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1

EMF24 Global Scenario Modeler Presentation Insights from the IMACLIM model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are approached √? Decreasing GDP losses per unit of tax increase (tax revenues returned Agricolture Energy Transport Dynamic sub-modules (reduced forms of BU models) Sta3c Hybrid matrixes in values, energy and ¬ę physical ¬Ľ content √? Secure

Boyer, Edmond

2

Land-use change trajectories up to 2050: insights from a global agro-economic model comparison  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Changes in agricultural land use have important implications for environmental services. Previous studies of agricultural land-use futures have been published indicating large uncertainty due to different model assumptions and methodologies. In this article we present a first comprehensive comparison of global agro-economic models that have harmonized drivers of population, GDP, and biophysical yields. The comparison allows us to ask two research questions: (1) How much cropland will be used under different socioeconomic and climate change scenarios? (2) How can differences in model results be explained? The comparison includes four partial and six general equilibrium models that differ in how they model land supply and amount of potentially available land. We analyze results of two different socioeconomic scenarios and three climate scenarios (one with constant climate). Most models (7 out of 10) project an increase of cropland of 10Ė25% by 2050 compared to 2005 (under constant climate), but one model projects a decrease. Pasture land expands in some models, which increase the treat on natural vegetation further. Across all models most of the cropland expansion takes place in South America and sub-Saharan Africa. In general, the strongest differences in model results are related to differences in the costs of land expansion, the endogenous productivity responses, and the assumptions about potential cropland.

Schmitz, Christoph; van Meijl, Hans; Kyle, G. Page; Nelson, Gerald C.; Fujimori, Shinichiro; Gurgel, Angelo; Havlik, Petr; Heyhoe, Edwina; Mason d'Croz, Daniel; Popp, Alexander; Sands, Ronald; Tabeau, Andrzej; van der Mensbrugghe, Dominique; von Lampe, Martin; Wise, Marshall A.; Blanc, Elodie; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Kavallari, Aikaterini; Valin, Hugo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Global ice sheet modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The University of Maine conducted this study for Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of a global climate modeling task for site characterization of the potential nuclear waste respository site at Yucca Mountain, NV. The purpose of the study was to develop a global ice sheet dynamics model that will forecast the three-dimensional configuration of global ice sheets for specific climate change scenarios. The objective of the third (final) year of the work was to produce ice sheet data for glaciation scenarios covering the next 100,000 years. This was accomplished using both the map-plane and flowband solutions of our time-dependent, finite-element gridpoint model. The theory and equations used to develop the ice sheet models are presented. Three future scenarios were simulated by the model and results are discussed.

Hughes, T.J.; Fastook, J.L. [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States). Institute for Quaternary Studies

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Global pattern of earthquakes and seismic energy distributions: Insights for the mechanisms of plate tectonics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

√?√? √? √?√?√? √? √?√? Global pattern of earthquakes and seismic energy distributions: Insights.F., Global pattern of earthquakes and seismic energy distri- butions: Insights for the mechanisms of plate% of the total energy in the first ~50km; only 6% of events dissipates about 20% of the total amount of energy

Stuttgart, Universität

5

Behavioural insights into the Modelling of Freight Transportation and Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fuelled the extension of supply chains and the globalization of the world economy. At the micro-step modelling paradigm cannot provide adequate answers in the twenty-first century global customer-driven economy. This special issue is dedicated to innovative modelling efforts that provide new insights

Bertini, Robert L.

6

Global pattern of earthquakes and seismic energy distributions: Insights for the mechanisms of plate tectonics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global pattern of earthquakes and seismic energy distributions: Insights for the mechanisms October 2011 Keywords: Global seismicity Declustered catalogue Earthquake energy distribution Plate% of the total energy in the first ~50 km; only 6% of events dissipates about 20% of the total amount of energy

Doglioni, Carlo

7

Multimodal Transport Modeling for Nairobi, Kenya: Insights and Recommendations with an Evidence-Based Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multimodal Transport Modeling for Nairobi, Kenya: Insights and Recommendations with an Evidence-5 August 2009 #12;Multimodal Transport Modeling for Nairobi, Kenya: Insights and Recommendations

California at Berkeley, University of

8

The China-in-Global Energy Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The China-in-Global Energy Model (C-GEM) is a global Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) model that captures the interaction of production, consumption and trade among multiple global regions and sectors Ė including five ...

Qi, T.

9

Molecular modeling gives insight into nonionic surfactants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the study of a nonionic surfactant through the use of molecular modeling software. The surfactant was decyl alcohol capped with 8 moles of ethylene oxide. This nonionic surfactant is a strong water-wetting agent as well as a good aqueous foaming agent. Four molecular dynamics studies of a single surfactant molecule were conducted under the following conditions: at a water surface at 80 F; in bulk water at 260 F; in bulk hexane at 80 F; at a hexane/water interface at 80 F. The conformations of the surfactant were observed and compared to known solubility data. The results from molecular modeling dynamics calculations will provide new insights into the behavior of surfactant molecules at surfaces and interfaces. This methodology was also extended to aggregates of surfactants to promote understanding of wetting behavior and non-emulsification behavior. In this paper, two studies were performed involving aggregates: one in bulk water at 80 F and another in bulk water at 260 F.

Gdanski, R.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' scientific report ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' scientific report ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' Team) : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 6 2.2 Anthropogenic climate change studies: scenario experiments (96) : : : : : : : : : 7 2 following its creation, the ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' team had to make its proofs in order

11

Penetration of UV-visible solar radiation in the global oceans: Insights from ocean color remote sensing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Penetration of UV-visible solar radiation in the global oceans: Insights from ocean color remote 2013. [1] Penetration of solar radiation in the ocean is determined by the attenuation coefficient (Kd. Lewis, R. Arnone, and R. Brewin (2013), Penetration of UV-visible solar radiation in the global oceans

12

Friction versus dilation revisited: Insights from theoretical and numerical models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Friction versus dilation revisited: Insights from theoretical and numerical models N. Makedonska,1 controlled by the frictional strength of the fault gouge, a granular layer that accumulates between the fault friction coefficient) of such granular layers is the systems resistance to dilation, a byprocess

Einat, Aharonov

13

``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' scientific report 1 ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' scientific report 1 ``Climate Modelling & Global Change of the tropical climate : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 6 2.2 Short≠term variability studies : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 8 2.3 Climate drift sensitivity studies

14

Model year 2010 Honda insight level-1 testing report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a part of the US Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA), a model year 2010 Honda Insight was procured by eTec (Phoenix, AZ) and sent to ANL's Advanced Powertrain Research Facility for the purposes of vehicle-level testing in support of the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA). Data was acquired during testing using non-intrusive sensors, vehicle network information, and facilities equipment (emissions and dynamometer data). Standard drive cycles, performance cycles, steady-state cycles and A/C usage cycles were tested. Much of this data is openly available for download in ANL's Downloadable Dynamometer Database (D3). The major results are shown here in this report. Given the preliminary nature of this assessment, the majority of the testing was done over standard regulatory cycles and seeks to obtain a general overview of how the vehicle performs. These cycles include the US FTP cycle (Urban) and Highway Fuel Economy Test cycle as well as the US06, a more aggressive supplemental regulatory cycle. Data collection for this testing was kept at a fairly high level and includes emissions and fuel measurements from an exhaust emissions bench, high-voltage and accessory current and voltage from a DC power analyzer, and CAN bus data such as engine speed, engine load, and electric machine operation when available. The following sections will seek to explain some of the basic operating characteristics of the MY2010 Insight and provide insight into unique features of its operation and design.

Rask, E.; Bocci, D.; Duoba, M.; Lohse-Busch, H. (Energy Systems)

2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

15

Supercomputers Fuel Global High-Resolution Climate Models  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Supercomputers Fuel Global High-Resolution Climate Models Supercomputers Fuel Global High-Resolution Climate Models Berkeley Lab Researcher Says Climate Science is Entering New...

16

Climate Insights 101 Questions and Discussion Points: Module 1, Lesson 4: An Introduction to Climate Modelling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Insights 101 Questions and Discussion Points: Module 1, Lesson 4: An Introduction to Climate Modelling 1 Climate Insights 101 Questions and Discussion Points Module 1, Lesson 4: An Introduction to Climate Modelling Available at http://pics.uvic.ca/education/climate-insights-101 Updated May

Pedersen, Tom

17

Computer modeling of the global warming effect  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The state of knowledge of global warming will be presented and two aspects examined: observational evidence and a review of the state of computer modeling of climate change due to anthropogenic increases in greenhouse gases. Observational evidence, indeed, shows global warming, but it is difficult to prove that the changes are unequivocally due to the greenhouse-gas effect. Although observational measurements of global warming are subject to ``correction,`` researchers are showing consistent patterns in their interpretation of the data. Since the 1960s, climate scientists have been making their computer models of the climate system more realistic. Models started as atmospheric models and, through the addition of oceans, surface hydrology, and sea-ice components, they then became climate-system models. Because of computer limitations and the limited understanding of the degree of interaction of the various components, present models require substantial simplification. Nevertheless, in their present state of development climate models can reproduce most of the observed large-scale features of the real system, such as wind, temperature, precipitation, ocean current, and sea-ice distribution. The use of supercomputers to advance the spatial resolution and realism of earth-system models will also be discussed.

Washington, W.M. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

18

Roofline: An Insightful Visual Performance Model for Floating-Point Programs and Multicore Architectures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We propose an easy-to-understand, visual performance model that offers insights to programmers and architects on improving parallel software and hardware for floating point computations.

Williams, Samuel; Waterman, Andrew; Patterson, David

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Climate Models from the Joint Global Change Research Institute  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Staff at the Joint Institute develop and use models to simulate the economic and physical impacts of global change policy options. The GCAM, for example, gives analysts insight into how regional and national economies might respond to climate change mitigation policies including carbon taxes, carbon trading, and accelerated deployment of energy technology. Three available models are Phoenix, GCAM, and EPIC. Phoenix is a global, dynamic recursive, computable general equilibrium model that is solved in five-year time steps from 2005 through 2100 and divides the world into twenty-four regions. Each region includes twenty-six industrial sectors. Particular attention is paid to energy production in Phoenix. There are nine electricity-generating technologies (coal, natural gas, oil, biomass, nuclear, hydro, wind, solar, and geothermal) and four additional energy commodities: crude oil, refined oil products, coal, and natural gas. Phoenix is designed to answer economic questions related to international climate and energy policy and international trade. Phoenix replaces the Second Generation Model (SGM) that was formerly used for general equilibrium analysis at JGCRI. GCAM is the Global Change Assessment Model, a partial equilibrium model of the world with 14 regions. GCAM operates in 5 year time steps from 1990 to 2095 and is designed to examine long-term changes in the coupled energy, agriculture/land-use, and climate system. GCAM includes a 151-region agriculture land-use module and a reduced form carbon cycle and climate module in addition to its incorporation of demographics, resources, energy production and consumption. The model has been used extensively in a number of assessment and modeling activities such as the Energy Modeling Forum (EMF), the U.S. Climate Change Technology Program, and the U.S. Climate Change Science Program and IPCC assessment reports. GCAM is now freely available as a community model. The Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) Model is a process-based agricultural systems model composed of simulation components for weather, hydrology, nutrient cycling, pesticide fate, tillage, crop growth, soil erosion, crop and soil management and economics. Staff at PNNL have been involved in the development of this model by integrating new sub-models for soil carbon dynamics and nitrogen cycling.

20

Landau gauge condensates from global color model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We compute the dimension-2 gluon pair condensate $g^2$ and the dimension-4 mixed quark-gluon condensate $$ in Landau gauge within the framework of global color model. The result for the dynamical gluon mass is within the range given by other independent determinations. The obtained mixed Landau gauge condensate $$ is clearly dependent on the definitions of the condensates. We show that the consistent result may be obtained when the same definitions are used.

