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Sample records for global risk-based corrective

  1. Soils Project Risk-Based Corrective Action Evaluation Process with ROTC 1 and ROTC 2, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Patrick; Sloop, Christina

    2012-04-01

    This document formally defines and clarifies the NDEP-approved process the NNSA/NSO Soils Activity uses to fulfill the requirements of the FFACO and state regulations. This process is used to establish FALs in accordance with the risk-based corrective action (RBCA) process stipulated in Chapter 445 of the Nevada Administrative Code (NAC) as described in the ASTM International (ASTM) Method E1739-95 (NAC, 2008; ASTM, 1995). It is designed to provide a set of consistent standards for chemical and radiological corrective actions.

  2. USING RISK-BASED CORRECTIVE ACTION (RBCA) TO ASSESS (THEORETICAL) CANCER DEATHS AVERTED COMPARED TO THE (REAL) COST OF ENVIRONMENTAL REMEDIATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, M. L.; Hylko, J. M.

    2002-02-25

    In 1978, on the basis of existing health studies at the time, the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project legislation was proposed that would authorize remedial action at inactive uranium processing sites and vicinity properties. The cost of the program to the Federal Government was expected to be $180 million. With the completion of this project, approximately 1300 theoretical cancer deaths were prevented in the next 100 years at a cost of $1.45 billion, based on the Fiscal Year 1998 Federal UMTRA budget. The individual site costs ranged from $0.2 million up to $18 billion spent per theoretical cancer death averted over the next 100 years. Resources required to sustain remediation activities such as this are subject to reduction over time, and are originally based on conservative assumptions that tend to overestimate risks to the general public. This evaluation used a process incorporating risk-based corrective action (RBCA); a three-tiered, decision-making process tailoring corrective action activities according to site-specific conditions and risks. If RBCA had been applied at the start of the UMTRA Project, and using a criterion of >1 excess cancer death prevented as justification to remediate the site, only 50% of the existing sites would have been remediated, yielding a cost savings of $303.6 million to the Federal Government and affected States, which share 10% of the cost. This cost savings equates to 21% of the overall project budget. In addition, only 22% of the vicinity properties had structural contamination contributing to elevated interior gamma exposure and radon levels. Focusing only on these particular properties could have saved an additional $269.3 million, yielding a total savings of $573 million; 40% of the overall project budget. As operational experience is acquired, including greater understanding of the radiological and nonradiological risks, decisions should be based on the RBCA process, rather than relying on conservative assumptions that tend to overestimate risks to the general public.

  3. Self-correcting differential global positioning system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schreiber, Randal Alfred

    1993-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) is a satellite based system that can accurately determine a user's position in terms of latitude, longitude, and height or in terms of X, Y, and Z. The X, Y, and Z coordinate system is an Earth Centered Earth...

  4. Fermions as global correction in lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob Finkenrath; Francesco Knechtli; Björn Leder

    2011-12-08

    The fermion determinant is a highly non-local object and its logarithm is an extensive quantity. For these reasons it is widely believed that the determinant cannot be treated in acceptance steps of gauge link configurations that differ in a large fraction of the links. However, for exact factorisations of the determinant that separate the ultraviolet from the infra-red modes of the Dirac operator it is known that the latter show less variation under changes of the gauge field compared to the former. Using a factorisation based on recursive domain decomposition allows for a hierarchical algorithm that starts with pure gauge updates of the links within the domains and ends after a number of filters with a global acceptance step. We find that the global acceptance rate is high on moderate lattice sizes. Whether this type of algorithm can help in curing the problem of critical slowing down is presently under study.

  5. Impact of hadronic and nuclear corrections on global analysis of spin-dependent parton distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jimenez-Delgado, Pedro; Accardi, Alberto; Melnitchouk, Wally

    2014-02-01

    We present the first results of a new global next-to-leading order analysis of spin-dependent parton distribution functions from the most recent world data on inclusive polarized deep-inelastic scattering, focusing in particular on the large-x and low-Q^2 regions. By directly fitting polarization asymmetries we eliminate biases introduced by using polarized structure function data extracted under nonuniform assumptions for the unpolarized structure functions. For analysis of the large-x data we implement nuclear smearing corrections for deuterium and 3He nuclei, and systematically include target mass and higher twist corrections to the g_1 and g_2 structure functions at low Q^2. We also explore the effects of Q^2 and W^2 cuts in the data sets, and the potential impact of future data on the behavior of the spin-dependent parton distributions at large x.

  6. A practical global distortion correction method for an image intensifier based x-ray fluoroscopy system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gutierrez, Luis F.; Ozturk, Cengizhan; McVeigh, Elliot R.; Lederman, Robert J. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 and Lab of Cardiac Energetics, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States); Cardiovascular Branch, Division of Intramural Research, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 and Biomedical Engineering Institute, Bogazici University, Istanbul (Turkey); Lab of Cardiac Energetics, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States); Cardiovascular Branch, Division of Intramural Research, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States)

    2008-03-15

    X-ray images acquired on systems with image intensifiers (II) exhibit characteristic distortion which is due to both external and internal factors. The distortion is dependent on the orientation of the II, a fact particularly relevant to II's mounted on C arms which have several degrees of freedom of motion. Previous descriptions of distortion correction strategies have relied on a dense sampling of the C-arm orientation space, and as such have been limited mostly to a single arc of the primary angle, {alpha}. We present a new method which smooths the trajectories of the segmented vertices of the grid phantom as a function of {alpha} prior to solving the two-dimensional warping problem. It also shows that the same residual errors of distortion correction could be achieved without fitting the trajectories of the grid vertices, but instead applying the previously described global method of distortion correction, followed by directly smoothing the values of the polynomial coefficients as functions of the C-arm orientation parameters. When this technique was applied to a series of test images at arbitrary {alpha}, the root-mean-square (RMS) residual error was 0.22 pixels. The new method was extended to three degrees of freedom of the C-arm motion: the primary angle, {alpha}; the secondary angle, {beta}; and the source-to-intensifier distance, {lambda}. Only 75 images were used to characterize the distortion for the following ranges: {alpha}, {+-}45 deg. ({delta}{alpha}=22.5 deg.); {beta}, {+-}36 deg. ({delta}{beta}=18 deg.); {lambda}, 98-118 cm ({delta}{lambda}=10 cm). When evaluated on a series of test images acquired at arbitrary ({alpha},{beta},{lambda}), the RMS residual error was 0.33 pixels. This method is targeted at applications such as guidance of catheter-based interventions and treatment planning for brachytherapy, which require distortion-corrected images over a large range of C-arm orientations.

  7. Use of Risk-Based End States

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-07-15

    The policy addresses conducting cleanup that is aimed at, and achieves, clearly defined, risk-based end states. Canceled by DOE N 251.106.

  8. Global analysis of proton elastic form factor data with two-photon exchange corrections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Arrington; W. Melnitchouk; J. A. Tjon

    2007-09-01

    We use the world's data on elastic electron-proton scattering and calculations of two-photon exchange effects to extract corrected values of the proton's electric and magnetic form factors over the full Q^2 range of the existing data. Our analysis combines the corrected Rosenbluth cross section and polarization transfer data, and is the first extraction of G_Ep and G_Mp including explicit two-photon exchange corrections and their associated uncertainties. In addition, we examine the angular dependence of the corrected cross sections, and discuss the possible nonlinearities of the cross section as a function of epsilon.

  9. Assembling a viable, generic Risk-Based PV&T

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Suman

    Based Methods, ASME PCC-3-2007. Risk-Based Inspection Technology, API RP 581, 2nd Edition, September Mitigation: Inspection Repair Replace Refer ASME PCC-3-2007, Fig. 3.3.4 #12;11/13/2014 5 The 6 step by NDE technicians, consider permanent labels, barcodes, QR codes etc. that correspond

  10. Prediction of regionalized car insurance risks based on control variates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Volker

    Prediction of regionalized car insurance risks based on control variates Marcus C. Christiansen, Christian Hirsch, Volker Schmidt October 1, 2013 Abstract We show how regional prediction of car insurance compute such predictors and consider an application to German car insurance data. 1 Introduction

  11. Global

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Low LETUseful LinksGlass Stronger thanGlenn T.4Global

  12. Protecting the Smart Grid: A Risk Based Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clements, Samuel L.; Kirkham, Harold; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Lu, Shuai

    2011-10-10

    This paper describes a risk-based approach to security that has been used for years in protecting physical assets, and shows how it could be modified to help secure the digital aspects of the smart grid and control systems in general. One way the smart grid has been said to be vulnerable is that mass load fluctuations could be created by quickly turning off and on large quantities of smart meters. We investigate the plausibility.

  13. Exploring the limit of accuracy for density functionals based on the generalized gradient approximation: Local, global hybrid, and range-separated hybrid functionals with and without dispersion corrections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mardirossian, Narbe; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2014-05-14

    The limit of accuracy for semi-empirical generalized gradient approximation (GGA) density functionals is explored by parameterizing a variety of local, global hybrid, and range-separated hybrid functionals. The training methodology employed differs from conventional approaches in 2 main ways: (1) Instead of uniformly truncating the exchange, same-spin correlation, and opposite-spin correlation functional inhomogeneity correction factors, all possible fits up to fourth order are considered, and (2) Instead of selecting the optimal functionals based solely on their training set performance, the fits are validated on an independent test set and ranked based on their overall performance on the training and test sets. The 3 different methods of accounting for exchange are trained both with and without dispersion corrections (DFT-D2 and VV10), resulting in a total of 491 508 candidate functionals. For each of the 9 functional classes considered, the results illustrate the trade-off between improved training set performance and diminished transferability. Since all 491 508 functionals are uniformly trained and tested, this methodology allows the relative strengths of each type of functional to be consistently compared and contrasted. The range-separated hybrid GGA functional paired with the VV10 nonlocal correlation functional emerges as the most accurate form for the present training and test sets, which span thermochemical energy differences, reaction barriers, and intermolecular interactions involving lighter main group elements.

  14. Corrective Action

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Community, Environment Environmental Protection Obeying Environmental Laws Individual Permit Corrective Action Individual Permit: Corrective Action Certifications If...

  15. ANCOLD Proceedings of Technical Groups A RISK-BASED RE-EVALUATION OF RESERVOIR OPERATING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowles, David S.

    ANCOLD Proceedings of Technical Groups 1 A RISK-BASED RE-EVALUATION OF RESERVOIR OPERATING of the 2004 risk-based evaluation of operating restrictions for Lake Success, which incorporated new RESTRICTIONS TO REDUCE THE RISK OF FAILURE FROM EARTHQUAKE AND PIPING David S. Bowles1 Loren R. Anderson1

  16. Risk-Based Ranking Experiences for Cold War Legacy Facilities in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Droppo, James G.

    2003-05-01

    Over the past two decades, a number of government agencies in the United States have faced increasing public scrutiny for their efforts to address the wide range of potential environmental issues related to Cold War legacies. Risk-based ranking was selected as a means of defining the relative importance of issues. Ambitious facility-wide risk-based ranking applications were undertaken. However, although facility-wide risk-based ranking efforts can build invaluable understanding of the potential issues related to Cold War legacies, conducting such efforts is difficult because of the potentially enormous scope and the potentially strong institutional barriers. The U.S. experience is that such efforts are worth undertaking to start building a knowledge base and infrastructure that are based on a thorough understanding of risk. In both the East and the West, the legacy of the Cold War includes a wide range of potential environmental issues associated with large industrial complexes of weapon production facilities. The responsible agencies or ministries are required to make decisions that could benefit greatly from information on the relative importance of these potential issues. Facility-wide risk-based ranking of potential health and environmental issues is one means to help these decision makers. The initial U.S. risk-based ranking applications described in this chapter were “ground-breaking” in that they defined new methodologies and approaches to meet the challenges. Many of these approaches fit the designation of a population-centred risk assessment. These U.S. activities parallel efforts that are just beginning for similar facilities in the countries of the former Soviet Union. As described below, conducting a facility-wide risk-based ranking has special challenges and potential pitfalls. Little guidance exists to conduct major risk-based rankings. For those considering undertaking such efforts, the material contained in this chapter should be useful background information.

  17. Risk-based Maintenance Allocation and Scheduling for Bulk Electric Power Transmission System Equipment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    risk of wide-area bulk transmission system failures. The work makes use of two previously developed1 Risk-based Maintenance Allocation and Scheduling for Bulk Electric Power Transmission System for bulk transmission equipment that is based on the cumulative long-term risk caused by each piece

  18. Executive Summary -A Risk-Based Approach to Quality Assurance in Higher Education: An Empirical Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neirotti, Juan Pablo

    1 Executive Summary - A Risk-Based Approach to Quality Assurance in Higher Education: An Empirical Analysis Introduction This three-year Economic and Social Science Research Council (ESRC)-funded Ph of the extent to which available data can provide relevant indicators of an institution's risk of a negative

  19. Towards Smart Grids: Performing Case studies with a Risk-based Security Assessment Methodology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuik, Kees

    Towards Smart Grids: Performing Case studies with a Risk- based Security Assessment Methodology grid operation in the future, additional measures are needed to stabilise the electrical power system. One may think of: · inclusion of "smart components", such as phase-shifting transformers (PSTs

  20. Risk-Based Strategies for Wind/Pumped-Hydro Coordination under Electricity Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    be reduced by coupling the wind farm with energy storage facilities, thus constituting a virtual power plant1 Risk-Based Strategies for Wind/Pumped-Hydro Coordination under Electricity Markets Franck Bourry is able to minimize the imbalance penalty risks associated to wind power forecast uncertainty through

  1. Handbook of methods for risk-based analysis of Technical Specification requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samanta, P.K.; Vesely, W.E.

    1993-12-31

    Technical Specifications (TS) requirements for nuclear power plants define the Limiting Conditions for Operation (LCOs) and Surveillance Requirements (SRs) to assure safety during operation. In general, these requirements were based on deterministic analysis and engineering judgments. Experiences with plant operation indicate that some elements of the requirements are unnecessarily restrictive, while others may not be conducive to safety. Improvements in these requirements are facilitated by the availability of plant specific Probabilistic Safety Assessments (PSAs). The use of risk and reliability-based methods to improve TS requirements has gained wide interest because these methods can: quantitatively evaluate the risk impact and justify changes based on objective risk arguments. Provide a defensible basis for these requirements for regulatory applications. The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) Office of Research is sponsoring research to develop systematic risk-based methods to improve various aspects of TS requirements. The handbook of methods, which is being prepared, summarizes such risk-based methods. The scope of the handbook includes reliability and risk-based methods for evaluating allowed outage times (AOTs), action statements requiring shutdown where shutdown risk may be substantial, surveillance test intervals (STIs), defenses against common-cause failures, managing plant configurations, and scheduling maintenances. For each topic, the handbook summarizes methods of analysis and data needs, outlines the insights to be gained, lists additional references, and presents examples of evaluations.

  2. Development of a risk-based approach to Hanford Site cleanup

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hesser, W.A.; Daling, P.M. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Baynes, P.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)] [and others

    1995-06-01

    In response to a request from Mr. Thomas Grumbly, Assistant Secretary of Energy for Environmental Management, the Hanford Site contractors developed a conceptual set of risk-based cleanup strategies that (1) protect the public, workers, and environment from unacceptable risks; (2) are executable technically; and (3) fit within an expected annual funding profile of 1.05 billion dollars. These strategies were developed because (1) the US Department of Energy and Hanford Site budgets are being reduced, (2) stakeholders are dissatisfied with the perceived rate of cleanup, (3) the US Congress and the US Department of Energy are increasingly focusing on risk and riskreduction activities, (4) the present strategy is not integrated across the Site and is inconsistent in its treatment of similar hazards, (5) the present cleanup strategy is not cost-effective from a risk-reduction or future land use perspective, and (6) the milestones and activities in the Tri-Party Agreement cannot be achieved with an anticipated funding of 1.05 billion dollars annually. The risk-based strategies described herein were developed through a systems analysis approach that (1) analyzed the cleanup mission; (2) identified cleanup objectives, including risk reduction, land use, and mortgage reduction; (3) analyzed the existing baseline cleanup strategy from a cost and risk perspective; (4) developed alternatives for accomplishing the cleanup mission; (5) compared those alternatives against cleanup objectives; and (6) produced conclusions and recommendations regarding the current strategy and potential risk-based strategies.

  3. Corrective Action

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAuditsClusterInformationContractCorporate Culture | NationalCorrective Action

  4. Waste management project's alternatives: A risk-based multi-criteria assessment (RBMCA) approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karmperis, Athanasios C.; Sotirchos, Anastasios; Aravossis, Konstantinos; Tatsiopoulos, Ilias P.

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine the evaluation of a waste management project's alternatives. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We present a novel risk-based multi-criteria assessment (RBMCA) approach. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In the RBMCA the evaluation criteria are based on the quantitative risk analysis of the project's alternatives. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Correlation between the criteria weight values and the decision makers' risk preferences is examined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Preference to the multi-criteria against the one-criterion evaluation process is discussed. - Abstract: This paper examines the evaluation of a waste management project's alternatives through a quantitative risk analysis. Cost benefit analysis is a widely used method, in which the investments are mainly assessed through the calculation of their evaluation indicators, namely benefit/cost (B/C) ratios, as well as the quantification of their financial, technical, environmental and social risks. Herein, a novel approach in the form of risk-based multi-criteria assessment (RBMCA) is introduced, which can be used by decision makers, in order to select the optimum alternative of a waste management project. Specifically, decision makers use multiple criteria, which are based on the cumulative probability distribution functions of the alternatives' B/C ratios. The RBMCA system is used for the evaluation of a waste incineration project's alternatives, where the correlation between the criteria weight values and the decision makers' risk preferences is analyzed and useful conclusions are discussed.

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF RISK-BASED AND TECHNOLOGY-INDEPENDENT SAFETY CRITERIA FOR GENERATION IV SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William E. Kastenberg; Edward Blandford; Lance Kim

    2009-03-31

    This project has developed quantitative safety goals for Generation IV (Gen IV) nuclear energy systems. These safety goals are risk based and technology independent. The foundations for a new approach to risk analysis has been developed, along with a new operational definition of risk. This project has furthered the current state-of-the-art by developing quantitative safety goals for both Gen IV reactors and for the overall Gen IV nuclear fuel cycle. The risk analysis approach developed will quantify performance measures, characterize uncertainty, and address a more comprehensive view of safety as it relates to the overall system. Appropriate safety criteria are necessary to manage risk in a prudent and cost-effective manner. This study is also important for government agencies responsible for managing, reviewing, and for approving advanced reactor systems because they are charged with assuring the health and safety of the public.

  6. Homeland security R&D roadmapping : risk-based methodological options.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandt, Larry D.

    2008-12-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratories support the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) in the development and execution of a research and development (R&D) strategy to improve the nation's preparedness against terrorist threats. Current approaches to planning and prioritization of DHS research decisions are informed by risk assessment tools and processes intended to allocate resources to programs that are likely to have the highest payoff. Early applications of such processes have faced challenges in several areas, including characterization of the intelligent adversary and linkage to strategic risk management decisions. The risk-based analysis initiatives at Sandia Laboratories could augment the methodologies currently being applied by the DHS and could support more credible R&D roadmapping for national homeland security programs. Implementation and execution issues facing homeland security R&D initiatives within the national laboratories emerged as a particular concern in this research.

  7. Development of a Risk-Based Comparison Methodology of Carbon Capture Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engel, David W.; Dalton, Angela C.; Dale, Crystal; Thompson, Julie; Leclaire, Rene; Edward, Bryan; Jones, Edward

    2014-06-01

    Given the varying degrees of maturity among existing carbon capture (CC) technology alternatives, an understanding of the inherent technical and financial risk and uncertainty associated with these competing technologies is requisite to the success of carbon capture as a viable solution to the greenhouse gas emission challenge. The availability of tools and capabilities to conduct rigorous, risk–based technology comparisons is thus highly desirable for directing valuable resources toward the technology option(s) with a high return on investment, superior carbon capture performance, and minimum risk. To address this research need, we introduce a novel risk-based technology comparison method supported by an integrated multi-domain risk model set to estimate risks related to technological maturity, technical performance, and profitability. Through a comparison between solid sorbent and liquid solvent systems, we illustrate the feasibility of estimating risk and quantifying uncertainty in a single domain (modular analytical capability) as well as across multiple risk dimensions (coupled analytical capability) for comparison. This method brings technological maturity and performance to bear on profitability projections, and carries risk and uncertainty modeling across domains via inter-model sharing of parameters, distributions, and input/output. The integration of the models facilitates multidimensional technology comparisons within a common probabilistic risk analysis framework. This approach and model set can equip potential technology adopters with the necessary computational capabilities to make risk-informed decisions about CC technology investment. The method and modeling effort can also be extended to other industries where robust tools and analytical capabilities are currently lacking for evaluating nascent technologies.

  8. Environmental restoration risk-based prioritization work package planning and risk ranking methodology. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dail, J.L.; Nanstad, L.D.; White, R.K.

    1995-06-01

    This document presents the risk-based prioritization methodology developed to evaluate and rank Environmental Restoration (ER) work packages at the five US Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Field Office (DOE-ORO) sites [i.e., Oak Ridge K-25 Site (K-25), Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant (Y-12)], the ER Off-site Program, and Central ER. This prioritization methodology was developed to support the increased rigor and formality of work planning in the overall conduct of operations within the DOE-ORO ER Program. Prioritization is conducted as an integral component of the fiscal ER funding cycle to establish program budget priorities. The purpose of the ER risk-based prioritization methodology is to provide ER management with the tools and processes needed to evaluate, compare, prioritize, and justify fiscal budget decisions for a diverse set of remedial action, decontamination and decommissioning, and waste management activities. The methodology provides the ER Program with a framework for (1) organizing information about identified DOE-ORO environmental problems, (2) generating qualitative assessments of the long- and short-term risks posed by DOE-ORO environmental problems, and (3) evaluating the benefits associated with candidate work packages designed to reduce those risks. Prioritization is conducted to rank ER work packages on the basis of the overall value (e.g., risk reduction, stakeholder confidence) each package provides to the ER Program. Application of the methodology yields individual work package ``scores`` and rankings that are used to develop fiscal budget requests. This document presents the technical basis for the decision support tools and process.

  9. Global Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crow, Ben D

    2006-01-01

    of Globalization: Statistics Weiss, L. (1997). "of Globalization: Statistics Milanovic, B. (1999). Truethe focus of global statistics, particularly in relation to

  10. RISK-BASED EVALUATION OF OPERATING RESTRICTIONS TO REDUCE THE RISK OF EARTHQUAKE-INDUCED DAM FAILURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowles, David S.

    RISK-BASED EVALUATION OF OPERATING RESTRICTIONS TO REDUCE THE RISK OF EARTHQUAKE-INDUCED DAM and consequences of an Earthquake-induced dam failure. The potential for both a sudden overtopping failure on the seismic performance of the dam, the potential life loss and economic consequences of Earthquake

  11. Probabilistic Risk Based Decision Support for Oil and Gas Exploration and Production Facilities in Sensitive Ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg Thoma; John Veil; Fred Limp; Jackson Cothren; Bruce Gorham; Malcolm Williamson; Peter Smith; Bob Sullivan

    2009-05-31

    This report describes work performed during the initial period of the project 'Probabilistic Risk Based Decision Support for Oil and Gas Exploration and Production Facilities in Sensitive Ecosystems.' The specific region that is within the scope of this study is the Fayetteville Shale Play. This is an unconventional, tight formation, natural gas play that currently has approximately 1.5 million acres under lease, primarily to Southwestern Energy Incorporated and Chesapeake Energy Incorporated. The currently active play encompasses a region from approximately Fort Smith, AR east to Little Rock, AR approximately 50 miles wide (from North to South). The initial estimates for this field put it almost on par with the Barnett Shale play in Texas. It is anticipated that thousands of wells will be drilled during the next several years; this will entail installation of massive support infrastructure of roads and pipelines, as well as drilling fluid disposal pits and infrastructure to handle millions of gallons of fracturing fluids. This project focuses on gas production in Arkansas as the test bed for application of proactive risk management decision support system for natural gas exploration and production. The activities covered in this report include meetings with representative stakeholders, development of initial content and design for an educational web site, and development and preliminary testing of an interactive mapping utility designed to provide users with information that will allow avoidance of sensitive areas during the development of the Fayetteville Shale Play. These tools have been presented to both regulatory and industrial stakeholder groups, and their feedback has been incorporated into the project.

  12. Globalization Nationalized

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazlish, Bruce

    Globalism and globalization have been seen as competitors to other allegiances, namely regionalism and nationalism. A look at recent efforts at reconceptualizing global history in China, Korea and the U.S., however, suggests ...

  13. Impact of mesophyll diffusion on estimated global land CO2 fertilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Forrest M.

    by Earth system models. Without this correction, the CFE for global GPP is underestimated by 0.05 Pg

  14. Toward a risk-based approach to the assessment of the surety of information systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wyss, G.D.; Fletcher, S.K.; Halbgewachs, R.D.; Jansma, R.M.; Lim, J.J.; Murphy, M.; Sands, P.D.

    1995-03-01

    Traditional approaches to the assessment of information systems have treated system security, system reliability, data integrity, and application functionality as separate disciplines. However, each areas requirements and solutions have a profound impact on the successful implementation of the other areas. A better approach is to assess the ``surety`` of an information system, which is defined as ensuring the ``correct`` operation of an information system by incorporating appropriate levels of safety, functionality, confidentiality, availability, and integrity. Information surety examines the combined impact of design alternatives on all of these areas. We propose a modelling approach that combines aspects of fault trees and influence diagrams for assessing information surety requirements under a risk assessment framework. This approach allows tradeoffs to be based on quantitative importance measures such as risk reduction while maintaining the modelling flexibility of the influence diagram paradigm. This paper presents an overview of the modelling method and a sample application problem.

  15. Risk-based maintenance modeling. Prioritization of maintenance importances and quantification of maintenance effectiveness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vesely, W.E.; Rezos, J.T.

    1995-09-01

    This report describes methods for prioritizing the risk importances of maintenances using a Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA). Approaches then are described for quantifying their reliability and risk effects. Two different PRA importance measures, minimal cutset importances and risk reduction importances, were used to prioritize maintenances; the findings show that both give similar results if appropriate criteria are used. The justifications for the particular importance measures also are developed. The methods developed to quantify the reliability and risk effects of maintenance actions are extensions of the usual reliability models now used in PRAs. These extended models consider degraded states of the component, and quantify the benefits of maintenance in correcting degradations and preventing failures. The negative effects of maintenance, including downtimes, also are included. These models are specific types of Markov models. The data for these models can be obtained from plant maintenance logs and from the Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System (NPRDS). To explore the potential usefulness of these models, the authors analyzed a range of postulated values of input data. These models were used to examine maintenance effects on a components reliability and performance for various maintenance programs and component data. Maintenance schedules were analyzed to optimize the component`s availability. In specific cases, the effects of maintenance were found to be large.

  16. Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 447: Project Shoal Area, Subsurface, Nevada, Rev. No.: 3 with Errata Sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tim Echelard

    2006-03-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan (CADD/CAP) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 447, Project Shoal Area (PSA)-Subsurface, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996). Corrective Action Unit 447 is located in the Sand Springs Mountains in Churchill County, Nevada, approximately 48 kilometers (30 miles) southeast of Fallon, Nevada. The CADD/CAP combines the decision document (CADD) with the Corrective Action Plan (CAP) and provides or references the specific information necessary to recommend corrective actions for CAU 447, as provided in the FFACO. Corrective Action Unit 447 consists of two corrective action sites (CASs): CAS 57-49-01, Emplacement Shaft, and CAS 57-57-001, Cavity. The emplacement shaft (CAS-57-49-01) was backfilled and plugged in 1996 and will not be evaluated further. The purpose of the CADD portion of the document (Section 1.0 to Section 4.0) is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for the subsurface at PSA. To achieve this, the following tasks were required: (1) Develop corrective action objectives. (2) Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria. (3) Develop corrective action alternatives. (4) Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of the corrective action alternatives in relation to the corrective action objectives and screening criteria. (5) Recommend a preferred corrective action alternative for the subsurface at PSA. The original Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) for the PSA was approved in September 1996 and described a plan to drill and test four characterization wells, followed by flow and transport modeling (DOE/NV, 1996). The resultant drilling is described in a data report (DOE/NV, 1998e) and the data analysis and modeling in an interim modeling report (Pohll et al., 1998). After considering the results of the modeling effort, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) determined that the degree of uncertainty in transport predictions for PSA remained unacceptably large. As a result, a second CAIP was developed by DOE and approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) in December 1998 (DOE/NV, 1998a). This plan prescribed a rigorous analysis of uncertainty in the Shoal model and quantification of methods of reducing uncertainty through data collection. This analysis is termed a Data Decision Analysis (Pohll et al., 1999a) and formed the basis for a second major characterization effort at PSA (Pohll et al., 1999b). The details for this second field effort are presented in an Addendum to the CAIP, which was approved by NDEP in April 1999 (DOE/NV, 1999a). Four additional characterization wells were drilled at PSA during summer and fall of 1999; details of the drilling and well installation are in IT Corporation (2000), with testing reported in Mihevc et al. (2000). A key component of the second field program was a tracer test between two of the new wells (Carroll et al., 2000; Reimus et al., 2003). Based on the potential exposure pathways, two corrective action objectives were identified for CAU 447: Prevent or mitigate exposure to groundwater contaminants of concern at concentrations exceeding regulatory maximum contaminant levels or risk-based levels; and Reduce the risk to human health and the environment to the extent practicable. Based on the review of existing data, the results of the modeling, future use, and current operations at PSA, the following alternatives have been developed for consideration at CAU 447: Alternative 1--No Further Action; Alternative 2--Proof-of-Concept and Monitoring with Institutional Controls; and Alternative 3--Contaminant Control. The corrective action alternatives were evaluated based on the approach outlined in the ''Focused Evaluation of Selected Remedial Alternatives for the Underground Test Area'' (DOE/NV, 1998b). Each alternative was assessed against nine evaluation criteria. These criteria include overall protection of human health and the environment;

  17. Optimizing Power Factor Correction 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, R. K.; Burmeister, L. C.

    1986-01-01

    FACTOR CORRECTION Robert K. Phillips and Louis C. Burmeister, Mechanical Engineering, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS The optimal investment for power factor correcting capacitors for Kansas Power and Light Company large power contract customers... consumer of electricity were made for demands of 200, 400, 800, 1,600, 3,200, and 6,400 k\\~ and monthly energy consumption periods of 100, 150, 200, 300, 400, and 500 hours for several capacitor purchase and installation costs. The results...

  18. Corrective Action Program Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-03-02

    This Guide was developed to assist the Department of Energy (DOE) organizations and contractors in the development, implementation, and followup of corrective action programs utilizing the feedback and improvement core safety function within DOE's Integrated Safety Management System. This Guide outlines some of the basic principles, concepts, and lessons learned that DOE managers and contractors might consider when implementing corrective action programs based on their specific needs. Canceled by DOE G 414.1-2B. Does not cancel other directives.

  19. Risk-Based Disposal Plan for PCB Paint in the TRA Fluorinel Dissolution Process Mockup and Gamma Facilities Canal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. A. Montgomery

    2008-05-01

    This Toxic Substances Control Act Risk-Based Polychlorinated Biphenyl Disposal plan was developed for the Test Reactor Area Fluorinel Dissolution Process Mockup and Gamma Facilities Waste System, located in Building TRA-641 at the Reactor Technology Complex, Idaho National Laboratory Site, to address painted surfaces in the empty canal under 40 CFR 761.62(c) for paint, and under 40 CFR 761.61(c) for PCBs that may have penetrated into the concrete. The canal walls and floor will be painted with two coats of contrasting non-PCB paint and labeled as PCB. The canal is covered with open decking; the access grate is locked shut and signed to indicate PCB contamination in the canal. Access to the canal will require facility manager permission. Protective equipment for personnel and equipment entering the canal will be required. Waste from the canal, generated during ultimate Decontamination and Decommissioning, shall be managed and disposed as PCB Bulk Product Waste.

  20. Global Predictions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swyden, Courtney

    2006-01-01

    stream_source_info Global Predictions.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 7503 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Global Predictions.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Every morning... drought index is based on a daily water balance, where a drought factor is calculated with precipitation and soil moisture,? Srinivasan said. Global Predictions Story by Courtney Swyden Global Predictions Lab uses advanced technologies to forecast...

  1. USING A RISK-BASED METHODOLOGY FOR THE TRANSFER OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL WITHIN THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE BOUNDARY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loftin, B.; Watkins, R.; Loibl, M.

    2010-06-03

    Shipment of radioactive materials (RAM) is discussed in the Code of Federal Regulations in parts of both 49 CFR and 10 CFR. The regulations provide the requirements and rules necessary for the safe shipment of RAM across public highways, railways, waterways, and through the air. These shipments are sometimes referred to as in-commerce shipments. Shipments of RAM entirely within the boundaries of Department of Energy sites, such as the Savannah River Site (SRS), can be made using methodology allowing provisions to maintain equivalent safety while deviating from the regulations for in-commerce shipments. These onsite shipments are known as transfers at the SRS. These transfers must follow the requirements approved in a site-specific Transportation Safety Document (TSD). The TSD defines how the site will transfer materials so that they have equivalence to the regulations. These equivalences are documented in an Onsite Safety Assessment (OSA). The OSA can show how a particular packaging used onsite is equivalent to that which would be used for an in-commerce shipment. This is known as a deterministic approach. However, when a deterministic approach is not viable, the TSD allows for a risk-based OSA to be written. These risk-based assessments show that if a packaging does not provide the necessary safety to ensure that materials are not released (during normal or accident conditions) then the worst-case release of materials does not result in a dose consequence worse than that defined for the SRS. This paper will discuss recent challenges and successes using this methodology at the SRS.

  2. Correction coil cable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, S.T.

    1994-11-01

    A wire cable assembly adapted for the winding of electrical coils is taught. A primary intended use is for use in particle tube assemblies for the Superconducting Super Collider. The correction coil cables have wires collected in wire array with a center rib sandwiched therebetween to form a core assembly. The core assembly is surrounded by an assembly housing having an inner spiral wrap and a counter wound outer spiral wrap. An alternate embodiment of the invention is rolled into a keystoned shape to improve radial alignment of the correction coil cable on a particle tube in a particle tube assembly. 7 figs.

  3. Global energy and global precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Global energy and global precipitation or Why doesn't precipitation increase as Clausias expect precipitation to increase at the same rate. · Rest of this brief talk is to show you why Heat Flux (S) 20 W/m2 Atmospheric heating from precipitation LP Atmosphere has small heat capacity. So

  4. Risk-based high-throughput chemical screening and prioritization using exposure models and in vitro bioactivity assays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shin, Hyeong -Moo; Ernstoff, Alexi; Arnot, Jon A.; Wetmore, Barbara A.; Csiszar, Susan A.; Fantke, Peter; Zhang, Xianming; McKone, Thomas E.; Jolliet, Olivier; Bennett, Deborah H.

    2015-05-01

    We present a risk-based high-throughput screening (HTS) method to identify chemicals for potential health concerns or for which additional information is needed. The method is applied to 180 organic chemicals as a case study. We first obtain information on how the chemical is used and identify relevant use scenarios (e.g., dermal application, indoor emissions). For each chemical and use scenario, exposure models are then used to calculate a chemical intake fraction, or a product intake fraction, accounting for chemical properties and the exposed population. We then combine these intake fractions with use scenario-specific estimates of chemical quantity to calculate dailymore »intake rates (iR; mg/kg/day). These intake rates are compared to oral equivalent doses (OED; mg/kg/day), calculated from a suite of ToxCast in vitro bioactivity assays using in vitro-to-in vivo extrapolation and reverse dosimetry. Bioactivity quotients (BQs) are calculated as iR/OED to obtain estimates of potential impact associated with each relevant use scenario. Of the 180 chemicals considered, 38 had maximum iRs exceeding minimum OEDs (i.e., BQs > 1). For most of these compounds, exposures are associated with direct intake, food/oral contact, or dermal exposure. The method provides high-throughput estimates of exposure and important input for decision makers to identify chemicals of concern for further evaluation with additional information or more refined models.« less

  5. Aberration Corrected Emittance Exchange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nanni, Emilio A

    2015-01-01

    Full exploitation of emittance exchange (EEX) requires aberration-free performance of a complex imaging system including active radio-frequency (RF) elements which can add temporal distortions. We investigate the performance of an EEX line where the exchange occurs between two dimensions with normalized emittances which differ by orders of magnitude. The transverse emittance is exchanged into the longitudinal dimension using a double dog-leg emittance exchange setup with a 5 cell RF deflector cavity. Aberration correction is performed on the four most dominant aberrations. These include temporal aberrations that are corrected with higher order magnetic optical elements located where longitudinal and transverse emittance are coupled. We demonstrate aberration-free performance of emittances differing by 4 orders of magnitude, i.e. an initial transverse emittance of $\\epsilon_x=1$ pm-rad is exchanged with a longitudinal emittance of $\\epsilon_z=10$ nm-rad.

