.0.CO;2 ) Frakes, L. A. 1999 Estimating the global thermal state from Cretaceous sea surface and continental temperature...Cretaceous continental vertebrate faunas of Niger and northern Sudan. In Geoscientific research in Northeast Africa (eds U. Thorweihe...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Lateral variation of 134Cs and 137Cs concentrations in surface seawater in and around the Japan Sea after the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A total of 82 surface seawater samples was collected in the Japan Sea and the southwestern Okhotsk Sea before and after the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident. Analysis of 134Cs and 137Cs concentrations using low-background ?-spectrometry revealed that the 137Cs concentration of the samples collected in June 2011 was 1.5–2.8 mBq/L, which is approximately 1–2 times higher than the pre-accident 137Cs level, while the 134Cs concentration was less than detectable to 1 mBq/L. In addition to 134Cs being clearly detected (?1 mBq/L), 137Cs concentration in water samples from the northeastern Japan Sea (2–2.8 mBq/L) was also higher than that from the coast in the southwestern Japan Sea (?1.5 mBq/L). These higher concentrations in the northeastern Japan Sea could be ascribed to the atmospheric transport of nuclides from the FDNPP as aerosols and subsequent transport and dilution after delivery to the sea surface.

M. Inoue; H. Kofuji; S. Nagao; M. Yamamoto; Y. Hamajima; K. Yoshida; K. Fujimoto; T. Takada; Y. Isoda

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Is the basinwide warming in the North Atlantic Ocean related to atmospheric carbon dioxide and global warming?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to atmospheric carbon dioxide and global warming? Chunzai Wang1 and Shenfu Dong1,2 Received 31 January 2010 is controversial. Some studies argued that the warming is due to global warming in association with the secular sea surface temperature. Here we show that both global warming and AMO variability make a contribution

Wang, Chunzai

145

Sea Surface Roughness and Drag Coefficient as Functions of Neutral Wind Speed  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Near the surface, it is commonly believed that the behavior of the (turbulent) atmospheric flow can be well described by a constant stress layer. In the case of a neutrally stratified surface layer, this leads to the well-known logarithmic wind ...

Hans Hersbach

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

The Transient Circulation Response to Radiative Forcings and Sea Surface Warming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tropospheric circulation shifts have strong potential to impact surface climate. However, the magnitude of these shifts in a changing climate and the attending regional hydrological changes are difficult to project. Part of this difficulty arises ...

Paul W. Staten; Thomas Reichler; Jian Lu

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

What influence will future solar activity changes over the 21st century have on projected global near-surface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the observed increase in anthropogenic greenhouse gas con- centrations" [IPCC, 2007, p. 10], where "very likely with observed varia- tions and trends in global near-surface temperatures over the 20th century when they include both anthropogenic and natural forcings than when they include natural forcings only [Hegerl et al

Lockwood, Mike

148

Influence of Ice Particle Surface Roughening on the Global Cloud Radiative Effect BINGQI YI,* PING YANG,* BRYAN A. BAUM,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Influence of Ice Particle Surface Roughening on the Global Cloud Radiative Effect BINGQI YI,* PING are developed for se- verely roughened ice particles. The parameterizations are based on a general habit mixture and severely roughened ice particles. While the influence of particle roughening on the single

Baum, Bryan A.

149

Refinement of a semi-empirical model for the microwave emissivity of the sea surface as a function of wind speed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

's sea surface emissivity model. The first change to the model is to the model's treatment of multiple reflections. Multiple reflections are now treated as if the radiation is reflected back into the view path of the microwave sensor. This change lowered...

Kohn, David Jacob

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

150

Inside Sea Salt | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sea salt particles are emitted into the atmosphere by the action of ocean waves and bubble bursting at the ocean surface. They are ubiquitous in the atmospheric environment....

151

Climate sensitivity, sea level and atmospheric carbon dioxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...annual sea surface temperatures ranging from 0C to...continual high-frequency temperature oscillations, which...Earth is closest to the Sun. The slowly changing...affect the seasonal distribution of insolation-[27...synchronously with global temperature during the past 800000...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Response of Surface Cracks in Tubular Members During Global Buckling and Instability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Beam-columns in compression are subject to potential buckling. If the axial load is combined with a global bending moment, member instability may occur. One situation where this can occur is for pipelines on the seabed, where thermal strains induce significant compression in the pipeline due to constrained expansion. This may lead to upheaval buckling or snaking. In this condition one should also assess how a weld defect in the buckle zone will evolve. If the crack is located on the compressive side of the cross section, the crack remains closed. If the crack is located on the side where beam bending eventually leads to tension, fracture may develop. This has not been studied sufficiently in the past, and is the topic of the present paper. Here the interesting case of initial compression, with closure of the crack, is followed by a transition to tension and opening of the crack when the transverse displacement increases in the post-buckling regime. Simple cases of tubular beam-columns with surface cracks are investigated for cracks growing in a ductile manner. The simulations are based on shell and linespring finite elements.

Bjørn Skallerud

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Surface circulation in the Iroise Sea (W. Brittany) from high resolution HF radar mapping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-induced surface currents and the vari- ational interpolation on a regular grid. Combining these processing is characterized by two distinct zones approximately separated by the 100 m isobath: in the offshore zone permanent anticyclonic eddies: north of the western extremity of the Sein archipelago, and north the Ushant

154

Probabilistic ecological risk assessment and source apportionment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in surface sediments from Yellow Sea  

SciTech Connect

Based on the concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in 12 surface sediment samples from Yellow Sea, the relative risk of 9 PAHs was investigated using joint risk probability distribution curves and overlapping area, which were generated based on the distributions of exposure and acute toxicity data (LC50), and the sources of PAHs were apportioned using principal component analysis. It was found that joint probability curve and overlapping area indicated the acceptable ecological risk of individual PAHs, only a small fraction of the benthic organisms was affected. Among the nine PAHs studied, the overall risk of pyrene was the highest, with that of naphthalene the lowest. For lower exposure levels at which the percentage of species affected was less than 10%, the risk associated with phenanthrene and fluorene were clearly higher than that of the other seven PAHs. It was indicated that PAHs in surface sediments mainly originated from vehicular emissions, coal combustion sources, coke oven emission and wood combustion, petroleum origin made little influence on sources of PAHs by PCA.

Liu, A.X.; Lang, Y.H.; Xue, L.D.; Liao, S.L.; Zhou, H. [Ocean University of China, Qingdao (China). College for Environmental Science & Engineering

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

155

Reconstruction of drought variability in North China and its association with sea surface temperature in the joining area of Asia and Indian–Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Using tree-ring data from the northernmost marginal area of the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) in North China, May–July mean Palmer drought severity index (PDSI) was reconstructed back to 1767 AD. The reconstruction captured 52.8% of the variance over the calibration period from 1945 to 2005 AD and showed pronounced pluvial periods during 1850–1905, 1803–1811 and 1940–1961 and dry periods during 1814–1844, 1916–1932 and 1984–2012. These anomalous periods have previously been reported in other parts of North China. Spatial correlation analyses and comparisons with other hydroclimatic indices in North China indicated that our new PDSI reconstruction could represent spatial and temporal drought variability in this region well. Our work also suggested that the drying tendency currently observed in the northern part of North China (including the study area) is consistent with the weakening of the EASM. Meanwhile the drying trend was seemingly restrained at present in the southern part of North China. Spatial correlation patterns with global sea surface temperature (SST) indicated that the regional hydroclimatic variability in North China was tightly linked to SST over the joining area of Asia and Indian–Pacific Ocean (AIPO), especially over the tropical western Pacific. When SST from prior November to current July (NJ-SST) in the AIPO area was anomalously high (low), the thermal contrast between Asian land and ocean was weakened (strengthened), and the EASM was correspondingly weakened (strengthened), thereby causing droughts (pluvials) in North China. The results of this study do not only provide useful information for assessing the long-term climate change in North China, but also suggest that abnormal variability in NJ-SST over the AIPO area could be used to forecast hydroclimatic conditions in North China.

Qiufang Cai; Yu Liu; Han Liu; Junli Ren

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Free and forced tropical variability: role of the wind-evaporation-sea surface temperature (WES) feedback  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 11 3 Spatial distribution of the ocean mixed layer depth used in the Slab Ocean Model. : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 22 4 Annual mean (a) SST (contour interval: 2 K) and (b) latent heat ux (contour interval: 40 W/m2...) as simulated in CCM3-SOM. : : : : 27 5 Annual mean (a) surface winds and (b) convective precipitation (contour interval: 2 mm/day) as simulated in CCM3-SOM. : : : : : : 28 6 Di erence in annual mean (a) SST (contour interval: 0.2 K): WES-o -SOM - CCM3-SOM...

Mahajan, Salil

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

157

LETTER doi:10.1038/nature12156 Signature of ocean warming in global fisheries catch  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LETTER doi:10.1038/nature12156 Signature of ocean warming in global fisheries catch William W. L changes in sea surface temperature5 . This study shows that ocean warming has already affected global. Cheung1 , Reg Watson2 & Daniel Pauly3 Marine fishes and invertebrates respond to ocean warming through

Pauly, Daniel

158

Surface reflectance and conversion efficiency dependence of technologies for mitigating global warming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A means of assessing the relative impact of different renewable energy technologies on global warming has been developed. All power plants emit thermal energy to the atmosphere. Fossil fuel power plants also emit CO2 which accumulates in the atmosphere and provides an indirect increase in global warming via the greenhouse effect. A fossil fuel power plant may operate for some time before the global warming due to its CO2 emission exceeds the warming due to its direct heat emission. When a renewable energy power plant is deployed instead of a fossil fuel power plant there may be a significant time delay before the direct global warming effect is less than the combined direct and indirect global warming effect from an equivalent output coal fired plant – the “business as usual” case. Simple expressions are derived to calculate global temperature change as a function of ground reflectance and conversion efficiency for various types of fossil fuelled and renewable energy power plants. These expressions are used to assess the global warming mitigation potential of some proposed Australian renewable energy projects. The application of the expressions is extended to evaluate the deployment in Australia of current and new geo-engineering and carbon sequestration solutions to mitigate global warming. Principal findings are that warming mitigation depends strongly on the solar to electric conversion efficiency of renewable technologies, geo-engineering projects may offer more economic mitigation than renewable energy projects and the mitigation potential of reforestation projects depends strongly on the location of the projects.

Ian Edmonds; Geoff Smith

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Final Report DE-EE0005380: Assessment of Offshore Wind Farm Effects on Sea Surface, Subsurface and Airborne Electronic Systems  

SciTech Connect

Offshore wind energy is a valuable resource that can provide a significant boost to the US renewable energy portfolio. A current constraint to the development of offshore wind farms is the potential for interference to be caused by large wind farms on existing electronic and acoustical equipment such as radar and sonar systems for surveillance, navigation and communications. The US Department of Energy funded this study as an objective assessment of possible interference to various types of equipment operating in the marine environment where offshore wind farms could be installed. The objective of this project was to conduct a baseline evaluation of electromagnetic and acoustical challenges to sea surface, subsurface and airborne electronic systems presented by offshore wind farms. To accomplish this goal, the following tasks were carried out: (1) survey electronic systems that can potentially be impacted by large offshore wind farms, and identify impact assessment studies and research and development activities both within and outside the US, (2) engage key stakeholders to identify their possible concerns and operating requirements, (3) conduct first-principle modeling on the interactions of electromagnetic signals with, and the radiation of underwater acoustic signals from, offshore wind farms to evaluate the effect of such interactions on electronic systems, and (4) provide impact assessments, recommend mitigation methods, prioritize future research directions, and disseminate project findings. This report provides a detailed description of the methodologies used to carry out the study, key findings of the study, and a list of recommendations derived based the findings.

Ling, Hao [The University of Texas at Austin] [The University of Texas at Austin; Hamilton, Mark F. [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories] [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories; Bhalla, Rajan [Science Applications International Corporation] [Science Applications International Corporation; Brown, Walter E. [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories] [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories; Hay, Todd A. [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories] [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories; Whitelonis, Nicholas J. [The University of Texas at Austin] [The University of Texas at Austin; Yang, Shang-Te [The University of Texas at Austin] [The University of Texas at Austin; Naqvi, Aale R. [The University of Texas at Austin] [The University of Texas at Austin

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

160

Optimal Estimation of the Surface Fluxes of Chloromethanes Using a 3-D Global Atmospheric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(CH2Cl2), chloroform (CHCl3), and carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), are chlorine-containing gases concentrations of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases. The Center for Global Change Science at MIT

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global sea surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Spectroscopy of H3+ based on a new high-accuracy global potential energy surface  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of various potential energy surfaces of In order to fully appreciate the quality of the PES presented...Molecular potential energy functions. Chichester...Csaszar 2012 Calibration-quality adiabatic potential energy surfaces for H and its...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Influence of Bottom Friction on Sea Surface Roughness and Its Impact on Shallow Water Wind Wave Modeling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using a selected subset of the measured data obtained in shallow waters near Vindeby, Denmark, during RASEX (Risø Air–Sea Experiment), the role of bottom friction dissipation in predicting wind waves (not swell) is assessed with a third-...

Hakeem K. Johnson; Henrik Kofoed-Hansen

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Assessment of Seawater Intrusion Potential From Sea-level Rise in Coastal Aquifers of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2009). Impact of Sea-Level Rise on Sea Water Intrusion inC. (1997). Global Sea Level Rise: A Redetermination. Surveys2007). Effects of sea-level rise on groundwater flow in a

Loáiciga, Hugo A; Pingel, Thomas J; Garcia, Elizabeth S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Recent oppositely directed trends in solar climate forcings and the global mean surface air temperature  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...102 and 108 years. Recently, solar effects on climate on time scales...becoming feasible to detect genuine solar forcing in climate records (Haigh 2003). The thermal capacity of the Earth's oceans is large...decadal-scale (and hence solar cycle) variations in global...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Advances in the Surface Science of TiO2 – A Global Perspective...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ultraviolet catalysis thin films semiconductors renewable energy ultra-high vacuum UHV VT SPM atomic-resolution imaging proteins surface science Volume: 28 Issue: 10 Pages:...

166

ARM - Sea Level and Climate Change  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

if severe storms such as hurricanes and typhoons become more frequent. Statistics on Sea Level Rise According to many studies, the global mean sea level may have risen by one or...

167

Estimating the Economic Cost of Sea-Level Rise  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To improve the estimate of economic costs of future sea-level rise associated with global climate change,

Sugiyama, Masahiro.

168

Iterative Estimationof Antarctic Sea Ice Extent Using SeaWindsData QuinnP. Remund and David G. Long  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an importantcomponent in global geophysical processes. For example, the insulating nature of sea ice impedes heatIterative Estimationof Antarctic Sea Ice Extent Using SeaWindsData QuinnP. Remund and David G. Long-378-4383,FAX: 801-378-6586 Abstract- Polar sea ice extent is an important input to global climate models

Long, David G.

169

Droplets on Inclined Plates: Local and Global Hysteresis of Pinned Capillary Surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Local contact line pinning prevents droplets from rearranging to minimal global energy, and models for droplets without pinning cannot predict their shape. We show that experiments are much better described by a theory, developed herein, that does account for the constrained contact line motion, using as example droplets on tilted plates. We map out their shapes in suitable phase spaces. For 2D droplets, the critical point of maximum tilt depends on the hysteresis range and Bond number. In 3D, it also depends on the initial width, highlighting the importance of the deposition history.

Michiel Musterd; Volkert van Steijn; Chris R. Kleijn; Michiel T. Kreutzer

2014-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

170

Hydrohalite in cold sea ice: Laboratory observations of single crystals, surface accumulations, and migration rates under a temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

April 2009; published 17 July 2009. [1] When NaCl precipitates out of a saturated solution, it forms it instead precipitates as the dihydrate ``hydrohalite,'' NaCl Á 2H2O. When sea ice is cooled, hydrohalite begins to precipitate within brine inclusions at about �23°C. In this work, hydrohalite crystals

Warren, Stephen

171

An investigation of the relationships between rainfall in northeast Brazil and sea surface temperatures of the equatorial regions of the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;"V IL FEST? GATION OF THE R). LATIONSHIPS BET))'EFN RATNFAI. L IN NOR'I'llL 'EST BRAZIL AND SEA SL'Rl'ACE TFI!PERAT)JRES CF TIIF. Eq?IA'I'ORIA), RFGIONS OF THE PACIFIC AVL' ATLANITIC OCEANS A TI?csiS OV M "u?'v'I N ARTIIL)R COCHRANE Suhrafr...Mcmli c r) / ~g. ember) (Member) May 1977 ABSTRACT An Investigation of the Relationships between Rainfall in Northeast Brazil and Sca Surface Temperatures of the Equatorial Rcgi. ons of the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans (IJay 1977) . Marvin Arthur...

Cochrane, Marvin Arthur

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

172

Shipboard Measurements and Estimations of AirSea Fluxes in the Western Tropical Pacific Ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ship­board Measurements and Estimations of Air­Sea Fluxes in the Western Tropical Pacific Ocean E dur­ ing the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere (TOGA) Coupled Ocean and Atmospheric Response of the surface­layer turbulence properties are compared with those from previous land and ocean results. Momentum

California at Irvine, University of

173

Sensitivity of Global Tropical Climate to Land Surface Processes: Mean State and Interannual Variability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to be made in a system that allows for atmosphere­ocean interactions. 1. Introduction Future projections influence on the surface energy and water budgets. The sensitivity to those processes is represented in the intensity of equatorial Pacific trades modified by convection over land. The results further demonstrate

Xue, Yongkang

174

Global crustal thickness from neural network inversion of surface wave data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Africa and the backarc of the Rocky Mountains we observe a thinner...error surface becomes almost flat. In order to achieve this...Africa, the backarc of the Rocky Mountains, west Australia and...Africa, the backarc of the Rocky Mountains and west Australia......

Ueli Meier; Andrew Curtis; Jeannot Trampert

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Organic carbon and nitrogen in the surface sediments of world oceans and seas: distribution and relationship to bottom topography  

SciTech Connect

Information dealing with the distribution of organic carbon and nitrogen in the top sediments of world oceans and seas has been gathered and evaluated. Based on the available information a master chart has been constructed which shows world distribution of sedimentary organic matter in the oceans and seas. Since organic matter exerts an influence upon the settling properties of fine inorganic particles, e.g. clay minerals and further, the interaction between organic matter and clay minerals is maximal, a relationship between the overall bottom topography and the distribution of clay minerals and organic matter should be observable on a worldwide basis. Initial analysis of the available data indicates that such a relationship does exist and its significance is discussed.

Premuzic, E.T.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Sea Level CD-ROMs Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sea Level CD-ROMs Introduction The Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere (TOGA) Sea Level Center Service for Mean Sea Level. This CD-ROM contains the holdings of the WDC as of July 1994, which consists with the greatest concentration between 5 and 30 years, although a few sites have over 70 years. CD-ROM Contents

177

1 Time evolution of observed JulySeptember sea surface 2 temperatureSahel climate teleconnection with removed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are synchronous of inphase rainfall excess over the whole Sudan 19 Sahel due to a strengthening of the convergence departure from midlevels above 10°N­18°N associated with air ascents above the Saharan 24 thermal lows, (2 the global warming effect. In this work 46we have chosen to separate thermal evolutions observed in 47the

Boyer, Edmond

178

Abundance of oceanic sea skaters, Halobates in the tropical Indian Ocean with respect to surface chlorophyll and oxygen concentrations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study aims to clarify the relationship between environmental factors and the abundance of oceanic sea skaters, Halobates mostly H. micans. Samplings were performed in the tropical Indian Ocean at 15 stations along a straight line from 04°09?S, 094°26?E to 16°39?S, 065°15?E in October–November, 2010 with a Neuston net with CTD casting. A significant positive correlation was seen between chlorophyll concentration and number of Halobates individuals (mostly H. micans) collected, while a significant negative correlation was seen between oxygen concentration and number of individuals. More food such as zooplankton available to sea skaters in high-chlorophyll and low-oxygen areas may lead to higher population densities. Neuston net samplings were also taken around a fixed station, 8°S, 80°30?E in September–October 2011. The larval density of H. micans tended to be higher in spots where the air temperature was between 27.5 °C and 28.0 °C than in spots where it was between 25 °C and 27 °C. Reproductive and growth activities of H. micans may be affected by even a relatively small variation in air temperature in the spots they inhabit even at the fixed point 8°S, 80°30E in the Indian Ocean.

Tetsuo Harada; Yuki Osumi; Takashi Shiraki; Akane Kobayashi; Takero Sekimoto; Mitsuru Nakajo; Hitomi Takeuchi; Koki Iyota

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Arctic sea ice modeling with the material-point method.  

SciTech Connect

Arctic sea ice plays an important role in global climate by reflecting solar radiation and insulating the ocean from the atmosphere. Due to feedback effects, the Arctic sea ice cover is changing rapidly. To accurately model this change, high-resolution calculations must incorporate: (1) annual cycle of growth and melt due to radiative forcing; (2) mechanical deformation due to surface winds, ocean currents and Coriolis forces; and (3) localized effects of leads and ridges. We have demonstrated a new mathematical algorithm for solving the sea ice governing equations using the material-point method with an elastic-decohesive constitutive model. An initial comparison with the LANL CICE code indicates that the ice edge is sharper using Materials-Point Method (MPM), but that many of the overall features are similar.

Peterson, Kara J.; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Subsidence, Sea Level Rise, and Seismicity in the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

butions to global sea level rise. Nature 428:406-409. Mount420. Reed DJ. 2002a. Sea-level rise and coastal marsh sus-MARCH 2005 Subsidence, Sea Level Rise, and Seismicity in the

Mount, Jeffrey; Twiss, Robert

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global sea surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Impact of dynamic feedbacks between sedimentation, sea-level rise, and biomass production on near-surface marsh stratigraphy and carbon accumulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impact of dynamic feedbacks between sedimentation, sea-level rise, and biomass production on near Keywords: salt marsh organic sediments accretion sea-level rise belowground biomass carbon storage a b model we explore how marsh stratigraphy responds to sediment supply and the rate of sea- level rise

182

An Integrated Experimental and Computational Investigation into the Dynamic Loads and Free-surface Wave-Field Perturbations Induced by Head-Sea Regular Waves on a 1/8.25 Scale-Model of the R/V ATHENA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A 1/8.25 scale-model of the U.S. Navy Research Vessel ATHENA was tested in regular head-sea waves to obtain data for validation of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) predictive tools. The experiments were performed in the David Taylor Model Basin at the Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC). With the model towed fixed in head-seas, horizontal and vertical loads on the model were obtained at two Froude numbers, $F_r=0.25$ and $F_r=0.43$. The model was run at two conditions of head-sea wavelengths corresponding to $\\lambda=2L_o$ and $\\lambda=1/2L_o$ with $H/\\lambda=0.03$, where $L_o$ is the length of the model and $H=2 a$ is the wave height. The wave field perturbations induced by the head-sea waves were quantified from free-surface images generated by a laser light sheet. Predictions of the horizontal and vertical loads on the model in regular head sea waves were made with the Numerical Flow Analysis (NFA) code. Numerical predictions of the wave-field perturbations were compared with the experimental data and th...

Ratcliffe, Toby; O'Shea, Thomas T; Fu, Thomas; Russell, Lauren; Dommermuth, Douglas G

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

PhotosbyG.Myers(TNC) Sea Turtle Biology & Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PhotosbyG.Myers(TNC) Sea Turtle Biology & Conservation in the Arnavon Marine Conservation Area ........................................................................................ i SEA TURTLE BIOLOGY & CONSERVATION.................................................................. 1 1. GLOBAL IMPORTANCE OF THE ARNAVON TURTLE POPULATIONS ............................... 1 2

Prestwich, Ken

184

Coastal flood damage and adaptation costs under 21st century sea-level rise  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coastal flood damage and adaptation costs under 21st century sea-level rise Jochen Hinkela,1st century sea-level rise are assessed on a global scale taking into account a wide range- ment and sea-level rise. Uncertainty in global mean and regional sea level was derived from four

Marzeion, Ben

185

Effects of 20002050 changes in climate and emissions on global tropospheric ozone and the policy-relevant background surface ozone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) project major changes in anthro- pogenic emissions of greenhouse gases and ozone precur- sors over the 2Effects of 2000­2050 changes in climate and emissions on global tropospheric ozone and the policy; published 27 September 2008. [1] We use a global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem) driven by a general

Mickley, Loretta J.

186

The new GFDL global atmosphere and land model AM2/LM2: Evaluation with prescribed SST simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The new GFDL global atmosphere and land model AM2/LM2: Evaluation with prescribed SST simulations climatology, and components from previous models used at GFDL. The land model, known as LM2, includes soil of the coupled model AM2/LM2 is evaluated with a series of prescribed sea-surface temperature (SST) simulations

Bretherton, Chris

187

Sea Mammals:  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Sea Mammals: Sea Mammals: Resources and Population The nanrine mammal resources nenr Amchitkn Island consist o f sea otters, harbor seals, and Steller sea 1io11s as perntnnent residents, northern fur seals that migrate througla Aleutian passes, and wholes nnd porpoises in the surrouttdiftg seas. Archaeological and historic data on nni~nnl populations indicate that the species present tlten were the same as those present today nnd dentoxstrate tlre contii~ued importawe that sea mammals haue played in tlre island's history. Sen otter observations nnd surueys made front 1935 to 1974 document the recovery of this species Carl E. Abegglen* U. S. Fish and It'ildlife Service, Division of I\'ildlife Research, Anchorage, Alaska from near extinction at the start of the twentieth century.