Zhao Zhang; Wei-qin Zhao

2006-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global insight model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Bioenergetics Modeling in the 21st Century: Reviewing New Insights and Revisiting Old Constraints  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bioenergetics Modeling in the 21st Century: Reviewing New Insights and Revisiting Old Constraints.--The development and application of fish bioenergetics models have flourished in recent years, due in part of bioenergetics models can be hampered by uncertainty in model parameters. A review of the literature showed

22

Integrated decision support model for global sourcing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Over the last decade, the U.S. aircraft industry has experienced increasing levels of international integration as companies seek to access global talent and resources, cut production costs, spread financial risk, and ...

Mroczkowski, Victor A. (Victor Adam)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Global manufacturing model and case studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

provision. This research provides information that should contribute to a better understanding of being globally competitive and helps a company to be able to make a wise move against its competitors....

Kijtawesataporn, Komsun

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Currents and turbulence within a kelp forest (Macrocystis pyrifera): Insights from a dynamically scaled laboratory model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Currents and turbulence within a kelp forest (Macrocystis pyrifera): Insights from a dynamically a dynamically matched 1/25-scale model. Two kelp configurations with surface canopies and one without a surface acoustic Doppler velocimeters. Since flow within the model kelp forest was very heterogeneous, spatially

Denny, Mark

25

Welding processes in volcanology: insights from field, experimental, and modeling studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Welding processes in volcanology: insights from field, experimental, and modeling studies Anita This volume is a collection of ten papers largely derived from a special session, Welding Processes, experimental, and modeling studies. We briefly review advances in understanding welding as represented

Russell, Kelly

26

Global Insight Energy Group  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecember 2005 (Thousand9,0, 1997Environment >7,99 DiagramLearnOutlook Mary Novak

27

Numerica: a Modeling Language for Global Optimization Pascal Van Hentenryck  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

equilibrium problems, and design problems (e.g., nu­ clear reactor design). The field of global optimizationNumerica: a Modeling Language for Global Optimization Pascal Van Hentenryck Brown University Box or to optimize a nonlinear function subject to nonlinear constraints. This includes appli­ cations

Neumaier, Arnold

28

Large Scale Simulation of Tor: Modelling a Global Passive Adversary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Implementing global passive adversary attacks on currently deployed low latency anonymous networks designs have been developed which attempt to apply mixes to low latency traffic. The most widelyLarge Scale Simulation of Tor: Modelling a Global Passive Adversary Gavin O' Gorman and Stephen

Blott, Stephen

29

MODELING THE GLOBAL PEAKS AND COOLING SY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of assessed building energy consumption and indoor air temperature peaks. At last, the coupling of the urban energy consumption. Building uses are an important part of the global energy use thus a good conception until the year 2100 highlight a regular increase building energy consumption and indoor At last

Boyer, Edmond

30

GLOBAL COMPREHENSIVE MODELS IN POLITICS AND POLICYMAKING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In this editorial, I reflect on the role of comprehensive models, such as IAMs and earth system models (ESMs

Edwards, Paul N.

31

Carbon Footprint and the Management of Supply Chains: Insights from Simple Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Footprint and the Management of Supply Chains: Insights from Simple Models Saif Benjaafar1-making that accounts for both cost and carbon footprint. We examine how the values of these parameters as well or shareholders, are undertaking initiatives to reduce their carbon footprint. However, these initiatives have

Benjaafar, Saifallah

32

RICCI Sophie Global Change and Climate Modeling Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RICCI Sophie Global Change and Climate Modeling Team CERFACS - Toulouse, FRANCE Technical Report TR covariance matrix#17;. This hypothesis stems from the T S water mass properties conservation over long term

33

MIT Integrated Global System Model (IGSM) Version 2: Model Description and Baseline Evaluation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The MIT Integrated Global System Model (IGSM) is designed for analyzing the global environmental changes that may result from anthropogenic causes, quantifying the uncertainties associated with the projected changes, and ...

Sokolov, Andrei P.

34

Global Biofuels Modeling and Land Use  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Biofuels Modeling and Land Use DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) 2015 Project Peer Review Strategic Analysis & Cross-cutting Sustainability March 25 2015 Gbadebo Oladosu...

35

A BAYESIAN MODEL COMMITTEE APPROACH TO FORECASTING GLOBAL SOLAR RADIATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 A BAYESIAN MODEL COMMITTEE APPROACH TO FORECASTING GLOBAL SOLAR RADIATION in the realm of solar radiation forecasting. In this work, two forecasting models: Autoregressive Moving. The very first results show an improvement brought by this approach. 1. INTRODUCTION Solar radiation

Boyer, Edmond

36

Does the problem of global warming exist at all? Insight from the temperature drift induced by inevitable colored noise  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the present paper we state a problem of the colored noise nonremovability on the climatic 30-year time scale, which essentially changes the angle of view on the known problem of global warming.

Rusov, V D; Eingorn, M V; Zelentsova, T N; Linnik, E P; Beglaryan, M E; Vachev, B

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Global sensitivity analysis of computer models with functional inputs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

function. Lastly, the new methodology is applied to an industrial computer code that simulates the nuclear with scalar input variables. For example, in the nuclear engineering domain, global SA tools have been applied (Helton et al. [7]), environmental model of dose calculations (Iooss et al. [10]), reactor dosimetry

Boyer, Edmond

38

Parallel Seismic Ray Tracing in a Global Earth Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Parallel Seismic Ray Tracing in a Global Earth Model Marc Grunberg * , Stéphane Genaud of the Earth interior, and seismic tomogra- phy is a means to improve knowledge in this #28;eld. In order present in this paper the de- sign of a software program implement- ing a fast seismic ray

Genaud, Stéphane

39

Mercury exosphere I. Global circulation model of its sodium component  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mercury exosphere I. Global circulation model of its sodium component Francois Leblanc a,*, R 2010 Accepted 27 April 2010 Available online 5 May 2010 Keywords: Mercury, Atmosphere Aeronomy a b s t r a c t Our understanding of Mercury's sodium exosphere has improved considerably in the last 5

Johnson, Robert E.

40

Global Biogeochemistry Models and Global Carbon Cycle Research at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The climate modeling community has long envisioned an evolution from physical climate models to ''earth system'' models that include the effects of biology and chemistry, particularly those processes related to the global carbon cycle. The widely reproduced Box 3, Figure 1 from the 2001 IPCC Scientific Assessment schematically describes that evolution. The community generally accepts the premise that understanding and predicting global and regional climate change requires the inclusion of carbon cycle processes in models to fully simulate the feedbacks between the climate system and the carbon cycle. Moreover, models will ultimately be employed to predict atmospheric concentrations of CO{sub 2} and other greenhouse gases as a function of anthropogenic and natural processes, such as industrial emissions, terrestrial carbon fixation, sequestration, land use patterns, etc. Nevertheless, the development of coupled climate-carbon models with demonstrable quantitative skill will require a significant amount of effort and time to understand and validate their behavior at both the process level and as integrated systems. It is important to consider objectively whether the currently proposed strategies to develop and validate earth system models are optimal, or even sufficient, and whether alternative strategies should be pursued. Carbon-climate models are going to be complex, with the carbon cycle strongly interacting with many other components. Off-line process validation will be insufficient. As was found in coupled atmosphere-ocean GCMs, feedbacks between model components can amplify small errors and uncertainties in one process to produce large biases in the simulated climate. The persistent tropical western Pacific Ocean ''double ITCZ'' and upper troposphere ''cold pole'' problems are examples. Finding and fixing similar types of problems in coupled carbon-climate models especially will be difficult, given the lack of observations required for diagnosis and validation of biogeochemical processes.

Covey, C; Caldeira, K; Guilderson, T; Cameron-Smith, P; Govindasamy, B; Swanston, C; Wickett, M; Mirin, A; Bader, D

2005-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global insight model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

A Model of Success: The Carnegie Institute for Global Ecology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carnegie Institute for Global Ecology Kirstin Weeks, DavidInstitute for Global Ecology, the answer is an unquali? edremarkable about the Global Ecology building is not only how

Weeks, Kirstin; Lehrer, David; Bean, Jonathan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Global Solvability of the Anharmonic Oscillator Model From Nonlinear Optics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global Solvability of the Anharmonic Oscillator Model From Nonlinear Optics J.L. Joly CEREMAB URA approxiamation may blow up in finite time. Key words. Nonlinear optics, nonlinear Maxwell equations, nonlinear equations @ t B + curl E = 0 (1:1) @ t E \\Gamma curl B = \\Gamma@ t P (1:2) @ 2 t P + @ t P=T 1 + aP = bE (1

Joly, Jean-Luc

43

Selection between foreground models for global 21-cm experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The precise form of the foregrounds for sky-averaged measurements of the 21-cm line during and before the epoch of reionization is unknown. We suggest that the level of complexity in the foreground models used to fit global 21-cm data should be driven by the data, under a Bayesian model selection methodology. A first test of this approach is carried out by applying nested sampling to simplified models of global 21-cm data to compute the Bayesian evidence for the models. If the foregrounds are assumed to be polynomials of order n in log-log space, we can infer the necessity to use n=4 rather than n=3 with <2h of integration with limited frequency coverage, for reasonable values of the n=4 coefficient. Using a higher-order polynomial does not necessarily prevent a significant detection of the 21-cm signal. Even for n=8, we can obtain very strong evidence distinguishing a reasonable model for the signal from a null model with 128h of integration. More subtle features of the signal may, however, be lost if the...

Harker, Geraint

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Global horizontal irradiance clear sky models : implementation and analysis.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Clear sky models estimate the terrestrial solar radiation under a cloudless sky as a function of the solar elevation angle, site altitude, aerosol concentration, water vapor, and various atmospheric conditions. This report provides an overview of a number of global horizontal irradiance (GHI) clear sky models from very simple to complex. Validation of clear-sky models requires comparison of model results to measured irradiance during clear-sky periods. To facilitate validation, we present a new algorithm for automatically identifying clear-sky periods in a time series of GHI measurements. We evaluate the performance of selected clear-sky models using measured data from 30 different sites, totaling about 300 site-years of data. We analyze the variation of these errors across time and location. In terms of error averaged over all locations and times, we found that complex models that correctly account for all the atmospheric parameters are slightly more accurate than other models, but, primarily at low elevations, comparable accuracy can be obtained from some simpler models. However, simpler models often exhibit errors that vary with time of day and season, whereas the errors for complex models vary less over time.

Stein, Joshua S.; Hansen, Clifford W.; Reno, Matthew J.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

MODELING X-RAY BINARY EVOLUTION IN NORMAL GALAXIES: INSIGHTS FROM SINGS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the largest-scale comparison to date between observed extragalactic X-ray binary (XRB) populations and theoretical models of their production. We construct observational X-ray luminosity functions (oXLFs) using Chandra observations of 12 late-type galaxies from the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxy Survey. For each galaxy, we obtain theoretical XLFs (tXLFs) by combining XRB synthetic models, constructed with the population synthesis code StarTrack, with observational star formation histories (SFHs). We identify highest-likelihood models both for individual galaxies and globally, averaged over the full galaxy sample. Individual tXLFs successfully reproduce about half of the oXLFs, but for some galaxies we are unable to find underlying source populations, indicating that galaxy SFHs and metallicities are not well matched and/or that XRB modeling requires calibration on larger observational samples. Given these limitations, we find that the best models are consistent with a product of common envelope ejection efficiency and central donor concentration {approx_equal} 0.1, and a 50% uniform-50% ''twins'' initial mass-ratio distribution. We present and discuss constituent subpopulations of tXLFs according to donor, accretor, and stellar population characteristics. The galaxy-wide X-ray luminosity due to low-mass and high-mass XRBs, estimated via our best global model tXLF, follows the general trend expected from the L{sub X} -star formation rate and L{sub X} -stellar mass relations of Lehmer et al. Our best models are also in agreement with modeling of the evolution of both XRBs over cosmic time and of the galaxy X-ray luminosity with redshift.

Tzanavaris, P.; Jenkins, L.; Lehmer, B. D.; Hornschemeier, A.; Ptak, A.; Basu-Zych, A. R. [Laboratory for X-ray Astrophysics, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Mail Code 662, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Fragos, T.; Zezas, A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Tremmel, M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195-1580 (United States); Kalogera, V. [Center for Interdisciplinary Research and Exploration in Astrophysics and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

46

Global delivery of IT services : looking beyond the global delivery model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of this thesis is to analyze the factors that create competitive advantage through global delivery of IT services. Research on this thesis consists of a review of IT services markets and globally distributed ...