  6. Correction coil cable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Sou-Tien (Danville, CA)

    1994-11-01

    A wire cable assembly (10, 310) adapted for the winding of electrical coils is taught. A primary intended use is for use in particle tube assemblies (532) for the superconducting super collider. The correction coil cables (10, 310) have wires (14, 314) collected in wire arrays (12, 312) with a center rib (16, 316) sandwiched therebetween to form a core assembly (18, 318 ). The core assembly (18, 318) is surrounded by an assembly housing (20, 320) having an inner spiral wrap (22, 322) and a counter wound outer spiral wrap (24, 324). An alternate embodiment (410) of the invention is rolled into a keystoned shape to improve radial alignment of the correction coil cable (410) on a particle tube (733) in a particle tube assembly (732).

  7. Global warming, global research, and global governing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preining, O.

    1997-12-31

    The anticipated dangers of Global Warming can be mitigated by reducing atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations, especially CO{sub 2}. To reach acceptable, constant levels within the next couple of centuries it might be necessary to accept stabilization levels higher than present ones, The annual CO{sub 2} emissions must be reduced far below today`s values. This is a very important result of the models discussed in the 1995 IPCC report. However, any even very modest scenario for the future must take into account a substantial increase in the world population which might double during the 21st century, There is a considerable emission reduction potential of the industrialized world due to efficiency increase, However, the demand for energy services by the growing world population will, inspite of the availability of alternative energy resources, possibly lead to a net increase in fossil fuel consumption. If the climate models are right, and the science community believes they are, we will experience a global warming of the order of a couple of degrees over the next century; we have to live with it. To be prepared for the future it is essential for us to use new research techniques embracing not only the familiar fields of hard sciences but also social, educational, ethical and economic aspects, We must find a way to build up the essential intellectual capacities needed to deal with these kinds of general problems within all nations and all societies. But this is not Although, we also have to find the necessary dynamical and highly flexible structures for a global governing using tools such as the environmental regime. The first step was the Framework Convention On Climate Change, UN 1992; for resolution of questions regarding implementations the Conference of the Parties was established.

  8. Global Solutions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you not findGeoscience/EnvironmentGlobal Security Global Security

  9. Global Warming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Low LETUseful LinksGlass StrongerGlobalOn1 Global

  10. Motivation Defect correction The algorithm Summary Defect correction in optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemker, P.W.

    Motivation Defect correction The algorithm Summary Defect correction in optimization "Manifold Mapping" P.W. Hemker IPIR/CWI/UvA June 11, 2010 Manifold Mapping P.W. Hemker #12;Motivation Defect correction The algorithm Summary Motivation Motivation determine x1, x2, x1, x3, x4, x5, x6, x7 Manifold

  11. Ensure Program Correctness Programming Languages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sheng-Wei

    Ensure Program Correctness Programming Languages and Formal Methods Research Group Lab Coordinator Bow-Yaw Wang The Programming Languages and Formal Methods Research Group develops techniques to help ensure program correctness. Our research in programming languages focuses on syntactic, semantic

  12. Corrective Measures Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit the followingConcentratingPortalCoolCoronary Stents ImprovedCorrective

  13. Frey, H.C., and B. Hubbell, "A Risk-based Assessment And Management Framework For Multipollutant Air Quality," Paper 2009-A-235-AWMA, Proceedings, 102nd Annual Conference and Exhibition, Air & Waste Management Association, Detroit,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, H. Christopher

    Frey, H.C., and B. Hubbell, "A Risk-based Assessment And Management Framework For Multipollutant Air Quality," Paper 2009-A-235-AWMA, Proceedings, 102nd Annual Conference and Exhibition, Air & Waste Management Association, Detroit, Michigan, June 16-19, 2009. A Risk-based Assessment And Management Framework

  14. RCRA corrective action and closure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-02-01

    This information brief explains how RCRA corrective action and closure processes affect one another. It examines the similarities and differences between corrective action and closure, regulators` interests in RCRA facilities undergoing closure, and how the need to perform corrective action affects the closure of DOE`s permitted facilities and interim status facilities.

  15. Hierarchical Correctness Proofs Distributed Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tuttle, Mark R.

    distributed networks. With this model we are able to construct modular, hierarchical correct- ness proofs these messages and process variables can be extremely di cult, and the resulting proofs of correct- ness of the full algorithm's correct- ness. Some time ago, we began to consider this approach of proof by re nement

  16. PROCEEDINGS OF THE WORKSHOP ON LHC INTERACTION REGION CORRECTION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FISCHER,W.; WEI,J.

    1999-09-02

    The Workshop on LHC Interaction Region Correction Systems was held at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York, on 6 and 7 May 1999. It was attended by 25 participants from 5 institutions. The performance of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at collision energy is limited by the field quality of the interaction region quadrupoles and dipoles. In three sessions the workshop addressed the field quality of the these magnets, reviewed the principles and efficiency of global and local correction schemes and finalized a corrector layout. The session on Field Quality Issues, chaired by J. Strait (FNAL), discussed the progress made by KEK and FNAL in achieving the best possible field quality in the interaction region quadrupoles. Results of simulation studies were presented that assess the effects of magnetic field errors with simulation studies. Attention was given to the uncertainties in predicting and measuring field errors. The session on Global Correction, chaired by J.-P. Koutchouk (CERN), considered methods of reducing the nonlinear detuning or resonance driving terms in the accelerator one-turn map by either sorting or correcting. The session also discussed the crossing angle dependence of the dynamic aperture and operational experience from LEP. The session on Local Correction, chaired by T. Taylor (CERN), discussed the location, strength and effectiveness of multipole correctors in the interaction regions for both proton and heavy ion operation. Discussions were based on technical feasibility considerations and dynamic aperture requirements. The work on linear corrections in the interaction regions was reviewed.

  17. Addendum to the Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 321: Area 22 Weather Station Fuel Storage Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynn Kidman

    2008-10-01

    This document constitutes an addendum to the August 2001, Corrective Action Decision Document / Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 321: Area 22 Weather Station Fuel Storage as described in the document Recommendations and Justifications for Modifications for Use Restrictions Established under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (UR Modification document) dated February 2008. The UR Modification document was approved by NDEP on February 26, 2008. The approval of the UR Modification document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR modifications. In conformance with the UR Modification document, this addendum consists of: • This cover page that refers the reader to the UR Modification document for additional information • The cover and signature pages of the UR Modification document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the UR Modification document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the UR for CAS 22-99-05, Fuel Storage Area. This UR was established as part of a Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective action and is based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996; as amended August 2006). Since this UR was established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, this UR was re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006c). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the UR) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove the UR because contamination is not present at the site above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining this UR will be canceled, and the postings and signage at this site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at this site that are unrelated to the FFACO UR such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004f). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at this site.

  18. Quantum Corrections in Galileons from Matter Loops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lavinia Heisenberg

    2014-10-09

    Galileon interactions represent a class of effective field theories that have received much attention since their inception. They can be treated in their own right as scalar field theories with a specific global shift and Galilean symmetry or as a descendant of a more fundamental theory like massive gravity. It is well known that the Galileon theories are stable under quantum corrections thanks to the non-renormalization theorem which is not due to the symmetry. We consider different covariant couplings of this Galileon scalar field with the matter field: the conformal coupling, the disformal coupling and the longitudinal coupling. We compute the one-loop quantum corrections to the Galileon interactions from the coupling to the external matter fields. In all the considered cases of covariant couplings we show that the terms generated by one-loop matter corrections not only renormalize the Galileon interactions but also give rise to higher order derivative ghost interactions. However, the renormalized version of the Galileon interactions as well as the new interactions come at a scale suppressed by the original classical coupling scale and hence are harmless within the regime of validity of the effective field theory.

  19. Review: Global Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    introduction to global climate change, the greenhouseReview: Global Climate Change: A Primer By Orrin H PilkeyPilkey, Keith C. Global Climate Change: a primer. Durham,

  20. Thermodynamics of error correction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pablo Sartori; Simone Pigolotti

    2015-04-24

    Information processing at the molecular scale is limited by thermal fluctuations. This can cause undesired consequences in copying information since thermal noise can lead to errors that can compromise the functionality of the copy. For example, a high error rate during DNA duplication can lead to cell death. Given the importance of accurate copying at the molecular scale, it is fundamental to understand its thermodynamic features. In this paper, we derive a universal expression for the copy error as a function of entropy production and dissipated work of the process. Its derivation is based on the second law of thermodynamics, hence its validity is independent of the details of the molecular machinery, be it any polymerase or artificial copying device. Using this expression, we find that information can be copied in three different regimes. In two of them, work is dissipated to either increase or decrease the error. In the third regime, the protocol extracts work while correcting errors, reminiscent of a Maxwell demon. As a case study, we apply our framework to study a copy protocol assisted by kinetic proofreading, and show that it can operate in any of these three regimes. We finally show that, for any effective proofreading scheme, error reduction is limited by the chemical driving of the proofreading reaction.

  1. RCRA corrective action: Work plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-02-01

    This Information Brief describes the work plans that owners/operators may have to prepare in conjunction with the performance of corrective action for compliance with RCRA guidelines. In general, the more complicated the performance of corrective action appears from the remedial investigation and other analyses, the more likely it is that the regulator will impose work plan requirements. In any case, most owner/operators will prepare work plans in conjunction with the performance of corrective action processes as a matter of best engineering management practices.

  2. Risk-based Prioritization of Facility Decommissioning and Environmental Restoration Projects in the National Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program at the Chalk River Laboratory - 13564

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Jerel G.; Kruzic, Michael; Castillo, Carlos; Pavey, Todd; Alexan, Tamer; Bainbridge, Ian

    2013-07-01

    Chalk River Laboratory (CRL), located in Ontario Canada, has a large number of remediation projects currently in the Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program (NLLP), including hundreds of facility decommissioning projects and over one hundred environmental remediation projects, all to be executed over the next 70 years. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) utilized WorleyParsons to prioritize the NLLP projects at the CRL through a risk-based prioritization and ranking process, using the WorleyParsons Sequencing Unit Prioritization and Estimating Risk Model (SUPERmodel). The prioritization project made use of the SUPERmodel which has been previously used for other large-scale site prioritization and sequencing of facilities at nuclear laboratories in the United States. The process included development and vetting of risk parameter matrices as well as confirmation/validation of project risks. Detailed sensitivity studies were also conducted to understand the impacts that risk parameter weighting and scoring had on prioritization. The repeatable prioritization process yielded an objective, risk-based and technically defendable process for prioritization that gained concurrence from all stakeholders, including Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) who is responsible for the oversight of the NLLP. (authors)

  3. Global hydrological cycle response to rapid and slow global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuang, Zhiming

    Global hydrological cycle response to rapid and slow global warming and Jiaxu Zhang #12;· Anthropogenic global warming causes "robust" changes in the global in the global hydrological cycle due to anthropogenic global warming Atmospheric radiative

  4. Entropic corrections to Einstein equations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendi, S. H. [Physics Department, College of Sciences, Yasouj University, Yasouj 75914 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics of Maragha (RIAAM), Maragha (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sheykhi, A. [Research Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics of Maragha (RIAAM), Maragha (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Physics, Shahid Bahonar University, P.O. Box 76175-132, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-04-15

    Considering the general quantum corrections to the area law of black hole entropy and adopting the viewpoint that gravity interprets as an entropic force, we derive the modified forms of Modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) theory of gravitation and Einstein field equations. As two special cases we study the logarithmic and power-law corrections to entropy and find the explicit form of the obtained modified equations.

  5. Litchfield Correctional Center District Heating Low Temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Litchfield Correctional Center District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Litchfield Correctional Center District Heating Low Temperature...

  6. Environmental Management Headquarters Corrective Action Plan...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    I Environmental Management Headquarters Corrective Action Plan - Radiological Release Phase I The purpose of this Corrective Action Plan (CAP) is to specify U.S. Department of...

  7. Global Warming Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schofield, Jeremy

    Global Warming Observations: 1. Global temperature has been gradually rising in recent years #15 in range 8000 12000 nm { CFC's, methane and N 2 O important for global warming even though concentra- tions in concentration of \\greenhouse gases" like CO 2 What determines global temperature? Energy budget of earth: 1

  8. Global Health Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Ophir

    Bay Area Global Health Seminar Series Moving beyond millennium targets in global health: The challenges of investing in health and universal health coverage Although targets can help to focus global health efforts, they can also detract attention from deeper underlying challenges in global health

  9. Sensor Data Management, Validation, Correction,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

    in three areas Envelope Equipment System/building integration Develop component technologies that are more in real buildings #12;6 Envelope research lab facilities Heat Flow Through Roof/Attic Assemblies Heat FlowSensor Data Management, Validation, Correction, and Provenance for Building Technologies Charles

  10. Global Focus Microscope The Global Health Challenge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . To address this need, we developed the Global Focus Microscope (GFM): a portable, battery- powered, inverted digi- tal images, the Global Focus Microscope comes with shelf for an iPhone 4. Figure 1. From left to right: Malaria parasites imaged at 1000x in bright field mode, tuberculosis imaged at 400x in bright

  11. The Global Brain is Neither Global nor a Brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rocha, Luis

    The Global Brain is Neither Global nor a Brain Adaptive Webs for Heterarchies Luis Mateus Rocha-organism or a global brain? The Global Brain Is Neither Global nor a Brain #12;!Disembodied Brain Disembodied brains on symbol-matter requirements for open-ended evolution) The Global Brain Is Neither Global Nor a Brain #12

  12. Radiosondes Corrected for Inaccuracy in RH Measurements

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Miloshevich, Larry

    2008-01-15

    Corrections for inaccuracy in Vaisala radiosonde RH measurements have been applied to ARM SGP radiosonde soundings. The magnitude of the corrections can vary considerably between soundings. The radiosonde measurement accuracy, and therefore the correction magnitude, is a function of atmospheric conditions, mainly T, RH, and dRH/dt (humidity gradient). The corrections are also very sensitive to the RH sensor type, and there are 3 Vaisala sensor types represented in this dataset (RS80-H, RS90, and RS92). Depending on the sensor type and the radiosonde production date, one or more of the following three corrections were applied to the RH data: Temperature-Dependence correction (TD), Contamination-Dry Bias correction (C), Time Lag correction (TL). The estimated absolute accuracy of NIGHTTIME corrected and uncorrected Vaisala RH measurements, as determined by comparison to simultaneous reference-quality measurements from Holger Voemel's (CU/CIRES) cryogenic frostpoint hygrometer (CFH), is given by Miloshevich et al. (2006).

  13. Radiosondes Corrected for Inaccuracy in RH Measurements

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Miloshevich, Larry

    Corrections for inaccuracy in Vaisala radiosonde RH measurements have been applied to ARM SGP radiosonde soundings. The magnitude of the corrections can vary considerably between soundings. The radiosonde measurement accuracy, and therefore the correction magnitude, is a function of atmospheric conditions, mainly T, RH, and dRH/dt (humidity gradient). The corrections are also very sensitive to the RH sensor type, and there are 3 Vaisala sensor types represented in this dataset (RS80-H, RS90, and RS92). Depending on the sensor type and the radiosonde production date, one or more of the following three corrections were applied to the RH data: Temperature-Dependence correction (TD), Contamination-Dry Bias correction (C), Time Lag correction (TL). The estimated absolute accuracy of NIGHTTIME corrected and uncorrected Vaisala RH measurements, as determined by comparison to simultaneous reference-quality measurements from Holger Voemel's (CU/CIRES) cryogenic frostpoint hygrometer (CFH), is given by Miloshevich et al. (2006).

  14. Before House Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Global Human...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    House Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Global Human Rights, and International Organizations, Committee on Foreign Affairs Before House Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health,...

  15. Cows Causing Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi

    2008-08-06

    Broadcast Transcript: Remember when President Reagan blamed trees for air pollution? Well now the Japanese are blaming cows for global warming. Apparently, the methane emissions from burping cows account for 5% of all global greenhouse gases. Simple...

  16. Review: Globalization of Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennant, Matthew Aaron

    2009-01-01

    Review: Globalization of Water: Sharing the Planet’sAshok K. Globalization of Water: Sharing the Planet’s140) liters of virtual water (p. 15). This is one of the

  17. Globalization of biopharmaceutical manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pande, Rachna

    2011-01-01

    The biomanufacturing industry is changing due to increasing globalization. However, it is changing differently from other high tech industries like software/ semiconductor/ automobiles. In this study we use global ...

  18. CHILLING CONSIDERATIONS GLOBAL WARMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    CHILLING CONSIDERATIONS REGARDING GLOBAL WARMING Stephen E. Schwartz http IS INCREASING Global carbon dioxide concentration over the last thousand years Polar ice cores #12;Mann et al 1000-1850) 1998 THE TEMPERATURE'S RISING #12;GLOBAL ANNUAL TEMPERATURE ANOMALY, 1880-2008 0.8 0.6 0.4 0

  19. SCIENTIFIC EVIDENCE GLOBAL WARMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    SCIENTIFIC EVIDENCE FOR GLOBAL WARMING Stephen E. Schwartz Jefferson's Ferry Public Affairs century. The warmest year of the millennium was 1998. #12;EVIDENCE OF GLOBAL WARMING OTHER THAN SURFACE TEMPERATURE ANOMALY The global ocean has warmed significantly since the late 1940s: more than half

  20. Carbon Dioxide & Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    Carbon Dioxide & Global Warming University of MiaMi rosenstiel sChool of Marine anD atMospheriC s , organic carbon, and other chemicals that contribute to global warming in a variety of studies. DownCienCe 4600 rickenbacker Causeway Miami, florida 33149 http://www.rsmas.miami.edu the Chemistry of Global

  1. Global Information Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keromytis, Angelos D.

    Global Information Technologies: Concepts, Methodologies, Tools, and Applications Felix B. Tan in the United States of America by Information Science Reference (an imprint of IGI Global) 701 E. Chocolate (an imprint of IGI Global) 3 Henrietta Street Covent Garden London WC2E 8LU Tel: 44 20 7240 0856 Fax

  2. Meteorology as Infrastructural Globalism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Paul N.

    the history of a global governance institution, the World Me- teorological Organization (WMO), from its (from the 1967 inauguration of the Intelsat system) and global environmental monitoring (from the UN Confer- ence on the Human Environment, 1972). Throughout, Hewson sees global governance institutions

  3. GLOBAL TAXONOMY INITIATIVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant, Taran

    #12;THE GLOBAL TAXONOMY INITIATIVE: Using Systematic Inventories to Meet Country and Regional Needs (COP) to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) has endorsed a GlobalTaxonomy Initiative (GTI workshop, The Global Taxonomy Initiative: Shortening the Distance between Discovery and Delivery, made

  4. GBAS Differentially Corrected Positioning Service Ionospheric Anomaly Errors Evaluated in an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    . Young Shin Park is a Ph.D. Candidate in Aeronautics and Astronautics in the Global Positioning System after application of differential corrections is small. However, during solar storms and in geomagnetic done to mitigate the potential impact of errors induced by ionospheric anomalies on the precision

  5. Electroweak Radiative Corrections at High Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ansgar Denner

    2001-10-11

    For energies far above the electroweak scale, large electroweak radiative corrections occur that grow logarithmically with energy and can easily reach several tens of per cent in the TeV range. Recent work on these corrections is reviewed.

  6. Correctional Managed Health Care Michael Vasquenza, BS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    Correctional Managed Health Care Michael Vasquenza, BS Kirsten Shea, MBA #12;NO CONFLICTS of budget reductions · Pharmacy services · Aging population · Legal obligations · Logistics specific to Correctional Institutions / Building InfrastructureInfrastructure · Space and accompanying environment

  7. Surface Correction to Landau Diamagnetism 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Roland E.

    1975-01-01

    field applied perpendicular to the surface, we show that gd ??g?'/3, where gd and g~ are, respectively, the surface corrections to the Landau diamagnetism and the Pauli paramagnetism. The total surface contribution to the susceptibility is y' :=(2.../3)(pa/w )A [y(kw) -w/4], where y(k+) is the phase shift for k, = kF . Since iyi = w/4 and y(k F) & (y), the surface contributions to the magnetic susceptibility and electronic heat capacity are positive. s 1 sXg= ?3Xp~ (2) where X'?and X~ are...

  8. Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 398: Area 25 Spill Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynn Kidman

    2008-10-01

    This document constitutes an addendum to the April 2003, Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 398: Area 25 Spill Sites as described in the document Recommendations and Justifications for Modifications for Use Restrictions Established under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (UR Modification document) dated February 2008. The UR Modification document was approved by NDEP on February 26, 2008. The approval of the UR Modification document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR modifications. In conformance with the UR Modification document, this addendum consists of: • This cover page that refers the reader to the UR Modification document for additional information • The cover and signature pages of the UR Modification document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the UR Modification document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the UR for CAS 25-25-17, Subsurface Hydraulic Oil Spill. This UR was established as part of a Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective action and is based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996; as amended August 2006). Since this UR was established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, this UR was re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006c). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the UR) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove the UR because contamination is not present at the site above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining this UR will be canceled, and the postings and signage at this site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at this site that are unrelated to the FFACO UR such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004f). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at this site.

  9. Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 403: Second Gas Station, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant Evenson

    2009-05-01

    This document constitutes an addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 403: Second Gas Station, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, September 1998 as described in the document Supplemental Investigation Report for FFACO Use Restrictions, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (SIR) dated November 2008. The SIR document was approved by NDEP on December 5, 2008. The approval of the SIR document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR removals. In conformance with the SIR document, this addendum consists of: • This page that refers the reader to the SIR document for additional information • The cover, title, and signature pages of the SIR document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the SIR document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the UR for CAS 03-02-004-0360, Underground Storage Tanks. This UR was established as part of a Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective action and is based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996). Since this UR was established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, this UR was reevaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the UR) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove the UR because contamination is not present at the site above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining this UR will be canceled, and the postings and signage at this site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at this site that are unrelated to the FFACO UR such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at this site.

  10. Correction of the Chromaticity up to Second Order for MEIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. K. Sayed, S.A. Bogacz, P. Chevtsov

    2010-03-01

    The proposed electron collider lattice exhibits low ?- functions at the Interaction Point (IP) (?x?100mm ? ?y? 20 mm) and rather large equilibrium momentum spread of the collider ring (?p/p = 0.00158). Both features make the chromatic corrections of paramount importance. Here the chromatic effects of the final focus quadruples are cor- rected both locally and globally. Local correction features symmetric sextupole families around the IP, the betatron phase advances from the IP to the sextupoles are chosen to eliminate the second order chromatic aberration. Global interleaved families of sextupoles are placed in the figure-8 arc sections, and non-interleaved families at straight sec- tion making use of the freely propagated dispersion wave from the arcs. This strategy minimizes the required sex- tupole strength and eventually leads to larger dynamic aper- ture of the collider. The resulting spherical aberrations induced by the sextupoles are mitigated by design; the straight and arc sections optics features an inverse identity transformation between sextupoles in each pair.

  11. Final corrective action study for the former CCC/USDA facility in Ramona, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.

    2011-04-20

    Past operations at a grain storage facility formerly leased and operated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) in Ramona, Kansas, resulted in low concentrations of carbon tetrachloride in groundwater that slightly exceed the regulatory standard in only one location. As requested by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment, the CCC/USDA has prepared a Corrective Action Study (CAS) for the facility. The CAS examines corrective actions to address groundwater impacted by the former CCC/USDA facility but not releases caused by other potential groundwater contamination sources in Ramona. Four remedial alternatives were considered in the CAS. The recommended remedial alternative in the CAS consists of Environmental Use Control to prevent the inadvertent use of groundwater as a water supply source, coupled with groundwater monitoring to verify the continued natural improvement in groundwater quality. The Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) has directed Argonne National Laboratory to prepare a Corrective Action Study (CAS), consistent with guidance from the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE 2001a), for the CCC/USDA grain storage facility formerly located in Ramona, Kansas. This effort is pursuant to a KDHE (2007a) request. Although carbon tetrachloride levels at the Ramona site are low, they remain above the Kansas Tier 2 risk-based screening level (RBSL) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 5 {micro}g/L (Kansas 2003, 2004). In its request for the CAS, the KDHE (2007a) stated that, because of these levels, risk is associated with potential future exposure to contaminated groundwater. The KDHE therefore determined that additional measures are warranted to limit future use of the property and/or exposure to contaminated media as part of site closure. The KDHE further requested comparison of at least two corrective action alternatives to the 'no-action' alternative, as the basis for the Draft Corrective Action Decision for the site. The history and nature of the contamination and previous investigations are summarized in Section 2. Also included in Section 2 is an evaluation of human and environmental targets and potential exposure pathways. Section 3 describes the corrective action goals and applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs). Section 4 describes four alternatives, Section 5 analyzes the alternatives in detail, and Section 6 compares the alternatives. Section 6 also includes a summary and a recommended corrective action.

  12. A tropical influence on global climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, E.K.; Kirtman, B.P.; Lindzen, R.S.

    1997-05-15

    A potential influence of tropical sea surface temperature on the global climate response to a doubling of the CO{sub 2} concentration is tested using an atmospheric general circulation model coupled to a slab mixed layer ocean. The warming is significantly reduced when sea surface temperatures in the eastern equatorial Pacific cold tongue region between latitudes 2.25{degrees}N and 2.25{degrees}S are held at the control simulation values. Warming of the global mean temperature outside of the cold tongue region is reduced from 2.4{degrees}C in the unconstrained case to 1.9{degrees}C when the sea surface temperature constraint is applied. The decrease in the warming results from a positive net heat flux into the ocean cold tongue region and implicit heat storage in the subsurface ocean, induced by horizontal atmospheric heat fluxes. The reduced surface temperature warming outside of the cold tongue region is due to reduction in the downward longwave radiative flux at the surface, caused in turn by reduced atmospheric temperature and moisture. The global mean surface temperature responds to the heat storage in the ocean as if the global mean radiative forcing due to the doubled CO{sub 2} (approximately 4 W m{sup {minus}2}) was reduced by the value of the global mean heat flux into the ocean. This mechanism also provides a possible explanation for the observed high correlation on interannual timescales between the global mean tropospheric temperature and sea surface temperature in the eastern tropical Pacific. The results emphasize the importance of correctly modeling the dynamical processes in the ocean and atmosphere that help determine the sea surface temperature in the equatorial eastern Pacific, in addition to the thermodynamical processes, in projecting global warming. 23 refs., 8 figs.

  13. Engineering the global ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stringfellow, William T.; Jain, Ravi

    2010-01-01

    of humans deliberately engineering agricultural landscapes.010-0302-8 EDITORIAL Engineering the global ecosystemtale about human explorers engineering the ecosystem of Mars

  14. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 340: Pesticide Release sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE /NV

    1998-12-08

    This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit 340, the NTS Pesticide Release Sites, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996 (FFACO, 1996). Corrective Action Unit 340 is located at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, and is comprised of the following Corrective Action Sites: 23-21-01, Area 23 Quonset Hut 800 Pesticide Release Ditch; 23-18-03, Area 23 Skid Huts Pesticide Storage; and 15-18-02, Area 15 Quonset Hut 15-11 Pesticide Storage. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for each Corrective Action Site. The scope of this Corrective Action Decision Document consists of the following tasks: Develop corrective action objectives; Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria; Develop corrective action alternatives; Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of the corrective action alternatives in relation to the corrective action objectives and screening criteria; and Recommend and justify a preferred corrective action alternative for each Corrective Action Site.

  15. A two-dimensional matrix correction for off-axis portal dose prediction errors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, Daniel W.; Kumaraswamy, Lalith; Bakhtiari, Mohammad; Podgorsak, Matthew B.

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: This study presents a follow-up to a modified calibration procedure for portal dosimetry published by Bailey et al. ['An effective correction algorithm for off-axis portal dosimetry errors,' Med. Phys. 36, 4089-4094 (2009)]. A commercial portal dose prediction system exhibits disagreement of up to 15% (calibrated units) between measured and predicted images as off-axis distance increases. The previous modified calibration procedure accounts for these off-axis effects in most regions of the detecting surface, but is limited by the simplistic assumption of radial symmetry. Methods: We find that a two-dimensional (2D) matrix correction, applied to each calibrated image, accounts for off-axis prediction errors in all regions of the detecting surface, including those still problematic after the radial correction is performed. The correction matrix is calculated by quantitative comparison of predicted and measured images that span the entire detecting surface. The correction matrix was verified for dose-linearity, and its effectiveness was verified on a number of test fields. The 2D correction was employed to retrospectively examine 22 off-axis, asymmetric electronic-compensation breast fields, five intensity-modulated brain fields (moderate-high modulation) manipulated for far off-axis delivery, and 29 intensity-modulated clinical fields of varying complexity in the central portion of the detecting surface. Results: Employing the matrix correction to the off-axis test fields and clinical fields, predicted vs measured portal dose agreement improves by up to 15%, producing up to 10% better agreement than the radial correction in some areas of the detecting surface. Gamma evaluation analyses (3 mm, 3% global, 10% dose threshold) of predicted vs measured portal dose images demonstrate pass rate improvement of up to 75% with the matrix correction, producing pass rates that are up to 30% higher than those resulting from the radial correction technique alone. As in the 1D correction case, the 2D algorithm leaves the portal dosimetry process virtually unchanged in the central portion of the detector, and thus these correction algorithms are not needed for centrally located fields of moderate size (at least, in the case of 6 MV beam energy).Conclusion: The 2D correction improves the portal dosimetry results for those fields for which the 1D correction proves insufficient, especially in the inplane, off-axis regions of the detector. This 2D correction neglects the relatively smaller discrepancies that may be caused by backscatter from nonuniform machine components downstream from the detecting layer.

  16. Global Change Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    Global Change and Sustainability Center The GCSC is an inclusionary and interdisciplinary hub that promotes, coordinates, and conducts local to global environmental- and sustainability-related research to complex environmental and sustainability issues and challenges. 2012 Annual Report #12;1GCSC 2012 ANNUAL

  17. Method for using global optimization to the estimation of surface-consistent residual statics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reister, David B. (Knoxville, TN); Barhen, Jacob (Oak Ridge, TN); Oblow, Edward M. (Knoxville, TN)

    2001-01-01

    An efficient method for generating residual statics corrections to compensate for surface-consistent static time shifts in stacked seismic traces. The method includes a step of framing the residual static corrections as a global optimization problem in a parameter space. The method also includes decoupling the global optimization problem involving all seismic traces into several one-dimensional problems. The method further utilizes a Stochastic Pijavskij Tunneling search to eliminate regions in the parameter space where a global minimum is unlikely to exist so that the global minimum may be quickly discovered. The method finds the residual statics corrections by maximizing the total stack power. The stack power is a measure of seismic energy transferred from energy sources to receivers.

  18. Rulison Site corrective action report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    Project Rulison was a joint US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and Austral Oil Company (Austral) experiment, conducted under the AEC`s Plowshare Program, to evaluate the feasibility of using a nuclear device to stimulate natural gas production in low-permeability gas-producing geologic formations. The experiment was conducted on September 10, 1969, and consisted of detonating a 40-kiloton nuclear device at a depth of 2,568 m below ground surface (BGS). This Corrective Action Report describes the cleanup of petroleum hydrocarbon- and heavy-metal-contaminated sediments from an old drilling effluent pond and characterization of the mud pits used during drilling of the R-EX well at the Rulison Site. The Rulison Site is located approximately 65 kilometers (40 miles) northeast of Grand Junction, Colorado. The effluent pond was used for the storage of drilling mud during drilling of the emplacement hole for the 1969 gas stimulation test conducted by the AEC. This report also describes the activities performed to determine whether contamination is present in mud pits used during the drilling of well R-EX, the gas production well drilled at the site to evaluate the effectiveness of the detonation in stimulating gas production. The investigation activities described in this report were conducted during the autumn of 1995, concurrent with the cleanup of the drilling effluent pond. This report describes the activities performed during the soil investigation and provides the analytical results for the samples collected during that investigation.

  19. Corrective Action Plan for Environmenta' Management Headquarters

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    for Environmenta' Management Headquarters Phase 2: Radiological Release Event at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant on February 14 2014 Washington, DC 20585 August 2015 Corrective...

  20. Dispersion corrections to parity violating electron scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorchtein, M.; Horowitz, C. J. [Nuclear Theory Center, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States); Ramsey-Musolf, M. J. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2010-08-04

    We consider the dispersion correction to elastic parity violating electron-proton scattering due to {gamma}Z exchange. In a recent publication, this correction was reported to be substantially larger than the previous estimates. In this paper, we study the dispersion correction in greater detail. We confirm the size of the disperion correction to be {approx}6% for the QWEAK experiment designed to measure the proton weak charge. We enumerate parameters that have to be constrained to better than relative 30% in order to keep the theoretical uncertainty for QWEAK under control.

  1. Re: Corrected Memorandum Summarizing Ex Parte Communication

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    September 25, 2014 To: expartecommunication@hq.doe.gov (sent via email) Re: Corrected Memorandum Summarizing Ex Parte Communication This memorandum is submitted to revise and...

  2. A global warning for global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paepe, R.

    1996-12-31

    The problem of global warming is a complex one not only because it is affecting desert areas such as the Sahel leading to famine disasters of poor rural societies, but because it is an even greater threat to modern well established industrial societies. Global warming is a complex problem of geographical, economical and societal factors together which definitely are biased by local environmental parameters. There is an absolute need to increase the knowledge of such parameters, especially to understand their limits of variance. The greenhouse effect is a global mechanism which means that in changing conditions at one point of the Earth, it will affect all other regions of the globe. Industrial pollution and devastation of the forest are quoted as similar polluting anthropogenic activities in far apart regions of the world with totally different societies and industrial compounds. The other important factor is climatic cyclicity which means that droughts are bound to natural cycles. These natural cycles are numerous as is reflected in the study of geo-proxydata from several sequential geological series on land, ice and deepsea. Each of these cycles reveals a drought cycle which occasionally interfere at the same time. It is believed that the present drought might well be a point of interference between the natural cycles of 2,500 and 1,000 years and the man induced cycle of the last century`s warming up. If the latter is the only cycle involved, man will be able to remediate. If not, global warming will become even more disastrous beyond the 21st century.

  3. Weather-Corrected Performance Ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dierauf, T.; Growitz, A.; Kurtz, S.; Cruz, J. L. B.; Riley, E.; Hansen, C.

    2013-04-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) system performance depends on both the quality of the system and the weather. One simple way to communicate the system performance is to use the performance ratio (PR): the ratio of the electricity generated to the electricity that would have been generated if the plant consistently converted sunlight to electricity at the level expected from the DC nameplate rating. The annual system yield for flat-plate PV systems is estimated by the product of the annual insolation in the plane of the array, the nameplate rating of the system, and the PR, which provides an attractive way to estimate expected annual system yield. Unfortunately, the PR is, again, a function of both the PV system efficiency and the weather. If the PR is measured during the winter or during the summer, substantially different values may be obtained, making this metric insufficient to use as the basis for a performance guarantee when precise confidence intervals are required. This technical report defines a way to modify the PR calculation to neutralize biases that may be introduced by variations in the weather, while still reporting a PR that reflects the annual PR at that site given the project design and the project weather file. This resulting weather-corrected PR gives more consistent results throughout the year, enabling its use as a metric for performance guarantees while still retaining the familiarity this metric brings to the industry and the value of its use in predicting actual annual system yield. A testing protocol is also presented to illustrate the use of this new metric with the intent of providing a reference starting point for contractual content.

  4. Proving the Correctness of Coroutines without History

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarke, Edmund M.

    Proving the Correctness of Coroutines without History Variables Edmund M. Clarke (Duke University) Abstract We examine the question of whether history variables are necessary in formal proofs of correctness for coroutines. History v ~ are special variables which are added to a program to facilitate its Droof

  5. Electromagnetic Corrections in Staggered Chiral Perturbation Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernard, Claude

    Electromagnetic Corrections in Staggered Chiral Perturbation Theory C. Bernard and E.D. Freeland perturbation theory including electromagnetism, and discuss the extent to which quenched-photon simulations can-lat]17Nov2010 #12;Electromagnetic Corrections in Staggered Chiral Perturbation Theory E.D. Freeland 1

  6. EXACT WAVEFRONT CORRECTION IN ADAPTIVE OPTICS.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosier, Lionel - Institut de Mathématiques �lie Cartan, Université Henri Poincaré

    EXACT WAVEFRONT CORRECTION IN ADAPTIVE OPTICS. Pierre Le Gall Lionel Rosier Institut Elie Cartan an adaptive optical system in which a deformable mirror is controlled to compensate for random wavefront c 2005 IFAC Keywords: Adaptive optics, exact wavefront correction, membrane mirror. 1. INTRODUCTION

  7. Fuel cell flooding detection and correction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DiPierno Bosco, Andrew (Rochester, NY); Fronk, Matthew Howard (Honeoye Falls, NY)

    2000-08-15

    Method and apparatus for monitoring an H.sub.2 -O.sub.2 PEM fuel cells to detect and correct flooding. The pressure drop across a given H.sub.2 or O.sub.2 flow field is monitored and compared to predetermined thresholds of unacceptability. If the pressure drop exists a threshold of unacceptability corrective measures are automatically initiated.