188

sea pipeline  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

sea pipeline, sealine, marine (pipe)line, undersea (pipe)line, submarine (pipe)line, subsea (pipe)line ? Untermeer(es)(rohr)leitung f

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

PUBLISHED ONLINE: 11 JULY 2010 | DOI: 10.1038/NGEO901 Patterns of Indian Ocean sea-level change in a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

continental ice1 . However, sea-level rise is not globally uniform1­5 . Regional sea levels can be affected Ocean sea level with climate-model simulations, to identify a distinct spatial pattern of sea-level rise on some coasts and islands in the Indian Ocean. Global mean sea-level rise since the 1950s has been

Fasullo, John

190

A review of global ocean temperature observations: Implications for ocean heat content estimates and climate change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S. A. Grodsky (2005), Sea level rise and the warming of thecontributions to sea level rise, Oceanography, 24, 112–121,acceleration in global sea-level rise, Geophys. Res. Lett. ,

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

,i . Hadley `~~OE..."~OEoe...fl...l"~,, . ,2006 ,49(5) :1271 1278 Zhou B T, Wang H J . Interannual and interdecadal variations of the Hadley Circulation and its connection with tropical sea surface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,i»� . Hadley »·`~~OE...°"~OE·oe...°­»fl...º¨¨·l"£´~,, . §­¤ ,2006 ,49(5) :1271¡« 1278 Zhou B T, Wang H J . Interannual and interdecadal variations of the Hadley Circulation and its connection with tropical sea surface temperature. Chinese J . Geophys. (in Chinese) , 2006 ,49(5) :1271¡« 1278 Hadley

192

The weathering of oil after the Deepwater?Horizon oil spill: insights from the chemical composition of the oil from the sea surface, salt marshes and sediments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The oil released during the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill may have both short-?and long-time impacts on the northern Gulf of Mexico ecosystems. An understanding of how the composition and concentration of the oil are altered by weathering, including chemical, physical and biological processes, is needed to evaluate the oil toxicity and impact on the ecosystem in the northern Gulf of Mexico. This study examined petroleum hydrocarbons in oil mousse collected from the sea surface and salt marshes, and in oil deposited in sediments adjacent to the wellhead after the DWH oil spill. Oil mousses were collected at two stations (OSS and CT, located 130 and 85?km away from the wellhead, respectively) in May 2010, and two sediment samples from stations SG and SC, within 6 km of the wellhead, in May 2011. We also collected oil mousse from salt marshes at Marsh Point (MP), Mississippi, 186?km away from the wellhead in July 2010. In these samples, n-alkanes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), alkylated PAHs, BTEX (collective name of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and p-, m-, and o-xylenes), C3-benzenes and trace metals were measured to examine how the oil was altered chemically. The chemical analysis indicates that the oil mousses underwent different degrees of weathering with the pattern of OSS?DWH oil spill, as supported by the presence of short-chained n-alkanes (C10?C 15), BTEX and C 3-benzenes. The weathering of oil in sediment may result from biological degradation and dissolution, evidenced by the preferential loss of mid-chained n-alkanes C16?C 27, lower ratios of n-C 17/Pr and n-C 18/Ph , and preferential loss of PAHs relative to alkylated PAHs.

Zhanfei Liu; Jiqing Liu; Qingzhi Zhu; Wei Wu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

ICE SHEET SOURCES OF SEA LEVEL RISE AND FRESHWATER DISCHARGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ICE SHEET SOURCES OF SEA LEVEL RISE AND FRESHWATER DISCHARGE DURING THE LAST DEGLACIATION Anders E the sources of sea level rise and freshwater dis- charge to the global oceans associated with retreat of ice­10 m sea level rise at 19.0­19.5 ka, sourced largely from Northern Hemisphere ice sheet retreat

Carlson, Anders

194

Computer modeling of the global warming effect  

SciTech Connect

The state of knowledge of global warming will be presented and two aspects examined: observational evidence and a review of the state of computer modeling of climate change due to anthropogenic increases in greenhouse gases. Observational evidence, indeed, shows global warming, but it is difficult to prove that the changes are unequivocally due to the greenhouse-gas effect. Although observational measurements of global warming are subject to ``correction,`` researchers are showing consistent patterns in their interpretation of the data. Since the 1960s, climate scientists have been making their computer models of the climate system more realistic. Models started as atmospheric models and, through the addition of oceans, surface hydrology, and sea-ice components, they then became climate-system models. Because of computer limitations and the limited understanding of the degree of interaction of the various components, present models require substantial simplification. Nevertheless, in their present state of development climate models can reproduce most of the observed large-scale features of the real system, such as wind, temperature, precipitation, ocean current, and sea-ice distribution. The use of supercomputers to advance the spatial resolution and realism of earth-system models will also be discussed.

Washington, W.M. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

195

Radioactivity levels in some sediment samples from Red Sea and Baltic Sea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Natural radioactivity in sand used in thermal therapy at the Red Sea coast. Environ...and surface sediments of the Red Sea, Sudan. Environ. Radioact. (2008) 99:1825-1828...in the Red Sea coastal Environment of Sudan. Marine Pollut. Bull. (1998b) 36......

K. Salahel Din; P. Vesterbacka

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Seasonal Tropical Cyclone Predictions Using Optimized Combinations of ENSO Regions: Application to the Coral Sea Basin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study examines combining ENSO sea surface temperature (SST) regions for seasonal prediction of Coral Sea tropical cyclone (TC) frequency. The Coral Sea averages ~4 TCs per season, but is characterized by strong interannual variability, with 1–...

Hamish A. Ramsay; Michael B. Richman; Lance M. Leslie

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Alkanes at the Air-Sea Interface from Offshore Louisiana and Florida  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...HYDROCARBONS FROM SEA-WATER, DEEP-SEA...ATMOSPHERE AND SURFACE WATER, SCIENCE 183...PRODUCTION OF CONDENSATION NUCLEI FROM BUBBLED SEA WATER, JOURNAL OF...SAMPLING DEVICE FOR RECOVERY OF PETROLEUM...not be the only atmospheric sulfate-producing...

Enoch J. Ledet; John L. Laseter

1974-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

198

Mixed Layer Lateral Eddy Fluxes Mediated by Air-Sea Interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The modulation of air–sea heat fluxes by geostrophic eddies due to the stirring of temperature at the sea surface is discussed and quantified. It is argued that the damping of eddy temperature variance by such air–sea ...

Shuckburgh, Emily

199

A Computer-Based Atlas of Global Instrumental Climate Data (DB-1003)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Computer-Based Atlas of Global Instrumental Climate Data (DB-1003) A Computer-Based Atlas of Global Instrumental Climate Data (DB-1003) DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/cli.db1003 data Data Investigators R. S. Bradley, L. G. Ahern, and F. T. Keimig Color-shaded and contoured images of global, gridded instrumental data have been produced as a computer-based atlas. Each image simultaneously depicts anomaly maps of surface temperature, sea-level pressure, 500-mbar geopotential heights, and percentages of reference-period precipitation. Monthly, seasonal, and annual composites are available in either cylindrical equidistant or northern and southern hemisphere polar projections. Temperature maps are available from 1854 to 1991, precipitation from 1851 to 1989, sea-level pressure from 1899 to 1991, and 500-mbar heights from 1946 to 1991. The source of data for the temperature

200

ERDC/CRRELTR-06-16 Propagation of Uncertainties in Sea Ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the global heat bal- ance. This capability is attributed to the unique location of sea ice at the interface in the polar region has precipitated increased efforts to measure sea ice thickness as an index for global heatERDC/CRRELTR-06-16 Propagation of Uncertainties in Sea Ice Thickness Calculations from Basin

Geiger, Cathleen

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global sea surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

ASSESSING THE UTILITY OF MODIS FOR MONITORING SNOW AND SEA ICE EXTENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

has begun. For the first time daily, global maps of snow cover and sea ice extent are being produced, global maps of snow cover and sea ice extent are being produced in a fully automated fashion from spaceASSESSING THE UTILITY OF MODIS FOR MONITORING SNOW AND SEA ICE EXTENT G. Scharfen, S. Khalsa U

Oldenburg, Carl von Ossietzky Universität

202

ARKTOS: An Intelligent System for SAR Sea Ice Image Classification Leen-Kiat Soh1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in meteorology and in global climate studies. For example, the thickness of sea ice influences the heat fluxARKTOS: An Intelligent System for SAR Sea Ice Image Classification Leen-Kiat Soh1 , Costas sea ice image analysis named ARKTOS (Advanced Reasoning using Knowledge for Typing Of Sea ice). ARKTOS

Kansas, University of

203

Spatial variability of sea level rise due to water impoundment behind dams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Click Here for Full Article Spatial variability of sea level rise due to water impoundment behind global sea level by 30.0 mm and decreasing the rate of sea level rise. The load from impounded water change on sea level rise sources, which include thermal expansion of seawater and the melting of glaciers

Conrad, Clint

204

PALeo-constraints on SEA-level rise (PALSEA) -a PAGES/IMAGES working group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PALeo-constraints on SEA-level rise (PALSEA) - a PAGES/IMAGES working group Coordinators: Mark for the reduction in ice sheets and subsequent rise in sea level over the next century are highly uncertain rise. Interglacial sea levels constrain the global sensitivity of sea-level to radiative forcing. Well

Siddall, Mark

205

ELSEVIER Marine Geology 124 (1995) 137-159 A sea-level rise curve  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ELSEVIER Marine Geology 124 (1995) 137-159 A sea-level rise curve Koren R. Nydick, Alison B. from emissions of greenhouse gases. 1. Introduction 1.1. Climate and sea-level rise Global sea level has been of peat deposits in salt marshes provide insight into the rates of relative sea-level rise (RSLR

Royer, Dana

206

Sea level budget over 20032008: A reevaluation from GRACE space gravimetry, satellite altimetry and Argo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

global mean sea level rise during the 1993­2003 decade, the remaining rate of rise being essentially that recent years sea level rise can be mostly explained by an increase of the mass of the oceans. Estimating of sea level rise over that period. We next estimate the steric sea level (i.e., ocean thermal expansion

Berthier, Etienne

207

Water Mass Transformation and Formation in the Labrador Sea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Objectively analyzed surface hydrographic fields and NCEP–NCAR reanalysis fluxes are used to estimate water mass transformation and formation rates in the Labrador Sea, focusing on Labrador Sea Water (LSW). The authors estimate a mean long-term ...

Paul G. Myers; Chris Donnelly

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Evaluating Tidal Marsh Sustainability in the Face of Sea-Level Rise: A Hybrid Modeling Approach Applied to San Francisco Bay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wetland losses due to sea-level rise: regional and global2009) The impact of sea level rise on developing countries:Coastal impacts due to sea-level rise. Annu Rev Earth Pl Sc

Kelly, Maggi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

A model of the threedimensional evolution of Arctic melt ponds on firstyear and multiyear sea ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ice. In the summer the upper layers of sea ice and snow melts producing meltwater that accumulatesA model of the threedimensional evolution of Arctic melt ponds on firstyear and multiyear sea ice F in Arctic melt ponds on the surface of sea ice. An accurate estimate of the fraction of the sea ice surface

Feltham, Daniel

210

Role of Resolved and Parameterized Eddies in the Labrador Sea Balance of Heat and Buoyancy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Deep convection in the Labrador Sea is an important component of the global ocean ventilation. The associated loss of heat to the atmosphere from the interior of the sea is thought to be mostly supplied by mesoscale eddies, generated either ...

Oleg A. Saenko; Frédéric Dupont; Duo Yang; Paul G. Myers; Igor Yashayaev; Gregory C. Smith

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Sea-Level and Climate Change: Should I Sell My Shore House? Kenneth G. Miller,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sea-level rise and land subsidence (sinking). We conclude the following: - The rate of global sea-level. - Global sea-level is predicted to rise by >80 cm (2.6 ft) by 2100 due to thermal expansion of seawater and melting of ice sheets. - Sea-level rise on the U.S. East Coast will exceed 1 m (~3 ft) by 2100 due

212

AN INTEGRATED GLOBAL OBSERVING SYSTEM FOR SEA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) transition of the research results into sustained operations; and 3) management ap- plications in the U, and effective data integration and dissemination. Efficient management of sustained observing sys- tem, and the management and strategic planning applications at CPO. The final discussion contains some concluding remarks

213

Evaluation of cloud fraction and its radiative effect simulated by IPCC AR4 global models against ARM surface observations  

SciTech Connect

Cloud Fraction (CF) is the dominant modulator of radiative fluxes. In this study, we evaluate CF simulations in the IPCC AR4 GCMs against ARM ground measurements, with a focus on the vertical structure, total amount of cloud and its effect on cloud shortwave transmissivity, for both inter-model deviation and model-measurement discrepancy. Our intercomparisons of three CF or sky-cover related dataset reveal that the relative differences are usually less than 10% (5%) for multi-year monthly (annual) mean values, while daily differences are quite significant. The results also show that the model-observation and the inter-model deviations have a similar magnitude for the total CF (TCF) and the normalized cloud effect, and they are twice as large as the surface downward solar radiation and cloud transmissivity. This implies that the other cloud properties, such as cloud optical depth and height, have a similar magnitude of disparity to TCF among the GCMs, and suggests that a better agreement among the GCMs in solar radiative fluxes could be the result of compensating errors in either cloud vertical structure, cloud optical depth or cloud fraction. Similar deviation pattern between inter-model and model-measurement suggests that the climate models tend to generate larger bias against observations for those variables with larger inter-model deviation. The simulated TCF from IPCC AR4 GCMs are very scattered through all seasons over three ARM sites: Southern Great Plains (SGP), Manus, Papua New Guinea and North Slope of Alaska (NSA). The GCMs perform better at SGP than at Manus and NSA in simulating the seasonal variation and probability distribution of TCF; however, the TCF in these models is remarkably underpredicted and cloud transmissivity is less susceptible to the change of TCF than the observed at SGP. Much larger inter-model deviation and model bias are found over NSA than the other sites in estimating the TCF, cloud transmissivity and cloud-radiation interaction, suggesting that the Arctic region continues to challenge cloud simulations in climate models. Most of the GCMs tend to underpredict CF and fail to capture the seasonal variation of CF at middle and low levels in the tropics. The high altitude CF is much larger in the GCMs than the observation and the inter-model variability of CF also reaches maximum at high levels in the tropics. Most of the GCMs tend to underpredict CF by 50-150% relative to the measurement average at low and middle levels over SGP. While the GCMs generally capture the maximum CF in the boundary layer and vertical variability, the inter-model deviation is largest near surface over the Arctic. The internal variability of CF simulated in ensemble runs with the same model is very minimal.

Qian, Yun; Long, Charles N.; Wang, Hailong; Comstock, Jennifer M.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Xie, Shaocheng

2012-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

214

sea level rise | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

sea level rise sea level rise Home Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(1992) Super contributor 18 January, 2013 - 15:46 U.S. Global Change Research Program publishes "National Climate Assessment" report for United States climate change drought OpenEI sea level rise temperatures U.S. Global Climate Change program The U.S. Global Change Research Program, established under the Department of Commerce in 2010, and partnered with NOAA, released an extensive National Climate Assessment report, projecting future climate changes in the United States under different scenarios. The 1,200 page report highlights some rather grim findings about the future of climate change. Here are 5 of the more disconcerting graphics from the report: 1. U.S. Average Temperatures Syndicate content

215

Mangroves, Mudbanks and Seawalls: Political Ecology of Adaptation to Sea Level Rise in Suriname.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study seeks to understand how global discourses of sea level rise (SLR) and mangrove ecology influence national climate change adaptation policy to reduce coastal… (more)

Nijbroek, Ravic

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

CORONAL HEATING BY SURFACE ALFVEN WAVE DAMPING: IMPLEMENTATION IN A GLOBAL MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS MODEL OF THE SOLAR WIND  

SciTech Connect

The heating and acceleration of the solar wind is an active area of research. Alfven waves, because of their ability to accelerate and heat the plasma, are a likely candidate in both processes. Many models have explored wave dissipation mechanisms which act either in closed or open magnetic field regions. In this work, we emphasize the boundary between these regions, drawing on observations which indicate unique heating is present there. We utilize a new solar corona component of the Space Weather Modeling Framework, in which Alfven wave energy transport is self-consistently coupled to the magnetohydrodynamic equations. In this solar wind model, the wave pressure gradient accelerates and wave dissipation heats the plasma. Kolmogorov-like wave dissipation as expressed by Hollweg along open magnetic field lines was presented in van der Holst et al. Here, we introduce an additional dissipation mechanism: surface Alfven wave (SAW) damping, which occurs in regions with transverse (with respect to the magnetic field) gradients in the local Alfven speed. For solar minimum conditions, we find that SAW dissipation is weak in the polar regions (where Hollweg dissipation is strong), and strong in subpolar latitudes and the boundaries of open and closed magnetic fields (where Hollweg dissipation is weak). We show that SAW damping reproduces regions of enhanced temperature at the boundaries of open and closed magnetic fields seen in tomographic reconstructions in the low corona. Also, we argue that Ulysses data in the heliosphere show enhanced temperatures at the boundaries of fast and slow solar wind, which is reproduced by SAW dissipation. Therefore, the model's temperature distribution shows best agreement with these observations when both dissipation mechanisms are considered. Lastly, we use observational constraints of shock formation in the low corona to assess the Alfven speed profile in the model. We find that, compared to a polytropic solar wind model, the wave-driven model with physical dissipation mechanisms presented in this work is more aligned with an empirical Alfven speed profile. Therefore, a wave-driven model which includes the effects of SAW damping is a better background to simulate coronal-mass-ejection-driven shocks.

Evans, R. M. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Space Weather Lab, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Opher, M. [Astronomy Department, Boston University, 675 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Oran, R.; Van der Holst, B.; Sokolov, I. V.; Frazin, R.; Gombosi, T. I. [Center for Space Environment Modeling, University of Michigan, 2455 Hayward Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Vasquez, A., E-mail: Rebekah.e.frolov@nasa.gov [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio (CONICET-UBA) and FCEN (UBA), CC 67, Suc 28, Ciudad de Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

217

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 50, NO. 9, SEPTEMBER 2012 3317 Multiyear Arctic Sea Ice Classification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, QuikSCAT, sea ice. I. INTRODUCTION THE HIGH albedo and insulating properties of sea ice make Arctic Sea Ice Classification Using QuikSCAT Aaron M. Swan and David G. Long, Fellow, IEEE Abstract--Long-term trends in Arctic sea ice are of particular interest in studies of global temperature, climate change

Long, David G.

218

High-resolution calculation of the solar global convection with the reduced speed of sound technique: II. Near surface shear layer with the rotation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a high-resolution, highly stratified numerical simulation of rotating thermal convection in a spherical shell. Our aim is to study in detail the processes that can maintain a near surface shear layer (NSSL) as inferred from helioseismology. Using the reduced speed of sound technique we can extend our global convection simulation to $0.99\\,R_{\\odot}$ and include near the top of our domain small-scale convection with short time scales that is only weakly influenced by rotation. We find the formation of a NSSL preferentially in high latitudes in the depth range $r=0.95-0.975R_\\odot$. The maintenance mechanisms are summarized as follows. Convection under weak influence of rotation leads to Reynolds stresses that transport angular momentum radially inward in all latitudes. This leads to the formation of a strong poleward directed meridional flow and a NSSL, which is balanced in the meridional plane by forces resulting from the $\\langle v'_r v'_\\theta\\rangle$ correlation of turbulent velocities. The orig...

Hotta, H; Yokoyama, T

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Reducing uncertainty in high-resolution sea ice models.  

SciTech Connect

Arctic sea ice is an important component of the global climate system, reflecting a significant amount of solar radiation, insulating the ocean from the atmosphere and influencing ocean circulation by modifying the salinity of the upper ocean. The thickness and extent of Arctic sea ice have shown a significant decline in recent decades with implications for global climate as well as regional geopolitics. Increasing interest in exploration as well as climate feedback effects make predictive mathematical modeling of sea ice a task of tremendous practical import. Satellite data obtained over the last few decades have provided a wealth of information on sea ice motion and deformation. The data clearly show that ice deformation is focused along narrow linear features and this type of deformation is not well-represented in existing models. To improve sea ice dynamics we have incorporated an anisotropic rheology into the Los Alamos National Laboratory global sea ice model, CICE. Sensitivity analyses were performed using the Design Analysis Kit for Optimization and Terascale Applications (DAKOTA) to determine the impact of material parameters on sea ice response functions. Two material strength parameters that exhibited the most significant impact on responses were further analyzed to evaluate their influence on quantitative comparisons between model output and data. The sensitivity analysis along with ten year model runs indicate that while the anisotropic rheology provides some benefit in velocity predictions, additional improvements are required to make this material model a viable alternative for global sea ice simulations.

Peterson, Kara J.; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

global | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

global global Dataset Summary Description GIS data for offshore wind speed (meters/second). Specified to Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZ).Wind resource based on NOAA blended sea winds and monthly wind speed at 30km resolution, using a 0.11 wind sheer to extrapolate 10m - 90m. Annual average >= 10 months of data, no nulls. Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords GIS global NOAA NREL offshore wind wind speed Data application/zip icon Download Shapefile (zip, 18.5 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Please cite NREL and NOAA Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global sea surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Integrating biomass, sulphate and sea-salt aerosol responses into a microphysical chemical parcel model: implications for climate studies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...John Schellnhuber Integrating biomass, sulphate and sea-salt aerosol...biomass burning. In Global biomass burning: atmospheric, climatic...particles from African savanna combustion experiments. Atmos. Res...99)00329-5 . Integrating biomass, sulphate and sea-salt aerosol...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Global Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Applications Global Security science-innovationassetsimagesicon-science.jpg Global Security National security depends on science and technology. The United States relies on...

223

California Sea Grant 1 California Sea Grant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California Sea Grant 1 California Sea Grant Strategic Plan 2010­2013 #12;2 Strategic Plan 2010­2013 The National Sea Grant College Program, U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, supported this publication under NOAA grant number NA08OAR4170669, project number C/P-1 through

Jaffe, Jules

224

SEASONAL V A R IA TIONS IN STRUCTURE AND CIRCULATION IN THE RED SEA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SEASONAL V A R IA TIONS IN STRUCTURE AND CIRCULATION IN THE RED SEA A DISSERTATION SUBMITTE D and surface circulation in the Red Sea, occur r ing along the north-south axis of the Sea and extending fr om on in the northern Red Sea is frorn the nor th-northwest throughout the year' during the winter ( fr om October

Luther, Douglas S.

225

Can a Convective Cloud Feedback Help to Eliminate Winter Sea Ice at High CO2 Concentrations?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

have remote effects on global climate as well. Accurate forecasting of winter sea ice has significantCan a Convective Cloud Feedback Help to Eliminate Winter Sea Ice at High CO2 Concentrations? DORIAN) ABSTRACT Winter sea ice dramatically cools the Arctic climate during the coldest months of the year and may

Tziperman, Eli

226

Svalbard glacier elevation changes and contribution to sea level rise Christopher Nuth,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Svalbard glacier elevation changes and contribution to sea level rise Christopher Nuth,1 Geir contribution to global sea level rise of 0.026 mm yrÃ?1 sea level equivalent. Citation: Nuth, C., G. Moholdt, J level rise, J. Geophys. Res., 115, F01008, doi:10.1029/2008JF001223. 1. Introduction [2] The most recent

Kääb, Andreas

227

Meteorologically driven trends in sea level rise Alexander S. Kolker1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Meteorologically driven trends in sea level rise Alexander S. Kolker1 and Sultan Hameed2 Received] Determining the rate of global sea level rise (GSLR) during the past century is critical to understanding a suite of coastal oceanographic processes. These findings reduce variability in regional sea level rise

Hameed, Sultan

228

Estimating the economic cost of sea-level rise Masahiro Sugiyama  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimating the economic cost of sea-level rise by Masahiro Sugiyama Bachelor of Science in Earth To improve the estimate of economic costs of future sea-level rise associated with global climate change, the thesis generalizes the sea-level rise cost function originally proposed by Fankhauser, and applies

229

Thermosteric sea level rise, 19552003 J. I. Antonov, S. Levitus, and T. P. Boyer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermosteric sea level rise, 1955­­2003 J. I. Antonov, S. Levitus, and T. P. Boyer National/year to global sea level rise. About half of this thermosteric trend is due to warming of the Atlantic Ocean), Thermosteric sea level rise, 1955­2003, Geophys. Res. Lett., 32, L12602, doi:10.1029/2005GL023112. 1

230

Mean and Variability of Air-Sea Heat Fluxes in the Indian Ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-sea heat Fluxes) Project: blended product planned activity: daily, 1º-grid, mid 1950's ­ present currently available: daily, 1º-grid, 1988-2003 #12;OAFlux (Objectively Analyzed Air-sea Heat Fluxes) For the GlobalMean and Variability of Air-Sea Heat Fluxes in the Indian Ocean Lisan Yu Woods Hole Oceanographic

Yu, Lisan

231

Impact of global dimming and brightening on global warming Martin Wild,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impact of global dimming and brightening on global warming Martin Wild,1 Atsumu Ohmura,1 and Knut February 2007. [1] Speculations on the impact of variations in surface solar radiation on global warming was responsible for the observed warming. To disentangle surface solar and greenhouse influences on global warming

Fischlin, Andreas

232

UNCERTAINTY IN THE GLOBAL FORECAST SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

We validated one year of Global Forecast System (GFS) predictions of surface meteorological variables (wind speed, air temperature, dewpoint temperature, air pressure) over the entire planet for forecasts extending from zero hours into the future (an analysis) to 36 hours. Approximately 12,000 surface stations world-wide were included in this analysis. Root-Mean-Square- Errors (RMSE) increased as the forecast period increased from zero to 36 hours, but the initial RMSE were almost as large as the 36 hour forecast RMSE for all variables. Typical RMSE were 3 C for air temperature, 2-3mb for sea-level pressure, 3.5 C for dewpoint temperature and 2.5 m/s for wind speed. Approximately 20-40% of the GFS errors can be attributed to a lack of resolution of local features. We attribute the large initial RMSE for the zero hour forecasts to the inability of the GFS to resolve local terrain features that often dominate local weather conditions, e.g., mountain- valley circulations and sea and land breezes. Since the horizontal resolution of the GFS (about 1{sup o} of latitude and longitude) prevents it from simulating these locally-driven circulations, its performance will not improve until model resolution increases by a factor of 10 or more (from about 100 km to less than 10 km). Since this will not happen in the near future, an alternative for the near term to improve surface weather analyses and predictions for specific points in space and time would be implementation of a high-resolution, limited-area mesoscale atmospheric prediction model in regions of interest.

