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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global oil consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Just oil? The distribution of environmental and social impacts of oil production and consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of bene?ts and costs of oil and to deeper global, economic,distribution of bene?ts and costs from oil. It is virtuallyboth the bene?ts and costs of oil production and consumption

O'Rourke, D; Connolly, S

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nations began to seek out oil reserves around the world. 3on the limited global oil reserves and spiking prices. Manyto the largest proven oil reserves, making up 61 percent of

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Railroad fuel-oil consumption in 1928  

SciTech Connect

Data are presented, by districts, covering the consumption of fuel oil for various uses by railroads.

Redfield, A.H.

1930-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Global Oil Geopolitics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Iran-Iraq War . Iranian revolution . Arab Oil Embargo . Asian financial crisis . capacity exhausted . Global financial collapse . 9-11 attacks . OPEC cuts targets 1.7 ...

5

Fact Sheet: Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fact Sheet: Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Biofuels Fact Sheet: Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Biofuels Secretary of Energy Samuel W....

6

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

interpretations of China’s foreign oil strategy. Argumentsof aspects of China’s foreign oil activities, they do notits largest directly-run foreign oil project. Supplying 10

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Michael T. Klare, Blood and Oil: The Dangers of America’sDowns and Jeffrey A. Bader, “Oil-Hungry China Belongs at BigChina, Africa, and Oil,” (Council on Foreign Relations,

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is an important oil source for China, yet unlike itsthe United States as a major oil source outside the volatileto be a critical source of oil, and one that is almost

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

China’s domestic oil supply will peak, and demand Robertpeak will come around 2020, 24 and that by this point, China’s demand Oil

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

21, 2008. Ying, Wang. “ China, Venezuela firms to co-developApril 21, “China and Venezuela sign oil agreements. ” Chinaaccessed April 21, “Venezuela and China sign oil deal. ” BBC

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industry analysts and academics agree that China’s domestic oil supply will peak, and demand Robert Ebel, China’s Energy

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Oil consumption, pollutant emission, oil proce volatility and economic activities in selected Asian Developing Economies.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??It is now well established in the literature that oil consumption, oil price shocks, and oil price volatility may impact the economic activities negatively. Studies… (more)

Rafiq, Shuddhasattwa

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

21, 2008. “China signs $2bn Iran oil deal. ” Al Jazeera (11of its partnerships: Sudan, Iran and Venezuela. An analysiss $400 million contract with Iran may omit information about

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Oil and Global Adjustment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The current account surplus of the world’s major oil exporting economies – defined as the IMF’s fuel-exporting emerging economies plus Norway – increased from $110b to about $500b between 2002 and 2006. 2 In 2006, the current account surplus of the Gulf

Brad Setser

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

21, 2008. Ying, Wang. “ China, Venezuela firms to co-developoilfields. ” China Daily (27 August 2005) http://David and Bi Jianhai. “China’s Global Hunt for Energy. ”

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Oil Dependencies and Peak Oil's Effects on Oil Consumption.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? During the year of 2007, the world has experienced historically high oil prices both in nominal and in real terms, which has reopened discussions… (more)

Tekin, Josef

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Experimental study of lube oil characteristics in the PCV system and effects on engine oil consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engine oil consumption is an important source of hydrocarbon and particulate emissions in modem automobile engines. Great efforts have been made by automotive manufacturers to minimize the impact of oil consumption on ...

Lopez, Oscar, 1980-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Exploiting Domain Knowledge to Forecast Heating Oil Consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The GasDay laboratory at Marquette University provides forecasts of energy consumption. One such service is the Heating Oil Forecaster

George F. Corliss; Tsuginosuke Sakauchi; Steven R. Vitullo; Ronald H. Brown

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

New Zealand Energy Data: Oil Consumption by Fuel and Sector ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oil Consumption by Fuel and Sector The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to oil and other...

20

Heavy Oil Consumption Reduction Program (Quebec, Canada) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heavy Oil Consumption Reduction Program (Quebec, Canada) Heavy Oil Consumption Reduction Program (Quebec, Canada) Heavy Oil Consumption Reduction Program (Quebec, Canada) < Back Eligibility Commercial Agricultural Industrial Construction Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate $5 million per site Program Info Funding Source Government of Quebec State Quebec Program Type Rebate Program Provider Agence de l'efficacité énergétique This program helps heavy oil consumers move toward sustainable development while improving their competitive position by reducing their consumption. Financial assistance is offered to carry out various analyses as well as implement energy efficient measures relating to heavy fuel oil or to switch to other forms of energy containing fewer pollutants, such as natural gas,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global oil consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Major Corporate Fleets Align to Reduce Oil Consumption | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Major Corporate Fleets Align to Reduce Oil Consumption Major Corporate Fleets Align to Reduce Oil Consumption Major Corporate Fleets Align to Reduce Oil Consumption April 1, 2011 - 1:07pm Addthis President Obama announces the National Clean Fleets Partnership to help companies reduce fuel usage by incorporating electric vehicles, alternative fuels, and conservation techniques. Dennis A. Smith Director, National Clean Cities What does this project do? Cuts oil imports and consumption Helps businesses save money Increases the efficiency of large-scale fleets Reduces emissions Surrounded by cutting-edge vehicles, from all-electric trucks to hydraulic hybrids, President Obama today announced the National Clean Fleets Partnership, an initiative of the Department's Clean Cities program, at a UPS fleet facility in Landover, Maryland. This public-private partnership

22

Major Corporate Fleets Align to Reduce Oil Consumption | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Major Corporate Fleets Align to Reduce Oil Consumption Major Corporate Fleets Align to Reduce Oil Consumption Major Corporate Fleets Align to Reduce Oil Consumption April 1, 2011 - 1:07pm Addthis President Obama announces the National Clean Fleets Partnership to help companies reduce fuel usage by incorporating electric vehicles, alternative fuels, and conservation techniques. Dennis A. Smith Director, National Clean Cities What does this project do? Cuts oil imports and consumption Helps businesses save money Increases the efficiency of large-scale fleets Reduces emissions Surrounded by cutting-edge vehicles, from all-electric trucks to hydraulic hybrids, President Obama today announced the National Clean Fleets Partnership, an initiative of the Department's Clean Cities program, at a UPS fleet facility in Landover, Maryland. This public-private partnership

23

Air toxics from heavy oil production and consumption  

SciTech Connect

This report assesses the potential impact of recent Federal and state regulations for airborne toxic substances on the production and consumption of heavy fuel oils. Emissions of nickel from heavy oil production in California are considered in some detail, in conjunction with California state regulations for toxic emissions. Although the use of thermal energy from heavy crude oils could in theory be impacted by toxic air pollution regulations, recent trends towards the use of natural gas for the required extraction energy appear to provide substantial relief, in addition to reducing emissions of criteria air pollutants. However, the consumption of residual fuel oils containing toxic metals could result in higher population exposures to these substances and their attendant risks may be worthy of more detailed analysis.

Lipfert, F.W.; DePhillips, M.P.; Moskowitz, P.D.

1992-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

24

Table 2. Fuel Oil Consumption and Expeditures in U.S. Households ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Fuel Oil Consumption and Expeditures in U.S. Households ... Space Heating - Main or Secondary ... Forms EIA-457 A-G of the 2001 Residential Energy Consumption

25

Running Out of and Into Oil: Analyzing Global Oil Depletion and Transition Through 2050  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents a risk analysis of world conventional oil resource production, depletion, expansion, and a possible transition to unconventional oil resources such as oil sands, heavy oil and shale oil over the period 2000 to 2050. Risk analysis uses Monte Carlo simulation methods to produce a probability distribution of outcomes rather than a single value. Probability distributions are produced for the year in which conventional oil production peaks for the world as a whole and the year of peak production from regions outside the Middle East. Recent estimates of world oil resources by the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the International Institute of Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA), the World Energy Council (WEC) and Dr. C. Campbell provide alternative views of the extent of ultimate world oil resources. A model of oil resource depletion and expansion for twelve world regions is combined with a market equilibrium model of conventional and unconventional oil supply and demand to create a World Energy Scenarios Model (WESM). The model does not make use of Hubbert curves but instead relies on target reserve-to-production ratios to determine when regional output will begin to decline. The authors believe that their analysis has a bias toward optimism about oil resource availability because it does not attempt to incorporate political or environmental constraints on production, nor does it explicitly include geologic constraints on production rates. Global energy scenarios created by IIASA and WEC provide the context for the risk analysis. Key variables such as the quantity of undiscovered oil and rates of technological progress are treated as probability distributions, rather than constants. Analyses based on the USGS and IIASA resource assessments indicate that conventional oil production outside the Middle East is likely to peak sometime between 2010 and 2030. The most important determinants of the date are the quantity of undiscovered oil, the rate at which unconventional oil production can be expanded, and the rate of growth of reserves and enhanced recovery. Analysis based on data produced by Campbell indicates that the peak of non-Middle East production will occur before 2010. For total world conventional oil production, the results indicate a peak somewhere between 2020 and 2050. Key determinants of the peak in world oil production are the rate at which the Middle East region expands its output and the minimum reserves-to-production ratios producers will tolerate. Once world conventional oil production peaks, first oil sands and heavy oil from Canada, Venezuela and Russia, and later some other source such as shale oil from the United States must expand if total world oil consumption is to continue to increase. Alternative sources of liquid hydrocarbon fuels, such as coal or natural gas are also possible resources but not considered in this analysis nor is the possibility of transition to a hydrogen economy. These limitations were adopted to simplify the transition analysis. Inspection of the paths of conventional oil production indicates that even if world oil production does not peak before 2020, output of conventional oil is likely to increase at a substantially slower rate after that date. The implication is that there will have to be increased production of unconventional oil after that date if world petroleum consumption is to grow.

Greene, D.L.

2003-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

26

U.S. crude oil production growth contributes to global oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Rising crude oil production in the United States contributed to relatively stable global crude oil prices in 2013, at around the same annual average ...

27

Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.eia.gov Annual Energy Outlook 2013 projections to 2040 • Growth in energy production outstrips consumption growth • Crude oil production rises sharply over the next decade • Motor gasoline consumption reflects more stringent fuel economy standards • The U.S. becomes a net exporter of natural gas in the early 2020s • U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain below their 2005 level through 2040

Adam Sieminski Administrator; Adam Sieminski; Adam Sieminski; Adam Sieminski; Adam Sieminski

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Application of Grey Correlation Method in Energy Consumption Analysis of Crude Oil Gathering System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to take quantitative analysis on impact factors of energy consumption in crude oil gathering system, gray system theory analysis was adopted to evaluate energy consumption impact factors sequence of crude oil gathering system through the establishment ... Keywords: Gathering and Transporting of Crude Oil, Influence factor, Grey Correlation

Zhou Yingming; Wang Shuwei; Li Dong; Wu Guozhong

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

The Role of Inventories and Speculative Trading in the Global Market for Crude Oil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a structural model of the global market for crude oil that for the first time explicitly allows for shocks to the speculative demand for oil as well as shocks to the flow demand and flow supply. The forward-looking element of the real price of oil is identified with the help of data on oil inventories. The model estimates rule out explanations of the 2003-08 oil price surge based on unexpectedly diminishing oil supplies and based on speculative trading. Instead, we find that this surge was caused by fluctuations in the flow demand for oil driven by the global business cycle. There is evidence, however, that speculative demand shifts played an important role during earlier oil price shock episodes including 1979, 1986, and 1990. We also show that, even after accounting for the role of inventories in smoothing oil consumption, our estimate of the short-run price elasticity of oil demand is much higher than traditional estimates from dynamic models that do not account for price endogeneity. We conclude that additional regulation of oil markets would not have prevented the 2003-08 oil price surge.

Lutz Kilian; Dan Murphy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #376: June 13, 2005 U.S. Oil Consumption  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6: June 13, 2005 6: June 13, 2005 U.S. Oil Consumption Over 20 Million Barrels per Day in 2004 to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #376: June 13, 2005 U.S. Oil Consumption Over 20 Million Barrels per Day in 2004 on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #376: June 13, 2005 U.S. Oil Consumption Over 20 Million Barrels per Day in 2004 on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #376: June 13, 2005 U.S. Oil Consumption Over 20 Million Barrels per Day in 2004 on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #376: June 13, 2005 U.S. Oil Consumption Over 20 Million Barrels per Day in 2004 on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #376: June 13, 2005 U.S. Oil Consumption Over 20 Million Barrels per Day in 2004 on Digg

31

Sources and characteristics of oil consumption in a spark-ignition engine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont.) At low load, oil flowing past by the piston was found to be the major consumption source, while the contributions of oil evaporation and of blowby entrainment became more significant with increasing engine load. ...

Yilmaz, Ertan, 1970-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Middle East leads global crude oil and condensate production ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Growth in North American crude oil production (including lease condensate) contributed to record global production of 75.6 million barrels per day (bbl/d) in 2012 ...

33

New Zealand Energy Data: Oil Consumption by Fuel and Sector | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oil Consumption by Fuel and Sector Oil Consumption by Fuel and Sector Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to oil and other petroleum products. Included here are two oil consumption datasets: quarterly petrol consumption by sector (agriculture, forestry and fishing; industrial; commercial; residential; transport industry; and international transport), from 1974 to 2010; and oil consumption by fuel type (petrol, diesel, fuel oil, aviation fuels, LPG, and other), also for the years 1974 through 2010. The full 2010 Energy Data File is available: http://www.med.govt.nz/upload/73585/EDF%202010.pdf. Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated July 02nd, 2010 (4 years ago)

34

Microsoft PowerPoint - GlobalOilEcon.ppt  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Globalization, Oil Prices and Globalization, Oil Prices and U.S. Economic Activity Stephen Brown Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas 2008 Energy Conference U.S. Energy Information Administration Globalization, Oil Price Shocks and U.S. Economic Activity Nathan Balke, Stephen Brown, Mine Yücel March 31, 2008 I. Introduction. What are the economic consequences to the United States of an increase in the oil price? Conventional thinking: oil supply shock * Higher oil price * Slower GDP growth * Increased price level Real oil price and recessions (shaded) Index, 1982 = 100 0 30 60 90 120 150 48 51 54 57 60 63 66 69 72 75 78 81 84 87 90 93 96 99 02 05 Empirical evidence of a negative relationship is mixed: For: Mork and Hall (1980), Hamilton (1983, 2003), Balke, Brown, and Yücel (2002), Hamilton and Herrera (2004),

35

Global Oil Geopolitics - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 imported refiner acquisition cost of crude oil WTI crude ... World Crude Oil Supply and Demand Balance 14

36

Global natural gas consumption doubled from 1980 to 2010 - Today ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Although consumption in North America saw the slowest regional ... trends in regional natural gas consumption and production are more similar because of the limited ...

37

Staff Listing - Office for Oil and Gas Global Security and Supply...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Staff Listing - Office for Oil and Gas Global Security and Supply Staff Listing - Office for Oil and Gas Global Security and Supply Director of the Office for Oil and Gas Global...

38

U.S. crude oil production growth contributes to global oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

China accounted for almost one-third of growth in global demand and surpassed the United States to become the world's largest importer of crude oil.

39

Impact of 1980 scheduled capacity additions on electric-utility oil consumption  

SciTech Connect

The electric-utility sector currently consumes approximately 8% of the total oil used in the Nation. This oil represented about 15% of total fuel consumed by electric utilities in 1979. Two important factors that affect the level of utility oil consumption in 1980 are the substantial increase in coal-fired generating capacity and the uncertainty surrounding nuclear-plant licensing. With particular emphasis on these considerations, this report analyzes the potential for changes in electric-utility oil consumption in 1980 relative to the 1979 level. Plant conversions, oil to coal, for example, that may occur in 1980 are not considered in this analysis. Only the potential reduction in oil consumption resulting from new generating-capacity additions is analyzed. Changes in electric-utility oil consumption depend on, among other factors, regional-electricity-demand growth and generating-plant mix. Five cases are presented using various electricity-demand-growth rate assumptions, fuel-displacement strategies, and nuclear-plant-licensing assumptions. In general, it is likely that there will be a reduction in electric-utility oil consumption in 1980. Using the two reference cases of the report, this reduction is projected to amount to a 2 to 5% decrease from the 1979 oil-consumption level; 7% reduction is the largest reduction projected.

Gielecki, M.; Clark, G.; Roberts, B.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Nonresidential buildings energy consumption survey: 1979 consumption and expenditures. Part 2. Steam, fuel oil, LPG, and all fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents data on square footage and on total energy consumption and expenditures for commercial buildings in the contiguous United States. Also included are detailed consumption and expenditures tables for fuel oil or kerosene, liquid petroleum gas (LPG), and purchased steam. Commercial buildings include all nonresidential buildings with the exception of those where industrial activities occupy more of the total square footage than any other type of activity. 7 figures, 23 tables.

Patinkin, L.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global oil consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Oil market in international and Norwegian perspectives.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Crude oil is the most important energy source in global perspective. About 35 percent of the world’s primary energy consumption is supplied by oil, followed… (more)

Singsaas, Julia Nazyrova

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Global oil yields: Have we got it seriously wrong?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Up to now, most oilseed crop specialists have assumed that one metric ton (MT) per hectare (1MT/ha) was a pretty good ballpark figure for average oil yields from annual oilseed crops such as canola or sunflower. Global oil yields: Have we got it seriously

43

Piston ring pack design effects on production spark ignition engine oil consumption : a simulation analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the most significant contributors to an engine's total oil consumption is the piston ring-pack. As a result, optimization of the ring pack is becoming more important for engine manufacturers and lubricant suppliers. ...

Senzer, Eric B

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

"Table A10. Total Consumption of LPG, Distillate Fuel Oil, and Residual Fuel"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Total Consumption of LPG, Distillate Fuel Oil, and Residual Fuel" 0. Total Consumption of LPG, Distillate Fuel Oil, and Residual Fuel" " Oil for Selected Purposes by Census Region and Economic Characteristics of the" " Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Barrels per Day)" ,,,," Inputs for Heat",,," Primary Consumption" " "," Primary Consumption for all Purposes",,," Power, and Generation of Electricity",,," for Nonfuel Purposes",,,"RSE" ," ------------------------------------",,," ------------------------------------",,," -------------------------------",,,"Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","LPG","Distillate(b)","Residual","LPG","Distillate(b)","Residual","LPG","Distillate(b)","Residual","Factors"

45

Running Out of and Into Oil: Analyzing Global Oil Depletion and Transition Through 2050  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

L. Greene, Janet L. Hopson, and Jia Li L. Greene, Janet L. Hopson, and Jia Li A risk analysis is presented of the peaking of world conventional oil pro- duction and the likely transition to unconventional oil resources such as oil sands, heavy oil, and shale oil. Estimates of world oil resources by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and C. J. Campbell provide alternative views of ultimate world oil resources. A global energy scenario created by the International Institute of Applied Systems Analysis and the World Energy Council provides the context for the risk analysis. A model of oil resource depletion and expansion for 12 world regions is combined with a market equilibrium model of conventional and unconventional oil sup- ply and demand. The model does not use Hubbert curves. Key variables

46

Increment in World Oil Consumption by Region, 1997-2020  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

World oil production is projected to increase by a total of 39.8 million barrels per day ... Substantial growth is also expected in Central and South America, ...

47

Just oil? The distribution of environmental and social impacts of oil production and consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that the greatest quantity of oil from marine transport isunderrepresents the quantity of oil products that escapes

O'Rourke, D; Connolly, S

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Spills worsen problems in global oil movements  

SciTech Connect

Since early 1978 there have been several serious accidents involving oil tankers and terminals. The wreck of the Amoco Cadiz off the northwestern coast of France on March 16, 1978, resulted in the largest oil spill in history; about 230,000 tons were spilled over 60 mi of the French coastline. Other less spectacular spills have had similar damaging effects. International spill liability agreements are discussed. The bulk of coastal pollution throughout the world is caused by ballast tank discharges that are in excess of limits set by international convention. Minimizing or eliminating ballast discharges is a primary goal of individual oil companies and international groups. Theoretically, the load on top method of ballast tank cleaning should largely eliminate pollution from ships with facilities to use this technique. Examined are methods of enforcing international regulation of ballast tank cleaning operations and implementing widespread use of the load on top cleaning technique. (1 map, 5 photos, 1 table)

Vielvoye, R.

1979-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

49

A global typology of cities : classification tree analysis of urban resource consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A study was carried out to develop a typology of urban metabolic (or resource consumption) profiles for 155 globally representative cities. Classification tree analysis was used to develop a model for determining how certain ...

Saldivar-Sali, Artessa Niccola D., 1980-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Rising Asian demand drives global coal consumption growth ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Global coal demand has almost doubled since 1980, driven by increases in Asia, where demand is up over 400% from 1980-2010. In turn, Asian demand is ...

51

GLOBAL SUSTAINABILITY/OIL SPILL COMMUNITY SEMINAR "Natural and Unnatural Oil in the Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GLOBAL SUSTAINABILITY/OIL SPILL COMMUNITY SEMINAR "Natural and Unnatural Oil in the Gulf of Mexico in the Gulf of Mexico has been cited as a factor that may have pre-conditioned the gulf ecosystem better a strong Gulf of Mexico focus, but includes work on the deep-sea biology of hydrothermal vents

52

[Outlook for 1997 in the global oil and gas industries  

SciTech Connect

This section contains 4 small articles which deal with the global outlook on the following: worldwide drilling (Middle East leads the charge); offshore drilling (US Gulf remains hot); worldwide oil production (Producers meet the challenge); and the Canadian outlook (Canada prepares for another brisk year by Hans Maciej). Tables are provided for the 1997 forecast of drilling outside the US, the 1997 forecast of offshore drilling worldwide, world crude oil/condensate production by country in 1995 and 1996, and Canadian drilling forecasts.

NONE

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Just oil? The distribution of environmental and social impacts of oil production and consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

term threat from new oil and gas exploration” (42). In theyear comes from oil and gas exploration and production.within oil and gas concessions that are under exploration or

O'Rourke, D; Connolly, S

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Just oil? The distribution of environmental and social impacts of oil production and consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fact, emissions of TABLE 6 Sources of oil spills from marineoil spills are a major source of oil emissions and thaternments. Taxes from oil are a major source of income for

O'Rourke, D; Connolly, S

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Just oil? The distribution of environmental and social impacts of oil production and consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

77% of the world’s proven oil reserves and 40% of world oilbarrels of proven oil reserves, which represents approxi-66% of the total world oil reserves (21). The Persian Gulf

O'Rourke, D; Connolly, S

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Fact Sheet: Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Biofuels  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fact Sheet: Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Fact Sheet: Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Biofuels Fact Sheet: Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Biofuels June 11, 2008 - 1:30pm Addthis Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman and Secretary of Agriculture Edward T. Schafer sent a letter on June 11, 2008 to Senator Jeff Bingaman addressing a number of questions related to biofuels, food, and gasoline and diesel prices. Read the letter. Without Biofuels, Gas Prices Would Increase $.20 to $.35 per Gallon. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) estimates that gasoline prices would be between 20 cents to 35 cents per gallon higher without ethanol1, a first-generation biofuel. For a typical household, that means saving about $150 to $300 per year. For the U.S. overall, this saves gas expenditures of $28 billion to

57

Fact Sheet: Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Biofuels  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Biofuels Fact Sheet: Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Biofuels June 11, 2008 - 1:30pm Addthis Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman and Secretary of Agriculture Edward T. Schafer sent a letter on June 11, 2008 to Senator Jeff Bingaman addressing a number of questions related to biofuels, food, and gasoline and diesel prices. Read the letter. Without Biofuels, Gas Prices Would Increase $.20 to $.35 per Gallon. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) estimates that gasoline prices would be between 20 cents to 35 cents per gallon higher without ethanol1, a first-generation biofuel. For a typical household, that means saving about $150 to $300 per year. For the U.S. overall, this saves gas expenditures of $28 billion to

58

Monthly, global emissions of carbon dioxide from fossil fuel consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines available data, develops a strategy and presents a monthly, global time series of fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions for the years 1950 2006. This monthly time series was constructed from detailed study of monthly data from the 21 countries that account for approximately 80% of global total emissions. These data were then used in a Monte Carlo approach to proxy for all remaining countries. The proportional-proxy methodology estimates by fuel group the fraction of annual emissions emitted in each country and month. Emissions from solid, liquid and gas fuels are explicitly modelled by the proportional-proxy method. The primary conclusion from this study is the global monthly time series is statistically significantly different from a uniform distribution throughout the year. Uncertainty analysis of the data presented show that the proportional-proxy method used faithfully reproduces monthly patterns in the data and the global monthly pattern of emissions is relatively insensitive to the exact proxy assignments used. The data and results presented here should lead to a better understanding of global and regional carbon cycles, especially when the mass data are combined with the stable carbon isotope data in atmospheric transport models.

Andres, Robert Joseph [ORNL; Gregg, JS [Riso National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark; Losey, London M [ORNL; Marland, Gregg [ORNL; Boden, Thomas A [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

The Impact of Oil Consumption Mechanisms on Diesel Exhaust Particle Size Distributions and Detailed Exhaust Chemical Composition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Detailed exhaust emission data have been taken from a Cummins N-14 single cylinder research engine in which the oil consumption was varied by different engine modifications. Low sulfur fuel was used, and oil consumption was varied by modifying the intake valve stem seals, the exhaust valve stem seals, the oil control ring and combinations of these modifications. Detailed measurements of exhaust gas particle size distributions and chemical composition were made for the various oil consumption configurations for a range of engine loads and speeds. The particulate mass was measured with TEOM and traditional gravimetric filter methods. Filter data for EC/OC, sulfates and trace metals have been taken and analyzed. The trace metals in the particulate mass serve as the basis for assessing oil consumption at the different operating conditions. The data indicate that the oil consumption for the steady state testing done here was approximately an order of magnitude below oil consumption values cited in the literature. We did measure changes in the details of the chemical composition of the particulate for the different engine operating conditions, but it did not correlate with changes in the oil consumption. Furthermore, the data indicate that the particle size distribution is not strongly impacted by low level oil consumption variations observed in this work.

Stetter, J; Forster, N; Ghandhi, J; Foster, D

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

60

Table 4b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Fuel Oil Consumption per  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Fuel Oil Consumption per 4b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Fuel Oil Consumption per Effective Occupied Square Foot, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Fuel Oil (thousand) Total Fuel Oil Consumption (trillion Btu) Fuel Oil Intensities (thousand Btu) Per Square Foot Per Effective Occupied Square Foot All Buildings 10 14 13 13 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 10 16 11 11 5,001 to 10,000 15 22 18 18 10,001 to 25,000 15 24 19 19 25,001 to 50,000 13 25 29 29 50,001 to 100,000 14 27 21 22 100,001 to 200,000 13 36 34 34 200,001 to 500,000 13 37 33 33 Over 500,000 17 51 50 50 Principal Building Activity Education 17 17 16 17 Food Sales and Service 25 36 16 16 Health Care 29 48 47 47 Lodging 27 37 32 32 Mercantile and Service 14 25 26 26 Office 14 19 21 21 Public Assembly 23 46 35 34 Public Order and Safety 28 48 46 46 Religious Worship

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global oil consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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61

version 11apr11a Geopolitics of the Global Oil System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-alternatives; the world growth in oil-fueled vehicles, and critique "Peak Oil" theories. Part 2, Political EconomySYLLABUS version 11apr11a Geopolitics of the Global Oil System The New School University Graduate-group blogs: 1. China Oil Affairs http://chinaoilaffairs.blogspot.com/ 2. Rentismo & Dutch Disease http

O'Donnell, Tom

62

Shale oil and shale gas resources are globally abundant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. ...

63

RUNNING OUT OF AND INTO OIL: ANALYZING GLOBAL OIL DEPLETION AND TRANSITION THROUGH 2050  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 RUNNING OUT OF AND INTO OIL: ANALYZING GLOBAL OIL DEPLETION AND TRANSITION THROUGH 2050 October 2003 David L. Greene Corporate Fellow Janet L. Hopson Research Assistant Jia Li Senior Research Technician DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY Reports produced after January 1, 1996, are generally available free via the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Information Bridge: Web site: http://www.osti.gov/bridge Reports produced before January 1, 1996, may be purchased by members of the public from the following source: National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Telephone: 703-605-6000 (1-800-553-6847) TDD: 703-487-4639 Fax: 703-605-6900 E-mail: info@ntis.fedworld.gov Web site: http://www.ntis.gov/support/ordernowabout.htm

64

Microsoft Word - Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Biofuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

For Immediate Release For Immediate Release June 11, 2008 202-586-4940 Fact Sheet: Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Biofuels Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman and Secretary of Agriculture Edward T. Schafer sent a letter on June 11, 2008 to Senator Jeff Bingaman addressing a number of questions related to biofuels, food, and gasoline and diesel prices. The letter is available at http://www.energy.gov Without Biofuels, Gas Prices Would Increase $.20 to $.35 per Gallon. * The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) estimates that gasoline prices would be between 20 cents to 35 cents per gallon higher without ethanol 1 , a first-generation biofuel. * For a typical household, that means saving about $150 to $300 per year. * For the U.S. overall, this saves gas expenditures of $28 billion to $49 billion based on annual

65

Oil transportation in the global landscape : the Murmansk Oil Terminal and Pipeline proposal evaluated  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil and transportation have been commingled since the first oil reserves were discovered. The importance of energy, namely oil, and the transportation of that energy from the producers to the consumers is persistently ...