Cherian, Binoy

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Global  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky LearningGet Assistance GetGiant ProteaseGlass andT.2 -Global

48

A Vast Machine Computer Models, Climate Data, and the Politics of Global Warming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Vast Machine Computer Models, Climate Data, and the Politics of Global Warming Paul N. Edwards models, climate data, and the politics of global warming / Paul N. Edwards. p. cm. Includes. Climatology--History. 3. Meteorology--History. 4. Climatology--Technological innovation. 5. Global temperature

49

Global temperatures using satellite and numerical model assimilated data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) aboard the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) series of polar orbiting satellites (TIROS-N to NOAA-11) have provided stable, precise measurements of vertically integrated, atmospheric temperature since December 1978. In this study, comparisons are made between the MSU channel measurements and those derived from the Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS) at the National Meteorological Center (NMC) over the period 1979 to 1990. Land areas rich in Radiosonde Observations (RAOBS) showed similar magnitudes of spatial variability between the NMC GDAS and the MSU temperatures. Excessive spatial variability can be noted in the GDAS over land areas where conventional data is poor. Over the ocean, however, the assimilation of satellite data into the model improves the spatial variability detected by the GDAS.

Basist, A.; Ropelewski, C.; Grody, N. (NOAA/NWS/NMC, Washington, DC (United States) NOAA/NESDIS, Washington, DC (United States))

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Intercomparison of the Cloud Water Phase among Global Climate Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mixed-phase clouds (clouds that consist of both cloud droplets and ice crystals) are frequently present in the Earthís atmosphere and influence the Earthís energy budget through their radiative properties, which are highly dependent on the cloud water phase. In this study, the phase partitioning of cloud water is compared among six global climate models (GCMs) and with Cloud and Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization retrievals. It is found that the GCMs predict vastly different distributions of cloud phase for a given temperature, and none of them are capable of reproducing the spatial distribution or magnitude of the observed phase partitioning. While some GCMs produced liquid water paths comparable to satellite observations, they all failed to preserve sufficient liquid water at mixed-phase cloud temperatures. Our results suggest that validating GCMs using only the vertically integrated water contents could lead to amplified differences in cloud radiative feedback. The sensitivity of the simulated cloud phase in GCMs to the choice of heterogeneous ice nucleation parameterization is also investigated. The response to a change in ice nucleation is quite different for each GCM, and the implementation of the same ice nucleation parameterization in all models does not reduce the spread in simulated phase among GCMs. The results suggest that processes subsequent to ice nucleation are at least as important in determining phase and should be the focus of future studies aimed at understanding and reducing differences among the models.

Komurcu, Muge; Storelvmo, Trude; Tan, Ivy; Lohmann, U.; Yun, Yuxing; Penner, Joyce E.; Wang, Yong; Liu, Xiaohong; Takemura, T.

2014-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

51

A simple model for evolution of proteins towards the global minimum of free energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A simple model for evolution of proteins towards the global minimum of free energy Tamar Kaffe-Abramovich and Ron Unger Background: Proteins seem to have their native structure in a global minimum of free energy is in the global minimum of free energy. The aim of this study is to investigate such evolutionary processes

Unger, Ron

52

The China-in-Global Energy Model Tianyu Qi, Niven Winchester, Da Zhang,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of production, consumption and trade among multiple global regions and sectors ­ including five energy to communicate research results and improve public understanding of global environment and energy challenges-intensive sectors ­ to analyze global energy demand, CO2 emissions, and economic activity. The C-GEM model supplies

53

Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) and hybrid ARMA/ANN model to predict global radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) and hybrid ARMA/ANN model to predict global radiation Cyril a hybrid ARMA/ANN model and data issued from a numerical weather prediction model (ALADIN). We particularly@gmail.com #12;Abstract. We propose in this paper an original technique to predict global radiation using

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

54

ENERGY INVESTMENTS UNDER CLIMATE POLICY: A COMPARISON OF GLOBAL MODELS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The levels of investment needed to mobilize an energy system transformation and mitigate climate change are not known with certainty. This paper aims to inform the ongoing dialogue and in so doing to guide public policy and strategic corporate decision making. Within the framework of the LIMITS integrated assessment model comparison exercise, we analyze a multi-IAM ensemble of long-term energy and greenhouse gas emissions scenarios. Our study provides insight into several critical but uncertain areas related to the future investment environment, for example in terms of where capital expenditures may need to flow regionally, into which sectors they might be concentrated, and what policies could be helpful in spurring these financial resources. We find that stringent climate policies consistent with a 2įC climate change target would require a considerable upscaling of investments into low-carbon energy and energy efficiency, reaching approximately $45 trillion (range: $30Ė$75 trillion) cumulative between 2010 and 2050, or about $1.1 trillion annually. This represents an increase of some $30 trillion ($10Ė$55 trillion), or $0.8 trillion per year, beyond what investments might otherwise be in a reference scenario that assumes the continuation of present and planned emissions-reducing policies throughout the world. In other words, a substantial "clean-energy investment gap" of some $800 billion/yr exists ó notably on the same order of magnitude as present-day subsidies for fossil energy and electricity worldwide ($523 billion). Unless the gap is filled rather quickly, the 2įC target could potentially become out of reach.

McCollum, David; Nagai, Yu; Riahi, Keywan; Marangoni, Giacomo; Calvin, Katherine V.; Pietzcker, Robert; Van Vliet, Jasper; van der Zwaan, Bob

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Galaxy Evolution Insights from Spectral Modeling of Large Data Sets from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This thesis centers on the use of spectral modeling techniques on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to gain new insights into current questions in galaxy evolution. The SDSS provides a large, uniform, high quality data set which can be exploited in a number of ways. One avenue pursued here is to use the large sample size to measure precisely the mean properties of galaxies of increasingly narrow parameter ranges. The other route taken is to look for rare objects which open up for exploration new areas in galaxy parameter space. The crux of this thesis is revisiting the classical Kennicutt method for inferring the stellar initial mass function (IMF) from the integrated light properties of galaxies. A large data set ({approx} 10{sup 5} galaxies) from the SDSS DR4 is combined with more in-depth modeling and quantitative statistical analysis to search for systematic IMF variations as a function of galaxy luminosity. Galaxy H{alpha} equivalent widths are compared to a broadband color index to constrain the IMF. It is found that for the sample as a whole the best fitting IMF power law slope above 0.5 M{sub {circle_dot}} is {Lambda} = 1.5 {+-} 0.1 with the error dominated by systematics. Galaxies brighter than around M{sub r,0.1} = -20 (including galaxies like the Milky Way which has M{sub r,0.1} {approx} -21) are well fit by a universal {Lambda} {approx} 1.4 IMF, similar to the classical Salpeter slope, and smooth, exponential star formation histories (SFH). Fainter galaxies prefer steeper IMFs and the quality of the fits reveal that for these galaxies a universal IMF with smooth SFHs is actually a poor assumption. Related projects are also pursued. A targeted photometric search is conducted for strongly lensed Lyman break galaxies (LBG) similar to MS1512-cB58. The evolution of the photometric selection technique is described as are the results of spectroscopic follow-up of the best targets. The serendipitous discovery of two interesting blue compact dwarf galaxies is reported. These galaxies were identified by their extremely weak (< 150) [N {pi}] {lambda}6584 to H{alpha} emission line ratios. Abundance analysis from emission line fluxes reveals that these galaxies have gas phase oxygen abundances 12 + log(O/H) {approx} 7.7 to 7.9, not remarkably low, and near infrared imaging detects an old stellar population. However, the measured nitrogen to oxygen ratios log(N/O) < 1.7 are anomalously low for blue compact dwarf galaxies. These objects may be useful for understanding the chemical evolution of nitrogen.

Hoversten, Erik A.; /Johns Hopkins U.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Why are climate models reproducing the observed global surface warming so well?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Why are climate models reproducing the observed global surface warming so well? Reto Knutti1 global surface warming so well?, Geophys. Res. Lett., 35, L18704, doi:10.1029/ 2008GL034932. 1 models reproduce the observed surface warming better than one would expect given the uncertainties

Fischlin, Andreas

57

An Improved Global Model for Air-Sea Exchange of Mercury: High  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Improved Global Model for Air-Sea Exchange of Mercury: High Concentrations over the North by inputs from Hg enriched subsurface waters through entrainment and Ekman pumping. Globally, subsurface). Previous efforts to model Hg air-sea exchange (2) and atmospheric transport (4-6) have been unable

Holmes, Christopher D.

58

Multiscale models of atmospheric mercury: bromine chemistry, air-sea exchange, and global transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

entrainment of RGM-rich air from the free troposphere (25­40%). Oxidation of Hg0 by Cl is minor (3Multiscale models of atmospheric mercury: bromine chemistry, air-sea exchange, and global transport Multiscale models of atmospheric mercury: bromine chemistry, air-sea exchange, and global transport Abstract

Holmes, Christopher D.

59

Global Ocean Circulation Modeling with an Isopycnic Coordinate Model. Final Report for May 1, 1998 - April 30, 2002  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall aim of this project was to continue development of a global version of the Miami Isopycnic Coordinate Ocean Model (MICOM) with the intent of turning it into a full-fledged oceanic component of an earth system model.

Bleck, R.

2004-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

60

Global patterns of nitrogen limitation: confronting two global biogeochemical models with observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

representations of Earth System Models have included the carbon (C) cycle (Friedlingstein et al., 2006

Templer, Pamela

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global insight model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

SO2 emissions and lifetimes: Estimates from inverse modeling using in situ and global, spacebased  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SO2 emissions and lifetimes: Estimates from inverse modeling using in situ and global, spacebased 18 March 2011. [1] Topdown constraints on global sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions are inferred through of GEOSChem for inversion of SO2 columns to emissions. The seasonal mean SO2 lifetime calculated with the GEOS

Martin, Randall

62

1997 SPECIAL ISSUE A Neural Global Workspace Model for Conscious Attention  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1997 SPECIAL ISSUE A Neural Global Workspace Model for Conscious Attention James Newman,1 Bernard J and 3 Department of Computer Science, Yonsei University (Received 9 July 1996; accepted 24 April 1997 neural network principles. 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd. Keywords--Attention, Binding, Consciousness, Global

Memphis, University of

63

Trend analysis from 1970 to 2008 and model evaluation of EDGARv4 global gridded  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Trend analysis from 1970 to 2008 and model evaluation of EDGARv4 global gridded anthropogenic.J. Olivier, Diego Guizzardi, Rob Maas and Frank Dentener *Reprinted from Science of the Total Environment Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change combines cutting-edge scientific research

64

Time series modeling and large scale global solar radiation forecasting from geostationary satellites data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Time series modeling and large scale global solar radiation forecasting from geostationary global solar radiation. In this paper, we use geostationary satellites data to generate 2-D time series of solar radiation for the next hour. The results presented in this paper relate to a particular territory

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

65

Inferring surface heat flux distributions guided by a global seismic model: particular application to Antarctica  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-flow measurements are rare or entirely absent. This will result in a smooth global heat-flow map that may proveInferring surface heat flux distributions guided by a global seismic model: particular application to Antarctica Nikolai M. Shapiro*, Michael H. Ritzwoller Department of Physics, Center for Imaging the Earth

Shapiro, Nikolai

66

Adjustment and Sensitivity Analyses of a Beta Global Rangeland Model Randall B. Boone1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Adjustment and Sensitivity Analyses of a Beta Global Rangeland Model Randall B. Boone1 , Richard Institute, P.O. Box 30709, Nairobi 00100, Kenya Contact R.B. Boone at: Randall.Boone@ColoState.edu August 31

Boone, Randall B.

67

Oceanic transports of heat and salt from a global model and data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A state estimate produced by ECCO-GODAE from a global one-degree model and data spanning the years 1992-2005 is analyzed in terms of transports of volume, temperature, and freshwater. The estimate is assessed to be ...