Werth, D.; Garrett, A.

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

233

The Global Atmospheric Environment for the Next Generation  

SciTech Connect

Air quality, ecosystem exposure to nitrogen deposition, and climate change are intimately coupled problems: we assess changes in the global atmospheric environment between 2000 and 2030 using twenty-five state-of-the-art global atmospheric chemistry models and three different emissions scenarios. The first (CLE) scenario reflects implementation of current air quality legislation around the world, whilst the second (MFR) represents a more optimistic case in which all currently feasible technologies are applied to achieve maximum emission reductions. We contrast these scenarios with the more pessimistic IPCC SRES A2 scenario. Ensemble simulations for the year 2000 are consistent among models, and show a reasonable agreement with surface ozone, wet deposition and NO{sub 2} satellite observations. Large parts of the world are currently exposed to high ozone concentrations, and high depositions of nitrogen to ecosystems. By 2030, global surface ozone is calculated to increase globally by 1.5 {+-} 1.2 ppbv (CLE), and 4.3 {+-} 2.2 ppbv (A2). Only the progressive MFR scenario will reduce ozone by -2.3 {+-} 1.1 ppbv. The CLE and A2 scenarios project further increases in nitrogen critical loads, with particularly large impacts in Asia where nitrogen emissions and deposition are forecast to increase by a factor of 1.4 (CLE) to 2 (A2). Climate change may modify surface ozone by -0.8 {+-} 0.6 ppbv, with larger decreases over sea than over land. This study shows the importance of enforcing current worldwide air quality legislation, and the major benefits of going further. Non-attainment of these air quality policy objectives, such as expressed by the SRES-A2 scenario, would further degrade the global atmospheric environment.

Dentener, F; Stevenson, D; Ellingsen, K; van Joije, T; Schultz, M; Amann, M; Atherton, C; Bell, N; Bergmann, D; Bey, I; Bouwman, L; Butler, T; Cofala, J; Collins, B; Drevet, J; Doherty, R; Eickhout, B; Eskes, H; Fiore, A; Gauss, M; Hauglustaine, D; Horowitz, L; Isaksen, I A; Josse, B; Lawrence, M; Krol, M; Lamarque, J F; Montanaro, V; Muller, J F; Peuch, V H; Pitari, G; Pyle, J; Rast, S; Rodriguez, J; Sanderson, M; Savage, N H; Shindell, D; Strahan, S; Szopa, S; Sudo, K; Van Dingenen, R; Wild, O; Zeng, G

2005-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

234

A parametric study of directional sea modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

examines the effect due to wave loading described by the directional sea spectrum on the response of offshore structures. The use of directional seas in design is expected to provide a better representation of the ocean surface and associated kinematics... as compared to unidirectional theory. This in turn should provide a basis for minimizing the overdesign of offshore structures. Several of the more popular directional wave spreading functions are intro- duced. A parametric study is conducted in order...

Whatley, Christopher Paul

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

235

North Sea oil: Women not at sea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... in the North Sea Oil Industry, which claims that the recruitment of skilled personnel for offshore geological work is regulated by managerial chauvinism, and discriminates against women.

Hugh Barnes

1985-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

236

E-Print Network 3.0 - atlantic sea measured Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atlantic inflow to the Nordic Seas, and begins tsalinity of the Atlantic inflow... . The rise in sea-level in the subpolar Atlantic corresponds to the slowing of the surface...

237

Transport Properties in the Adriatic Sea as Deduced from Drifter Data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The surface transport properties in the Adriatic Sea, a semienclosed subbasin of the Mediterranean Sea, have been studied using a drifter dataset in the period December 1994–March 1996. Three main points have been addressed. First, the exchange ...

Pierpaolo Falco; Annalisa Griffa; Pierre-Marie Poulain; Enrico Zambianchi

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Examination of the Effects of Sea Salt Aerosols on Southeast Texas Ozone and Secondary Organic Aerosol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of this research is to examine sea salt aerosols and their impact on polluted environments. Sea salt aerosols act as Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) as well as providing a surface for heterogeneous reactions. Such reactions have implications for trace gases...

Benoit, Mark David

2013-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

239

SEAS Safety Program SEAS SAFETY PROGRAM 2013-2014  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SEAS Safety Program SEAS SAFETY PROGRAM 2013-2014 Program Structure and Responsibilities Dr. Anas Chalah #12;SEAS Safety Program SEAS Safety Program Structure We have developed a great model of collaboration among · EHSEM · SEAS Safety Program · SEAS Facilities which accounts for the regulatory component

240

SEAS Safety Program SEAS SAFETY PROGRAM 2012-2103  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SEAS Safety Program SEAS SAFETY PROGRAM 2012-2103 Program Structure and Responsibilities Dr. Anas Chalah #12;SEAS Safety Program SEAS Safety Program Structure We have developed a great model of collaboration among · EHSEM · SEAS Safety Program · SEAS Facilities which accounts for the regulatory component

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global sea surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

The Rising Sea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the thick of a sea level rise. After reading the evidencepredictive figure for ocean level rise by the turn of thethat a 7-foot (2 m) sea level rise by the year 2100 should

Miller, Ryder W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

What stiffens sea cucumbers?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Oceanography, La Jolla, California, examine the amazing properties of the connective tissues of the humble sea cucumber Cucumaria frondosa. ...

Henry Gee

2000-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

243

Climate Drives Sea Change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Labrador Sea to the Mid-Atlantic Bight (3–5). This freshening...outflow began to exit the Canadian Basin and enter the Labrador Sea via...Labrador Sea to the Mid-Atlantic Bight. The first pulse of low-salinity...and reached the Mid-Atlantic Bight by 1991. Several years later...

Charles H. Greene; Andrew J. Pershing

2007-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

244

ERA-40 SST and Sea Ice Concentration Data  

SciTech Connect

The lower boundary condition of sea surface temperature (SST) and sea-ice concentration (sic) is a critical forcing of the lower frequencies in multi-decadal global atmospheric reanalyses such as ERA-40. Partly in response to the ERA-40 project, new SST/sic data sets have been developed that are considerably improved over those available to the first-generation reanalyses. This paper documents the input SST/sic data sets and the processing that created the daily SST/sic specification for the ERA-40 period 1956-2001. The source data are: (1) the monthly mean HadISST data set from the UKMO Hadley Centre for 1956-1981; and (2) the weekly NCEP 2DVAR data for 1982-present. Both data sets are reanalyses of satellite and conventional SST/sic observations. The principal reason for the higher quality of these source data sets is the use of a common consensus sic and a common sic-SST relationship in the sea ice margins. The use of a common sic resulted in a very smooth transition between HadISST and NCEP 2DVAR, despite differences in data assimilation techniques and monthly versus weekly analyses. No special action was required to insure consistency at the transition unlike as was necessary for the AMIP II experiment (Fiorino, 1997). The only special processing was application of the AMIP II mid-month calculation (Taylor et al., 2000) for the interpolation of monthly mean data to daily values. This scheme insures that the monthly mean of the daily-interpolated data is nearly identical to the input monthly mean. Detailed comparisons of the SST and sic during the HadISST-NCEP transition, and other long time series, are given. We also compare the NCEP 2DVAR (circa 2000) to a newer version of the OISST (V2, circa 2001) and demonstrate that the small differences should have no impact on the ERA-40 atmosphere reanalyses.

Fiorino, M

2001-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

245

Dynamical suppression of sea level rise along the Pacific coast of North America: Indications for imminent acceleration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dynamical suppression of sea level rise along the Pacific coast of North America: Indications changes in global mean sea level (MSL) rise have important practical implications for shoreline and beach occurred after the mid1970s regime shift, can account for the suppression of regional sea level rise along

Bromirski, Peter D.

246

Biostratigraphic, chronostratigraphic, and stratigraphic sequence analysis of Lower Tertiary marine sediments of Alabama for indicators of sea-level change  

SciTech Connect

Early Eocene to late Oligocene marine sedimentary units in southwestern Alabama were sampled at closely spaced intervals to derive a precise time-stratigraphic framework and to determine the paleoecological and mineralogical responses to fluctuations in sea level. Paleontologic control consisted of planktonic, smaller and larger benthonic foraminifera, calcareous nannofossils, dinoflagellates, and megafossils. Paleomagnetic reversals were delineated in two boreholes which, when supplemented by strontium isotope dates and the biostratigraphic control, provided a robust in situ chronostratigraphy for the Gulf Coast lower Tertiary. Paleoecologic trends in regression and transgression can be clearly correlated across major regional facies changes. Using the chronostratigraphy developed here, the second-, third-, and fourth-orders of Vail's global sea-level cycles can be recognized and demonstrate the influence of sea-level change on sedimentation. Stratigraphic systems tracts (SSTs) and bounding surfaces in outcrop were determined by lithologic variations and paleoecologic trends, and additionally by gamma logs in the cores. The lower sequence boundary occurs at a contact where an older, relatively fine-grained, deep-water, fossiliferous unit was abruptly succeeded by a coarse-grained, shallow-water, poorly fossiliferous unit. The transgressive surface occurs at the base of a fining- and deepening-upwards unit that was commonly glauconitic and very fossiliferous. Transgression culminated with a pulse of planktonic microfossils in a bed having reduced clastic sedimentation; on the log the surface of maximum starvation was marked by a gamma spike.

Thompson, P.R. (ARCO Oil and Gas Co., Plano, TX (United States)); Baum, G.R. (ARCO Alaska, Inc., Anchorage (United States))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Global Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

nonpartisan organization with a mission to strengthen global security by reducing the risk of use and preventing the spread of nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons and to...

248

The spatial response function of SeaWinds backscatter measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

regions are used to produce images of the Earth's land and ice surfaces to support climate studies in a wide variety of studies, including ocean wind retrieval, sea-ice mapping and classification, iceberg are also collected over the land and ice areas of the Earth. SeaWinds measurements over these land and ice

Long, David G.

249

Trophic interactions within the Ross Sea continental shelf ecosystem  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...important as sources of iron that fuel surface phytoplankton blooms...sea ice present, cryophilic algae in the Ross Sea are an important...annual, integrated basis ice algae contribute approximately 20...The temporal dynamics of ice algae are quite different compared...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Streamline Regularization for Large Discontinuous Motion of Sea Ice , C. A. Geiger1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Streamline Regularization for Large Discontinuous Motion of Sea Ice M. Thomas1 , C. A. Geiger1 , P the sea ice on the po- lar ocean surfaces serve as thermal regulators for the planet. The variable thickness and dynamic nature of the sea ice is intimately connected with the thermal reg- ulation

Geiger, Cathleen

251

Can North Atlantic Sea Ice Anomalies Account for DansgaardOeschger Climate Signals?*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The presence of sea ice lowers surface temperature by insulating the atmosphere from the ocean heat reservoirCan North Atlantic Sea Ice Anomalies Account for Dansgaard­Oeschger Climate Signals?* CAMILLE LI 2010) ABSTRACT North Atlantic sea ice anomalies are thought to play an important role in the abrupt

Battisti, David

252

A continuum model of melt pond evolution on Arctic sea ice Daniela Flocco1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the atmosphere and ocean. In particular, sea ice affects the polar climate by insulating the ocean fromA continuum model of melt pond evolution on Arctic sea ice Daniela Flocco1 and Daniel L. Feltham1 the Northern Hemisphere summer, absorbed solar radiation melts snow and the upper surface of Arctic sea ice

Feltham, Daniel

253

North Sea platforms revamped  

SciTech Connect

Many of the early North Sea platforms are reaching their end-of-field life. Most are still equipped with their original drilling package. In a few cases the package has either been removed or decommissioned. The early installations were designed for much simpler and less demanding wells than the horizontal, extended-reach or designer wells common today. Extended-reach wells now can be drilled realistically from ageing platforms, without incurring massive capital expenditure. This can be achieved using the existing drilling package to the limit of its capabilities and supplementing where necessary with relatively minor upgrades or the use of temporary equipment. Drilling even a few more wells from existing platforms not only prolongs field life, it enables any surplus processing capacity to be made available to develop near-field potential with extended-reach drilling (ERD) or by tying back subsea satellite wells, or for processing third-party fluids. The paper describes well design, surface equipment, mud pumps, shakers and solids control equipment, drill cuttings disposal systems, derrick and hoisting system, top drive and drillstring, downhole equipment, well planning, casing wear, logistics, rig preparations, and ERD vs. subsea tie-backs.

O'Hare, J.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas (SOCAT) gridded data products  

SciTech Connect

A well documented, publicly available, global data set for surface ocean carbon dioxide (CO2) parameters has been called for by international groups for nearly two decades. The Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas (SOCAT) project was initiated by the international marine carbon science community in 2007 with the aim of providing a comprehensive, publicly available, regularly updated, global data set of marine surface CO2, which had been subject to quality control (QC). SOCAT version 1.5 was made public in September 2011 and holds 6.3 million quality controlled surface CO2 data from the global oceans and coastal seas, spanning four decades (1968 2007). The SOCAT gridded data is the second data product to come from the SOCAT project. Recognizing that some groups may have trouble working with millions of measurements, the SOCAT gridded product was generated to provide a robust regularly spaced fCO2 product with minimal spatial and temporal interpolation which should be easier to work with for many applications. Gridded SOCAT is rich with information that has not been fully explored yet, but also contains biases and limitations that the user needs to recognize and address.

Sabine, Christopher [NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory; Hankin, S. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Koyuk, H [Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean, University of Washington; Bakker, D C E [School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK; Pfeil, B [Geophysical Institute, University of Bergen; Uni Research AS, Bergen, Norway; Olsen, A [Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research, UNIFOB AS, Bergen, Norway; Metzl, N [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, LOCEAN/IPSL, Paris, France; Kozyr, Alexander [ORNL; Fassbender, A [School of Oceanography, University of Washington, Seattle, WA; Manke, A [Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; Malczyk, J [Jetz Laboratory, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Yale University; Akl, J [CSIRO Wealth from Oceans Flagship, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia; Alin, S R [Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; Bellerby, R G J [Geophysical Institute, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Borges, A [University of Liege, Chemical Oceanography Unit, Institut de Physique, Liege, Belgium; Boutin, J [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, LOCEAN/IPSL, Paris, France; Brown, P J [School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK; Cai, W-J [Department of Marine Sciences, University of Georgia; Chavez, F P [Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, Moss Landing, CA; Chen, A [Institute of Marine Geology and Chemistry, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; Cosa, C [Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; Feely, R A [Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; Gonzalez-Davila, M [Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Facultad de Ciencias del Mar, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria,; Goyet, C [Institut de Modélisation et d'Analyse en Géo-Environnement et Santé, Université de Perpignan; Hardman-Mountford, N [CSIRO, Marine and Atmospheric Research, Wembley, Western Australia, Australia; Heinze, C [Geophysical Institute, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Hoppema, M [Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven, Germany; Hunt, C W [Ocean Process Analysis Lab, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire; Hydes, D [National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, UK; Ishii, M [Japan Meteorological Agency, Meteorological Research Institute, Tsukuba, Japan; Johannessen, T [Geophysical Institute, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Key, R M [Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey; Kortzinger, A [GEOMAR, Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research, Kiel, Germany; Landschutzer, P [School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK; Lauvset, S K [Geophysical Institute, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Lefevre, N [Université Pierre et Marie Curie, LOCEAN/IPSL, Paris, France; Lenton, A [Centre for Australian Weather and Climate Research, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia; Lourantou, A [Université Pierre et Marie Curie, LOCEAN/IPSL, Paris, France; Merlivat, L [Université Pierre et Marie Curie, LOCEAN/IPSL, Paris, France; Midorikawa, T [Nagasaki Marine Observatory, Nagasaki, Japan; Mintrop, L [MARIANDA, Kiel, Germany; Miyazaki, C [Faculty of Environmental Earth Science, Hokkaido University, Hokkaido, Japan; Murata, A [Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, Yokosuka, Japan; Nakadate, A [Marine Division, Global Environment and Marine Department, Japan Meteorological Agency, Tokyo, Japan; Nakano, Y [Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, Yokosuka, Japan; Nakaoka, S [National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES), Tsukuba, Japan; Nojiri, Y [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Japan; et al.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Airborne sound propagation over sea during offshore wind farm piling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Offshore piling for wind farm construction has attracted a lot of attention in recent years due to the extremely high noise emission levels associated with such operations. While underwater noise levels were shown to be harmful for the marine biology the propagation of airborne piling noise over sea has not been studied in detail before. In this study detailed numerical calculations have been performed with the Green's Function Parabolic Equation (GFPE) method to estimate noise levels up to a distance of 10?km. Measured noise emission levels during piling of pinpiles for a jacket-foundation wind turbine were assessed and used together with combinations of the sea surface state and idealized vertical sound speed profiles (downwind sound propagation). Effective impedances were found and used to represent non-flat sea surfaces at low-wind sea states 2 3 and 4. Calculations show that scattering by a rough sea surface which decreases sound pressure levels exceeds refractive effects which increase sound pressure levels under downwind conditions. This suggests that the presence of wind even when blowing downwind to potential receivers is beneficial to increase the attenuation of piling sound over the sea. A fully flat sea surface therefore represents a worst-case scenario.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

It's Not Too Late to Change Global Warming's Course - NERSC Science News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

It's Not Too Late to It's Not Too Late to Change Global Warming's Course It's Not Too Late to Change Global Warming's Course Simulations Show That Cuts in Greenhouse Gas Emissions Would Save Arctic Ice, Reduce Sea Level Rise October 27, 2009 | Tags: Climate Research mitigation1.jpg Computer simulations show the extent that average air temperatures at Earth's surface could warm by 2080-2099 compared to 1980-1999, if (top) greenhouse gases emissions continue to climb at current rates, or if (middle) society cuts emissions by 70 percent. In the latter case, temperatures rise by less than 2°C (3.6°F) across nearly all of Earth's populated areas (the bottom panel shows warming averted). However, unchecked emissions could lead to warming of 3°C (5.4°F) or more across parts of Europe, Asia, North America, and Australia. (Image: Geophysical

257

Cost-Effective Methods for Accurate Determination of Sea Level Rise Vulnerability: A Solomon Islands Example  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For millions of people living along the coastal fringe, sea level rise is perhaps the greatest threat to livelihoods over the coming century. With the refinement and downscaling of global climate models and increasing availability of airborne-...

Simon Albert; Kirsten Abernethy; Badin Gibbes; Alistair Grinham; Nixon Tooler; Shankar Aswani

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

The Role of Oceans and Sea Ice in Abrupt Transitions between Multiple Climate States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The coupled climate dynamics underlying large, rapid, and potentially irreversible changes in ice cover are studied. A global atmosphere–ocean–sea ice general circulation model with idealized aquaplanet geometry is forced ...

Rose, Brian E. J.

259

Swell : a proposition for coastal metropolises in the age of rising seas and distributed centralization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Premised upon the certain realities of the rise of urban sprawl, globalized dynamic networks, and sea levels, this thesis seeks to question these forces and mobilize the inherent potentials that lie within their intersections. ...

Dorsey, Talia (Talia H.)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Land–Sea Thermal Contrast and Intensity of the North American Monsoon under Climate Change Conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The hypothesis that global warming during the twenty-first century will increase the land–sea thermal contrast (LSTC) and therefore the intensity of early season precipitation of the North American monsoon (NAM) is examined. To test this ...

Abraham Torres-Alavez; Tereza Cavazos; Cuauhtemoc Turrent

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global sea surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Effect of Sea Level Rise on Energy Infrastructure in Four Major Metropolitan Areas (September 2014)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability has released findings of a pilot study that explores the feasibility of assessing the impacts of sea level rise on energy infrastructure. The goal of the study was to develop a method to identify energy facilities exposed to sea level rise (SLR) through 2100 that is flexible and scalable, uses existing and robust data sources, accounts for global and local sea level changes, and can incorporate results from regional studies.

262

Recent Arctic Sea Ice Variability: Connections to the Arctic Oscillation and the ENSO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of regional and global climate through the ice albedo feed- back, insulating effect, deep water formationRecent Arctic Sea Ice Variability: Connections to the Arctic Oscillation and the ENSO Jiping Liu; accepted 20 April 2004; published 13 May 2004. [1] Trends in the satellite-derived Arctic sea ice

263

Sea level rise implications on shoreline changes: expectations from a retrospective analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sea level rise implications on shoreline changes: expectations from a retrospective analysis Gonéri de Recherche et de Formation en Calcul Scientifique (Cerfacs) Sea level rise is a major consequence level rise is up to 3 times the global mean rate (estimated as 3.5 mm per year since the early 1990s

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

264

Deep and Surface Circulation in the Northwest Indian Ocean from Argo, Surface Drifter, Satellite, and In Situ Profiling Current Observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

located in the Sea of Oman and Arabian Sea, as well as a model skill comparison of the Simple Ocean Data Assimilation (SODA) model, contributed to understanding the dynamics in this region. Spatial patterns of surface current velocity produced from...

Stryker, Sarah

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

265

The connection between Labrador Sea buoyancy loss, deep western boundary current strength, and Gulf Stream path in an ocean circulation model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the diagnostic sea ice model, and insulation of the ocean, which is less physical with the prognostic sea ice and surface water mass transformation are strongly dependent on the choice of sea ice and salinity restoring boundary condi- tions. Coupling the ocean model to a prognostic sea ice model results in much greater

Jochum, Markus

266

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 42, NO. 7, JULY 2004 1433 Automatic Detection and Validity of the Sea-Ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by insulating the ocean from the atmosphere and increasing the surface albedo. Sea-ice Manuscript received Detection and Validity of the Sea-Ice Edge: An Application of Enhanced-Resolution QuikScat/SeaWinds Data Abstract--Sea-ice edge detection is an essential task at the different national ice services to secure

Long, David G.

267

On the Interaction between Marine Boundary Layer Cellular Cloudiness and Surface Heat Fluxes  

SciTech Connect

The interaction between marine boundary layer cellular cloudiness and surface uxes of sensible and latent heat is investigated. The investigation focuses on the non-precipitating closed-cell state and the precipitating open-cell state at low geostrophic wind speed. The Advanced Research WRF model is used to conduct cloud-system-resolving simulations with interactive surface fluxes of sensible heat, latent heat, and of sea salt aerosol, and with a detailed representation of the interaction between aerosol particles and clouds. The mechanisms responsible for the temporal evolution and spatial distribution of the surface heat fluxes in the closed- and open-cell state are investigated and explained. It is found that the horizontal spatial structure of the closed-cell state determines, by entrainment of dry free tropospheric air, the spatial distribution of surface air temperature and water vapor, and, to a lesser degree, of the surface sensible and latent heat flux. The synchronized dynamics of the the open-cell state drives oscillations in surface air temperature, water vapor, and in the surface fluxes of sensible and latent heat, and of sea salt aerosol. Open-cell cloud formation, cloud optical depth and liquid water path, and cloud and rain water path are identified as good predictors of the spatial distribution of surface air temperature and sensible heat flux, but not of surface water vapor and latent heat flux. It is shown that by enhancing the surface sensible heat flux, the open-cell state creates conditions by which it is maintained. While the open-cell state under consideration is not depleted in aerosol, and is insensitive to variations in sea-salt fluxes, it also enhances the sea-salt flux relative to the closed-cell state. In aerosol-depleted conditions, this enhancement may replenish the aerosol needed for cloud formation, and hence contribute to the perpetuation of the open-cell state as well. Spatial homogenization of the surface fluxes is found to have only a small effect on cloud properties in the investigated cases. This indicates that sub-grid scale spatial variability in the surface flux of sensible and latent heat and of sea salt aerosol may not be required in large scale and global models to describe marine boundary layer cellular cloudiness.