Roy, Ankur, 1976-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Global crude oil supply disruptions and strong demand support high ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

While Brent crude oil spot prices have increased as much as $7 per barrel (6%) since the chemical weapons incident in Syria on August 21, 2013, market fundamentals ...

67

Table 2. Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditures in U.S. Households ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1 A small amount of fuel oil used for appliances is included in "Fuel Oil" under "All Uses." NF = No applicable RSE row factor.

68

Local Implications of Globally Restricted Mobility: A study of Queenstown’s vulnerability to peak oil and climate change.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis employs a case study approach to investigate local implications of globally restricted mobility by examining Queenstown’s vulnerability to peak oil and climate change.… (more)

Walsh, Tim

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Staff Listing - Office for Oil and Gas Global Security and Supply |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Staff Listing - Office for Staff Listing - Office for Oil and Gas Global Security and Supply Staff Listing - Office for Oil and Gas Global Security and Supply Director of the Office for Oil and Gas Global Security and Supply (Vacant) Natural Gas Regulatory Activities Division John A. Anderson, Director Room 3E-042 Lisa Craig Room 3E-042 Telephone (202)586-9484 FAX (202) 586-6050 Case Management Beverly Howard Room 3E-042 Telephone (202) 586-9387 FAX (202) 586-6050 Lisa Tracy Room 3E-052 Telephone (202) 586-4523 FAX (202) 586-6050 Marc Talbert Room 3E-042 Telephone (202) 586-7991 FAX (202) 586-6050 Office of Natural Gas Docket Room Larine Moore Docket Room Manager Room 3E-042 Telephone (202) 586-9478 FAX (202) 586-6050 International Activities Division Sally Kornfeld, Director Room 3E-042 Telephone (202) 586-3814

70

Diacylglycerol Oil, 2nd EditionChapter 11 Long-Term Clinical Studies of Ad Libitum Diacylglycerol Consumption in Subjects in a Free-Living Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Diacylglycerol Oil, 2nd Edition Chapter 11 Long-Term Clinical Studies of Ad Libitum Diacylglycerol Consumption in Subjects in a Free-Living Environment Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Heal

71

Diacylglycerol Oil, 2nd Edition Chapter 9 besity Effect and Prevention of Insulin Resistance by a Long-Term Consumption of Dietary Diacylglycerol in Experimental Animal Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Diacylglycerol Oil, 2nd Edition Chapter 9 besity Effect and Prevention of Insulin Resistance by a Long-Term Consumption of Dietary Diacylglycerol in Experimental Animal Models Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food S

72

Enforcing boundaries : globalization, state power and the geography of cross- border consumption in Tijuana, Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bueno Para Pensar”: Thinking Consumption in the U.S. -Mexico97 Chapter 2. Mexico in Tijuana. the Imagined Community andInstitutions and Networks of Mexico’s Imagined Community:

Murià Tuñón, Magalí

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Table 4a. U.S. Crude Oil and Liquid Fuels Supply, Consumption, and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total Commercial Inventory ..... 1,082 1,112 1,123 1,111 1,097 1,122 1,126 1,085 1,092 1,127 1,138 1,097 1,111 1,085 1,097 Crude Oil in SPR ...

74

Technology adoption and content consumption in Chinese television: Local city, national city, and global city  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances in media technologies allow people to restructure their relations across a broad range of time and space. As a result, modern communities are organized on local, national, and global bases. These communities are sustained and developed by media ... Keywords: China, Community, New media technology, Programming, Space, Television, Time

Jia Lu, Ian Weber

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

The Di¤erential E¤ects of Oil Demand and Supply Shocks on the Global Economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We employ a set of sign restrictions on the impulse responses of a Global VAR model, estimated for 38 countries/regions over the period 1979Q2–2011Q2, as well as bounds on impact price elasticities of oil supply and oil demand to discriminate between supply-driven and demand-driven oil-price shocks, and to study the time pro…le of their macroeconomic e¤ects across a wide range of countries and real/…nancial variables. We show that the above identi…cation scheme can greatly bene…t from the cross-sectional dimension of the GVAR — by providing a large number of additional cross-country sign restrictions and hence reducing the set of admissible models. The results indicate that the economic consequences of a supply-driven oil-price shock are very di¤erent from those of an oil-demand shock driven by global economic activity, and vary for oilimporting countries compared to energy exporters. While oil importers typically face a long-lived fall in economic activity in response to a supply-driven surge in oil prices, the impact is positive for energy-exporting countries that possess large proven oil/gas reserves. However, in response to an oil-demand disturbance, almost all countries in

Paul Cashin A; Kamiar Mohaddes B; Maziar Raissi C; Mehdi Raissi Ay

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Global simulations of smoke from Kuwaiti oil fires and possible effects on climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Los Alamos Global Climate Model has bee used to simulate the global evolution of the Kuwaiti oil fire smoke and its potential effects on the climate. The initial simulations were done shortly before the fires were lit in January 1991. They indicated that such an event would not result in a ``Mini Nuclear Winter`` as some people were suggesting. Further simulations during the year suggested that the smoke could be responsible for subtle regional climate changes in the spring such as a 5 degree centigrade decrease in the surface temperature in Kuwait, a 10% decrease in precipitation in Saudi Arabia and a 10% increase in precipitation in the Tibetan Plateau region. These results are in qualitative agreement with the observations this year.

Glatzmaier, G.A.; Malone, R.C.; Kao, C.Y.J.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

77

Global simulations of smoke from Kuwaiti oil fires and possible effects on climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Los Alamos Global Climate Model has bee used to simulate the global evolution of the Kuwaiti oil fire smoke and its potential effects on the climate. The initial simulations were done shortly before the fires were lit in January 1991. They indicated that such an event would not result in a Mini Nuclear Winter'' as some people were suggesting. Further simulations during the year suggested that the smoke could be responsible for subtle regional climate changes in the spring such as a 5 degree centigrade decrease in the surface temperature in Kuwait, a 10% decrease in precipitation in Saudi Arabia and a 10% increase in precipitation in the Tibetan Plateau region. These results are in qualitative agreement with the observations this year.

Glatzmaier, G.A.; Malone, R.C.; Kao, C.Y.J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Oil Prices and Long-Run Risk.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??I show that relative levels of aggregate consumption and personal oil consumption provide anexcellent proxy for oil prices, and that high oil prices predict low… (more)

READY, ROBERT

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

version 11apr11a Geopolitics of the Global Oil System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alternatives: Oil sands, shale oil, Gas and/or Coal to Liquid o "Americas Oil Shale Resource," Office of Deputy: "Oil Shale Resources Technology and Economics." http://www.umich.edu/~twod/oil- ns [Optional] Section 3, "Environmental and Regulatory Issues," pp. 22 ­ 28. [Optional] Appendix B: "Oil Shale

O'Donnell, Tom

80

Table 2.9 Commercial Buildings Consumption by Energy Source ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

parking garages. Web Page: For related information, ... "Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey." 6 Distillate fuel oil, residual fuel oil, ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global oil consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Futures oil market outlook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We expect the broader expansion of global economic activity in 1995 to more than offset the anticipated slowdown in the US economic growth. This should result in worldwide oil demand growth in excess of 1 million barrels per day and firmer oil prices. This comes on the heels of nearly identical growth in 1994 and should be followed by an even larger increase in 1996. This year`s demand growth comes against a backdrop of flat OPEC production and an increase in non-OPEC supplies that will fall short of the expected increase in consumption. Some degree of political upheaval in at least a half dozen important oil exporting nations could also have implication for crude supplies. One major wildcard that remains for global oil markets is the status of the United Nations` sanctions on Iraqi exports and the timing of when these sanctions are to be eased or lifted completely.

Saucer, J. [Smith Barney, Houston, TX (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1992 Consumption and Expenditures 1992 Consumption & Expenditures Overview Full Report Tables National estimates of electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat...

83

Vsd Oil Free Compressor, Vsd Oil Free Compressor Products, Vsd ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Vsd Oil Free Compressor, You Can Buy Various High Quality Vsd Oil Free Compressor Products from Global Vsd Oil Free Compressor Suppliers and Vsd Oil ...

84

Lubricant oil consumption effects on diesel exhaust ash emissions using a sulfur dioxide trace technique and thermogravimetry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A detailed experimental study was conducted targeting lubricant consumption effects on ,diesel exhaust ash levels using a model year 2002 5.9L diesel engine, high and low Sulfur commercial lubricants, and clean diesel ...

Plumley, Michael J

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C35A. Fuel Oil Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Fuel Oil Consumption...

86

Modeling the Oil Transition: A Summary of the Proceedings of the DOE/EPA Workshop on the Economic and Environmental Implications of Global Energy Transitions  

SciTech Connect

The global energy system faces sweeping changes in the next few decades, with potentially critical implications for the global economy and the global environment. It is important that global institutions have the tools necessary to predict, analyze and plan for such massive change. This report summarizes the proceedings of an international workshop concerning methods of forecasting, analyzing, and planning for global energy transitions and their economic and environmental consequences. A specific case, it focused on the transition from conventional to unconventional oil and other energy sources likely to result from a peak in non-OPEC and/or global production of conventional oil. Leading energy models from around the world in government, academia and the private sector met, reviewed the state-of-the-art of global energy modeling and evaluated its ability to analyze and predict large-scale energy transitions.

Greene, David L [ORNL

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Impact of Oil Prices Fluctuations on Economies in the Age of Globalization.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Early in the past century, oil has powered economic growth in industrialized economies. Towards the end of the 20th century, as emerging and underdeveloped economies… (more)

Soh feussi, Ancel Raynaud

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Hard truths: facing the hard truths about energy. A comprehensive view to 2030 of global oil and natural gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In response to the questions posed by the US Secretary of Energy in October 2005, the National Petroleum Council conducted a comprehensive study considering the future of oil and natural gas to 2030 in the context of the global energy system. The Council proposed five core strategies to assist markets in meeting the energy challenges to 2030 and beyond. All five strategies are essential; there is no single, easy solution to the multiple challenges we face. However, we are confident that the prompt adoption of these strategies, along with a sustained commitment to implementation, will promote U.S. competitiveness by balancing economic, security, and environmental goals. The United States must: Moderate the growing demand for energy by increasing efficiency of transportation, residential, commercial, and industrial uses; Expand and diversify production from clean coal, nuclear, biomass, other renewables, and unconventional oil and gas; moderate the decline of conventional domestic oil and gas production; and increase access for development of new resources; Integrate energy policy into trade, economic, environmental, security, and foreign policies; strengthen global energy trade and investment; and broaden dialogue with both producing and consuming nations to improve global energy security; Enhance science and engineering capabilities and create long-term opportunities for research and development in all phases of the energy supply and demand system; and Develop the legal and regulatory framework to enable carbon capture and sequestration. In addition, as policymakers consider options to reduce carbon dioxide emissions, provide an effective global framework for carbon management, including establishment of a transparent, predictable, economy-wide cost for carbon dioxide emissions. The report, details findings and recommendations based on comprehensive analyses developed by the study teams. 5 apps.

NONE

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Unconventional Oil and Gas Resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

World oil use is projected to grow to 98 million b/d in 2015 and 118 million b/d in 2030. Total world natural gas consumption is projected to rise to 134 Tcf in 2015 and 182 Tcf in 2030. In an era of declining production and increasing demand, economically producing oil and gas from unconventional sources is a key challenge to maintaining global economic growth. Some unconventional hydrocarbon sources are already being developed, including gas shales, tight gas sands, heavy oil, oil sands, and coal bed methane. Roughly 20 years ago, gas production from tight sands, shales, and coals was considered uneconomic. Today, these resources provide 25% of the U.S. gas supply and that number is likely to increase. Venezuela has over 300 billion barrels of unproven extra-heavy oil reserves which would give it the largest reserves of any country in the world. It is currently producing over 550,000 b/d of heavy oil. Unconventional oil is also being produced in Canada from the Athabasca oil sands. 1.6 trillion barrels of oil are locked in the sands of which 175 billion barrels are proven reserves that can be recovered using current technology. Production from 29 companies now operating there exceeds 1 million barrels per day. The report provides an overview of continuous petroleum sources and gives a concise overview of the current status of varying types of unconventional oil and gas resources. Topics covered in the report include: an overview of the history of Oil and Natural Gas; an analysis of the Oil and Natural Gas industries, including current and future production, consumption, and reserves; a detailed description of the different types of unconventional oil and gas resources; an analysis of the key business factors that are driving the increased interest in unconventional resources; an analysis of the barriers that are hindering the development of unconventional resources; profiles of key producing regions; and, profiles of key unconventional oil and gas producers.

none

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

90

Vsd Oil Free Air Compressor, Vsd Oil Free Air Compressor ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Vsd Oil Free Air Compressor, You Can Buy Various High Quality Vsd Oil Free Air Compressor Products from Global Vsd Oil Free Air Compressor Suppliers ...

91

Oil Free Vsd Air Compressor, Oil Free Vsd Air Compressor ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oil Free Vsd Air Compressor, You Can Buy Various High Quality Oil Free Vsd Air Compressor Products from Global Oil Free Vsd Air Compressor Suppliers ...

92

The Differential Effects of Oil Demand and Supply Shocks on the Global Economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.6 11.7 51 3.7 World 81.5 100.0 39.0 100.0 1365 100.0 Source: Oil reserve and production data is from the British Petroleum Statistical Review of World Energy and oil export data is from the OPEC Annual Statistical Bulletin. For country groupings see... .g. the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) member states). While the international business cycle is very important for the economic performance of commodity exporters, macroeconomic and political developments 1 in this group of countries also...

Cashin, Paul; Mohaddes, Kamiar; Raissi, Maziar; Raissi, Mehdi

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How can we compare or add up our energy consumption? To compare or aggregate energy consumption across different energy sources like oil, natural gas, ...

94

Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How can we compare or add up our energy consumption? To compare or aggregate energy consumption across different energy sources like oil, natural gas, and electricity ...

95

Oil and gas seeps, often the result of geological defor-mation of the oil-saturated strata, are a common global  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and early 1890s, several Summer- Chapter 2 A BRIEF HISTORY OF OIL DEVELOPMENT IN SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA Milton HISTORY OF OIL DEVELOPMENT IN SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA 2-3 A BRIEF HISTORY OF OIL DEVELOPMENT IN SOUTHERN by filling the caissons with 6,000 tons of sand #12;2-4 A BRIEF HISTORY OF OIL DEVELOPMENT IN SOUTHERN

Love, Milton

96

Status of fossil energy resources: A global perspective  

SciTech Connect

This article deals with recently status of global fossil energy sources. Fossil energy sources have been split into three categories: oil,coal, and natural gas. Fossil fuels are highly efficient and cheap. Currently oil is the fastest primary energy source in the world (39% of world energy consumption). Coal will be a major source of energy for the world for the foreseeable future (24% of world energy consumption). In 2030, coal covers 45% of world energy needs. Natural gas is expected to be the fastest growing component of world energy consumption (23% of world energy consumption). Fossil fuel extraction and conversion to usable energy has several environmental impacts. They could be a major contributor to global warming and greenhouse gases and a cause of acid rain; therefore, expensive air pollution controls are required.

Balat, M. [SILA Science, Trabzon (Turkey)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The major energy sources in the United States are petroleum (oil), natural ... To compare or aggregate energy consumption across different energy sources like oil, ...

98

Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude oil, gasoline ... Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS ... transportation, manufacturing, and a variety of consumer products. It is the ...

99

& CONSUMPTION US HYDROPOWER PRODUCTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

12% of the nation's electricity. Hydropower produces more than 90,000 megawatts of electricity, which is enough to meet the needs of 28.3 million consumers. Hydropower accounts for over 90% of all electricity the NAO. ENERGY CONSUMPTION AND PRODUCTION IN NORWAY AND THE NAO The demand for heating oil in Norway

100

WORLD OIL SUPPLY – PRODUCTION, RESERVES, AND EOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

“The weakness of intelligence is in discerning the turning points” (J. Schlesinger: former CIA Director and Ex-Secretary of Defense and of Energy) World Oil Consumption: Since 1980, the world has consumed far more oil than has been discovered. We are now finding only one barrel of new oil for every four barrels that we consume. As Donald Hodel, Ex-U.S. Secretary of Energy said: “We are sleepwalking into a disaster.” Global R/P: (Figure 1-A). Economists and laymen routinely view the future of global oil production as being directly related to a simple global Reserves/Production (R/P) ratio. This implies that oil produced in all of the world’s fields will abruptly stop when the R/P date (40 years in the future) is reached. This is as unrealistic as to expect all humans to die off suddenly, instead of gradually. Global R/Ps should NOT be used to estimate timing of future oil supplies. National R/P: (Figure 1-B). Instead of posting one average Global R/P of 40 years for the entire world, Figure 1-B shows (“National R/P”) for individual nations. This results in a very different, but a much more realistic semi-quantitative picture of the distribution of the world’s claimed oil reserves and future global oil supply than does Figure 1-A. Scale: All of these graphs are drawn to scale, which puts tight limits on their construction and analysis. A 40,000-million-barrels (4 BBO/year x 10 years) rectangle in the upper left corner of each figure shows the graphic scale for the area under the World Production Curve (WPC). (BBO =

M. King; Hubbert Center; M. King; Hubbert Center; L. F. Ivanhoe

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global oil consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Table 3.3 Fuel Consumption, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 3 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","RSE" "Economic",,"Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","Row" "Characteristic(a)","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

102

Local expert says Gulf Coast oil spill worst in US history -KCBD, NewsChannel 11 Lubbock | http://www.kcbd.com/Global/story.asp?s=12420450&clienttype=printable[5/5/2010 10:50:55 AM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Local expert says Gulf Coast oil spill worst in US history - KCBD, NewsChannel 11 Lubbock | http devastating oil spill in our nation's history. Texas Tech University's Environmental and Human Health Director://www.kcbd.com/Global/story.asp?s=12420450&clienttype=printable[5/5/2010 10:50:55 AM] 5/3/10 Local expert says Gulf Coast oil spill worst

Rock, Chris

103

Peak oil: diverging discursive pipelines.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Peak oil is the claimed moment in time when global oil production reaches its maximum rate and henceforth forever declines. It is highly controversial as… (more)

Doctor, Jeff

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Margins up; consumption down  

SciTech Connect

The results of a survey of dealers in the domestic fuel oil industry are reported. Wholesale prices, reacting to oversupply, decreased as did retail prices; retail prices decreased at a slower rate so profit margins were larger. This trend produced competitive markets as price-cutting became the method for increasing a dealer's share of the profits. Losses to other fuels decreased, when the figures were compared to earlier y; and cash flow was very good for most dealers. In summary, profits per gallon of oil delivered increased, while the consumption of gasoline per customer decreased. 22 tables.

Mantho, M.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from the U.S. Department of Energy, imports of Venezuelanrecording. Energy Information Administration, “U.S. Imports

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Office Buildings - Energy Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Energy Consumption Office buildings consumed more than 17 percent of the total energy used by the commercial buildings sector (Table 4). At least half of total energy, electricity, and natural gas consumed by office buildings was consumed by administrative or professional office buildings (Figure 2). Table 4. Energy Consumed by Office Buildings for Major Fuels, 2003 All Buildings Total Energy Consumption (trillion Btu) Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million sq. ft.) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat All Buildings 4,859 71,658 6,523 3,559 2,100 228 636 All Non-Mall Buildings 4,645 64,783 5,820 3,037 1,928 222 634 All Office Buildings 824 12,208 1,134 719 269 18 128 Type of Office Building

107

Survey Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

fsidentoi fsidentoi Survey Consumption and 'Expenditures, April 1981 March 1982 Energy Information Administration Wasningtoa D '" N """"*"""*"Nlwr. . *'.;***** -. Mik>. I This publication is available from ihe your COr : 20585 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Consum ption and Expendi tures, April 1981 Through March 1982 Part 2: Regional Data Prepared by: Bruce Egan This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administra tion, the independent statistical

108

Modeling energy consumption of residential furnaces and boilers in U.S. homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CONSUMPTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Consumption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Consumption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Lutz, James; Dunham-Whitehead, Camilla; Lekov, Alex; McMahon, James

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Compare All CBECS Activities: Fuel Oil Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Oil Use Compare Activities by ... Fuel Oil Use Total Fuel Oil Consumption by Building Type Commercial buildings in the U.S. used a total of approximately 1.3 billion gallons...

110

OIL PRICES AND LONG-RUN RISK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I show that relative levels of aggregate consumption and personal oil consumption provide an excellent proxy for oil prices, and that high oil prices predict low future aggregate consumption growth. Motivated by these facts, I add an oil consumption good to the long-run risk model of Bansal and Yaron [2004] to study the asset pricing implications of observed changes in the dynamic interaction of consumption and oil prices. Empirically I observe that, compared to the first half of my 1987- 2010 sample, oil consumption growth in the last 10 years is unresponsive to levels of oil prices, creating an decrease in the mean-reversion of oil prices, and an increase in the persistence of oil price shocks. The model implies that the change in the dynamics of oil consumption generates increased systematic risk from oil price shocks due to their increased persistence. However, persistent oil prices also act as a counterweight for shocks to expected consumption growth, with high expected growth creating high expectations of future oil prices which in turn slow down growth. The combined effect is to reduce overall consumption risk and lower the equity premium. The model also predicts that these changes affect the riskiness of of oil futures contracts, and combine to create a hump shaped

Robert Ready; Robert Clayton Ready; Robert Clayton Ready; Amir Yaron

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

The individual contribution of automotive components to vehicle fuel consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuel consumption has grown to become a major point of interest as oil reserves are depleted. The purpose of this study is to determine the key components that cause variation in the instantaneous fuel consumption of vehicles ...

Napier, Parhys L

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

The Global Scramble for Energy and Mineral Resources and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dec 3, 2008 ... Oil shale is being seriously re-appraised. Page 97. Page 98. World Natural Gas Consumption. Page 99. NATURAL GAS CONSUMPTION - ...

113

Drunk On Oil: Russian Foreign Policy 2000-2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Julia. “ World Stocks Sag as Oil Price Surges. ” The NewCollapse: Grain and Oil,” On the Issues, Am. Enterpriseet. al. , “Unrelenting Oil Addiction,” Russ. in Global

Brugato, Thomas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Trends in U.S. Residential Natural Gas Consumption  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

the Residential Energy Consumption Survey. Energy Information Administration, Office of Oil and Gas, June 2010 1 Natural gas prices may have also contributed to the decrease...

115

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3A. Total Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003 3A. Total Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Using Fuel Oil Fuel Oil Consumption Fuel Oil Expenditures Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (trillion Btu) Total (million gallons) Total (million dollars) All Buildings ................................ 465 16,265 35 228 1,644 1,826 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 211 606 3 34 249 292 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 102 736 7 36 262 307 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 66 1,043 16 28 201 238 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 24 895 38 17 124 134 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 25 1,852 76 29 209 229

116

Prod. of Oil, Gas & Coal - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Production of oil, gas, and coal. Projected supply and disposition of crude oil. The model now uses the EIA’s projections of production, imports, and consumption of ...

117

Modeling the oil Transition: A Summary of the Proceedings of the DOE/EPA Workshop on the Economic and Environmental Implications of Global Energy Transitions, February 2007  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7-014 7-014 Modeling the Oil Transition: A Summary of the Proceedings of the DOE/EPA Workshop on the Economic and Environmental Implications of Global Energy Transitions February 2007 David L. Greene, Editor DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY Reports produced after January 1, 1996, are generally available free via the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Information Bridge: Web site: http://www.osti.gov/bridge Reports produced before January 1, 1996, may be purchased by members of the public from the following source: National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Telephone: 703-605-6000 (1-800-553-6847) TDD: 703-487-4639 Fax: 703-605-6900 E-mail: info@ntis.fedworld.gov Web site: http://www.ntis.gov/support/ordernowabout.htm

118

Secretary Moniz Speaks at the Center on Global Energy Policy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

-Renewables --Solar --Wind --Geothermal --Bioenergy -Fossil --Oil --Natural Gas -Nuclear Energy Usage -Storage --Hydrogen & Fuel Cells -Transmission -Consumption -Smart Grid...

119

Oil transport inside the oil control ring grove and its interaction with surrounding areas in internal combustion engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In piston ring pack design, there is a tradeoff between reducing friction and increasing oil consumption. While friction reduces engine efficiency, oil consumption can poison exhaust aftertreatment systems. The primary ...

Senzer, Eric B

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Energy Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Consumption Survey (RECS) - U.S. Energy Information Consumption Survey (RECS) - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) U.S. Energy Information Administration - EIA - Independent Statistics and Analysis Sources & Uses Petroleum & Other Liquids Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas Exploration and reserves, storage, imports and exports, production, prices, sales. Electricity Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions. Consumption & Efficiency Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, manufacturing, and transportation. Coal Reserves, production, prices, employ- ment and productivity, distribution, stocks, imports and exports. Renewable & Alternative Fuels

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global oil consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Global Alternative Fuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alternative Fuels Jump to: navigation, search Name Global Alternative Fuels Place El Paso, Texas Zip 79922 Product Global Alternative Fuels processes virgin oils (palm, soybean,...

122

Chapter 4. Fuel Economy, Consumption and Expenditures  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Fuel Economy, Consumption, and Expenditures 4. Fuel Economy, Consumption, and Expenditures Chapter 4. Fuel Economy, Consumption, and Expenditures This chapter analyzes trends in fuel economy, fuel consumption, and fuel expenditures, using data unique to the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey, as well as selected data from other sources. Analysis topics include the following: Following the oil supply and price disruptions caused by the Arab oil embargo of 1973-1974, motor gasoline price increases, the introduction of corporate average fuel economy standards, and environmental quality initiatives helped to spur major changes in vehicle technology. But have the many advances in vehicle technology resulted in measurable gains in the fuel economy of the residential vehicle fleet?

123

Analysis of federal incentives used to stimulate energy consumption  

SciTech Connect

Conclusions of an analysis which identifies and quantifies Federal incentives that have increased the consumption of coal, oil, natural gas, and electricity are summarized. Data on estimated cost of incentives used to stimulate energy consumption by incentive type and energy source are tabulated for coal, oil, gas, and electricity. It is suggested that the examination of past incentives can be useful in developing guidelines and limits for the use of incentives to stimulate consumption of solar energy. (MCW)

Cole, R.J.; Cone, B.W.; Emery, J.C.; Huelshoff, M.; Lenerz, D.E.; Marcus, A.; Morris, F.A.; Sheppard, W.J.; Sommers, P.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Energy consumption metrics of MIT buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With world energy demand on the rise and greenhouse gas levels breaking new records each year, lowering energy consumption and improving energy efficiency has become vital. MIT, in a mission to help improve the global ...

Schmidt, Justin David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

RESIDENTIAL ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY 1997 CONSUMPTION AND ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Residential Sector energy Intensities for 1978-1997 using data from EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey.

126

The effect of biofuel on the international oil market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of biofuels reduces global fossil fuel consumption andthe reduction of fossil fuel consumption, and therefore theto one. 7 Dynamic facets of fossil fuel can be introduced to

Hochman, Gal; Rajagopal, Deepak; Zilberman, David D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Technological Options to Address Global Climate Change  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2K-2854 RAB 4/01 2K-2854 RAB 4/01 Hydro 8% Coal 22% Coal 22% Other 1% Gas 23% Gas 23% Coal 19% Coal 19% Gas 28% Gas 28% Fossil Fuels Will Continue as Key to World Economy 1999 data from International Energy Annual 1999 (February 2001) 2020 data from International Energy Outlook 2001 (March 2001) + 6 0 % Oil 40% Hydro 7% Other 0.7% Nuclear 7% 1999 85% Fossil Energy 382 Qbtu / yr 2020 85% Fossil Energy 607 Qbtu / yr Oil 40% Nuclear 4% 2K-2854 RAB 4/01 World Energy Demand Growing Dramatically 0 2 4 6 8 12 2000 2050 2100 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 Population (Billions) Energy Consumption (Qbtu / yr) Population Projections: United Nations "Long-Range World Population Projections: Based on the 1998 Revision" Energy Projections: "Global Energy Perspectives" ITASA / WEC World Population Population of

128

Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... March 2003 Price Spike August 2003 Price Spike Quarterly World Oil Demand Growth from Previous Year Overview of Market Fundamentals Tight balance in global ...

129

Balancing oil and environment... responsibly.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Balancing Oil and Environment…Responsibly As the price of oil continues to skyrocket and global oil production nears the brink, pursuing unconventional oil supplies, such as oil shale, oil sands, heavy oils, and oils from biomass and coal has become increasingly attractive. Of particular significance to the American way is that our continent has significant quantities of these resources. Tapping into these new resources, however, requires cutting-edge technologies for identification, production, processing and environmental management. This job needs a super hero or two for a job of this size and proportion…

Weimer, Walter C.; Teske, Lisa

2007-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

130

Household energy and consumption and expenditures, 1990. Supplement, Regional  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this supplement to the Household Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1990 report is to provide information on the use of energy in residential housing units, specifically at the four Census regions and nine Census division levels. This report includes household energy consumption, expenditures, and prices for natural gas, electricity, fuel oil, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), and kerosene as well as household wood consumption. For national-level data, see the main report, Household Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1990.