  8. Detector signal correction method and system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carangelo, Robert M. (Glastonbury, CT); Duran, Andrew J. (Oviedo, FL); Kudman, Irwin (Boca Raton, FL)

    1995-07-11

    Corrective factors are applied so as to remove anomalous features from the signal generated by a photoconductive detector, and to thereby render the output signal highly linear with respect to the energy of incident, time-varying radiation. The corrective factors may be applied through the use of either digital electronic data processing means or analog circuitry, or through a combination of those effects.

  9. The Challenge of Quantum Error Correction.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fominov, Yakov

    in the design of physical bits. #12;What we need Hardware requirements: 1. Many 103-104 / R individual bits (R flip classical error b. Phase error 0exp( ( ) )z i E t dt = - Fluctuates 1. Need hardware error #12;Classical error correction by the software and hardware. , / 2 0 Hardware error correction: Ising

  10. A Variational Approach to MR Bias Correction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willsky, Alan S.

    sequences, the MR signal is given by: We can target , T1, and T2 measurements through appropriate selectionA Variational Approach to MR Bias Correction Ayres Fan Stochastic Systems Group Research Qualifying Exam June 10, 2003 #12;Outline 1. Introduction to bias correction 2. Magnetic resonance imaging 3

  11. A Variational Approach to MR Bias Correction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willsky, Alan S.

    A Variational Approach to MR Bias Correction Ayres Fan Stochastic Systems Group July 17, 2003 With W. Wells, J. Fisher, M. Cetin, S. Haker, R. Mulkern, C. Tempany, A. Willsky #12;Outline 1 inhomogeneity that corrupts magnetic resonance (MR) images. Correcting for the bias field makes both human

  12. A Variational Approach to MR Bias Correction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willsky, Alan S.

    A Variational Approach to MR Bias Correction Ayres Fan, W. Wells, J. Fisher, M. Cetin, S. Haker, A that corrupts magnetic resonance (MR) images. Correcting for the bias field makes both human analysis (e that encourages smoothness in b and piecewise smoothness in f: We generally choose p 1 to help preserve edges D

  13. Global Cool Cities Alliance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is currently supporting the Global Cool Cities Alliance (GCCA), a non-profit organization that works with cities, regions, and national governments to speed the...

  14. Global Energy Management System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eidt, B. D.

    2005-01-01

    commitment to Stanford University's Global Climate and Energy Project (GCEP). The overarching goal of this program is the accelerated development of commercially viable energy technologies that can substantially reduce greenhouse gas emissions on a...

  15. The Global Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chatzivasileiadis, Spyros; Andersson, Göran

    2012-01-01

    This paper puts forward the vision that a natural future stage of the electricity network could be a grid spanning the whole planet and connecting most of the large power plants in the world: this is the "Global Grid". The main driving force behind the Global Grid will be the harvesting of remote renewable sources, and its key infrastructure element will be the high capacity long transmission lines. Wind farms and solar power plants will supply load centers with green power over long distances. This paper focusses on the introduction of the concept, showing that a globally interconnected network can be technologically feasible and economically competitive. We further highlight the multiple opportunities emerging from a global electricity network such as smoothing the renewable energy supply and electricity demand, reducing the need for bulk storage, and reducing the volatility of the energy prices. We also discuss possible investment mechanisms and operating schemes. Among others, we envision in such a system...

  16. KRFTWRK – Global Human Electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prohaska, Rainer

    2009-01-01

    Power Network 2.1.1 Virtual Power Plants The Global Powernetwork, based on "Virtual Power Plants", called "VPP". A "participant runs a virtual human power plant. Per every "

  17. Global Research Collaborations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    i Global Research Collaborations Merrill Series on The Research Mission..........................................................................................................9 Director, North America Office, German Research Foundation (Deutsch Forschungsgemeinschaft, DFG) International Research Collaboration: Just Nice to Have or Necessary? Panel 1: Research Administrators Prem

  18. Quantum Error Correction for Quantum Memories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbara M. Terhal

    2015-04-10

    Active quantum error correction using qubit stabilizer codes has emerged as a promising, but experimentally challenging, engineering program for building a universal quantum computer. In this review we consider the formalism of qubit stabilizer and subsystem stabilizer codes and their possible use in protecting quantum information in a quantum memory. We review the theory of fault-tolerance and quantum error-correction, discuss examples of various codes and code constructions, the general quantum error correction conditions, the noise threshold, the special role played by Clifford gates and the route towards fault-tolerant universal quantum computation. The second part of the review is focused on providing an overview of quantum error correction using two-dimensional (topological) codes, in particular the surface code architecture. We discuss the complexity of decoding and the notion of passive or self-correcting quantum memories. The review does not focus on a particular technology but discusses topics that will be relevant for various quantum technologies.

  19. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 424: Area 3 Landfill Complex, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Nevada

    1998-08-31

    This corrective action plan provides the closure implementation methods for the Area 3 Landfill Complex, Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 424, located at the Tonopah Test Range. The Area 3 Landfill Complex consists of 8 landfill sites, each designated as a separate corrective action site.

  20. Corrections to "Proving Safety Properties of the Steam Boiler Controller" Correction Sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch, Nancy

    Corrections to "Proving Safety Properties of the Steam Boiler Controller" 1 Correction Sheet After our paper "Proving Safety Properties of the Steam Boiler Controller" went already to print, Myla address http://theory.lcs.mit.edu/tds/boiler.html. Following are the corrections to these errors and some

  1. Corrections to "Proving Safety Properties of the Steam Boiler Controller" Correction Sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch, Nancy

    Corrections to "Proving Safety Properties of the Steam Boiler Controller" 1 Correction Sheet After our paper "Proving Safety Properties of the Steam Boiler Controller" went already to print, Myla_steam_water_est(sr) = #12;Corrections to "Proving Safety Properties of the Steam Boiler Controller" 2 7. p.11, The initial

  2. Systems integration for global sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    footprinting of global biofuel production. Appl. Energy 112,tion research because biofuel production and consumption as90% of the global biofuel production of 105 billion liters

  3. Higher Derivative Corrections to Manifestly Supersymmetric Nonlinear Realizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muneto Nitta; Shin Sasaki

    2014-11-05

    When global symmetries are spontaneously broken in supersymmetric vacua, there appear quasi-Nambu-Goldstone (NG) fermions as superpartners of NG bosons. In addition to these, there can appear quasi-NG bosons in general. The quasi-NG bosons and fermions together with the NG bosons are organized into chiral multiplets. K\\"ahler potentials of low-energy effective theories were constructed some years ago as supersymmetric nonlinear realizations. It is known that higher derivative terms in the superfield formalism often encounter with the auxiliary field problem; the auxiliary fields are acted by space-time derivatives and cannot be eliminated. In this paper, we construct higher derivative corrections to supersymmetric nonlinear realizations in the off-shell superfield formalism free from the auxiliary field problem. As an example, we present manifestly supersymmetric chiral Lagrangian.

  4. Comment on "Global Genetic Change Tracks Global Climate Warming in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodríguez, Miguel Ángel

    Comment on "Global Genetic Change Tracks Global Climate Warming in Drosophila subobscura" Francisco in response to global warming. However, that conclusion is not adequately buttressed by their data, because that chromosomal inversion polymorphisms of Drosophila subobscura are evolving in response to global warming. (2

  5. Interplay of threshold resummation and hadron mass corrections in deep inelastic processes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Accardi, Alberto; Anderle, Daniele P.; Ringer, Felix

    2015-02-01

    We discuss hadron mass corrections and threshold resummation for deep-inelastic scattering lN-->l'X and semi-inclusive annihilation e+e- ? hX processes, and provide a prescription how to consistently combine these two corrections respecting all kinematic thresholds. We find an interesting interplay between threshold resummation and target mass corrections for deep-inelastic scattering at large values of Bjorken xB. In semi-inclusive annihilation, on the contrary, the two considered corrections are relevant in different kinematic regions and do not affect each other. A detailed analysis is nonetheless of interest in the light of recent high precision data from BaBar and Belle on pion and kaonmore »production, with which we compare our calculations. For both deep inelastic scattering and single inclusive annihilation, the size of the combined corrections compared to the precision of world data is shown to be large. Therefore, we conclude that these theoretical corrections are relevant for global QCD fits in order to extract precise parton distributions at large Bjorken xB, and fragmentation functions over the whole kinematic range.« less

  6. Inflationary power spectra with quantum holonomy corrections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mielczarek, Jakub, E-mail: jakub.mielczarek@uj.edu.pl [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Reymonta 4, Cracow, 30-059 Poland (Poland)

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we study slow-roll inflation with holonomy corrections from loop quantum cosmology. It was previously shown that, in the Planck epoch, these corrections lead to such effects as singularity avoidance, metric signature change and a state of silence. Here, we consider holonomy corrections affecting the phase of cosmic inflation, which takes place away from the Planck epoch. Both tensor and scalar power spectra of primordial inflationary perturbations are computed up to the first order in slow-roll parameters and V/?{sub c}, where V is a potential of the scalar field and ?{sub c} is a critical energy density (expected to be of the order of the Planck energy density). Possible normalizations of modes at short scales are discussed. In case the normalization is performed with use of the Wronskian condition applied to adiabatic vacuum, the tensor and scalar spectral indices are not quantum corrected in the leading order. However, by choosing an alternative method of normalization one can obtain quantum corrections in the leading order. Furthermore, we show that the holonomy-corrected equations of motion for tensor and scalar modes can be derived based on effective background metrics. This allows us to show that the classical Wronskian normalization condition is well defined for the cosmological perturbations with holonomy corrections.

  7. Perimeter security for Minnesota correctional facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crist, D.; Spencer, D.D.

    1996-12-31

    For the past few years, the Minnesota Department of Corrections, assisted by Sandia National Laboratories, has developed a set of standards for perimeter security at medium, close, and maximum custody correctional facilities in the state. During this process, the threat to perimeter security was examined and concepts about correctional perimeter security were developed. This presentation and paper will review the outcomes of this effort, some of the lessons learned, and the concepts developed during this process and in the course of working with architects, engineers and construction firms as the state upgraded perimeter security at some facilities and planned new construction at other facilities.

  8. Dead-time Corrected Disdrometer Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Bartholomew, Mary Jane

    Original and dead-time corrected disdrometer results for observations made at SGP and TWP. The correction is based on the technique discussed in Sheppard and Joe, 1994. In addition, these files contain calculated radar reflectivity factor, mean Doppler velocity and attenuation for every measurement for both the original and dead-time corrected data at the following wavelengths: 0.316, 0.856, 3.2, 5, and 10cm (W,K,X,C,S bands). Pavlos Kollias provided the code to do these calculations.

  9. Neutrinoless double beta decay and QCD corrections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Namit Mahajan

    2014-01-30

    We consider one loop QCD corrections and renormalization group running of the neutrinoless double beta decay amplitude focusing on the short-range part of the amplitude (without the light neutrino exchange) and find that these corrections can be sizeable. Depending on the operator under consideration, there can be moderate to large cancellations or significant enhancements. We discuss several specific examples in this context. Such large corrections will lead to significant shifts in the half-life estimates which currently are known to be plagued with the uncertainties due to nuclear physics inputs to the physical matrix elements.

  10. Quadratic electroweak corrections for polarized Moller scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Aleksejevs, S. Barkanova, Y. Kolomensky, E. Kuraev, V. Zykunov

    2012-01-01

    The paper discusses the two-loop (NNLO) electroweak radiative corrections to the parity violating electron-electron scattering asymmetry induced by squaring one-loop diagrams. The calculations are relevant for the ultra-precise 11 GeV MOLLER experiment planned at Jefferson Laboratory and experiments at high-energy future electron colliders. The imaginary parts of the amplitudes are taken into consideration consistently in both the infrared-finite and divergent terms. The size of the obtained partial correction is significant, which indicates a need for a complete study of the two-loop electroweak radiative corrections in order to meet the precision goals of future experiments.

  11. Dead-time Corrected Disdrometer Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Bartholomew, Mary Jane

    2008-03-05

    Original and dead-time corrected disdrometer results for observations made at SGP and TWP. The correction is based on the technique discussed in Sheppard and Joe, 1994. In addition, these files contain calculated radar reflectivity factor, mean Doppler velocity and attenuation for every measurement for both the original and dead-time corrected data at the following wavelengths: 0.316, 0.856, 3.2, 5, and 10cm (W,K,X,C,S bands). Pavlos Kollias provided the code to do these calculations.

  12. GLOBAL WARMING THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    GLOBAL WARMING THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT AND YOUR FAMILY'S CONTRIBUTION TO IT Stephen E. Schwartz://www.grida.no/climate/ipcc_tar/wg1/ #12;EVIDENCE OF GLOBAL WARMING OTHER THAN SURFACE TEMPERATURE ANOMALY The global ocean has warmed latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere. #12;MORE EVIDENCE OF GLOBAL WARMING OTHER THAN SURFACE TEMPERATURE

  13. Review of Power Corrections in DIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Kluge

    2006-06-23

    An overview is given of analyses in DIS at HERA which confront the predictions of power corrections with measured data. These include mean values and distributions of 2-jet as well as 3-jet event shape variables and jet rates.

  14. Quantum error-correcting codes and devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gottesman, Daniel (Los Alamos, NM)

    2000-10-03

    A method of forming quantum error-correcting codes by first forming a stabilizer for a Hilbert space. A quantum information processing device can be formed to implement such quantum codes.

  15. Correct Hardware Design and Verification Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Margaria, T.; Melham, T.F.

    Margaria,T. Melham,T.F. Correct Hardware Design and Verification Methods: 11th IFIP WG10.5 Advanced Research Working Conference, CHARME 2001: UK Springer Verlag

  16. Correcting Iron Deficiencies in Grain Sorghum 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Livingston, Stephen; Coffman, Cloyce G.; Unruh, L. G.

    1996-02-20

    Until grain sorghum develops an extensive root system, young plants may be unable to obtain enough ferrous iron to maintain normal growth. This publication offers strategies for avoiding, identifying and correcting iron deficiencies....

  17. The accuracy of climate models' simulated season lengths and the effectiveness of grid scale correction factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winterhalter, Wade

    2011-09-01

    Global climate change is expected to impact biological populations through a variety of mechanisms including increases in the length of their growing season. Climate models are useful tools for predicting how season length might change in the future. However, the accuracy of these models tends to be rather low at regional geographic scales. Here, I determined the ability of several atmosphere and ocean general circulating models (AOGCMs) to accurately simulate historical season lengths for a temperate ectotherm across the continental United States. I also evaluated the effectiveness of regional-scale correction factors to improve the accuracy of these models. I found that both the accuracy of simulated season lengths and the effectiveness of the correction factors to improve the model's accuracy varied geographically and across models. These results suggest that regional specific correction factors do not always adequately remove potential discrepancies between simulated and historically observed environmental parameters. As such, an explicit evaluation of the correction factors' effectiveness should be included in future studies of global climate change's impact on biological populations.

  18. Detector signal correction method and system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carangelo, R.M.; Duran, A.J.; Kudman, I.

    1995-07-11

    Corrective factors are applied so as to remove anomalous features from the signal generated by a photoconductive detector, and to thereby render the output signal highly linear with respect to the energy of incident, time-varying radiation. The corrective factors may be applied through the use of either digital electronic data processing means or analog circuitry, or through a combination of those effects. 5 figs.

  19. The State and the Global Ecological Crisis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carchidi, Victoria

    2006-01-01

    acknowledges that global environmental governance oftenforms of global environmental governance” sitting between

  20. The Private Regulation of Global Corporate Conduct

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vogel, David

    2006-01-01

    issue annual reports Can Forest Certification Fill Gaps in the Global Forest Regime” Global Environmental Politics

  1. Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 326: Areas 6 and 27 Release Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant Evenson

    2009-05-01

    This document constitutes an addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 326: Areas 6 and 27 Release Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Revision 1), December 2002 as described in the document Supplemental Investigation Report for FFACO Use Restrictions, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (SIR) dated November 2008. The SIR document was approved by NDEP on December 5, 2008. The approval of the SIR document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR removals. In conformance with the SIR document, this addendum consists of: • This page that refers the reader to the SIR document for additional information • The cover, title, and signature pages of the SIR document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the SIR document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the UR for CAS 06-25-01, CP-1 Heating Oil Release. This UR was established as part of a Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective action and is based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996). Since this UR was established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, this UR was reevaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the UR) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove the UR because contamination is not present at the site above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining this UR will be canceled, and the postings and signage at this site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at this site that are unrelated to the FFACO UR such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at this site.

  2. Addendum 2 to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 358: Areas 18, 19, 20 Cellars/Mud Pits, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revison 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant Evenson

    2009-05-01

    This document constitutes an addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 358: Areas 18, 19, 20 Cellars/Mud Pits, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, January 2004 as described in the document Supplemental Investigation Report for FFACO Use Restrictions, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (SIR) dated November 2008. The SIR document was approved by NDEP on December 5, 2008. The approval of the SIR document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR removals. In conformance with the SIR document, this addendum consists of: • This page that refers the reader to the SIR document for additional information • The cover, title, and signature pages of the SIR document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the SIR document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the UR for CAS 19-09-05, Mud Pit. This UR was established as part of a Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective action and is based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996). Since this UR was established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, this UR was reevaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the UR) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove the UR because contamination is not present at the site above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining this UR will be canceled, and the postings and signage at this site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at this site that are unrelated to the FFACO UR such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at this site.

  3. Addendum 2 to the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 454: Historical Underground Storage Tank Release Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant Evenson

    2009-05-01

    This document constitutes an addendum to the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 454: Historical Underground Storage Tank Release Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, April 1998 as described in the document Supplemental Investigation Report for FFACO Use Restrictions, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (SIR) dated November 2008. The SIR document was approved by NDEP on December 5, 2008. The approval of the SIR document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR removals. In conformance with the SIR document, this addendum consists of: • This page that refers the reader to the SIR document for additional information • The cover, title, and signature pages of the SIR document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the SIR document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the URs for CASs: • 12-25-08, Spill H950524F (from UST 12-B-1) • 12-25-10, Spill H950919A (from UST 12-COMM-1) These URs were established as part of Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective actions and were based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996). Since these URs were established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, these URs were re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the URs) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove these URs because contamination is not present at these sites above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining these URs will be canceled, and the postings and signage at each site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at these sites that are unrelated to the FFACO URs such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at these sites.

  4. Addendum to the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 452: Historical Underground Storage Tank Release Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant Evenson

    2009-05-01

    This document constitutes an addendum to the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 452: Historical Underground Storage Tank Release Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, April 1998 as described in the document Supplemental Investigation Report for FFACO Use Restrictions, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (SIR) dated November 2008. The SIR document was approved by NDEP on December 5, 2008. The approval of the SIR document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR removals. In conformance with the SIR document, this addendum consists of: • This page that refers the reader to the SIR document for additional information • The cover, title, and signature pages of the SIR document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the SIR document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the URs for CASs: • 25-25-09, Spill H940825C (from UST 25-3101-1) • 25-25-14, Spill H940314E (from UST 25-3102-3) • 25-25-15, Spill H941020E (from UST 25-3152-1) These URs were established as part of Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective actions and were based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996). Since these URs were established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, these URs were re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the URs) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove these URs because contamination is not present at these sites above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining these URs will be canceled, and the postings and signage at each site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at these sites that are unrelated to the FFACO URs such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at these sites.

  5. Global Health Center (GHC) Website Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Michael S.

    Global Health Center (GHC) Website Architecture About Global Health Student Interest Group Contact) Leadership Electives (overview) PTGH Conversations in Global Health OHSU Global Health Grants Concentration in Global Health Studies Scholarship · Information · Awards · Reports News & Events Donate to the Center

  6. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 366: Area 11 Plutonium Valley Dispersion Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-04-30

    This Corrective Action Plan has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 366, Area 11 Plutonium Valley Dispersion Sites, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996 as amended). CAU 366 consists of the following six Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Area 11 of the Nevada National Security Site: · CAS 11-08-01, Contaminated Waste Dump #1 · CAS 11-08-02, Contaminated Waste Dump #2 · CAS 11-23-01, Radioactively Contaminated Area A · CAS 11-23-02, Radioactively Contaminated Area B · CAS 11-23-03, Radioactively Contaminated Area C · CAS 11-23-04, Radioactively Contaminated Area D Site characterization activities were performed in 2011 and 2012, and the results are presented in Appendix A of the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) for CAU 366 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2012a). The following closure alternatives were recommended in the CADD: · No further action for CAS 11-23-01 · Closure in place for CASs 11-08-01, 11-08-02, 11-23-02, 11-23-03, and 11-23-04 The scope of work required to implement the recommended closure alternatives includes the following: · Non-engineered soil covers approximately 3 feet thick will be constructed at CAS 11-08-01 over contaminated waste dump (CWD) #1 and at CAS 11-08-02 over CWD #2. · FFACO use restrictions (URs) will be implemented for the areas where the total effective dose (TED) exceeds the final action level (FAL) of 25 millirems per Occasional Use Area year (mrem/OU-yr). The FAL is based on an assumption that the future use of the site includes occasional work activities and that workers will not be assigned to the area on a regular basis. A site worker under this scenario is assumed to be on site for a maximum of 80 hours per year for 5 years. The FFACO UR boundaries will encompass the areas where a worker would be exposed to 25 millirems of radioactivity per year if they are present for 80 hours per year. These boundaries will be defined as follows: – It is assumed that radiological contaminants are present at CAS 11-08-01 and CAS 11-08-02 within CWDs #1 and #2 at levels exceeding the FAL. Therefore, UR boundaries will be established around the perimeters of the soil covers that will be constructed at CWD #1 and CWD #2. A geophysical survey revealed buried metallic debris outside the fence and adjacent to CWD #1. Therefore, the UR boundary for CWD #1 will be expanded to include the mound containing buried material. – It is assumed that radiological contaminants are present at CAS 11-23-02, CAS 11-23-03, and CAS 11-23-04, within the three High Contamination Area (HCA) boundaries associated with the 11b, 11c, and 11d test areas at levels exceeding the FAL. Therefore, the UR boundaries will be established around the perimeters of the HCAs. The TED at an area of soil impacted by radiological debris outside the fence and adjacent to the 11c test area HCA exceeds the FAL of 25 mrem/OU-yr. Because the radiological impact from the debris at this location is visible on the aerial flyover radiological survey, all other areas within this isopleth of the flyover survey are conservatively also assumed to exceed the FAL. Therefore, the UR boundaries for the 11b, 11c, and 11d test areas will be expanded to include the areas within this isopleth. · The FFACO URs will all be located within the large Contamination Area (CA) that encompasses Plutonium Valley. Because access to the CA is limited and entry into the CA for post-closure inspections and maintenance would be impractical, UR warning signs will be posted along the existing CA fence. In accordance with the Soils Risk-Based Corrective Action Evaluation Process (NNSA/NSO, 2012b), an administrative UR will be implemented as a best management practice for the areas where the TED exceeds 25 millirems per Industrial Area year. This limit is based on continuous industrial use of the site and addresses exposure to industrial workers who would regularly be assigned to the work area for an entire career (250 days

  7. Global decarbonization strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Messner, S.

    1996-12-31

    The presentation covers a brief summary of the research activities of the Environmentally Compatible Energy Strategies Project (ECS) at IIASA. The overall research focuses on long-term global energy development and emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG). The ultimate goal is to analyze strategies that achieve decarbonization of global energy systems during the next century. The specific activities range from mitigation of GHG emissions to an integrated assessment of climate change. One focal point is the GHG mitigation technology inventory CO{sub 2}DB, which presently covers approximately 1,400 technologies related to energy and the greenhouse effect. Another integral part is the development of global energy and emissions scenarios, an effort involving a number of formal models to assess the implications. A large number of global scenarios for the next century has been developed, that could be grouped into three families. All of them include energy efficiency improvements and some degree of decarbonization in the world. They are based on different economic and technological development trajectories, and their emissions range from very high to a stabilization of atmospheric carbon dioxide emissions. The presentation will outline the salient characteristics of the three scenario families and provide some regional implications of these alternative futures.

  8. WORKPLACE GUIDES GLOBAL WORKING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roelleke, Thomas

    of Stonewall good practice publications ­ profiles some of the employers paving the way for gay staff to work do arise. This guide provides clear, practical tips on how gay employees can access internationalWORKPLACE GUIDES GLOBAL WORKING Supporting lesbian, gay and bisexual staff on overseas assignments

  9. Global Change at Edinburgh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenaway, Alan

    at Edinburgh | 2 The Global Change Group Human impacts on our planet are changing the atmosphere, climate, ice and to the CarboEurope programme. Cryosphere: field & remote observations & experiments on glacial erosion Biodiversity and the carbon cycle in Peru 10 Radiation penetration in forest stands 12 Genetics and Past

  10. GLOBALIZATION HAS EXISTED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Wei

    -tech and social spheres. Leading in our highly connected, dynamic and fast-changing world takes special skills that you will consider joining us in expanding and strengthening Darden's global community and impact. MARC countries with active alumni chapters around the globe. EXAMPLES India Mexico Brazil PARTNER SCHOOLS Darden

  11. Do Coupled Climate Models Correctly SImulate the Upward Branch of the Deept Ocean Global Conveyor?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarmiento, Jorge L; Downes, Stephanie; Bianchi, Daniele

    2013-01-17

    The large-scale meridional overturning circulation (MOC) connects the deep ocean, a major reservoir of carbon, to the other components of the climate system and must therefore be accurately represented in Earth System Models. Our project aims to address the specific question of the pathways and mechanisms controlling the upwelling branch of the MOC, a subject of significant disagreement between models and observational syntheses, and among general circulation models. Observations of these pathways are limited, particularly in regions of complex hydrography such as the Southern Ocean. As such, we rely on models to examine theories of the overturning circulation, both physically and biogeochemically. This grant focused on a particular aspect of the meridional overturning circulation (MOC) where there is currently significant disagreement between models and observationally based analyses of the MOC, and amongst general circulation models. In particular, the research focused on addressing the following questions: 1. Where does the deep water that sinks in the polar regions rise to the surface? 2. What processes are responsible for this rise? 3. Do state-of-the-art coupled GCMs capture these processes? Our research had three key components: observational synthesis, model development and model analysis. In this final report we outline the key results from these areas of research for the 2007 to 2012 grant period. The research described here was carried out primarily by graduate student, Daniele Bianchi (now a Postdoc at McGill University, Canada), and Postdoc Stephanie Downes (now a Research Fellow at The Australian national University, Australia). Additional support was provided for programmers Jennifer Simeon as well as Rick Slater.

  12. Thrust at N{sup 3}LL with power corrections and a precision global...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    order perturbative analyses. Instead our treatment is based on fitting nonperturbative matrix elements in field theory, which are moments Omegasub i of a nonperturbative soft...

  13. A Bayesian Approach to Assess the Importance of Crustal Corrections in Global Anisotropic Surface Wave Tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xing, Z; Beghein, C

    2015-01-01

    from measurements of surface wave phase velocity anomalies,boundary from surface wave dispersion data, J. Geophys.radially anisotropic surface wave tomography, J. Geophys.

  14. Thrust at N{sup 3}LL with power corrections and a precision global fit for

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of rare Kaon and Pion decaysArticle) |errors (Technical

  15. Manifold corrections on spinning compact binaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhong Shuangying; Wu Xin [Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China)

    2010-05-15

    This paper deals mainly with a discussion of three new manifold correction methods and three existing ones, which can numerically preserve or correct all integrals in the conservative post-Newtonian Hamiltonian formulation of spinning compact binaries. Two of them are listed here. One is a new momentum-position scaling scheme for complete consistency of both the total energy and the magnitude of the total angular momentum, and the other is the Nacozy's approach with least-squares correction of the four integrals including the total energy and the total angular momentum vector. The post-Newtonian contributions, the spin effects, and the classification of orbits play an important role in the effectiveness of these six manifold corrections. They are all nearly equivalent to correct the integrals at the level of the machine epsilon for the pure Kepler problem. Once the third-order post-Newtonian contributions are added to the pure orbital part, three of these corrections have only minor effects on controlling the errors of these integrals. When the spin effects are also included, the effectiveness of the Nacozy's approach becomes further weakened, and even gets useless for the chaotic case. In all cases tested, the new momentum-position scaling scheme always shows the optimal performance. It requires a little but not much expensive additional computational cost when the spin effects exist and several time-saving techniques are used. As an interesting case, the efficiency of the correction to chaotic eccentric orbits is generally better than one to quasicircular regular orbits. Besides this, the corrected fast Lyapunov indicators and Lyapunov exponents of chaotic eccentric orbits are large as compared with the uncorrected counterparts. The amplification is a true expression of the original dynamical behavior. With the aid of both the manifold correction added to a certain low-order integration algorithm as a fast and high-precision device and the fast Lyapunov indicators of two nearby trajectories, phase space scans for chaos in the spinning compact binary system are given.

  16. Harmonic distortion correction in pipelined analog to digital converters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panigada, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Background Correction of Harmonic Distortion in PipelinedBackground Correction of Harmonic Distortion in PipelinedADC with 69dB SNDR Enabled by Digital Harmonic Distortion

  17. Tonopah Test Range Environmental Restoration Corrective Action Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2010-08-04

    This report describes the status (closed, closed in place, or closure in progress) of the Corrective Action Sites and Corrective Action Units at the Tonopah Test Range

  18. Corrective Action Tracking System (CATS) | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Action Tracking System (CATS) Corrective Action Tracking System (CATS) The CATS web-based database is used to enter, track, and report the status of corrective actions...

  19. Corrective Action Tracking System User's Guide | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    September 07, 2004 Corrective Action Tracking System (CATS) User's Guide for Direct Web Access The Department of Energy (DOE) Corrective Action Management Program (CAMP) prescribes...

  20. Environmental Management Los Alamos Field Office Corrective Action...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Field Office Corrective Action Plan - Radiological Release Phase II Environmental Management Los Alamos Field Office Corrective Action Plan - Radiological Release Phase II On...

  1. Automatic grammar correction : using PCFGs and whole sentence context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Vineet

    2012-01-01

    OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Automatic Grammar Correction: Using2002). Bleu: a method for automatic evaluation of machineABSTRACT OF THE THESIS Automatic Grammar Correction: Using

  2. Environmental Management Los Alamos Field Corrective Action Plan...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Los Alamos Field Corrective Action Plan - Radiological Release Phase II Environmental Management Los Alamos Field Corrective Action Plan - Radiological Release Phase II On March...

  3. Global interrupt and barrier networks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blumrich, Matthias A. (Ridgefield, CT); Chen, Dong (Croton-On-Hudson, NY); Coteus, Paul W. (Yorktown Heights, NY); Gara, Alan G. (Mount Kisco, NY); Giampapa, Mark E (Irvington, NY); Heidelberger, Philip (Cortlandt Manor, NY); Kopcsay, Gerard V. (Yorktown Heights, NY); Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D. (Mount Kisco, NY); Takken, Todd E. (Mount Kisco, NY)

    2008-10-28

    A system and method for generating global asynchronous signals in a computing structure. Particularly, a global interrupt and barrier network is implemented that implements logic for generating global interrupt and barrier signals for controlling global asynchronous operations performed by processing elements at selected processing nodes of a computing structure in accordance with a processing algorithm; and includes the physical interconnecting of the processing nodes for communicating the global interrupt and barrier signals to the elements via low-latency paths. The global asynchronous signals respectively initiate interrupt and barrier operations at the processing nodes at times selected for optimizing performance of the processing algorithms. In one embodiment, the global interrupt and barrier network is implemented in a scalable, massively parallel supercomputing device structure comprising a plurality of processing nodes interconnected by multiple independent networks, with each node including one or more processing elements for performing computation or communication activity as required when performing parallel algorithm operations. One multiple independent network includes a global tree network for enabling high-speed global tree communications among global tree network nodes or sub-trees thereof. The global interrupt and barrier network may operate in parallel with the global tree network for providing global asynchronous sideband signals.

  4. Housekeeping category corrective action unit work plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-08-01

    The purpose of this Corrective Action Unit (CAU) Work Plan is to provide a strategy to be used by the US Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), the US Department of Defense (DoD) Defense Special Weapons Agency (DSWA) (formerly the Defense Nuclear Agency), and contractor personnel for conducting corrective actions at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and Nevada off-site locations including the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), the Project Shoal Area, and the Central Nevada Test Area. This Work Plan applies to housekeeping category CAUs already listed in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) Appendices (FFACO, 1996) as well as newly identified Corrective Action Sites (CASs) that will follow the housekeeping process.

  5. Power Corrections to Event Shape Distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. L. Dokshitzer; B. R. Webber

    1997-04-30

    We estimate the effects of non-perturbative physics on the differential distributions of infrared- and collinear-safe $e^+e^-$ event shape variables, by extending the notion of an infrared-regular effective strong coupling, which accounts for the non-perturbative corrections to the mean values of several shape variables, to their distributions. This leads to $1/Q$ power corrections over a range of values of the shape variables considered, where $Q$ is the centre-of-mass energy. In the case of the thrust variable, the leading correction is simply a shift of the distribution, by an amount proportional to $1/Q$. We show that this gives an excellent description of the data throughout a wide range of $T$ and $Q$.

  6. RCRA corrective action program guide (Interim)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for compliance with an increasingly complex spectrum of environmental regulations. One of the most complex programs is the corrective action program proposed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under the authority of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) as amended by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA). The proposed regulations were published on July 27, 1990. The proposed Subpart S rule creates a comprehensive program for investigating and remediating releases of hazardous wastes and hazardous waste constituents from solid waste management units (SWMUs) at facilities permitted to treat, store, or dispose of hazardous wastes. This proposed rule directly impacts many DOE facilities which conduct such activities. This guidance document explains the entire RCRA Corrective Action process as outlined by the proposed Subpart S rule, and provides guidance intended to assist those persons responsible for implementing RCRA Corrective Action at DOE facilities.

  7. Heterotic $?$'-corrections in Double Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oscar A. Bedoya; Diego Marques; Carmen Nunez

    2014-12-15

    We extend the generalized flux formulation of Double Field Theory to include all the first order bosonic contributions to the $\\alpha '$ expansion of the heterotic string low energy effective theory. The generalized tangent space and duality group are enhanced by $\\alpha'$ corrections, and the gauge symmetries are generated by the usual (gauged) generalized Lie derivative in the extended space. The generalized frame receives derivative corrections through the spin connection with torsion, which is incorporated as a new degree of freedom in the extended bein. We compute the generalized fluxes and find the Riemann curvature tensor with torsion as one of their components. All the four-derivative terms of the action, Bianchi identities and equations of motion are reproduced. Using this formalism, we obtain the first order $\\alpha'$ corrections to the heterotic Buscher rules. The relation of our results to alternative formulations in the literature is discussed and future research directions are outlined.

  8. Globalization and the Middle Class

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stone, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    of Liberal Trade on the Middle Class There is considerableGlobalization and the Middle Class Katherine V.W. StoneGlobalization and the Middle Class ? Katherine V.W. Stone

  9. International Health Global Health Policy--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miyashita, Yasushi

    50 International Health Global Health Policy-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- http://www.ghp.m.u-tokyo.ac.jp Our mission is to improve population health by enhancing accountability and improving evidence base of global (both domestic and international) health programmes through the provision

  10. Resummed QCD Power Corrections to Nuclear Shadowing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, J; Qiu, Jianwei; Vitev, Ivan

    2004-01-01

    We calculate and resum a perturbative expansion of nuclear enhanced power corrections to the structure functions measured in deeply inelastic scattering of leptons on a nuclear target. Our results for the Bjorken $x$-, $Q^2$- and $A$-dependence of nuclear shadowing in $F_2^A(x,Q^2)$ and the nuclear modifications to $F_L^A(x,Q^2)$, obtained in terms of the QCD factorization approach, are consistent with the existing data. We demonstrate that the low-$Q^2$ behavior of these data and the measured large longitudinal structure function point to a critical role for the power corrections when compared to other theoretical approaches.

  11. Resummed QCD Power Corrections to Nuclear Shadowing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jianwei Qiu; Ivan Vitev

    2005-01-10

    We calculate and resum a perturbative expansion of nuclear enhanced power corrections to the structure functions measured in deeply inelastic scattering of leptons on a nuclear target. Our results for the Bjorken $x$-, $Q^2$- and $A$-dependence of nuclear shadowing in $F_2^A(x,Q^2)$ and the nuclear modifications to $F_L^A(x,Q^2)$, obtained in terms of the QCD factorization approach, are consistent with the existing data. We demonstrate that the low-$Q^2$ behavior of these data and the measured large longitudinal structure function point to a critical role for the power corrections when compared to other theoretical approaches.

