Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global risk-based corrective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Soils Project Risk-Based Corrective Action Evaluation Process with ROTC 1 and ROTC 2, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This document formally defines and clarifies the NDEP-approved process the NNSA/NSO Soils Activity uses to fulfill the requirements of the FFACO and state regulations. This process is used to establish FALs in accordance with the risk-based corrective action (RBCA) process stipulated in Chapter 445 of the Nevada Administrative Code (NAC) as described in the ASTM International (ASTM) Method E1739-95 (NAC, 2008; ASTM, 1995). It is designed to provide a set of consistent standards for chemical and radiological corrective actions.

Matthews, Patrick; Sloop, Christina

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Empirical Correction of the NCEP Global Forecast System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines the extent to which an empirical correction method can improve forecasts of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) operational Global Forecast System. The empirical correction is based on adding a forcing ...

Xiaosong Yang; Timothy DelSole; Hua-Lu Pan

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

USING RISK-BASED CORRECTIVE ACTION (RBCA) TO ASSESS (THEORETICAL) CANCER DEATHS AVERTED COMPARED TO THE (REAL) COST OF ENVIRONMENTAL REMEDIATION  

SciTech Connect

In 1978, on the basis of existing health studies at the time, the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project legislation was proposed that would authorize remedial action at inactive uranium processing sites and vicinity properties. The cost of the program to the Federal Government was expected to be $180 million. With the completion of this project, approximately 1300 theoretical cancer deaths were prevented in the next 100 years at a cost of $1.45 billion, based on the Fiscal Year 1998 Federal UMTRA budget. The individual site costs ranged from $0.2 million up to $18 billion spent per theoretical cancer death averted over the next 100 years. Resources required to sustain remediation activities such as this are subject to reduction over time, and are originally based on conservative assumptions that tend to overestimate risks to the general public. This evaluation used a process incorporating risk-based corrective action (RBCA); a three-tiered, decision-making process tailoring corrective action activities according to site-specific conditions and risks. If RBCA had been applied at the start of the UMTRA Project, and using a criterion of >1 excess cancer death prevented as justification to remediate the site, only 50% of the existing sites would have been remediated, yielding a cost savings of $303.6 million to the Federal Government and affected States, which share 10% of the cost. This cost savings equates to 21% of the overall project budget. In addition, only 22% of the vicinity properties had structural contamination contributing to elevated interior gamma exposure and radon levels. Focusing only on these particular properties could have saved an additional $269.3 million, yielding a total savings of $573 million; 40% of the overall project budget. As operational experience is acquired, including greater understanding of the radiological and nonradiological risks, decisions should be based on the RBCA process, rather than relying on conservative assumptions that tend to overestimate risks to the general public.

Miller, M. L.; Hylko, J. M.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

4

Simultaneous global coupling and vertical dispersion correction in RHIC  

SciTech Connect

Residual vertical dispersion on the order of +/-0.2 m (peak to peak) has been measured at store energies for both polarized protons and heavy ion beams in RHIC. The hypothesis is that this may have impact on the polarization transmission efficiency during the energy ramp, the polarization lifetime at store and, for heavy ions, the dynamic aperture. An algorithm to correct global coupling and dispersion simultaneously using existing skew quadrupoles was developed. Measured coupling and dispersion functions acquired before and after correction are presented.

Liu C.; Luo, Y.; Marusic, A.; Minty, M.

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

5

Dynamic ray tracing and traveltime corrections for global seismic tomography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a dynamic ray tracing program for a spherically symmetric Earth that may be used to compute Frechet kernels for traveltime and amplitude anomalies at finite frequency. The program works for arbitrarily defined phases and background models. The numerical precisions of kinematic and dynamic ray tracing are optimized to produce traveltime errors under 0.1 s, which is well below the data uncertainty in global seismology. This tolerance level is obtained for an integration step size of about 20 km for the most common seismic phases. We also give software to compute ellipticity, crustal and topographic corrections and attenuation.

Tian Yue [Department of Geosciences, Guyot Hall, Princeton University, NJ 08544 (United States)], E-mail: ytian@princeton.edu; Hung, S.-H. [Department of Geosciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Nolet, Guust [Department of Geosciences, Guyot Hall, Princeton University, NJ 08544 (United States); Montelli, Raffaella [ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company, P.O. Box 22189, GW03-940A, Houston, TX 77252-2189 (United States); Dahlen, F.A. [Department of Geosciences, Guyot Hall, Princeton University, NJ 08544 (United States)

2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

6

Global analysis of proton elastic form factor data with two-photon exchange corrections  

SciTech Connect

We use the world's data on elastic electron-proton scattering and calculations of two-photon exchange effects to extract corrected values of the proton's electric and magnetic form factors over the full Q^2 range of the existing data. Our analysis combines the corrected Rosenbluth cross section and polarization transfer data, and is the first extraction of G_Ep and G_Mp including explicit two-photon exchange corrections and their associated uncertainties. In addition, we examine the angular dependence of the corrected cross sections, and discuss the possible nonlinearities of the cross section as a function of epsilon.

J. Arrington; W. Melnitchouk; J. A. Tjon

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

A NEW GUI FOR GLOBAL ORBIT CORRECTION AT THE ALS USING MATLAB  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Orbit correction is a vital procedure at particle accelerators around the world. The orbit correction routine currently used at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a bit cumbersome and a new Graphical User Interface (GUI) has been developed using MATLAB. The correction algorithm uses a singular value decomposition method for calculating the required corrector magnet changes for correcting the orbit. The application has been successfully tested at the ALS. The GUI display provided important information regarding the orbit including the orbit errors before and after correction, the amount of corrector magnet strength change, and the standard deviation of the orbit error with respect to the number of singular values used. The use of more singular values resulted in better correction of the orbit error but at the expense of enormous corrector magnet strength changes. The results showed an inverse relationship between the peak-to-peak values of the orbit error and the number of singular values used. The GUI interface helps the ALS physicists and operators understand the specifi c behavior of the orbit. The application is convenient to use and is a substantial improvement over the previous orbit correction routine in terms of user friendliness and compactness.

Pachikara, J.; Portmann, G.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Risk-based regulation: A utility's perspective  

SciTech Connect

Yankee Atomic Electric Company (YAEC) has supported the operation of several plants under the premise that regulations and corresponding implementation strategies are intended to be [open quotes]risk based.[close quotes] During the past 15 yr, these efforts have changed from essentially qualitative to a blend of qualitative and quantitative. Our observation is that implementation of regulatory requirements has often not addressed the risk significance of the underlying intent of regulations on a proportionate basis. It has caused our resource allocation to be skewed, to the point that our cost-competitiveness has eroded, but more importantly we have missed opportunities for increases in safety.

Chapman, J.R. (Yankee Atomic Electric Co., Bolton, MA (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Risk-based access control systems built on fuzzy inferences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuzzy inference is a promising approach to implement risk-based access control systems. However, its application to access control raises some novel problems that have not been yet investigated. First, because there are many different fuzzy operations, ... Keywords: access control, fuzzy inference, risk

Qun Ni; Elisa Bertino; Jorge Lobo

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Protecting the Smart Grid: A Risk Based Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a risk-based approach to security that has been used for years in protecting physical assets, and shows how it could be modified to help secure the digital aspects of the smart grid and control systems in general. One way the smart grid has been said to be vulnerable is that mass load fluctuations could be created by quickly turning off and on large quantities of smart meters. We investigate the plausibility.

Clements, Samuel L.; Kirkham, Harold; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Lu, Shuai

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

11

Guidelines for risk-based prioritization of DOE activities  

SciTech Connect

This standard describes issues that should be considered when comparing, selecting, or implementing risk-based prioritization (RBP) systems. It also discusses characteristics that should be used in evaluating the quality of an RBP system and its associated results. The purpose of this standard is to provide guidance for selecting or developing an RBP system so that when implemented, it will: (a) improve the quality of the RBP systems employed by DOE and its contractors; (b) improve the consistency and comparability of RBP system results; (c) satisfy DOE requests to perform RBP; (d) help ensure that limited resources are used efficiently and effectively; (e) help ensure that characteristics for evaluating RBP systems are met and properly balanced; (f) promote greater understanding, use, and acceptance of RBP systems; (g) promote greater understanding between DOE and its stakeholders and regulators; (h) improve the quality of resource allocation, planning, and scheduling decisions. This standard is applicable to any and all uses of RBP by DOE elements, including cases in which RBP is requested by DOE or is used to help allocate resources among alternatives that compete for resources. Prioritizing alternatives that compete for limited resources encompasses many policy issues that are inherent to an RBP effort. It is the position of this standard that policy issues should be determined by the decision maker(s) requesting the prioritization. For additional information on policy issues, refer to section 10 on Application Guidance for Policy Issues.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Risk-Based Maintenance Application Case Study: Risk Evaluation and Prioritization at a Fossil Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes an application of the use of risk-based maintenance prioritization at a fossil power plant. In 2002, EPRI issued a report titled "Risk Based Maintenance Guideline" (product number 1004382) for fossil power plants. That guideline described several risk-based methods, which are being used in other industries primarily within the United States. Since then, a method called Risk Evaluation and Prioritization (REaP) has been evaluated for its use in decision making at fossil power plants ...

2003-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

13

2013 Global Carbon Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2013 Global Carbon Project 2013 Global Carbon Project DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/GCP_2013_V1.1 image 2013 Budget v1.1 (November 2013) image 2013 Budget v1.3 (December 2013, contains typographical corrections to 2011 Australia emissions from v1.1 and corrections to the 2011 Australia transfer and consumption emissions from v1.2) image image image image Global Carbon Dioxide Emissions to Reach 36 Billion Tonnes in 2013 Global emissions of carbon dioxide from the combustion of fossil fuels will reach 36 billion tonnes for the year 2013. "This is a level unprecedented in human history," says CSIRO's Dr Pep Canadell, Executive-Director of the Global Carbon Project (GCP) and co-author of a new report. Global emissions due to fossil fuel alone are set to grow this year at a slightly lower pace of 2.1% than the average 3.1% since 2000, reaching 36

14

Corrective Action Management Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Corrective Action Management Program (CAMP) Home CAMP Background DOE Directives Corrective Action Management Team Corrective Action Tracking System (CATS) CAMP Quarterly Reports...

15

Corrective Actions Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stewardship Environmental Cleanup Corrective Actions Corrective Actions Process The general process for evaluating and remediating potential release sites is called...

16

Microsoft PowerPoint - S05-04_Hoffman_Risk-Based Corrosion.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Based Corrosion Studies at SRS Based Corrosion Studies at SRS EM Waste Processing Technical Exchange 2010 E.N. Hoffman Senior Engineer A Savannah River National Laboratory November 17th, 2010 SRNL-STI-2010-00692 Print Close 2 Risk Based Corrosion Studies at SRS, SRNL-STI-2010-00692 Contributors Tommy Edwards, SRNL Tracy Murphy, SRNL Bruce Wiersma, SRNL Philip Zapp, SRNL Brenda Garcia-Diaz, SRNL Print Close 3 Risk Based Corrosion Studies at SRS, SRNL-STI-2010-00692 Type III 1.3 Mgal 1966-1981 Type I 750 kgal 1951-1953 Type II 1.0 Mgal 1955-1956 SRS Waste Tank Design and Fabrication TYPE I and II (ASTM 285-B) Experienced stress corrosion cracking (SCC) 2 have been closed; 22 scheduled for closure by 2017 No active leak sites today TYPE III (ASTM A516-70 and A537 Class I) * Post-fabrication relief of weld residual stresses

17

National Research Needs Conference Proceedings: Risk-Based Decision Making for Onsite Wastewater Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On May 19-20, 2000, the Research Needs Conference for "Risk-Based Decision Making for Onsite Wastewater Treatment" was convened in St. Louis, Missouri. The conference, funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), was the culmination of an eighteen-month-long effort by the National Decentralized Water Resources Capacity Development Project (NDWRCDP) to assist onsite wastewater leadership in identifying critical research gaps in the field. The five "White Papers" included in this volume of Pro...

2001-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

18

Handbook of methods for risk-based analysis of Technical Specification requirements  

SciTech Connect

Technical Specifications (TS) requirements for nuclear power plants define the Limiting Conditions for Operation (LCOs) and Surveillance Requirements (SRs) to assure safety during operation. In general, these requirements were based on deterministic analysis and engineering judgments. Experiences with plant operation indicate that some elements of the requirements are unnecessarily restrictive, while others may not be conducive to safety. Improvements in these requirements are facilitated by the availability of plant specific Probabilistic Safety Assessments (PSAs). The use of risk and reliability-based methods to improve TS requirements has gained wide interest because these methods can: quantitatively evaluate the risk impact and justify changes based on objective risk arguments. Provide a defensible basis for these requirements for regulatory applications. The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) Office of Research is sponsoring research to develop systematic risk-based methods to improve various aspects of TS requirements. The handbook of methods, which is being prepared, summarizes such risk-based methods. The scope of the handbook includes reliability and risk-based methods for evaluating allowed outage times (AOTs), action statements requiring shutdown where shutdown risk may be substantial, surveillance test intervals (STIs), defenses against common-cause failures, managing plant configurations, and scheduling maintenances. For each topic, the handbook summarizes methods of analysis and data needs, outlines the insights to be gained, lists additional references, and presents examples of evaluations.

Samanta, P.K.; Vesely, W.E.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

19

Handbook of methods for risk-based analyses of technical specifications  

SciTech Connect

Technical Specifications (TS) requirements for nuclear power plants define the Limiting Conditions for Operation (LCOs) and Surveillance Requirements (SRs) to assure safety during operation. In general, these requirements are based on deterministic analysis and engineering judgments. Experiences with plant operation indicate that some elements of the requirements are unnecessarily restrictive, while a few may not be conducive to safety. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) Office of Research has sponsored research to develop systematic risk-based methods to improve various aspects of TS requirements. This handbook summarizes these risk-based methods. The scope of the handbook includes reliability and risk-based methods for evaluating allowed outage times (AOTs), scheduled or preventive maintenance, action statements requiring shutdown where shutdown risk may be substantial, surveillance test intervals (STIs), and management of plant configurations resulting from outages of systems, or components. For each topic, the handbook summarizes analytic methods with data needs, outlines the insights to be gained, lists additional references, and gives examples of evaluations.

Samanta, P.K.; Kim, I.S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Mankamo, T. [Avaplan Oy, Espoo (Finland); Vesely, W.E. [Science Applications International Corp., Dublin, OH (United States)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Global Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Security Global Security LANL's mission is to develop and apply science and technology to ensure the safety, security, and effectiveness of the U.S. nuclear deterrent;...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global risk-based corrective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

A risk-based waste clearance concept for the D&D program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recycling and reusing radioactively contaminated metals could be a viable alternative to D&D (decontamination and decommissioning) waste minimization. Release of such metals under the current international dose guideline would result in annual public risk levels of less than 10{sup -6} for an individual and 10{sup -2} for society. Methodology and data are available to strongly support a conservative yet practical analysis. It is feasible, therefore, to address the issues and to derive risk-based standards for the unrestricted release of radioactive scrap metal that are designed to prevent undue risk to the public.

Chen, S.Y.; Bhattacharyya, S.K.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

22

Risk-Based Management of Power Plant Equipment: Proceedings of the International Seminar, London, October 21 - 23, 2002  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research specialists, materials experts, plant engineers, senior managers, and numerous other experts from the fossil power industry presented papers at the proceedings of an international seminar targeting risk-based management of plant equipment. The focus of the seminar is the lack of national or international guidelines related to risk-based power plant assessments, reduction of maintenance-related costs, and a systematic approach for measuring the main plant risks in terms of plant safety. Held in L...

2002-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

23

Corrective Action Glossary  

SciTech Connect

The glossary of technical terms was prepared to facilitate the use of the Corrective Action Plan (CAP) issued by OSWER on November 14, 1986. The CAP presents model scopes of work for all phases of a corrective action program, including the RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI), Corrective Measures Study (CMS), Corrective Measures Implementation (CMI), and interim measures. The Corrective Action Glossary includes brief definitions of the technical terms used in the CAP and explains how they are used. In addition, expected ranges (where applicable) are provided. Parameters or terms not discussed in the CAP, but commonly associated with site investigations or remediations are also included.

Not Available

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

The role of risk-based prioritization in total quality management  

SciTech Connect

The climate in which government managers must make decisions grows more complex and uncertain. All stakeholders - the public, industry, and Congress - are demanding greater consciousness, responsibility, and accountability of programs and their budgets. Yet, managerial decisions have become multifaceted, involve greater risk, and operate over much longer time periods. Over the last four or five decades, as policy analysis and decisions became more complex, scientists from psychology, operations research, systems science, and economics have developed a more or less coherent process called decision analysis to aid program management. The process of decision analysis - a systems theoretic approach - provides the backdrop for this paper. The Laboratory Integrated Prioritization System (LIPS) has been developed as a systems analytic and risk-based prioritization tool to aid the management of the Tri-Labs` (Lawrence Livermore, Los Alamos, and Sandia) operating resources. Preliminary analyses of the effects of LIPS has confirmed the practical benefits of decision and systems sciences - the systematic, quantitative reduction in uncertainty. To date, the use of LIPS - and, hence, its value - has been restricted to resource allocation within the Tri-Labs` operations budgets. This report extends the role of risk-based prioritization to the support of DOE Total Quality Management (TQM) programs. Furthermore, this paper will argue for the requirement to institutionalize an evolutionary, decision theoretic approach to the policy analysis of the Department of Energy`s Program Budget.

Bennett, C.T.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Waste management project's alternatives: A risk-based multi-criteria assessment (RBMCA) approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine the evaluation of a waste management project's alternatives. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We present a novel risk-based multi-criteria assessment (RBMCA) approach. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In the RBMCA the evaluation criteria are based on the quantitative risk analysis of the project's alternatives. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Correlation between the criteria weight values and the decision makers' risk preferences is examined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Preference to the multi-criteria against the one-criterion evaluation process is discussed. - Abstract: This paper examines the evaluation of a waste management project's alternatives through a quantitative risk analysis. Cost benefit analysis is a widely used method, in which the investments are mainly assessed through the calculation of their evaluation indicators, namely benefit/cost (B/C) ratios, as well as the quantification of their financial, technical, environmental and social risks. Herein, a novel approach in the form of risk-based multi-criteria assessment (RBMCA) is introduced, which can be used by decision makers, in order to select the optimum alternative of a waste management project. Specifically, decision makers use multiple criteria, which are based on the cumulative probability distribution functions of the alternatives' B/C ratios. The RBMCA system is used for the evaluation of a waste incineration project's alternatives, where the correlation between the criteria weight values and the decision makers' risk preferences is analyzed and useful conclusions are discussed.

Karmperis, Athanasios C., E-mail: athkarmp@mail.ntua.gr [National Technical University of Athens, School of Mechanical Engineering, Sector of Industrial Management and Operational Research, Athens (Greece); Sotirchos, Anastasios, E-mail: anasot@mail.ntua.gr [National Technical University of Athens, School of Mechanical Engineering, Sector of Industrial Management and Operational Research, Athens (Greece); Aravossis, Konstantinos, E-mail: arvis@mail.ntua.gr [National Technical University of Athens, School of Mechanical Engineering, Sector of Industrial Management and Operational Research, Athens (Greece); Tatsiopoulos, Ilias P., E-mail: itat@central.ntua.gr [National Technical University of Athens, School of Mechanical Engineering, Sector of Industrial Management and Operational Research, Athens (Greece)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

26

COUPLING MEASUREMENT AND CORRECTION AT RHIC.  

SciTech Connect

Coupling correction at RHIC has been operationally achieved through a two-step process: using local triplet skew quadrupoles to compensate coupling corn rolled low-beta triplet quadrupoles, and minimizing the tune separation and residual coupling with orthogonal global skew quadrupole families. An application has been developed for global correction that allows skew quadrupole tuning and tune display with a choice of different tune measurement techniques, including tune-meter, Schottky and phase lock loop (PLL). Coupling effects have been analysed by using 1024-turn (TBT) information from the beam position monitor (BPM) system. These data allow the reconstruction of the off-diagonal terms of the transfer matrix, a measure of global coupling. At both injection and storage energies, coordination of tune meter kicks with TBT acquisition at 322 BPM's in each ring allows the measurement of local coupling at all BPM locations.

PILAT,F.; BEEBE-WANG,J.; FISCHER,W.; PTITSYN,V.; SATOGATA,T.

2002-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

27

Risk Based Maintenance Optimization using Probabilistic Maintenance Quantification Models of Circuit Breaker  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New maintenance techniques for circuit breakers are studied in this dissertation by proposing a probabilistic maintenance model and a new methodology to assess circuit breaker condition utilizing its control circuit data. A risk-based decision approach is proposed at system level making use of the proposed new methodology, for optimizing the maintenance schedules and allocation of resources. This dissertation is focused on developing optimal maintenance strategies for circuit breakers, both at component and system level. A probabilistic maintenance model is proposed using similar approach recently introduced for power transformers. Probabilistic models give better insight into the interplay among monitoring techniques, failure modes and maintenance techniques of the component. The model is based on the concept of representing the component life time by several deterioration stages. Inspection and maintenance is introduced at each stage and model parameters are defined. A sensitivity analysis is carried to understand the importance of model parameters in obtaining optimal maintenance strategies. The analysis covers the effect of inspection rate calculated for each stage and its impact on failure probability, inspection cost, maintenance cost and failure cost. This maintenance model is best suited for long-term maintenance planning. All simulations are carried in MATLAB and how the analysis results may be used to achieve optimal maintenance schedules is discussed. A new methodology is proposed to convert data from the control circuit of a breaker into condition of the breaker by defining several performance indices for breaker assemblies. Control circuit signal timings are extracted and a probability distribution is fitted to each timing parameter. Performance indices for various assemblies such as, trip coil, close coil, auxiliary contacts etc. are defined based on the probability distributions. These indices are updated using Bayesian approach as the new data arrives. This process can be made practical by approximating the Bayesian approach calculating the indices on-line. The quantification of maintenance is achieved by computing the indices after a maintenance action and comparing with those of previously estimated ones. A risk-based decision approach to maintenance planning is proposed based on the new methodology developed for maintenance quantification. A list of events is identified for the test system under consideration, and event probability, event consequence, and hence the risk associated with each event is computed. Optimal maintenance decisions are taken based on the computed risk levels for each event. Two case studies are presented to evaluate the performance of the proposed new methodology for maintenance quantification. The risk-based decision approach is tested on IEEE Reliability Test System. All simulations are carried in MATLAB and the discussions of results are provided.

Natti, Satish

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 504: 16a-Tunnel Muckpile, Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD)/Closure Report (CR) was prepared by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 504, 16a-Tunnel Muckpile. This CADD/CR is consistent with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. Corrective Action Unit 504 is comprised of four Corrective Action Sites (CASs): • 16-06-01, Muckpile • 16-23-01, Contaminated Burial Pit • 16-23-02, Contaminated Area • 16-99-01, Concrete Construction Waste Corrective Action Site 16-23-01 is not a burial pit; it is part of CAS 16-06-01. Therefore, there is not a separate data analysis and assessment for CAS 16-23-01; it is included as part of the assessment for CAS 16-06-01. In addition to these CASs, the channel between CAS 16-23-02 (Contaminated Area) and Mid Valley Road was investigated with walk-over radiological surveys and soil sampling using hand tools. The purpose of this CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation for closure in place with use restrictions for CAU 504. A CADD was originally submitted for CAU 504 and approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP). However, following an agreement between NDEP, DTRA, and the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office to change to a risk-based approach for assessing the corrective action investigation (CAI) data, NDEP agreed that the CAU could be re-evaluated using the risk-based approach and a CADD/CR prepared to close the site.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

29

NIST Stray light correction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... A correction, which can be done in real time, can reduce errors due to stray light by more than one order of magnitude. ...

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

30

DEVELOPMENT OF RISK-BASED AND TECHNOLOGY-INDEPENDENT SAFETY CRITERIA FOR GENERATION IV SYSTEMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project has developed quantitative safety goals for Generation IV (Gen IV) nuclear energy systems. These safety goals are risk based and technology independent. The foundations for a new approach to risk analysis has been developed, along with a new operational definition of risk. This project has furthered the current state-of-the-art by developing quantitative safety goals for both Gen IV reactors and for the overall Gen IV nuclear fuel cycle. The risk analysis approach developed will quantify performance measures, characterize uncertainty, and address a more comprehensive view of safety as it relates to the overall system. Appropriate safety criteria are necessary to manage risk in a prudent and cost-effective manner. This study is also important for government agencies responsible for managing, reviewing, and for approving advanced reactor systems because they are charged with assuring the health and safety of the public.

William E. Kastenberg; Edward Blandford; Lance Kim

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

31

Homeland security R&D roadmapping : risk-based methodological options.  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratories support the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) in the development and execution of a research and development (R&D) strategy to improve the nation's preparedness against terrorist threats. Current approaches to planning and prioritization of DHS research decisions are informed by risk assessment tools and processes intended to allocate resources to programs that are likely to have the highest payoff. Early applications of such processes have faced challenges in several areas, including characterization of the intelligent adversary and linkage to strategic risk management decisions. The risk-based analysis initiatives at Sandia Laboratories could augment the methodologies currently being applied by the DHS and could support more credible R&D roadmapping for national homeland security programs. Implementation and execution issues facing homeland security R&D initiatives within the national laboratories emerged as a particular concern in this research.

Brandt, Larry D.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Environmental restoration risk-based prioritization work package planning and risk ranking methodology. Revision 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents the risk-based prioritization methodology developed to evaluate and rank Environmental Restoration (ER) work packages at the five US Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Field Office (DOE-ORO) sites [i.e., Oak Ridge K-25 Site (K-25), Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant (Y-12)], the ER Off-site Program, and Central ER. This prioritization methodology was developed to support the increased rigor and formality of work planning in the overall conduct of operations within the DOE-ORO ER Program. Prioritization is conducted as an integral component of the fiscal ER funding cycle to establish program budget priorities. The purpose of the ER risk-based prioritization methodology is to provide ER management with the tools and processes needed to evaluate, compare, prioritize, and justify fiscal budget decisions for a diverse set of remedial action, decontamination and decommissioning, and waste management activities. The methodology provides the ER Program with a framework for (1) organizing information about identified DOE-ORO environmental problems, (2) generating qualitative assessments of the long- and short-term risks posed by DOE-ORO environmental problems, and (3) evaluating the benefits associated with candidate work packages designed to reduce those risks. Prioritization is conducted to rank ER work packages on the basis of the overall value (e.g., risk reduction, stakeholder confidence) each package provides to the ER Program. Application of the methodology yields individual work package ``scores`` and rankings that are used to develop fiscal budget requests. This document presents the technical basis for the decision support tools and process.

Dail, J.L.; Nanstad, L.D.; White, R.K.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Corrective and Preventive Action  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 Corrective/Preventive Action Process 11_0414 Page 1 of 8 8 Corrective/Preventive Action Process 11_0414 Page 1 of 8 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Corrective/Preventive Action Process Document Number: P-008 Rev 11_0414 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: Q-001, Quality Manual Notify of Changes: EOTA Employees Referenced Document(s): P-004 Business System Management Review, F-017 Corrective Action Report Planning Worksheet or F-018 Preventive Action Report Planning Worksheet P-008 Corrective/Preventive Action Process 11_0414 Page 2 of 8 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change A Initial Release 08_0310 Implemented Multiple reviewer of "Root Cause" into process. 08_0313 Changed verbiage in Process, Responsibility and Definitions for clarification. Assigned new Backup Document Owner.

34

Application of the risk-based strategy to the Hanford tank waste organic-nitrate safety issue  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the results from application of the Risk-Based Decision Management Approach for Justifying Characterization of Hanford Tank Waste to the organic-nitrate safety issue in Hanford single-shell tanks (SSTs). Existing chemical and physical models were used, taking advantage of the most current (mid-1997) sampling and analysis data. The purpose of this study is to make specific recommendations for planning characterization to help ensure the safety of each SST as it relates to the organic-nitrate safety issue. An additional objective is to demonstrate the viability of the Risk-Based Strategy for addressing Hanford tank waste safety issues.

Hunter, V.L.; Colson, S.D.; Ferryman, T.; Gephart, R.E.; Heasler, P.; Scheele, R.D.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

EMPLOYERS STRATEGIES Correctional institutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

agencies Advocacy groups Federal, state and local government United Way agencies/local branches of national agencies Environmental advocacy groups Environmental periodicals Federal government Regional, stateEMPLOYERS STRATEGIES Correctional institutions Court systems Federal, state and local government

Escher, Christine

36

Auxiliary feedwater system risk-based inspection guide for the Maine Yankee Nuclear Power Plant  

SciTech Connect

In a study sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Pacific Northwest Laboratory has developed and applied a methodology for deriving plant-specific risk-based inspection guidance for the auxiliary feedwater (AFW) system at pressurized water reactors that have not undergone probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). This methodology uses existing PRA results and plant operating experience information. Existing PRA-based inspection guidance information recently developed for the NRC for various plants was used to identify generic component failure modes. The information was then combined with plant-specific and industry-wide component information and failure data to identify failure modes and failure mechanisms for the AFW system at the selected plants. Maine Yankee was selected as one of a series of plants for study. ne product of this effort is a prioritized listing of AFW failures which have occurred at the plant and at other PWRs. This listing is intended for use by NRC inspectors in the preparation of inspection plans addressing AFW risk-important components at the Maine Yankee plant.

Gore, B.F.; Vo, T.V.; Moffitt, N.E.; Bumgardner, J.D. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Risk-based Inspection Scheduling Planning for Intelligent Agent in the Autonomous Fault Management  

SciTech Connect

This paper developed an autonomous fault management focusing to the inspection scheduling planning which was implemented to the advanced small nuclear reactor without on-site refuelling to assure the safety without human intervention. The inspection scheduling planning was developed optimally on the risk-based approach compromising between two important constraints related to the risk of action planning as such failure probability and shortest path. Performance was represented using computer simulation implemented to the DURESS components location and failure probability. It could be concluded that the first priority to be inspected was flow sensor FB2 which had the largest comparation value of 0.104233 comparing with the other components. The next route would be visited were sequentially FB1, FA2, FA1, FB, FA, VB, pump B, VA, pump A, VB2, VB1, VA2, VA1, reservoir 2, reservoir 1, FR2, and FR1. The movement route planning could be transferred to activate the robot arm which reflected as intelligent agent.

Hari Nugroho, Djoko; Sudarno [Center for Reactor Technology and Nuclear Safety-BATAN, Indonesia Building no 80 PUSPIPTEK Area, Serpong (Indonesia)

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

38

USING RISK-BASED STANDARDS WILL SHORTEN CLEANUP TIME AT PETROLEUM CONTAMINATED SITES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Air Force has identified more than 4,500 sites that require environmental investigation and possible remediation. About 2,500 of these are contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons such as jet fuel, diesel, gasoline, and heating oil. Many of the sites that require remediation will be cleaned up based on an established regulatory standard. Many state and federal regulators routinely enforce a soil cleanup standard of 100 mg/kg total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH). Several states have lowered this standard to 50 mg/kg TPH just for "good measure." The 100 mg/kg TPH standard is often used across the board--without regard for the type of petroleum hydrocarbon contamination being remediated and with little thought about the risk-based standards on which that figure was established. But where exactly did the number come from and and how did it become a standard in the first place? The answer can be traced to the California Leaking Underground Fuel Tank Field Manual, or LUFT, a manual designed to provide a consistent approach to underground storage tank spills (State of California, 1989). The LUFT manual clearly illustrates that the 100 mg/kg TPH standard is based on a

Lieutenant Colonel; Ross N. Miller; Lieutenant Colonel; Ross N. Miller

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Auxiliary feedwater system risk-based inspection guide for the South Texas Project nuclear power plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a study sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Pacific Northwest Laboratory has developed and applied a methodology for deriving plant-specific risk-based inspection guidance for the auxiliary feedwater (AFW) system at pressurized water reactors that have not undergone probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). This methodology uses existing PRA results and plant operating experience information. Existing PRA-based inspection guidance information recently developed for the NRC for various plants was used to identify generic component failure modes. This information was then combined with plant-specific and industry-wide component information and failure data to identify failure modes and failure mechanisms for the AFW system at the selected plants. South Texas Project was selected as a plant for study. The product of this effort is a prioritized listing of AFW failures which have occurred at the plant and at other PWRs. This listing is intended for use by the NRC inspectors in preparation of inspection plans addressing AFW risk important components at the South Texas Project plant.

Bumgardner, J.D.; Nickolaus, J.R.; Moffitt, N.E.; Gore, B.F.; Vo, T.V. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Correction coil cable  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates generally to the field of the manufacture of electrical coil windings, and more particularly to a unique cable assembly for use in winding coils having small wires and a large number of winding turns. The predominant current usage of the correction coil cable of the present invention is as the winding wire for correction coils in the superconducting super collider and in similar devices which might be developed in the future.

Wang, Sou-Tien

1991-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global risk-based corrective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Probabilistic Risk Based Decision Support for Oil and Gas Exploration and Production Facilities in Sensitive Ecosystems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes work performed during the initial period of the project “Probabilistic Risk Based Decision Support for Oil and Gas Exploration and Production Facilities in Sensitive Ecosystems.” The specific region that is within the scope of this study is the Fayetteville Shale Play. This is an unconventional, tight formation, natural gas play that currently has approximately 1.5 million acres under lease, primarily to Southwestern Energy Incorporated and Chesapeake Energy Incorporated. The currently active play encompasses a region from approximately Fort Smith, AR east to Little Rock, AR approximately 50 miles wide (from North to South). The initial estimates for this field put it almost on par with the Barnett Shale play in Texas. It is anticipated that thousands of wells will be drilled during the next several years; this will entail installation of massive support infrastructure of roads and pipelines, as well as drilling fluid disposal pits and infrastructure to handle millions of gallons of fracturing fluids. This project focuses on gas production in Arkansas as the test bed for application of proactive risk management decision support system for natural gas exploration and production. The activities covered in this report include meetings with representative stakeholders, development of initial content and design for an educational web site, and development and preliminary testing of an interactive mapping utility designed to provide users with information that will allow avoidance of sensitive areas during the development of the Fayetteville Shale Play. These tools have been presented to both regulatory and industrial stakeholder groups, and their feedback has been incorporated into the project.

Thoma, Greg; Veil, John; Limp, Fred; Cothren, Jackson; Gorham, Bruce; Williamson, Malcolm; Smith, Peter; Sullivan, Bob

2009-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

42

Probabilistic Risk Based Decision Support for Oil and Gas Exploration and Production Facilities in Sensitive Ecosystems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes work performed during the initial period of the project 'Probabilistic Risk Based Decision Support for Oil and Gas Exploration and Production Facilities in Sensitive Ecosystems.' The specific region that is within the scope of this study is the Fayetteville Shale Play. This is an unconventional, tight formation, natural gas play that currently has approximately 1.5 million acres under lease, primarily to Southwestern Energy Incorporated and Chesapeake Energy Incorporated. The currently active play encompasses a region from approximately Fort Smith, AR east to Little Rock, AR approximately 50 miles wide (from North to South). The initial estimates for this field put it almost on par with the Barnett Shale play in Texas. It is anticipated that thousands of wells will be drilled during the next several years; this will entail installation of massive support infrastructure of roads and pipelines, as well as drilling fluid disposal pits and infrastructure to handle millions of gallons of fracturing fluids. This project focuses on gas production in Arkansas as the test bed for application of proactive risk management decision support system for natural gas exploration and production. The activities covered in this report include meetings with representative stakeholders, development of initial content and design for an educational web site, and development and preliminary testing of an interactive mapping utility designed to provide users with information that will allow avoidance of sensitive areas during the development of the Fayetteville Shale Play. These tools have been presented to both regulatory and industrial stakeholder groups, and their feedback has been incorporated into the project.

Greg Thoma; John Veil; Fred Limp; Jackson Cothren; Bruce Gorham; Malcolm Williamson; Peter Smith; Bob Sullivan

2009-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

43

Optimizing Power Factor Correction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The optimal investment for power factor correcting capacitors for Kansas Power and Light Company large power contract customers is studied. Since the billing capacity is determined by dividing the real demand by the power factor (the minimum billing capacity is based on 80 percent of the summer peak billing capacity) and the billing capacity is used to determine the number of kilowatt-hours billed at each pricing tier, the power factor affects both the demand and the energy charge. There is almost no information available in the literature concerning recommended power factor corrections for this situation. The general advice commonly given in the past has been that power factor should be corrected to above 0.9 if it is below that value to begin with, but that does not take into account the facts of the situation studied here. Calculations relevant to a commercial consumer of electricity were made for demands of 200, 400, 800, 1,600, 3,200, and 6,400 kW and monthly energy consumption periods of 100, 150, 200, 300, 400, and 500 hours for several capacitor purchase and installation costs. The results are displayed in a series of graphs that enable annual cost savings and payback periods to be readily determined over a range of commonly encountered parameter values. It is found that it is often economically advantageous to correct a power factor to near unity.