Not Available

1993-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

131

Oil price; oil demand shocks; oil supply shocks; dynamic effects.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Using a newly developed measure of global real economic activity, a structural decomposition of the real price of crude oil in four components is proposed: oil supply shocks driven by political events in OPEC countries; other oil supply shocks; aggregate shocks to the demand for industrial commodities; and demand shocks that are specific to the crude oil market. The latter shock is designed to capture shifts in the price of oil driven by higher precautionary demand associated with fears about future oil supplies. The paper quantifies the magnitude and timing of these shocks, their dynamic effects on the real price of oil and their relative importance in determining the real price of oil during 1975-2005. The analysis sheds light on the origin of the observed fluctuations in oil prices, in particular during oil price shocks. For example, it helps gauge the relative importance of these shocks in the build-up of the real price of crude oil since the late 1990s. Distinguishing between the sources of higher oil prices is shown to be crucial in assessing the effect of higher oil prices on U.S. real GDP and CPI inflation, suggesting that policies aimed at dealing with higher oil prices must take careful account of the origins of higher oil prices. The paper also quantifies the extent to which the macroeconomic performance of the U.S. since the mid-1970s has been driven by the external economic shocks driving the real price of oil as opposed to domestic economic factors and policies. Key words: JEL:

Lutz Kilian

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Oil Price Shocks and Inflation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil prices have risen sharply over the last year, leading to concerns that we could see a repeat of the 1970s, when rising oil prices were accompanied by severe recessions and surging inflation. This Economic Letter examines the historical relationship between oil price shocks and inflation in light of some recent research and goes on to discuss what the recent jump in oil prices might mean for inflation in the future. Figure 1 Inflation and the relative price of oil The historical record Figure 1 plots the price of oil relative to the core personal consumption expenditures price index (PCEPI) together with the core PCEPI inflation

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Factors of material consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Historic consumption trends for materials have been studied by many researchers, and, in order to identify the main drivers of consumption, special attention has been given to material intensity, which is the consumption ...

Silva Díaz, Pamela Cristina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

All Consumption Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2010 Consumption Summary Tables. Table C1. Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and End-Use Sector, 2010 (Trillion Btu) ... Ranked by State, 2010

135

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #334: August 23, 2004 China Is #2 in Oil  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4: August 23, 4: August 23, 2004 China Is #2 in Oil Consumption to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #334: August 23, 2004 China Is #2 in Oil Consumption on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #334: August 23, 2004 China Is #2 in Oil Consumption on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #334: August 23, 2004 China Is #2 in Oil Consumption on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #334: August 23, 2004 China Is #2 in Oil Consumption on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #334: August 23, 2004 China Is #2 in Oil Consumption on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #334: August 23, 2004 China Is #2 in Oil Consumption on AddThis.com... Fact #334: August 23, 2004 China Is #2 in Oil Consumption

136

Table WH3. Total Consumption for Water Heating by Major Fuels Used ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table WH3. Total Consumption for Water Heating by Major Fuels Used, 2005 Physical Units Electricity (billion kWh) Natural Gas (billion cf) Fuel Oil

137

Table SH7. Average Consumption for Space Heating by Main Space ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Fuel Oil (gallons) Main Space Heating Fuel Used (physical units of consumption per household using the fuel as a main heating source) Table SH7.

138

Table SH8. Average Consumption for Space Heating by Main Space ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Fuel Oil Main Space Heating Fuel Used (million Btu of consumption per household using the fuel as a main heating source) Any Major Fuel 4 Table SH8.

139

2 World Oil Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.eia.gov Crude oil prices react to a variety of geopolitical and economic events price per barrel (real 2010 dollars, quarterly average) 140 120 imported refiner acquisition cost of crude oil WTI crude oil price Global financial collapse 100 80 60 U.S. spare capacity exhausted Iran-Iraq War Saudis abandon swing producer role Asian financial crisis 9-11 attacks Low spare capacity

Adam Sieminski Administrator; Adam Sieminski; Adam Sieminski

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Heating Degree Day Data Applied to Residential Heating Energy Consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Site-specific total electric energy and heating oil consumption for individual residences show a very high correlation with National Weather Service airport temperature data when transformed to heating degree days. Correlations of regional total ...

Robert G. Quayle; Henry F. Diaz

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global oil consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

BP Oil Spill Footage (High Def) - Leak at 4850' - June 3 2010...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

--Solar --Wind --Geothermal --Bioenergy -Fossil --Oil --Natural Gas -Nuclear Energy Usage -Storage --Hydrogen & Fuel Cells -Transmission -Consumption -Smart Grid Science...

142

BP Oil Spill Footage (High Def) - Top Hat Procedure at 4850'...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

--Solar --Wind --Geothermal --Bioenergy -Fossil --Oil --Natural Gas -Nuclear Energy Usage -Storage --Hydrogen & Fuel Cells -Transmission -Consumption -Smart Grid Science...

143

Electricity Consumption Electricity Consumption EIA Electricity Consumption Estimates  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Consumption Consumption Electricity Consumption EIA Electricity Consumption Estimates (million kWh) National Petroleum Council Assumption: The definition of electricity con- sumption and sales used in the NPC 1999 study is the equivalent ofwhat EIA calls "sales by utilities" plus "retail wheeling by power marketers." This A nn u al Gro wth total could also be called "sales through the distribution grid," 2o 99 99 to Sales by Utilities -012% #N/A Two other categories of electricity consumption tracked by EIA cover on site Retail Wheeling Sales by generation for host use. The first, "nonutility onsite direct use," covers the Power Marketen 212.25% #N/A traditional generation/cogeneration facilities owned by industrial or large All Sales Through Distribution

144

Table E3.1. Fuel Consumption, 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E3.1. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" E3.1. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","RSE" "Economic",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","Row" "Characteristic(a)","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

145

Table 4.3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","RSE" "Economic",,,"Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","Row" "Characteristic(a)","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

146

Consumption Technical Notes  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

as street lighting and public services; and the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey covers only manufacturing establishments,

147

Global Climate & Energy ProjectGlobal & Energy Project STANFORD UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from plants and animals to energy, and to determine the best conditions for doing so (see below). #12, and processes may have an enormous impact on the world's future energy consumption and environment. In orderGlobal Climate & Energy ProjectGlobal & Energy Project STANFORD UNIVERSITY Global Energy Climate

Nur, Amos

148

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A9. A9. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Fuel Type, Census Region, and End Use, 1994: Part 1 (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units) See footnotes at end of table. Energy Information Administration/Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 166 End-Use Categories (trillion Btu) kWh) (1000 bbl) (1000 bbl) cu ft) (1000 bbl) tons) (trillion Btu) Total (million Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel (billion LPG (1000 short Other Net Distillate Natural and Electricity Residual Fuel Oil and Gas Breeze) a b c Coal (excluding Coal Coke d RSE Row Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: NF 0.5 1.3 1.4 0.8 1.2 1.2 NF TOTAL INPUTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16,515 778,335 70,111 26,107 5,962 25,949 54,143 5,828 2.7 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . --

149

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. 0. Number of Establishments that Actually Switched Fuels from Natural Gas to Residual Fuel Oil, by Industry Group and Selected Industries, 1994 369 Energy Information Administration/Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 SIC Residual Fuel Oil Total Code Industry Group and Industry (billion cu ft) Factors (counts) (counts) (percents) (counts) (percents) a Natural Gas Switchable to Establishments RSE Row Able to Switch Actually Switched RSE Column Factors: 1.3 0.1 1.4 1.7 1.6 1.8 20 Food and Kindred Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 14,698 702 4.8 262 1.8 5.6 2011 Meat Packing Plants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 759 23 3.0 10 1.3 9.0 2033 Canned Fruits and Vegetables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 531 112 21.2 33 6.2 11.6 2037 Frozen Fruits and Vegetables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 232 Q 5.3

150

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5A. Fuel Oil Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 5A. Fuel Oil Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Fuel Oil (million square feet) Fuel Oil Energy Intensity (gallons/square foot) North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West All Buildings .............................. 1,302 172 107 64 6,464 2,909 4,663 2,230 0.20 0.06 0.02 Q Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 10,000 ............................ 381 Q Q Q 763 Q 274 Q 0.50 Q 0.10 Q 10,001 to 100,000 ........................ 404 63 Q Q 1,806 648 985 351 0.22 0.10 Q Q Over 100,000 ............................... 517 21 45 Q 3,894 2,055 3,404 1,780 0.13 0.01 0.01 Q

151

World energy consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Historical and projected world energy consumption information is displayed. The information is presented by region and fuel type, and includes a world total. Measurements are in quadrillion Btu. Sources of the information contained in the table are: (1) history--Energy Information Administration (EIA), International Energy Annual 1992, DOE/EIA-0219(92); (2) projections--EIA, World Energy Projections System, 1994. Country amounts include an adjustment to account for electricity trade. Regions or country groups are shown as follows: (1) Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), US (not including US territories), which are included in other (ECD), Canada, Japan, OECD Europe, United Kingdom, France, Germany, Italy, Netherlands, other Europe, and other OECD; (2) Eurasia--China, former Soviet Union, eastern Europe; (3) rest of world--Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and other countries not included in any other group. Fuel types include oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, and other. Other includes hydroelectricity, geothermal, solar, biomass, wind, and other renewable sources.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

World Oil Transit Chokepoints  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Chokepoints are narrow channels along widely used global sea routes, some so narrow that restrictions are placed on the size of vessel that can navigate through them. They are a critical part of global energy security due to the high volume of oil traded through their narrow straits.

Information Center

2012-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

153

Table 3.5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data and Regional Totals; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Waste"," ",," " " "," "," ","Blast"," "," ","Pulping Liquor"," ","Oils/Tars","RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Furnace/Coke","Waste","Petroleum","or","Wood Chips,","and Waste","Row"

154

Comparison of Life Cycle Emissions and Energy Consumption for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comparison of Life Cycle Emissions and Energy Consumption for Environmentally Adapted Metalworking to significantly influence the environmental burdens of all fluids, energy consumption was relatively constant and consumed without long-distance transportation. MWF Production Each MWF is composed of lubricant oil

Clarens, Andres

155

Consumer Winter Heating Oil Costs  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: Using the Northeast as a regional focus for heating oil, the typical oil-heated household consumes about 680 gallons of oil during the winter, assuming that weather is "normal." The previous three winters were warmer than average and generated below normal consumption rates. Last winter, consumers saw large increases over the very low heating oil prices seen during the winter of 1998-1999 but, outside of the cold period in late January/early February they saw relatively low consumption rates due to generally warm weather. Even without particularly sharp cold weather events this winter, we think consumers are likely to see higher average heating oil prices than were seen last winter. If weather is normal, our projections imply New England heating oil

156

Fuel Consumption - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The Energy Information Administration, Residential Energy Consumption Survey(RTECS), 1994 Fuel Consumption

157

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #487: September 17, 2007 World Oil  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7: September 17, 7: September 17, 2007 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2006 to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #487: September 17, 2007 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2006 on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #487: September 17, 2007 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2006 on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #487: September 17, 2007 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2006 on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #487: September 17, 2007 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2006 on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #487: September 17, 2007 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2006 on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #487:

158

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #336: September 6, 2004 World Oil  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6: September 6, 6: September 6, 2004 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2003 to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #336: September 6, 2004 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2003 on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #336: September 6, 2004 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2003 on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #336: September 6, 2004 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2003 on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #336: September 6, 2004 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2003 on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #336: September 6, 2004 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2003 on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #336:

159

OIL & GAS HISTORY 1 History in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to reduce consumption of imported oil, developing renewable diesel plays a vital role industry is the availablilty of affordable vegetable oil feedstocks and the competition of current feedstocks (primarily soybean) with food and feed markets. The price of October 2009 Chicago soybean oil

160

The effect of biofuel on the international oil market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a barrel of crude oil increases with the quantity supplied –use global quantities of GEG imported and consumed by oil-oil-exporting countries is larger and prices lower than the quantity and

Hochman, Gal; Rajagopal, Deepak; Zilberman, David D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global oil consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

C3. Primary Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 C3. Primary Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Fossil Fuels Fossil Fuels (as commingled) Coal Natural Gas excluding Supplemental Gaseous Fuels a Petroleum Total Natural Gas including Supplemental Gaseous Fuels a Motor Gasoline including Fuel Ethanol a Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel b LPG c Motor Gasoline excluding Fuel Ethanol a Residual Fuel Oil Other d Total Alabama ........... 651.0 614.8 156.5 13.4 12.8 304.5 13.4 49.1 549.5 1,815.4 614.8 319.8 Alaska ............... 15.5 337.0 85.1 118.2 1.3 31.9 1.9 28.6 267.1 619.6 337.0 34.6 Arizona ............. 459.9 293.7 151.8 21.5 9.1 297.3 (s) 21.1 500.9 1,254.5 293.7 323.4 Arkansas ........... 306.1 288.6 134.9 5.9 9.4 165.4 0.2 19.8 335.7 930.5 288.6 175.6 California .......... 55.3 2,196.6 567.0 549.7 67.2 1,695.4 186.9 339.6 3,405.8 5,657.6 2,196.6

162

MECS Fuel Oil Figures  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

: Percentage of Total Purchased Fuels by Type of Fuel : Percentage of Total Purchased Fuels by Type of Fuel Figure 1. Percent of Total Purchased Fuel Sources: Energy Information Administration. Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS): Consumption of Energy; U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, Annual Survey of Manufactures (ASM): Statistics for Industry Groups and Industries: Statistical Abstract of the United States. Note: The years below the line on the "X" Axis are interpolated data--not directly from the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey or the Annual Survey of Manufactures. Figure 2: Changes in the Ratios of Distillate Fuel Oil to Natural Gas Figure 2. Changes in the Ratios of Distillate Fuel Oil to Natural Gas Sources: Energy Information Administration. Office of

163

Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Other Petroleum Products Consumption Model  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The other petroleum product consumption module of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) model is designed to provide U.S. consumption forecasts for 6 petroleum product categories: asphalt and road oil, petrochemical feedstocks, petroleum coke, refinery still gas, unfinished oils, and other miscvellaneous products

Tancred Lidderdale

2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

164

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4A. Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for All Buildings, 2003 4A. Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for All Buildings, 2003 Fuel Oil Consumption Fuel Oil Expenditures per Building (gallons) per Square Foot (gallons) per Building (thousand dollars) per Square Foot (dollars) per Gallon (dollars) All Buildings ................................ 3,533 0.10 3.9 0.11 1.11 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 1,177 0.41 1.4 0.48 1.18 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 2,573 0.36 3.0 0.42 1.17 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 3,045 0.19 3.6 0.23 1.18 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 5,184 0.14 5.6 0.15 1.09 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 8,508 0.11 9.3 0.12 1.10 100,001 to 200,000 ........................ 12,639 0.09 13.1 0.09 1.03

165

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #578: July 6, 2009 World Oil...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

was responsible for 8% of the world's petroleum production, held 2% of the world's crude oil reserves, and consumed 24% of the world's petroleum consumption in 2007. The...

166

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #432: July 10, 2006 World Oil...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

was responsible for 8% of the world's petroleum production, held 2% of the world's crude oil reserves, and consumed 25% of the world's petroleum consumption in 2005. The...

167

UK Energy Consumption by Sector The energy consumption data consists...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consumption by Sector The energy consumption data consists of five spreadsheets: "overall data tables" plus energy consumption data for each of the following...

168

Crude Oil  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Barrels) Product: Crude Oil Liquefied Petroleum Gases Distillate Fuel Oil Residual Fuel Oil Still Gas Petroleum Coke Marketable Petroleum Coke Catalyst Petroleum Coke Other...

169

OIL PRODUCTION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OIL PRODUCTION Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) is a term applied to methods used for recovering oil from a petroleum reservoir beyond that recoverable by primary and secondary methods....

170

Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-56144 Sectoral Trends in Global Energy Use andAC02-05CH11231. ii Sectoral Trends in Global Energy Use andConsumption iii iv Sectoral Trends in Global Energy Use and

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992 - Executive  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

& Expenditures > Executive Summary & Expenditures > Executive Summary 1992 Consumption & Expenditures Executive Summary Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992 presents statistics about the amount of energy consumed in commercial buildings and the corresponding expenditures for that energy. These data are based on the 1992 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), a national energy survey of buildings in the commercial sector, conducted by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the U.S. Department of Energy. Figure ES1. Energy Consumption is Commercial Buidings by Energy Source, 1992 Energy Consumption: In 1992, the 4.8 million commercial buildings in the United States consumed 5.5 quadrillion Btu of electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat. Of those 5.5 quadrillion Btu, consumption of site electricity accounted for 2.6 quadrillion Btu, or 48.0 percent, and consumption of natural gas accounted for 2.2 quadrillion Btu, or 39.6 percent. Fuel oil consumption made up 0.3 quadrillion Btu, or 4.0 percent of the total, while consumption of district heat made up 0.4 quadrillion Btu, or 7.9 percent of energy consumption in that sector. When the energy losses that occur at the electricity generating plants are included, the overall energy consumed by commercial buildings increases to about 10.8 quadrillion Btu (Figure ES1).

172

Connected Consumption: The hidden networks of consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we present the Connected Consumption Network (CCN) that allows a community of consumers to collaboratively sense the market from a mobile device, enabling more informed financial decisions in geo-local ...

Reed, David P.

173

Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - Data - U.S. Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 MECS Survey Data 2010 | 2006 | 2002 | 1998 | 1994 | 1991 | Archive 1 MECS Survey Data 2010 | 2006 | 2002 | 1998 | 1994 | 1991 | Archive Data Methodology & Forms + EXPAND ALL Consumption of Energy for All Purposes (First Use) Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census Region, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991: Part 1 (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units) XLS Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census Region, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991: Part 2 (Estimates in Trillion Btu) XLS Total Consumption of LPG, Distillate Fuel Oil, and Residual Fuel Oil for Selected Purposes by Census Region, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991 (Estimates in Barrels per Day) XLS Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census Region and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991 (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units) XLS

174

Consumer Winter Heating Oil Costs  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: The outlook for heating oil costs this winter, due to high crude oil costs and tight heating oil supplies, breaks down to an expected increase in heating expenditures for a typical oil-heated household of more than $200 this winter, the result of an 18% increase in the average price and an 11% increase in consumption. The consumption increase is due to the colder than normal temperatures experienced so far this winter and our expectations of normal winter weather for the rest of this heating season. Last winter, Northeast heating oil (and diesel fuel) markets experienced an extremely sharp spike in prices when a severe weather situation developed in late January. It is virtually impossible to gauge the probability of a similar (or worse) price shock recurring this winter,

175

CSV File Documentation: Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption Consumption The State Energy Data System (SEDS) comma-separated value (CSV) files contain consumption estimates shown in the tables located on the SEDS website. There are four files that contain estimates for all states and years. Consumption in Physical Units contains the consumption estimates in physical units for all states; Consumption in Btu contains the consumption estimates in billion British thermal units (Btu) for all states. There are two data files for thermal conversion factors: the CSV file contains all of the conversion factors used to convert data between physical units and Btu for all states and the United States, and the Excel file shows the state-level conversion factors for coal and natural gas in six Excel spreadsheets. Zip files are also available for the large data files. In addition, there is a CSV file for each state, named

176

Summary World Oil Data (from World on the Edge) | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oil Data (from World on the Edge) Oil Data (from World on the Edge) Dataset Summary Description This dataset presents summary information related to world oil. It is part of a supporting dataset for the book World On the Edge: How to Prevent Environmental and Economic Collapse by Lester R. Brown, available from the Earth Policy Institute. This world oil dataset includes the following data: World oil production (1950 - 2009): Top 20 producing countries (2009); Oil production in U.S. (1900 - 2009); Oil consumption in U.S. (950 - 2010); Oil consumption in China (1965 - 2009); Oil consumption in E.U. (1965 - 2009); Top 20 oil importing countries (2009); World's 20 largest oil discoveries; Real price of gasoline (2007); Retail gas prices by country (2008); and fossil fuel consumption subsidies (2009).

177

RECENT TRENDS IN EMERGING TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND ENERGY CONSUMPTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abundance of energy can be improved both by developing new sources of fuel and by improving efficiency of energy utilization, although we really need to pursue both paths to improve energy accessibility in the future. Currently, 2.7 billion people or 38% of the world s population do not have access to modern cooking fuel and depend on wood or dung and 1.4 billion people or 20% do not have access to electricity. It is estimated that correcting these deficiencies will require an investment of $36 billion dollars annually through 2030. In growing economies, energy use and economic growth are strongly linked, but energy use generally grows at a lower rate due to increased access to modern fuels and adaptation of modern, more efficient technology. Reducing environmental impacts of increased energy consumption such as global warming or regional emissions will require improved technology, renewable fuels, and CO2 reuse or sequestration. The increase in energy utilization will probably result in increased transportation fuel diversity as fuels are shaped by availability of local resources, world trade, and governmental, environmental, and economic policies. The purpose of this paper is to outline some of the recently emerging trends, but not to suggest winners. This paper will focus on liquid transportation fuels, which provide the highest energy density and best match with existing vehicles and infrastructure. Data is taken from a variety of US, European, and other sources without an attempt to normalize or combine the various data sources. Liquid transportation fuels can be derived from conventional hydrocarbon resources (crude oil), unconventional hydrocarbon resources (oil sands or oil shale), and biological feedstocks through a variety of biochemical or thermo chemical processes, or by converting natural gas or coal to liquids.

Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

"Table A52. Nonswitchable Minimum Requirements and Maximum Consumption"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Nonswitchable Minimum Requirements and Maximum Consumption" 2. Nonswitchable Minimum Requirements and Maximum Consumption" " Potential by Census Region, 1991" " (Estimates in Physical Units)" ,,,,"RSE" ,"Actual","Minimum","Maximum","Row" "Type of Energy","Consumption","Consumption(a)","Consumption(b)","Factors" "RSE Column Factors:",1,1.2,0.8 ," Total United States" ,"-","-","-" "Electricity Receipts(c) (million kilowatthours)",718480,701478,766887,2 "Natural Gas (billion cubic feet)",5345,3485,5887,2 "Distillate Fuel Oil (thousand barrels)",23885,19113,201081,3.7 "Residual Fuel Oil (thousand barrels)",65837,36488,201921,2.6

179

2013 Global Carbon Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2013 Global Carbon Project 2013 Global Carbon Project DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/GCP_2013_V1.1 image 2013 Budget v1.1 (November 2013) image 2013 Budget v1.3 (December 2013, contains typographical corrections to 2011 Australia emissions from v1.1 and corrections to the 2011 Australia transfer and consumption emissions from v1.2) image image image image Global Carbon Dioxide Emissions to Reach 36 Billion Tonnes in 2013 Global emissions of carbon dioxide from the combustion of fossil fuels will reach 36 billion tonnes for the year 2013. "This is a level unprecedented in human history," says CSIRO's Dr Pep Canadell, Executive-Director of the Global Carbon Project (GCP) and co-author of a new report. Global emissions due to fossil fuel alone are set to grow this year at a slightly lower pace of 2.1% than the average 3.1% since 2000, reaching 36

180

Table 3.1 Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Fuel Consumption, 2010; 1 Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Net Residual Distillate Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) (billion NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,158 75,407 2 4 563 1 8 * 99 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 350 16,479 * * 118 * 6 0 45 311221 Wet Corn Milling 214 7,467 * * 51 * 5 0 25 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 107 1,218 * * 15 * 2 * 36 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 143 9,203

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global oil consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

consumption consumption Dataset Summary Description This dataset is from the report Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature (J. Macknick, R. Newmark, G. Heath and K.C. Hallett) and provides estimates of operational water withdrawal and water consumption factors for electricity generating technologies in the United States. Estimates of water factors were collected from published primary literature and were not modified except for unit conversions. Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released August 28th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords coal consumption csp factors geothermal PV renewable energy technologies Water wind withdrawal Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies (xlsx, 32.3 KiB)

182

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007-Low World Oil Price Projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Low World Oil Price Case Projections (1990-2030) Low World Oil Price Case Projections (1990-2030) International Energy Outlook 2007 Low World Oil Price Projections Tables (1990-2030) Formats Table Data Titles (1 to 12 complete) Low World Oil Price Projections Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Low World Oil Price Projections Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table E1 World Total Energy Consumption by Region, Low World Oil Price Case Table E1. World Total Energy Consumption by Region. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table E2 World Total Energy Consumption by Region and Fuel, Low World Oil Price Case Table E2. World Total Energy Consumption by Region and Fuel. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

183

Energy consumption in the pipeline industry  

SciTech Connect

Estimates are developed of the energy consumption and energy intensity (EI) of five categories of U.S. pipeline industries: natural gas, crude oil, petroleum products, coal slurry, and water. For comparability with other transportation modes, it is desirable to calculate EI in Btu/Ton-Mile, and this is done, although the necessary unit conversions introduce additional uncertainties. Since water and sewer lines operate by lift and gravity, a comparable EI is not definable.

Banks, W. F.

1977-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

184

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 State Energy Data 2011: Consumption Table C9. Electric Power Sector Consumption Estimates, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Nuclear Electric Power Hydroelectric Power b Biomass Geothermal Solar/PV d Wind Net Electricity Imports e Total f Distillate Fuel Oil Petroleum Coke Residual Fuel Oil Total Wood and Waste c Alabama ............. 586.1 349.4 1.1 0.0 0.0 1.1 411.8 86.3 4.6 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1,439.3 Alaska ................. 6.0 42.3 3.3 0.0 1.5 4.8 0.0 13.1 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 (s) 66.3 Arizona ............... 449.9 183.9 0.6 0.0 0.0 0.6 327.3 89.1 2.4 0.0 0.8 2.5 1.5 1,057.9 Arkansas ............. 300.5 109.2 0.5 0.0 0.1 0.6 148.5 28.7 1.3 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 588.9 California ............ 19.7 630.1 0.4 11.1 (s) 11.5 383.6 413.4 69.0 122.0 8.4 75.3 20.1 1,753.1 Colorado ............. 362.4 88.1 0.3 0.0 0.0 0.3 0.0 20.2 0.9

185

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

C4. Total End-Use Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 C4. Total End-Use Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Hydro- electric power f Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/PV i Retail Electricity Sales Net Energy j,k Electrical System Energy Losses l Total j,k Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel b LPG c Motor Gasoline d Residual Fuel Oil Other e Total Wood and Waste g Losses and Co- products h Alabama ........... 65.0 265.4 155.4 13.4 12.8 319.8 13.4 49.1 563.8 0.0 154.1 0.0 0.1 0.2 303.7 1,352.2 579.1 1,931.3 Alaska ............... 9.5 294.7 81.8 118.2 1.3 34.6 0.4 28.6 265.0 0.0 2.3 0.0 0.2 (s) 21.6 593.2 44.7 637.9 Arizona ............. 10.0 109.8 151.3 21.5 9.1 323.4 (s) 21.1 526.5 0.0 4.4 3.1 0.3 7.9 255.7 917.8 513.7 1,431.5 Arkansas ........... 5.6 179.4 134.5 5.9 9.4 175.6 0.1 19.8 345.4 0.0 82.6 0.0 0.7 0.2 163.5 777.4 339.8 1,117.1 California ..........

186

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

State State Energy Data 2011: Consumption 11 Table C8. Transportation Sector Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Retail Electricity Sales Net Energy Electrical System Energy Losses e Total Aviation Gasoline Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel b LPG c Lubricants Motor Gasoline d Residual Fuel Oil Total Alabama ............. 0.0 23.5 0.4 124.4 13.4 0.3 2.3 316.3 6.7 463.7 0.0 487.2 0.0 487.2 Alaska ................. 0.0 3.5 0.8 44.4 118.2 (s) 0.4 32.9 0.4 197.2 0.0 200.7 0.0 200.7 Arizona ............... 0.0 15.6 1.0 111.3 21.5 0.8 1.6 318.2 0.0 454.5 0.0 470.1 0.0 470.1 Arkansas ............. 0.0 11.5 0.4 99.7 5.9 0.4 2.0 171.3 0.0 279.8 (s) 291.2 (s) 291.2 California ............ 0.0 25.7 1.9 440.9 549.7 3.8 13.3 1,770.1 186.9 2,966.5 2.8 2,995.1 5.5 3,000.5 Colorado ............. 0.0 14.7 0.6 83.2 58.3 0.3

187

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 State Energy Data 2011: Consumption Table C7. Industrial Sector Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Hydro- electric power e Biomass Geo- thermal Retail Electricity Sales Net Energy h,i Electrical System Energy Losses j Total h,i Distillate Fuel Oil LPG b Motor Gasoline c Residual Fuel Oil Other d Total Wood and Waste f Losses and Co- products g Alabama ............. 65.0 179.1 23.9 3.7 3.3 6.7 46.3 83.9 0.0 147.2 0.0 (s) 115.1 590.4 219.5 810.0 Alaska ................. 0.1 253.8 19.2 0.1 1.0 0.0 27.1 47.4 0.0 0.1 0.0 0.0 4.5 306.0 9.4 315.4 Arizona ............... 10.0 22.0 33.2 1.4 4.6 (s) 18.4 57.6 0.0 1.4 3.1 0.2 42.1 136.5 84.7 221.2 Arkansas ............. 5.6 93.1 31.1 2.6 4.0 0.1 17.4 55.1 0.0 72.7 0.0 (s) 58.0 284.5 120.5 405.0 California ............ 35.6 767.4 77.2 23.9 29.6 (s) 312.5

188

1 Consumption smoothing: empirical evidence from rural Burkina Faso  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper analyzes the community insurance of individual consumption against income risks in rural Burkina Faso. The study area is characterized by significant income volatility, particularly for poor households, caused by global or idiosyncratic shocks. The average consumption at village or region community level is used to control for global shocks. The differential effect of income instability on consumption insurance of poor households has been identified. We find robust results by using the General Least Square Method, applied to a 2004-2006 panel data from PNGT2. These results indicate partial consumption insurance by the community. Poor household income is more unstable. Its consumption is more linked to its income variation and less assured by its community during important global shocks. Consumption in the cotton basin is more sensitive to the income risk and less insured by the community. Food consumption is more assured. These results reveal an important role of the rural community in risk sharing, principally in situation of absence of formal insurance structures. 1. Background and objectives The rural Burkina Faso is characterized by important income volatility generated by global or idiosyncratic shocks. This volatility would be particularly for the poor. The main income source in this area is agriculture; then, income is dependent on climatic and socio-economic shocks, as in most of the developing countries (Deaton, 1992, 1997). The instability of household income is a risk on their consumption. Some risks are global, affecting all the households and others are idiosyncratic. However, the formal institutional mechanisms of consumption insurance against these risks are not well developed or not effective. The literature indicates that rural households develop various actions of consumption adjustment in case of income risks 1. It is, for example, about storage of agricultural food grains, space diversification of land plots exploited, credit, speculation on assets and family solidarity

Yiriyibin Bambio

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Household energy and consumption and expenditures, 1990. [Contains Division, Census Region, and Climate Zone maps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this supplement to the Household Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1990 report is to provide information on the use of energy in residential housing units, specifically at the four Census regions and nine Census division levels. This report includes household energy consumption, expenditures, and prices for natural gas, electricity, fuel oil, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), and kerosene as well as household wood consumption. For national-level data, see the main report, Household Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1990.