Kazil, J.; Feingold, G.; Wang, Hailong; Yamaguchi, T.

2014-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

268

Global distribution and climate forcing of marine organic aerosol: 1. Model improvements and evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Marine organic aerosol emissions have been implemented and evaluated within the National Center of Atmospheric Research (NCAR)'s Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5) with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's 7-mode Modal Aerosol Module (MAM-7). Emissions of marine primary organic aerosols (POA), phytoplanktonproduced isoprene- and monoterpenes-derived secondary organic aerosols (SOA) and methane sulfonate (MS{sup -}) are shown to affect surface concentrations of organic aerosols in remote marine regions. Global emissions of submicron marine POA is estimated to be 7.9 and 9.4 Tg yr{sup -1}, for the Gantt et al. (2011) and Vignati et al. (2010) emission parameterizations, respectively. Marine sources of SOA and particulate MS{sup -} (containing both sulfur and carbon atoms) contribute an additional 0.2 and 5.1 Tg yr{sup -1}, respectively. Widespread areas over productive waters of the Northern Atlantic, Northern Pacific, and the Southern Ocean show marine-source submicron organic aerosol surface concentrations of 100 ngm{sup -3}, with values up to 400 ngm{sup -3} over biologically productive areas. Comparison of long-term surface observations of water insoluble organic matter (WIOM) with POA concentrations from the two emission parameterizations shows that despite revealed discrepancies (often more than a factor of 2), both Gantt et al. (2011) and Vignati et al. (2010) formulations are able to capture the magnitude of marine organic aerosol concentrations, with the Gantt et al. (2011) parameterization attaining better seasonality. Model simulations show that the mixing state of the marine POA can impact the surface number concentration of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The largest increases (up to 20 %) in CCN (at a supersaturation (S) of 0.2 %) number concentration are obtained over biologically productive ocean waters when marine organic aerosol is assumed to be externally mixed with sea-salt. Assuming marine organics are internally-mixed with sea-salt provides diverse results with increases and decreases in the concentration of CCN over different parts of the ocean. The sign of the CCN change due to the addition of marine organics to seasalt aerosol is determined by the relative significance of the increase in mean modal diameter due to addition of mass, and the decrease in particle hygroscopicity due to compositional changes in marine aerosol. Based on emerging evidence for increased CCN concentration over biologically active surface ocean areas/periods, our study suggests that treatment of sea spray in global climate models (GCMs) as an internal mixture of marine organic aerosols and sea-salt will likely lead to an underestimation in CCN number concentration.

Meskhidze, N.; Xu, J.; Gantt, Brett; Zhang, Yang; Nenes, Athanasios; Ghan, Steven J.; Liu, Xiaohong; Easter, Richard C.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

269

SEA GRANT PROGRAM SITE VISITS Sea Grant Program Webinar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SEA GRANT PROGRAM SITE VISITS Sea Grant Program Webinar May 2014 Sami J. Grimes, NSGO #12;OVERVIEW Sea Grant Evaluation Process Why Site Visits? Results from Previous Site Visit Cycle Overview of How Site Visits are Conducted Site Visit Terms Changes from the Previous Site Visit Cycle Sea Grant

270

SeaVolt Technologies formerly Sea Power Associates | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SeaVolt Technologies formerly Sea Power Associates SeaVolt Technologies formerly Sea Power Associates Jump to: navigation, search Name SeaVolt Technologies (formerly Sea Power & Associates) Place San Francisco, California Zip CA 94111 Sector Ocean Product The company's Wave Rider system, which is still in prototype stages, uses buoys and hydraulic pumps to convert the movement of ocean waves into electricity. References SeaVolt Technologies (formerly Sea Power & Associates)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. SeaVolt Technologies (formerly Sea Power & Associates) is a company located in San Francisco, California .

271

GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 24, NO.12, PAGES 1503-1506, JUNE 15, 1997 Spatial variations in the rate of sea level rise caused by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the rate of sea level rise caused by the present-day melting of glaciers and ice sheets Clinton P. Conrad. Becausemostlong duration tide gaugesarein.the northernhemisphere,if the sources of sea level rise are unbalanced between the two hemispheres,estimates of global sea level rise could be in error by 10 to 20%. Individual

Conrad, Clint

272

Global Paradox  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

From the Publisher:In the tradition of his bestselling Megatrends books, John Naisbitt explores the new wave of global economic change predicted as a result of the breaking apart of the Soviet empire--and the opportunities and challenges for nations, ...

John Naisbitt

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Making Global Illumination User Friendly  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Making Global Illumination User Friendly Making Global Illumination User Friendly Title Making Global Illumination User Friendly Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBL-37860 Year of Publication 1995 Authors Ward, Gregory J. Conference Name 6th Eurographics Workshop on Rendering Date Published 06/1995 Conference Location Dublin, Ireland Call Number LBL-37860 Abstract Global illumination researchers tend to think in terms of mesh density and sampling frequency, and their software reflects this in its user interface. Advanced rendering systems are rife with long command lines and parameters for tuning the sample densities, thresholds and other algorithm-specific variables, and the novice user is quickly lost in a sea of possibilities. This paper details a successful effort of making one such global illumination system usable by people who understand their problems, even if they do not understand the methods needed to solve them, through an assisted oracle approach. A single program is introduced to map a small set of intuitive control variables to the rendering commands and parameter settings needed to produce the desired output in a reasonable time. This new executive program then serves as the basis for a graphical user interface that is both friendly in its appearance and reliable in its performance. Finally, we conclude with some future directions for improving this interface.

274

Frequently Asked Global Change Questions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Asked Global Change Questions Asked Global Change Questions This page lists global change questions that have been received at CDIAC and the answers that were provided to a diverse audience. If you have a question relating to carbon dioxide and global change and cannot find the answer you need here, you can "Ask Us a Question", and we will be glad to try to help you. Questions Should we grow trees to remove carbon in the atmosphere? What are the present tropospheric concentrations, global warming potentials (100 year time horizon), and atmospheric lifetimes of CO2, CH4, N2O, CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113, CCl4, methyl chloroform, HCFC-22, sulphur hexafluoride, trifluoromethyl sulphur pentafluoride, perfluoroethane, and surface ozone? Where can I find information on the naming of halocarbons?

275

Orographic effects during winter cold air outbreaks over the Sea of Japan (East Sea): Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

scatterometer wind measurements, such as the wakes (vortex street) in the lee of peaks along the range. Our of the coastal topography on the surface wind field during outbreaks has not been investigated in de- tail equations, orographic effect, gap wind, rotating channel flow, Rossby adjustment, Sea of Japan, air

Scotti, Alberto

276

Electrolysis of Sea Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In implementation of the hydrogen economy, the electrolysis of sea water as the source of hydrogen has been ... . Two options exist for performance of this electrolysis. The first option is to subject the water t...

L. O. Williams

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Wind: wind speed and wind power density maps at 10m and 50m above surface  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

maps at 10m and 50m above surface maps at 10m and 50m above surface and 0.25 degree resolution for global oceans from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Raster GIS ASCII data files of wind speed and wind power density at 10 and 50 m heights. Global data of offshore wind resource as generated by NASA's QuikSCAT SeaWinds scatterometer. (Purpose): To provide information on the wind resource potential of offshore areas. Source NREL Date Released December 31st, 2005 (9 years ago) Date Updated November 01st, 2007 (7 years ago) Keywords GEF GIS NASA NREL SWERA UNEP wind Data application/zip icon Download Maps (zip, 36.3 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 2000 - 2004 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below

278

Global Health Research | 2 Global Health Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global Health Research | 2 Global Health Research Supporting researchers in low- and middle-income countries to carry out health- related research within their own countries. Gl bal Health #12;3 | Global Health Research #12;Global Health Research | 4 We are a global charitable foundation dedicated

Rambaut, Andrew

279

Global Predictions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

created every day by the lab and used by the forest service, county commissioners and others. Using computer technology and satellites, the lab currently focuses on three core spatial technologies? GIS, global positioning systems (GPS) and remote...,? said Srinivasan. The lab also uses GPS, a satellite navigation system useful for surveying property boundaries and fields. GPS uses satellites to locate and track any feature on Earth at any given time. The lab is using GPS in identifying the Corps...

Swyden, Courtney

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

The Global Historical Climatology Network: Long-Term Monthly Temperature,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Global Historical Climatology Network: Long-Term Monthly Temperature, The Global Historical Climatology Network: Long-Term Monthly Temperature, Precipitation, Sea Level Pressure, and Station Pressure Data (1992) (NDP-041) DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/cli.ndp041 data Data PDF PDF File graphics NDP-041 Temperature Stations graphics NDP-041 Precipitation Stations Please note: the latest version of the Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN) is available directly from NOAA's National Climatic Data Center. Investigators R. S. Vose, R. L. Schmoyer, P. M. Steurer, T. C. Peterson, R. Heim, T. R. Karl, and J. K. Eischeid This NDP contains monthly temperature, precipitation, sea-level pressure, and station-pressure data for thousands of meteorological stations worldwide. The database was compiled from pre-existing national, regional, and global collections of data as part of the Global Historical Climatology

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global sea surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Controls on Eurasian coastal sea ice formation, melt onset and decay from ERS scatterometry: regional contrasts and effects of river  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

first-year sea ice (FYI) are observed in the Eurasian Arctic using the C-band (5.3 GHz) European RemoteControls on Eurasian coastal sea ice formation, melt onset and decay from ERS scatterometry and Kolyma rivers. Melt onset of the sea ice surface is associated with abrupt changes in s0 40, with values

Smith, Laurence C.

282

Review: Global Climate Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

introduction to global climate change, the greenhouseReview: Global Climate Change: A Primer By Orrin H PilkeyPilkey, Keith C. Global Climate Change: a primer. Durham,

Smith, Jennifer

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Global Warming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The greenhouse effect is the process in which the absorption of infrared radiation by an atmosphere warms a planet. The effect occurs naturally to keep Earth's surface warm. However, the anthropogenic greenhouse...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Morphology and seismic stratigraphy of the Toyama deep sea fan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. C. Hilde The Toyama Deep Sea Fan, a contemporary depositional feature located in the Japan Sea, is a canyon-fed elongate fan system with pronounced lobes in both the Yamato and Japan Basins. The Toyama Fan is the eighth largest modern fan system... with a surface area greater than 108, 000 square kilometers. Deposits of this Quaternary turbidite system range in thickness from less than 150 m to more than 750 m. The meandering Toyama Deep Sea Channel extends northward from the central coast...

Shepherd, David Barton

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

285

Title: SeaWiFS Studying the Ocean from Space Lesson developed by Elizabeth Tobin*.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to better understand the ocean as a system. Students will learn about NASA's SeaWiFS Project, and how NASA in the global carbon cycle. Students will then have the opportunity to simulate how NASA scientists use ocean color intensity to identify phytoplankton abundances on a global scale. Grade levels: 8th - 12th grade

Carrington, Emily

286

U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Surface...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

global horizontal irradiance GIS data at on... (Abstract): Global Horizontal Irradiance NASA Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Release 6.0 Data Set (Jan 2008) 22-year...

287

global warming's six indias  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

global warming's six indias: An Audience Segmentation Analysis #12;Global Warming's Six Indias 1............................................................................................................................................20 2. Global Warming Beliefs and Attitudes................................................................................ 21 Knowledge about global warming varies widely by group

Haller, Gary L.

288

Global Wavenumber Spectrum with Corrections for Altimeter High Frequency Noise  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The altimetry wavenumber spectra of sea surface height (SSH) provide a unique dataset for testing of geostrophic turbulence. While SSH spectral slopes of k-11/3 and k-5 respectively are expected from theories and numerical simulations, the ...

Xiao-Hui Zhou; Dong-Ping Wang; Dake Chen

289

Coastal Sensitivity to Sea  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New IPCC Tier-1 Global Biomass Carbon Map for the Year 2000 New IPCC Tier-1 Global Biomass Carbon Map for the Year 2000 Submitted to ORNL-CDIAC by Aaron Ruesch and Holly K. Gibbs* *Corresponding author: hgibbs@stanford.edu Authors' affiliation at the time of publication: Center for Sustainability and the Global Environment (SAGE) Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies, University of Wisconsin-Madison Please cite these data as: Ruesch, Aaron, and Holly K. Gibbs. 2008. New IPCC Tier-1 Global Biomass Carbon Map For the

290

Climate Change and a Global City: An Assessment of the Metropolitan East Coast (MEC) Region.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and wastewater processing plants are located at critical low elevations. They are exposed to coastal or riverine cities in the US and the world face similar problems. Sea level rise is a global issue of increasing

291

Global Variations in Oceanic Evaporation (1958–2005): The Role of the Changing Wind Speed  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Global estimates of oceanic evaporation (Evp) from 1958 to 2005 have been recently developed by the Objectively Analyzed Air–Sea Fluxes (OAFlux) project at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI). The nearly 50-yr time series shows that ...

Lisan Yu

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

THE STATE OF SEA GRANT 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE STATE OF SEA GRANT 2010 Biennial Report to Congress by the National Sea Grant Advisory Board, November 2010 Impacts, challenges and opportunities #12;B The State of Sea Grant 2010: Impacts, Challenges ................................................................................................................................. 5 The Sea Grant Model

293

A Physically Based Framework for Modelling the Organic Fractionation of Sea Spray Aerosol from Bubble Film Langmuir Equilibria  

SciTech Connect

The presence of a large fraction of organic matter in primary sea spray aerosol (SSA) can strongly affect its cloud condensation nuclei activity and interactions with marine clouds. Global climate models require new parameterizations of the SSA composition in order to improve the representation of these processes. Existing proposals for such a parameterization use remotely-sensed chlorophyll-a concentrations as a proxy for the biogenic contribution to the aerosol. However, both observations and theoretical considerations suggest that existing relationships with chlorophyll-a, derived from observations at only a few locations, may not be representative for all ocean regions. We introduce a novel framework for parameterizing the fractionation of marine organic matter into SSA based on a competitive Langmuir adsorption equilibrium at bubble surfaces. Marine organic matter is partitioned into classes with differing molecular weights, surface excesses, and Langmuir adsorption parameters. The classes include a lipid-like mixture associated with labile dissolved organic carbon (DOC), a polysaccharide-like mixture associated primarily with semi-labile DOC, a protein-like mixture with concentrations intermediate between lipids and polysaccharides, a processed mixture associated with recalcitrant surface DOC, and a deep abyssal humic-like mixture. Box model calculations have been performed for several cases of organic adsorption to illustrate the underlying concepts. We then apply the framework to output from a global marine biogeochemistry model, by partitioning total dissolved organic carbon into several classes of macromolecule. Each class is represented by model compounds with physical and chemical properties based on existing laboratory data. This allows us to globally map the predicted organic mass fraction of the nascent submicron sea spray aerosol. Predicted relationships between chlorophyll-\\textit{a} and organic fraction are similar to existing empirical parameterizations, but can vary between biologically productive and non-productive regions, and seasonally within a given region. Major uncertainties include the bubble film thickness at bursting and the variability of organic surfactant activity in the ocean, which is poorly constrained. In addition, marine colloids and cooperative adsorption of polysaccharides may make important contributions to the aerosol, but are not included here. This organic fractionation framework is an initial step towards a closer linking of ocean biogeochemistry and aerosol chemical composition in Earth system models. Future work should focus on improving constraints on model parameters through new laboratory experiments or through empirical fitting to observed relationships in the real ocean and atmosphere, as well as on atmospheric implications of the variable composition of organic matter in sea spray.

Burrows, Susannah M.; Ogunro, O.; Frossard, Amanda; Russell, Lynn M.; Rasch, Philip J.; Elliott, S.

2014-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

294

Sea Level Rise Media Release  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sea Level Rise Media Release Coverage Report 07/06/2009 Melting Ice Could Lead to Massive Waves 06/11/2009 Rising sea levels could see U.S. Atlantic coast cities make hard choices; Where to let Baltimore Chronicle & Sentinel, The 06/08/2009 Rapid rise in sea levels on East Coast predicted Pittsburgh

Hu, Aixue

295

Changing Global Sea Levels as a Geologic Index  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...level as geologic benchmarks, was an unexpected...Even other major oil com-panies are...crucial to oil exploration. The beauty ofthe...limestone for the oil found in the Bu...eventually trapped the oil in the weathered...Armentrout of Mobil Exploration and Producing...stratigraphic test (COST) wells drilled...

RICHARD A. KERR

1980-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

296

The multimillennial sea-level commitment of global warming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...atmospheric CO 2 concentration and a standard polar amplification of 1.5...with profound impact on Europe Review of the current state of six ‘tipping...Grounding-line migration in plan-view marine ice-sheet models: Results...past interglacial periods from uranium-series dating of corals...

Anders Levermann; Peter U. Clark; Ben Marzeion; Glenn A. Milne; David Pollard; Valentina Radic; Alexander Robinson

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

The Phanerozoic Record of Global Sea-Level Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and contraction of seawater, and variations in groundwater and lake storage. Changes in ocean basin volume18O values than seawater (fig. S2) Ee.g., (8, 9)^. Oxygen isotope values provide a proxy-precipitation effects on seawater. (iii) Postdepositional alteration (dia- genesis) may overprint original d18O values

298

Red hot sea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... region of very young seafloor spreading. Some of the evidence for this view comes from geothermal studies, which is only to be expected, although it comes as a surprise to ... to draw a much better, though still far from complete, picture of Red Sea geothermal characteristics.

Peter J. Smith

1977-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

299

New Pilot Study on Sea Level Rise Offers Approach That Can Help Communities Assess Possible Impact of Sea Level Rise on Energy Assets  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

As part of our commitment to improve the resilience of our electric grid in the face of extreme weather events, OE has released findings of a pilot study that explores the feasibility of assessing the impacts of sea level rise on energy infrastructure. The goal of our study was to develop a method to identify energy facilities exposed to sea level rise (SLR) through 2100 that is flexible and scalable, uses existing and robust data sources, accounts for global and local sea level changes, and can incorporate results from regional studies.

300

Development, sensitivity analysis, and uncertainty quantification of high-fidelity arctic sea ice models.  

SciTech Connect

Arctic sea ice is an important component of the global climate system and due to feedback effects the Arctic ice cover is changing rapidly. Predictive mathematical models are of paramount importance for accurate estimates of the future ice trajectory. However, the sea ice components of Global Climate Models (GCMs) vary significantly in their prediction of the future state of Arctic sea ice and have generally underestimated the rate of decline in minimum sea ice extent seen over the past thirty years. One of the contributing factors to this variability is the sensitivity of the sea ice to model physical parameters. A new sea ice model that has the potential to improve sea ice predictions incorporates an anisotropic elastic-decohesive rheology and dynamics solved using the material-point method (MPM), which combines Lagrangian particles for advection with a background grid for gradient computations. We evaluate the variability of the Los Alamos National Laboratory CICE code and the MPM sea ice code for a single year simulation of the Arctic basin using consistent ocean and atmospheric forcing. Sensitivities of ice volume, ice area, ice extent, root mean square (RMS) ice speed, central Arctic ice thickness, and central Arctic ice speed with respect to ten different dynamic and thermodynamic parameters are evaluated both individually and in combination using the Design Analysis Kit for Optimization and Terascale Applications (DAKOTA). We find similar responses for the two codes and some interesting seasonal variability in the strength of the parameters on the solution.

Peterson, Kara J.; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston; Paskaleva, Biliana S.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global sea surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Adapting to Rising Sea Level: A Florida Perspective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Global climate change and concomitant rising sea level will have a profound impact on Florida’s coastal and marine systems. Sea?level rise will increase erosion of beaches cause saltwater intrusion into water supplies inundate coastal marshes and other important habitats and make coastal property more vulnerable to erosion and flooding. Yet most coastal areas are currently managed under the premise that sea?level rise is not significant and the shorelines are static or can be fixed in place by engineering structures. The new reality of sea?level rise and extreme weather due to climate change requires a new style of planning and management to protect resources and reduce risk to humans. Scientists must: (1) assess existing coastal vulnerability to address short term management issues and (2) model future landscape change and develop sustainable plans to address long term planning and management issues. Furthermore this information must be effectively transferred to planners managers and elected officials to ensure their decisions are based upon the best available information. While there is still some uncertainty regarding the details of rising sea level and climate change development decisions are being made today which commit public and private investment in real estate and associated infrastructure. With a design life of 30 yrs to 75 yrs or more many of these investments are on a collision course with rising sea level and the resulting impacts will be significant. In the near term the utilization of engineering structures may be required but these are not sustainable and must ultimately yield to “managed withdrawal” programs if higher sea?level elevations or rates of rise are forthcoming. As an initial step towards successful adaptation coastal management and planning documents (i.e. comprehensive plans) must be revised to include reference to climate change and rising sea?level.

Randall W. Parkinson

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

MHK Technologies/SeaWEED | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SeaWEED SeaWEED < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage SeaWEED.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Grey Island Energy Inc Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5 6 System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description The Sea Wave Energy Extraction Device is designed to maximize power production while maintaining a high degree of survivability in some of the world s harshest environments The device is designed to harness power generated by ocean surface waves by adjusting to varying wave conditions and utilizing a hydraulic takeoff system to transmit mechanical power Technology Dimensions Device Testing Scale Test *In water tests of the system were successfully completed in the tow tank of NRC Institute for Ocean Technology

303

MODIS Collection 5 global land cover: Algorithm refinements and characterization of new datasets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

information is required to parameterize land surface processes in regional-to-global scale Earth system models

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

304

QUESTIONS ABOUT GLOBAL WARMING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

QUESTIONS ABOUT GLOBAL WARMING ¥IS IT REAL? ¥IS IT IMPORTANT? ¥WHAT IS IT DUE TO? ¥HOW MUCH MORE in the atmosphere, giving Earth its temperate climate. Global Atmosphere, Global Warming GLOBAL TEMPERATURE TREND�t a cure for global warming! Aerosols only last a short while in the atmosphere, they would have

305

Coupled variability and air-sea interaction in the South Atlantic Andreas Sterl, Wilco Hazeleger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Tanimoto (1998) describe a pan-Atlantic SST pattern reaching from South Africa to Greenland. Most studiesCoupled variability and air-sea interaction in the South Atlantic Ocean Andreas Sterl, Wilco mechanisms involved in forcing and damping of Sea Surface Temperature (SST) variability in the South Atlantic

Haak, Hein

306

Wind- versus Eddy-Forced Regional Sea Level Trends and Variability in the North Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Regional sea level trend and variability in the Pacific Ocean have often been considered to be induced by low-frequency surface wind changes. In this study, we demonstrate that significant sea level trend and variability can also be generated by ...

Bo Qiu; Shuiming Chen; Lixin Wu; Shinichiro Kida

307

Global Cool Cities Alliance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Global Cool Cities Alliance Global Cool Cities Alliance Global Cool Cities Alliance The Department of Energy (DOE) is currently supporting the Global Cool Cities Alliance (GCCA), a non-profit organization that works with cities, regions, and national governments to speed the worldwide installation of cool roofs, pavements, and other surfaces. GCCA is dedicated to advancing policies and actions that increase the solar reflectance of our buildings and pavements as a cost-effective way to promote cool buildings, cool cities, and to mitigate the effects of climate change through global cooling. The alliance was launched in June of 2011. Cool reflective surfaces are an important near-term strategy for improving city sustainability by delivering significant benefits such as increased building efficiency and comfort, improved urban health, and heat

308

Geoengineering: Plan B Remedy for Global Warming Andrew A. Lacis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geoengineering: Plan B Remedy for Global Warming Geoengineering: Plan B Remedy for Global Warming Andrew A. Lacis NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies Accelerated melting of Greenland ice is a clear indication that consequences of global warming are real and impending. The underlying causes of global warming are well enough understood, but the necessary reduction of greenhouse gases to prevent irreversible climate change is unlikely to happen before the point of no return is reached. To reverse the impending sea level rise, geoengineering counter- measures may be required to counter the current global energy imbalance due to global warming. Of the many proposed remedies, deploying aerosols within the stratosphere offers realistic prospects. Sulfur injections in the lower stratosphere would have the cooling effect of naturally occurring volcanic aerosols. Soot at

309

Exploring the undulating plateau: the future of global oil supply  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...4% quoted by the UK Energy Research Centre in 2008...North Sea and the Gulf of Mexico. Better subsurface seismic...slowly out of the global energy equation. In a short...alternative sources of energy, for example solar power. Over the past...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Ising model for melt ponds on Arctic sea ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The albedo of melting Arctic sea ice, a key parameter in climate modeling, is determined by pools of water on the ice surface. Recent observations show an onset of pond complexity at a critical area of about 100 square meters, attended by a transition in pond fractal dimension. To explain this behavior and provide a statistical physics approach to sea ice modeling, we introduce a two dimensional Ising model for pond evolution which incorporates ice-albedo feedback and the underlying thermodynamics. The binary magnetic spin variables in the Ising model correspond to the presence of melt water or ice on the sea ice surface. The model exhibits a second-order phase transition from isolated to clustered melt ponds, with the evolution of pond complexity in the clustered phase consistent with the observations.