Olson, Elise

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Estimation of OTEC Global Resources with an Ocean General Circulation Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) relies on the availability of temperature differencesEstimation of OTEC Global Resources with an Ocean General Circulation Model Krishnakumar Rajagopalan Postdoctoral Fellow Department of Ocean and Resources Engineering University of Hawai'i Abstract

Frandsen, Jannette B.

69

Testing Linear Diagnostics of Ensemble Performance on a Simplified Global Circulation Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is inherently flow dependent and that the ensemble predicts potential patterns of forecast errors more reliably than the magnitudes of the errors. A low-resolution global circulation model is implemented to calculate linear diagnostics in the vector space...

Nelson, Ethan

2011-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

70

Global vegetation model diversity and the risks of climate-driven ecosystem shifts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Climate change is modifying global biogeochemical cycles, and is expected to exert increasingly large effects in the future. How these changes will in turn affect and interact with the structure and function of particular ecosystems is unclear, however, both because of scientific uncertainties and the very diversity of global vegetation models in use. Writing in Environmental Research Letters, Warszawski et al. (1) aggregate results from a group of models, across a range of emissions scenarios and climate data, to investigate these risks. Although the models frequently disagree about which specific regions are at risk, they consistently predict a greater chance of ecosystem restructuring with more warming; this risk roughly doubles between 2 and 3 įC increases in global mean temperature. The innovative work of Warszawski et al. represents an important first step towards fully consistent multi-model, multi-scenario assessments of the future risks to global ecosystems.

Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin

2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

71

BETR Global - A geographically explicit global-scale multimedia contaminant fate model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

balance†model. †Environmental†Science†&† Technology,†43(4),†direct†sources. †Environmental†Science†&†Technology,†43(making†process. †Environmental†Science†&†Policy,†13(3),†175?

Macleod, M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

GLOBAL STABILITY IN CHEMOSTAT-TYPE COMPETITION MODELS WITH NUTRIENT RECYCLING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GLOBAL STABILITY IN CHEMOSTAT-TYPE COMPETITION MODELS WITH NUTRIENT RECYCLING SHIGUI RUAN AND XUE- type competition models with nutrient recycling. In the first model the recycling is instantaneous, whereas in the second, the recycling is delayed. They carried out the equilibrium analysis and obtained

Ruan, Shigui

73

Syn-collisional delamination in convergent orogens: insights from lithospheric buoyancy and physical modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

buoyant mass within the model lithospheric mantle exhibit no tendency for delamination or wedging, despite a weak horizon at the base of the model crust. This contrast in behavior indicates that the mass distribution within the model lithosphere is a...

Moore, Vernon Michael

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Optimization of global model composed of radial basis functions using the term-ranking approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A term-ranking method is put forward to optimize the global model composed of radial basis functions to improve the predictability of the model. The effectiveness of the proposed method is examined by numerical simulation and experimental data. Numerical simulations indicate that this method can significantly lengthen the prediction time and decrease the Bayesian information criterion of the model. The application to real voice signal shows that the optimized global model can capture more predictable component in chaos-like voice data and simultaneously reduce the predictable component (periodic pitch) in the residual signal.

Cai, Peng; Tao, Chao, E-mail: taochao@nju.edu.cn; Liu, Xiao-Jun [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

75

Modeling aviation's global emissions, uncertainty analysis, and applications to policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(cont.) fuel burn results below 3000 ft. For emissions, the emissions indices were the most influential uncertainties for the variance in model outputs. By employing the model, this thesis examined three policy options for ...

Lee, Joosung Joseph, 1974-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Centennial Variations of the Global Monsoon Precipitation in the Last Millennium: Results from ECHO-G Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Centennial Variations of the Global Monsoon Precipitation in the Last Millennium: Results from ECHO-G with the ECHAM and the global Hamburg Ocean Primitive Equation (ECHO-G) coupled ocean­atmosphere model

Wang, Bin

77

Ocean Heat Transport, Sea Ice, and Multiple Climate States: Insights from Energy Balance Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Several extensions of energy balance models (EBMs) are explored in which (i) sea ice acts to insulate the

Rose, Brian Edward James

78

Global tropospheric ozone modeling: Quantifying errors due to grid resolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

model-derived monthly climatologies [Tegen et al. , 1997],extent that the MODIS climatology does. [ 11 ] The standarduse the optional aerosol climatology. These simulations are

Wild, Oliver; Prather, Michael J

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Regional forecasting with global atmospheric models; Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the project was to conduct model simulations for past and future climate change with respect to the proposed Yucca Mtn. repository. The authors report on three main topics, one of which is boundary conditions for paleo-hindcast studies. These conditions are necessary for the conduction of three to four model simulations. The boundary conditions have been prepared for future runs. The second topic is (a) comparing the atmospheric general circulation model (GCM) with observations and other GCMs; and (b) development of a better precipitation data base for the Yucca Mtn. region for comparisons with models. These tasks have been completed. The third topic is preliminary assessments of future climate change. Energy balance model (EBM) simulations suggest that the greenhouse effect will likely dominate climate change at Yucca Mtn. for the next 10,000 years. The EBM study should improve rational choice of GCM CO{sub 2} scenarios for future climate change.

Crowley, T.J.; Smith, N.R. [Applied Research Corp., College Station, TX (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Global and multi-scale features of solar wind-magnetosphere coupling: From modeling to forecasting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and substorms; 2784 Magnetospheric Physics: Solar wind/magnetosphere interactions; 3210 Mathematical Geophysics in the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction, de- veloping first principles models that encompass allGlobal and multi-scale features of solar wind-magnetosphere coupling: From modeling to forecasting

Sitnov, Mikhail I.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global insight model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Global empirical wind model for the upper mesosphere/lower thermosphere. I. Prevailing wind  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global empirical wind model for the upper mesosphere/lower thermosphere. I. Prevailing wind Y. I. An updated empirical climatic zonally aver- aged prevailing wind model for the upper mesosphere/ lower of monthly mean winds from meteor radar and MF radar measurements at more than 40 stations, well distributed

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

82

The holonic enterprise: a model for Internet-enabled global manufacturing supply chain and workflow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The holonic enterprise: a model for Internet-enabled global manufacturing supply chain and workflow, which supports organizational information that, in turn, can mirror social organization. The Holonic with an overview of the three main concepts used to develop our HE model: holonic systems, MAS, and the Internet

Ulieru, Mihaela

83

Parameterization of urban sub-grid scale processes in global atmospheric chemistry models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-scale models. (submitted to Journal of Geophysical Research) #12;2 1. Introduction Atmospheric pollution has1 Parameterization of urban sub-grid scale processes in global atmospheric chemistry models Josep such as meteorology. Effective emissions may be √?aged√? emissions of primary pollutants or actual production

84

Modeling the Global Structure of the Heliosphere during the Recent Solar Minimum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Berkeley, California. Abstract. The recent solar minimum, marking the end of solar cycle 23, has beenModeling the Global Structure of the Heliosphere during the Recent Solar Minimum: Model Mikic and Janet G. Luhmann Predictive Science, San Diego, California. Harvard-Smithsonian Center

California at Berkeley, University of

85

ECONOMIC MODELING OF THE GLOBAL ADOPTION OF CARBON CAPTURE AND SEQUESTRATION TECHNOLOGIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ECONOMIC MODELING OF THE GLOBAL ADOPTION OF CARBON CAPTURE AND SEQUESTRATION TECHNOLOGIES J. R. Mc of carbon capture and sequestration technologies as applied to electric generating plants. The MIT Emissions, is used to model carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) technologies based on a natural gas combined cycle

86

Theory of hair bundle motion: new insights from the simplest model of hair bundle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 Single Hair bundle motion and a simpleas a model of a single hair bundle motion . . . . . . . . .of mechan- otransduction in hair cells. Ē Annu Rev Neurosci,

Ji, Seung Keun

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Increasing NOAA's computational capacity to improve global forecast modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Systems Division Stephen J. Lord Director, NWS NCEP Environmental Modeling Center 19 July 2010 (303) 4973060 tom.hamill@noaa.gov #12; 2 Executive Summary The accuracy of many

Hamill, Tom

88

The temporal cascade structure of reanalyses and Global Circulation models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and stochastic forecasting. 1. Introduction "Weather prediction by Numerical Process" (Richardson, 1922 equations. While these equations are deterministic, numerical weather prediction has been increasingly of the deterministic models. Interestingly, Richardson is not only the father of numerical weather forecasting, he

Lovejoy, Shaun

89

"Big Picture" Process Modeling Tools |GE Global Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

window) Using process modeling tools to attain cost-effective results for GE customers Jimmy Lopez 2015.03.26 Sometimes, we need to look outside the box to realize the powerful...

90

Integrated Model to Access the Global Environment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429 Throttled (bot load) ErrorEnergyInnovation FuelsIntegrated FuelGeothermalModel

91

Long-Range Atmospheric Transport of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons: A Global 3-D Model Analysis Including Evaluation of Arctic Sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use the global 3-D chemical transport model GEOS-Chem to simulate long-range atmospheric transport of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). To evaluate the modelís ability to simulate PAHs with different volatilities, ...

Friedman, Carey

92

Leveraging The Open Provenance Model as a Multi-Tier Model for Global Climate Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Global climate researchers rely upon many forms of sensor data and analytical methods to help profile subtle changes in climate conditions. The U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program provides researchers with curated Value Added Products (VAPs) resulting from continuous sensor data streams, data fusion, and modeling. The ARM operations staff and software development teams (data producers) rely upon a number of techniques to ensure strict quality control (QC) and quality assurance (QA) standards are maintained. Climate researchers (data consumers) are highly interested in obtaining as much provenance (data quality, data pedigree) as possible to establish data trustworthiness. Currently all the provenance is not easily attainable or identifiable without significant efforts to extract and piece together information from configuration files, log files, codes, and status information from ARM databases. The need for a formalized approach to managing provenance became paramount with the planned addition of 120 new instruments, new data products, and data collection scaling to half a terabyte daily. Last year our research identified the need for a multi-tier provenance model to enable the data consumer easy access to the provenance for their data. This year we are leveraging the Open Provenance Model as a foundational construct that serves the needs of both the VAP producers and consumers, we are organizing the provenance in different tiers of granularity to model VAP lineage, causality at the component level within a VAP, and the causality for each time step as samples are being assembled within the VAP. This paper shares our implementation strategy and how the ARM operations staff and the climate research community can greatly benefit from this approach to more effectively assess and quantify VAP provenance.

Stephan, Eric G.; Halter, Todd D.; Ermold, Brian D.

2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

93

New Insight into Integrated Reservoir Management using Top-Down, Intelligent Reservoir Modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technique; Application to a Giant and Complex Oil Field in the Middle East Kalantari-Dahaghi A., Mohaghegh S Modeling" by applying the technology on a large and complex Oil field in the Middle East #12;Introduction and WC · Type Curve Matching · (single-well) production History Matching · Volumetric Reserve Estimation

Mohaghegh, Shahab

94

9.7 um Silicate Features in AGNs: New Insights into Unification Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe observations of 9.7 um silicate features in 97 AGNs, exhibiting a wide range of AGN types and of X-ray extinction toward the central nuclei. We find that the strength of the silicate feature correlates with the HI column density estimated from fitting the X-ray data, such that low HI columns correspond to silicate emission while high columns correspond to silicate absorption. The behavior is generally consistent with unification models where the large diversity in AGN properties is caused by viewing-angle-dependent obscuration of the nucleus. Radio-loud AGNs and radio-quiet quasars follow roughly the correlation between HI columns and the strength of the silicate feature defined by Seyfert galaxies. The agreement among AGN types suggests a high-level unification with similar characteristics for the structure of the obscuring material. We demonstrate the implications for unification models qualitatively with a conceptual disk model. The model includes an inner accretion disk (< 0.1 pc in radius), a middle disk (0.1-10 pc in radius) with a dense diffuse component and with embedded denser clouds, and an outer clumpy disk (10-300 pc in radius).

