Sample records for global population distribution

  1. The LandScan Global Population Distribution Project: Current State of the Art and Prospective Innovation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, Amy N [ORNL; Bright, Eddie A [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advances in remote sensing, dasymetric mapping techniques, and the ever-increasing availability of spatial datasets have enhanced global human population distribution databases. These datasets demonstrate an enormous improvement over the conventional use of choropleth maps to represent population distribution and are vital for analysis and planning purposes including humanitarian response, disease mapping, risk analysis, and evacuation modeling. Dasymetric mapping techniques have been employed to address spatial mismatch, but also to develop finer resolution population distributions in areas of the world where subnational census data are coarse or non-existent. One such implementation is the LandScan Global model which provides a 30 arc-second global population distribution based on ancillary datasets such as land cover, slope, proximity to roads, and settlement locations. This work will review the current state of the LandScan model, future innovations aimed at increasing spatial and demographic resolution, and situate LandScan within the landscape of other global population distribution datasets.

  2. Title: Global Distribution of Poverty Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Global Distribution of Poverty Data Creator / Copyright Owner: Center for International: N/A Publication Date: N/A Coverage Date(s): 1993 - 1998 Updates: N/A Abstract: The Global Poverty Mapping Project seeks to enhance current understanding of the global distribution of poverty

  3. Globally Integrated Power and Clock Distribution Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedman, Eby G.

    Globally Integrated Power and Clock Distribution Network Renatas Jakushokas and Eby G. Friedman and clock distribution networks are fundamentally different in terms of signal frequency and current flow signals may be integrated to eliminate the on-chip global clock distribution network. This combined

  4. Method for spatially distributing a population

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bright, Edward A [Knoxville, TN; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [Knoxville, TN; Coleman, Phillip R [Knoxville, TN; Dobson, Jerome E [Lawrence, KS

    2007-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for spatially distributing a population count within a geographically defined area can include the steps of logically correlating land usages apparent from a geographically defined area to geospatial features in the geographically defined area and allocating portions of the population count to regions of the geographically defined area having the land usages, according to the logical correlation. The process can also include weighing the logical correlation for determining the allocation of portions of the population count and storing the allocated portions within a searchable data store. The logically correlating step can include the step of logically correlating time-based land usages to geospatial features of the geographically defined area. The process can also include obtaining a population count for the geographically defined area, organizing the geographically defined area into a plurality of sectors, and verifying the allocated portions according to direct observation.

  5. Topography, energy and the global distribution of bird species richness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Storch, David

    Topography, energy and the global distribution of bird species richness Richard G. Davies1,*, C data on the global distribution of extant continental and continental island bird species to test, 1988; Currie 1991; Allen et al. 2002). Its role is also argued to extend to the influence of solar

  6. Work distribution in global product development organizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tripathy, Anshuman

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The evolution of the internet, digital design tools, and more importantly, increasing access to global markets and workforce, has increased the interest of firms in offshoring their engineering and product development ...

  7. Estimating Traveler Populations at Airport and Cruise Terminals for Population Distribution and Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jochem, Warren C [ORNL; Sims, Kelly M [ORNL; Bright, Eddie A [ORNL; Urban, Marie L [ORNL; Rose, Amy N [ORNL; Coleman, Phil R [ORNL; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, uses of high-resolution population distribution databases are increasing steadily for environmental, socioeconomic, public health, and disaster-related research and operations. With the development of daytime population distribution, temporal resolution of such databases has been improved. However, the lack of incorporation of transitional population, namely business and leisure travelers, leaves a significant population unaccounted for within the critical infrastructure networks, such as at transportation hubs. This paper presents two general methodologies for estimating passenger populations in airport and cruise port terminals at a high temporal resolution which can be incorporated into existing population distribution models. The methodologies are geographically scalable and are based on, and demonstrate how, two different transportation hubs with disparate temporal population dynamics can be modeled utilizing publicly available databases including novel data sources of flight activity from the Internet which are updated in near-real time. The airport population estimation model shows great potential for rapid implementation for a large collection of airports on a national scale, and the results suggest reasonable accuracy in the estimated passenger traffic. By incorporating population dynamics at high temporal resolutions into population distribution models, we hope to improve the estimates of populations exposed to or at risk to disasters, thereby improving emergency planning and response, and leading to more informed policy decisions.

  8. Title: Gridded Population of World and Global Rural-Urban Mapping Project Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Gridded Population of World and Global Rural-Urban Mapping Project Data Creator / Copyright Data Format: BIL, ASCII, Grid, Shapefile, CSV, XLS, E00 Datum / Map Projection: N/A Resolution: N Science Information Network (CIESIN). "Gridded Population of World and Global Rural-Urban Mapping Project

  9. Global Distribution and Density of Constructed Impervious Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elvidge, Christopher D. [NOAA National Geophysical Data Center,; Tuttle, Benjamin T. [NOAA National Geophysical Data Center,; Sutton, Paul S. [University of Denver; Baugh, Kimberly E. [NOAA National Geophysical Data Center,; Howard, Ara T. [NOAA National Geophysical Data Center,; Milesi, Christina [Foundation of California State University, Monterey Bay, California.; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL; Nemani, Ramakrishna R [NASA Ames Research Center

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first global inventory of the spatial distribution and density of constructed impervious surface area (ISA). Examples of ISA include roads, parking lots, buildings, driveways, sidewalks and other manmade surfaces. While high spatial resolution is required to observe these features, the product we made is at one km2 resolution and is based on two coarse resolution indicators of ISA. Inputs into the product include the brightness of satellite observed nighttime lights and population count. The reference data used in the calibration were derived from 30 meter resolution ISA estimates of the USA from the U.S. Geological Survey. Nominally the product is for the years 2000-01 since both the nighttime lights and reference data are from those two years. We found that 1.05% of the United States land area is impervious surface (83,337 km2) and 0.43 % of the world's land surface (579,703 km2) is constructed impervious surface. China has more ISA than any other country (87,182 km2), but has only 67 m2 of ISA per person, compared to 297 m2 per person in the USA. Hyrdologic and environmental impacts of ISA begin to be exhibited when the density of ISA reaches 10% of the land surface. An examination of the areas with 10% or more ISA in watersheds finds that with the exception of Europe, the majority of watershed areas have less than 0.4% of their area at or above the 10% ISA threshold. The authors believe the next step for improving the product is to include reference ISA data from many more areas around the world.

  10. Unveiling the distribution of absorption in the AGN population

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Dwelly; Mathew J. Page

    2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We use the very deep XMM-Newton observations in the CDF-S to measure the distribution of absorption in the AGN population. We describe the Monte Carlo method used to unveil the intrinsic properties of the AGN using their multi-band X-ray colours. The measured distribution of AGN in z, L_X and N_H space is compared with the distributions predicted by a number of XLFs and absorption models. In contrast to other studies, we do not find any evidence that the absorption distribution is dependent on redshift or intrinsic luminosity.

  11. Spatial and Temporal Patterns of Global Onshore Wind Speed Distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Yuyu; Smith, Steven J.

    2013-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind power, a renewable energy source, can play an important role in electrical energy generation. Information regarding wind energy potential is important both for energy related modeling and for decision-making in the policy community. While wind speed datasets with high spatial and temporal resolution are often ultimately used for detailed planning, simpler assumptions are often used in analysis work. An accurate representation of the wind speed frequency distribution is needed in order to properly characterize wind energy potential. Using a power density method, this study estimated global variation in wind parameters as fitted to a Weibull density function using NCEP/CFSR reanalysis data. The estimated Weibull distribution performs well in fitting the time series wind speed data at the global level according to R2, root mean square error, and power density error. The spatial, decadal, and seasonal patterns of wind speed distribution were then evaluated. We also analyzed the potential error in wind power estimation when a commonly assumed Rayleigh distribution (Weibull k = 2) is used. We find that the assumption of the same Weibull parameter across large regions can result in substantial errors. While large-scale wind speed data is often presented in the form of average wind speeds, these results highlight the need to also provide information on the wind speed distribution.

  12. LandScan USA: A High Resolution Geospatial and Temporal Modeling Approach for Population Distribution and Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL; Bright, Eddie A [ORNL; Coleman, Phil R [ORNL; Urban, Marie L [ORNL

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High resolution population distribution data are critical for successfully addressing important issues ranging from socio-environmental research to public health to homeland security, since scientific analyses, operational activities, and policy decisions are significantly influenced by the number of impacted people. Dasymetric modeling has been a well recognized approach for spatial decomposition of census data to increase the spatial resolution of population distribution. However, enhancing the temporal resolution of population distribution poses a greater challenge. In this paper, we discuss the development of LandScan USA, a multi-dimensional dasymetric modeling approach, which has allowed creation of very high resolution population distribution data both over space and time. At a spatial resolution of 3 arc seconds (~90m), the initial LandScan USA database contains both a nighttime residential as well as a baseline daytime population distribution that incorporates movement of workers and students. Challenging research issues of disparate and misaligned spatial data integration and modeling to develop a database at a national scale, as well as model verification and validation approaches are illustrated and discussed. Initial analyses indicate a high degree of accuracy for LandScan USA distribution model and data. High resolution population data such as LandScan USA, which describes both distribution and dynamics of human population, clearly has the potential to profoundly impact on multiple domain applications of national and global priority.

  13. Estimating future global per capita water availability based on changes in climate and population

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Estimating future global per capita water availability based on changes in climate and population: Received 22 September 2011 Received in revised form 16 December 2011 Accepted 26 January 2012 Available availability a b s t r a c t Human populations are profoundly affected by water stress, or the lack

  14. Local and Global Radiative Feedback from Population III Star Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Shea, Brian W

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an overview of recent work that focuses on understanding the radiative feedback processes that are potentially important during Population III star formation. Specifically, we examine the effect of the Lyman-Werner (photodissociating) background on the early stages of primordial star formation, which serves to delay the onset of star formation in a given halo but never suppresses it entirely. We also examine the effect that both photodissociating and ionizing radiation in I-fronts from nearby stellar systems have on the formation of primordial protostellar clouds. Depending on the strength of the incoming radiation field and the central density of the halos, Pop III star formation can be suppressed, unaffected, or even enhanced. Understanding these and other effects is crucial to modeling Population III star formation and to building the earliest generations of galaxies in the Universe.

  15. Globally distributed product development : role of complexity in the what, where and how

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makumbe, Pedzisayi O

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation presents findings on four elements of the relationship between Global Product Development or Globally distributed Product Development (GPD) and product complexity. I examine this relationship in the context ...

  16. Genetic relationships of American alligator populations distributed across different ecological and geographic scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryberg, Wade Alan

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    differentiation indicated by F[st] values. Each population contained unique alleles for at least one locus. Additionally, assignment tests based on the distribution of genotypes placed 76% of individuals to their source population. These genetic data reveal...

  17. Simulating the Spatial Distribution of Population and Emissions to 2100

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asadoorian, Malcolm O.

    Urbanization and economic development have important implications for many environmental processes including global climate change. Although there is evidence that urbanization depends endogenously on economic variables, ...

  18. Financial distortions and the distribution of global volatility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eden, Maya Rachel

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, I study the interactions between various aspects of the financial system and macroeconomic volatility in a globally integrated environment. In Chapter 1, I illustrate that an efficient allocation of liquidity ...

  19. On Reducing the Global State Graph for Verification of Distributed Computations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garg, Vijay

    On Reducing the Global State Graph for Verification of Distributed Computations Arindam Chakraborty and Vijay K. Garg Parallel and Distributed Systems Laboratory The University of Texas at Austin Austin, TX 78712, USA {chakrabo,garg}@ece.utexas.edu Abstract Correct distributed programs are very hard to write

  20. Practical Challenges when Implementing a Distributed Population of Cloud-Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Practical Challenges when Implementing a Distributed Population of Cloud-Computing Simulators will soon appear. For example, we recently applied a genetic algorithm to steer a population of cloud-computing-- Computational steering, cloud computing, cluster computing, discrete event simulation, distributed systems

  1. Estimating future global per capita water availability based on changes in climate and population

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parish, Esther S [ORNL; Kodra, Evan [Northeastern University; Ganguly, Auroop R [Northeastern University; Steinhaeuser, Karsten [University of Minnesota

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Human populations are profoundly affected by water stress, or the lack of sufficient per capita available freshwater. Water stress can result from overuse of available freshwater resources or from a reduction in the amount of available water due to decreases in rainfall and stored water supplies. Analyzing the interrelationship between human populations and water availability is complicated by the uncertainties associated with climate change projections and population projections. We present a simple methodology developed to integrate disparate climate and population data sources and develop first-order per capita water availability projections at the global scale. Simulations from the coupled land-ocean-atmosphere Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3) forced with a range of hypothetical greenhouse gas emissions scenarios are used to project grid-based changes in precipitation minus evapotranspiration as proxies for changes in runoff, or fresh water supply. Population growth changes according to several Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) storylines are used as proxies for changes in fresh water demand by 2025, 2050 and 2100. These freshwater supply and demand projections are then combined to yield estimates of per capita water availability aggregated by watershed and political unit. Results suggest that important insights might be extracted from the use of the process developed here, notably including the identification of the globe s most vulnerable regions in need of more detailed analysis and the relative importance of population growth versus climate change in in altering future freshwater supplies. However, these are only exemplary insights and, as such, could be considered hypotheses that should be rigorously tested with multiple climate models, multiple observational climate datasets, and more comprehensive population change storylines.

  2. Role of ammonia chemistry and coarse mode aerosols in global climatological inorganic aerosol distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zender, Charles

    1 Role of ammonia chemistry and coarse mode aerosols in global climatological inorganic aerosol distributions Chao Luo1 , Charles S. Zender1 , Huisheng Bian2 , Swen Metzger3 Abstract We use an inorganic aerosol thermodynamic equilibrium model

  3. Climate Change Influences on Global Distributions of Dengue and Chikungunya Virus Vectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Lindsay P.; Luther, Caylor; Moo-Llanes, David; Ramsey, Janine M.; Danis-Lozano, Rogelio; Peterson, A. Townsend

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This packet presents raster data files that accompany a manuscript submitted for publication to Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, titled “Climate Change Influences on Global Vector Distributions for Dengue and Chikungunya Viruses...

  4. Global distribution of N2O emissions from aquatic systems: natural emissions and anthropogenic eects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seitzinger, Sybil

    Global distribution of N2O emissions from aquatic systems: natural emissions and anthropogenic, are increasing due to human activities. Our analysis suggests that a third of global anthropogenic N2O emission the remainder. Over 80% of aquatic anthropogenic N2O emissions are from the Northern Hemisphere mid

  5. Inferring surface heat flux distributions guided by a global seismic model: particular application to Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Nikolai

    -flow measurements are rare or entirely absent. This will result in a smooth global heat-flow map that may proveInferring surface heat flux distributions guided by a global seismic model: particular application to Antarctica Nikolai M. Shapiro*, Michael H. Ritzwoller Department of Physics, Center for Imaging the Earth

  6. World population growth, industrialization, energy demand, and environmental goals are presently driving rapid global change in emissions with complex conse-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauzerall, Denise

    395 World population growth, industrialization, energy demand, and environmental goalsPollution Intercontinental transport of pollution between Asia, North America, and Europe takes place via the prevailing by the scientific community as a global pol- lutant for which regulation can best be accomplished by a global

  7. World population growth, industrialization, energy demand, and environmental goals are presently driving rapid global change in emissions with complex conse-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauzerall, Denise

    377 World population growth, industrialization, energy demand, and environmental goalsPollution Intercontinental transport of pollution between Asia, North America, and Europe takes place via the prevailing by the scientific community as a global pol- lutant for which regulation can best be accomplished by a global

  8. Water distribution across the mantle transition zone and its implications for global material circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frontiers Water distribution across the mantle transition zone and its implications for global Available online 13 December 2010 Editor: R.W. Carlson Keywords: water hydrogen seismology electrical conductivity partial melting Various methods for inferring the water distribution in Earth's mantle

  9. On the Global Content PMI: Improved Copy-Protected Internet Content Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matsuoka, Yoky

    On the Global Content PMI: Improved Copy-Protected Internet Content Distribution Tadayoshi Kohno distribution, copy-protection, PMI, risk manage- ment. 1 Introduction The Internet is changing the way Conference, 2001. #12;2 Tadayoshi Kohno and Mark McGovern the Privilege Management Infrastructure (PMI

  10. Population growth, distribution, and size in Latin America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez-Carr, David

    timber harvesting oil exploration/extraction population growth? degradation of lands in source areas history in Amazonia · Early extractive uses Rubber Forestry #12;Development history in Amazonia forests in the world 2) 45% of all the fresh water on the Earth 3) the planet's largest carbon sink 4

  11. Linking Stochastic Dynamics to Population Distribution: An Analytical Framework of Gene Expression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney

    expression. (a) Kinetic schLinking Stochastic Dynamics to Population Distribution: An Analytical Framework of Gene Expression propagation in a simple genetic network. This model allows for the extraction of kinetic parameters of gene

  12. INCOHERENCE AND THE PARAMETRIC TEST FRAMEWORK: MISCONCEIVED RELATIONSHIPS AMONG SAMPLE, SAMPLING DISTRIBUTION, AND POPULATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Alex

    INCOHERENCE AND THE PARAMETRIC TEST FRAMEWORK: MISCONCEIVED RELATIONSHIPS AMONG SAMPLE, SAMPLING Keywords: Parametric test, sample, population, sampling distributions Parametric tests are frequently parametric tests, nor hold beliefs that are consistent with that framework. The parametric test framework

  13. Modeling and responding to pandemic influenza : importance of population distributional attributes and non-pharmaceutical interventions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nigmatulina, Karima Robert

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    After reviewing prevalent approaches to the modeling pandemic influenza transmission, we present a simple distributional model that captures the most significant population attributes that alter the dynamics of the outbreak. ...

  14. Population and Size Distribution of Small Jovian Trojan Asteroids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. C. Jewitt; C. A. Trujillo; J. X. Luu

    2000-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a study of Jovian Trojan objects detected serendipitously during the course of a sky survey conducted at the University of Hawaii 2.2-meter telescope. We used a 8192 x 8192 pixel charge-coupled device (CCD) mosaic to observe 20 deg^2 at locations spread over the L4 Lagrangian swarm and reached a limiting magnitude V = 22.5 mag (50% of maximum detection efficiency). Ninety-three Jovian Trojans were detected with radii 2 - 20 km (assumed albedo 0.04). Their differential magnitude distribution has a slope of 0.40 +/- 0.05 corresponding to a power law size distribution index 3.0 +/- 0.3 (1-sigma). The total number of L4 Trojans with radii > 1 km is of order 1.6 x 10^5 and their combined mass (dominated by the largest objects) is ~ 10^{-4} M_{Earth}. The bias-corrected mean inclination is 13.7 +/- 0.5 deg. We also discuss the size and spatial distribution of the L4 swarm.

  15. The Global Economy and the Latino Populations in the United States: A World Systems Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, William I.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a result of the globalization of the economy In other words,to the impact of the globalization of the economy on a stillcaused by the globalization of the economy — the garment and

  16. The effect of climate change, population distribution, and climate mitigation on building energy use in the U.S. and China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Yuyu; Eom, Jiyong; Clarke, Leon E.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A changing climate will affect the energy system in a number of ways, one of which is through changes in demands for heating and cooling in buildings. Understanding the potential effect of climate on heating and cooling demands must take into account not only the manner in which the building sector might evolve over time - including, for example, movements from rural to urban environments in developing countries - but also important uncertainty about the nature of climate change itself and the growth and movements of populations over time. In this study, we explored the uncertainty in climate change impacts on heating and cooling by constructing estimates of heating and cooling degree days for both a reference (no-policy) scenario and a climate mitigation scenario built from 0.5 degree latitude by 0.5 degree longitude resolution output from three different Global Climate Models (GCMs) and three gridded scenarios of population distribution. The implications that changing climate and population distribution might have for building energy consumption in the U.S. and China were then explored by using the heating and cooling degree days results as inputs to a detailed, building energy model, nested in the long-term global integrated assessment framework, Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM). Across the climate models and population distribution scenarios, the results indicate that unabated climate change would cause total final energy consumption to decrease modestly in both U.S. and China buildings by the end of the century, as decreased heating consumption is more than balanced by increased cooling using primarily electricity. However, the results also indicate that when indirect emissions from the power sector are also taken into account, climate change may have negligible effect on building sector CO2 emissions in the two countries. The variation in results due to variation of population distribution is noticeably smaller than variation due to the use of different climate models.

  17. Estimate of the global distribution of stratiform supercooled liquid water clouds using the LITE lidar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hogan, Robin

    them to generally have a greater effect on the net radiative fluxes than any ice clouds in the profileEstimate of the global distribution of stratiform supercooled liquid water clouds using the LITE layers that have a much larger radiative impact than ice clouds of the same water content because

  18. Large scale risk-assessment of wind-farms on population viability of a globally endangered long-lived raptor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carrete, Martina

    through increments in mortality rates. For this purpose, we evaluate potential conse- quences of wind-term impacts of wind-farms rather than focusing on short-term mortality, as is often promoted by powerLarge scale risk-assessment of wind-farms on population viability of a globally endangered long

  19. 2.1 Introduction 2.2 Distributions of Samples from a Normal Population 2.3 Distributions of Order Statistics Mathematical Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Li-Xin

    of Order Statistics Mathematical Statistics Chapter Two. Preliminary on Sampling Distribution #12;§2.1 Introduction §2.2 Distributions of Samples from a Normal Population §2.3 Distributions of Order Statistics Chapter Two. Preliminary on Sampling Distribution The primary objective of StatisticsTo make inferences

  20. Deviation from power law of the global earthquake seismic moment distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Serra, Isabel

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The distribution of earthquake seismic moment is of capital importance to evaluate seismic hazard, in particular regarding the most extreme events. Likelihood-ratio tests let to compare the performance of the most suitable probabilistic models when ?tted to the global CMT catalog. The conclusion is that the truncated gamma model outperforms the power law and the tapered Gutenberg-Richter models, being able to explain the empirical data both before and after the great Sumatra-Andaman earthquake of 2004.

  1. Global Population Genetics and Evolution of Invasive Biotypes in the Whitefly Complex Bemisia tabaci

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hadjistylli, Margarita

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae). Bull. Entomol.Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) populationsanalysis of Bemisia (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) populations by

  2. Probability distributions for regional climate change from uncertain global mean warming and uncertain scaling relationship Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 11(3), 10971114, 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Probability distributions for regional climate change from uncertain global mean warming of probability distributions for regional climate change from uncertain global mean warming and an uncertain/precipitation per degree global mean warming. Each scaling variable is assumed to be normally distributed

  3. New Limits on Intrinsic Charm in the Nucleon from Global Analysis of Parton Distributions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jimenez-Delgado, P.; Hobbs, T. J.; Londergan, J. T.; Melnitchouk, W.

    2015-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new global QCD analysis of parton distribution functions, allowing for possible intrinsic charm (IC) contributions in the nucleon inspired by light-front models. The analysis makes use of the full range of available high-energy scattering data for Q^2 > 1 GeV^2 and W^2 > 3.5 GeV^2, including fixed-target proton and deuteron deep cross sections at lower energies that were excluded in previously global analyses. The expanded data set places more stringent constraints on the momentum carried by IC, with _IC at most 0.5% (corresponding to an IC normalization of 1%) at the 4-sigma level for deltamore »= 1. We also critically assess the impact of older EMC measurements of F_2c at large x, which favor a nonzero IC, but with very large X^2 values.« less

  4. New Limits on Intrinsic Charm in the Nucleon from Global Analysis of Parton Distributions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jimenez-Delgado, P.; Hobbs, T. J.; Londergan, J. T.; Melnitchouk, W.

    2015-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new global QCD analysis of parton distribution functions, allowing for possible intrinsic charm (IC) contributions in the nucleon inspired by light-front models. The analysis makes use of the full range of available high-energy scattering data for Q^2 > 1 GeV^2 and W^2 > 3.5 GeV^2, including fixed-target proton and deuteron deep cross sections at lower energies that were excluded in previously global analyses. The expanded data set places more stringent constraints on the momentum carried by IC, with _IC at most 0.5% (corresponding to an IC normalization of 1%) at the 4-sigma level for delta = 1. We also critically assess the impact of older EMC measurements of F_2c at large x, which favor a nonzero IC, but with very large X^2 values.

  5. Constraints on spin-dependent parton distributions at large x from global QCD analysis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jimenez-Delgado, Pedro [JLAB; Avakian, Harut A. [JLAB; Melnitchouk, Wally [JLAB

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the behavior of spin-dependent parton distribution functions (PDFs) at large parton momentum fractions x in the context of global QCD analysis. We explore the constraints from existing deep-inelastic scattering data, and from theoretical expectations for the leading x -> 1 behavior based on hard gluon exchange in perturbative QCD. Systematic uncertainties from the dependence of the PDFs on the choice of parametrization are studied by considering functional forms motivated by orbital angular momentum arguments. Finally, we quantify the reduction in the PDF uncertainties that may be expected from future high-x data from Jefferson Lab at 12 GeV.

  6. Constraints on spin-dependent parton distributions at large x from global QCD analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jimenez-Delgado, P. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Avakian, H. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Melnitchouk, W. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the behavior of spin-dependent parton distribution functions (PDFs) at large parton momentum fractions x in the context of global QCD analysis. We explore the constraints from existing deep-inelastic scattering data, and from theoretical expectations for the leading x ? 1 behavior based on hard gluon exchange in perturbative QCD. Systematic uncertainties from the dependence of the PDFs on the choice of parametrization are studied by considering functional forms motivated by orbital angular momentum arguments. Finally, we quantify the reduction in the PDF uncertainties that may be expected from future high-x data from Jefferson Lab at 12 GeV.

  7. Impact of hadronic and nuclear corrections on global analysis of spin-dependent parton distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jimenez-Delgado, Pedro [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Accardi, Alberto [Hampton University, Hampton, VA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Melnitchouk, Wally [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first results of a new global next-to-leading order analysis of spin-dependent parton distribution functions from the most recent world data on inclusive polarized deep-inelastic scattering, focusing in particular on the large-x and low-Q^2 regions. By directly fitting polarization asymmetries we eliminate biases introduced by using polarized structure function data extracted under nonuniform assumptions for the unpolarized structure functions. For analysis of the large-x data we implement nuclear smearing corrections for deuterium and 3He nuclei, and systematically include target mass and higher twist corrections to the g_1 and g_2 structure functions at low Q^2. We also explore the effects of Q^2 and W^2 cuts in the data sets, and the potential impact of future data on the behavior of the spin-dependent parton distributions at large x.

  8. Population strategies to decrease sodium intake : a global cost-effectiveness analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webb, Michael William, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Excessive sodium consumption is both prevalent and very costly in many countries around the world. Recent research has found that more than 90% of the world's adult population live in countries with mean intakes exceeding ...

  9. G2C2 - IV: A novel approach to study the radial distributions of multiple populations in Galactic globular clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vanderbeke, Joachim; De Rijcke, Sven; Baes, Maarten; West, Michael; Alonso-García, Javier; Kunder, Andrea

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use the HB morphology of 48 Galactic GCs to study the radial distributions of the different stellar populations known to exist in globular clusters. Assuming that the (extremely) blue HB stars correspond to stars enriched in Helium and light elements, we compare the radial distributions of stars selected according to colour on the HB to trace the distribution of the secondary stellar populations in globular clusters. Unlike other cases, our data show that the populations are well mixed in 80% of the cases studied. This provides some constraints on the mechanisms proposed to pollute the interstellar medium in young globular clusters.

  10. A Set Coverage-based Mapping Heuristic for Scheduling Distributed Data-Intensive Applications on Global Grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buyya, Rajkumar

    A Set Coverage-based Mapping Heuristic for Scheduling Distributed Data-Intensive Applications on Global Grids Srikumar Venugopal and Rajkumar Buyya Grid Computing and Distributed Systems (GRIDS Email:{srikumar, raj}@csse.unimelb.edu.au Abstract Data-intensive Grid applications need access to large

  11. Dynamics of two populations of phase oscillators with different frequency distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu Terada; Toshio Aoyagi

    2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A large variety of rhythms have been observed in nature. These rhythms can be often regarded to interact with each other, such as electroencephalogram (EEG) in the brain. To investigate the dynamical properties of such systems, in this paper, we consider two populations of phase oscillators with different frequency distributions, particularly under the condition that the average frequency of fast oscillators is almost equal to the integral multiple of that of slow oscillators. What is the most important point is that we have to use the specific type of the coupling function derived from the phase reduction theory. Under some additional assumption, moreover, we can reduce the system consisting of two populations of coupled phase oscillators to a low-dimensional system in the continuum limit. As a result, we find chimera states in which clustering and incoherent states coexist. We also confirm that the behaviors of the derived low-dimensional model fairly agree with that of the original one.

  12. This document is a preprint of the final paper: L. Meng, T. Dragicevic, J. M. Guerrero, "Dynamic consensus algorithm based distributed global efficiency optimization of a droop controlled

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasquez, Juan Carlos

    consensus algorithm based distributed global efficiency optimization of a droop controlled dc microgrid Distributed Global Efficiency Optimization of a Droop Controlled DC Microgrid Lexuan Meng, Tomislav Dragicevic for transferring power from external grid to a DC microgrid. Droop control is used for the distributed load sharing

  13. Copyright 2009, IGI Global, distributing in print or electronic forms without written permission of IGI Global is prohibited. Chapter XVIII

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakanishi, Hideyuki

    Many research projects have studied various aspects of smart environments including smart rooms, home (Brotherton & Abowd, 2004), smart homes (Kidd et al., 1999), smart offices (Addlesee et al., 2001), and smart permission of IGI Global is prohibited. Chapter XVIII Virtual Cities for Simulating Smart Urban Public Spaces

  14. Estimating the Spatial Distribution of Population without Power during Extreme Weather Events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omitaomu, Olufemi A [ORNL; Fernandez, Steven J [ORNL; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One challenge in emergency preparedness and response during extreme weather events such as hurricanes and ice storms is estimating how many people may be without power and how long they could be without power. In this presentation, we will discuss a method for estimating the spatial distribution of people without power during extreme weather events. The method is based on a directional nearest-neighbor approach in which grid cells representing substation locations acquire other grid cells representing customers/population demand with respect to the capacity of each substation. We also present a method for estimating restoration time in case of an outage. The application of these methods during the 2008 hurricane season will also be discussed.

  15. Availability in Globally Distributed Storage Systems Daniel Ford, Francois Labelle, Florentina I. Popovici, Murray Stokely, Van-Anh Truong

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maccabe, Barney

    Availability in Globally Distributed Storage Systems Daniel Ford, Franc¸ois Labelle, Florentina I,flab,florentina,mstokely}@google.com, vatruong@ieor.columbia.edu {luiz,cgrimes,sean}@google.com Google, Inc. Abstract Highly available cloud are needed to achieve high performance and availability amidst an abundance of failure sources that include

  16. Dynamically and Observationally Constrained Estimates of Water-Mass Distributions and Ages in the Global Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeVries, Tim; Primeau, Francois

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lumpkin, R. , and K. Speer, 2007: Global ocean meridionalStammer 2004; Lumpkin and Speer 2007), but, in an advective–

  17. Fast BPM data distribution for global orbit feedback using commercial gigabit ethernet technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulsart, R.; Cerniglia, P.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.