Not Available

1993-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

190

Modelling Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy consumption in China has attracted considerable research interest since the middle 1990s. This is largely prompted by the environmental ramifications of the extensive use of fossil fuels in the country to propel two decades of high economic growth. Since the late 1980s, there has been an increasing awareness on the part of the Chinese government of the imperative for the balance of economic growth and environmental protection. The government has since taken various measures ranging from encouraging energy-saving practice, controlling waste discharges to financing R & D programs on improving energy efficiency. Against this backdrop has seen a constant decline of the energy intensity of the economy, measured as the ratio of total energy consumed in standard coal equivalent to the real GDP since 1989. Using the 1987 and 1997 input-output tables for China, the present study examines the impact of technical and structural changes in the economy on industry fuel consumption over the 10-year period. Technical changes are reflected in changes in direct input-output coefficients, which capture the technical evolvement of intermediate production processes. Structural changes refer to shifts in the pattern of final demand for energy, including the import and export composition of various fuels. Six fuels are included in the study, namely, coal, oil, natural gas, electricity, petroleum and coke and gas, which cover all of the energy types available in the input-output tables. It is found that the predominant force of falling energy intensity was changes in direct energy input requirements in various industries. Such changes were responsible for a reduction in the consumption of four of the six fuels per unit of total output. Structural changes were not conducive for improv...

Baiding Hu Department; Baiding Hu

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Consumption | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NREL. National Clean Fleets partners are investing in hybrid vehicles to reduce their oil use, vehicle emissions and fuel costs. Detecting Air Leaks For a thorough and accurate...

192

"Table A15. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Census Region and Economic" " Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991" ,,,"Consumption","Major" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","Byproducts(b)","Fuel Oil(c)"," " " ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","as a Percent","as a Percent","RSE" " ","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","of Consumption","of Natural Gas","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(percent)","(percent)","Factors"

193

"Table A45. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption" 5. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption" " for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Industry Group," " Selected Industries, and Value of Shipment Categories, 1994" ,,,,,"Major" ,,,"Consumption","Consumption per","Byproducts(c)","Fuel Oil(d)" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","Dollar of Value","as a Percent","as a Percent","RSE" "SIC",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","of Consumption","of Natural Gas","Row" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristics(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(percents)","(percents)","Factors"

194

"Table A46. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption" Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption" " for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Industry Group," " Selected Industries, and Employment Size Categories, 1994" ,,,,,"Major" ,,,"Consumption","Consumption per","Byproducts(c)","Fuel Oil(d)" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","Dollar of Value","as a Percent","as a Percent","RSE" "SIC",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","of Consumption","of Natural Gas","Row" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristics(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(percents)","(percents)","Factors"

195

"Table A48. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" 8. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, and Economic" " Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" ,,,"Consumption","Major" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","Byproducts(b)","Fuel Oil(c)"," " " ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","as a Percent","as a Percent","RSE" " ","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","of Consumption","of Natural Gas","Row"

196

"Table A51. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" 1. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Census Region and Economic" " Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991 " ,,,,,"Major" ,,,"Consumption","Consumption per","Byproducts(c)","Fuel Oil(d)" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","Dollar of Value","as a Percent","as a Percent","RSE" "SIC",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","of Consumption","of Natural Gas","Row" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristics(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(percent)","(percent)","Factors"

197

"Table A50. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" 0. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Industry Group," " Selected Industries, and Economic Characteristics of the" " Establishment, 1991 (Continued)" ,,,,,"Major" ,,,"Consumption","Consumption per","Byproducts(c)","Fuel Oil(d)" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","Dollar of Value","as a Percent of","as a Percent","RSE" "SIC",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","of Consumption","of Natural Gas","Row" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristics(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(Percent)","(percent)","Factors"

198

"Table A47. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" 7. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, and" " Selected Industries, 1994" ,,,,,"Major" ,,,,"Consumption","Byproducts(b)" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar","as a","Fuel Oil(c) as" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","Percent of","a Percent of","RSE" "SIC"," ","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","Consumption","Natural Gas","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(percents)","(percents)","Factors"

199

GOED Nutraceutical Oils Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lab Proficiency Testing service for Global Organization for EPA and DHA Omega-3 /GOED Nutraceutical Oils in Marine Oil samples using AOCS methods Ce 1i-07, GOED Monograph, Cd 3d-63, Cd 8b-90, Cd 18-90. GOED Nutraceutical Oils Laboratory Proficiency Testing

200

Powering the World: Offshore Oil & Gas Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rate of production of oil is peaking now, coal will peak in 2-5 years, and natural gas in 20-30 yearsPowering the World: Offshore Oil & Gas Production Macondo post-blowout operations Tad Patzek Gulf of Mexico's oil and gas production Conclusions ­ p.5/59 #12;Summary of Conclusions. . . The global

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global oil consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Will lecture on: OIL AND WAR: A GRIM EARTH SCIENCES POINT OF VIEW  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of fluids in crustal processes and in energy resources. Worldwide, per-capita oil consumption is closely therefore requires increased per-capita oil consumption. However, oil is a finite resource whose production correlated with standard of living. In developing nations like China and India, increasing prosperity

Schuster, Assaf

202

Optimization of Electric Energy Consumption in Marginal California Oilfields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents a pilot study of electricity consumption in California oilfields that found significant potential for reducing costs through energy efficiency improvements. It offers suggestions for reducing electricity consumption that, if implemented, could result in a system-wide demand reduction and reduce the need for additional generation and power infrastructure capacity. Moreover, reducing oilfield energy costs would reduce the overall cost of oil production, helping marginal wells remain a...

2003-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

203

www.globalsubsidies.org THE GLOBAL SUBSIDIES INITIATIVE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

countries. Energy consumption is rising particularly rapidly in oil- and gas- producing countries because.1). Such subsidies lead to excessive consumption of energy services, which multiplies the harmful impacts consumption of coal and lowering emissions of CO2 and most other air pollutants. While win-win policies

Toohey, Darin W.

204

Household energy consumption and expenditures 1987  

SciTech Connect

This report is the third in the series of reports presenting data from the 1987 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). The 1987 RECS, seventh in a series of national surveys of households and their energy suppliers, provides baseline information on household energy use in the United States. Data from the seven RECS and its companion survey, the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS), are made available to the public in published reports such as this one, and on public use data files. This report presents data for the four Census regions and nine Census divisions on the consumption of and expenditures for electricity, natural gas, fuel oil and kerosene (as a single category), and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). Data are also presented on consumption of wood at the Census region level. The emphasis in this report is on graphic depiction of the data. Data from previous RECS surveys are provided in the graphics, which indicate the regional trends in consumption, expenditures, and uses of energy. These graphs present data for the United States and each Census division. 12 figs., 71 tabs.

Not Available

1990-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

205

OpenEI - consumption  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

91/0 en Operational water 91/0 en Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/969 This dataset is from the report Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature (J. Macknick, R. Newmark, G. Heath and K.C. Hallett) and provides estimates of operational water withdrawal and water consumption factors for electricity generating technologies in the United States. Estimates of water factors were collected from published primary literature and were not modified except for unit conversions.

License

206

Energy-consumption modelling  

SciTech Connect

A highly sophisticated and accurate approach is described to compute on an hourly or daily basis the energy consumption for space heating by individual buildings, urban sectors, and whole cities. The need for models and specifically weather-sensitive models, composite models, and space-heating models are discussed. Development of the Colorado State University Model, based on heat-transfer equations and on a heuristic, adaptive, self-organizing computation learning approach, is described. Results of modeling energy consumption by the city of Minneapolis and Cheyenne are given. Some data on energy consumption in individual buildings are included.

Reiter, E.R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Chinese Petroleum Corporations' International Oil Trade in Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we focus on the international oil trade of Chinese petroleum corporations' in Africa. Initially, we are trying to understand the current oil reserves in Africa. Then the reasons and the situation of Chinese petroleum companies' international ... Keywords: Chinese Petroleum Corporations, Oil Business in Africa, Global Energy Situation, Global Energy Situation

Zhang Long

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Statements on Oil by the Energy Committee at  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Offshore and unconventional fields will be producing an increasing portion of global oil supply Solar. . . The global rate of production of oil is peaking now, coal will peak in 2-5 years, and natural gas in 20) Few understand the ever more stringent daily withdrawal limits imposed by nature on our ATM cards (oil

Keeling, Stephen L.

209

Improving Vehicle Efficiency, Reducing Dependence on Foreign Oil (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Program. Today, the United States spends about $400 billion each year on imported oil. To realize a secure energy future, America must break its dependence on imported oil and its volatile costs. The transportation sector accounts for about 70% of U.S. oil demand and holds tremendous opportunity to increase America's energy security by reducing oil consumption. That's why the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) conducts research and development (R and D) on vehicle technologies which can stem America's dependence on oil, strengthen the economy, and protect the environment. Hybrid-electric and plug-in hybrid-electric vehicles can significantly improve fuel economy, displacing petroleum. Researchers are making batteries more affordable and recyclable, while enhancing battery range, performance, and life. This research supports President Obama's goal of putting 1 million electric vehicles on the road by 2015. The program is also working with businesses to develop domestic battery and electric-drive component plants to improve America's economic competitiveness globally. The program facilitates deployment of alternative fuels (ethanol, biodiesel, hydrogen, electricity, propane, and natural gas) and fuel infrastructures by partnering with state and local governments, universities, and industry. Reducing vehicle weight directly improves vehicle efficiency and fuel economy, and can potentially reduce vehicle operating costs. Cost-effective, lightweight, high-strength materials can significantly reduce vehicle weight without compromising safety. Improved combustion technologies and optimized fuel systems can improve near-and mid-term fuel economy by 25% for passenger vehicles and 20% for commercial vehicles by 2015, compared to 2009 vehicles. Reducing the use of oil-based fuels and lubricants in vehicles has more potential to improve the nation's energy security than any other action; even a 1% improvement in vehicle fuel efficiency would save consumers more than $4 billion annually.

Not Available

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Global Optimization for the Design of Space Trajectories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the overall energy spent during the mission. Global ... minimize the overall energy consumption, we are led to the following objective ...... User's guide for SNOPT.

211

Oil Market Assessment  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Logo Oil Market Assessment - September Logo Oil Market Assessment - September 12, 2001 EIA Home Page Based on Energy Information Administration (EIA) contacts and trade press reports, overall U.S. and global oil supplies appear to have been minimally impacted by yesterday's terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. Rumors of scattered closures of U.S. refineries, pipelines, and terminals were reported, and Louisiana Offshore Oil Port operations were partially suspended. While the NYMEX and New York Harbor were temporarily closed, operations are expected to resume soon. Most, if not all petroleum industry infrastructure is expected to resume normal operations today or in the very near term. Prices at all levels (where markets were open) posted increases yesterday, but many prices fell today, as initial reactions

212

Maximum of oil output of a treadle-powered peanut oil press  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The manual processing of food products has become a substantial part of the daily routine of a typical household in the developing world. Consumption of oil is an essential part of an individual's diet and thus, the ...

Patel, Ravi M. (Ravi Mahendra)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

EIA Average Energy Consumption 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table US8. Average Consumption by Fuels Used, 2005 Physical Units per Household Fuels Used (physical units of consumption per household using the fuel)

214

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

J Related EIA Publications on Energy Consumption Energy Information AdministrationManufacturing Consumption of Energy 1991 526 Appendix J Related EIA Publications on Energy...

215

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Energy Consumption in the Manufacturing Sector, 1991 In 1991, the amount of energy consumed in the manufacturing sector was as follows: * Primary Consumption of Energy for All...

216

Household Energy Consumption and Expenditures  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presents information about household end use consumption of energy and expenditures for that energy. These data were collected in the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS)

Information Center

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

methodology used to estimate these statistics relied on data from the 1990 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption...

218

1997 Consumption and Expenditures Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

5HVLGHQWLDO (QHUJ\\ &RQVXPSWLRQ 6XUYH\\V 1997 Consumption and Expenditures Tables Appliances Consumption Tables (17 pages, 60 kb) Contents Pages CE5-1c.

219

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #220: June 10, 2002 World Oil Reserves,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0: June 10, 2002 0: June 10, 2002 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2001 to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #220: June 10, 2002 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2001 on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #220: June 10, 2002 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2001 on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #220: June 10, 2002 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2001 on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #220: June 10, 2002 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2001 on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #220: June 10, 2002 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2001 on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #220:

220

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #88: May 11, 1999 World Oil Reserves,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8: May 11, 1999 8: May 11, 1999 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 1998 to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #88: May 11, 1999 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 1998 on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #88: May 11, 1999 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 1998 on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #88: May 11, 1999 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 1998 on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #88: May 11, 1999 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 1998 on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #88: May 11, 1999 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 1998 on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #88: May

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global oil consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #380: July 11, 2005 World Oil Reserves,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

80: July 11, 2005 80: July 11, 2005 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2004 to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #380: July 11, 2005 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2004 on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #380: July 11, 2005 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2004 on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #380: July 11, 2005 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2004 on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #380: July 11, 2005 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2004 on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #380: July 11, 2005 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2004 on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #380:

222

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #191: November 19, 2001 U.S. Oil  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1: November 19, 1: November 19, 2001 U.S. Oil Consumption Nearly 20 Million Barrels per Day in 2000 to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #191: November 19, 2001 U.S. Oil Consumption Nearly 20 Million Barrels per Day in 2000 on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #191: November 19, 2001 U.S. Oil Consumption Nearly 20 Million Barrels per Day in 2000 on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #191: November 19, 2001 U.S. Oil Consumption Nearly 20 Million Barrels per Day in 2000 on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #191: November 19, 2001 U.S. Oil Consumption Nearly 20 Million Barrels per Day in 2000 on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #191: November 19, 2001 U.S. Oil Consumption Nearly 20 Million Barrels per Day in 2000 on Digg

223

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #266: May 5, 2003 World Oil Reserves,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6: May 5, 2003 6: May 5, 2003 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2002 to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #266: May 5, 2003 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2002 on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #266: May 5, 2003 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2002 on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #266: May 5, 2003 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2002 on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #266: May 5, 2003 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2002 on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #266: May 5, 2003 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2002 on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #266:

224

America's Oil Imports: A Self-Inflicted Burden Vaclav Smil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

America's Oil Imports: A Self-Inflicted Burden Vaclav Smil Faculty of Environment, University of Manitoba Burdensome dependence on crude oil imports is a key challenge for America's energy policy; its principal cause is excessive consumption of refined oil products, which is mainly the result

Smil, Vaclav

225

Oil, Climate Change & Sustainable Energy PASEF-20 October 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil, Climate Change & Sustainable Energy PASEF- 20 October 2011 1) How much longer can we rely should it contain? Ken Lande ­ Physics Department #12;Remaining Crude Oil Supplies Present World consumption = 30 billion barrels/year 1) Conventional Oil- Originally ~ 2 trillion barrels ­ ½ used ~ 1

Zywina, David

226

The effect of biofuel on the international oil market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

barrel of crude oil in the Middle East was 14.85 US$ between5,000 US$ mark). Although consumption of crude oil in theUS$ for o?shore drilling; in other words, the marginal cost of a barrel of crude oil

Hochman, Gal; Rajagopal, Deepak; Zilberman, David D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Risk analysis in oil and gas projects : a case study in the Middle East  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global demand for energy is rising around the world. Middle East is a major supplier of oil and gas and remains an important region for any future oil and gas developments. Meanwhile, managing oil and gas projects are ...

Zand, Emad Dolatshahi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Utilization of Oil Shale Retorting Technology and Underground Overview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper analyzes the world's oil shale development and status of underground dry distillation technology and, through case studies proved the advantages of underground dry distillation technology. Global oil shale resource-rich, many countries in the ... Keywords: oil shale, ground retorting, underground dry distillation, shale oil, long slope mining

Chen Shuzhao; Guo Liwen; Xiao Cangyan; Wang Haijun

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

International Energy Outlook 2006 - World Oil Markets  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil Markets Oil Markets International Energy Outlook 2006 Chapter 3: World Oil Markets In the IEO2006 reference case, world oil demand increases by 47 percent from 2003 to 2030. Non-OECD Asia, including China and India, accounts for 43 percent of the increase. In the IEO2006 reference case, world oil demand grows from 80 million barrels per day in 2003 to 98 million barrels per day in 2015 and 118 million barrels per day in 2030. Demand increases strongly despite world oil prices that are 35 percent higher in 2025 than in last yearÂ’s outlook. Much of the growth in oil consumption is projected for the nations of non-OECD Asia, where strong economic growth is expected. Non-OECD Asia (including China and India) accounts for 43 percent of the total increase in world oil use over the projection period.

230

Effects of replacing fish oil with vegetable oils in feed for rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??As global capture of fish has stagnated and fish consumption is increasing due to a growing human population, the demand can only be met by… (more)

Pettersson, Andreas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Elements of consumption: an abstract visualization of household consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To promote sustainability consumers must be informed about their consumption behaviours. Ambient displays can be used as an eco-feedback technology to convey household consumption information. Elements of Consumption (EoC) demonstrates this by visualizing ... Keywords: a-life, eco-feedback, household consumption, sustainability

Stephen Makonin; Philippe Pasquier; Lyn Bartram

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 State Energy Data 2011: Consumption Table C5. Residential Sector Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Coal a Natural Gas b Petroleum Biomass Geothermal Solar/PV e Retail Electricity Sales Net Energy f Electrical System Energy Losses g Total f Distillate Fuel Oil Kerosene LPG c Total Wood d Alabama ............. 0.0 37.2 0.1 0.1 6.0 6.2 6.0 0.1 0.2 112.6 162.2 214.7 376.9 Alaska ................. 0.0 20.5 8.1 0.1 0.5 8.8 1.9 0.1 (s) 7.3 38.6 15.1 53.7 Arizona ............... 0.0 39.1 (s) (s) 5.5 5.5 2.6 (s) 7.9 112.9 168.0 226.8 394.7 Arkansas ............. 0.0 34.2 0.1 (s) 5.2 5.3 8.6 0.7 0.2 64.1 113.1 133.2 246.3 California ............ 0.0 522.4 0.6 0.6 30.9 32.2 33.3 0.2 43.2 301.6 932.9 583.1 1,516.1 Colorado ............. 0.0 134.2 0.1 (s) 12.3 12.4 8.3 0.2 0.7 62.4 216.5 136.5 353.0 Connecticut ......... 0.0 46.0 59.6

233

Supply and demand of lube oils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lube oil consumption in the world has reached about 40 million tonnes per year, of which 24 million tonnes is used outside the communist areas. There are large regional differences in annual consumption per head from one kilogramme (kg) in India to 35 kg in North America. A statistical analysis of historical data over twenty years in about ninety countries has lead to the conclusion that national income, measured as GDP per head, is the key determinant of total lube oil consumption per head. The functional relationship, however, is different in different countries. Starting from GDP projections until the year 2000, regional forecasts of lube oil demand have been made which show that the share of developing nations outside the communist area in world demand will grow. This will increase the regional imbalance between base oil capacity and demand.

Vlemmings, J.M.L.M.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Regulatory issues associated with the international oils & fats trade  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

FOSFA’s John Hancock reviews three major areas of regulation of the global trading of oils and fats. Regulatory issues associated with the international oils & fats trade Inform Magazine Inform Archives Regulatory issues associated with the interna

235

Summer maintenance affects North Sea crude oil production and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

North Sea Brent is an important global benchmark crude oil that is used to price many different crude oils produced around the world, such as Bonny Light from Nigeria ...

236

Oil palm vegetation liquor: a new source of phenolic bioactives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste from agricultural products represents a disposal liability, which needs to be addressed. Palm oil is the most widely traded edible oil globally, and its production generates 85 million tons of aqueous by-products ...

Sambandan, T. G.

237

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Table C6. Commercial Sector Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Hydro- electric Power e Biomass Geothermal Retail Electricity Sales Net Energy g Electrical System Energy Losses h Total g Distillate Fuel Oil Kerosene LPG b Motor Gasoline c Residual Fuel Oil Total d Wood and Waste f Alabama ............. 0.0 25.5 7.0 (s) 2.7 0.2 0.0 10.0 0.0 0.9 0.0 75.9 112.4 144.8 257.2 Alaska ................. 9.4 16.9 10.1 0.1 0.6 0.7 0.0 11.5 0.0 0.3 0.1 9.7 48.0 20.2 68.2 Arizona ............... 0.0 33.1 6.8 (s) 1.5 0.7 0.0 8.9 0.0 0.5 (s) 100.7 143.2 202.3 345.5 Arkansas ............. 0.0 40.6 3.6 (s) 1.2 0.4 0.0 5.2 0.0 1.3 0.0 41.4 88.6 86.1 174.7 California ............ 0.0 250.9 47.9 0.1 8.7 1.4 0.0 58.1 (s) 17.4 0.7 418.9 746.2 809.9 1,556.1 Colorado ............. 3.2 57.6 5.9 (s) 2.9 0.2 0.0 9.1 0.0 1.2 0.2

238

Oil and Oil Derivatives Compliance Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... for international connection of oiled residues discharge ... C to + 163°C, fuels, lubricating oils and hydraulic ... fuel of gas turbine, crude oil, lubricating oil ...

2012-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

239

Recent world fossil-fuel and primary energy production and consumption trends  

SciTech Connect

Worldwide fossil fuel and primary electric power production figures since 1973 show a recent drop in oil production similar to the 1975 decline after recession. Crude oil consumption has declined since 1978, while production has increased. Natural gas production and consumption continue to increase as does power generation from all energy sources. Differences are noted between data sources and comparisons made of the validity of the data. 13 references, 7 figures, 12 tables. (DCK)

Parent, J.D.

1982-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

240

"Table A11. Total Primary Consumption of Combustible Energy for Nonfuel"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Total Primary Consumption of Combustible Energy for Nonfuel" 1. Total Primary Consumption of Combustible Energy for Nonfuel" " Purposes by Census Region and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment," 1991 " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" " "," "," "," ","Natural"," "," ","Coke"," "," " " ","Total","Residual","Distillate","Gas(c)"," ","Coal","and Breeze","Other(d)","RSE" " ","(trillion","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","(trillion","Row"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global oil consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Steel Plate Processing for Line Pipes in Oil and Gas Transport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This has further helped in reducing the specific steel consumption in oil and gas transportation. The current focus on less wall thickness at increased strength ...

242

Amtrak fuel consumption study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents a study of fuel consumption on National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) trains and is part of an effort to determine effective ways of conserving fuel on the Amtrak system. The study was performed by the Transportation Systems Center (TSC). A series of 26 test runs were conducted on Amtrak trains operating between Boston, Massachusetts, and New Haven, Connecticut, to measure fuel consumption, trip time and other fuel-use-related parameters. The test data were analyzed and compared with results of the TSC Train Performance Simulator replicating the same operations.

Hitz, J.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - High World Oil Price Case  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

High World Oil Price Case Projections Tables (1990-2030) High World Oil Price Case Projections Tables (1990-2030) International Energy Outlook 2007 High World Oil Price Case Projections Tables (1990-2030) Formats Data Table Titles (1 to 12 complete) High World Oil Price Case Projections Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. High World Oil Price Case Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table D1 World Total Primary Energy Consumption by Region Table D1. World Total Primary Energy Consumption by Region. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table D2 World Total Energy Consumption by Region and Fuel Table D2. World total Energy Consumption by Region and Fuel. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

244

"Table A8. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A8. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" A8. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Census Region, Industry Group, and" " Selected Industries, 1991" ,,,,,"Major" ,,,,"Consumption","Byproducts(b)" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar","as a","Fuel Oil(c) as" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","Percent of","a Percent of","RSE" "SIC"," ","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","Consumsption","Natural Gas","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(PERCENT)","(percent)","Factors"

245

MECS Fuel Oil Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

: Actual, Minimum and Maximum Use Values for Fuel Oils and Natural Gas : Actual, Minimum and Maximum Use Values for Fuel Oils and Natural Gas Year Distillate Fuel Oil (TBtu) Actual Minimum Maximum Discretionary Rate 1985 185 148 1224 3.4% 1994 152 125 1020 3.1% Residual Fuel Oil (TBtu) Actual Minimum Maximum Discretionary Rate 1985 505 290 1577 16.7% 1994 441 241 1249 19.8% Natural Gas (TBtu) Actual Minimum Maximum Discretionary Rate 1985 4656 2702 5233 77.2% 1994 6141 4435 6758 73.4% Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, 1985 and 1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Surveys. Table 2: Establishments That Actually Switched Between Natural Gas and Residual Fuel Oil Type of Switch Number of Establishments in Population Number That Use Original Fuel Percentage That Use Original Fuel Number That Can Switch to Another Fuel Percentage That Can Switch to Another Fuel Number That Actually Made a Switch Percentage That Actually Made a Switch

246

Peak Oil Food Network | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Network Network Jump to: navigation, search Name Peak Oil Food Network Place Crested Butte, Colorado Zip 81224 Website http://www.PeakOilFoodNetwork. References Peak Oil Food Network[1] LinkedIn Connections This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. The Peak Oil Food Network is a networking organization located in Crested Butte, Colorado, and is open to the general public that seeks to promote the creation of solutions to the challenge of food production impacted by the peak phase of global oil production. Private citizens are encouraged to join and contribute by adding comments, writing blog posts or adding to discussions about food and oil related topics. Peak Oil Food Network can be followed on Twitter at: http://www.Twitter.com/PeakOilFoodNtwk Peak Oil Food Network on Twitter

247

Table 5.2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Other(f) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 2,437 79 130 5,211 69 868 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 27 46 19 2,134 10 572 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 27 20 4 733 3 72 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 0 26 15 1,401 7 500 -- Direct Uses-Total Process -- 1,912 26 54 2,623 29 289 -- Process Heating -- 297 25 14 2,362 24 280

248

Table 5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Other(f) Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 714,166 13 22 5,064 18 39 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 7,788 7 3 2,074 3 26 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 7,788 3 1 712 1 3 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process

249

World Energy Consumption by Fuel Type, 1970-2020  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Notes: Natural gas is projected to be the fastest-growing component of primary world energy consumption, more than doubling between 1997 and 2020. Gas accounts for the largest increment in electricity generation (41 percent of the total increment of energy used for electricity generation). Combined-cycle gas turbine power plants offer some of the highest commercially available plant efficiencies, and natural gas is environmentally attractive because it emits less sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, and particulate matter than does oil or coal. In the IEO2000 projection, world natural gas consumption reaches the level of coal by 2005, and by 2020 gas use exceeds coal by 29 percent. Oil currently provides a larger share of world energy consumption than any other energy source and is expected to remain in that position

250

Table 5.7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 845,727 13 22 5,064 18 39 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 12,979 7 3 2,074 3 26 Conventional Boiler Use 12,979 3 1 712 1 3 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 4 3 1,362 2 23 Direct Uses-Total Process 675,152 4 9 2,549 7 13 Process Heating

251

Table 5.5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million Other(e) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 714,166 13 22 5,064 18 39 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 7,788 7 3 2,074 3 26 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 7,788 3 1 712 1 3 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 0 4 3 1,362 2 23 -- Direct Uses-Total Process

252

Table 5.6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal End Use Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Other(e) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 2,437 79 130 5,211 69 868 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 27 46 19 2,134 10 572 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 27 20 4 733 3 72 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 0 26 15 1,401 7 500 -- Direct Uses-Total Process -- 1,912 26 54 2,623 29 289 -- Process Heating -- 297 25 14 2,362 24 280 -- Process Cooling and Refrigeration -- 182 * Q 25

253

Table 5.4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 2,886 79 130 5,211 69 868 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 44 46 19 2,134 10 572 Conventional Boiler Use 44 20 4 733 3 72 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 26 15 1,401 7 500 Direct Uses-Total Process 2,304 26 54 2,623 29 289 Process Heating 318 25 14 2,362 24 280 Process Cooling and Refrigeration

254

CDIAC::Carbon Emission::Time Series Global Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The 2013 version of this database presents a time series recording 1° The 2013 version of this database presents a time series recording 1° latitude by 1° longitude CO2 emissions in units of million metric tons of carbon per year from anthropogenic sources for 1751-2010. Detailed geographic information on CO2 emissions can be critical in understanding the pattern of the atmospheric and biospheric response to these emissions. Global, regional, and national annual estimates for 1751 through 2010 were published earlier (Boden et al. 2013). Those national, annual CO2 emission estimates were based on statistics about fossil-fuel burning, cement manufacturing and gas flaring in oil fields as well as energy production, consumption, and trade data, using the methods of Marland and Rotty (1984). The national annual estimates were combined with gridded 1° data on

255

Reduced power consumption in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and a potential energy savings of over $30 Billion/year. This new approach is demanded by the exponentiallyBenefits Reduced power consumption in IC devices; hence potential energy savings of 300 Billion KWh://www.sia- online.org) CuRIE Interconnect Technology for Improved Energy Efficiency in IC Chips ARPA-E Technology

256

Reduction of Water Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cooling systems using water evaporation to dissipate waste heat, will require one pound of water per 1,000 Btu. To reduce water consumption, a combination of "DRY" and "WET" cooling elements is the only practical answer. This paper reviews the various options available: WET-DRY towers, or DRY-WET, or combination WET and DRY towers!