Y. Shi; G. H. Rieke; D. C. Hines; V. Gorjian; M. W. Werner; K. Cleary; F. J. Low; P. S. Smith; J. Bouwman

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

95

The AeroCom Evaluation and Intercomparison of Organic Aerosol in Global Models  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

This paper evaluates the current status of global modeling of the organic aerosol (OA) occurrence in the troposphere and analyzes the differences calculated between models as well as between models and observations. Thirty-one global chemistry/transport and general circulation models have participated in this intercomparison, in the framework of AeroCom phase II. The simulation of OA varies greatly between models in terms of the magnitude of primary emissions, secondary OA (SOA) formation, the number of OA species used (2 to 62), the complexity of OA parameterizations (gas-particle partitioning, chemical aging, multiphase chemistry, aerosol microphysics), and the OA physical, chemical and optical properties. The diversity of the global OA simulation results has increased since earlier AeroCom experiments, mainly due to the increasing complexity of the SOA parameterization in models, and the implementation of new, highly uncertain, OA sources. Diversity of over an order of magnitude exists in the modeled vertical distribution of OA that deserves a dedicated future study. Furthermore, although the OA/OC ratio depends on OA sources and atmospheric processing and is important for model evaluation against OA and OC observations, it is resolved only by few global models. The median global primary OA source strength is 56 Tg a 1 (range 34 - 144 Tg a-1) and the median secondary OA source strength (natural and anthropogenic) is 19 Tg a-1 (range 13-121 Tg a-1). Among the models that take into account the semi-volatile SOA nature, the median source is calculated to be 51 Tg a-1 (range 16-121 Tg a-1), much larger than the median value of the models that calculate SOA in a more simplistic way (19 Tg a-1; range 13-20 Tg a-1, with one model at 37 Tg a-1). The median atmospheric burden of OA is 1.4 Tg (24 models in the range of 0.6-2.0 Tg and 4 between 2.4-3.8 Tg) with a median OA lifetime of 5.4 days (range 3.8-9.6 days). In models that reported both OA and sulfate burdens, the median value of the OA/sulfate burden ratio of is calculated to be 0.77; 13 models calculate a ratio lower than 1, and 9 models higher than 1. For 26 models that reported OA deposition fluxes, the median wet removal is 70 Tg a-1 (range 28-209 Tg a-1), which is on average 85% of the total OA deposition.

Tsigaridis, Kostas; Daskalakis, N.; Kanakidou, M.; Adams, P. J.; Artaxo, Paulo; Bahadur, R.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Bellouin, N.; Benedetti, Angela; Bergman, T.; Berntsen, T.; Beukes, J. P.; Bian, Huisheng; Carslaw, K. S.; Chin, M.; Curci, Gabriele; Diehl, Thomas; Easter, Richard C.; Ghan, Steven J.; Gong, S.; Hodzic, Alma; Hoyle, Christopher R.; Iversen, T.; Jathar, S.; Jimenez, J. L.; Kaiser, J. W.; Kirkevag, A.; Koch, Dorothy; Kokkola, H.; Lee, Y. H.; Lin, G.; Liu, Xiaohong; Luo, Gan; Ma, Xiaoyan; Mann, G. W.; Mihalopoulos, Nikos; Morcrette, J. -J.; Muller, J. F.; Myhre, G.; Myriokefalitakis, S.; Ng, Nga L.; O'Donell, D.; Penner, J. E.; Pozzoli, L.; Pringle, K. J.; Russell, Lynn; Schulz, M.; Sciare, J.; Seland, O.; Shindell, Drew; Sillman, S.; Skeie, R. B.; Spracklen, D. V.; Stavrakou, T.; Steenrod, Stephen D.; Takemura, T.; Tiitta, P.; Tilmes, S.; Tost, H.; van Noije, T.; van Zyl, P. G.; von Salzen, Knut; Yu, Fangqun; Wang, Zaizi; Wang, Zhilli; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Kai; Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Xiaoye

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

96

A 1:1000 scale model of the digital world: Global connectivity can lead to the extinction of local networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The overwhelming success of online social networks, the key actors in the cosmos of the Web 2.0, has reshaped human interactions on a worldwide scale. To understand the fundamental mechanisms which determine the fate of online social networks at the system level, we recently introduced a general ecological theory of the digital world. In this paper, we discuss the impact of heterogeneity in the network intrinsic fitness and present how the general theory can be applied to understand the competition between an international network, like Facebook, and local services. To this end, we construct a 1:1000 scale model of the digital world enclosing the 80 countries with most Internet users. We find that above a certain threshold the level of global connectivity can lead to the extinction of local networks. In addition, we reveal the complex role the tendency of individuals to engage in more active networks plays for the probability of local networks to become extinct and provide insights into the conditions under w...

Kleineberg, Kaj-Kolja

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Voronoi Tessellations and Their Application to Climate and Global Modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We review the use of Voronoi tessellations for grid generation, especially on the whole sphere or in regions on the sphere. Voronoi tessellations and the corresponding Delaunay tessellations in regions and surfaces on Euclidean space are defined and properties they possess that make them well-suited for grid generation purposes are discussed, as are algorithms for their construction. This is followed by a more detailed look at one very special type of Voronoi tessellation, the centroidal Voronoi tessellation (CVT). After defining them, discussing some of their properties, and presenting algorithms for their construction, we illustrate the use of CVTs for producing both quasi-uniform and variable resolution meshes in the plane and on the sphere. Finally, we briefly discuss the computational solution of model equations based on CVTs on the sphere.

Ju, Lili [University of South Carolina; Ringler, Todd [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gunzburger, Max [Florida State University

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Global instability in a Sellers-type model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Ghil-Sellers energy balance model of Earth's climate, features -- for a considerable range of the solar intensity -- two stable climate states (a warm and a cold snowball Earth), where the bistability results from the celebrated ice-albedo feedback. The unstable solution is obtained and characterized in this paper. We find such unstable states by applying for the first time in a geophysical context the so-called edge tracking method that has been used for studying multiple coexisting states in shear flows. We examine robustness, efficiency, and accuracy properties of the edge tracking algorithm. We find that the procedure is the most efficient when taking a single bisection per cycle. Due to the strong diffusivity of the system trajectories of transient dynamics, initialized between the stable states with respect to the mean temperature, are confined to the heteroclininc trajectory, one which connects the fixed unstable and stable states, after relatively short transient times. This constraint dictates a ...

Bodai, Tamas; Lunkeit, Frank; Boschi, Robert

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

MOGO: Model-Oriented Global Optimization of Petascale Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The MOGO project was initiated under in 2008 under the DOE Program Announcement for Software Development Tools for Improved Ease-of-Use on Petascale systems (LAB 08-19). The MOGO team consisted of Oak Ridge National Lab, Argonne National Lab, and the University of Oregon. The overall goal of MOGO was to attack petascale performance analysis by developing a general framework where empirical performance data could be efficiently and accurately compared with performance expectations at various levels of abstraction. This information could then be used to automatically identify and remediate performance problems. MOGO was be based on performance models derived from application knowledge, performance experiments, and symbolic analysis. MOGO was able to make reasonable impact on existing DOE applications and systems. New tools and techniques were developed, which, in turn, were used on important DOE applications on DOE LCF systems to show significant performance improvements.

Malony, Allen D.; Shende, Sameer S.

2012-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

100

A Global, Multi-Resolution Approach to Regional Ocean Modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this collaborative research project between Pennsylvania State University, Colorado State University and Florida State University, we mainly focused on developing multi-resolution algorithms which are suitable to regional ocean modeling. We developed hybrid implicit and explicit adaptive multirate time integration method to solve systems of time-dependent equations that present two signi#12;cantly di#11;erent scales. We studied the e#11;ects of spatial simplicial meshes on the stability and the conditioning of fully discrete approximations. We also studies adaptive #12;nite element method (AFEM) based upon the Centroidal Voronoi Tessellation (CVT) and superconvergent gradient recovery. Some of these techniques are now being used by geoscientists(such as those at LANL).

Du, Qiang

2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global insight model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Comparing Local and Global Software Effort Estimation Models Reflections on a Systematic Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

protocols. Keywords: D.2.9.b Cost estimation, project effort prediction, systematic review, empirical of practice in the form of benchmarking, assessment of current activities, estimation of future tasksComparing Local and Global Software Effort Estimation Models ≠ Reflections on a Systematic Review

102

Modeling the Dynamics of Desakota Regions: Global - Local Nexus in the Taipei Metropolitan Area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Since the 1970s, Asia has experienced rapid urbanization processes, which are distinct from U.S. society, and the direction of Asian urbanization is more strongly affected by economic globalization. The desakota model, proposed by McGee and Ginsburg...

Wu, Bing-Sheng

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

103

Conceptual understanding of climate change with a globally resolved energy balance model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conceptual understanding of climate change with a globally resolved energy balance model Dietmar on the surface energy balance by very simple repre- sentations of solar and thermal radiation, the atmospheric and cold regions to warm more than other regions. Keywords Climate dynamics √Ā Climate change √Ā Climate

Dommenget, Dietmar

104

Changes in Temperature and Precipitation Extremes in the IPCC Ensemble of Global Coupled Model Simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Changes in Temperature and Precipitation Extremes in the IPCC Ensemble of Global Coupled Model September 2006) ABSTRACT Temperature and precipitation extremes and their potential future changes on Climate Change (IPCC) diagnostic exercise for the Fourth Assessment Report (AR4). Climate extremes

105

Honda Gen II Insight HEV Accelerated Testing - August 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Honda Gen II Insight HEV Accelerated Testing - August 2012 Two model year 2010 Honda Generation II Insight hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) entered Accelerated testing during July...

106

Genome sequence analysis of the model grass Brachypodium distachyon: insights into grass genome evolution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three subfamilies of grasses, the Erhardtoideae (rice), the Panicoideae (maize, sorghum, sugar cane and millet), and the Pooideae (wheat, barley and cool season forage grasses) provide the basis of human nutrition and are poised to become major sources of renewable energy. Here we describe the complete genome sequence of the wild grass Brachypodium distachyon (Brachypodium), the first member of the Pooideae subfamily to be completely sequenced. Comparison of the Brachypodium, rice and sorghum genomes reveals a precise sequence- based history of genome evolution across a broad diversity of the grass family and identifies nested insertions of whole chromosomes into centromeric regions as a predominant mechanism driving chromosome evolution in the grasses. The relatively compact genome of Brachypodium is maintained by a balance of retroelement replication and loss. The complete genome sequence of Brachypodium, coupled to its exceptional promise as a model system for grass research, will support the development of new energy and food crops

Schulman, Al

2009-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

107

Simulating boreal forest carbon dynamics after stand-replacing fire disturbance: insights from a global process-based vegetation model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CLIMVAR GPPCAL-CMCD CNT-CMCD ORC-STD FM-BF-NOSNAG AverageEC obs. period CMCD HHCD for only EC obs. period CMCD ORC-STD ORC-FM-NOSNAG Standard ORCHIDEE with fire and without

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Automatic Calibration of a Building Energy Simulation Model Using a Global Optimization Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AUTOMATIC CALIBRATION OF A BUILDING ENERGY SIMULATION MODEL USING A GLOBAL OPTIMIZATION PROGRAM Seung Uk Lee Research Associate Texas A&M University Energy Systems Laboratory College Station, TX David E. Claridge, Ph.D., P....E. Professor Texas A&M University Energy Systems Laboratory College Station, TX ABSTRACT A simulation model used to analyze the energy performance of an existing building should be calibrated to measured consumption data from...

Lee, S. U.; Claridge, D.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Comparing Supply-Side Specifications in Models of Global Agriculture and the Food System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper compares the theoretical specification of production and technical change across the partial equilibrium (PE) and computable general equilibrium (CGE) models of the global agricultural and food system included in the AgMIP model comparison study. The two modeling approaches have different theoretical underpinnings concerning the scope of economic activity they capture and how they represent technology and the behavior of supply and demand in markets. This paper focuses on their different specifications of technology and supply behavior, comparing their theoretical and empirical treatments. While the models differ widely in their specifications of technology, both within and between the PE and CGE classes of models, we find that the theoretical responsiveness of supply to changes in prices can be similar, depending on parameter choices that define the behavior of supply functions over the domain of applicability defined by the common scenarios used in the AgMIP comparisons. In particular, we compare the theoretical specification of supply in CGE models with neoclassical production functions and PE models that focus on land and crop yields in agriculture. In practice, however, comparability of results given parameter choices is an empirical question, and the models differ in their sensitivity to variations in specification. To illustrate the issues, sensitivity analysis is done with one global CGE model, MAGNET, to indicate how the results vary with different specification of technical change, and how they compare with the results from PE models.