Ma, Y -P; Golden, K M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Building | GE Global Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scientists at GE Global Research get into the holiday spirit by bringing high-tech additive manufacturing techniques to Christmas... Read More Global Research and GE...

312

Timeline | GE Global Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Research Over Time From our earliest days, we've been changing the landscape in commercial science and technology. Explore our inventions' evolution. Home > Global Research...

313

"Half Seas Over": The Impact of Sea Level Rise on International Law and Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

other ramifications of sea level rise. As the overview ofintro. 1960). SEA LEVEL RISE beneath the sea, immersedZONE ACTIVmES AND SEA LEVEL RISE I (Envi- ronment and Policy

Menefee, Samuel Pyeatt

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Generated using version 3.0 of the official AMS LATEX template Can North Atlantic sea ice anomalies account for Dansgaard-Oeschger climate signals?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of sea ice lowers surface temperature by insulating the atmosphere from the ocean heat reservoirGenerated using version 3.0 of the official AMS LATEX template Can North Atlantic sea ice anomalies. 1 #12;ABSTRACT North Atlantic sea ice anomalies are thought to play an important role in the abrupt

Battisti, David

315

Aliens among us SEA-MONKEYS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aliens among us SEA-MONKEYS® FUN FACTS Did you know? Sea-Monkeys® · breathe through their legs, so adults have three. W hat is the connection between Sea-Monkeys® and aliens? Be- lieve it or not NASA scientists think it is possible that some alien life might resemble Sea-Monkeys®. Sea

Maxwell, Bruce D.

316

Unpolarized emissivity of thin oil films over anisotropic Gaussian seas in infrared window regions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we derive the unpolarized infrared (IR) emissivity of thin oil films over anisotropic Gaussian seas from a refined physical surface spectrum model of damping due to...

Pinel, Nicolas; Bourlier, Christophe; Sergievskaya, Irina

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Roles of Indian and Pacific Ocean air–sea coupling in tropical atmospheric variability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sea surface temperature (SST) variations include negative feedbacks from the atmosphere, whereas SST anomalies are specified in stand-alone atmospheric general circulation simulations. Is the SST forced response ...

Renguang Wu; Ben P. Kirtman

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Possible change in distribution of seaweed, Sargassum horneri, in northeast Asia under A2 scenario of global warming and consequent effect on some fish  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Global warming effects on seaweed beds are already perceptible. Their geographical distributions greatly depend on water temperatures. To predict future geographical distributions of brown alga, Sargassum horneri, forming large beds in the northwestern Pacific, we referred to future monthly surface water temperatures at about 1.1° of longitude and 0.6° of latitude in February and August in 2050 and 2100 simulated by 12 organizations under an A2 scenario of global warming. The southern limit of S. horneri distribution is expected to keep moving northward such that it may broadly disappear from Honshu Island, the Chinese coast, and Korean Peninsula in 2100, when tropical Sargassum species such as Sargassum tenuifolium may not completely replace S. horneri. Thus, their forests in 2100 do not substitute those of S. horneri in 2000. Fishes using the beds and seaweed rafts consisting of S. horneri in East China Sea suffer these disappearances.

Teruhisa Komatsu; Masahiro Fukuda; Atsuko Mikami; Shizuha Mizuno; Attachai Kantachumpoo; Hideaki Tanoue; Michio Kawamiya

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Interactive Display of Isosurfaces with Global Illumination  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In many applications, volumetric data sets are examined by displaying isosurfaces, surfaces where the data, or some function of the data, takes on a given value. Interactive applications typically use local lighting models to render such surfaces. This ... Keywords: Path tracing, isosurface, visualization, rendering, global illumination, precomputed radiance transfer.

Chris Wyman; Steven Parker; Peter Shirley; Charles Hansen

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Chapter 4 The use of satellite surface wind data to improve weather analysis and forecasting at the NASA Data Assimilation Office  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

One important application of satellite surface wind observations is to improve the accuracy of weather analyses and forecasts. The first satellite to measure surface wind over the ocean was SeaSat in 1978. The initial impact of satellite surface wind data on weather analysis and forecasting was very small, but extensive research has been conducted since SeaSat to improve data accuracy and utilization of these data in atmospheric models. Satellite surface wind data are now used to detect intense storms over the ocean as well as to improve the overall representation of the wind field in numerical weather prediction models. Satellite wind data contribute to improved warnings for ships at sea and to more accurate global weather forecasts. Experiments with the Goddard Earth Observing System atmospheric general circulation model and data assimilation system indicate that the impact of satellite wind data measured by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Scatterometer was approximately twice as large as the impact of Special Sensor Microwave Imager or European Remote-sensing Satellite wind data. Locations of cyclones over the ocean were up to 500 km more accurate, and the useful forecast skill in the Southern Hemisphere extratropics was extended by 24 hours.

R. Atlas; R.N. Hoffman

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global sea surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

The Science and Ethics of Global warming Global warming has become one of the central political and scientific issues of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Science and Ethics of Global warming Global warming has become one of the central political of the considerations that might govern our response to global warming, including a discussion of some new developments of the atmosphere is to reduce the efficiency with which the earth's surface radiates away the energy it absorbs

Kirk-Davidoff, Daniel

322

Dorsal and ventral target strength measurements on gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) in sea cages  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The aim of this study is to establish a relationship between target strength (TS) and total body length of the gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata), in order to monitor its growth in sea cages. Five classes of commercial size gilthead sea bream are characterized, comprising lengths from 20 to 25 cm, corresponding to weights between 160 and 270 g. A few specimens were introduced into a sea cage of 3 m in diameter and a height of 2.7 m. We measure TS directly using a Simrad EK60 echosounder with a 7^{\\circ} split-beam transducer working at 200 kHz. The transducer was located in the center of the cage during measurements, at the bottom facing upwards for ventral recordings and on the surface facing downwards to perform dorsal recordings. Two analyses based on single echo detection were performed: the first one obtains compensated transducer directivity TS values from intensity and angular echosounder data; while the second one omit phase information, affording uncompensated TS values (TSu). Two algorithms have bee...

Soliveres, Ester; Espinosa, Victor

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Internal-tide spectroscopy and prediction in the Timor Sea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Spectral analyses of two 3.5-year mooring records from the Timor Sea quantified the coherence of mode-0 (surface) and mode-1 (internal) tides with the astronomical tidal potential. The noncoherent tides had well-defined variance and were most ...

Samuel M. Kelly; Nicole L. Jones; Gregory N. Ivey; Ryan J. Lowe

324

Building Sea Grant The Role of the National Sea Grant Office  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building Sea Grant The Role of the National Sea Grant Office Prepared by The National Sea Grant Office Review Committee of the National Sea Grant Review Panel June 2002 #12;2 Letter from the National Sea Grant Review Panel May 20,2002 The report of the National Sea Grant Review Panel's committee

325

Nonlinear wave loads on a three-column TLP in real seas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of offshore structures. In extreme storm sea conditions waves are significantly non- Gaussian and create remarkable nonlinear excitation loads, especially for the surface- piercing-column support of shuctures such as semi-submersibles, tension leg platforms... of offshore structures. In extreme storm sea conditions waves are significantly non- Gaussian and create remarkable nonlinear excitation loads, especially for the surface- piercing-column support of shuctures such as semi-submersibles, tension leg platforms...

Wang, Zhongmin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

326

Global Health Seminar Series  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bay Area Global Health Seminar Series Moving beyond millennium targets in global health: The challenges of investing in health and universal health coverage Although targets can help to focus global health efforts, they can also detract attention from deeper underlying challenges in global health

Klein, Ophir

327

Continental margin architecture : sea level and climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. , 2006. Rapid sea-level rise and Holocene climate in theJ. , 2006. Rapid sea-level rise and Holocene climate in theJ. , 2006. Rapid sea-level rise and Holocene climate in the

Hill, Jenna Catherine

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

CHARACTERIZING UNCERTAIN SEA LEVEL RISE PROJECTIONS TO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHARACTERIZING UNCERTAIN SEA LEVEL RISE PROJECTIONS TO SUPPORT INVESTMENT DECISIONS Many institutions worldwide are considering how to include expectations about future sea level rise sea level rise in its investment plans? Such extreme events--for instance, increased storm frequency

329

Improved Global Bathymetry, Global Sea Floor Roughness, and Deep Ocean Mixing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

substantial kinetic energy in the M2 tide and a rough seaenergy of M2 tide .75integrated kinetic energy of the M 2 tide (J/m 2 ) Figure 4-

Becker, Joseph J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Improved global bathymetry, global sea floor roughness, and deep ocean mixing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

substantial kinetic energy in the M2 tide and a rough seaenergy of M2 tide .75integrated kinetic energy of the M 2 tide (J/m 2 ) Figure 4-

Becker, Joseph Jeffrey

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Improved global bathymetry, global sea floor roughness, and deep ocean mixing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ocean and the increased mixing over rough topography by proposing that tidal dissipation was a power

Becker, Joseph Jeffrey

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Improved Global Bathymetry, Global Sea Floor Roughness, and Deep Ocean Mixing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ocean and the increased mixing over rough topography by proposing that tidal dissipation was a power

Becker, Joseph J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Probability of sea level rise  

SciTech Connect

The report develops probability-based projections that can be added to local tide-gage trends to estimate future sea level at particular locations. It uses the same models employed by previous assessments of sea level rise. The key coefficients in those models are based on subjective probability distributions supplied by a cross-section of climatologists, oceanographers, and glaciologists.

Titus, J.G.; Narayanan, V.K.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

ARM - Lesson Plans: Estimating Local Sea Level  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lesson Plans Lesson Plans: Estimating Local Sea Level Objective The objective is to train students' skills in observing the local environment based upon the sea level...

335

sea level | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

sea level sea level Dataset Summary Description This dataset, made available by the UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC), shows sea level rise for the period as early as 1834 through 2008 for the following UK sites: Aberdeen, Liverpool, Newlyn, North Shields, and Sheerness. Data is from the Proudman Oceanographic Laboratory. Earliest year of available data varies by site, beginning between 1834 and 1916. Source UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) Date Released March 12th, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords climate change sea level UK Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon 1 Excel file: Sea level rise (UK) (xls, 280.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment (Does not have "National Statistics" status)

336

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 38, NO. 4, JULY 2000 1843 An Iterative Approach to Multisensor Sea Ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 38, NO. 4, JULY 2000 1843 An Iterative play a critical role in the global climate, the remote sensing community has had a keen interest in the variability of polar sea ice characteris- tics. Sea ice influences heat transfer between the warmer ocean

Long, David G.

337

R&D for technology to solve global warming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Global warming is a problem in which the combustion of coal, oil, and other fossil fuels causes the atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases, such as carbon dioxide (CO2), to increase. This results in mounting global air temperatures that lead to climatic change. Specifically, global warming will cause a rise in sea levels, changes in the rain-fall patterns, and other problems. In order to secure the route to solutions for global warming that requires new responses in ways that are compatible with economic growth, it is essential to achieve breakthroughs with innovative technologies. In addition to energ-related R&D, also important are R&D for CO2 absorption and fixation for fundamental solution to global warming. Japan has started the development of innovative environmental technologies, such as technologies for CO2 fixation and utilization.

K. Honjo

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

DOE/SEA-04  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM 10 ). As a result of the study, on August 19, 2005, the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (VDEQ) issued a letter to Mirant requesting that Mirant "undertake such action as is necessary to ensure protection of human health and the environment, in the area surrounding the Potomac River Generating Station, including the potential reduction of levels of operation, or potential shutdown of the facility." On August 24, 2005, in response to VDEQ's August 19, 2005, letter, Mirant decided to shut down all five generating units at the Plant. Figure S-1. The location of the Plant in relation to the central Washington, D.C. area. DOE/SEA-04 November 2006 S-3 DOE Action On August 24, 2005, the District of Columbia Public Service Commission (DCPSC) filed an

339

DOE/SEA-04  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

μm in aerodynamic μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM 10 ). As a result of the study, on August 19, 2005, the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (VDEQ) issued a letter to Mirant requesting that Mirant "undertake such action as is necessary to ensure protection of human health and the environment, in the area surrounding the Potomac River Generating Station, including the potential reduction of levels of operation, or potential shutdown of the facility." On August 24, 2005, in response to VDEQ's August 19, 2005, letter, Mirant decided to shut down all five generating units at the Plant. Figure S-1. The location of the Plant in relation to the central Washington, D.C. area. DOE/SEA-04 November 2006 S-3 DOE Action On August 24, 2005, the District of Columbia Public Service Commission (DCPSC) filed an

340

Toward resolution-independent dust emissions in global models: Impacts on the seasonal and spatial distribution of dust  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simulating the emission of mineral dust and sea-salt aerosol is nonlinear with surface winds and therefore requires accurate representation of surface winds. Consequently, the resolution of a simulation affects emission ...

Pierce, J. R.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global sea surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Chapter Three - The Study of Deep-Sea Cephalopods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract “Deep-sea” cephalopods are here defined as cephalopods that spend a significant part of their life cycles outside the euphotic zone. In this chapter, the state of knowledge in several aspects of deep-sea cephalopod research are summarized, including information sources for these animals, diversity and general biogeography and life cycles, including reproduction. Recommendations are made for addressing some of the remaining knowledge deficiencies using a variety of traditional and more recently developed methods. The types of oceanic gear that are suitable for collecting cephalopod specimens and images are reviewed. Many groups of deep-sea cephalopods require taxonomic reviews, ideally based on both morphological and molecular characters. Museum collections play a vital role in these revisions, and novel (molecular) techniques may facilitate new use of old museum specimens. Fundamental life-cycle parameters remain unknown for many species; techniques developed for neritic species that could potentially be applied to deep-sea cephalopods are discussed. Reproductive tactics and strategies in deep-sea cephalopods are very diverse and call for comparative evolutionary and experimental studies, but even in the twenty-first century, mature individuals are still unknown for many species. New insights into diet and trophic position have begun to reveal a more diverse range of feeding strategies than the typically voracious predatory lifestyle known for many cephalopods. Regular standardized deep-sea cephalopod surveys are necessary to provide insight into temporal changes in oceanic cephalopod populations and to forecast, verify and monitor the impacts of global marine changes and human impacts on these populations.

Henk-Jan T. Hoving; Jose Angel A. Perez; Kathrin S.R. Bolstad; Heather E. Braid; Aaron B. Evans; Dirk Fuchs; Heather Judkins; Jesse T. Kelly; José E.A.R. Marian; Ryuta Nakajima; Uwe Piatkowski; Amanda Reid; Michael Vecchione; José C.C. Xavier

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Advertising, economic development, and global warming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Advertising is tied to global warming through an endogenous growth model. The model allows for the possibility that the environment can become a source rather than a sink for greenhouse gases. Optimal control analysis of the model shows that a feasible steady state is possible for which the environment remains a sink, and identifies a sufficient condition for such to be the case. Comparative-static analysis shows that, for sufficiently small values of steady-state anthropogenic greenhouse gas concentration, global surface temperature and advertising in steady state are negative functions of parameters that measure the damaging effects of global warming.

Gary M. Erickson

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Chapter Thirty-Six - The Implications of Global Warming and Climate Change on Waterborne Diseases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The distribution of pathogens and the incidence of waterborne disease outbreaks are closely linked to environmental and climatic conditions. Global climate change will affect the hydrological cycle in many different ways that will influence waterborne pathogen survival, infectivity and distribution. These changes include frequency and intensity of heavy rainfall events leading to higher surface runoff and flooding, droughts, increased temperatures and sea level rise. Indirectly, this will impact on the effectiveness of traditional infrastructural and the barrier approach to pathogen control on which water industry has evolved and now relies. Climate change will also result in an alteration in the behaviour of populations and test their ability to cope with changes in risk from infection and possible failures in the barriers that protect them from pathogens. The effect of climate change on the risk from waterborne diseases will differ between tropical and temperate areas, and developed and developing countries. Those countries with a well-developed water and wastewater treatment infrastructure will be least affected. The key to overcoming these problems is an awareness of the potential risks to pathogen distribution and infectivity caused by global warming and the implementation of an integrated approach to pathogen safety through the implementation of water security and water safety plans. The United Nations Millennium Development Goal to halve the number of people without sustainable access to safe drinking water and basic sanitation by 2015 is unlikely to be achieved. Global warming is increasing the number of people falling into this category each year, as well as making it far more difficult to achieve the vital goal. Disinfection will remain the major technique of ensuring drinking water is free from waterborne microorganisms, but it must be seen as part of a larger integrated approach to water resource protection which will become increasingly difficult as global warming continues to create uncertainties in our climate.

Nicholas F. Gray

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Paleotopography and Sea-level Controls on Facies Distribution and Stratal Architecture in the Westerville Limestone Member (Upper Pennsylvanian) NE Kansas and NW Missouri  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Packstone Facies 35 Microbial Boundstone Facies 40 Coarse-Grained Packstone Facies 44 STRATIGRAPHIC CORRELATIONS AND SEQUENCE-STRATIGRAPHIC INTERPRETATIONS 45 Stratigraphic Datum (Surface A) 58 Wea Shale 58 Surface B 63 Westerville Limestone Member 63... Interval W1 63 Surface C 70 Interval W2 73 Surface D 79 Interval W3 83 Surface E 93 Nellie Bly Formation and Quivira Shale Member 93 Relative Sea-Level Curve 94 DISCUSSION 102 Relative Sea-Level Curve 102 v Paleotopography, Relative Sea Level, and Carbonate...

Fairchild, Justin M.

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

345

Cows Causing Global Warming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Broadcast Transcript: Remember when President Reagan blamed trees for air pollution? Well now the Japanese are blaming cows for global warming. Apparently, the methane emissions from burping cows account for 5% of all global greenhouse gases. Simple...

Hacker, Randi

2008-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

346

Curing | GE Global Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

this paper-based instrument, the size of a deck of playing cards, enables... Read More Additive Manufacturing Demonstration at GE Global Research See how GE Global Research is...

347

Global Environmental Course Title  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Department Global Environmental Studies Room Course Title Frontier of Sustainability Science Instructor Akihisa MORI, Global Environmental Studies Satoshi KONISHI, Institute of Advanced consisting from a variety of academic field, including philosophy, politics, economics, energy, architecture

Takada, Shoji

348

The draft paper "Global Surface Temperature Change" by Hansen, Ruedy, Sato and Lo is available at http://data.giss.nasa.gov/gistemp/paper/gistemp2010_draft0601.pdf. This is an  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

interesting charts are collected on two PowerPoint posters available at http://www.columbia.edu/~jeh1 importance to humanity, and global warming is the first order manifestation of increasing greenhouse gases be alleviated by stressing the need to focus on the frequency and magnitude of warm and cold anomalies, which

Hansen, James E.

349

Polar Sea Ice Mapping Using SeaWinds Data Hyrum S. Anderson and David G. Long  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Bayes detection to produce sea ice extent maps. Statistical models for sea ice and ocean are represented information is incorpo- rated through the loss terms associated with Bayes risk. Sea ice extent maps producedPolar Sea Ice Mapping Using SeaWinds Data Hyrum S. Anderson and David G. Long Brigham Young

Long, David G.

350

Atmospheric Circulation and Its Effect on Arctic Sea Ice in CCSM3 Simulations at Medium and High Resolution*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Canadian archipelago, where the T85 winds produce thicker ice than their T42 counterparts. Seasonal forcingAtmospheric Circulation and Its Effect on Arctic Sea Ice in CCSM3 Simulations at Medium and High) ABSTRACT The simulation of Arctic sea ice and surface winds changes significantly when Community Climate

Bitz, Cecilia

351

Arctic sea-ice decline archived by multicentury annual-resolution record from crustose coralline algal proxy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...stratification, and deep water mass formation, among other...winter sea ice via wind-driven anomalies of sea-ice velocity, surface vertical...anomalously high due to wind-driven equatorward...are indicated on the map (Methods). Black circle...three accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS...

Jochen Halfar; Walter H. Adey; Andreas Kronz; Steffen Hetzinger; Evan Edinger; William W. Fitzhugh

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

The wave state and sea spray related parameterization of wind stress applicable from low to extreme winds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The wave state and sea spray related parameterization of wind stress applicable from low to extreme surface aerodynamic roughness applicable from low to extreme winds is proposed. The corresponding), The wave state and sea spray related parameterization of wind stress applicable from low to extreme winds

Liu, Paul

353

Doppler characteristics of sea clutter.  

SciTech Connect

Doppler radars can distinguish targets from clutter if the target's velocity along the radar line of sight is beyond that of the clutter. Some targets of interest may have a Doppler shift similar to that of clutter. The nature of sea clutter is different in the clutter and exo-clutter regions. This behavior requires special consideration regarding where a radar can expect to find sea-clutter returns in Doppler space and what detection algorithms are most appropriate to help mitigate false alarms and increase probability of detection of a target. This paper studies the existing state-of-the-art in the understanding of Doppler characteristics of sea clutter and scattering from the ocean to better understand the design and performance choices of a radar in differentiating targets from clutter under prevailing sea conditions.

Raynal, Ann Marie; Doerry, Armin Walter

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Regional Sea-Level Projection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...to inform such decisions. Earth system models used in the last Intergovermental...than twice) than do current Earth system models (fig. S1). Is this discrepancy...project future sea-level rise? Earth system models have significant uncertainties...

Josh K. Willis; John A. Church

2012-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

355

Local effects of global warming.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Currently, global warming is a focus of attention. In order to scientifically evaluate evidence about global warming, and prove the existence of global warming, this… (more)

Lu, Jun

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Sea turtle auditory behavior  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Little is known of sea turtles’ auditory behavior. Startles (neck contractions) were observed in 25 loggerheads (Caretta caretta) to tones from 35 to 1000 Hz when the turtles were near the bottom of holding tanks at a depth of 1 meter. A composite audiogram revealed lowest thresholds in the 400–500 Hz range (106 dB SPL re 1 ?m). Thresholds at 735 and 1000 Hz were 117 and 156 dB respectively. Thresholds in the 100–200 Hz range were ?124?dB with lower frequencies being 10–12 dB higher. Tank diving behavior was elicited with 30 Hz at 164 dB. ABR thresholds to vibration clicks with peak energy at 500 Hz were 113 dB. Seismic air guns (Bolt 600) were employed in a large net enclosure. Turtles increased swimming speed for exposures in the 151–161 dB levels. Avoidance ?175?dB was common in initial trials before habituation. ABRs pre? and post?air gun exposures revealed TTS of more than 15 dB in one animal with recovery in 2 weeks. Air guns in depths >10?m may result in more energy in the low frequencies with unknown bioeffects. Turtle repelling with sound is possible and can be made practical (Lenhardt US Patent No. 6388949).

Martin Lenhardt

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Global Climate Change Links  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Climate Change Links Global Climate Change Links This page provides links to web pages that we at CDIAC feel do a responsible job of presenting information and discussion pertinent to the science behind the global climate change ("global warming") debate. These sites include those on both sides of the debate; some asserting that global warming is a clear and present danger, and others that might be labeled global warming "skeptics." Some of these sites don't take a position per se; they exist to offer the public objective scientific information and results on our present understanding of the climate system. The list is not intended to be comprehensive, by any means. We hope it will be especially helpful for those who may be just beginning their research into global

358

Impact of Sea Spray on Air–Sea Fluxes. Part II: Feedback Effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents estimations for the transfer of momentum, heat, and water mass between the air and the sea. The results from Lagrangian stochastic simulations of sea spray drops (see Part I), along with two sea spray generation functions, are ...

James A. Mueller; Fabrice Veron

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

State estimation of the Labrador Sea with a coupled sea ice-ocean adjoint model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sea ice (SI) and ocean variability in marginal polar and subpolar seas are closely coupled. SI variability in the Labrador Sea is of climatic interest because of its relationship to deep convection/mode water formation, ...

Fenty, Ian Gouverneur

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Hydrographic Preconditioning for Seasonal Sea Ice Anomalies in the Labrador Sea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study investigates the hydrographic processes involved in setting the maximum wintertime sea ice (SI) extent in the Labrador Sea and Baffin Bay. The analysis is based on an ocean and sea ice state estimate covering ...

Fenty, Ian

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global sea surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Tritium concentrations of the deep sea-water in the Japan Sea and the Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tritium concentrations were determined for sea-water samples collected from the Japan Sea and the Pacific Ocean. In the Japan Sea, it was ... place. On the other hand, in the Pacific Ocean, the tritium concentrat...

T. Kajì; N. Momoshima; Y. Takashima

1988-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

362

Sensitivity of global warming to the pattern of tropical ocean warming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The current generation of climate models that couple atmospheric and oceanic general circulation models predict substantially different patterns of sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the Tropics when run in an...

Joseph J. Barsugli; Sang-Ik Shin; Prashant D. Sardeshmukh

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

High-Frequency Variability in Hurricane Power Dissipation and Its Relationship to Global Temperature  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The power dissipation of Atlantic tropical cyclones has risen dramatically during the last decades and the increase is correlated with an increase in the underlying sea surface temperature (SST) at low (decadal) frequencies. Because of the large ...