  12. ARM - Evaluation Product - KAZR Correction (KAZRCOR)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments? WeDatastreamstps DocumentationAtlanticENA Contacts ENAProductsHSRL Corrected forCorrection (KAZRCOR) ARM

  13. Global climate feedbacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manowitz, B.

    1990-10-01

    The important physical, chemical, and biological events that affect global climate change occur on a mesoscale -- requiring high spatial resolution for their analysis. The Department of Energy has formulated two major initiatives under the US Global Change Program: ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurements), and CHAMMP (Computer Hardware Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics). ARM is designed to use ground and air-craft based observations to document profiles of atmospheric composition, clouds, and radiative fluxes. With research and models of important physical processes, ARM will delineate the relationships between trace gases, aerosol and cloud structure, and radiative transfer in the atmosphere, and will improve the parameterization of global circulation models. The present GCMs do not model important feedbacks, including those from clouds, oceans, and land processes. The purpose of this workshop is to identify such potential feedbacks, to evaluate the uncertainties in the feedback processes (and, if possible, to parameterize the feedback processes so that they can be treated in a GCM), and to recommend research programs that will reduce the uncertainties in important feedback processes. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases.

  14. CHILLING CONSIDERATIONS ABOUT GLOBAL WARMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    CHILLING CONSIDERATIONS ABOUT GLOBAL WARMING: GREENHOUSE GASES, AEROSOLS, RADIATIVE FORCING dioxide increase: sources, mixing ratio, forcing Global temperature change Climate sensitivity and time;#12;ATMOSPHERIC RADIATION Energy per area per time Power per area Unit: Watt per square meter W m-2 #12;GLOBAL

  15. CHILLING CONSIDERATIONS ABOUT GLOBAL WARMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    CHILLING CONSIDERATIONS ABOUT GLOBAL WARMING Stephen E. Schwartz Ethical Culture Society of Suffolk;ATMOSPHERIC RADIATION Energy per area per time Power per area Unit: Watt per square meter W m-2 #12;GLOBAL ENERGY BALANCE Global and annual average energy fluxes in watts per square meter 343 237 237 254K 390

  16. Forecasting phenology under global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silander Jr., John A.

    Forecasting phenology under global warming Ine´s Iba´n~ez1,*, Richard B. Primack2, Abraham J in phenology. Keywords: climate change; East Asia, global warming; growing season, hierarchical Bayes; plant is shifting, and these shifts have been linked to recent global warming (Parmesan & Yohe 2003; Root et al

  17. 2, 921942, 2002 Global ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ACPD 2, 921­942, 2002 Global ozone forecasting H. J. Eskes et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Geophysical Society 2002 Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Global ozone forecasting based on ERS-2 July 2002 Correspondence to: H. J. Eskes (eskes@knmi.nl) 921 #12;ACPD 2, 921­942, 2002 Global ozone

  18. Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlson, Ann E.

    2008-01-01

    Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation Ann E. Carlson*2008]HEAT WAVES, GLOBAL WARMING, AND MITIGATION 175 stroke2001). 2008]HEAT WAVES, GLOBAL WARMING, AND MITIGATION 177

  19. Global Warming, endogenous risk and irreversibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Anthony C.; Narain, Urvashi

    2002-01-01

    The economics of global warming, Institute for InternationalEconomic Models of Global Warming, Cambridge, Mass. MITstochastic losses from global warming, Risk Analysis 16(2):

  20. Global Warming Systemically Caused Hurricane Sandy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lakoff, George

    2012-01-01

    Global Warming Systemically Caused Hurricane Sandyby George Lakoff Yes, global warming systemically causedExplain to others why global warming systemically caused the

  1. Physically Based Global Downscaling: Regional Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghan, Steven J.; Shippert, Timothy R.; Fox, Jared

    2006-02-01

    The climate simulated by a global atmosphere/land model with a physically-based subgrid orography scheme is evaluated in ten selected regions. Climate variables simulated for each of multiple elevation classes within each grid cell are mapped according the high-resolution distribution of surface elevation in each region. Comparison of the simulated annual mean climate with gridded observations leads to the following conclusions. At low to moderate elevations the downscaling scheme correctly simulates increasing precipitation, decreasing temperature, and increasing snow with increasing elevation within regions smaller than 100 km. At high elevations the downscaling scheme correctly simulates a decrease in precipitation with increasing elevation. Too little precipitation is simulated on the windward side of mountain ranges and too much precipitation is simulated on the lee side. The simulated sensitivity of surface air temperature to surface elevation is too strong, particularly in valleys influenced by drainage circulations. Observations show little evidence of a “snow shadow”, so the neglect of the subgrid rainshadow does not produce an unrealistic simulation of the snow distribution. Summertime snow area, which is a proxy for land ice, is much larger than observed. Summertime snow water equivalent is far less than the observed thickness of glaciers because a 1 m upper bound on snow water is applied to the simulations and because snow transport by slides is neglected. The 1 m upper bound on snow water equivalent also causes an underestimate of seasonal snow water during late winter, compared with gridded station measurements. Potential solutions to these problems are discussed.

  2. NSA AERI Hatch Correction Data Set

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Turner, David

    From 2000-2008, the NSA AERI hatch was determined to be indicated as open too frequently. Analysis suggests that the hatch was actually opening and closing properly but that its status was not being correctly reported by the hatch controller to the datastream. An algorithm was written to determine the hatch status from the observed

  3. Electromagnetic corrections to light hadron masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Portelli; S. Dürr; Z. Fodor; J. Frison; C. Hoelbling; S. D. Katz; S. Krieg; T. Kurth; L. Lellouch; T. Lippert; K. K. Szabó; A. Ramos

    2011-01-12

    At the precision reached in current lattice QCD calculations, electromagnetic effects are becoming numerically relevant. We will present preliminary results for electromagnetic corrections to light hadron masses, based on simulations in which a $\\mathrm{U}(1)$ degree of freedom is superimposed on $N_f=2+1$ QCD configurations from the BMW collaboration.

  4. The Politically Correct Nuclear Energy Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is Sustainable - Coal, Oil and Natural Gas · Natural Gas is a Clean Fuel - relative to what - coal? · RenewablesThe Politically Correct Nuclear Energy Plant Andrew C. Kadak Massachusetts Institute of Technology are "clean and free"... · Conservation with sacrifice will work · There is no solution to nuclear waste

  5. Jeremy Carter Correctional Magnetic Coils for Beryllium-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Gus

    Jeremy Carter Correctional Magnetic Coils for Beryllium- based Ion Plasma Chamber Physics 492R was to develop and assemble two sets of identical magnetic coils for the Beryllium based plasma chamber. This particular plasma in nature is Beryllium based and is being studied by various professors, as well

  6. NSA AERI Hatch Correction Data Set

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Turner, David

    2012-03-23

    From 2000-2008, the NSA AERI hatch was determined to be indicated as open too frequently. Analysis suggests that the hatch was actually opening and closing properly but that its status was not being correctly reported by the hatch controller to the datastream. An algorithm was written to determine the hatch status from the observed

  7. Image Fusion for MR Bias Correction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willsky, Alan S.

    . For example, for fast-spin echo (FSE) pulse sequences, the MR signal is given by this equation: · Target T1Image Fusion for MR Bias Correction Ayres Fan Stochastic Systems Group Joint work with W. Wells, J strength · Spatially varying field strength encodes spatial location in the frequency domain #12;MR Imaging

  8. ADDITIONS AND CORRECTIONS 2008, Volume 112B

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berne, Bruce J.

    of the microscopic contact angle obtained in the simulations to a macroscopic value, via eq 7, was not performed function. Although eq 7 is correct, the combination of the approximated (temperature independent) line propose to use the values of the contact angles, 0, obtained directly from the simulations

  9. Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Discharge Area, Nevada Test Site, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant Evenson

    2009-05-01

    This document constitutes an addendum to the Closure Report for CAU 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Discharge Area Nevada Test Site, December 1997 as described in the document Supplemental Investigation Report for FFACO Use Restrictions, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (SIR) dated November 2008. The SIR document was approved by NDEP on December 5, 2008. The approval of the SIR document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR removals. In conformance with the SIR document, this addendum consists of: • This page that refers the reader to the SIR document for additional information • The cover, title, and signature pages of the SIR document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the SIR document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the UR for CAS 12-19-01, A12 Fleet Ops Steam Cleaning Efflu. This UR was established as part of a Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective action and is based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996). Since this UR was established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, this UR was reevaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the UR) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove the UR because contamination is not present at the site above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining this UR will be canceled, and the postings and signage at this site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at this site that are unrelated to the FFACO UR such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at this site.

  10. Global warming from HFC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, E.

    1998-11-01

    Using a variety of public sources, a computer model of hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerant emissions in the UK has been developed. This model has been used to estimate and project emissions in 2010 under three types of scenarios: (1) business as usual; (2) voluntary agreements to reduce refrigerant leakage; and (3) comprehensive regulations to reduce refrigerant leakage. This resulting forecast is that UK emissions of HFC refrigerants in 2010 will account for 2% to 4% of the UK`s 1990 baseline global warming contribution.

  11. The Global Energy Challenge

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Crabtree, George

    2010-01-08

    The expected doubling of global energy demand by 2050 challenges our traditional patterns of energy production, distribution and use.   The continued use of fossil fuels raises concerns about supply, security, environment and climate.  New routes are needed for the efficient conversion of energy from chemical fuel, sunlight, and heat to electricity or hydrogen as an energy carrier and finally to end uses like transportation, lighting, and heating. Opportunities for efficient new energy conversion routes based on nanoscale materials will be presented, with emphasis on the sustainable energy technologies they enable.

  12. Global carbon budget 2014

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Le Quéré, C.; Moriarty, R.; Andrew, R. M.; Peters, G. P.; Ciais, P.; Friedlingstein, P.; Jones, S. D.; Sitch, S.; Tans, P.; Arneth, A.; et al

    2015-05-08

    Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project future climate change. Here we describe data sets and a methodology to quantify all major components of the global carbon budget, including their uncertainties, based on the combination of a range of data, algorithms, statistics, and model estimates and their interpretation by a broad scientific community. We discuss changes compared to previous estimates, consistency within and among components, alongside methodology and data limitations. CO2 emissionsmore »from fossil fuel combustion and cement production (EFF) are based on energy statistics and cement production data, respectively, while emissions from land-use change (ELUC), mainly deforestation, are based on combined evidence from land-cover-change data, fire activity associated with deforestation, and models. The global atmospheric CO2 concentration is measured directly and its rate of growth (GATM) is computed from the annual changes in concentration. The mean ocean CO2 sink (SOCEAN) is based on observations from the 1990s, while the annual anomalies and trends are estimated with ocean models. The variability in SOCEAN is evaluated with data products based on surveys of ocean CO2 measurements. The global residual terrestrial CO2 sink (SLAND) is estimated by the difference of the other terms of the global carbon budget and compared to results of independent dynamic global vegetation models forced by observed climate, CO2, and land-cover-change (some including nitrogen–carbon interactions). We compare the mean land and ocean fluxes and their variability to estimates from three atmospheric inverse methods for three broad latitude bands. All uncertainties are reported as ±1?;, reflecting the current capacity to characterise the annual estimates of each component of the global carbon budget. For the last decade available (2004–2013), EFF was 8.9 ± 0.4 GtC yr?ą,ELUC 0.9 ± 0.5 GtC yr?ą, GATM 4.3 ± 0.1 GtC yr?ą, SOCEAN 2.6 ± 0.5 GtC yr?ą, and SLAND 2.9 ± 0.8 GtC yr?ą. For year 2013 alone, EFF grew to 9.9 ± 0.5 GtC yr?ą, 2.3% above 2012, continuing the growth trend in these emissions, ELUC was 0.9 ± 0.5 GtC yr?ą, GATM was 5.4 ± 0.2 GtC yr?ą, SOCEAN was 2.9 ± 0.5 GtC yr?ą, and SLAND was 2.5 ± 0.9 GtC yr?ą. GATM was high in 2013, reflecting a steady increase in EFF and smaller and opposite changes between SOCEAN and SLAND compared to the past decade (2004–2013). The global atmospheric CO2 concentration reached 395.31 ± 0.10 ppm averaged over 2013. We estimate that EFF will increase by 2.5% (1.3–3.5%) to 10.1 ± 0.6 GtC in 2014 (37.0 ± 2.2 GtCO2 yr?ą), 65% above emissions in 1990, based on projections of world gross domestic product and recent changes in the carbon intensity of the global economy. From this projection of EFF and assumed constant ELUC for 2014, cumulative emissions of CO2 will reach about 545 ± 55 GtC (2000 ± 200 GtCO2) for 1870–2014, about 75% from EFF and 25% from ELUC. This paper documents changes in the methods and data sets used in this new carbon budget compared with previous publications of this living data set (Le Quéré et al., 2013, 2014). All observations presented here can be downloaded from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (doi:10.3334/CDIAC/GCP_2014).« less

  13. Sandia Energy - Global

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis ofSample SULIColinEnergy PolicyLeaks inGlobal Home Analysis

  14. Global Threat Reduction Initiative

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nA Guide to Tapping intoandMinimaland(GTO)GetSafeguards |Global

  15. Global Home Filesystem

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFESOpportunitiesNERSC Getting Started at NERSCGitGlennGlobalofGlobal

  16. Global tree network for computing structures enabling global processing operations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blumrich; Matthias A. (Ridgefield, CT); Chen, Dong (Croton-On-Hudson, NY); Coteus, Paul W. (Yorktown Heights, NY); Gara, Alan G. (Mount Kisco, NY); Giampapa, Mark E. (Irvington, NY); Heidelberger, Philip (Cortlandt Manor, NY); Hoenicke, Dirk (Ossining, NY); Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D. (Mount Kisco, NY); Takken, Todd E. (Mount Kisco, NY); Vranas, Pavlos M. (Bedford Hills, NY)

    2010-01-19

    A system and method for enabling high-speed, low-latency global tree network communications among processing nodes interconnected according to a tree network structure. The global tree network enables collective reduction operations to be performed during parallel algorithm operations executing in a computer structure having a plurality of the interconnected processing nodes. Router devices are included that interconnect the nodes of the tree via links to facilitate performance of low-latency global processing operations at nodes of the virtual tree and sub-tree structures. The global operations performed include one or more of: broadcast operations downstream from a root node to leaf nodes of a virtual tree, reduction operations upstream from leaf nodes to the root node in the virtual tree, and point-to-point message passing from any node to the root node. The global tree network is configurable to provide global barrier and interrupt functionality in asynchronous or synchronized manner, and, is physically and logically partitionable.

  17. Large-Actuator-Number Horizontal Path Correction of Atmospheric Turbulence utilizing an Interferometric Phase Conjugate Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, K L; Stappaerts, E A; Gavel, D; Tucker, J; Silva, D A; Wilks, S C; Olivier, S S; Olsen, J

    2004-08-25

    An adaptive optical system used to correct horizontal beam propagation paths has been demonstrated. This system utilizes an interferometric wave-front sensor and a large-actuator-number MEMS-based spatial light modulator to correct the aberrations incurred by the beam after propagation along the path. Horizontal path correction presents a severe challenge to adaptive optics systems due to the short atmospheric transverse coherence length and the high degree of scintillation incurred by laser propagation along these paths. Unlike wave-front sensors that detect phase gradients, however, the interferometric wave-front sensor measures the wrapped phase directly. Because the system operates with nearly monochromatic light and uses a segmented spatial light modulator, it does not require that the phase be unwrapped to provide a correction and it also does not require a global reconstruction of the wave-front to determine the phase as required by gradient detecting wave-front sensors. As a result, issues with branch points are eliminated. Because the atmospheric probe beam is mixed with a large amplitude reference beam, it can be made to operate in a photon noise limited regime making its performance relatively unaffected by scintillation. The MEMS-based spatial light modulator in the system contains 1024 pixels and is controlled to speeds in excess of 800 Hz, enabling its use for correction of horizontal path beam propagation. In this article results are shown of both atmospheric characterization with the system and open loop horizontal path correction of a 1.53 micron laser by the system. To date Strehl ratios of greater than 0.5 have been achieved.

  18. The Business of Global Environmental Governance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton-Smith, Elery

    2005-01-01

    The Business of Global Environmental Governance By David L.Business of Global Environmental Governance. Cambridge, MA :

  19. Ethics in collaborative global health researchhealth research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    in developing countries ­Global health inequalities­Global health inequalities ­Disproportionate burden

  20. Error Correction Using Probabilistic Language Models 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sunder, Gowrishankar

    2015-05-07

    performing model which is similar to what we have implemented towards the later part of the research. Yuret at. al. [23] have proposed solutions towards generating corrections making use of Wordnet training data and a thesaurus but it is pretty complicated..., especially related to the Thesaurus part and is not entirely applicable in a practical sense. An Entropy-based Language model [5] provides a class-based abstraction helping in better predictions. In such a model, an hierarchy of grammatical constructs...

  1. Mean Field Analysis of Quantum Annealing Correction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shunji Matsuura; Hidetoshi Nishimori; Tameem Albash; Daniel A. Lidar

    2015-10-26

    Quantum annealing correction (QAC) is a method that combines encoding with energy penalties and decoding to suppress and correct errors that degrade the performance of quantum annealers in solving optimization problems. While QAC has been experimentally demonstrated to successfully error-correct a range of optimization problems, a clear understanding of its operating mechanism has been lacking. Here we bridge this gap using tools from quantum statistical mechanics. We study analytically tractable models using a mean-field analysis, specifically the $p$-body ferromagnetic infinite-range transverse-field Ising model as well as the quantum Hopfield model, in the zero temperature limit. We demonstrate that for $p=2$, where the quantum phase transition is of second order, QAC pushes the phase transition to infinite transverse field strength. For $p\\ge3$, where the quantum phase transition is of first order, QAC softens the closing of the gap for small energy penalty values and prevents its closure for sufficiently large energy penalty values. Thus QAC provides protection from excitations that occur near the quantum critical point.

  2. Home Page > Business > Industrial > Global Trade Of Wood Chips Down 26% In 2009 As Pulpmills Reduce Production Worldwide, Reports Wood Resources International

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Check Correct All Grammar Errors And Enhance Your Writing. Try Now! www.Grammarly.com Free TradingHome Page > Business > Industrial > Global Trade Of Wood Chips Down 26% In 2009 As Pulpmills Reduce Production Worldwide, Reports Wood Resources International Global Trade Of Wood Chips Down 26% In 2009

  3. Atmospheric chemistry and global change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prather, MJ

    1999-01-01

    and particles. Thus Atmospheric Chemistry and Global Changethe future of atmospheric chemistry. BROWSINGS Tornadothe complexity of atmospheric chemistry well, but trips a

  4. Systems integration for global sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    air pollution, and energy security policy. Energy Policy 38,Mima, European climate–energy security nexus: A model based16). Coupling global energy security policy with climate

  5. Enlighten Your Research Global Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    your data Programs & Workshops CrossConnects Workshop Series Operating Innovative Networks Workshop Series Enlighten Your Research Global Program Science Requirements Reviews...

  6. Environmental Regulation, Globalization, and Innovation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashford, Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    This essay explores the complex relationship between environmental regulation, innovation, and sustainable development within the context of an increasingly globalizing economy. It will be argued that industrial policy, ...

  7. Full accuracy differential GPS C/A code pseudorange error correction concept 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Desai, Rajendra Laxman

    1983-01-01

    correction concept. Furthermore two types of plots of the eighteen satellite orbit conf'gunation of the Global Positioning System is devel oped . The first plot shows the subpoi nt of the satellste orbit on the face of the earth. Infonmation on land masses... and satellite identif'cation is included on the plot. The second plot shows a three-drmensional nepnesentation of the eanth and the actual satellite orbits anound the earth. The earth may be viewed fnom any desired latitude and longitude. Landmasses...

  8. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 417: Central Nevada Test Area Surface, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Campbell

    2000-04-01

    This Corrective Action Plan provides methods for implementing the approved corrective action alternative as provided in the Corrective Action Decision Document for the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA), Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417 (DOE/NV, 1999). The CNTA is located in the Hot Creek Valley in Nye County, Nevada, approximately 137 kilometers (85 miles) northeast of Tonopah, Nevada. The CNTA consists of three separate land withdrawal areas commonly referred to as UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4, all of which are accessible to the public. CAU 417 consists of 34 Corrective Action Sites (CASs). Results of the investigation activities completed in 1998 are presented in Appendix D of the Corrective Action Decision Document (DOE/NV, 1999). According to the results, the only Constituent of Concern at the CNTA is total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH). Of the 34 CASs, corrective action was proposed for 16 sites in 13 CASs. In fiscal year 1999, a Phase I Work Plan was prepared for the construction of a cover on the UC-4 Mud Pit C to gather information on cover constructibility and to perform site management activities. With Nevada Division of Environmental Protection concurrence, the Phase I field activities began in August 1999. A multi-layered cover using a Geosynthetic Clay Liner as an infiltration barrier was constructed over the UC-4 Mud Pit. Some TPH impacted material was relocated, concrete monuments were installed at nine sites, signs warning of site conditions were posted at seven sites, and subsidence markers were installed on the UC-4 Mud Pit C cover. Results from the field activities indicated that the UC-4 Mud Pit C cover design was constructable and could be used at the UC-1 Central Mud Pit (CMP). However, because of the size of the UC-1 CMP this design would be extremely costly. An alternative cover design, a vegetated cover, is proposed for the UC-1 CMP.

  9. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 562: Waste Systems, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2011-04-30

    This Corrective Action Plan has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 562, Waste Systems, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (1996; as amended March 2010). CAU 562 consists of 13 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 2, 23, and 25 of the Nevada National Security Site. Site characterization activities were performed in 2009 and 2010, and the results are presented in Appendix A of the Corrective Action Decision Document for CAU 562. The scope of work required to implement the recommended closure alternatives is summarized. (1) CAS 02-26-11, Lead Shot, will be clean closed by removing shot. (2) CAS 02-44-02, Paint Spills and French Drain, will be clean closed by removing paint and contaminated soil. As a best management practice (BMP), asbestos tile will be removed. (3) CAS 02-59-01, Septic System, will be clean closed by removing septic tank contents. As a BMP, the septic tank will be removed. (4) CAS 02-60-01, Concrete Drain, contains no contaminants of concern (COCs) above action levels. No further action is required; however, as a BMP, the concrete drain will be removed. (5) CAS 02-60-02, French Drain, was clean closed. Corrective actions were completed during corrective action investigation activities. As a BMP, the drain grates and drain pipe will be removed. (6) CAS 02-60-03, Steam Cleaning Drain, will be clean closed by removing contaminated soil. As a BMP, the steam cleaning sump grate and outfall pipe will be removed. (7) CAS 02-60-04, French Drain, was clean closed. Corrective actions were completed during corrective action investigation activities. (8) CAS 02-60-05, French Drain, will be clean closed by removing contaminated soil. (9) CAS 02-60-06, French Drain, contains no COCs above action levels. No further action is required. (10) CAS 02-60-07, French Drain, requires no further action. The french drain identified in historical documentation was not located during corrective action investigation activities. (11) CAS 23-60-01, Mud Trap Drain and Outfall, will be clean closed by removing sediment from the mud trap. As a BMP, the mud trap and outfall pipe will be removed. (12) CAS 23-99-06, Grease Trap, will be clean closed by removing sediment from the grease trap and backfilling the grease trap with grout. (13) CAS 25-60-04, Building 3123 Outfalls, will be clean closed by removing contaminated soil and the sludge-containing outfall pipe.

  10. Correction to NF 3 , the greenhouse gas missing from Kyoto

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prather, Michael J; Hsu, Juno

    2010-01-01

    J. Hsu (2008), NF 3 , the greenhouse gas missing from Kyoto,Correction to “NF 3 , the greenhouse gas missing from Kyoto”2010), Correction to “NF 3 , the greenhouse gas missing from

  11. Tonopah Test Range Summary of Corrective Action Units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald B. Jackson

    2007-05-01

    Corrective Action Sites (CASs) and Corrective Action Units (CAUs) at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) may be placed into three categories: Clean Closure/No Further Action, Closure in Place, or Closure in Progress.

  12. Correcting Nitrogen Deficiencies in Cotton with Urea-Based Products 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Livingston, Stephen; Stichler, Charles

    1995-11-22

    Correcting nitrogen deficiency is important for cotton plant growth. This publication explains nitrogen requirements, the problems associated with nitrogen deficiency, and ways to correct deficiencies using urea as a source ...

  13. Perturbative corrections to the determination of Vub from the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Perturbative corrections to the determination of Vub from the P+spectrum in B ->Xu l nu bar Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Perturbative corrections to the determination...

  14. Higher Derivative Corrections to O-Plane Actions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhao

    2014-11-17

    Higher derivative corrections to effective actions are very important and of great interest in string theory. The aim of this dissertation is to develop a method to constrain the higher derivative corrections to O-plane ...

  15. Corrective Action Tracking System (CATS) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The CATS web-based database is used to enter, track, and report the status of corrective actions developed and implemented in the DOE Corrective Action Management Program (CAMP) to...

  16. Migration and Global Environmental Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Migration and Global Environmental Change Future Challenges and Opportunities FINAL PROJECT REPORT and adaptation, and also developmental and humanitarian agendas. Migration and Global Environmental Change Future Environmental Change (2011) Final Project Report The Government Office for Science, London #12;3 A range

  17. GLOBAL WARMING THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    PercentofTotal US China Russia Japan Germany ANNUAL ENERGY CONSUMPTION Total Global Consum ENERGY BALANCE Global and annual average energy fluxes in watts per square meter 343 237 237 254K 390 RADIATION Energy per area per time Power per area Unit: Watt per square meter W m-2 #12;Everybody talks

  18. Hadronic ?Z box corrections in Mřller scattering

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hall, Nathan L.; Blunden, Peter G.; Melnitchouk, Wally; Thomas, Anthony W.; Young, Ross D.

    2014-04-01

    The possibility of measuring the parity-violating asymmetry in Moller scattering with sufficient accuracy to determine sin2?W to 0.1% offers a complementary path to the discovery of new physics to that followed at high energy colliders. We present a new calculation of the ?Z box contribution to parity-violating electron-proton scattering, which constitutes an important uncertainty in computing the background to this process. We show that while the ?Z correction grows rapidly with energy, it can be relatively well constrained by data from parity-violating inelastic scattering and parton distribution functions.

  19. Automation of one-loop QCD corrections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valentin Hirschi; Rikkert Frederix; Stefano Frixione; Maria Vittoria Garzelli; Fabio Maltoni; Roberto Pittau

    2013-05-14

    We present the complete automation of the computation of one-loop QCD corrections, including UV renormalization, to an arbitrary scattering process in the Standard Model. This is achieved by embedding the OPP integrand reduction technique, as implemented in CutTools, into the MadGraph framework. By interfacing the tool so constructed, which we dub MadLoop, with MadFKS, the fully automatic computation of any infrared-safe observable at the next-to-leading order in QCD is attained. We demonstrate the flexibility and the reach of our method by calculating the production rates for a variety of processes at the 7 TeV LHC.

  20. Massive Feynman integrals and electroweak corrections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janusz Gluza; Tord Riemann

    2015-01-19

    There are steady advances in the calculation of electroweak corrections to massive scattering problems at colliders, from the very beginning in the nineteen seventies until contemporary developments. Recent years brought a remarkable progress due to new calculational technologies. This was motivated by demands from phenomenological applications at particle accelerators: higher multiplicities of the final states, extreme kinematics, need of higher precision and thus of higher orders in perturbation theory. We describe selected contributions from the project "Massive particle production" of Sonderforschungsbereich/Transregio 9 of Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft.

  1. Study of 1/m corrections in HQET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shunsuke Negishi; Hideo Matsufuru; Tetsuya Onogi; Takashi Umeda

    2005-10-07

    We report our exploratory study on the matching condition of HQET with QCD including 1/m corrections. We introduce a new observable from the dependence of the heavy-light effective energy on the twisted boundary condition parameter $\\theta$, which could be used to match the kinetic term $\\vec{D}^2/(2m)$. Carrying out quenched QCD simulations for fixed lattice spacing in small volumes with O(a)-improved Wilson fermions, we study the 1/m dependence of this observable, from which the static limit and 1/m coefficient can be extracted. We also compare our preliminary result with HQET.

  2. Corrections to our results for optical nanofiber traps in Cesium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Ding; A. Goban; K. S. Choi; H. J. Kimble

    2012-12-20

    Several errors in Refs. [1, 2] are corrected related to the optical trapping potentials for a state-insensitive, compensated nanofiber trap for the D2 transition of atomic Cesium. Section I corrects our basic formalism in Ref. [1] for calculating dipole-force potentials. Section II corrects erroneous values for a partial lifetime and a transition wavelength in Ref. [1]. Sections III and IV present corrected figures for various trapping configurations considered in Refs. [1] and [2], respectively.

  3. (Managing the global environment)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rayner, S.F.

    1989-10-03

    The conference was stimulated by concern that policy makers increasingly have to make environmental management decisions in the absence of solidly established scientific consensus about ecological processes and the consequences of human actions. Often, as in the case of climate change, some decisions may have to be made in the absence of information that is desirable but may not be available for years to come, if ever. Six topics were identified as running throughout the Congress. These were: the epistemology and history of the sciences or disciplines concerned with the environment, including the scientific basis of rationality and modes of dealing with uncertainty and complexity; the social, economic, and institutional conditions for the production of knowledge bearing on the environment, including the politics of research and the improvement of scientific data; the structuring and institutionalization of expert assessments on national and international levels, including the global distribution of expertise; the means of establishing scientific information, the role of the media in transmitting and processing knowledge about the environment, and the organization of public environmental debate; and decision making and management under conditions of uncertainty; and, finally the relationship between science and ethics. 13 refs.

  4. A Globally Unevolving Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meir Shimon

    2015-09-30

    A scalar-tensor theory of gravity is formulated in which $G$ and particle masses are allowed to vary. The theory yields a globally static cosmological model with no evolutionary timescales, no cosmological coincidences, and no flatness and horizon `problems'. It can be shown that the energy densities of dark energy ($\\rho_{DE}$) and non-relativistic baryons and dark matter ($\\rho_{M}$) are related by $\\rho_{DE}=2\\rho_{M}$, in agreement with current observations, if DE is associated with the canonical kinetic and potential energy densities of the scalar fields. Under general assumptions, the model favors light fermionic dark matter candidates (e.g., sterile neutrinos). The main observed features of the CMB are naturally explained in this model, including the spectral flatness of its perturbations on the largest angular scales, and the observed adiabatic and gaussian nature of density perturbations. More generally, we show that many of the cosmological observables, normally attributed to the dynamics of expanding space, could be of kinematic origin. In gravitationally bound systems, the values of G and particle masses spontaneously freeze out by a symmetry breaking of the underlying conformal symmetry, and the theory reduces to standard general relativity (with, e.g., all solar system tests satisfied).

  5. Radiative Corrections to the PREX and QWEAK Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. J. Horowitz

    2012-07-01

    The high precision parity violating electron scattering experiments PREX and QWEAK are sensitive to radiative corrections. In this paper we introduce the PREX experiment that measures the neutron radius of {sup 208}Pb and discuss coulomb distortion corrections. We then discuss dispersion corrections for QWEAK that aims to measure the weak charge of the proton.

  6. UNIVERSITY OF CONNECICUT HEALTH CENTER CORRECTIONAL MANAGED HEALTH CARE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    UNIVERSITY OF CONNECICUT HEALTH CENTER CORRECTIONAL MANAGED HEALTH CARE POLICY AND PROCEDURES FOR USE WITHIN THE CONNECTICUT DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTION NUMBER: E 1.01 Page 1 of 2 INFORMATION ON HEALTH SERVICES Effective Date: 04/01/01 POLICY: University of Connecticut Health Center (UCHC), Correctional

  7. Compiler Correctness and Implementation Verification: The Verifix Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Holger

    Compiler Correctness and Implementation Verification: The Verifix Approach Wolfgang Goerigk \\Lambda \\Lambda Hans Langmaack \\Lambda Holger Pfeifer x Harald Ruess x Wolf Zimmermann z Abstract Compiler the correctness of the compiling specification and the correctness of the compiler implementation. We will discuss

  8. UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT HEALTH CENTER CORRECTIONAL MANAGED HEALTH CARE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT HEALTH CENTER CORRECTIONAL MANAGED HEALTH CARE POLICY AND PROCEDURES FOR USE WITHIN THE CONNECTICUT DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTION NUMBER: B 1.01 Page 1 of 2 INFECTION CONTROL of Connecticut Health Center (UCHC), Correctional Managed Health Care (CMHC) shall establish and maintain

  9. UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT HEALTH CENTER CORRECTIONAL MANAGED HEALTH CARE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT HEALTH CENTER CORRECTIONAL MANAGED HEALTH CARE POLICY AND PROCEDURES FOR USE WITHIN THE CONNECTICUT DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTION NUMBER: F 1.01 Page 1 of 1 HEALTHY LIFESTYLE PROMOTION Effective Date: 04/01/01 POLICY: University of Connecticut Health Center (UCHC), Correctional

  10. Risk Based Security Management at Research Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ek, David R.

    2015-09-01

    This presentation provides a background of what led to the international emphasis on nuclear security and describes how nuclear security is effectively implemented so as to preserve the societal benefits of nuclear and radioactive materials.

  11. Use of Risk-Based End States

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2010-11-18

    This 7 year old policy was formulated as part of an effort to better define criteria for when the Office of Environmental Management would be completed with cleanup at DOE sites contaminated by nuclear weapons research, development, and production and nuclear energy research. Based on adherence to existing legislation, the Policy is not necessary.

  12. Global production through 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foreman, N.E.

    1996-12-01

    Two companion studies released recently should provide great food for thought among geo-political strategists and various national governments. If predictions contained in these Petroconsultants studies of oil and gas production trends for the next 10 years are realized, there will be great repercussions for net exporters and importers, alike. After analyzing and predicting trends within each of the world`s significant producing nations for the 1996--2005 period, the crude oil and condensate report concludes tat global production will jump nearly 24%. By contrast, worldwide gas output will leap 40%. The cast of characters among producers and exporters that will benefit from these increases varies considerably for each fuel. On the oil side, Russia and the OPEC members, particularly the Persian Gulf nations, will be back in the driver`s seat in terms of affecting export and pricing patterns. On the gas side, the leading producers will be an interesting mix of mostly non-OPEC countries. The reemergence of Persian Gulf oil producers, coupled with an anticipated long-term decline among top non-OPEC producing nations should present a sobering picture to government planners within large net importers, such as the US. They are likely to find themselves in much the same supply trap as was experienced in the 1970s, only this time the dependence on foreign oil supplies will be much worse. Gas supplies will not be similarly constrained, and some substitution for oil is probable. Here, two articles, ``World oil industry is set for transition`` and ``Worldwide gas surges forward in next decade,`` present a summary of the findings detailed in Petroconsultants` recent studies.

  13. Resisting globalization- ATTAC in France: local discourses, global terrain 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard, Marie des Neiges

    2007-04-25

    The debate over the "globalization" process has been influenced by the emergence of social movements who deplore this process. This research focuses on the French social movement ATTAC (Action for a Tobin Tax for the Aid of Citizens...

  14. The China-in-Global Energy Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qi, T.

    The China-in-Global Energy Model (C-GEM) is a global Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) model that captures the interaction of production, consumption and trade among multiple global regions and sectors – including five ...

  15. MA in Globalization Studies Student Handbook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Michael

    MA in Globalization Studies Student Handbook 2014-15 Institute on Globalization and the Human://globalization.mcmaster.ca Meetings and materials are available in accessible formats on request #12;Table of Contents Welcome...................................................................................................................................................3 Selecting a Topic

  16. Nonthermal correction to black hole spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wen-Yu Wen

    2014-11-14

    Area spectrum of black holes have been obtained via various methods such as quasinormal modes, adiabatic invariance and angular momentum. Among those methods, calculations were done by assuming black holes in thermal equilibrium. Nevertheless, black holes in the asymptotically flat space usually have negative specific heat and therefore tend to stay away from thermal equilibrium. Even for those black holes with positive specific heat, temperature may still not be well defined in the process of radiation, due to the back reaction of decreasing mass. Respect to these facts, it is very likely that Hawking radiation is nonthermal and the area spectrum is no longer equidistant. In this note, we would like to illustrate how the area spectrum of black holes is corrected by this nonthermal effect.

  17. Figure correction of multilayer coated optics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chapman; Henry N. (Livermore, CA), Taylor; John S. (Livermore, CA)

    2010-02-16

    A process is provided for producing near-perfect optical surfaces, for EUV and soft-x-ray optics. The method involves polishing or otherwise figuring the multilayer coating that has been deposited on an optical substrate, in order to correct for errors in the figure of the substrate and coating. A method such as ion-beam milling is used to remove material from the multilayer coating by an amount that varies in a specified way across the substrate. The phase of the EUV light that is reflected from the multilayer will be affected by the amount of multilayer material removed, but this effect will be reduced by a factor of 1-n as compared with height variations of the substrate, where n is the average refractive index of the multilayer.