Adler, J.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Crisis and Consumption Smoothing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dramatic impact of the current crisis on performance of businesses across sectors and economies has been headlining the business press for the past several months. Extant reconciliations of these patterns in the popular press rely on ad hoc reasoning. ... Keywords: consumer behavior, consumption smoothing, crisis, econometrics, marketing strategy

Pushan Dutt; V. Padmanabhan

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Natural Gas Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Lease Fuel Consumption Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Volumes Delivered to Consumers Volumes Delivered to Residential Volumes Delivered to Commercial Consumers Volumes Delivered to Industrial Consumers Volumes Delivered to Vehicle Fuel Consumers Volumes Delivered to Electric Power Consumers Period: Monthly Annual Lease Fuel Consumption Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Volumes Delivered to Consumers Volumes Delivered to Residential Volumes Delivered to Commercial Consumers Volumes Delivered to Industrial Consumers Volumes Delivered to Vehicle Fuel Consumers Volumes Delivered to Electric Power Consumers Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 23,103,793 23,277,008 22,910,078 24,086,797 24,477,425 25,533,448 1949-2012 Alabama 418,512 404,157 454,456 534,779 598,514 666,738 1997-2012 Alaska 369,967 341,888 342,261 333,312 335,458 343,110 1997-2012

259

Contact angle measurements and wetting behavior of inner surfaces of pipelines exposed to heavy crude oil and water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to deliver these oils at low energy consumption. However, the possible accumulation of oil on the pipe walls alternative for the transportation of heavy crude oils. The lubricating effect of the aqueous film leads to reduced equivalent viscosities and, hence, low energy consumption. One of the possible problems associated

Loh, Watson

260

Trends in Commercial Buildings--Trends in Energy Consumption and Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption and Energy Sources - Part 1 Energy Consumption and Energy Sources - Part 1 Part 2. Energy Intensity Data Tables Total Energy Consumption Consumption by Energy Source Background: Site and Primary Energy Trends in Energy Consumption and Energy Sources Part 1. Energy Consumption The CBECS collects energy consumption statistics from energy suppliers for four major energy sources—electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat—and collects information from the sampled buildings on the use of the four major sources and other energy sources (e.g., district chilled water, solar, wood). Energy consumed in commercial buildings is a significant fraction of that consumed in all end-use sectors. In 2000, about 17 percent of total energy was consumed in the commercial sector. Total Energy Consumption

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global oil consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Don't Supersize Me! Toward a Policy of Consumption-Based Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Don't Supersize Me! Toward a Policy of Consumption-Based Energy Efficiency Jeffrey Harris, Rick ultimately reverse) the growth in total energy consumption and carbon emissions. Instead, policy makers need for effective policy in a carbon- and oil-constrained world with increasingly brittle energy markets. To start

Diamond, Richard

262

Table N5.1. Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 1. Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data and Regional Totals; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Waste"," ",," " " "," "," ","Blast"," "," ","Pulping Liquor"," ","Oils/Tars","RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Furnace/Coke"," ","Petroleum","or","Wood Chips,","and Waste","Row"

263

Global Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Security Global Security LANL's mission is to develop and apply science and technology to ensure the safety, security, and effectiveness of the U.S. nuclear deterrent;...

264

Materials Aspects of Corrosion and Fouling in Oil Refining and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DeepStar is an operator funded global Research & Development collaboration between oil companies, vendors, regulators and academic/research institutes ...

265

Caspian countries are developing new oil and natural gas export ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The Caspian Sea region has the potential to export oil and natural gas to European, South Asian, and East Asian markets. With rising energy prices and growing global ...

266

Investing in Oil and Natural Gas A Few Key Issues  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The Top 20 IOCs and Top 20 NOCs Account for Over Half of E&P Spend Source: PFC Energy, Global E&P Surveys Oil Prices Rose, ...

267

Multiscale forecasting and risk measurement in the crude oil market.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

???With the increasing trend of globalization and deregulation comes the increasing level of structural complexity in the crude oil market, which in turn leads to… (more)

He, Kaijian ( ???)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

EIA World Oil Production Projections, 1990-2020  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1. EIA’s International Energy Outlook 2000 predicts that the global conventional oil production peak will occur after 2020, since production is still ...

269

Fuel consumption: Industrial, residential, and general studies. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning fuel consumption in industrial and residential sectors. General studies of fuel supply, demand, policy, forecasts, and consumption models are presented. Citations examine fuel information and forecasting systems, fuel production, international economic and energy activities, heating oils, and pollution control. Fuel consumption in the transportation sector is covered in a separate bibliography. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

A Glance at China’s Household Consumption  

SciTech Connect

Known for its scale, China is the most populous country with the world’s third largest economy. In the context of rising living standards, a relatively lower share of household consumption in its GDP, a strong domestic market and globalization, China is witnessing an unavoidable increase in household consumption, related energy consumption and carbon emissions. Chinese policy decision makers and researchers are well aware of these challenges and keen to promote green lifestyles. China has developed a series of energy policies and programs, and launched a wide?range social marketing activities to promote energy conservation.

Shui, Bin

2009-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

271

TAX EXPENDITURES RELATED TO THE PRODUCTION AND CONSUMPTION OF MOTOR FUELS AND MOTOR VEHICLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-miles of travel RECS = Residential Energy Consumption Survey SIC = standard industrial classification SOx = sulfur industries, or oil over other energy industries: virtually all major energy sources require large investments.......................24 18.5.1 Corporate income-tax expenditures for the oil industry

Delucchi, Mark

272

Energy consumption forecasting in process industry using support vector machines and particle swarm optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, Support Vector Machines (SVMs) are applied in predicting energy consumption in the first phase of oil refining at a particular oil refinery. During cross-validation process of the SVM training Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm ... Keywords: energy prediction, particle swarm optimization (PSO), support vector machines (SVM)

Milena R. Petkovi?; Milan R. Rapai?; Boris B. Jakovljevi?

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025-Market Trends - Oil and  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Natural Gas Oil and Natural Gas Index (click to jump links) Natural Gas Consumption and Prices Natural Gas Production Natural Gas Imports and Wellhead Prices Natural Gas Alternative Cases Oil Prices and Reserve Additions Oil Production Alaskan Oil Production and Oil Imports Petroleum Refining Refined Petroleum Products Natural Gas Consumption and Prices Projected Increases in Natural Gas Use Are Led by Electricity Generators Figure 85. Natural gas consumption by end-use sector, 1990-2025 (trillion cubic feet). Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. Figure data Total natural gas consumption is projected to increase from 2002 to 2025 in all the AEO2004 cases. The projections for domestic natural gas consumption in 2025 range from 29.1 trillion cubic feet per year in the low economic

274

Global Energy & Mining Data, World Bank (1970 - 2007) | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Global Energy & Mining Data, World Bank (1970 - 2007) Global Energy & Mining Data, World Bank (1970 - 2007) Dataset Summary Description The energy-mining_xml_en.zip and energy-mining_xls_en.zip files contain identical data, but in different formats (XML and Excel, respectively). In particular, each contains files with the following contents: Alternative and Nuclear Energy: Percentage of Total Energy Use Combustible Renewables and Waste: Metric Tons of Oil Equivalent Combustible Renewable and Waste: Percentage of Total Energy Electric Power Consumption Electric Power Transmission and Distribution Losses Electric Power Transmission and Distribution Losses: Percentage of Output Electricity Production from Coal Sources Electricity Production from Coal Sources: Percentage of Total Electricity Production from Hydroelectric Sources

275

Updated Hubbert curves analyze world oil supply  

SciTech Connect

The question is not whether, but when, world crude oil production will start to decline, ushering in the permanent oil shock era. While global information for predicting this event is not so straightforward as the data M. King Hubbert used in creating his famous Hubbert Curve that predicted the US (Lower 48 states, or US/48) 1970 oil production peak, there are strong indications that most of the world`s large exploration targets have now been found. Meanwhile, the earth`s population is exploding along with the oil needs of Asia`s developing nations. This article reviews Hubbert`s original analyses on oil discovery and production curves for the US/48 and projects his proven methodology onto global oil discoveries and production as of 1992. The world`s oil discovery curve peaked in 1962, and thence declined, as a Hubbert Curve predicts. However, global production was restricted after the 1973 Arab oil embargo. Otherwise, world production would have peaked in the mid-1990s. Two graphs show alternate versions of future global oil production.

Ivanhoe, L.F. [Novum Corp., Ojai, CA (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

World Energy Consumption by Fuel Type, 1970-2020  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption by Fuel Type, 1970-2020 Energy Consumption by Fuel Type, 1970-2020 Source: EIA, International Energy Outlook 2000 Previous slide Next slide Back to first slide View graphic version Notes: Natural gas is projected to be the fastest-growing component of primary world energy consumption, more than doubling between 1997 and 2020. Gas accounts for the largest increment in electricity generation (41 percent of the total increment of energy used for electricity generation). Combined-cycle gas turbine power plants offer some of the highest commercially available plant efficiencies, and natural gas is environmentally attractive because it emits less sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, and particulate matter than does oil or coal. In the IEO2000 projection, world natural gas consumption reaches the level of coal by

277

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Estimation of Energy End-use Consumption Estimation of Energy End-use Consumption 2003 CBECS The energy end-use consumption tables for 2003 (Detailed Tables E1-E11 and E1A-E11A) provide estimates of the amount of electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat used for ten end uses: space heating, cooling, ventilation, water heating, lighting, cooking, refrigeration, personal computers, office equipment (including servers), and other uses. Although details vary by energy source (Table 1), there are four basic steps in the end-use estimation process: Regressions of monthly consumption on degree-days to establish reference temperatures for the engineering models, Engineering modeling by end use, Cross-sectional regressions to calibrate the engineering estimates and account for additional energy uses, and

278

Data Center Power Consumption  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Center Power Consumption Center Power Consumption A new look at a growing problem Fact - Data center power density up 10x in the last 10 years 2.1 kW/rack (1992); 14 kW/rack (2007) Racks are not fully populated due to power/cooling constraints Fact - Increasing processor power Moore's law Fact - Energy cost going up 3 yr. energy cost equivalent to acquisition cost Fact - Iterative power life cycle Takes as much energy to cool computers as it takes to power them. Fact - Over-provisioning Most data centers are over-provisioned with cooling and still have hot spots November 2007 SubZero Engineering An Industry at the Crossroads Conflict between scaling IT demands and energy efficiency Server Efficiency is improving year after year Performance/Watt doubles every 2 years Power Density is Going Up

279

Table 3.2 Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Fuel Consumption, 2010; 2 Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. NAICS Net Residual Distillate LPG and Coke Code(a) Subsector and Industry Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coal and Breeze Other(f) Total United States 311 Food 1,158 257 12 22 579 6 182 2 99 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 350 56 * 1 121 * 126 0 45 311221 Wet Corn Milling 214 25 * * 53 * 110 0 25 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 107 4 1 1 15 * 49 2 36 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 143 31 1 Q 100 1 2 0 4 3115 Dairy Products 105 33 2 2 66 1 * 0 2 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 212 69 5 3 125 2 Q 0 8 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 86 29 1 1 38 1 10 0 7 3121 Beverages

280

Table 3.3 Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Fuel Consumption, 2010; 3 Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. Economic Net Residual Distillate LPG and Coke and Characteristic(a) Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coal Breeze Other(f) Total United States Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 1,148 314 6 53 446 14 25 Q 291 20-49 1,018 297 13 22 381 18 97 5 185 50-99 1,095 305 7 13 440 6 130 9 186 100-249 1,728 411 16 11 793 7 131 7 353 250-499 1,916 391 16 11 583 3 185 5 722 500 and Over 7,323 720 21 21 2,569 21 300 348 3,323 Total 14,228 2,437 79 130 5,211 69 868 376 5,059 Employment Size Under 50 1,149 305 12 45 565 21 31

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global oil consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

101. Natural Gas Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1. Natural Gas Consumption 1. Natural Gas Consumption in the United States, 1930-1996 (Million Cubic Feet) Table Year Lease and Plant Fuel Pipeline Fuel Delivered to Consumers Total Consumption Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Utilities Total 1930 ....................... 648,025 NA 295,700 80,707 721,782 NA 120,290 1,218,479 1,866,504 1931 ....................... 509,077 NA 294,406 86,491 593,644 NA 138,343 1,112,884 1,621,961 1932 ....................... 477,562 NA 298,520 87,367 531,831 NA 107,239 1,024,957 1,502,519 1933 ....................... 442,879 NA 283,197 85,577 590,865 NA 102,601 1,062,240 1,505,119 1934 ....................... 502,352 NA 288,236 91,261 703,053 NA 127,896 1,210,446 1,712,798 1935 ....................... 524,926 NA 313,498 100,187 790,563 NA 125,239 1,329,487 1,854,413 1936 ....................... 557,404 NA 343,346

282

Residential Energy Consumption Survey:  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

E/EIA-0262/2 E/EIA-0262/2 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: 1978-1980 Consumption and Expenditures Part II: Regional Data May 1981 U.S. Department of Energy Energy Information Administration Assistant Administrator for Program Development Office of the Consumption Data System Residential and Commercial Data Systems Division -T8-aa * N uojssaooy 'SOS^-m (£03) ao£ 5925 'uofSfAfQ s^onpojj aa^ndmoo - aojAaag T BU T3gN am rcoj? aig^IT^^ '(adBx Q-naugBH) TOO/T8-JQ/30Q 30^703 OQ ' d jo :moaj ajqBfT^A^ 3J^ sjaodaa aAoqe aqa jo 's-TZTOO-eoo-Tgo 'ON ^ois odo 'g^zo-via/aoQ 'TBST Sujpjjng rXaAang uojidmnsuoo XSaaug sSu-ppjprig ON ^oo^s OdO '^/ZOZO-Via/aOQ *086T aunr '6L6I ?sn§ny og aunf ' jo suja^Bd uoj^dmnsuoo :XaAjng uo^^dmnsuoQ XSaaug OS '9$ '6-ieTOO- 00-T90 OdD 'S/ZOZO-Via/aOa C

283

fuel_oil.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Oil Usage Form Fuel Oil Usage Form 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) 1. Timely submission of this report is mandatory under Public Law 93-275, as amended. 2. This completed report is due by 3. Data reported on this questionnaire are for the entire building identified in the label to the right. 4. Data may be submitted directly on this questionnaire or in any other format, such as a computer-generated listing, which provides the same i nformation and is conve nient for y our company. a. You may submit a single report for the entire building, or if it i s easier, a separate report for each of several accounts in the building. These will then be aggregated by the survey contractor. b. If you are concerned about your individual account information, you may c

284

Global production through 2005  

SciTech Connect

Two companion studies released recently should provide great food for thought among geo-political strategists and various national governments. If predictions contained in these Petroconsultants studies of oil and gas production trends for the next 10 years are realized, there will be great repercussions for net exporters and importers, alike. After analyzing and predicting trends within each of the world`s significant producing nations for the 1996--2005 period, the crude oil and condensate report concludes tat global production will jump nearly 24%. By contrast, worldwide gas output will leap 40%. The cast of characters among producers and exporters that will benefit from these increases varies considerably for each fuel. On the oil side, Russia and the OPEC members, particularly the Persian Gulf nations, will be back in the driver`s seat in terms of affecting export and pricing patterns. On the gas side, the leading producers will be an interesting mix of mostly non-OPEC countries. The reemergence of Persian Gulf oil producers, coupled with an anticipated long-term decline among top non-OPEC producing nations should present a sobering picture to government planners within large net importers, such as the US. They are likely to find themselves in much the same supply trap as was experienced in the 1970s, only this time the dependence on foreign oil supplies will be much worse. Gas supplies will not be similarly constrained, and some substitution for oil is probable. Here, two articles, ``World oil industry is set for transition`` and ``Worldwide gas surges forward in next decade,`` present a summary of the findings detailed in Petroconsultants` recent studies.

Foreman, N.E. [Petroconsultants, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Oil reserves  

SciTech Connect

As of March 1988, the Strategic Petroleum Reserve inventory totaled 544.9 million barrels of oil. During the past 6 months the Department of Energy added 11.0 million barrels of crude oil to the SPR. During this period, DOE distributed $208 million from the SPR Petroleum Account. All of the oil was purchased from PEMEX--the Mexican national oil company. In FY 1988, $164 million was appropriated for facilities development and management and $439 million for oil purchases. For FY 1989, DOE proposes to obligate $173 million for facilities development and management and $236 million for oil purchases. DOE plans to postpone all further drawdown exercises involving crude oil movements until their effects on cavern integrity are evaluated. DOE and the Military Sealift Command have made progress in resolving the questions surrounding nearly $500,000 in payments for demurrage charges.

Not Available

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

2009 Energy Consumption Per Person  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Per capita energy consumption across all sectors of the economy. Click on a state for more information.

287

Oil price shocks: Testing a macroeconomic model  

SciTech Connect

The main research objective was to answer the following question: Will Consumer Price Index forecast models utilizing computer oil-consumption ratios have better predictive capability as indicated by lower numerical differences from actual results than a model utilizing oil prices as the energy-related variable Multiple linear regressions were run on the components of the United States CPI to reduce them to a kernel set with meaningful predictive capability. New linear regressions were run with this kernel set and crude oil prices during the 1973 to 1984 time period. Crude oil prices were rationalized with a 1972 = 100 based index of GNP base petroleum consumption, the index of net energy imports, and the index of petroleum imports to create new oil substitute constructs to be used in multiple regressions with the CPI. Predictions obtained from the model were compared with actual results in the 1985-1987 time period to determine which model version showed the greatest predictive power. Results of the model tests show that oil prices are strongly related to the CPI, but neither the use of oil prices or the index of GNP-based petroleum consumption produced results that closely predict future prices.

Williams, D.D.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A. Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel for All Buildings, 2003 A. Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Total Energy Consumption (trillion Btu) Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat Primary Site All Buildings ................................ 4,859 71,658 6,523 10,746 3,559 2,100 228 636 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,586 6,922 685 1,185 392 257 34 Q 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 948 7,033 563 883 293 224 36 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 810 12,659 899 1,464 485 353 28 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 261 9,382 742 1,199 397 278 17 Q 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 147 10,291 913 1,579 523 277 29 Q

289

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 . Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 All Buildings* Total Energy Consumption (trillion Btu) Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat Primary Site All Buildings* ............................... 4,645 64,783 5,820 9,168 3,037 1,928 222 634 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,552 6,789 672 1,164 386 250 34 Q 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 889 6,585 516 790 262 209 36 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 738 11,535 776 1,229 407 309 27 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 241 8,668 673 1,058 350 258 16 Q 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 129 9,057 759 1,223 405 244 26 Q

290

An experimental study of the oil evolution in critical piston ring pack regions and the effects of piston and ring designs in an internal combustion engine utilizing two-dimensional laser induced fluorescence and the impact on maritime economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Faced with increasing concern for lubricating, oil consumption and engine friction, it is critical to understand the oil transport mechanisms in the power cylinder system. Lubricating oil travels through distinct regions ...

Vokac, Adam, 1978-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Increasing Global Renewable Energy Market Share  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to experience even greater energy supply uncertainties and price increases from fossil fuels. Recent trendsIncreasing Global Renewable Energy Market Share: Recent Trends and Perspectives Final Report a time of growing volatility and uncertainty in world energy markets. Oil price increases, which hit oil

Damm, Werner

292

World Oil Price, 1970-2020  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

World Oil Price, 1970-2020 World Oil Price, 1970-2020 (1999 dollars per barrel) 17.09 50- 45 - 40 - I Nominal dollars 35- 1995 _2020 15 - J 9, AE02000 5- 10 - HHistory Projections 0 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 35AS0570 ^a .i^ Petroleum Supply, Consumption, and Imports, 1970-2020 (million barrels per day) 30- History Projections 25 - 20 - 20~ Consumption _ Net imports 15 - Domestic supply . _ 5- 0 0 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 '-'e^~~~ u,~~ ~35AS0570 ., te Petroleum Consumption by Sector, 1970-2020 (million barrels per day) 20- History Projections 15- XTransportation 10 Industrial Eect i city gener - 5- 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 .n 35AS0570 r-N Crude Oil Production by Source, 1970-2020 (million barrels per day) 8 History Projections 6- Lower 48 conventional 4- Lower 48 offshore 2- lasa k r 0 § ^.^^^r"_ "^^"' ^Lower 48 EOR

293

Learning from the Past - Evaluating Forecasts for Canadian Oil Sands Production with Data; Utvärdering av historiska prognoser av oljesand i Kanada.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Crude oil plays an important role for the global energy system. As there is ample evidence that conventional oil production will have peaked by… (more)

Hehl, Friedrich

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Residential energy-consumption survey: consumption and expenditures, April 1978-March 1979  

SciTech Connect

Tables present data on energy consumption and expenditures for US households during a 12-month period. The total amount of energy consumed by the residential sector from April 1978 through March 1979 is estimated to have been 10,563 trillion Btu with an average household consumption of 138 million Btu. Table 1 summarizes residential energy consumption for all fuels (totals and averages) as wells as total amounts consumed and expenditures for each of the major fuel types (natural gas, electricity, fuel oil, and liquid petroleum gas). Tables 2 and 3 give the number of households and the average energy prices, respectively, for each of the major fuel types. In Tables 4 to 9, totals and averages for both consumption and expenditures are given for each of the major fuels. The consumption of each fuel is given first for all households using the fuel. Then, households are divided into those that use the fuel as their main source of heat and those using the fuel for other purposes. Electricity data (Tables 5 to 7) are further broken down into households that use electricity for air conditioning and those not using it for this purpose. Limited data are also presented on households that use each of the major fuels for heating water. Each of the consumption tables is given for a variety of general household features, including: geographical, structural and physical, and demographic characteristics. Tables 10 to 18 present the same information for the subgroup of households living in single-family owner-occupied detached houses. The third set of tables (19 to 27) is limited to households that paid directly for all of the energy they used. Tables 28 to 36 provide variance estimates for the data.

Not Available

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil)...

296

ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 RESIDENTIAL TRANSPORTATION 5 RESIDENTIAL TRANSPORTATION ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY Prepared for: UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION OFFICE OF ENERGY MARKETS AND END USE ENERGY END USE DIVISION RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL BRANCH WASHINGTON, DC 20585 Prepared by: THE ORKAND CORPORATION 8484 GEORGIA AVENUE SILVER SPRING, MD 20910 October 1986 Contract Number DE-AC01-84EI19658 TABLE OF CONTENTS FRONT MATTER Index to Program Descriptions........................................... vi List of Exhibits ....................................................... viii Acronyms and Abbreviations ............................................. ix SECTION 1: GENERAL INFORMATION ........................................ 1-1 1.1. Summary ....................................................... 1-1

297

Reducing Greenhouse Emissions and Fuel Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Emissions and Fuel Consumption Impacts of IntelligentTravel Time, Fuel Consumption and Weigh Station Efficiency.EMISSIONS AND FUEL CONSUMPTION - Sustainable Approaches for

Shaheen, Susan; Lipman, Timothy

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Essays on consumption cycles and corporate finance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the consumption cycle . . . . . . . . . . . . .3.1.6 Optimal consumption, expenditures and1.3.2 Optimal nondurable consumption and durable

Issler, Paulo Floriano

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Milk consumption and acne in adolescent girls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Milk consumption and acne in adolescent girls Clement Aassociation between milk consumption and occurrence of acneand 'don't drink milk'. Consumption of the specific types of

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

A Note on the Consumption Function  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Zeldes, S. (1989) ‘ Consumption and Liquidity Constraints:A Note on the Consumption Function Douglas G.Steigerwald Consumption Function The international

Steigerwald, Douglas G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global oil consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Stock Market and Consumption: Evidence from China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A. 1992. Understanding Consumption. Cambridge, UK: CambridgeStock market wealth and consumption. The Journal of Economic139–146. Stock Market and Consumption: Evidence from China

Hau, Leslie C

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Global residential appliance standards  

SciTech Connect

In most countries, residential electricity consumption typically ranges from 20% to 40% of total electricity consumption. This energy is used for heating, cooling, refrigeration and other end-uses. Significant energy savings are possible if new appliance purchases are for models with higher efficiency than that of existing models. There are several ways to ensure or encourage such an outcome, for example, appliance rebates, innovative procurement, and minimum efficiency standards. This paper focuses on the latter approach. At the present time, the US is the only country with comprehensive appliance energy efficiency standards. However, many other countries, such as Australia, Canada, the European Community (EC), Japan and Korea, are considering enacting standards. The greatest potential impact of minimum efficiency standards for appliances is in the developing countries (e.g., China and India), where saturations of household appliances are relatively low but growing rapidly. This paper discusses the potential savings that could be achieved from global appliance efficiency standards for refrigerators and freezers. It also could be achieved from global appliance efficiency standards for refrigerators and freezers. It also discusses the impediments to establishing common standards for certain appliance types, such as differing test procedures, characteristics, and fuel prices. A methodology for establishing global efficiency standards for refrigerators and freezers is described.

Turiel, I.; McMahon, J.E. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (US); Lebot, B. [Agence Francaise pour la Maitrise de l`Energie, Valbonne (FR)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Characterization of oil transport in the power cylinder of internal combustion engines during steady state and transient operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engine friction, wear, and oil consumption are some of the primary interests for the automotive industry. However, there is currently a lack of understanding of the fundamentals involving oil transport inside the power ...

Przesmitzki, Steve (Steve Victor)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Indexes of Consumption and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Figure on manufacturing production indexes and purchased energy consumption Figure on manufacturing production indexes and purchased energy consumption Source: Energy Information Administration and Federal Reserve Board. History of Shipments This chart presents indices of 14 years (1980-1994) of historical data of manufacturing production indexes and Purchased (Offsite-Produced) Energy consumption, using 1992 as the base year (1992 = 100). Indexing both energy consumption and production best illustrates the trends in output and consumption. Taken separately, these two indices track the relative growth rates within the specified industry. Taken together, they reveal trends in energy efficiency. For example, a steady increase in output, coupled with a decline in energy consumption, represents energy efficiency gains. Likewise, steadily rising energy consumption with a corresponding decline in output illustrates energy efficiency losses.