Robinson, Sherman; van Meijl, Hans; Willenbockel, Dirk; Valin, Hugo; Fujimori, Shinichiro; Masui, Toshihiko; Sands, Ronald; Wise, Marshall A.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Havlik, Petr; Mason d'Croz, Daniel; Tabeau, Andrzej; Kavallari, Aikaterini; Schmitz, Christoph; Dietrich, Jan P.; von Lampe, Martin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Impacts of increased bioenergy demand on global food markets: an AgMIP economic model intercomparison  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Integrated Assessment studies have shown that meeting ambitious greenhouse gas mitigation targets will require substantial amounts of bioenergy as part of the future energy mix. In the course of the Agricultural Model Comparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP), five global agro-economic models were used to analyze a future scenario with global demand for ligno-cellulosic bioenergy rising to about 100 ExaJoule in 2050. From this exercise a tentative conclusion can be drawn that ambitious climate change mitigation need not drive up global food prices much, if the extra land required for bioenergy production is accessible or if the feedstock, e.g. from forests, does not directly compete for agricultural land. Agricultural price effects across models by the year 2050 from high bioenergy demand in an RCP2.6-type scenario appear to be much smaller (+5% average across models) than from direct climate impacts on crop yields in an RCP8.5-type scenario (+25% average across models). However, potential future scarcities of water and nutrients, policy-induced restrictions on agricultural land expansion, as well as potential welfare losses have not been specifically looked at in this exercise.

Lotze-Campen, Hermann; von Lampe, Martin; Kyle, G. Page; Fujimori, Shinichiro; Havlik, Petr; van Meijl, Hans; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Popp, Alexander; Schmitz, Christoph; Tabeau, Andrzej; Valin, Hugo; Willenbockel, Dirk; Wise, Marshall A.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Intercomparison and evaluation of global aerosol microphysical properties among AeroCom models of a range of complexity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many of the next generation of global climate models will include aerosol schemes which explicitly simulate the microphysical processes that determine the particle size distribution. These models enable aerosol optical ...

Ridley, David Andrew

112

Impact of emissions, chemistry, and climate on atmospheric carbon monoxide : 100-year predictions from a global chemistry-climate model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The possible trends for atmospheric carbon monoxide in the next 100 yr have been illustrated using a coupled atmospheric chemistry and climate model driven by emissions predicted by a global economic development model. ...

Wang, Chien.; Prinn, Ronald G.

113

Why Do Global Long-term Scenarios for Agriculture Differ? An overview of the AgMIP Global Economic Model Intercomparison  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent studies assessing plausible futures for agricultural markets and global food security have had contradictory outcomes. Ten global economic models that produce long-term scenarios were asked to compare a reference scenario with alternate socio-economic, climate change and bioenergy scenarios using a common set of key drivers. Results suggest that, once general assumptions are harmonized, the variability in general trends across models declines, and that several common conclusions are possible. Nonetheless, differences in basic model parameters, sometimes hidden in the way market behavior is modeled, result in significant differences in the details. This holds for both the common reference scenario and for the various shocks applied. We conclude that agro-economic modelers aiming to inform the agricultural and development policy debate require better data and analysis on both economic behavior and biophysical drivers. More interdisciplinary modeling efforts are required to cross-fertilize analyses at different scales.

von Lampe, Martin; Willenbockel, Dirk; Ahammad, Helal; Blanc, Elodie; Cai, Yongxia; Calvin, Katherine V.; Fujimori, Shinichiro; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Havlik, Petr; Kyle, G. Page; Lotze-Campen, Hermann; Mason d'Croz, Daniel; Nelson, Gerald; Sands, Ronald; Schmitz, Christoph; Tabeau, Andrzej; Valin, Hugo; van der Mensbrugghe, Dominique; van Meijl, Hans

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Is the Ozone Depletion Regime a Model for an Emerging Regime on Global Warming?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the for- mation of a global warming regime produces a highlydepletion and the global warming regimes was recognized byan Emerging Regime on Global Warming? by Winfried Lang I.

Lang, Winfried

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Assessing the Effects of Anthropogenic Aerosols on Pacific Storm Track Using a Multiscale Global Climate Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atmospheric aerosols impact weather and global general circulation by modifying cloud and precipitation processes, but the magnitude of cloud adjustment by aerosols remains poorly quantified and represents the largest uncertainty in estimated forcing of climate change. Here we assess the impacts of anthropogenic aerosols on the Pacific storm track using a multi-scale global aerosol-climate model (GCM). Simulations of two aerosol scenarios corresponding to the present day and pre-industrial conditions reveal long-range transport of anthropogenic aerosols across the north Pacific and large resulting changes in the aerosol optical depth, cloud droplet number concentration, and cloud and ice water paths. Shortwave and longwave cloud radiative forcing at the top of atmosphere are changed by - 2.5 and + 1.3 W m-2, respectively, by emission changes from pre-industrial to present day, and an increased cloud-top height indicates invigorated mid-latitude cyclones. The overall increased precipitation and poleward heat transport reflect intensification of the Pacific storm track by anthropogenic aerosols. Hence, this work provides for the first time a global perspective of the impacts of Asian pollution outflows from GCMs. Furthermore, our results suggest that the multi-scale modeling framework is essential in producing the aerosol invigoration effect of deep convective clouds on the global scale.

Wang, Yuan; Wang, Minghuai; Zhang, Renyi; Ghan, Steven J.; Lin, Yun; Hu, Jiaxi; Pan, Bowen; Levy, Misti; Jiang, Jonathan; Molina, Mario J.

2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

116

The effects of gas-fluid-rock interactions on CO2 injection and storage: Insights from reactive transport modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Possible means of reducing atmospheric CO{sub 2} emissions include injecting CO{sub 2} in petroleum reservoirs for Enhanced Oil Recovery or storing CO{sub 2} in deep saline aquifers. Large-scale injection of CO{sub 2} into subsurface reservoirs would induce a complex interplay of multiphase flow, capillary trapping, dissolution, diffusion, convection, and chemical reactions that may have significant impacts on both short-term injection performance and long-term fate of CO{sub 2} storage. Reactive Transport Modeling is a promising approach that can be used to predict the spatial and temporal evolution of injected CO{sub 2} and associated gas-fluid-rock interactions. This presentation will summarize recent advances in reactive transport modeling of CO{sub 2} storage and review key technical issues on (1) the short- and long-term behavior of injected CO{sub 2} in geological formations; (2) the role of reservoir mineral heterogeneity on injection performance and storage security; (3) the effect of gas mixtures (e.g., H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2}) on CO{sub 2} storage; and (4) the physical and chemical processes during potential leakage of CO{sub 2} from the primary storage reservoir. Simulation results suggest that CO{sub 2} trapping capacity, rate, and impact on reservoir rocks depend on primary mineral composition and injecting gas mixtures. For example, models predict that the injection of CO{sub 2} alone or co-injection with H{sub 2}S in both sandstone and carbonate reservoirs lead to acidified zones and mineral dissolution adjacent to the injection well, and carbonate precipitation and mineral trapping away from the well. Co-injection of CO{sub 2} with H{sub 2}S and in particular with SO{sub 2} causes greater formation alteration and complex sulfur mineral (alunite, anhydrite, and pyrite) trapping, sometimes at a much faster rate than previously thought. The results from Reactive Transport Modeling provide valuable insights for analyzing and assessing the dynamic behaviors of injected CO{sub 2}, identifying and characterizing potential storage sites, and managing injection performance and reducing costs.

Xiao, Y.; Xu, T.; Pruess, K.

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

117

Finite Element Analysis of the Amontons-Coulomb's Model using Local and Global Friction Tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In spite of the abundant number of experimental friction tests that have been reported, the contact with friction modeling persists to be one of the factors that determine the effectiveness of sheet metal forming simulation. This difficulty can be understood due to the nature of the friction phenomena, which comprises the interaction of different factors connected to both sheet and tools' surfaces. Although in finite element numerical simulations friction models are commonly applied at the local level, they normally rely on parameters identified based on global experimental tests results. The aim of this study is to analyze the applicability of the Amontons-Coulomb's friction coefficient identified using complementary tests: (i) load-scanning, at the local level and (ii) draw-bead, at the global level; to the numerical simulation of sheet metal forming processes.

Oliveira, M. C.; Menezes, L. F.; Ramalho, A. [CEMUC, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Coimbra, Polo II, Rua Luis Reis Santos, Pinhal de Marrocos, 3030-788 Coimbra (Portugal); Alves, J. L. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minho, Campus de Azurem, 4800-058, Guimaraes (Portugal)

2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

118

Progress in the Development of Global Medium-Energy Nucleon-Nucleus Optical Model Potentials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two existing global medium-energy nucleon-nucleus phenomenological optical model potentials are described and compared with experiment and with each other. The first of these employs a Dirac approach (second-order reduction) that is global in projectile energy and projectile isospin and applies to the target nucleus 208-Pb. Here the standard S-V (isoscalar-scalar, isoscalar-vector) model has been extended to include the corresponding isovector components by introduction of a relativistic Lane model. The second of these employs a relativistic equivalent to the Schroedinger equation and is global in projectile energy, projectile isospin, and target (Z,A). Here, particular attention is given to predictions for the integrated scattering observables - neutron total cross sections and proton total reaction cross sections - and their sensitivity to the absorptive parts of the potential. Finally, current work is described and the influence of the nuclear bound state problem (treated in relativistic mean field theory) on the Dirac scattering problem is mentioned.

David G. Madland

1997-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

119

Update on INSIGHTS Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

INSIGHTS is a transformational separate effects testing capability to perform in situ irradiation studies and characterization of the microscale behavior of nuclear fuel materials under a wide variety of in-pile conditions. Separate effects testing including growth, irradiation, and monitoring of these materials, and encompasses the full science based approach for fuels development from the nanoscale to the mesoscale behavior of the sample material and other defects driven by the modeling and simulation efforts of INL.

Not Listed; Eric Burgett

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) and hybrid ARMA/ANN model to predict global radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose in this paper an original technique to predict global radiation using a hybrid ARMA/ANN model and data issued from a numerical weather prediction model (ALADIN). We particularly look at the Multi-Layer Perceptron. After optimizing our architecture with ALADIN and endogenous data previously made stationary and using an innovative pre-input layer selection method, we combined it to an ARMA model from a rule based on the analysis of hourly data series. This model has been used to forecast the hourly global radiation for five places in Mediterranean area. Our technique outperforms classical models for all the places. The nRMSE for our hybrid model ANN/ARMA is 14.9% compared to 26.2% for the na\\"ive persistence predictor. Note that in the stand alone ANN case the nRMSE is 18.4%. Finally, in order to discuss the reliability of the forecaster outputs, a complementary study concerning the confidence interval of each prediction is proposed

Voyant, Cyril; Paoli, Christophe; Nivet, Marie Laure

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global insight model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Model Development Development of a system emulating the global carbon cycle in Earth system models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

developed a loosely coupled model (LCM) which can represent the outputs of a GCMbased Earth system model

K. Tachiiri; J. C. Hargreaves; J. D. Annan; A. Oka; A. Abe-ouchi; M. Kawamiya

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

The new GFDL global atmosphere and land model AM2/LM2: Evaluation with prescribed SST simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The new GFDL global atmosphere and land model AM2/LM2: Evaluation with prescribed SST simulations climatology, and components from previous models used at GFDL. The land model, known as LM2, includes soil of the coupled model AM2/LM2 is evaluated with a series of prescribed sea-surface temperature (SST) simulations

Bretherton, Chris

123

Supplementary Information for: Global soil carbon projections are improved by modeling microbial processes. William R. Wieder, Gordon B. Bonan, & Steven D. Allison (2.1 MB .pdf)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

total = 660 Pg C; (b) Observed soil profile, global total = 1259 Pg C; (c) CLM microbial model surface soils, global total = 784 Pg C [spatial correlation with observations (r) = 0.75, model-weighted root mean square error (RMSE) = 2.9 kg C m-2 ]; (d) CLM microbial model soil profile, global total = 1310 Pg

Saleska, Scott

124

Impact of transport model errors on the global and regional methane emissions estimated by inverse modelling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A modelling experiment has been conceived to assess the impact of transport model errors on methane emissions estimated in an atmospheric inversion system. Synthetic methane observations, obtained from 10 different model ...