  18. Optimal error estimates for corrected trapezoidal rules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talvila, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Corrected trapezoidal rules are proved for $\\int_a^b f(x)\\,dx$ under the assumption that $f"\\in L^p([a,b])$ for some $1\\leq p\\leq\\infty$. Such quadrature rules involve the trapezoidal rule modified by the addition of a term $k[f'(a)-f'(b)]$. The coefficient $k$ in the quadrature formula is found that minimizes the error estimates. It is shown that when $f'$ is merely assumed to be continuous then the optimal rule is the trapezoidal rule itself. In this case error estimates are in terms of the Alexiewicz norm. This includes the case when $f"$ is integrable in the Henstock--Kurzweil sense or as a distribution. All error estimates are shown to be sharp for the given assumptions on $f"$. It is shown how to make these formulas exact for all cubic polynomials $f$. Composite formulas are computed for uniform partitions.

  19. Optics measurements and corrections at RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai M.; Aronson, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Luo, Y.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; White, S.

    2012-05-20

    The further improvement of RHIC luminosity performance requires more precise understanding of the RHIC modeling. Hence, it is necessary to minimize the beta-beat, deviation of measured beta function from the calculated beta functions based on an model. The correction of betabeat also opens up the possibility of exploring operating RHIC polarized protons at a working point near integer, a prefered choice for both luminosity as well as beam polarization. The segment-by-segment technique for reducing beta-beat demonstrated in the LHC operation for reducing the beta-beat was first tested in RHIC during its polarized proton operation in 2011. It was then fully implemented during the RHIC polarized proton operation in 2012. This paper reports the commissioning results. Future plan is also presented.

  20. Quantum Error Correction with magnetic molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    José J. Baldoví; Salvador Cardona-Serra; Juan M. Clemente-Juan; Luis Escalera-Moreno; Alejandro Gaita-Arińo; Guillermo Mínguez Espallargas

    2014-08-22

    Quantum algorithms often assume independent spin qubits to produce trivial $|\\uparrow\\rangle=|0\\rangle$, $|\\downarrow\\rangle=|1\\rangle$ mappings. This can be unrealistic in many solid-state implementations with sizeable magnetic interactions. Here we show that the lower part of the spectrum of a molecule containing three exchange-coupled metal ions with $S=1/2$ and $I=1/2$ is equivalent to nine electron-nuclear qubits. We derive the relation between spin states and qubit states in reasonable parameter ranges for the rare earth $^{159}$Tb$^{3+}$ and for the transition metal Cu$^{2+}$, and study the possibility to implement Shor's Quantum Error Correction code on such a molecule. We also discuss recently developed molecular systems that could be adequate from an experimental point of view.

  1. Final Report: Correctness Tools for Petascale Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mellor-Crummey, John

    2014-10-27

    In the course of developing parallel programs for leadership computing systems, subtle programming errors often arise that are extremely difficult to diagnose without tools. To meet this challenge, University of Maryland, the University of Wisconsin—Madison, and Rice University worked to develop lightweight tools to help code developers pinpoint a variety of program correctness errors that plague parallel scientific codes. The aim of this project was to develop software tools that help diagnose program errors including memory leaks, memory access errors, round-off errors, and data races. Research at Rice University focused on developing algorithms and data structures to support efficient monitoring of multithreaded programs for memory access errors and data races. This is a final report about research and development work at Rice University as part of this project.

  2. Chiral corrections to hyperon axial form factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang Fujiun; Tiburzi, B. C.

    2008-05-01

    We study the complete set of flavor-changing hyperon axial-current matrix elements at small momentum transfer. Using partially quenched heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory, we derive the chiral and momentum behavior of the axial and induced pseudoscalar form factors. The meson pole contributions to the latter posses a striking signal for chiral physics. We argue that the study of hyperon axial matrix elements enables a systematic lattice investigation of the efficacy of three-flavor chiral expansions in the baryon sector. This can be achieved by considering chiral corrections to SU(3) symmetry predictions, and their partially quenched generalizations. In particular, despite the presence of eight unknown low-energy constants, we are able to make next-to-leading order symmetry breaking predictions for two linear combinations of axial charges.

  3. Range corrections in Proton Halo Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryberg, Emil; Hammer, H -W; Platter, Lucas

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the effects of finite-range corrections in halo effective field theory for S-wave proton halo nuclei. We calculate the charge radius to next-to-leading order and the astrophysical S-factor for low-energy proton capture to fifth order in the low-energy expansion. As an application, we confront our results with experimental data for the S-factor for proton capture on Oxygen-16 into the excited $1/2^+$ state of Fluorine-17. Our low-energy theory is characterized by a systematic low-energy expansion, which can be used to quantify an energy-dependent model error to be utilized in data fitting. Finally, we show that the existence of proton halos is suppressed by the need for two fine tunings in the underlying theory.

  4. Global Warming* The Perfect Storm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    Global Warming* The Perfect Storm Jim Hansen 29 January 2008 Health Implications of Climate Change opinion #12;Perfect Storm, Perfect Disaster 1. Great Inertia of Systems - Ocean: Half of Warming still "In

  5. Computational Differentiation in Global Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumaier, Arnold

    Computational Differentiation in Global Optimization Software This talk will present: 1. The general problem framework in optimization software. 2. An example of effectiveness of computational differentiation in optimization packages. 3. Particular importance of computational differentiation verified

  6. Global optimization in reduced space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsung, Achim

    2014-01-01

    Optimization is a key activity in any engineering discipline. Global optimization methods, in particular, strive to solve nonconvex problems, which often arise in chemical engineering, and deterministic algorithms such as ...

  7. Systems integration for global sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    of the global virtual water trade network. Proc. Natl. Acad.J. Wang et al. , China’s water–energy nexus: Greenhouse-gasand future trends in grey water footprints of anthropogenic

  8. Puzzles from the First Globalization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berger, Suzanne

    In the first globalization, 1870-1914, as in our own times, debates raged over the impact on domestic life of free movement across borders of goods, people, and capital. Then as today in the hard times that have followed ...

  9. The Private Regulation of Global Corporate Conduct

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vogel, David

    2006-01-01

    Legitimacy in Global Environmental Governance,” Journal ofundermining of global environmental governance,” Review ofglobal scope of business activity into Robert Falkner, “Private Environmental Governance

  10. Engine Combustion Network (ECN): Global sensitivity analysis...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Engine Combustion Network (ECN): Global sensitivity analysis of Spray A for different combustion vessels Title Engine Combustion Network (ECN): Global sensitivity analysis of Spray...

  11. Energy Frontier Research Center | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    include GE Global Research, Yale University-Crabtree Group, Yale University-Batista Group, Stanford University and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. GE Global...

  12. Fast Correction Optics to Reduce Chromatic Aberrations in Longitudinally Compressed Ion Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lidia, S.M.

    2009-01-01

    FAST CORRECTION OPTICS TO REDUCE CHROMATIC ABERRATIONS INrecent work on fast correction optics that remove the time-EINZEL LENS CORRECTION OPTIC An electrostatic, Einzel lens [

  13. Global Cooling: Effect of Urban Albedo on Global Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, Hashem; Menon, Surabi; Rosenfeld, Arthur

    2007-05-22

    In many urban areas, pavements and roofs constitute over 60% of urban surfaces (roof 20-25%, pavements about 40%). The roof and the pavement albedo can be increased by about 0.25 and 0.10, respectively, resulting in a net albedo increase for urban areas of about 0.1. Many studies have demonstrated building cooling-energy savings in excess of 20% upon raising roof reflectivity from an existing 10-20% to about 60%. We estimate U.S. potential savings in excess of $1 billion (B) per year in net annual energy bills. Increasing albedo of urban surfaces can reduce the summertime urban temperature and improve the urban air quality. Increasing the urban albedo has the added benefit of reflecting more of the incoming global solar radiation and countering the effect of global warming. We estimate that increasing albedo of urban areas by 0.1 results in an increase of 3 x 10{sup -4} in Earth albedo. Using a simple global model, the change in air temperature in lowest 1.8 km of the atmosphere is estimated at 0.01K. Modelers predict a warming of about 3K in the next 60 years (0.05K/year). Change of 0.1 in urban albedo will result in 0.01K global cooling, a delay of {approx}0.2 years in global warming. This 0.2 years delay in global warming is equivalent to 10 Gt reduction in CO2 emissions.

  14. Totally Corrective Boosting with Cardinality Penalization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasil S. Denchev; Nan Ding; Shin Matsushima; S. V. N. Vishwanathan; Hartmut Neven

    2015-04-07

    We propose a totally corrective boosting algorithm with explicit cardinality regularization. The resulting combinatorial optimization problems are not known to be efficiently solvable with existing classical methods, but emerging quantum optimization technology gives hope for achieving sparser models in practice. In order to demonstrate the utility of our algorithm, we use a distributed classical heuristic optimizer as a stand-in for quantum hardware. Even though this evaluation methodology incurs large time and resource costs on classical computing machinery, it allows us to gauge the potential gains in generalization performance and sparsity of the resulting boosted ensembles. Our experimental results on public data sets commonly used for benchmarking of boosting algorithms decidedly demonstrate the existence of such advantages. If actual quantum optimization were to be used with this algorithm in the future, we would expect equivalent or superior results at much smaller time and energy costs during training. Moreover, studying cardinality-penalized boosting also sheds light on why unregularized boosting algorithms with early stopping often yield better results than their counterparts with explicit convex regularization: Early stopping performs suboptimal cardinality regularization. The results that we present here indicate it is beneficial to explicitly solve the combinatorial problem still left open at early termination.

  15. Earned Value Management System (EVMS) Corrective Action Standard...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    as a primary reference for PMOA PM-1 for development of Corrective Action Requests (CARs) and Continuous Improvement Opportunities (CIOs), as well as the assessment of...

  16. Nuclear Waste Partnership (NWP) Corrective Action Plan Addendum...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Addendum Radiological Release Event Phase II Nuclear Waste Partnership (NWP) Corrective Action Plan Addendum Radiological Release Event Phase II On Friday, February 14, 2014 there...

  17. Nuclear Waste Partnership (NWP) Corrective Action Plan - Truck...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    - Truck Fire and Radiological Release Phase I Nuclear Waste Partnership (NWP) Corrective Action Plan - Truck Fire and Radiological Release Phase I Submittal of the Underground Salt...

  18. Method of absorbance correction in a spectroscopic heating value sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Saveliev, Alexei; Jangale, Vilas Vyankatrao; Zelepouga, Sergeui; Pratapas, John

    2013-09-17

    A method and apparatus for absorbance correction in a spectroscopic heating value sensor in which a reference light intensity measurement is made on a non-absorbing reference fluid, a light intensity measurement is made on a sample fluid, and a measured light absorbance of the sample fluid is determined. A corrective light intensity measurement at a non-absorbing wavelength of the sample fluid is made on the sample fluid from which an absorbance correction factor is determined. The absorbance correction factor is then applied to the measured light absorbance of the sample fluid to arrive at a true or accurate absorbance for the sample fluid.

  19. Feed-forward digital phase and amplitude correction system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, D.U.L.; Conway, P.H.

    1994-11-15

    Phase and amplitude modifications in repeatable RF pulses at the output of a high power pulsed microwave amplifier are made utilizing a digital feed-forward correction system. A controlled amount of the output power is coupled to a correction system for processing of phase and amplitude information. The correction system comprises circuitry to compare the detected phase and amplitude with the desired phase and amplitude, respectively, and a digitally programmable phase shifter and attenuator and digital logic circuitry to control the phase shifter and attenuator. The phase and amplitude of subsequent are modified by output signals from the correction system. 11 figs.

  20. Feed-forward digital phase and amplitude correction system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, David U. L. (Rancho Palos Verdes, CA); Conway, Patrick H. (Rancho Palos Verdes, CA)

    1994-01-01

    Phase and amplitude modifications in repeatable RF pulses at the output of a high power pulsed microwave amplifier are made utilizing a digital feed-forward correction system. A controlled amount of the output power is coupled to a correction system for processing of phase and amplitude information. The correction system comprises circuitry to compare the detected phase and amplitude with the desired phase and amplitude, respectively, and a digitally programmable phase shifter and attenuator and digital logic circuitry to control the phase shifter and attenuator. The Phase and amplitude of subsequent are modified by output signals from the correction system.

  1. Combining QCD and electroweak corrections to dilepton production...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Combining QCD and electroweak corrections to dilepton production in the framework of the FEWZ simulation code Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Combining QCD and...

  2. Earned Value Management System (EVMS) Corrective Action Standard...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    (ECASOP) Issued by Office of Project Management, Oversight, and Assessments (PMOA) PM-1 September 21, 2015 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EVMS CORRECTIVE ACTION SOP SEPTEMBER 21, 2015 ii...

  3. Case Study #1 "The Global Warming Debate"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Christopher A.

    CHEM 001A Case Study #1 "The Global Warming Debate" Global warming is one of the most contentious issues of our time. There is an ongoing debate about whether global warming is caused by human activity.S., and because the scientific evidence used to determine if global warming is man-made is so difficult

  4. PRINT ONLY: GLOBAL WARMING Alexeev V. A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    PRINT ONLY: GLOBAL WARMING Alexeev V. A. Global Warming: 0.6°C or Less? [#1035] The peculiarities of global warming on the Earth during the last century are discussed. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXVIII (2007) full818.pdf #12;GLOBAL WARMING: 0.6 OR LESS? V.A.Alexeev; Vernadsky Institute of Geochemistry

  5. Group Work: Global warming & natural variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allan, Richard P.

    Group Work: Global warming & natural variability Left: Global annual temperature departure from://skepticalscience.com/foster-and-rahmstorf-measure-global-warming-signal.html 2013 2012 2011 #12;: 1963-1964, 1982-83, 1991-93 1. How do these events affect the global annual temperature and can you

  6. Global warming debates: the reading course

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huybers, Peter

    Global warming debates: the reading course spring 2012 Instructors: Eli Tziperman and Peter Huybers Hurricanes due to global warming? Apr 7: Stratospheric cooling: Why is the stratosphere cooling? Apr 14: Mid will be the impact of global warming on agriculture? Apr 28: Final Debate: Take sides! Should we act to curb global

  7. Global warming debates: the reading course

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huybers, Peter

    Global warming debates: the reading course spring 2010 Instructors: Eli Tziperman and Peter Huybers Hurricanes due to global warming? Apr 7: Stratospheric cooling: Why is the stratosphere cooling? Apr 14: Mid will be the impact of global warming on agriculture? Apr 28: Final Debate: Take sides! Should we act to curb global

  8. Race and racism: Towards a global future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winant, H

    2006-01-01

    accomplishment of dismantling the various colonialSingh 1998). The global dismantling of European empire was

  9. Center for Innovation in GLOBAL HEALTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    Center for Innovation in GLOBAL HEALTH Conversations in Global Health Thursday, April 9, 2015 5 in integrated and innovative delivery, finding creative new ways to ensure solutions and products get and the Duke Global Health Institute. Sponsored by the Center for Innovation in Global Health (CIGH). The event

  10. Public Transport and Sustainable Urbanism: Global Lesson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cervero, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Public Transport and Sustainable Urbanism: Global Lessonsviable and sustainable form of urbanism. Notes J. Kenworthy

  11. Center for Innovation in GLOBAL HEALTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    Center for Innovation in GLOBAL HEALTH Center for Innovation in GLOBAL HEALTH Conversations in Global Health Gavin Yamey, MD, MPH, MA, MRCP with featured guest: Wednesday, March 4, 2015 4:00 - 5:00 p.m. Li Ka Shing Center, Room 120 A leading global health researcher and former journalist, Professor

  12. Global Climate Change and Agriculture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izaurralde, Roberto C.

    2009-01-01

    The Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released in 2007 significantly increased our confidence about the role that humans play in forcing climate change. There is now a high degree of confidence that the (a) current atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) far exceed those of the pre-industrial era, (b) global increases in CO2 arise mainly from fossil fuel use and land use change while those of CH4 and N2O originate primarily from agricultural activities, and (c) the net effect of human activities since 1750 has led to a warming of the lower layers of the atmosphere, with an increased radiative forcing of 1.6 W m-2. Depending on the scenario of human population growth and global development, mean global temperatures could rise between 1.8 and 4.0 °C by the end of the 21st century.

  13. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 321: Area 22 Weather Station Fuel Storage, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

    1999-07-22

    This Corrective Action Decision Document identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's selection of a recommended corrective action alternative appropriate to facilitate the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 321, Weather Station Fuel Storage, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 321 is located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Area 22, and consists of a single Corrective Action Site (CAS) 22-99-05, Fuel Storage Area. This CAS contains a fuel storage area approximately 325 by 540 feet, which was used to store fuel and other petroleum products necessary for motorized operations at the historical Camp Desert Rock facility, which was operational from 1951 to 1958. The corrective action investigation conducted in February 1999 found the only contaminant of concern above preliminary action levels to be total petroleum hydrocarbons as diesel-range organics at two sample locations. During this investigation, the two corrective action objectives identified were (1) to prevent or mitigate exposure to near-surface soil containing contaminants of concern, and (2) to prevent spread of contaminants of concern beyond the corrective action unit. Based on the corrective action objectives, the two corrective action alternatives developed for consideration were: Alternative 1 - No Further Action; and Alternative 2 - Clean Closure by Excavation and Disposal. The two alternatives were evaluated based on four general corrective action standards and five remedy selection decision factors, and the preferred corrective action alternative chosen on technical merit, focusing on performance, reliability, feasibility, and safety was Alternative 2. This alternative meets all applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the site and will eliminate potential future exposure pathways to the contaminated soils at the Weather Station Fuel Storage site.

  14. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 552: Area 12 Muckpile and Ponds, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2004-04-06

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's approach for collecting the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 552: Area 12 Muckpile and Ponds, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in Area 12 on the NTS, CAU 552 consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 12-06-04, Muckpile; 12-23-05, Ponds. Corrective Action Site 12-06-04 in Area 12 consists of the G-Tunnel muckpile, which is the result of tunneling activities. Corrective Action Site 12-23-05 consists of three dry ponds adjacent to the muckpile. The toe of the muckpile extends into one of the ponds creating an overlap of two CASs. The purpose of the investigation is to ensure that adequate data are collected to provide sufficient and reliable information to identify, evaluate, and select technic ally viable corrective actions. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

  15. High-speed horizontal-path atmospheric turbulence correction using a large actuator-number MEMS spatial light modulator in an interferometric phase conjugation engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, K; Stappaerts, E; Gavel, D; Wilks, S; Tucker, J; Silva, D; Olsen, J; Olivier, S; Young, P; Kartz, M; Flath, L; Kruelivitch, P; Crawford, J; Azucena, O

    2004-03-04

    Atmospheric propagation results for a high-speed, large-actuator-number, adaptive optics system are presented. The system uses a MEMS-based spatial light modulator correction device with 1024 actuators. Tests over a 1.35 km path achieved correction speeds in excess of 800 Hz and Strehl ratios close to 0.5. The wave-front sensor was based on a quadrature interferometer that directly measures phase. This technique does not require global wave-front reconstruction, making it relatively insensitive to scintillation and phase residues. The results demonstrate the potential of large actuator number MEMS-based spatial light modulators to replace conventional deformable mirrors.

  16. Global warming: A Northwest perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, M.J.; Counts, C.A.

    1990-02-01

    The Northwest Power Planning Council convened a symposium in Olympia, Washington, on the subject of global climate change ( the greenhouse effect'') and its potential for affecting the Pacific Northwest. The symposium was organized in response to a need by the Power Council to understand global climate change and its potential impacts on resource planning and fish and wildlife planning for the region, as well as a need to understand national policy developing toward climate change and the Pacific Northwest's role in it. 40 figs., 15 tabs.

  17. Global change: Acronyms and abbreviations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodard, C.T.; Stoss, F.W.

    1995-05-01

    This list of acronyms and abbreviations is compiled to provide the user with a ready reference to dicipher the linguistic initialisms and abridgements for the study of global change. The terms included in this first edition were selected from a wide variety of sources: technical reports, policy documents, global change program announcements, newsletters, and other periodicals. The disciplinary interests covered by this document include agriculture, atmospheric science, ecology, environmental science, oceanography, policy science, and other fields. In addition to its availability in hard copy, the list of acronyms and abbreviations is available in DOS-formatted diskettes and through CDIAC`s anonymous File Transfer Protocol (FTP) area on the Internet.

  18. Increase of global monsoon area and precipitation under global warming: A robust signal?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Tim

    Increase of global monsoon area and precipitation under global warming: A robust signal? Pang future sea surface temperature (SST) warming patterns. The results show that the global monsoon area. Zhao (2012), Increase of global monsoon area and precipitation under global warming: A robust signal

  19. Graduate Certificate in Global Health Fact Sheet College of Public Health GRADUATE EDUCATION IN GLOBAL HEALTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    Graduate Certificate in Global Health Fact Sheet · College of Public Health GRADUATE EDUCATION IN GLOBAL HEALTH Graduate Certificate in Global Health A UGA Graduate Program What is Global Health? Global health applies public health principles to solutions of health problems that transcend national

  20. Self-interaction corrections in density functional theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsuneda, Takao; Hirao, Kimihiko

    2014-05-14

    Self-interaction corrections for Kohn-Sham density functional theory are reviewed for their physical meanings, formulations, and applications. The self-interaction corrections get rid of the self-interaction error, which is the sum of the Coulomb and exchange self-interactions that remains because of the use of an approximate exchange functional. The most frequently used self-interaction correction is the Perdew-Zunger correction. However, this correction leads to instabilities in the electronic state calculations of molecules. To avoid these instabilities, several self-interaction corrections have been developed on the basis of the characteristic behaviors of self-interacting electrons, which have no two-electron interactions. These include the von Weizsäcker kinetic energy and long-range (far-from-nucleus) asymptotic correction. Applications of self-interaction corrections have shown that the self-interaction error has a serious effect on the states of core electrons, but it has a smaller than expected effect on valence electrons. This finding is supported by the fact that the distribution of self-interacting electrons indicates that they are near atomic nuclei rather than in chemical bonds.

  1. CORRECTION OF BUTT-WELDING INDUCED DISTORTIONS BY LASER FORMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Y. Lawrence

    CORRECTION OF BUTT-WELDING INDUCED DISTORTIONS BY LASER FORMING Peng Cheng, Andrew J. Birnbaum, Y Egland Technology and Solutions Division Caterpillar Inc. Peoria, IL KEYWORDS Welding, Distortion, Correction, Laser Forming ABSTRACT Welding-induced distortion is an intrinsic phenomenon arising due

  2. Technical Note Correction of Eddy-Current Distortions in Diffusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Note Correction of Eddy-Current Distortions in Diffusion Tensor Images Using the Known,2 Purpose: To correct eddy-current artifacts in diffusion ten- sor (DT) images without the need to obtain- tortions caused by eddy currents induced by large diffusion gradients. We propose a new postacquisition

  3. Correcting second-order contamination in low-resolution spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Stanishev

    2007-05-23

    An empirical method for correcting low-resolution astronomical spectra for second-order contamination is presented. The method was developed for correcting spectra obtained with grism #4 of the ALFOSC spectrograph at the Nordic Optical Telescope and the performance is demonstrated on spectra of two nearby bright Type Ia supernovae.

  4. Does rationality consist in responding correctly to reasons? John Broome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitelson, Branden

    Does rationality consist in responding correctly to reasons? John Broome Journal of Moral form. What does it mean to say that rationality consists in responding correctly to reasons? Partly does not call for a response from you. Your punishment is the responsibility of the authorities

  5. Complete Two-Loop Corrections to H -> gamma gamma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giampiero Passarino; Christian Sturm; Sandro Uccirati

    2007-07-10

    In this paper the complete two-loop corrections to the Higgs-boson decay, H -> gamma gamma, are presented. The evaluations of both QCD and electroweak corrections are based on a numerical approach. The results cover all kinematical regions, including the WW normal-threshold, by introducing complex masses in the relevant (gauge-invariant) parts of the LO and NLO amplitudes.

  6. UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT HEALTH CENTER CORRECTIONAL MANAGED HEALTH CARE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT HEALTH CENTER CORRECTIONAL MANAGED HEALTH CARE POLICY AND PROCEDURES FOR USE WITHIN THE CONNECTICUT DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTION NUMBER: C 1.00 Page 1 of 1 UCHC/CMHC EMPLOYEES: ACCESSING E-MAIL Effective Date: 07/30/07 POLICY: University of Connecticut Health Center (UCHC

  7. UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT HEALTH CENTER CORRECTIONAL MANAGED HEALTH CARE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT HEALTH CENTER CORRECTIONAL MANAGED HEALTH CARE POLICY AND PROCEDURES FOR USE WITHIN THE CONNECTICUT DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTION NUMBER: P 1.01 Page 1 of 1 PATIENT SAFETY SYSTEM, Daniel Bannish PsyD _______________________________________ #12;UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT HEALTH CENTER

  8. Device for wavefront correction in an ultra high power laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ault, Earl R. (Livermore, CA); Comaskey, Brian J. (Walnut Creek, CA); Kuklo, Thomas C. (Oakdale, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A system for wavefront correction in an ultra high power laser. As the laser medium flows past the optical excitation source and the fluid warms its index of refraction changes creating an optical wedge. A system is provided for correcting the thermally induced optical phase errors.

  9. Corrective measures evaluation report for Tijeras Arroyo groundwater.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witt, Johnathan L (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID); Orr, Brennon R. (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID); Dettmers, Dana L. (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID); Hall, Kevin A. (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID); Howard, M. Hope (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID)

    2005-08-01

    This Corrective Measures Evaluation report was prepared as directed by a Compliance Order on Consent issued by the New Mexico Environment Department to document the process of selecting the preferred remedial alternative for Tijeras Arroyo Groundwater. Supporting information includes background concerning the site conditions and potential receptors and an overview of work performed during the Corrective Measures Evaluation. The evaluation of remedial alternatives included identifying and describing four remedial alternatives, an overview of the evaluation criteria and approach, comparing remedial alternatives to the criteria, and selecting the preferred remedial alternative. As a result of the Corrective Measures Evaluation, monitored natural attenuation of the contaminants of concern (trichloroethene and nitrate) is the preferred remedial alternative for implementation as the corrective measure for Tijeras Arroyo Groundwater. Design criteria to meet cleanup goals and objectives and the corrective measures implementation schedule for the preferred remedial alternative are also presented.

  10. Using error correction to determine the noise model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Laforest; D. Simon; J. -C. Boileau; J. Baugh; M. Ditty; R. Laflamme

    2007-01-25

    Quantum error correcting codes have been shown to have the ability of making quantum information resilient against noise. Here we show that we can use quantum error correcting codes as diagnostics to characterise noise. The experiment is based on a three-bit quantum error correcting code carried out on a three-qubit nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) quantum information processor. Utilizing both engineered and natural noise, the degree of correlations present in the noise affecting a two-qubit subsystem was determined. We measured a correlation factor of c=0.5+/-0.2 using the error correction protocol, and c=0.3+/-0.2 using a standard NMR technique based on coherence pathway selection. Although the error correction method demands precise control, the results demonstrate that the required precision is achievable in the liquid-state NMR setting.

  11. Global visibility of naked singularities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Giambo'

    2006-03-29

    Global visibility of naked singularities is analyzed here for a class of spherically symmetric spacetimes, extending previous studies - limited to inhomogeneous dust cloud collapse - to more physical valid situations in which pressures are non-vanishing. Existence of nonradial geodesics escaping from the singularity is shown, and the observability of the singularity from far-away observers is discussed.

  12. Excellence in Public & Global Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maizels, Rick

    countries · A positive and constructive working environment, shared by our diverse population of staff and supportive working environment based upon an ethos of respect and rigorous scientific enquiry. We health and health equity worldwide · Global reach and partnerships across high, medium and low income

  13. Satellite Radio: Its Global Impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Udgaonkar, Jayant B.

    Satellite Radio: Its Global Impact TIFR Alumni Lecture By S.Rangarajan #12;1 A wonder called RADIO "No wonder so many physicists started as radio tinkers, and no wonder, before physicist became on Richard Feynmann We will stick to the definition of Radio as · Wireless Audio Delivery ·Listener cannot

  14. RENEWABLES 2005 GLOBAL STATUS REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    to renewable energy. The establishment of a global policy network was embraced in the Political Declaration Research Institute Chinese Renewable Energy Industries Association China Susan McDade Energy Environment Institute Lead Author: Eric Martinotwww.ren21.net #12;Renewable Energy Policy Network for the 21st Century

  15. RENEWABLES 2007 GLOBAL STATUS REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    RENEWABLES 2007 GLOBAL STATUS REPORT www.ren21.net #12;Renewable Energy Policy Network for the 21st renewable energy. It provides a forum for leadership and exchange in international policy processes. It bolsters appropriate policies that increase the wise use of renewable energies in developing

  16. Global Temperature November 3, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    of instrumental temperature measurements occurred when the 1997-98 "El Nino of the century" occurred on the back of a strong two-decade warming trend; in addition, the global temperature impact of the El Nino, which typically lags the El Nino by a few months, coincided almost precisely with calendar year 1998. As a result

  17. Conservation and Global Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landweber, Laura

    V.6 Conservation and Global Climate Change Diane M. Debinski and Molly S. Cross OUTLINE 1. Introduction 2. How climate is changing 3. Environmental responses to climate change 4. Consequences of climate the coming decades will be preserving biodiversity in the face of climate change. It has become increasingly

  18. Global Information for Export Success

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    they are in a draft stage and subject to revision. In this way, international free trade, international transpar- encyGlobal Information for Export Success Notify U.S. is a service for U.S. exporters and trade and regulations that impact export market access · A daily report providing U.S. trade stakeholders

  19. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 374: Area 20 Schooner Unit Crater Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2010-02-01

    Corrective Action Unit 374 is located in Areas 18 and 20 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 374 comprises the five corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: • 18-22-05, Drum • 18-22-06, Drums (20) • 18-22-08, Drum • 18-23-01, Danny Boy Contamination Area • 20-45-03, U-20u Crater (Schooner) These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on October 20, 2009, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 374.

  20. Satellite remote sensing of global rainfall using passive microwave radiometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferriday, J.G.

    1994-12-31

    Global rainfall over land and ocean is estimated using measurements of upwelling microwaves by a satellite passive microwave radiometer. Radiative transfer calculations through a cloud model are used to parameterize an inversion technique for retrieving rain rates from brightness temperatures measured by the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I). The rainfall retrieval technique is based on the interaction between multi-spectral microwave radiances and millimeter sized liquid and frozen hydrometeors distributed in the satellite`s field of view. The rain rate algorithm is sensitive to both hydrometeor emission and scattering while being relatively insensitive to extraneous atmospheric and surface effects. Separate formulations are used over ocean and land to account for different background microwave characteristics and the algorithm corrects for inhomogeneous distributions of rain rates within the satellite`s field of view. Estimates of instantaneous and climate scale rainfall are validated through comparisons with modeled clouds, surface radars, rain gauges and alternative satellite estimates. The accuracy of the rainfall estimates is determined from a combination of validation comparisons, theoretical sampling error calculations, and modeled sensitivity to variations in atmospheric and surface radiative properties. An error budget is constructed for both instantaneous rain rates and climate scale global estimates. At a one degree resolution, the root mean square errors in instantaneous rain rate estimates are 13% over ocean and 20% over land. The root mean square errors in global rainfall totals over a four month period are found to be 46% over ocean and 63% over land. Global rainfall totals are computed on a monthly scale for a three year period from 1987 to 1990. The time series is analyzed for climate scale rainfall distribution and variability.

  1. Expanding Global Network: Discovery to Delivery The United States ranks #1 in innovation. Purdue is preparing for the 21st century global

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    challenges ­ global health, global competitiveness, global energy security, global warming, global with the Bayero University, Nigeria (K. Beaver) Frontiers in applications of carbon nanotubes and graphene

  2. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 562: Waste Systems Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alfred Wickline

    2009-04-01

    Corrective Action Unit 562 is located in Areas 2, 23, and 25 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 562 is comprised of the 13 corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: • 02-26-11, Lead Shot • 02-44-02, Paint Spills and French Drain • 02-59-01, Septic System • 02-60-01, Concrete Drain • 02-60-02, French Drain • 02-60-03, Steam Cleaning Drain • 02-60-04, French Drain • 02-60-05, French Drain • 02-60-06, French Drain • 02-60-07, French Drain • 23-60-01, Mud Trap Drain and Outfall • 23-99-06, Grease Trap • 25-60-04, Building 3123 Outfalls These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on December 11, 2008, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 562. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS. The scope of the corrective action investigation for CAU 562 includes the following activities: • Move surface debris and/or materials, as needed, to facilitate sampling. • Conduct radiological surveys. • Perform field screening. • Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine the nature and extent of any contamination released by each CAS. • Collect samples of source material to determine the potential for a release. • Collect samples of potential remediation wastes. • Collect quality control samples. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; DOE, Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management (FFACO, 1996; as amended February 2008). Under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, this Corrective Action Investigation Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Fieldwork will be conducted following approval of the plan.

  3. Power Corrections in Electron-Positron Annihilation: Experimental Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefan Kluth

    2006-06-20

    Experimental studies of power corrections with e+e- data are reviewed. An overview of the available data for jet and event shape observables is given and recent analyses based on the Dokshitzer-Marchesini-Webber (DMW) model of power corrections are summarised. The studies involve both distributions of the observables and their mean values. The agreement between perturbative QCD combined with DMW power corrections and the data is generally good, and the few exceptions are discussed. The use of low energy data sets highlights deficiencies in the existing calculations for some observables. A study of the finiteness of the physical strong coupling at low energies using hadronic $\\tau$ decays is shown.

  4. Power Corrections and Renormalons in $e^+e^-$ Fragmentation Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Dasgupta; B. R. Webber

    1996-08-21

    We estimate the power corrections (infrared renormalon contributions) to the coefficient functions for the transverse, longitudinal and asymmetric fragmentation functions in $e^+e^-$ annihilation, using a method based on the analysis of one-loop Feynman graphs containing a massive gluon. The leading corrections have the expected $1/Q^2$ behaviour, but the gluonic coefficients of the longitudinal and transverse contributions separately have strong singularities at small $x$, which cancel in their sum. This leads to $1/Q$ corrections to the longitudinal and transverse parts of the annihilation cross section, which cancel in the total cross section.

  5. Correction to kinetic energy density using exactly solvable model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexey Sergeev; Raka Jovanovic; Sabre Kais; Fahhad H Alharbi

    2015-06-03

    An accurate non-gradient-expansion based correction to Thomas--Fermi is developed using solvable model. The used model is a system of $N$ non-interacting electrons moving independently in the Coulomb field of the nuclear charge. The presented correction is applicable for atoms and should be extendable beyond that. The method exploits the fact that the difference between the Thomas--Fermi approximation and the non-interacting kinetic energy is comparable to the difference between the same values inside the proposed solvable model. The numerical experiments show that by adding this correction factor, the precision of Thomas--Fermi approximation is enhanced by an order of magnitude.

  6. Nuclear enhanced power corrections to DIS structure functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiaofeng Guo; Jianwei Qiu; Wei Zhu

    2001-10-03

    We calculate nuclear enhanced power corrections to structure functions measured in deeply inelastic lepton-nucleus scattering in Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). We find that the nuclear medium enhanced power corrections at order of $O(\\alpha_s/Q^2)$ enhance the longitudinal structure function $F_L$, and suppress the transverse structure function $F_1$. We demonstrate that strong nuclear effects in $\\sigma_A/\\sigma_D$ and $R_A/R_D$, recently observed by HERMES Collaboration, can be explained in terms of the nuclear enhanced power corrections.

  7. Quantum-corrected finite entropy of noncommutative acoustic black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. A. Anacleto; F. A. Brito; G. C. Luna; E. Passos; J. Spinelly

    2015-01-31

    In this paper we consider the generalized uncertainty principle in the tunneling formalism via Hamilton-Jacobi method to determine the quantum-corrected Hawking temperature and entropy for 2+1-dimensional noncommutative acoustic black holes. In our results we obtain an area entropy, a correction logarithmic in leading order, a correction term in subleading order proportional to the radiation temperature associated with the noncommutative acoustic black holes and an extra term that depends on a conserved charge. Thus, as in the gravitational case, there is no need to introduce the ultraviolet cut-off and divergences are eliminated.

  8. Quantum-corrected finite entropy of noncommutative acoustic black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anacleto, M A; Luna, G C; Passos, E; Spinelly, J

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we consider the generalized uncertainty principle in the tunneling formalism via Hamilton-Jacobi method to determine the quantum-corrected Hawking temperature and entropy for 2+1-dimensional noncommutative acoustic black holes. In our results we obtain an area entropy, a correction logarithmic in leading order, a correction term in subleading order proportional to the radiation temperature associated with the noncommutative acoustic black holes and an extra term that depends on a conserved charge. Thus, as in the gravitational case, there is no need to introduce the ultraviolet cut-off and divergences are eliminated.