Phillips, R. K.; Burmeister, L. C.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 447: Project Shoal Area, Subsurface, Nevada, Rev. No.: 3 with Errata Sheet  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan (CADD/CAP) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 447, Project Shoal Area (PSA)-Subsurface, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996). Corrective Action Unit 447 is located in the Sand Springs Mountains in Churchill County, Nevada, approximately 48 kilometers (30 miles) southeast of Fallon, Nevada. The CADD/CAP combines the decision document (CADD) with the Corrective Action Plan (CAP) and provides or references the specific information necessary to recommend corrective actions for CAU 447, as provided in the FFACO. Corrective Action Unit 447 consists of two corrective action sites (CASs): CAS 57-49-01, Emplacement Shaft, and CAS 57-57-001, Cavity. The emplacement shaft (CAS-57-49-01) was backfilled and plugged in 1996 and will not be evaluated further. The purpose of the CADD portion of the document (Section 1.0 to Section 4.0) is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for the subsurface at PSA. To achieve this, the following tasks were required: (1) Develop corrective action objectives. (2) Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria. (3) Develop corrective action alternatives. (4) Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of the corrective action alternatives in relation to the corrective action objectives and screening criteria. (5) Recommend a preferred corrective action alternative for the subsurface at PSA. The original Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) for the PSA was approved in September 1996 and described a plan to drill and test four characterization wells, followed by flow and transport modeling (DOE/NV, 1996). The resultant drilling is described in a data report (DOE/NV, 1998e) and the data analysis and modeling in an interim modeling report (Pohll et al., 1998). After considering the results of the modeling effort, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) determined that the degree of uncertainty in transport predictions for PSA remained unacceptably large. As a result, a second CAIP was developed by DOE and approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) in December 1998 (DOE/NV, 1998a). This plan prescribed a rigorous analysis of uncertainty in the Shoal model and quantification of methods of reducing uncertainty through data collection. This analysis is termed a Data Decision Analysis (Pohll et al., 1999a) and formed the basis for a second major characterization effort at PSA (Pohll et al., 1999b). The details for this second field effort are presented in an Addendum to the CAIP, which was approved by NDEP in April 1999 (DOE/NV, 1999a). Four additional characterization wells were drilled at PSA during summer and fall of 1999; details of the drilling and well installation are in IT Corporation (2000), with testing reported in Mihevc et al. (2000). A key component of the second field program was a tracer test between two of the new wells (Carroll et al., 2000; Reimus et al., 2003). Based on the potential exposure pathways, two corrective action objectives were identified for CAU 447: Prevent or mitigate exposure to groundwater contaminants of concern at concentrations exceeding regulatory maximum contaminant levels or risk-based levels; and Reduce the risk to human health and the environment to the extent practicable. Based on the review of existing data, the results of the modeling, future use, and current operations at PSA, the following alternatives have been developed for consideration at CAU 447: Alternative 1--No Further Action; Alternative 2--Proof-of-Concept and Monitoring with Institutional Controls; and Alternative 3--Contaminant Control. The corrective action alternatives were evaluated based on the approach outlined in the ''Focused Evaluation of Selected Remedial Alternatives for the Underground Test Area'' (DOE/NV, 1998b). Each alternative was assessed against nine evaluation criteria. These criteria include overall protection of human health and the environment;

Tim Echelard

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 447: Project Shoal Area, Subsurface, Nevada, Rev. No.: 3 with Errata Sheet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan (CADD/CAP) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 447, Project Shoal Area (PSA)-Subsurface, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996). Corrective Action Unit 447 is located in the Sand Springs Mountains in Churchill County, Nevada, approximately 48 kilometers (30 miles) southeast of Fallon, Nevada. The CADD/CAP combines the decision document (CADD) with the Corrective Action Plan (CAP) and provides or references the specific information necessary to recommend corrective actions for CAU 447, as provided in the FFACO. Corrective Action Unit 447 consists of two corrective action sites (CASs): CAS 57-49-01, Emplacement Shaft, and CAS 57-57-001, Cavity. The emplacement shaft (CAS-57-49-01) was backfilled and plugged in 1996 and will not be evaluated further. The purpose of the CADD portion of the document (Section 1.0 to Section 4.0) is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for the subsurface at PSA. To achieve this, the following tasks were required: (1) Develop corrective action objectives. (2) Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria. (3) Develop corrective action alternatives. (4) Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of the corrective action alternatives in relation to the corrective action objectives and screening criteria. (5) Recommend a preferred corrective action alternative for the subsurface at PSA. The original Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) for the PSA was approved in September 1996 and described a plan to drill and test four characterization wells, followed by flow and transport modeling (DOE/NV, 1996). The resultant drilling is described in a data report (DOE/NV, 1998e) and the data analysis and modeling in an interim modeling report (Pohll et al., 1998). After considering the results of the modeling effort, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) determined that the degree of uncertainty in transport predictions for PSA remained unacceptably large. As a result, a second CAIP was developed by DOE and approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) in December 1998 (DOE/NV, 1998a). This plan prescribed a rigorous analysis of uncertainty in the Shoal model and quantification of methods of reducing uncertainty through data collection. This analysis is termed a Data Decision Analysis (Pohll et al., 1999a) and formed the basis for a second major characterization effort at PSA (Pohll et al., 1999b). The details for this second field effort are presented in an Addendum to the CAIP, which was approved by NDEP in April 1999 (DOE/NV, 1999a). Four additional characterization wells were drilled at PSA during summer and fall of 1999; details of the drilling and well installation are in IT Corporation (2000), with testing reported in Mihevc et al. (2000). A key component of the second field program was a tracer test between two of the new wells (Carroll et al., 2000; Reimus et al., 2003). Based on the potential exposure pathways, two corrective action objectives were identified for CAU 447: Prevent or mitigate exposure to groundwater contaminants of concern at concentrations exceeding regulatory maximum contaminant levels or risk-based levels; and Reduce the risk to human health and the environment to the extent practicable. Based on the review of existing data, the results of the modeling, future use, and current operations at PSA, the following alternatives have been developed for consideration at CAU 447: Alternative 1--No Further Action; Alternative 2--Proof-of-Concept and Monitoring with Institutional Controls; and Alternative 3--Contaminant Control. The corrective action alternatives were evaluated based on the approach outlined in the ''Focused Evaluation of Selected Remedial Alternatives for the Underground Test Area'' (DOE/NV, 1998b). Each alternative was assessed against nine evaluation criteria. These criteria include overall protection of human health and the environment;

Tim Echelard

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Correction of Global Precipitation Products for Orographic Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Underestimation of precipitation in topographically complex regions plagues most gauge-based gridded precipitation datasets. Gauge locations are usually in or near population centers, which tend to lie at low elevations relative to the ...

Jennifer C. Adam; Elizabeth A. Clark; Dennis P. Lettenmaier; Eric F. Wood

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

High Pressure Coolant Injection (HPCI) System Risk-Based Inspection Guide for Browns Ferry Nuclear Power Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The High Pressure Coolant Injection (HPCI) system has been examined from a risk perspective. A System Risk-Based Inspection Guide (S-RIG) has been developed as an aid to HPCI system inspections at the Browns Ferry Nuclear Power Plant, Units 1, 2 and 3. The role of. the HPCI system in mitigating accidents is discussed in this S-RIG, along with insights on identified risk-based failure modes which could prevent proper operation of the system. The S-RIG provides a review of industry-wide operating experience, including plant-specific illustrative examples to augment the PRA and operational considerations in identifying a catalogue of basic PRA failure modes for the HPCI system. It is designed to be used as a reference for routine inspections, self-initiated safety system functional inspections (SSFIs), and the evaluation of risk significance of component failures at the nuclear power plant.

Wong, S.; DiBiasio, A.; Gunther, W. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Approach and issues toward development of risk-based release standards for radioactive scrap metal recycle and reuse  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities is expected to generate large amounts of slightly radioactive scrap metal (RSM). It is likely that some of these materials will be suitable for recycling and reuse. The amount of scrap steel from DOE facilities, for instance, is estimated to be more than one million tons (Hertzler 1993). However, under current practice and without the establishment of acceptable recycling standards, the RSM would be disposed of primarily as radioactive low-level waste (LLW). In the United States, no specific standards have been developed for the unrestricted release of bulk contaminated materials. Although standards for unrestricted release of radioactive surface contamination (NRC 1974) have existed for about 20 years, the release of materials is not commonly practiced because of the lack of risk-based justifications. Recent guidance from international bodies (IAEA 1988) has established a basis for deriving risk-based release limits for radioactive materials. It is important, therefore, to evaluate the feasibility of recycling and associated issues necessary for the establishment of risk-based release limits for the radioactive metals.

Chen, S.Y.; Nieves, L.A.; Nabelssi, B.K.; LePoire, D.J.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Correction coil cable  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wire cable assembly (10, 310) adapted for the winding of electrical coils is taught. A primary intended use is for use in particle tube assemblies (532) for the superconducting super collider. The correction coil cables (10, 310) have wires (14, 314) collected in wire arrays (12, 312) with a center rib (16, 316) sandwiched therebetween to form a core assembly (18, 318 ). The core assembly (18, 318) is surrounded by an assembly housing (20, 320) having an inner spiral wrap (22, 322) and a counter wound outer spiral wrap (24, 324). An alternate embodiment (410) of the invention is rolled into a keystoned shape to improve radial alignment of the correction coil cable (410) on a particle tube (733) in a particle tube assembly (732).

Wang, Sou-Tien (Danville, CA)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Galileo single frequency ionospheric correction: performances in terms of position  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For GPS single frequency users, the ionospheric contribution to the error budget is estimated by the well-known Klobuchar algorithm. For Galileo, it will be mitigated by a global algorithm based on the NeQuick model. This algorithm relies on the adaptation ... Keywords: Data ingestion, Galileo, Ionospheric correction, NeQuick model, Positioning, Single frequency

Benoît Bidaine; Matthieu Lonchay; René Warnant

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Response of the NMC MRF Model to Systematic-Error Correction within Integration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe an extensive nudging (within-integration correction) experiment with a large and sophisticated atmospheric model. The model is an R30 version of the National Meteorological Center (NMC) T80 operational global medium-range forecast ...

Suranjana Saha

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

About the Reliability of Manual Model PV Corrections to Improve Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Weather Forecast Centre of Météo-France has developed a tool that corrects the state of the atmosphere within the Action de Recherche Petite Echelle Grande Echelle (ARPEGE) operational global model by adjusting the potential vorticity ...

Philippe Arbogast; Karine Maynard; Catherine Piriou

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Bias Correction and Forecast Skill of NCEP GFS Ensemble Week-1 and Week-2 Precipitation, 2-m Surface Air Temperature, and Soil Moisture Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple bias correction method was used to correct daily operational ensemble week-1 and week-2 precipitation and 2-m surface air temperature forecasts from the NCEP Global Forecast System (GFS). The study shows some unexpected and striking ...

Yun Fan; Huug van den Dool

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Integrated Global Nuclear Materials Management - Preliminary Concepts -  

SciTech Connect

Approach to Connect Global Objectives and Local Actions: (1) Articulate global objectives into a hierarchy of subsystem requirements and local attributes and measures; (2) Establish a baseline system and viable alternatives through the interactions and relationships (e.g., networks) of local system elements and their options; (3) Evaluate performance of system alternatives and develop improved nuclear material management strategies and technologies; and (4) The need to address greatest concerns first (prioritized or graded approach) and to make tradeoffs among implementation options and competing objectives entails a risk-based approach. IGNMM could provide a systematic understanding of global nuclear materials management and evolutionarily improve and integrate the management through an active architecture, using for example, situation awareness, system models, methods, technologies, and international cooperation. Different tools would be used within the overall framework to address individual issues on the desired geographic scale that could be easily linked to broader analyses. Life-cycle system analyses would allow for evaluating material path alternatives on an integrated global scale. Disconnects, overlaps, technical options, and alternatives for optimizing nuclear materials processes could be evaluated in an integrated manner.

Dreicer, M; Jones, E; Richardson, J

2006-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

55

Risk-Based Disposal Plan for PCB Paint in the TRA Fluorinel Dissolution Process Mockup and Gamma Facilities Canal  

SciTech Connect

This Toxic Substances Control Act Risk-Based Polychlorinated Biphenyl Disposal plan was developed for the Test Reactor Area Fluorinel Dissolution Process Mockup and Gamma Facilities Waste System, located in Building TRA-641 at the Reactor Technology Complex, Idaho National Laboratory Site, to address painted surfaces in the empty canal under 40 CFR 761.62(c) for paint, and under 40 CFR 761.61(c) for PCBs that may have penetrated into the concrete. The canal walls and floor will be painted with two coats of contrasting non-PCB paint and labeled as PCB. The canal is covered with open decking; the access grate is locked shut and signed to indicate PCB contamination in the canal. Access to the canal will require facility manager permission. Protective equipment for personnel and equipment entering the canal will be required. Waste from the canal, generated during ultimate Decontamination and Decommissioning, shall be managed and disposed as PCB Bulk Product Waste.

R. A. Montgomery

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

USING A RISK-BASED METHODOLOGY FOR THE TRANSFER OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL WITHIN THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE BOUNDARY  

SciTech Connect

Shipment of radioactive materials (RAM) is discussed in the Code of Federal Regulations in parts of both 49 CFR and 10 CFR. The regulations provide the requirements and rules necessary for the safe shipment of RAM across public highways, railways, waterways, and through the air. These shipments are sometimes referred to as in-commerce shipments. Shipments of RAM entirely within the boundaries of Department of Energy sites, such as the Savannah River Site (SRS), can be made using methodology allowing provisions to maintain equivalent safety while deviating from the regulations for in-commerce shipments. These onsite shipments are known as transfers at the SRS. These transfers must follow the requirements approved in a site-specific Transportation Safety Document (TSD). The TSD defines how the site will transfer materials so that they have equivalence to the regulations. These equivalences are documented in an Onsite Safety Assessment (OSA). The OSA can show how a particular packaging used onsite is equivalent to that which would be used for an in-commerce shipment. This is known as a deterministic approach. However, when a deterministic approach is not viable, the TSD allows for a risk-based OSA to be written. These risk-based assessments show that if a packaging does not provide the necessary safety to ensure that materials are not released (during normal or accident conditions) then the worst-case release of materials does not result in a dose consequence worse than that defined for the SRS. This paper will discuss recent challenges and successes using this methodology at the SRS.

Loftin, B.; Watkins, R.; Loibl, M.

2010-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

57

First Impressions Stafford Creek Correctional  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

First Impressions Stafford Creek Correctional Center in Washington state participates Project In July 2010, I found myself at the gates of Stafford Creek Corrections Center, turning over my. The program engages scientists in a medium and activity that may be unfamiliar--presenting Stafford Creek

LeRoy, Carri J.

58

Global Home File System at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home Home Global Home Filesystem Overview Global home directories (or "global homes") provide a convenient means for a user to have access to source files, input files, configuration files, etc., regardless of the platform the user is logged in to. Wherever possible, you should refer to your home directory using the environment variable $HOME. The absolute path to your home directory (e.g., /u4/elvis/) may change, but the value of $HOME will always be correct. For security reasons, you should never allow "world write" access to your $HOME directory or your $HOME/.ssh directory. NERSC scans for such security weakness, and, if detected, will change the permissions on your directories. Platforms Utilizing Global Home The Global Home file system is available on all NERSC systems except PDSF.

59

THE COUPLING CORRECTION SYSTEM AT RHIC: RESULTS FOR THE RUN 2000 AND PLANS FOR 2001.  

SciTech Connect

The RHIC coupling correction system has been commissioned during the year 2000 run, which marked the successful first year of operation of the machine. The RHIC coupling correction system is described with particular emphasis on its flexibility, which allows using both global and local coupling compensation techniques. Coupling measurements and correction data are presented for the RHIC Blue and Yellow rings, together with the procedure used to reduce the minimum tune separation to 0.001, the typical resolution for tune measurements during run 2000. They further demonstrate how local coupling compensation in the interaction regions substantially reduces the strength of the skew quadrupole families used for global coupling compensation.

PILAT,F.; FISCHER,W.; PEGGS,S.; PTITSYN,V.; TEPIKIAN,S.

2001-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

60

THE COUPLING CORRECTION SYSTEM AT RHIC: RESULTS FOR THE RUN 2000 AND PLANS FOR 2001.  

SciTech Connect

The RHIC coupling correction system has been commissioned during the Year 2000 run, which marked the successful first year of operation of the machine. The RHIC coupling correction system is described with particular emphasis on its flexibility, which allows using both global and local coupling compensation techniques. Coupling measurements and correction data are presented for the RHIC Blue and Yellow rings, together with the procedure used to reduce the minimum tune separation to 0.001, the typical resolution for tune measurements during run 2000. They further demonstrate how local coupling compensation in the interaction region substantially reduces the strength of the skew quadrupole families used for global coupling compensation.

PILAT,F.; FISCHER,W.; PEGGS,S.; PTITSYN,V.; TEPIKIAN,S.

2001-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global risk-based corrective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 417: Central Nevada Test Area Surface, Nevada Appendix D - Corrective Action Investigation Report, Central Nevada Test Area, CAU 417  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's selection of a recommended corrective action alternative (CAA) appropriate to facilitate the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417: Central Nevada Test Area Surface, Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in Hot Creek Valley in Nye County, Nevada, and consisting of three separate land withdrawal areas (UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4), CAU 417 is comprised of 34 corrective action sites (CASs) including 2 underground storage tanks, 5 septic systems, 8 shaker pad/cuttings disposal areas, 1 decontamination facility pit, 1 burn area, 1 scrap/trash dump, 1 outlier area, 8 housekeeping sites, and 16 mud pits. Four field events were conducted between September 1996 and June 1998 to complete a corrective action investigation indicating that the only contaminant of concern was total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) which was found in 18 of the CASs. A total of 1,028 samples were analyzed. During this investigation, a statistical approach was used to determine which depth intervals or layers inside individual mud pits and shaker pad areas were above the State action levels for the TPH. Other related field sampling activities (i.e., expedited site characterization methods, surface geophysical surveys, direct-push geophysical surveys, direct-push soil sampling, and rotosonic drilling located septic leachfields) were conducted in this four-phase investigation; however, no further contaminants of concern (COCs) were identified. During and after the investigation activities, several of the sites which had surface debris but no COCs were cleaned up as housekeeping sites, two septic tanks were closed in place, and two underground storage tanks were removed. The focus of this CADD was to identify CAAs which would promote the prevention or mitigation of human exposure to surface and subsurface soils with contaminant concentrations above preliminary action levels. Based on the potential exposure pathways, several risk-based CAAs were developed and evaluated against the individual CAS requirements. It was determined that a combination of the CAAs would be recommended to meet all applicable state and federal regulations for closure of these sites and to eliminate potential future exposure pathways to the TPH-contaminated soils.

U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations office

1999-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

62

Nadir Correction of AIRS Radiances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A statistical method to correct for the limb effect in off-nadir Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) channel radiances is described, using the channel radiance itself and principal components (PCs) of the other channel radiances to account for ...

Chee-Kiat Teo; Tieh-Yong Koh

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Entropic corrections to Einstein equations  

SciTech Connect

Considering the general quantum corrections to the area law of black hole entropy and adopting the viewpoint that gravity interprets as an entropic force, we derive the modified forms of Modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) theory of gravitation and Einstein field equations. As two special cases we study the logarithmic and power-law corrections to entropy and find the explicit form of the obtained modified equations.

Hendi, S. H. [Physics Department, College of Sciences, Yasouj University, Yasouj 75914 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics of Maragha (RIAAM), Maragha (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sheykhi, A. [Research Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics of Maragha (RIAAM), Maragha (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Physics, Shahid Bahonar University, P.O. Box 76175-132, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

64

Reusable and correct endogenous model transformations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Correctness of model transformations is a prerequisite for generating correct implementations from models. Given refining model transformations that preserve desirable properties, models can be transformed into correct-by-construction implementations. ...

Suzana Andova; Mark G. J. van den Brand; Luc Engelen

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Risk identification and assessment in a risk based audit environment: the effects of budget constraints and decision aid use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Risk based audit (RBA) approaches represent a major trend in current audit methodology. The approach is based on risk analysis used to identify business strategy risk. The RBA has created a new set of research issues that need investigation. In particular, this approach has important implications for risk identification and risk assessment. The success of the RBA approach is contingent on understanding what factors improve or interfere with the accuracy of these risk judgments. I examine how budget constraints and decision aid use affect risk identification and risk assessment. Unlike previous budget pressure studies, I cast budget constraints as a positive influence on auditors. I expect more stringent budget constraints to be motivating to the auditor as they provide a goal for the auditor to achieve. I also expect budget constraints to induce feelings of pressure leading to the use of time-pressure adaptation strategies. When auditors have use of a decision aid, they take advantage of these motivational goals and/or use beneficial adaptive strategies. Overall, I find that auditor participants tend to be more accurate when identifying financial statement risks compared to business risks. Budget constraints have no effect on risk identification for financial or business risks; they also have no effect on financial risk assessments. On the other hand, business risk assessments are improved by implementing more stringent budget constraints, but only when a decision aid is also provided. Budget constraints can affect performance through a goal theory route or a time-pressure adaptation route. I investigate the paths through which budget constraints improve business risk assessments under decision aid use. I find that budget constraints directly affect performance, supporting a goal theory route. However, I do not find that budget constraints are mediated by perceived budget pressure as expected. Auditors appear to use a positive adaptive strategy to respond to perceived budget pressure, however perceived budget pressure is not induced by providing a more stringent budget.

Diaz, Michelle Chandler

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Cosmic global strings  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the following topics: Global Strings; The Gravitational field of a straight global string; How do global strings behave The axion cosmological energy density; Computer simulations of the motion and decay of global strings; and Electromagnetic radiation from the conversion of Nambu-Goldstone bosons in astrophysical magnetic fields.

Sikivie, P. (Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (USA). Dept. of Physics)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Litchfield Correctional Center District Heating Low Temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Correctional Center District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Litchfield Correctional Center District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

68

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 367: Area 10 Sedan, Ess and Uncle Unit Craters Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit 367 is located in Area 10 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 367 comprises the four corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: • 10-45-01, U-10h Crater (Sedan) • 10-45-02, Ess Crater Site • 10-09-03, Mud Pit • 10-45-03, Uncle Crater Site The CASs in CAU 367 are being investigated because hazardous and/or radioactive contaminants may be present in concentrations that exceed risk-based corrective action (RBCA) levels. Existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend CAAs for the CASs. Additional information will be generated by conducting a CAI before evaluating and selecting CAAs. The scope of the corrective action investigation for CAU 367 includes the following activities: • Move surface debris and/or materials, as needed, to facilitate sampling. • Conduct radiological surveys. • Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine the area where TED at the site exceeds FALs (i.e., corrective action boundary). • Evaluate TED to potential receptors in areas along Mercury Highway that have been impacted by a release of radionuclides from the Sedan test. • Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis related to the drilling mud within CAS 10-09-03, Mud Pit, and any encountered stains or waste as necessary to determine whether COCs are present. • If COCs are present, collect additional step-out samples to define the extent of the contamination. • Collect samples of investigation-derived waste, as needed, for waste management purposes.

Patrick Matthews

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Corrections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the top of mons schools in Vermont: Thetford Academy and aAmericans lead the people of Vermont in the U.S. Congress

Editors, by

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Empirical Correction of XBT Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors use a collocation method between XBT and CTD/Ocean Station Data (OSD; including bottle cast and low-resolution CTD) from World Ocean Database 2005 (WOD2005) to statistically correct the XBT fall rate. An analysis of the annual median ...

M. Hamon; G. Reverdin; P.-Y. Le Traon

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Volume I - Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part B, Development of Risk-based Preliminary Remediation Goals)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

B, B, Development of Risk-based Preliminary Remediation Goals) Interim United States Office of Research and EPA/540/R-92/003 Environmental Protection Development December 1991 Agency Washington, DC 20460 EPA/540/R-92/003 Publication 9285.7-01 B December 1991 Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Volume I - Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part B, Development of Risk-based Preliminary Remediation Goals) Interim Office of Emergency and Remedial Response U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC 20460 Printed on Recycled Paper N O T I C E The policies set out in this document are intended solely as guidance; they are not final U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) actions. These policies are not intended, nor can they be relied upon, to create any rights enforceable by any party in litigation with the United States. EPA officials may

72

Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Correctional Institution -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Federal Federal Correctional Institution - Phoenix, Arizona to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Correctional Institution - Phoenix, Arizona on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Correctional Institution - Phoenix, Arizona on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Correctional Institution - Phoenix, Arizona on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Correctional Institution - Phoenix, Arizona on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Correctional Institution - Phoenix, Arizona on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Correctional Institution - Phoenix, Arizona on AddThis.com... Energy-Efficient Products Technology Deployment

73

Review: Globalization of Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review: Globalization of Water: Sharing the Planet’sAshok K. Globalization of Water: Sharing the Planet’s140) liters of virtual water (p. 15). This is one of the

Tennant, Matthew Aaron

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Global Energy Perspectives  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Global Energy Perspectives: Supply Security, Economic Development and Sustainability The Annual Energy Policy Conference of the National Capital Area ...

75

Global Security 2009  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Security *Intelligence *Hyper Innovation Global Security Weapons & Complex Integration NIF Office of Strategic Outcomes Operations & Business Lawrence Livermore National...

76

Global Climate Change Links  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Climate Change Links Global Climate Change Links This page provides links to web pages that we at CDIAC feel do a responsible job of presenting information and discussion pertinent to the science behind the global climate change ("global warming") debate. These sites include those on both sides of the debate; some asserting that global warming is a clear and present danger, and others that might be labeled global warming "skeptics." Some of these sites don't take a position per se; they exist to offer the public objective scientific information and results on our present understanding of the climate system. The list is not intended to be comprehensive, by any means. We hope it will be especially helpful for those who may be just beginning their research into global

77

String Correction for Baryon Orbital Excitations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The correction to the string junction three-quark potential in a baryon due to the proper moment of inertia of the QCD string is calculated. The magnitudes of the string corrections in P-wave heavy baryons are estimated.

Driga, O N; Veselov, A I

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Radiative QCD corrections a personal outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe several problems related to the studies of the effects of radiative QCD corrections in the phenomenological and theoretical considerations thus summarizing the work of the QCD part of the Symposium on "Radiative Corrections: Status and Outlook".

Kataev, A L

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Radiative QCD Corrections: A Personal Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe several problems related to the studies of the effects of radiative QCD corrections in the phenomenological and theoretical considerations thus summarizing the work of the QCD part of the Symposium on "Radiative Corrections: Status and Outlook".

Andrei L. Kataev

1994-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

80

Addendum to the Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 406: Area 3 Building 03-74 & Building 03-58 Underground Discharge Points and Corrective Action Unit 429: Area 3 Building 03-55 & Area 9 Building 09-52 Underground Discharge Points, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Revision 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document constitutes an addendum to the March 2000, Corrective Action Decision Document / Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 406: Area 3 Building 03-74 & 03-58 Underground Discharge Points and Corrective Action Unit 429: Area 3 Building 03-55 & Area 9 Building 09-52 Underground Discharge Points (TTR) as described in the document Recommendations and Justifications for Modifications for Use Restrictions Established under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (UR Modification document) dated February 2008. The UR Modification document was approved by NDEP on February 26, 2008. The approval of the UR Modification document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR modifications. In conformance with the UR Modification document, this addendum consists of: • This cover page that refers the reader to the UR Modification document for additional information • The cover and signature pages of the UR Modification document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the UR Modification document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the UR for CAS 03-51-001-0355 – Photo Shop UDP, Drains in CAU 429. It should be noted that there are no changes to CAU 406. This UR was established as part of a Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective action and is based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996; as amended August 2006). Since this UR was established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, this UR was re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006c). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the UR) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove the UR because contamination is not present at the site above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining this UR will be canceled, and the postings and signage at this site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at this site that are unrelated to the FFACO UR such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004f). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at this site.

Lynn Kidman

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global risk-based corrective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Global Oil Geopolitics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Iran-Iraq War . Iranian revolution . Arab Oil Embargo . Asian financial crisis . capacity exhausted . Global financial collapse . 9-11 attacks . OPEC cuts targets 1.7 ...

82

Cleantech Professional Resource Global Limited CPR Global | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Professional Resource Global Limited CPR Global Professional Resource Global Limited CPR Global Jump to: navigation, search Name Cleantech Professional Resource Global Limited (CPR Global) Place London, United Kingdom Zip EC4M 9DN Product Cleantech Professional Resource is a resource management consultancy focusing on the cleantech sector in the UK and Europe. References Cleantech Professional Resource Global Limited (CPR Global)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Cleantech Professional Resource Global Limited (CPR Global) is a company located in London, United Kingdom . References ↑ "Cleantech Professional Resource Global Limited (CPR Global)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Cleantech_Professional_Resource_Global_Limited_CPR_Global&oldid=343687

83

Definition: Corrective Action Plan | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Corrective Action Plan Corrective Action Plan Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Corrective Action Plan A list of actions and an associated timetable for implementation to remedy a specific problem.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Corrective action and preventive action (CAPA, also called corrective action / preventive action) are improvements to an organization's processes taken to eliminate causes of non-conformities or other undesirable situations. CAPA is a concept within good manufacturing practice (GMP). It focuses on the systematic investigation of the root causes of non-conformities in an attempt to prevent their recurrence (for corrective action) or to prevent occurrence (for preventive action). Corrective actions are implemented in response to customer complaints,

84

The effect and correction of coupling generated by the RHIC triplet quadrupoles  

SciTech Connect

This study explores the possibility of operating the nominal RHIC coupling correction system in local decoupling mode, where a subset of skew quadrupoles are independently set by minimizing the coupling as locally measured by beam position monitors. The goal is to establish a correction procedure for the skew quadrupole errors in the interaction region triplets that does not rely on a priori knowledge of the individual errors. After a description of the present coupling correction scheme envisioned for RHIC, the basics of the local decoupling method will be briefly recalled in the context of its implementation in the TEAPOT simulation code as well as operationally. The method is then applied to the RHIC lattice: a series of simple tests establish that single triplet skew quadrupole errors can be corrected by local decoupling. More realistic correction schemes are then studied in order to correct distributed sources of skew quadrupole errors: the machine can be decoupled either by pure local decoupling or by a combination of global (minimum tune separation) and local decoupling. The different correction schemes are successively validated and evaluated by standard RHIC simulation runs with the complete set of errors and corrections. The different solutions and results are finally discussed together with their implications for the hardware.

Pilat, F.; Peggs, S.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Wei, J.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 542: Disposal Holes, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 542 is located in Areas 3, 8, 9, and 20 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 542 is comprised of eight corrective action sites (CASs): (1) 03-20-07, ''UD-3a Disposal Hole''; (2) 03-20-09, ''UD-3b Disposal Hole''; (3) 03-20-10, ''UD-3c Disposal Hole''; (4) 03-20-11, ''UD-3d Disposal Hole''; (5) 06-20-03, ''UD-6 and UD-6s Disposal Holes''; (6) 08-20-01, ''U-8d PS No.1A Injection Well Surface Release''; (7) 09-20-03, ''U-9itsy30 PS No.1A Injection Well Surface Release''; and (8) 20-20-02, ''U-20av PS No.1A Injection Well Surface Release''. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on January 30, 2006, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and Bechtel Nevada. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 542. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS. The scope of the CAI for CAU 542 includes the following activities: (1) Move surface debris and/or materials, as needed, to facilitate sampling. (2) Conduct radiological surveys. (3) Conduct geophysical surveys to locate previously unidentified features at CASs 03-20-07, 03-20-09, 03-20-10, 03-20-11, and 06-20-03. (4) Perform field screening. (5) Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. (6) Collect quality control samples for laboratory analyses to evaluate the performance of measurement systems and controls based on the requirements of the data quality indicators. (7) If COCs are present at the surface/near surface (< 15 feet below ground surface), collect additional step-out samples to define the extent of the contamination. (8) If COCs are present in the subsurface (i.e., base of disposal hole), collect additional samples to define the vertical extent of contamination. A conservative use restriction will be used to encompass the lateral extent of subsurface contamination. (9) Stake or flag sample locations in the field, and record coordinates through global positioning systems surveying. (10) Collect samples of investigation-derived waste, as needed, for waste management and minimization purposes. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. Under the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'', this Corrective Action Investigation Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Field work will be conducted following approval of the plan.

Laura Pastor

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Improving mine safety technology and training: establishing US global leadership  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2006, the USA's record of mine safety was interrupted by fatalities that rocked the industry and caused the National Mining Association and its members to recommit to returning the US underground coal mining industry to a global mine safety leadership role. This report details a comprehensive approach to increase the odds of survival for miners in emergency situations and to create a culture of prevention of accidents. Among its 75 recommendations are a need to improve communications, mine rescue training, and escape and protection of miners. Section headings of the report are: Introduction; Review of mine emergency situations in the past 25 years: identifying and addressing the issues and complexities; Risk-based design and management; Communications technology; Escape and protection strategies; Emergency response and mine rescue procedures; Training for preparedness; Summary of recommendations; and Conclusions. 37 refs., 3 figs., 5 apps.

NONE

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

87

Error-correcting codes and cryptography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 20, 2006 ... topics where error-correcting codes overlap with cryptography. In some of these ..... human errors, e.g., misconfigurations or bugs. If biological ...

88

Federal Correctional Institution - Phoenix, Arizona | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Institution - Phoenix, Arizona October 7, 2013 - 9:54am Addthis Photo of a Parabolic-Trough Solar Water-Heating System Installed at the Federal Correctional Institution...

89

Weather-Corrected Performance Ratio  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Photovoltaic (PV) system performance depends on both the quality of the system and the weather. One simple way to communicate the system performance is to use the performance ratio (PR): the ratio of the electricity generated to the electricity that would have been generated if the plant consistently converted sunlight to electricity at the level expected from the DC nameplate rating. The annual system yield for flat-plate PV systems is estimated by the product of the annual insolation in the plane of the array, the nameplate rating of the system, and the PR, which provides an attractive way to estimate expected annual system yield. Unfortunately, the PR is, again, a function of both the PV system efficiency and the weather. If the PR is measured during the winter or during the summer, substantially different values may be obtained, making this metric insufficient to use as the basis for a performance guarantee when precise confidence intervals are required. This technical report defines a way to modify the PR calculation to neutralize biases that may be introduced by variations in the weather, while still reporting a PR that reflects the annual PR at that site given the project design and the project weather file. This resulting weather-corrected PR gives more consistent results throughout the year, enabling its use as a metric for performance guarantees while still retaining the familiarity this metric brings to the industry and the value of its use in predicting actual annual system yield. A testing protocol is also presented to illustrate the use of this new metric with the intent of providing a reference starting point for contractual content.

Dierauf, T.; Growitz, A.; Kurtz, S.; Cruz, J. L. B.; Riley, E.; Hansen, C.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Global Renewable Power International Global RPI | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

RPI) Place Spain Sector Wind energy Product Spain-based developer of wind projects in Poland, Croatia and Chile. References Global Renewable Power International (Global RPI)1...

91

Regional and Global Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Products > Regional/Global Products > Regional/Global Regional and Global Data Biogeochemical Dynamics Data Regional and global biogeochemical dynamics data can be used to improve our understanding of the structure and function of various ecosystems; to enable prediction across spatial and temporal scales; and to parameterize and validate terrestrial ecosystem models. The ORNL DAAC compiles, archives, and distributes more than 150 products from the following projects: Climate Collections Hydroclimatology Collections ISLSCP II Project Net Primary Productivity (NPP) River Discharge (RIVDIS) Russian Land Cover (RLC) Soil Collections Vegetation Collections Vegetation-Ecosystem Modeling (VEMAP) Climate Collections Climate collections include measured and modeled values for variables such as temperature, precipitation, humidity, radiation, wind velocity, and

92

Pax Global, Inc.,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pax Global, Inc., Pax Global, Inc., (freezers) Issued: April 2, 2013 BEFORE THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Washington, D.C. 20585 ) ) ) ) ) Case Number: 2013-SE-L413 NOTICE OF NONCOMPLIANCE DETERMINATION Manufacturers and private labelers are prohibited from distributing covered products in the United States that do not comply with applicable federal energy conservation standards. 10 C.F.R. § 429.102; 42 U.S.C. § 6302. Pax Global, Inc. ("Pax Global") is a private labeler and uses the "Crosley" and "Daewoo" brands to distribute freezers in the United States. TESTING l. The U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE") tested four privately labeled units o basic model numbe , manufactured , 1 that had been distributed in the United States by a third-pa1iy private labeler.