305

Explaining cross-country variation in cigarette consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. This short paper uses cross-country data on per capita cigarette consumption and selected socioeconomic variables to explain inter-country differentials in consumption. It is found that the proportion of the aged in the total population and higher literacy among women have relatively greater and positive impact on cigarette consumption. Even after controlling for the effect of the two variables, a country's industrialized status has a positive impact on consumption. It would thus seem that aging and economic, and social developments are pro-cigarette consumption. Background The US Surgeon General's initial report on smoking was nearly 40 years old. All these years, health warnings on cigarette packs have been in place. Despite the "warnings" and concerted efforts to dissuade potential smokers, cigarettes are here to stay. Global cigarette production and consumption have been rising steadily since cigarettes were introduced at the beginning of the 20 th century (see Table 1 for evidence on growth during 1960–2000). It is estimated that at present about 1.1 billion people – close to a fifth of the global population – are smokers and the number is expected to rise to more than 1.6 billion by

Kolluru Srinivas; Bhanoji Rao; Open Access

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Energy, environment, and conscious consumption: making connections through design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While environmental scientists alert the society to the urgent need for a turning point in the way resources have been consumed globally, the current economic situation in Brazil favors opportunities to increase still more individual's consumption. This ... Keywords: culture, eco-feedback technology, motivation

Lara Schibelsky Godoy Piccolo; Maria Cecília Calani Baranauskas

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Uncovering practices of making energy consumption accountable: A phenomenological inquiry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reacting to the discussion on global warming, the HCI community has started to explore the design of tools to support responsible energy consumption. An important part of this research focuses on motivating energy savings by providing feedback tools ... Keywords: Energy, phenomenology, sustainability

Tobias Schwartz, Gunnar Stevens, Leonardo Ramirez, Volker Wulf

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Nuclear Power: A Leading Strategy to Reduce Oil Imports Position Statement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The long-term threats to energy sustainability, energy security, and global environmental quality represented by the growing demand for oil are well documented. Of the more than 20 million barrels/day of oil used by the United States, about 45 % is devoted to the production of motor gasoline. This has resulted in the growing energy security problem for our country due to an increasing dependence on imported oil from unstable regions. The large consumption of oil also is a major contributor to the nation’s greenhouse gas emission levels. The partial substitution of electricity for gasoline as a transportation fuel could have a major impact on both our energy security and environmental quality while improving our energy sustainability posture. It is possible to use nuclear power to provide this contribution economically without large external or opportunity costs. Increasing the use of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) appears to be a feasible means of beginning this transition. The purpose of this position paper is not to argue that PHEVs should be adopted as the only solution to our energy supply challenge. Indeed, the American Nuclear Society favors a broad and intensive approach to the problem including study of all the attractive alternatives that might eventually contribute to the solution—feasibility will eventually determine those options that are

unknown authors

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

EIA-Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Low Oil PriceTables  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil Price Tables (2007-2035) Oil Price Tables (2007-2035) Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Main Low Oil Price Tables (2007- 2035) Table Title Formats Summary Low Oil Price Case Tables PDF Gif Year-by-Year Low Oil Price Case Tables Excel Gif Table 1. Total Energy Supply and Disposition Summary Excel Gif Table 2. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source Excel Gif Table 3. Energy Prices by Sector and Source Excel Gif Table 4. Residential Sector Key Indicators and Consumption Excel Gif Table 5. Commercial Sector Indicators and Consumption Excel Gif Table 6. Industrial Sector Key Indicators and Consumption Excel Gif Table 7. Transportation Sector Key Indicators and Delivered Energy Consumption Excel Gif Table 8. Electricity Supply, Disposition, Prices, and Emissions Excel Gif Table 9. Electricity Generating Capacity

310

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1991--Combined Consumption and Fuel  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

< < Welcome to the U.S. Energy Information Administration's Manufacturing Web Site. If you are having trouble, call 202-586-8800 for help. Return to Energy Information Administration Home Page. Home > Energy Users > Manufacturing > Consumption and Fuel Switching Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1991 (Combined Consumption and Fuel Switching) Overview Full Report Tables & Spreadsheets This report presents national-level estimates about energy use and consumption in the manufacturing sector as well as manufacturers' fuel-switching capability. Contact: Stephanie.battle@eia.doe.gov Stephanie Battle Director, Energy Consumption Division Phone: (202) 586-7237 Fax: (202) 586-0018 URL: http://www.eia.gov/emeu/mecs/mecs91/consumption/mecs1a.html File Last Modified: May 25, 1996

311

Residential Energy Consumption Survey Results: Total Energy Consumption,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Survey Results: Total Energy Consumption, Survey Results: Total Energy Consumption, Expenditures, and Intensities (2005) Dataset Summary Description The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) is a national survey that collects residential energy-related data. The 2005 survey collected data from 4,381 households in housing units statistically selected to represent the 111.1 million housing units in the U.S. Data were obtained from residential energy suppliers for each unit in the sample to produce the Consumption & Expenditures data. The Consumption & Expenditures and Intensities data is divided into two parts: Part 1 provides energy consumption and expenditures by census region, population density, climate zone, type of housing unit, year of construction and ownership status; Part 2 provides the same data according to household size, income category, race and age. The next update to the RECS survey (2009 data) will be available in 2011.

312

U.S. Energy Demand, Offshore Oil Production and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;Summary of Conclusions. . . The global rate of production of oil is peaking now, coal will peak in 2U.S. Energy Demand, Offshore Oil Production and BP's Macondo Well Spill Tad Patzek, Petroleum that run the U.S. Complexity, models, risks Gulf of Mexico's oil and gas production Conclusions ­ p.3/4 #12

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

313

Table 4.1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010; 1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) (billion NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,113 75,673 2 4 563 1 8 * 54 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 346 16,620 * * 118 * 6 0 41 311221 Wet Corn Milling 214 7,481 * * 51 * 5 0 25 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 72 1,264 * * 15 * 2 * * 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 142 9,258 * Q 97

314

Investing in Oil and Natural Gas A Few Key Issues  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Strategic Advisors in Global Energy Strategic Advisors in Global Energy Strategic Advisors in Global Energy Strategic Advisors in Global Energy Investing in Oil and Natural Gas: A Few Key Issues Prepared for EIA Conference Susan Farrell, Senior Director PFC Energy April 8, 2009 Investing in Oil and Gas| PFC Energy| Page 2 The Top 20 IOCs and Top 20 NOCs Account for Over Half of E&P Spend Source: PFC Energy, Global E&P Surveys Investing in Oil and Gas| PFC Energy| Page 3 Oil Prices Rose, But So Did Costs + 52% $0 $20 $40 $60 $80 $100 $120 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 WTI $/barrel Annual averages Large Gulf of Mexico Facility Costs by Segment Avg $28.31 Avg $59.13 Source: PFC Energy Investing in Oil and Gas| PFC Energy| Page 4 Near term Spending Cuts will be Significant

315

Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and ...  

Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and electrical energy consumption systems are described. In one aspect, an electrical appliance energy ...

316

Map Data: State Consumption | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Consumption Map Data: State Consumption stateconsumptionpc2009.csv More Documents & Publications Map Data: Renewable Production Map Data: State Spending...

317

Consumption & Efficiency - Analysis & Projections - U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Today in Energy - Commercial Consumption & Efficiency. Short, timely articles with graphs about recent commercial consumption and efficiency ...

318

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation into Sustainable Water Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into Sustainable Water Consumption Kultar Kanda, Terry Brar, Ronald Ho, Nick Yeh University of British Columbia;1 An Investigation into Sustainable Water Consumption APSC 261- TECHNOLOGY AND SOCIETY I DR. CHRISTINA GYENGE NOVEMBER 30, 2010 KULTAR KANDA TERRY BRAR RONALD HO NICK YEH #12;2 Abstract With the increasing global

319

Accounting for the energy consumption of personal computing including portable devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In light of the increased awareness of global energy consumption, questions are also being asked about the contribution of computing equipment. Though studies have documented the share of energy consumption due to these equipment over the years, these ... Keywords: computing, electricity, energy, environment, networking, portable devices

Pavel Somavat; Shraddha Jadhav; Vinod Namboodiri

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Consumption and expenditures, April 1984 through March 1985: Part 1, National data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents data collected in the 1984 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) conducted by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The 1984 RECS was the sixth national survey of US households and their energy suppliers. The purpose of these surveys is to provide baseline information on how households use energy. Households in all types of housing units - single family homes (including townhouses), apartments, and mobile homes - were chosen to participate. Data from the surveys are available to the public in published reports such as this one and on public-use data tapes. The report presents data on the US consumption and expenditures for residential use of these ''major fuels'' - natural gas, electricity, fuel oil, kerosene, and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) - from April 1984 through March 1985. These data are presented in tables in the Detailed Statistics section of this report. Except for kerosene and wood fuel, the consumption and expenditures data are based on actual household bills obtained, with the permission of the household, from the companies supplying energy to the household. Purchases of kerosene are based on respondent reports because records of ''cash and carry'' purchases of kerosene for individual households are usually unavailable. Data on the consumption of wood fuel (Table 27) covers the 12-month period ending November 1984 and are based on respondent recall of the amount of wood burned during the 12-month period. Both the kerosene and wood consumption data are subject to memory errors and other reporting errors. This report does not cover household use of motor fuel, which is reported separately.

Not Available

1987-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global oil consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Purification of Vegetable Oils Post-Consumption Residential and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The viscosity residential treated with clay Tonsil was lower compared to the crude ... Designing a Collaborative System for Socio-Environmental Management of ...

322

Oil Consumption for Transportation and Other Uses in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... the developing countries is caused in part by the substitution of petroleum products for noncommercial fuels (such as wood burning for home heating and cooking) ...

323

"Table A2. Total Consumption of LPG, Distillate Fuel Oil,...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,32,1688,378,0,58,0,15.7 3274," Lime","Q",657,"W","Q",657,"W",0,0,0,33.9 3296," Mineral Wool","W","W","W",113,34,"W","W","W",0,2 33,"Primary Metal Industries","W",5117,"W",2433,494...

324

Oil Consumption for Transportation and Other Uses in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... products for noncommercial fuels (such as wood burning for home heating and cooking) as incomes rise and the energy infrastructure matures. ...

325

Energy Consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consumption Consumption Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (9 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (7 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

326

2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Residential Energy Consumption Survey ... Office of Management and Budget, Washington, DC 20503. Form EIA-457A (2001) Form Approval: OMB No. 1905-0092 ...

327

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

includes descriptions of the 30 groups that comprise the strata of the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey. These are the 20 major industrial groups (two-digit SIC) and...

328

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

DOEEIA-0464(91) Distribution Category UC-950 Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991 December 1993 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S....

329

RESIDENTIAL ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY 1997  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

RESIDENTIAL ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY 1997. OVERVIEW: MOST POPULOUS STATES ... Homes with air-conditioning: 95%... with a central air-conditioning system: 83%

330

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B Survey Design, Implementation, and Estimates Introduction The 1991 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) has been designed by the Energy Information Administration...

331

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a regular basis at the time of the 1990 RECS personal interviews. Electricity: See Main Heating Fuel. Energy Information AdministrationHousehold Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991...

332

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AdministrationHousehold Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 110 Electricity: See Main Heating Fuel. Energy Used in the Home: For electricity or natural gas, the quantity is the...

333

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Information AdministrationManufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 Introduction The market for natural gas has been changing for quite some time. As part of natural gas...

334

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Detailed Tables 28 Energy Information AdministrationManufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 1. In previous MECS, the term "primary energy" was used to denote the "first use" of...

335

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Appendix A How the Survey Was Conducted Introduction The Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS) was designed by the Energy Information Administration (EIA)...

336

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Manufacturing Energy Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Chemical Industry Analysis Brief Change Topic: Steel | Chemical Chemical Industry Analysis Brief Change Topic: Steel | Chemical JUMP TO: Introduction | Energy Consumption | Energy Expenditures | Producer Prices and Production | Energy Intensity | Energy Management Activities | Fuel Switching Capacity Introduction The chemical industries are a cornerstone of the U.S. economy, converting raw materials such as oil, natural gas, air, water, metals, and minerals into thousands of various products. Chemicals are key materials for producing an extensive assortment of consumer goods. They are also crucial materials in creating many resources that are essential inputs to the numerous industries and sectors of the U.S. economy.1 The manufacturing sector is classified by the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) of which the chemicals sub-sector is NAICS

337

Wednesday, December 8, 2010 Global Warming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rising and people in developing countries are consuming more energy per capita... ...and more demand, but not renewable) Energy consumption is rising faster than the renewables are growing, so more oil, coal that are emitted directly to air So this is $100 per 400 gallons, or 25 cents per gallon. Per capita emissions

Toohey, Darin W.

338

Modeling energy consumption of residential furnaces and boilers in U.S. homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENERGY CONSUMPTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28 ENERGY CONSUMPTIONENERGY CONSUMPTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Lutz, James; Dunham-Whitehead, Camilla; Lekov, Alex; McMahon, James

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Global Insight Energy Group  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Outlook Outlook Mary Novak Managing Director IHS Global Insight Copyright © 2010 IHS Global Insight, Inc. Overview: Energy Sector Transformation Underway * The recession has hit energy demand hard, and aggregate energy demand is not expected to return to 2007 levels until 2018. * Oil and natural gas prices will both rise over the long-term, but the price trends will diverge with natural gas prices rising slowly due to the development of shale gas. * This forecast does not include a GHG cap-and-trade program. However, it is assumed that there will be continued improvement in equipment, appliance and building efficiencies that will reduce carbon emissions relative to past projections. * The forecast also includes the more than 30 state- level programs to increase efficiency and reduce

340

Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Consumption and expenditures, April 1984 through March 1985: Part 2, Regional data. [Contains glossary  

SciTech Connect

Included here are data at the Census region and division level on consumption of and expenditures for the major fuels used in residential households - electricity, natural gas, fuel oil/kerosene, and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). Data are also presented on wood consumption. Section 1 of this report contains data on the average amount of energy consumed per household for space heating in 1984 and the corresponding expenditures. Sections 2 through 7 summarize the energy consumption and expenditure patterns. Appendices A through D contain information on how the survey was conducted, estimates of the size of the housing unit in square feet and the quality of the data. Procedures for calculating relative standard errors (RSE) are located in Appendix C, Quality of the Data. Procedures for estimating the end-use statistics are located in Appendix D. Census and weather maps, and related publications are located in Appendices E through G.

Not Available

1987-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global oil consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

CBECS 1992 - Consumption & Expenditures, Detailed Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Detailed Tables Detailed Tables Detailed Tables Figure on Energy Consumption in Commercial Buildings by Energy Source, 1992 Divider Line The 49 tables present detailed energy consumption and expenditure data for buildings in the commercial sector. This section provides assistance in reading the tables by explaining some of the headings for the data categories. It will also explain the use of row and column factors to compute both the confidence levels of the estimates given in the tables and the statistical significance of differences between the data in two or more categories. The section concludes with a "Quick-Reference Guide" to the statistics in the different tables. Categories of Data in the Tables After Table 3.1, which is a summary table, the tables are grouped into the major fuel tables (Tables 3.2 through 3.13) and the specific fuel tables (Tables 3.14 through 3.29 for electricity, Tables 3.30 through 3.40 for natural gas, Tables 3.41 through 3.45 for fuel oil, and Tables 3.46 through 3.47 for district heat). Table 3.48 presents energy management and DSM data as reported by the building respondent. Table 3.49 presents data on participation in electric utility-sponsored DSM programs as reported by both the building respondent and the electricity supplier.

342

Groundwater and Wastewater Remediation Using Agricultural Oils  

agricultural oils to stimulate endogenous microbes which accelerates the cleanup.  The oils tested include canola oil, grapeseed oil, coconut oil, corn oil, cottonseed oil, olive oil, palm oil, palm kernel oil, peanut oil, ...

343

Greece poised for oil and gas development  

SciTech Connect

The first indigenous crude oil in Greece will be produced by late 1980, and commercial operations are expected to start in early 1981 from the offshore oil and gas field in the North Aegean Sea. The discovery of oil in Greek waters started a new era in the economic development of Greece and could be considered a milestone in the development of the country. The discovery also had international political implications. Many analysts consider it as the main cause of the dispute between Greece and Turkey over the delineation of the continental shelf of the Aegean Sea. The Greek Government, after the collapse of the dictatorial regime in 1974, has enacted new legislation regarding oil exploration and exploitation activities in Greece. Oil found so far amounts to 12% of present domestic consumption, and there is hope of more as the Public Petroleum Corporation turns its attention westward.

Vougaris, C.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

2009 Residential Energy Consumption Survey  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

6 Built-in room heater burning gas, oil, or kerosene? 7 Heating stove burning wood, coal, or coke (IF VOLUNTEERED) 8 Portable electric heaters (IF VOLUNTEERED)

345

Electricity Consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consumption Consumption Dataset Summary Description Total annual electricity consumption by country, 1980 to 2009 (billion kilowatthours). Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords EIA Electricity Electricity Consumption world Data text/csv icon total_electricity_net_consumption_1980_2009billion_kwh.csv (csv, 50.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 1980 - 2009 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access Average vote Your vote Overall rating Average vote Your vote Comments Login or register to post comments

346

Biofuels Consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biofuels Consumption Biofuels Consumption Dataset Summary Description Total annual biofuels consumption and production data by country was compiled by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). Data is presented as thousand barrels per day. Source EIA Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords Biofuels Biofuels Consumption EIA world Data text/csv icon total_biofuels_production_2000_2010thousand_barrels_per_day.csv (csv, 9.3 KiB) text/csv icon total_biofuels_consumption_2000_2010thousand_barrels_per_day.csv (csv, 9.3 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 2000 - 2010 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote

347

Coal consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

consumption consumption Dataset Summary Description Total annual coal consumption by country, 1980 to 2009 (available as Quadrillion Btu). Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords coal Coal consumption EIA world Data text/csv icon total_coal_consumption_1980_2009quadrillion_btu.csv (csv, 38.3 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 1980 - 2009 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access Average vote Your vote Overall rating Average vote Your vote Comments Login or register to post comments

348

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(MECS) > MECS 1994 Combined Consumption and Fuel Switching (MECS) > MECS 1994 Combined Consumption and Fuel Switching Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey 1994 (Combined Consumption and Fuel Switching) Manufacturing Energy Consumption Logo Full Report - (file size 5.4 MB) pages:531 Selected Sections (PDF format) Contents (file size 56 kilobytes, 10 pages). Overview (file size 597 kilobytes, 11 pages). Chapters 1-3 (file size 265 kilobytes, 9 pages). Chapter 4 (file size 1,070 kilobytes, 15 pages). Appendix A - Detailed Tables Tables A1 - A8 (file size 1,031 kilobytes, 139 pages). Tables A9 - A23 (file size 746 kilobytes, 119 pages). Tables A24 - A29 (file size 485 kilobytes, 84 pages). Tables A30 - A44 (file size 338 kilobytes, 39 pages). Appendix B (file size 194 kilobytes, 24 pages). Appendix C (file size 116 kilobytes, 16 pages).

349

OIl Speculation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Investor Flows and the 2008 BoomBust in Oil Prices Kenneth J. Singleton 1 August 10, 2011 1 Graduate School of Business, Stanford University, kenneths@stanford.edu. This research...

350

PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating...

351

Heading off the permanent oil crisis  

SciTech Connect

The 1996 spike in gasoline prices was not a signal of any fundamental worldwide shortage of crude oil. But based on a review of many studies of recoverable crude oil that have been published since the 1950s, it looks as though such a shortfall is now within sight. With world demand for oil growing at 2 percent per year, global production is likely to peak between the years 2007 and 2014. As this time approaches, we can expect prices to rise markedly and, most likely, permanently. Policy changes are needed now to ease the transition to high-priced oil. Oil production will continue, though at a declining rate, for many decades after its peak, and there are enormous amounts of coal, oil sands, heavy oil, and oil shales worldwide that could be used to produce liquid or gaseous substitutes for crude oil, albeit at higher prices. But the facilities for making such synthetic fuels are costly to build and environmentally damaging to operate, and their use would substantially increase carbon dioxide emissions (compared to emissions from products made from conventional crude oil). This paper examines ways of heading of the impending oil crisis. 8 refs., 3 figs.

MacKenzie, J.J. [World Resources Inst., Washington, DC (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Crude Oil and Gasoline Price Monitoring  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

What drives crude oil prices? What drives crude oil prices? November 13, 2013 | Washington, DC An analysis of 7 factors that influence oil markets, with chart data updated monthly and quarterly Crude oil prices react to a variety of geopolitical and economic events November 13, 2013 2 price per barrel (real 2010 dollars, quarterly average) Low spare capacity Iraq invades Kuwait Saudis abandon swing producer role Iran-Iraq War Iranian revolution Arab Oil Embargo Asian financial crisis U.S. spare capacity exhausted Global financial collapse 9-11 attacks OPEC cuts targets 1.7 mmbpd OPEC cuts targets 4.2 mmbpd Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Thomson Reuters 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 imported refiner acquisition cost of crude oil

353

Too early to tell on $100 oil  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Confidential Confidential Presentation to: April 7, 2008 Middle East oil demand and Lehman Brothers oil price outlook Adam Robinson Middle East oil demand u Three pillars of Middle East oil demand - Petrodollar reinvestment - Purchasing power rise - Power sector constraints u Natural gas shortages for power generation mean balance of risks to any Middle East oil demand forecast are firmly to the upside, adding to summer upside seasonality u Lehman Brothers has pegged 3Q08 as the tightest quarter of the current oil cycle, with a possible turning point coming by the end of the year 1 Putting the GCC economy in global context u GCC = Saudi Arabia, UAE, Kuwait, Qatar, Bahrain, Oman u GDP/capita in 2007: $19,000 - Nearly 3x China and 5x India u At $800 bn, GCC is a top 10 developing economy by size

354

Table A9. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A9. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census" A9. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census" " Region and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" " ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(e)","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","(cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors"

355

Table A20. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All P  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes by Census" Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes by Census" " Region, Census Division, and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,,,,,"Coke",,"Shipments" " "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(e)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","of Energy Sources","RSE" " ","Total(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(f)","Produced Onsite(g)","Row"

356

Heavy Oil Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Select Reports from Heavy Oil Projects Project Number Performer Title Heavy Oil Recovery US (NIPERBDM-0225) BDM-Oklahoma, Inc. Feasibility Study of Heavy Oil Recovery in the...

357

Crude Oil Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Notes: Crude oil exports are restricted to: (1) crude oil derived from fields under the State waters of Alaska's Cook Inlet; (2) Alaskan North Slope crude oil; (3) ...

358

3. Crude Oil Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

3. Crude Oil Statistics The United States had 21,371 million barrels of crude oil proved reserves as of December 31, 2004. Crude oil proved reserves ...

359

Adequate description of heavy oil viscosities and a method to assess optimal steam cyclic periods for thermal reservoir simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A global steady increase of energy consumption coupled with the decline of conventional oil resources points to a more aggressive exploitation of heavy oil. Heavy oil is a major source of energy in this century with a worldwide base reserve exceeding 2.5 trillion barrels. Management decisions and production strategies from thermal oil recovery processes are frequently based on reservoir simulation. A proper description of the physical properties, particularly oil viscosity, is essential in performing reliable modeling studies of fluid flow in the reservoir. We simulated cyclic steam injections on the highly viscous Hamaca oil, with a viscosity of over 10,000 cp at ambient temperature, and the production was drastically impacted by up to an order of magnitude when using improper mixing rules to describe the oil viscosity. This thesis demonstrates the importance of these mixing rules and alerts reservoir engineers to the significance of using different options simulators have built in their platforms to describe the viscosity of heavy oils. Log linear and power mixing rules do not provide enough flexibility to describe the viscosity of extra heavy oil with temperature. A recently implemented mixing rule in a commercial simulator has been studied providing satisfactory results. However, the methodology requires substantial interventions, and cannot be automatically updated. We provide guidelines to improve it and suggest more flexible mixing rules that could easily be implemented in commercial simulators. We also provide a methodology to determine the adequate time for each one of the periods in cyclic steam injection: injection, soaking and production. There is a lot of speculation in this matter and one of the objectives of this thesis is to better understand and provide guidelines to optimize oil production using proper lengths in each one of these periods. We have found that the production and injection periods should be similar in time length. Nevertheless, the production period should not be less than the injection period. On the other hand, the soaking period should be as short as possible because it is unproductive time in terms of field oil production for the well and therefore it translates into a negative cash flow for a company.

Mago, Alonso Luis

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Releasing Oil from the SPR | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Releasing Oil from the SPR Releasing Oil from the SPR Releasing Oil from the SPR The Strategic Petroleum Reserve exists, first and foremost, as an emergency response tool the President can use should the United States be confronted with an economically-threatening disruption in oil supplies. Statutory Authority for an SPR Drawdown Standard Sales Provisions Historical Oil Sales and Exchanges SPR Crude Oil Assays 2011 IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies A Presidentially-directed release has occurred three times under these conditions. First, in 1991, at the beginning of Operation Desert Storm, the United States joined its allies in assuring the adequacy of global oil supplies when war broke out in the Persian Gulf. An emergency sale of SPR crude oil was announced the day the war began.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global oil consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

5 World Oil Trends WORLD OIL TRENDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5 World Oil Trends Chapter 1 WORLD OIL TRENDS INTRODUCTION In considering the outlook for California's petroleum supplies, it is important to give attention to expecta- tions of what the world oil market. Will world oil demand increase and, if so, by how much? How will world oil prices be affected

362

Higher U.S. oil production in 2013 and 2014 means lower oil imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Higher U.S. oil production in 2013 and 2014 means lower oil Higher U.S. oil production in 2013 and 2014 means lower oil imports U.S. crude oil production topped 7 million barrels per day in November and December for the first time in 20 years, and production is expected to keep rising over the next two years. The U.S. Energy Information Administration's new monthly forecast sees domestic crude oil output averaging 7.3 million barrels per day this year and climbing to 7.9 million barrels next year. Higher crude oil production means America will need less imported oil. U.S. net imports of crude oil and liquid fuels are forecast to drop to 6.0 million barrels per day in 2014, less than half the 12.5 million barrels per day level in 2005. That will push U.S. imports down to just 32 percent of domestic oil consumption, the lowest

363

U.S. crude oil production expected to exceed oil imports later this year  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

crude oil production expected to exceed oil imports later crude oil production expected to exceed oil imports later this year U.S. crude oil production is expected to surpass U.S. crude oil imports by the fourth quarter of this year. That would mark the first time since February 1995 that domestic crude oil output exceeds imports, according to the latest monthly energy outlook from the U.S. Energy Information Administration. The United States will still need to import crude oil to help meet domestic demand. However, total crude oil imports this year are on track to fall to their lowest level since 1997. U.S. oil production is expected to continue to rise over the next two years as imports fall. As a result, the share of total U.S. petroleum consumption met by net imports is forecast to fall to 32 percent next year, the lowest level since 1985 and nearly half the peak level of 60 percent seen in

364

US ENC IL Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

IL IL Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ENC IL Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US ENC IL Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US ENC IL Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Illinois households use 129 million Btu of energy per home, 44% more than the U.S. average. * High consumption, combined with low costs for heating fuels compared to states with a similar climate, result in Illinois households spending 2% more for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S.

365

US ENC IL Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

IL IL Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ENC IL Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US ENC IL Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US ENC IL Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Illinois households use 129 million Btu of energy per home, 44% more than the U.S. average. * High consumption, combined with low costs for heating fuels compared to states with a similar climate, result in Illinois households spending 2% more for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S.

366

US ENC MI Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

MI MI Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ENC MI Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US ENC MI Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US ENC MI Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Michigan households use 123 million Btu of energy per home, 38% more than the U.S. average. * High consumption, combined with low costs for heating fuels compared to states with a similar climate, result in Michigan households spending 6% more for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S.

367

US ENC MI Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

MI MI Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ENC MI Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US ENC MI Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US ENC MI Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Michigan households use 123 million Btu of energy per home, 38% more than the U.S. average. * High consumption, combined with low costs for heating fuels compared to states with a similar climate, result in Michigan households spending 6% more for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S.

368

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

energy data used in this report do not reflect adjustments for losses in electricity generation or transmission. energy data used in this report do not reflect adjustments for losses in electricity generation or transmission. 1 The manufacturing sector is composed of establishments classified in Standard Industrial Classification 20 through 39 of the U.S. economy as defined 2 by the Office of Management and Budget. The manufacturing sector is a part of the industrial sector, which also includes mining; construction; and agriculture, forestry, and fishing. The EIA also conducts energy consumption surveys in the residential, commercial buildings, and residential transportation sectors: the Residential Energy 3 Consumption Survey (RECS); the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS); and, until recently, the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS).

369

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

17 17 Table C12. Total Energy Consumption, Gross Domestic Product (GDP), Energy Consumption per Real Dollar of GDP, Ranked by State, 2011 Rank Total Energy Consumption Gross Domestic Product (GDP) Energy Consumption per Real Dollar of GDP State Trillion Btu State Billion Chained (2005) Dollars State Thousand Btu per Chained (2005) Dollar 1 Texas 12,206.6 California 1,735.4 Louisiana 19.7 2 California 7,858.4 Texas 1,149.9 Wyoming 17.5 3 Florida 4,217.1 New York 1,016.4 North Dakota 15.4 4 Louisiana 4,055.3 Florida 661.1 Alaska 14.3 5 Illinois 3,977.8 Illinois 582.1 Mississippi 13.8 6 Ohio 3,827.6 Pennsylvania 500.4 Kentucky 13.5

370

Financing retirement consumption and bequests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation consists of three essays that evaluate possible vehicles for financing either retirement consumption or bequests. Chapter 1 compares the use of Roth and tax-deferred retirement accounts for retirement ...

Bishop, Tonja Bowen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Progressive consumption : strategic sustainable excess  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Trends in the marketplace show that urban dwellers are increasingly supporting locally produced foods. This thesis argues for an architecture that responds to our cultures consumptive behaviors. Addressing the effects of ...

Bonham, Daniel J. (Daniel Joseph MacLeod)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Energy consumption of building 39  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The MIT community has embarked on an initiative to the reduce energy consumption and in accordance with the Kyoto Protocol. This thesis seeks to further expand our understanding of how the MIT campus consumes energy and ...

Hopeman, Lisa Maria

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

W as hi ng to n, DC DOEEIA-0464(94) Distribution Category UC-950 Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 August 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets...

374

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

S Y M n i 1 y 2 i (W i ) (W i 1) , Energy Information Administration, Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey: Methodological Report 1985. Although this report describes 44...