    2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to correct beam perturbations in RHIC around 10Hz, a new fast data distribution network was required to deliver BPM position data at rates several orders of magnitude above the capability of the existing system. The urgency of the project limited the amount of custom hardware that could be developed, which dictated the use of as much commercially available equipment as possible. The selected architecture uses a custom hardware interface to the existing RHIC BPM electronics together with commercially available Gigabit Ethernet switches to distribute position data to devices located around the collider ring. Using the minimum Ethernet packet size and a field programmable gate array (FPGA) based state machine logic instead of a software based driver, real-time and deterministic data delivery is possible using Ethernet. The method of adapting this protocol for low latency data delivery, bench testing of Ethernet hardware, and the logic to construct Ethernet packets using FPGA hardware will be discussed. A robust communications system using almost all commercial off-the-shelf equipment was developed in under a year which enabled retrofitting of the existing RHIC BPM system to provide 10 KHz data delivery for a global orbit feedback scheme using 72 BPMs. Total latencies from data acquisition at the BPMs to delivery at the controller modules, including very long transmission distances, were kept under 100 {micro}s, which provide very little phase error in correcting the 10 Hz oscillations. Leveraging off of the speed of Gigabit Ethernet and wide availability of Ethernet products enabled this solution to be fully implemented in a much shorter time and at lower cost than if a similar network was developed using a proprietary method.

  18. Role of ammonia chemistry and coarse mode aerosols in global climatological inorganic aerosol distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luo, Chao; Zender, Charles S; Bian, Huisheng; Metzger, Swen

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    times of tropospheric aerosols inferred from a global three-sional simulation of 210Pb aerosols. Journal of Geophysicalof sulfate and nitrate aerosol. Atmospheric Environ- ment

  19. Consideration of the electron energy distribution function shape in a Ar and N{sub 2} global model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, Namjun; Oh, Soo-Ghee [Division of Energy Systems Research, Ajou University, Suwon 443-749 (Korea, Republic of); Gaboriau, Freddy [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, INPT, LAPLACE (Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d'Energie), 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse cedex 9 (France); CNRS, LAPLACE, F-31062 Toulouse (France)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a method to compensate the effects of the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) shape on plasma characteristics when using global models to describe Ar and N{sub 2} inductively coupled discharges. A non-Maxwellian global model is developed for the pressure range 1-1000 mTorr by using an user-friendly Boltzmann equation solver to calculate the EEDF. The calculated EEDFs are compared with the measurements performed with a single Langmuir probe in the same conditions. We also compare the calculated results by using the Boltzmann equation solver with the results by assuming a Maxwellian EEDF and point out the influence of both methods on the contribution of the multi-step process on ionization. Finally, to take into account the shape of the EEDF in global models, abacuses are presented as a function of the absorbed power density and the pressure for typical Ar and N{sub 2} planar ICP discharges.

  20. An ensemble CCDAS method to derive the full probabilityAn ensemble CCDAS method to derive the full probability distribution of the global net COdistribution of the global net CO22 fluxflux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    probability distribution of the global net COdistribution of the global net CO22 fluxflux Tilo Ziehn, Marko to their a priori mean and standard deviation. This provides us with monthly fields of the net primary productivity are propagated forward using the Jacobian model code to obtain the uncertainty in the net ecosystem productivity

  1. Using Citizen Science Data to Model the Distributions of Common Songbirds of Turkey Under Different Global

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    Using Citizen Science Data to Model the Distributions of Common Songbirds of Turkey Under Different an ornithological citizen science initiative (www.kusbank.org) with maximum entropy modeling and eight bioclimatic (2013) Using Citizen Science Data to Model the Distributions of Common Songbirds of Turkey Under

  2. Limits to Species' Distributions: Spatial Structure and Dynamics of Breeding Bird Populations Along an Ecological Gradient

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hargrove, Lori

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    K. J. 2003. The structure and dynamics of geographic ranges.8 Chapter 1: Spatial structure and dynamics of breeding birdDistributions: Spatial Structure and Dynamics of Breeding

  3. MODELING DAYTIME AND NIGHTTIME POPULATION DISTRIBUTIONS IN PORTUGAL USING GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freire, Sergio Carneiro

    2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    for two municipalities of Metropolitan Lisbon in Portugal, Cascais and Oeiras. Their combined population was 332,811 in 2001. The most recent census enumeration figures iv and mobility statistics (2001) are combined with physiographic data, using... and Organization of Variables .......................................................36 3.3.1 Street Centerlines ...................................................................................37 3.3.2 Land Use and Land Cover...

  4. Population Effects on the Metallicity Distribution Function Derived From the Red Giant Branch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ordoñez, Antonio J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have tested the reliability of the red giant branch (RGB) as a metallicity indicator accounting for observational errors as well as the complexity of star formation histories (SFHs) and chemical evolution histories observed in various stellar systems. We generate model color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) produced with a variety of evolutionary histories and compare the resultant metallicity estimates from the colors and magnitudes of RGB stars to the true input metallicities. We include realistic models for photometric errors and completeness in our synthetic CMDs. As expected, for simple simple stellar populations dominated by old stars, the RGB provides a very accurate estimate of the modular metallicity value for a population. An error in the age of a system targeted for this type of study may produce metallicity errors of a few tenths of a dex. The size of this metallicity error depends linearly on the age error, and we find this dependence to be stronger with more precise photometry. If the population has...

  5. The effects of a kappa-distribution in the heliosheath on the global heliosphere and ENA flux at 1 AU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Heerikhuisen; N. V. Pogorelov; V. Florinski; G. P. Zank; J. A. le Roux

    2008-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate heliosheath energetic neutral atom (ENA) fluxes at keV energies, by assuming that the heliosheath proton distribution can be approximated by a kappa-distribution. The choice of the kappa parameter derives from observational data of the solar wind (SW). This has direct applications to the upcoming IBEX mission. We will look at all-sky ENA maps within the IBEX energy range (10 eV to 6 keV), as well as ENA energy spectra in several directions. We find that the use of kappa, as opposed to a Maxwellian, gives rise to greatly increased ENA fluxes above 1 keV, while medium energy fluxes are somewhat reduced. We show how IBEX data can be used to estimate the spectral slope in the heliosheath, and that the use of kappa reduces the differences between ENA maps at different energies. We also investigate the effect introducing a kappa-distribution has on the global interaction between the SW and the local interstellar medium (LISM), and find that there is generally an increase in energy transport from the heliosphere into the LISM, due to the modified profile of ENA's energies. This results in a termination shock that moves out by 4 AU, a heliopause that moves in by 9 AU and a bow shock 25 AU farther out, in the nose direction.

  6. Global distribution and climate forcing of marine organic aerosol: 1. Model improvements and evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meskhidze, N.; Xu, J.; Gantt, Brett; Zhang, Yang; Nenes, Athanasios; Ghan, Steven J.; Liu, Xiaohong; Easter, Richard C.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

    2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Marine organic aerosol emissions have been implemented and evaluated within the National Center of Atmospheric Research (NCAR)'s Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5) with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's 7-mode Modal Aerosol Module (MAM-7). Emissions of marine primary organic aerosols (POA), phytoplanktonproduced isoprene- and monoterpenes-derived secondary organic aerosols (SOA) and methane sulfonate (MS{sup -}) are shown to affect surface concentrations of organic aerosols in remote marine regions. Global emissions of submicron marine POA is estimated to be 7.9 and 9.4 Tg yr{sup -1}, for the Gantt et al. (2011) and Vignati et al. (2010) emission parameterizations, respectively. Marine sources of SOA and particulate MS{sup -} (containing both sulfur and carbon atoms) contribute an additional 0.2 and 5.1 Tg yr{sup -1}, respectively. Widespread areas over productive waters of the Northern Atlantic, Northern Pacific, and the Southern Ocean show marine-source submicron organic aerosol surface concentrations of 100 ngm{sup -3}, with values up to 400 ngm{sup -3} over biologically productive areas. Comparison of long-term surface observations of water insoluble organic matter (WIOM) with POA concentrations from the two emission parameterizations shows that despite revealed discrepancies (often more than a factor of 2), both Gantt et al. (2011) and Vignati et al. (2010) formulations are able to capture the magnitude of marine organic aerosol concentrations, with the Gantt et al. (2011) parameterization attaining better seasonality. Model simulations show that the mixing state of the marine POA can impact the surface number concentration of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The largest increases (up to 20 %) in CCN (at a supersaturation (S) of 0.2 %) number concentration are obtained over biologically productive ocean waters when marine organic aerosol is assumed to be externally mixed with sea-salt. Assuming marine organics are internally-mixed with sea-salt provides diverse results with increases and decreases in the concentration of CCN over different parts of the ocean. The sign of the CCN change due to the addition of marine organics to seasalt aerosol is determined by the relative significance of the increase in mean modal diameter due to addition of mass, and the decrease in particle hygroscopicity due to compositional changes in marine aerosol. Based on emerging evidence for increased CCN concentration over biologically active surface ocean areas/periods, our study suggests that treatment of sea spray in global climate models (GCMs) as an internal mixture of marine organic aerosols and sea-salt will likely lead to an underestimation in CCN number concentration.

  7. Choose the most appropriate answer 1. A The predicted increase in global population will be particularly harmful in Africa where

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romeo, Alessandro

    in developed and poor countries and doesn't diminish as the previous research said. 3. A Rich western countries brought contraceptives and introduced development policies to try to limit population growth in the world's poorest countries. 4. A Western spending on foreign programs is decreased in the last years. B Over 30

  8. Sensitivity of Remote Aerosol Distributions to Representation of Cloud-Aerosol Interactions in a Global Climate Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Hailong; Easter, Richard C.; Rasch, Philip J.; Wang, Minghuai; Liu, Xiaohong; Ghan, Steven J.; Qian, Yun; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Ma, Po-Lun; Vinoj, V.

    2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Many global aerosol and climate models, including the widely used Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5), have large biases in predicting aerosols in remote regions such as upper troposphere and high latitudes. In this study, we conduct CAM5 sensitivity simulations to understand the role of key processes associated with aerosol transformation and wet removal affecting the vertical and horizontal long-range transport of aerosols to the remote regions. Improvements are made to processes that are currently not well represented in CAM5, which are guided by surface and aircraft measurements together with results from a multi-scale aerosol-climate model (PNNL-MMF) that explicitly represents convection and aerosol-cloud interactions at cloud-resolving scales. We pay particular attention to black carbon (BC) due to its importance in the Earth system and the availability of measurements. We introduce into CAM5 a new unified scheme for convective transport and aerosol wet removal with explicit aerosol activation above convective cloud base. This new implementation reduces the excessive BC aloft to better simulate observed BC profiles that show decreasing mixing ratios in the mid- to upper-troposphere. After implementing this new unified convective scheme, we examine wet removal of submicron aerosols that occurs primarily through cloud processes. The wet removal depends strongly on the sub-grid scale liquid cloud fraction and the rate of conversion of liquid water to precipitation. These processes lead to very strong wet removal of BC and other aerosols over mid- to high latitudes during winter months. With our improvements, the Arctic BC burden has a10-fold (5-fold) increase in the winter (summer) months, resulting in a much better simulation of the BC seasonal cycle as well. Arctic sulphate and other aerosol species also increase but to a lesser extent. An explicit treatment of BC aging with slower aging assumptions produces an additional 30-fold (5-fold) increase in the Arctic winter (summer) BC burden. This BC aging treatment, however, has minimal effect on other under-predicted species. Interestingly, our modifications to CAM5 that aim at improving prediction of high-latitude and upper tropospheric aerosols also produce much better AOD and AAOD over various other regions globally when compared to multi-year AERONET retrievals. The improved aerosol distributions have impacts on other aspects of CAM5, improving the simulation of global mean liquid water path and cloud forcing.

  9. Sensitivity of photolysis frequencies and key tropospheric oxidants in a global model to cloud vertical distributions and optical properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Hongyu

    in the tropical upper troposphere. We find that the radiative impact of clouds on global photolysis frequencies(O1 D), J(NO2)) due to the radiative effects of clouds in June are about 0.0% (0.4%, 0.9%), 0.8% (1Sensitivity of photolysis frequencies and key tropospheric oxidants in a global model to cloud

  10. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PARALLEL AND DISTRIBUTED SYSTEMS, VOL. X, NO. X, JUNE 2008 1 Schedulability analysis of global scheduling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipari, Giuseppe

    analysis of global scheduling algorithms on multiprocessor platforms Marko Bertogna, Michele Cirinei and sporadic real-time task sets with constrained deadlines preemptively scheduled on a multiprocessor platform to two typical scheduling algorithms: Earliest Deadline First (EDF) and Fixed Priority (FP). Then

  11. Study of quark fragmentation in e(+)e(-) annihilation at 29 GeV: Global jet parameters and single-particle distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PARTICLES AND FIELDS THIRD SERIES, VOLUME 31, NUMBER 1 1 JANUARY 1985 Study of quark fragmentation in e+e annihilation at 29 GeV: Global jet parameters and single-particle distributions D. Bender, "M. Derrick, E. Fernandez, '"' R. Fries,". G..., California 94720 L. Keller and J. Va'vra Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford, California 94305 (Received 21 May 1984) In this paper, results are presented fram a study of the hadronic final states in e+e annihilation at 29 GeV. The data were obtained...

  12. 18 International Journal of Biomaterials Research and Engineering, 1(1), 18-31, January-March 2011 Copyright 2011, IGI Global. Copying or distributing in print or electronic forms without written permission of IGI Global is prohibited.Copyright 2011, IG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Jian

    18 International Journal of Biomaterials Research and Engineering, 1(1), 18-31, January-March 2011 Copyright © 2011, IGI Global. Copying or distributing in print or electronic forms without written or electronic forms without written permission of IGI Global is prohibited. Keywords: Biodegradable Elastomer

  13. THE DEEP SWIRE FIELD. IV. FIRST PROPERTIES OF THE SUB-mJy GALAXY POPULATION: REDSHIFT DISTRIBUTION, AGN ACTIVITY, AND STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strazzullo, Veronica; Pannella, Maurilio; Owen, Frazer N.; Wang, Wei-Hao [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 1003 Lopezville Rd., Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Bender, Ralf [Universitaets-Sternwarte, Scheinerstrasse 1, Munich D-81679 (Germany); Morrison, Glenn E. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Shupe, David L., E-mail: vstrazzu@nrao.ed [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, 100-22, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2010-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a study of a 20 cm selected sample in the Deep Spitzer Wide-area InfraRed Extragalactic Legacy Survey Very Large Array Field, reaching a 5{sigma} limiting flux density at the image center of S{sub 1.4{sub GHz}} {approx} 13.5 {mu}Jy. In a 0.6 x 0.6 deg{sup 2} field, we are able to assign an optical/IR counterpart to 97% of the radio sources. Up to 11 passbands from the NUV to 4.5 {mu}m are then used to sample the spectral energy distribution (SED) of these counterparts in order to investigate the nature of the host galaxies. By means of an SED template library and stellar population synthesis models, we estimate photometric redshifts, stellar masses, and stellar population properties, dividing the sample into three sub-classes of quiescent, intermediate, and star-forming galaxies. We focus on the radio sample in the redshift range 0.3 < z < 1.3 where we estimate to have a redshift completeness higher than 90% and study the properties and redshift evolution of these sub-populations. We find that, as expected, the relative contributions of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and star-forming galaxies to the {mu}Jy population depend on the flux density limit of the sample. At all flux levels, a significant population of 'green-valley' galaxies is observed. While the actual nature of these sources is not definitely understood, the results of this work may suggest that a significant fraction of faint radio sources might be composite (and possibly transition) objects, thus a simple 'AGN versus star-forming' classification might not be appropriate to fully understand what faint radio populations really are.

  14. Global Inequality in Energy Consumption from 1980 to 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Scott; Yakovenko, Victor M

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the global probability distribution of energy consumption per capita around the world using data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) for 1980-2010. We find that the Lorenz curves have moved up during this time period, and the Gini coefficient G has decreased from 0.66 in 1980 to 0.55 in 2010, indicating a decrease in inequality. The global probability distribution of energy consumption per capita in 2010 is close to the exponential distribution with G=0.5. We attribute this result to the globalization of the world economy, which mixes the world and brings it closer to the state of maximal entropy. We argue that global energy production is a limited resource that is partitioned among the world population. The most probable partition is the one that maximizes entropy, thus resulting in the exponential distribution function. A consequence of the latter is the law of 1/3: the top 1/3 of the world population consumes 2/3 of produced energy. We also find similar results for the global pro...

  15. Global Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crow, Ben D

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1996). Globalization in Question: International Economy andGlobalization; Justice; Poverty; Underground Economy; United

  16. The Effects of Quality Control on Decreasing Error Propagation in the LandScan USA Population Distribution Model: A Case Study of Philadelphia County

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patterson, Lauren [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Urban, Marie L [ORNL; Myers, Aaron T [ORNL; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL; Bright, Eddie A [ORNL; Coleman, Phil R [ORNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Landscan USA is a high resolution dasymetric model incorporating multiple ancillary variables to distribute populations. LandScan USA is a valuable tool in determining the population at risk during emergency response situations. However, a critical evaluation is necessary to produce user confidence regarding model accuracy through the verification and validation of model outputs. Unfortunately, dynamic models, such as population distribution, are often not validated due to the difficulty of having multiple input datasets and lack of validated data. A validated dataset allows analysis of model accuracy, as well as quantifying the benefits and costs of improving input datasets compared to find a balance for producing the best model. This paper examines inaccuracies present within the input variables of two national school datasets incorporated in the model. Schools were chosen since a validated school dataset exists for Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania. Quality control efforts utilized throughout the LandScan USA process are quantified to determine the degree of quality control necessary to have a statistically significant effect on model output. Typical LandScan USA quality control resulted in 43% of school enrollment values changed, compared to 89% for the validated dataset. Normal quality control methods resulted in 36% of schools being spatially relocated compared to 87% for the validated dataset. However, the costs of increasing quality control from normal to the validated dataset equated to a 600% increase in manual labor time for statistically insignificant improvements in LandScan USA daytime. This study enabled validation verification of not only the quality control process for LandScan USA, but also provides confidence in model output and use for policy issues, planning and emergency situations.

  17. Population dynamics and within field distribution of the greenbug, Schizaphis graminum (Rondani), and its parasitoids in Central Texas winter wheat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kring, T. J

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    throughout the study period. The low greenbug densities prevented descriptton of a meaning- ful szgntficant immigration and/or emigration pattern based on slate p d ' . R. d ' b d h pl p production of the panicle. Primary parasitotds reared from... in the Texas Panhandle. Descriptions of greenbug age distribution as it changes through time on wheat is limited zn the United States to Kieckhefer's (1975) work rn South Dakota. Kieckhefer distinguished density gradients of nymphal, apterous and slate...

  18. Global Distribution and Climate Forcing of Marine Organic Aerosol - Part 2: Effects on Cloud Properties and Radiative Forcing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gantt, Brett; Xu, Jun; Meskhidze, N.; Zhang, Yang; Nenes, Athanasios; Ghan, Steven J.; Liu, Xiaohong; Easter, Richard C.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

    2012-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of simulations with the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) with a 7-mode Modal Aerosol Model were conducted to assess the changes in cloud microphysical properties and radiative forcing resulting from marine organic aerosols. Model simulations show that the anthropogenic aerosol indirect forcing (AIF) predicted by CAM5 is decreased in absolute magnitude by up to 0.09 Wm{sup -2} (7 %) when marine organic aerosols are included. Changes in the AIF from marine organic aerosols are associated with small global increases in low-level incloud droplet number concentration and liquid water path of 1.3 cm{sup -3} (1.5 %) and 0.22 gm{sup -2} (0.5 %), respectively. Areas especially sensitive to changes in cloud properties due to marine organic aerosol include the Southern Ocean, North Pacific Ocean, and North Atlantic Ocean, all of which are characterized by high marine organic emission rates. As climate models are particularly sensitive to the background aerosol concentration, this small but non-negligible change in the AIF due to marine organic aerosols provides a notable link for ocean-ecosystem marine low-level cloud interactions and may be a candidate for consideration in future earth system models.

  19. Assessing Spatial and Attribute Errors of Input Data in Large National Datasets for use in Population Distribution Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patterson, Lauren A [ORNL; Urban, Marie L [ORNL; Myers, Aaron T [ORNL; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL; Bright, Eddie A [ORNL; Coleman, Phil R [ORNL

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geospatial technologies and digital data have developed and disseminated rapidly in conjunction with increasing computing performance and internet availability. The ability to store and transmit large datasets has encouraged the development of national datasets in geospatial format. National datasets are used by numerous agencies for analysis and modeling purposes because these datasets are standardized, and are considered to be of acceptable accuracy. At Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a national population model incorporating multiple ancillary variables was developed and one of the inputs required is a school database. This paper examines inaccuracies present within two national school datasets, TeleAtlas North America (TANA) and National Center of Education Statistics (NCES). Schools are an important component of the population model, because they serve as locations containing dense clusters of vulnerable populations. It is therefore essential to validate the quality of the school input data, which was made possible by increasing national coverage of high resolution imagery. Schools were also chosen since a 'real-world' representation of K-12 schools for the Philadelphia School District was produced; thereby enabling 'ground-truthing' of the national datasets. Analyses found the national datasets not standardized and incomplete, containing 76 to 90% of existing schools. The temporal accuracy of enrollment values of updating national datasets resulted in 89% inaccuracy to match 2003 data. Spatial rectification was required for 87% of the NCES points, of which 58% of the errors were attributed to the geocoding process. Lastly, it was found that by combining the two national datasets together, the resultant dataset provided a more useful and accurate solution. Acknowledgment Prepared by Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6285, managed by UT-Battelle, LLC for the U. S. Department of Energy undercontract no. DEAC05-00OR22725. Copyright This manuscript has been authored by employees of UT-Battelle, LLC, under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725 with the U.S. Department of Energy. Accordingly, the United States Government retains and the publisher, by accepting the article for publication, acknowledges that the United States Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this manuscript, or allow others to do so, for United States Government purposes.

  20. Relationship of adiposity to the population distribution of plasma triglyceride concentrations in vigorously active men and women

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Paul T.

    2002-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Context and Objective: Vigorous exercise, alcohol and weight loss are all known to increase HDL-cholesterol, however, it is not known whether these interventions raise low HDL as effectively as has been demonstrated for normal HDL. Design: Physician-supplied medical data from 7,288 male and 2,359 female runners were divided into five strata according to their self-reported usual running distance, reported alcohol intake, body mass index (BMI) or waist circumference. Within each stratum, the 5th, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th, and 95th percentiles for HDL-cholesterol were then determined. Bootstrap resampling of least-squares regression was applied to determine the cross-sectional relationships between these factors and each percentile of the HDL-cholesterol distribution. Results: In both sexes, the rise in HDL-cholesterol per unit of vigorous exercise or alcohol intake was at least twice as great at the 95th percentile as at the 5th percentile of the HDL-distribution. There was also a significant graded increase in the slopes relating exercise (km run) and alcohol intake to HDL between the 5th and the 95th percentile. Men's HDL-cholesterol decreased in association with fatness (BMI and waist circumference) more sharply at the 95th than at the 5th percentile of the HDL-distribution. Conclusions: Although exercise, alcohol and adiposity were all related to HDL-cholesterol, the elevation in HDL per km run or ounce of alcohol consumed, and reduction in HDL per kg of body weight (men only), was least when HDL was low and greatest when HDL was high. These cross-sectional relationships support the hypothesis that men and women who have low HDL-cholesterol will be less responsive to exercise and alcohol (and weight loss in men) as compared to those who have high HDL-cholesterol.

  1. Distributed Web Server Architecture: A Framework for Global, Fast, Reliable Content Delivery Current methods of delivering content quickly and reliably over the web can be hard and expensive to implement.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Distributed Web Server Architecture: A Framework for Global, Fast, Reliable Content Delivery Brad that provides low­latency initial response to customer requests followed by checking for a better server and redirecting the customer to that better server if one is available. The solution utilizes aspects of Internet

  2. Globalization Nationalized

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazlish, Bruce

    Globalism and globalization have been seen as competitors to other allegiances, namely regionalism and nationalism. A look at recent efforts at reconceptualizing global history in China, Korea and the U.S., however, suggests ...

  3. Populations Population Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dever, Jennifer A.

    - species interactions Abiotic factors: l Climate l Temperature l Moisture l Wind l Soil l Fire Biotic- Ã? mortality increases as population size increases or birth rate decreases" l Negative feedback

  4. Global Health Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Ophir

    Bay Area Global Health Seminar Series Monday, January 27, 2014 2:30pm ­ 4:00pm (Reception to follow at the Center for Health Policy and the Woods Institute for the Environment. He studies how economic, political, and natural environments affect population health in developing countries using a mix of experimental

  5. International Journal of Data Warehousing and Mining, 8(4), 1-21, October-December 2012 1 Copyright 2012, IGI Global. Copying or distributing in print or electronic forms without written permission of IGI Global is prohibited.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ezeife, Christie

    of IGI Global is prohibited. Keywords: Non-DeterministicFiniteAutomata(NFA),ObjectOrientedMining,WebContentMining, WebDataIntegration,Wrappers INTRODUCTION World Wide Web (WWW) is growing expo- nentially over the years and web documents constitute some of the largest repositories of information (Kosala & Blockeel

  6. Perturbation Theory for Population Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francisco M. Fernandez

    2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We prove that a recently proposed homotopy perturbation method for the treatment of population dynamics is just the Taylor expansion of the population variables about initial time. Our results show that this perturbation method fails to provide the global features of the ecosystem dynamics.

  7. Global Atmospheric Change and Animal Populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and oil, produces both primary pollutants (those directly produced from fossil fuel combustion; e produced from fossil fuel combustion that undergo secondary chemical reactions to form pollutants; e Dioxide (CO2) A direct result of fossil fuel combustion, CO2 is arguably the most important greenhouse gas

  8. Global Scale Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asphaug, Erik; Jutzi, Martin

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Global scale impacts modify the physical or thermal state of a substantial fraction of a target asteroid. Specific effects include accretion, family formation, reshaping, mixing and layering, shock and frictional heating, fragmentation, material compaction, dilatation, stripping of mantle and crust, and seismic degradation. Deciphering the complicated record of global scale impacts, in asteroids and meteorites, will lead us to understand the original planet-forming process and its resultant populations, and their evolution in time as collisions became faster and fewer. We provide a brief overview of these ideas, and an introduction to models.

  9. Parallel Interval Continuous Global Optimization Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    abdeljalil benyoub

    2002-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Jul 19, 2002 ... Abstract: We theorically study, on a distributed memory architecture, the parallelization of Hansen's algorithm for the continuous global ...

  10. Pax Global: Compromise Agreement (2013-SE-1413)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE and Pax Global, Inc., entered into a Compromise Agreement to resolve a case involving the distribution in commerce of noncompliant freezers.

  11. Global analysis of genetic variation in human arsenic (+ 3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujihara, Junko [Department of Legal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Shimane University, Izumo, Shimane (Japan); Soejima, Mikiko [Department of Forensic Medicine and Human Genetics, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume, Fukuoka (Japan); Yasuda, Toshihiro [Division of Medical Genetics and Biochemistry, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Fukui, Eiheiji-cho, Fukui (Japan); Koda, Yoshiro [Department of Forensic Medicine and Human Genetics, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume, Fukuoka (Japan); Agusa, Tetsuro [Department of Legal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Shimane University, Izumo, Shimane (Japan); Kunito, Takashi [Department of Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Science, Shinshu University, Matsumoto, Nagano (Japan); Tongu, Miki; Yamada, Takaya [Department of Experimental Animals, Center for Integrated Research in Science, Faculty of Medicine, Shimane University, Izumo (Japan); Takeshita, Haruo, E-mail: htakeshi@med.shimane-u.ac.j [Department of Legal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Shimane University, Izumo, Shimane (Japan)

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Human arsenic (+ 3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT) is known to catalyze the methylation of arsenite. The objective of this study was to investigate the diversity of the AS3MT gene at the global level. The distribution of 18 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in AS3MT was performed in 827 individuals from 10 populations (Japanese, Korean, Chinese, Mongolian, Tibetans, Sri Lankan Tamils, Sri Lankan Sinhalese, Nepal Tamangs, Ovambo, and Ghanaian). In the African populations, the A allele in A6144T was not observed; the allele frequencies of C35587 were much lower than those in other populations; the allele frequencies of A37616 and C37950 were relatively higher than those in other populations. Among Asian populations, Mongolians showed a different genotype distribution pattern. A lower C3963 and T6144 frequencies were observed, and, in the C37616A and T37950C polymorphism, the Mongolian population showed higher A37616 and C37950 allele frequencies than other Asian populations, similarly to the African populations. A total of 66 haplotypes were observed in the Ovambo, 48, in the Ghanaian, 99, in the Japanese, 103, in the Korean, 103, in the South Chinese, 20, in the Sri Lankan Tamil, 12, in the Sri Lankan Sinhalese, 21, in the Nepal Tamang, 50, in the Tibetan, and 45, in the Mongolian populations. The D' values between the SNP pairs were extremely high in the Sri Lankan Sinhalese population. Relatively higher D' values were observed in Mongolian and Sri Lankan Tamil populations. Network analysis showed two clusters that may have different origins, African and Asians (Chinese and/or Japanese). The present study is the first to demonstrate the existence of genetic heterogeneity in a world wide distribution of 18 SNPs in AS3MT.

  12. Parameterization of Urban Characteristics for Global Climate Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Trisha L.

    2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    of varying scales and effects of climate change on urban populations, urbanization must be included in global climate models (GCMs). To properly capture the spatial variability in urban areas, GCMs require global databases of urban extent and characteristics...

  13. update: Emerging research opportunities in global urban ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    La Sorte, Frank A.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    populations.   Global  Ecology  and  Bio? geography, 20, Global  change  and  the  ecology  of  cities.   Science, rates in urban areas.  Ecology Letters, 12, 1165– La Sorte, 

  14. Global Energy: Supply, Demand, Consequences, Opportunities

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Arun Majumdar

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    July 29, 2008 Berkeley Lab lecture: Arun Majumdar, Director of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division, discusses current and future projections of economic growth, population, and global energy demand and supply, and explores the implications of these trends for the environment.

  15. DISTRIBUTED CONNECTIVITY CONTROL OF MOBILE NETWORKS, MARCH 2007. 1 Distributed Connectivity Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zavlanos, Michael

    DISTRIBUTED CONNECTIVITY CONTROL OF MOBILE NETWORKS, MARCH 2007. 1 Distributed Connectivity Control of distributed motion algorithms that guarantee connectivity of the overall network. In this paper, we address CONNECTIVITY CONTROL OF MOBILE NETWORKS, MARCH 2007. sufficient for global connectedness. Distributed

  16. The Size Distribution of Superbubbles in the Interstellar Medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. S. Oey; C. J. Clarke

    1998-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We use the standard, adiabatic shell evolution to predict the size distribution N(R) for populations of SN-driven superbubbles in a uniform ISM. We derive N(R) for simple cases of superbubble creation rate and mechanical luminosity function. We then compare our predictions for N(R) with the largely complete HI hole catalogue for the SMC, with a view toward the global structure of the ISM in that galaxy. We also present a preliminary derivation for N(v), the distribution of shell expansion velocities.