93

The Global Grid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper puts forward the vision that a natural future stage of the electricity network could be a grid spanning the whole planet and connecting most of the large power plants in the world: this is the "Global Grid". The main driving force behind the Global Grid will be the harvesting of remote renewable sources, and its key infrastructure element will be the high capacity long transmission lines. Wind farms and solar power plants will supply load centers with green power over long distances. This paper focusses on the introduction of the concept, showing that a globally interconnected network can be technologically feasible and economically competitive. We further highlight the multiple opportunities emerging from a global electricity network such as smoothing the renewable energy supply and electricity demand, reducing the need for bulk storage, and reducing the volatility of the energy prices. We also discuss possible investment mechanisms and operating schemes. Among others, we envision in such a system...

Chatzivasileiadis, Spyros; Andersson, Göran

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Estimated Global Hydrographic Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An estimate is made of the three-dimensional global oceanic temperature and salinity variability, omitting the seasonal cycle, both as a major descriptive element of the ocean circulation and for use in the error estimates of state estimation. ...

Gaël Forget; Carl Wunsch

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

KRFTWRK – Global Human Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power Network 2.1.1 Virtual Power Plants The Global Powernetwork, based on "Virtual Power Plants", called "VPP". A "participant runs a virtual human power plant. Per every "

Prohaska, Rainer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Global Ocean Meridional Overturning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A decade-mean global ocean circulation is estimated using inverse techniques, incorporating air–sea fluxes of heat and freshwater, recent hydrographic sections, and direct current measurements. This information is used to determine mass, heat, ...

Rick Lumpkin; Kevin Speer

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Global Warming, Soot, Ice  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Warming, Soot, Ice Speaker(s): James Hansen Date: November 7, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Irreversible "dangerous anthropogenic interference" with the climate system...

98

Earth's Global Energy Budget  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An update is provided on the Earth's global annual mean energy budget in the light of new observations and analyses. In 1997, Kiehl and Trenberth provided a review of past estimates and performed a number of radiative computations to better ...

Kevin E. Trenberth; John T. Fasullo; Jeffrey Kiehl

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Global Climate Change  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

When President Bush announced his Global Climate Change Initiative in February 2002, he committed the United States to a new strategy to cut greenhouse gas emissions over the next...

100

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

21, 2008. Ying, Wang. “ China, Venezuela firms to co-developoilfields. ” China Daily (27 August 2005) http://David and Bi Jianhai. “China’s Global Hunt for Energy. ”

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global risk-based corrective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


102

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nations began to seek out oil reserves around the world. 3on the limited global oil reserves and spiking prices. Manyto the largest proven oil reserves, making up 61 percent of

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Final corrective action study for the former CCC/USDA facility in Ramona, Kansas.  

SciTech Connect

Past operations at a grain storage facility formerly leased and operated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) in Ramona, Kansas, resulted in low concentrations of carbon tetrachloride in groundwater that slightly exceed the regulatory standard in only one location. As requested by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment, the CCC/USDA has prepared a Corrective Action Study (CAS) for the facility. The CAS examines corrective actions to address groundwater impacted by the former CCC/USDA facility but not releases caused by other potential groundwater contamination sources in Ramona. Four remedial alternatives were considered in the CAS. The recommended remedial alternative in the CAS consists of Environmental Use Control to prevent the inadvertent use of groundwater as a water supply source, coupled with groundwater monitoring to verify the continued natural improvement in groundwater quality. The Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) has directed Argonne National Laboratory to prepare a Corrective Action Study (CAS), consistent with guidance from the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE 2001a), for the CCC/USDA grain storage facility formerly located in Ramona, Kansas. This effort is pursuant to a KDHE (2007a) request. Although carbon tetrachloride levels at the Ramona site are low, they remain above the Kansas Tier 2 risk-based screening level (RBSL) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 5 {micro}g/L (Kansas 2003, 2004). In its request for the CAS, the KDHE (2007a) stated that, because of these levels, risk is associated with potential future exposure to contaminated groundwater. The KDHE therefore determined that additional measures are warranted to limit future use of the property and/or exposure to contaminated media as part of site closure. The KDHE further requested comparison of at least two corrective action alternatives to the 'no-action' alternative, as the basis for the Draft Corrective Action Decision for the site. The history and nature of the contamination and previous investigations are summarized in Section 2. Also included in Section 2 is an evaluation of human and environmental targets and potential exposure pathways. Section 3 describes the corrective action goals and applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs). Section 4 describes four alternatives, Section 5 analyzes the alternatives in detail, and Section 6 compares the alternatives. Section 6 also includes a summary and a recommended corrective action.

LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

104

Method for using global optimization to the estimation of surface-consistent residual statics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An efficient method for generating residual statics corrections to compensate for surface-consistent static time shifts in stacked seismic traces. The method includes a step of framing the residual static corrections as a global optimization problem in a parameter space. The method also includes decoupling the global optimization problem involving all seismic traces into several one-dimensional problems. The method further utilizes a Stochastic Pijavskij Tunneling search to eliminate regions in the parameter space where a global minimum is unlikely to exist so that the global minimum may be quickly discovered. The method finds the residual statics corrections by maximizing the total stack power. The stack power is a measure of seismic energy transferred from energy sources to receivers.

Reister, David B. (Knoxville, TN); Barhen, Jacob (Oak Ridge, TN); Oblow, Edward M. (Knoxville, TN)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Fuel cell flooding detection and correction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus for monitoring an H.sub.2 -O.sub.2 PEM fuel cells to detect and correct flooding. The pressure drop across a given H.sub.2 or O.sub.2 flow field is monitored and compared to predetermined thresholds of unacceptability. If the pressure drop exists a threshold of unacceptability corrective measures are automatically initiated.

DiPierno Bosco, Andrew (Rochester, NY); Fronk, Matthew Howard (Honeoye Falls, NY)

2000-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

106

Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 214: Bunkers and Storage Areas Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This document constitutes an addendum to the September 2006, Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 214: Bunkers and Storage Areas as described in the document Recommendations and Justifications for Modifications for Use Restrictions Established under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (UR Modification document) dated February 2008. The UR Modification document was approved by NDEP on February 26, 2008. The approval of the UR Modification document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR modifications. In conformance with the UR Modification document, this addendum consists of: • This cover page that refers the reader to the UR Modification document for additional information • The cover and signature pages of the UR Modification document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the UR Modification document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the URs for: • CAS 25-23-01, Contaminated Materials • CAS 25-23-19, Radioactive Material Storage These URs were established as part of Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective actions and were based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996; as amended August 2006). Since these URs were established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, these URs were re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006c). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the URs) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove these URs because contamination is not present at these sites above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining these URs will be canceled, and the postings and signage at each site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at these sites that are unrelated to the FFACO URs such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004f). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at these sites.

Lynn Kidman

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 403: Second Gas Station, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This document constitutes an addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 403: Second Gas Station, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, September 1998 as described in the document Supplemental Investigation Report for FFACO Use Restrictions, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (SIR) dated November 2008. The SIR document was approved by NDEP on December 5, 2008. The approval of the SIR document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR removals. In conformance with the SIR document, this addendum consists of: • This page that refers the reader to the SIR document for additional information • The cover, title, and signature pages of the SIR document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the SIR document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the UR for CAS 03-02-004-0360, Underground Storage Tanks. This UR was established as part of a Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective action and is based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996). Since this UR was established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, this UR was reevaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the UR) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove the UR because contamination is not present at the site above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining this UR will be canceled, and the postings and signage at this site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at this site that are unrelated to the FFACO UR such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at this site.

Grant Evenson

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Corrections to "Proving Safety Properties of the Steam Boiler Controller" Correction Sheet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Corrections to "Proving Safety Properties of the Steam Boiler Controller" 1 Correction Sheet After our paper "Proving Safety Properties of the Steam Boiler Controller" went already to print, Myla address http://theory.lcs.mit.edu/tds/boiler.html. Following are the corrections to these errors and some

Lynch, Nancy

109

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 424: Area 3 Landfill Complex, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This corrective action plan provides the closure implementation methods for the Area 3 Landfill Complex, Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 424, located at the Tonopah Test Range. The Area 3 Landfill Complex consists of 8 landfill sites, each designated as a separate corrective action site.

Bechtel Nevada

1998-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

110

Homogenization of the Global Radiosonde Temperature Dataset through Combined Comparison with Reanalysis Background Series and Neighboring Stations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes progress in the homogenization of global radiosonde temperatures with updated versions of the Radiosonde Observation Correction Using Reanalyses (RAOBCORE) and Radiosonde Innovation Composite Homogenization (RICH) software ...

Leopold Haimberger; Christina Tavolato; Stefan Sperka

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

NETL: Global Environmental Benefits  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Environmental Benefits Global Environmental Benefits Gasification Systems Global Environmental Benefits Environmental performance for future energy production systems is a much greater factor as emission standards tighten in the United States and worldwide. The outstanding environmental performance of gasification systems makes it an excellent technology for the clean production of electricity and other products. In addition, the reduction of CO2 emissions is one of the major challenges facing industry in response to global climate change. Other countries with coal reserves might potentially import technologies developed in the United States to enable low-cost gasification with carbon capture and EOR or sequestration. Not only will this benefit the U.S. gasification technology industry, but it will also result in a global environmental benefit through more affordable control of greenhouse gases (GHGs). See the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) link below for a summary of the impact of fossil fuels without carbon capture on CO2 emissions, on the GHG contributions of different countries, and of the projected impact of developing countries to 2030:

112

global | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

global global Dataset Summary Description GIS data for offshore wind speed (meters/second). Specified to Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZ).Wind resource based on NOAA blended sea winds and monthly wind speed at 30km resolution, using a 0.11 wind sheer to extrapolate 10m - 90m. Annual average >= 10 months of data, no nulls. Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords GIS global NOAA NREL offshore wind wind speed Data application/zip icon Download Shapefile (zip, 18.5 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Please cite NREL and NOAA Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata

113

Global ice sheet modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The University of Maine conducted this study for Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of a global climate modeling task for site characterization of the potential nuclear waste respository site at Yucca Mountain, NV. The purpose of the study was to develop a global ice sheet dynamics model that will forecast the three-dimensional configuration of global ice sheets for specific climate change scenarios. The objective of the third (final) year of the work was to produce ice sheet data for glaciation scenarios covering the next 100,000 years. This was accomplished using both the map-plane and flowband solutions of our time-dependent, finite-element gridpoint model. The theory and equations used to develop the ice sheet models are presented. Three future scenarios were simulated by the model and results are discussed.

Hughes, T.J.; Fastook, J.L. [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States). Institute for Quaternary Studies

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Quadratic electroweak corrections for polarized Moller scattering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper discusses the two-loop (NNLO) electroweak radiative corrections to the parity violating electron-electron scattering asymmetry induced by squaring one-loop diagrams. The calculations are relevant for the ultra-precise 11 GeV MOLLER experiment planned at Jefferson Laboratory and experiments at high-energy future electron colliders. The imaginary parts of the amplitudes are taken into consideration consistently in both the infrared-finite and divergent terms. The size of the obtained partial correction is significant, which indicates a need for a complete study of the two-loop electroweak radiative corrections in order to meet the precision goals of future experiments.

A. Aleksejevs, S. Barkanova, Y. Kolomensky, E. Kuraev, V. Zykunov

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Principal Associate Director - Global Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Principal Associate Director - Global Security Principal Associate Director - Global Security As Principal Associate Director for Global Security, Wallace leads Laboratory programs with special focus on developing and applying the scientific and engineering capabilities to address complex national and global security threats. Contact Operator Los Alamos National Laboratory (505 667-5061 Wallace's expertise is forensic seismology, a highly specialized discipline focusing on detection and quantification of nuclear tests. Terry C. Wallace, Jr. Principal Associate Director for Global Security Terry C. Wallace, Jr., Principal Associate Director for Global Security As Principal Associate Director for Global Security, Wallace leads Laboratory programs with a focus on applying scientific and engineering capabilities

116

Errata Corrections as of February 7, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Errata Corrections as of February 7, 2012. 1. On Table 21 of the Scenario Case Data spreadsheet files for the Credit Cap 2.1 and Credit Cap 3.0 tables, data for ...

117

Correcting for optical aberrations using multilayer displays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optical aberrations of the human eye are currently corrected using eyeglasses, contact lenses, or surgery. We describe a fourth option: modifying the composition of displayed content such that the perceived image appears ...

Huang, Fu-Chung

118

Quantum error-correcting codes and devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of forming quantum error-correcting codes by first forming a stabilizer for a Hilbert space. A quantum information processing device can be formed to implement such quantum codes.

Gottesman, Daniel (Los Alamos, NM)

2000-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

119

2009 Federal Technical Capabilities Program (FTCP) Corrective...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NW, Suite 700 Washington D.C. 20004-2901 Dear Mr. Chairman: Enclosed is the Federal Technical Capabilities Program (FTCP) Corrective Action Plan, Revision 2, which is Deliverable...

120

QCD corrections to Higgs boson production  

SciTech Connect

We discuss the O({alpha}{sub s}) QCD radiative corrections to Higgs boson production in the limit in which the top quark is much heavier than the Higgs boson. The subleading corrections, of O({alpha}{sub s}M{sub H}{sup 2}/M{sub top}{sup 2}), are presented for the decay H {yields} {gamma}{gamma} and shown to be small.

Dawson, S.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global risk-based corrective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

QCD corrections to Higgs boson production  

SciTech Connect

We discuss the O([alpha][sub s]) QCD radiative corrections to Higgs boson production in the limit in which the top quark is much heavier than the Higgs boson. The subleading corrections, of O([alpha][sub s]M[sub H][sup 2]/M[sub top][sup 2]), are presented for the decay H [yields] [gamma][gamma] and shown to be small.

Dawson, S.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 342: Area 23 Mercury Fire Training Pit, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for the Nevada Test Site's Area 23 Mercury Fire Training Pit (Corrective Action Unit 342) in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996). Corrective Action Unit 342 is comprised of Corrective Action Site 23-56-01. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for Corrective Action Unit 342. The scope of this document consists of the following: Develop corrective action objectives; Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria; Develop corrective action alternatives; Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of corrective action alternatives in relation to corrective action objectives and screening criteria; and Recommend and justify a preferred corrective action alternative for the Corrective Action Unit.

DOE/NV

1999-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

123

Global Hunger Index  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of halving the proportion of hungry people between 1990 and 2015, we are nowhere near meeting that target. The percentage of undernourished people fell from 20 percent in 1990–92 to 16 percent in 2004–06. In recent years, however, the number of hungry people has actually been increasing. In 2009, on the heels of a global food price

Heidi Fritschel; Yisehac Yohannes

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Risk-Based Production Optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the pilot application of a risk-informed approach to production optimization at fossil power plants. In this project, EPRI worked with a U.S. utility to develop risk profiles for plant components at two of the utilitys coal-fired generating units. The information was then used as a basis for identifying timing strategies for performing outage-based maintenance. The primary objective was to apply a risk-informed approach to identifying an optimal sequence of outage intervals and scop...

2011-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

125

Corrective action management (CAM) process guide  

SciTech Connect

Consistent direction for identification, long-term reporting and trending, and correction of conditions adverse to the environment, safety and health will facilitate a successful transition and follow- on for the Project Hanford Management Contractor (PHMC). Continuity of the corrective action management process is vital. It provides consistency via reporting and trending on corrective action management activities at the Site during the transition process. To ensure success,consideration of the business rules and the Hanford Action Tracking System (HATS), the automated tool that supports them, is essential. This document provides a consolidated synopsis of corrective action management business rules, the process, and the HATS to support the transition process at Hanford. It applies to the baseline of corrective action work the PHMC and its subcontractors will inherit. HATS satisfies the requirement for collection of data that enables long-term reporting and trending. The information contains all originating document, condition,and action data. HATS facilitates consistent tracking,reporting, closure, and trending of the corrective action work in progress across the Site. HATS follows the glossary standard definitions for commitment tracking listed in Appendix A and Site data value standards that are applicable. For long term access and use, HATS data are fed to a full text search and retrieval system called Search Hanford Accessible Reports Electronically(SHARE). An individual, organization, or company has the ability, through SHARE, to pull together the appropriate information as needed.

Lutter, T.M., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

126

Scale-Selective Bias Correction in a Downscaling of Global Analysis Using a Regional Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Systematic large-scale errors are often found within the regional domain in the regional dynamical downscaling procedure. This paper proposes a method to suppress such errors using a combination of spectral tendency damping and area average ...

Hideki Kanamaru; Masao Kanamitsu

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Diagnosis and Correction of Systematic Humidity Error in a Global Numerical Weather Prediction Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accuracy of humidity forecasts has been considered relatively unimportant to much of the operational numerical weather prediction (NWP) community. However, the U.S. Air Force is interested in accurate water vapor and cloud forecasts as end ...

Donald C. Norquist; Sam S. Chang

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Joint Variability of Global Runoff and Global Sea Surface Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global land surface runoff and sea surface temperatures (SST) are analyzed to identify the primary modes of variability of these hydroclimatic data for the period 1905–2002. A monthly water-balance model first is used with global monthly ...

Gregory J. McCabe; David M. Wolock

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Global Climate Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data Data The climate data at the ORNL DAAC are used primarily as driving variables in terrestrial biogeochemistry models. These models typically use data on temperature (min,max), precipitation, humidity (relative humidity, vapor pressure deficit, dew point), radiation (PFD in PAR, shortwave, direct/diffuse, and UV radiation, daylength), and wind velocity. Climate / meteorology data are required at hourly to monthly time scales, either point or gridded, at spatial scales ranging from regional to continental to global. The ORNL DAAC currently distributes climate data from several related projects: VEMAP-1 Hydroclimatology, and Global Historical Climatology Network. We are also now distributing climate data developed at the East Anglia Climate Research Unit and the Potsdam Institute for Climate Research.

130

Global Insight Energy Group  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Outlook Outlook Mary Novak Managing Director IHS Global Insight Copyright © 2010 IHS Global Insight, Inc. Overview: Energy Sector Transformation Underway * The recession has hit energy demand hard, and aggregate energy demand is not expected to return to 2007 levels until 2018. * Oil and natural gas prices will both rise over the long-term, but the price trends will diverge with natural gas prices rising slowly due to the development of shale gas. * This forecast does not include a GHG cap-and-trade program. However, it is assumed that there will be continued improvement in equipment, appliance and building efficiencies that will reduce carbon emissions relative to past projections. * The forecast also includes the more than 30 state- level programs to increase efficiency and reduce

131

Global Climate & Energy ProjectGlobal & Energy Project STANFORD UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from plants and animals to energy, and to determine the best conditions for doing so (see below). #12, and processes may have an enormous impact on the world's future energy consumption and environment. In orderGlobal Climate & Energy ProjectGlobal & Energy Project STANFORD UNIVERSITY Global Energy Climate

Nur, Amos

132

Global hydrological cycle response to rapid and slow global warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We analyze the response of global water vapor to global warming in a series of fully coupled climate model simulations. We find that a roughly 7% per Kelvin rate of increase of water vapor with global surface temperature is robust only for rapid ...

Larissa Back; Karen Russ; Zhengyu Liu; Kuniaki Inoue; Jiaxu Zhang; Bette Otto-Bliesner

133

Empirical Correction of a Coupled Land–Atmosphere Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates empirical strategies for correcting the bias of a coupled land–atmosphere model and tests the hypothesis that a bias correction can improve the skill of such models. The correction strategies investigated include 1) ...

Timothy DelSole; Mei Zhao; Paul A. Dirmeyer; Ben P. Kirtman

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

NDSeq: runtime checking for nondeterministic sequential specifications of parallel correctness  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose to specify the correctness of a program's parallelism using a sequential version of the program with controlled nondeterminism. Such a nondeterministic sequential specification allows (1) the correctness of parallel interference to ... Keywords: parallel correctness, serializability, specification

Jacob Burnim; Tayfun Elmas; George Necula; Koushik Sen

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Global climate feedbacks  

SciTech Connect

The important physical, chemical, and biological events that affect global climate change occur on a mesoscale -- requiring high spatial resolution for their analysis. The Department of Energy has formulated two major initiatives under the US Global Change Program: ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurements), and CHAMMP (Computer Hardware Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics). ARM is designed to use ground and air-craft based observations to document profiles of atmospheric composition, clouds, and radiative fluxes. With research and models of important physical processes, ARM will delineate the relationships between trace gases, aerosol and cloud structure, and radiative transfer in the atmosphere, and will improve the parameterization of global circulation models. The present GCMs do not model important feedbacks, including those from clouds, oceans, and land processes. The purpose of this workshop is to identify such potential feedbacks, to evaluate the uncertainties in the feedback processes (and, if possible, to parameterize the feedback processes so that they can be treated in a GCM), and to recommend research programs that will reduce the uncertainties in important feedback processes. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases.

Manowitz, B.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Global residential appliance standards  

SciTech Connect

In most countries, residential electricity consumption typically ranges from 20% to 40% of total electricity consumption. This energy is used for heating, cooling, refrigeration and other end-uses. Significant energy savings are possible if new appliance purchases are for models with higher efficiency than that of existing models. There are several ways to ensure or encourage such an outcome, for example, appliance rebates, innovative procurement, and minimum efficiency standards. This paper focuses on the latter approach. At the present time, the US is the only country with comprehensive appliance energy efficiency standards. However, many other countries, such as Australia, Canada, the European Community (EC), Japan and Korea, are considering enacting standards. The greatest potential impact of minimum efficiency standards for appliances is in the developing countries (e.g., China and India), where saturations of household appliances are relatively low but growing rapidly. This paper discusses the potential savings that could be achieved from global appliance efficiency standards for refrigerators and freezers. It also could be achieved from global appliance efficiency standards for refrigerators and freezers. It also discusses the impediments to establishing common standards for certain appliance types, such as differing test procedures, characteristics, and fuel prices. A methodology for establishing global efficiency standards for refrigerators and freezers is described.

Turiel, I.; McMahon, J.E. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (US); Lebot, B. [Agence Francaise pour la Maitrise de l`Energie, Valbonne (FR)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Errata Corrections as of October 25, 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Corrections as of October 25, 2011 Corrections as of October 25, 2011 1. On Figure 4 of page 6, the axis labels were changed to reflect that the difference between HCES and Reference case natural gas prices is shown on the left-hand axis, and the difference between HCES and Reference case electricity prices is shown on the right-hand axis. 2. On Figure 7 of page 9, the axis label was corrected from 2009 dollars to 2005 dollars. 3. The following sentence was added to the Background section on page 1 in order to clarify that intra-utility credit trading was specified in Chairman Hall's request: "The HCES will apply to utilities in the aggregate; utilities may trade compliance credits with other utilities." 4. In summary tables B1 through B5, the units label for sulfur dioxide emissions, nitrogen oxide

138

GoGlobal Fall 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Policy and Social Welfare at the UCLA School of Public Affairs, and Visiting Professor of Global & International

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

On Correction of Diffuse Radiation Measured by MFRSR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

an angular correction is needed. Such a correction of MFRSR data is performed for direct solar radiation, whereas uncertainty exists concerning the diffuse irradiance, whose...

140

Tonopah Test Range Environmental Restoration Corrective Action Sites  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the status (closed, closed in place, or closure in progress) of the Corrective Action Sites and Corrective Action Units at the Tonopah Test Range

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global risk-based corrective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Interacting holographic dark energy with logarithmic correction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The holographic dark energy (HDE) is considered to be the most promising candidate of dark energy. Its definition is originally motivated from the entropy-area relation which depends on the theory of gravity under consideration. Recently a new definition of HDE is proposed with the help of quantum corrections to the entropy-area relation in the setup of loop quantum cosmology. Using this new definition, we investigate the model of interacting dark energy and derive its effective equation of state. Finally we establish a correspondence between generalized Chaplygin gas and entropy-corrected holographic dark energy.

Mubasher Jamil; M. Umar Farooq

2010-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

142

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 366: Area 11 Plutonium Valley Dispersion Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Plan has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 366, Area 11 Plutonium Valley Dispersion Sites, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996 as amended). CAU 366 consists of the following six Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Area 11 of the Nevada National Security Site: · CAS 11-08-01, Contaminated Waste Dump #1 · CAS 11-08-02, Contaminated Waste Dump #2 · CAS 11-23-01, Radioactively Contaminated Area A · CAS 11-23-02, Radioactively Contaminated Area B · CAS 11-23-03, Radioactively Contaminated Area C · CAS 11-23-04, Radioactively Contaminated Area D Site characterization activities were performed in 2011 and 2012, and the results are presented in Appendix A of the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) for CAU 366 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2012a). The following closure alternatives were recommended in the CADD: · No further action for CAS 11-23-01 · Closure in place for CASs 11-08-01, 11-08-02, 11-23-02, 11-23-03, and 11-23-04 The scope of work required to implement the recommended closure alternatives includes the following: · Non-engineered soil covers approximately 3 feet thick will be constructed at CAS 11-08-01 over contaminated waste dump (CWD) #1 and at CAS 11-08-02 over CWD #2. · FFACO use restrictions (URs) will be implemented for the areas where the total effective dose (TED) exceeds the final action level (FAL) of 25 millirems per Occasional Use Area year (mrem/OU-yr). The FAL is based on an assumption that the future use of the site includes occasional work activities and that workers will not be assigned to the area on a regular basis. A site worker under this scenario is assumed to be on site for a maximum of 80 hours per year for 5 years. The FFACO UR boundaries will encompass the areas where a worker would be exposed to 25 millirems of radioactivity per year if they are present for 80 hours per year. These boundaries will be defined as follows: – It is assumed that radiological contaminants are present at CAS 11-08-01 and CAS 11-08-02 within CWDs #1 and #2 at levels exceeding the FAL. Therefore, UR boundaries will be established around the perimeters of the soil covers that will be constructed at CWD #1 and CWD #2. A geophysical survey revealed buried metallic debris outside the fence and adjacent to CWD #1. Therefore, the UR boundary for CWD #1 will be expanded to include the mound containing buried material. – It is assumed that radiological contaminants are present at CAS 11-23-02, CAS 11-23-03, and CAS 11-23-04, within the three High Contamination Area (HCA) boundaries associated with the 11b, 11c, and 11d test areas at levels exceeding the FAL. Therefore, the UR boundaries will be established around the perimeters of the HCAs. The TED at an area of soil impacted by radiological debris outside the fence and adjacent to the 11c test area HCA exceeds the FAL of 25 mrem/OU-yr. Because the radiological impact from the debris at this location is visible on the aerial flyover radiological survey, all other areas within this isopleth of the flyover survey are conservatively also assumed to exceed the FAL. Therefore, the UR boundaries for the 11b, 11c, and 11d test areas will be expanded to include the areas within this isopleth. · The FFACO URs will all be located within the large Contamination Area (CA) that encompasses Plutonium Valley. Because access to the CA is limited and entry into the CA for post-closure inspections and maintenance would be impractical, UR warning signs will be posted along the existing CA fence. In accordance with the Soils Risk-Based Corrective Action Evaluation Process (NNSA/NSO, 2012b), an administrative UR will be implemented as a best management practice for the areas where the TED exceeds 25 millirems per Industrial Area year. This limit is based on continuous industrial use of the site and addresses exposure to industrial workers who would regularly be assigned to the work area for an entire career (250 days

none,

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

143

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 366: Area 11 Plutonium Valley Dispersion Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Plan has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 366, Area 11 Plutonium Valley Dispersion Sites, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996 as amended). CAU 366 consists of the following six Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Area 11 of the Nevada National Security Site: · CAS 11-08-01, Contaminated Waste Dump #1 · CAS 11-08-02, Contaminated Waste Dump #2 · CAS 11-23-01, Radioactively Contaminated Area A · CAS 11-23-02, Radioactively Contaminated Area B · CAS 11-23-03, Radioactively Contaminated Area C · CAS 11-23-04, Radioactively Contaminated Area D Site characterization activities were performed in 2011 and 2012, and the results are presented in Appendix A of the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) for CAU 366 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2012a). The following closure alternatives were recommended in the CADD: · No further action for CAS 11-23-01 · Closure in place for CASs 11-08-01, 11-08-02, 11-23-02, 11-23-03, and 11-23-04 The scope of work required to implement the recommended closure alternatives includes the following: · Non-engineered soil covers approximately 3 feet thick will be constructed at CAS 11-08-01 over contaminated waste dump (CWD) #1 and at CAS 11-08-02 over CWD #2. · FFACO use restrictions (URs) will be implemented for the areas where the total effective dose (TED) exceeds the final action level (FAL) of 25 millirems per Occasional Use Area year (mrem/OU-yr). The FAL is based on an assumption that the future use of the site includes occasional work activities and that workers will not be assigned to the area on a regular basis. A site worker under this scenario is assumed to be on site for a maximum of 80 hours per year for 5 years. The FFACO UR boundaries will encompass the areas where a worker would be exposed to 25 millirems of radioactivity per year if they are present for 80 hours per year. These boundaries will be defined as follows: – It is assumed that radiological contaminants are present at CAS 11-08-01 and CAS 11-08-02 within CWDs #1 and #2 at levels exceeding the FAL. Therefore, UR boundaries will be established around the perimeters of the soil covers that will be constructed at CWD #1 and CWD #2. A geophysical survey revealed buried metallic debris outside the fence and adjacent to CWD #1. Therefore, the UR boundary for CWD #1 will be expanded to include the mound containing buried material. – It is assumed that radiological contaminants are present at CAS 11-23-02, CAS 11-23-03, and CAS 11-23-04, within the three High Contamination Area (HCA) boundaries associated with the 11b, 11c, and 11d test areas at levels exceeding the FAL. Therefore, the UR boundaries will be established around the perimeters of the HCAs. The TED at an area of soil impacted by radiological debris outside the fence and adjacent to the 11c test area HCA exceeds the FAL of 25 mrem/OU-yr. Because the radiological impact from the debris at this location is visible on the aerial flyover radiological survey, all other areas within this isopleth of the flyover survey are conservatively also assumed to exceed the FAL. Therefore, the UR boundaries for the 11b, 11c, and 11d test areas will be expanded to include the areas within this isopleth. · The FFACO URs will all be located within the large Contamination Area (CA) that encompasses Plutonium Valley. Because access to the CA is limited and entry into the CA for post-closure inspections and maintenance would be impractical, UR warning signs will be posted along the existing CA fence. In accordance with the Soils Risk-Based Corrective Action Evaluation Process (NNSA/NSO, 2012b), an administrative UR will be implemented as a best management practice for the areas where the TED exceeds 25 millirems per Industrial Area year. This limit is based on continuous industrial use of the site and addresses exposure to industrial workers who would regularly be assigned to the work area for an entire career (250 days

none,

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

144

Global Fossil Fuel Carbon Emissions - Graphics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Global Graphics Global Fossil-Fuel Carbon Emissions - Graphics Carbon Emission Estimates image image Global Per Capita Carbon Emission Estimates...

145

Arrhenius and global warming  

SciTech Connect

Although concern about global atmospheric warming has intensified in recent decades, research into the greenhouse effect actually began in the 19th century. Fourier and other scientists appreciated that without heat-absorbing gases in the atmosphere, the temperature on the ground would be considerably lower, making life as we know it impossible. In 1896, the Swedish scientist Svante Arrhenius was the first to make a quantitative link between changes in carbon dioxide concentration and climate. Publication of his paper was celebrated at a recent Swedish workshop. 13 refs., 1 fig.

Uppenbrink, J.

1996-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

146

Global Laser Enrichment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

APPLICATION – PUBLIC RESPONSES GE-Hitachi Global Laser Enrichment LLC (GLE) hereby submits the additional information requested in the November 19, 2009 letter. Enclosure 1 of this letter contains the responses the questions. A separate letter has been submitted that contains a non-public version of these responses, which contains Export-Controlled and Security-Related Information. If there are any questions regarding this letter and its contents, please do not hesitate to contact myself, or Julie Olivier of my staff at 910-819-4799 or at Julie.Olivier@ge.com.

Uranium Enrichment Branch; Albert E. Kennedy; Albert E. Kennedy; Tammy Orr (gle

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Global Laser Enrichment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PUBLIC VERSION GE-Hitachi Global Laser Enrichment LLC (GLE) hereby submits revision 2 of the GLE License Application. Enclosure 1 contains revised Request for Additional Information responses. Enclosure 2 contains revised chapters 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, and 11 of the GLE License Application. Enclosure 3 contains the revised pubic version of the Decommissioning Funding Plan. Non-Public versions of the revised License Application and the Decommissioning Funding Plan have been prepared and will be submitted under separate enclosure. If there are any questions regarding this letter and its contents, please do not hesitate to contact me at 910-819-4799 or at

Julie Olivier; Brian Smith Chief; Uranium Enrichment Branch; Julie Olivier; Tim Johnson (nrc; Tammy Orr (gle; Lori Butler (geh; Jerry Head (geh; Patricia Campbell (geh; Bob Crate (gle; Ken Givens (gle; Tom Owens (gle

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

The Global Energy Challenge  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The expected doubling of global energy demand by 2050 challenges our traditional patterns of energy production, distribution and use. The continued use of fossil fuels raises concerns about supply, security, environment and climate. New routes are needed for the efficient conversion of energy from chemical fuel, sunlight, and heat to electricity or hydrogen as an energy carrier and finally to end uses like transportation, lighting, and heating. Opportunities for efficient new energy conversion routes based on nanoscale materials will be presented, with emphasis on the sustainable energy technologies they enable.

Crabtree, George (ANL)

2007-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

149

Towards mechanized correctness proofs for cryptographic algorithms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In [R.J. Corin, J.I. den Hartog, A probabilistic hoare-style logic for game-based cryptographic proofs, in: M. Bugliesi, B. Preneel, V. Sassone (Eds.), ICALP 2006 Track C, Venice, Italy, in: Lecture Notes in Computer Science, vol. 4052, Springer-Verlag, ... Keywords: Axiomatization, Cryptography, Hoare logic, Probability, Provable correctness

Jerry den Hartog

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

FTCP Corrective Action Plan- Revision 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

January 2007 FTCP Corrective Action Plan, Revision 1, which is Deliverable B for Commitment 13 in the Department of Energy (DOE) Implementation Plan to Improve Oversight of Nuclear Operations, issued in response to Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 2004- 1, Oversight of Complex, High-Hazard Nuclear Operations

151

FTCP Corrective Action Plan- Revision 2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

March 2009 FTCP Corrective Action Plan, Revision 2, which is Deliverable B for Commitment 13 in the Department of Energy (DOE) Implementation Plan to Improve Oversight of Nuclear Operations, issued in response to Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 2004-1, Oversight of Complex, High-Hazard Nuclear Operations

152

String Corrections To The Riemann Curvature Tensor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The string corrections to the Riemann Curvature tensor are found to first order in the string slope parameter, here proportional to $\\g$. This is done for D=10 supergravity, the presumed low energy limit of string theory. We follow the perturbative approach. We also simplify a crucial result in our previous solution.

Bellucci, S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Visual calibration and correction for ambient illumination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many applications require that an image will appear the same regardless of where or how it is displayed. However, the conditions in which an image is displayed can adversely affect its appearance. Computer monitor screens not only emit light, but can ... Keywords: Viewing conditions, ambient illumination, contrast correction, device independence, ergonomics, perceptually accurate display, reflections

Kate Devlin; Alan Chalmers; Erik Reinhard

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Study Climate and Global Change  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What We Study How We Study Prepare The Nation For Change Assess the U.S. Climate Make Our Science Accessible Link Climate Change & Health Provide Data and Tools Coordinate Internationally Study Climate and Global Change Print E-mail Deforestation What is global change? "Global change" refers to changes in the global environment that may alter the capacity of the Earth to sustain life. This includes alterations in: Climate Land productivity Oceans or other water resources Atmospheric chemistry Ecological systems Demographic and socioeconomic trends What is global change research? According to the Global Change Research Act of 1990, "Global change research" refers to the study, monitoring, assessment, prediction, and information management activities used to describe and understand the:

155

Global Scratch Upgrade in Progress  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Scratch Gets Global Scratch Gets an Upgrade Global Scratch Gets an Upgrade Improvements Will Include Higher Data Output Rates, Connection to PDSF October 29, 2013 The most used file system at the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC)-global scratch-just got an upgrade. As a result, some users may see their data output to global scratch reach up to 80 gigabytes per second. Although users will probably not see their 20-terabyte storage quotas increase, the upgrade ensures that global scratch remains flexible and paves the way for PDSF to eventually use the file system Because of the upgrade, users will also be able to better access their temporary data files or "scratch data" from any NERSC system, not just the one that generated it. Prior to the upgrade, Global scratch typically

156

Atmospheric Correction Algorithm for Hyperspectral Imagery  

SciTech Connect

In December 1997, the US Department of Energy (DOE) established a Center of Excellence (Hyperspectral-Multispectral Algorithm Research Center, HyMARC) for promoting the research and development of algorithms to exploit spectral imagery. This center is located at the DOE Remote Sensing Laboratory in Las Vegas, Nevada, and is operated for the DOE by Bechtel Nevada. This paper presents the results to date of a research project begun at the center during 1998 to investigate the correction of hyperspectral data for atmospheric aerosols. Results of a project conducted by the Rochester Institute of Technology to define, implement, and test procedures for absolute calibration and correction of hyperspectral data to absolute units of high spectral resolution imagery will be presented. Hybrid techniques for atmospheric correction using image or spectral scene data coupled through radiative propagation models will be specifically addressed. Results of this effort to analyze HYDICE sensor data will be included. Preliminary results based on studying the performance of standard routines, such as Atmospheric Pre-corrected Differential Absorption and Nonlinear Least Squares Spectral Fit, in retrieving reflectance spectra show overall reflectance retrieval errors of approximately one to two reflectance units in the 0.4- to 2.5-micron-wavelength region (outside of the absorption features). These results are based on HYDICE sensor data collected from the Southern Great Plains Atmospheric Radiation Measurement site during overflights conducted in July of 1997. Results of an upgrade made in the model-based atmospheric correction techniques, which take advantage of updates made to the moderate resolution atmospheric transmittance model (MODTRAN 4.0) software, will also be presented. Data will be shown to demonstrate how the reflectance retrieval in the shorter wavelengths of the blue-green region will be improved because of enhanced modeling of multiple scattering effects.