Locatelli, R.

125

The U.S. Research University as a Global Model: Some Fundamental Problems to Consider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The political economy of globalization in the Americas. PaloThe political economy of globalization in the Americas (pp.The political economy of globalization in the Americas (pp.

Rhoads, Robert A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Evaluating Clouds, Aerosols, and their Interactions in Three Global Climate Models using COSP and Satellite Observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accurately representing aerosol-cloud interactions in global climate models is challenging. As parameterizations evolve, it is important to evaluate their performance with appropriate use of observations. In this work we compare aerosols, clouds, and their interactions in three climate models (AM3, CAM5, ModelE) to MODIS satellite observations. Modeled cloud properties were diagnosed using the CFMIP Observations Simulator Package (COSP). Cloud droplet number concentrations (N) were derived using the same algorithm for both satellite-simulated model values and observations. We find that aerosol optical depth tau simulated by models is similar to observations. For N, AM3 and CAM5 capture the observed spatial pattern of higher values in near-coast versus remote ocean regions, though modeled values in general are higher than observed. In contrast, ModelE simulates lower N in most near-coast versus remote regions. Aerosol- cloud interactions were computed as the sensitivity of N to tau for marine liquid clouds off the coasts of South Africa and Eastern Asia where aerosol pollution varies in time. AM3 and CAM5 are in most cases more sensitive than observations, while the sensitivity for ModelE is statistically insignificant. This widely used sensitivity could be subject to misinterpretation due to the confounding influence of meteorology on both aerosols and clouds. A simple framework for assessing the N Ė tau sensitivity at constant meteorology illustrates that observed sensitivity can change from positive to statistically insignificant when including the confounding influence of relative humidity. Satellite simulated values of N were compared to standard model output and found to be higher with a bias of 83 cm-3.

Ban-Weiss, George; Jin, Ling; Bauer, S.; Bennartz, Ralph; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Kai; Ming, Yi; Guo, Huan; Jiang, Jonathan

2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

127

Global search tool for the Advanced Photon Source Integrated Relational Model of Installed Systems (IRMIS) database.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Integrated Relational Model of Installed Systems (IRMIS) is a relational database tool that has been implemented at the Advanced Photon Source to maintain an updated account of approximately 600 control system software applications, 400,000 process variables, and 30,000 control system hardware components. To effectively display this large amount of control system information to operators and engineers, IRMIS was initially built with nine Web-based viewers: Applications Organizing Index, IOC, PLC, Component Type, Installed Components, Network, Controls Spares, Process Variables, and Cables. However, since each viewer is designed to provide details from only one major category of the control system, the necessity for a one-stop global search tool for the entire database became apparent. The user requirements for extremely fast database search time and ease of navigation through search results led to the choice of Asynchronous JavaScript and XML (AJAX) technology in the implementation of the IRMIS global search tool. Unique features of the global search tool include a two-tier level of displayed search results, and a database data integrity validation and reporting mechanism.

Quock, D. E. R.; Cianciarulo, M. B.; APS Engineering Support Division; Purdue Univ.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Evolution of Meteorological Base Models for Estimating Hourly Global Solar Radiation in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ESL-PA-13-11-01 Available online at www.sciencedirect.com Energy Procedia 00 (2013) 000Ė000 www.elsevier.com/locate/procedia 2013 ISES Solar World Congress Evaluation of Meteorological Base Models... for Estimating Hourly Global Solar Radiation in Texas Kee Han Kima,b*, Juan-Carlos Baltazarb, and Jeff S. Haberla,b aDepartment of Architecture, Texas A&M University, 3137 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843-3137, U.S.A. bEnergy Systems Laboratory, Texas A...

Kim, H.; Baltazar, J.C.; Haberl, J.S

129

Collaborative Proposal: Transforming How Climate System Models are Used: A Global, Multi-Resolution Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite the great interest in regional modeling for both weather and climate applications, regional modeling is not yet at the stage that it can be used routinely and effectively for climate modeling of the ocean. The overarching goal of this project is to transform how climate models are used by developing and implementing a robust, efficient, and accurate global approach to regional ocean modeling. To achieve this goal, we will use theoretical and computational means to resolve several basic modeling and algorithmic issues. The first task is to develop techniques for transitioning between parameterized and high-fidelity regional ocean models as the discretization grid transitions from coarse to fine regions. The second task is to develop estimates for the error in scientifically relevant quantities of interest that provide a systematic way to automatically determine where refinement is needed in order to obtain accurate simulations of dynamic and tracer transport in regional ocean models. The third task is to develop efficient, accurate, and robust time-stepping schemes for variable spatial resolution discretizations used in regional ocean models of dynamics and tracer transport. The fourth task is to develop frequency-dependent eddy viscosity finite element and discontinuous Galerkin methods and study their performance and effectiveness for simulation of dynamics and tracer transport in regional ocean models. These four projects share common difficulties and will be approach using a common computational and mathematical toolbox. This is a multidisciplinary project involving faculty and postdocs from Colorado State University, Florida State University, and Penn State University along with scientists from Los Alamos National Laboratory. The completion of the tasks listed within the discussion of the four sub-projects will go a long way towards meeting our goal of developing superior regional ocean models that will transform how climate system models are used.

Estep, Donald

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

130

Agriculture and Climate Change in Global Scenarios: Why Don't the Models Agree  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Agriculture is unique among economic sectors in the nature of impacts from climate change. The production activity that transforms inputs into agricultural outputs makes direct use of weather inputs. Previous studies of the impacts of climate change on agriculture have reported substantial differences in outcomes of key variables such as prices, production, and trade. These divergent outcomes arise from differences in model inputs and model specification. The goal of this paper is to review climate change results and underlying determinants from a model comparison exercise with 10 of the leading global economic models that include significant representation of agriculture. By providing common productivity drivers that include climate change effects, differences in model outcomes are reduced. All models show higher prices in 2050 because of negative productivity shocks from climate change. The magnitude of the price increases, and the adaptation responses, differ significantly across the various models. Substantial differences exist in the structural parameters affecting demand, area, and yield, and should be a topic for future research.

Nelson, Gerald; van der Mensbrugghe, Dominique; Ahammad, Helal; Blanc, Elodie; Calvin, Katherine V.; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Havlik, Petr; Heyhoe, Edwina; Kyle, G. Page; Lotze-Campen, Hermann; von Lampe, Martin; Mason d'Croz, Daniel; van Meijl, Hans; Mueller, C.; Reilly, J. M.; Robertson, Richard; Sands, Ronald; Schmitz, Christoph; Tabeau, Andrzej; Takahashi, Kiyoshi; Valin, Hugo; Willenbockel, Dirk

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Atomic Level Green-Kubo Stress Correlation Function for a Model Crystal: An Insight into Molecular Dynamics Results on a Model Liquid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In order to get insight into the connection between the vibrational dynamics and the atomic level Green-Kubo stress correlation function in liquids we consider this connection in a model crystal instead. Of course, vibrational dynamics in liquids and crystals are quite different and it is not expected that the results obtained on a model crystal should be valid for liquids. However, these considerations provide a benchmark to which the results of the previous molecular dynamics simulations can be compared. Thus, assuming that vibrations are plane waves, we derive analytical expressions for the atomic level stress correlation functions in the classical limit and analyze them. These results provide, in particular, a recipe for analysis of the atomic level stress correlation functions in Fourier space and extraction of the wavevector and frequency dependent information. We also evaluate the energies of the atomic level stresses. Obtained energies are significantly smaller than the energies that were obtained in MD simulations of liquids previously. This result suggests that the average energies of the atomic level stresses in liquids and glasses are largely determined by the structural disorder. We discuss this result in the context of equipartition of the atomic level stress energies. Analysis of the previously published data suggests that it is possible to speak about configurational and vibrational contributions to the average energies of the atomic level stresses in a glass state. However, this separation in a liquid state is problematic. We also consider peak broadening in the pair distribution function with increase of distance. We find that peak broadening (by ~40%) occurs due to the transverse vibrational modes, while contribution from the longitudinal modes does not change with distance. Finally, we introduce and consider atomic level transverse current correlation function.

V. A. Levashov

2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

132

The Thermodynamic Influence of Subgrid Orography in a Global Climate Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Assessments of the impacts of climate change typically require information at scales of 10 km or less. Such a resolution will not be achieved by global climate models for many years. We have developed an alternative to explicit resolution that can meet the needs of climate change impact assessment now. We have applied to a global climate model a physically-based subgrid-scale treatment of the influence of orography on temperature, clouds, precipitation, and land surface hydrology. The treatment represents subgrid variations in surface elevation in terms of fractional area distributions of discrete elevation classes. For each class it calculates the height rise/descent of air parcels traveling through the grid cell, and applies the influence of the rise/descent to the temperature and humidity profiles of the elevation class. Cloud, radiative, and surface processes are calculated separately for each elevation class using the same physical parameterizations used by the model without the subgrid parameterization. The simulated climate fields for each elevation class can then be distributed in post-processing according to the spatial distribution of surface elevation within each grid cell. Parallel 10-year simulations with and without the subgrid treatment have been performed. The simulated temperature, precipitation and snow water are mapped to 2.5 minute (~5 km) resolution and compared with gridded analyses of station measurements. The simulation with the subgrid scheme produces a much more realistic distribution of snow water and significantly more realistic distributions of temperature and precipitation than the simulation without the subgrid scheme. Moreover, the grid cell means of most other fields are virtually unchanged by the subgrid scheme. This suggests that the tuning of the climate model without the subgrid scheme is also applicable to the model with the scheme.

Ghan, Steven J.; Bian, Xindi; Hunt, Allen G.; Coleman, Andre M.

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

A Vast Machine Computer Models, Climate Data, and the Politics of Global Warming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Climatology--History. 3. Meteorology--History. 4. Climatology--Technological innovation. 5. Global temperature

Edwards, Paul N.

134

Global well-posedness of strong solutions to a tropical climate model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we consider the Cauchy problem to the TROPIC CLIMATE MODEL derived by Frierson-Majda-Pauluis in [Comm. Math. Sci, Vol. 2 (2004)] which is a coupled system of the barotropic and the first baroclinic modes of the velocity and the typical midtropospheric temperature. The system considered in this paper has viscosities in the momentum equations, but no diffusivity in the temperature equation. We establish here the global well-posedness of strong solutions to this model. In proving the global existence of strong solutions, to overcome the difficulty caused by the absence of the diffusivity in the temperature equation, we introduce a new velocity $w$ (called the pseudo baroclinic velocity), which has more regularities than the original baroclinic mode of the velocity. An auxiliary function $\\phi$, which looks like the effective viscous flux for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations, is also introduced to obtain the $L^\\infty$ bound of the temperature. Regarding the uniqueness, we use the idea of p...

Li, Jinkai

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 'Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds' project focused extensively on the analysis and utilization of water vapor and aerosol profiles derived from the ARM Raman lidar at the Southern Great Plains ARM site. A wide range of different tasks were performed during this project, all of which improved quality of the data products derived from the lidar or advanced the understanding of atmospheric processes over the site. These activities included: upgrading the Raman lidar to improve its sensitivity; participating in field experiments to validate the lidar aerosol and water vapor retrievals; using the lidar aerosol profiles to evaluate the accuracy of the vertical distribution of aerosols in global aerosol model simulations; examining the correlation between relative humidity and aerosol extinction, and how these change, due to horizontal distance away from cumulus clouds; inferring boundary layer turbulence structure in convective boundary layers from the high-time-resolution lidar water vapor measurements; retrieving cumulus entrainment rates in boundary layer cumulus clouds; and participating in a field experiment that provided data to help validate both the entrainment rate retrievals and the turbulent profiles derived from lidar observations.