James B. Elsner; Anastasios A. Tsonis; Thomas H. Jagger

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

The Hadley and Walker Circulation Changes in Global Warming Conditions Described by Idealized Atmospheric Simulations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sea surface temperature (SST) changes constitute a major indicator and driver of climate changes induced by greenhouse gas increases. The objective of the present study is to investigate the role played by the detailed structure of the SST change ...

Guillaume Gastineau; Laurent Li; Hervé Le Treut

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Relative outcomes of climate change mitigation related to global  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Relative outcomes of climate change mitigation related to global Relative outcomes of climate change mitigation related to global temperature versus sea-level rise Submitted by mkaczmar on February 8, 2013 - 15:19 Authors: Gerald A. Meehl, Aixue Hu, Claudia Tebaldi, Julie M. Arblaster, Warren M. Washington, Haiyan Teng, Benjamin M. Sanderson, Toby Ault, Warren G. Strand & James B. White III There is a common perception that, if human societies make the significant adjustments necessary to substantively cut emissions of greenhouse gases, global temperature increases could be stabilized, and the most dangerous consequences of climate change could be avoided. Here we show results from global coupled climate model simulations with the new representative concentration pathway mitigation scenarios to 2300 to illustrate that, with

366

The Relative Importance of Clouds and Sea Ice for the Solar Energy Budget of the Southern Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effects of clouds and sea ice on the solar radiation budget are determined for the Southern Ocean around Antarctica between latitudes 50° and 80°S. Distributions of cloud optical depth are used, together with distributions of surface albedo, ...

Melanie F. Fitzpatrick; Stephen G. Warren

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Offshore Floating Wind Turbine-driven Deep Sea Water Pumping for Combined Electrical Power and District Cooling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new concept utilising floating wind turbines to exploit the low temperatures of deep sea water for space cooling in buildings is presented. The approach is based on offshore hydraulic wind turbines pumping pressurised deep sea water to a centralised plant consisting of a hydro-electric power system coupled to a large-scale sea water-cooled air conditioning (AC) unit of an urban district cooling network. In order to investigate the potential advantages of this new concept over conventional technologies, a simplified model for performance simulation of a vapour compression AC unit was applied independently to three different systems, with the AC unit operating with (1) a constant flow of sea surface water, (2) a constant flow of sea water consisting of a mixture of surface sea water and deep sea water delivered by a single offshore hydraulic wind turbine and (3) an intermittent flow of deep sea water pumped by a single offshore hydraulic wind turbine. The analysis was based on one year of wind and ambient temperature data for the Central Mediterranean that is known for its deep waters, warm climate and relatively low wind speeds. The study confirmed that while the present concept is less efficient than conventional turbines utilising grid-connected electrical generators, a significant portion of the losses associated with the hydraulic transmission through the pipeline are offset by the extraction of cool deep sea water which reduces the electricity consumption of urban air-conditioning units.

T Sant; D Buhagiar; R N Farrugia

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

A hierarchical family of global analytic Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surfaces for the H+ H2 reaction ranging in quality from double-zeta to the complete basis set limit  

SciTech Connect

A hierarchical family of analytical Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surfaces has been developed for the H+ H2 system. Ab initio calculations of near full CI quality (converged to within? 1 mEh) were performed for a set of 4067 configurations with the aug-cc-pVDZ, aug-cc-pVTZ, and aug-cc-pVQZ basis sets. The complete basis set (CBS) limit energies were obtained using a highly accurate many-body basis set extrapolation scheme. Surfaces were fitted for the estimated complete basis set (CBS) limit, as well as for the aug-cc-pVDZ, aug-cc-pVTZ, and aug-cc-pVQZ basis sets using a robust new functional form. The mean unsigned fitting error for the CBS surface is a mere 0.0023 kcal/mol, and deviations for data not included in the fitting process are of similarly small magnitudes. Highly accurate calculations of the saddle point and van der Waals minimum configurations were performed using basis sets as large as aug-mcc-pV7Z, and these data show excellent agreement with the results of the extrapolated potential surface. The remaining errors from fitting, correlation treatment, and basis set incompleteness for the new CBS-limit surface are lower by over an order of magnitude compared to any prior analytic surface, and are all now significantly smaller than non-Born-Oppenheimer effects. We expect that this new family of potential surfaces will prove useful in studies elucidating the sensitivity of dynamical quantities to the quality of the potential surface.

Mielke, Steven L. (WASHINGTON STATE UNIV); Garrett, Bruce C. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Peterson, Kirk A. (WASHINGTON STATE UNIV TC)

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

The Global Hydrological Cycle Bob Stewart  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is a heat pump, and water and vapor is the working medium. (Your air conditioner is a heat pump, and freon Association 2008 #12;What is Wrong With This Picture? Source: US Global Change Research Program: Our Changing in the atmosphere help keep heat near the surface, and because there is no convection, and no transport of heat

370

2013 Global Carbon Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2013 Global Carbon Project 2013 Global Carbon Project DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/GCP_2013_V1.1 image 2013 Budget v1.1 (November 2013) image 2013 Budget v1.3 (December 2013, contains typographical corrections to 2011 Australia emissions from v1.1 and corrections to the 2011 Australia transfer and consumption emissions from v1.2) image image image image Global Carbon Dioxide Emissions to Reach 36 Billion Tonnes in 2013 Global emissions of carbon dioxide from the combustion of fossil fuels will reach 36 billion tonnes for the year 2013. "This is a level unprecedented in human history," says CSIRO's Dr Pep Canadell, Executive-Director of the Global Carbon Project (GCP) and co-author of a new report. Global emissions due to fossil fuel alone are set to grow this year at a slightly lower pace of 2.1% than the average 3.1% since 2000, reaching 36

371

Cleantech Professional Resource Global Limited CPR Global | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Professional Resource Global Limited CPR Global Professional Resource Global Limited CPR Global Jump to: navigation, search Name Cleantech Professional Resource Global Limited (CPR Global) Place London, United Kingdom Zip EC4M 9DN Product Cleantech Professional Resource is a resource management consultancy focusing on the cleantech sector in the UK and Europe. References Cleantech Professional Resource Global Limited (CPR Global)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Cleantech Professional Resource Global Limited (CPR Global) is a company located in London, United Kingdom . References ↑ "Cleantech Professional Resource Global Limited (CPR Global)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Cleantech_Professional_Resource_Global_Limited_CPR_Global&oldid=343687

372

Powering | GE Global Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trials GE Global Research is advancing technology that will make the inspection of wind turbines faster and more reliable for customers.... Read More Brilliant(tm) Wind...

373

Subsidizing Global Solar Power.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? With national cuts on solar PV subsidies and the current “oversupply” of panels, the global solar market is clearly threatened by a contraction. Yet,… (more)

Arnesson, Daniel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Efficient Global Optimization of Expensive Black-Box Functions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In many engineering optimization problems, the number of function evaluations is severely limited by time or cost. These problems pose a special challenge to the field of global optimization, since existing methods often require more function evaluations ... Keywords: Bayesian global optimization, Kriging, Random function, Response surface, Stochastic process, Visualization

Donald R. Jones; Matthias Schonlau; William J. Welch

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Tag: Global Security | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Security Global Security Tag: Global Security Displaying 1 - 10 of 61... Category: Global Security Ultrasonic cleaner cuts costs, enhances safety The process of upgrading an old cleaning unit revealed how things were once done and the advances that have followed. More... Category: Global Security Well Logging Security Initiatives GTRI demonstrates the threat to the security of (oil) well logging systems and outlines the initiatives that are enhancing the security of these sources worldwide. More... Category: Global Security Y-12 Receives Two R&D 100 Awards Engineers at the National Nuclear Security Administration's Y-12 National Security Complex have won two R&D 100 Awards. More... Category: Global Security Y-12 researchers garner R&D 100 awards A research chemist and his revolutionary cloth invented to clean surfaces

376

Analysis of sub-surface towing of tendons and comparison of results using WINPOST and ORCAFLEX  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During tendon towing the pipe is floating in a horizontal plane parallel to the sea-surface unlike the usual vertical slender members like risers, mooring lines, etc where the pipe/cable is perpendicular to the sea-surface. This change in projection...

Mendon, Perdoor Mukthi

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

377

Ukraine's Military Role in the Black Sea Region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the territorial sea; • protection of merchant fleet, sea oil and gas industry and other state activity in the sea; • assistance to the Army in their conduct of operations (military actions) at sea directions; • participation in peacekeeping operations. 3...

Coffman, Amy Beth; Crump, James Andrew; Dickson, Robbi K.; Mueller, Meaghan; Pulis, Sarah L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Climate Feedback Analysis of the GFDL IPCC AR4 Global Warming Simulation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Both observed and modeled global warming pattern shows a large surface polar warming and a large upper atmospheric warming in the tropics. This pattern… (more)

Castet, Christelle Clemence

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

ALS Global Agroecosystems -Draft 1 Global Agroecosystems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

following class or by appointment PREREQUISITES Introduction to Soils (SWS 3022), Soils for Environmental. This course will emphasize greater understanding of this triple bottom line in agricultural production and timely global issue in agroecology and effectively communicate in video format. CLASS FORMAT Three 50

Ma, Lena

380

global horizontal irradiance | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

horizontal irradiance horizontal irradiance Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Global Horizontal IrradianceNASA Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Release 6.0 Data Set (Jan 2008)22-year Monthly & Annual Average (July 1983 - June 2005) Parameter: Insolation Incident On A Horizontal Surface (kWh/m^2/day) Internet: http://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/sse/ Note 1: SSE Methodology & Accuracy sections online Note 2: Lat/Lon values indicate the lower left corner of a 1x1 degree region. Negative values are south and west; Source U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Date Released March 31st, 2009 (5 years ago) Date Updated April 01st, 2009 (5 years ago) Keywords GHI GIS global horizontal irradiance NASA solar

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global sea surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

National Sea Grant College What Does the National Sea Grant College Program Do for the Nation?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Sea Grant College Program What Does the National Sea Grant College Program Do for the Nation? NOAA's National Sea Grant College Program enhances the practical use and conservation of coastal, marine, and Great Lakes resources to create a sustainable economy and environment. Sea Grant

382

OHIO SEA GRANT AND STONE LABORATORY OHIO SEA GRANT AND STONE LABORATORY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5/16/2014 1 OHIO SEA GRANT AND STONE LABORATORY OHIO SEA GRANT AND STONE LABORATORY Climate Change Impacts on Lake Erie and Stone Lab Efforts to Address the Problem OHIO SEA GRANT AND STONE LABORATORY (CLEAR) ·1978--Ohio Sea Grant College Program ·1992--Great Lakes Aquatic Ecosystem Research Consortium

Howat, Ian M.

383

Seasonal variation of upwelling in the Alaskan Beaufort Sea: Impact of sea ice cover  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that lateral ocean heat flux from the shelf to the basin melts a substantial amount of ice in the marginal iceSeasonal variation of upwelling in the Alaskan Beaufort Sea: Impact of sea ice cover Lena M to characterize differences in upwelling near the shelf break in the Alaskan Beaufort Sea due to varying sea ice

Pickart, Robert S.

384

Seasonal variation of upwelling in the Alaskan Beaufort Sea: Impact of sea ice cover  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ocean heat flux42 from the shelf to the basin melts a substantial amount of ice in the marginal ice Seasonal variation of upwelling in the Alaskan Beaufort Sea: Impact of sea ice cover Lena M the shelfbreak in the Alaskan Beaufort Sea due to3 varying sea-ice conditions. The record is divided into three

Pickart, Robert S.

385

Global Development Our Responsibility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of expertise cover urgent global issues such as food production, energy supply, climate change, biodiversity e ort to address urgent global issues particularly a ecting developing countries e.g. climate change of Communication, 2012 · Project Leader: Karin Nilsson · Graphic Design: Viktor Wrange & Michael Kvick Cover Photo

386

The microbial fate of carbon in high-latitude seas: Impact of the microbial loop on oceanic uptake of CO{sub 2}  

SciTech Connect

This dissertation examines pelagic microbial processes in high-latitude seas, how they affect regional and global carbon cycling, and how they might respond to hypothesized changes in climate. Critical to these interests is the effect of cold temperature on bacterial activity. Also important is the extent to which marine biological processes in general impact the inorganic carbon cycle. The study area is the Northeast Water (NEW) Polynya, a seasonally-recurrent opening in the permanent ice situated over the northeastern Greenland continental shelf. This work was part of an international, multi-disciplinary research project studying carbon cycling in the coastal Arctic. The first chapter describes a simple model which links a complex marine food web to a simplified ocean and atmosphere. The second chapter investigates the inorganic carbon inventory of the summertime NEW Polynya surface waters to establish the effect of biological processes on the air-sea pCO{sub 2} gradient. The third and fourth chapters use a kinetic approach to examine microbial activities in the NEW Polynya as a function of temperature and dissolved organic substrate concentration, testing the so-called Pomeroy hypothesis that microbial activity is disproportionately reduced at low environmental temperatures owing to increased organic substrate requirements. Together, the suite of data collected on microbial activities, cell size, and grazing pressure suggest how unique survival strategies adopted by an active population of high-latitude bacteria may contribute to, rather than detract from, an efficient biological carbon pump.

Yager, P.L.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

387

Updating Maryland's Sea-level Rise  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Updating Maryland's Sea-level Rise Projections Scientific and Technical Working Group Maryland Climate Change Commission June 26, 2013 #12;Sea-level Rise Expert Group Donald F. Boesch* , University-author of the National Assessment Scenarios report Author of paper(s) on recent sea-level rise ~ Author contributing

Ezer,Tal

388

Preserving deep-sea natural heritage: Emerging issues in offshore conservation and management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Human activity in the deep sea is extending ever deeper, with recent research showing that this environment is more sensitive to human and natural impacts than previously thought. Some deep-water fish stocks have collapsed and fishing methods such as bottom trawling have raised international concern over the habitat damage they cause. It is likely that in its current form, deep-sea fishing is unsustainable. Diminishing reserves of hydrocarbons in shallow water are pushing exploration and production into deeper waters, which may cause damage to little known deep-sea habitats. The deep sea is also proposed as an environment where anthropogenic carbon dioxide could be stored to minimise the effect of its release into the atmosphere. At the same time, rising atmospheric carbon dioxide levels may be altering the chemical equilibrium of the global ocean by lowering pH. Many countries are now beginning to designate some deep-sea habitats as marine protected areas in measures to reduce the damage caused by fishing and other anthropogenic activities. This review examines these current and emerging issues in deep-sea conservation and discusses conservation status and the designation of protected areas. The enforcement of protected areas using satellite tracking of vessels is discussed and applied to an internationally agreed deep-water conservation area, which aims to protect cold-water coral habitats on the Darwin Mounds in the north east Atlantic Ocean.

Andrew J. Davies; J. Murray Roberts; Jason Hall-Spencer

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

PRAVDI&, V. Surface charge characterization of sea sediments ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Atomic Energy Agency, Monaco, who sup- plied all the ... tain the electrical neutrality of the system. These ions are ... the external electrical circuit that measures.

Orcas

2000-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

390

SEA GRANT AT A GLANCE February 2014 National Sea Grant Office's  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SEA GRANT AT A GLANCE � February 2014 1 National Sea Grant Office's Annual Program Update February 5-13, 2014 #12;SEA GRANT AT A GLANCE � February 2014 2 Annual Program Update Schedule Conf. Call Island Sea Grant (Grimes) 9:30am � 10:00am Louisiana Sea Grant (Kim) 10:00am � 10:10am Break 10:10am � 10

391

University of Hawai`i Sea Grant ranked among the best Sea Grant programs in the nation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of Hawai`i Sea Grant ranked among the best Sea Grant programs in the nation According to an independent review panel of experts, the University of Hawai`i Sea Grant College Program (UH Sea Grant) ranks among the top Sea Grant programs in the nation. A total of 33 university-based Sea Grant programs

Wang, Yuqing

392

The Global Grid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper puts forward the vision that a natural future stage of the electricity network could be a grid spanning the whole planet and connecting most of the large power plants in the world: this is the “Global Grid”. The main driving force behind the Global Grid will be the harvesting of remote renewable sources, and its key infrastructure element will be the high capacity long transmission lines. Wind farms and solar power plants will supply load centers with green power over long distances. This paper focuses on the introduction of the concept, showing that a globally interconnected network can be technologically feasible and economically competitive. We further highlight the multiple opportunities emerging from a global electricity network such as smoothing the renewable energy supply and electricity demand, reducing the need for bulk storage, and reducing the volatility of the energy prices. We also discuss possible investment mechanisms and operating schemes. Among others, we envision in such a system a global power market and the establishment of two new coordinating bodies, the “Global Regulator” and the “Global System Operator”.

Spyros Chatzivasileiadis; Damien Ernst; Göran Andersson

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Representing Variability in Subgrid Snow Cover and Snow Depth in a Global Land Model: Offline Validation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Subgrid snow cover is one of the key parameters in global land models since snow cover has large impacts on the surface energy and moisture budgets, and hence the surface temperature. In this study, the Subgrid Snow Distribution (SSNOWD) snow ...

T. Nitta; K. Yoshimura; K. Takata; R. O’ishi; T. Sueyoshi; S. Kanae; T. Oki; A. Abe-Ouchi; G. E. Liston

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Forecasting phenology under global warming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Forrest Forecasting phenology under global warming Ines Ibanez 1 * Richard B. Primack...and site-specific responses to global warming. We found that for most species...climate change|East Asia, global warming|growing season, hierarchical...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

SeaTech Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SeaTech Energy SeaTech Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name SeaTech Energy Place Florida Zip 33701 Sector Hydro Product Florida-based developer and distributor of hydro-electric turbines. References SeaTech Energy[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. SeaTech Energy is a company located in Florida . References ↑ "SeaTech Energy" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=SeaTech_Energy&oldid=350710" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load)

396

InSAR At Salton Sea Area (Eneva And Adams, 2010) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Eneva And Adams, 2010) Eneva And Adams, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: InSAR At Salton Sea Area (Eneva And Adams, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Salton Sea Area Exploration Technique InSAR Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown References Mariana Eneva, David Adams (2010) Modeling Of Surface Deformation From Satellite Radar Interferometry In The Salton Sea Geothermal Field, California Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=InSAR_At_Salton_Sea_Area_(Eneva_And_Adams,_2010)&oldid=400447" Category: Exploration Activities What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

397

Upward Shift of the Atmospheric General Circulation under Global Warming: Theory and Simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, including upward shifts in the ver- tical velocities and distributions of cloud water and ice as the seaUpward Shift of the Atmospheric General Circulation under Global Warming: Theory and Simulations circulation of the atmosphere shift upward in response to warming in simu- lations of climate change with both

O'Gorman, Paul

398

Regional and Global Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Products > Regional/Global Products > Regional/Global Regional and Global Data Biogeochemical Dynamics Data Regional and global biogeochemical dynamics data can be used to improve our understanding of the structure and function of various ecosystems; to enable prediction across spatial and temporal scales; and to parameterize and validate terrestrial ecosystem models. The ORNL DAAC compiles, archives, and distributes more than 150 products from the following projects: Climate Collections Hydroclimatology Collections ISLSCP II Project Net Primary Productivity (NPP) River Discharge (RIVDIS) Russian Land Cover (RLC) Soil Collections Vegetation Collections Vegetation-Ecosystem Modeling (VEMAP) Climate Collections Climate collections include measured and modeled values for variables such as temperature, precipitation, humidity, radiation, wind velocity, and

399

Pax Global, Inc.,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pax Global, Inc., Pax Global, Inc., (freezers) Issued: April 2, 2013 BEFORE THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Washington, D.C. 20585 ) ) ) ) ) Case Number: 2013-SE-L413 NOTICE OF NONCOMPLIANCE DETERMINATION Manufacturers and private labelers are prohibited from distributing covered products in the United States that do not comply with applicable federal energy conservation standards. 10 C.F.R. § 429.102; 42 U.S.C. § 6302. Pax Global, Inc. ("Pax Global") is a private labeler and uses the "Crosley" and "Daewoo" brands to distribute freezers in the United States. TESTING l. The U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE") tested four privately labeled units o basic model numbe , manufactured , 1 that had been distributed in the United States by a third-pa1iy private labeler.

400

KRFTWRK – Global Human Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power Network 2.1.1 Virtual Power Plants The Global Powernetwork, based on "Virtual Power Plants", called "VPP". A "participant runs a virtual human power plant. Per every "

Prohaska, Rainer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global sea surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Impacts of Global Warming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The 2001 Inter-governmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Report provides not merely 1, but 19 separate chapters on the impacts of global warming, comprising over 1,000 pages of descriptions...

Donald Rapp

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Global New Product Development  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the age of ubiquitous internet bandwidth, the development of a global market, coupled with rapid development of what once were underdeveloped countries and regions has led to many companies thinking and act...

Russell Watt

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Mobile Means Global  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

mHealth is rapidly expanding globally, in both volume ... questions developers and users must ask is whether mHealth can be scaled and sustained for the ... governments, foundations, entrepreneurs, and businesses...

Donna Malvey; Donna J. Slovensky

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Global Biomass Energy Potential  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The intensive use of renewable energy is one of the options to stabilize...2...atmospheric concentration at levels of 350 to 550ppm. A recent evaluation of the global potential of primary renewable energy carried...

Jos#X00C9; Roberto Moreira

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Earth's Global Energy Budget  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An update is provided on the Earth's global annual mean energy budget in the light of new observations and analyses. In 1997, Kiehl and Trenberth provided a review of past estimates and performed a number of radiative computations to better ...

Kevin E. Trenberth; John T. Fasullo; Jeffrey Kiehl

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Improvements to a MODIS global terrestrial evapotranspiration algorithm Qiaozhen Mu , Maosheng Zhao, Steven W. Running  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

towers. The global annual total ET over the vegetated land surface is 62.8Ã?103 km3 , agrees very wellImprovements to a MODIS global terrestrial evapotranspiration algorithm Qiaozhen Mu , Maosheng Zhao Vegetation cover fraction MODIS MODIS global evapotranspiration (ET) products by Mu et al. [Mu, Q., Heinsch

Montana, University of

407

ARM - Lesson Plans: Global Warming  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plans: Global Warming Objective The objective is to understand the enhanced greenhouse effect and the effects of global warming. Important Points to Understand If the...

408

Title: Aerodynamic and Scalar Roughness over Snow and Sea Ice In Monin-Obukhov similarity theory, the aerodynamic roughness, z0, is the artificial height  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Title: Aerodynamic and Scalar Roughness over Snow and Sea Ice Abstract: In Monin-Obukhov similarity theory, the aerodynamic roughness, z0, is the artificial height above the surface at which the wind speed the theory and measurement of the aerodynamic and scalar roughness lengths over snow and sea ice. The data

409

Global Change Master Directory | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Change Master Directory Global Change Master Directory Energy Data Apps Maps Challenges Resources Blogs Let's Talk Energy Beta You are here Data.gov » Communities » Energy » Data Global Change Master Directory Dataset Summary Description The GCMD database holds more than 30,000 descriptions of Earth science data sets and services covering all aspects of Earth and environmental sciences. Tags {Agriculture,atmosphere,biosphere,bilogy,climate,cryosphere,"land surface",oceans,paleoclimate,"solid Earth",Sun,"terrestrial hydrosphere",NASA,GSFC,"Goddard Space Flight Center"} Dataset Ratings Overall 0 No votes yet Data Utility 0 No votes yet Usefulness 0 No votes yet Ease of Access 0 No votes yet Dataset Additional Information Last Updated 01-Jan-2010 Publisher National Aeronautics and Space Administration

410

SEA and DOE Extension Comments  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 North Pitt Street, 0 North Pitt Street, Alexandria, VA 22314 Jan. 8, 2007 Anthony J. Como Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability NEPA Document Manager Re: Nov. 2006 Special Environmental Analysis (SEA) by Dept. of Energy Objections Dear Mr. Como: My first objection to the SEA is DOE's extending the radius of the PM 2.5 and SO2 receptor grid to 36 miles*, thereby also extending the health effects to 240,581 people within the larger geographic area. By doing so, the 4000 people living very close to the plant and impacted by the highest PM 2.5 pollutants are not the focus, yet they are the most seriously affected by PM 2.5 particles. These microscopic particles are the most dangerous to public health since they are breathed directly into the lungs, causing

411

Chapter 15. BIOLOGICALPHYSICAL INTERACTIONS AND GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

605 Chapter 15. BIOLOGICAL­PHYSICAL INTERACTIONS AND GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE: SOME LESSONS FROM EARTH, absorb- ing long-wave radiation emitted from the planet surface and warming Earth's surface temperature combined. The idea that burning a relatively small amount of coal, oil, and gas can affect such a large

Schrag, Daniel

412

Estimated global ocean wind power potential from QuikSCAT observations, accounting for turbine characteristics and siting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evaluation of global wind power, J. Geophys. Res. , 110,2009), Global ocean wind power sensitivity to surface layerCO 2 reductions via offshore wind power matched to inherent

Capps, Scott B; Zender, Charles S

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

GLOBAL GOVERNANCE FIGHTING POVERTY 26 GLOBAL AGENDA 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, they would discover a nearly total disparity between global commitments and domestic politics. Bush hasGLOBAL GOVERNANCE FIGHTING POVERTY 26 GLOBAL AGENDA 2003 the world promised to put real resources credible document spelling out the US role in a global war against AIDS. The planned US financial

414

Greenland ice sheet surface mass-balance modeling in a 131-year perspective, 1950-2080  

SciTech Connect

Fluctuations in the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) surface mass-balance (SMB) and freshwater influx to the surrounding oceans closely follow climate fluctuations and are of considerable importance to the global eustatic sea level rise. SnowModel, a state-of-the-art snow-evolution modeling system, was used to simulate variations in the GrIS melt extent, surface water balance components, changes in SMB, and freshwater influx to the ocean. The simulations are based on the IPCC scenario AlB modeled by the HIRHAM4 RCM (using boundary conditions from ECHAM5 AOGCM) from 1950 through 2080. In-situ meteorological station (GC-Net and WMO DMI) observations from inside and outside the GrIS were used to validate and correct RCM output data before it was used as input for SnowModel. Satellite observations and independent SMB studies were used to validate the SnowModel output and confirm the model's robustness. We simulated a {approx}90% increase in end-of-summer surface melt extent (0.483 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2}) from 1950 to 2080, and a melt index (above 2,000-m elevation) increase of 138% (1.96 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} x days). The greatest difference in melt extent occured in the southern part of the GrIS, and the greatest changes in the number of melt days was seen in the eastern part of the GrIS ({approx}50-70%) and was lowest in the west ({approx}20-30%). The rate of SMB loss, largely tied to changes in ablation processes, lead to an enhanced average loss of 331 km{sup 3} from 1950 to 2080, an average 5MB level of -99 km{sup 3} for the period 2070-2080. GrIS surface freshwater runoff yielded an eustatic rise in sea level from 0.8 {+-} 0.1 (1950-1959) to 1.9 {+-} 0.1 mm (2070-2080) sea level equivalent (SLE) y{sup -1}. The accumulated GrIS freshwater runoff contribution from surface melting equaled 160 mm SLE from 1950 through 2080.