R. J. Pollina

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 447: Project Shoal Area, Subsurface, Nevada  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 447: Project Shoal Area, Subsurface, Nevada Controlled Copy No.: Revision No.: 3 March 2006 Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. DOE/NV--1025--Rev. 3 Available for public sale, in paper, from: U.S. Department of Commerce National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Phone: 800.553.6847 Fax: 703.605.6900 Email: orders@ntis.gov Online ordering: http://www.ntis.gov/ordering.htm Available electronically at http://www.osti.gov/bridge Available for a processing fee to U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors, in paper, from: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information P.O. Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0062

158

BBSLA – Kazakhstan (032610) Kazakh (Global Version ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BBSLA – Kazakhstan (032610) Kazakh (Global Version 031010) 1 BLACKBERRY SOLUTION ??????????? ???????? ????????????? ...

159

BBSLA - Kazakhstan (032610) Russian (Global Version ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BBSLA - Kazakhstan (032610) Russian (Global Version 031010) 1 ???????????? ?????????? ?? ????????????? ??????? ...

160

Global Threat Reduction Initiative  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nonproliferation Nonproliferation U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 1 The Current Status of Gap and U.S.-Origin Nuclear Fuel Removals 2011 Jeff Galan, Deputy Project Manager U.S.-Origin Nuclear Remove Program National Nuclear Security Administration Global Threat Reduction Initiative Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 2 GTRI Mission and Goals GTRI is: A part of President Obama's comprehensive strategy to prevent nuclear terrorism; and The key organization responsible for implementing the U.S. HEU minimization policy. GTRI MISSION Reduce and protect vulnerable nuclear and radiological material located at civilian sites worldwide. DOE STRATEGIC GOAL 2.2 Prevent the acquisition of nuclear and radiological materials for use in weapons of mass destruction and other

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global risk-based corrective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Global emissions inventories  

SciTech Connect

Atmospheric chemistry determines the concentrations of most of the important greenhouse gases except for carbon dioxide. The rate of removal of the greenhouse gases from the atmosphere is also controlled by atmospheric chemistry. The indirect effects of chemical forcing resulting from the chemical interactions of other species can also affect the concentrations of radiatively important gases such as ozone. In order to establish the contribution of any possible climatic change attributable to individual greenhouse gases, spatially and temporally resolved estimates of their emissions need to be established. Unfortunately, for most of the radiatively important species the global magnitudes of their individual fluxes are not known to better than a factor of two and their spatial distributions are even more poorly characterized. Efforts to estimate future projections of potential impacts and to monitor international agreements will require continued research to narrow the uncertainties of magnitude and geographical distribution of emissions.

Dignon, J.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Global Energy Management System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exxon Mobil Corporation has undertaken voluntary actions to continuously improve energy efficiency in our operations for many years. From 1973 to 1999, we improved the energy efficiency of our refineries and chemical plants by over 35 percent - saving the cumulative equivalent of 1.8 billion barrels of oil and reducing carbon dioxide emissions by over 200 million tonnes. In 2000, we redoubled our efforts with deployment of our Global Energy Management System (GEMS), which utilizes international best practices and benchmarking to identify energy efficiencies at each of our refineries and chemical plants. Thus far, we have identified opportunities to improve the energy efficiency of these facilities by an additional 15 to 20 percent. At full implementation, savings are expected to total $500 million to $1 billion per year, with an associated reduction in carbon dioxide emissions of about 10 million tonnes per year - roughly equivalent to removing 1.5 million cars from the world's roads.

Eidt, B. D.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Corrections Requested for Information Quality Compliance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I have received your alleged response to my April 28, 2008 Information Quality Challenge (RFC #08002) from Dr. Lawrence W. Reiter. It is unacceptable for an EPA official to provide a distorted and misleading non-responsive reply to my information quality challenge by deceptively “reframing ” my concerns. Dr. Reiter’s reply of October 3, 2008 does not address any of the challenges I provided in my request for correction. Dr. Reiter’s reply is non-responsive to my concerns. I demand that the EPA provide me with an accurate, timely, and supported response to my information quality challenge. EPA Provides a Non-Response to Citizens Concerns by Deceptively Reframing the Scope of the Information Quality Challenge. The Unacceptable Non-Response by EPA Must be Corrected Immediately. Complaint Filed with the EPA’s Inspector General Office to Hold EPA Officials Accountable. Dr. Reiter’s reply to me is completely non-responsive to my many

unknown authors

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

G-corrected holographic dark energy model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Here we investigate the holographic dark energy model in the framework of FRW cosmology where the Newtonian gravitational constant,$G$, is varying with cosmic time. Using the complementary astronomical data which support the time dependency of $G$, the evolutionary treatment of EoS parameter and energy density of dark energy model are calculated in the presence of time variation of $G$. It has been shown that in this case, the phantom regime can be achieved at the present time. We also calculate the evolution of $G$- corrected deceleration parameter for holographic dark energy model and show that the dependency of $G$ on the comic time can influence on the transition epoch from decelerated expansion to the accelerated phase. Finally we perform the statefinder analysis for $G$- corrected holographic model and show that this model has a shorter distance from the observational point in $s-r$ plane compare with original holographic dark energy model.

Malekjani, M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Emissivity Correcting Pyrometry of Semiconductor Growth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emissivity Correcting Pyrometry of Semiconductor Growth Emissivity Correcting Pyrometry of Semiconductor Growth by W. G. Breiland, L. A. Bruskas, A. A. Allerman, and T. W. Hargett Motivation-Temperature is a critical factor in the growth of thin films by either chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). It is particularly important in compound semiconductor growth because one is often challenged to grow materials with specific chemical compositions in order to maintain stringent lattice-matching conditions or to achieve specified bandgap values. Optical pyrometry can be used to measure surface temperatures, but the thin film growth causes significant changes in the emissivity of the surface, leading to severe errors in the pyrometer measurement. To avoid these errors, emissivity changes must be measured and

166

Correcting the burden formula for heave blasting  

SciTech Connect

A fundamental error in the derivation of a heave blasting burden formula was found and then corrected. The original derivation used the impulse-momentum principle, with a 0.3m thick radius of rock mass being acted on by an explosive impulse. However, the rock weight was not converted to mass by dividing the gravitational constant. This mistake can be verified by checking the units in the formula, which resolve into m 1/2-sec instead of meters.

Thompson, S.D.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Clean slate corrective action investigation plan  

SciTech Connect

The Clean Slate sites discussed in this report are situated in the central portion of the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), north of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) on the northwest portion of the Nellis Air Force Range (NAFR) which is approximately 390 kilometers (km) (240 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. These sites were the locations for three of the four Operation Roller Coaster experiments. These experiments evaluated the dispersal of plutonium in the environment from the chemical explosion of a plutonium-bearing device. Although it was not a nuclear explosion, Operation Roller Coaster created some surface contamination which is now the subject of a corrective action strategy being implemented by the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project (NV ERP) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) activities will be conducted at three of the Operation Roller Coaster sites. These are Clean Slate 1 (CS-1), Clean Slate 2 (CS-2), and Clean Slate 3 (CS-3) sites, which are located on the TTR. The document that provides or references all of the specific information relative to the various investigative processes is called the Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP). This CAIP has been prepared for the DOE Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) by IT Corporation (IT).

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Continuous-time quantum error correction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Continuous-time quantum error correction (CTQEC) is an approach to protecting quantum information from noise in which both the noise and the error correcting operations are treated as processes that are continuous in time. This chapter investigates CTQEC based on continuous weak measurements and feedback from the point of view of the subsystem principle, which states that protected quantum information is contained in a subsystem of the Hilbert space. We study how to approach the problem of constructing CTQEC protocols by looking at the evolution of the state of the system in an encoded basis in which the subsystem containing the protected information is explicit. This point of view allows us to reduce the problem to that of protecting a known state, and to design CTQEC procedures from protocols for the protection of a single qubit. We show how previously studied CTQEC schemes with both direct and indirect feedback can be obtained from strategies for the protection of a single qubit via weak measurements and weak unitary operations. We also review results on the performance of CTQEC with direct feedback in cases of Markovian and non-Markovian decoherence, where we have shown that due to the existence of a Zeno regime in non-Markovian dynamics, the performance of CTQEC can exhibit a quadratic improvement if the time resolution of the weak error-correcting operations is high enough to reveal the non-Markovian character of the noise process.

Ognyan Oreshkov

2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

169

Global Natural Gas Market Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report examines the characteristics of global gas markets. These markets have entered a period of supplier strength and high prices as global demand growth has outpaced supply growth. The report systematically evaluates developments in global liquefaction andfor the principal consuming nationsin domestic production, market growth, pipelines, and regasification. While containing a great deal of detail, the report probes myriad announcements of commercial activities to help interpret the evolving comp...

2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

170

NIST Global Standards Information Staff  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Ileana Martinez. Global standards & trade, Europe, Americas, e-Accessibility, biofuels, accreditation. ileana.martinez@nist.gov 301-975-2766. ...

171

Machine Learning for Global Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

approach for global optimization in which machine learning is used to predict ..... In Figure 1 we show the level curves of the 2–dimensional Rastrigin function.

172

Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 394: Areas 12, 18, and 29 Spill/Release Sites Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This document constitutes an addendum to the September 2003, Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 394: Areas 12, 18, and 29 Spill/Release Sites as described in the document Recommendations and Justifications for Modifications for Use Restrictions Established under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (UR Modification document) dated February 2008. The UR Modification document was approved by NDEP on February 26, 2008. The approval of the UR Modification document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR modifications. In conformance with the UR Modification document, this addendum consists of: • This cover page that refers the reader to the UR Modification document for additional information • The cover and signature pages of the UR Modification document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the UR Modification document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the URs for: • CAS 12-25-04, UST 12-16-2 Waste Oil Release • CAS 18-25-01, Oil Spills • CAS 18-25-02, Oil Spills • CAS 18-25-03, Oil Spill • CAS 29-44-01, Fuel Spill These URs were established as part of Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective actions and were based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996; as amended August 2006). Since these URs were established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, these URs were re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006c). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the URs) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove these URs because contamination is not present at these sites above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining these URs will be canceled, and the postings and signage at each site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at these sites that are unrelated to the FFACO URs such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004f). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at these sites.

Lynn Kidman

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 322: Areas 1 & 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This document constitutes an addendum to the June 2006, Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 322: Areas 1 & 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells as described in the document Recommendations and Justifications for Modifications for Use Restrictions Established under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (UR Modification document) dated February 2008. The UR Modification document was approved by NDEP on February 26, 2008. The approval of the UR Modification document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR modifications. In conformance with the UR Modification document, this addendum consists of: • This cover page that refers the reader to the UR Modification document for additional information • The cover and signature pages of the UR Modification document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the UR Modification document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the URs for: • CAS 01-25-01, AST Release • CAS 03-25-03, Mud Plant AST Diesel Release These URs were established as part of Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective actions and were based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996; as amended August 2006). Since these URs were established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, these URs were re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006c). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the URs) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove these URs because contamination is not present at these sites above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining these URs will be canceled, and the postings and signage at each site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at these sites that are unrelated to the FFACO URs such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004f). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at these sites.

Lynn Kidman

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 423: Area 3 Building 03-60 Underground Discharge Point, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This document constitutes an addendum to the July 1999, Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 423: Area 3 Building 0360 Underground Discharge Point, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada as described in the document Recommendations and Justifications for Modifications for Use Restrictions Established under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (UR Modification document) dated February 2008. The UR Modification document was approved by NDEP on February 26, 2008. The approval of the UR Modification document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR modifications. In conformance with the UR Modification document, this addendum consists of: • This cover page that refers the reader to the UR Modification document for additional information • The cover and signature pages of the UR Modification document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the UR Modification document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the UR for CAS 03-02-002-0308, Underground Discharge Point. This UR was established as part of a Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective action and is based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996; as amended August 2006). Since this UR was established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, this UR was re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006c). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the UR) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove the UR because contamination is not present at the site above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining this UR will be canceled, and the postings and signage at this site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at this site that are unrelated to the FFACO UR such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004f). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at this site.

Lynn Kidman

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 427: Area 3 Septic Waste Systems 2, 6, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This document constitutes an addendum to the April 1999, Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 427: Area 3 Septic Waste Systems 2, 6, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada as described in the document Recommendations and Justifications for Modifications for Use Restrictions Established under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (UR Modification document) dated February 2008. The UR Modification document was approved by NDEP on February 26, 2008. The approval of the UR Modification document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR modifications. In conformance with the UR Modification document, this addendum consists of: • This cover page that refers the reader to the UR Modification document for additional information • The cover and signature pages of the UR Modification document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the UR Modification document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the URs for: • CAS 03-05-002-SW02, Septic Waste System • CAS 03-05-002-SW06, Septic Waste System These URs were established as part of Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective actions and were based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996; as amended August 2006). Since these URs were established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, these URs were re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006c). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the URs) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove these URs because contamination is not present at these sites above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining these URs will be canceled, and the postings and signage at each site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at these sites that are unrelated to the FFACO URs such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004f). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at these sites.

Lynn Kidman

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Addendum to the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 452: Historical Underground Storage Tank Release Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This document constitutes an addendum to the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 452: Historical Underground Storage Tank Release Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, April 1998 as described in the document Supplemental Investigation Report for FFACO Use Restrictions, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (SIR) dated November 2008. The SIR document was approved by NDEP on December 5, 2008. The approval of the SIR document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR removals. In conformance with the SIR document, this addendum consists of: • This page that refers the reader to the SIR document for additional information • The cover, title, and signature pages of the SIR document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the SIR document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the URs for CASs: • 25-25-09, Spill H940825C (from UST 25-3101-1) • 25-25-14, Spill H940314E (from UST 25-3102-3) • 25-25-15, Spill H941020E (from UST 25-3152-1) These URs were established as part of Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective actions and were based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996). Since these URs were established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, these URs were re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the URs) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove these URs because contamination is not present at these sites above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining these URs will be canceled, and the postings and signage at each site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at these sites that are unrelated to the FFACO URs such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at these sites.

Grant Evenson

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 326: Areas 6 and 27 Release Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This document constitutes an addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 326: Areas 6 and 27 Release Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Revision 1), December 2002 as described in the document Supplemental Investigation Report for FFACO Use Restrictions, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (SIR) dated November 2008. The SIR document was approved by NDEP on December 5, 2008. The approval of the SIR document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR removals. In conformance with the SIR document, this addendum consists of: • This page that refers the reader to the SIR document for additional information • The cover, title, and signature pages of the SIR document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the SIR document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the UR for CAS 06-25-01, CP-1 Heating Oil Release. This UR was established as part of a Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective action and is based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996). Since this UR was established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, this UR was reevaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the UR) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove the UR because contamination is not present at the site above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining this UR will be canceled, and the postings and signage at this site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at this site that are unrelated to the FFACO UR such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at this site.

Grant Evenson

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Addendum 2 to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 358: Areas 18, 19, 20 Cellars/Mud Pits, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revison 0  

SciTech Connect

This document constitutes an addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 358: Areas 18, 19, 20 Cellars/Mud Pits, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, January 2004 as described in the document Supplemental Investigation Report for FFACO Use Restrictions, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (SIR) dated November 2008. The SIR document was approved by NDEP on December 5, 2008. The approval of the SIR document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR removals. In conformance with the SIR document, this addendum consists of: • This page that refers the reader to the SIR document for additional information • The cover, title, and signature pages of the SIR document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the SIR document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the UR for CAS 19-09-05, Mud Pit. This UR was established as part of a Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective action and is based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996). Since this UR was established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, this UR was reevaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the UR) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove the UR because contamination is not present at the site above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining this UR will be canceled, and the postings and signage at this site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at this site that are unrelated to the FFACO UR such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at this site.

Grant Evenson

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Addendum 2 to the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 454: Historical Underground Storage Tank Release Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This document constitutes an addendum to the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 454: Historical Underground Storage Tank Release Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, April 1998 as described in the document Supplemental Investigation Report for FFACO Use Restrictions, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (SIR) dated November 2008. The SIR document was approved by NDEP on December 5, 2008. The approval of the SIR document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR removals. In conformance with the SIR document, this addendum consists of: • This page that refers the reader to the SIR document for additional information • The cover, title, and signature pages of the SIR document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the SIR document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the URs for CASs: • 12-25-08, Spill H950524F (from UST 12-B-1) • 12-25-10, Spill H950919A (from UST 12-COMM-1) These URs were established as part of Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective actions and were based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996). Since these URs were established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, these URs were re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the URs) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove these URs because contamination is not present at these sites above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining these URs will be canceled, and the postings and signage at each site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at these sites that are unrelated to the FFACO URs such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at these sites.

Grant Evenson

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 358: Areas 18, 19, 20 Cellars/Mud Pits Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This document constitutes an addendum to the January 2004, Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 358: Areas 18, 19, 20 Cellars/Mud Pits as described in the document Recommendations and Justifications for Modifications for Use Restrictions Established under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (UR Modification document) dated February 2008. The UR Modification document was approved by NDEP on February 26, 2008. The approval of the UR Modification document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR modifications. In conformance with the UR Modification document, this addendum consists of: • This cover page that refers the reader to the UR Modification document for additional information • The cover and signature pages of the UR Modification document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the UR Modification document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the URs for: • CAS 20-23-02, Postshot Cellar • CAS 20-23-03, Cellar • CAS 20-23-04, Postshot Cellar • CAS 20-23-05, Postshot Cellar • CAS 20-23-06, Cellar • CAS 20-37-01, Cellar & Mud Pit • CAS 20-37-05, Cellar These URs were established as part of Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective actions and were based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996; as amended August 2006). Since these URs were established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, these URs were re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006c). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the URs) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove these URs because contamination is not present at these sites above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining these URs will be canceled, and the postings and signage at each site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at these sites that are unrelated to the FFACO URs such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004f). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at these sites.

Lynn Kidman

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global risk-based corrective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 335: Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revison 0  

SciTech Connect

This document constitutes an addendum to the June 2003, Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 335: Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit as described in the document Recommendations and Justifications for Modifications for Use Restrictions Established under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (UR Modification document) dated February 2008. The UR Modification document was approved by NDEP on February 26, 2008. The approval of the UR Modification document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR modifications. In conformance with the UR Modification document, this addendum consists of: • This cover page that refers the reader to the UR Modification document for additional information • The cover and signature pages of the UR Modification document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the UR Modification document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the URs for: • CAS 06-20-02, 20-inch Cased Hole • CAS 06-23-03, Drain Pit These URs were established as part of Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective actions and were based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996; as amended August 2006). Since these URs were established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, these URs were re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006c). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the URs) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove these URs because contamination is not present at these sites above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining these URs will be canceled, and the postings and signage at each site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at these sites that are unrelated to the FFACO URs such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004f). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at these sites.

Lynn Kidman

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 356: Mud Pits and Disposal Sites Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This document constitutes an addendum to the November 2002, Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 356: Mud Pits and Disposal Sites as described in the document Recommendations and Justifications for Modifications for Use Restrictions Established under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (UR Modification document) dated February 2008. The UR Modification document was approved by NDEP on February 26, 2008. The approval of the UR Modification document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR modifications. In conformance with the UR Modification document, this addendum consists of: • This cover page that refers the reader to the UR Modification document for additional information • The cover and signature pages of the UR Modification document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the UR Modification document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the URs for: • CAS 03-04-01, Area 3 Change House Septic System • CAS 03-09-04, Mud Pit These URs were established as part of Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective actions and were based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996; as amended August 2006). Since these URs were established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, these URs were re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006c). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the URs) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove these URs because contamination is not present at these sites above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining these URs will be canceled, and the postings and signage at each site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at these sites that are unrelated to the FFACO URs such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004f). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at these sites.

Lynn Kidman

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 342: Area 23 Mercury Fire Training Pit Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This document constitutes an addendum to the April 2000, Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 342: Area 23 Mercury Fire Training Pit as described in the document Recommendations and Justifications for Modifications for Use Restrictions Established under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (UR Modification document) dated February 2008. The UR Modification document was approved by NDEP on February 26, 2008. The approval of the UR Modification document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR modifications. In conformance with the UR Modification document, this addendum consists of: • This cover page that refers the reader to the UR Modification document for additional information • The cover and signature pages of the UR Modification document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the UR Modification document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the UR for CAS 23-56-01, Former Mercury Fire Training Pit. This UR was established as part of a Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective action and is based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996; as amended August 2006). Since this UR was established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, this UR was re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006c). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the UR) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove the UR because contamination is not present at the site above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining this UR will be canceled, and the postings and signage at this site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at this site that are unrelated to the FFACO UR such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004f). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at this site.

Lynn Kidman

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Global warming and global dioxide emission: An empirical study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the dynamic relationship between global surface temperature (global warming) and global carbon dioxide emission (CO{sub 2}) is modelled and analyzed by causality and spectral analysis in the time domain and frequency domain, respectively. Historical data of global CO{sub 2} emission and global surface temperature anomalies over 129 years from 1860-1988 are used in this study. The causal relationship between the two phenomena is first examined using the Sim and Granger causality test in the time domain after the data series are filtered by ARIMA models. The Granger causal relationship is further scrutinized and confirmed by cross-spectral and multichannel spectral analysis in the frequency domain. The evidence found from both analyses proves that there is a positive causal relationship between the two variables. The time domain analysis suggests that Granger causality exists between global surface temperature and global CO{sub 2} emission. Further, CO{sub 2} emission causes the change in temperature. The conclusions are further confirmed by the frequency domain analysis, which indicates that the increase in CO{sub 2} emission causes climate warming because a high coherence exists between the two variables. Furthermore, it is proved that climate changes happen after an increase in CO{sub 2} emission, which confirms that the increase in CO{sub 2} emission does cause global warming. 27 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

Linyan Sun [Xian Jiaotong Univ., Shaanxi (China); Wang, M. [Saint Mary`s Univ., Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Chinese demand drives global deforestation Chinese demand drives global deforestation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chinese demand drives global deforestation Chinese demand drives global deforestation By Tansa Musa zones and do not respect size limits in their quest for maximum financial returns. "I lack words economy. China's demand for hardwood drives illegal logging says "Both illegal and authorized

186

Overall Requirements for Global Information Multimedia Communication Village 10th Strategic Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The foundations for the definition of the network of the future should be based on a correct user and community characterizations to minimize the fragmentation of the experiences during the global interactions with information communication infrastructures. ... Keywords: Access networks, Network evolution, Smart environments domotics, User identity, WiMax, Wireless communications

Antonio Cimmino; Pasquale Donadio

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 417: Central Nevada Test Area Surface, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Plan provides methods for implementing the approved corrective action alternative as provided in the Corrective Action Decision Document for the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA), Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417 (DOE/NV, 1999). The CNTA is located in the Hot Creek Valley in Nye County, Nevada, approximately 137 kilometers (85 miles) northeast of Tonopah, Nevada. The CNTA consists of three separate land withdrawal areas commonly referred to as UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4, all of which are accessible to the public. CAU 417 consists of 34 Corrective Action Sites (CASs). Results of the investigation activities completed in 1998 are presented in Appendix D of the Corrective Action Decision Document (DOE/NV, 1999). According to the results, the only Constituent of Concern at the CNTA is total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH). Of the 34 CASs, corrective action was proposed for 16 sites in 13 CASs. In fiscal year 1999, a Phase I Work Plan was prepared for the construction of a cover on the UC-4 Mud Pit C to gather information on cover constructibility and to perform site management activities. With Nevada Division of Environmental Protection concurrence, the Phase I field activities began in August 1999. A multi-layered cover using a Geosynthetic Clay Liner as an infiltration barrier was constructed over the UC-4 Mud Pit. Some TPH impacted material was relocated, concrete monuments were installed at nine sites, signs warning of site conditions were posted at seven sites, and subsidence markers were installed on the UC-4 Mud Pit C cover. Results from the field activities indicated that the UC-4 Mud Pit C cover design was constructable and could be used at the UC-1 Central Mud Pit (CMP). However, because of the size of the UC-1 CMP this design would be extremely costly. An alternative cover design, a vegetated cover, is proposed for the UC-1 CMP.

K. Campbell

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 139: Waste Disposal Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 139, Waste Disposal Sites, is listed in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 (FFACO, 1996). CAU 139 consists of seven Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 3, 4, 6, and 9 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), which is located approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1). CAU 139 consists of the following CASs: CAS 03-35-01, Burn Pit; CAS 04-08-02, Waste Disposal Site; CAS 04-99-01, Contaminated Surface Debris; CAS 06-19-02, Waste Disposal Site/Burn Pit; CAS 06-19-03, Waste Disposal Trenches; CAS 09-23-01, Area 9 Gravel Gertie; and CAS 09-34-01, Underground Detection Station. Details of the site history and site characterization results for CAU 139 are provided in the approved Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2006) and in the approved Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) (NNSA/NSO, 2007). The purpose of this Corrective Action Plan (CAP) is to present the detailed scope of work required to implement the recommended corrective actions as specified in Section 4.0 of the approved CADD (NNSA/NSO, 2007). The approved closure activities for CAU 139 include removal of soil and debris contaminated with plutonium (Pu)-239, excavation of geophysical anomalies, removal of surface debris, construction of an engineered soil cover, and implementation of use restrictions (URs). Table 1 presents a summary of CAS-specific closure activities and contaminants of concern (COCs). Specific details of the corrective actions to be performed at each CAS are presented in Section 2.0 of this report.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Statistical global metabolic control analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work introduces the concept of global sensitivity based on simultaneous variation of a complete set of enzymes, metabolite concentrations, and cofactors in finite ranges of concentrations. Perturbations are defined by finite ranges of concentrations ... Keywords: MCA metabolic control analysis, flux control coefficients, global sensitivity, homeostasis

Zelimir Kurtanjek

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Global and Regional Solutions Directorate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at Pacific NW National Lab (PNNL) ­ Founding Director Joint Global Change Research Institute (PNNL/UMd) ­ ALD (PNNL) ­ Environmental and Health Sciences Directorate; Emerging Technologies ­ Chief Scientist ­ Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program ­ Director ­ PNNL Global Studies Program ­ Other (PNNL): Center

Homes, Christopher C.

191

GLOBAL IMPACT FROM THE HEART  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GLOBAL IMPACT FROM THE HEART OF NORTHERN IRELAND #12;#12;CHANCELLOR'S WELCOME 4 VICE: INNOVATIVE AND WORLD-CLASS 18 CONTACT 26 CONTENTS 3GLOBAL IMPACT FROM THE HEART OF NORTHERN IRELAND #12;Queen THE HEART OF NORTHERN IRELANDGLOBAL IMPACT FROM THE HEART OF NORTHERN IRELAND CHANCELLOR'S WELCOME

Müller, Jens-Dominik

192

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 563: Septic Systems, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, with Errata Sheet, Revision 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit 563, Septic Systems, is located in Areas 3 and 12 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 563 is comprised of the four corrective action sites (CASs) below: • 03-04-02, Area 3 Subdock Septic Tank • 03-59-05, Area 3 Subdock Cesspool • 12-59-01, Drilling/Welding Shop Septic Tanks • 12-60-01, Drilling/Welding Shop Outfalls These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document.

Alfred Wickline

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 562: Waste Systems, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Plan has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 562, Waste Systems, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (1996; as amended March 2010). CAU 562 consists of 13 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 2, 23, and 25 of the Nevada National Security Site. Site characterization activities were performed in 2009 and 2010, and the results are presented in Appendix A of the Corrective Action Decision Document for CAU 562. The scope of work required to implement the recommended closure alternatives is summarized. (1) CAS 02-26-11, Lead Shot, will be clean closed by removing shot. (2) CAS 02-44-02, Paint Spills and French Drain, will be clean closed by removing paint and contaminated soil. As a best management practice (BMP), asbestos tile will be removed. (3) CAS 02-59-01, Septic System, will be clean closed by removing septic tank contents. As a BMP, the septic tank will be removed. (4) CAS 02-60-01, Concrete Drain, contains no contaminants of concern (COCs) above action levels. No further action is required; however, as a BMP, the concrete drain will be removed. (5) CAS 02-60-02, French Drain, was clean closed. Corrective actions were completed during corrective action investigation activities. As a BMP, the drain grates and drain pipe will be removed. (6) CAS 02-60-03, Steam Cleaning Drain, will be clean closed by removing contaminated soil. As a BMP, the steam cleaning sump grate and outfall pipe will be removed. (7) CAS 02-60-04, French Drain, was clean closed. Corrective actions were completed during corrective action investigation activities. (8) CAS 02-60-05, French Drain, will be clean closed by removing contaminated soil. (9) CAS 02-60-06, French Drain, contains no COCs above action levels. No further action is required. (10) CAS 02-60-07, French Drain, requires no further action. The french drain identified in historical documentation was not located during corrective action investigation activities. (11) CAS 23-60-01, Mud Trap Drain and Outfall, will be clean closed by removing sediment from the mud trap. As a BMP, the mud trap and outfall pipe will be removed. (12) CAS 23-99-06, Grease Trap, will be clean closed by removing sediment from the grease trap and backfilling the grease trap with grout. (13) CAS 25-60-04, Building 3123 Outfalls, will be clean closed by removing contaminated soil and the sludge-containing outfall pipe.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2011-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

194

Chromaticity correction for a muon collider optics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Muon Collider (MC) is a promising candidate for the next energy frontier machine. However, in order to obtain peak luminosity in the 10{sup 34} cm{sup 2}s{sup -1} range the collider lattice designmust satisfy a number of stringent requirements. In particular the expected large momentum spread of the muon beam and the very small {beta}* call for a careful correction of the chromatic effects. Here we present a particular solution for the interaction region (IR) optics whose distinctive feature is a three-sextupole local chromatic correction scheme. The scheme may be applied to other future machines where chromatic effects are expected to be large. The expected large muon energy spread requires the optics to be stable over a wide range of momenta whereas the required luminosity calls for {beta}* in the mm range. To avoid luminosity degradation due to hour-glass effect, the bunch length must be comparatively small. To keep the needed RF voltage within feasible limits the momentum compaction factor must be small over the wide range of momenta. A low {beta}* means high sensitivity to alignment and field errors of the Interaction Region (IR) quadrupoles and large chromatic effects which limit the momentum range of optics stability and require strong correction sextupoles, which eventually limit the Dynamic Aperture (DA). Finally, the ring circumference should be as small as possible, luminosity being inversely proportional to the collider length. A promising solution for a 1.5 TeV center of mass energy MC with {beta}* = 1 m in both planes has been proposed. This {beta}* value has been chosen as a compromise between luminosity and feasibility based on the magnet design and energy deposition considerations. The proposed solution for the IR optics together with a new flexible momentum compaction arc cell design allows to satisfy all requirements and is relatively insensitive to the beam-beam effect.

Alexahin, Y.; Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Kapin, V.; /Fermilab

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Educational Global Climate Change Links  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Educational Global Climate Change Links Educational Global Climate Change Links Evidence of the importance of global climate change to the future generation is reflected in the increasing number of queries CDIAC receives from students and educators, from a range of educational levels. We have compiled a listing of some sites that we hope will be of interest and of use to those looking for information, fun, ideas, and ways that they can make a difference. These links were chosen because we have found them useful in responding to those with inquiring minds. These links will take the user outside of CDIAC, and are by no means comprehensive. We are not responsible for the content or intent of these outside links. Tools you can use! NOAA's Global Climate Dashboard - The Global Climate Dashboard is

196

Frequently Asked Global Change Questions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Asked Global Change Questions Asked Global Change Questions This page lists global change questions that have been received at CDIAC and the answers that were provided to a diverse audience. If you have a question relating to carbon dioxide and global change and cannot find the answer you need here, you can "Ask Us a Question", and we will be glad to try to help you. Questions Should we grow trees to remove carbon in the atmosphere? What are the present tropospheric concentrations, global warming potentials (100 year time horizon), and atmospheric lifetimes of CO2, CH4, N2O, CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113, CCl4, methyl chloroform, HCFC-22, sulphur hexafluoride, trifluoromethyl sulphur pentafluoride, perfluoroethane, and surface ozone? Where can I find information on the naming of halocarbons?

197

Measurement and correction of accelerator optics  

SciTech Connect

This report reviews procedures and techniques for measuring, correcting and controlling various optics parameters of an accelerator, including the betatron tune, beta function, betatron coupling, dispersion, chromaticity, momentum compaction factor, and beam orbit. The techniques described are not only indispensable for the basic set-up of an accelerator, but in addition the same methods can be used to study more esoteric questions as, for instance, dynamic aperture limitations or wakefield effects. The different procedures are illustrated by examples from several accelerators, storage rings, as well as linacs and transport lines.

Zimmerman, F.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Forecast Bias Correction: A Second Order Method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The difference between a model forecast and actual observations is called forecast bias. This bias is due to either incomplete model assumptions and/or poorly known parameter values and initial/boundary conditions. In this paper we discuss a method for estimating corrections to parameters and initial conditions that would account for the forecast bias. A set of simple experiments with the logistic ordinary differential equation is performed using an iterative version of a first order version of our method to compare with the second order version of the method.

Crowell, Sean

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Radiative corrections to heavy Higgs physics  

SciTech Connect

The one-loop correction to the width of a 1 TeV Higgs boson is rather modest; it increases the tree width by only 15%. This is surprising in light of the fact that the particle is strongly coupled to itself and to longitudinal gauge bosons. We argue that this may be understood in terms of an effective energy-dependent coupling which is strong for s > m/sub H/S but weak for s < m/sub H/S. 8 refs., 1 fig.

Willenbrock, S.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 453: Area 9 UXO Landfill, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This corrective action plan proposes the closure method for the area 9 unexploded Ordnance landfill, corrective action unit 453 located at the Tonopah Test Range. The area 9 UXO landfill consists of corrective action site no. 09-55-001-0952 and is comprised of three individual landfill cells designated as A9-1, A9-2, and A9-3. The three landfill cells received wastes from daily operations at area 9 and from range cleanups which were performed after weapons testing. Cell locations and contents were not well documented due to the unregulated disposal practices commonly associated with early landfill operations. However, site process knowledge indicates that the landfill cells were used for solid waste disposal, including disposal of UXO.

Bechtel Nevada

1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global risk-based corrective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Global production through 2005  

SciTech Connect

Two companion studies released recently should provide great food for thought among geo-political strategists and various national governments. If predictions contained in these Petroconsultants studies of oil and gas production trends for the next 10 years are realized, there will be great repercussions for net exporters and importers, alike. After analyzing and predicting trends within each of the world`s significant producing nations for the 1996--2005 period, the crude oil and condensate report concludes tat global production will jump nearly 24%. By contrast, worldwide gas output will leap 40%. The cast of characters among producers and exporters that will benefit from these increases varies considerably for each fuel. On the oil side, Russia and the OPEC members, particularly the Persian Gulf nations, will be back in the driver`s seat in terms of affecting export and pricing patterns. On the gas side, the leading producers will be an interesting mix of mostly non-OPEC countries. The reemergence of Persian Gulf oil producers, coupled with an anticipated long-term decline among top non-OPEC producing nations should present a sobering picture to government planners within large net importers, such as the US. They are likely to find themselves in much the same supply trap as was experienced in the 1970s, only this time the dependence on foreign oil supplies will be much worse. Gas supplies will not be similarly constrained, and some substitution for oil is probable. Here, two articles, ``World oil industry is set for transition`` and ``Worldwide gas surges forward in next decade,`` present a summary of the findings detailed in Petroconsultants` recent studies.

Foreman, N.E. [Petroconsultants, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

ARM - PI Product - NSA AERI Hatch Correction Data Set  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsNSA AERI Hatch Correction Data Set Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : NSA AERI Hatch Correction...

203

Statistical Correction of Dynamical Prognoses: The Decision Problem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A statistical correction scheme significantly reduces the mean S1 skill score of the Australian Region Primitive Equation Model. However, on a number of days, the statistically predicted corrections degrade the dynamical prognoses. Empirical ...