  17. Draft only. This version: July 2011 GPE-VN: A general equilibrium model for the study of globalization,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coxhead, Ian

    of economies with global markets, for growth, economic welfare, income distribution and the environment, but the implications of integration with the global economy for income distribution, poverty change of globalization, poverty and the environment in Vietnam1 Ian Coxhead, University

  18. Nonuniform character of the population of spin projections K for a fissile nucleus at the scission point and anisotropies in the angular distributions of fragments originating from the induced fission of nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kadmensky, S. G., E-mail: kadmensky@phys.vsu.ru [Voronezh State University (Russian Federation); Bunakov, V. E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Kadmensky, S. S. [Voronezh State University (Russian Federation)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that the emergence of anisotropies in the angular distributions of fragments originating from the spontaneous and induced fission of oriented actinide nuclei is possible only if nonuniformities in the population of the projectionsM (K) of the fissile-nucleus spin onto the z axis of the laboratory frame (fissile-nucleus symmetry axis) appear simultaneously in the vicinity of the scission point but not in the vicinity of the outer saddle point of the deformation potential. The possibilities for creating the orientation of fissile nuclei for spontaneous and induced fission and the effect of these orientations on the anisotropies under analysis are considered. The role of Coriolis interaction as a unique source of the mixing of different-K fissile-nucleus states at all stages of the fission process is studied with allowance for the dynamical enhancement of this interaction for excited thermalized states of the nucleus involved that is characterized by a high energy density. It is shown that the absence of thermalization of excited states of the fissile nucleus that appear because of the effect of nonadiabaticity of its collective deformation motion in the vicinity of the scission point is a condition of conservation of the influence that transition fission states formed at the inner and outer fission barriers exerts on the distribution of the spin projections K for lowenergy spontaneous nuclear fission. It is confirmed that anisotropies observed in the angular distributions of fragments originating from the fission of nuclei that is induced by fast light particles (multiply charged ions) are due to the appearance of strongly excited equilibrium(nonequilibrium) states of the fissile nucleus in the vicinity of its scission point that have a Gibbs (non-Gibbs) distribution of projections K.

  19. Two Phase Dynamics as the Origin to: 0.25 keV and 0.1 keV X-ray Diffuse Backgrounds, CMB, Global Quantized Redshift, 10 Mpc Space distributions and 30 Myr Cycles at Earth Phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eduardo del Pozo Garcia

    2015-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    An Alternative to explain the origin of matter-background connections from the paper "Do Cosmic Backgrounds Cyclical Renew by Matter and Quanta Emissions?..." proposed: A sequence of discontinuous small changes of light speed in time as the cause, which provoke that criticality processes take place every 26-30 million years. Then, matter particles and quanta reach at one threshold value, and are compelled to reorganize their internal energy and make emissions that later becomes in current cosmic backgrounds. The small discontinues relative decreasing of c of about 10 -5) should do some small effects on planet and living bodies. Cyclic small reorganization of matter particles is consider as the astrophysical origin of Earth cyclic catastrophes. And at space global distribution: quantized redshift, change of galaxy fractal distribution at 10 Mpc scale, galaxy average luminosity and the luminosity fluctuation of galaxy pairs are enhanced out to separations near 10 Mpc. Also proposed: Like the Universe is observed flat in distance and time, the gravitational constant G might decrease with time, which may originate the Earth orbit eccentricity cycle of 100000 yr and, provoke the former mentioned sequence of c decrease in time. And, every 6 million years, the accumulation of G relative decrease of about 10-5 in G compelled space-time to reach at one threshold value that, trigger small relative decrease of light speed c of about 10-5 cyclically. This is interpreted as the Universe has two dynamical phases following one each other cyclically with intervals of 26-30 million years respectively: One of about 0.1 million years, called "activation phase", at which the critical processes take place, follows by longer "inhibition phase". The present approach indicates the existence of a subtle non linear dynamics, which could also contribute to the origin of galaxy fractal distribution.

  20. Application of the CALIOP Layer Product to Evaluate the Vertical Distribution of Aerosols Estimated by Global Models: AeroCom Phase I Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koffi, Brigitte; Schultz, Michael; Breon, Francois-Marie; Griesfeller, Jan; Winker, D.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, Susanne E.; Berntsen, T.; Chin, Mian; Collins, William D.; Dentener, Frank; Diehl, Thomas; Easter, Richard C.; Ghan, Steven J.; Ginoux, P.; Gong, S.; Horowitz, L.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevag, A.; Koch, Dorothy; Krol, Maarten; Myhre, G.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.

    2012-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) layer product is used for a multimodel evaluation of the vertical distribution of aerosols. Annual and seasonal aerosol extinction profiles are analyzed over 13 sub-continental regions representative of industrial, dust, and biomass burning pollution, from CALIOP 2007-2009 observations and from AeroCom (Aerosol Comparisons between Observations and Models) 2000 simulations. An extinction mean height diagnostic (Z{sub a}) is defined to quantitatively assess the models performance. It is calculated over the 0-6 km and 0-10 km altitude ranges by weighting the altitude of each 100 m altitude layer by its aerosol extinction coefficient. The mean extinction profiles derived from CALIOP layer products provide consistent regional and seasonal specificities and a low inter-annual variability. While the outputs from most models are significantly correlated with the observed Z{sub a} climatologies, some do better than others, and 2 of the 12 models perform particularly well in all seasons. Over industrial and maritime regions, most models show higher Z{sub a} than observed by CALIOP, whereas over the African and Chinese dust source regions, Z{sub a} is underestimated during Northern Hemisphere Spring and Summer. The positive model bias in Z{sub a} is mainly due to an overestimate of the extinction above 6 km. Potential CALIOP and model limitations, and methodological factors that might contribute to the differences are discussed.

  1. Global fish production and climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brander, K.M. [International Council for the Exploration of the Sea, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Current global fisheries production of {approx}160 million tons is rising as a result of increases in aquaculture production. A number of climate-related threats to both capture fisheries and aquaculture are identified, but there is low confidence in predictions of future fisheries production because of uncertainty over future global aquatic net primary production and the transfer of this production through the food chain to human consumption. Recent changes in the distribution and productivity of a number of fish species can be ascribed with high confidence to regional climate variability, such as the El Nino-Southern Oscillation. Future production may increase in some high-latitude regions because of warming and decreased ice cover, but the dynamics in low-latitude regions are giverned by different processes, and production may decline as a result of reduced vertical mixing of the water column and, hence, reduced recycling of nutrients. There are strong interactions between the effects of fishing and the effects of climate because fishing reduces the age, size, and geographic diversity of populations and the biodiversity of marine ecosystems, making both more sensitive to additional stresses such as climate change. Inland fisheries are additionally threatened by changes in precipiation and water management. The frequency and intensity of extreme climate events is likely to have a major impact on future fisheries production in both inland and marine systems. Reducing fishing mortality in the majority of fisheries, which are currently fully exploited or overexploited, is the pricipal feasible means of reducing the impacts of climate change.

  2. Global Health Research | 2 Global Health Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    Global Health Research | 2 Global Health Research Supporting researchers in low- and middle-income countries to carry out health- related research within their own countries. Gl bal Health #12;3 | Global Health Research #12;Global Health Research | 4 We are a global charitable foundation dedicated

  3. Global product development : a framework for organizational diagnosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martínez, Víctor Takahiro Endo

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main purpose of this thesis is to present an approach for analyzing product development organizations in a globalizing world. The fragmentation and distribution of several product development activities in the global ...

  4. Population Growth & Issues Can we feed the growing world

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Youqin

    Local and global weather change (global warming) Ozone depletion Can we feed world population? How population? Every six seconds a child dies because of hunger and related causes; 10.9 million children under five die in developing countries each year. Malnutrition and hunger-related diseases cause 60

  5. Understanding Global Capitalism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, William I.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sociology; globalization; political economy; development;economy fueled through 700 billion dollars injected into globalizationGlobalization Studies, also called CGS. I would economy and

  6. The Logic of Global Warming A bitter pill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pratt, Vaughan

    The Logic of Global Warming A bitter pill Vaughan Pratt Stanford University June 23, 2011 Vaughan PrattStanford University () The Logic of Global WarmingA bitter pill June 23, 2011 1 / 1 What is climate population growth. 2. Accumulation of hazardous materials: lead, mercury, CFCs, . . . 3. Global warming

  7. The Global Energy Challenge

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    George Crabtree

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The expected doubling of global energy demand by 2050 challenges our traditional patterns of energy production, distribution and use.   The continued use of fossil fuels raises concerns about supply, security, environment and climate.  New routes are needed for the efficient conversion of energy from chemical fuel, sunlight, and heat to electricity or hydrogen as an energy carrier and finally to end uses like transportation, lighting, and heating. Opportunities for efficient new energy conversion routes based on nanoscale materials will be presented, with emphasis on the sustainable energy technologies they enable.

  8. Global Warming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.NewofGeothermal Heat Pump Basics31/2007 TeppeiProgramsGlobal1

  9. Academy for Global Engagement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Academy for Global Engagement 2013-2014 Global Fellows #12;Meredith Gore and Wildlife #12;Global Research Interests · risk percepHon and public support and Agricultural Engineering #12;Global Research Interests · catalyHc conversion of biomass

  10. global warming's six indias

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, Gary L.

    global warming's six indias: An Audience Segmentation Analysis #12;Global Warming's Six Indias 1............................................................................................................................................20 2. Global Warming Beliefs and Attitudes................................................................................ 21 Knowledge about global warming varies widely by group

  11. A new method for deriving the stellar birth function of resolved stellar populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gennaro, Mario; Brown, Tom; Gordon, Karl

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new method for deriving the stellar birth function (SBF) of resolved stellar populations. The SBF (stars born per unit mass, time, and metallicity) is the combination of the initial mass function (IMF), the star-formation history (SFH), and the metallicity distribution function (MDF). The framework of our analysis is that of Poisson Point Processes (PPPs), a class of statistical models suitable when dealing with points (stars) in a multidimensional space (the measurement space of multiple photometric bands). The theory of PPPs easily accommodates the modeling of measurement errors as well as that of incompleteness. Compared to most of the tools used to study resolved stellar populations, our method avoids binning stars in the color-magnitude diagram and uses the entirety of the information (i.e., the whole likelihood function) for each data point; the proper combination of the individual likelihoods allows the computation of the posterior probability for the global population parameters. This inc...

  12. Global ocean wind power sensitivity to surface layer stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capps, Scott B; Zender, Charles S

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2005), Evaluation of global wind power, J. Geophys. Res. ,Pryor (2003), Can satellite sampling of offshore wind speedsrealistically represent wind speed distributions? , J. Appl.

  13. Flexible Distributed Energy & Water from Waste for the Food ...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Flexible Distributed Energy & Water from Waste for the Food & Beverage Industry - Presentation by GE Global Research, June 2011 Flexible Distributed Energy & Water from Waste for...

  14. Proximate Population Factors and Deforestation in Tropical Agricultural Frontiers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez-Carr, David

    Proximate Population Factors and Deforestation in Tropical Agricultural Frontiers David L. Carr are significantly associated at the global and regional scales, evidence for population links to deforestation of thought on population­environment theories relevant to deforestation in tropical agricultural frontiers

  15. Occupational Populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    ? The general population may be exposed to radon in indoor and outdoor air and drinking water. ? The primary source of indoor radon is from soil; radon in the soil can enter the home through cracks in the floors, walls, or foundations. The release of radon from water may also contribute to indoor levels. ? Exposures to radon gas are accompanied by exposure to radon progeny which are the decay products of radon-222 [e.g., bismuth-214 ( 214 Bi), lead-210 ( 210 Pb), 214 Pb, polonium-210 ( 210 Po), and 218 Po.

  16. Integration of Demand Side Management, Distributed Generation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    integration of energy efficiency, distributed generation, renewable energy resources and energy storage technologies, both locally and globally, to maximize the value of the...

  17. Global Digital Library Development in the New Millennium: Fertile Ground for Distributed Cross-Disciplinary Collaboration, (Ching-chih Chen, Ed., Beijing, China: Tsinghua University Press), 2001, pp. 1-12. 2001, pp. 1-12.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agogino, Alice M.

    1 _______________________________________________________________________ Global Digital Library of a National Science, Mathematics, Engineering and Technology Education Digital Library Alice Agogino, Andy and Technology Education (SMETE) Digital Library at www.smete.org. This digital learning community will provide

  18. Stellar Populations in Bulges of Spiral Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Jablonka; J. Gorgas; P. Goudfrooij

    2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have conducted a spectroscopic analysis of the bulges of a sample of 31 spiral galaxies, spanning the Hubble sequence from S0 to Scd type, in order to study the radial distribution of their stellar population properties.

  19. Global Energy: Supply, Demand, Consequences, Opportunities (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majumdar, Arun

    2008-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Summer Lecture Series 2009: Arun Majumdar, Director of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division, discusses current and future projections of economic growth, population, and global energy demand and supply, and explores the implications of these trends for the environment.

  20. Global Energy: Supply, Demand, Consequences, Opportunities (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Majumdar, Arun

    2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Summer Lecture Series 2009: Arun Majumdar, Director of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division, discusses current and future projections of economic growth, population, and global energy demand and supply, and explores the implications of these trends for the environment.

  1. Data Distribution Analysis and Optimization for PointerBased Distributed Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jenq-Kuen

    Data Distribution Analysis and Optimization for Pointer­Based Distributed Programs Jenq Kuen Lee Abstract High Performance Fortran (HPF) provides distributed arrays to efficiently support a global name space on distributed memory architectures. The distributed data structures supported by HPF, how­ ever

  2. algorithm population sizing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CiteSeer Summary: Deciding the appropriate population size and number of islands for distributed island-model genetic algorithms is often critical to the algorithms success. This...

  3. QUESTIONS ABOUT GLOBAL WARMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    QUESTIONS ABOUT GLOBAL WARMING ¥IS IT REAL? ¥IS IT IMPORTANT? ¥WHAT IS IT DUE TO? ¥HOW MUCH MORE in the atmosphere, giving Earth its temperate climate. Global Atmosphere, Global Warming GLOBAL TEMPERATURE TREND IS THIS CARBON DIOXIDE COMING FROM? Other sources are home heating and electric power production. WE ARE ALL

  4. Global Health Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Ophir

    Bay Area Global Health Seminar Series Moving beyond millennium targets in global health: The challenges of investing in health and universal health coverage Although targets can help to focus global health efforts, they can also detract attention from deeper underlying challenges in global health

  5. Global Warming Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schofield, Jeremy

    Global Warming Observations: 1. Global temperature has been gradually rising in recent years #15 in range 8000 12000 nm { CFC's, methane and N 2 O important for global warming even though concentra- tions in concentration of \\greenhouse gases" like CO 2 What determines global temperature? Energy budget of earth: 1

  6. Distributed Termination Detection for Dynamic Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhamdhere, Dhananjay Madhav

    Distributed Termination Detection for Dynamic Systems D. M. Dhamdhere \\Lambda Sridhar R. Iyer E for detecting the termination of a dis­ tributed computation is presented. The algorithm does not require global are provided. Keywords Distributed algorithms, Distributed computation, Distributed termination, Dynamic

  7. The Scientific and Social Challenges of Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiehl, Jeff

    ) · Snow cover (decrease) · Sea ice cover (decrease) · Ocean heat (increase) · Ocean acidity (increase) (AD 2200-2300?) High Climate Sensitivity Low Climate Sensitivity (Geol. Data) (No Arctic/Greenland ice in Technology · Changes in Consumption #12;10/16/07 30 US is 5% of global population, but 25% of global

  8. Evolutionary Game Theory and Population Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miekisz, Jacek

    , Poland miekisz@mimuw.edu.pl 1 Short overview We begin these lecture notes by a crash course in game maximizing their individual payoffs and particles in lattice-gas models minimizing their interaction energy by the minimum of some global quantity, the total energy or free energy of the system. Population dynamics lacks

  9. Globalization of biopharmaceutical manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pande, Rachna

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The biomanufacturing industry is changing due to increasing globalization. However, it is changing differently from other high tech industries like software/ semiconductor/ automobiles. In this study we use global ...

  10. Global Environmental Course Title

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takada, Shoji

    : Environmental discourses, Environment and development in Africa, Environmental conservation and Ainu people Department Global Environmental Studies Room Course Title Frontier of Sustainability Science Instructor Akihisa MORI, Global Environmental Studies Satoshi KONISHI, Institute of Advanced

  11. Nonsingular static global string

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Sen; N. Banerjee

    2000-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A new solution for the spacetime outside the core of a U(1) static global string has been presented which is nonsingular. This is the first example of a nonsingular spacetime around a static global string.}}

  12. Review: Globalization of Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennant, Matthew Aaron

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review: Globalization of Water: Sharing the Planet’sAshok K. Globalization of Water: Sharing the Planet’s140) liters of virtual water (p. 15). This is one of the

  13. Cows Causing Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi

    2008-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Broadcast Transcript: Remember when President Reagan blamed trees for air pollution? Well now the Japanese are blaming cows for global warming. Apparently, the methane emissions from burping cows account for 5% of all global greenhouse gases. Simple...

  14. Global Priority Conservation Areas in the Face of 21st Century Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Junsheng; Lin, Xin; Chen, Anping; Peterson, A. Townsend; Ma, Keping; Bertzky, Monika; Ciais, Philippe; Kapos, Valerie; Peng, Changhui; Poulter, Benjamin

    2013-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In an era when global biodiversity is increasingly impacted by rapidly changing climate, efforts to conserve global biodiversity may be compromised if we do not consider the uneven distribution of climate-induced threats. Here, via a novel...

  15. Introduction Global ecosystems and human populations have been affected by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandiford, Mike

    ,Australia Received 9 October 2009; revised manuscript accepted 15 March 2010 Corresponding author: Mark C. Quigley, Department of Geological Sciences, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand Email: mark.quigley. Quigley,1 Travis Horton,1 John C. Hellstrom,2 Matthew L. Cupper2 and Mike Sandiford2 Abstract New high

  16. Global population structure of yellowfin tuna, Thunnus albacares,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . two re- gions of the Indian Ocean, and six re- gions of the Pacific Ocean. One of the Indian Ocean least four yellowfin tuna stocks: Atlantic Ocean, Indian Ocean, west-central Pacific Ocean, and east Pacific Ocean. Mito- chondrial DNA differentiation was more limited, but spatial heterogene- ity of the 24

  17. Dissimilarity Measures for Population-Based Global Optimization ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    andrea,,,

    the minimization of the Morse potential energy, which turns out to be par- ticularly ..... Note that the local optimization strategy often includes a centering step, in.

  18. Tool investigates population, climate impacts on global water resources |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2, 2003

  19. Diversity waves in collapse-driven population dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maslov, Sergei

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Populations of species in ecosystems are constrained by the availability of resources within their environment. In effect this means that a growth of one population, needs to be balanced by the reduction in size of others. In neutral models of biodiversity all populations are assumed to change incrementally due to stochastic births and deaths of individuals. Here we propose and model another redistribution mechanism driven by abrupt collapses of the entire population of a single species freeing up resources for the remaining ones. This mechanism may be relevant for communities of bacteria, with strain-specific collapses caused e.g. by invading bacteriophages, or for other ecosystems where infectious diseases play an important role. The emergent property of the population dynamics in our system are cyclic "diversity waves" triggered by collapses of globally dominating populations. The population diversity in the environment peaks at the beginning of each wave and exponentially decreases afterwards. Population ...

  20. Development of an atmospheric aerosol model for studies of global budgets and effects of airborne particulate material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giorgi, F.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microphysics-removal atmospheric aerosol model (AAM) is developed for use in general circulation models (GCMs) to study global budgets and effects of particulate material. In this model the particle population is composed of a set of log-normal modes whose time evolution due to microphysical processes is described via prognostic equations for an appropriate number of moments of the particle-size distribution. Detailed parameterizations of particle coagulation, sedimentation, dry deposition, and wet removal are developed and implemented into the AAM. The AAM is incorporated into a GCM and is applied to two types of studies: (1) characteristics of the particle wet and dry removal processes, and (2) climatic impact of massive particulate injections following a global nuclear war, with emphasis on the sensitivity of the simulated effects to the inclusion of particle microphysics. Results are discussed.

  1. Human effects on the global atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnston, H.S.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This review considers whether human activities can significantly change important functions of the global atmosphere by altering the amount or distribution of certain trace species. It deals with three specific topics: stratopheric ozone, the role of species other than carbon dioxide on the greenhouse effect, and certain recently recognized atmospheric consequences of a large scale nuclear war. 64 references, 10 figures, 2 tables.

  2. Design Editorial Globalization and Internationalism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papalambros, Panos

    ; especially, the development of an increasingly integrated global economy marked especially by free tradeJournal of Mechanical Design Editorial Globalization and Internationalism There has always been and Strabo, but to Friedman's empirical observations of globalization. According to Wikipedia, "globalization

  3. Global ocean wind power sensitivity to surface layer stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capps, Scott B; Zender, Charles S

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluation of global wind power, J. Geophys. Res. , 110,W. Tang, and X. Xie (2008), Wind power distribution over theApproach to Short-Term Wind Power Prediction, 1st ed. ,

  4. Population Analysis, Fall 2005 1 Population Analyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, William R.

    Population Analysis, Fall 2005 1 Population Analyses EEOB/AEcl 611 Fall Semester 2005 Scheduled Phone: 294-5176 email: wrclark@iastate.edu AEcl 611 is evolving in response to very rapid changes. The emphasis in AEcl 611 is on understanding the statistical basis of various analytical techniques, applying

  5. INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS &INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS &INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS & THE GLOBAL ECONOMYTHE GLOBAL ECONOMYTHE GLOBAL ECONOMY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krylov, Anna I.

    GLOBAL ECONOMYTHE GLOBAL ECONOMY This major offers students rigorous interdisciplinary training 331: The Global Economy 2030 -- Examination of key ideas from economics, demography and technology. Guest lecturers illuminate possible conditions of the global economy in 2030. IR 454: International

  6. Engineering the global ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stringfellow, William T.; Jain, Ravi

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of humans deliberately engineering agricultural landscapes.010-0302-8 EDITORIAL Engineering the global ecosystemtale about human explorers engineering the ecosystem of Mars

  7. Hanford Site Regional Population - 2010 Census

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, Erin L.; Snyder, Sandra F.

    2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy conducts radiological operations in south-central Washington State. Population dose estimates must be performed to provide a measure of the impact from site radiological releases. Results of the U.S. 2010 Census were used to determine counts and distributions for the residential population located within 50-miles of several operating areas of the Hanford Site. Year 2010 was the first census year that a 50-mile population of a Hanford Site operational area exceeded the half-million mark.

  8. Uniform Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    randomly and equally likely a point in that interval), the uniform distribution ... Roughly speaking, this means that from any distribution we can create the uniform.

  9. Globalization: Ecological Consequences of Global-Scale Connectivity in People,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    11 Globalization: Ecological Consequences of Global-Scale Connectivity in People, Resources of the global mineral aerosol load (Tanaka & Chiba, 2006). #12;The Systemic Dimension of Globalization212 of Agriculture ­ Agricultural Research Service, Las Cruces, New Mexico USA 1. Introduction Globalization

  10. global warming's six americas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, Gary L.

    Energy Sources 17 Subsidies for Fossil Fuel and Renewable Energy Industries 18 Support for a Carbon Tax and Costs of Reducing Fossil Fuel Use and Global Warming 8 The Alarmed 9 The Concerned 10 The Cautious 11 the spring and fall of 2012. Perceived Benefits and Costs of Reducing Fossil Fuel Use and Global Warming

  11. Global Change Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    Global Change and Sustainability Center The GCSC is an inclusionary and interdisciplinary hub that promotes, coordinates, and conducts local to global environmental- and sustainability-related research to complex environmental and sustainability issues and challenges. 2012 Annual Report #12;1GCSC 2012 ANNUAL

  12. Global Development Our Responsibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of expertise cover urgent global issues such as food production, energy supply, climate change, biodiversity e ort to address urgent global issues particularly a ecting developing countries e.g. climate change of Communication, 2012 · Project Leader: Karin Nilsson · Graphic Design: Viktor Wrange & Michael Kvick Cover Photo

  13. CHILLING CONSIDERATIONS GLOBAL WARMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    (millionsofsquarekilometers) 30 20 10 MELTING OF GREENLAND ICE CAP Satellite determination of maximum extent of glacial melt Complete melt of the Greenland ice sheet would raise the level of the global ocean 23 feet. ASAN Steffen IS INCREASING Global carbon dioxide concentration over the last thousand years Polar ice cores #12;Mann et al

  14. Is Arnold diffusion relevant to global diffusion?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seiichiro Honjo; Kunihiko Kaneko

    2003-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Global diffusion of Hamiltonian dynamical systems is investigated by using a coupled standard maps. Arnold web is visualized in the frequency space, using local rotation numbers, while Arnold diffusion and resonance overlaps are distinguished by the residence time distributions at resonance layers. Global diffusion in the phase space is shown to be accelerated by diffusion across overlapped resonances generated by the coupling term, rather than Arnold diffusion along the lower-order resonances. The former plays roles of hubs for transport in the phase space, and accelerate the diffusion.

  15. PhD Recent Graduates with background in Distributed Systems. Virtualization, Distributed Systems, Application Servers or Operating Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plotkin, Joshua B.

    and maintenance support of the project. * Work closely with internal SAP associates, external partnersPhD Recent Graduates with background in Distributed Systems. Virtualization, Distributed Systems, Application Servers or Operating Systems Global Business Incubator Location ­ Palo Alto PURPOSE

  16. Changing Pollen Types/Concentrations/ Distribution in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levetin, Estelle

    to global warming, as the distributions of mosquitoes and other arthropod vectors have expanded exponentially from preindustrial levels of approximately 280 ppm [1] to the current average global level by Current Medicine Group LLC The buildup of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere has resulted in global

  17. Global warming, bad weather, insurance losses and the global economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Low, N.C. [UOB Life Assurance Ltd., Singapore (Singapore); Shen, S. [Global Warming International Center, Woodridge, IL (United States)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Global warming causes extremely bad weather in the near term. The impact on the insurance industry is described. Why global warming in the near term causes very bad weather is explained. The continuing trend of very bad weather and the future impact on the insurance industry is explored. How very bad weather can affect the global financial market is explained. Taking a historical view of the development of the modern economy, the authors describe in the near term the impact of global warming on the global economy. The long term impact of global warming on the global economy and the human race is explored. Opportunities presented by global warming are described.

  18. Sharing global CO2 emission reductions among one billion high emitters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharing global CO2 emission reductions among one billion high emitters Shoibal Chakravartya of a country to estimate how its fossil fuel CO2 emissions are distributed among its citizens, from which we distributions. For example, re- ducing projected global emissions in 2030 by 13 GtCO2 would require

  19. Population genomics of Populus trichocarpa identifies signatures of selection and adaptive trait associations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, Luke M [West Virginia University, Morgantown; Slavov, Gancho [West Virginia University, Morgantown; Rodgers-Melnick, Eli [West Virginia University, Morgantown; Martin, Joel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ranjan, Priya [ORNL; Muchero, Wellington [ORNL; Brunner, Amy M. [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Schackwitz, Wendy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Gunter, Lee E [ORNL; Chen, Jay [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Difazio, Stephen P. [West Virginia University, Morgantown

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Forest trees are dominant components of terrestrial ecosystems that have global ecological and economic importance. Despite distributions that span wide environmental gradients, many tree populations are locally adapted, and mechanisms underlying this adaptation are poorly understood. Here we use a combination of whole-genome selection scans and association analyses of 544 Populus trichocarpa trees to reveal genomic bases of adaptive variation across a wide latitudinal range. Three hundred ninety-seven genomic regions showed evidence of recent positive and/or divergent selection and enrichment for associations with adaptive traits that also displayed patterns consistent with natural selection. These regions also provide unexpected insights into the evolutionary dynamics of duplicated genes and their roles in adaptive trait variation.

  20. China's Global Oil Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Bryan G

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    21, 2008. Ying, Wang. “ China, Venezuela firms to co-developoilfields. ” China Daily (27 August 2005) http://David and Bi Jianhai. “China’s Global Hunt for Energy. ”

  1. Global Cool Cities Alliance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is currently supporting the Global Cool Cities Alliance (GCCA), a non-profit organization that works with cities, regions, and national governments to speed the...

  2. China's Global Oil Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Bryan G

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    nations began to seek out oil reserves around the world. 3on the limited global oil reserves and spiking prices. Manyto the largest proven oil reserves, making up 61 percent of

  3. Global warming elucidated

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, S. [Global Warming International Center, Woodridge, IL (United States)

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The meaning of global warming and its relevance to everyday life is explained. Simple thermodynamics is used to predict an oscillatory nature of the change in climate due to global warming. Global warming causes extreme events and bad weather in the near term. In the long term it may cause the earth to transition to another equilibrium state through many oscillation in climatic patterns. The magnitudes of these oscillations could easily exceed the difference between the end points. The author further explains why many no longer fully understands the nature and magnitudes of common phenomena such as storms and wind speeds because of these oscillations, and the absorptive properties of clouds. The author links the increase in duration of the El Nino to global warming, and further predicts public health risks as the earth transitions to another equilibrium state in its young history.

  4. Systems integration for global sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Le, A. Z. Khan, Improving integration for integrated coastal347 ISSUE 6225 Systems integration for global sustainabilitySUSTAINABILITY Systems integration for global sustainability

  5. Global aspects of radiation memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Winicour

    2014-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Gravitational radiation has a memory effect represented by a net change in the relative positions of test particles. Both the linear and nonlinear sources proposed for this radiation memory are of the "electric" type, or E mode, as characterized by the even parity of the polarization pattern. Although "magnetic" type, or B mode, radiation memory is mathematically possible, no physically realistic source has been identified. There is an electromagnetic counterpart to radiation memory in which the velocity of charged particles obtain a net "kick". Again, the physically realistic sources of electromagnetic radiation memory that have been identified are of the electric type. In this paper, a global null cone description of the electromagnetic field is applied to establish the non-existence of B mode radiation memory and the non-existence of E mode radiation memory due to a bound charge distribution.

  6. Global climatic catastrophes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Budyko, M.I.; Golitsyn, G.S.; Izrael, A

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work inquires into global climatic catastrophes of the past, presenting data not easily available outside of the Socialist Countries, and applies these results to the study of future climatic developments, especially as they threaten in case of Nuclear Warfare - Nuclear Winter. The authors discuss probable after effects from the Soviet point of view on the basis of research, stressing the need to avoid all conflict which might lead to the next and final Global Climatic Catastrophy.

  7. Repeat photography is a useful tool for evaluating hypotheses for landscape changes caused by global

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Villiers, Marienne

    by global warming. Climate change scenarios for southern Africa suggest that it is the western part for the region's biota (Midgley and Thuiller 2007). A de- tailed study of mortality levels within populations

  8. A Case Study of Global Perspective Change From Selected Study Abroad Program Participation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cockerell, Lauren

    2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examined selected components of faculty-led study abroad programs and determined students’ changes in global perspectives after participating in faculty-led study abroad programs. A census of the population of interest (N=19), included...