  9. NLO QCD corrections to ZZ jet production at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Binoth, T.; Gleisberg, T.; Karg, S.; Kauer, N.; Sanguinetti, G.

    2010-05-26

    A fully differential calculation of the next-to-leading order QCD corrections to the production of Z-boson pairs in association with a hard jet at the Tevatron and LHC is presented. This process is an important background for Higgs particle and new physics searches at hadron colliders. We find sizable corrections for cross sections and differential distributions, particularly at the LHC. Residual scale uncertainties are typically at the 10% level and can be further reduced by applying a veto against the emission of a second hard jet. Our results confirm that NLO corrections do not simply rescale LO predictions.

  10. Solar neutrinos radiative corrections in neutrino-electron scattering experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahcall, J N; Sirlin, A; Bahcall, John N; Kamionkowski, Marc; Sirlin, Alberto

    1995-01-01

    Radiative corrections to the electron recoil-energy spectra and to total cross sections are computed for neutrino-electron scattering by solar neutrinos. Radiative corrections change monotonically the electron recoil spectrum for incident \\b8 neutrinos, with the relative probability of observing recoil electrons being reduced by about 4 \\% at the highest electron energies. For p-p and \\be7 neutrinos, the recoil spectra are not affected significantly. Total cross sections for solar neutrino-electron scattering are reduced by about 2 \\% compared to previously computed values. We also calculate the recoil spectra from ^{13}N and ^{15}O neutrinos including radiative corrections.

  11. Relativistic corrections to $J/\\psi$ polarization in photo- and hadroproduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Zhi-Guo

    2015-01-01

    We systematically calculate the relativistic corrections to the polarization variables of prompt $J/\\psi$ photoproduction and hadroproduction using the factorization formalism of nonrelativistic QCD. Specifically, we include the ${}^3\\!S_1^{[1]}$ and ${}^3\\!P_{J}^{[1]}$ color-singlet and the ${}^3\\!S_1^{[8]}$, ${}^1\\!S_{0}^{[8]}$, and ${}^3\\!P_{J}^{[8]}$ color-octet channels as well as the effects due to the mixing between the ${}^3\\!S_1^{[8]}$ and ${}^3\\!D_1^{[8]}$ channels. We provide all the squared hard-scattering amplitudes in analytic form. Assuming the nonrelativistic-QCD long-distance matrix elements to satisfy the velocity scaling rules, we find the relativistic corrections to be appreciable, especially at small transverse momentum $p_T$ and large inelasticity $z$. The results obtained here and in our previous work on the unpolarized yield [Phys. Rev. D 90, 014045 (2014)] will help to render global analyses of prompt $J/\\psi$ production data more complete and hopefully to shed light on the $J/\\psi$ p...

  12. Global Superdiffusion of Weak Chaos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Itzhack Dana

    2003-10-20

    A class of kicked rotors is introduced, exhibiting accelerator-mode islands (AIs) and {\\em global} superdiffusion for {\\em arbitrarily weak} chaos. The corresponding standard maps are shown to be exactly related to generalized web maps taken modulo an ``oblique cylinder''. Then, in a case that the web-map orbit structure is periodic in the phase plane, the AIs are essentially {\\em normal} web islands folded back into the cylinder. As a consequence, chaotic orbits sticking around the AI boundary are accelerated {\\em only} when they traverse tiny {\\em ``acceleration spots''}. This leads to chaotic flights having a quasiregular {\\em steplike} structure. The global weak-chaos superdiffusion is thus basically different in nature from the strong-chaos one in the usual standard and web maps.

  13. Value of global weather sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canavan, G.H.

    1998-12-23

    Long-range weather predictions have great scientific and economic potential, but require precise global observations. Small balloon transponders could serve as lagrangian trace particles to measure the vector wind, which is the primary input to long-range numerical forecasts. The wind field is difficult to measure; it is at present poorly sampled globally. Distance measuring equipment (DME) triangulation of signals from roughly a million transponders could sample it with sufficient accuracy to support {approximately} two week forecasts. Such forecasts would have great scientific and economic potential which is estimated below. DME uses small, low-power transmitters on each transponder to broadcast short, low-power messages that are detected by several small receivers and forwarded to the ground station for processing of position, velocity, and state information. Thus, the transponder is little more than a balloon with a small radio, which should only weigh a few grams and cost a few dollars.

  14. On global warming T. C. Dorlas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorlas, Teunis C.

    On global warming T. C. Dorlas Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies School of Theoretical Physics- ature curve The ongoing debate about global warming prompted me to have a look at the physics myself

  15. Climate Whiplash: What Happens AFTER Global Warming?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallin, Michael

    Climate Whiplash: What Happens AFTER Global Warming? with Dr. Curt Stager Author and Professor, Paul Smith's College Department of Natural Sciences Most debate over global warming looks only as far

  16. Digest of Global Initiatives (June 16, 2011)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pittendrigh, Barry

    it comes to clean energy, energy security, environmental stabilitDigest of Global Initiatives (June 16, 2011) Active or Pending: Active Title: Eco, and practical protocols for the best solutions for global energy, climate, and environmental problems. More than

  17. Global trends in agriculture and food systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    development * Corresponding author: Danish Research Centre for Organic Food and Farming (DARCOF), P.O. Box 501 Global trends in agriculture and food systems Marie Trydeman Knudsen*, Niels Halberg, Jřrgen E .................................................................................16 Global trends in organic agriculture

  18. Climate Theme Global Tropical Moored Buoy Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Theme Global Tropical Moored Buoy Array: Observing, Understanding Observing System for Climate #12;Performance 4 Global Tropical Moored Buoy Array: A coordinated multi-national effort to develop and sustain moored buoy observing systems for climate research

  19. Global Pollution: How Much Is Too Much?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trevors, Jack T.; Saier, Milton H.

    2009-01-01

    009-0252-0 Global Pollution: How Much Is Too Much? Jack T.1) How much global pollution can our planet tolerate andThere is already more pollution on our planet than we can

  20. Global Migration and Regionalization, 1840-1940

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKeown, Adam

    2007-01-01

    Thousands Sources: See McKeown, "Global Migration," 188-9.Figure 4: Indian Migration, 1842-1937 Burma, Ceylon, Malayaof India, 100; McKeown, "Global Migrations," 186-9.

  1. Risk in the Global Supply Chain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Datta, Shoumen

    2006-01-01

    Carbon footprints are not on the priority list of risk analysts in operations management for at least half or more of global businesses. What are the other risks in the global supply chain?

  2. Global Supply Chains and Wage Inequality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Costinot, Arnaud

    A salient feature of globalization in recent decades is the emergence of "global supply chains" in which different countries specialize in different stages of a sequential production process. In Costinot, Vogel and Wang ...

  3. Global Warming: the Sacrificial Temptation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galam, Serge

    2008-01-01

    The claimed unanimity of the scientific community about the human culpability for global warming is questioned. Up today there exists no scientific proof of human culpability. It is not the number of authors of a paper, which validates its scientific content. The use of probability to assert the degree of certainty with respect the global warming problem is shown to be misleading. The debate about global warming has taken on emotional tones driven by passion and irrationality while it should be a scientific debate. The degree of hostility used to mull any dissonance voice demonstrates that the current debate has acquired a quasi-religious nature. Scientists are behaving as priests in their will "to save the planet". We are facing a dangerous social phenomenon, which must be addressed from the social point of view. The current unanimity of citizens, scientists, journalists, intellectuals and politicians is intrinsically worrying. The calls to sacrifice our way of life to calm down the upset nature is an emotio...

  4. Implementation of global energy sustainability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grob, G.R.

    1998-02-01

    The term energy sustainability emerged from the UN Conference on Environment and Development in Rio 1992, when Agenda 21 was formulated and the Global Energy Charter proclaimed. Emission reductions, total energy costing, improved energy efficiency, and sustainable energy systems are the four fundamental principles of the charter. These principles can be implemented in the proposed financial, legal, technical, and education framework. Much has been done in many countries toward the implementation of the Global Energy Charter, but progress has not been fast enough to ease the disastrous effects of the too many ill-conceived energy systems on the environment, climate, and health. Global warming is accelerating, and pollution is worsening, especially in developing countries with their hunger for energy to meet the needs of economic development. Asian cities are now beating all pollution records, and greenhouse gases are visibly changing the climate with rising sea levels, retracting glaciers, and record weather disasters. This article presents why and how energy investments and research money have to be rechanneled into sustainable energy, rather than into the business-as-usual of depleting, unsustainable energy concepts exceeding one trillion dollars per year. This largest of all investment sectors needs much more attention.

  5. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 137: Waste Disposal Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.:0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wickline, Alfred

    2005-12-01

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information including facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 137: Waste Disposal Sites. This CAIP has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 137 contains sites that are located in Areas 1, 3, 7, 9, and 12 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), which is approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). Corrective Action Unit 137 is comprised of the eight corrective action sites (CASs) shown on Figure 1-1 and listed below: (1) CAS 01-08-01, Waste Disposal Site; (2) CAS 03-23-01, Waste Disposal Site; (3) CAS 03-23-07, Radioactive Waste Disposal Site; (4) CAS 03-99-15, Waste Disposal Site; (5) CAS 07-23-02, Radioactive Waste Disposal Site; (6) CAS 09-23-07, Radioactive Waste Disposal Site; (7) CAS 12-08-01, Waste Disposal Site; and (8) CAS 12-23-07, Waste Disposal Site. The Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) will include field inspections, radiological surveys, geophysical surveys, sampling of environmental media, analysis of samples, and assessment of investigation results, where appropriate. Data will be obtained to support corrective action alternative evaluations and waste management decisions. The CASs in CAU 137 are being investigated because hazardous and/or radioactive constituents may be present in concentrations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. Existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives for the CASs. Additional information will be generated by conducting a CAI before evaluating and selecting corrective action alternatives.

  6. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 365: Baneberry Contamination Area, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2010-12-01

    Corrective Action Unit 365 comprises one corrective action site (CAS), CAS 08-23-02, U-8d Contamination Area. This site is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for the CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The site will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on July 6, 2010, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for the Baneberry site. The primary release associated with Corrective Action Unit 365 was radiological contamination from the Baneberry nuclear test. Baneberry was an underground weapons-related test that vented significant quantities of radioactive gases from a fissure located in close proximity to ground zero. A crater formed shortly after detonation, which stemmed part of the flow from the fissure. The scope of this investigation includes surface and shallow subsurface (less than 15 feet below ground surface) soils. Radionuclides from the Baneberry test with the potential to impact groundwater are included within the Underground Test Area Subproject. Investigations and corrective actions associated with the Underground Test Area Subproject include the radiological inventory resulting from the Baneberry test.

  7. An Explanation of Global Warming without Supercomputing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An Explanation of Global Warming without Supercomputing (revised version) K. Miyazaki E that the anthropogenic global warming is severely limited because the Earth is a water planet. 1 Introduction Now,2,3] on this anthropogenic global warming (AGW) is essentially based on the results of elaborate and enormous computer

  8. Global Warming: The Threat to the Planet*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    Global Warming: The Threat to the Planet* Jim Hansen 17 April 2007 2007 Leo Szilard Lecture. Graham Red Squirrel #12;Survival of Species 1. "Business-as-Usual" Scenario - Global Warming ~ 3şC - Likely Extinctions ~ 50 percent 2. "Alternative" Scenario - Global Warming ~ 1şC - Likely Extinctions

  9. An Explanation of Global Warming without Supercomputing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An Explanation of Global Warming without Supercomputing K. Miyazaki E-mail: miyazakiro that the climate sensitivity never exceeds 6 C. Consequently, the anthropogenic global warming is severely limited be calculated in simple terms. Global warming is like that." However, there will be not a few physicists who do

  10. Global Warming Hole 31 March 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    Global Warming Hole 31 March 2015 James Hansen Sorry to have disappeared for two months. I-thirds of North America know that global warming is really happening. In fact, 2015 should be the year that stifles discussion of a warming hiatus. A substantial developing El Nino will add to the global warming

  11. 1999 Macmillan Magazines Ltd Does global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McFadden, Geoff

    © 1999 Macmillan Magazines Ltd Does global warming make Triton blush? Neptune's largest moon (refs 5,6), and global warming has now been observed7 . We obtained four spectra of Triton between 0. Both the spectral changes and the global warming may have been caused by a triggering event

  12. Wildfires ignite debate on global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moritz, Max A.

    Wildfires ignite debate on global warming Astemperaturessoar. Is there a link with global warming? We have good reason to think so, and not taking the link seriously could have on climate change and global fire predictions last month, and I have been in my own media storm ever since

  13. Global warming debates: the reading course

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huybers, Peter

    Global warming debates: the reading course Spring 2014 Instructors: Peter Huybers and Eli Tziperman of global warming", please prepare by reading "the climate of man", IPCC introduction, and Lindzen article. background basics. l 1. Mountain Glaciers: Are mountain glaciers melting? Due to global warming? First, see

  14. Global Warming and the Free State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boynton, Walter R.

    Global Warming and the Free State Comprehensive Assessment of Climate Change Impacts in Maryland of the report. Citation Boesch, D.F. (editor). 2008. Global Warming and the Free State: Comprehensive AssessmentJuskelis,MarylandSierraClub Global Warming and the Free State Comprehensive Assessment of Climate Change Impacts in Maryland Report

  15. CHAPTER FOUR Global and African Regional Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deMenocal, Peter B.

    45 CHAPTER FOUR Global and African Regional Climate during the Cenozoic SARAH J. FEAKINS AND PETER by significant climate change. Major global changes included massive tectonic reorganization, a reduction in atmospheric pCO2 (Pagani et al., 1999; Pearson and Palmer, 2000), and a dramatic cooling of global climate

  16. Title: Global Distribution of Poverty Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Global Distribution of Poverty Data Creator / Copyright Owner: Center for International: N/A Publication Date: N/A Coverage Date(s): 1993 - 1998 Updates: N/A Abstract: The Global Poverty Mapping Project seeks to enhance current understanding of the global distribution of poverty

  17. Solar Correction Factors of Building Envelope in Tebei 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, D.; Tang, M.

    2006-01-01

    Tebei has very rich solar energy in China and needs heating in winter,but the present energy building design code has no solar correction factor for the overall heat transfer coefficient of building envelope for Tebei. ...

  18. Bayesian redshift-space distortions correction from galaxy redshift surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Angulo, Raul E; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Rodriguez-Torres, Sergio; Monteagudo, Carlos Hernandez; Prada, Francisco; Yepes, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    We present a Bayesian reconstruction method which maps a galaxy distribution from redshift-space to real-space inferring the distances of the individual galaxies. The method is based on sampling density fields assuming a lognormal prior with a likelihood given by the negative binomial distribution function modelling stochastic bias. We assume a deterministic bias given by a power law relating the dark matter density field to the expected halo or galaxy field. Coherent redshift-space distortions are corrected in a Gibbs-sampling procedure by moving the galaxies from redshift-space to real-space according to the peculiar motions derived from the recovered density field using linear theory with the option to include tidal field corrections from second order Lagrangian perturbation theory. The virialised distortions are corrected by sampling candidate real-space positions (being in the neighbourhood of the observations along the line of sight), which are compatible with the bulk flow corrected redshift-space posi...

  19. Passive background correction method for spatially resolved detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmitt, Randal L. (Tijeras, NM); Hargis, Jr., Philip J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-05-10

    A method for passive background correction during spatially or angularly resolved detection of emission that is based on the simultaneous acquisition of both the passive background spectrum and the spectrum of the target of interest.

  20. Electroweak radiative corrections to W boson production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baur, U. [Department of Physics, SUNY at Buffalo, NY (United States); Keller, S., Wackeroth, D. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)

    1996-11-14

    We present some results of a new calculation of the O({alpha}) electroweak radiative corrections to W boson production at hadron colliders with special emphasis on the transverse mass distribution.

  1. Energy dependence of acceptance-corrected dielectron excess mass...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy dependence of acceptance-corrected dielectron excess mass spectrum at mid-rapidity in Au+Au collisions at sNN19.6 and 200 GeV Citation Details In-Document Search Title:...

  2. Corrective Actin Tracking System CATS User's Guide for Direct...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    09072004 Corrective Action Tracking System (CATS) User's Guide for Direct Web Access Document Number EH-33-2004-09-0001.Ver.4.0 The United States Department of...

  3. Verification of full functional correctness for imperative linked data structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zee, Karen K

    2010-01-01

    We present the verification of full functional correctness for a collection of imperative linked data structures implemented in Java. A key technique that makes this verification possible is a novel, integrated proof ...

  4. Proof Plans for the Correction of False Conjectures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bundy, Alan; Monroy, Raul; Ireland, Andrew

    1994-01-01

    Theorem proving is the systematic derivation of a mathcmaticM proof from a set of axioms by the use of rules of inference. We ~re interested in a related but far less explored problem: the analysis and correction of ...

  5. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 573: Alpha Contaminated Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 573 is located in Area 5 of the Nevada National Security Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 573 is a grouping of sites where there has been a suspected release of contamination associated with non-nuclear experiments and nuclear testing. This document describes the planned investigation of CAU 573, which comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): • 05-23-02, GMX Alpha Contaminated Area • 05-45-01, Atmospheric Test Site - Hamilton These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives.

  6. Power Corrections and Renormalons in Deep Inelastic Structure Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Dasgupta; B. R. Webber

    1996-04-23

    We study the power corrections (infrared renormalon contributions) to the coefficient functions for non-singlet deep inelastic structure functions due to gluon vacuum polarization insertions in one-loop graphs. Remarkably, for all the structure functions $F_1$, $F_2$, $F_3$ and $g_1$, there are only two such contributions, corresponding to $1/Q^2$ and $1/Q^4$ power corrections. We compute their dependence on Bjorken $x$. The results could be used to model the dominant higher-twist contributions.

  7. Estimation of Power Corrections to Hadronic Event Shapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. R. Webber

    1994-08-03

    Power corrections to hadronic event shapes are estimated using a recently suggested relationship between perturbative and non-perturbative effects in QCD. The infrared cutoff dependence of perturbative calculations is related to non-perturbative contributions with the same dependence on the energy scale $Q$. Corrections proportional to $1/Q$ are predicted, in agreement with experiment. An empirical proportionality between the magnitudes of perturbative and non-perturbative coefficients is noted.

  8. Calculation of Power Corrections to Hadronic Event Shapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. L. Dokshitzer; B. R. Webber

    1995-04-04

    We compute power corrections to hadronic event shapes in $e^+e^-$ annihilation, assuming an infrared regular behaviour of the effective coupling $\\alpha_s$. With the integral of $\\alpha_s$ over the infrared region as the only non-perturbative parameter, also measured in heavy quark physics, we can account for the empirical features of $1/Q$ corrections to the mean values of various event shapes.

  9. Suboptimal quantum-error-correcting procedure based on semidefinite programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naoki Yamamoto; Shinji Hara; Koji Tsumura

    2006-06-13

    In this paper, we consider a simplified error-correcting problem: for a fixed encoding process, to find a cascade connected quantum channel such that the worst fidelity between the input and the output becomes maximum. With the use of the one-to-one parametrization of quantum channels, a procedure finding a suboptimal error-correcting channel based on a semidefinite programming is proposed. The effectiveness of our method is verified by an example of the bit-flip channel decoding.

  10. Method and system for photoconductive detector signal correction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carangelo, R.M.; Hamblen, D.G.; Brouillette, C.R.

    1992-08-04

    A corrective factor is applied so as to remove anomalous features from the signal generated by a photoconductive detector, and to thereby render the output signal highly linear with respect to the energy of incident, time-varying radiation. The corrective factor may be applied through the use of either digital electronic data processing means or analog circuitry, or through a combination of those effects. 5 figs.

  11. Assessment and Corrective Management for Fish Populations in Small Impoundments. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anonymous,

    1985-01-01

    to the pondowner for correcting unbalanced or undesirable fish populations. These include renovation, harvest manipu lation and supplemental stocking. However, if unsatisfactory fish populations are a result of poor water quality, improper pond design or an over...-abundance of aquatic vegetation, the suggested corrective techniques alone may not be successful. Renovation Total renovation using rotenone should be considered for a farm pond if species such as gar, bowfin, flathead catfish, chain pickerel, black bullheads...

  12. Systematic quantum corrections to screening in thermonuclear fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chitanvis, S M

    2006-01-01

    We develop a series expansion of the plasma screening length away from the classical limit in powers of $\\hbar^{2}$. It is shown that the leading order quantum correction increases the screening length in solar conditions by approximately 2% while it decreases the fusion rate by approximately $ 0.34%$. We also calculate the next higher order quantum correction which turns out to be approximately 0.05%.

  13. Systematic quantum corrections to screening in thermonuclear fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shirish M. Chitanvis

    2006-06-13

    We develop a series expansion of the plasma screening length away from the classical limit in powers of $\\hbar^{2}$. It is shown that the leading order quantum correction increases the screening length in solar conditions by approximately 2% while it decreases the fusion rate by approximately $ 0.34%$. We also calculate the next higher order quantum correction which turns out to be approximately 0.05%.

  14. Chiral corrections and the axial charge of the delta

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang Fujiun; Tiburzi, Brian C.

    2008-07-01

    Chiral corrections to the delta axial charge are determined using heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory. Knowledge of this axial coupling is necessary to assess virtual-delta contributions to nucleon and delta observables. We give isospin relations useful for a lattice determination of the axial coupling. Furthermore, we detail partially quenched chiral corrections, which are relevant to address partial quenching and/or mixed action errors in lattice calculations of the delta axial charge.

  15. Method and system for photoconductive detector signal correction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carangelo, Robert M. (Glastonbury, CT); Hamblen, David G. (East Hampton, CT); Brouillette, Carl R. (West Hartford, CT)

    1992-08-04

    A corrective factor is applied so as to remove anomalous features from the signal generated by a photoconductive detector, and to thereby render the output signal highly linear with respect to the energy of incident, time-varying radiation. The corrective factor may be applied through the use of either digital electronic data processing means or analog circuitry, or through a combination of those effects.

  16. The Energy Efficiency Potential of Global Transport to 2050 ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Energy Efficiency Potential of Global Transport to 2050 The Energy Efficiency Potential of Global Transport to 2050 Broad view of sustainability of global transportation...

  17. Institutionalizing Unsustainability: The Paradox of Global Climate Governance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevenson, Hayley

    2013-01-01

    national Climate Governance. Global Environmental Politicsof Global Climate Governance change and other environmentalenvironmental foreign policymakers in responding to global climate governance

  18. The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership An article describing the small scale reactors in the GNEP. The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership More...

  19. Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 547: Miscellaneous Contaminated Waste Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Krauss

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this CADD/CAP is to present the corrective action alternatives (CAAs) evaluated for CAU 547, provide justification for selection of the recommended alternative, and describe the plan for implementing the selected alternative. Corrective Action Unit 547 consists of the following three corrective action sites (CASs): (1) CAS 02-37-02, Gas Sampling Assembly; (2) CAS 03-99-19, Gas Sampling Assembly; and(3) CAS 09-99-06, Gas Sampling Assembly. The gas sampling assemblies consist of inactive process piping, equipment, and instrumentation that were left in place after completion of underground safety experiments. The purpose of these safety experiments was to confirm that a nuclear explosion would not occur in the case of an accidental detonation of the high-explosive component of the device. The gas sampling assemblies allowed for the direct sampling of the gases and particulates produced by the safety experiments. Corrective Action Site 02-37-02 is located in Area 2 of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and is associated with the Mullet safety experiment conducted in emplacement borehole U2ag on October 17, 1963. Corrective Action Site 03-99-19 is located in Area 3 of the NNSS and is associated with the Tejon safety experiment conducted in emplacement borehole U3cg on May 17, 1963. Corrective Action Site 09-99-06 is located in Area 9 of the NNSS and is associated with the Player safety experiment conducted in emplacement borehole U9cc on August 27, 1964. The CAU 547 CASs were investigated in accordance with the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to determine and implement appropriate corrective actions for CAU 547. Existing radiological survey data and historical knowledge of the CASs were sufficient to meet the DQOs and evaluate CAAs without additional investigation. As a result, further investigation of the CAU 547 CASs was not required. The following CAAs were identified for the gas sampling assemblies: (1) clean closure, (2) closure in place, (3) modified closure in place, (4) no further action (with administrative controls), and (5) no further action. Based on the CAAs evaluation, the recommended corrective action for the three CASs in CAU 547 is closure in place. This corrective action will involve construction of a soil cover on top of the gas sampling assembly components and establishment of use restrictions at each site. The closure in place alternative was selected as the best and most appropriate corrective action for the CASs at CAU 547 based on the following factors: (1) Provides long-term protection of human health and the environment; (2) Minimizes short-term risk to site workers in implementing corrective action; (3) Is easily implemented using existing technology; (4) Complies with regulatory requirements; (5) Fulfills FFACO requirements for site closure; (6) Does not generate transuranic waste requiring offsite disposal; (7) Is consistent with anticipated future land use of the areas (i.e., testing and support activities); and (8) Is consistent with other NNSS site closures where contamination was left in place.

  20. Global Analysis of Solar Neutrino and KamLAND Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. B. Balantekin; H. Yuksel

    2003-01-13

    A global analysis of the data from all the solar neutrino experiments combined with the recent KamLAND data is presented. A formula frequently used in the literature gives survival probability for three active solar neutrino flavors in terms of a suitably-modified two-flavor survival probability. Corrections to this formula, which depend on $\\theta_{13}$ and $\\delta m_{31}^2$, are calculated. For the mass scale suggested by the atmospheric neutrino experiments the contributions of $\\delta m_{31}^2$ to these corrections is found to be negligible. The role of $\\theta_{13}$ in solar neutrino physics is elaborated. For electron neutrino oscillations into another active flavor, we find best fit values of $\\tan^2 \\theta_{12} \\sim 0.46$, $\\tan^2 \\theta_{13} \\sim 0$, and $\\delta m_{21}^2 \\sim 7.1 \\times 10^{-5}$ eV$^2$. It is found that the combined solar neutrino and KamLAND date provide the limit $\\cos^4 \\theta_{13} < 0.8$ at the 90 % confidence level.

  1. About GE Global Research Center | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of raregovAboutRecovery Act Recovery ActARM OverviewAbout GE Global Research

  2. Global Research on On The Verge | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Low LETUseful LinksGlass StrongerGlobalOn The Verge

  3. Fault-Tolerant Error Correction with the Gauge Color Code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin J. Brown; Naomi H. Nickerson; Dan E. Browne

    2015-08-03

    The gauge color code is a quantum error-correcting code with local syndrome measurements that, remarkably, admits a universal transversal gate set without the need for resource-intensive magic state distillation. A result of recent interest, proposed by Bomb\\'{i}n, shows that the subsystem structure of the gauge color code admits an error-correction protocol that achieves tolerance to noisy measurements without the need for repeated measurements, so called single-shot error correction. Here, we demonstrate the promise of single-shot error correction by designing a two-part decoder and investigate its performance. We simulate fault-tolerant error correction with the gauge color code by repeatedly applying our proposed error-correction protocol to deal with errors that occur continuously to the underlying physical qubits of the code over the duration that quantum information is stored. We estimate a sustainable error rate, i.e. the threshold for the long time limit, of $ \\sim 0.31\\%$ for a phenomenological noise model using a simple decoding algorithm.

  4. Mathematics Of Ice To Aid Global Warming Forecasts Mathematics Of Ice To Aid Global Warming Forecasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    Mathematics Of Ice To Aid Global Warming Forecasts Mathematics Of Ice To Aid Global Warming forecasts of how global warming will affect polar icepacks. See also: Earth & Climate q Global Warming q the effects of climate warming, and its presence greatly reduces solar heating of the polar oceans." "Sea ice

  5. Impact of global dimming and brightening on global warming Martin Wild,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    Impact of global dimming and brightening on global warming Martin Wild,1 Atsumu Ohmura,1 and Knut February 2007. [1] Speculations on the impact of variations in surface solar radiation on global warming was responsible for the observed warming. To disentangle surface solar and greenhouse influences on global warming

  6. Global Warming Politics in a Post-Environmental World 1 Global Warming Politics in a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global Warming Politics in a Post-Environmental World 1 Global Warming Politics in a Post Warming Politics in a Post-Environmental World 3 Global Warming Politics in a Post-Environmental World Worry About Global Warming.. 14 Everybody Loses on Fuel Efficiency

  7. Global Biodiesel Market Trends,Global Biodiesel Market Trends, Outlook and OpportunitiesOutlook and Opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global Biodiesel Market Trends,Global Biodiesel Market Trends, Outlook and OpportunitiesPresident, Emerging Markets Online http://www.emerginghttp://www.emerging--markets.commarkets.com Author, Biodiesel 2020: A Global Market SurveyAuthor, Biodiesel 2020: A Global Market Survey Columnist

  8. Essays on the Financial Crisis and Globalization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Nirvikar

    2009-01-01

    with known principles of market design, and create financialfor thinking about market design. Relationships, and theinstead, better market design is the correct prescription.

  9. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 370: T-4 Atmospheric Test Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2009-05-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 370, T-4 Atmospheric Test Site, located in Area 4 at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Corrective Action Unit 370 is comprised of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 04-23-01, Atmospheric Test Site T-4. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 370 due to the implementation of the corrective action of closure in place with administrative controls. To achieve this, corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from June 25, 2008, through April 2, 2009, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 370: T-4 Atmospheric Test Site and Record of Technical Change No. 1.

  10. Economic Globalization and a Nuclear Renaissance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Thomas W.; Johnson, Wayne L.; Parker, Brian M.

    2001-10-22

    The phenomenon of globalization has become increasingly well recognized, documented, and analyzed in the last several years. Globalization, the integration of markets and intra-firm competition on a worldwide basis, involves complex behavioral and mindset changes within a firm that facilitate global competition. The changes revolve around efficient information flow and rapid deployment of technology. The objective of this report is to examine the probable characteristics of a global nuclear renaissance and its broad implications for industry structure and export control relative to nuclear technology. The question of how a modern renaissance would affect the trend toward globalization of the nuclear industry is addressed.

  11. Corrective action decision document for the Roller Coaster Lagoons and North Disposal Trench (Corrective Action Unit Number 404)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-03-26

    The North Disposal Trench, located north of the eastern most lagoon, was installed in 1963 to receive solid waste and construction debris from the Operation Roller Coaster man camp. Subsequent to Operation Roller Coaster, the trench continued to receive construction debris and range cleanup debris (including ordnance) from Sandia National Laboratories and other operators. A small hydrocarbon spill occurred during Voluntary Corrective Action (VCA) activities (VCA Spill Area) at an area associated with the North Disposal Trench Corrective Action Site (CAS). Remediation activities at this site were conducted in 1995. A corrective action investigation was conducted in September of 1996 following the Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP); the detailed results of that investigation are presented in Appendix A. The Roller Coaster Lagoons and North Disposal Trench are located at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), a part of the Nellis Air Force Range, which is approximately 225 kilometers (140 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, by air.

  12. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 190: Contaminated Waste Sites Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wickline, Alfred

    2006-12-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 190 is located in Areas 11 and 14 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 190 is comprised of the four Corrective Action Sites (CASs) listed below: (1) 11-02-01, Underground Centrifuge; (2) 11-02-02, Drain Lines and Outfall; (3) 11-59-01, Tweezer Facility Septic System; and (4) 14-23-01, LTU-6 Test Area. These sites are being investigated because existing information is insufficient on the nature and extent of potential contamination to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI). The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on August 24, 2006, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture, and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 190. The scope of the CAU 190 CAI includes the following activities: (1) Move surface debris and/or materials, as needed, to facilitate sampling; (2) Conduct radiological and geophysical surveys; (3) Perform field screening; (4) Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present; (5) If COCs are present, collect additional step-out samples to define the lateral and vertical extent of the contamination; (6) Collect samples of source material, if present, to determine the potential for a release; (7) Collect samples of investigation-derived waste, as needed, for waste management and minimization purposes; and (8) Collect quality control samples. This Corrective Action Investigation Document (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) agreed to by the State of Nevada, U.S. Department of Energy, and U.S. Department of Defense. Under the FFACO, this CAIP will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Field work will be conducted following approval.

  13. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 143: Area 25 Contaminated Waste Dumps, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. L. Gustafason

    2001-02-01

    This Corrective Action Plan (CAP) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 143: Area 25 Contaminated Waste Dumps, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996. This CAP provides the methodology for implementing the approved corrective action alternative as listed in the Corrective Action Decision Document (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, 2000). The CAU includes two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 25-23-09, Contaminated Waste Dump Number 1; and 25-23-03, Contaminated Waste Dump Number 2. Investigation of CAU 143 was conducted in 1999. Analytes detected during the corrective action investigation were evaluated against preliminary action levels to determine constituents of concern for CAU 143. Radionuclide concentrations in disposal pit soil samples associated with the Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility West Trenches, the Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility East Trestle Pit, and the Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility Trench are greater than normal background concentrations. These constituents are identified as constituents of concern for their respective CASs. Closure-in-place with administrative controls involves use restrictions to minimize access and prevent unauthorized intrusive activities, earthwork to fill depressions to original grade, placing additional clean cover material over the previously filled portion of some of the trenches, and placing secondary or diversion berm around pertinent areas to divert storm water run-on potential.

  14. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 232: Area 25 Sewage Lagoons Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE/NV Operations Office

    1999-05-01

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the US Department of Defense. The CAIP is a document that provides or references all of the specific information for investigation activities associated with Corrective Action Units (CAUs) or Corrective Action Sites (CASs). According to the FFACO, CASs are sites potentially requiring corrective action(s) and may include solid waste management units or individual disposal or release sites. A CAU consists of one or more CASs grouped together based on geography, technical similarity, or agency responsibility for the purpose of determining corrective actions. This CAIP contains the environmental sample collection objectives and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at CAU 232, Area 25 Sewage Lagoons. Corrective Action Unit 232 consists of CAS 25-03-01, Sewage Lagoon, located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1) (DOE/NV, 1996a). The Area 25 Sewage Lagoons (Figure 1-2) (IT, 1999b) are located approximately 0.3 mi south of the Test Cell 'C' (TCC) Facility and were used for the discharge of sanitary effluent from the TCC facility. For purposes of this discussion, this site will be referred to as either CAU 232 or the sewage lagoons.

  15. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 528: Polychlorinated Biphenyls Contamination, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2003-05-08

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 528, Polychlorinated Biphenyls Contamination (PCBs), Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in the southwestern portion of Area 25 on the NTS in Jackass Flats (adjacent to Test Cell C [TCC]), CAU 528 consists of Corrective Action Site 25-27-03, Polychlorinated Biphenyls Surface Contamination. Test Cell C was built to support the Nuclear Rocket Development Station (operational between 1959 and 1973) activities including conducting ground tests and static firings of nuclear engine reactors. Although CAU 528 was not considered as a direct potential source of PCBs and petroleum contamination, two potential sources of contamination have nevertheless been identified from an unknown source in concentrations that could potentially pose an unacceptable risk to human health and/or the environment. This CAU's close proximity to TCC prompted Shaw to collect surface soil samples, which have indicated the presence of PCBs extending throughout the area to the north, east, south, and even to the edge of the western boundary. Based on this information, more extensive field investigation activities are being planned, the results of which are to be used to support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

  16. Are we seeing global warming?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hasselmann, K.

    1997-05-09

    Despite considerable progress, the question of whether the observed gradual increase in global mean temperature over the last century is indeed caused by human activities or is simply an expression of natural climate variation on a larger spatial and temporal scales remains a controversial issue. To answer this question three things are needed: prediction of the anthropogenic climate change signal; determination of the natural climate variability noise; and computation of the signal-to-noise ratio and test of whether the ratio exceeds some predefined statistical detection threshold. This article discusses all these issues and the uncertainties involved in getting definitive answers. 12 refs., 1 fig.

  17. Non-Abelian Global Vortices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minoru Eto; Eiji Nakano; Muneto Nitta

    2009-03-09

    We study topologically stable non-Abelian global vortices in the U(N) linear sigma model. The profile functions of the solutions are numerically obtained. We investigate the behaviour of vortices in two limits in which masses of traceless or trace parts of massive bosons are much larger than the others. In the limit that the traceless parts are much heavier, we find a somewhat bizarre vortex solution carrying a non-integer U(1) winding number 1/\\sqrt{N} which is irrational in general.

  18. Global Collaboration on Energy Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brueske, S.

    2015-01-01

    stream_source_info ESL-IE-15-06-36.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 16268 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name ESL-IE-15-06-36.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 June 4, 2015 IETC? slide 1... ENERGY MANAGEMENT WORKING GROUP (EWMG) Global Collaboration on Energy Management Industrial Energy Technology Conference June 3, 2015 Sabine Brueske, Energetics Incorporated; presenting on behalf of Graziella Siciliano, U.S. Department of Energy ESL...