Mernild, Sebastian Haugard [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Liston, Glen [COLORADO STATE UNIV.; Hiemstra, Christopher [COLORADO STATE UNIV.; Christensen, Jens [DANISH METEOROLOGICAL INS.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Sea-Level Rise, El Niño, And The Future Of The California Coastline  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

City of Santa Barbara Sea-Level Rise Vulnerability Study.Projecting future sea level rise. California Climate Changeand responses to sea level rise. In Understanding Sea Level

Russell, Nicole Lian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Critical Mechanisms for the Formation of Extreme Arctic Sea-Ice Extent in the Summers of 2007 and 1996  

SciTech Connect

A warming Arctic climate is undergoing significant e 21 nvironmental change, most evidenced by the reduction of Arctic sea-ice extent during the summer. In this study, we examine two extreme anomalies of September sea-ice extent in 2007 and 1996, and investigate the impacts of cloud fraction (CF), atmospheric precipitable water vapor (PWV), downwelling longwave flux (DLF), surface air temperature (SAT), pressure and winds on the sea-ice variation in 2007 and 1996 using both satellite-derived sea-ice products and MERRA reanalysis. The area of the Laptev, East Siberian and West Chukchi seas (70-90oN, 90-180oE) has experienced the largest variation in sea-ice extent from year-to-year and defined here as the Area Of Focus (AOF). The record low September sea-ice extent in 2007 was associated with positive anomalies 30 of CF, PWV, DLF, and SAT over the AOF. Persistent anti-cyclone positioned over the Beaufort Sea coupled with low pressure over Eurasia induced easterly zonal and southerly meridional winds. In contrast, negative CF, PWV, DLF and SAT anomalies, as well as opposite wind patterns to those in 2007, characterized the 1996 high September sea-ice extent. Through this study, we hypothesize the following positive feedbacks of clouds, water vapor, radiation and atmospheric variables on the sea-ice retreat during the summer 2007. The record low sea-ice extent during the summer 2007 is initially triggered by the atmospheric circulation anomaly. The southerly winds across the Chukchi and East Siberian seas transport warm, moist air from the north Pacific, which is not only enhancing sea-ice melt across the AOF, but also increasing clouds. The positive cloud feedback results in higher SAT and more sea-ice melt. Therefore, 40 more water vapor could be evaporated from open seas and higher SAT to form more clouds, which will enhance positive cloud feedback. This enhanced positive cloud feedback will then further increase SAT and accelerate the sea-ice retreat during the summer 2007.

Dong, Xiquan; Zib, Benjamin J.; Xi, Baike; Stanfield, Ryan; Deng, Yi; Zhang, Xiangdong; Lin, B.; Long, Charles N.

2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

417

NETL: Global Environmental Benefits  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Environmental Benefits Global Environmental Benefits Gasification Systems Global Environmental Benefits Environmental performance for future energy production systems is a much greater factor as emission standards tighten in the United States and worldwide. The outstanding environmental performance of gasification systems makes it an excellent technology for the clean production of electricity and other products. In addition, the reduction of CO2 emissions is one of the major challenges facing industry in response to global climate change. Other countries with coal reserves might potentially import technologies developed in the United States to enable low-cost gasification with carbon capture and EOR or sequestration. Not only will this benefit the U.S. gasification technology industry, but it will also result in a global environmental benefit through more affordable control of greenhouse gases (GHGs). See the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) link below for a summary of the impact of fossil fuels without carbon capture on CO2 emissions, on the GHG contributions of different countries, and of the projected impact of developing countries to 2030:

418

The Tourism Global Value Chain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Tourism Global Value Chain ECONOMIC UPGRADING AND WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT Michelle Christian 2011 CENTER on GLOBALIZATION, GOVERNANCE & COMPETITIVENESS #12;The Tourism Global Value Chain: Economic: November 17, 2011 #12;The Tourism Global Value Chain: Economic Upgrading and Workforce Development i Table

Richardson, David

419

Original article Predicted global warming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Original article Predicted global warming and Douglas-fir chilling requirements DD McCreary1 DP to predicted global warming. Douglas-fir / chilling / global warming / bud burst / reforestation Résumé offer evidence that mean global warming of 3-4 °C could occur within the next century, particularly

Boyer, Edmond

420

Principal Associate Director - Global Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Principal Associate Director - Global Security Principal Associate Director - Global Security As Principal Associate Director for Global Security, Wallace leads Laboratory programs with special focus on developing and applying the scientific and engineering capabilities to address complex national and global security threats. Contact Operator Los Alamos National Laboratory (505 667-5061 Wallace's expertise is forensic seismology, a highly specialized discipline focusing on detection and quantification of nuclear tests. Terry C. Wallace, Jr. Principal Associate Director for Global Security Terry C. Wallace, Jr., Principal Associate Director for Global Security As Principal Associate Director for Global Security, Wallace leads Laboratory programs with a focus on applying scientific and engineering capabilities

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global sea surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Historical Antarctic mean sea ice area, sea ice trends, and winds in CMIP5 simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In contrast to Arctic sea ice, average Antarctic sea ice area is not retreating but has slowly increased since satellite measurements began in 1979. While most climate models from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project ...

Mahlstein, Irina

422

Coupled Sea Ice–Ocean-State Estimation in the Labrador Sea and Baffin Bay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sea ice variability in the Labrador Sea is of climatic interest because of its relationship to deep convection, mode-water formation, and the North Atlantic atmospheric circulation. Historically, quantifying the relationship ...

Fenty, Ian

423

Estimation and Assessment of Errors Related to Antenna Pattern Distortion in CODAR SeaSonde High-Frequency Radar Ocean Current Measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A simulation-based investigation of errors in HF radar–derived, near-surface ocean current measurements is presented. The simulation model is specific to Coastal Ocean Dynamics Application Radar (CODAR) SeaSonde radar systems that employ a ...

Kenneth Laws; Jeffrey D. Paduan; John Vesecky

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Assessment of sea-ice albedo radiative forcing and feedback over the Northern Hemisphere from 1982 to 2009 using satellite and reanalysis data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The decreasing surface albedo caused by continously retreating sea ice over Arctic plays a critical role in Arctic warming amplification. However, the quantification of the change in radiative forcing at top of atmosphere (TOA) introduced by the ...

Yunfeng Cao; Shunlin Liang; Xiaona Chen; Tao He

425

Subantarctic Mode Water formation : air-sea fluxes and cross-frontal exchange  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Front in the southeast Pacific Ocean, with mean profilesCO2 in the Pacific ocean. Global Biogeochemical Cycles, 16.surface layer in the Pacific ocean. J. Geophysical Research-

Holte, James

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Storm flooding sensitivity to sea level rise for Galveston Bay, Texas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The combination of sea level rise and population growth in coastal regions makes it essential to continue improving flood management strategies. Flooding estimates must take into account both local vertical land motion and estimated rates of sea level rise linked to global climate change. Several extreme value distributions are compared using multiple statistical measures for the modeling of maximum annual storm surges based on the 105-year record of Galveston Pier 21, Texas. Increases in inundation frequencies are computed based on two possible sea level rise scenarios, a conservative linear continuation of the past century trend, and a scenario based on the upper limit of the sea level range in the IPCC AR4 report, i.e. the A1FI scenario. The research shows that by the year 2100 exceedance probabilities may double for the impact of the largest storms such as Hurricane Ike, but may increase by 6–7 times for the smaller surges associated locally with the impact of storms such as Hurricanes Cindy, Alicia, and Rita. While individually not as devastating or costly as large hurricanes, the cumulative and regular cost of smaller surge events could well be a bigger threat to coastal communities as sea level rises.

Natalya N. Warner; Philippe E. Tissot

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Williston Basin subsidence and sea level history: Chronological and lithofacies constraints  

SciTech Connect

The intent is to use lithofacies information to identify the top-driven components of sediment accumulation-depositional environments, sediments supply, compaction, sediment and water load. Physical carbonate stratigraphy is used to determine sediment accumulation corrections. Physical stratigraphic geometric patterns are used to estimate the original thicknesses of dissolved salts and to determine absolute water depth. Seawater strontium chronostratigraphy constrains the ages and paleo-oceanographic setting of Devonian-Mississippian strata. The measured strontium stratigraphy can be used for correlation, age assignment and diagentic study. Removing sediment compaction, sediment/water load effects and using the newly derived Devonian-Mississippian chronostratigraphy to examine the behavior of the Williston Basin reveals a number of facts. (1) Temporal and spatial variation in the surficial components of sediment accumulation is significant and, unless removed, obscures tectonic subsidence and sea-level change patterns. (2) Both the corrected tectonic subsidence/sea level record and lithofacies patterns of the Devonian Williston Basin show flexural or in-plane stress interference reflecting plate boundary reorganization along the near edge of the Paleozoic North American craton, culminating the Antler orogeny. (3) The tectonic subsidence and sea level change record of the Williston Basin which has been corrected for sediment compaction, water and sediment load, has extremely linear subsidence through time. This is interrupted by changes in global sea level of 100-140 m over 25-35 my and apparent sea level change of 35-60 m over 2-4 my.

Lee Roark, C.K.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

In: Lozn et al., Climate of the 21st century: Changes and risks. GEO, Hamburg/Germany, pp. 206-211, The response of polar sea ice to climate variability and change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reductions in ice coverage with important consequences for the global heat budget. With global climate models and anthropogenic climate change. While satellite remote sensing can now provide sea-ice data sets of sufficient, reductions in ice extent due to, e.g., perturbations in atmospheric heat transfer into the polar regions

Eicken, Hajo

429

Hexavalent chromium is cytotoxic and genotoxic to hawksbill sea turtle cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Sea turtles are a charismatic and ancient ocean species and can serve as key indicators for ocean ecosystems, including coral reefs and sea grass beds as well as coastal beaches. Genotoxicity studies in the species are absent, limiting our understanding of the impact of environmental toxicants on sea turtles. Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) is a ubiquitous environmental problem worldwide, and recent studies show it is a global marine pollutant of concern. Thus, we evaluated the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of soluble and particulate Cr(VI) in hawksbill sea turtle cells. Particulate Cr(VI) was both cytotoxic and genotoxic to sea turtle cells. Concentrations of 0.1, 0.5, 1, and 5 ?g/cm2 lead chromate induced 108, 79, 54, and 7% relative survival, respectively. Additionally, concentrations of 0, 0.1, 0.5, 1, and 5 ?g/cm2 lead chromate induced damage in 4, 10, 15, 26, and 36% of cells and caused 4, 11, 17, 30, and 56 chromosome aberrations in 100 metaphases, respectively. For soluble Cr, concentrations of 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2.5, and 5 ?M sodium chromate induced 84, 69, 46, 25, and 3% relative survival, respectively. Sodium chromate induced 3, 9, 9, 14, 21, and 29% of metaphases with damage, and caused 3, 10, 10, 16, 26, and 39 damaged chromosomes in 100 metaphases at concentrations of 0, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2.5, and 5 ?M sodium chromate, respectively. These data suggest that Cr(VI) may be a concern for hawksbill sea turtles and sea turtles in general.

Sandra S. Wise; Hong Xie; Tomokazu Fukuda; W. Douglas Thompson; John Pierce Wise

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Biological Consequences of Tidal Stirring Gradients in the North Sea [and Discussion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Purdie M. Baars S. Oosterhuis G. Daneri F. Hannah D. K. Mills D. Plummer A. J. Pomroy A. W. Walne H. J. Witte M. J...photosynthetically active radiation, sea-surface heating, and wind stirring, are proposed as the most important controls on plankton...

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Oxygen isotope analyses and deep-sea temperature changes: implications for rates of oceanic mixing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... fluxes into the deep sea come primarily from three sources: formation of deep water, geothermal heating, and cross-thermocline diffusion20. At steady Fig. 1 Schematic heat budget of ... (Qu) is balanced by heat input from sinking near-surface water «?s), geothermal heating (Qg), and cross-thermocline diffusion (Qd). The combination of these effects ...

Alan C. Mix; Nicklas G. Pisias

1988-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

432

Deep-Sea Research II 50 (2003) 21832204 Temperature and salinity variability in the exit passages  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-strait gradient in near-surface temperature and salinity through the outflow straits, except in Lombok StraitDeep-Sea Research II 50 (2003) 2183­2204 Temperature and salinity variability in the exit passages pressure gauges at each side of the straits, equipped with temperature and salinity sensors

Sprintall, Janet

433

The Intraseasonal Oscillation in Eastern Pacific Sea Levels: How Is It Forced?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Daily sea level and surface winds at eastern Pacific shore locations and equatorial islands, together with gridded five-day averages of 850 mb winds, have been analyzed for the 1979–84 period to determine how the 40–60 day intraseasonal ...

David B. Enfield

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Explicit global integrators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be advantageous. For this purpose, forward interpolation utilizing Radau Quadrature will be employed. An explicit method of global integration has been developed to estimate a solution to a differential equation. A set of functions P (x), P (x), , P (x) and a... set of points n+1 x , x , , x can be found such that n+1 r x n+1 f(u)du = g P. (x)i'(x. ) 0 i=1 for all x when f(u) is a polynomial of degree n or less. The above process is described by Axelsson as global integration. In . th the cases...

Merriam, Robert Stevens

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

435

INVESTIGATION OF SEASONAL SEA-ICE THICKNESS VARIABILITY IN THE ROSS SEA Beth A. Schellenberg  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

routinely produced weekly ice charts since the 1970's. From the period of 1995 to 2000, classificationINVESTIGATION OF SEASONAL SEA-ICE THICKNESS VARIABILITY IN THE ROSS SEA Beth A. Schellenberg P1.23 1. INTRODUCTION A number of studies suggest a connections between sea-ice variability

Geiger, Cathleen

436

Sea Turtles: Navigating with Young sea turtles use the Earth's magnetic field as a source of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sea Turtles: Navigating with Magnetism Young sea turtles use the Earth's magnetic field as a source satellite telemetry has now demonstrated for the first time that adult turtles also navigate using the Earth's magnetic field. Kenneth J. Lohmann The ability of sea turtles to navigate across vast expanses of seemingly

Lohmann, Kenneth J.

437

SEA TURTLE RESEARCH INTERNSHIPS Karen Beasley Sea Turtle Rescue and Rehabilitation Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SEA TURTLE RESEARCH INTERNSHIPS Karen Beasley Sea Turtle Rescue and Rehabilitation Center Sponsors of North Carolina Wilmington North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences KAREN BEASLEY SEA TURTLE RESCUE AND REHABILITATION CENTER MISSION STATEMENT · The conservation and protection of all species of marine turtles, both

Southwood Williard, Amanda

438

Effect of Terrestrial and Marine Organic Aerosol on Regional and Global Climate: Model Development, Application, and Verification with Satellite Data  

SciTech Connect

In this DOE project the improvements to parameterization of marine primary organic matter (POM) emissions, hygroscopic properties of marine POM, marine isoprene derived secondary organic aerosol (SOA) emissions, surfactant effects, new cloud droplet activation parameterization have been implemented into Community Atmosphere Model (CAM 5.0), with a seven mode aerosol module from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)���¢��������s Modal Aerosol Model (MAM7). The effects of marine aerosols derived from sea spray and ocean emitted biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) on microphysical properties of clouds were explored by conducting 10 year CAM5.0-MAM7 model simulations at a grid resolution 1.9�������°��������2.5�������° with 30 vertical layers. Model-predicted relationship between ocean physical and biological systems and the abundance of CCN in remote marine atmosphere was compared to data from the A-Train satellites (MODIS, CALIPSO, AMSR-E). Model simulations show that on average, primary and secondary organic aerosol emissions from the ocean can yield up to 20% increase in Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) at 0.2% Supersaturation, and up to 5% increases in droplet number concentration of global maritime shallow clouds. Marine organics were treated as internally or externally mixed with sea salt. Changes associated with cloud properties reduced (absolute value) the model-predicted short wave cloud forcing from -1.35 Wm-2 to -0.25 Wm-2. By using different emission scenarios, and droplet activation parameterizations, this study suggests that addition of marine primary aerosols and biologically generated reactive gases makes an important difference in radiative forcing assessments. All baseline and sensitivity simulations for 2001 and 2050 using global-through-urban WRF/Chem (GU-WRF) were completed. The main objective of these simulations was to evaluate the capability of GU-WRF for an accurate representation of the global atmosphere by exploring the most accurate configuration of physics options in GWRF for global scale modeling in 2001 at a horizontal grid resolution of 1�������° x 1�������°. GU-WRF model output was evaluated using observational datasets from a variety of sources including surface based observations (NCDC and BSRN), model reanalysis (NCEP/ NCAR Reanalysis and CMAP), and remotely-sensed data (TRMM) to evaluate the ability of GU-WRF to simulate atmospheric variables at the surface as well as aloft. Explicit treatment of nanoparticles produced from new particle formation in GU-WRF/Chem-MADRID was achieved by expanding particle size sections from 8 to 12 to cover particles with the size range of 1.16 nm to 11.6 �������µm. Simulations with two different nucleation parameterizations were conducted for August 2002 over a global domain at a 4�������º by 5�������º horizontal resolution. The results are evaluated against field measurement data from the 2002 Aerosol Nucleation and Real Time Characterization Experiment (ANARChE) in Atlanta, Georgia, as well as satellite and reanalysis data. We have also explored the relationship between ���¢��������clean marine���¢������� aerosol optical properties and ocean surface wind speed using remotely sensed data from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) on board the CALIPSO satellite and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) on board the AQUA satellite. Detailed data analyses

Meskhidze, Nicholas; Zhang, Yang; Kamykowski, Daniel

2012-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

439

U.S. Global Climate Change program | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

U.S. Global Climate Change program U.S. Global Climate Change program Home Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(1992) Super contributor 18 January, 2013 - 15:46 U.S. Global Change Research Program publishes "National Climate Assessment" report for United States climate change drought OpenEI sea level rise temperatures U.S. Global Climate Change program The U.S. Global Change Research Program, established under the Department of Commerce in 2010, and partnered with NOAA, released an extensive National Climate Assessment report, projecting future climate changes in the United States under different scenarios. The 1,200 page report highlights some rather grim findings about the future of climate change. Here are 5 of the more disconcerting graphics from the report: 1. U.S. Average Temperatures

440

Modeling Of Surface Deformation From Satellite Radar Interferometry In The  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modeling Of Surface Deformation From Satellite Radar Interferometry In The Modeling Of Surface Deformation From Satellite Radar Interferometry In The Salton Sea Geothermal Field, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Modeling Of Surface Deformation From Satellite Radar Interferometry In The Salton Sea Geothermal Field, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Surface deformation in the Salton Sea geothermal field is modeled using results from satellite radar interferometry, data from leveling surveys, and observations from the regional GPS network. The field is located in the Salton Trough, an active spreading center in southern California, which is traversed by the Brawley seismic zone. Deformation time series at thousands of points in the study area are obtained from a

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global sea surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

On the connection between continental-scale land surface processes and the tropical climate in a coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system  

SciTech Connect

The impact of global tropical climate to perturbations in land surface processes (LSP) are evaluated using perturbations given by different LSP representations of continental-scale in a global climate model that includes atmosphere-ocean interactions. One representation is a simple land scheme, which specifies climatological albedos and soil moisture availability. The other representation is the more comprehensive Simplified Simple Biosphere Model, which allows for interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes. The results demonstrate that LSP processes such as interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes have strong impacts on the seasonal mean states and seasonal cycles of global precipitation, clouds, and surface air temperature. The impact is especially significant over the tropical Pacific. To explore the mechanisms for such impact, different LSP representations are confined to selected continental-scale regions where strong interactions of climate-vegetation biophysical processes are present. We find that the largest impact is mainly from LSP perturbations over the tropical African continent. The impact is through anomalous convective heating in tropical Africa due to changes in the surface heat fluxes, which in turn affect basinwide teleconnections in the Pacific through equatorial wave dynamics. The modifications in the equatorial Pacific climate are further enhanced by strong air-sea coupling between surface wind stress and upwelling, as well as effect of ocean memory. Our results further suggest that correct representations of land surface processes, land use change and the associated changes in the deep convection over tropical Africa are crucial to reducing the uncertainty when performing future climate projections under different climate change scenarios.

Ma, Hsi-Yen; Mechoso, C. R.; Xue, Yongkang; Xiao, Heng; Neelin, David; Ji, Xuan

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

442

Global Biodiversity Conservation Priorities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global Biodiversity Conservation Priorities T. M. Brooks,1,2,3 * R. A. Mittermeier,1 G. A. B. da is essential to minimize biodiversity loss. To address this need, biodiversity conservation organizations have conservation funding. H uman actions are causing a biodiversity crisis, with species extinction rates up

Wilmers, Chris

443

Global Lightning Observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flash Rate Global distribution of lightning from a combined nine years of observations of the NASA OTDGlobal Lightning Observations #12;Optical Transient Detector ( launched April, 1995 ) Lightning Imaging Sensor ( launched November, 1997 ) Lightning Detection from Low Earth Orbit #12;LIS on TRMM #12

California at Berkeley, University of

444

global warming's six americas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vehicles & Solar Panels 23 Regulating CO2 as a Pollutant 24 A 20 Percent National Renewable Energy Standard the spring and fall of 2012. Perceived Benefits and Costs of Reducing Fossil Fuel Use and Global Warming Introduction 5 The Six Americas Audience Segments 6 Changes in the Size of Segments 7 Perceived Benefits

Haller, Gary L.

445

Patterns in Global Hydrothermal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Patterns in Global Hydrothermal Activity noaa ocean exploration Presenter: Edward T. Baker #12) High-T vents High = hydrothermal discharge Low = active or inactive discharge sites B. Davy, GNS NZ #12 Lc(km) #12;Future Directions Quantify processes: ·Employ or develop new technologies (AUVs, solid

446

Vaccines and global health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...been an appropriate, rational process for global priority setting...recs/acip/downloads/mtg-slides-oct10/02-3-mening-CostEffect...comparing choices is found, the process of new vaccine introduction...antigen through the complicated process from first identification to...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Global Health Seminar Series  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bay Area Global Health Seminar Series Monday, January 27, 2014 2:30pm ­ 4:00pm (Reception to follow at the Center for Health Policy and the Woods Institute for the Environment. He studies how economic, political, and natural environments affect population health in developing countries using a mix of experimental

Klein, Ophir

448

SciFeatureSciFeature SEA-MONKEYS AND ALIENS?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SciFeatureSciFeature MSU SEA-MONKEYS® AND ALIENS? What is the connection between Sea-Monkeys® and aliens? Believe it or not NASA scientists think it is possible that some alien life might resemble Sea

449

ARKTOS: An intelligent system for SAR sea ice image classification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an intelligent system for satellite sea ice image analysis named Advanced Reasoning using Knowledge for T ping Of Sea ice (ARKTOS). ARKTOS performs fully automated analysis of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) sea ice images by mimicking...

Soh, L. K.; Tsatsoulis, Costas; Gineris, D.; Bertoia, C.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Surface premelting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The most important results obtained in the theory of surface premelting of crystals are briefly discussed on the basis of the vibration-positional model, the quasiliquid layer model, the surface roughness model, and in the case of ice, the model of the oriented dipoles at the surface. A review of the existing experimental results on surface premelting is presented, these results being obtained by investigating the crystal morphology, the polar diagram of the specific surface energy, the surface self-diffusion, the thermal emissivity, as well as upon application of LEED, NMR, Rutherford backscattering at proton channeling and ellipsometry. The agreement between theoretical and experimental data is discussed.