A. F. Bennett; L. M. Leslie

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Thermal Mass Correction for the Evaluation of Salinity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper revisits the thermal mass inertia correction of Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc., (SBE4) conductivity probes for the calculation of salinity. In particular, it is shown that the standard parameters recommended for the correction method are ...

Vigan Mensah; Marc Le Menn; Yves Morel

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Correcting Microwave Precipitation Retrievals for near-Surface Evaporation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper compares two methods for correcting passive or active microwave surface precipitation estimates based on hydrometeors sensed aloft that may evaporate before landing. These corrections were derived using two years ...

Surussavadee, Chinnawat

206

Empirical Correction of a Dynamical Model. Part I: Fundamental Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The possibility of empirically correcting a nonlinear dynamical model is examined. The empirical correction is constructed by fitting a first-order Markov model to the forecast errors using initial conditions as predictors. The dynamical operator ...

Timothy DelSole; Arthur Y. Hou

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Tonopah Test Range Summary of Corrective Action Units  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Sites (CASs) and Corrective Action Units (CAUs) at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) may be placed into three categories: Clean Closure/No Further Action, Closure in Place, or Closure in Progress.

Ronald B. Jackson

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Quantum corrected spherical collapse: A phenomenological framework  

SciTech Connect

A phenomenological framework is presented for incorporating quantum gravity motivated corrections into the dynamics of spherically symmetric collapse. The effective equations are derived from a variational principle that guarantees energy conservation and the existence of a Birkhoff theorem. The gravitational potential can be chosen as a function of the areal radius to yield specific nonsingular static spherically symmetric solutions that generically have two horizons. For a specific choice of potential, the effective stress energy tensor violates only the dominant energy condition. The violations are maximum near the inner horizon and die off rapidly. A numerical study of the quantum corrected collapse of a spherically symmetric scalar field in this case reveals that the modified gravitational potential prevents the formation of a central singularity and ultimately yields a static, mostly vacuum, spacetime with two horizons. The matter 'piles up' on the inner horizon giving rise to mass inflation at late times. The Cauchy horizon is transformed into a null, weak singularity, but in contrast to Einstein gravity, the absence of a central singularity renders this null singularity stable.

Ziprick, Jonathan; Kunstatter, Gabor [Perimeter Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Department of Physics and Winnipeg Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of Winnipeg, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3B 2E9 (Canada)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

209

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 490: Station 44 Burn Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 490, Station 44 Burn Area is located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR). CAU 490 is listed in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996) and includes for Corrective Action Sites (CASs): (1) Fire Training Area (CAS 03-56-001-03BA); (2) Station 44 Burn Area (CAS RG-56-001-RGBA); (3) Sandia Service Yard (CAS 03-58-001-03FN); and (4) Gun Propellant Burn Area (CAS 09-54-001-09L2).

K. B. Campbell

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Cold quark matter, quadratic corrections, and gauge/string duality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We make an estimate of the quadratic correction in the pressure of cold quark matter using gauge/string duality.

Andreev, Oleg [Arnold Sommerfeld Center for Theoretical Physics, LMU-Muenchen, Theresienstrasse 37, 80333 Muenchen (Germany)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

211

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 204: Storage Bunkers, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No. 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The six bunkers included in CAU 204 were primarily used to monitor atmospheric testing or store munitions. The ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) for Corrective Action Unit 204: Storage Bunkers, Nevada Test Site, Nevada'' (NNSA/NV, 2002a) provides information relating to the history, planning, and scope of the investigation; therefore, it will not be repeated in this CADD. This CADD identifies potential corrective action alternatives and provides a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for each CAS within CAU 204. The evaluation of corrective action alternatives is based on process knowledge and the results of investigative activities conducted in accordance with the CAIP (NNSA/NV, 2002a) that was approved prior to the start of the Corrective Action Investigation (CAI). Record of Technical Change (ROTC) No. 1 to the CAIP (approval pending) documents changes to the preliminary action levels (PALs) agreed to by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) and DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). This ROTC specifically discusses the radiological PALs and their application to the findings of the CAU 204 corrective action investigation. The scope of this CADD consists of the following: (1) Develop corrective action objectives; (2) Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria; (3) Develop corrective action alternatives; (4) Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of corrective action alternatives in relation to corrective action objectives and screening criteria; and (5) Recommend and justify a preferred corrective action alternative for each CAS within CAU 204.

Robert Boehlecke

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Radiative Corrections to the PREX and QWEAK Experiments  

SciTech Connect

The high precision parity violating electron scattering experiments PREX and QWEAK are sensitive to radiative corrections. In this paper we introduce the PREX experiment that measures the neutron radius of {sup 208}Pb and discuss coulomb distortion corrections. We then discuss dispersion corrections for QWEAK that aims to measure the weak charge of the proton.

C. J. Horowitz

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Unitary application of the quantum error correction codes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

From the set of operators for errors and its correction code, we introduce the so-called complete unitary transformation. It can be used for encoding while the inverse of it can be applied for correcting the errors of the encoded qubit. We show that this unitary protocol can be applied for any code which satisfies the quantum error correction condition.

Xoaohua Wu; Bo You

2011-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

214

Global Warming: Physics and Facts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains papers on: A tutorial on global atmospheric energetics and the greenhouse effect; global climate models: what and how; comparison of general circulation models; climate and the earth`s radiation budget; temperature and sea level change; short-term climate variability and predictions; the great ocean conveyor; trace gases in the atmosphere: temporal and spatial trends; the geochemical carbon cycle and the uptake of fossil fuel CO{sub 2}; forestry and global warming; the physical and policy linkages; policy implications of greenhouse warming; options for lowering US carbon dioxide emissions; options for reducing carbon dioxide emissions; and science and diplomacy: a new partnership to protect the environment.

Levi, B.G. [Physics Today, New York, NY (United States); Hafemeister, D. [Committee on Foreign Relations (U.S. Senate), Washington, DC (United States); Scribner, R. [Georgetown Univ., Washington, DC (United States)] [eds.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Global Warming: Physics and Facts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains papers on: A tutorial on global atmospheric energetics and the greenhouse effect; global climate models: what and how; comparison of general circulation models; climate and the earth's radiation budget; temperature and sea level change; short-term climate variability and predictions; the great ocean conveyor; trace gases in the atmosphere: temporal and spatial trends; the geochemical carbon cycle and the uptake of fossil fuel CO{sub 2}; forestry and global warming; the physical and policy linkages; policy implications of greenhouse warming; options for lowering US carbon dioxide emissions; options for reducing carbon dioxide emissions; and science and diplomacy: a new partnership to protect the environment.

Levi, B.G. (Physics Today, New York, NY (United States)); Hafemeister, D. (Committee on Foreign Relations (U.S. Senate), Washington, DC (United States)); Scribner, R. (Georgetown Univ., Washington, DC (United States)) (eds.)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Corrective Action Decision Document/ Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 443: Central Nevada Test Area-Subsurface Central Nevada Test Area, Nevada, Rev. No. 0  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan (CADD/CAP) has been prepared for the subsurface at the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 443, CNTA - Subsurface, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996). CAU 443 is located in Hot Creek Valley in Nye County, Nevada, north of U.S. Highway 6, about 48 kilometers north of Warm Springs, Nevada. The CADD/CAP combines the decision document (CADD) with the corrective action plan (CAP) and provides or references the specific information necessary to recommend corrective actions for the UC-1 Cavity (Corrective Action Site 58-57-001) at CAU 443, as provided in the FFACO. The purpose of the CADD portion of the document (Section 1.0 to Section 4.0) is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for the subsurface at CNTA. To achieve this, the following tasks were required: (1) Develop corrective action objectives; (2) Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria; (3) Develop corrective action alternatives; (4) Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of the corrective action alternatives in relation to the corrective action objectives and screening criteria; and (5) Recommend a preferred corrective action alternative for the subsurface at CNTA. A Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) was performed in several stages from 1999 to 2003, as set forth in the ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for the Central Nevada Test Area Subsurface Sites (Corrective Action Unit No. 443)'' (DOE/NV, 1999). Groundwater modeling was the primary activity of the CAI. Three phases of modeling were conducted for the Faultless underground nuclear test. The first involved the gathering and interpretation of geologic and hydrogeologic data into a three-dimensional numerical model of groundwater flow, and use of the output of the flow model for a transport model of radionuclide release and migration behavior (Pohlmann et al., 2000). The second modeling phase (known as a Data Decision Analysis [DDA]) occurred after the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection reviewed the first model and was designed to respond to concerns regarding model uncertainty (Pohll and Mihevc, 2000). The third modeling phase updated the original flow and transport model to incorporate the uncertainty identified in the DDA, and focused the model domain on the region of interest to the transport predictions. This third phase culminated in the calculation of contaminant boundaries for the site (Pohll et al., 2003).

Susan Evans

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 543: Liquid Disposal Units, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 543, Liquid Disposal Units, is listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996. CAU 543 consists of seven Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 6 and 15 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 543 consists of the following seven CASs: {sm_bullet} CAS 06-07-01, Decon Pad {sm_bullet} CAS 15-01-03, Aboveground Storage Tank {sm_bullet} CAS 15-04-01, Septic Tank {sm_bullet} CAS 15-05-01, Leachfield {sm_bullet} CAS 15-08-01, Liquid Manure Tank {sm_bullet} CAS 15-23-01, Underground Radioactive Material Area {sm_bullet} CAS 15-23-03, Contaminated Sump, Piping From January 24, 2005 through April 14, 2005, CAU 543 site characterization activities were conducted, and are reported in Appendix A of the CAU 543 Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2005). The recommended corrective action as stated in the approved CADD is No Further Action for five of the CAU 543 CASs, and Closure In Place for the remaining two CASs.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

PLEASE RETURN TO PDCC FOR CORRECTIONS  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

PLEASE PLEASE RETURN TO PDCC FOR CORRECTIONS ~ F : S : R : D R : C ~ H : R : o L N : S F T I L : E M. se~;/:~~;: : : : : :::::EHC~DATA : B : E ~ H ~ '"" ENVIRON SAFETY & HEALTH :::s ~ FSRD NOTEBOOKS SAFETY & HEALTH BEH ~ ~ READING FILE ENVIR COMPLIANCE BEH '\.. ....... ~ DOE/P&CD: French/Sislrunk DCa WASTE MGMT & TREATMENT BEH § ~ DOE/HQ: J. Wagoner DHQ PROCUREMENT BPO ::::s ~ 1-~~~~~~~~~~+~+~t---t~TM-Al-E-B-E-RL-IN-E-------+-B-ET-+-+-+-:-::-~-:-~-~ A-A:-T-~N-~-:~-:-AN-T-IO-N~~-t-:-:-~+-~t--I ~ ~ ... S-IT-E-S:-1-5-8-N-FS-S------.,I--+--+-+P-R-O-JE-C-T-C-a-N-T-R-O-LS~~~~-+~BP";;C+~-+-~"I ~

219

Radiative Corrections in Yang-Mills thermodynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We provide arguments why the loop expansion of the pressure in the effective theory for the deconfining phase of SU(2) Yang-Mills thermodynamics is likely to terminate at a finite order despite the fact that the effective gauge coupling is large (e{>=}{radical}(8){pi}). Each order l of the expansion measures the lth power of the fraction of a typical residual action of the quantum fluctuation in one loop S{sub l} and h. Here S{sub l} rapidly decreases with l. This is demonstrated by a computation of irreducible 2-loop and 3-loop diagrams which correct the pressure of free quasiparticles radiatively. In fact, at the three-loop level, one diagram vanishes identically. By benchmarking with known 2-loop results we show that the Monte-Carlo method used to compute on the 3-loop level is reliable.

Kaviani, Dariush [IPPP, University of Durham, South Rd, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)

2011-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

220

Optics measurements and corrections at RHIC  

SciTech Connect

The further improvement of RHIC luminosity performance requires more precise understanding of the RHIC modeling. Hence, it is necessary to minimize the beta-beat, deviation of measured beta function from the calculated beta functions based on an model. The correction of betabeat also opens up the possibility of exploring operating RHIC polarized protons at a working point near integer, a prefered choice for both luminosity as well as beam polarization. The segment-by-segment technique for reducing beta-beat demonstrated in the LHC operation for reducing the beta-beat was first tested in RHIC during its polarized proton operation in 2011. It was then fully implemented during the RHIC polarized proton operation in 2012. This paper reports the commissioning results. Future plan is also presented.

Bai M.; Aronson, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Luo, Y.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; White, S.

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global risk-based corrective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Figure correction of multilayer coated optics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is provided for producing near-perfect optical surfaces, for EUV and soft-x-ray optics. The method involves polishing or otherwise figuring the multilayer coating that has been deposited on an optical substrate, in order to correct for errors in the figure of the substrate and coating. A method such as ion-beam milling is used to remove material from the multilayer coating by an amount that varies in a specified way across the substrate. The phase of the EUV light that is reflected from the multilayer will be affected by the amount of multilayer material removed, but this effect will be reduced by a factor of 1-n as compared with height variations of the substrate, where n is the average refractive index of the multilayer.

Chapman; Henry N. (Livermore, CA), Taylor; John S. (Livermore, CA)

2010-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

222

ERRATA SHEET for Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 490: Station 44 Burn Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Section 2.1.1.3 of the Table of Contents reference on Page v and on Page 12 of the Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 490: Station 44 Burn Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada erroneously refers to the Nevada Environmental Policy Act Determination. The correct title of the referenced document is the National Environmental Policy Act Determination.

K. B. Campbell

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Global Warming and Extreme Weather  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Warming and Extreme Weather Global Warming and Extreme Weather Speaker(s): Michael Wehner Date: November 28, 2006 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Surabi Menon Extreme weather events can have serious impacts on human and ecological systems. Changes in the magnitude and frequency of extreme weather associated with changes in the mean climate are likely the most serious consequence of human induced global warming. Understanding what the future portends is vital if society hopes to adapt to the very different world that awaits. In this talk, we will exploit simple extreme value theory to make predictions about the late 21st century climate. Current work on the relationship between global warming and the hurricane cycle will also be presented. The bottom line is that events that are considered rare today

224

BPL Global | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BPL Global BPL Global Jump to: navigation, search Name BPL Global Place Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Zip 15222 Product BPL Global is a Pittburgh based company that uses broadband over powerline (BPL) to intergrate offerings of advanced metering infrastructure and broadband internet. Coordinates 40.438335°, -79.997459° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.438335,"lon":-79.997459,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

225

Endeavor Global | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Endeavor Global Endeavor Global Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Endeavor Global Name Endeavor Global Address 900 Broadway Place New York, New York Zip 10003 Coordinates 40.7391824°, -73.9897252° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.7391824,"lon":-73.9897252,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

226

Global Circuit Model with Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud data from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) database have been introduced into the global circuit model developed by Tinsley and Zhou. Using the cloud-top pressure data and cloud type information, the authors ...

Limin Zhou; Brian A. Tinsley

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Puzzles from the First Globalization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the first globalization, 1870-1914, as in our own times, debates raged over the impact on domestic life of free movement across borders of goods, people, and capital. Then as today in the hard times that have followed ...

Berger, Suzanne

228

EPS Global International Cancer Conference  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sept.10-12th, 2010 Suzhou, China Welcome Message Dear Colleagues and Friends, It is my pleasure to announce that EPS Global International Cancer Conference will be held on...

229

The Psychology of Global Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The evidence in support of global warming and the lack of significant published evidence to the contrary provides an extraordinarily strong foundation for the scientific community's call for action on greenhouse gas emissions. However, public ...

Ben R. Newell; Andrew J. Pitman

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Magnitude correlations in global seismicity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By employing natural time analysis, we analyze the worldwide seismicity and study the existence of correlations between earthquake magnitudes. We find that global seismicity exhibits nontrivial magnitude correlations for earthquake magnitudes greater than M{sub w}6.5.

Sarlis, N. V. [Solid State Section and Solid Earth Physics Institute, Physics Department, University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, Zografos GR-157 84, Athens (Greece)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

231

THE GLOBAL NUCLEAR ENERGY PARTNERSHIP:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GLOBAL NUCLEAR ENERGY PARTNERSHIP: GLOBAL NUCLEAR ENERGY PARTNERSHIP: Greater Energy Security in a Cleaner, Safer World The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) is a comprehensive strategy to increase U.S. and global energy security, encourage clean development around the world, reduce the risk of nuclear proliferation, and improve the environment. A plentiful, reliable supply of energy is the cornerstone of sustained economic growth and prosperity. Nuclear power is the only proven technology that can provide abundant supplies of base load electricity reliably and without air pollution or emissions of greenhouse gasses. In order to help meet growing demand for energy at home and encourage the growth of prosperity around the globe, GNEP provides for the safe, extensive expansion of clean nuclear power.

232

Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Discharge Area, Nevada Test Site, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This document constitutes an addendum to the Closure Report for CAU 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Discharge Area Nevada Test Site, December 1997 as described in the document Supplemental Investigation Report for FFACO Use Restrictions, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (SIR) dated November 2008. The SIR document was approved by NDEP on December 5, 2008. The approval of the SIR document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR removals. In conformance with the SIR document, this addendum consists of: • This page that refers the reader to the SIR document for additional information • The cover, title, and signature pages of the SIR document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the SIR document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the UR for CAS 12-19-01, A12 Fleet Ops Steam Cleaning Efflu. This UR was established as part of a Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective action and is based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996). Since this UR was established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, this UR was reevaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the UR) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove the UR because contamination is not present at the site above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining this UR will be canceled, and the postings and signage at this site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at this site that are unrelated to the FFACO UR such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at this site.

Grant Evenson

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Corrective Action Tracking System User's Guide | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Corrective Action Tracking System User's Guide Corrective Action Tracking System User's Guide Corrective Action Tracking System User's Guide September 07, 2004 Corrective Action Tracking System (CATS) User's Guide for Direct Web Access The Department of Energy (DOE) Corrective Action Management Program (CAMP) prescribes process requirements and responsibilities for DOE line managers to develop and implement corrective actions to effectively resolve safety findings arising from: Findings as identified by the Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance Environment, Safety and Health and Emergency Management assessments; Judgments of Need as identified by Type A accident investigations: Other sources as directed by the Secretary or Deputy Secretary, including crosscutting safety findings. Corrective Action Tracking System User's Guide

234

ARM - PI Product - Radiosondes Corrected for Inaccuracy in RH Measurements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsRadiosondes Corrected for Inaccuracy in RH ProductsRadiosondes Corrected for Inaccuracy in RH Measurements Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : Radiosondes Corrected for Inaccuracy in RH Measurements 2000.01.01 - 2005.12.31 Site(s) SGP General Description Corrections for inaccuracy in Vaisala radiosonde RH measurements have been applied to ARM SGP radiosonde soundings. The magnitude of the corrections can vary considerably between soundings. The radiosonde measurement accuracy, and therefore the correction magnitude, is a function of atmospheric conditions, mainly T, RH, and dRH/dt (humidity gradient). The corrections are also very sensitive to the RH sensor type, and there are 3 Vaisala sensor types represented in this dataset (RS80-H, RS90, and RS92).

235

Corrective Action Tracking System User's Guide | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Corrective Action Tracking System User's Guide Corrective Action Tracking System User's Guide Corrective Action Tracking System User's Guide September 07, 2004 Corrective Action Tracking System (CATS) User's Guide for Direct Web Access The Department of Energy (DOE) Corrective Action Management Program (CAMP) prescribes process requirements and responsibilities for DOE line managers to develop and implement corrective actions to effectively resolve safety findings arising from: Findings as identified by the Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance Environment, Safety and Health and Emergency Management assessments; Judgments of Need as identified by Type A accident investigations: Other sources as directed by the Secretary or Deputy Secretary, including crosscutting safety findings. Corrective Action Tracking System User's Guide

236

Corrective Action Tracking System (CATS) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Corrective Action Tracking System (CATS) Corrective Action Tracking System (CATS) Corrective Action Tracking System (CATS) The CATS web-based database is used to enter, track, and report the status of corrective actions developed and implemented in the DOE Corrective Action Management Program (CAMP) to effectively resolve and prevent recurrence of reported findings. The web-site includes guidance for accessing, reviewing and editing the database. NOTICE: Because of the potential sensitive nature of some information in Corrective Action Plans (CAPs) that is placed in the Department of Energy (DOE) Corrective Action Tracking System (CATS), DOE is limiting access to the CATS web site. Members of the public cannot access the CATS web site at this time. DOE regrets any inconvenience caused by this decision in

237

NERSC Calculations Provide Independent Confirmation of Global...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NERSC Calculations Provide Independent Confirmation of Global Land Warming Since 1901 NERSC Calculations Provide Independent Confirmation of Global Land Warming Since 1901...

238

The Private Regulation of Global Corporate Conduct  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ameliorate the negative social impacts of global markets isenvironmental and social impacts and the royalty paymentscriticisms of the social impact of economic globalization

Vogel, David

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Building Technologies Office: Global Superior Energy Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Superior Energy Global Superior Energy Performance Partnership to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Global Superior Energy Performance Partnership on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Global Superior Energy Performance Partnership on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Global Superior Energy Performance Partnership on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Global Superior Energy Performance Partnership on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Global Superior Energy Performance Partnership on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Global Superior Energy Performance Partnership on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities 179d Tax Calculator Advanced Energy Design Guides Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides

240

Global Environment Facility (GEF) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edit with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Global Environment Facility (GEF) Jump to: navigation, search Name Global Environment Facility Address...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global risk-based corrective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Global Energias Renovables SL | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energias Renovables SL Jump to: navigation, search Name Global Energias Renovables SL Place Madrid, Spain Sector Wind energy Product Spanish wind power developer. References Global...

242

Global Celsius SL | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Celsius SL Jump to: navigation, search Name Global Celsius SL Place Madrid, Spain Sector Wind energy Product Spanish wind project developer. References Global Celsius SL1...

243

Global Alternative Fuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alternative Fuels Jump to: navigation, search Name Global Alternative Fuels Place El Paso, Texas Zip 79922 Product Global Alternative Fuels processes virgin oils (palm, soybean,...

244

Global Green Partners | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Global Green Partners Jump to: navigation, search Name Global Green Partners Place Los Altos,...

245

Sunrise Global Solar Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Sunrise Global Solar Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name Sunrise Global Solar Energy Place Taoyuan County, Taiwan Zip...

246

Global Fossil Fuel Carbon Emissions - Graphics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Global Graphics Global Fossil-Fuel Carbon Emissions - Graphics Data graphic Data (ASCII, Fixed Format) Data graphic Data (ASCII, Comma-delimited)...

247

The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) An article that examines the global nuclear energy partnership. The Global Nuclear Energy...

248

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 554: Area 23 Release Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 554: Area 23 Release Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. Information presented in this CAIP includes facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for the selection and evaluation of environmental samples. Corrective Action Unit 554 is located in Area 23 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 554 is comprised of one Corrective Action Site (CAS), which is: 23-02-08, USTs 23-115-1, 2, 3/Spill 530-90-002. This site consists of soil contamination resulting from a fuel release from underground storage tanks (USTs). Corrective Action Site 23-02-08 is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation prior to evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for this CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document for CAU 554. Corrective Action Site 23-02-08 will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on July 15, 2004, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; and contractor personnel. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 554.

David A. Strand

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 447: Project Shoal Area, Nevada Subsurface Site  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) describes the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) continued environmental investigation of the subsurface Project Shoal Area (PSA) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 447. The PSA is located in the Sand Springs Mountains in Churchill County, Nevada, about 48 kilometers (km) (30 miles [mi]) southeast of Fallon, Nevada. Project Shoal was part of the Vela Uniform Program which was conducted to improve the US' ability to detect, identify, and locate underground nuclear detonations. The test consisted of detonating a 12-kiloton nuclear device deep underground in granitic rock to determine whether seismic waves produced by an underground nuclear test could be differentiated from seismic waves produced by a naturally occurring earthquake. The test was a joint effort conducted by the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and the US Department of Defense (DoD) in October 1963 (AEC, 1964).

DOE /NV

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Global Cooling: Effect of Urban Albedo on Global Temperature  

SciTech Connect

In many urban areas, pavements and roofs constitute over 60% of urban surfaces (roof 20-25%, pavements about 40%). The roof and the pavement albedo can be increased by about 0.25 and 0.10, respectively, resulting in a net albedo increase for urban areas of about 0.1. Many studies have demonstrated building cooling-energy savings in excess of 20% upon raising roof reflectivity from an existing 10-20% to about 60%. We estimate U.S. potential savings in excess of $1 billion (B) per year in net annual energy bills. Increasing albedo of urban surfaces can reduce the summertime urban temperature and improve the urban air quality. Increasing the urban albedo has the added benefit of reflecting more of the incoming global solar radiation and countering the effect of global warming. We estimate that increasing albedo of urban areas by 0.1 results in an increase of 3 x 10{sup -4} in Earth albedo. Using a simple global model, the change in air temperature in lowest 1.8 km of the atmosphere is estimated at 0.01K. Modelers predict a warming of about 3K in the next 60 years (0.05K/year). Change of 0.1 in urban albedo will result in 0.01K global cooling, a delay of {approx}0.2 years in global warming. This 0.2 years delay in global warming is equivalent to 10 Gt reduction in CO2 emissions.

Akbari, Hashem; Menon, Surabi; Rosenfeld, Arthur

2007-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

251

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 407: Roller Coaster RADSAFE Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Plan (CAP) has been prepared for the Roller Coaster RADSAFE Area Corrective Action Unit 407 in accordance with the Federal Facility and Consent Order (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection [NDEP] et al., 1996). This CAP provides the methodology for implementing the approved Corrective Action Alternative as listed in the Corrective Action Decision Document (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, 1999). The RCRSA was used during May and June of 1963 to decontaminate vehicles, equipment, and personnel from the Clean Slate tests. The Constituents of Concern (COCs) identified during the site characterization include plutonium, uranium, and americium. No other COCS were identified. The following closure actions will be implemented under this plan: (1) Remove and dispose of surface soils which are over three times background for the area. Soils identified for removal will be disposed of at an approved disposal facility. Excavated areas will be backfilled with clean borrow soil fi-om a nearby location. (2) An engineered cover will be constructed over the waste disposal pit area where subsurface COCS will remain. (3) Upon completion of the closure and approval of the Closure Report by NDEP, administrative controls, use restrictions, and site postings will be used to prevent intrusive activities at the site. Barbed wire fencing will be installed along the perimeter of this unit. Post closure monitoring will consist of site inspections to determine the condition of the engineered cover. Any identified maintenance and repair requirements will be remedied within 90 working days of discovery and documented in writing at the time of repair. Results of all inspections/repairs for a given year will be addressed in a single report submitted annually to the NDEP.

T. M. Fitzmaurice

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Corrective action decision document, Second Gas Station, Tonopah test range, Nevada (Corrective Action Unit No. 403)  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) for Second Gas Station (Corrective Action Unit [CAU] No. 403) has been developed for the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Nevada Environmental Restoration Project to meet the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 as stated in Appendix VI, {open_quotes}Corrective Action Strategy{close_quotes} (FFACO, 1996). The Second Gas Station Corrective Action Site (CAS) No. 03-02-004-0360 is the only CAS in CAU No. 403. The Second Gas Station CAS is located within Area 3 of the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), west of the Main Road at the location of former Underground Storage Tanks (USTs) and their associated fuel dispensary stations. The TTR is approximately 225 kilometers (km) (140 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, by air and approximately 56 km (35 mi) southeast of Tonopah, Nevada, by road. The TTR is bordered on the south, east, and west by the Nellis Air Force Range and on the north by sparsely populated public land administered by the Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Forest Service. The Second Gas Station CAS was formerly known as the Underground Diesel Tank Site, Sandia Environmental Restoration Site Number 118. The gas station was in use from approximately 1965 to 1980. The USTs were originally thought to be located 11 meters (m) (36 feet [ft]) east of the Old Light Duty Shop, Building 0360, and consisted of one gasoline UST (southern tank) and one diesel UST (northern tank) (DOE/NV, 1996a). The two associated fuel dispensary stations were located northeast (diesel) and southeast (gasoline) of Building 0360 (CAU 423). Presently the site is used as a parking lot, Building 0360 is used for mechanical repairs of vehicles.

NONE

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Making Global Illumination User Friendly  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Making Global Illumination User Friendly Making Global Illumination User Friendly Title Making Global Illumination User Friendly Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBL-37860 Year of Publication 1995 Authors Ward, Gregory J. Conference Name 6th Eurographics Workshop on Rendering Date Published 06/1995 Conference Location Dublin, Ireland Call Number LBL-37860 Abstract Global illumination researchers tend to think in terms of mesh density and sampling frequency, and their software reflects this in its user interface. Advanced rendering systems are rife with long command lines and parameters for tuning the sample densities, thresholds and other algorithm-specific variables, and the novice user is quickly lost in a sea of possibilities. This paper details a successful effort of making one such global illumination system usable by people who understand their problems, even if they do not understand the methods needed to solve them, through an assisted oracle approach. A single program is introduced to map a small set of intuitive control variables to the rendering commands and parameter settings needed to produce the desired output in a reasonable time. This new executive program then serves as the basis for a graphical user interface that is both friendly in its appearance and reliable in its performance. Finally, we conclude with some future directions for improving this interface.

254

Subterranean formation permeability contrast correction methods  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a method of correcting the permeability contrast in a subterranean formation penetrated by a well bore to improve the sweep efficiency of waterflooding operations carried out therein, the formation containing at least one high permeability zone lying adjacent to at least one low permeability zone, which zones are in fluid communication with one another at the boundary therebetween. It comprises isolating the high permeability zone from the low permeability zone; injecting a crosslinkable aqueous polymer solution into the high permeability zone in an amount sufficient to substantially fill some the zone therewith, the crosslinkable aqueous polymer solution being capable of plugging the high permeability zone when crosslinked; isolating the low permeability zone from the high permeability zone; injecting into the low permeability zone an aqueous liquid containing a crosslinking agent which upon contact with the aqueous polymer solution causes the solution to form a crosslinked gel; and displacing the aqueous liquid containing the crosslinking agent through the low permeability zone so that the crosslinking agent contact the aqueous polymer solution and forms a crosslinked gel at least at the boundary between the zones whereby fluid communication between the zones is reduced and subsequently injected flood water is substantially confined to the low permeability zone.

Beardmore, D.H.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

255

Global fits of parton distributions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1qg ? ?S(µ2) P 2qg ? ?s(µ2) x P n qg ? ?nS(µ2) lnn?2(1/x) x and scale variations of P 1qg, P 2qg never give an indication of these logs. In order to investigate the true theoretical error we must consider some way of performing correct large...

Thorne, Robert S

256

ARM - Evaluation Product - Corrected Moments in Antenna Coordinates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsCorrected Moments in Antenna Coordinates ProductsCorrected Moments in Antenna Coordinates Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : Corrected Moments in Antenna Coordinates Site(s) SGP TWP General Description Raw moments from the scanning ARM precipitation radars (SAPRs) are subject to a number of instrumental and atmospheric phenomena that must be retrieved and corrected for. The Corrected Moments in Antenna Coordinates (CMAC) value-added product contains both raw data and fields that have been processed to: · correct for velocity aliasing · unfold and generate a cross-polarimetric phase difference that is monotonically increasing, removing impulses caused by non-uniform beam filling and phase shift on backscatter · recalculate specific differential phase using a 20-point Sobel filter on

257

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 560: Septic Systems, Nevada Test Site, Nevada with ROTC1, Revision 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 560 is located in Areas 3 and 6 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 560 is comprised of the seven corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: • 03-51-01, Leach Pit • 06-04-02, Septic Tank • 06-05-03, Leach Pit • 06-05-04, Leach Bed • 06-59-03, Building CP-400 Septic System • 06-59-04, Office Trailer Complex Sewage Pond • 06-59-05, Control Point Septic System These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on January 22, 2008, by representatives from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 560.

Grant Evenson

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

(Chemistry of the global atmosphere)  

SciTech Connect

The traveler attended the conference The Chemistry of the Global Atmosphere,'' and presented a paper on the anthropogenic emission of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) to the atmosphere. The conference included meetings of the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry (IGAC) programme, a core project of the International Geosphere/Biosphere Programme (IGBP) and the traveler participated in meetings on the IGAC project Development of Global Emissions Inventories'' and agreed to coordinate the working group on CO{sub 2}. Papers presented at the conference focused on the latest developments in analytical methods, modeling and understanding of atmospheric CO{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O, SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, NMHCs, CFCs, and aerosols.

Marland, G.

1990-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

259

BBSLA – Malaysia (032410) English (Global Version 031010) ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BBSLA – Malaysia (032410) English (Global Version 031010) 1 BLACKBERRY SOLUTION LICENSE AGREEMENT PLEASE READ THIS ...

260

BBSLA – Argentina (031710) Spanish (Global Version ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BBSLA – Argentina (031710) Spanish (Global Version 031010) CONTRATO DE LICENCIA DE SOLUCIÓN BLACKBERRY FAVOR LEER ESTE ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global risk-based corrective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

BBSLA – Pakistan (032310) English (Global Version 031010) ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BBSLA – Pakistan (032310) English (Global Version 031010) 1 BLACKBERRY SOLUTION LICENSE AGREEMENT PLEASE READ THIS ...

262

BBSLA – Thailand (032410) English (Global Version 031010) ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BBSLA – Thailand (032410) English (Global Version 031010) 1 BLACKBERRY SOLUTION LICENSE AGREEMENT PLEASE READ THIS ...

263

BBSLA - South Africa (031910) English (Global Version ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BBSLA - South Africa (031910) English (Global Version 031010) 1 BLACKBERRY SOLUTION LICENSE AGREEMENT PLEASE READ THIS ...

264

New experimental constraints on polarizability corrections to hydrogen hyperfine structure  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We present a state-of-the-art evaluation of the polarizability corrections--the inelastic nucleon corrections--to the hydrogen ground-state hyperfine splitting using analytic fits to the most recent data. We find a value {Delta}{sub pol} = 1.3 {+-} 0.3 ppm. This is 1-2 ppm smaller than the value of {Delta}{sub pol} deduced using hyperfine splitting data and elastic nucleon corrections obtained from modern form factor fits.

Vahagn Nazaryan; Carl Carlson; Keith Griffioen

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Global warming: A Northwest perspective  

SciTech Connect

The Northwest Power Planning Council convened a symposium in Olympia, Washington, on the subject of global climate change ( the greenhouse effect'') and its potential for affecting the Pacific Northwest. The symposium was organized in response to a need by the Power Council to understand global climate change and its potential impacts on resource planning and fish and wildlife planning for the region, as well as a need to understand national policy developing toward climate change and the Pacific Northwest's role in it. 40 figs., 15 tabs.

Scott, M.J.; Counts, C.A. (eds.)

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Global change: Acronyms and abbreviations  

SciTech Connect

This list of acronyms and abbreviations is compiled to provide the user with a ready reference to dicipher the linguistic initialisms and abridgements for the study of global change. The terms included in this first edition were selected from a wide variety of sources: technical reports, policy documents, global change program announcements, newsletters, and other periodicals. The disciplinary interests covered by this document include agriculture, atmospheric science, ecology, environmental science, oceanography, policy science, and other fields. In addition to its availability in hard copy, the list of acronyms and abbreviations is available in DOS-formatted diskettes and through CDIAC`s anonymous File Transfer Protocol (FTP) area on the Internet.

Woodard, C.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Stoss, F.W. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment and Resources Center

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Global Scratch File System at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scratch Scratch Global Scratch File System Overview The global scratch file system (or "global scratch") can be accessed by multiple NERSC systems. Its default quota is much larger than the Global Home quota, so it can be used to temporarily store large amounts of data. This file system is periodically purged. Platforms Using Global Scratch The global scratch file system is available on all NERSC systems except PDSF. Quotas Default global scratch quotas are 20 TB and 2,000,000 inodes. If you need more than that, fill out the Disk Quota Change Request Form. Purging Yes, files in global scratch file system are subject to purging. Backup No, Files in global scratch file system are not backed up. Environment Variable You can reference your personal scratch directory in global scratch as

268

DNFSB staff trip report reviewing the corrective action process...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

deficiencies that are safety significant. b. The primary corrective action database management systems used at Hanford include the Central Information Control System (CICS) used...

269

2010 Joint Effectiveness Review of Hanford Bldg 336 Corrective...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Joint Assessment of the Effectiveness of Corrective Actions for the Building 336 Accident, July 2010 The U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Independent Oversight, within the...

270

Root Cause Analysis (RCA) & Corrective Action Plan (CAP) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

prior to project approval, additional funding authorization, and project execution. Corrective Measure 2 Develop and implement a comprehensive staffing plan, with an...

271

Impact of Vaisala Radiosonde Humidity Corrections on ARM IOP...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proceedings, St. Petersburg, Florida, April 8-12, 2002 Impact of Vaisala Radiosonde Humidity Corrections on ARM IOP Data L. M. Miloshevich National Center for Atmospheric...