  9. GLOBAL LEADERSHIP PROGRAM MISSION STATEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saidak, Filip

    GLOBAL LEADERSHIP PROGRAM MISSION STATEMENT The Global Leadership Program at UNCG will afford. Leadership, citizenship and cross-cultural understanding have taken on new meanings and have become essential for the successful citizen of the new globalized world. The Global Leadership Program (GLP) is open to all domestic

  10. Original article Predicted global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Original article Predicted global warming and Douglas-fir chilling requirements DD McCreary1 DP to predicted global warming. Douglas-fir / chilling / global warming / bud burst / reforestation Résumé offer evidence that mean global warming of 3-4 °C could occur within the next century, particularly

  11. Global ice sheet modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, T.J.; Fastook, J.L. [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States). Institute for Quaternary Studies

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The University of Maine conducted this study for Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of a global climate modeling task for site characterization of the potential nuclear waste respository site at Yucca Mountain, NV. The purpose of the study was to develop a global ice sheet dynamics model that will forecast the three-dimensional configuration of global ice sheets for specific climate change scenarios. The objective of the third (final) year of the work was to produce ice sheet data for glaciation scenarios covering the next 100,000 years. This was accomplished using both the map-plane and flowband solutions of our time-dependent, finite-element gridpoint model. The theory and equations used to develop the ice sheet models are presented. Three future scenarios were simulated by the model and results are discussed.

  12. Long range global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rolle, K.C.; Pulkrabek, W.W.; Fiedler, R.A. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Platteville, WI (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper explores one of the causes of global warming that is often overlooked, the direct heating of the environment by engineering systems. Most research and studies of global warming concentrate on the modification that is occurring to atmospheric air as a result of pollution gases being added by various systems; i.e., refrigerants, nitrogen oxides, ozone, hydrocarbons, halon, and others. This modification affects the thermal radiation balance between earth, sun and space, resulting in a decrease of radiation outflow and a slow rise in the earth`s steady state temperature. For this reason the solution to the problem is perceived as one of cleaning up the processes and effluents that are discharged into the environment. In this paper arguments are presented that suggest, that there is a far more serious cause for global warming that will manifest itself in the next two or three centuries; direct heating from the exponential growth of energy usage by humankind. Because this is a minor contributor to the global warming problem at present, it is overlooked or ignored. Energy use from the combustion of fuels and from the output of nuclear reactions eventually is manifest as warming of the surroundings. Thus, as energy is used at an ever increasing rate the consequent global warming also increases at an ever increasing rate. Eventually this rate will become equal to a few percent of solar radiation. When this happens the earth`s temperature will have risen by several degrees with catastrophic results. The trends in world energy use are reviewed and some mathematical models are presented to suggest future scenarios. These models can be used to predict when the global warming problem will become undeniably apparent, when it will become critical, and when it will become catastrophic.

  13. INTERNATIONAL RELATIONSINTERNATIONAL RELATIONSINTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (GLOBAL BUSINESS)(GLOBAL BUSINESS)(GLOBAL BUSINESS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krylov, Anna I.

    INTERNATIONAL RELATIONSINTERNATIONAL RELATIONSINTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (GLOBAL BUSINESS)(GLOBAL BUSINESS)(GLOBAL BUSINESS) Future leaders in business, government, and law need to understand how global, and internship opportunities, it is an ideal major for those interested in entering the realms of business

  14. Global Compact for Higher Education Institutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global Compact for Higher Education Institutions Communicating on Progress for Université Laval Guide to the United Nations Global Compact for Higher Education Institutions: Implementing the Global to the United Nations Global Compact for Higher Education Institutions: Implementing the Global Compact

  15. Monsoons in a warming and more populous world: the question of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the 1990's ­ 45% were in Asia ­ 30% in US ­ 10% in Europe · Human impact ­ 2 billion people affected ­ 400. Global warming and climate change 3. Population increase and attendant problems 4. Societal and human if global warming were to occur? ­ Monsoons ­ Tropical cyclones ­ Droughts ­ Floods ­ Dust Storms · How can

  16. ITP Industrial Distributed Energy: Distributed Energy Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ITP Industrial Distributed Energy: Distributed Energy Program Project Profile: Verizon Central Office Building ITP Industrial Distributed Energy: Distributed Energy Program Project...

  17. GLOBAL TAXONOMY INITIATIVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant, Taran

    #12;THE GLOBAL TAXONOMY INITIATIVE: Using Systematic Inventories to Meet Country and Regional Needs International #12;Table of Contents Introduction 1 I. Using Inventories to Build Capacity and Advance the GTI 2 for systematic inventories. A major component of the workshop addressed how systematic inventories can serve

  18. Global Vision Study Abroad

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    Finding a Global Vision Study Abroad Students Visit South Africa Philosophy in the Community arts sculpture of South Africa's late pop diva Brenda Fassie. More on Page 4 #12;At every post energy and passion for his work. At the same time, I would also like to express my sincere gratitude

  19. WORKPLACE GUIDES GLOBAL WORKING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roelleke, Thomas

    of Stonewall good practice publications ­ profiles some of the employers paving the way for gay staff to work do arise. This guide provides clear, practical tips on how gay employees can access internationalWORKPLACE GUIDES GLOBAL WORKING Supporting lesbian, gay and bisexual staff on overseas assignments

  20. Global Climate & Catastrophic Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Global Climate & Catastrophic Risk Forum 2012 A Joint Program with LA RIMS Education Day Rethinking Catastrophic Risk in Risk Management: Earthquake-Related Challenges Featuring: Keynote Speaker Dr. Frank Beuthin, Willis Group Holdings Plc. Yohei Miyamoto, Aon Risk Solutions Curtis deVera, Marsh

  1. Population segments with disabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stough, Laura

    with disabilities given the large prevalence of this population throughout the world, the intensity of their social vulnerabilities in disaster, and recent federal mandates that specify equal access for individuals with disabilities to emergency preparedness..., as “special needs” populations. More recently, the functional-needs approach to defining disability-related needs during disaster was adopted by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (2010) in its Comprehensive Preparedness Guide 101 and in the National...

  2. CHEMICAL ENRICHMENT OF DAMPED Ly{alpha} SYSTEMS AS A DIRECT CONSTRAINT ON POPULATION III STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulkarni, Girish; Hennawi, Joseph F. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Rollinde, Emmanuel; Vangioni, Elisabeth, E-mail: girish@mpia-hd.mpg.de [Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, UMR 7095, UPMC, Paris VI, 98 bis boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations of damped Ly{alpha} absorbers (DLAs) can be used to measure gas-phase metallicities at large cosmological look-back times with high precision. Furthermore, relative abundances can still be measured accurately deep into the reionization epoch (z > 6) using transitions redward of Ly{alpha}, even though Gunn-Peterson absorption precludes measurement of neutral hydrogen. In this paper, we study the chemical evolution of DLAs using a model for the coupled evolution of galaxies and the intergalactic medium (IGM), which is constrained by a variety of observations. Our goal is to explore the influence of Population III stars on the abundance patterns of DLAs to determine the degree to which abundance measurements can discriminate between different Population III stellar initial mass functions (IMFs). We include effects, such as inflows onto galaxies due to cosmological accretion and outflows from galaxies due to supernova feedback. A distinct feature of our model is that it self-consistently calculates the effect of Population III star formation on the reionization of an inhomogeneous IGM, thus allowing us to calculate the thermal evolution of the IGM and implement photoionization feedback on low-mass galaxy formation. We find that if the critical metallicity of Population III to II/I transition is {approx}< 10{sup -4} Z{sub Sun }, then the cosmic Population III star formation rate drops to zero for z < 8. Nevertheless, at high redshift (z {approx} 6), chemical signatures of Population III stars remain in low-mass galaxies (halo mass {approx}< 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }). This is because photoionization feedback suppresses star formation in these galaxies until relatively low redshift (z {approx} 10), and the chemical record of their initial generation of Population III stars is retained. We model DLAs as these low-mass galaxies, and assign to them a mass-dependent H I absorption cross-section in order to predict the expected distribution of DLA abundance ratios. We find that these distributions are anchored toward abundance ratios set by Population II supernova yields, but they exhibit a tail which depends significantly on the Population III IMF for z > 5. Thus, a sample of DLA metallicity and relative abundance measurements at high redshift holds the promise to constrain Population III enrichment and the Population III IMF. We find that a sample of just 10 DLAs with relative abundances measured to an accuracy of 0.1 dex is sufficient to constrain the Population III IMF at 4{sigma}. These constraints may prove stronger than other probes of Population III enrichment, such as metal-poor stars and individual metal-poor DLAs. Our results provide a global picture of the thermal, ionization, and chemical evolution of the universe, and have the potential to rule out certain Population III scenarios.

  3. Supernova rates and stellar populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Mannucci

    2007-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the results about the nature of type Ia Supernovae that can be derived by studying their rates in different stellar populations. While the evolution of SN photometry and spectra can constrain the explosion mechanism, the SN rate depends on the progenitor system. We review the current available data on rates as a function of parent galaxy color, morphology, star formation rate, radio luminosity and environment. By studying the variation of the rates with the color of the parent galaxy, a strong evidence was established that type Ia SNe come from both young and old stars. The dependence of the rates with the radio power of the parent galaxy is best reproduced by a bimodal distribution of delay time between the formation of the progenitor and its explosion as a SN. Cluster early-type galaxies show higher type Ia SN rate with respect to field galaxies, and this effect can be due either to traces of young stars or to differences in the delay time distribution.

  4. Electric Vehicles Global Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sóbester, András

    Hot Topics Electric Vehicles Global Climate Change Green Building Hydraulic Fracturing Nuclear to global warming. The UKgovernment has just announced it is investing $1 billion in their development Green Living Industry Regulation Remediation Research and Technology Sustainability Waste Water Products

  5. Global and Regional Solutions Directorate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    at Pacific NW National Lab (PNNL) ­ Founding Director Joint Global Change Research Institute (PNNL/UMd) ­ ALD (PNNL) ­ Environmental and Health Sciences Directorate; Emerging Technologies ­ Chief Scientist ­ Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program ­ Director ­ PNNL Global Studies Program ­ Other (PNNL): Center

  6. Distributed DBMS Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yangjun

    Distributed DBMS Outline Introduction What is a distributed DBMS Problems Current state-of-affairs Background Distributed DBMS Architecture Distributed Database Design Semantic Data Control Distributed Query Processing Distributed Transaction Management Parallel Database Systems Distributed Object DBMS

  7. theoretical population biology 50, 91 104 (1996) The Sampling Theory of Neutral Alleles in an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    island populations, is studied by analytical methods. A new result is presented for the distribution further studies the mathematical properties of the con- tinuous-generation island model of population of a haploid island population with continuous generations and a fluctuating article no. 0024 91 0040-5809Ã?96

  8. Development of an atmospheric aerosol model for studies of global budgets and effects of airborne particulate material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giorgi, F.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microphysics-removal Atmospheric Aerosol Model (AAM) is developed for use in General Circulation Models (GCM) to study global budgets and effects of particulate material. In this model the particle population is assumed to be composed of a set of log-normal modes whose time evolution due to microphysical processes is described via prognostic equations for an appropriate number of moments of the particle size distribution. This newly devised technique, by making use of a small number of prognostic equations for the aerosol variables and utilizing optimized numerical procedures, renders the model computationally efficient, hence particularly suitable for use in complex 3D GCMs. Detailed parameterizations of particle coagulation, sedimentation, dry deposition, and wet removal are incorporated into the AAM.

  9. The global distribution of large subaerial distributary fluvial systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gwynn, David Wilkinson

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the area of the upstream drainage basin, but is related to the size of the downstream basin. This sample of systems occurs in a variety of climates and in two different geologic settings - foreland basins and half graben. The rivers on all systems...

  10. Common global architecture applied to automobile electrical distribution systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azpeitia Camacho, Marcia E. (Marcia Edna)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrical and electronic components have a prominent role in today's vehicles. Particularly during the last two decades, functionality has been added at an exponential rate, resulting in increased complexity, especially ...

  11. A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norwood, Zachary Mills

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    renewable and non-renewable energy systems including its global warming potential (potential for deep market penetration of renewable distributed energy

  12. 2, 921942, 2002 Global ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ACPD 2, 921­942, 2002 Global ozone forecasting H. J. Eskes et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Geophysical Society 2002 Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Global ozone forecasting based on ERS-2 July 2002 Correspondence to: H. J. Eskes (eskes@knmi.nl) 921 #12;ACPD 2, 921­942, 2002 Global ozone

  13. Globalization, Labor, Transformation of Work

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in an Increasingly Global Economy Edited by Jonathan H. Westover THE ORGANISATION #12;First published in Australia in an increasingly global economy Jonathan H. Westover (editor) Bibliography. 978 1 86335 660 2 (pbk.) 978 1 86335 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 Economic Globalization and Caribbean Economies, Syed H. Akhter, Paul Pounder

  14. GLOBAL WARMING THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    GLOBAL WARMING THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT AND YOUR FAMILY'S CONTRIBUTION TO IT Stephen E. Schwartz GREENHOUSE EFFECT #12;GLOBAL ENERGY BALANCE Global and annual average energy fluxes in watts per square meter about it.But nobody does anything about it. ­ Mark Twain­ Mark Twain Now with the greenhouse effect, we

  15. Global Warming: Connecting the Dots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    Global Warming: Connecting the Dots from Causes to Solutions* Jim Hansen 26 February 2007 National://www.columbia.edu/~jeh1/worldwatch_nov2006.pdf) 5. Communicating dangers and opportunities in global warming, Amer-16, 2006. (http://pubs.giss.nasa.gov/docs/2006/2006_Hansen.pdf) 8. Global warming: Connecting the dots from

  16. 4, 10591092, 2007 Global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    BGD 4, 1059­1092, 2007 Global warming potential of agro-ecosystems S. Lehuger et al. Title Page Predicting the global warming potential of agro-ecosystems S. Lehuger, B. Gabrielle, E. Larmanou, P. Laville Correspondence to: S. Lehuger (simon.lehuger@grignon.inra.fr) 1059 #12;BGD 4, 1059­1092, 2007 Global warming

  17. Normal Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    User

    NORMAL DlSTRlBUTION TABLE. Entries represent the area under the standardized normal distribution from -w to z, Pr(Z

  18. Visualizing Global Inequality on the Web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Ian; Lodha, S K; Crow, Ben D; Fulfrost, Brian

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on Mapping Global Inequality, University of California,Visualizing Global Inequality on the Web Ian Myers 1 ,for mapping global inequality by (i) creating a simple user

  19. Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlson, Ann E.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation Ann E. Carlson*2008]HEAT WAVES, GLOBAL WARMING, AND MITIGATION 175 stroke2001). 2008]HEAT WAVES, GLOBAL WARMING, AND MITIGATION 177

  20. Global Warming, endogenous risk and irreversibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Anthony C.; Narain, Urvashi

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The economics of global warming, Institute for InternationalEconomic Models of Global Warming, Cambridge, Mass. MITstochastic losses from global warming, Risk Analysis 16(2):

  1. Population Ecology Philip M. Dixon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Population Ecology Philip M. Dixon Department of Statistics Iowa State University 20 December 2001 Population ecology is the discipline in ecology that deals with the structure and dynamics (e.g. growth interacting populations. Population ecology is closely related to other ecological disciplines, e

  2. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF POPULATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WOODS HOLE, MASS. SPECIAL SCIENTIFIC REPORT- FISHERIES No. 204 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OF POPULATIONS OF THE STRIPED BASS By Robert Minturn Lewis Fishery Research Biologist Special Scientific Report by Merriman (1937 and 1941), Vladykov and Wal- lace (1952), Raney and de Sylva (1953), Raney, Woolcott

  3. 862 PHYTOPATHOLOGY Population Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Bruce

    de Agronomía, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Carrera 30 45-00 Bogotá, Colombia; second author potato in Colombia using 11 simple-sequence repeat (SSR) markers. In total, 288 different multilocus%. RST statistics indicated a very low level of population differentiation overall, consistent with high

  4. The global energy landscape and materials innovation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    V.S. Arunachalam; E.L. Fleischer [Center for Study of Science, Technology & Policy (India)

    2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy challenges form the backdrop for this special expanded issue of MRS Bulletin on Harnessing Materials for Energy. This article introduces the global landscape of materials issues associated with energy. It examines the complex web of energy availability, production, storage, transmission, distribution, use, and efficiency. It focuses on the materials challenges that lie at the core of these areas and discusses how revolutionary concepts can address them. Cross-cutting topics are introduced and interrelationships between topics explored. Article topics are set in the context of the grand energy challenges that face the world into the middle of this century. 57 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Global minimizers for axisymmetric multiphase membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rustum Choksi; Marco Morandotti; Marco Veneroni

    2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a Canham-Helfrich-type variational problem defined over closed surfaces enclosing a fixed volume and having fixed surface area. The problem models the shape of multiphase biomembranes. It consists of minimizing the sum of the Canham-Helfrich energy, in which the bending rigidities and spontaneous curvatures are now phase-dependent, and a line tension penalization for the phase interfaces. By restricting attention to axisymmetric surfaces and phase distributions, we extend our previous results for a single phase (arXiv:1202.1979) and prove existence of a global minimizer.

  6. The M31 population of supersoft sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Kahabka

    1999-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1991 ROSAT PSPC M31 X-ray point source catalog has been screened in order to set up a sample of candidate supersoft sources in this galaxy, additional to the 16 supersoft sources of Supper et al. (1997). 26 candidates have been found. Absorbing hydrogen column densities, effective temperatures and white dwarf masses (assuming the sources are on the stability line of surface nuclear burning) are derived. An observed white dwarf mass distribution is derived which indicates that the masses are constrained to values above 0.90 solar masses. The entire population of supersoft sources in M31 is estimated taking a theoretical white dwarf mass distribution into account, assuming that the observationally derived sample is restricted to white dwarf masses above 0.90 solar, and taking into account that the gas and the source population have a different scale height. A total number of at least 200-500 and at most 6,000-15,000 sources is deduced depending on the used galaxy N_H model, making use of the population synthesis calculation of Yungelson (1996). The spatial distribution favors a disk (or spiral-arm) dominated young stellar population with a ratio of 1/(4-7) of bulge/disk systems. Assuming that all supersoft sources with masses in excess of 0.5 solar masses are progenitors of supernovae of type Ia, a SN Ia rate of (0.8-7) 10^-3 yr^-1 is derived for M31 based on these progenitors. Supersoft sources might account for 20-100% of the total SN Ia rate in a galaxy like M31.

  7. BERNHARD WEHRLI he global river system acts as a gigantic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    and dissolved substances, but this pipeline is leaking carbon dioxide to the atmosphere at surprisingly high a flux of this greenhouse gas that is larger than previ- ously estimated and dominated by hotspot regions stations that measure the global distribution and variability of atmospheric CO2 concen- trations. This top

  8. Global Threat Reduction Initiative

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked Questions for DOE FY 2011Talley,GENIIFY14 BudgetHollettGive UsDepartment ofGlobal

  9. Sandia Energy - Global

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementing Nonlinear757 (1)Tara46EnergyPower Systems Glitter-SizedGlobal

  10. Horizontal stirring in the global ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernández-Carrasco, I; Hernández-García, E; Turiel, A

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Horizontal mixing and the distribution of coherent structures in the global ocean are analyzed using Finite-Size Lyapunov Exponents (FSLE), computed for the surface velocity field derived from the Ocean general circulation model For the Earth Simulator (OFES). FSLEs measure horizontal stirring and dispersion; additionally, the transport barriers which organize the oceanic flow can roughly be identified with the ridges of the FSLE field. We have performed a detailed statistical study, particularizing for the behaviour of the two hemispheres and different ocean basins. The computed Probability Distributions Functions (PDFs) of FSLE are broad and asymmetric. Horizontal mixing is generally more active in the northern hemisphere than in the southern one. Nevertheless the Southern Ocean is the most active ocean, and the Pacific the less active one. A striking result is that the main currents can be classified in two 'activity classes': Western Boundary Currents, which have broad PDFs with large FSLE values, and Eas...

  11. Defense nuclear agency - global effects program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auton, D.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Considerable progress has been made in the determination and analysis of fuel inventories and their distribution. Nonurban inventories are reasonably well documented and probably sufficient for most global effects analyses. Urban inventories are now in good shape for the United States. Work remains to be completed for European and Soviet urban areas. The largest single uncertainty and driving force for all subsequent analyses is the scenario. Knowing the fuel inventories and their distribution is critical and allows scenario assumptions to be played against the fuel bed data. The second largest uncertainty areas is the amount of smoke that would be produced for any given scenario. Much research is under way that contributes to resolving this issue, but there remain the following nagging problems: (1) dynamics of fire spreading and fire zone behavior; (2) scaling from laboratory and small-field measurements; and (3) relatability of materials burned in item 2 to the real case of interest.

  12. Ethics in collaborative global health researchhealth research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    in developing countries ­Global health inequalities­Global health inequalities ­Disproportionate burden

  13. Global tree network for computing structures enabling global processing operations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blumrich; Matthias A. (Ridgefield, CT); Chen, Dong (Croton-On-Hudson, NY); Coteus, Paul W. (Yorktown Heights, NY); Gara, Alan G. (Mount Kisco, NY); Giampapa, Mark E. (Irvington, NY); Heidelberger, Philip (Cortlandt Manor, NY); Hoenicke, Dirk (Ossining, NY); Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D. (Mount Kisco, NY); Takken, Todd E. (Mount Kisco, NY); Vranas, Pavlos M. (Bedford Hills, NY)

    2010-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for enabling high-speed, low-latency global tree network communications among processing nodes interconnected according to a tree network structure. The global tree network enables collective reduction operations to be performed during parallel algorithm operations executing in a computer structure having a plurality of the interconnected processing nodes. Router devices are included that interconnect the nodes of the tree via links to facilitate performance of low-latency global processing operations at nodes of the virtual tree and sub-tree structures. The global operations performed include one or more of: broadcast operations downstream from a root node to leaf nodes of a virtual tree, reduction operations upstream from leaf nodes to the root node in the virtual tree, and point-to-point message passing from any node to the root node. The global tree network is configurable to provide global barrier and interrupt functionality in asynchronous or synchronized manner, and, is physically and logically partitionable.

  14. Geographically Distributed Development : trends, challenges and best practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yin, Yuhong

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Economic and market forces as well as technological progress emerging throughout the last decade signifies the Geographically Distributed Development (GDD) or Global Software Development (GSD) as a software industry norm ...

  15. Distributed Approaches for Determination of Reconfiguration Algorithm Termination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lai, Hong-jian

    Distributed Approaches for Determination of Reconfiguration Algorithm Termination Pinak Tulpule architecture was used as globally shared memory structure for detection of algorithm termination. This paper of algorithm termination. Keywords--autonomous agent-based reconfiguration, dis- tributed algorithms, shipboard

  16. Distributed multi-agent optimization with state-dependent communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lobel, Ilan

    We study distributed algorithms for solving global optimization problems in which the objective function is the sum of local objective functions of agents and the constraint set is given by the intersection of local ...

  17. DISTRIBUTED DATABASES INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Chengfei

    D DISTRIBUTED DATABASES INTRODUCTION The development of network and data communication tech- nology distributed database management. Naturally, the decen- tralized approach reflects the distributed aspects in the definition of a distributed database exist. First, a distributed database is distributed

  18. Evaluation of global wind power Cristina L. Archer and Mark Z. Jacobson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    here are representative of the global distribution of winds, global wind power generated at locations or greater) and can therefore be considered suitable for low-cost wind power generation. This estimate in northern Europe along the North Sea, the southern tip of the South American continent, the island

  19. Global impact of fossil fuel combustion on atmospheric NO x Larry W. Horowitz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob, Daniel J.

    Global impact of fossil fuel combustion on atmospheric NO x Larry W. Horowitz Advanced Study University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (email djj@io.harvard.edu) #12; Abstract. Fossil fuel combustion of fossil fuel combustion on the global distribution of NO x . In the model, we tag fossil fuel NO x and its

  20. Distributed Merge Trees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morozov, Dmitriy; Weber, Gunther

    2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Improved simulations and sensors are producing datasets whose increasing complexity exhausts our ability to visualize and comprehend them directly. To cope with this problem, we can detect and extract significant features in the data and use them as the basis for subsequent analysis. Topological methods are valuable in this context because they provide robust and general feature definitions. As the growth of serial computational power has stalled, data analysis is becoming increasingly dependent on massively parallel machines. To satisfy the computational demand created by complex datasets, algorithms need to effectively utilize these computer architectures. The main strength of topological methods, their emphasis on global information, turns into an obstacle during parallelization. We present two approaches to alleviate this problem. We develop a distributed representation of the merge tree that avoids computing the global tree on a single processor and lets us parallelize subsequent queries. To account for the increasing number of cores per processor, we develop a new data structure that lets us take advantage of multiple shared-memory cores to parallelize the work on a single node. Finally, we present experiments that illustrate the strengths of our approach as well as help identify future challenges.

  1. Chimera and globally clustered chimera: Impact of time delay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheeba, Jane H; Lakshmanan, M

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Following a short report of our preliminary results [Phys. Rev. E 79, 055203(R) (2009)], we present a more detailed study of the effects of coupling delay in diffusively coupled phase oscillator populations. We find that coupling delay induces chimera and globally clustered chimera (GCC) states in delay coupled populations. We show the existence of multi-clustered states that act as link between the chimera and the GCC states. A stable GCC state goes through a variety of GCC states, namely periodic, aperiodic, long-- and short--period breathers and becomes unstable GCC leading to global synchronization in the system, on increasing time delay. We provide numerical evidence and theoretical explanations for the above results and discuss possible applications of the observed phenomena.

  2. Global Studies Course List Fall 2010 (2111) COURSE LIST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Huiqiang

    2111-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ...........................................................................5 2. Global Economy and Global Governance .................................................9 3 from one of six Global Concentrations (Sustainable Development; Global Economy and Global GovernanceGlobal Studies Course List ­ Fall 2010 (2111) Page 1 COURSE LIST Fall 2010 (2111) Global Studies

  3. Computer modeling of the global warming effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington, W.M. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The state of knowledge of global warming will be presented and two aspects examined: observational evidence and a review of the state of computer modeling of climate change due to anthropogenic increases in greenhouse gases. Observational evidence, indeed, shows global warming, but it is difficult to prove that the changes are unequivocally due to the greenhouse-gas effect. Although observational measurements of global warming are subject to ``correction,`` researchers are showing consistent patterns in their interpretation of the data. Since the 1960s, climate scientists have been making their computer models of the climate system more realistic. Models started as atmospheric models and, through the addition of oceans, surface hydrology, and sea-ice components, they then became climate-system models. Because of computer limitations and the limited understanding of the degree of interaction of the various components, present models require substantial simplification. Nevertheless, in their present state of development climate models can reproduce most of the observed large-scale features of the real system, such as wind, temperature, precipitation, ocean current, and sea-ice distribution. The use of supercomputers to advance the spatial resolution and realism of earth-system models will also be discussed.

  4. Privatization and the globalization of energy markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report reviews recent global efforts to privatize energy resources and outlines the opportunities and challenges privatization has presented to U.S. and foreign multinational energy companies. The group of energy companies studied in this report includes the major U.S. petroleum companies and many foreign companies. The foreign companies reviewed include state-run energy enterprises, recently privatized energy enterprises, and foreign multinationals that have been privately held. The privatization of non-petroleum energy industries, such as electricity generation and transmission, natural gas transmission, and coal mining, are also discussed. Overseas investments made by electric companies, natural gas companies, and coal companies are included. The report is organized into six chapters: (1) economics of privatization; (2) petroleum privatization efforts among non-U.S. Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development nations; (3) petroleum privatization efforts in Latin America; (4) privatization in socialist and former socialist regimes; (5) privatization efforts in global electric power generation, transmission, and distribution industries; and (6) privatization and globalization of world coal.

  5. Environmental Regulation, Globalization, and Innovation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashford, Nicholas

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This essay explores the complex relationship between environmental regulation, innovation, and sustainable development within the context of an increasingly globalizing economy. It will be argued that industrial policy, ...

  6. Machine Learning for Global Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    schoen,,,

    Noname manuscript No. (will be inserted by the editor). Machine Learning for Global Optimization. A. Cassioli?. · D. Di Lorenzo. ?. · M. Locatelli. ??. · F. Schoen.

  7. Global Optimization via Slack Variables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaac Siwale

    2015-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    London. England e-mail: ike_siwale@hotmail.com. Abstract. This paper presents a method for finding global optima to constrained nonlinear programs via slack ...

  8. Long-term global nuclear energy and fuel cycle strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krakowski, R.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Technology and Safety Assessment Div.

    1997-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Global Nuclear Vision Project is examining, using scenario building techniques, a range of long-term nuclear energy futures. The exploration and assessment of optimal nuclear fuel-cycle and material strategies is an essential element of the study. To this end, an established global E{sup 3} (energy/economics/environmental) model has been adopted and modified with a simplified, but comprehensive and multi-regional, nuclear energy module. Consistent nuclear energy scenarios are constructed using this multi-regional E{sup 3} model, wherein future demands for nuclear power are projected in price competition with other energy sources under a wide range of long-term demographic (population, workforce size and productivity), economic (price-, population-, and income-determined demand for energy services, price- and population-modified GNP, resource depletion, world-market fossil energy prices), policy (taxes, tariffs, sanctions), and top-level technological (energy intensity and end-use efficiency improvements) drivers. Using the framework provided by the global E{sup 3} model, the impacts of both external and internal drivers are investigated. The ability to connect external and internal drivers through this modeling framework allows the study of impacts and tradeoffs between fossil- versus nuclear-fuel burning, that includes interactions between cost, environmental, proliferation, resource, and policy issues.

  9. Electricity Demand Evolution Driven by Storm Motivated Population Movement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, Melissa R [ORNL; Fernandez, Steven J [ORNL; Fu, Joshua S [ORNL; Walker, Kimberly A [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Managing the risks posed by climate change to energy production and delivery is a challenge for communities worldwide. Sea Level rise and increased frequency and intensity of natural disasters due to sea surface temperature rise force populations to move locations, resulting in changing patterns of demand for infrastructure services. Thus, Infrastructures will evolve to accommodate new load centers while some parts of the network are underused, and these changes will create emerging vulnerabilities. Combining climate predictions and agent based population movement models shows promise for exploring the universe of these future population distributions and changes in coastal infrastructure configurations. In this work, we created a prototype agent based population distribution model and developed a methodology to establish utility functions that provide insight about new infrastructure vulnerabilities that might result from these patterns. Combining climate and weather data, engineering algorithms and social theory, we use the new Department of Energy (DOE) Connected Infrastructure Dynamics Models (CIDM) to examine electricity demand response to increased temperatures, population relocation in response to extreme cyclonic events, consequent net population changes and new regional patterns in electricity demand. This work suggests that the importance of established evacuation routes that move large populations repeatedly through convergence points as an indicator may be under recognized.