D. Nenow

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Seabirds and North Sea Oil [and Discussion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and around the North Sea. The oil industry recognized the problem...beaches. The feared increase in oil pollution incidents has not...few accidents associated with offshore production have had little effect...declines cannot be attributed to oil activities in the North Sea...

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Lecture course on Sea level variations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

level rise from tide gauges "viewpoint of the solid Earth" "A tide staff" Rate is ~ 20 cm/century 7 Level rise between 1993 and 2010 by satellite ALTIMETRY Sea level is rising (by altimetry) "viewpoint of space" 1993-2010 8Friday, November 11, 2011 #12;Sea level will be rising (IPCC scenarios) Figure 11

Cerveny, Vlastislav

453

Ocean and Sea Ice SAF Technical Note  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean and Sea Ice SAF Technical Note SAF/OSI/CDOP/KNMI/TEC/RP/147 Validation of ASCAT 12.5-km winds The Ocean and Sea Ice Satellite Application Facility (OSI SAF) delivers an operational level 2 wind product produces a level 1 product with 12.5-km WVC spacing that has a resolution of approximately 25 km. Since

Stoffelen, Ad

454

Ocean and Sea Ice SAF Technical Note  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean and Sea Ice SAF Technical Note SAF/OSI/CDOP2/KNMI/TEC/RP/194 Quality Control of Ku. The OSCAT level 2a data are available in near-real time and OWDP is used at KNMI to produce the Ocean and Sea Ice (OSI) SAF wind product which is made available to users. A beta version of OWDP is also

Stoffelen, Ad

455

Nitrogen cycle of the Baltic Sea from an isotopic perspective Baltic Sea Research Institute-Warnemunde (IOW), Rostock, Germany  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nitrogen cycle of the Baltic Sea from an isotopic perspective M. Voss Baltic Sea Research Institute-Warnemu¨nde, Hamburg, Germany S. Hille, T. Neumann, and J. W. Dippner Baltic Sea Research Institute-Warnemu¨nde (IOW

Dippner, Joachim W.

456

Physical aspects of the greenhouse effect and global warming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

According to the simplest model of the earth’s radiative balance global warming will occur with certainty as humankind increases its production and consumption of nonsolar energy. This prediction is revisited using a broader model that allows the greenhouse effect to be considered. The new model predicts a global warming of ?T E =(114? K )? where ? is the rate of surface energy release in units of the average incident solar radiation 342? W?m ?2 and ?T E is the average temperature rise at the earth’s surface. Present values of these quantities excluding geothermal sources are ?=0.69×10 ?4 and ?T E =7.9? mK . The model assigns a small number of optical parameters to the atmosphere and surface and qualifies the simple warming prediction: It is rigorous only if parameters other than ? are unchanged. The model is not complex and should serve as an aid to an elementary understanding of global warming.

Robert S. Knox

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Sensitivity of the wind stress and storm surges to surface drag  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- 29 April 2009 , CD zU ln~ #12;Background Air-Sea Interaction High and/or extreme wind speeds , CD ? #12;Background Air-Sea Interaction High and/or extreme wind speeds ­ Dynamics Sensitivity High and/or extreme wind speeds ­ Dynamics Sensitivity of the wind stress and storm surges to surface

Vries, Hans de

458

Multispectral Imaging At Salton Sea Area (Reath, Et Al., 2010...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salton Sea Area (Reath, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Multispectral Imaging At Salton Sea Area (Reath, Et Al.,...

459

Fish Ecology of the Red Sea and Persian Gulf  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Among the important factors of Red Sea and Persian Gulf ecology are the following: A. The Red Sea is a deep basin with warm surfa...

H. Steinitz

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Development of Sea Level Rise Scenarios for Climate Change Assessments...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sea Level Rise Scenarios for Climate Change Assessments of the Mekong Delta, Vietnam Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Development of Sea Level Rise...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global sea surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-299 Sea...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

99 Sea Breeze Pacific Regional Transmission System, INC Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-299 Sea Breeze Pacific Regional Transmission System, INC TBDApplication...

462

2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winner Naval Sea...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Naval Sea Systems Command 2013 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winner Naval Sea Systems Command fewm13nswcphiladelphiahighres.pdf fewm13nswcphiladelphia.pdf More...

463

Tropospheric Chemistry of Internally Mixed Sea Salt and Organic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tropospheric Chemistry of Internally Mixed Sea Salt and Organic Particles: Surprising Reactivity of NaCl with Weak Organic Acids Tropospheric Chemistry of Internally Mixed Sea Salt...

464

Global Climate Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data Data The climate data at the ORNL DAAC are used primarily as driving variables in terrestrial biogeochemistry models. These models typically use data on temperature (min,max), precipitation, humidity (relative humidity, vapor pressure deficit, dew point), radiation (PFD in PAR, shortwave, direct/diffuse, and UV radiation, daylength), and wind velocity. Climate / meteorology data are required at hourly to monthly time scales, either point or gridded, at spatial scales ranging from regional to continental to global. The ORNL DAAC currently distributes climate data from several related projects: VEMAP-1 Hydroclimatology, and Global Historical Climatology Network. We are also now distributing climate data developed at the East Anglia Climate Research Unit and the Potsdam Institute for Climate Research.

465

Global Insight Energy Group  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Outlook Outlook Mary Novak Managing Director IHS Global Insight Copyright © 2010 IHS Global Insight, Inc. Overview: Energy Sector Transformation Underway * The recession has hit energy demand hard, and aggregate energy demand is not expected to return to 2007 levels until 2018. * Oil and natural gas prices will both rise over the long-term, but the price trends will diverge with natural gas prices rising slowly due to the development of shale gas. * This forecast does not include a GHG cap-and-trade program. However, it is assumed that there will be continued improvement in equipment, appliance and building efficiencies that will reduce carbon emissions relative to past projections. * The forecast also includes the more than 30 state- level programs to increase efficiency and reduce

466

International Health Global Health Policy--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

50 International Health Global Health Policy-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- http://www.ghp.m.u-tokyo.ac.jp Our mission is to improve population health by enhancing accountability and improving evidence base of global (both domestic and international) health programmes through the provision

Miyashita, Yasushi

467

Global Health: Disease Eradication  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...have been considered as potential candidates for eradication, but the World Health Organization (WHO) has targeted only two other diseases for global eradication after smallpox. In 1986, WHO's policymaking body, the World Health Assembly, adopted the elimination of dracunculiasis (guinea worm disease)... The most cost-effective intervention for certain infectious diseases is to eliminate them entirely. This article reviews the characteristics of potentially eradicable diseases and surveys current eradication methods.

Hopkins D.R.

2013-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

468

20th Century Global Weather Reanalysis Project at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

20th Century 20th Century Reanalysis Project 20th Century Reanalysis Project Key Challenges: Assimilate historical weather observations from sources as diverse as 19th century sea captains and turn of the century explorers and medical doctors, to reconstruct a comprehensive global atmospheric circulation dataset in six-hour intervals from 1871 to the present. Use this dataset to analyze (and reanalyze) global weather conditions over that period of time. Why it Matters: Using historical climate data will help us understand current weather patterns, especially for extreme weather events. It will help explain climate variations that may have misinformed early-century policy decisions and will provide an important validation check on climate models being used to make 21st-century climate projections. Results from

469

Global climate feedbacks  

SciTech Connect

The important physical, chemical, and biological events that affect global climate change occur on a mesoscale -- requiring high spatial resolution for their analysis. The Department of Energy has formulated two major initiatives under the US Global Change Program: ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurements), and CHAMMP (Computer Hardware Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics). ARM is designed to use ground and air-craft based observations to document profiles of atmospheric composition, clouds, and radiative fluxes. With research and models of important physical processes, ARM will delineate the relationships between trace gases, aerosol and cloud structure, and radiative transfer in the atmosphere, and will improve the parameterization of global circulation models. The present GCMs do not model important feedbacks, including those from clouds, oceans, and land processes. The purpose of this workshop is to identify such potential feedbacks, to evaluate the uncertainties in the feedback processes (and, if possible, to parameterize the feedback processes so that they can be treated in a GCM), and to recommend research programs that will reduce the uncertainties in important feedback processes. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases.

Manowitz, B.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Is an Alternative Globalization Possible?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global Democracy. 94. Amartya Sen, Development as Freedom (trump card. Recently, Amartya Sen’s “capability approach” 94

Evans, Peter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Hydrate-phobic surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Clathrate hydrate formation and subsequent plugging of deep-sea oil and gas pipelines represent a significant bottleneck for ultra deep-sea production. Current methods for hydrate mitigation focus on injecting thermodynamic ...

Smith, Jonathan David, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

2, 183201, 2005 Global terrestrial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 1997). According to Watts (2000) and Kettle et al. (2002) total global sources and sinks are balancedBGD 2, 183­201, 2005 Global terrestrial COS sink strength L. Sandoval-Soto et al. Title Page Discussions is the access reviewed discussion forum of Biogeosciences Global uptake of carbonyl sulfide (COS

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

473

4, 10591092, 2007 Global warming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BGD 4, 1059­1092, 2007 Global warming potential of agro-ecosystems S. Lehuger et al. Title Page Predicting the global warming potential of agro-ecosystems S. Lehuger, B. Gabrielle, E. Larmanou, P. Laville Correspondence to: S. Lehuger (simon.lehuger@grignon.inra.fr) 1059 #12;BGD 4, 1059­1092, 2007 Global warming

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

474

GLOBAL WARMING THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GLOBAL WARMING THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT AND YOUR FAMILY'S CONTRIBUTION TO IT Stephen E. Schwartz GREENHOUSE EFFECT #12;GLOBAL ENERGY BALANCE Global and annual average energy fluxes in watts per square meter about it.But nobody does anything about it. ­ Mark Twain­ Mark Twain Now with the greenhouse effect, we

Schwartz, Stephen E.

475

Thinking about global climate change  

SciTech Connect

Opinions regarding issues related to global climate change are presented. The focus is on socioeconomic and historical aspects. World War II is discussed as an intellectual and emotional turning point in global issues, and global climate change is identified as a possible turning point of similar significance. Political, scientific, and public points of view regarding the issue are discussed.

Russell, M. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

476

Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation Ann E. Carlson*2008]HEAT WAVES, GLOBAL WARMING, AND MITIGATION 175 stroke2001). 2008]HEAT WAVES, GLOBAL WARMING, AND MITIGATION 177

Carlson, Ann E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Global Warming, endogenous risk and irreversibility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The economics of global warming, Institute for InternationalEconomic Models of Global Warming, Cambridge, Mass. MITstochastic losses from global warming, Risk Analysis 16(2):

Fisher, Anthony C.; Narain, Urvashi

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Global Climate Data, Sept. 18, 2000  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate Data Climate Data The ORNL DAAC announces the addition of "Global Monthly Climatology for the Twentieth Century (New et al.)" to its collection of climate data. The newest addition contains gridded data related to monthly surface climate over global land areas at 0.5-degree resolution. Precipitation, mean temperature, and diurnal temperature range are interpolated directly from station time-series. Wet-day frequency, vapor pressure, cloud cover, and ground-frost frequency are interpolated where data are available and estimated for regions with no data. Data can be accessed through an on-line interface that allows users to select the data by parameter and years. By agreement with the data provider, users who wish to request the complete 400-megabyte data set on a

479

Characterizing Surface Temperature and Clarity of Kuwait's Seawaters Using Remotely Sensed Measurements and GIS Analyses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kuwait sea surface temperature (SST) and water clarity are important water characteristics that influence the entire Kuwait coastal ecosystem. The aim of this project was to study the spatial and temporal distributions of Kuwait SST using MODIS...

Alsahli, Mohammad M. M.

2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

480

Dynamical Adjustment of the Northern Hemisphere Surface Air Temperature Field: Methodology and Application to Observations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The influence of atmospheric circulation changes reflected in spontaneously-occurring sea-level pressure (SLP) anomalies upon surface air temperature (SAT) variability and trends is investigated using partial least squares (PLS) regression, a ...

Brian V. Smoliak; John M. Wallace; Pu Lin; Qiang Fu

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global sea surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Light hydrocarbons in the surface water of the mid-Atlantic  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During a cruise of RV Polarstern over the Atlantic in September/October 1988, C2?C4 hydrocarbons were measured in surface sea water. The ship passed through three different ocean ... at 8° N and 3° S. Hydrocarbon

C. Plass; R. Koppmann; J. Rudolph

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Alba is first heavy North Sea crude  

SciTech Connect

The development of the Alba oil field will constitute two North Sea firsts: the first Eocene reservoir developed, and the first development to handle heavy crude. The field was discovered in Block 16/26 of the North Sea's U.K. sector in 1984. The Alba field is in the heart of the North Sea, about midway between the northern fields of the East Shetlands basin and the southern Fulmar and Argyll fields. About 250 million bbl of the estimated 1 billion bbl reservoir of 20{degrees} gravity crude is believed recoverable.

Not Available

1991-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

483

The convective desalination of sea ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

containing both liquid brine and solid (pure water) ice. Frad is the flux of penetrating solar radiation. Thus the thermal properties of sea ice are composed of those of the solid and liquid phases that make up sea ice. Fixed-salinity models used in older... components of the physical climate system. Evolving in space and time, sea ice has thermal and mechanical properties that must be updated dynamically for a faithful representation within climate models. Such models are vital tools to help people everywhere...

Rees Jones, David

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Deep-Sea Research II 52 (2005) 32813302 Sediment transport by sea ice in the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

resuspension and subsequent ice entrainment (420 m for the Chukchi Sea). Sediment loads averaged at 128 t km�2 deep for resuspension and entrainment) is at minimum 4 � 106 t in the sampling area and is estimated

Rigor, Ignatius G.

485

Study Climate and Global Change  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What We Study How We Study Prepare The Nation For Change Assess the U.S. Climate Make Our Science Accessible Link Climate Change & Health Provide Data and Tools Coordinate Internationally Study Climate and Global Change Print E-mail Deforestation What is global change? "Global change" refers to changes in the global environment that may alter the capacity of the Earth to sustain life. This includes alterations in: Climate Land productivity Oceans or other water resources Atmospheric chemistry Ecological systems Demographic and socioeconomic trends What is global change research? According to the Global Change Research Act of 1990, "Global change research" refers to the study, monitoring, assessment, prediction, and information management activities used to describe and understand the:

486

Global Scratch Upgrade in Progress  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Scratch Gets Global Scratch Gets an Upgrade Global Scratch Gets an Upgrade Improvements Will Include Higher Data Output Rates, Connection to PDSF October 29, 2013 The most used file system at the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC)-global scratch-just got an upgrade. As a result, some users may see their data output to global scratch reach up to 80 gigabytes per second. Although users will probably not see their 20-terabyte storage quotas increase, the upgrade ensures that global scratch remains flexible and paves the way for PDSF to eventually use the file system Because of the upgrade, users will also be able to better access their temporary data files or "scratch data" from any NERSC system, not just the one that generated it. Prior to the upgrade, Global scratch typically

487

Review of potential impacts to sea turtles from underwater explosive removal of offshore structures  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to collect and synthesize existing information relevant to the explosive removal of offshore structures (EROS) in aquatic environments. Data sources were organized and summarized by topic - explosive removal methods, physics of underwater explosions, sea turtle resources, documented impacts to sea turtles, and mitigation of effects. Information was gathered via electronic database searches and literature source review. Bulk explosive charges are the most commonly used technique in EROS. While the physical principles of underwater detonations and the propagation of pressure and acoustic waves are well understood, there are significant gaps in the application of this knowledge. Impacts to sea turtles from explosive removal operations may range from non-injurious effects (e.g. acoustic annoyance; mild tactile detection or physical discomfort) to varying levels of injury (i.e. non-lethal and lethal injuries). Very little information exists regarding the impacts of underwater explosions on sea turtles. Effects of explosions on turtles often must be inferred from documented effects to other vertebrates with lungs or other gas-containing organs, such as mammals and most fishes. However, a cautious approach should be used when determining impacts to sea turtles based on extrapolations from other vertebrates. The discovery of beached sea turtles and bottlenose dolphins following an explosive platform removal event in 1986 prompted the initiation of formal consultation between the U.S. Department of the Interior, Minerals Management Service (MMS) and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), authorized through the Endangered Species Act Section 7, to determine a mechanism to minimize potential impacts to listed species. The initial consultation resulted in a requirement for oil and gas companies to obtain a permit (through separate consultations on a case-by-case basis) prior to using explosives in Federal waters. Because many offshore structure removal operations are similar, a 'generic' Incidental Take Statement was established by the NMFS that describes requirements to protect sea turtles when an operator's individual charge weights did not exceed 50 lb (23 kg). Requirements associated with the Incidental Take Permit were revised in 2003 and 2006 to accommodate advances in explosive charge technologies, removals of structures in deeper waters, and adequate protection of deep water marine mammal species in Gulf of Mexico waters. Generally, these requirements include pre- and post-detonation visual monitoring using standard surface and aerial survey methods for sea turtles and marine mammals, and, in some scenarios, passive acoustic survey methods for marine mammals within a specified radius from an offshore structure. The survey program has been successful in mitigating impacts to sea turtles associated with EROS. However, even with these protective measures in place, there have been observations of sea turtles affected by explosive platform removals.

Viada, Stephen T. [CSA International, Inc., 759 Parkway Street, Jupiter, FL 33477 (United States)], E-mail: sviada@conshelf.com; Hammer, Richard M. [CSA International, Inc., 759 Parkway Street, Jupiter, FL 33477 (United States)], E-mail: rhammer@conshelf.com; Racca, Roberto [JASCO Research Ltd., Vancouver Island Technology Park, Suite 2101, 4464 Markham Street, Victoria, British Columbia, V8Z 7X8 (Canada)], E-mail: rob@jasco.com; Hannay, David [JASCO Research Ltd., Vancouver Island Technology Park, Suite 2101, 4464 Markham Street, Victoria, British Columbia, V8Z 7X8 (Canada)], E-mail: dave@jasco.com; Thompson, M. John [CSA International, Inc., 759 Parkway Street, Jupiter, FL 33477 (United States)], E-mail: jthompson@conshelf.com; Balcom, Brian J. [CSA International, Inc., 759 Parkway Street, Jupiter, FL 33477 (United States)], E-mail: bbalcom@conshelf.com; Phillips, Neal W. [CSA International, Inc., 759 Parkway Street, Jupiter, FL 33477 (United States)], E-mail: nphillips@conshelf.com

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

488

Positioning Sea Grant An Integrated National Communications Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Positioning Sea Grant An Integrated National Communications Plan 2003-06 Prepared and Submitted March 10, 2003 by Stephen Wittman, Wisconsin Sea Grant #12;2 #12;3 Positioning Sea Grant: An Integrated communications "inside the beltway" to attain greater federal support for the National Sea Grant College Program

489

Contemporary Sea Level Rise Anny Cazenave and William Llovel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contemporary Sea Level Rise Anny Cazenave and William Llovel Laboratoire d'´etudes en g reserved 1941-1405/10/0115-0145$20.00 Key Words sea level rise, climate change, land ice melt, ocean we report on most recent results on contemporary sea level rise. We first present sea level

Siegel, David A.

490

Sea Level Rise Adaptation: From Climate Chaos to Climate Resilience  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sea Level Rise Adaptation: From Climate Chaos to Climate Resilience Human Dimensions and Ocean, 2013 #12;Main Discussion Points · How do we incorporate Sea-Level Rise into planning and regulatory actions? · What Does the new NRC Report on Sea- Level Rise mean to Decision-makers? · How does Sea-Level

Rohs, Remo

491

AMSR-E Algorithm Theoretical Basis Document: Sea Ice Products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Arctic perennial ice regions, and the ice temperature is produced from an algorithm similar to the Nimbus1 AMSR-E Algorithm Theoretical Basis Document: Sea Ice Products Thorsten Markus and Donald J 20771 1. Overview The AMSR-E sea ice standard level 3 products include sea ice concentration, sea ice

Waliser, Duane E.

492

Atlas of Japan (East) Sea hydrographic properties in summer, 1999  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atlas of Japan (East) Sea hydrographic properties in summer, 1999 Lynne D. Talley a,*, Pavel properties from CTD and discrete bottle sample profiles covering the Japan (East) Sea in summer, 1999: Japan sea; Ocean chemistry; Ocean atlas; Marginal seas; Water masses 1. Introduction The Japan or East

Talley, Lynne D.

493

Global ocean wind power sensitivity to surface layer stability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

observa- tions, vertical wind speed profile estimation givenspeed differences compared to over the Gulf Stream, 80 m wind power is relatively smaller because of reduced verticalvertical momentum transfer over the Gulf Stream and North Atlantic Current results in sub-logarithmic wind profiles, reduced 80 – 10 m wind speed

Capps, Scott B; Zender, Charles S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Radionuclide Concentrations in Surface Air: Direct Relationship to Global Fallout  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Centuries of Climatic Record from Camp Century on the Greenland Ice Sheet Abstract...the entire Greenland ice sheet at Camp Century (6). Certain physical and chemical...stable isotope dating method on the Camp Century core (see 10). The appr-oximiiate...

Michael T. Kleinman; Herbert L. Volchok

1969-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

495

The Global Energy Challenge  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The expected doubling of global energy demand by 2050 challenges our traditional patterns of energy production, distribution and use.   The continued use of fossil fuels raises concerns about supply, security, environment and climate.  New routes are needed for the efficient conversion of energy from chemical fuel, sunlight, and heat to electricity or hydrogen as an energy carrier and finally to end uses like transportation, lighting, and heating. Opportunities for efficient new energy conversion routes based on nanoscale materials will be presented, with emphasis on the sustainable energy technologies they enable.

George Crabtree

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

496

The Global Energy Challenge  

SciTech Connect

The expected doubling of global energy demand by 2050 challenges our traditional patterns of energy production, distribution and use.   The continued use of fossil fuels raises concerns about supply, security, environment and climate.  New routes are needed for the efficient conversion of energy from chemical fuel, sunlight, and heat to electricity or hydrogen as an energy carrier and finally to end uses like transportation, lighting, and heating. Opportunities for efficient new energy conversion routes based on nanoscale materials will be presented, with emphasis on the sustainable energy technologies they enable.

George Crabtree

2007-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

497

Recent Global Climate Change-Related News and Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recent Global Climate Change-Related News and Publications Recent Global Climate Change-Related News and Publications A sampling of what CDIAC staff members have been following: Extreme summer weather in northern mid-latitudes linked to a vanishing cryosphere. Tang, Q., X. Zhang, and J.A. Francis, 2013, Nature Climate Change DOI: 10.1038/nclimate2065. Uncertainty in annual aankings from NOAA's global temperature time series. Arguez A., T.R. Karl, M.F. Squires, and R.S. Vose, 2013, Geophysical Research Letters DOI: 10.1002/2013GL057999. Climate extremes and the carbon cycle. Reichstein, M., et al.., 2013, Nature DOI: 10.1038/nature12350. Anatomy of an extreme event. Hoerling, M., et al., 2013, J. Climate DOI: 10.1175/JCLI-D-12-00270.1. Australia's unique influence on global sea level in 2010-2011. Fasullo, J.T., C. Boening, F.W. Landerer, and R.S. Nerem, 2013, Geophysical

498

Examining Sea Ice in the Southern Ocean Using ArcGIS Tracy L. DeLiberty, Cathleen A. Geiger and Mary D. Lemcke  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. On the contrary, the southern ice cover modeling results produce conflicting responses in global warming scenariosExamining Sea Ice in the Southern Ocean Using ArcGIS Tracy L. DeLiberty, Cathleen A. Geiger at the University of Delaware, the Australian Antarctic Division, the National Ice Center (NIC), Clarkson University

Geiger, Cathleen

499

Distribution of the organic matter in the channel-levees systems of the Congo mud-rich deep sea fan (West Africa).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(West Africa). Implication for deep offshore petroleum source rocks and global carbon cycle François), the origin of which is a mixture of terrestrial higher- plant debris and deeply oxidized phytoplanktonic-prone source rocks for the deep offshore of the Atlantic margins. Finally, the Congo deep-sea turbiditic system

500

Global warming and oil spills could cool shoaling reefs  

SciTech Connect

High water temperature generated on reef flats have been implicated as one of the factors determining the ecological patterns and structural morphologies peculiar to shoaling reefs. In approximately ten years of water temperature and water level data from a shoaling reef flat at Punta Galeta (Caribbean Panama), water temperatures were dependent on water levels. Water temperatures ranged up to 38[degrees]C when daily minimum water depths over the reef crest were < 12 cm, but never exceeded 30[degrees]C when the minimum water levels were > 12 cm. If conservative predictions of sea level rise caused by global warming are correct, normal vertical accretion rates of the reef flat could keep pace with rising sea level until the middle of the next century; after that the occurrence of high water temperatures would be rapidly reduced. However, damage from an oil spill at Punta Galeta in 1986 was concentrated at the seaward margin of the reef flat, where biogenic processes control the overall vertical accretion of the reef platform. By slowing rates of vertical accretion, oil impact could potentially accelerate the effects of global warming on the ecology and morphology of the reef.

Cubit, J.D. (Smithsonian Tropical Research Inst., Apdo (Panama))

1990-01-09T23:59:59.000Z