272

Clean Slate 1 Corrective Action Plan, Revision 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Plan (CAP) has been prepared to meet the requirements specified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996). A Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) (DOE, 1997) was submitted to the Nevada Department of Environmental Protection (NDEP) January 31, 1997 for the Clean Slate 1 (CS-1) Site in accordance with the Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) (DOE, 1996) and the Soils Media Operable Unit Quality Assurance Project Plan (DOE, 1995). The FFACO lists CS-1 as Corrective Action Unit (CAU) number 412.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 145: Wells and Storage Holes, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 145: Wells and Storage Holes. Information presented in this CAIP includes facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for the selection and evaluation of environmental samples. Corrective Action Unit 145 is located in Area 3 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 145 is comprised of the six Corrective Action Sites (CASs) listed below: (1) 03-20-01, Core Storage Holes; (2) 03-20-02, Decon Pad and Sump; (3) 03-20-04, Injection Wells; (4) 03-20-08, Injection Well; (5) 03-25-01, Oil Spills; and (6) 03-99-13, Drain and Injection Well. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) prior to evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. One conceptual site model with three release scenario components was developed for the six CASs to address all releases associated with the site. The sites will be investigated based on data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on June 24, 2004, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and Bechtel Nevada. The DQOs process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 145.

David A. Strand

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Motor vehicles and global warming  

SciTech Connect

Energy use in transportation is one of the contributors to the concern over global warming. The primary greenhouse gases released by the transportation sector are carbon dioxide and chlorofluorocarbons. When all greenhouse gases are considered, CO{sub 2} emissions from the operation of highway vehicles worldwide represent about 4.7% of global warming enhancement. CO{sub 2} emissions from U.S. highway vehicles along represent about 2 to 2.5% of worldwide greenhouse gases. The use of CFCs in automotive air conditioning, in blowing foams for seats and padding and in the manufacture of electronic circuit boards accounted for 15% of the global usage of CFC-12 in 1985 according to the U.S. EPA. The Motor Vehicle Manufacturers Association supports the phase-out of CFC use provided that safe substitutes are available and that adequate lead time is allowed for.They suggest that reduction of greenhouse gases would require planning on a global scope to be effective. One alternative they suggest for further study is a carbon fee for reducing emissions of carbon dioxide. This fee would be levied on each type of fossil fuel, proportional to its carbon content per unit of energy.

Halberstadt, M.L.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

RENEWABLES 2005 GLOBAL STATUS REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research Institute Chinese Renewable Energy Industries Association China Susan McDade Energy EnvironmentRENEWABLES 2005 GLOBAL STATUS REPORT Paper prepared for the REN21 Network by The Worldwatch Institute Lead Author: Eric Martinotwww.ren21.net #12;Renewable Energy Policy Network for the 21st Century

Kammen, Daniel M.

276

On globally Symmetric Finsler spaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper consider the symmetric of Finsler spaces. We give some conditions about globally symmetric Finsler spaces. Then we prove that these spaces can be written as a coset space of Lie group with an invariant Finsler metric. Finally, we prove that such a space must be Berwaldian

Khatamy, R Chavosh

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

PRINCIPLE OF GLOBAL DECOUPLING WITH COUPLING ANGLE MODULATION.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The global betatron decoupling on the ramp is an important issue for the operation of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). A new scheme, coupling angle modulation, was found. By modulating two orthogonal skew quadrupole families, an extra rotating coupling is introduced into the coupled machine. The skew quadrupole modulation frequency is about 0.2Hz for the RHIC ramp, and 0.5Hz at injection and store. The eigentune changes are tracked with a high resolution phase lock loop (PLL) tune measurement system. The global coupling correction strengths are determined by the modulation skew quadrupole strengths at the minimum eigentune split multiplied by a factor k. k is determined by the uncoupled eigentune split and the maximum and the minimum tune split during the skew quadrupole modulation. This decoupling scheme is fast and robust. It had been verified at the RHIC and has been applied for the RHIC global decoupling on the ramp. In this article, the principle of the coupling angle modulation is presented in detail. Simulation results are also shown.

LUO, Y.; PILAT, F.; PEGGS, S.; TRBOJEVIC, D.; ROSER, T.

2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

278

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 232: Area 25 Sewage Lagoons, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 232, Area 25 Sewage Lagoons, has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office; the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; and the U. S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 232 consists of Corrective Action Site 25-03-01, Sewage Lagoon. Corrective Action Unit 232, Area 25 Sewage Lagoons, received sanitary effluent from four buildings within the Test Cell ''C'' Facility from the mid-1960s through approximately 1996. The Test Cell ''C'' Facility was used to develop nuclear propulsion technology by conducting nuclear test reactor studies. Based on the site history collected to support the Data Quality Objectives process, contaminants of potential concern include volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, petroleum hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, pesticides, herbicides, gamma emitting radionuclides, isotopic plutonium, isotopic uranium, and strontium-90. A detailed conceptual site model is presented in Section 3.0 and Appendix A of this Corrective Action Investigation Plan. The conceptual model serves as the basis for the sampling strategy. Under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, the Corrective Action Investigation Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Field work will be conducted following approval of the plan. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the Corrective Action Decision Document.

USDOE /NV

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 552: Area 12 Muckpile and Ponds, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's approach for collecting the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 552: Area 12 Muckpile and Ponds, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in Area 12 on the NTS, CAU 552 consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 12-06-04, Muckpile; 12-23-05, Ponds. Corrective Action Site 12-06-04 in Area 12 consists of the G-Tunnel muckpile, which is the result of tunneling activities. Corrective Action Site 12-23-05 consists of three dry ponds adjacent to the muckpile. The toe of the muckpile extends into one of the ponds creating an overlap of two CASs. The purpose of the investigation is to ensure that adequate data are collected to provide sufficient and reliable information to identify, evaluate, and select technic ally viable corrective actions. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

2004-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

280

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 543: Liquid Disposal Units, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 543: Liquid Disposal Units is listed in Appendix III of the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) which was agreed to by the state of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). CAU 543 sites are located in Areas 6 and 15 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 543 consists of the following seven Corrective Action Sites (CASs) (Figure 1): CAS 06-07-01, Decon Pad; CAS 15-01-03, Aboveground Storage Tank; CAS 15-04-01, Septic Tank; CAS 15-05-01, Leachfield; CAS 15-08-01, Liquid Manure Tank; CAS 15-23-01, Underground Radioactive Material Area; and CAS 15-23-03, Contaminated Sump, Piping. All Area 15 CASs are located at the former U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Farm, which operated from 1963 to 1981 and was used to support animal experiments involving the uptake of radionuclides. Each of the Area 15 CASs, except CAS 15-23-01, is associated with the disposal of waste effluent from Building 15-06, which was the primary location of the various tests and experiments conducted onsite. Waste effluent disposal from Building 15-06 involved piping, sumps, outfalls, a septic tank with leachfield, underground storage tanks, and an aboveground storage tank (AST). CAS 15-23-01 was associated with decontamination activities of farm equipment potentially contaminated with radiological constituents, pesticides, and herbicides. While the building structures were removed before the investigation took place, all the original tanks, sumps, piping, and concrete building pads remain in place. The Area 6 CAS is located at the Decontamination Facility in Area 6, a facility which operated from 1971 to 2001 and was used to decontaminate vehicles, equipment, clothing, and other materials that had become contaminated during nuclear testing activities. The CAS includes the effluent collection and distribution systems for Buildings 6-605, 6-606, and 6-607, which consists of septic tanks, sumps, piping, floor drains, drain trenches, cleanouts, and a concrete foundation. Additional details of the site history are provided in the CAU 543 Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2004a), and the CAU 543 Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) (NNSA/NSO, 2005).

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global risk-based corrective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 563: Septic Systems, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Plan (CAP) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 563, Septic Systems, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. CAU 563 consists of four Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 3 and 12 of the Nevada Test Site. CAU 563 consists of the following CASs: #2; CAS 03-04-02, Area 3 Subdock Septic Tank #2; CAS 03-59-05, Area 3 Subdock Cesspool #2; CAS 12-59-01, Drilling/Welding Shop Septic Tanks #2; CAS 12-60-01, Drilling/Welding Shop Outfalls Site characterization activities were performed in 2007, and the results are presented in Appendix A of the CAU 563 Corrective Action Decision Document. The scope of work required to implement the recommended closure alternatives is summarized below. #2; CAS 03-04-02, Area 3 Subdock Septic Tank, contains no contaminants of concern (COCs) above action levels. No further action is required for this site; however, as a best management practice (BMP), all aboveground features (e.g., riser pipes and bumper posts) will be removed, the septic tank will be removed, and all open pipe ends will be sealed with grout. #2; CAS 03-59-05, Area 3 Subdock Cesspool, contains no COCs above action levels. No further action is required for this site; however, as a BMP, all aboveground features (e.g., riser pipes and bumper posts) will be removed, the cesspool will be abandoned by filling it with sand or native soil, and all open pipe ends will be sealed with grout. #2; CAS 12-59-01, Drilling/Welding Shop Septic Tanks, will be clean closed by excavating approximately 4 cubic yards (yd3) of arsenic- and chromium-impacted soil. In addition, as a BMP, the liquid in the South Tank will be removed, the North Tank will be removed or filled with grout and left in place, the South Tank will be filled with grout and left in place, all open pipe ends will be sealed with grout or similar material, approximately 10 yd3 of chlordane-impacted soil will be excavated, and debris within the CAS boundary will be removed. #2; CAS 12-60-01, Drilling/Welding Shop Outfalls, contains no COCs above action levels. No further action is required for this site; however, as a BMP, three drain pipe openings will be sealed with grout.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

282

LNBL C-5 Electrical Safety Corrective Action Plan 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of 2 #12;LNBL C-5 Electrical Safety Corrective Action Plan 2009 Page 2 of 2 2. The Task Hazard Analysis exposure to hazardous electrical energy/ LOTO verification. 6. Energized Electrical Work Permit (EEWPLNBL C-5 Electrical Safety Corrective Action Plan 2009 Finding Statement : LBNL has not ensured

Knowles, David William

283

User-assisted ink-bleed correction for handwritten documents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a user-assisted framework for correcting ink-bleed in old handwritten documents housed at the National Archives of Singapore (NAS). Our approach departs from traditional correction techniques that strive for full automation. Fully-automated ... Keywords: document processing, ink-bleed, restoration, user-assisted systems

Yi Huang; Michael S. Brown

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Network protocols: correcting transmission errors of up to two bits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While the construction of Hamming Codes that can detect and correct 1-bit transmission errors has been illustrated [1], Hamming Codes that will detect and correct transmission errors of more than 1 bit remain yet to be constructed. In this paper, ...

Sei-Jong Chung

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Two-photon exchange corrections to the pion form factor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We compute two-photon exchange corrections to the electromagnetic form factor of the pion, taking into account the finite size of the pion. Compared to the soft-photon approximation for the infrared-divergent contribution, which neglects hadron structure effects, the corrections are found to be or approx.1 GeV{sup 2} at extreme backward angles.

Blunden, P. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada); Jefferson Lab, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, Virginia 23606 (United States); Melnitchouk, W. [Jefferson Lab, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, Virginia 23606 (United States); Tjon, J. A. [Physics Department, University of Utrecht, NL-3508 TC Utrecht (Netherlands)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

286

PNNL: Atmospheric Sciences & Global Change - Frontiers in Global Change  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Frontiers in Global Change Frontiers in Global Change Dr. Thanos Nenes Dr. Thanos Nenes Aerosol-Cloud Interactions: The Elusive Component of Climate Change Dr. Thanos Nenes Professor & Georgia Power Faculty Scholar, School of Earth & Atmospheric Sciences, School of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA Thursday, August 1, 2013 EMSL Auditorium 10:00AM The effect of human activities on climate is one of the most important issues facing society. Humans influence climate in many ways. Emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) tend to warm climate, by reducing the amount of infrared radiation that is emitted to space. Increased levels of suspended atmospheric particles ("aerosols") exert a net cooling effect by directly scattering and absorption of solar radiation (the "aerosol direct climatic

287

Guidance on NEPA Review for Corrective Actions under the Resource  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NEPA Review for Corrective Actions under the Resource NEPA Review for Corrective Actions under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Guidance on NEPA Review for Corrective Actions under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) This guidance results from the work of a Task Team formed by DOE's Environmental Management's NEPA Compliance Officer to study streamlining the NEPA process for RCRA corrective actions, in response to a recommendation in the National Academy of Sciences Report on "Improving the Environment: An Evaluation of DOE'S Environmental Management Program." Guidance on National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Review for Corrective Actions under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) More Documents & Publications Application of NEPA to CERCLA and RCRA Cleanup Actions

288

Guidance on NEPA Review for Corrective Actions under the Resource  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Guidance on NEPA Review for Corrective Actions under the Resource Guidance on NEPA Review for Corrective Actions under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Guidance on NEPA Review for Corrective Actions under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) This guidance results from the work of a Task Team formed by DOE's Environmental Management's NEPA Compliance Officer to study streamlining the NEPA process for RCRA corrective actions, in response to a recommendation in the National Academy of Sciences Report on "Improving the Environment: An Evaluation of DOE'S Environmental Management Program." Guidance on National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Review for Corrective Actions under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) More Documents & Publications Application of NEPA to CERCLA and RCRA Cleanup Actions

289

Corrective measures evaluation report for Tijeras Arroyo groundwater.  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Measures Evaluation report was prepared as directed by a Compliance Order on Consent issued by the New Mexico Environment Department to document the process of selecting the preferred remedial alternative for Tijeras Arroyo Groundwater. Supporting information includes background concerning the site conditions and potential receptors and an overview of work performed during the Corrective Measures Evaluation. The evaluation of remedial alternatives included identifying and describing four remedial alternatives, an overview of the evaluation criteria and approach, comparing remedial alternatives to the criteria, and selecting the preferred remedial alternative. As a result of the Corrective Measures Evaluation, monitored natural attenuation of the contaminants of concern (trichloroethene and nitrate) is the preferred remedial alternative for implementation as the corrective measure for Tijeras Arroyo Groundwater. Design criteria to meet cleanup goals and objectives and the corrective measures implementation schedule for the preferred remedial alternative are also presented.

Witt, Johnathan L (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID); Orr, Brennon R. (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID); Dettmers, Dana L. (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID); Hall, Kevin A. (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID); Howard, M. Hope (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID)

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Holographic insulator/superconductor phase transition with Weyl corrections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analytically investigate the phase transition between the holographic insulator and superconductor with Weyl corrections by using the variational method for the Sturm-Liouville eigenvalue problem. We find that similar to the curvature corrections, in p-wave model, the higher Weyl couplings make the insulator/superconductor phase transition harder to occur. However, in s-wave case the Weyl corrections do not influence the critical chemical potential, which is in contrast to the effect caused by the curvature corrections. Moreover, we observe that the Weyl corrections will not affect the critical phenomena and the critical exponent of the system always takes the mean-field value in both models. Our analytic results are found to be in good agreement with the numerical findings.

Zixu Zhao; Qiyuan Pan; Jiliang Jing

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

291

partnership profile: the global fund | 1 About the Global Fund to Fight AIDS,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Malaria The Global Fund to Fight aIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (Global Fund) is a global public-private international disbursements in 2010. as a public-private partnership representing governments, civil society

Derisi, Joseph

292

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 374: Area 20 Schooner Unit Crater Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit 374 is located in Areas 18 and 20 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 374 comprises the five corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: • 18-22-05, Drum • 18-22-06, Drums (20) • 18-22-08, Drum • 18-23-01, Danny Boy Contamination Area • 20-45-03, U-20u Crater (Schooner) These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on October 20, 2009, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 374.

Patrick Matthews

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 204: Storage Bunkers, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 0, Including Errata Sheet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Decision Document identifies the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's corrective action alternative recommendation for each of the corrective action sites (CASs) within Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 204: Storage Bunkers, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. An evaluation of analytical data from the corrective action investigation, review of current and future operations at each CAS, and a detailed comparative analysis of potential corrective action alternatives were used to determine the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. There are six CASs in CAU 204, which are all located between Areas 1, 2, 3, and 5 on the NTS. The No Further Action alternative was recommended for CASs 01-34-01, 02-34-01, 03-34-01, and 05-99-02; and a Closure in Place with Administrative Controls recommendation was the preferred corrective action for CASs 05-18-02 and 05-33-01. These alternatives were judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated as well as applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the sites and will eliminate potential future exposure pathways to the contaminated media at CAU 204.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 528: Polychlorinated Biphenyls Contamination, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's selection of a recommended corrective action alternative appropriate to facilitate the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 528: Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) Contamination, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in Area 25 of the NTS, CAU 528 consists of one Corrective Action Site (CAS): 25-27-03, Polychlorinated Biphenyls Surface Contamination. Corrective Action Unit 528 was created to address the presence of PCBs around the Test Cell C concrete pad. Corrective action investigation activities were performed from August 24, 2003, through January 8, 2004. The PCBs and total petroleum hydrocarbons-diesel range organics were identified as contaminants of concern in the surface and shallow subsurface soils in 12 areas (Areas 1 through 12) at CAS 25-27-03. Based on the review of existing data, future use, and current operations at the NTS, the following alternatives have been developed for consideration: Alternative 1 - No Further Action; Alternative 2 - Clean Closure; Alternative 3 - Closure in Place with Administrative Controls. The three corrective action alternatives were evaluated on their technical merits, focusing on performance, reliability, feasibility, and safety. Alternative 3 is the preferred corrective action for CAS 25-27-03. The selected alternative was judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated for closure of the sites and additionally to minimize potential future exposure pathways to the contaminated media at CAU 528.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

2004-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

295

Global warming continues in 1989  

SciTech Connect

Nineteen eight-nine ranks as one of the warmest years on record despite the chill of unusually cool water in the tropical Pacific. The continued robustness of the warming trend that began in the mid-1970s lends support to claims that an intensifying greenhouse effect is behind it all, although that case has not yet been made definitively. Even at the current rate of global warming it will take another 10 years or so to be confident that the greenhouse effect is with us. Although the global warming trend is consistent with an increasing contribution by the greenhouse effect, direct signs that the greenhouse effect is intensifying are still hard to come by in the temperature record. Greenhouse models agree that if that is happening, the temperature increase should be most pronounced around the Arctic. Alaska, northwestern Canada, and northern Siberia warmed sharply in the 1980s, but the region from eastern Canada through Greenland and into Scandinavia cooled markedly.

Kerr, R.A.

1990-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

296

Carbon dioxide and global change  

SciTech Connect

This book presents an analysis and review of the many potential consequences of the rapidly rising CO{sub 2} content of Earth's atmosphere. Covering both the physical (climatic) and biological effects of atmospheric CO{sub 2} enrichment, the book presents an overview of the interrelated aspects of this complex and demanding subject. Focus is on the search for evidence of global warming (the highly speculative climatic greenhouse effect) and global vegetative stimulation (the well established biological greenhouse effect). The pros and cons of all issues related to these phenomena are discussed. The author's estimate of where the world is headed as a result of mankind's great geophysical experiments is offered.

Idso, S.B. (Arizona State Univ. (US))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

global horizontal | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

87 87 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142278787 Varnish cache server global horizontal Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Documentation of the satellite-based high resolution solar resource assessment for Ghana provided by DLR. The high resolution solar data (10kmx10km) provide country maps of the annual and monthly sums of hourly global horizontal and direct normal irradiance (GHI and DNI) for the year 2000, 2001 and 2002. Additionally, for selected sites hourly values of GHI and DNI are provided.The Documentation gives an overview about the used input data and used methodology, shows example maps and describes a comparison with ground data (if provided by the country)

298

Global Technology Regulation and Potentially  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2000 Bill Joy proposed that the best way to prevent technological apocalypse was to "relinquish " emerging bio-, info- and nanotechnologies. His essay introduced many watchdog groups to the dangers that futurists had been warning of for decades. One such group, ETC, has called for a moratorium on all nanotechnological research until all safety issues can be investigated and social impacts ameliorated. In this essay I discuss the differences and similarities of regulating bio- and nanotechnological innovation to the efforts to regulate nuclear and biological weapons of mass destruction. I then suggest the creation of a global technology regulatory regime to ensure the safe and equitable diffusion of genetic, molecular and information technologies, and point out the principal political obstacles to implementing such a regime. Global Technology Regulation James J. Hughes 2

Fritz Allhoff; Patrick Lin; James Moor; John Weckert; J. Hughes Ph. D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Implementation of global energy sustainability  

SciTech Connect

The term energy sustainability emerged from the UN Conference on Environment and Development in Rio 1992, when Agenda 21 was formulated and the Global Energy Charter proclaimed. Emission reductions, total energy costing, improved energy efficiency, and sustainable energy systems are the four fundamental principles of the charter. These principles can be implemented in the proposed financial, legal, technical, and education framework. Much has been done in many countries toward the implementation of the Global Energy Charter, but progress has not been fast enough to ease the disastrous effects of the too many ill-conceived energy systems on the environment, climate, and health. Global warming is accelerating, and pollution is worsening, especially in developing countries with their hunger for energy to meet the needs of economic development. Asian cities are now beating all pollution records, and greenhouse gases are visibly changing the climate with rising sea levels, retracting glaciers, and record weather disasters. This article presents why and how energy investments and research money have to be rechanneled into sustainable energy, rather than into the business-as-usual of depleting, unsustainable energy concepts exceeding one trillion dollars per year. This largest of all investment sectors needs much more attention.

Grob, G.R. [CMDC, Zurich (Switzerland)

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 139: Waste Disposal Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 139 is located in Areas 3, 4, 6, and 9 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 139 is comprised of the seven corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: (1) 03-35-01, Burn Pit; (2) 04-08-02, Waste Disposal Site; (3) 04-99-01, Contaminated Surface Debris; (4) 06-19-02, Waste Disposal Site/Burn Pit; (5) 06-19-03, Waste Disposal Trenches; (6) 09-23-01, Area 9 Gravel Gertie; and (7) 09-34-01, Underground Detection Station. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives with the exception of CASs 09-23-01 and 09-34-01. Regarding these two CASs, CAS 09-23-01 is a gravel gertie where a zero-yield test was conducted with all contamination confined to below ground within the area of the structure, and CAS 09-34-01 is an underground detection station where no contaminants are present. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for the other five CASs where information is insufficient. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on January 4, 2006, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and Bechtel Nevada. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 139.

Grant Evenson

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global risk-based corrective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 557: Spills and Tank Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 557 is located in Areas 1, 3, 6, and 25 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, and is comprised of the four corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: • 01-25-02, Fuel Spill • 03-02-02, Area 3 Subdock UST • 06-99-10, Tar Spills • 25-25-18, Train Maintenance Bldg 3901 Spill Site These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 3, 2008, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 557. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS. The scope of the corrective action investigation for CAU 557 includes the following activities: • Move surface debris and/or materials, as needed, to facilitate sampling. • Conduct radiological survey at CAS 25-25-18. • Perform field screening. • Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine whether contaminants of concern are present. • If contaminants of concern are present, collect additional step-out samples to define the extent of the contamination. • Collect samples of investigation-derived waste, as needed, for waste management purposes.

Alfred Wickline

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 551: Area 12 Muckpiles, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information including facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 551, Area 12 muckpiles, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. This CAIP has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 551 is located in Area 12 of the NTS, which is approximately 110 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). Area 12 is approximately 40 miles beyond the main gate to the NTS. Corrective Action Unit 551 is comprised of the four Corrective Action Sites (CASs) shown on Figure 1-1 and listed below: (1) 12-01-09, Aboveground Storage Tank and Stain; (2) 12-06-05, Muckpile; (3) 12-06-07, Muckpile; and (4) 12-06-08, Muckpile. Corrective Action Site 12-01-09 is located in Area 12 and consists of an above ground storage tank (AST) and associated stain. Corrective Action Site 12-06-05 is located in Area 12 and consists of a muckpile associated with the U12 B-Tunnel. Corrective Action Site 12-06-07 is located in Area 12 and consists of a muckpile associated with the U12 C-, D-, and F-Tunnels. Corrective Action Site 12-06-08 is located in Area 12 and consists of a muckpile associated with the U12 B-Tunnel. In keeping with common convention, the U12B-, C-, D-, and F-Tunnels will be referred to as the B-, C-, D-, and F-Tunnels. The corrective action investigation (CAI) will include field inspections, radiological surveys, and sampling of media, where appropriate. Data will also be obtained to support waste management decisions.

David A. Strand

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 551: Area 12 Muckpiles, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No. 0  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information including facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 551, Area 12 muckpiles, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. This CAIP has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 551 is located in Area 12 of the NTS, which is approximately 110 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). Area 12 is approximately 40 miles beyond the main gate to the NTS. Corrective Action Unit 551 is comprised of the four Corrective Action Sites (CASs) shown on Figure 1-1 and listed below: (1) 12-01-09, Aboveground Storage Tank and Stain; (2) 12-06-05, Muckpile; (3) 12-06-07, Muckpile; and (4) 12-06-08, Muckpile. Corrective Action Site 12-01-09 is located in Area 12 and consists of an above ground storage tank (AST) and associated stain. Corrective Action Site 12-06-05 is located in Area 12 and consists of a muckpile associated with the U12 B-Tunnel. Corrective Action Site 12-06-07 is located in Area 12 and consists of a muckpile associated with the U12 C-, D-, and F-Tunnels. Corrective Action Site 12-06-08 is located in Area 12 and consists of a muckpile associated with the U12 B-Tunnel. In keeping with common convention, the U12B-, C-, D-, and F-Tunnels will be referred to as the B-, C-, D-, and F-Tunnels. The corrective action investigation (CAI) will include field inspections, radiological surveys, and sampling of media, where appropriate. Data will also be obtained to support waste management decisions.

Robert F. Boehlecke

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Global DC Closed Orbit Correction. Experimen.t on. the NSLS X-ray Rin.g  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

~~'i~·ted manuscript has been authored CQntl;.)CiO ( of the U. S. Government er cont;~,-I No. W-31-109-ENG-38.:LJrdingly, the U. S. Government retains a (onexc\\usive, royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this 1 contribution, or allow others to do SO, for C. Government purposes.

Y. Chung; G. Decker; K. Evans

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Design error diagnosis and correction in digital circuits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the design of digital systems is becoming Micrographics. increasingly complex, an undetected design error in the late phase of the design process may have catastrophic consequences. It is thus very important to discover these design errors as early as and efficient way. Simulation and tautology possible, and to correct them in a fast checking can be used for design verification. Their role is only to decide whether the design is correct or not. But when the existence of an error is detected, further mechanized help is needed to and the error correction. Though error diagnosis methods based on simulation are simple and fast, they are not considered accurate enough to be used for error correction. Symbolic methods based on Binary Decision Diagrams (BDDs) are accurate enough to be used both for diagnosis and correction, but they have limited applicability due to the memory explosion problem associated with BDDS. This work presents a simulation-based error correction procedure, which can efficiently overcome the limitations of a symbolic error correction method without sacrificing much accuracy.

Nayak, Debashis

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

NLO corrections to the photon impact factor: Combining real and virtual corrections.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(1) B k (2) B k (j) B k (N B ) B FIG. 1. Kinematics for A + B ? A? + g + B? with initial state momenta pA, pB and final state momenta kiA, ?, k j B . An 8A-reggeon is exchanged, emitting a real gluon with momentum ? which is assumed to be separated... ? (2?)D?2 (11) where d?g = dD? (2?)D?1 ? +(?2)(2?)D?(D)(r ? r? + ?) (12) is the phase space measure for the gluon in the central region. Returning to the impact factor representation (2), the NLO corrections due to the extra gluon in the s-channel can...

Bartels, J; Colferai, D; Gieseke, Stefan; Kyrieleis, A

307

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 240: Area 25 Vehicle Washdown Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Corrective Action Plan is to provide the strategy and methodology to close the Area 25 Vehicle Washdown. The CAU will be closed following state and federal regulations and the FFACO (1996). Site characterization was performed during March 1999 at each CAS. Soil samples were collected at each CAS using a direct-push method. Soil samples were collected from the surface to depths of up to 2.7 m (9 ft) below ground surface. In addition, the gravel sump at CAS 25-07-02 (F and J Roads Pad) was sampled using a backhoe. Soil samples were collected from depths of 0 to 0.6 m (0 to 2 ft) below the gravel layer in the sump.

D. S. Tobiason

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Global Change Research Act of 1990  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Change Research Act of 1990 Print E-mail Global Change Research Act of 1990 Print E-mail The U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) was established by Presidential initiative in 1989 and mandated by Congress in the Global Change Research Act (GCRA) of 1990 in order to "assist the nation and the world to understand, assess, predict, and respond to human-induced and natural processes of global change." In consultation with White House officials and the Subcommittee on Global Change Research (SGCR), USGCRP's Executive Director ensures that the Program meets all mandated requirements which are summarized in the table below. Global Change Research Act of 1990 Requirements Please click on the buttons below for further details about the Global Change Research Act of 1990. Public Law 101-606(11/16/90) 104 Stat. 3096-3104

309

Change in Global Temperature: A Statistical Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates several issues relating to global climatic change using statistical techniques that impose minimal restrictions on the data. The main findings are as follows: 1) The global temperature increase since the last century is a ...

Gordon R. Richards

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Human Footprints on the Global Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Footprints on the Global Environment. By Rosa A. Eugene,Footprints on the Global Environment. MIT Press, 2010. xi +of its own impact on the environment that surrounds its

Ferrara, Enzo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Ardour Global Indexes LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zip 10016 Product New-York based company that manages the Ardour Global Indexes, a set of alternative energy financial indicators. References Ardour Global Indexes LLC1 LinkedIn...

312

A Multinational Course on Global Climate Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel multinational course on global climate change was developed by East Carolina University in collaboration with five international universities and the U.S. Department of State. This course was developed to help foster the global conversation needed ...

Rosana Nieto Ferreira; Andrew Herdman; Scott Curtis; Rosina Chia; Elmer Poe; Robert Thompson; Biwu Yang

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

A University Perspective on Global Climate Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global atmospheric models are proliferating, in part because of the widespread availability of powerful computers. There are about two dozen global modeling groups at work in the United States today. These groups are put into four categories, ...

David A. Randall

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Re-embedding the global soul  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis proposes to "re-embed" the "global nomad" into the context of an increasingly globalized world at the room scale. I define re-embedding as the "plugging in" of social relationships to local contexts and their ...

Wang, Joy (Joy Yuk-Hwa), 1975-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Defining and Estimating Global Mean Temperature Anomalies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methods used to quantify temperature changes of the earth must he assessed relative to an appropriate definition of global mean temperature. In this paper, global mean temperature is defined and the adequacy of using weighted average anomalies to ...

Richard F. Gunst; Sabyasachi Basu; Robert Brunell

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Emerging Global Trends in Advanced Manufacturing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Emerging Global Trends in Advanced Manufacturing Stephanie S. Shipp, Project Leader Nayanee Gupta Bhavya Lal ...

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

317

Globally Solving Nonconvex Quadratic Programming Problems via ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mar 7, 2011 ... ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY. 9700 South Cass Avenue. Argonne, Illinois 60439. Globally Solving Nonconvex Quadratic ...

318

Empirically corrected HEAT method for calculating atomization energies  

SciTech Connect

We describe how to increase the accuracy ofthe most recent variants ofthe HEAT method for calculating atomization energies of molecules by means ofextremely simple empirical corrections that depend on stoichiometry and the number ofunpaired electrons in the molecule. Our corrections reduce the deviation from experiment for all the HEAT variants. In particular, our corrections reduce the average absolute deviation and the root-mean-square deviation ofthe 456-QP variant to 0.18 and 0.23 kJoule/mol (i.e., 0.04 and 0.05 kcallmol), respectively.

Brand, Holmann V [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Self-Correcting HVAC Controls Project Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This document represents the final project report for the Self-Correcting Heating, Ventilating and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) Controls Project jointly funded by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building Technologies Program (BTP). The project, initiated in October 2008, focused on exploratory initial development of self-correcting controls for selected HVAC components in air handlers. This report, along with the companion report documenting the algorithms developed, Self-Correcting HVAC Controls: Algorithms for Sensors and Dampers in Air-Handling Units (Fernandez et al. 2009), document the work performed and results of this project.

Fernandez, Nicholas; Brambley, Michael R.; Katipamula, Srinivas; Cho, Heejin; Goddard, James K.; Dinh, Liem H.

2010-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

320

BEAM-BASED NON-LINEAR OPTICS CORRECTIONS IN COLLIDERS.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method has been developed to measure and correct operationally the non-linear effects of the final focusing magnets in colliders, that gives access to the effects of multi-pole errors by applying closed orbit bumps, and analyzing the resulting tune and orbit shifts. This technique has been tested and used during 4 years of RHIC (the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at BNL) operations. I will discuss here the theoretical basis of the method, the experimental set-up, the correction results, the present understanding of the machine model, the potential and limitations of the method itself as compared with other non-linear correction techniques.

PILAT, R.; LUO, Y.; MALITSKY, N.; PTITSYN, V.

2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global risk-based corrective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

System and method for generating motion corrected tomographic images  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and related system for generating motion corrected tomographic images includes the steps of illuminating a region of interest (ROI) to be imaged being part of an unrestrained live subject and having at least three spaced apart optical markers thereon. Simultaneous images are acquired from a first and a second camera of the markers from different angles. Motion data comprising 3D position and orientation of the markers relative to an initial reference position is then calculated. Motion corrected tomographic data obtained from the ROI using the motion data is then obtained, where motion corrected tomographic images obtained therefrom.

Gleason, Shaun S. (Knoxville, TN); Goddard, Jr., James S. (Knoxville, TN)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 562: Waste Systems Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit 562 is located in Areas 2, 23, and 25 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 562 is comprised of the 13 corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: • 02-26-11, Lead Shot • 02-44-02, Paint Spills and French Drain • 02-59-01, Septic System • 02-60-01, Concrete Drain • 02-60-02, French Drain • 02-60-03, Steam Cleaning Drain • 02-60-04, French Drain • 02-60-05, French Drain • 02-60-06, French Drain • 02-60-07, French Drain • 23-60-01, Mud Trap Drain and Outfall • 23-99-06, Grease Trap • 25-60-04, Building 3123 Outfalls These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on December 11, 2008, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 562. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS. The scope of the corrective action investigation for CAU 562 includes the following activities: • Move surface debris and/or materials, as needed, to facilitate sampling. • Conduct radiological surveys. • Perform field screening. • Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine the nature and extent of any contamination released by each CAS. • Collect samples of source material to determine the potential for a release. • Collect samples of potential remediation wastes. • Collect quality control samples. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; DOE, Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management (FFACO, 1996; as amended February 2008). Under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, this Corrective Action Investigation Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Fieldwork will be conducted following approval of the plan.

Alfred Wickline

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Correct-by-Construction Asynchronous Implementation of Modular Synchronous Specifications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we introduce a new model for the representation of distributed asynchronous implementations of synchronous specifications. The model covers classical implementations, where a notion of global synchronization is preserved by means of signaling, ... Keywords: Asynchronous systems, Endochronous systems, Globally asynchronous, Kahn processes, Semantics preservation, Synchronous systems, locally synchronous (GALS) architectures

Dumitru Potop-Butucaru; Benoît Caillaud

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Local and Global Illumination in the Volume Rendering Integral  

SciTech Connect

This article is intended as an update of the major survey by Max [1] on optical models for direct volume rendering. It provides a brief overview of the subject scope covered by [1], and brings recent developments, such as new shadow algorithms and refraction rendering, into the perspective. In particular, we examine three fundamentals aspects of direct volume rendering, namely the volume rendering integral, local illumination models and global illumination models, in a wavelength-independent manner. We review the developments on spectral volume rendering, in which visible light are considered as a form of electromagnetic radiation, optical models are implemented in conjunction with representations of spectral power distribution. This survey can provide a basis for, and encourage, new efforts for developing and using complex illumination models to achieve better realism and perception through optical correctness.

Max, N; Chen, M

2005-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

325

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 365: Baneberry Contamination Area, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit 365 comprises one corrective action site (CAS), CAS 08-23-02, U-8d Contamination Area. This site is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for the CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The site will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on July 6, 2010, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for the Baneberry site. The primary release associated with Corrective Action Unit 365 was radiological contamination from the Baneberry nuclear test. Baneberry was an underground weapons-related test that vented significant quantities of radioactive gases from a fissure located in close proximity to ground zero. A crater formed shortly after detonation, which stemmed part of the flow from the fissure. The scope of this investigation includes surface and shallow subsurface (less than 15 feet below ground surface) soils. Radionuclides from the Baneberry test with the potential to impact groundwater are included within the Underground Test Area Subproject. Investigations and corrective actions associated with the Underground Test Area Subproject include the radiological inventory resulting from the Baneberry test.