  10. CLIMATE CHANGE GLOBAL ECONOMY How to decarbonise the global economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLIMATE CHANGE · GLOBAL ECONOMY How to decarbonise the global economy Today's report on deep efforts of independent experts from 15 countries to find national pathways to making economies based-zero emissions sometime in the second half of this century. This deep cut should occur in a growing world economy

  11. Global warming and global dioxide emission: An empirical study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linyan Sun [Xian Jiaotong Univ., Shaanxi (China); Wang, M. [Saint Mary`s Univ., Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada)

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, the dynamic relationship between global surface temperature (global warming) and global carbon dioxide emission (CO{sub 2}) is modelled and analyzed by causality and spectral analysis in the time domain and frequency domain, respectively. Historical data of global CO{sub 2} emission and global surface temperature anomalies over 129 years from 1860-1988 are used in this study. The causal relationship between the two phenomena is first examined using the Sim and Granger causality test in the time domain after the data series are filtered by ARIMA models. The Granger causal relationship is further scrutinized and confirmed by cross-spectral and multichannel spectral analysis in the frequency domain. The evidence found from both analyses proves that there is a positive causal relationship between the two variables. The time domain analysis suggests that Granger causality exists between global surface temperature and global CO{sub 2} emission. Further, CO{sub 2} emission causes the change in temperature. The conclusions are further confirmed by the frequency domain analysis, which indicates that the increase in CO{sub 2} emission causes climate warming because a high coherence exists between the two variables. Furthermore, it is proved that climate changes happen after an increase in CO{sub 2} emission, which confirms that the increase in CO{sub 2} emission does cause global warming. 27 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. Population and Climate Change:Population and Climate Change: Coupling Population Models withCoupling Population Models with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalnay, Eugenia

    Coupling Population Models with Earth System ModelsEarth System Models Eugenia Kalnay, Safa Motesharrei, Jorge Rivas Change: Fully Coupling Population and Earth System Models" My research at the U. of Maryland #12

  13. Key distributionKey distribution Key distribution, symmetric encryption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Michael

    COMP 522 Key distributionKey distribution COMP 522 Key distribution, symmetric encryption From in a secure way and must keep the key secure" · Important issue: how to distribute secret keys? COMP 522 Key distribution, manual delivery For two parties A and B: · A key could be created by A and delivered physically

  14. THE ROLE OF ODP IN UNDERSTANDING THE CAUSESTHE ROLE OF ODP IN UNDERSTANDING THE CAUSESTHE ROLE OF ODP IN UNDERSTANDING THE CAUSESTHE ROLE OF ODP IN UNDERSTANDING THE CAUSESTHE ROLE OF ODP IN UNDERSTANDING THE CAUSES AND EFFECTS OF GLOBAL SEA LEVEL CHANGEA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    profound impacts on the distribution of sediments sources of mineral and water resources the stability IN UNDERSTANDING THE CAUSES AND EFFECTS OF GLOBAL SEA LEVEL CHANGEAND EFFECTS OF GLOBAL SEA LEVEL CHANGEAND EFFECTS OF GLOBAL SEA LEVEL CHANGEAND EFFECTS OF GLOBAL SEA LEVEL CHANGEAND EFFECTS OF GLOBAL SEA LEVEL CHANGE "Much

  15. Analysis and visualization of global magnetospheric processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winske, D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Mozer, F.S.; Roth, I. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Physics Dept.

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The purpose of this project is to develop new computational and visualization tools to analyze particle dynamics in the Earth`s magnetosphere. These tools allow the construction of a global picture of particle fluxes, which requires only a small number of in situ spacecraft measurements as input parameters. The methods developed in this project have led to a better understanding of particle dynamics in the Earth`s magnetotail in the presence of turbulent wave fields. They have also been used to demonstrate how large electromagnetic pulses in the solar wind can interact with the magnetosphere to increase the population of energetic particles and even form new radiation belts.

  16. The neural network approach to parton distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrea Piccione; Joan Rojo; for the NNPDF Collaboration

    2005-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce the neural network approach to global fits of parton distrubution functions. First we review previous work on unbiased parametrizations of deep-inelastic structure functions with faithful estimation of their uncertainties, and then we summarize the current status of neural network parton distribution fits.

  17. Global Calibration Claudio Albanese 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albanese, Claudio

    Global Calibration Claudio Albanese 1 September 13, 2009 Abstract Current technology advances calibration strategies. Although the industry is largely based on local calibration, we argue that global calibration is nowadays emerging as technically feasible and represents a useful complement to existing method

  18. GLOBAL WARMING THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    GLOBAL WARMING THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT AND YOUR FAMILY'S CONTRIBUTION TO IT Stephen E. Schwartz September 22, 2004 http://www.ecd.bnl.gov/steve/schwartz.html #12;#12;THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT #12;GLOBAL does anything about it. ­ Mark Twain­ Mark Twain Now with the greenhouse effect, we ARE doing something

  19. GLOBAL IMPACT FROM THE HEART

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Jens-Dominik

    GLOBAL IMPACT FROM THE HEART OF NORTHERN IRELAND #12;#12;CHANCELLOR'S WELCOME 4 VICE: INNOVATIVE AND WORLD-CLASS 18 CONTACT 26 CONTENTS 3GLOBAL IMPACT FROM THE HEART OF NORTHERN IRELAND #12;Queen THE HEART OF NORTHERN IRELANDGLOBAL IMPACT FROM THE HEART OF NORTHERN IRELAND CHANCELLOR'S WELCOME

  20. Global Biofuel Use, 1850-2000.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernandes, S. D.; Trautmann, N. M.; Streets, D. G.; Roden, C. A.; Bond, T. C.; Decision and Information Sciences; Univ. of Illinois

    2007-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents annual, country-level estimates of biofuel use for the period 1850-2000. We estimate that global biofuel consumption rose from about 1000 Tg in 1850 to 2460 Tg in 2000, an increase of 140%. In the late 19th century, biofuel consumption in North America was very high, {approx}220-250 Tg/yr, because widespread land clearing supplied plentiful fuelwood. At that time biofuel use in Western Europe was lower, {approx}180-200 Tg/yr. As fossil fuels became available, biofuel use in the developed world fell. Compensating changes in other parts of the world, however, caused global consumption to remain remarkably stable between 1850 and 1950 at {approx}1200 {+-} 200 Tg/yr. It was only after World War II that biofuel use began to increase more rapidly in response to population growth in the developing world. Between 1950 and 2000, biofuel use in Africa, South Asia, and Southeast Asia grew by 170%, 160%, and 130%, respectively.

  1. Introduction to Dynamic Distributed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roma "La Sapienza", Università di

    Introduction to Dynamic Distributed SystemsSystems #12;Outline Introduction Churn Building Applications in Dynamic Distributed Systems RegistersRegisters Eventual Leader election Connectivity in Dynamic Distributed Systems #12;Dynamic Distributed Systems: Context & Motivations Advent of Complex Distributed

  2. Distributed Generation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA : Papers SubfoldersU.S. RefiningDistributed EnergyUntapped

  3. Global versus Nuclear Starbursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francoise Combes

    2001-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The strongest starbursts are observed towards galaxy nuclei, or circumnuclear regions. However in interacting galaxies, star formation is also triggered in overlap regions far from nuclei, in spiral arms and sometimes in tidal tails. What is the relative importance of these starbursts? What kind of starformation is dominating, as a function of redshift? These different starbursts occur in different dynamical conditions (global and local): gravitational instabilities, density waves, radial flows, shear, cloud collisions, density accumulations, and they have been investigated with the help of numerical simulations. Gravitational instabilities are necessary to initiate star formation, but they are not sufficient; galactic disks are self-regulated through these instabilities to have their Toomre Q parameter of the order of 1, and thus this criterium is in practice unable to predict the onset of intense star formation. Super star clusters are a characteristic SF mode in starbursts, and might be due to the rapid formation of large gas complexes. Star formation can propagate radially inwards, due to gravity torques and gas inflow, but also outwards, due to superwinds, and energy outflows: both expanding or collapsing waves are observed in circumnuclear regions. Mergers are more efficient in forming stars at high redshift, because of larger gas content, and shorter dynamical times. The relation between nuclear starbursts and nuclear activity is based on the same fueling mechanisms, but also on reciprocal triggering and regulations.

  4. Population balance modeling -an application in particle technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ehrman, Sheryl H.

    in industry · Design problem, sneak peak · Particle collection using cyclones · Aerosol topics ­ size distributions ­ aggregates and fractals ­ coagulation/breakup · Population balance equations · Discrete and University of Maryland Link to Matlab: www.glue.umd.edu/~sehrman/popbal.htm #12;Outline · Aerosol reactors

  5. The Interdisciplinary Global Change Curriculum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Case study modules Population growth Natural resource management Environmental law Economic incentives's biota Energy Sustainable development Environmental justice Economic indicators GIS spatial analysis (Arc

  6. Resisting globalization- ATTAC in France: local discourses, global terrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard, Marie des Neiges

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The debate over the "globalization" process has been influenced by the emergence of social movements who deplore this process. This research focuses on the French social movement ATTAC (Action for a Tobin Tax for the Aid of Citizens...

  7. Specific Examples of Global Activities Environmental assessment in Azerbaijan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , global warming, and global entrepreneurship. Discovery Park works syner- gistically with the Office competitiveness, global energy security, global warming, and global entrepreneurship. Discovery Park worksSpecific Examples of Global Activities · Environmental assessment in Azerbaijan · Study abroad

  8. The CJ12 parton distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Accardi, Alberto [JLAB; Owens, Jeff F. [Florida State U.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three new sets of next-to-leading order parton distribution functions (PDFs) are presented, determined by global fits to a wide variety of data for hard scattering processes. The analysis includes target mass and higher twist corrections needed for the description of deep-inelastic scattering data at large x and low Q^2, and nuclear corrections for deuterium targets. The PDF sets correspond to three different models for the nuclear effects, and provide a more realistic uncertainty range for the d quark PDF compared with previous fits. Applications to weak boson production at colliders are also discussed.

  9. The China-in-Global Energy Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qi, T.

    The China-in-Global Energy Model (C-GEM) is a global Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) model that captures the interaction of production, consumption and trade among multiple global regions and sectors – including five ...

  10. The Private Regulation of Global Corporate Conduct

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vogel, David

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is a major goal of the UN Global Compact as well as severalindustry codes. The UN Global Compact has more than 2,300exploit. For the UN, the Global Compact provides a vehicle

  11. Global Migration in Transition: The Americas, Europe, and Italian Diaspora (1946-1960)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maccari-Clayton, Marina

    2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    of Italian emigration, see Federica Bertagna and Marina Maccari, “Italy,” in The Encyclopedia of European Migrations and Minorities, eds. Klaus Bade, Piter Emmer, Leo Lucassen, and Jochen Oltmer (Cambridge University Press, forthcoming in 2011) 3 For data... and Reappraisal,” Population and Development Review, 19, 3 (1993): 431-466; C. Stahl, “Explaining international migration,” in Global Population Movements and their Implications for Australia, eds. C. Sthal, R. Ball, C, Inglis, and P. Gutman (Canberra...

  12. The Strategic Significance of Global InequalityThe Strategic Significance of Global InequalityThe Strategic Significance of Global InequalityThe Strategic Significance of Global InequalityThe Strategic Significance of Global Inequality By Jeffrey D. Sachs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    27 The Strategic Significance of Global InequalityThe Strategic Significance of Global InequalityThe Strategic Significance of Global InequalityThe Strategic Significance of Global InequalityThe Strategic

  13. Fish population and behavior revealed by instantaneous continental-shelf scale imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Symonds, Deanelle T

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The application of a technique to instantaneously image and continuously monitor the abundance, spatial distribution, and behavior of fish populations over thousands of square kilometers using Ocean Acoustic Waveguide ...

  14. Scenarios of Global Municipal Water-Use Demand Projections over the 21st Century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Davies, Evan; Eom, Jiyong

    2013-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper establishes three future projections of global municipal water use to the end of the 21st century: A reference business-as usual (BAU) scenario, a High Technological Improvement (High Tech) scenario and a Low Technological Improvement (Low Tech) scenario. A global municipal water demand model is constructed using global water use statistics at the country-scale, calibrated to the base year of 2005, and simulated to the end of the 21st century. Since the constructed water demand model hinges on socioeconomic variables (population, income), water price, and end-use technology and efficiency improvement rates, projections of those input variables are adopted to characterize the uncertainty in future water demand estimates. The water demand model is linked to the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), a global change integrated assessment model. Under the reference scenario, the global total water withdrawal increases from 466 km3/year in 2005 to 941 km3/year in 2100,while withdrawals in the high and low tech scenarios are 321 km3/ year and 2000 km3/ year, respectively. This wide range (321-2000 km3/ year) indicates the level of uncertainty associated with such projections. The simulated global municipal demand projections are most sensitive to population and income projections, then to end-use technology and efficiency projections, and finally to water price. Thus, using water price alone as a policy measure to reduce municipal water use may substantiate the share of municipal water price of people’s annual incomes.

  15. Global Scratch Upgrade in Progress

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rates, Connection to PDSF October 29, 2013 The most used file system at the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC)-global scratch-just got an upgrade. As...

  16. Global Environment Facility Evaluation Office

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfaff, Alex

    Global Environment Facility Evaluation Office PROTECTED AREAS AND AVOIDED DEFORESTATION #12;Protected Areas and Avoided Deforestation: An Econometric Evaluation - i - TABLE OF CONTENTS 1................................................................................4 3.3 ESTIMATED EFFECTS OF PROTECTED AREAS ON DEFORESTATION

  17. Global optimization in reduced space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsung, Achim

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optimization is a key activity in any engineering discipline. Global optimization methods, in particular, strive to solve nonconvex problems, which often arise in chemical engineering, and deterministic algorithms such as ...

  18. NERSC Calculations Provide Independent Confirmation of Global...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Calculations Provide Independent Confirmation of Global Land Warming Since 1901 NERSC Calculations Provide Independent Confirmation of Global Land Warming Since 1901 September 9,...

  19. GASIFICATION FOR DISTRIBUTED GENERATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald C. Timpe; Michael D. Mann; Darren D. Schmidt

    2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A recent emphasis in gasification technology development has been directed toward reduced-scale gasifier systems for distributed generation at remote sites. The domestic distributed power generation market over the next decade is expected to be 5-6 gigawatts per year. The global increase is expected at 20 gigawatts over the next decade. The economics of gasification for distributed power generation are significantly improved when fuel transport is minimized. Until recently, gasification technology has been synonymous with coal conversion. Presently, however, interest centers on providing clean-burning fuel to remote sites that are not necessarily near coal supplies but have sufficient alternative carbonaceous material to feed a small gasifier. Gasifiers up to 50 MW are of current interest, with emphasis on those of 5-MW generating capacity. Internal combustion engines offer a more robust system for utilizing the fuel gas, while fuel cells and microturbines offer higher electric conversion efficiencies. The initial focus of this multiyear effort was on internal combustion engines and microturbines as more realistic near-term options for distributed generation. In this project, we studied emerging gasification technologies that can provide gas from regionally available feedstock as fuel to power generators under 30 MW in a distributed generation setting. Larger-scale gasification, primarily coal-fed, has been used commercially for more than 50 years to produce clean synthesis gas for the refining, chemical, and power industries. Commercial-scale gasification activities are under way at 113 sites in 22 countries in North and South America, Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia, according to the Gasification Technologies Council. Gasification studies were carried out on alfalfa, black liquor (a high-sodium waste from the pulp industry), cow manure, and willow on the laboratory scale and on alfalfa, black liquor, and willow on the bench scale. Initial parametric tests evaluated through reactivity and product composition were carried out on thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) equipment. These tests were evaluated and then followed by bench-scale studies at 1123 K using an integrated bench-scale fluidized-bed gasifier (IBG) which can be operated in the semicontinuous batch mode. Products from tests were solid (ash), liquid (tar), and gas. Tar was separated on an open chromatographic column. Analysis of the gas product was carried out using on-line Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). For selected tests, gas was collected periodically and analyzed using a refinery gas analyzer GC (gas chromatograph). The solid product was not extensively analyzed. This report is a part of a search into emerging gasification technologies that can provide power under 30 MW in a distributed generation setting. Larger-scale gasification has been used commercially for more than 50 years to produce clean synthesis gas for the refining, chemical, and power industries, and it is probable that scaled-down applications for use in remote areas will become viable. The appendix to this report contains a list, description, and sources of currently available gasification technologies that could be or are being commercially applied for distributed generation. This list was gathered from current sources and provides information about the supplier, the relative size range, and the status of the technology.

  20. The Birth of a Galaxy: Primoridal Metal Enrichment and Population II Stellar Populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wise, John H; Norman, Michael L; Abel, Tom

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Population III stars first form in dark matter halos with masses around 10^6 Msun. By definition, they are metal-free, and their protostellar collapse is driven by molecular hydrogen cooling in the gas-phase, leading to a massive characteristic mass ~100 Msun and suppressed fragmentation. Population II stars with lower characteristic masses form when the star-forming gas reaches a critical metallicity of 10^{-6} - 10^{-3.5} Zsun, depending on whether dust cooling is important. We present adaptive mesh refinement radiation hydrodynamics simulations that follows the transition from Population III to II star formation. We model stellar radiative feedback with adaptive ray tracing. A top-heavy initial mass function for the Population III stars is considered, resulting in a plausible distribution of pair-instability supernovae and associated metal enrichment. We find that the gas fraction recovers from 5 percent to nearly the cosmic fraction in halos with merger histories rich in halos above 10^7 Msun. A single pa...

  1. Distributed DBMS I Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yangjun

    Distributed DBMS Outline I Introduction I Background I Distributed DBMS Architecture I Distributed Data server approach Parallel architectures Parallel DBMS techniques Parallel execution models Parallel Database Systems Distributed Object DBMS Database Interoperability Concluding Remarks #12

  2. Modeling Population Exposures to Pollutants Emitted from Natural Gas Cooking Burners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    iPage | i Modeling Population Exposures to Pollutants Emitted from Natural Gas Cooking. LBNL4885E #12;Modeling Population Exposures to Pollutants Emitted from Natural Gas Cooking Burners distributions resulting from use of natural gas cooking appliances across households in California. The model

  3. Distributed Theorem Proving for Distributed Hybrid Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Platzer, André

    system with a varying number of arbitrarily many cars. 1 Introduction Hybrid systems with joint discrete a multi-agent system, e.g., distributed car control systems. Such systems form distributed hybrid systemsDistributed Theorem Proving for Distributed Hybrid Systems David W. Renshaw, Sarah M. Loos

  4. Gamma-ray burst radio afterglows from Population III stars: Simulation methods and detection prospects with SKA precursors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macpherson, Damien

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the prospects of detecting radio afterglows from long Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) from Population III (Pop III) progenitors using the SKA precursor instruments WMA (Murchison Widefield Array) and ASKAP (Australian SKA Pathfinder). We derive a realistic model of GRB afterglows that encompasses the widest range of plausible physical parameters and observation angles. We define the best case scenario of Pop III GRB energy and redshift distributions. Using probability distribution functions fitted to the observed microphysical parameters of long GRBs, we simulate a large number of Pop III GRB afterglows to find the global probability of detection. We find that ASKAP may be able to detect 35% of Pop III GRB afterglows in the optimistic case, and 27% in the pessimistic case. A negligible number will be detectable by MWA in either case. Detections per image for ASKAP, found by incorporating intrinsic rates with detectable timescales, are as high as $\\sim$ 6000 and as low as $\\sim$ 11, which shows the opti...

  5. MICROBIAL POPULATIONS FECAL PELLETS AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luther, Douglas S.

    MICROBIAL POPULATIONS FECAL PELLETS AND AND BIOLU}IINESCENCEOF OCEANIC SEDII,IENTTRAP PARTICLES activities of microbial populations associated with fecal pellets col-Lecteo from oceanic zooplankton were (indicators of microbial growth and reproduction rates, respectively) were monitored in fecal pellets at time

  6. Estimated population near uranium tailings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloomster, C.H.; Brown, D.R.; Bruno, G.A.; Craig, S.N.; Dirks, J.A.; Griffin, E.A.; Reis, J.W.; Young, J.K.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Population studies, which took place during the months of April, May, and June 1983, were performed for 27 active and 25 inactive mill sites. For each mill site, a table showing population by radius (1/2, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 km) in 16 compass directions was generated. 22 references, 6 tables.

  7. Fish distribution studies near N Reactor, Summer 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dauble, D.D.; Page, T.L.

    1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes field studies that were initiated in July 1983 to provide estimates of the relative distribution of late-summer outmigrant juvenile salmonids and juvenile resident fish upstream of the N Reactor 009 Outfall. Chinook salmon are among the fish species most sensitive to thermal effects, and impacts to the juvenile outmigrant populations are of particular concern to state and federal regulatory and fisheries management agencies. Therefore, the distribution studies were conducted from late July through September, a period when high ambient river temperatures and low river flows make these salmonid populations most susceptible to thermal effects. In addition, data were not available on the spatial distribution of outmigrant juvenile chinook salmon in late summer. Information on the relative distribution of resident fish populations was also gathered. Previous studies of midstream distribution of juvenile resident fish were limited to a description of ichthyoplankton populations (Beak Consultants, Inc. 1980 Page et al. 1982), and no data were available on vertical or horizontal distribution of juvenile resident fish species near N Reactor. Relative densities and spatial distribution estimates of juvenile salmonid and resident fish species will be used in conjunction with laboratory thermal effects studies (Neitzel et al. 1984) and with plume characterization studies (Ecker et al. 1983) to assess potential impacts of thermal discharge on fish populations near N Reactor.

  8. Climate Mitigation Policy Implications for Global Irrigation Water Demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Wise, Marshall A.

    2013-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy, water and land are scarce resources, critical to humans. Developments in each affect the availability and cost of the others, and consequently human prosperity. Measures to limit greenhouse gas concentrations will inevitably exact dramatic changes on energy and land systems and in turn alter the character, magnitude and geographic distribution of human claims on water resources. We employ the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), an integrated assessment model to explore the interactions of energy, land and water systems in the context of alternative policies to limit climate change to three alternative levels: 2.5 Wm-2 (445 ppm CO2-e), 3.5 Wm-2 (535 ppm CO2-e) and 4.5 Wm-2 (645 ppm CO2-e). We explore the effects of alternative land-use emissions mitigation policy options—one which values terrestrial carbon emissions equally with fossil fuel and industrial emissions, and an alternative which places no penalty on land-use change emissions. We find that increasing populations and economic growth could be anticipated to lead to increased demand for water for agricultural systems (+200%), even in the absence of climate change. In general policies to mitigate climate change will increase agricultural demands for water, regardless of whether or not terrestrial carbon is valued or not. Burgeoning demands for water are driven by the demand for bioenergy in response to emissions mitigation policies. We also find that the policy matters. Increases in the demand for water when terrestrial carbon emissions go un-prices are vastly larger than when terrestrial system carbon emissions are prices at the same rate as fossil fuel and industrial emissions. Our estimates for increased water demands when terrestrial carbon systems go un-priced are larger than earlier studies. We find that the deployment of improved irrigation delivery systems could mitigate some of the increase in water demands, but cannot reverse the increases in water demands when terrestrial carbon emissions go un-priced. Finally we estimates that the geospatial pattern of water demands could stress some parts of the world, e.g. China, India and other countries in south and east Asia, earlier and more intensely than in other parts of the world, e.g. North America.

  9. Global Cooling: Effect of Urban Albedo on Global Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, Hashem; Menon, Surabi; Rosenfeld, Arthur

    2007-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In many urban areas, pavements and roofs constitute over 60% of urban surfaces (roof 20-25%, pavements about 40%). The roof and the pavement albedo can be increased by about 0.25 and 0.10, respectively, resulting in a net albedo increase for urban areas of about 0.1. Many studies have demonstrated building cooling-energy savings in excess of 20% upon raising roof reflectivity from an existing 10-20% to about 60%. We estimate U.S. potential savings in excess of $1 billion (B) per year in net annual energy bills. Increasing albedo of urban surfaces can reduce the summertime urban temperature and improve the urban air quality. Increasing the urban albedo has the added benefit of reflecting more of the incoming global solar radiation and countering the effect of global warming. We estimate that increasing albedo of urban areas by 0.1 results in an increase of 3 x 10{sup -4} in Earth albedo. Using a simple global model, the change in air temperature in lowest 1.8 km of the atmosphere is estimated at 0.01K. Modelers predict a warming of about 3K in the next 60 years (0.05K/year). Change of 0.1 in urban albedo will result in 0.01K global cooling, a delay of {approx}0.2 years in global warming. This 0.2 years delay in global warming is equivalent to 10 Gt reduction in CO2 emissions.

  10. Case Study #1 "The Global Warming Debate"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Christopher A.

    CHEM 001A Case Study #1 "The Global Warming Debate" Global warming is one of the most contentious issues of our time. There is an ongoing debate about whether global warming is caused by human activity.S., and because the scientific evidence used to determine if global warming is man-made is so difficult

  11. PRINT ONLY: GLOBAL WARMING Alexeev V. A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    PRINT ONLY: GLOBAL WARMING Alexeev V. A. Global Warming: 0.6°C or Less? [#1035] The peculiarities of global warming on the Earth during the last century are discussed. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXVIII (2007) full818.pdf #12;GLOBAL WARMING: 0.6 OR LESS? V.A.Alexeev; Vernadsky Institute of Geochemistry

  12. Measuring the bioenergetic cost of fish activity in situ using a globally dispersed radiotracer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rasmussen, Joseph

    Measuring the bioenergetic cost of fish activity in situ using a globally dispersed radiotracer is an important component of the bioenergetic budget of fish, yet this parameter has rarely been quantified for wild populations. Using a 137 Cs mass balance approach, we estimated the annual bioenergetic budgets

  13. Structure and controls of the global virtual water trade network S. Suweis,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konar, Megan

    2011; accepted 28 February 2011; published 17 May 2011. [1] Recurrent or ephemeral water shortages al., 2008]). Due to population growth and economic development, water shortage is thus subjectStructure and controls of the global virtual water trade network S. Suweis,1,2 M. Konar,2 C. Dalin

  14. Distribution of Clokey's Eggvetch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David C. Anderson

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environment, Safety and Health Division of the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office implements the Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). This program ensures compliance with applicable environmental laws and regulations, delineates and describes NTS ecosystems, and provides ecological information for predicting and evaluating potential impacts of proposed projects on those ecosystems. Over the last several decades, has taken an active role in providing information on the tatus of plant species proposed for protection under the Endangered Species Act(ESA). One such species is Clokey's eggvetch (Astragalus oophorus var. clokeyanus), which is a candidate species under the listing guidelines of the ESA. Surveys for this species were conducted on the NTS in 1996, 1997, and 1998. Field surveys focused on potential habitat for this species in the southern Belted range and expanded to other areas with similar habitat. Over 30 survey day s were completed; five survey days in 1996, 25 survey days in 1997, and three survey days in 1998. Clokey's eggvetch was located at several sites in the southern Belted Range. It was found through much of the northern section of Kawich Canyon, one site at the head of Gritty Gulch, and a rather extensive location in Lambs Canyon. It was also located further south at Captain Jack Springs in the Eleana Range, in much of Falcon Canyon and around Echo Peak on Pahute Mesa, and was also found in the Timber and Shoshone Mountains. Overall, the locations of Clokey's eggvetch on the NTS appears to form a distinct bridge between populations of the species located further north in the Belted and Kawich Ranges and the population located in the Spring Mountains. Clokey's eggvetch was commonly found along washes and small draws, and typically in sandy loam soils with a covering of light tuffaceous rock. It occurs primarily above 1830 meters (6000 feet) in association with single-leaf pinyon (Pinus monophylla), Utah juniper (Juniperus osteosperma), and big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. tridentata). Overall, the populations of Clokey's eggvetch on the NTS appear to be vigorous and do not appear threatened. It is estimated that there are approximately 2300 plants on the NTS. It should be considered as a species of concern because of its localized distribution, but it does not appear to warrant protection under the ESA.

  15. Global analysis of the intranuclear cascade model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braun, E.; Fraenkel, Z.

    1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis of the predictions of the intranuclear cascade model of Yariv-Fraenkel is made by means of global variables (flow angle and transverse momentum distributions). Signatures for the flow effect in the reaction are studied and the distributions of the shape of the events are determined, using the sphericity and coplanarity as shape parameters. The dependence of the results on two parameters of the model is investigated: the rearrangement of the particles in the Fermi sea after each particle-particle collision and the nuclear potential. The influence of the evaporation particles on the flow angle is checked. A comparison with the experimental results of the plastic ball/plastic wall group is made, using a simulation filter in order to take the experimental acceptance of the detector into account. The dependence of the flow angle on the mass of the colliding ions and on the bombarding energy is also studied. We find that the model predicts finite flow angles of the emitted particles. Slow rearrangement and a central potential cause larger flow angles. However, in all cases we find that the most probable calculated flow angle is smaller than the experimental one.

  16. Physically Based Global Downscaling: Regional Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghan, Steven J.; Shippert, Timothy R.; Fox, Jared

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The climate simulated by a global atmosphere/land model with a physically-based subgrid orography scheme is evaluated in ten selected regions. Climate variables simulated for each of multiple elevation classes within each grid cell are mapped according the high-resolution distribution of surface elevation in each region. Comparison of the simulated annual mean climate with gridded observations leads to the following conclusions. At low to moderate elevations the downscaling scheme correctly simulates increasing precipitation, decreasing temperature, and increasing snow with increasing elevation within regions smaller than 100 km. At high elevations the downscaling scheme correctly simulates a decrease in precipitation with increasing elevation. Too little precipitation is simulated on the windward side of mountain ranges and too much precipitation is simulated on the lee side. The simulated sensitivity of surface air temperature to surface elevation is too strong, particularly in valleys influenced by drainage circulations. Observations show little evidence of a “snow shadow”, so the neglect of the subgrid rainshadow does not produce an unrealistic simulation of the snow distribution. Summertime snow area, which is a proxy for land ice, is much larger than observed. Summertime snow water equivalent is far less than the observed thickness of glaciers because a 1 m upper bound on snow water is applied to the simulations and because snow transport by slides is neglected. The 1 m upper bound on snow water equivalent also causes an underestimate of seasonal snow water during late winter, compared with gridded station measurements. Potential solutions to these problems are discussed.