375

Fuel Consumption | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Consumption, CO2 Emissions, And A Simple Connection To the Vehicle Fuel Consumption, CO2 Emissions, And A Simple Connection To the Vehicle Road Load Equation Jan 15 2014 11:30 AM - 12:30 PM Glen E. Johnson Tennessee Tech University, Cookeville Energy and Transportation Science Division Seminar National Transportation Research Center, Room C-04 CONTACT : Email: Andreas Malikopoulos Phone:865.382.7827 Add to Calendar SHARE Ambitious goals have been set to reduce fuel consumption and CO2 emissions over the next generation. Starting from first principles, we will derive relations to connect fuel consumption and carbon dioxide emissions to a vehicle's road load equation. The model suggests approaches to facilitate achievement of future fuel and emissions targets. About the speaker: Dr. Johnson is a 1973 Mechanical Engineering graduate of Worcester

376

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . Vehicle Fuel Efficiency and Consumption Fuel consumption is estimated from RTECS data on the vehicle stock (Chapter 2) and miles traveled (Chapter 3), in combination with vehicle fuel efficiency ratings, adjusted to account for individual driving circumstances. The first two sections of this chapter present estimates of household vehicle fuel efficiency and household fuel consumption calculated from these fuel efficiency estimates. These sections also discuss variations in fuel efficiency and consumption based on differences in household and vehicle characteristics. The third section presents EIA estimates of the potential savings from replacing the oldest (and least fuel-efficient) household vehicles with new (and more fuel-efficient) vehicles. The final section of this chapter focuses on households receiving (or eligible to receive) supplemental income under

377

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

C2. Energy Consumption Estimates for Major Energy Sources in Physical Units, 2011 State Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Power f Fuel Ethanol g...

378

Model for electric energy consumption in eastern Saudi Arabia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrical energy consumption in the eastern province of Saudi Arabia is modeled as a function of weather data, global solar radiation, population, and gross domestic product per capita. Five years of data have been used to develop the energy consumption model. Variable selection in the regression model is carried out by using the general stepping-regression technique. Model adequacy is determined from a residual analysis technique. Model validation aims to determine if the model will function successfully in its intended operating field. In this regard, new energy consumption data for a sixth year are collected, and the results predicted by the regression model are compared with the new data set. Finally, the sensitivity of the model is examined. It is found that the model is strongly influenced by the ambient temperature.

Al-Garni, A.Z.; Al-Nassar, Y.N.; Zubair, S.M.; Al-Shehri, A. [King Fahd Univ. of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Have We Run Out of Oil Yet? Oil Peaking Analysis from an Optimist's Perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study addresses several questions concerning the peaking of conventional oil production from an optimist's perspective. Is the oil peak imminent? What is the range of uncertainty? What are the key determining factors? Will a transition to unconventional oil undermine or strengthen OPEC's influence over world oil markets? These issues are explored using a model combining alternative world energy scenarios with an accounting of resource depletion and a market-based simulation of transition to unconventional oil resources. No political or environmental constraints are allowed to hinder oil production, geological constraints on the rates at which oil can be produced are not represented, and when USGS resource estimates are used, more than the mean estimate of ultimately recoverable resources is assumed to exist. The issue is framed not as a question of "running out" of conventional oil, but in terms of the timing and rate of transition from conventional to unconventional oil resources. Unconventional oil is chosen because production from Venezuela's heavy-oil fields and Canada's Athabascan oil sands is already underway on a significant scale and unconventional oil is most consistent with the existing infrastructure for producing, refining, distributing and consuming petroleum. However, natural gas or even coal might also prove to be economical sources of liquid hydrocarbon fuels. These results indicate a high probability that production of conventional oil from outside of the Middle East region will peak, or that the rate of increase of production will become highly constrained before 2025. If world consumption of hydrocarbon fuels is to continue growing, massive development of unconventional resources will be required. While there are grounds for pessimism and optimism, it is certainly not too soon for extensive, detailed analysis of transitions to alternative energy sources.

Greene, David L [ORNL; Hopson, Dr Janet L [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Li, Jia [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

OpenEI - Electricity Consumption  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Annual Electricity Annual Electricity Consumption (1980 - 2009) http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/877 Total annual electricity consumption by country, 1980 to 2009 (billion kilowatthours). Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA). License

Type of License:  Other (please specify below)
Source of data

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global oil consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Manufacturing consumption of energy 1991  

SciTech Connect

This report provides estimates on energy consumption in the manufacturing sector of the US economy. These estimates are based on data from the 1991 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS). This survey--administered by the Energy End Use and Integrated Statistics Division, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Energy Information Administration (EIA)--is the most comprehensive source of national-level data on energy-related information for the manufacturing industries.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Specialty Oils Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lab Proficiency Testing provider for Specialty Oils. Samples tested include Walnut Oil, Pecan Oil, Pistachio Oil, Sesame Seed Oil, Flax Seed Oil, Neem Oil, Safflower Oil, Sunflower Oil. Specialty Oils Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program Laboratory Pro

383

Oil | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil Oil Oil Prices, 2000-2008 For the first time since 1995, U.S. oil production has surpassed imports. Explore the trend with our interactive chart. |...

384

of oil yields from enhanced oil recovery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

oil yields from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and CO oil yields from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and CO 2 storage capacity in depleted oil reservoirs. The primary goal of the project is to demonstrate that remaining oil can be economically produced using CO 2 -EOR technology in untested areas of the United States. The Citronelle Field appears to be an ideal site for concurrent CO 2 storage and EOR because the field is composed of sandstone reservoirs

385

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

8A. District Heat Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for All Buildings, 2003 District Heat Consumption District Heat Expenditures per Building (million Btu) per Square Foot...

386

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

7A. Total District Heat Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Using District Heat District Heat Consumption District Heat Expenditures Number of...

387

Natural gas consumption reflects shifting sectoral patterns ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. natural gas consumption since 1997 reflects shifting patterns. Total U.S. natural gas consumption rose 7% between 1997 and 2011, but this modest ...

388

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

RECS data show decreased energy consumption per household. RECS 2009 — Release date: June 6, 2012. Total United States energy consumption in homes has remained ...

389

EIA Oil price timeline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, ... Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions.

390

A predictive ocean oil spill model  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Initially, the project focused on creating an ocean oil spill model and working with the major oil companies to compare their data with the Los Alamos global ocean model. As a result of this initial effort, Los Alamos worked closely with the Eddy Joint Industry Project (EJIP), a consortium oil and gas producing companies in the US. The central theme of the project was to use output produced from LANL`s global ocean model to look in detail at ocean currents in selected geographic areas of the world of interest to consortium members. Once ocean currents are well understood this information could be used to create oil spill models, improve offshore exploration and drilling equipment, and aid in the design of semi-permanent offshore production platforms.

Sanderson, J.; Barnette, D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Papodopoulos, P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schaudt, K. [Marathon Oil Co., Littleton, CO (United States); Szabo, D. [Mobil Research and Development Corp., Dallas, TX (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Happiness through consumption: towards a theoretical approach based on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

human needs satisfaction Economic welfare is traditionally related to happiness as increases in economic welfare are viewed as increases in utility, which has been a measure of happiness since the marginalist revolution at the beginning of XX century. Consumption is one of the main activities analysed by economic theory that is thought to account for greatest utility. However, the analysis of macroeconomic data do not allow the statement that individual consumption choices do not lead to greatest social welfare or global happiness, as in most capitalist societies deprivation and negative effects from over-consumption are experienced simultaneously. The neoclassical formal approach, which is the main theoretical framework followed by economist, does not intend to contemplate everyday paradoxes of consumption and happiness as it is based upon Utilitarianism. To maintain the link between theory and real economy it is necessary to progress towards a theoretical framework that facilitates the evaluation of consumption and its effects on individual and social welfare or happiness. This normative framework could facilitate the theoretical analysis of the paradoxes found

Monica Guillen Royo

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Residential energy consumption survey: housing characteristics 1984  

SciTech Connect

Data collected in the 1984 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the sixth national survey of households and their fuel suppliers, provides baseline information on how households use energy. Households living in all types of housing units - single-family homes (including townhouses), apartments, and mobile homes - were chosen to participate. Data from the surveys are available to the public. The housing characteristics this report describes include fuels and the uses they are put to in the home; appliances; square footage of floorspace; heating (and cooling) equipment; thermal characteristics of housing structures; conservation features and measures taken; the consumption of wood; temperatures indoors; and regional weather. These data are tabulated in sets, first showing counts of households and then showing percentages. Results showed: Fewer households are changing their main heating fuel. More households are air conditioned than before. Some 50% of air-conditioned homes now use central systems. The three appliances considered essential are the refrigerator, the range, and the television set. At least 98% of US homes have at least one television set; but automatic dishwashers are still not prevalent. Few households use the budget plans tht are available from their utility companies to ease the payment burden of seasonal surges in fuel bills. The most common type of heating equipment in the United States is the natural-gas forced-air furnace. About 40% ofthose furnaces are at least 15 years old. The oldest water heaters are those that use fuel oil. The most common conservation feature in 1984 is ceiling or attic insulation - 80% of homes report having this item. Relatively few households claimed tax credits in 1984 for energy-conservation improvements.

Not Available

1986-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

393

US ENC WI Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

120 120 US ENC WI Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ENC WI Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US ENC WI Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 US ENC WI Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Wisconsin households use 103 million Btu of energy per home, 15% more than the U.S. average. * Lower electricity and natural gas rates compared to states with a similar climate, such as New York, result in households spending 5% less for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers, keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S.

394

US ENC WI Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

120 120 US ENC WI Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ENC WI Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US ENC WI Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 US ENC WI Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Wisconsin households use 103 million Btu of energy per home, 15% more than the U.S. average. * Lower electricity and natural gas rates compared to states with a similar climate, such as New York, result in households spending 5% less for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers, keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S.

395

US WSC TX Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

WSC TX WSC TX Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US WSC TX Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 US WSC TX Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 US WSC TX Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Texas households consume an average of 77 million Btu per year, about 14% less than the U.S. average. * Average electricity consumption per Texas home is 26% higher than the national average, but similar to the amount used in neighboring states. * The average annual electricity cost per Texas household is $1,801, among the highest in the nation, although similar to other warm weather states like Florida. * Texas homes are typically newer, yet smaller in size, than homes in other parts of

396

US WSC TX Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

WSC TX WSC TX Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US WSC TX Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 US WSC TX Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 US WSC TX Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Texas households consume an average of 77 million Btu per year, about 14% less than the U.S. average. * Average electricity consumption per Texas home is 26% higher than the national average, but similar to the amount used in neighboring states. * The average annual electricity cost per Texas household is $1,801, among the highest in the nation, although similar to other warm weather states like Florida. * Texas homes are typically newer, yet smaller in size, than homes in other parts of

397

US ESC TN Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ESC TN ESC TN Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ESC TN Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 US ESC TN Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $400 $800 $1,200 $1,600 US ESC TN Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Tennessee households consume an average of 79 million Btu per year, about 12% less than the U.S. average. * Average electricity consumption for Tennessee households is 33% higher than the national average and among the highest in the nation, but spending for electricity is closer to average due to relatively low electricity prices. * Tennessee homes are typically newer, yet smaller in size, than homes in other parts of the country.

398

Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - Analysis & Projections -  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data 2010 2006 2002 1998 1994 1991 Archive Analysis & Projections MECS Industry Analysis Briefs Steel Industry Analysis The steel industry is critical to the U.S. economy. Steel is the material of choice for many elements of construction, transportation, manufacturing, and a variety of consumer products. It is the backbone of bridges, skyscrapers, railroads, automobiles, and appliances. Most grades of steel used today - particularly high-strength steels that are lighter and more versatile - were not available a decade ago. Chemical Industry Analysis The chemical industries are a cornerstone of the U.S. economy, converting raw materials such as oil, natural gas, air, water, metals, and minerals

399

Today in Energy - Residential Consumption & Efficiency  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Short, timely articles with graphs about recent residential consumption and efficiency issues and trends

400

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

State Energy Data System ... An Assessment of EIA's Building Consumption Data. ... Commercial Buildings - CBECS. Manufacturing - MECS.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global oil consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Today in Energy - Commercial Consumption & Efficiency  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Short, timely articles with graphs about recent commercial consumption and efficiency issues and trends

402

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity - Oil Bypass Filtration Evaluation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with oil bypass filter systems from PuraDYN Filter Technologies (8 buses) and Refined Global Solutions (3 buses). Six gasoline-equipped INL Tahoes are also equipped with PuraDYN...

403

Global Energy Management System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exxon Mobil Corporation has undertaken voluntary actions to continuously improve energy efficiency in our operations for many years. From 1973 to 1999, we improved the energy efficiency of our refineries and chemical plants by over 35 percent - saving the cumulative equivalent of 1.8 billion barrels of oil and reducing carbon dioxide emissions by over 200 million tonnes. In 2000, we redoubled our efforts with deployment of our Global Energy Management System (GEMS), which utilizes international best practices and benchmarking to identify energy efficiencies at each of our refineries and chemical plants. Thus far, we have identified opportunities to improve the energy efficiency of these facilities by an additional 15 to 20 percent. At full implementation, savings are expected to total $500 million to $1 billion per year, with an associated reduction in carbon dioxide emissions of about 10 million tonnes per year - roughly equivalent to removing 1.5 million cars from the world's roads.

Eidt, B. D.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

OpenEI - Energy Consumption  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Commercial and Commercial and Residential Hourly Load Profiles for all TMY3 Locations in the United States http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/961 This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols).  This dataset also includes the consumption/residential/">Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types

405

Monitoring Energy Consumption of Smartphones  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the rapid development of new and innovative applications for mobile devices like smartphones, advances in battery technology have not kept pace with rapidly growing energy demands. Thus energy consumption has become a more and more important issue of mobile devices. To meet the requirements of saving energy, it is critical to monitor and analyze the energy consumption of applications on smartphones. For this purpose, we develop a smart energy monitoring system called SEMO for smartphones using Android operating system. It can profile mobile applications with battery usage information, which is vital for both developers and users.

Ding, Fangwei; Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Xuhai; Ma, Chengchuan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System Heating Oil, PIA Office...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System Heating Oil, PIA Office of Fossil Energy Headquaters Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System Heating Oil, PIA Office of Fossil Energy...

407

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory The Joint Global Change  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pacific Northwest Pacific Northwest National Laboratory The Joint Global Change The Joint Global Change Research Institute Research Institute Nuclear Power and Stabilizing CO 2 Concentrations Jae Edmonds and Sonny Kim Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee Meeting April 15 and 16, 2002 Alexandria, VA Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 2 The Joint Global Change The Joint Global Change Research Institute Research Institute CLIMATE CHANGE Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 3 The Joint Global Change The Joint Global Change Research Institute Research Institute CLIMATE CHANGE Multiple gases * CO 2 (fossil fuel, land-use) * CH 4 (rice paddies, ruminant livestock, landfills, coal mining, oil and gas production, incomplete combustion) * N 2 O (nitrogen fertilizers, industrial processes, other??)

408

OIl Speculation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Investor Investor Flows and the 2008 Boom/Bust in Oil Prices Kenneth J. Singleton 1 August 10, 2011 1 Graduate School of Business, Stanford University, kenneths@stanford.edu. This research is the outgrowth of a survey paper I prepared for the Air Transport Association of America. I am grateful to Kristoffer Laursen for research assistance and to Kristoffer and Stefan Nagel for their comments. Abstract This paper explores the impact of investor flows and financial market conditions on returns in crude-oil futures markets. I begin by arguing that informational frictions and the associated speculative activity may induce prices to drift away from "fundamental" values and show increased volatility. This is followed by a discussion of the interplay between imperfect infor- mation about real economic activity, including supply, demand, and inventory accumulation, and speculative

409

Energy Information Administration - Energy Efficiency-Table 5b. Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

b b Page Last Modified: June 2010 Table 5b. Consumption of Energy for All Purposes (First Use) per Ton of Steel, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Million Btu per ton) MECS Survey Years Iron and Steel Mills (NAICS1 331111) 19982 20022 20062 Total 3 17 16 13 Net Electricity 4 2 2 2 Natural Gas 5 5 4 Coal 7 6 4 Notes: 1. The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) has replaced the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system. NAICS 331111 includes steel works, blast furnaces (including coke ovens), and rolling mills. 2. Denominators represent the entire steel industry, not those based mainly on electric, natural gas, residual fuel oil or coal.

410

Global biofuel use, 18502000 Suneeta D. Fernandes,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global biofuel use, 1850­2000 Suneeta D. Fernandes,1 Nina M. Trautmann,1 David G. Streets,1 February 2007; published 30 May 2007. [1] This paper presents annual, country-level estimates of biofuel use for the period 1850­2000. We estimate that global biofuel consumption rose from about 1000 Tg

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

411

Is there oil after OPEC : Ecuador's Pasaje  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 1973 when Ecuador joined the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries, crude oil production increased by nearly half and domestic petroleum consumption has more than tripled. Oil's percent of Gross Domestic Product was just 3% in 1972, peaked at 17.3% in 1974, and has since declined to 11.71% in 1991. In 1992 the national perspective changed and found that OPEC membership was working against, not in favor of, economic growth. This issue addresses Ecuador's status change and its plans for its petroleum and economic future.

Not Available

1992-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

412

Just oil? The distribution of environmental and social impacts of oil production and consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

YPF Westdeutsche Landesbank Exxon Shell Nigerian Nationalsome perspective, the Exxon-Valdez spill, which released 12to approximately ?ve Exxon-Valdez spills per year. For many

O'Rourke, D; Connolly, S

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Just oil? The distribution of environmental and social impacts of oil production and consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The four super majors—ExxonMobil, Royal Dutch/Shell, BP-2001, ?ve corporations (ExxonMobil, BP-Amoco- Arco, Chevron-involved BP Amoco ExxonMobil Chevron Phillips Petroleum

O'Rourke, D; Connolly, S

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Gulf Shale Oil Upgrading Process technology  

SciTech Connect

A description of the Gulf Shale Oil Hydrotreating Process, which is designed for upgrading full range shale oil to premium quality synthetic crude, is presented. The process consists of two sections: a low severity pretreating section which stabilizes the raw oil, removes iron, arsenic, trace metals and particulates, and sulfur; and a twostage, high severity hydrotreating section which completes the upgrading. The second section hydrotreats the bulk oil to a specified nitrogen content, allowing for a quality FCC feedstock in the 650F+ (343C+) residue. The main reactor effluent is flashed with subsequent hydrotreating of the flash vapor oil to achieve a low nitrogen level in the naphtha and middle distillate. The benefit of this flash configuration is hydrogen addition selectivity which maximizes syncrude quality while minimizing overall hydrogen consumption; this selectivity relationship is detailed. Finally, the product quality of the syncrudes produced with the Gulf Shale Oil Hydrotreating Process using shale oils derived from three different retort technologies and for Western and Eastern shales are discussed.

Jones, W.; Antezana, F.J.; Cugini, A.V.; Lyzinski, D.; Miller, J.B.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

G (2005) - Household Fuel Oil or Kerosene Usage Form G (2005) - Household Fuel Oil or Kerosene Usage Form OMB No. 1905-0092, Expiring May 31, 2008 Household Fuel Oil or Kerosene Usage Form Service Address: If the customer account number is not shown on the label, please enter it here. STEP 1 Customer Account: __/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/ STEP 2 Now, please turn the page and answer the seven questions for the household identified above. Completed forms are due by March 4, 2006. If you have any questions, please call (toll-free) 1-NNN-NNN-NNNN. Ask for the Supplier Survey Specialist. This report is mandatory under Public Law 93-275, as amended. See the enclosed Answers to Frequently Asked Questions for more details concerning confidentiality and sanctions.

416

US NE MA Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

NE MA NE MA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 US NE MA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US NE MA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US NE MA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Massachusetts households use 109 million Btu of energy per home, 22% more than the U.S. average. * The higher than average site consumption results in households spending 22% more for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers, keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S. However, spending on electricity is closer to the national average due to higher

417

US NE MA Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

NE MA NE MA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 US NE MA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US NE MA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US NE MA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Massachusetts households use 109 million Btu of energy per home, 22% more than the U.S. average. * The higher than average site consumption results in households spending 22% more for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers, keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S. However, spending on electricity is closer to the national average due to higher

418

Conspicuous Consumption and Dynamic Pricing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

How do firms develop marketing strategy when consumers seek to satisfy both quality and status-related considerations? We develop an analytical model to study this issue, examining both pricing and product management decisions in markets for conspicuous ... Keywords: conspicuous consumption, durable goods, dynamic pricing, game theory, status

Raghunath Singh Rao, Richard Schaefer

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Reduces a processor's energy consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). Clearly, this is energy inefficient and wasteful of energy. 2 More precisely, the faster that a processor decide that energy is being wasted and will decrease the frequency/voltage level. Translation: LowerReduces a processor's energy consumption by up to 70% Diminishes greenhouse gas emissions Improves

420

Experimental Studies Focused on the Pore-Scale Aspects of Heavy Oil and Bitumen Recovery Using the Steam Assisted Gravity Drainage (SAGD) and Solvent-Aided SAGD (SA-SAGD) Recovery Processes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Increasing energy consumption and continuous depletion of hydrocarbon reservoirs will result in a conventional oil production peak in the near future. Thus, the gap between… (more)

Mohammadzadeh Shanehsaz, Omidreza

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global oil consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Total OECD Oil Stocks*  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: The most recent data show OECD inventories remaining at very low levels. EIA expects inventories to remain low through the coming year. This increases the potential for price volatility through the rest of the winter, and into the next gasoline season. Inventories are a good measure of the supply/demand balance that affects prices. A large over-supply (production greater than demand) will put downward pressure on prices, while under-supply will push prices upward. As global oil production changed relative to demand, the world moved from a period of over-supply in 1998 to one of under-supply in 1999 and 2000. OECD inventories illustrate the changes in the world petroleum balance. OECD inventories rose to high levels during 1997 and 1998 when production exceeded demand and prices dropped to around $10 per barrel in

422

Total OECD Oil Stocks*  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The most recent data show OECD inventories remaining at very low The most recent data show OECD inventories remaining at very low levels. EIA expects inventories to remain low through the coming year. This increases the potential for price volatility through the winter, and even extending to the next gasoline season. Inventories are a good measure of the supply/demand balance that effects prices. A large over-supply (production greater than demand) will put downward pressure on prices, while under-supply will push prices upward. As global oil production changed relative to demand, the world moved from a period of over-supply in 1998 to one of under-supply in 1999 and 2000. OECD inventories illustrate the changes in the world petroleum balance. OECD inventories rose to high levels during 1997 and 1998 when production exceeded demand and prices dropped to around $10 per barrel in

423

Total OECD Oil Stocks*  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Notes: The most recent data show OECD inventories remaining at very low levels. EIA expects inventories to remain low through the coming year. This increases the potential for price volatility through the winter, and even extending to the next gasoline season. Inventories are a good measure of the supply/demand balance that effects prices. A large over-supply (production greater than demand) will put downward pressure on prices, while under-supply will push prices upward. As global oil production changed relative to demand, the world moved from a period of over-supply in 1998 to one of under-supply in 1999 and 2000. OECD inventories illustrate the changes in the world petroleum balance. OECD inventories rose to high levels during 1997 and 1998 when production exceeded demand and prices dropped to around $10 per barrel in

424

Beginning of an oil shale industry in Australia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses how preparations are being made for the construction and operation of a semi commercial plant to process Australian oil shale. This plant is primarily designed to demonstrate the technical feasibility of processing these shales at low cost. Nevertheless it is expected to generate modest profits even at this demonstration level. This will be the first step in a three staged development of one of the major Australian oil shale deposits which may ultimately provide nearly 10% of Australia's anticipated oil requirements by the end of the century. In turn this development should provide the basis for a full scale oil shale industry in Australia based upon the advantageously disposed oil shale deposits there. New sources of oil are becoming critical since Australian production is declining rapidly while consumption is accelerating.

Wright, B. (Southern Pacific Petroleum NL, 143 Macquarie Street, Sydney (AU))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Oilgopoly: a general equilibrium model of the oil-macroeconomy nexus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Saudi Arabia is the largest player in the world oil market. It maintains ample spare capacity, restricts investment in developing reserves, and its output is negatively correlated with other OPEC producers. While this behavior does not …t into the perfect competition paradigm, we show that it can be rationalized as that of a dominant producer with competitive fringe. We build a quantitative general equilibrium model along these lines which is capable of matching the historical volatility of the oil price, competitive and non-competitive oil output, and of generating the observed comovement among the oil price, oil quantities, and U.S. GDP. We use our framework to answer questions on which available models are silent: (1) What are the proximate determinants of the oil price and how do they vary over the cycle? (2) How large are oil pro…ts and what losses do they imply for oil-importers? (3) What do di¤erent fundamental shocks imply for the comovement of oil prices and GDP? (4) What are the general equilibrium e¤ects of taxes on oil consumption or oil production? We …nd, in particular, that the existence of an oil production distortion does not necessarily justify an oil consumption tax di¤erent from zero. 1

Anton Nakov Y; Banco De España; Galo Nuño; Banco De España

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

The 1997 Residential Energy Consumption Survey -- Two Decades  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1997 Residential Energy Consumption Survey presents two decades of changes in energy consumption related Household Characteristics

427

Implications of ``peak oil'' for atmospheric CO2 and climate Pushker A. Kharecha1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Implications of ``peak oil'' for atmospheric CO2 and climate Pushker A. Kharecha1 and James E environments. If conventional oil production peaks within the next few decades, it may have a large effect., and J. E. Hansen (2008), Implications of ``peak oil'' for atmospheric CO2 and climate, Global Biogeochem

428

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

World Production of Crude Oil, NGPL, and Other Liquids, andWorld Production of Crude Oil, NGPL, and Other Liquids, andProduction of Crude Oil, NGPL, and Other Liquids, and Re?

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Reduce Oil Dependence Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reduce Oil Dependence Costs U.S. Petroleum Use, 1970-2010 Nearly 40% of the oil we use is imported, costing us roughly 300 billion annually. Increased domestic oil production from...

430

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural Gas, Heating Oil and Gasoline,” NBER Working Paper.2006. “China’s Growing Demand for Oil and Its Impact on U.S.and Income on Energy and Oil Demand,” Energy Journal 23(1),

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Oil Spills and Wildlife  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil Spills and Wildlife Name: jess Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: what are some effects of oil spills on plants? Replies: The effects of oil spills over the last...

432

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the residual quantity of oil that never gets produced.order to purchase a quantity Q barrels of oil at a price P tD t Q t Q t+1 Quantity Figure 5. Monthly oil production for

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2004. “OPEC’s Optimal Crude Oil Price,” Energy Policy 32(2),Figure 3. Price of crude oil contract maturing December ofbarrels per day. Monthly crude oil production Iran Iraq

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2004. “OPEC’s Optimal Crude Oil Price,” Energy Policy 32(2),percent change in real oil price. Figure 3. Price of crude023 Understanding Crude Oil Prices James D. Hamilton June

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Muslim oil and gas periphery; the future of hydrocarbons in Africa, southeast Asia and the Caspian. Master`s thesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This thesis is a study of the contemporary political, economic, and technical developments and future prospects of the Muslim hydrocarbon exporters of Africa, Southeast Asia, and the Caspian. The established Muslim oil and gas periphery of Africa and Southeast Asia has four members in the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and is systemically increasing its production of natural gas. I analyze US government and corporate policies regarding the countries and the major dilemmas of the Muslim hydrocarbon periphery. The first chapter provides a selective overview of global energy source statistics; the policies, disposition and composition of the major hydrocarbon production and consumption players and communities; a selective background of OPEC and its impact on the globe; and a general portrait of how the Muslim periphery piece fits into the overall Muslim oil and gas puzzle. Chapter two analyzes the established Muslim oil and gas periphery of Africa and Southeast Asia asking the following questions: What are the major political, economic, and technical trends and dilemmas affecting these producer nations. And what are the United States` policies and relationships with these producers. Chapter three asks the same questions as chapter two, but with regard to the newly independent states of the Caspian Sea. I probe the regional petroleum exploration and transportation dilemmas in some detail.