Patrick Matthews

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 137: Waste Disposal Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.:0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information including facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 137: Waste Disposal Sites. This CAIP has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 137 contains sites that are located in Areas 1, 3, 7, 9, and 12 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), which is approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). Corrective Action Unit 137 is comprised of the eight corrective action sites (CASs) shown on Figure 1-1 and listed below: (1) CAS 01-08-01, Waste Disposal Site; (2) CAS 03-23-01, Waste Disposal Site; (3) CAS 03-23-07, Radioactive Waste Disposal Site; (4) CAS 03-99-15, Waste Disposal Site; (5) CAS 07-23-02, Radioactive Waste Disposal Site; (6) CAS 09-23-07, Radioactive Waste Disposal Site; (7) CAS 12-08-01, Waste Disposal Site; and (8) CAS 12-23-07, Waste Disposal Site. The Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) will include field inspections, radiological surveys, geophysical surveys, sampling of environmental media, analysis of samples, and assessment of investigation results, where appropriate. Data will be obtained to support corrective action alternative evaluations and waste management decisions. The CASs in CAU 137 are being investigated because hazardous and/or radioactive constituents may be present in concentrations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. Existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives for the CASs. Additional information will be generated by conducting a CAI before evaluating and selecting corrective action alternatives.

Wickline, Alfred

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Mass Correction Applied to Semi-Lagrangian Advection Scheme  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple mass correction is proposed for the semi-Lagrangian scheme using forward trajectories. The procedure includes (a) constructing the Lagrangian network induced by the motion of the fluid from the Eulerian network and finding the ...

Wen-Yih Sun; Ming-Teh Sun

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Skill, Correction, and Downscaling of GCM-Simulated Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability of general circulation models (GCMs) to correctly simulate precipitation is usually assessed by comparing simulated mean precipitation with observed climatologies. However, to what extent the skill in simulating average precipitation ...

Jonathan M. Eden; Martin Widmann; David Grawe; Sebastian Rast

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Litchfield Correctional Center District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Correctional Center District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Correctional Center District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Litchfield Correctional Center District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Litchfield Correctional Center Sector Geothermal energy Type District Heating Location Susanville, California Coordinates 40.4162842°, -120.6530063° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

330

Corrections to Bottom Pressure Records for Dynamic Temperature Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Factory calibration of Digiquartz™ transducers allows for static temperature corrections, assuming that the temperature changes slowly enough during deployment that the gauge is always in thermal equilibrium. Deep ocean bottom pressure recorders ...

Edward F. Boss; Frank I. González

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Error Determination of a Successive Correction Type Objective Analysis Scheme  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Purdue Regional Objective Analysis of the Mesoscale (PROAM) is a successive correction type scheme for the analysis of surface meteorological data. The scheme is subjected to a series of experiments to evaluate its performance under a variety ...

David R. Smith; Fred W. Leslie

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Computer Interval Arithmetic: Definition and Proof of Correct Implementation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A definition is given of computer interval arithmetic suitable for implementation on a digital computer. Some computational properties and simplifications are derived. An ALGOL code segment is proved to be a correct implementation of the definition on ...

Donald I. Good; Ralph L. London

1970-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Passive background correction method for spatially resolved detection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for passive background correction during spatially or angularly resolved detection of emission that is based on the simultaneous acquisition of both the passive background spectrum and the spectrum of the target of interest.

Schmitt, Randal L. (Tijeras, NM); Hargis, Jr., Philip J. (Albuquerque, NM)

2011-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

334

Bias Correction, Quantile Mapping, and Downscaling: Revisiting the Inflation Issue  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quantile mapping is routinely applied to correct biases of regional climate model simulations compared to observational data. If the observations are of similar resolution as the regional climate model, quantile mapping is a feasible approach. ...

Douglas Maraun

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

A Bias-Corrected Precipitation Climatology for China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of bias corrections of Chinese standard precipitation gauge (CSPG) measurements for wind-induced undercatch, a trace amount of precipitation, and wetting loss. Long-term daily data of precipitation, temperature, ...

Baisheng Ye; Daqing Yang; Yongjian Ding; Tianding Han; Toshio Koike

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Evaluation of Two Gustiness Models for Exposure Correction Calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gustiness models from Wieringa and Beljaars are evaluated. The models are used to relate the gustiness from wind speed records to the local roughness length. The roughness length is used to apply exposure corrections to sheltered wind stations. ...

J. W. Verkaik

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 547: Miscellaneous Contaminated Waste Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this CADD/CAP is to present the corrective action alternatives (CAAs) evaluated for CAU 547, provide justification for selection of the recommended alternative, and describe the plan for implementing the selected alternative. Corrective Action Unit 547 consists of the following three corrective action sites (CASs): (1) CAS 02-37-02, Gas Sampling Assembly; (2) CAS 03-99-19, Gas Sampling Assembly; and(3) CAS 09-99-06, Gas Sampling Assembly. The gas sampling assemblies consist of inactive process piping, equipment, and instrumentation that were left in place after completion of underground safety experiments. The purpose of these safety experiments was to confirm that a nuclear explosion would not occur in the case of an accidental detonation of the high-explosive component of the device. The gas sampling assemblies allowed for the direct sampling of the gases and particulates produced by the safety experiments. Corrective Action Site 02-37-02 is located in Area 2 of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and is associated with the Mullet safety experiment conducted in emplacement borehole U2ag on October 17, 1963. Corrective Action Site 03-99-19 is located in Area 3 of the NNSS and is associated with the Tejon safety experiment conducted in emplacement borehole U3cg on May 17, 1963. Corrective Action Site 09-99-06 is located in Area 9 of the NNSS and is associated with the Player safety experiment conducted in emplacement borehole U9cc on August 27, 1964. The CAU 547 CASs were investigated in accordance with the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to determine and implement appropriate corrective actions for CAU 547. Existing radiological survey data and historical knowledge of the CASs were sufficient to meet the DQOs and evaluate CAAs without additional investigation. As a result, further investigation of the CAU 547 CASs was not required. The following CAAs were identified for the gas sampling assemblies: (1) clean closure, (2) closure in place, (3) modified closure in place, (4) no further action (with administrative controls), and (5) no further action. Based on the CAAs evaluation, the recommended corrective action for the three CASs in CAU 547 is closure in place. This corrective action will involve construction of a soil cover on top of the gas sampling assembly components and establishment of use restrictions at each site. The closure in place alternative was selected as the best and most appropriate corrective action for the CASs at CAU 547 based on the following factors: (1) Provides long-term protection of human health and the environment; (2) Minimizes short-term risk to site workers in implementing corrective action; (3) Is easily implemented using existing technology; (4) Complies with regulatory requirements; (5) Fulfills FFACO requirements for site closure; (6) Does not generate transuranic waste requiring offsite disposal; (7) Is consistent with anticipated future land use of the areas (i.e., testing and support activities); and (8) Is consistent with other NNSS site closures where contamination was left in place.

Mark Krauss

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

General pattern of global system conflicts and global threats of the 21st century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data on global conflicts took place from 750 B.C. up to now are analyzed and their general pattern is revealed. An attempt is made to foresee the next global conflict called the conflict of the 21st century. Its nature and main characteristics are analyzed. ... Keywords: Fibonacci sequence, cluster analysis, global system conflicts, global threats, scenarios

M. Z. Zgurovsky

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Global Futures: A Multithreaded Execution Model for Global Arrays-based Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present Global Futures (GF), an execution model extension to Global Arrays, which is based on a PGAS-compatible active message-based paradigm. We describe the design and implementation of Global Futures and illustrate its use in a computational chemistry ... Keywords: Global Arrays, multithreading, execution models

Daniel Chavarria-Miranda; Sriram Krishnamoorthy; Abhinav Vishnu

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

String-corrected dilatonic black holes in d dimensions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We solve the dilaton field equation in the background of a spherically symmetric black hole in bosonic or heterotic string theory with curvature-squared corrections in arbitrary d spacetime dimensions. We then apply this result to obtain a spherically symmetric black hole solution with dilatonic charge and curvature-squared corrections in bosonic or heterotic string theory compactified on a torus. For this black hole, we obtain its free energy, entropy, temperature, specific heat, and mass.

Moura, Filipe [Centro de Matematica da Universidade do Minho, Escola de Ciencias, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global risk-based corrective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Adapting Corrective Action Programs for Maintenance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

All nuclear power plants have a corrective action program (CAP) that is required by regulation. This program establishes the threshold for problem initiation, screening criteria for determining the significance of problems, and requirements for the development of corrective actions. Problems entered into the CAP are prioritized to receive appropriate attention, and completion dates are assigned based on the significance of the problem. Problems are also categorized based on their nature and are assigned ...

2009-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

342

QCD corrections to Higgs boson production: An update  

SciTech Connect

We compute analytic results for the QCD corrections to Higgs boson production in hadronic collisions in the limit in which the top quark is much heavier than the Higgs boson. The first non-leading corrections of O({alpha}{sub s}{sup 2}M{sub H}{sup 2}/m{sub t}{sup 2}) are given and numerical results presented for the LHC.

Dawson, S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Kauffman, R. [Franklin and Marshall Coll., Lancaster, PA (United States). Physics Dept.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

The ProCoS Approach to Correct Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PorCoS is the name of the ESPRIT project “Provably Correct Systems”. A system is seen as a technological system with embedded controlling processors, sensors, actuators, connecting channels and timers in a physical environment, especially a ... Keywords: asynchronous circuits, computer-based real-time systems, correctness, duration calculus, hardware description, high-level timed programming, machine programming, requirements, safety-critical applications, specification, systems architecture

Hans Langmaack

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) is a comprehensive strategy to increase U.S....

345

The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership A report on the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) is a comprehensive strategy to increase U.S....

346

CO2 Global Solutions International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Global Solutions International Jump to: navigation, search Name CO2 Global Solutions International Place Madrid, Spain Zip 28001 Sector Carbon Product CO2 Global Solutions is a...

347

Energy Crossroads: Global Climate Change | Environmental Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Climate Change Global Climate Change Suggest a Listing Best Global Warming Articles Global Warming Articles provides facts about the causes, effects and answers to global warming; the environment; energy conservation, climate change and more. Ecolytics As emissions requirements, climate change, financial markets, and risk management become increasingly interconnected, organizations are left with critical choices regarding greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions management. Ecolytics(tm), a comprehensive web-based software tool, can help organizations in the navigation of this complex area by providing an effective cataloging, strategic planning, economic analysis, and risk management solution. Enviro$en$e Funded by the Environmental Protection Agency and the Strategic

348

Economic Globalization and a Nuclear Renaissance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The phenomenon of globalization has become increasingly well recognized, documented, and analyzed in the last several years. Globalization, the integration of markets and intra-firm competition on a worldwide basis, involves complex behavioral and mindset changes within a firm that facilitate global competition. The changes revolve around efficient information flow and rapid deployment of technology. The objective of this report is to examine the probable characteristics of a global nuclear renaissance and its broad implications for industry structure and export control relative to nuclear technology. The question of how a modern renaissance would affect the trend toward globalization of the nuclear industry is addressed.

Wood, Thomas W.; Johnson, Wayne L.; Parker, Brian M.

2001-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

349

Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 355: Area 2 Cellars/Mud Pits Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This document constitutes an addendum to the November 2003, Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 355: Area 2 Cellars/Mud Pits as described in the document Recommendations and Justifications for Modifications for Use Restrictions Established under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (UR Modification document) dated February 2008. The UR Modification document was approved by NDEP on February 26, 2008. The approval of the UR Modification document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR modifications. In conformance with the UR Modification document, this addendum consists of: • This cover page that refers the reader to the UR Modification document for additional information • The cover and signature pages of the UR Modification document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the UR Modification document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the URs for: • CAS 02-37-01, Cellar & Mud Pit • CAS 02-37-03, Cellar & Mud Pit • CAS 02-37-04, Cellar & Mud Pit • CAS 02-37-05, Cellar & Mud Pit • CAS 02-37-06, Cellar & Mud Pit • CAS 02-37-07, Cellar & Mud Pit • CAS 02-37-10, Cellar & Mud Pit • CAS 02-37-11, Cellar & Mud Pit • CAS 02-37-12, Cellar & Mud Pit • CAS 02-37-13, Cellar & Mud Pit • CAS 02-37-14, Cellar & Mud Pit • CAS 02-37-15, Cellar & Mud Pit • CAS 02-37-16, Cellar & Mud Pit • CAS 02-37-17, Cellar • CAS 02-37-18, Cellar & Tanks These URs were established as part of Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective actions and were based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996; as amended August 2006). Since these URs were established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, these URs were re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006c). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the URs) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove these URs because contamination is not present at these sites above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining these URs will be canceled, and the postings and signage at each site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at these sites that are unrelated to the FFACO URs such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004f). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at these sites.

Lynn Kidman

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Global warming and biological diversity  

SciTech Connect

This book is based on presentations given at the World Wildlife Fund's Conference on Consequences of the Greenhouse Effect for Biological Diverisity in 1988, and includes updated literature citations. The general topics covered in the book include the following: overview; summary of past responses of plants to climatic change; general ecological and physiological responses; ecosystems in 4 specific regions (arctic marine, Alaskan North Slope, NW US forests, and Mediterranean); global warming's implications for conservation. Ideas and data from many ecosystems and information about the relationships between biodiversity and climatic change are brought together with a balance of factual information and defensible scientific prognostication.

Peters, R.L.; Lovejoy, T.E. (eds.)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Global Direct Cost of Corrosion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 8   Country-specific direct cost of corrosion for the year 2004...Basque region 1988 Pesetas, 75 100.00 0.75 1.9977 1.5 Czechoslovakia 1998 Koruna, 31.816 (f) 29.8600 1.0655 1.1006 1.17 Netherlands 1969 Guilders, 0.51441 3.6340 0.1416 8.2103 1.16 Sweden 1967 Kroner, 1 5.0000 0.2000 3.0284 0.61 Finland 1965 Markka, 0.175 (g) 3.2110 0.0545 2.0995 0.11 Global...

352

NCCI Gardner Dept of Correction | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NCCI Gardner Dept of Correction NCCI Gardner Dept of Correction Jump to: navigation, search Name NCCI Gardner Dept of Correction Facility NCCI Gardner Dept of Correction Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Department of Corrections - Division of Capital Asset Management for the Commonwealth of MA Developer Department of Corrections - Division of Capital Asset Management for the Commonwealth of MA Energy Purchaser Distributed generation - net metered Location Westminster MA Coordinates 42.5800093°, -71.93783283° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.5800093,"lon":-71.93783283,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

353

GVR: Global View Resilience | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the range of errors that can be detected and corrected. Efficiency is critical for exascale reliability, so by exploiting new opportunities arising from the myriad ongoing...

354

Global Forest Resource Assessment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Global Forest Resource Assessment Global Forest Resource Assessment Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Global Forest Resource Assessment Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: Resource assessment Resource Type: Publications Website: www.fao.org/forestry/fra/fra2010/en/ Global Forest Resource Assessment Screenshot References: Global Forest Research Assessment[1] Overview "FAO, in cooperation with its member countries, has monitored the world's forests at 5 to 10 year intervals since 1946. These global assessments provide valuable information to policy-makers in countries, to international negotiations, arrangements and organizations related to forests and to the general public. The Global Forest Resources Assessment

355

Think Green Global Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Think Green Global Inc Think Green Global Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Think Green Global, Inc. Place New York, New York Zip 10010 Sector Renewable Energy Product New York-based investment bank and strategic development firm that is dedicated to enhancing the growth of renewable energy and clean technology companies. References Think Green Global, Inc.[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Think Green Global, Inc. is a company located in New York, New York . References ↑ "Think Green Global, Inc." Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Think_Green_Global_Inc&oldid=352225" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations

356

Global Industry Analysts | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Global Industry Analysts Global Industry Analysts Jump to: navigation, search Name Global Industry Analysts Address 6150 Hellyer Avenue Place San Jose, California Zip 95138 Product Market research services Year founded 1987 Number of employees 501-1000 Phone number (408) 528-9966 Website http://www.strategyr.com/ Region Bay Area References Global Industry Analysts[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! Global Industry Analysts Global Industry Analysts, Inc., (GIA) offers one of the world's largest portfolios of research reports in terms of topics covered, geographic regions analyzed, companies profiled, and pages published. The company's current portfolio consists of more than 900 Global Strategic Business Reports (large multi-client research programs); 45,000+ Market Trend

357

Risk Based Corrosion Studies at SRS  

Stress Corrosion Cracking: Concentrated Waste Solutions Stress corrosion cracks associated with fabrication welds in Tank 16 (Type II). Tank has been ...

358

Risk-based plant performance indicators  

SciTech Connect

Tasked by the 1979 President's Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island, the US nuclear power industry has put into place a performance indicator program as one means for showing a demonstrable record of achievement.'' Largely through the efforts of the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO), plant performance data has, since 1983, been collected and analyzed to aid utility management in measuring their plants' performance progress. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has also developed a set of performance indicators. This program, conducted by NRC's Office for the Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD), is structured to present information on plant operational performance in a manner that could enhance the staff's ability to recognize changes in the safety performance. 4 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

Boccio, J.L.; Azarm, M.A.; Vesely, W.E.; Hall, R.E.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

A Risk-Based Sensor Placement Methodology  

SciTech Connect

A sensor placement methodology is proposed to solve the problem of optimal location of sensors or detectors to protect population against the exposure to and effects of known and/or postulated chemical, biological, and/or radiological threats. Historical meteorological data are used to characterize weather conditions as wind speed and direction pairs with the percentage of occurrence of the pairs over the historical period. The meteorological data drive atmospheric transport and dispersion modeling of the threats, the results of which are used to calculate population at risk against standard exposure levels. Sensor locations are determined via a dynamic programming algorithm where threats captured or detected by sensors placed in prior stages are removed from consideration in subsequent stages. Moreover, the proposed methodology provides a quantification of the marginal utility of each additional sensor or detector. Thus, the criterion for halting the iterative process can be the number of detectors available, a threshold marginal utility value, or the cumulative detection of a minimum factor of the total risk value represented by all threats.

Lee, Ronald W [ORNL; Kulesz, James J [ORNL

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Risk-Based Sensor Placement Methodology  

Current methods for sensor placement are based on qualitative approaches ranging from “best guess” to expensive, customized studies.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global risk-based corrective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Corrective action decision document for the Roller Coaster Lagoons and North Disposal Trench (Corrective Action Unit Number 404)  

SciTech Connect

The North Disposal Trench, located north of the eastern most lagoon, was installed in 1963 to receive solid waste and construction debris from the Operation Roller Coaster man camp. Subsequent to Operation Roller Coaster, the trench continued to receive construction debris and range cleanup debris (including ordnance) from Sandia National Laboratories and other operators. A small hydrocarbon spill occurred during Voluntary Corrective Action (VCA) activities (VCA Spill Area) at an area associated with the North Disposal Trench Corrective Action Site (CAS). Remediation activities at this site were conducted in 1995. A corrective action investigation was conducted in September of 1996 following the Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP); the detailed results of that investigation are presented in Appendix A. The Roller Coaster Lagoons and North Disposal Trench are located at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), a part of the Nellis Air Force Range, which is approximately 225 kilometers (140 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, by air.

1997-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

362

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 190: Contaminated Waste Sites Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 190 is located in Areas 11 and 14 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 190 is comprised of the four Corrective Action Sites (CASs) listed below: (1) 11-02-01, Underground Centrifuge; (2) 11-02-02, Drain Lines and Outfall; (3) 11-59-01, Tweezer Facility Septic System; and (4) 14-23-01, LTU-6 Test Area. These sites are being investigated because existing information is insufficient on the nature and extent of potential contamination to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI). The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on August 24, 2006, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture, and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 190. The scope of the CAU 190 CAI includes the following activities: (1) Move surface debris and/or materials, as needed, to facilitate sampling; (2) Conduct radiological and geophysical surveys; (3) Perform field screening; (4) Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present; (5) If COCs are present, collect additional step-out samples to define the lateral and vertical extent of the contamination; (6) Collect samples of source material, if present, to determine the potential for a release; (7) Collect samples of investigation-derived waste, as needed, for waste management and minimization purposes; and (8) Collect quality control samples. This Corrective Action Investigation Document (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) agreed to by the State of Nevada, U.S. Department of Energy, and U.S. Department of Defense. Under the FFACO, this CAIP will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Field work will be conducted following approval.

Wickline, Alfred

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 309: Area 12 Muckpiles, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information including facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 309, Area 12 Muckpiles, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. This CAIP has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD). Corrective Action Unit 309 is located in Area 12 of the NTS, which is approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). Area 12 is approximately 40 mi beyond the main gate to the NTS. Corrective Action Unit 309 is comprised of the three Corrective Action Sites (CASs) shown on Figure 1-1 and listed below: CAS 12-06-09, Muckpile; CAS 12-08-02, Contaminated Waste Dump (CWD); and CAS 12-28-01, I, J, and K-Tunnel Debris. Corrective Action Sites 12-06-09 and 12-08-02 will be collectively referred to as muckpiles in this document. Corrective Action Site 12-28-01 will be referred to as the fallout plume because of the extensive lateral area of debris and fallout contamination resulting from the containment failures of the J-and K-Tunnels. The corrective action investigation (CAI) will include field inspections, radiological surveys, and media sampling, where appropriate. Data will also be obtained to support waste management decisions. The CASs in CAU 309 are being investigated because hazardous and/or radioactive constituents may be present in concentrations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and/or the environment. Existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination at these sites are insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives for the CASs. Therefore, additional information will be obtained by conducting a CAI prior to evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS.

David A. Strand

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 555: Septic Systems Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0 with Errata  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information including facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 555: Septic Systems, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. This CAIP has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 555 is located in Areas 1, 3 and 6 of the NTS, which is approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, and is comprised of the five corrective action sites (CASs) shown on Figure 1-1 and listed below: (1) CAS 01-59-01, Area 1 Camp Septic System; (2) CAS 03-59-03, Core Handling Building Septic System; (3) CAS 06-20-05, Birdwell Dry Well; (4) CAS 06-59-01, Birdwell Septic System; and (5) CAS 06-59-02, National Cementers Septic System. An FFACO modification was approved on December 14, 2005, to include CAS 06-20-05, Birdwell Dry Well, as part of the scope of CAU 555. The work scope was expanded in this document to include the investigation of CAS 06-20-05. The Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) will include field inspections, radiological surveys, geophysical surveys, sampling of environmental media, analysis of samples, and assessment of investigation results, where appropriate. Data will be obtained to support corrective action alternative evaluations and waste management decisions. The CASs in CAU 555 are being investigated because hazardous and/or radioactive constituents may be present in concentrations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. Existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives for the CASs. Additional information will be generated by conducting a CAI before the evaluation and selection of corrective action alternatives.

Pastor, Laura

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 500: Test Cell A Septic System, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the US Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). The CAIP is a document that provides or references all of the specific information for investigation activities associated with Corrective Action Units (CAUs) or Corrective Action Sites (CASs). According to the FFACO (1996), CASs are sites potentially requiring corrective action(s), and may include solid waste management units, individual disposal sites, or release sites. Corrective Action Units consist of one or more CASs grouped together based on geography, technical similarity, or agency responsibility for the purpose of determining corrective actions. This CAIP will be used in conjunction with the Work Plan for Leachfield Corrective Action Units: Nevada Test Site and Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (DOE/NV, 1998c), hereafter referred to as the Leachfield Work Plan. Under the FFACO, a work plan is an optional planning document that provides information for a CAU or group of CAUs where significant commonality exists. This CAIP contains CAU-specific information including a facility description, environmental sample collection objectives, and the criteria for conducting site investigation activities at CAU 500. This CAIP addresses one of three leachfield systems associated with Test Cell A, which is located in Area 25 at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is approximately 105 kilometers (km) (65 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (see Leachfield Work Plan Figure 1-1). Corrective Action Unit 500 is comprised of the Test Cell A Septic System (CAS 25-04-05) and the associated leachfield system presented in Figure 1-1 (FFACO, 1996).

IT Las Vegas

1999-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

366

Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 370: T-4 Atmospheric Test Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 370, T-4 Atmospheric Test Site, located in Area 4 at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Corrective Action Unit 370 is comprised of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 04-23-01, Atmospheric Test Site T-4. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 370 due to the implementation of the corrective action of closure in place with administrative controls. To achieve this, corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from June 25, 2008, through April 2, 2009, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 370: T-4 Atmospheric Test Site and Record of Technical Change No. 1.

Patrick Matthews

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 232: Area 25 Sewage Lagoons Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the US Department of Defense. The CAIP is a document that provides or references all of the specific information for investigation activities associated with Corrective Action Units (CAUs) or Corrective Action Sites (CASs). According to the FFACO, CASs are sites potentially requiring corrective action(s) and may include solid waste management units or individual disposal or release sites. A CAU consists of one or more CASs grouped together based on geography, technical similarity, or agency responsibility for the purpose of determining corrective actions. This CAIP contains the environmental sample collection objectives and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at CAU 232, Area 25 Sewage Lagoons. Corrective Action Unit 232 consists of CAS 25-03-01, Sewage Lagoon, located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1) (DOE/NV, 1996a). The Area 25 Sewage Lagoons (Figure 1-2) (IT, 1999b) are located approximately 0.3 mi south of the Test Cell 'C' (TCC) Facility and were used for the discharge of sanitary effluent from the TCC facility. For purposes of this discussion, this site will be referred to as either CAU 232 or the sewage lagoons.

DOE /NV Operations Office

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 240: Area 25 Vehicle Washdown Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the US Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). The CAIP is a document that provides or references all of the specific information for investigation activities associated with Corrective Action Units (CAUs) or Corrective Action Sites (CASs). According to the FFACO, CASs are sites potentially requiring corrective action(s) and may include solid waste management units or individual disposal or release sites (FFACO, 1996). Corrective Action Units consist of one or more CASs grouped together based on geography, technical similarity, or agency responsibility for the purpose of determining corrective actions. This CAIP contains the environmental sample collection objectives and the criteria for conducting site investigation activities at CAU 240, Area 25 Vehicle Washdown, which is located on the Nevada Test Site (NTS).

DOE /NV

1999-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

369

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 135: Area 25 Underground Storage Tanks Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the US Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). The CAIP is a document that provides or references all of the specific information for investigation activities associated with Corrective Action Units (CAUs) or Corrective Action Sites (CASs). According to the FFACO, CASs are sites potentially requiring corrective action(s) and may include solid waste management units or individual disposal or release sites (FFACO, 1996). Corrective Action Units consist of one or more CASs grouped together based on geography, technical similarity, or agency responsibility for the purpose of determining corrective actions. This CAIP contains the environmental sample collection objectives and the criteria for conducting site investigation activities at CAU 135, Area 25 Underground Storage Tanks (USTs), which is located on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is approximately 105 kilometers (km) (65 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada.

U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

1999-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

370

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 143: Area 25 Contaminated Waste Dumps, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Plan (CAP) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 143: Area 25 Contaminated Waste Dumps, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996. This CAP provides the methodology for implementing the approved corrective action alternative as listed in the Corrective Action Decision Document (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, 2000). The CAU includes two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 25-23-09, Contaminated Waste Dump Number 1; and 25-23-03, Contaminated Waste Dump Number 2. Investigation of CAU 143 was conducted in 1999. Analytes detected during the corrective action investigation were evaluated against preliminary action levels to determine constituents of concern for CAU 143. Radionuclide concentrations in disposal pit soil samples associated with the Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility West Trenches, the Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility East Trestle Pit, and the Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility Trench are greater than normal background concentrations. These constituents are identified as constituents of concern for their respective CASs. Closure-in-place with administrative controls involves use restrictions to minimize access and prevent unauthorized intrusive activities, earthwork to fill depressions to original grade, placing additional clean cover material over the previously filled portion of some of the trenches, and placing secondary or diversion berm around pertinent areas to divert storm water run-on potential.

D. L. Gustafason

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 528: Polychlorinated Biphenyls Contamination, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. 0  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 528, Polychlorinated Biphenyls Contamination (PCBs), Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in the southwestern portion of Area 25 on the NTS in Jackass Flats (adjacent to Test Cell C [TCC]), CAU 528 consists of Corrective Action Site 25-27-03, Polychlorinated Biphenyls Surface Contamination. Test Cell C was built to support the Nuclear Rocket Development Station (operational between 1959 and 1973) activities including conducting ground tests and static firings of nuclear engine reactors. Although CAU 528 was not considered as a direct potential source of PCBs and petroleum contamination, two potential sources of contamination have nevertheless been identified from an unknown source in concentrations that could potentially pose an unacceptable risk to human health and/or the environment. This CAU's close proximity to TCC prompted Shaw to collect surface soil samples, which have indicated the presence of PCBs extending throughout the area to the north, east, south, and even to the edge of the western boundary. Based on this information, more extensive field investigation activities are being planned, the results of which are to be used to support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

2003-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

372

Glass viscosity calculation based on a global statistical modelling approach  

SciTech Connect

A global statistical glass viscosity model was developed for predicting the complete viscosity curve, based on more than 2200 composition-property data of silicate glasses from the scientific literature, including soda-lime-silica container and float glasses, TV panel glasses, borosilicate fiber wool and E type glasses, low expansion borosilicate glasses, glasses for nuclear waste vitrification, lead crystal glasses, binary alkali silicates, and various further compositions from over half a century. It is shown that within a measurement series from a specific laboratory the reported viscosity values are often over-estimated at higher temperatures due to alkali and boron oxide evaporation during the measurement and glass preparation, including data by Lakatos et al. (1972) and the recently published High temperature glass melt property database for process modeling by Seward et al. (2005). Similarly, in the glass transition range many experimental data of borosilicate glasses are reported too high due to phase separation effects. The developed global model corrects those errors. The model standard error was 9-17°C, with R^2 = 0.985-0.989. The prediction 95% confidence interval for glass in mass production largely depends on the glass composition of interest, the composition uncertainty, and the viscosity level. New insights in the mixed-alkali effect are provided.

Fluegel, Alex

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Global Analysis of Solar Neutrino Oscillations Including SNO CC Measurement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For active and sterile neutrinos, we present the globally allowed solutions for two neutrino oscillations. We include the SNO CC measurement and all other relevant solar neutrino and reactor data. Five active neutrino oscillation solutions (LMA, LOW, SMA, VAC, and Just So2) are currently allowed at 3 sigma; three sterile neutrino solutions (Just So2, SMA, and VAC) are allowed at 3 sigma. The goodness of fit is satisfactory for all eight solutions. We also investigate the robustness of the allowed solutions by carrying out global analyses with and without: 1) imposing solar model constraints on the 8B neutrino flux, 2) including the Super-Kamiokande spectral energy distribution and day-night data, 3) including a continuous mixture of active and sterile neutrinos, 4) using an enhanced CC cross section for deuterium (due to radiative corrections), and 5) a optimistic, hypothetical reduction by a factor of three of the error of the SNO CC rate. For every analysis strategy used in this paper, the most favored solutions all involve large mixing angles: LMA, LOW, or VAC. The favored solutions are robust, but the presence at 3 sigma of individual sterile solutions and the active Just So2 solution is sensitive to the analysis assumptions.

John N. Bahcall; M. C. Gonzalez-Garcia; Carlos Pena-Garay

2001-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

374

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 562: Waste Systems Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) presents information supporting the selection of corrective action alternatives (CAAs) leading to the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 562, Waste Systems, in Areas 2, 23, and 25 of the Nevada Test Site, Nevada. This complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. Corrective Action Unit 562 comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): • 02-26-11, Lead Shot • 02-44-02, Paint Spills and French Drain • 02-59-01, Septic System • 02-60-01, Concrete Drain • 02-60-02, French Drain • 02-60-03, Steam Cleaning Drain • 02-60-04, French Drain • 02-60-05, French Drain • 02-60-06, French Drain • 02-60-07, French Drain • 23-60-01, Mud Trap Drain and Outfall • 23-99-06, Grease Trap • 25-60-04, Building 3123 Outfalls The purpose of this CADD is to identify and provide the rationale for the recommendation of CAAs for the 13 CASs within CAU 562. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from July 27, 2009, through May 12, 2010, as set forth in the CAU 562 Corrective Action Investigation Plan. The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill the following data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process: • Determine whether COCs are present. • If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent. • Provide sufficient information and data to complete appropriate corrective actions. A data quality assessment (DQA) performed on the CAU 562 data demonstrated the quality and acceptability of the data for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Analytes detected during the CAI were evaluated against appropriate final action levels (FALs) to identify the COCs for each CAS. The results of the CAI identified COCs at 10 of the 13 CASs in CAU 562, and thus corrective action is required. Assessment of the data generated from investigation activities conducted at CAU 562 is shown in Table ES-1. Based on the evaluation of analytical data from the CAI, review of future and current operations at the 13 CASs, and the detailed and comparative analysis of the potential CAAs, the following corrective actions are recommended for CAU 562. • No further action is the preferred corrective action for CASs 02-60-01, 02-60-06, and 02-60-07. • Clean closure is the preferred corrective action for CASs 02-26-11, 02-44-02, 02-59-01, 02-60-02, 02-60-03, 02-60-04, 02-60-05, 23-60-01, 23-99-06, and 25-60-04. The preferred CAAs were evaluated on technical merit focusing on performance, reliability, feasibility, safety, and cost. The alternatives were judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated. The alternatives meet all applicable federal and state regulations for closure of the site and will reduce potential exposures to contaminated media to acceptable levels. The DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office provides the following recommendations: • No further corrective action is required at CASs 02-60-01, 02-60-06, and 02-60-07. • Clean closure is recommended for the remaining 10 CASs in CAU 562. • A Corrective Action Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection that contains a detailed description of the proposed actions that will be taken to implement the selected corrective actions.

Mark Krause

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Measurement and correction of leaf open times in helical tomotherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The binary multileaf collimator (MLC) is one of the most important components in helical tomotherapy (HT), as it modulates the dose delivered to the patient. However, methods to ensure MLC quality in HT treatments are lacking. The authors obtained data on the performance of the MLC in treatments administered in their department in order to assess possible delivery errors due to the MLC. Correction methods based on their data are proposed. Methods: Twenty sinograms from treatments delivered using both of the authors HT systems were measured and analyzed by recording the fluence collected by the imaging detector. Planned and actual sinograms were compared using distributions of leaf open time (LOT) errors, as well as differences in fluence reconstructed at each of the 51 projections into which the treatment planning system divides each rotation for optimization purposes. They proposed and applied a method based on individual leaf error correction and the increase in projection time to prevent latency effects when LOT is close to projection time. In order to analyze the dosimetric impact of the corrections, inphantom measurements were made for four corrected treatments. Results: The LOTs measured were consistent with those planned. Most of the mean errors in LOT distributions were within 1 ms with standard deviations of over 4 ms. Reconstructed fluences showed good results, with over 90% of points passing the 3% criterion, except in treatments with a short mean LOT, where the percentage of passing points was as low as 66%. Individual leaf errors were as long as 4 ms in some cases. Corrected sinograms improved error distribution, with standard deviations of over 3 ms and increased percentages of points passing 3% in the fluence per angle analysis, especially in treatments with a short mean LOT and those that were more subject to latency effects. The minimum percentage of points within 3% increased to 86%. In-phantom measurements of the corrected treatments showed that, while treatments affected by latency effects were improved, those affected by individual leaf errors were not. Conclusions: Measurement of MLC performance in real treatments provides the authors with a valuable tool for ensuring the quality of HT delivery. The LOTs of MLC are very accurate in most cases. Sources of error were found and correction methods proposed and applied. The corrections decreased the amount of LOT errors. The dosimetric impact of these corrections should be evaluated more thoroughly using 3D dose distribution analysis.

Sevillano, David; Minguez, Cristina; Sanchez, Alicia; Sanchez-Reyes, Alberto [Department of Medical Physics, Tomotherapy Unit, Grupo IMO, Madrid 28010 (Spain)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

376

Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Demonstrate More...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Demonstrate More Proliferation-Resistant Recycling Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Demonstrate More...

377

Principal Associate Directorate for Global Security: Los National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Security's Future at Los Alamos Nuclear Nonproliferation Space Systems Intelligence Warfighter Support Counterterrorism Mass Effect Event Response Global...

378

Corrective measures evaluation report for technical area-v groundwater.  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Measures Evaluation Report was prepared as directed by the Compliance Order on Consent issued by the New Mexico Environment Department to document the process of selecting the preferred remedial alternative for contaminated groundwater at Technical Area V. Supporting information includes background information about the site conditions and potential receptors and an overview of work performed during the Corrective Measures Evaluation. Evaluation of remedial alternatives included identification and description of four remedial alternatives, an overview of the evaluation criteria and approach, qualitative and quantitative evaluation of remedial alternatives, and selection of the preferred remedial alternative. As a result of the Corrective Measures Evaluation, it was determined that monitored natural attenuation of all contaminants of concern (trichloroethene, tetrachloroethene, and nitrate) was the preferred remedial alternative for implementation as the corrective measure to remediate contaminated groundwater at Technical Area V of Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico. Finally, design criteria to meet cleanup goals and objectives and the corrective measures implementation schedule for the preferred remedial alternative are presented.