  17. Comparison Chart of Public Health & Population Health Graduate/Professional Degrees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Health OR PHS 740 Health Impact Assessment of Global Environmental Change PHS 787 Field Work Seminar PHS population-based approaches to promote health and prevent disease in communities Seek to understand health, non-profit organizations, hospitals and universities in fields such as health education, food safety

  18. PARTNER, GLOBAL PUBLIC SECTOR DIRECTOR OF GLOBAL SALES STRATEGY & EXECUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    as never before. It reveals everything from large and systemic patterns--of global markets, workflows are best positioned to outperform in the "Decade of Smart." And as centers of business, culture and life, over pizza and drinks, we discuss how to solve the problems of the GLOBE, and our only home - planet

  19. Onix: A Distributed Control Platform for Large-scale Production Networks Teemu Koponen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Onix: A Distributed Control Platform for Large-scale Production Networks Teemu Koponen , Martin on top of which a network control plane can be implemented as a distributed system. Control planes written within Onix operate on a global view of the network, and use basic state distribution primitives

  20. Global change: Acronyms and abbreviations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodard, C.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Stoss, F.W. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment and Resources Center

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This list of acronyms and abbreviations is compiled to provide the user with a ready reference to dicipher the linguistic initialisms and abridgements for the study of global change. The terms included in this first edition were selected from a wide variety of sources: technical reports, policy documents, global change program announcements, newsletters, and other periodicals. The disciplinary interests covered by this document include agriculture, atmospheric science, ecology, environmental science, oceanography, policy science, and other fields. In addition to its availability in hard copy, the list of acronyms and abbreviations is available in DOS-formatted diskettes and through CDIAC`s anonymous File Transfer Protocol (FTP) area on the Internet.

  1. Making Globalization Work for Sustainable Human Development The Global Programme Paradigm : A Synthesis Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the best practices and strategies to manage their integration into the global economy and therefore bringMaking Globalization Work for Sustainable Human Development The Global Programme Paradigm-UNDP Global Programme on Globalization, Liberalization and Sustainable Human Development* Gabriela Tejada

  2. Population Toxicokinetics of Benzene Frederic Yves Bois,1 Elise T. Jackson,1 Kaija Pekari,2 and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Population Toxicokinetics of Benzene Frederic Yves Bois,1 Elise T. Jackson,1 Kaija Pekari,2 these problems. As an example, we modeled the distribution and metabolism of benzene in humans. We derive statistical distributions for the parameters of a physiological model of benzene, on the basis of existing

  3. Role of plant biomass in the global environmental partitioning of chlorinated hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calamari, D.; Morosini, M.; Vighi, M. (Univ. of Milan, (Italy)); Bacci, E.; Focardi, S.; Gaggi, C. (Univ. of Siena (Italy))

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plant biomass plays a significant role in the global environmental partitioning phenomena and plants are good indicators of tropospheric contamination levels by chlorinated hydrocarbons. In the present research 300 samples of plants were collected in 265 areas distributed worldwide and analyzed for HCB (hexachlorobenzene), {alpha}-HCH (hexachlorocyclohexane), {gamma}-HCH, p,p{prime}-DDT,o,p{prime}-DDT, and p,p{prime}-DDE (degradation product of DDT). Global HCB distribution is strongly dependent on the temperature, the HCB being present mainly in samples from cold areas. The sum of DDTs show higher concentrations in samples from topical areas, while the sum of HCHs is higher in the plants from the Northern Hemisphere. These results are discussed, taking into account the role of physicochemical properties in determining the global distribution as well as the air age of the contamination.

  4. Statistical assessment of Monte Carlo distributional tallies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiedrowski, Brian C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Solomon, Clell J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Four tests are developed to assess the statistical reliability of distributional or mesh tallies. To this end, the relative variance density function is developed and its moments are studied using simplified, non-transport models. The statistical tests are performed upon the results of MCNP calculations of three different transport test problems and appear to show that the tests are appropriate indicators of global statistical quality.

  5. A Population Model for the Academic Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yan; Chiu, Dah Ming

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent times, the academic ecosystem has seen a tremendous growth in number of authors and publications. While most temporal studies in this area focus on evolution of co-author and citation network structure, this systemic inflation has received very little attention. In this paper, we address this issue by proposing a population model for academia, derived from publication records in the Computer Science domain. We use a generalized branching process as an overarching framework, which enables us to describe the evolution and composition of the research community in a systematic manner. Further, the observed patterns allow us to shed light on researchers' lifecycle encompassing arrival, academic life expectancy, activity, productivity and offspring distribution in the ecosystem. We believe such a study will help develop better bibliometric indices which account for the inflation, and also provide insights into sustainable and efficient resource management for academia.

  6. Inferring population history from genealogies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lohse, Konrad R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis investigates a range of genealogical approaches to making quantitative inferences about the spatial and demographic history of populations with application to two insect systems: A local radiation of high ...

  7. Population modeling using harpacticoid copepods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , communities and ecosystems. Environmental management decisions rely on ERAs, which and Amphiascus tenuiremis, and demographic equations were used to calculate population statistical power for reproductive endpoints, but at high labor and cost. Therefore

  8. RENEWABLES 2007 GLOBAL STATUS REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    RENEWABLES 2007 GLOBAL STATUS REPORT www.ren21.net #12;Renewable Energy Policy Network for the 21st renewable energy. It provides a forum for leadership and exchange in international policy processes. It bolsters appropriate policies that increase the wise use of renewable energies in developing

  9. Agricultural Sciences for Global Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agricultural Sciences for Global Development ­ SLU's contribution Research Capacity building Provision of expertise The mission of the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU) is "to develop in rural areas, and agriculture plays an essential role in their livelihoods. Nevertheless, FAO estimates

  10. RENEWABLES 2005 GLOBAL STATUS REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    to renewable energy. The establishment of a global policy network was embraced in the Political Declaration Research Institute Chinese Renewable Energy Industries Association China Susan McDade Energy Environment Institute Lead Author: Eric Martinotwww.ren21.net #12;Renewable Energy Policy Network for the 21st Century

  11. Satellite Radio: Its Global Impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Udgaonkar, Jayant B.

    Satellite Radio: Its Global Impact TIFR Alumni Lecture By S.Rangarajan #12;1 A wonder called RADIO "No wonder so many physicists started as radio tinkers, and no wonder, before physicist became on Richard Feynmann We will stick to the definition of Radio as · Wireless Audio Delivery ·Listener cannot

  12. GLOBAL WOOD SUPPLY Sten Nilsson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GLOBAL WOOD SUPPLY Sten Nilsson Biomass and Resource Efficiency: the need for a supply led approach the wood come from? Western EU Deficit Eastern EU Deficit Rest of Eastern Europe Balanced Russia Rest of Eastern Europe Balanced Russia Is probably at production ceiling under current conditions Japan

  13. Conservation and Global Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landweber, Laura

    V.6 Conservation and Global Climate Change Diane M. Debinski and Molly S. Cross OUTLINE 1. Introduction 2. How climate is changing 3. Environmental responses to climate change 4. Consequences of climate the coming decades will be preserving biodiversity in the face of climate change. It has become increasingly

  14. 7, 38373857, 2007 Global transports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and 180 are still transporting into soil and water. It is found that lighter PCBs have more long range international concern with identifying and managing environmentally persistent substances that are bothACPD 7, 3837­3857, 2007 Global transports and budgets of PCBs P. Huang et al. Title Page Abstract

  15. Global climate change and the mitigation challenge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank Princiotta [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States). Air Pollution Prevention and Control Division

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), have led to increasing atmospheric concentrations, very likely the primary cause of the 0.8{sup o}C warming the Earth has experienced since the Industrial Revolution. With industrial activity and population expected to increase for the rest of the century, large increases in greenhouse gas emissions are projected, with substantial global additional warming predicted. This paper examines forces driving CO{sub 2} emissions, a concise sector-by-sector summary of mitigation options, and research and development (R&D) priorities. To constrain warming to below approximately 2.5{sup o}C in 2100, the recent annual 3% CO{sub 2} emission growth rate needs to transform rapidly to an annual decrease rate of from 1 to 3% for decades. Furthermore, the current generation of energy generation and end-use technologies are capable of achieving less than half of the emission reduction needed for such a major mitigation program. New technologies will have to be developed and deployed at a rapid rate, especially for the key power generation and transportation sectors. Current energy technology research, development, demonstration, and deployment (RDD&D) programs fall far short of what is required. 20 refs., 18 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. First Insights into the SWIRE Galaxy Populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carol Lonsdale; Maria Polletta; Jason Surace; David Shupe; Fan Fang; C. Kevin Xu; Harding E. Smith; Brian Siana; Michael Rowan-Robinson; Tom Babbedge; Seb Oliver; Francesca Pozzi; Payam Davoodi; Frazer Owen; Deborah Padgett; Dave Frayer; Tom Jarrett; Frank Masci; JoAnne O'Linger; Tim Conrow; Duncan Farrah; Glenn Morrison; Nick Gautier; Alberto Franceschini; Stefano Berta; Ismael Perez-Fournon; Herve Dole; Gordon Stacey; Steve Sergeant; Marguerite Pierre; Matt Griffin; Rick Puetter

    2004-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We characterize the SWIRE galaxy populations in the SWIRE validation field within the Lockman Hole, based on the 3.6-24$\\mu$ Spitzer data and deep U,g',r',r' optical imaging within an area ~1/3 sq. deg for ~16,000 Spitzer-SWIRE sources. The entire SWIRE survey will discover over 2.3 million galaxies at 3.6$\\mu$m and almost 350,000 at 24$\\mu$m; ~70,000 of these will be 5-band 3.6-24$\\mu$ detections. The colors cover a broad range, generally well represented by redshifted spectral energy distributions of known galaxy populations, however significant samples of unusually blue objects in the [3.6-4.5]$\\mu$m color are found, as well as many objects very red in the 3.6-24$\\mu$m mid-IR. Nine of these are investigated and are interpreted as star-forming systems, starbursts and AGN from z=0.37 to 2.8, with luminosities from L$_{IR}$=10$^{10.3}$ to 10$^{13.7}$ L$_{\\odot}$

  17. ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' scientific report ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' scientific report ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' Team) : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 6 2.2 Anthropogenic climate change studies: scenario experiments (96) : : : : : : : : : 7 2 following its creation, the ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' team had to make its proofs in order

  18. COLUMBIA ENGINEERING WINTER GLOBAL EDUCATIONAL EXPERIENCE: EXPLORING GLOBAL ENGINEERING WITH CITY UNIVERSITY OF HONG KONG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hone, James

    COLUMBIA ENGINEERING WINTER GLOBAL EDUCATIONAL EXPERIENCE: EXPLORING GLOBAL ENGINEERING WITH CITY UNIVERSITY OF HONG KONG JANUARY 7th ­ 15TH , 2012 Program Features The Winter Global Educational Experience is open to Columbia Engineering

  19. Pretzelosity distribution function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Avakian; A. V. Efremov; P. Schweitzer; F. Yuan

    2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The 'pretzelosity' distribution is discussed. Theoretical properties, model results, and perspectives to access experimental information on this leading twist, transverse momentum dependent parton distribution function are reviewed. Its relation to helicity and transversity distributions is highlighted.

  20. Learning poisson binomial distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daskalakis, Constantinos

    We consider a basic problem in unsupervised learning: learning an unknown Poisson Binomial Distribution. A Poisson Binomial Distribution (PBD) over {0,1,...,n} is the distribution of a sum of n independent Bernoulli random ...

  1. Valence quark distributions of the proton from maximum entropy approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rong Wang; Xurong Chen

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an attempt of maximum entropy principle to determine valence quark distributions in the proton at very low resolution scale $Q_0^2$. The initial three valence quark distributions are obtained with limited dynamical information from quark model and QCD theory. Valence quark distributions from this method are compared to the lepton deep inelastic scattering data, and the widely used CT10 and MSTW08 data sets. The obtained valence quark distributions are consistent with experimental observations and the latest global fits of PDFs. Maximum entropy method is expected to be particularly useful in the case where relatively little information from QCD calculation is given.

  2. Valence quark distributions of the proton from maximum entropy approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Rong

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an attempt of maximum entropy principle to determine valence quark distributions in the proton at very low resolution scale $Q_0^2$. The initial three valence quark distributions are obtained with limited dynamical information from quark model and QCD theory. Valence quark distributions from this method are compared to the lepton deep inelastic scattering data, and the widely used CT10 and MSTW08 data sets. The obtained valence quark distributions are consistent with experimental observations and the latest global fits of PDFs. Maximum entropy method is expected to be particularly useful in the case where relatively little information from QCD calculation is given.

  3. About Industrial Distributed Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Advanced Manufacturing Office's (AMO's) Industrial Distributed Energy activities build on the success of predecessor DOE programs on distributed energy and combined heat and power (CHP) while...

  4. The Human Carbon Budget: An Estimate of the Spatial Distribution of Metabolic Carbon Consumption and Release in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, Tristram O. [ORNL; Singh, Nagendra [ORNL; Marland, Gregg [ORNL; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon dioxide is taken up by agricultural crops and released soon after during the consumption of agricultural commodities. The global net impact of this process on carbon flux to the atmosphere is negligible, but impact on the spatial distribution of carbon dioxide uptake and release across regions and continents is significant. To estimate the consumption and release of carbon by humans over the landscape, we developed a carbon budget for humans in the United States. The budget was derived from food commodity intake data for the US and from algorithms representing the metabolic processing of carbon by humans. Data on consumption, respiration, and waste of carbon by humans were distributed over the US using geospatial population data with a resolution of approximately 450 x 450 m. The average adult in the US contains about 21 kg C and consumes about 67 kg C yr-1 which is balanced by the annual release of about 59 kg C as expired CO2, 7 kg C as feces and urine, and less than 1 kg C as flatus, sweat, and aromatic compounds. In 2000, an estimated 17.2 Tg C were consumed by the US population and 15.2 Tg C were expired to the atmosphere as CO2. Historically, carbon stock in the US human population has increased between 1790-2006 from 0.06 Tg to 5.37 Tg. Displacement and release of total harvested carbon per capita in the US is nearly 12% of per capita fossil fuel emissions. Humans are using, storing, and transporting carbon about the Earth s surface. Inclusion of these carbon dynamics in regional carbon budgets can improve our understanding of carbon sources and sinks.

  5. A phased approach to distribution network optimization given incremental supply chain change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riechel, Patrick

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis addresses the question of how to optimize a distribution network when the supply chain has undergone an incremental change. A case study is presented for Company A, a major global biotechnology company that ...

  6. DOE 2012 Market Report on U.S. Wind Technologies for Distributed...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Global Distributed Wind Market (Poster) - Matt Gagne, eFormative Options Using the Wind Policy Tool to Examine Potential Feed-In Tariffs in the United States (Poster) - Matt...

  7. Workforce Development in the Global Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, David

    Workforce Development in the Global Economy: LINKING SKILLS AND CAPABILITIES Phil Psilos & Competitiveness Duke University INTRODUCTION NOVEMBER 2011 #12;Workforce Development in the Global Economy competitiveness, and innovation in the knowledge economy. Duke CGGC works with a network of researchers

  8. Electronic Communities: Global Village or Cyberbalkans?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electronic Communities: Global Village or Cyberbalkans? Marshall Van Alstyne Erik Brynjolfsson Tel KEYWORDS: Information Economy (AD02), Economic Theory (AM), Economic Impacts (BA01), Computerization of Society (BD0101), Organizational Structure (DA03), Information Flows (DD07), Globalization (AF1301

  9. Risk in the Global Supply Chain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Datta, Shoumen

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon footprints are not on the priority list of risk analysts in operations management for at least half or more of global businesses. What are the other risks in the global supply chain?

  10. Global Pollution: How Much Is Too Much?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trevors, Jack T.; Saier, Milton H.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    009-0252-0 Global Pollution: How Much Is Too Much? Jack T.1) How much global pollution can our planet tolerate andThere is already more pollution on our planet than we can

  11. Global vorticity shedding for a vanishing foil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steele, Stephanie Chin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore several aspects of the phenomenon we call global vorticity shedding. Global vorticity shedding occurs when an object in viscous fluid suddenly vanishes, shedding the entire boundary layer vorticity into the wake ...

  12. The neutron star mass distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiziltan, Bülent [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Kottas, Athanasios; De Yoreo, Maria [Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Thorsett, Stephen E., E-mail: bkiziltan@cfa.harvard.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California and UCO/Lick Observatory, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2013-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, the number of pulsars with secure mass measurements has increased to a level that allows us to probe the underlying neutron star (NS) mass distribution in detail. We critically review the radio pulsar mass measurements. For the first time, we are able to analyze a sizable population of NSs with a flexible modeling approach that can effectively accommodate a skewed underlying distribution and asymmetric measurement errors. We find that NSs that have evolved through different evolutionary paths reflect distinctive signatures through dissimilar distribution peak and mass cutoff values. NSs in double NS and NS-white dwarf (WD) systems show consistent respective peaks at 1.33 M {sub ?} and 1.55 M {sub ?}, suggesting significant mass accretion (?m ? 0.22 M {sub ?}) has occurred during the spin-up phase. The width of the mass distribution implied by double NS systems is indicative of a tight initial mass function while the inferred mass range is significantly wider for NSs that have gone through recycling. We find a mass cutoff at ?2.1 M {sub ?} for NSs with WD companions, which establishes a firm lower bound for the maximum NS mass. This rules out the majority of strange quark and soft equation of state models as viable configurations for NS matter. The lack of truncation close to the maximum mass cutoff along with the skewed nature of the inferred mass distribution both enforce the suggestion that the 2.1 M {sub ?} limit is set by evolutionary constraints rather than nuclear physics or general relativity, and the existence of rare supermassive NSs is possible.

  13. Global Superdiffusion of Weak Chaos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Itzhack Dana

    2003-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A class of kicked rotors is introduced, exhibiting accelerator-mode islands (AIs) and {\\em global} superdiffusion for {\\em arbitrarily weak} chaos. The corresponding standard maps are shown to be exactly related to generalized web maps taken modulo an ``oblique cylinder''. Then, in a case that the web-map orbit structure is periodic in the phase plane, the AIs are essentially {\\em normal} web islands folded back into the cylinder. As a consequence, chaotic orbits sticking around the AI boundary are accelerated {\\em only} when they traverse tiny {\\em ``acceleration spots''}. This leads to chaotic flights having a quasiregular {\\em steplike} structure. The global weak-chaos superdiffusion is thus basically different in nature from the strong-chaos one in the usual standard and web maps.

  14. Integrated Assessment of Global Water Scarcity over the 21st Century under Multiple Climate Change Mitigation Policies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Wise, Marshall A.; Patel, Pralit L.; Eom, Jiyong; Calvin, Katherine V.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water scarcity conditions over the 21st century both globally and regionally are assessed in the context of climate change, by estimating both water availability and water demand within the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), a leading community integrated assessment model of energy, agriculture, climate, and water. To quantify changes in future water availability, a new gridded water-balance global hydrologic model – namely, the Global Water Availability Model (GWAM) – is developed and evaluated. Global water demands for six major demand sectors (irrigation, livestock, domestic, electricity generation, primary energy production, and manufacturing) are modeled in GCAM at the regional scale (14 geopolitical regions, 151 sub-regions) and then spatially downscaled to 0.5 o x 0.5o resolution to match the scale of GWAM. Using a baseline scenario (i.e., no climate change mitigation policy) with radiative forcing reaching 8.8 W/m2 (equivalent to the SRES A1Fi emission scenario) and a global population of 14 billion by 2095, global annual water demand grows from about 9% of total annual renewable freshwater in 2005 to about 32% by 2095. This results in almost half of the world population living under extreme water scarcity by the end of the 21st century. Regionally, the demand for water exceeds the amount of water availability in two GCAM regions, the Middle East and India. Additionally, in years 2050 and 2095, 20% and 27% of the global population, respectively, is projected to live in areas (grid cells) that will experience greater water demands than the amount of available water in a year (i.e., the water scarcity index (WSI) > 1.0). This study implies an increasingly prominent role for water in future human decisions, and highlights the importance of including water in integrated assessment of global change.

  15. Global

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.NewofGeothermal Heat Pump Basics

  16. 4, 40694124, 2007 Global-scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    - water resources) that has been calculated by the most recent version of the WaterGAP Global Hydrology

  17. Global Sustainability: Toward Definition BECKY J. BROWN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,Madison,Wisconsin53705,USA. Science Program of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the Global

  18. Sandia National Laboratories: Global Climate & Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    20, 2013, in Advanced Materials Laboratory, Energy Efficiency, Facilities, Global Climate & Energy, Materials Science, Modeling, Modeling & Analysis, Partnership, Research &...

  19. Optimization Online - Machine Learning for Global Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrea Cassioli

    2009-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Jul 23, 2009 ... We propose to use a Support Vector Machine (although different machine ... Citation: Technical report - Global Optimization Laboratory, ...

  20. Implementation of global energy sustainability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grob, G.R. [CMDC, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The term energy sustainability emerged from the UN Conference on Environment and Development in Rio 1992, when Agenda 21 was formulated and the Global Energy Charter proclaimed. Emission reductions, total energy costing, improved energy efficiency, and sustainable energy systems are the four fundamental principles of the charter. These principles can be implemented in the proposed financial, legal, technical, and education framework. Much has been done in many countries toward the implementation of the Global Energy Charter, but progress has not been fast enough to ease the disastrous effects of the too many ill-conceived energy systems on the environment, climate, and health. Global warming is accelerating, and pollution is worsening, especially in developing countries with their hunger for energy to meet the needs of economic development. Asian cities are now beating all pollution records, and greenhouse gases are visibly changing the climate with rising sea levels, retracting glaciers, and record weather disasters. This article presents why and how energy investments and research money have to be rechanneled into sustainable energy, rather than into the business-as-usual of depleting, unsustainable energy concepts exceeding one trillion dollars per year. This largest of all investment sectors needs much more attention.

  1. The Emerging Chinese economy & its Global Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussex, University of

    The Emerging Chinese economy & its Global Impacts Department of Geography & IDS University of Sussex 5 February: The Emerging Chinese Economy & its Global Impacts + Decoding the Harmonious Socialist of Leicester 19 February: Global Production Network & the Chinese Economy Prof. John Humphrey, IDS 26 February

  2. Rangeland ecology: Key global research issues & questions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Rangeland ecology: Key global research issues & questions Robin Reid1 and Maria Fernandez Ecology Lab 2Associate Professor Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA Global Issues and Questions in Rangeland Ecology · Despite the focus here on global issues, we need to recognize that Mongolia

  3. Global optimization in inverse problem of scatterometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Global optimization in inverse problem of scatterometry Lekbir Afraites1,2 Jerome Hazard3 Patrick as a parametric optimization problem using the Least Square criterion. In this work, a design procedure for global robust optimization is developed using Kriging and global optimization approaches. Robustness

  4. An Explanation of Global Warming without Supercomputing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An Explanation of Global Warming without Supercomputing (revised version) K. Miyazaki E that the anthropogenic global warming is severely limited because the Earth is a water planet. 1 Introduction Now,2,3] on this anthropogenic global warming (AGW) is essentially based on the results of elaborate and enormous computer

  5. Global Warming: The Threat to the Planet*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    Global Warming: The Threat to the Planet* Jim Hansen 17 April 2007 2007 Leo Szilard Lecture. Graham Red Squirrel #12;Survival of Species 1. "Business-as-Usual" Scenario - Global Warming ~ 3ºC - Likely Extinctions ~ 50 percent 2. "Alternative" Scenario - Global Warming ~ 1ºC - Likely Extinctions

  6. An Explanation of Global Warming without Supercomputing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An Explanation of Global Warming without Supercomputing K. Miyazaki E-mail: miyazakiro that the climate sensitivity never exceeds 6 C. Consequently, the anthropogenic global warming is severely limited be calculated in simple terms. Global warming is like that." However, there will be not a few physicists who do

  7. How Minds Work Global Workspace Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Memphis, University of

    1 How Minds Work Global Workspace Theory Stan Franklin Computer Science Division & Institute for Intelligent Systems The University of Memphis #12;February 3, 2005 HMW: Global Workspace Theory 2 Global Workspace Theory · A Theory of Consciousness · A Theory of Cognition · A Theory of Mind #12;February 3

  8. Introduction to Distributed Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pous, Damien

    1 Introduction to Distributed Systems Fabienne Boyer, LIG, fabienne.boyer@inria.fr Sources: Cours d'Olivier Gruber, Sacha Krakowiak, Sara Bouchenak, UJF Fabienne Boyer, Distributed Programming 2 Objectives Study conceptual and practical aspects of distributed systems l Client-server model l Distributed protocols l

  9. Distributed Paging Yair Bartal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartal, Yair

    . We survey distributed data management problems including distributed paging, file allocation fantastically on an annual basis. This survey deals with distributed data management problems. Such prob­ lems in distributed data management is the de­ sign of a dynamic allocation of file copies in a network in order

  10. Saskia Sassen and the Sociology of Globalization: A Critical Appraisal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, William I.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Economic globalization denationalizes national economies andGlobalization and the Postcolonial World: The New Political Economywidely on globalization from a political-economy approach.

  11. A Model of Success: The Carnegie Institute for Global Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weeks, Kirstin; Lehrer, David; Bean, Jonathan

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carnegie Institute for Global Ecology Kirstin Weeks, DavidInstitute for Global Ecology, the answer is an unquali? edremarkable about the Global Ecology building is not only how

  12. Ability of the Geo-environment and Oceans to Support the Global Population

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coles, Cynthia

    it has to be expected that even the use of relatively renewable energy will be associated with some of Engineering and Applied Science, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada

  13. Global Population Genetics and Evolution of Invasive Biotypes in the Whitefly Complex Bemisia tabaci

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hadjistylli, Margarita

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2 Cameroon 14 CanIsl-1 (Canary Islands) CanIsl-3 CanIsl-4Morocco, and the Canary Islands forming one cluster (Westernexisted in Spain and the Canary Islands, the already known B

  14. Are global trade negotiations behind a fragmented world of "gated globalization"?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandyopadhyay, Antar

    Are global trade negotiations behind a fragmented world of "gated globalization"? James Lake In a very simple three country model where global trade negotiations precede a sequential Free Trade. Even though sequential FTA for- mation may lead to global free trade if governments have not previously

  15. Graduate Certificate in Global Health Fact Sheet College of Public Health GRADUATE EDUCATION IN GLOBAL HEALTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    Graduate Certificate in Global Health Fact Sheet · College of Public Health GRADUATE EDUCATION. Educational Objectives for the Graduate Certificate in Global Health Increase understanding of the global-disciplinary education in global health, electives and internships will be expected by student involvement with various

  16. Global Mineral Resource Assessment Potash--A Global Overview of Evaporite-Related Potash

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleskes, Joe

    Global Mineral Resource Assessment Potash--A Global Overview of Evaporite-Related Potash Resources intentionally left blank. #12;Global Mineral Resource Assessment Michael L. Zientek, Jane M. Hammarstrom, and Kathleen M. Johnson, editors Potash--A Global Overview of Evaporite-Related Potash Resources, Including

  17. United Nations Global Compact The UN Global Compact is a strategic policy initiative for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chatziantoniou, Damianos

    United Nations Global Compact The UN Global Compact is a strategic policy initiative for businesses in the world. The Global Compact pursues two complementary objectives: 1. Mainstream the ten principles the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). Participation in the Global Compact is open to degree-granting academic

  18. Impact of global dimming and brightening on global warming Martin Wild,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    Impact of global dimming and brightening on global warming Martin Wild,1 Atsumu Ohmura,1 and Knut February 2007. [1] Speculations on the impact of variations in surface solar radiation on global warming was responsible for the observed warming. To disentangle surface solar and greenhouse influences on global warming

  19. Global Biodiesel Market Trends,Global Biodiesel Market Trends, Outlook and OpportunitiesOutlook and Opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global Biodiesel Market Trends,Global Biodiesel Market Trends, Outlook and OpportunitiesPresident, Emerging Markets Online http://www.emerginghttp://www.emerging--markets.commarkets.com Author, Biodiesel 2020: A Global Market SurveyAuthor, Biodiesel 2020: A Global Market Survey Columnist

  20. EO 12898: Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    EO 12898: Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations EO 12898: Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations To focus...

  1. Adult demography and larval processes in coastal benthic populations : intertidal barnacles in Southern California and Baja California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tapia, Fabián

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The geographic distribution and dynamics of coastal benthic populations are shaped by physical - biological interactions affecting larval dispersal and the demography of juvenile and adult individuals. This thesis focused ...

  2. EFFECTS OF SAMPLE SIZE ON CHARACTERIZATION OF WOOD-PARTICLE LENGTH DISTRIBUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EFFECTS OF SAMPLE SIZE ON CHARACTERIZATION OF WOOD-PARTICLE LENGTH DISTRIBUTION Quang V. Cao of sample size on fitting length distribution of wood particles used for manufacturing wood-based composites moments and the ability of the sample distributions to characterize the population represented

  3. About GE Global Research Center | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMForms About Become agovEducationWelcome toAboutAbout GE Global Research

  4. Women Engineers Lead Global Innovation in Bangalore | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsingWhat is abig worldFélicieTeresa MathewsLead Global

  5. Population Ecology ISSN 1438-3896

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Aguiar, Marcus A. M.

    1 23 Population Ecology ISSN 1438-3896 Popul Ecol DOI 10.1007/s10144-012-0352-3 Impacts of enemy of Population Ecology and Springer Japan. This e-offprint is for personal use only and shall not be self of Population Ecology and Springer Japan 2012 Abstract In this study, we used data from both experi- ments

  6. Integrated Transmission and Distribution Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalsi, Karanjit; Fuller, Jason C.; Tuffner, Francis K.; Lian, Jianming; Zhang, Wei; Marinovici, Laurentiu D.; Fisher, Andrew R.; Chassin, Forrest S.; Hauer, Matthew L.

    2013-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Distributed, generation, demand response, distributed storage, smart appliances, electric vehicles and renewable energy resources are expected to play a key part in the transformation of the American power system. Control, coordination and compensation of these smart grid assets are inherently interlinked. Advanced control strategies to warrant large-scale penetration of distributed smart grid assets do not currently exist. While many of the smart grid technologies proposed involve assets being deployed at the distribution level, most of the significant benefits accrue at the transmission level. The development of advanced smart grid simulation tools, such as GridLAB-D, has led to a dramatic improvement in the models of smart grid assets available for design and evaluation of smart grid technology. However, one of the main challenges to quantifying the benefits of smart grid assets at the transmission level is the lack of tools and framework for integrating transmission and distribution technologies into a single simulation environment. Furthermore, given the size and complexity of the distribution system, it is crucial to be able to represent the behavior of distributed smart grid assets using reduced-order controllable models and to analyze their impacts on the bulk power system in terms of stability and reliability. The objectives of the project were to: • Develop a simulation environment for integrating transmission and distribution control, • Construct reduced-order controllable models for smart grid assets at the distribution level, • Design and validate closed-loop control strategies for distributed smart grid assets, and • Demonstrate impact of integrating thousands of smart grid assets under closed-loop control demand response strategies on the transmission system. More specifically, GridLAB-D, a distribution system tool, and PowerWorld, a transmission planning tool, are integrated into a single simulation environment. The integrated environment allows the load flow interactions between the bulk power system and end-use loads to be explicitly modeled. Power system interactions are modeled down to time intervals as short as 1-second. Another practical issue is that the size and complexity of typical distribution systems makes direct integration with transmission models computationally intractable. Hence, the focus of the next main task is to develop reduced-order controllable models for some of the smart grid assets. In particular, HVAC units, which are a type of Thermostatically Controlled Loads (TCLs), are considered. The reduced-order modeling approach can be extended to other smart grid assets, like water heaters, PVs and PHEVs. Closed-loop control strategies are designed for a population of HVAC units under realistic conditions. The proposed load controller is fully responsive and achieves the control objective without sacrificing the end-use performance. Finally, using the T&D simulation platform, the benefits to the bulk power system are demonstrated by controlling smart grid assets under different demand response closed-loop control strategies.