  19. Endeavor Global | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, AlabamaETEC GmbH JumpEllenville, New York:Corporation JumpEncap DevelopmentOpenGlobal

  20. Solar Global | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc JumpHeter Battery TechnologySocovoltaic SystemsInternationalGlobal Jump to:

  1. Global Warming and Human Health

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Low LETUseful LinksGlass StrongerGlobalOn1

  2. Collaborating for Quality and Safety: Implementing Therapeutic Phlebotomy in Connecticut Correctional Facility Infirmaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    Collaborating for Quality and Safety: Implementing Therapeutic Phlebotomy in Connecticut to be performed in Connecticut Correctional facility medical unit infirmaries, and improve the patient care in Connecticut Correctional Managed Heath Care (CMHC)Connecticut Correctional Managed Heath Care (CMHC) medical

  3. Design techniques for graph-based error-correcting codes and their applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lan, Ching Fu

    2006-04-12

    -correcting (channel) coding. The main idea of error-correcting codes is to add redundancy to the information to be transmitted so that the receiver can explore the correlation between transmitted information and redundancy and correct or detect errors caused...

  4. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 562: Waste Systems Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Krause

    2010-08-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) presents information supporting the selection of corrective action alternatives (CAAs) leading to the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 562, Waste Systems, in Areas 2, 23, and 25 of the Nevada Test Site, Nevada. This complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. Corrective Action Unit 562 comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): • 02-26-11, Lead Shot • 02-44-02, Paint Spills and French Drain • 02-59-01, Septic System • 02-60-01, Concrete Drain • 02-60-02, French Drain • 02-60-03, Steam Cleaning Drain • 02-60-04, French Drain • 02-60-05, French Drain • 02-60-06, French Drain • 02-60-07, French Drain • 23-60-01, Mud Trap Drain and Outfall • 23-99-06, Grease Trap • 25-60-04, Building 3123 Outfalls The purpose of this CADD is to identify and provide the rationale for the recommendation of CAAs for the 13 CASs within CAU 562. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from July 27, 2009, through May 12, 2010, as set forth in the CAU 562 Corrective Action Investigation Plan. The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill the following data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process: • Determine whether COCs are present. • If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent. • Provide sufficient information and data to complete appropriate corrective actions. A data quality assessment (DQA) performed on the CAU 562 data demonstrated the quality and acceptability of the data for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Analytes detected during the CAI were evaluated against appropriate final action levels (FALs) to identify the COCs for each CAS. The results of the CAI identified COCs at 10 of the 13 CASs in CAU 562, and thus corrective action is required. Assessment of the data generated from investigation activities conducted at CAU 562 is shown in Table ES-1. Based on the evaluation of analytical data from the CAI, review of future and current operations at the 13 CASs, and the detailed and comparative analysis of the potential CAAs, the following corrective actions are recommended for CAU 562. • No further action is the preferred corrective action for CASs 02-60-01, 02-60-06, and 02-60-07. • Clean closure is the preferred corrective action for CASs 02-26-11, 02-44-02, 02-59-01, 02-60-02, 02-60-03, 02-60-04, 02-60-05, 23-60-01, 23-99-06, and 25-60-04. The preferred CAAs were evaluated on technical merit focusing on performance, reliability, feasibility, safety, and cost. The alternatives were judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated. The alternatives meet all applicable federal and state regulations for closure of the site and will reduce potential exposures to contaminated media to acceptable levels. The DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office provides the following recommendations: • No further corrective action is required at CASs 02-60-01, 02-60-06, and 02-60-07. • Clean closure is recommended for the remaining 10 CASs in CAU 562. • A Corrective Action Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection that contains a detailed description of the proposed actions that will be taken to implement the selected corrective actions.

  5. WHAT'S IN A NAME? GLOBAL WARMING VERSUS CLIMATE CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, Gary L.

    WHAT'S IN A NAME? GLOBAL WARMING VERSUS CLIMATE CHANGE May 2014 #12;What's In A Name? Global Warming vs. Climate Change 1 TABLE OF CONTENTS PREFACE NATIONAL SURVEY STUDY 2: GLOBAL WARMING VS. CLIMATE CHANGE............................ 10 Is global

  6. Engineering change in global climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, S.H.

    1996-12-31

    {open_quotes}With increased public focus on global warming and in the wake of the intense heat waves, drought, fires, and super-hurricanes that occurred in 1988 and 1989, interest in geoengineering has surged,{close_quotes} says Stephen H. Schneider, professor of biological science at Stanford University in Stanford, California. One scheme set forth in a National Research Council report proposes using 16-inch naval guns to fire aerosol shells into the stratosphere in hopes of offsetting {open_quotes}the radiative effects of increasing carbon dioxide,{close_quotes} Schneider says. Schneider, however, would prefer that we {open_quotes}seek measures that can cure our global {open_quote}addiction{close_quote} to polluting practices.{close_quotes} Rather than playing God, he says we should {open_quotes}stick to being human and pursue problem - solving methods currently within our grasp.{close_quotes} Such strategies include efforts to promote energy efficiency and reduce our reliance on automobiles.

  7. Correcting Quadrupole Roll in Magnetic Lenses with Skew Quadrupoles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walstrom, Peter Lowell

    2014-11-10

    Quadrupole rolls (i.e. rotation around the magnet axis) are known to be a significant source of image blurring in magnetic quadrupole lenses. These rolls may be caused by errors in mechanical mounting of quadrupoles, by uneven radiation-induced demagnetization of permanent-magnet quadrupoles, etc. Here a four-quadrupole ×10 lens with so-called ”Russian” or A -B B-A symmetry is used as a model problem. Existing SLAC 1/2 in. bore high-gradient quadrupoles are used in the design. The dominant quadrupole roll effect is changes in the first-order part of the transfer map (the R matrix) from the object to the image plane (Note effects on the R matrix can be of first order in rotation angle for some R-matrix elements and second order in rotation angle for other elements, as shown below). It is possible to correct roll-induced image blur by mechanically adjusting the roll angle of one or more of the quadrupoles. Usually, rotation of one quadrupole is sufficient to correct most of the combined effect of rolls in all four quadrupoles. There are drawbacks to this approach, however, since mechanical roll correction requires multiple entries into experimental area to make the adjustments, which are made according to their effect on images. An alternative is to use a single electromagnetic skew quadrupole corrector placed either between two of the quadrupoles or after the fourth quadrupole (so-called “non-local” correction). The basic feasibility of skew quadrupole correction of quadrupole roll effects is demonstrated here. Rolls of the third lens quadrupole of up to about 1 milliradian can be corrected with a 15 cm long skew quadrupole with a gradient of up to 1 T/m. Since the effect of rolls of the remaining three lens quadrupoles are lower, a weaker skew quadrupole can be used to correct them. Non-local correction of quadrupole roll effects by skew quadrupoles is shown to be about one-half as effective as local correction (i.e. rotating individual quadrupoles to zero roll angle or placing skew quadrupole correctors in the bores of main quadrupoles).

  8. Global atmospheric chemistry: Integrating over fractional cloud cover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neu, Jessica L; Prather, Michael J; Penner, Joyce E

    2007-01-01

    trace gases and atmospheric chemistry, in Climate Change2007 Global atmospheric chemistry: Integrating over2007), Global atmospheric chemistry: Integrating over

  9. Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    Consumption iii iv Sectoral Trends in Global Energy Use andenergy consumption scenarios. In applying this approach to global

  10. Correction of Magnetization Sextupole and Decapole in a 5 Centimeter Bore SSC Dipole Using Passive Superconductor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    The Idea of Passive Superconductor Correction," presented aton the Fermilab Passive Superconductor Test," ICFA Workshop,methods of passive superconductor correction will reduce

  11. Higher order corrections in minimal supergravity models of inflation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrara, Sergio; Kallosh, Renata; Linde, Andrei; Porrati, Massimo E-mail: kallosh@stanford.edu E-mail: massimo.porrati@nyu.edu

    2013-11-01

    We study higher order corrections in new minimal supergravity models of a single scalar field inflation. The gauging in these models leads to a massive vector multiplet and the D-term potential for the inflaton field with a coupling g{sup 2} ? 10{sup ?10}. In the de-Higgsed phase with vanishing g{sup 2}, the chiral and vector multiplets are non-interacting, and the potential vanishes. We present generic manifestly supersymmetric higher order corrections for these models. In particular, for a supersymmetric gravity model ?R+R{sup 2} we derive manifestly supersymmetric corrections corresponding to R{sup n}. The dual version corresponds to a standard supergravity model with a single scalar and a massive vector. It includes, in addition, higher Maxwell curvature/scalar interaction terms of the Born-Infeld type and a modified D-term scalar field potential. We use the dual version of the model to argue that higher order corrections do not affect the last 60 e-foldings of inflation; for example the ?R{sup 4} correction is irrelevant as long as ? < 10{sup 24}.

  12. Corrective measures evaluation report for technical area-v groundwater.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witt, Johnathan L (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID); Orr, Brennon R. (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID); Dettmers, Dana L. (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID); Hall, Kevin A. (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID); Howard, Hope (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID)

    2005-07-01

    This Corrective Measures Evaluation Report was prepared as directed by the Compliance Order on Consent issued by the New Mexico Environment Department to document the process of selecting the preferred remedial alternative for contaminated groundwater at Technical Area V. Supporting information includes background information about the site conditions and potential receptors and an overview of work performed during the Corrective Measures Evaluation. Evaluation of remedial alternatives included identification and description of four remedial alternatives, an overview of the evaluation criteria and approach, qualitative and quantitative evaluation of remedial alternatives, and selection of the preferred remedial alternative. As a result of the Corrective Measures Evaluation, it was determined that monitored natural attenuation of all contaminants of concern (trichloroethene, tetrachloroethene, and nitrate) was the preferred remedial alternative for implementation as the corrective measure to remediate contaminated groundwater at Technical Area V of Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico. Finally, design criteria to meet cleanup goals and objectives and the corrective measures implementation schedule for the preferred remedial alternative are presented.

  13. Bunch mode specific rate corrections for PILATUS3 detectors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Trueb, P.; Dejoie, C.; Kobas, M.; Pattison, P.; Peake, D. J.; Radicci, V.; Sobott, B. A.; Walko, D. A.; Broennimann, C.

    2015-04-09

    PILATUS X-ray detectors are in operation at many synchrotron beamlines around the world. This article reports on the characterization of the new PILATUS3 detector generation at high count rates. As for all counting detectors, the measured intensities have to be corrected for the dead-time of the counting mechanism at high photon fluxes. The large number of different bunch modes at these synchrotrons as well as the wide range of detector settings presents a challenge for providing accurate corrections. To avoid the intricate measurement of the count rate behaviour for every bunch mode, a Monte Carlo simulation of the counting mechanismmore »has been implemented, which is able to predict the corrections for arbitrary bunch modes and a wide range of detector settings. This article compares the simulated results with experimental data acquired at different synchrotrons. It is found that the usage of bunch mode specific corrections based on this simulation improves the accuracy of the measured intensities by up to 40% for high photon rates and highly structured bunch modes. For less structured bunch modes, the instant retrigger technology of PILATUS3 detectors substantially reduces the dependency of the rate correction on the bunch mode. The acquired data also demonstrate that the instant retrigger technology allows for data acquisition up to 15 million photons per second per pixel.« less

  14. 55-Gallon Drum Attenuation Corrections for Waste Assay Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casella, V.R.

    2002-04-03

    The present study shows how the percent attenuation for low-level waste (LLW), carbon-steel 55-gallon drums (44 and 46 mil) and for transuranic (TRU) DOT Type 7A 55-gallon drums (approximately 61 mil) changes with gamma energy from 60 keV to 1400 keV. Attenuation for these drums is in the range of 5 to 15 percent at energies from 400 to 1400 keV and from 15 to 35 percent at energies from 120 to 400 keV. At 60 keV, these drums attenuate 70-80 percent of the gamma rays. Correction factors were determined in order to correct for gamma attenuation of a TRU drum if a calibration is performed with a LLW drum. These correction factors increase the activities of the TRU drum by from 10 percent to 2 percent in the energy range of 165 to 1400 keV, with an increase of about 50 percent at 60 keV. Correction factors for TRU drums and for analyses without a drum were used to adjust the percent yield for frequently measured gamma rays, so that the assay libraries could be modified to provide the drum attenuation corrections.

  15. Coordinated joint motion control system with position error correction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Danko, George (Reno, NV)

    2011-11-22

    Disclosed are an articulated hydraulic machine supporting, control system and control method for same. The articulated hydraulic machine has an end effector for performing useful work. The control system is capable of controlling the end effector for automated movement along a preselected trajectory. The control system has a position error correction system to correct discrepancies between an actual end effector trajectory and a desired end effector trajectory. The correction system can employ one or more absolute position signals provided by one or more acceleration sensors supported by one or more movable machine elements. Good trajectory positioning and repeatability can be obtained. A two-joystick controller system is enabled, which can in some cases facilitate the operator's task and enhance their work quality and productivity.

  16. Characterization of quantum dynamics using quantum error correction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Omkar; R. Srikanth; S. Banerjee

    2015-01-27

    Characterizing noisy quantum processes is important to quantum computation and communication (QCC), since quantum systems are generally open. To date, all methods of characterization of quantum dynamics (CQD), typically implemented by quantum process tomography, are \\textit{off-line}, i.e., QCC and CQD are not concurrent, as they require distinct state preparations. Here we introduce a method, "quantum error correction based characterization of dynamics", in which the initial state is any element from the code space of a quantum error correcting code that can protect the state from arbitrary errors acting on the subsystem subjected to the unknown dynamics. The statistics of stabilizer measurements, with possible unitary pre-processing operations, are used to characterize the noise, while the observed syndrome can be used to correct the noisy state. Our method requires at most $2(4^n-1)$ configurations to characterize arbitrary noise acting on $n$ qubits.

  17. Relativistic corrections to prompt $J/\\psi$ photo- and hadroproduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Zhi-Guo

    2015-01-01

    We systematically calculate the relativistic corrections to prompt $J/\\psi$ photoproduction and hadroproduction using the factorization formalism of nonrelativistic QCD. Specifically, we include the ${}^3\\!S_1^{[1]}$ and ${}^3\\!P_{J}^{[1]}$ color-singlet and the ${}^3\\!S_1^{[8]}$, ${}^1\\!S_{0}^{[8]}$, and ${}^3\\!P_{J}^{[8]}$ color-octet channels as well as the effects due to the mixing between the ${}^3\\!S_1^{[8]}$ and ${}^3\\!D_1^{[8]}$ channels. We provide all the squared hard-scattering amplitudes in analytic form. Assuming the nonrelativistic-QCD long-distance matrix elements to satisfy the velocity scaling rules, we find the relativistic corrections to be appreciable, except in the ${}^3\\!S_1^{[1]}$ color-singlet channel of hadroproduction. We also observe significant differences in the line shapes of the relativistic corrections between photoproduction and hadroproduction.

  18. Differential equations to compute $\\hbar$ corrections of the trace formula

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabor Vattay

    1994-09-19

    In this paper a new method for computation of higher order corrections to the saddle point approximation of the Feynman path integral is discussed. The saddle point approximation leads to local Schr\\"odinger problems around classical orbits. Especially, the saddle point approximation leads to Schr\\"odinger problems around classical periodic orbits when it is applied to the trace of Green's function. These local Schr\\"odinger problems, in semiclassical approximation, can be solved exactly on the basis of local analytic functions. Then the corrections of the semiclassical result can be treated perturbatively. The strength of the perturbation is proportional to $\\hbar$. The perturbation problem leads to ordinary differential equations. We propose these equations for numerical calculation of corrections, since they can easily be solved by computers. We give quantum mechanical generalizations of the semiclassical zeta functions. Two simple examples are included in order to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method.

  19. Power corrections and renormalons in Drell-Yan production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Beneke; V. M Braun

    1995-06-30

    The resummed Drell-Yan cross section in the double-logarithmic approximation suffers from infrared renormalons. Their presence was interpreted as an indication for non-perturbative corrections of order $\\lqcd/(Q(1-z))$. We find that, once soft gluon emission is accurately taken into account, the leading renormalon divergence in the resummed cross section is cancelled by higher-order perturbative contributions in the exponent of the resummed cross section. From this evidence, `higher twist' corrections to the hard cross section in Drell-Yan production should therefore intervene only at order $\\lqcd^2/((Q^2 (1-z)^2)$ in the entire perturbative domain $Q (1-z) > \\lqcd$. We compare this result with hadronic event shape variables, comment on the potential universality of non-perturbative corrections to resummed cross sections, and on possible implications for phenomenology.

  20. Instanton corrections to the effective action of N=4 SYM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bianchi, Massimo; Wen, Congkao

    2015-01-01

    We compute the one-instanton effective action of N=4 super Yang-Mills theory with gauge group Sp(2N). The result can be written in a very compact and manifestly supersymmetric form involving an integral over the superspace of an irrational function of N=4 on-shell superfields. In the Coulomb branch, the instanton corrects both the MHV and next-to-next-MHV gluon couplings D^4F^{2n+2} and F^{2n+4} as well as their super-symmetrically related partners. We confirm at the non-perturbative level the non-renormalization theorems for MHV couplings F^{2n+2} that are expected to receive perturbative corrections only at n-loops. We compute also the one and two-loop corrections to the D^4F^4 coupling and show that its completion under SL(2,Z) duality is consistent with the one-instanton results of U(2) gauge group.

  1. Corrective measures evaluation work plan : Tijeras Arroyo Groundwater : revision 0.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wymore, Ryan A.; Collins, Sue S.; Skelly, Michael Francis; Koelsch, Michael C.

    2004-12-01

    This document, which is prepared as directed by the Compliance Order on Consent (COOC) issued by the New Mexico Environment Department, outlines a process to evaluate remedial alternatives to identify a corrective measure for the Sandia National Laboratories Tijeras Arroyo Groundwater (TAG). The COOC provides guidance for implementation of a Corrective Measures Evaluation (CME) for TAG. This Work Plan documents an initial screening of remedial technologies and presents a list of possible remedial alternatives for those technologies that passed the screening. This Work Plan outlines the methods for evaluating these remedial alternatives and describes possible site-specific evaluation activities necessary to estimate remedy effectiveness and cost. These methods will be reported in the CME Report. This Work Plan outlines the CME Report, including key components and a description of the corrective measures process.

  2. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 105 based on the implementation of the corrective actions. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from October 22, 2012, through May 23, 2013, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites; and in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices.

  3. Global warming, insurance losses and financial industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Low, N.C.

    1996-12-31

    Global warming causes extremely bad weather in the near term. They have already caught the attention of the insurance industry, as they suffered massive losses in the last decade. Twenty-one out of the 25 largest catastrophes in the US, mainly in the form of hurricanes have occurred in the last decade. The insurance industry has reacted by taking the risk of global warming in decisions as to pricing and underwriting decisions. But they have yet to take a more active role in regulating the factors that contributes to global warming. How global warming can impact the financial industry and the modern economy is explored. Insurance and modern financial derivatives are key to the efficient functioning of the modern economy, without which the global economy can still function but will take a giant step backward. Any risk as global warming that causes economic surprises will hamper the efficient working of the financial market and the modern economy.

  4. Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 104: Area 7 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2012-10-01

    CAU 104 comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): • 07-23-03, Atmospheric Test Site T-7C • 07-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site T7-1 • 07-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site • 07-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site T7-5a • 07-23-07, Atmospheric Test Site - Dog (T-S) • 07-23-08, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (T-S) • 07-23-09, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (T-S) • 07-23-10, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie • 07-23-11, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie • 07-23-12, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (Bus) • 07-23-13, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (Buster) • 07-23-14, Atmospheric Test Site - Ruth • 07-23-15, Atmospheric Test Site T7-4 • 07-23-16, Atmospheric Test Site B7-b • 07-23-17, Atmospheric Test Site - Climax These 15 CASs include releases from 30 atmospheric tests conducted in the approximately 1 square mile of CAU 104. Because releases associated with the CASs included in this CAU overlap and are not separate and distinguishable, these CASs are addressed jointly at the CAU level. The purpose of this CADD/CAP is to evaluate potential corrective action alternatives (CAAs), provide the rationale for the selection of recommended CAAs, and provide the plan for implementation of the recommended CAA for CAU 104. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from October 4, 2011, through May 3, 2012, as set forth in the CAU 104 Corrective Action Investigation Plan.

  5. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 383: Area E-Tunnel Sites, Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2010-03-15

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report (CADD/CR) was prepared by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 383, Area 12 E-Tunnel Sites, which is the joint responsibility of DTRA and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). This CADD/CR is consistent with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) agreed to by the State of Nevada, the DOE, and the U.S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 383 is comprised of three Corrective Action Sites (CASs) and two adjacent areas: • CAS 12-06-06, Muckpile • CAS 12-25-02, Oil Spill • CAS 12-28-02, Radioactive Material • Drainage below the Muckpile • Ponds 1, 2, and 3 The purpose of this CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation to support the recommendation for closure with no further corrective action, by placing use restrictions at the three CASs and two adjacent areas of CAU 383.

  6. Soil degradation, global warming and climate impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feddema, Johannes J.; Freire, Sergio Carneiro

    2001-01-01

    stream_size 21847 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Feddema_Soil_Degradation_Global_Warming.pdf.txt stream_source_info Feddema_Soil_Degradation_Global_Warming.pdf.txt Content-Encoding UTF-8 Content-Type text.... This study will demonstrate one methodology for assessing the potential large-scale impacts of soil degradation on African climates and water resources. In addition it will compare and contrast these impacts to those expected from global warming and compare...

  7. Global change research: Science and policy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rayner, S.

    1993-05-01

    This report characterizes certain aspects of the Global Change Research Program of the US Government, and its relevance to the short and medium term needs of policy makers in the public and private sectors. It addresses some of the difficulties inherent in the science and policy interface on the issues of global change. Finally, this report offers some proposals for improving the science for policy process in the context of global environmental change.

  8. Power Corrections to Event Shapes in Deep Inelastic Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Dasgupta; B. R. Webber

    1997-04-11

    We investigate the power-suppressed corrections to the mean values of various quantities that characterise the shapes of final states in deep inelastic lepton scattering. Our method is based on an analysis of one-loop Feynman graphs containing a massive gluon, which is equivalent to the evaluation of leading infrared renormalon contributions. As in $\\ee$ annihilation, we find that the leading corrections are proportional to $1/Q$. We give quantitative estimates based on the hypothesis of a universal low-energy effective coupling.

  9. Radiative corrections in fermion bags bound by Higgs boson exchange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Yu. Kuchiev; V. V. Flambaum

    2011-01-16

    Radiative corrections for several heavy fermions bound together via the Higgs boson exchange are studied. The fermion bags considered include 12, or fewer, fermions occupying the lowest S_{1/2} shell. It is shown that for `moderately heavy' fermions with masses 0.4< m c^2< 1 TeV the radiative corrections are small, 10^{-2}, and have an attractive nature. Therefore they do not put existence of the fermion bag in doubt. This proves that these fermion bags can exist in nature.

  10. Thermodynamically constrained correction to ab initio equations of state

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    French, Martin; Mattsson, Thomas R.

    2014-07-07

    We show how equations of state generated by density functional theory methods can be augmented to match experimental data without distorting the correct behavior in the high- and low-density limits. The technique is thermodynamically consistent and relies on knowledge of the density and bulk modulus at a reference state and an estimation of the critical density of the liquid phase. We apply the method to four materials representing different classes of solids: carbon, molybdenum, lithium, and lithium fluoride. It is demonstrated that the corrected equations of state for both the liquid and solid phases show a significantly reduced dependence of the exchange-correlation functional used.

  11. Parton distributions in the presence of target mass corrections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F. M. Steffens,M. D. Brown,W. Melnitchouk,S. Sanches

    2012-12-01

    We study the consistency of parton distribution functions in the presence of target mass corrections (TMCs) at low Q{sup 2}. We review the standard operator product expansion derivation of TMCs in both x- and moment-space, and present the results in closed form for all unpolarized structure functions and their moments. To avoid the unphysical region at x > 1 in the standard analysis, we propose an expansion of the target mass corrected structure functions order by order in M{sup 2}/Q{sup 2}, and assess the convergence properties of the resulting forms numerically.

  12. Holographic 1/Nc correction from the chiral condensate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bum-Hoon Lee; Chanyong Park; Sunyoung Shin

    2010-10-06

    We investigate a gravity solution containing the gravitational backreaction of the massive scalar field dual to the chiral condensate, which corresponds to $1/N_c$ correction. In general, condensation changes the vacuum structure, so the present dual geometry is appropriate to describe the chiral condensate vacuum in the gauge theory side. After constructing the dual geometry numerically and applying the hard wall model we study the effect of the $1/N_c$ correction on the lightest meson spectra, which improves the values for lightest meson masses into the observations. In addition, we investigate the chiral condensate dependence the binding energy of heavy quarkonium.

  13. String Loop Corrections to Stable Non-BPS Branes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. D. Lambert; I. Sachs

    2000-10-31

    We calculate the string loop corrections to the tachyon potential for stable non-BPS Dp-branes on the orbifold T^4/Z_2. We find a non-trivial phase structure and we show that, after tachyon condensation, the non-BPS Dp-branes are attracted to each other for p=0,1,2. We then identify the corresponding closed string boundary states together with the massless long range fields they excite. For p=3,4 the string loop correction diverge. We identify the massless closed string fields responsible for these divergencies and regularise the partition function using a Fischler-Susskind mechanism.

  14. Cosmic Rays and Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Sloan; A W Wolfendale

    2007-06-28

    It has been claimed by others that observed temporal correlations of terrestrial cloud cover with `the cosmic ray intensity' are causal. The possibility arises, therefore, of a connection between cosmic rays and Global Warming. If true, the implications would be very great. We have examined this claim to look for evidence to corroborate it. So far we have not found any and so our tentative conclusions are to doubt it. Such correlations as appear are more likely to be due to the small variations in solar irradiance, which, of course, correlate with cosmic rays. We estimate that less than 15% of the 11-year cycle warming variations are due to cosmic rays and less than 2% of the warming over the last 35 years is due to this cause.

  15. Cosmic Rays and Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sloan, T

    2007-01-01

    It has been claimed by others that observed temporal correlations of terrestrial cloud cover with `the cosmic ray intensity' are causal. The possibility arises, therefore, of a connection between cosmic rays and Global Warming. If true, the implications would be very great. We have examined this claim to look for evidence to corroborate it. So far we have not found any and so our tentative conclusions are to doubt it. Such correlations as appear are more likely to be due to the small variations in solar irradiance, which, of course, correlate with cosmic rays. We estimate that less than 15% of the 11-year cycle warming variations are due to cosmic rays and less than 2% of the warming over the last 35 years is due to this cause.

  16. Cosmic Rays and Global Warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sloan, T.; Wolfendale, A. W.

    2008-01-24

    Some workers have claimed that the observed temporal correlations of (low level) terrestrial cloud cover with the cosmic ray intensity changes, due to solar modulation, are causal. The possibility arises, therefore, of a connection between cosmic rays and Global Warming. If true, the implications would be very great. We have examined this claim in some detail. So far, we have not found any evidence in support and so our conclusions are to doubt it. From the absence of corroborative evidence we estimate that less than 15% at the 95% confidence level, of the 11-year cycle warming variations are due to cosmic rays and less than 2% of the warming over the last 43 years is due to this cause. The origin of the correlation itself is probably the cycle of solar irradiance although there is, as yet, no certainty.

  17. Global change monitoring with lichens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Insarov, G.

    1997-12-31

    Environmental monitoring involves observations and assessment of changes in ecosystems and their components caused by anthropogenetic influence. An ideal monitoring system enables quantification of the contemporary state of the environment and detect changes in it. An important function of monitoring is to assess environment quality of areas that are not affected by local anthropogenic impacts, i.e. background areas. In background areas terrestrial ecosystems are mainly affected by such anthropogenic factors as lowered air pollution and global climate change. Assessment of biotic responses to altered climatic and atmospheric conditions provides an important basis for ecosystem management and environmental decision making. Without the ability to make such assessment, sustainability of ecosystems as a support system for humans remains uncertain.

  18. Coal mine methane global review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-07-01

    This is the second edition of the Coal Mine Methane Global Overview, updated in the summer of 2008. This document contains individual, comprehensive profiles that characterize the coal and coal mine methane sectors of 33 countries - 22 methane to market partners and an additional 11 coal-producing nations. The executive summary provides summary tables that include statistics on coal reserves, coal production, methane emissions, and CMM projects activity. An International Coal Mine Methane Projects Database accompanies this overview. It contains more detailed and comprehensive information on over two hundred CMM recovery and utilization projects around the world. Project information in the database is updated regularly. This document will be updated annually. Suggestions for updates and revisions can be submitted to the Administrative Support Group and will be incorporate into the document as appropriate.

  19. Working Fluids Low Global Warming Potential Refrigerants

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    by 50% compared to today's best common practice - Alternative refrigerants with low global warming potential (GWP) are needed to achieve these goals - Provide guidance to the...

  20. Global Environmental Change and Human Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunnas, Jan

    2011-01-01

    impacts and responses to environmental change making it anhuman security or environmental change if the lecturer isReview: Global Environmental Change and Human Security By

  1. Social Movements and the Problem of 'Globalization'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch, C

    1998-01-01

    Special issue, “Social Movements,” Social Research 52, no.effort. Magnusson, “Social Movements and the Global City,”Special Issue: “Social Movements and World Politics”) 23,

  2. A Global Optimization Approach to Quantum Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiaofei Huang

    2006-05-25

    This paper presents a global optimization approach to quantum mechanics, which describes the most fundamental dynamics of the universe. It suggests that the wave-like behavior of (sub)atomic particles could be the critical characteristic of a global optimization method deployed by nature so that (sub)atomic systems can find their ground states corresponding to the global minimum of some energy function associated with the system. The classic time-independent Schrodinger equation is shown to be derivable from the global optimization method to support this argument.

  3. Plenia Locatel Group: Globalizing from Venezuela

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibson, Cyrus

    2009-05-01

    In 2009 the founders and top executives of Plenia Locatel Group, a retail business in Venezuela specializing in health care products and services, were planning a global

  4. Globalization of Innovation: The Personal Computing Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dedrick, Jason; Kraemer, Kenneth L

    2007-01-01

    1990. Architectural innovation: the reconfiguration of2006. Global sourcing in innovation: theory and evidenceM. 1990. Radical innovation and corporate regeneration.

  5. Pax Global: Compromise Agreement (2013-SE-1413)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE and Pax Global, Inc., entered into a Compromise Agreement to resolve a case involving the distribution in commerce of noncompliant freezers.

  6. Susan Murabana - Astronomer, Global Hands On Universe

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Murabana, Susan

    2013-05-29

    Susan Murabana is working to bring astronomy education to Africa through Global Hands-On Universe, a program founded by Berkeley Lab astronomer Carl Pennypacker.

  7. ADVANCING A POLITICAL ECOLOGY OF GLOBAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bateman, Ian J.

    environmental issues: deforestation, desertification, biodiversity use and climate change. These discourses ecology, global environmental change, deforestation, desertification, biodiversity, climate change #12;1 1

  8. Business Requirements Global Office Knowledge Repository (GOKR)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riabov, Vladimir V.

    .................................................................................................4 3.3.2 Logistics................................................................................................10 5.1 GLOBAL OFFICE ACCOUNT MAINTENANCE.................................................................................11 5.2 EQUIPMENT SUPPLIER ACCOUNT MAINTENANCE

  9. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 543: Liquid Disposal Units, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2004-05-03

    The general purpose of this Corrective Action Investigation Plan is to ensure that adequate data are collected to provide sufficient and reliable information to identify, evaluate, and select technically viable corrective action alternatives (CAAs) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 543: Liquid Disposal Units, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. Located in Areas 6 and 15 on the NTS, CAU 543 is comprised of a total of seven corrective action sites (CASs), one in Area 6 and six in Area 15. The CAS in Area 6 consists of a Decontamination Facility and its components which are associated with decontamination of equipment, vehicles, and materials related to nuclear testing. The six CASs in Area 15 are located at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Farm and are related to waste disposal activities at the farm. Sources of possible contamination at Area 6 include potentially contaminated process waste effluent discharged through a process waste system, a sanitary waste stream generated within buildings of the Decon Facility, and radiologically contaminated materials stored within a portion of the facility yard. At Area 15, sources of potential contamination are associated with the dairy operations and the animal tests and experiments involving radionuclide uptake. Identified contaminants of potential concern include volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, petroleum hydrocarbons, pesticides, herbicides, polychlorinated biphenyls, metals, and radionuclides. Three corrective action closure alternatives - No Further Action, Close in Place, or Clean Closure - will be recommended for CAU 543 based on an evaluation of all the data quality objective-related data. Field work will be conducted following approval of the plan. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document.

  10. ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' scientific report ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' scientific report ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' Team : 1995/1996 Scientific Report February 1997 CERFACS ACTIVITY REPORT 1 #12; Contents 1 Climate Modelling) : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 6 2.2 Anthropogenic climate change studies: scenario experiments (96) : : : : : : : : : 7 2

  11. ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' scientific report 1 ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' scientific report 1 ``Climate Modelling & Global Change of the tropical climate : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 6 2.2 Short­term variability studies : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 8 2.3 Climate drift sensitivity studies

  12. Effective temperature scale and bolometric corrections from 2MASS photometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Masana; C. Jordi; I. Ribas

    2006-01-03

    This paper presents a method to determine effective temperatures, angular semi-diameters and bolometric corrections for population I and II FGK type stars based on V and 2MASS IR photometry. Accurate calibration is accomplished by using a sample of solar analogues, whose average temperature is assumed to be equal to the solar effective temperature of 5777 K. By taking into account all possible sources of error we estimate associated uncertainties better than 1% in effective temperature and in the range 1.0-2.5% in angular semi-diameter for unreddened stars. Comparison of our new temperatures with other determinations extracted from the literature indicates, in general, remarkably good agreement. These results suggest that the effective temperaure scale of FGK stars is currently established with an accuracy better than 0.5%-1%. The application of the method to a sample of 10999 dwarfs in the Hipparcos catalogue allows us to define temperature and bolometric correction (K band) calibrations as a function of (V-K), [m/H] and log g. Bolometric corrections in the V and K bands as a function of effective temperature, [m/H] and log g are also given. We provide effective temperatures, angular semi-diameters, radii and bolometric corrections in the V and K bands for the 10999 FGK stars in our sample with the corresponding uncertainties.

  13. Correcting vibration-induced performance degradation in enterprise servers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simunic, Tajana

    Correcting vibration-induced performance degradation in enterprise servers Christine S. Chan.gross, kaylan.vaidyanathan}@oracle.com ABSTRACT Server fan subsystems are power-hungry and generate vibrations types of vibrations and quantify their effect on hard disks. We introduce a thermal and cooling

  14. Power Corrections to Event Shapes with Mass-Dependent Operators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vicent Mateu; Iain W. Stewart; Jesse Thaler

    2013-02-06

    We introduce an operator depending on the "transverse velocity" r that describes the effect of hadron masses on the leading 1/Q power correction to event-shape observables. Here, Q is the scale of the hard collision. This work builds on earlier studies of mass effects by Salam and Wicke and of operators by Lee and Sterman. Despite the fact that different event shapes have different hadron mass dependence, we provide a simple method to identify universality classes of event shapes whose power corrections depend on a common nonperturbative parameter. We also develop an operator basis to show that at a fixed value of Q, the power corrections for many classic observables can be determined by two independent nonperturbative matrix elements at the 10% level. We compute the anomalous dimension of the transverse velocity operator, which is multiplicative in r and causes the power correction to exhibit non-trivial dependence on Q. The existence of universality classes and the relevance of anomalous dimensions are reproduced by the hadronization models in Pythia 8 and Herwig++, though the two programs differ in the values of their low-energy matrix elements.

  15. Extracting Provably Correct Rules from Artificial Neural Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clausen, Michael

    Extracting Provably Correct Rules from Artificial Neural Networks Sebastian B. Thrun University procedures have been applied successfully to a variety of real­world scenarios, artificial neural networks that automatically compile neural networks into symbolic rules offer a promising perspective to overcome

  16. SA 113 (2009/05) Request to Correct Personal Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burg, Theresa

    the records you want corrected. For a complete listing of public bodies, consult the Directory of Public the Directory of Public Bodies on the FOIP website at foip.alberta.ca. FOR OFFICE USE ONLY Date Received Request number that relates to the records, such as your employee number, case number or other identification

  17. Logarithmic corrections to scaling in turbulent thermal convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Dubrulle

    2001-01-04

    We use an analytic toy model of turbulent convection to show that most of the scaling regimes are spoiled by logarithmic corrections, in a way consistent with the most accurate experimental measurements available nowadays. This sets a need for the search of new measurable quantities which are less prone to dimensional theories.