Witt, Johnathan L (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID); Orr, Brennon R. (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID); Dettmers, Dana L. (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID); Hall, Kevin A. (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID); Howard, Hope (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID)

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Spectral Corrections Based on Optical Air Mass: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This conference paper describes the measurement of the photovoltaic (PV) performance with respect to reference conditions requires measuring the performance with respect to a reference spectrum. Procedures were developed in the mid 1980s to correct measurements for errors relating to the spectral irradiance of the light source being different from the standard and the responsivity of the irradiance detector being different from the device under test. In principle, these procedures are exact, but require the measurement of the spectral irradiance of the light source and responsivity of the test device. This is problematic for most facilities that measure module performance. It has been suggested that a polynomial fit of the short-circuit current (I sc ) measured under natural sunlight divided by the total broadband irradiance as a function of air mass provides an accurate spectral correction factor. The polynomial correction factor is normalized to unity at an absolute air mass of 1.5.The polynomial correction factor is compared with the spectral correction factor for a variety of devices at two locations.

Emery, K.; DelCueto, J.; Zaaiman, W.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Refractive aiming corrections for satellite observation of stars  

SciTech Connect

Standard references describe how apparent zenith angles differ from true zenith angles for observers on the Earth. In fact, correction formulae are available for aiming Earth-based sensors at stars; some corrections give variations as a function of observer altitude. Such corrections have not been available for observers in space. This report develops formulae appropriate for proper aiming from space-based sensors toward the relatively few stars that are near the Earth`s limb at any given time. These formulae correct for refractive effects and may be critical for steerable space-borne sensors with fields of view less than one degree, tasked to observe starlight passing near the Earth`s surface. Ray tracing in the U.S. Standard Atmosphere, 1976 including H{sub 2}O effects, is used to determine relations between the refracted tangent height, the apparent tangent height resulting from observation at the sensor, and the angle through which the detected rays have deviated. Analytic fits of the ray deviation as a function of apparent tangent height allows quick determination of corrections needed for a space-borne sensor. Using those results that apply in the plane of incidence and using the necessary coordinate rotations, alterations in the star`s apparent right ascension and declination are evaluated to improve the aim. Examples illustrate that alterations can be larger than one degree, with effects lasting up to a few minutes.

Vittitoe, C.N.; Schmidt, R.L.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global risk-based corrective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Heard Island global warming test  

SciTech Connect

In late January and early February 1991, an international team will conduct an experiment to test the possibility of measuring global warming in the world's oceans. The goal is to provide early indications of warming caused by the so-called greenhouse effect, the atmospheric buildup of CO{sub 2} and other gases. The method is based on the principle that acoustic energy travels through water between a source and receiver at a speed determined primarily by the water temperature. Thus acoustic travel time can be used as a temperature gauge. The idea is an outgrowth of suggestions made by Professor Walter Munk of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography and Professor Carl Wunsch of MIT in the early 1980s to use long-range underwater acoustic transmissions to measure changes in the heat content of the oceans.

Spindel, R.C. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle (USA))

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Coal mine methane global review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the second edition of the Coal Mine Methane Global Overview, updated in the summer of 2008. This document contains individual, comprehensive profiles that characterize the coal and coal mine methane sectors of 33 countries - 22 methane to market partners and an additional 11 coal-producing nations. The executive summary provides summary tables that include statistics on coal reserves, coal production, methane emissions, and CMM projects activity. An International Coal Mine Methane Projects Database accompanies this overview. It contains more detailed and comprehensive information on over two hundred CMM recovery and utilization projects around the world. Project information in the database is updated regularly. This document will be updated annually. Suggestions for updates and revisions can be submitted to the Administrative Support Group and will be incorporate into the document as appropriate.

NONE

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Global Power Solutions LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Solutions LLC Power Solutions LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Global Power Solutions LLC Place Colorado Zip CO 80401 Sector Geothermal energy Product String representation "Global Power So ... sition support." is too long. References Global Power Solutions LLC[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Global Power Solutions LLC is a company located in Colorado . References ↑ "Global Power Solutions LLC" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Global_Power_Solutions_LLC&oldid=345917" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link

384

GTZ Global Energy Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GTZ Global Energy Program GTZ Global Energy Program Jump to: navigation, search Logo: GTZ Global Energy Program Name GTZ Global Energy Program Agency/Company /Organization GTZ Sector Energy Focus Area Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy Topics Background analysis Website http://www.gtz.de/en/praxis/95 Program Start 2008 Program End 2012 References GTZ projects [1] GTZ is working globally with countries on supply of energy technologies and services to households, SME and public utility institutions. Key products include access to modern energy services and promotion of new technologies. References ↑ "GTZ projects" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=GTZ_Global_Energy_Program&oldid=328691" Category: Programs What links here Related changes

385

Global change research: Science and policy  

SciTech Connect

This report characterizes certain aspects of the Global Change Research Program of the US Government, and its relevance to the short and medium term needs of policy makers in the public and private sectors. It addresses some of the difficulties inherent in the science and policy interface on the issues of global change. Finally, this report offers some proposals for improving the science for policy process in the context of global environmental change.

Rayner, S.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Idaho Site Launches Corrective Actions Before Restarting Waste Treatment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Corrective Actions Before Restarting Waste Corrective Actions Before Restarting Waste Treatment Facility Idaho Site Launches Corrective Actions Before Restarting Waste Treatment Facility September 13, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Pictured here is the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit's off-gas filter following the June incident. Pictured here is the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit's off-gas filter following the June incident. A view of the process piping installations prior to startup of the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit. A view of the process piping installations prior to startup of the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit. Pictured here is the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit's off-gas filter following the June incident. A view of the process piping installations prior to startup of the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit.

387

Quality Assurance Program Undergoes Sound Changes to Ensure Safe, Correct  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Quality Assurance Program Undergoes Sound Changes to Ensure Safe, Quality Assurance Program Undergoes Sound Changes to Ensure Safe, Correct Work Quality Assurance Program Undergoes Sound Changes to Ensure Safe, Correct Work August 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - Completing the world's largest nuclear cleanup safely and correctly is EM's priority. In support of that central mission, EM recently made changes that strengthen its corporate quality assurance program, marking the first revisions to the quality program since EM established it in 2008. The program provides the foundation for achieving quality through a consistent approach to all mission-related work across the EM complex. EM believes the changes greatly advance EM's quality assurance program, serving to enhance the abilities of EM employees and contractors to ensure

388

ARM - Evaluation Product - KAZR and MWACR Ship Motion Corrections  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsKAZR and MWACR Ship Motion Corrections ProductsKAZR and MWACR Ship Motion Corrections Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : KAZR and MWACR Ship Motion Corrections 2012.09.22 - 2013.01.08 Site(s) MAG General Description The second ARM mobile facility has been configured to take advantage of ship-board deployments. At issue is how the motion at sea during these deployments affects the vertically-pointing cloud radars. Two radars of this type - the Ka-band ARM Zenith Radar (KAZR) and the Marine W-band ARM Cloud Radar (MWACR) - are instruments used in ARM's first ship-based field campaign. Each of these radars requires post-processing to account for the ship's motion across the open ocean. The primary adjustments that must be

389

Quality Assurance Program Undergoes Sound Changes to Ensure Safe, Correct  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Quality Assurance Program Undergoes Sound Changes to Ensure Safe, Quality Assurance Program Undergoes Sound Changes to Ensure Safe, Correct Work Quality Assurance Program Undergoes Sound Changes to Ensure Safe, Correct Work August 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - Completing the world's largest nuclear cleanup safely and correctly is EM's priority. In support of that central mission, EM recently made changes that strengthen its corporate quality assurance program, marking the first revisions to the quality program since EM established it in 2008. The program provides the foundation for achieving quality through a consistent approach to all mission-related work across the EM complex. EM believes the changes greatly advance EM's quality assurance program, serving to enhance the abilities of EM employees and contractors to ensure

390

Instrument Series: Microscopy Aberration-Corrected Scanning/Transmission  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aberration-Corrected Aberration-Corrected Scanning/Transmission Electron Microscope EMSL's aberration-corrected Titan 80-300(tm) scanning/transmission electron microscope (S/TEM) provides high-resolution imaging with sub-angstrom resolution and spectroscopic capabilities. This state-of-the-art instrument is equipped with a Schottky field-emission electron source, an electron gun monochromator, CEOS hexapole spherical aberration corrector for the probe-forming lens, high-angle annular dark field (HAADF) detector, an X-ray spectrometer (EDS), and a high-resolution Gatan Imaging Filter (GIF). The selection of electron energy between 80 kV and 300 kV enables optimized imaging for a variety of samples, including electron beam sensitive materials. Research Applications

391

Coordinated joint motion control system with position error correction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are an articulated hydraulic machine supporting, control system and control method for same. The articulated hydraulic machine has an end effector for performing useful work. The control system is capable of controlling the end effector for automated movement along a preselected trajectory. The control system has a position error correction system to correct discrepancies between an actual end effector trajectory and a desired end effector trajectory. The correction system can employ one or more absolute position signals provided by one or more acceleration sensors supported by one or more movable machine elements. Good trajectory positioning and repeatability can be obtained. A two-joystick controller system is enabled, which can in some cases facilitate the operator's task and enhance their work quality and productivity.

Danko, George (Reno, NV)

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

392

TeV scale dark matter and electroweak radiative corrections  

SciTech Connect

Recent anomalies in cosmic rays data, namely, from the PAMELA Collaboration, can be interpreted in terms of TeV scale decaying/annihilating dark matter. We analyze the impact of radiative corrections coming from the electroweak sector of the standard model on the spectrum of the final products at the interaction point. As an example, we consider virtual one loop corrections and real gauge bosons emission in the case of a very heavy vector boson annihilating into fermions. We find electroweak corrections that are relevant, but not as big as sometimes found in the literature; we relate this mismatch to the issue of gauge invariance. At scales much higher than the symmetry breaking scale, one loop electroweak effects are so big that eventually higher orders/resummations have to be considered: we advocate for the inclusion of these effects in parton shower Monte Carlo models aiming at the description of TeV scale physics.

Ciafaloni, Paolo; Urbano, Alfredo [INFN - Sezione di Lecce and Universita del Salento, Via per Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

393

Coordinated joint motion control system with position error correction  

SciTech Connect

Disclosed are an articulated hydraulic machine supporting, control system and control method for same. The articulated hydraulic machine has an end effector for performing useful work. The control system is capable of controlling the end effector for automated movement along a preselected trajectory. The control system has a position error correction system to correct discrepancies between an actual end effector trajectory and a desired end effector trajectory. The correction system can employ one or more absolute position signals provided by one or more acceleration sensors supported by one or more movable machine elements. Good trajectory positioning and repeatability can be obtained. A two-joystick controller system is enabled, which can in some cases facilitate the operator's task and enhance their work quality and productivity.

Danko, George (Reno, NV)

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

394

Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 104: Area 7 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

CAU 104 comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): • 07-23-03, Atmospheric Test Site T-7C • 07-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site T7-1 • 07-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site • 07-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site T7-5a • 07-23-07, Atmospheric Test Site - Dog (T-S) • 07-23-08, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (T-S) • 07-23-09, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (T-S) • 07-23-10, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie • 07-23-11, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie • 07-23-12, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (Bus) • 07-23-13, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (Buster) • 07-23-14, Atmospheric Test Site - Ruth • 07-23-15, Atmospheric Test Site T7-4 • 07-23-16, Atmospheric Test Site B7-b • 07-23-17, Atmospheric Test Site - Climax These 15 CASs include releases from 30 atmospheric tests conducted in the approximately 1 square mile of CAU 104. Because releases associated with the CASs included in this CAU overlap and are not separate and distinguishable, these CASs are addressed jointly at the CAU level. The purpose of this CADD/CAP is to evaluate potential corrective action alternatives (CAAs), provide the rationale for the selection of recommended CAAs, and provide the plan for implementation of the recommended CAA for CAU 104. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from October 4, 2011, through May 3, 2012, as set forth in the CAU 104 Corrective Action Investigation Plan.

Patrick Matthews

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 556: Dry Wells and Surface Release Points Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Draft), Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit  (CAU) 556, Dry Wells and Surface Release Points, is located in Areas 6 and 25 of the Nevada Test Site, 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 556 is comprised of four corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: •06-20-04, National Cementers Dry Well •06-99-09, Birdwell Test Hole •25-60-03, E-MAD Stormwater Discharge and Piping •25-64-01, Vehicle Washdown and Drainage Pit These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document.

Grant Evenson

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Global Threat Reduction Initiative | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Threat Reduction Initiative | National Nuclear Security Threat Reduction Initiative | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Global Threat Reduction Initiative Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Global Threat Reduction Initiative Global Threat Reduction Initiative The mission of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) is to reduce

397

Energy Options -- A Global Energy Perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the projected global carbon-free energy demand; and the challenges to the chemical sciences to enable the cost-effective production of carbon-free ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

398

Global Threat Reduction Initiative | National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Threat Reduction Initiative | National Nuclear Security Threat Reduction Initiative | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Global Threat Reduction Initiative Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Global Threat Reduction Initiative Global Threat Reduction Initiative The mission of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) is to reduce

399

Materials Sustainability: Digital Resource Center - Global Recycling ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 1, 2008 ... Global Recycling Network is an electronic information exchange that specializes in the trade of recyclables reclaimed in Municipal Solid Waste ...

400

Carbon Markets Global Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Carbon Markets Global Ltd Place London, United Kingdom Zip NW4 2HT Product Assist project originators develop and finance clean development...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global risk-based corrective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Pax Global: Compromise Agreement (2013-SE-1413)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE and Pax Global, Inc., entered into a Compromise Agreement to resolve a case involving the distribution in commerce of noncompliant freezers.

402

Global Security Directorate - Nonproliferation, Safeguards, and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home Centers & Programs Nonproliferation, Safeguards, and Security Programs click for full size image of Megatons to megawatts The Global Security and Nonproliferation Programs...

403

International Workshop on Nuclear Forensics Strengthens Global...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > International Workshop on Nuclear Forensics Strengthens Global Security...

404

Plenia Locatel Group: Globalizing from Venezuela  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2009 the founders and top executives of Plenia Locatel Group, a retail business in Venezuela specializing in health care products and services, were planning a global

Gibson, Cyrus

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

WEB RESOURCE: Global Nuclear Energy Partnership - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 16, 2007 ... This site provides general news and information on the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership, a U.S. initiative that seeks to develop worldwide ...

406

ARTICLES: Global Nuclear Energy Partnership - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jan 4, 2008 ... The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) was established to be an equal and voluntary international partnership for developing nuclear ...

407

Aquecimento Global e Mudança Climática na Amazônia:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

73 a 292. 1 Aquecimento Global e Mudana Climtica na Amaznia: Retroalimentao Clima-Vegetao e Impactos nos Recursos Hdricos Jos Marengo, 1 Carlos A. Nobre, 1...

408

Contour Global L P | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in under-served markets, such as that for renewable energy technologies and Combined Heat and Power (CHP), within developed economics. References Contour Global L.P.1...

409

Hotel energy use contributes to global warming.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Before learning about the consequences of global warming and the efforts hotels are making to reverse the effects, it is important to get a better… (more)

Faja, Christine

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 565: Stored Samples, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 565 is located in Area 26 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 565 is comprised of one corrective action site (CAS) listed--CAS 26-99-04, Ground Zero Soil Samples. This site is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend closure of CAU 565. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating closure objectives and selecting the appropriate corrective action. The results of the field investigation will support closure and waste management decisions that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report. The site will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on June 1, 2006, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and Bechtel Nevada. The DQO process was utilized to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate closure for CAU 565. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to this CAS. The scope of the corrective action investigation for CAU 565 includes the following activities: (1) Remove stored samples, shelves, and debris from the interior of Building 26-2106. (2) Perform field screening on stored samples, shelves, and debris. (3) Dispose of stored samples, shelves, and debris. (4) Collect samples of investigation-derived waste, as needed, for waste management purposes. (5) Conduct radiological surveys of Building 26-2106 in accordance with the requirements in the ''NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual'' to determine if there is residual radiological contamination that would prevent the release of the building for unrestricted use. This Corrective Action Investigation has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. Under the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'', this Corrective Action Investigation Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Field work will be conducted following approval of the plan.

Wickline, Alfred; McCall, Robert

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 565: Stored Samples, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 565 is located in Area 26 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 565 is comprised of one corrective action site (CAS) listed--CAS 26-99-04, Ground Zero Soil Samples. This site is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend closure of CAU 565. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating closure objectives and selecting the appropriate corrective action. The results of the field investigation will support closure and waste management decisions that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report. The site will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on June 1, 2006, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and Bechtel Nevada. The DQO process was utilized to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate closure for CAU 565. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to this CAS. The scope of the corrective action investigation for CAU 565 includes the following activities: (1) Remove stored samples, shelves, and debris from the interior of Building 26-2106. (2) Perform field screening on stored samples, shelves, and debris. (3) Dispose of stored samples, shelves, and debris. (4) Collect samples of investigation-derived waste, as needed, for waste management purposes. (5) Conduct radiological surveys of Building 26-2106 in accordance with the requirements in the ''NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual'' to determine if there is residual radiological contamination that would prevent the release of the building for unrestricted use. This Corrective Action Investigation has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. Under the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'', this Corrective Action Investigation Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Field work will be conducted following approval of the plan.

Wickline, Alfred; McCall, Robert

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

The Corot Book: Chap. V.5/ Extraction of the photometric information : corrections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present here the set of corrections that will be applied to the raw data of the CoRoT mission. The aim is to correct the data for instrumental and environmental perturbations as well as to optimize the duty-cycle, in order to reach the expected performances of the mission. The main corrections are : the correction of the electromagnetic interferences, suppression of outliers, the background correction, the jitter correction and the correction of the integration time variations. We focus here on these corrections and emphasize their efficiency.

R. Samadi; F. Fialho; J. E. S. Costa; R. Drummond; L. Pinheiro Da Silva; F. Baudin; P. Boumier; L. Jorda

2007-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

413

Corrective Action Decision Document, Area 15 Environmental Protection Agency Farm Laboratory Building, Corrective Action Unit No. 95, Revision 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) for the Nevada Test Site (NTS) Area 15 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Farm, Laboratory Building (Corrective Action Unit [CAU] No. 95), at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The scope of this CADD is to identify and evaluate potential corrective action alternatives for the decommissioning and decontamination (D and D) of the Laboratory Building, which were selected based on the results of investigative activities. Based on this evaluation, a preferred corrective action alternative is recommended. Studies were conducted at the EPA Farm from 1963 to 1981 to determine the animal intake and retention of radionuclides. The main building, the Laboratory Building, has approximately 370 square meters (4,000 square feet) of operational space. Other CAUS at the EPA Farm facility that will be investigated and/or remediated through other environmental restoration subprojects are not included in this CADD, with the exception of housekeeping sites. Associated structures that do not require classification as CAUS are considered in the evaluation of corrective action alternatives for CAU 95.

NONE

1997-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

414

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 261: Area 25 Test Cell A Leachfield System, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Plan (CAP) has been prepared for the Corrective Action Unit (CAU)261 Area 25 Test Cell A Leachfield System in accordance with the Federal Facility and Consent Order (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection [NDEP] et al., 1996). This CAP provides the methodology for implementing the approved corrective action alternative as listed in the Corrective Action Decision Document (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, 1999). Investigation of CAU 261 was conducted from February through May of 1999. There were no Constituents of Concern (COCs) identified at Corrective Action Site (CAS) 25-05-07 Acid Waste Leach Pit (AWLP). COCs identified at CAS 25-05-01 included diesel-range organics and radionuclides. The following closure actions will be implemented under this plan: Because COCs were not found at CAS 25-05-07 AWLP, no action is required; Removal of septage from the septic tank (CAS 25-05-01), the distribution box and the septic tank will be filled with grout; Removal of impacted soils identified near the initial outfall area; and Upon completion of this closure activity and approval of the Closure Report by NDEP, administrative controls, use restrictions, and site postings will be used to prevent intrusive activities at the site.

T. M. Fitzmaurice

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 383: Area E-Tunnel Sites, Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report (CADD/CR) was prepared by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 383, Area 12 E-Tunnel Sites, which is the joint responsibility of DTRA and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). This CADD/CR is consistent with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) agreed to by the State of Nevada, the DOE, and the U.S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 383 is comprised of three Corrective Action Sites (CASs) and two adjacent areas: • CAS 12-06-06, Muckpile • CAS 12-25-02, Oil Spill • CAS 12-28-02, Radioactive Material • Drainage below the Muckpile • Ponds 1, 2, and 3 The purpose of this CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation to support the recommendation for closure with no further corrective action, by placing use restrictions at the three CASs and two adjacent areas of CAU 383.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

416

Environmental Assessment for Prposed Perched Groundwater Corrective Measures  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for for Proposed Perched Groundwater Corrective Measures at the U.S. Department of Energy/ National Nuclear Security Administration Pantex Plant Amarillo, Texas February 2007 BWXT Pantex, L.L.C. Pantex Plant P.O. Box 30020 Amarillo, Texas 79120 P A N T E X P L A N T U.S. Department of Energy/ National Nuclear Security Administration February 2007 Environmental Assessment for Proposed Perched Groundwater Corrective Measures i TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF FIGURES ..........................................................................................................................................iii LIST OF TABLES............................................................................................................................................iii

417

Information loss and entropy conservation in quantum corrected Hawking radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It was found in [Phys.Lett.B 675 (2009) 98] that information is conserved in the process of black hole evaporation, by using the tunneling formulism and considering the correlations between emitted particles. In this Letter, we shall include quantum gravity effects, by taking into account of the log-area correction to Bekenstein-Hawking entropy. The correlation between successively emitted particles is calculated, with Planck-scale corrections. By considering the black hole evaporation process, entropy conservation is checked, and the existence of black hole remnant is emphasized. We conclue in this case information can leak out through the radiation and black hole evaporation is still a unitary process.

Yi-Xin Chen; Kai-Nan Shao

2009-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

418

Radiative corrections in fermion bags bound by Higgs boson exchange  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiative corrections for several heavy fermions bound together via the Higgs boson exchange are studied. The fermion bags considered include 12, or fewer, fermions occupying the lowest S_{1/2} shell. It is shown that for `moderately heavy' fermions with masses 0.4< m c^2< 1 TeV the radiative corrections are small, 10^{-2}, and have an attractive nature. Therefore they do not put existence of the fermion bag in doubt. This proves that these fermion bags can exist in nature.

M. Yu. Kuchiev; V. V. Flambaum

2010-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

419

Parton distributions in the presence of target mass corrections  

SciTech Connect

We study the consistency of parton distribution functions in the presence of target mass corrections (TMCs) at low Q{sup 2}. We review the standard operator product expansion derivation of TMCs in both x- and moment-space, and present the results in closed form for all unpolarized structure functions and their moments. To avoid the unphysical region at x > 1 in the standard analysis, we propose an expansion of the target mass corrected structure functions order by order in M{sup 2}/Q{sup 2}, and assess the convergence properties of the resulting forms numerically.

F. M. Steffens,M. D. Brown,W. Melnitchouk,S. Sanches

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Solar Correction Factors of Building Envelope in Tebei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tebei has very rich solar energy in China and needs heating in winter,but the present energy building design code has no solar correction factor for the overall heat transfer coefficient of building envelope for Tebei. Based on the typical year weather data, this paper compares the solar energy of a typical city, Lassa, in Tebei with that of another city that has the same degree-days of heating period, calculates the heating energy for the building, and proposes the solar correction factors for an overall heat transfer coefficient of building envelope in Tebei.

Wang, D.; Tang, M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global risk-based corrective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

A Summary Description of the Second Workshop on the Role of Macroalgal Oceanic Farming in Global Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Without corrective action, atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) will rise from the present 350 parts per million (ppm) to perhaps 500 ppm by the year 2050 which may result in major global climate changes. This document presents a summary of the second workshop on the Role of Macroalgal Oceanic Farming in Processes of Global Change which was held July 23 and 24, 1990 in Newport Beach, California. A need for a second workshop was identified in the first workshop which was held in Washington on December 6 and 7...

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Global Circuit Response to Seasonal Variations in Global Surface Air Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Comparisons are made between the seasonal behavior of the global electrical circuit and the surface air temperature for the Tropics and for the globe. Positive correlations between global circuit parameters and temperature are identified on both ...

Earle R. Williams

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Joint Spatiotemporal Variability of Global Sea Surface Temperatures and Global Palmer Drought Severity Index Values  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dominant modes of individual and joint variability in global sea surface temperatures (SST) and global Palmer drought severity index (PDSI) values for the twentieth century are identified through a multivariate frequency domain singular value ...

Somkiat Apipattanavis; Gregory J. McCabe; Balaji Rajagopalan; Subhrendu Gangopadhyay

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Globalization at NTT DoCoMo : implementing global business management strategies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global business management has become one of the most important issues facing companies today, and global economic dynamics provide companies with both tremendous opportunities and formidable challenges. Countries are ...

Takagi, Katsuyuki, 1964-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 543: Liquid Disposal Units, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

The general purpose of this Corrective Action Investigation Plan is to ensure that adequate data are collected to provide sufficient and reliable information to identify, evaluate, and select technically viable corrective action alternatives (CAAs) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 543: Liquid Disposal Units, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. Located in Areas 6 and 15 on the NTS, CAU 543 is comprised of a total of seven corrective action sites (CASs), one in Area 6 and six in Area 15. The CAS in Area 6 consists of a Decontamination Facility and its components which are associated with decontamination of equipment, vehicles, and materials related to nuclear testing. The six CASs in Area 15 are located at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Farm and are related to waste disposal activities at the farm. Sources of possible contamination at Area 6 include potentially contaminated process waste effluent discharged through a process waste system, a sanitary waste stream generated within buildings of the Decon Facility, and radiologically contaminated materials stored within a portion of the facility yard. At Area 15, sources of potential contamination are associated with the dairy operations and the animal tests and experiments involving radionuclide uptake. Identified contaminants of potential concern include volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, petroleum hydrocarbons, pesticides, herbicides, polychlorinated biphenyls, metals, and radionuclides. Three corrective action closure alternatives - No Further Action, Close in Place, or Clean Closure - will be recommended for CAU 543 based on an evaluation of all the data quality objective-related data. Field work will be conducted following approval of the plan. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

2004-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

426

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 254: Area 25 R-MAD Decontamination Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Decision Document identifies and rationalizes the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's selection of a recommended corrective action alternative (CAA) appropriate to facilitate the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 254, R-MAD Decontamination Facility, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in Area 25 at the Nevada Test Site in Nevada, CAU 254 is comprised of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 25-23-06, Decontamination Facility. A corrective action investigation for this CAS as conducted in January 2000 as set forth in the related Corrective Action Investigation Plan. Samples were collected from various media throughout the CAS and sent to an off-site laboratory for analysis. The laboratory results indicated the following: radiation dose rates inside the Decontamination Facility, Building 3126, and in the storage yard exceeded the average general dose rate; scanning and static total surface contamination surveys indicated that portions of the locker and shower room floor, decontamination bay floor, loft floor, east and west decon pads, north and south decontamination bay interior walls, exterior west and south walls, and loft walls were above preliminary action levels (PALs). The investigation-derived contaminants of concern (COCs) included: polychlorinated biphenyls, radionuclides (strontium-90, niobium-94, cesium-137, uranium-234 and -235), total volatile and semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons, and total Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (Metals). During the investigation, two corrective action objectives (CAOs) were identified to prevent or mitigate human exposure to COCs. Based on these CAOs, a review of existing data, future use, and current operations at the Nevada Test Site, three CAAs were developed for consideration: Alternative 1 - No Further Action; Alternative 2 - Unrestricted Release Decontamination and Verification Survey; and Alternative 3 - Unrestricted Release Decontamination and Verification Survey and Dismantling of Building 3126. These alternatives were evaluated based on four general corrective action standards and five remedy selection decision factors, and the preferred CAA chosen on technical merit was Alternative 2. This CAA was judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated and applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the site, and reduce the potential for future exposure pathways.

U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

From a proven correct microkernel to trustworthy large systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The seL4 microkernel was the world's first general-purpose operating system kernel with a formal, machine-checked proof of correctness. The next big step in the challenge of building truly trustworthy systems is to provide a framework for developing ...

June Andronick

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Correct as of 16 September 2011 Can solar power deliver?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Correct as of 16 September 2011 Can solar power deliver? Monday 14 ­ Tuesday 15 November 2011 Aresta / Giovanni De Santi / Jenny Nelson So, can solar power deliver? 12.20 Discussion 16.45 Discussion, Professor Can Li DAY 1 DAY 2 SESSION 1 Setting the scene. Chair: Giovanni De Santi SESSION 2 Solar

Rambaut, Andrew

429

Proving correctness of highly-concurrent linearisable objects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study a family of implementations for linked lists using fine-grain synchronisation. This approach enables greater concurrency, but correctness is a greater challenge than for classical, coarse-grain synchronisation. Our examples are demonstrative ... Keywords: concurrent programming, formal verification, linearisability, rely-guarantee reasoning, shared-memory concurrency

Viktor Vafeiadis; Maurice Herlihy; Tony Hoare; Marc Shapiro

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

RCRA corrective action determination of no further action  

SciTech Connect

On July 27, 1990, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed a regulatory framework (55 FR 30798) for responding to releases of hazardous waste and hazardous constituents from solid waste management units (SWMUs) at facilities seeking permits or permitted under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The proposed rule, `Corrective Action for Solid Waste Management Units at Hazardous Waste Facilities`, would create a new Subpart S under the 40 CFR 264 regulations, and outlines requirements for conducting RCRA Facility Investigations, evaluating potential remedies, and selecting and implementing remedies (i.e., corrective measures) at RCRA facilities. EPA anticipates instances where releases or suspected releases of hazardous wastes or constituents from SWMUs identified in a RCRA Facility Assessment, and subsequently addressed as part of required RCRA Facility Investigations, will be found to be non-existent or non-threatening to human health or the environment. Such releases may require no further action. For such situations, EPA proposed a mechanism for making a determination that no further corrective action is needed. This mechanism is known as a Determination of No Further Action (DNFA) (55 FR 30875). This information Brief describes what a DNFA is and discusses the mechanism for making a DNFA. This is one of a series of Information Briefs on RCRA corrective action.

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Context-based spelling correction for Japanese OCR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a novel spelling correction method for those languages that have no delimiter between words, such as Japanese, Chinese, and Thai. It consists of an approximate word matching method and an N-best word segmentation algorithm using a statistical ...

Masaaki Nagata

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Analysis and correction of vertical dispersion in RHIC  

SciTech Connect

In the context of preserving the polarization of proton beams, the source of vertical dispersion in RHIC is analyzed. Contributions to dispersion from non-coupling sources and coupling sources are compared. Based on the analysis of sources for dispersion, the right actuator for correcting dispersion is determined and a corresponding algorithm is developed.

Liu, C.; Minty, M.

2011-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

433

Thermal Lag Correction on Slocum CTD Glider Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work a new methodology is proposed to correct the thermal lag error in data from unpumped CTD sensors installed on Slocum gliders. The advantage of the new approach is twofold: first, it takes into account the variable speed of the glider; ...

Bartolomé Garau; Simón Ruiz; Weifeng G. Zhang; Ananda Pascual; Emma Heslop; John Kerfoot; Joaquín Tintoré

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Regional Interdecadal Variability in Bias-Corrected Ocean Temperature Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regional interdecadal variability, on subbasin to basin scales, is shown to be a robust feature of the post–World War II (WWII) historical temperature record, even after a recently proposed bias correction to XBT fall rates is applied. This study ...

Mark Carson; D. E. Harrison

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Information-theoretic corrections to black hole area quantisation?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nonlinear corrections are proposed to the discrete equispaced area spectrum of quantum black holes obtained previously in some quantisation schemes. It is speculated that such a modified spectrum might be related to the fine structure found using the loop quantum gravity approach.

Rajesh R Parwani

2009-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

436

A provenly correct translation of Fickle into Java  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a translation from Fickle, a small object-oriented language allowing objects to change their class at runtime, into Java. The translation is provenly correct in the sense that it preserves the static and dynamic semantics. Moreover, ... Keywords: Type and effect systems, semantics preserving translation

D. Ancona; C. Anderson; F. Damiani; S. Drossopoulou; P. Giannini; E. Zucca

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Securing Energy Metering Software with Automatic Source Code Correction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Securing Energy Metering Software with Automatic Source Code Correction Ib´eria Medeiros University of energy and achieving cost savings. This monitoring often involves energy metering software with a web of energy production have been fostering the monitoring and analy- sis of electricity consumption

Neves, Nuno

438

Forward correction and fountain codes in delay-tolerant networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Delay-tolerant ad hoc networks leverage the mobility of relay nodes to compensate for lack of permanent connectivity and thus enable communication between nodes that are out of range of each other. To decrease delivery delay, the information to be delivered ... Keywords: delay-tolerant networks (DTNs), forward correction, fountain codes, mobile ad hoc networks

Eitan Altman; Francesco De Pellegrini

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Convergence properties of the local defect correction method for parabolic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Convergence properties of the local defect correction method for parabolic problems R. Minero , H for parabolic problems presented in [14]. We derive a general expression for the iteration matrix of the method, domain decomposition and regridding. In [14] LDC is generalized to solve parabolic partial differential

Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

440

Quantum Corrections to Newton's Law in Resummed Quantum Gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the elements of resummed quantum gravity, a new approach to quantum gravity based on the work of Feynman using the simplest example of a scalar field as the representative matter. We show that we get a UV finite quantum correction to Newton's law.

B. F. L. Ward

2004-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global risk-based corrective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Error correction up to the information-theoretic limit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ever since the birth of coding theory almost 60 years ago, researchers have been pursuing the elusive goal of constructing the "best codes," whose encoding introduces the minimum possible redundancy for the level of noise they can correct. In this article, ...

Venkatesan Guruswami; Atri Rudra

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Increase of global monsoon area and precipitation under global warming: A robust signal?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increase of global monsoon area and precipitation under global warming: A robust signal? Pang 2012; revised 18 February 2012; accepted 20 February 2012; published 16 March 2012. [1] Monsoons of people around the world. The global monsoon precipitation had an increasing trend over the past three

Li, Tim

443

Innovative approaches to integrated global change modelling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integrated models are important tools to investigate the interactions between planetary processes and the growing impacts of human populations - in short: global change. Current models still have significant shortcomings, notably in their representation ... Keywords: Global change, Innovative approaches, Integrated assessment, Modelling, Research priorities

Carlo Giupponi, Mark E. Borsuk, Bert J. M. De Vries, Klaus Hasselmann

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

LONDON'S GLOBAL UNIVERSITY THE GRAND CHALLENGE OF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on global-health challenges. We need your involvement, your energy and your disciplines' intellectual-poor settings, to foster innovative, relevant solutions to partner countries' particular experiences of global and environmental responsibility, working seamlessly with and within a wide range of countries and cultures. A UCL

Saunders, Mark

445

Confronting global issues: a multipurpose IR simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes an international relations simulation that focuses on threats of transnational insurgent organizations, the future of the Iraqi regime, and the effect of globalization on foreign policies. It contains both the Simulation Director's ... Keywords: Iraq, foreign policy, globalization, international conflict, international relations simulations, negotiation, terrorism

Stephen M. Shellman; Kürsad Turan

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

A New Global Water Vapor Dataset  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comprehensive and accurate global water vapor dataset is critical to the adequate understanding of water vapor's role in the earth's climate system. To begin to satisfy this need, the authors have produced a blended dataset made up of global, 5-...

David L. Randel; Thomas J. Greenwald; Thomas H. Vonder Haar; Graeme L. Stephens; Mark A. Ringerud; Cynthia L. Combs

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

GEO Secretariat Global Earth Observing System of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Secretariat Vegetation greenness profiles North America Vegetation Annual Greenness Profiles 100 120 140 160;© GEO Secretariat GEO 2009-11 Work Plan ­ Related Task DA-09-05: Global Carbon Observation and Analysis System Implement a global carbon observation and analysis system addressing the three components

448

Global illumination with radiance regression functions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present radiance regression functions for fast rendering of global illumination in scenes with dynamic local light sources. A radiance regression function (RRF) represents a non-linear mapping from local and contextual attributes of surface points, ... Keywords: global illumination, neural network, non-linear regression, real time rendering

Peiran Ren; Jiaping Wang; Minmin Gong; Stephen Lin; Xin Tong; Baining Guo

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

GLOBAL BIOFUELS OUTLOOK MAELLE SOARES PINTO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GLOBAL BIOFUELS OUTLOOK 2010-2020 MAELLE SOARES PINTO DIRECTOR BIOFUELS EUROPE & AFRICA WORLD BIOFUELS MARKETS, ROTTERDAM MARCH 23, 2011 #12;Presentation Overview · Global Outlook ­ Biofuels Mandates in 2010 ­ Total Biofuels Supply and Demand ­ Regional Supply and Demand Outlook to 2020 ­ Biofuels

450

Modeling global temperature changes with genetic programming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We use genetic programming (GP), a variant of evolutionary computation, to build interpretab