  7. Carbon star populations in systems with different metallicities: statistics in Local Group galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Mouhcine; A. Lancon

    2002-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We present evolutionary population synthesis models for the study of the cool and luminous intermediate age stellar populations in resolved galaxies with particular emphasis on carbon star populations. We study the effects of the star formation history, the age and the metallicity on the populations of intermediate mass stars. In the case of instantaneous bursts, we confirm that lower metallicity results in higher contribution of carbon stars to the total star number, and in higher number ratios of carbon stars to late-type M stars. Chemically consistent models are used to study the effect of the star formation history on the relations between carbon star population properties and global parameters of the parent galaxy (age, metallicity). Our models are able to account, for the first time, for those correlations, as observed in the galaxies of the Local Group. For stellar populations older than 1 Gyr, the properties of carbon star populations are linked to the current metallicity in a way that is quite independent of the star formation scenario. The number of carbon stars to late-type M stars forms a metallicity sequence along which stellar populations with very different star formation histories are found (Abridged).

  8. Population Displacements Associated with Environmentally

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Socio economic Impacts Enviro Impacts Dam Climate Change Fresh H20 Salinization Drought Flood infrastructure Climate Impact(s) Infrastructure development objectives Socio economic Impacts Enviro Impacts ­ Environmental impacts of major infrastructure projects 2 P l i di l i d i h l i f2. Population displacements

  9. The stellar population of bulges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Jablonka

    2007-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This review summarizes the properties of the stellar population in bulges as observed in nearby or distant spiral galaxies. It gives a particular emphasis to the comparison with elliptical galaxies, when possible. The criteria of sample selection and choices in data analysis are addressed when they may be involved in discrepant results reached by different studies.

  10. The Evolution of Stellar Populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angeles Diaz; Eduardo Hardy

    2001-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We summarize the discussion section on ``Evolution of Stellar Populations'' we led on May 27, 2000 in Granada, Spain, as part of the Euroconference on The Evolution of Galaxies. I- Observational Clues. We also provide a partial comparison between the present knowledge of these topics and that which existed at the time of the Crete Conference of 1995.

  11. Economic Globalization and a Nuclear Renaissance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Thomas W.; Johnson, Wayne L.; Parker, Brian M.

    2001-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The phenomenon of globalization has become increasingly well recognized, documented, and analyzed in the last several years. Globalization, the integration of markets and intra-firm competition on a worldwide basis, involves complex behavioral and mindset changes within a firm that facilitate global competition. The changes revolve around efficient information flow and rapid deployment of technology. The objective of this report is to examine the probable characteristics of a global nuclear renaissance and its broad implications for industry structure and export control relative to nuclear technology. The question of how a modern renaissance would affect the trend toward globalization of the nuclear industry is addressed.

  12. Global synchronization of parallel processors using clock pulse width modulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Dong; Ellavsky, Matthew R.; Franke, Ross L.; Gara, Alan; Gooding, Thomas M.; Haring, Rudolf A.; Jeanson, Mark J.; Kopcsay, Gerard V.; Liebsch, Thomas A.; Littrell, Daniel; Ohmacht, Martin; Reed, Don D.; Schenck, Brandon E.; Swetz, Richard A.

    2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A circuit generates a global clock signal with a pulse width modification to synchronize processors in a parallel computing system. The circuit may include a hardware module and a clock splitter. The hardware module may generate a clock signal and performs a pulse width modification on the clock signal. The pulse width modification changes a pulse width within a clock period in the clock signal. The clock splitter may distribute the pulse width modified clock signal to a plurality of processors in the parallel computing system.

  13. Storm-Substorm Relationships During the 4 October, 2000 Storm. IMAGE Global ENA Imaging Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reeves, Geoffrey D.

    in geomagnetic storms and that the main-phase ring current is mostly partial where ions drift on open Mexico Global ion distributions in the 1-200 keV energy range from the main phase of the geomagnetic substorms occured during the main phase as can be seen from in-situ measurements from geosynchronous

  14. Global Warming Effects on U.S. Hurricane Damage KERRY EMANUEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Entekhabi, Dara

    that probability density distributions of aggregate damage become appreciably separated from those of the control have a substantial influence on trop- ical cyclone activity around the world. Global warming generally increases the thermodynamic potential for tropical cyclones (Emanuel 1987), while changing at- mospheric

  15. Global empirical wind model for the upper mesosphere/lower thermosphere. I. Prevailing wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Global empirical wind model for the upper mesosphere/lower thermosphere. I. Prevailing wind Y. I. An updated empirical climatic zonally aver- aged prevailing wind model for the upper mesosphere/ lower of monthly mean winds from meteor radar and MF radar measurements at more than 40 stations, well distributed

  16. The completeness of taxonomic inventories for describing the global diversity and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, Ransom A.

    The completeness of taxonomic inventories for describing the global diversity and distribution University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada B3H 4J1 Taxonomic inventories (or species censuses) are the most to the completeness of taxonomic inventories can have far-reaching consequences. Here, we used the largest publicly

  17. Utility Computing on Global Grids Chee Shin Yeo, Rajkumar Buyya1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buyya, Rajkumar

    . Utility computing is envisioned to be the next generation of Information Technology (IT) evolution1 Utility Computing on Global Grids Chee Shin Yeo, Rajkumar Buyya1 , Marcos Dias de Assunção, Jia Yu, Anthony Sulistio, Srikumar Venugopal, and Martin Placek Grid Computing and Distributed Systems

  18. Understanding global secondary organic aerosol amount and size-resolved condensational behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Understanding global secondary organic aerosol amount and size-resolved condensational behavior and Adams, 2009b) ·Condensation, coagulation, nucleation ·40 size bins (1 nm ­ 10 µm) ·Nucleation rates the aerosol mass distribution. However, recent closure studies with field measurements show that a significant

  19. A dynamic origin for the global asymmetry of lunar mare Shijie Zhong aY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuber, Maria

    basalts. Rare earth element (REE) distributions in the mare basalts are complementary to those in anorA dynamic origin for the global asymmetry of lunar mare basalts Shijie Zhong aY *, E.M. Parmentier b , Maria T. Zuber a a Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, M.I.T., Cambridge

  20. Sandia Energy - Global Climate Models

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand RequirementsCoatingsUltra-High-Voltage SiliconEnergyFailureGlobal Climate Models Home

  1. Endeavor Global | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazel Crest,Energy InformationEmily,Empower EnergyEncapOpenEndeavor Global

  2. Solar Global | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistmaSinosteelSolar Energy sro Jump to:Solar Global Jump to:

  3. BPL Global | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass Conversions Inc JumpIM 2011-003 Jump to: JumpBPL Global Jump to: navigation,

  4. Global Warming and Human Health

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental AssessmentsGeoffrey(SC) GettingGit GitGlobal Warming and Human

  5. Particlelike distributions of the Higgs field nonminimally coupled to gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andre Fuzfa; Massimiliano Rinaldi; Sandrine Schlogel

    2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    When the Higgs field is nonminimally coupled to gravity, there exists a family of spherically symmetric particlelike solutions to the field equations. These monopoles are the only globally regular and asymptotically flat distributions with finite energy of the Higgs field around compact objects. Moreover, spontaneous scalarization is strongly amplified for specific values of their mass and compactness.

  6. Open economy models of distribution and growth Robert A. Blecker*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlini, David

    Chapter 9 Open economy models of distribution and growth Robert A. Blecker* To appear in: Eckhard-Keynesian macro models for closed economies, the present chapter focuses on extensions of these models the post-Keynesian framework to a global economy that has become much more integrated in the past few

  7. Markets versus Regulation: The Efficiency and Distributional Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markets versus Regulation: The Efficiency and Distributional Impacts of U.S. Climate Policy Change Postal Address: Massachusetts Institute of Technology 77 Massachusetts Avenue, E19-411 Cambridge¨rich (CER- ETH) and Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change, Massachusetts Institute

  8. Architecture of the Secoqc Quantum Key Distribution network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehrdad Dianati; Romain Alleaume

    2006-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The European projet Secoqc (Secure Communication based on Quantum Cryptography) aims at developing a global network for unconditionally secure key distribution. This paper specifies the requirements and presents the principles guiding the design of this network, and relevant to its architecture and protocols.

  9. A better steam engine: Designing a distributed concentrating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    collector costs dominate. 2 #12;Distributed generation optionsg p · Biomass - methane, alcohol, dung, syngas added globally in 2008 · Geothermal heat pump · Fossil fuels - diesel, natural gas, propane, li application study: Reducing water consumption of concentrating solar power electricity generation, Tech. rep

  10. Indexing Distributed Complex Data for Complex Queries Egemen Tanin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samet, Hanan

    of the Digital Government, databases can use many ideas from this domain for scalable exchange of data are fundamental to many data management systems. Their mechanisms heavily rely on creating globally known mappingsIndexing Distributed Complex Data for Complex Queries Egemen Tanin Department of Computer Science

  11. The Sorcerer II Global Ocean Sampling Expedition: Expanding theUniverse of Protein Families

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yooseph, Shibu; Sutton, Granger; Rusch, Douglas B.; Halpern,Aaron L.; Williamson, Shannon J.; Remington, Karin; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Heidelberg, Karla B.; Manning, Gerard; Li, Weizhong; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Cieplak, Piotr; Miller, Christopher S.; Li, Huiying; Mashiyama, Susan T.; Joachimiak, Marcin P.; van Belle, Christopher; Chandonia, John-Marc; Soergel, David A.; Zhai, Yufeng; Natarajan, Kannan; Lee, Shaun; Raphael,Benjamin J.; Bafna, Vineet; Friedman, Robert; Brenner, Steven E.; Godzik,Adam; Eisenberg, David; Dixon, Jack E.; Taylor, Susan S.; Strausberg,Robert L.; Frazier, Marvin; Venter, J.Craig

    2006-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Metagenomics projects based on shotgun sequencing of populations of micro-organisms yield insight into protein families. We used sequence similarity clustering to explore proteins with a comprehensive dataset consisting of sequences from available databases together with 6.12 million proteins predicted from an assembly of 7.7 million Global Ocean Sampling (GOS) sequences. The GOS dataset covers nearly all known prokaryotic protein families. A total of 3,995 medium- and large-sized clusters consisting of only GOS sequences are identified, out of which 1,700 have no detectable homology to known families. The GOS-only clusters contain a higher than expected proportion of sequences of viral origin, thus reflecting a poor sampling of viral diversity until now. Protein domain distributions in the GOS dataset and current protein databases show distinct biases. Several protein domains that were previously categorized as kingdom specific are shown to have GOS examples in other kingdoms. About 6,000 sequences (ORFans) from the literature that heretofore lacked similarity to known proteins have matches in the GOS data. The GOS dataset is also used to improve remote homology detection. Overall, besides nearly doubling the number of current proteins, the predicted GOS proteins also add a great deal of diversity to known protein families and shed light on their evolution. These observations are illustrated using several protein families, including phosphatases, proteases, ultraviolet-irradiation DNA damage repair enzymes, glutamine synthetase, and RuBisCO. The diversity added by GOS data has implications for choosing targets for experimental structure characterization as part of structural genomics efforts. Our analysis indicates that new families are being discovered at a rate that is linear or almost linear with the addition of new sequences, implying that we are still far from discovering all protein families in nature.

  12. The RR Lyrae Population of the Galactic Bulge from the MACHO Database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The MACHO Collaboration; C. Alcock; R. A. Allsman; D. R. Alves; T. S. Axelrod; A. Basu; L. Baskett; A. Becker; D. P. Bennett; K. H. Cook; K. C. Freeman; K. Griest; M. J. Lehner; S. L. Marshall; D. Minniti; B. A. Peterson; M. R. Pratt; P. J. Quinn; A. W. Rodgers; C. W. Stubbs; W. Sutherland; A. Tomaney; T. Vandehei; D. L. Welch

    1997-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Mean colors and magnitudes of RR Lyrae stars in 24 fields towards the Galactic bulge from the MACHO database are presented. Accurate mean reddenings are computed for these fields on the basis of the mean colors. The distribution along the line of sight of the RR Lyrae population is examined on the basis of the mean magnitudes, and it is shown that the bulk of the RR Lyrae population is not barred. Only the RR Lyrae in the inner fields closer to the Galactic center (l-4) show evidence for a bar. The red giant clump stars in the MACHO fields, however, clearly show a barred distribution, confirming the results of previous studies. Given the different spatial distribution, the RR Lyrae and the clump giants trace two different populations. The RR Lyrae would represent the inner extension of the Galactic halo in these fields.

  13. Global study of lake surface water temperature (LSWT) behaviour and the tuning of a 1-dimensional model to determine the LSWTs of large lakes worldwide 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Layden, Aisling

    2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Lake surface water temperatures (LSWTs) of 246 globally distributed large lakes were derived from Along-Track Scanning Radiometers (ATSR) for the period 1991 to 2011. These LSWTs, derived in a systematic manner, presents ...

  14. Global Capitalism Theory and the Emergence of Transnational Elites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, William I.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    world economy associated with globalization have contributedGlobalization and the Post-Colonial World: The New Political Economy

  15. Global Capitalism Theory and the Emergence of Transnational Elites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, William I

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    world economy associated with globalization have contributedGlobalization and the Post-Colonial World: The New Political Economy

  16. activities relating global: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    assessment in Azerbaijan Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: , global warming, and global entrepreneurship. Discovery Park works syner- gistically with...

  17. assessing historical global: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    assessment in Azerbaijan Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: , global warming, and global entrepreneurship. Discovery Park works syner- gistically with...

  18. activation a global toggle: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    assessment in Azerbaijan Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: , global warming, and global entrepreneurship. Discovery Park works syner- gistically with...

  19. A General Systems Theory for Atmospheric Flows and Atmospheric Aerosol Size Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. M. Selvam

    2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric flows exhibit selfsimilar fractal spacetime fluctuations manifested as the fractal geometry to global cloud cover pattern and inverse power law form for power spectra of meteorological parameters such as windspeed, temperature, rainfall etc. Inverse power law form for power spectra indicate long-range spacetime correlations or non-local connections and is a signature of selforganised criticality generic to dynamical systems in nature such as river flows, population dynamics, heart beat patterns etc. The author has developed a general systems theory which predicts the observed selforganised criticality as a signature of quantumlike chaos in dynamical systems. The model predictions are (i) The fractal fluctuations can be resolved into an overall logarithmic spiral trajectory with the quasiperiodic Penrose tiling pattern for the internal structure. (ii) The probability distribution represents the power (variance) spectrum for fractal fluctuations and follows universal inverse power law form incorporating the golden mean. Such a result that the additive amplitudes of eddies when squared represent probability distribution is observed in the subatomic dynamics of quantum systems such as the electron or photon. Therefore the irregular or unpredictable fractal fluctuations exhibit quantumlike chaos. (iii) Atmospheric aerosols are held in suspension by the vertical velocity distribution (spectrum). The atmospheric aerosol size spectrum is derived in terms of the universal inverse power law characterizing atmospheric eddy energy spectrum. Model predicted spectrum is in agreement with the following two experimentally determined atmospheric aerosol data sets, (i) SAFARI 2000 CV-580 Aerosol Data, Dry Season 2000 (CARG) (ii) World Data Centre Aerosols data sets for the three stations Ny {\\AA}lesund, Pallas and Hohenpeissenberg.

  20. Distributed Basis Pursuit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Index Terms—Basis pursuit, distributed optimization, sensor networks, augmented ... and image denoising and restoration [1], [2], compression, fitting and ...

  1. Transversity Parton Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexei Prokudin

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transversity distribution is one of the three fundamental parton distributions that completely describe polarized spin 1/2 nucleon. Its chiral odd nature prevented for many years its experimental exploration, however presently we have obtained great deal of information about this distribution. This includes experimental data from Semi Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering, knowledge of scale dependence and phenomenological extractions. I will discuss main features of this distribution and indicate the future improvements of our knowledge.

  2. Synchronization and phase redistribution in self-replicating populations of coupled oscillators and excitable elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wen Yu; Kevin B. Wood

    2015-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the dynamics of phase synchronization in growing populations of discrete phase oscillatory systems when the division process is coupled to the distribution of oscillator phases. Using mean field theory, linear stability analysis, and numerical simulations, we demonstrate that coupling between population growth and synchrony can lead to a wide range of dynamical behavior, including extinction of synchronized oscillations, the emergence of asynchronous states with unequal state (phase) distributions, bistability between oscillatory and asynchronous states or between two asynchronous states, a switch between continuous (supercritical) and discontinuous (subcritical) transitions, and modulation of the frequency of bulk oscillations.

  3. Global warming, insurance losses and financial industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Low, N.C. [UOB Life Assurance Limited, Singapore (Singapore)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Global warming causes extremely bad weather in the near term. They have already caught the attention of the insurance industry, as they suffered massive losses in the last decade. Twenty-one out of the 25 largest catastrophes in the US, mainly in the form of hurricanes have occurred in the last decade. The insurance industry has reacted by taking the risk of global warming in decisions as to pricing and underwriting decisions. But they have yet to take a more active role in regulating the factors that contributes to global warming. How global warming can impact the financial industry and the modern economy is explored. Insurance and modern financial derivatives are key to the efficient functioning of the modern economy, without which the global economy can still function but will take a giant step backward. Any risk as global warming that causes economic surprises will hamper the efficient working of the financial market and the modern economy.

  4. Soil degradation, global warming and climate impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feddema, Johannes J.; Freire, Sergio Carneiro

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    will demonstrate one methodology for assessing the potential large-scale impacts of soil degradation on African climates and water resources. In addition it will compare and contrast these impacts to those expected from global warming and compare impacts for differ...- ent watershed regions on the continent. 2. METHODS In order to make a similar comparison between pro- jected climate change scenarios due to global warming © Inter-Research 2001 *E-mail: feddema@ku.edu Soil degradation, global warming and climate...

  5. THE MASS DISTRIBUTION OF SUBGIANT PLANET HOSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lloyd, James P. [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High mass stars are hostile to Doppler measurements due to rotation and activity on the main-sequence, so RV searches for planets around massive stars have relied on evolved stars. A large number of planets have been found around evolved stars with M > 1.5 M{sub Sun }. To test the robustness of mass determinations, Lloyd compared mass distributions of planet hosting subgiants with distributions from integrating isochrones and concluded that it is unlikely the subgiant planet hosts are this massive, but rather that the mass inferences are systematically in error. The conclusions of Lloyd have been called in to question by Johnson et al., who show TRILEGAL-based mass distributions that disagree with the mass distributions in Lloyd, which they attribute to Malmquist bias. Johnson et al. argue that the very small spectroscopic observational uncertainties favor high masses, and there are a large number of high mass sub giants in RV surveys. However, in this Letter, it is shown that Malmquist bias does not impact the mass distributions, but the mass distribution is sensitive to Galaxy model. The relationship needed to reconcile the subgiant planet host masses with any model of the Galactic stellar population is implausible, and the conclusion of Lloyd that spectroscopic mass determinations of subgiants are likely to have been overestimated is robust.

  6. The global carbon dioxide budget

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sundquist, E.T. (Geological Survey, Woods Hole, MA (United States))

    1993-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The increase in atmospheric CO[sub 2] levels during the last deglaciation was comparable in magnitude to the recent historical increase. However, global CO[sub 2] budgets for these changes reflect fundamental differences in rates and in sources and sinks. The modern oceans are a rapid net CO[sub 2] sink, whereas the oceans were a gradual source during the deglaciation. Unidentified terrestrial CO[sub 2] sinks are important uncertainties in both the deglacial and recent CO[sub 2] budgets. The deglacial CO[sub 2] budget represents a complexity of long-term dynamic behavior that is not adequately addressed by current models used to forecast future atmospheric CO[sub 2] levels.

  7. Cosmic Rays and Global Warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sloan, T. [Physics Department, University of Lancaster, Lancaster, UK (United Kingdom); Wolfendale, A. W. [Physics Department, Durham University, Durham (United Kingdom)

    2008-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Some workers have claimed that the observed temporal correlations of (low level) terrestrial cloud cover with the cosmic ray intensity changes, due to solar modulation, are causal. The possibility arises, therefore, of a connection between cosmic rays and Global Warming. If true, the implications would be very great. We have examined this claim in some detail. So far, we have not found any evidence in support and so our conclusions are to doubt it. From the absence of corroborative evidence we estimate that less than 15% at the 95% confidence level, of the 11-year cycle warming variations are due to cosmic rays and less than 2% of the warming over the last 43 years is due to this cause. The origin of the correlation itself is probably the cycle of solar irradiance although there is, as yet, no certainty.

  8. Cosmic Rays and Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Sloan; A W Wolfendale

    2007-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been claimed by others that observed temporal correlations of terrestrial cloud cover with `the cosmic ray intensity' are causal. The possibility arises, therefore, of a connection between cosmic rays and Global Warming. If true, the implications would be very great. We have examined this claim to look for evidence to corroborate it. So far we have not found any and so our tentative conclusions are to doubt it. Such correlations as appear are more likely to be due to the small variations in solar irradiance, which, of course, correlate with cosmic rays. We estimate that less than 15% of the 11-year cycle warming variations are due to cosmic rays and less than 2% of the warming over the last 35 years is due to this cause.

  9. FRIB cryogenic distribution system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganni, V.; Dixon, K.; Laverdure, N.; Knudsen, P.; Arenius, D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab), Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Barrios, M.; Jones, S.; Johnson, M.; Casagrande, F. [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Michigan State University Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (MSU-FRIB) helium distribution system has been revised to include bayonet/warm valve type disconnects between each cryomodule and the transfer line distribution system, similar to the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) and the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) cryogenic distribution systems. The heat loads at various temperature levels and some of the features in the design of the distribution system are outlined. The present status, the plans for fabrication, and the procurement approach for the helium distribution system are also included.

  10. FRIB cryogenic distribution system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganni, Venkatarao [JLAB; Dixon, Kelly D. [JLAB; Laverdure, Nathaniel A. [JLAB; Knudsen, Peter N. [JLAB; Arenius, Dana M. [JLAB; Barrios, Matthew N. [Michigan State; Jones, S. [Michigan State; Johnson, M. [Michigan State; Casagrande, Fabio [Michigan State

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Michigan State University Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (MSU-FRIB) helium distribution system has been revised to include bayonet/warm valve type disconnects between each cryomodule and the transfer line distribution system, similar to the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) and the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) cryogenic distribution systems. The heat loads at various temperature levels and some of the features in the design of the distribution system are outlined. The present status, the plans for fabrication, and the procurement approach for the helium distribution system are also included.

  11. Global Climate Change: Environment, Technology and Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mumby, Peter J.

    . Appreciate the main aspects of hydropower resource estimation, turbine design, deployment and environmental AND ASSESSMENTS Global Climate Change: Environment, Technology and Society I am a Civil Hydraulic

  12. Sandia National Laboratories: Global Climate & Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rates of Second Key Atmospheric Component On May 1, 2013, in Analysis, Capabilities, Climate, CRF, Energy, Facilities, Global Climate & Energy, Modeling & Analysis, News, News &...

  13. Sandia National Laboratories: General Electric Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and development agreements (CRADAs) with Northrop Grumman Information Systems and General Electric Global Research that will broadly add to the Labs' research. "These...

  14. GLOBAL AND ADAPTIVE SCALING IN A SEPARABLE ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    programs confirm that Adaptive Global Scaling subsumes former scaling ...... Then, the compact convex set B of symmetric matrices eigeinvalues of which.

  15. Semiconductor Engineers in a Global Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Clair; Linden, Greg

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technology: The Case of Semiconductors. Brookings Institute:Society, Space, and Semiconductors in The Restructuring Ofin the Global Semiconductor Industry. ” California

  16. Thermal Imaging Technologies | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enables Advanced Thermal Imaging An error occurred. Unable to execute Javascript. Bryan Whalen in the Electronics Cooling Lab at GE Global Research recorded this thermo...

  17. A Global Optimization Approach to Quantum Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiaofei Huang

    2006-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a global optimization approach to quantum mechanics, which describes the most fundamental dynamics of the universe. It suggests that the wave-like behavior of (sub)atomic particles could be the critical characteristic of a global optimization method deployed by nature so that (sub)atomic systems can find their ground states corresponding to the global minimum of some energy function associated with the system. The classic time-independent Schrodinger equation is shown to be derivable from the global optimization method to support this argument.

  18. Optimization Online - Global Optimization via Slack Variables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaac Siwale

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aug 1, 2014 ... Citation: Siwale, I. (2014). Global optimization via slack variables. Technical Report No. RD-16-2013, London: Apex Research Ltd. Download: ...

  19. Go Global Newsletter, Winter/Spring 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global & International Studies

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The World Tribunal on Iraq (WTI) held its final session inits inception and conduct. The WTI is one expression of themoral globalization. ” The WTI generated intense interest in

  20. A fractal-based approach to lake size-distributions David A. Seekell,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pace, Michael L.

    A fractal-based approach to lake size-distributions David A. Seekell,1 Michael L. Pace,1 Lars J in regional and global biogeochemical processes. Lakes are fractal but do not always conform to the power law size-distribution typically associated with fractal geographical features. Here, we evaluate

  1. Zonal mean atmospheric distribution of sulphur hexafluoride (SF6) A. B. Burgess,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    Zonal mean atmospheric distribution of sulphur hexafluoride (SF6) A. B. Burgess,1 R. G. Grainger,1 in the SF6 loading with time is observed globally (0.30 ± 0.025 pptv yrÀ1 ). This is compared against atmospheric distribution of sulphur hexafluoride (SF6), Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L07809, doi:10.1029/ 2005GL

  2. Distributed PI-Control with Applications to Power Systems Frequency Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dimarogonas, Dimos

    and decentralized control. In a distributed control architecture, there is no centralized controller with global. In a decentralized control architecture however, there is no communication between the individual controllersDistributed PI-Control with Applications to Power Systems Frequency Control Martin Andreasson12

  3. book review: Species distribution models for species distribution modellers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dormann, Carsten F

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mapping  species  distributions:  spa? tial inference and news and update  book review  Species distribution models for species distribution modellers  Ecological niches and 

  4. Arthropod population and community dynamics in turfgrass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yong

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-target arthropod and nematode populations in ographics. fungal and nematode treated bermudagrass were contrasted with populations in a chlorpyrifos and an untreated control treatment. Fifty-five arthropod families or suborder, herein referred...

  5. A NEW POPULATION OF HIGH-REDSHIFT SHORT-DURATION GAMMA-RAY BURSTS E. Berger,1,2,3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheppard, Scott S.

    A NEW POPULATION OF HIGH-REDSHIFT SHORT-DURATION GAMMA-RAY BURSTS E. Berger,1,2,3 D. B. Fox,4 P. A The redshift distribution of the short-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is a crucial, but currently fragmentary rays: bursts Online material: color figures 1. INTRODUCTION The redshift distribution of the short

  6. Pipeline Agglomerator Design Problem: Applications of Population Balances R. B. Diemer, Jr. and S. H. Ehrman, 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ehrman, Sheryl H.

    ) schematic to scale of your team's final design c) size distribution of particles in gas entering the cyclone d) size distribution and solids mass fraction of gas leaving the cyclone Also, submit a CDPipeline Agglomerator Design Problem: Applications of Population Balances © R. B. Diemer, Jr. and S

  7. Distributed Wind Energy Workshop | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you0andEnergyGlobal Nuclearof aDepartment-ofBenefits »DiscoverDistributed

  8. Stellar populations of bulges at low redshift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchez-Blazquez, Patricia

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter summarizes our current understanding of the stellar population properties of bulges and outlines important future research directions.

  9. Global attractors and extinction dynamics of cyclically competing species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rulands, Steffen; Frey, Erwin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transitions to absorbing states are of fundamental importance in non-equilibrium physics as well as ecology. In ecology, absorbing states correspond to the extinction of species. We here study the spatial population dynamics of three cyclically interacting species. The interaction scheme comprises both direct competition between species as in the cyclic Lotka-Volterra model, and separated selection and reproduction processes as in the May-Leonard model. We show that the dynamic processes leading to the transient maintenance of biodiversity are closely linked to attractors of the nonlinear dynamics for the overall species' concentrations. The characteristics of these global attractors change qualitatively at certain threshold values of the mobility, and depend on the relative strength of the different types of competition between species. They give information about the scaling of extinction times with the system size and thereby the stability of biodiversity. We define an effective free energy as the negative...

  10. ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' scientific report 1 ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' scientific report 1 ``Climate Modelling & Global Change of the tropical climate : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 6 2.2 Short­term variability studies : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 8 2.3 Climate drift sensitivity studies

  11. Environmental granularity, rivers and climate history as shaping factors for species' distribution and diversity patterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakazawa Ueji, Yoshinori Jorge

    2009-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Species distributions are composed by those places in which the environmental conditions are suitable for the species to survive and maintain populations; where the interactions with other species are adequate; that have ...

  12. Relationship between speed distribution measures and rural two-lane highway characteristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Jon Michael

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the behavior of speed population distributions on rural two-lane highways is needed to address driver error associated with elements of the highway. Previous research has identified a direct relationship between speed variance...

  13. Four New BL Lac Surveys: Sampling New Populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. A. Laurent-Muehleisen; R. H. Becker; W. Brinkmann; J. Siebert; E. D. Feigelson; R. I. Kollgaard; G. D. Schmidt; P. S. Smith

    1998-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The advent of large area deep radio and X-ray surveys is leading to the creation of many new BL Lac samples. In particular, the ROSAT All-Sky, Green Bank and FIRST surveys are proving to be rich sources of new BL Lacs. We will discuss the methods used in four independent BL Lac searches based on these surveys. Comparison of the broadband spectral energy distributions of these BL Lacs with those of previously known objects clearly points to the existence of a large previously unrecognized population of objects with characteristics intermediate between those exhibited by Low and High energy peaked BL Lacs.

  14. Using GIS and species distribution modelling techniques to determine new locations for botanical collecting surveys in Nepal 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, Christine

    2010-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding botanical distributions and plant biodiversity is of importance to conservationists, and also to others such as land managers, biogeographers and horticulturalists. In Nepal, a globally important biodiversity hot-spot, many plant...