  18. RCRA corrective action determination of no further action

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-06-01

    On July 27, 1990, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed a regulatory framework (55 FR 30798) for responding to releases of hazardous waste and hazardous constituents from solid waste management units (SWMUs) at facilities seeking permits or permitted under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The proposed rule, `Corrective Action for Solid Waste Management Units at Hazardous Waste Facilities`, would create a new Subpart S under the 40 CFR 264 regulations, and outlines requirements for conducting RCRA Facility Investigations, evaluating potential remedies, and selecting and implementing remedies (i.e., corrective measures) at RCRA facilities. EPA anticipates instances where releases or suspected releases of hazardous wastes or constituents from SWMUs identified in a RCRA Facility Assessment, and subsequently addressed as part of required RCRA Facility Investigations, will be found to be non-existent or non-threatening to human health or the environment. Such releases may require no further action. For such situations, EPA proposed a mechanism for making a determination that no further corrective action is needed. This mechanism is known as a Determination of No Further Action (DNFA) (55 FR 30875). This information Brief describes what a DNFA is and discusses the mechanism for making a DNFA. This is one of a series of Information Briefs on RCRA corrective action.

  19. Improving STT-MRAM Density Through Multibit Error Correction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sapatnekar, Sachin

    . Traditional methods enhance robustness at the cost of area/energy by using larger cell sizes to improve the thermal stability of the MTJ cells. This paper employs multibit error correction with DRAM to the read operation) through TX. A key attribute of an MTJ is the notion of thermal stability. Fig. 2

  20. A Visualization System for Correctness Proofs of Graph Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Metaxas, Takis

    A Visualization System for Correctness Proofs of Graph Algorithms P.A. Gloor1, D.B. Johnson2, F. Makedon2, P. Metaxas3 Feb. 28, 1993 Running head: Proof Visualization of Graph Algorithms Correspondence proofs of graph algorithms. The system has been demonstrated for a greedy algorithm, Prim's algorithm

  1. Idaho Site Launches Corrective Actions Before Restarting Waste Treatment Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    IDAHO FALLS, Idaho – The Idaho site and its cleanup contractor have launched a series of corrective actions they will complete before safely resuming startup operations at the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU) following an incident in June that caused the new waste treatment facility to shut down.

  2. Path Length Correction for dE/dx Olushakin Olojo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cinabro, David

    Path Length Correction for dE/dx Olushakin Olojo Department of Mechanical Engineering Wayne State used in CLEO. Due to the recent use of Helium Propane gas in the drift chamber, it is now possible of 50­50% Argon­Ethane to 60­40% Helium­Propane in the CLEO drift chamber has reduced e#ects caused

  3. Pure recoil corrections to hydrogen energy levels. Krzysztof Pachucki

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pachucki, Krzysztof

    Pure recoil corrections to hydrogen energy levels. Krzysztof Pachucki Max--Planck--Institut F approximation for the hydrogenic energy levels we can assume that the mass of the nucleus is infinite, vacuum polarization, etc. For the precise determination of hydrogenic energy levels we have to include

  4. Urban Water Demand with Periodic Error Correction David R. Bell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffin, Ronald

    them. Econometric estimates of residential demand for water abound (Dalhuisen et al. 2003Urban Water Demand with Periodic Error Correction by David R. Bell and Ronald C. Griffin February, Department of Agricultural Economics, Texas A&M University. #12;Abstract Monthly demand for publicly supplied

  5. Bipolar expansions and overlap corrections to the electrostatic interaction energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Vaman

    2015-06-10

    We use the multipole technique to derive four equivalent expressions for the bipolar expansion of the inverse distance, valid in all the regions of configuration space. Using the first-order perturbation theory, we calculate the overlap correction to the long-range electrostatic energy between two hydrogen atoms and between a hydrogen atom and a proton.

  6. Complete three-loop QCD corrections to the decay H -> ??

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Maierhöfer; P. Marquard

    2012-12-26

    We present the result for the three-loop singlet QCD corrections to the decay of a Higgs boson into two photons and improve the calculation for the non-singlet case. With the new result presented, the decay width Gamma(H -> \\gamma \\gamma) is completely known at O(G_F \\alpha ^2 \\alpha_s^2, G_F \\alpha ^3).

  7. Emissivity corrected infrared method for imaging anomalous structural heat flows

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Del Grande, Nancy K. (San Leandro, CA); Durbin, Philip F. (Livermore, CA); Dolan, Kenneth W. (Livermore, CA); Perkins, Dwight E. (Livermore, CA)

    1995-01-01

    A method for detecting flaws in structures using dual band infrared radiation. Heat is applied to the structure being evaluated. The structure is scanned for two different wavelengths and data obtained in the form of images. Images are used to remove clutter to form a corrected image. The existence and nature of a flaw is determined by investigating a variety of features.

  8. Energy efficiency of error correction for wireless communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Havinga, Paul J.M.

    -control is an important issue for mobile computing systems. This includes energy spent in the physical radio transmission and Networking Conference 1999 [7]. #12;ENERGY EFFICIENCY OF ERROR CORRECTION FOR WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONA ­ 2 on the energy of transmission and the energy of redundancy computation. We will show that the computational cost

  9. Radiative recoil correction to the Lamb shift Krzysztof Pachucki

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pachucki, Krzysztof

    analyzed the nuclear self­energy contribution and the corresponding definition of the nuclear mean square of the radiative recoil correction to hydrogenic energy levels in m 2 M ff (Z ff) 5 n 3 order is presented. The method bases on evaluation of the proton kinetic energy term on the electron state. The obtained result

  10. Exponentiated Electroweak Corrections in a Hadronic Event Generator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yost, Scott

    HERWIRI2: Exponentiated Electroweak Corrections in a Hadronic Event Generator Scott Yost integrated in the same event generator, e.g. NLO EWK + NLO QCD. Scott Yost HERWIRI2 ICHEP 2012 ­ Melbourne of the leading shower generators, HERWIG. · The structure is not tied to a particular shower, and our ultimate

  11. Power Grid Correction Using Sensitivity Analysis Meric Aydonat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najm, Farid N.

    Power Grid Correction Using Sensitivity Analysis Meric¸ Aydonat Department of ECE University University of Toronto Toronto, Ontario, Canada E-mail: f.najm@utoronto.ca Abstract--Power grid voltage verification has become a crucial step in reliable high-speed chip design. Power grid verification

  12. Relativistic and QED corrections for the Beryllium atom Krzysztof Pachucki

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pachucki, Krzysztof

    Relativistic and QED corrections for the Beryllium atom Krzysztof Pachucki #3; Institute are calculated for the ground state of the beryllium atom and its positive ion. A basis set of correlated of high precision theoretical predictions for energy levels of the beryllium atom and light ions. Our

  13. Inter-frame Motion Correction for MR Thermometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Vliet, Lucas J.

    Inter-frame Motion Correction for MR Thermometry S. Suprijanto1 , M.W. Vogel3 , F.M. Vos1 , H.A. Vrooman2,3 , and A.M. Vossepoel1,2,3 1 Quantitative Imaging, Delft University of Technology, 2628 CJ Delft with MRI to monitor changes in thermal therapy. Phase shift based MR thermome- try gives an estimate

  14. Displacement Correction Scheme for MR-Guided Interstitial Laser Therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Vliet, Lucas J.

    Displacement Correction Scheme for MR-Guided Interstitial Laser Therapy S. Suprijanto1 , M.W. Vogel[1,3]. In the absence of motion, MR thermometry based on phase imaging is quite accurate[12 , F.M. Vos1 , H.A. Vrooman2,3 , and A.M. Vossepoel1 1 Pattern Recognition Group, Department

  15. Stochastic Systems Group MR Bias Correction and Reflectance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willsky, Alan S.

    . Fisher, M. Cetin, S. Haker, A. Willsky #12;Stochastic Systems Group Outline 1. Introduction 2. MR) · Both maps will have edges #12;Stochastic Systems Group Outline 1. Introduction 2. MR measurement modelStochastic Systems Group MR Bias Correction and Reflectance and Illumination Separation Ayres Fan

  16. Selected CRC Polynomials Can Correct Errors and Thus Reduce Retransmission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mache, Jens

    sensor networks, minimizing communication is crucial to improve energy consumption and thus lifetime Correction, Reliability, Network Protocol, Low Power Comsumption I. INTRODUCTION Error detection using Cyclic of retransmitting the whole packet - improves energy consumption and thus lifetime of wireless sensor networks

  17. Occam: Specification and Compiler Correctness Part I: The Primary Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Börger, Egon

    levels of abstrac- tion, and relate them by relative correctness proofs, aiming at a transparent. It is the other way round: . . . unless there is a prior, generally accepted mathematical definition of a language has to be transparent; the central common ideas should be recognizable by inspection, so to say

  18. Selection of a Global Set of GMPEs for the GEM-PEER Global GMPEs Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    motion prediction equations for subduction earthquakes,prediction equations in engineering practice, Earthquakeprediction equations, attenuation relations, Global Earthquake

  19. CLOSURE REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 214: BUNKERS AND STORAGE AREAS NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of this Closure Report is to document that the closure of CAU 214 complied with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection-approved Corrective Action Plan closure requirements. The closure activities specified in the Corrective Action Plan were based on the approved corrective action alternatives presented in the CAU 214 Corrective Action Decision Document.

  20. ARM: SIRS: derived, correction of downwelling shortwave diffuse hemispheric measurements using Dutton and full algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Laura Riihimaki

    1997-03-21

    SIRS: derived, correction of downwelling shortwave diffuse hemispheric measurements using Dutton and full algorithm

  1. ARM: Broadband Radiometer Station (BRS) broadband shortwave and longwave 1-min radiation data with Dutton correction

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Laura Riihimaki

    1993-09-01

    Broadband Radiometer Station (BRS) broadband shortwave and longwave 1-min radiation data with Dutton correction

  2. Analysis and Improvements of Fringe Jump Corrections by Electronics on the JET Tokamak FIR Interferometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Analysis and Improvements of Fringe Jump Corrections by Electronics on the JET Tokamak FIR Interferometer

  3. Complete electroweak one-loop radiative corrections to top-pair production at TESLA -- a comparison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Fleischer; T. Hahn; W. Hollik; T. Riemann; C. Schappacher; A. Werthenbach

    2002-09-19

    Electroweak one-loop radiative corrections to the process e^+ e^- -> t tbar are revisited. Two groups from Karlsruhe and Bielefeld/Zeuthen performed independent calculations of both (virtual and soft) QED contributions and weak virtual corrections. For the angular distribution an agreement of at least eight digits for the weak corrections and of at least seven digits for additional photonic corrections is established.

  4. ARM: Broadband Radiometer Station (BRS) broadband shortwave and longwave 1-min radiation data with Dutton correction

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Laura Riihimaki

    Broadband Radiometer Station (BRS) broadband shortwave and longwave 1-min radiation data with Dutton correction

  5. Accelerating RCRA corrective action: The principles of the DOE approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimmell, T.A.; Green, D.R.; Ranek, N.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Coalgate, J.L. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-03-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is involved in the remediation of environmental contamination at many of its facilities under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). RCRA`s corrective action provisions were established by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984 (HSWA). In response to the HSWA mandate, EPA established a program for the conduct of RCRA corrective action that was similar to that established under the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). In addition, EPA developed and implemented its ``stabilization`` initiative as a means of quickly addressing immediate risks posed by releases until long term solutions can be applied. To improve the efficiency of environmental restoration at its facilities, DOE is developing guidance and training programs on accelerated environmental restoration under RCRA. A RCRA guidance document, entitled ``Accelerating RCRA Corrective Action at DOE Facilities,`` is currently being developed by DOE`s Office of Environmental Policy and Assistance. The new guidance document will outline a decision-making process for determining if acceleration is appropriate for individual facilities, for identifying, evaluating, and selecting options for program acceleration, and for implementing selected acceleration options. The document will also discuss management and planning strategies that provide a firm foundation for accelerating RCRA corrective action. These strategies include a number of very basic principles that have proven effective at DOE and other federal facilities, as well as some new approaches. The purpose of this paper is to introduce DOE`s new guidance document, discuss the general approach presented in the guidance for accelerating RCRA corrective action, and to emphasize some of the more important principles of effective management and planning.

  6. Global warming and nuclear power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, L., LLNL

    1998-07-10

    Nuclear fission power reactors represent a potential solution to many aspects of global change possibly induced by inputting of either particulate or carbon or sulfur oxides into the Earth`s atmosphere. Of proven technological feasibility, they presently produce high-grade heat for large-scale electricity generation, space heating and industrial process-energizing around the world, without emitting greenhouse gases or atmospheric particulates; importantly, electricity production costs from the best nuclear plants presently are closely comparable with those of the best fossil-fired plants. However, a substantial number of issues currently stand between nuclear power and widespread substitution for large stationary fossil fuel-fired systems. These include perceptual ones regarding both long-term and acute operational safety, plant decommissioning, fuel reprocessing, radwaste disposal, fissile materials diversion to military purposes and - perhaps most seriously- readily quantifiable concerns regarding long-term fuel supply and total unit electrical energy cost. We sketch a road-map for proceeding from the present situation toward a nuclear power-intensive world, addressing along the way each of the concerns which presently impede widespread nuclear substitution for fossil fuels, particularly for coal in the most populous and rapidly developing portions of the world, e.g., China and India. This `design to societal specifications` approach to large-scale nuclear fission power systems may lead to energy sources meeting essentially all stationary demands for high-temperature heat. Such advanced options offer a human population of ten billion the electricity supply levels currently enjoyed by Americans for 10,000 years. Nuclear power systems tailored to local needs-and-interests and having a common advanced technology base could reduce present-day world-wide C0{sub 2} emissions by two-fold, if universally employed. By application to small mobile demands, a second two-fold reduction might be attained. Even the first such halving of carbon intensivity of stationary-source energy production world-wide might permit continued slow power-demand growth in the highly developed countries and rapid development of the other 80% of the world, both without active governmental suppression of fossil fuel usage - while also stabilizing carbon input-rates into the Earth`s atmosphere. The second two-fold reduction might obviate most global warming concerns.

  7. Integrated assessment of global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ott, K.O.

    1996-12-31

    The anomalies of sea surface temperatures, which show a warming trend since the 1850s through the decade 1960/70 of {Delta}SST {approximately} 0.3 C, are complemented by changes of the ground surface temperature ({Delta}GST). The global surface temperature change, based on these data, allows an integrated assessment of the associated increase in black-body irradiance and a comparison with the enhanced greenhouse-gas back-scattering. Information on the GST history is obtained from unfolding analyses of underground temperature distributions measured in 90 boreholes in Alaskan permafrost and Canadian bedrock. These analyses show GST increases ({Delta}GST) since the 19th century through 1960/70 of 3 C on average, with standard deviations of +1.8 C and {minus}0.9 C on the high and low end respectively. The onset of the warming trend, which is uncertain in the GST data, is timed more accurately by detailed length records of large valley glaciers in the US and the Alps. Evaluation of the heat capacities and heat transfer indicates that the temperature response to an increase in radiative forcing must be much larger on land than on the sea. Conversely, the observed large ratio of {Delta}GST and {Delta}SST can only be explained by increased radiative forcing. From 1960/70 through the warmest decade on record, 1980/90, global {Delta}SST and {Delta}SAT have further increased to 0.6 C and 0.8 C respectively, But, the most recent GST data are not accurate enough to extend the comparison through 1990. Calculation of the increase of radiative forcing from back-scattering of greenhouse gases for 1850 to 1970 yields 1.3 W/cm{sup 2}. The increase in black-body irradiance from 3.6 C warming on land and 0.3 C on sea provides the required balance. The warming on land of 3.6 C is larger than the average value of 3.0 C, but well within the observed range.

  8. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 139: Waste Disposal Sites, Nevada Test Sites, Nevada with ROTC 1, Errata Sheet, Revision 0, January 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant Evenson

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this CADD is to identify and provide the rationale for the recommendation of a corrective action alternative (CAA) for the seven CASs within CAU 139. Corrective action investigation activities were performed from June 26 through September 27, 2006, as set forth in the CAU 139 Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP).

  9. Materials Genome Initiative for Global Competitiveness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandy, John A.

    Materials Genome Initiative for Global Competitiveness June 2011 #12;2 Materials Genome Initiative information visit www.ostp.gov. #12;3Materials Genome Initiative for Global Competitiveness EXECUTIVE OFFICE, the development of advanced materials will fuel many of the emerging industries that will address challenges

  10. Advanced Review Drought under global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Aiguo

    Advanced Review Drought under global warming: a review Aiguo Dai This article reviews recent literature on drought of the last millennium, followed by an update on global aridity changes from 1950 of the warmest SSTs in the Atlantic and warming in the Indian Ocean are responsible for the recent Sahel droughts

  11. Global Climate Dialogue Prepared by Kershney Naidoo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global Climate Dialogue Prepared by Kershney Naidoo In a historic moment of Justice for the Climate) backgrounds. It aimed to establish a set of guiding global principles for a just response to climate change. The intention of the Climate Justice Dialogue was to lend new impetus to an awareness of climate change

  12. New Laboratory Complex Department of Global Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and associated facilities to house its new Department of Global Ecology. The buildings, located on the campus1 New Laboratory Complex Department of Global Ecology Carnegie Institution of Washington Stanford Ecology will conduct basic research and training on large-scale interactions between ecological systems

  13. Frontiers in Global Change Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    's research group. The seminar will present the development of our U.S. monitoring and forecasting systemFrontiers in Global Change Seminar Series Towards a global drought monitoring, forecasting, activities under the Group of Earth Observations (GEO) and the World Climate Research Programme have

  14. Global Dynamic Optimization Adam Benjamin Singer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Chemical Engineering Abstract My thesis focuses on global optimization of nonconvex integral objectiveGlobal Dynamic Optimization by Adam Benjamin Singer Submitted to the Department of Chemical Engineering in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Chemical

  15. GLOBAL BIOFUELS OUTLOOK MAELLE SOARES PINTO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GLOBAL BIOFUELS OUTLOOK 2010-2020 MAELLE SOARES PINTO DIRECTOR BIOFUELS EUROPE & AFRICA WORLD BIOFUELS MARKETS, ROTTERDAM MARCH 23, 2011 #12;Presentation Overview · Global Outlook ­ Biofuels Mandates in 2010 ­ Total Biofuels Supply and Demand ­ Regional Supply and Demand Outlook to 2020 ­ Biofuels

  16. The Science of Global Warming Energy Balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blais, Brian

    The Science of Global Warming ·Energy Balance ·Feedback Loops Global Warming can be understood complexities ·Introduce a Simple Model of Energy Balance ·Understand the Vocabulary ·Point out some units of energy input from the Sun = Temperature: 5.3 oC Greenhouse Effect 101: A Balance is Achieved

  17. Global Optimization in the COCONUT Hermann Schichl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schichl, Hermann

    Global Optimization in the COCONUT project Hermann Schichl Institut f¨ur Mathematik der Universit for global optimization is presented, as it is developed in the COCONUT project. After a short introduction the presentation. 1 Introduction The COCONUT project [2] is aimed at the integration of the ex- isting approaches

  18. Global Optimization in the COCONUT Hermann Schichl ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schichl, Hermann

    Global Optimization in the COCONUT project Hermann Schichl ? Institut fur Mathematik der Universit for global optimization is presented, as it is developed in the COCONUT project. After a short introduction the presentation. 1 Introduction The COCONUT project [2] is aimed at the integration of the ex- isting approaches

  19. Global Trends 2030: AlternAtive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrijver, Karel

    Global Trends 2030: AlternAtive Worlds a publication of the National Intelligence Council #12;OFF ICEOFTHEDIRE CTOR OF NATIO NALINTELLIGE N CE Global Trends 2030: AlternAtive Worlds a publication 2030: Alternative Worlds is the fifth installment in the National Intelligence Council's series aimed

  20. Global Tectonics Lecture 8 Seismo-tectonics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fialko, Yuri

    earthquake predictor I. Browning claimed to have predicted the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake, he said that near a date there would be an M6 earthquake somewhere, a prediction virtually guaranteed to be true. MagnitudeGlobal Tectonics Lecture 8 ­ Seismo-tectonics #12;Global distribution of the earthquakes #12;Focal

  1. A model of global net ecosystem production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potter, C.S.; Matson, P.A. (NASA-Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA (United States)); Field, C.B.; Randerson, J. (Carnegie Institution of Washington, Stanford, CA (United States)); Vitousek, P.M.; Mooney, H.A. (Stanford Univ., CA (United States))

    1993-06-01

    We present an ecosystem modeling approach to resolve global climate and edaphic controls on seasonal NEP patterns. Global remote sensing, climate and land surface data sets are used as inputs to drive a terrestrial carbon cycle model at 1[degrees]lat/lon resolution. monthly net primary productivity (NPP) is calculated using surface radiation and NDVI to determine photosynthesis, which is subsequently adjusted by temperature, water and nitrogen stress factors. Total nitrogen availability is coupled to net mineralization rates from litter soil carbon pools. Soil respiration and NPP balance one another globally at around 60 Gt C yr[sup [minus]1]. The seasonal amplitude of global NEP is 1.2 Gt C. Although substantial month-to-month variation is observed for tropical forest areas, seasonal amplitude is driven globally by boreal and temperate forest ecosystems between 650 and 30[degrees] N latitude.

  2. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 271: Areas 25, 26, and 27 Septic Systems, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. B. Jackson

    2003-05-01

    The Areas 25, 26 and 27 Septic Systems are in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 as Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 271. This Corrective Action Plan (CAP) provides selected corrective action alternatives and proposes the closure methodology for CAU 271. CAU 271 is located on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) approximately 105 kilometers (65 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, and consists of the following 15 Corrective Action Sites (CAS): CAS 25-04-1, Septic System; CAS 25-04-03, Septic System; CAS25-04-04, Septic System; CAS 25-04-08, Septic System; CAS 25-04-09, Septic System; CAS 25-04-10, Septic System; CAS 25-04-11, Septic System; CAS 26-03-01, Contaminated Water Reservoir; CAS 26-04-1, Septic System; CAS 26-04-02, Septic System; CAS 26-05-01, Radioactive Leachfield; CAS-26-05-03, Septic System; CAS 26-05-04, Septic System; CAS 26-05-05, Septic System; and CAS 27-05-02, Leachfield.

  3. Corrective action investigation plan for Corrective Action Unit 340, Pesticide Release Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-01-01

    This Correction Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the US Department of Defense. As required by the FFACO (1996), this document provides or references all of the specific information for planning investigation activities associated with three Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). These CASs are collectively known as Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 340, Pesticide Release Sites. According to the FFACO, CASs are sites that may require corrective action(s) and may include solid waste management units or individual disposal or release sites. These sites are CAS 23-21-01, Area 23 Quonset Hut 800 (Q800) Pesticide Release Ditch; CAS 23-18-03, Area 23 Skid Huts Pesticide Storage; and CAS 15-18-02, Area 15 Quonset Hut 15-11 Pesticide Storage (Q15-11). The purpose of this CAIP for CAU 340 is to direct and guide the investigation for the evaluation of the nature and extent of pesticides, herbicides, and other contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) that were stored, mixed, and/or disposed of at each of the CASs.

  4. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 262: Area 25 Septic Systems and Underground Discharge Point, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. B. Campbell

    2002-06-01

    This Corrective Action Plan (CAP) provides selected corrective action alternatives and proposes the closure methodology for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 262, Area 25 Septic Systems and Underground Discharge Point. CAU 262 is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996. Remediation of CAU 262 is required under the FFACO. CAU 262 is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), approximately 100 kilometers (km) (62 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The nine Corrective Action Sites (CASs) within CAU 262 are located in the Nuclear Rocket Development Station complex. Individual CASs are located in the vicinity of the Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (R-MAD); Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (E-MAD); and Test Cell C compounds. CAU 262 includes the following CASs as provided in the FFACO (1996); CAS 25-02-06, Underground Storage Tank; CAS 25-04-06, Septic Systems A and B; CAS 25-04-07, Septic System; CAS 25-05-03, Leachfield; CAS 25-05-05, Leachfield; CAS 25-05-06, Leachfield; CAS 25-05-08, Radioactive Leachfield; CAS 25-05-12, Leachfield; and CAS 25-51-01, Dry Well. Figures 2, 3, and 4 show the locations of the R-MAD, the E-MAD, and the Test Cell C CASs, respectively. The facilities within CAU 262 supported nuclear rocket reactor engine testing. Activities associated with the program were performed between 1958 and 1973. However, several other projects used the facilities after 1973. A significant quantity of radioactive and sanitary waste was produced during routine operations. Most of the radioactive waste was managed by disposal in the posted leachfields. Sanitary wastes were disposed in sanitary leachfields. Septic tanks, present at sanitary leachfields (i.e., CAS 25-02-06,2504-06 [Septic Systems A and B], 25-04-07, 25-05-05,25-05-12) allowed solids to settle out of suspension prior to entering the leachfield. Posted leachfields do not contain septic tanks. All CASs located in CAU 262 are inactive or abandoned. However, some leachfields may still receive liquids from runoff during storm events. Results from the 2000-2001 site characterization activities conducted by International Technology (IT) Corporation, Las Vegas Office are documented in the Corrective Action Investigation Report for Corrective Action Unit 262: Area 25 Septic Systems and Underground Discharge Point, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. This document is located in Appendix A of the Corrective Action Decision Document for CAU 262. Area 25 Septic Systems and Underground Discharge Point, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. (DOE/NV, 2001).

  5. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 321: Area 22 Weather Station Fuel Storage, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE /NV

    1999-01-28

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the US Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). The CAIP is a document that provides or references all of the specific information for investigation activities associated with Corrective Action Units (CAUs) or Corrective Action Sites (CASs). According to the FFACO (1996), CASs are sites potentially requiring corrective action(s) and may include solid waste management units or individual disposal or release sites. A CAU consists of one or more CASs grouped together based on geography, technical similarity, or agency responsibility for the purpose of determining corrective actions. This CAIP contains the environmental sample collection objectives and the criteria for conducting site investigation activities at the CAU 321 Area 22 Weather Station Fuel Storage, CAS 22-99-05 Fuel Storage Area. For purposes of this discussion, this site will be referred to as either CAU 321 or the Fuel Storage Area. The Fuel Storage Area is located in Area 22 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is approximately 105 kilometers (km) (65 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1) (DOE/NV, 1996a). The Fuel Storage Area (Figure 1-2) was used to store fuel and other petroleum products necessary for motorized operations at the historic Camp Desert Rock facility which was operational from 1951 to 1958 at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada. The site was dismantled after 1958 (DOE/NV, 1996a).

  6. On the CFT Operator Spectrum at Large Global Charge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simeon Hellerman; Domenico Orlando; Susanne Reffert; Masataka Watanabe

    2015-05-13

    We calculate the anomalous dimensions of operators with large global charge $J$ in certain strongly coupled conformal field theories in three dimensions, such as the O(2) model and the supersymmetric fixed point with a single chiral superfield and a $W = \\Phi^3$ superpotential. Working in a $1/J$ expansion, we find that the large-$J$ sector of both examples is controlled by a conformally invariant effective Lagrangian for a Goldstone boson of the global symmetry. For both these theories, we find that the lowest state with charge $J$ is always a scalar operator whose dimension $\\Delta_J$ satisfies the sum rule $ J^2 \\Delta_J - \\left( \\tfrac{J^2}{2} + \\tfrac{J}{4} + \\tfrac{3}{16} \\right) \\Delta_{J-1} - \\left( \\tfrac{J^2}{2} - \\tfrac{J}{4} + \\tfrac{3}{16} \\right) \\Delta_{J+1} = 0.04067 $ up to corrections that vanish at large $J$. The spectrum of low-lying excited states is also calculable explcitly: For example, the second-lowest primary operator has spin two and dimension $\\Delta\\ll J + \\sqrt{3}$. In the supersymmetric case, the dimensions of all half-integer-spin operators lie above the dimensions of the integer-spin operators by a gap of order $J^{1/2}$. The propagation speeds of the Goldstone waves and heavy fermions are $\\frac{1}{\\sqrt{2}}$ and $\\pm \\frac{1}{2}$ times the speed of light, respectively. These values, including the negative one, are necessary for the consistent realization of the superconformal symmetry at large $J$.

  7. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 410: Waste Disposal Trenches, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada: Revision No. 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2003-12-22

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report (CADD/CR) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 410: Waste Disposal Trenches, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 410 consists of five Corrective Action Sites (CASs): TA-21-003-TANL; 09-21-001-TA09; TA-19-002-TAB2; TA-21-002-TAAL; and 03-19-001. The CADD and CR have been combined into one report because no further action is recommended for this CAU. The corrective action alternative recommended for CAU 410 is Clean Closure; therefore, no corrective action or corrective action plan is required. No use restrictions are required to be placed on this CAU because the investigation showed no evidence of remaining soil contamination or remaining debris/waste upon completion of all investigation activities.

  8. Climate Effects of Global Land Cover Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbard, S G; Caldeira, K; Bala, G; Phillips, T; Wickett, M

    2005-08-24

    There are two competing effects of global land cover change on climate: an albedo effect which leads to heating when changing from grass/croplands to forest, and an evapotranspiration effect which tends to produce cooling. It is not clear which effect would dominate in a global land cover change scenario. We have performed coupled land/ocean/atmosphere simulations of global land cover change using the NCAR CAM3 atmospheric general circulation model. We find that replacement of current vegetation by trees on a global basis would lead to a global annual mean warming of 1.6 C, nearly 75% of the warming produced under a doubled CO{sub 2} concentration, while global replacement by grasslands would result in a cooling of 0.4 C. These results suggest that more research is necessary before forest carbon storage should be deployed as a mitigation strategy for global warming. In particular, high latitude forests probably have a net warming effect on the Earth's climate.

  9. Semiclassical zero-temperature corrections to Schwarzschild spacetime and holography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fabbri, A.; Farese, S.; Navarro-Salas, J.; Sanchis-Alepuz, H.; Olmo, G.J.

    2006-05-15

    Motivated by the quest for black holes in anti-de Sitter braneworlds, and, in particular, by the holographic conjecture relating 5D classical bulk solutions with 4D quantum corrected ones, we numerically solve the semiclassical Einstein equations (backreaction equations) with matter fields in the (zero-temperature) Boulware vacuum state. In the absence of an exact analytical expression for in four dimensions we work within the s-wave approximation. Our results show that the quantum corrected solution is very similar to Schwarzschild spacetime until very close to the horizon, but then a bouncing surface for the radial function appears which prevents the formation of an event horizon. We also analyze the behavior of the geometry beyond the bounce, where a curvature singularity arises. In the dual theory, this indicates that the corresponding 5D static classical braneworld solution is not a black hole but rather a naked singularity.

  10. Multi-Step stochastic correction in dynamical fermion updating algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enno E. Scholz; Istvan Montvay

    2006-10-20

    The advantages of using Multi-Step corrections for simulations of lattice gauge theories with dynamical fermions will be discussed. This technique is suited for algorithms based on the Multi-Boson representation of the dynamical fermions as well as for the Hybrid Monte-Carlo (HMC) algorithm and variants of the latter, like the Polynomial-HMC. Especially the latter has the power to deal with an odd number of fermion fields--an essential feature necessary for realistic QCD-simulations with up-, down-, and strange-quarks. In particular, we will discuss the application of the multi-step (actually two-step) correction technique to a PHMC updating algorithm for twisted-mass Wilson fermions with non-degenerate fermion masses, as it was used in recent dynamical simulations for N_f=2+1+1 fermion flavors.

  11. Investigation of Correction Method of the Spacecraft Low Altitude Ranging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Jing-Lei; Wu, Shi-Tong; Huang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    gamma ray altitude control system is an important equipment for deep space exploration and sample return mission, its main purpose is a low altitude measurement of the spacecraft based on Compton Effect at the moment when it lands on extraterrestrial celestial or sampling returns to the Earth land, and an ignition altitude correction of the spacecraft retrograde landing rocket at different landing speeds. This paper presents an ignition altitude correction method of the spacecraft at different landing speeds, based on the number of particles gamma ray reflected field gradient graded. Through the establishment of a theoretical model, its algorithm feasibility is proved by a mathematical derivation and verified by an experiment, and also the adaptability of the algorithm under different parameters is described. The method provides a certain value for landing control of the deep space exploration spacecraft landing the planet surface.

  12. Positive specific heat of the quantum corrected dilaton black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Grumiller; W. Kummer; D. V. Vassilevich

    2003-06-20

    Path integral quantization of dilaton gravity in two dimensions is applied to the CGHS model to the first nontrivial order in matter loops. Our approach is background independent as geometry is integrated out exactly. The result is an effective shift of the Killing norm: the apparent horizon becomes smaller. The Hawking temperature which is constant to leading order receives a quantum correction. As a consequence, the specific heat becomes positive and proportional to the square of the black hole mass.

  13. Correcting Thermal Distribution Problems for a Large University Campus 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, H.; Deng, S.; Bruner, H. L.; Claridge, D. E.; Turner, W. D.

    2002-01-01

    display the same characteristics as the Butler building. In order to correct comfort complaints and flow problems, several emergency balances were performed over the years. This was only a temporary solution for the problems. After cold weather..., Utilities Office of Energy Management. We greatly appreciate the support for this work from the Office of Energy Management and the Continuous Commissioning Group, Energy Systems Laboratory, Texas A&M University. REFERENCES Deng, S., Liu, M...

  14. Emissivity corrected infrared method for imaging anomalous structural heat flows

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Del Grande, N.K.; Durbin, P.F.; Dolan, K.W.; Perkins, D.E.

    1995-08-22

    A method for detecting flaws in structures using dual band infrared radiation is disclosed. Heat is applied to the structure being evaluated. The structure is scanned for two different wavelengths and data obtained in the form of images. Images are used to remove clutter to form a corrected image. The existence and nature of a flaw is determined by investigating a variety of features. 1 fig.

  15. Final voluntary release assessment/corrective action report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-11-12

    The US Department of Energy, Carlsbad Area Office (DOE-CAO) has completed a voluntary release assessment sampling program at selected Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This Voluntary Release Assessment/Corrective Action (RA/CA) report has been prepared for final submittal to the Environmental protection Agency (EPA) Region 6, Hazardous Waste Management Division and the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) Hazardous and Radioactive Materials Bureau to describe the results of voluntary release assessment sampling and proposed corrective actions at the SWMU sites. The Voluntary RA/CA Program is intended to be the first phase in implementing the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) and corrective action process at the WIPP. Data generated as part of this sampling program are intended to update the RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) for the WIPP (Assessment of Solid Waste Management Units at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant), NMED/DOE/AIP 94/1. This Final Voluntary RA/CA Report documents the results of release assessment sampling at 11 SWMUs identified in the RFA. With this submittal, DOE formally requests a No Further Action determination for these SWMUs. Additionally, this report provides information to support DOE`s request for No Further Action at the Brinderson and Construction landfill SWMUs, and to support DOE`s request for approval of proposed corrective actions at three other SWMUs (the Badger Unit Drill Pad, the Cotton Baby Drill Pad, and the DOE-1 Drill Pad). This information is provided to document the results of the Voluntary RA/CA activities submitted to the EPA and NMED in August 1995.

  16. Vacuum-polarization corrections to the PNC amplitude in 133

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Walter R.

    |D|HF 6s Corrections to EPNC amplitude for 133 Cs Units: iea0 Ă? 10-11 (-QW /N) Type 7s|D|6s 7s|D|6s for 133 Cs, with RPA. Units: iea0 Ă? 10-11 (-QW /N) Type 7s|D|6s 7s|D|6s EPNC RPA -3.4570 1.2726 -0

  17. Power Law Corrections to BTZ Black Hole Entropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dharm Veer Singh

    2014-11-14

    We study the quantum scalar field in the background of BTZ black hole and evaluate the entanglement entropy of the non-vacuum states. The entropy is proportional to the area of event horizon for the ground state, but the area law is violated in the case of non-vacuum states (first excited state and mixed states) and the corrections scale as power law.

  18. Strong gravitational lensing with Gauss-Bonnet correction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadeghi, J.; Vaez, H. E-mail: h.vaez@umz.ac.ir

    2014-06-01

    In this paper we investigate the strong gravitational lensing in a five dimensional background with Gauss-Bonnet gravity, so that in 4-dimensions the Gauss-Bonnet correction disappears. By considering the logarithmic term for deflection angle, we obtain the deflection angle ?-circumflex and corresponding parameters ? and b-bar . Finally, we estimate some properties of relativistic images such as ?{sub ?}, s and r{sub m}.

  19. FTCP Corrective Action Plan - Revision 2 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015Executive Order14, 20111, 2015 FTCP Conference Call MinutesCorrective

  20. Carbonyl sulfide: No remedy for global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taubman, S.J.; Kasting, J.F. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)] [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1995-04-01

    The authors look at the possibility of counteracting global warming forces by the injection of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) into the stratosphere at levels high enough to balance the impact say of a doubling of carbon dioxide concentrations, which are projected to result in a global 3{degrees} C warming. OCS injections at densities to provide such cooling will result a 30 percent impact of global ozone, whereas the carbon dioxide only made a 5% impact. In addition levels which would be found on the earths surface would be in the range 10 ppmv which is questionable as a safe exposure limit for humans, in addition to its impact on the ph of rainwater.