Crockett, B.D.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Information Administration/Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 Energy Information Administration/Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 Introduction The market for natural gas has been changing for quite some time. As part of natural gas restructuring, gas pipelines were opened to multiple users. Manufacturers or their representatives could go directly to the wellhead to purchase their natural gas, arrange the transportation, and have the natural gas delivered either by the local distribution company or directly through a connecting pipeline. More recently, the electricity markets have been undergoing change. When Congress passed the Energy Policy Act of 1992, requirements were included not only to open access to the ownership of electricity generation, but also to open access to the transmission lines so that wholesale trade in electricity would be possible. Now several States, including California and

437

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 State Energy Data 2011: Consumption Table C11. Energy Consumption by Source, Ranked by State, 2011 Rank Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum b Retail Electricity Sales State Trillion Btu State Trillion Btu State Trillion Btu State Trillion Btu 1 Texas 1,695.2 Texas 3,756.9 Texas 5,934.3 Texas 1,283.1 2 Indiana 1,333.4 California 2,196.6 California 3,511.4 California 893.7 3 Ohio 1,222.6 Louisiana 1,502.9 Louisiana 1,925.7 Florida 768.0 4 Pennsylvania 1,213.0 New York 1,246.9 Florida 1,680.3 Ohio 528.0 5 Illinois 1,052.2 Florida 1,236.6 New York 1,304.0 Pennsylvania 507.6 6 Kentucky 1,010.6 Pennsylvania 998.6 Pennsylvania 1,255.6 New York 491.5

438

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Manufacturing Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey Forms Form EIA-846A (4-6-95) U.S. Department of Commerce Bureau of the Census Acting as Collecting and Compiling Agent For 1994 MANUFACTURING ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 9 hours per response, including the time of reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. Send comments regarding this burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of information, including suggestions for reducing this burden, to the Energy Information Administration, Office of Statistical Standards, EI-73, 1707 H-Street, NW, Washington, DC 20585; and to the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, Office of

439

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Detailed Detailed Tables The following tables present detailed characteristics of vehicles in the residential sector. Data are from the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey. The "Glossary" contains the definitions of terms used in the tables. Table Organization The "Detailed Tables" section consists of three types of tables: (1) Tables of totals such as number of vehicle miles traveled (VMT) or gallons consumed; (2) Tables of per household statistics such as VMT per household; and (3) Tables of per vehicle statistics such as vehicle fuel consumption per vehicle. The tables have been grouped together by specific topics such as model year data, or family income data to facilitate finding related information. The Quick-Reference Guide to the detailed tables indicates major topics of each table. Row and Column Factors These tables present estimates

440

US WNC MO Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

WNC MO WNC MO Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US WNC MO Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 3,000 6,000 9,000 12,000 15,000 US WNC MO Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 US WNC MO Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Missouri households consume an average of 100 million Btu per year, 12% more than the U.S. average. * Average household energy costs in Missouri are slightly less than the national average, primarily due to historically lower residential electricity prices in the state. * Missouri homes are typically larger than homes in other states and are more likely to be attached or detached single-family housing units.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global oil consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2(94) 2(94) Distribution Category UC-950 Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 December 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. ii Energy Information Administration/Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 Contacts This publication was prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) under the general direction of W. Calvin

442

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E E U.S. Census Regions and Divisions 489 Energy Information Administration/Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 Source: U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, Statistical Abstract of the United States,1996 (Washington, DC, October 1996), Figure 1. Appendix E U.S. Census Regions and Divisions Appendix F Descriptions of Major Industrial Groups and Selected Industries Executive Office of the President, Office of Management and Budget, Standard Industrial Classification Manual, 1987, pp. 67-263. 54 493 Energy Information Administration/Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 Appendix F Descriptions of Major Industrial Groups and Selected Industries This appendix contains descriptions of industrial groups and selected industries taken from the Standard Industrial

443

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. 3. Vehicle Miles Traveled This chapter presents information on household vehicle usage, as measured by the number of vehicle miles traveled (VMT). VMT is one of the two most important components used in estimating household vehicle fuel consumption. (The other, fuel efficiency, is discussed in Chapter 4). In addition, this chapter examines differences in driving behavior based on the characteristics of the household and the type of vehicle driven. Trends in household driving patterns are also examined using additional information from the Department of Transportation's Nationwide Personal Transportation Survey (NPTS). Household VMT is a measure of the demand for personal transportation. Demand for transportation may be viewed from either an economic or a social perspective. From the economic point-of-view, the use of a household vehicle represents the consumption of one

444

Fuel Consumption for Electricity Generation, All Sectors United States  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fuel Consumption for Electricity Generation, All Sectors Fuel Consumption for Electricity Generation, All Sectors United States Coal (thousand st/d) .................... 2,361 2,207 2,586 2,287 2,421 2,237 2,720 2,365 2,391 2,174 2,622 2,286 2,361 2,437 2,369 Natural Gas (million cf/d) ............. 20,952 21,902 28,751 21,535 20,291 22,193 28,174 20,227 20,829 22,857 29,506 21,248 23,302 22,736 23,627 Petroleum (thousand b/d) ........... 128 127 144 127 135 128 135 119 131 124 134 117 131 129 127 Residual Fuel Oil ...................... 38 28 36 29 30 31 33 29 31 30 34 27 33 31 30 Distillate Fuel Oil ....................... 26 24 27 28 35 30 30 26 31 26 28 25 26 30 28 Petroleum Coke (a) .................. 59 72 78 66 63 63 66 59 62 63 67 60 69 63 63 Other Petroleum Liquids (b) ..... 5 3 4 4 7 5 5 5 7 5 5 5 4 6 6 Northeast Census Region Coal (thousand st/d) ....................

445

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4) 4) June 2007 State Energy Consumption Estimates 1960 Through 2004 2004 Consumption Summary Tables Table S1. Energy Consumption Estimates by Source and End-Use Sector, 2004 (Trillion Btu) State Total Energy b Sources End-Use Sectors a Coal Natural Gas c Petroleum Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Power d Biomass e Other f Net Interstate Flow of Electricity/Losses g Residential Commercial Industrial b Transportation Alabama 2,159.7 853.9 404.0 638.5 329.9 106.5 185.0 0.1 -358.2 393.7 270.2 1,001.1 494.7 Alaska 779.1 14.1 411.8 334.8 0.0 15.0 3.3 0.1 0.0 56.4 63.4 393.4 266.0 Arizona 1,436.6 425.4 354.9 562.8 293.1 69.9 8.7 3.6 -281.7 368.5 326.0 231.2 511.0 Arkansas 1,135.9 270.2 228.9 388.3 161.1 36.5 76.0 0.6 -25.7 218.3 154.7 473.9 288.9 California 8,364.6 68.9 2,474.2 3,787.8 315.6 342.2

446

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9) 9) June 2011 State Energy Consumption Estimates 1960 Through 2009 2009 Consumption Summary Tables Table C1. Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and End-Use Sector, 2009 (Trillion Btu) State Total Energy b Sources End-Use Sectors a Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy e Net Interstate Flow of Electricity/ Losses f Net Electricity Imports Residential Commercial Industrial b Transportation Coal Natural Gas c Petroleum d Total Alabama 1,906.8 631.0 473.9 583.9 1,688.8 415.4 272.9 -470.3 0.0 383.2 266.0 788.5 469.2 Alaska 630.4 14.5 344.0 255.7 614.1 0.0 16.3 0.0 (s) 53.4 61.0 325.4 190.6 Arizona 1,454.3 413.3 376.7 520.8 1,310.8 320.7 103.5 -279.9 -0.8 400.8 352.1 207.8 493.6 Arkansas 1,054.8 264.1 248.1 343.1 855.3 158.7 126.5 -85.7 0.0 226.3 167.0 372.5

447

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3. Energy Consumption per Capita by End-Use Sector, Ranked by State, 2011 3. Energy Consumption per Capita by End-Use Sector, Ranked by State, 2011 Rank Residential Sector Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Transportation Sector Total Consumption State Million Btu State Million Btu State Million Btu State Million Btu State Million Btu 1 North Dakota 99.8 District of Columbia 193.1 Louisiana 585.8 Alaska 277.3 Wyoming 974.7 2 West Virginia 90.9 Wyoming 119.2 Wyoming 568.2 Wyoming 200.7 Louisiana 886.5 3 Missouri 89.4 North Dakota 106.9 Alaska 435.7 North Dakota 172.8 Alaska 881.3 4 Tennessee 87.8 Alaska 94.1 North Dakota 388.9 Louisiana 158.0 North Dakota 768.4 5 Kentucky 87.4 Montana 78.4 Iowa 243.4 Oklahoma 122.3 Iowa 493.6

448

Household vehicles energy consumption 1994  

SciTech Connect

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 reports on the results of the 1994 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS). The RTECS is a national sample survey that has been conducted every 3 years since 1985. For the 1994 survey, more than 3,000 households that own or use some 6,000 vehicles provided information to describe vehicle stock, vehicle-miles traveled, energy end-use consumption, and energy expenditures for personal vehicles. The survey results represent the characteristics of the 84.9 million households that used or had access to vehicles in 1994 nationwide. (An additional 12 million households neither owned or had access to vehicles during the survey year.) To be included in then RTECS survey, vehicles must be either owned or used by household members on a regular basis for personal transportation, or owned by a company rather than a household, but kept at home, regularly available for the use of household members. Most vehicles included in the RTECS are classified as {open_quotes}light-duty vehicles{close_quotes} (weighing less than 8,500 pounds). However, the RTECS also includes a very small number of {open_quotes}other{close_quotes} vehicles, such as motor homes and larger trucks that are available for personal use.

NONE

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Understanding Crude Oil Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5. Monthly oil production for Iran, Iraq, and Kuwait, inday. Monthly crude oil production Iran Iraq Kuwait Figure 6.Arabia PRODUCTION QUOTA Iran PRODUCTION QUOTA Venezuela

Hamilton, James Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Does Ownership Matter? The Performance and Efficiency of State Oil vs. Private Oil (1987-2006)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

deflators; the annual average real-terms crude oil price and global refining margin (average of US Gulf Coast, North-West Europe and Singapore), sourced from the BP Statistical Review of World Energy; a dummy variable for countries with OPEC membership... the forms and degree of State Oil vs. Private Oil involvement. For the upstream, the most fundamental decision is between public or private ownership of the subsoil. As of today, the U.S. is the only country to have opted for private ownership – all...

Wolf, C

451

Crude Oil Affects Gasoline Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude Oil Affects Gasoline Prices. WTI Crude Oil Price. Retail Gasoline Price. Source: Energy Information Administration

452

Use of waste oils to improve densified refuse derived fuels. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The preparation and properties of densified refuse-derived fuel (d-RDF) had previously been studied. The objectives of this study were the reduction of the power consumption and increase in the throughput of the densifier, increase in the calorific value and of the resistance of the d-RDF to weathering during outdoor storage. It was believed that these objectives might be achieved by adding waste oils to RDF just before densification. The majority of such oil from local sources includes spent crankcase oils with a high content of lead. In the work reported here, office wastes were shredded, air classified, and reshredded prior to feeding to an animal feed densifier. Water was added to the densifier feed in order to investigate a range of moisture contents. Waste oil (from a local dealer) was pumped through spray nozzles onto the densifier feed at controlled flows so as to investigate a range of oil contents. It is observed that over the practical range of waste oil contents, the savings in power consumption with increasing oil content are small. The addition of waste oil (up to 15 wt %) to the feed did not cause noticeable improvements in throughput rates. As expected, the calorific value of the fuel increases in proportion to the amount of waste oil. Pellets containing 13 wt % oil resulted in having a 20% higher calorific content. Increased waste oil levels in RDF led to reduction in pellet lengths and densities. The addition of waste oil to RDF did not improve pellet water repellency.

None

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Biochemically enhanced oil recovery and oil treatment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to the preparation of new, modified organisms, through challenge growth processes, that are viable in the extreme temperature, pressure and pH conditions and salt concentrations of an oil reservoir and that are suitable for use in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The modified microorganisms of the present invention are used to enhance oil recovery and remove sulfur compounds and metals from the crude oil.

Premuzic, Eugene T. (East Moriches, NY); Lin, Mow (Rocky Point, NY)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Biochemically enhanced oil recovery and oil treatment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to the preparation of new, modified organisms, through challenge growth processes, that are viable in the extreme temperature, pressure and pH conditions and salt concentrations of an oil reservoir and that are suitable for use in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The modified microorganisms of the present invention are used to enhance oil recovery and remove sulfur compounds and metals from the crude oil. 62 figures.

Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.

1994-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

455

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C31A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Building Size for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption...

456

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C25A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption...

457

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C32A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption...

458

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: Dec 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C10A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption...

459

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C30A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption...

460

Benefits vs. risks of fish consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The benefits of fish consumption outweigh the risks, according to a joint expert consultation released in October 2011 by two United Nations agencies. Benefits vs. risks of fish consumption News Inform Magazine Inform Archives Health Nutrition Omega

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global oil consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W XYZ ‹ Consumption & Efficiency Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) Glossary ...

462

Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Below are historical data tables from the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). These tables cover the total number of households ...

463

Energy Consumption and Expenditures RECS 2001  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Water Heating. Space Heating. Appliances. Air-Conditioning. About the Data. Tables: Total Energy Consumption in U.S ...

464

Consumption & Efficiency - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Consumption & Efficiency. Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, ... State Energy Data System: Noncombustible Renewable Energy for 2011 ...

465

State energy data report 1992: Consumption estimates  

SciTech Connect

This is a report of energy consumption by state for the years 1960 to 1992. The report contains summaries of energy consumption for the US and by state, consumption by source, comparisons to other energy use reports, consumption by energy use sector, and describes the estimation methodologies used in the preparation of the report. Some years are not listed specifically although they are included in the summary of data.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Foreign Oil Dependence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Public transportation provides greater freedom, access, opportunity and choice for Americans from all walks of life and from all across the country. Ridership is up 25.1 percent since 1995, and the millions of Americans who use public transportation each weekday know it saves money and gasoline. This independent analysis looks for the first time at what public transportation saves – both for individual households and for the nation as a whole. In addition, it explores a possible future where many more Americans would have the choice to take public transportation. It was commissioned from ICF International by the American Public Transportation Association. Public Transportation Reduces U.S. Foreign Oil Dependence Using conservative assumptions, the study found that current public transportation usage reduces U.S. gasoline consumption by 1.4 billion gallons each year. In concrete terms, that means: 108 million fewer cars filling up – almost 300,000 every day. 34 fewer supertankers leaving the Middle East – one every 11 days.

Linda Bailey

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Vehicle emissions and energy consumption impacts of modal shifts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Growing concern over air quality has prompted the development of strategies to reduce vehicle emissions in these areas. Concern has also been expressed regarding the current dependency of the U,S, on foreign oil. An option for addressing these concerns is to reduce vehicle-miles travelled (VMT), High- occupancy vehicle (HOV) lanes have been cited as one alternative for achieving this goal. However, latent travel demand frequently negates some or all of the VMT savings brought about by HOV lanes, The net effects of modal shifts to HOV lanes and the subsequent latent travel demand were studied in the thesis, A methodology was developed for estimating vehicle emissions and energy consumption impacts of modal shifts from private vehicles in the freeway mainlanes to buses in an HOV lane when latent travel demand is considered. The methodology was evaluated and determined to yield reasonable results, Finally, the methodology was applied to a freeway corridor in Houston, Texas. The results of the application indicate that reductions in VMT do not necessarily cause reductions in vehicle emissions of interest even when considered, all three of the pollutants of latent travel demand is not consumption was decreased at considered. Energy consumption was decreased a virtually all levels of latent travel demand except where latent travel demand was equivalent to the mode shift.

Mallett, Vickie Lynn

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

EIA - Analysis of Natural Gas Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption Consumption 2010 Natural Gas Year-In-Review 2009 This is a special report that provides an overview of the natural gas industry and markets in 2009 with special focus on the first complete set of supply and disposition data for 2009 from the Energy Information Administration. Topics discussed include natural gas end-use consumption trends, offshore and onshore production, imports and exports of pipeline and liquefied natural gas, and above-average storage inventories. Categories: Prices, Production, Consumption, Imports/Exports & Pipelines, Storage (Released, 7/9/2010, Html format) Trends in U.S. Residential Natural Gas Consumption This report presents an analysis of residential natural gas consumption trends in the United States through 2009 and analyzes consumption trends for the United States as a whole (1990 through 2009) and for each Census Division (1998 through 2009). It examines a long-term downward per-customer consumption trend and analyzes whether this trend persists across Census Divisions. The report also examines some of the factors that have contributed to the decline in per-customer consumption. To provide a more meaningful measure of per-customer consumption, EIA adjusted consumption data presented in the report for weather. Categories: Consumption (Released, 6/23/2010, pdf format)

469

Mathematical models of natural gas consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mathematical models of natural gas consumption Kristian Sabo, Rudolf Scitovski, Ivan of natural gas consumption Kristian Sabo, Rudolf Scitovski, Ivan Vazler , Marijana Zeki-Susac ksabo of natural gas consumption hourly fore- cast on the basis of hourly movement of temperature and natural gas

Scitovski, Rudolf

470

Verifying a Simplified Fuel Oil Flow Field Measurement Protocol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Better Buildings program is a U.S. Department of Energy program funding energy efficiency retrofits in buildings nationwide. The program is in need of an inexpensive method for measuring fuel oil consumption that can be used in evaluating the impact that retrofits have in existing properties with oil heat. This project developed and verified a fuel oil flow field measurement protocol that is cost effective and can be performed with little training for use by the Better Buildings program as well as other programs and researchers.

Henderson, H.; Dentz, J.; Doty, C.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

TheU.S.DollarExchangeRateandtheDemandforOil ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using recent advances in panel data estimation techniques, we find that an appreciation of the US dollar exchange rate leads to a significant decline in oil demand for a sample of 65 oil-importing countries. The estimated effectturnsouttobemuch larger than the impact of a shift in the global crude oil price expressed in US dollar. Furthermore, the effect of the US dollar on oil demand tends to be declining over time and, for a subsample of OECD countries, stronger for an appreciation compared to a depreciation of the US dollar.

Selien De Schryder; Gert Peersman

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

DOE/EIA-0321/HRIf Residential Energy Consumption Survey. Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

/HRIf /HRIf Residential Energy Consumption Survey. Consumption and Expenditures, April 1981 Through March 1982 an Part I: National Data Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. (202) 20fr02 'O'Q 'uoifkjjUSBM ujiuud juaoiujeAog 'S'n siuawnooQ jo luapuaiuuadns - 0088-292 (202) 98S02 '0'Q 8f 0-d I 6ujp|ing uoiieflSjUjiup v UOIIBUJJOJU | ABjau 3 02-13 'jaiuao UOIJBUJJOJUI XBjaug IBUO!;BN noA pasopua s; uujoi japjo uy 'MO|aq jeadde sjaqoinu auoydajaj PUB sassajppv 'OI3N 9>4i oi papajip aq pinoqs X6jaue uo suotjsenQ '(OIBN) J9»ueo aqjeiMJO^ui ASjaug (BUOIJEN s,vi3 QMi JO OdO 941 UUGJJ peuiBiqo eq ABOI suoijBonqnd (vi3) UO!JBJ;S!UILUPV UOIIBUUJO|U| XBjeug jaiflo PUB SJMJ p ssBiiojnd PUB UOIIBLUJO^JI 6uuepjQ (Od9) 90IWO Bujjuud luetuujaAOQ -g'n 'sjuaiunooa p juapuaiuuedng aqt LUOJI aiqB||BAB si uoHBOjiqnd sjt|i

473

Eco Oil 4  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This article describes the processes, challenges, and achievements of researching and developing a biobased motor oil.

Brett Earl; Brenda Clark

2009-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

474

Subject is oil shale  

SciTech Connect

The article reviews the current financial, legislative and regulatory problems of oil shale development. 2 refs.

Due, M.J.C.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Demonstrated Petroleum Reduction Using Oil Bypass Filter Technology on Heavy and Light Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demonstrated Petroleum Demonstrated Petroleum Reduction Using Oil Bypass Filter Technology on Heavy and Light Vehicles James Francfort (PI) Timothy Murphy Larry Zirker Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation * Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program * Performed by Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Fleet Operations * Goal - Support DOE's efforts to reduce petroleum consumption & ensure the energy security of the United States Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation * Objectives - Test the concept of using oil bypass filters to minimize engine oil changes & the generation of waste oils - Demonstration the economics of oil bypass filter systems - Estimate potential engine oil saving from bypass filter technologies that can be achieved by INEEL,

476

TV Energy Consumption Trends and Energy-Efficiency Improvement Options  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2008 Standby Power Consumption Report”, March. http://of measurement for the power consumption of audio, video andand Low Power Mode Energy Consumption”, Energy Efficiency in

Park, Won Young

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Addressing Water Consumption of Evaporative Coolers with Greywater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5 3. Water Consumption of Evaporative7 3.1.2. Water Consumption Due to9 3.1.4. Water Consumption due to

Sahai, Rashmi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Alcohol consumption, medical conditions and health behavior in older adults  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alcohol consumption In press, American JournalHealth Behavior Alcohol Consumption, Medical Conditions andin the association of alcohol consumption with health and

Satre, Derek; Gordon, Nancy P.; Weisner, Constance

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Modelling the impact of user behaviour on heat energy consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

strategies impact on energy consumption in residentialBEHAVIOUR ON HEAT ENERGY CONSUMPTION Nicola Combe 1 ,2 ,nearly 60% of domestic energy consumption and 27% of total

Combe, Nicola Miss; Harrison, David Professor; Way, Celia Miss

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

TV Energy Consumption Trends and Energy-Efficiency Improvement Options  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Low Power Mode Energy Consumption”, Energy Efficiency inEnergy Consumption ..26 3.1.3. 3D TV Energy Consumption and Efficiency

Park, Won Young

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global oil consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Whole-house measurements of standby power consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Whole-House Measurements of Standby Power Consumption" InStudy on Miscellaneous Standby Consumption of HouseholdA. , Murakoshi, C. 1997. Standby Electricity Consumption in

Ross, J.P.; Meier, Alan

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

2009 Energy Consumption Per Person | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home 2009 Energy Consumption Per Person 2009 Energy Consumption Per Person 2009 Energy Consumption...

483

Evaluation of Oil Bypass Filter Technology on Heavy-Duty Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity) (Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity) Evaluation of Oil Bypass Filter Technology on Heavy-Duty Vehicles James Francfort American Filtration and Separations Society April 2005 Presentation Outline * Background & Objectives * Oil bypass filters - features & reported benefits * INL testing method * puraDYN oil bypass filters * Refined Global Solutions (RGS) oil bypass filters * Testing results & trends * Particulate and ferrography testing * Initial INL Oil Bypass Filter Economics * Potential fleet oil savings * Testing Status Bypass Filter Evaluation - Background * Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program (Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity) * Vehicles operated by Idaho National Laboratory's Fleet Operations group * Idaho National Laboratory

484

Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and electrical energy consumption systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and electrical energy consumption systems are described. In one aspect, an electrical appliance energy consumption control method includes providing an electrical appliance coupled with a power distribution system, receiving electrical energy within the appliance from the power distribution system, consuming the received electrical energy using a plurality of loads of the appliance, monitoring electrical energy of the power distribution system, and adjusting an amount of consumption of the received electrical energy via one of the loads of the appliance from an initial level of consumption to an other level of consumption different than the initial level of consumption responsive to the monitoring.

Donnelly, Matthew K. (Kennewick, WA); Chassin, David P. (Pasco, WA); Dagle, Jeffery E. (Richland, WA); Kintner-Meyer, Michael (Richland, WA); Winiarski, David W. (Kennewick, WA); Pratt, Robert G. (Kennewick, WA); Boberly-Bartis, Anne Marie (Alexandria, VA)

2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

485

Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and electrical energy consumption systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and electrical energy consumption systems are described. In one aspect, an electrical appliance energy consumption control method includes providing an electrical appliance coupled with a power distribution system, receiving electrical energy within the appliance from the power distribution system, consuming the received electrical energy using a plurality of loads of the appliance, monitoring electrical energy of the power distribution system, and adjusting an amount of consumption of the received electrical energy via one of the loads of the appliance from an initial level of consumption to an other level of consumption different than the initial level of consumption responsive to the monitoring.

Donnelly, Matthew K. (Kennewick, WA); Chassin, David P. (Pasco, WA); Dagle, Jeffery E. (Richland, WA); Kintner-Meyer, Michael (Richland, WA); Winiarski, David W. (Kennewick, WA); Pratt, Robert G. (Kennewick, WA); Boberly-Bartis, Anne Marie (Alexandria, VA)

2006-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

486

Oil | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oil Oil Oil Oil Prices, 2000-2008 For the first time since 1995, U.S. oil production has surpassed imports. Explore the trend with our interactive chart. | Graphic by Daniel Wood, Energy Department. For the first time since 1995, U.S. oil production has surpassed imports. Explore the trend with our interactive chart. | Graphic by Daniel Wood, Energy Department. Oil is used for heating and transportation -- most notably, as fuel for gas-powered vehicles. America's dependence on foreign oil has declined in recent years, but oil prices have increased. The Energy Department supports research and policy options to increase our domestic supply of oil while ensuring environmentally sustainable supplies domestically and abroad, and is investing in research, technology and

487

Fuel efficient lubricants and the effect of special base oils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The demand for improved fuel economy is placing increasing pressure upon engine manufacturers world-wide. Lubricants that can provide additional fuel efficiency benefits are being vigorously sought. Such lubricants must achieve the current performance specifications that are also increasing in severity. To meet all of these requirements, passenger car lubricant formulations will need special base oils. This paper presents data on comparable 5W-30 formulations based on either hydrogenated mineral oil, or hydrocracked or poly alpha olefin basestocks. These blends clearly demonstrate the effect of improved volatility on oil consumption and oxidation stability in a range of bench engine tests. Equivalent engine test performance is observed for the hydrocracked and polyalphaolefin blends. Both exhibit performance superior to that attained by the hydrogenated mineral oil-based blend. Predicted Sequence VI fuel savings for these blends show additional fuel efficiency benefits for hydrocracked vs. hydrogenated mineral oil-based blends. 18 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

Kiovsky, T.E. [BP Oil Company, Cleveland, OH (United States); Yates, N.C.; Bales, J.R. [BP Oil International Limited, Middlesex (United Kingdom)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide Agency/Company /Organization: Natural Resources Canada Focus Area: Fuels & Efficiency Topics: Analysis Tools Website: oee.nrcan.gc.ca/transportation/tools/fuel-consumption-guide/fuel-consu Natural Resources Canada has compiled fuel consumption ratings for passenger cars and light-duty pickup trucks, vans, and special purpose vehicles sold in Canada. The website links to the Fuel Consumption Guide and allows users to search for vehicles from current and past model years. It also provides information about vehicle maintenance and other practices to reduce fuel consumption. How to Use This Tool This tool is most helpful when using these strategies:

489

Figure 1.6 State-Level Energy Consumption Estimates and Estimated ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Figure 1.6 State-Level Energy Consumption Estimates and Estimated Consumption per Capita, 2010 Consumption Consumption per Capita

490

Nearest neighbor technique and artificial neural networks for short-term electric consumptions forecast  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Promoting both energy savings and renewable energy development are two objectives of the actual and national French energy policy. In this sense, the present work takes part in a global development of various tools allowing managing energy demand. So, ... Keywords: Kohonen Self-Organizing Map, Multi-Layer Perceptron, Short-Term Electric Consumption, The Nearest Neighbor Technique, Virtual Power Plant

Van Giang Tran; Stéphane Grieu; Monique Polit

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

The Perils of Consumption and the Gift Economy as the Solution Daniel Miller’s Consumption and Its Consequences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Press. Miller, D. (2012). Consumption and its consequences.The Perils of Consumption and the Gift Economy asSolution Daniel Miller’s ‘Consumption and Its Consequences’

Leahy, Terry

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Outlook Briefing for the State Heating Oil and Propane Program Conference Asheville, NC Mike Burdette Petroleum Division, Energy ...

493

Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table of Contents. Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook. Short-Term World Oil Price Forecast . Price Movements Related to Supply/Demand Balance

494

Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude Oil, Heating Oil, and Propane Market Outlook Briefing for the State Heating Oil and Propane Program Conference Wilmington, DE by Douglas MacIntyre

495

Oil Dependence: The Value of R{ampersand}D  

SciTech Connect

Over the past quarter century the United States` dependence on oil has cost its economy on the order of $5 trillion. Oil dependence is defined as economically significant consumption of oil, given price inelastic demand in the short and long run and given the ability of the OPEC cartel to use market power to influence oil prices. Although oil prices have been lower and more stable over the past decade, OPEC still holds the majority of the world`s conventional oil resources according to the best available estimates. OPEC`s share of the world oil market is likely to grow significantly in the future,restoring much if not all of their former market power. Other than market share, the key determinants of OPEC`s market power are the long and short run price elasticities of world oil demand and supply. These elasticities depend critically on the technologies of oil supply and demand, especially the technology of energy use in transportation. Research and development can change these elasticities in fundamental ways, and given the nature of the problem,the government has an important role to play in supporting such research.

Greene, D.L.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Oil-Well Fire Fighting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Oil Well Fire Fighting. NIST fire Research NIST Fire Research 2 Oil Well Fire Fighting RoboCrane Model Oil Well Fire Fighting Working Model.

2011-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

497

AN ENGINE OIL LIFE ALGORITHM.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??An oil-life algorithm to calculate the remaining percentage of oil life is presented as a means to determine the right time to change the oil… (more)

Bommareddi, Anveshan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Fuel Oil Use in Manufacturing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and residual fuel oils. Distillate fuel oil, the lighter product, is also used for heating of homes and commercial buildings. Residual oil is a much denser, heavier product...

499

Consumption & Efficiency - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption & Efficiency Consumption & Efficiency Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Commercial Energy Consumption Survey Data Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey Data Vehicle Energy Consumption Survey Data Energy Intensity Consumption Summaries Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation All Consumption & Efficiency Data Reports Analysis & Projections All Sectors Commercial Buildings Efficiency Manufacturing Projections Residential Transportation All Reports Find statistics on energy consumption and efficiency across all fuel sources. + EXPAND ALL Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Household characteristics Release Date: March 28, 2011 Survey data for occupied primary housing units. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS)

500

Oil and Gas Air Heaters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most conventional air heaters adopt indirect heat transfer, which uses combustion gases to indirectly heat fresh air by heating surfaces to generate hot air used for material drying and dehumidification. We call them indirect air heaters. However, they have a higher manufacturing cost and lower thermal efficiency, especially when high temperature air is needed. For this reason, a direct air heater applicable for or feed and industrial raw products is put forward, which has advantages such as less production cost, smaller dimensions and higher thermal efficiency. Their design, working principles, characteristics, structure and applications are presented in this article, and brief comparisons are made between the indirect and direct air heater. Finally, the relation of hot-air temperature, oil or gas consumption and fresh airflow is determined based on energy equilibrium.

Kou, G.; Wang, H.; Zhou, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z