  15. New Laboratory Complex Department of Global Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and associated facilities to house its new Department of Global Ecology. The buildings, located on the campus1 New Laboratory Complex Department of Global Ecology Carnegie Institution of Washington Stanford Ecology will conduct basic research and training on large-scale interactions between ecological systems

  16. Compilationof Regional to Global Inventoriesof Anthropogenic Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    inventories of emissions of the trace species included in the study at the appropriate sectoral, spatial inventories calculated global emissions by large geographic areas (Vfkhelyi, 1985), with very little spatial to compile regional to global inventories of anthropogenic emissions. This discussion is by no means

  17. Global integration for metals, mining and forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    such as coils, bars and sheets. · Forest and paper companies own or lease forests, cut timber, process woodBeyond the familiar Global integration for metals, mining and forest and paper companies Industrial commitment by IBM Global Business Services to provide analysis and viewpoints that help companies realize

  18. The Science of Global Warming Energy Balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blais, Brian

    The Science of Global Warming ·Energy Balance ·Feedback Loops Global Warming can be understood complexities ·Introduce a Simple Model of Energy Balance ·Understand the Vocabulary ·Point out some units of energy input from the Sun = Temperature: 5.3 oC Greenhouse Effect 101: A Balance is Achieved

  19. Russia between transition and globalization Olga GARANINA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    a relatively closed economy towards integrating the globalizing world economy. This double challenge raisedRussia between transition and globalization Olga GARANINA PhD student University Pierre Mendes of the internal factors on the formulation of a policy of selective opening of the Russian economy since

  20. Global transition zone tomography Jeroen Ritsema1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritsema, Jeroen

    Global transition zone tomography Jeroen Ritsema1 and Hendrik Jan van Heijst Seismological on accurate models of seismic velocity variation in the upper mantle transition zone (400­1000 km depth. Such data provide new global transition zone constraints. We combined more than a million measurements

  1. New Realities for Global Health 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abolmaesumi, Purang

    D is an economist and sociologist, visiting professor in health and social care at London South Bank University#12;New Realities for Global Health 2013 Rapporteur's Report Graham Lister Canada-UK Colloquium, 21-UK Council #12;II /NEW REALITIES FOR GLOBAL HEALTH 2013 © The Canada-UK Council, 2014 #12;GRAHAM LISTER / III

  2. Global green building Presenter: Jane Henley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global green building Presenter: Jane Henley Chief Executive Officer World Green Building Council worldwide ·10% plus of global gross domestic product #12;World Green Building Council Growth #12;World Green Building Council #12;World Green Building Council Regional networks #12;· Champions the GBC model

  3. Your Guide to the Global Leadership

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saidak, Filip

    GLP HANDBOOK Your Guide to the Global Leadership Program at 2011-2012 #12;GLP Handbook 2 From plan as one of five strategic directions for the next five years. UNCG's Global Leadership Program proven their potential for a leadership position and possess the knowledge and skills to function

  4. GLOBAL BIOFUELS OUTLOOK MAELLE SOARES PINTO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GLOBAL BIOFUELS OUTLOOK 2010-2020 MAELLE SOARES PINTO DIRECTOR BIOFUELS EUROPE & AFRICA WORLD BIOFUELS MARKETS, ROTTERDAM MARCH 23, 2011 #12;Presentation Overview · Global Outlook ­ Biofuels Mandates in 2010 ­ Total Biofuels Supply and Demand ­ Regional Supply and Demand Outlook to 2020 ­ Biofuels

  5. 8th Global Conference on Sustainable Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berlin,Technische Universität

    8th Global Conference on Sustainable Manufacturing Architecture for Sustainable Engineering to competent partners in the global village. Sustainability engineering has evolved as a means to meet mankind, Germany Co-Chairman Prof. Dr. N. Ibrahim Abu Dhabi University, UAE for a sustainable product and process

  6. SOME CHILLING CONSIDERATIONS ABOUT GLOBAL WARMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    of Arizona #12;Weiss and Overpeck, University of Arizona #12;MELTING OF GREENLAND ICE CAP Satellite Complete melt of the Greenland ice sheet would raise the level of the global ocean 7 meters. #12 thousand years Polar ice cores #12;GREENHOUSE GAS FORCING AND CHANGE IN GLOBAL MEAN SURFACE TEMPERATURE

  7. 6, 48974927, 2006 A global emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    aerosol causes atmospheric warming through the direct aerosol effect, i.e. the trans- mission of absorbedACPD 6, 4897­4927, 2006 A global emission inventory of carbon aerosol for 1860­1997 C. Junker and C a Creative Commons License. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions A global emission inventory

  8. On-shell extension of distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorothea Bahns; Micha? Wrochna

    2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider distributions on $\\R^n\\setminus{0}$ which satisfy a given set of partial differential equations and provide criteria for the existence of extensions to $\\R^n$ that satisfy the same set of equations on $\\R^n$. We use the results to construct distributions satisfying specific renormalisation conditions in the Epstein and Glaser approach to perturbative quantum field theory. Contrary to other approaches, we provide a unified apporach to treat Lorentz covariance, invariance under global gauge group and almost homogeneity, as well as discrete symmetries. We show that all such symmetries can be recovered by applying a linear map defined for all degrees of divergence. Using similar techniques, we find a relation between on-shell and off-shell time-ordered products involving higher derivatives of the fields.

  9. Generalized parton distributions and exclusive processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guzey, Vadim [Hampton U.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ? In last fifteen years, GPDs have emerged as a powerful tool to reveal such aspects of the QCD structure of the nucleon as: - 3D parton correlations and distributions; - spin content of the nucleon. ? Further advances in the field of GPDs and hard exclusive processes rely on: - developments in theory and new methods in phenomenology such as new flexible parameterizations, neural networks, global QCD fits - new high-precision data covering unexplored kinematics: JLab at 6 and 12 GeV, Hermes with recoil detector, Compass, EIC. This slide-show presents: ? Nucleon structure in QCD, particularly hard processes, factorization and parton distributions; and a brief overview of GPD phenomenology, including basic properties of GPDs, GPDs and QCD structure of the nucleon, and constraining GPDs from experiments.

  10. Analysis of Voltage Rise Effect on Distribution Network with Distributed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    Analysis of Voltage Rise Effect on Distribution Network with Distributed Generation M. A. Mahmud.hossain@adfa.edu.au, and H.Pota@adfa.edu.au). Abstract: Connections of distributed generation (DG) in distribution networks are increasing. These connections of distributed generation cause voltage rise in the distribution network

  11. DIGITAL VISION & PHOTODISC Distributed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simeone, Osvaldo

    of scalability and energy efficiency and offers new opportunities through the interplay with specific distributed, to the advances in telegraphy and, later, wireless transmission. Railroad transportation, geodesy (measurement

  12. MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    * Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 December 20, 2007 MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION FROM: MICHAEL W. OWEN

  13. Distribution of Correspondence

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Defines correct procedures for distribution of correspondence to the Naval Reactors laboratories. Does not cancel another directive. Expired 8-30-97.

  14. Cooling water distribution system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orr, Richard (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A passive containment cooling system for a nuclear reactor containment vessel. Disclosed is a cooling water distribution system for introducing cooling water by gravity uniformly over the outer surface of a steel containment vessel using an interconnected series of radial guide elements, a plurality of circumferential collector elements and collector boxes to collect and feed the cooling water into distribution channels extending along the curved surface of the steel containment vessel. The cooling water is uniformly distributed over the curved surface by a plurality of weirs in the distribution channels.

  15. Distributionally Robust Convex Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    2College of Management and Technology, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, ... They also allow us to characterize distributional families in terms of.

  16. Perspective: The Climate-Population-Infrastructure Modeling and Simulation Fertile Area for New Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, Melissa R [ORNL; Fernandez, Steven J [ORNL; Walker, Kimberly A [ORNL; Fu, Joshua S [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Managing the risks posed by climate change and extreme weather to energy production and delivery is a challenge to communities worldwide. As climate conditions change, populations will shift, and demand will re-locate; and networked infrastructures will evolve to accommodate new load centers, and, hopefully, minimize vulnerability to natural disaster. Climate effects such as sea level rise, increased frequency and intensity of natural disasters, force populations to move locations. Displaced population creates new demand for built infrastructure that in turn generates new economic activity that attracts new workers and associated households to the new locations. Infrastructures and their interdependencies will change in reaction to climate drivers as the networks expand into new population areas and as portions of the networks are abandoned as people leave. Thus, infrastructures will evolve to accommodate new load centers while some parts of the network are underused, and these changes will create emerging vulnerabilities. Forecasting the location of these vulnerabilities by combining climate predictions and agent based population movement models shows promise for defining these future population distributions and changes in coastal infrastructure configurations. By combining climate and weather data, engineering algorithms and social theory it has been only recently possible to examine electricity demand response to increased climactic temperatures, population relocation in response to extreme cyclonic events, consequent net population changes and new regional patterns in electricity demand. These emerging results suggest a research agenda of coupling these disparate modelling approaches to understand the implications of climate change for protecting the nation s critical infrastructure.

  17. 1 Smart Distribution: Coupled Microgrids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. H. Lasseter

    Abstract-- The distribution system provides major opportunities for smart grid concepts. One way to approach distribution system problems is to rethinking our distribution system to include the integration of high levels of distributed energy resources, using microgrid concepts. Basic objectives

  18. Jet mass with a jet veto at two loops and the universality of non-global structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Randall Kelley; Matthew D. Schwartz; Robert M. Schabinger; Hua Xing Zhu

    2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the exclusive jet mass distribution in e+e- events, defined with a veto on the out-of-jet radiation, at two-loop order. In particular, we calculate the two-loop soft function, which is required to describe this distribution in the threshold region. When combined with other ingredients using soft-collinear effective theory, this generates the complete singular distribution for jet thrust, the sum of the jet masses, at two-loop order. The result is in excellent agreement with full QCD. The integrated jet thrust distribution is found to depend in an intricate way on both the finite jet cone size, R, and the jet veto scale. The result clarifies the structure of the potentially large logarithms (both global and non- global) which arise in jet observables for the first time at this order. Somewhat surprisingly, we find that, in the small R limit, there is a precise and simple correspondence between the non-global contribution to the integrated jet thrust distribution and the previously calculated non-global contribution to the integrated hemisphere soft function, including subleading terms. This suggests that the small R limit may provide a useful expansion for studying other exclusive jet substructure observables.

  19. Globalization and human cooperation Nancy R. Buchana,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , the overharvesting of natural resources and human-induced global warming. However, what does globalization imply and individual levels and ana- lyzing the relationship between globalization and individual co- operation of globalization increase, so too does individual cooperation at the global level vis-a`-vis the local level

  20. WHAT'S IN A NAME? GLOBAL WARMING VERSUS CLIMATE CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, Gary L.

    WHAT'S IN A NAME? GLOBAL WARMING VERSUS CLIMATE CHANGE May 2014 #12;What's In A Name? Global NATIONAL SURVEY STUDY 2: GLOBAL WARMING VS. CLIMATE CHANGE............................ 10 Is global?................................................................10 When you think of global warming / climate change, what comes first to mind

  1. The Parent Populations of 6 groups identified from Chemical Tagging in the Solar neighborhood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quillen, Alice C; De Silva, Gayandhi; Freeman, Ken; Zucker, Dan B; Minchev, Ivan; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We estimate the size and distribution of the parent populations for the 6 largest (at least 20 stars in the Solar neighborhood) chemical groups identified in the Chemical Tagging experiment by Mitschang et al.~2014. Stars in the abundance groups tend to lie near a boundary in angular momentum versus eccentricity space where the probability is highest for a star to be found in the Solar neighborhood and where orbits have apocenter approximately equal to the Sun's galactocentric radius. Assuming that the parent populations are uniformly distributed at all azimuthal angles in the Galaxy, we estimate that the parent populations of these abundance groups contain at least 200,000 members. The spread in angular momentum of the groups implies that the assumption of a uniform azimuthal distribution only fails for the two youngest groups and only for the highest angular momentum stars in them. The parent populations of three thin disk groups have narrow angular momentum distributions, but tails in the eccentricity and ...

  2. Test of two hypotheses explaining the size of populations in a system of cities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vitanov, Nikolay K

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two classical hypotheses are examined about the population growth in a system of cities: Hypothesis 1 pertains to Gibrat's and Zipf's theory which states that the city growth-decay process is size independent; Hypothesis 2 pertains to the so called Yule process which states that the growth of populations in cities happens when (i) the distribution of the city population initial size obeys a log-normal function, (ii) the growth of the settlements follows a stochastic process. The basis for the test is some official data on Bulgarian cities at various times. This system was chosen because (i) Bulgaria is a country for which one does not expect biased theoretical conditions; (ii) the city populations were determined rather precisely. The present results show that: (i) the population size growth of the Bulgarian cities is size dependent, whence Hypothesis 1 is not confirmed for Bulgaria; (ii) the population size growth of Bulgarian cities can be described by a double Pareto log-normal distribution, whence Hypothe...

  3. Climate Effects of Global Land Cover Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbard, S G; Caldeira, K; Bala, G; Phillips, T; Wickett, M

    2005-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    There are two competing effects of global land cover change on climate: an albedo effect which leads to heating when changing from grass/croplands to forest, and an evapotranspiration effect which tends to produce cooling. It is not clear which effect would dominate in a global land cover change scenario. We have performed coupled land/ocean/atmosphere simulations of global land cover change using the NCAR CAM3 atmospheric general circulation model. We find that replacement of current vegetation by trees on a global basis would lead to a global annual mean warming of 1.6 C, nearly 75% of the warming produced under a doubled CO{sub 2} concentration, while global replacement by grasslands would result in a cooling of 0.4 C. These results suggest that more research is necessary before forest carbon storage should be deployed as a mitigation strategy for global warming. In particular, high latitude forests probably have a net warming effect on the Earth's climate.

  4. Software distribution using xnetlib

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dongarra, J.J. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (US). Dept. of Computer Science]|[Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (US); Rowan, T.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (US); Wade, R.C. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (US). Dept. of Computer Science

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Xnetlib is a new tool for software distribution. Whereas its predecessor netlib uses e-mail as the user interface to its large collection of public-domain mathematical software, xnetlib uses an X Window interface and socket-based communication. Xnetlib makes it easy to search through a large distributed collection of software and to retrieve requested software in seconds.

  5. DISTRIBUTION John R. Jones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DISTRIBUTION John R. Jones Qualung aspen is the most widely distributed native North American tree aspen (Populus tremula), has a wider range (Weigle and Frothingham 1911). In the humid East, aspen plateaus. Aspen is one of the most common trees in the interior West, where its range (fig.1)coincides

  6. The inferred redshift distribution of the faint blue excess

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon P. Driver; Warrick J. Couch; Steven Phillipps; Rogier A. Windhorst

    1996-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We infer the redshift distribution of the faint blue galaxy excess (FBE) at B=23.5 by subtracting the predicted distribution of giant/normal galaxies from the observed N(z) distribution for all types. This is possible because of the recent deep {\\it Hubble Space Telescope} (HST) WFPC2 morphological number counts which have convincingly demonstrated that little evolution of the giant population is seen to B=26.0. The mean redshift of the FBE at B=23.5 is found to be _{FBE}=0.40 +/- 0.07 with upper and lower quartiles defined by z_{0.75}=0.58 +/- 0.05 and z_{0.25}=0.28 +/- 0.05, respectively. We compare this inferred FBE N(z) distribution to the predictions from three generic faint galaxy models: dwarf dominated (no evolution), pure luminosity evolution, and evolving dwarfs. The inferred FBE N(z) distribution strongly supports a hybrid evolving dwarf--rich model wherein a large population of dwarfs present at z=0.5 has subsequently faded to obscurity. The total integrated number density of dwarfs (down to M_{B}=-11) is estimated to be a factor of 20 times greater than that of E---Sc galaxies and the estimated fading to be 1.0 < \\Delta m < 1.4 mags. Thus, the dwarf population is estimated to be responsible for ~30% of the luminosity density locally, rising to ~57% at z=0.5.

  7. Global Dynamics in Galactic Triaxial Systems I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pablo M. Cincotta; Claudia M. Giordano; Josefa Perez; .

    2006-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we present a theoretical analysis of the global dynamics in a triaxial galactic system using a 3D integrable Hamiltonian as a simple representation. We include a thorough discussion on the effect of adding a generic non--integrable perturbation to the global dynamics of the system. We adopt the triaxial Stackel Hamiltonian as the integrable model and compute its resonance structure in order to understand its global dynamics when a perturbation is introduced. Also do we take profit of this example in order to provide a theoretical discussion about diffussive processes taking place in phase space.

  8. Global Environment Facility (GEF) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd toWell2008)Information GlobalGlobalGlobal

  9. Institutionalizing Unsustainability: The Paradox of Global Climate Governance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevenson, Hayley

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    results in 4° C global warming, sea level rise, specieslevels of greenhouse gases are responsible for incremental global warming.levels as that of the developing countries, the world would not today have faced the threat of global warming.

  10. Proving anthropogenic global warming and disproving natural warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovejoy, Shaun

    1 Proving anthropogenic global warming and disproving natural warming in global temperatures between 5 and 6o C. Although he was aware that his, these were negligible: global fossil fuel consumption was less than a twentieth

  11. Infrared absorption spectra, radiative efficiencies, and global warming potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Infrared absorption spectra, radiative efficiencies, and global warming potentials absorption spectra, radiative efficiencies, and global warming potentials of perfluorocarbons: Comparison. (1995) and combined with atmospheric lifetimes from the literature to determine global warming

  12. Global Warming: Is There Still Time to Avoid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    Global Warming: Is There Still Time to Avoid Disastrous Human -Made Climate Change? i.e. Have We simulations. (B) Simulated and observed surface temperature change. #12;21st Century Global Warming Climate) Simulated Global Warming Warming

  13. Expanding Global Network: Discovery to Delivery The United States ranks #1 in innovation. Purdue is preparing for the 21st century global

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    challenges ­ global health, global competitiveness, global energy security, global warming, global and visibility that Purdue enjoys at all levels globally. · Provide global experience for Purdue facultyExpanding Global Network: Discovery to Delivery The United States ranks #1 in innovation. Purdue

  14. ANALYSIS OF DISTRIBUTION FEEDER LOSSES DUE TO ADDITION OF DISTRIBUTED PHOTOVOLTAIC GENERATORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuffner, Francis K.; Singh, Ruchi

    2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Distributed generators (DG) are small scale power supplying sources owned by customers or utilities and scattered throughout the power system distribution network. Distributed generation can be both renewable and non-renewable. Addition of distributed generation is primarily to increase feeder capacity and to provide peak load reduction. However, this addition comes with several impacts on the distribution feeder. Several studies have shown that addition of DG leads to reduction of feeder loss. However, most of these studies have considered lumped load and distributed load models to analyze the effects on system losses, where the dynamic variation of load due to seasonal changes is ignored. It is very important for utilities to minimize the losses under all scenarios to decrease revenue losses, promote efficient asset utilization, and therefore, increase feeder capacity. This paper will investigate an IEEE 13-node feeder populated with photovoltaic generators on detailed residential houses with water heater, Heating Ventilation and Air conditioning (HVAC) units, lights, and other plug and convenience loads. An analysis of losses for different power system components, such as transformers, underground and overhead lines, and triplex lines, will be performed. The analysis will utilize different seasons and different solar penetration levels (15%, 30%).

  15. Distributed Stochastic Power Control in Ad-hoc Networks: A Nonconvex Case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Lei; Zhang, Junshan; Li, Jason H

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Utility-based power allocation in wireless ad-hoc networks is inherently nonconvex because of the global coupling induced by the co-channel interference. To tackle this challenge, we first show that the globally optimal point lies on the boundary of the feasible region, which is utilized as a basis to transform the utility maximization problem into an equivalent max-min problem with more structure. By using extended duality theory, penalty multipliers are introduced for penalizing the constraint violations, and the minimum weighted utility maximization problem is then decomposed into subproblems for individual users to devise a distributed stochastic power control algorithm, where each user stochastically adjusts its target utility to improve the total utility by simulated annealing. The proposed distributed power control algorithm can guarantee global optimality at the cost of slow convergence due to simulated annealing involved in the global optimization. The geometric cooling scheme and suitable penalty pa...

  16. A Monte Carlo simulation for kinetic chemotaxis models: an application to the traveling population wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yasuda, Shugo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Monte Carlo simulation for the chemotactic bacteria is developed on the basis of the kinetic modeling, i.e., the Boltzmann transport equation, and applied to the one-dimensional traveling population wave in a micro channel.In this method, the Monte Carlo method, which calculates the run-and-tumble motions of bacteria, is coupled with a finite volume method to solve the macroscopic transport of the chemical cues in the field. The simulation method can successfully reproduce the traveling population wave of bacteria which was observed experimentally. The microscopic dynamics of bacteria, e.g., the velocity autocorrelation function and velocity distribution function of bacteria, are also investigated. It is found that the bacteria which form the traveling population wave create quasi-periodic motions as well as a migratory movement along with the traveling population wave. Simulations are also performed with changing the sensitivity and modulation parameters in the response function of bacteria. It is found th...

  17. Stellar populations in bulges of spiral galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Jablonka

    1997-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the integrated properties of the stellar population in bulges along the Hubble sequence and new HST data for individual stars in the bulge of M31.

  18. X-ray populations in galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Fabbiano

    2005-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Today's sensistive, high resolution Chandra X-ray observations allow the study of many populations of X-ray sources. The traditional astronomical tools of photometric diagrams and luminosity functions are now applied to these populations, and provide the means for classifying the X-ray sources and probing their evolution. While overall stellar mass drives the amount of X-ray binaries in old stellar population, the amount of sources in star-forming galaxies is related to the star formation rate. Shart-lived, luminous, high mass binaries (HNXBs) dominate these young populations.

  19. Empirical Prediction Intervals for County Population Forecasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rayer, Stefan; Smith, Stanley K.; Tayman, Jeff

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the determination and prediction of population forecastperformance of empirical prediction intervals? Table 5 shows26, 163–184. Empirical Prediction Intervals for County

  20. Managing Tensions In A Globalizing Environment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoemaker, Martha McArdell

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Globalizing processes often place the social cohesion of organizations at risk when multinational people experience and exhibit tensions from their diverse cultural and language norms. This study uses discourse analysis and dialectical theory...

  1. HAS TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT KEPT PACE WITH GLOBALIZATION?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    HAS TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT KEPT PACE WITH GLOBALIZATION? bridges vol. 18, July 2008 / Pielke makers would benefit from an authoritative, independent perspective on technology assessment of renewable energy technologies; and the US Congress is considering implementing laws to regulate speculation

  2. A High-Resolution Global Climate Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duffy, P B

    2001-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A major factor limiting the quality and usefulness of global climate models is the coarse spatial resolution of these models. Global climate models today are typically run at resolutions of {approx}300 km (or even coarser) meaning that the smallest features represented are 300 km across. As Figure 1 shows, this resolution does not allow adequate representation of small or even large topographic features (e.g. the Sierra Nevada mountains). As a result of this and other problems, coarse-resolution global models do not come close to accurately simulating climate on regional spatial scales (e.g. within California). Results on continental and larger sales are much more realistic. An important consequence of this inability to simulate regional climate is that global climate model results cannot be used as the basis of assessments of potential societal impacts of climate change (e.g. effects on agriculture in the Central Valley, on management of water resources, etc.).

  3. Global expansion strategies for software firms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoden, Michihiko

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The business competition in the software industry is increasingly becoming a global competition. In this era with a fast-paced innovative environment, strategy plays an important role for managers in software companies in ...

  4. Sales & operations planning in a global business

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Honstain, Christopher Michael

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As companies become more global and begin to outsource manufacturing and other services, the uncertainty in the supply resource increases. Demand uncertainties increase as these same companies expand into new countries to ...

  5. Columbia University Office of Global Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hone, James

    Columbia University Office of Global Programs General Resources for Going Abroad For undergraduate.............................................................................................................................. 3 COLUMBIA CONTACTS Congratulations on your decision to undertake an international experience as part of your Columbia education

  6. Sulfuryl fluoride in the global atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muhle, J.

    The first calibrated high-frequency, high-precision, in situ atmospheric and archived air measurements of the fumigant sulfuryl fluoride (SO[subscript 2]F[subscript 2]) have been made as part of the Advanced Global Atmospheric ...

  7. Key Implications of the Global Economic Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lansky, Joshua

    Key Implications of the Global Economic Environment For PCT Filings: A Survey of the Issues DMI...............................................................................9 Annex 1: Incentives for Patent Filing: The Analytical Framework...........................11 I-1 Intellectual property, innovation, and economic growth.................................13 2-2 Individual

  8. Estimates of Cabbeling in the Global Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmitt, Raymond W.

    Owing to the larger thermal expansion coefficient at higher temperatures, more buoyancy is put into the ocean by heating than is removed by cooling at low temperatures. The authors show that, even with globally balanced ...

  9. Dynamics of global ocean heat transport variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jayne, Steven Robert

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A state-of-the-art, high-resolution ocean general circulation model is used to estimate the time-dependent global ocean heat transport and investigate its dynamics. The north-south heat transport is the prime manifestation ...

  10. Diplomarbeit Test der Dynamik zweier globaler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jablonowski, Christiane

    Diplomarbeit Test der Dynamik zweier globaler Wettervorhersagemodelle des Deutschen Wetterdienstes: Der Held-Suarez Test vorgelegt von Christiane Jablonowski Bonn, September 1998 Meteorologisches.1 Tests von globalen Zirkulationsmodellen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 1.1.1 Test von

  11. Global Social Media Directory: A Resource Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noonan, Christine F.; Piatt, Andrew W.

    2014-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Global Social Media Directory is a resource guide providing information on social networking services around the globe. This information changes rapidly, therefore, this document will be updated on a regular basis and as funding permits.

  12. Essays on global non-market strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucea, Rafael

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation is centrally concerned with the management of a firm's global non-market environment. The non-market environment of a given firm is conceived as the set of relationships, confrontational or collaborative, ...

  13. Increasing Global Renewable Energy Market Share

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peinke, Joachim

    Increasing Global Renewable Energy Market Share: Recent Trends and Perspectives Final Report Prepared for: Beijing International Renewable Energy Conference 2005 Prepared by: The Expert Group .............................................................. ix Message to the Beijing International Renewable Energy Conference from the Secretary General

  14. Evolving a global armaments logistics strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peck, Nathan (Nathan W.)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Few companies globally source and manage commercial transportation for frequent and high volumes of explosive cargo for the U. S. Department of Defense. U.S. regulations are strict and economically competitive options are ...

  15. Integrated decision support model for global sourcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mroczkowski, Victor A. (Victor Adam)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the last decade, the U.S. aircraft industry has experienced increasing levels of international integration as companies seek to access global talent and resources, cut production costs, spread financial risk, and ...

  16. Recent increases in global HFC-23 emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions and sinks: 1990-2007, Rep.A. Lindley (2007), Global emissions of HFC-23 estimated to2009), Greenhouse Gas Emissions Data, http://unfccc.int/ghg_

  17. Global manufacturing model and case studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kijtawesataporn, Komsun

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Second, an operational layer discusses, the general idea of what policy a company needs to develop and how a company globally manages its operations and supply chain, resources, and markets. The third layer, societal, shows the importance and the impacts...

  18. Needed : a realistic strategy for global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacoby, Henry D.; Prinn, Ronald G.; Schmalensee, Richard.

    Through a brief look at the science and economics of climate, the authors show that if climate change turns out to be a serious threat, an effective response will require a substantial and very long-term global effort. ...

  19. Global Warming Effects on Us Hurricane Damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emanuel, Kerry Andrew

    While many studies of the effects of global warming on hurricanes predict an increase in various metrics of Atlantic basin-wide activity, it is less clear that this signal will emerge from background noise in measures of ...

  20. The Impact of Global Warming and Air Pollution on Patient Visits in the Emergency Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Derlet, Robert W

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review The Impact sf Global Warming and 1 Air pollution onair pollution problems and global warming will effect thesites in the human body. Global Warming Global warming goes

  1. Joint Statement on the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership and...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Joint Statement on the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership and Nuclear Energy Cooperation Joint Statement on the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership and Nuclear Energy Cooperation...

  2. Global Trade Policy Development in a Two-Track System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crump, Larry

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    publication 9 March 2006 global trade policy development inbetween nations that reduce trade barriers on a reciprocalmight enhance the global trade policy develop- ment process

  3. address global challenges: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (for example, by addressing issues of global health, poverty and equality, and sustainable living). The aim of this document Saunders, Mark 124 GLOBAL INITIATIVES AT...

  4. DOE Initiates Environmental Impact Statement for Global Nuclear...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOE Initiates Environmental Impact Statement for Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Technology Demonstrations DOE Initiates Environmental Impact Statement for Global Nuclear Energy...

  5. accuracy integrated global: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cortical systems for local and global integration in discourse comprehension Giovanna Egidi a, Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Cortical systems for local and global...

  6. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Develop Advanced...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Develop Advanced Burner Reactors Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Develop Advanced Burner Reactors GNEP will develop...

  7. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Demonstrate Small...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Demonstrate Small-Scale Reactors Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Demonstrate Small-Scale Reactors GNEP will provide...

  8. Global Shuttleless Loom Industry 2015 Market Research Report...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Global Shuttleless Loom Industry 2015 Market Research Report Home Gosreports's picture Submitted by Gosreports(70) Contributor 2 July, 2015 - 20:44 Global Shuttleless Loom Industry...

  9. Global High-purity Pentoxide Industry 2015 Market Research Report...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Global High-purity Pentoxide Industry 2015 Market Research Report Home Gosreports's picture Submitted by Gosreports(70) Contributor 2 July, 2015 - 21:10 Global High-purity...

  10. Global Dicyandiamide Industry 2015 Market Research Report | OpenEI...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Global Dicyandiamide Industry 2015 Market Research Report Home Gosreports's picture Submitted by Gosreports(70) Contributor 2 July, 2015 - 20:38 Global Dicyandiamide Industry 2015...

  11. Global POF Shrink Film Industry 2015 Market Research Report ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Global POF Shrink Film Industry 2015 Market Research Report Home Gosreports's picture Submitted by Gosreports(70) Contributor 2 July, 2015 - 21:12 Global POF Shrink Film Industry...

  12. Supercomputers Fuel Global High-Resolution Climate Models

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Supercomputers Fuel Global High-Resolution Climate Models Supercomputers Fuel Global High-Resolution Climate Models Berkeley Lab Researcher Says Climate Science is Entering New...

  13. Testimonials - Partnerships in Fuel Cells - GE Global Research...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fuel Cells - GE Global Research Testimonials - Partnerships in Fuel Cells - GE Global Research Addthis An error occurred. Unable to execute Javascript. Text Version The words...

  14. Demonstration of Next Generation PEM CHP Systems for Global Markets...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Demonstration of Next Generation PEM CHP Systems for Global Markets Using PBI Membrane Technology Demonstration of Next Generation PEM CHP Systems for Global Markets Using PBI...

  15. ORAU Science Education Program (SEP) Global Change Education...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ORAU Science Education Program (SEP) Global Change Education Program (GCEP) PIA, Office of Information Resources ORAU Science Education Program (SEP) Global Change Education...

  16. Global Error bounds for systems of convex polynomials over ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is devoted to study the Lipschitzian/Holderian type global error ...... set is not neccessarily compact, we obtain the Hölder global error bound result.

  17. LIGHTS: Laboratory for Information Globalization and Harmonization Technologies and Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choucri, Nazli

    2004-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Three important trends - unrelenting globalization, growing worldwide electronic connectivity, and increasing knowledge intensity of economic activity - are creating new opportunities for global politics, with challenging ...

  18. acid improves global: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Global methodology in control architecture to improve mobile robot reliability B. Durand, K. Godary a global methodology devel- oped to increase the reliability of mobile...

  19. Global Optimization for the Design of Space Trajectories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    the European Space Agency as test problems for global optimization. We show that ... solved by means of relatively simple global optimization techniques rely-.

  20. Global optimization of expensive black box problems with a known ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    andrea

    Abstract In this paper we propose an algorithm for the global optimization of ... which this step is performed by globally optimizing a suitable merit function on.