Turner, David, D.; Ferrare, Richard, A.

2011-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

136

An integrated assessment modeling framework for uncertainty studies in global and regional climate change: the MIT IGSM-CAM (version 1.0)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper describes a computationally efficient framework for uncertainty studies in global and regional climate change. In this framework, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Integrated Global System Model ...

Monier, Erwan

137

Global Workspace Theory, its LIDA Model and the Underlying Neuroscience Stan Franklin, Steve Strain, Javier Snaider, Ryan McCall, Usef Faghihi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from animal (including human) cognition. Such architectures should faithfully model its insights from what is known from animal (including human) cognition be tested against empirical studies of humans and other animals. Such studies

Memphis, University of

138

Accounting for Global Climate Model Projection Uncertainty in Modern Statistical Downscaling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Future climate change has emerged as a national and a global security threat. To carry out the needed adaptation and mitigation steps, a quantification of the expected level of climate change is needed, both at the global and the regional scale; in the end, the impact of climate change is felt at the local/regional level. An important part of such climate change assessment is uncertainty quantification. Decision and policy makers are not only interested in 'best guesses' of expected climate change, but rather probabilistic quantification (e.g., Rougier, 2007). For example, consider the following question: What is the probability that the average summer temperature will increase by at least 4 C in region R if global CO{sub 2} emission increases by P% from current levels by time T? It is a simple question, but one that remains very difficult to answer. It is answering these kind of questions that is the focus of this effort. The uncertainty associated with future climate change can be attributed to three major factors: (1) Uncertainty about future emission of green house gasses (GHG). (2) Given a future GHG emission scenario, what is its impact on the global climate? (3) Given a particular evolution of the global climate, what does it mean for a particular location/region? In what follows, we assume a particular GHG emission scenario has been selected. Given the GHG emission scenario, the current batch of the state-of-the-art global climate models (GCMs) is used to simulate future climate under this scenario, yielding an ensemble of future climate projections (which reflect, to some degree our uncertainty of being able to simulate future climate give a particular GHG scenario). Due to the coarse-resolution nature of the GCM projections, they need to be spatially downscaled for regional impact assessments. To downscale a given GCM projection, two methods have emerged: dynamical downscaling and statistical (empirical) downscaling (SDS). Dynamic downscaling involves configuring and running a regional climate model (RCM) nested within a given GCM projection (i.e., the GCM provides bounder conditions for the RCM). On the other hand, statistical downscaling aims at establishing a statistical relationship between observed local/regional climate variables of interest and synoptic (GCM-scale) climate predictors. The resulting empirical relationship is then applied to future GCM projections. A comparison of the pros and cons of dynamical versus statistical downscaling is outside the scope of this effort, but has been extensively studied and the reader is referred to Wilby et al. (1998); Murphy (1999); Wood et al. (2004); Benestad et al. (2007); Fowler et al. (2007), and references within those. The scope of this effort is to study methodology, a statistical framework, to propagate and account for GCM uncertainty in regional statistical downscaling assessment. In particular, we will explore how to leverage an ensemble of GCM projections to quantify the impact of the GCM uncertainty in such an assessment. There are three main component to this effort: (1) gather the necessary climate-related data for a regional SDS study, including multiple GCM projections, (2) carry out SDS, and (3) assess the uncertainty. The first step is carried out using tools written in the Python programming language, while analysis tools were developed in the statistical programming language R; see Figure 1.

Johannesson, G

2010-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

139

A sensitivity study of the thermodynamic environment on GFDL model hurricane intensity: Implications for global warming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, the effect of thermodynamic environmental changes on hurricane intensity is extensively investigated with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory hurricane model for a suite of experiments with different initial upper-tropospheric temperature anomalies up to {+-}4 C and sea surface temperatures ranging from 26 to 31 C given the same relative humidity profile. The results indicate that stabilization in the environmental atmosphere and sea surface temperature (SST) increase cause opposing effects on hurricane intensity. The offsetting relationship between the effects of atmospheric stability increase (decrease) and SST increase (decrease) is monotonic and systematic in the parameter space. This implies that hurricane intensity increase due to a possible global warming associated with increased CO{sub 2} is considerably smaller than that expected from warming of the oceanic waters alone. The results also indicate that the intensity of stronger (weaker) hurricanes is more (less) sensitive to atmospheric stability and SST changes. The model-attained hurricane intensity is found to be well correlated with the maximum surface evaporation and the large-scale environmental convective available potential energy. The model-attained hurricane intensity if highly correlated with the energy available from wet-adiabatic ascent near the eyewall relative to a reference sounding in the undisturbed environment for all the experiments. Coupled hurricane-ocean experiments show that hurricane intensity becomes less sensitive to atmospheric stability and SST changes since the ocean coupling causes larger (smaller) intensity reduction for stronger (weaker) hurricanes. This implies less increase of hurricane intensity related to a possible global warming due to increased CO{sub 2}.

Shen, W.; Tuleya, R.E.; Ginis, I.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

INTERPRETING THE GLOBAL 21 cm SIGNAL FROM HIGH REDSHIFTS. I. MODEL-INDEPENDENT CONSTRAINTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The sky-averaged (global) 21 cm signal is a powerful probe of the intergalactic medium (IGM) prior to the completion of reionization. However, so far it has been unclear whether it will provide more than crude estimates of when the universe's first stars and black holes formed, even in the best case scenario in which the signal is accurately extracted from the foregrounds. In contrast to previous work, which has focused on predicting the 21 cm signatures of the first luminous objects, we investigate an arbitrary realization of the signal and attempt to translate its features to the physical properties of the IGM. Within a simplified global framework, the 21 cm signal yields quantitative constraints on the Ly? background intensity, net heat deposition, ionized fraction, and their time derivatives without invoking models for the astrophysical sources themselves. The 21 cm absorption signal is most easily interpreted, setting strong limits on the heating rate density of the universe with a measurement of its redshift alone, independent of the ionization history or details of the Ly? background evolution. In a companion paper, we extend these results, focusing on the confidence with which one can infer source emissivities from IGM properties.

Mirocha, Jordan; Harker, Geraint J. A.; Burns, Jack O., E-mail: jordan.mirocha@colorado.edu [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, Campus Box 389, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)

2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

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141

The Future of Food Demand: Understanding Differences in Global Economic Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Understanding the capacity of agricultural systems to feed the world population under climate change requires a good prospective vision on the future development of food demand. This paper reviews modeling approaches from ten global economic models participating to the AgMIP project, in particular the demand function chosen and the set of parameters used. We compare food demand projections at the horizon 2050 for various regions and agricultural products under harmonized scenarios. Depending on models, we find for a business as usual scenario (SSP2) an increase in food demand of 59-98% by 2050, slightly higher than FAO projection (54%). The prospective for animal calories is particularly uncertain with a range of 61-144%, whereas FAO anticipates an increase by 76%. The projections reveal more sensitive to socio-economic assumptions than to climate change conditions or bioenergy development. When considering a higher population lower economic growth world (SSP3), consumption per capita drops by 9% for crops and 18% for livestock. Various assumptions on climate change in this exercise do not lead to world calorie losses greater than 6%. Divergences across models are however notable, due to differences in demand system, income elasticities specification, and response to price change in the baseline.

Valin, Hugo; Sands, Ronald; van der Mensbrugghe, Dominique; Nelson, Gerald; Ahammad, Helal; Blanc, Elodie; Bodirsky, Benjamin; Fujimori, Shinichiro; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Havlik, Petr; Heyhoe, Edwina; Kyle, G. Page; Mason d'Croz, Daniel; Paltsev, S.; Rolinski, Susanne; Tabeau, Andrzej; van Meijl, Hans; von Lampe, Martin; Willenbockel, Dirk

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: CONTINUOUS DYNAMIC GRID ADAPTATION IN A GLOBAL ATMOSPHERIC MODEL: APPLICATION AND REFINEMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project had goals of advancing the performance capabilities of the numerical general circulation model EULAG and using it to produce a fully operational atmospheric global climate model (AGCM) that can employ either static or dynamic grid stretching for targeted phenomena. The resulting AGCM combined EULAG√ʬ?¬?s advanced dynamics core with the √ʬ?¬?physics√ʬ?¬Ě of the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model (CAM). Effort discussed below shows how we improved model performance and tested both EULAG and the coupled CAM-EULAG in several ways to demonstrate the grid stretching and ability to simulate very well a wide range of scales, that is, multi-scale capability. We leveraged our effort through interaction with an international EULAG community that has collectively developed new features and applications of EULAG, which we exploited for our own work summarized here. Overall, the work contributed to over 40 peer- reviewed publications and over 70 conference/workshop/seminar presentations, many of them invited.

Prusa, Joseph

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

143

A size-structured food-web model for the global ocean*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Global Change Science (CGCS) and the Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research (CEEPR of global environment and energy challenges, thereby contributing to informed debate about climate change reproduces global distributions of nutrients, biomass, and primary productivity, and captures the power

144

Consideration of the electron energy distribution function shape in a Ar and N{sub 2} global model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a method to compensate the effects of the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) shape on plasma characteristics when using global models to describe Ar and N{sub 2} inductively coupled discharges. A non-Maxwellian global model is developed for the pressure range 1-1000 mTorr by using an user-friendly Boltzmann equation solver to calculate the EEDF. The calculated EEDFs are compared with the measurements performed with a single Langmuir probe in the same conditions. We also compare the calculated results by using the Boltzmann equation solver with the results by assuming a Maxwellian EEDF and point out the influence of both methods on the contribution of the multi-step process on ionization. Finally, to take into account the shape of the EEDF in global models, abacuses are presented as a function of the absorbed power density and the pressure for typical Ar and N{sub 2} planar ICP discharges.

Kang, Namjun; Oh, Soo-Ghee [Division of Energy Systems Research, Ajou University, Suwon 443-749 (Korea, Republic of); Gaboriau, Freddy [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, INPT, LAPLACE (Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d'Energie), 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse cedex 9 (France); CNRS, LAPLACE, F-31062 Toulouse (France)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

145

Time series modeling and large scale global solar radiation forecasting from geostationary satellites data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

When a territory is poorly instrumented, geostationary satellites data can be useful to predict global solar radiation. In this paper, we use geostationary satellites data to generate 2-D time series of solar radiation for the next hour. The results presented in this paper relate to a particular territory, the Corsica Island, but as data used are available for the entire surface of the globe, our method can be easily exploited to another place. Indeed 2-D hourly time series are extracted from the HelioClim-3 surface solar irradiation database treated by the Heliosat-2 model. Each point of the map have been used as training data and inputs of artificial neural networks (ANN) and as inputs for two persistence models (scaled or not). Comparisons between these models and clear sky estimations were proceeded to evaluate the performances. We found a normalized root mean square error (nRMSE) close to 16.5% for the two best predictors (scaled persistence and ANN) equivalent to 35-45% related to ground measurements. F...

Voyant, Cyril; Muselli, Marc; Paoli, Christophe; Nivet, Marie Laure

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Interaction of waves and currents with kelp forests (Macrocystis pyrifera): Insights from a dynamically scaled laboratory model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a dynamically matched 1/25-scale physical model in a laboratory flume. In experiments with kelp mimics, waves a dynamically scaled laboratory model Johanna H. Rosman,a,* Mark W. Denny,b Robert B. Zeller,c Stephen G between model kelp and water under waves increased wake generation of turbulence, resulting in turbulent

Denny, Mark

147

FTT:Power : A global model of the power sector with induced technological change and natural resource depletion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work introduces a model of Future Technology Transformations for the power sector (FTT:Power), a representation of global power systems based on market competition, induced technological change (ITC) and natural resource use and depletion. It is the first component of a family of sectoral bottom-up models of technology, designed for integration into the global macroeconometric model E3MG. ITC occurs as a result of technological learning produced by cumulative investment and leads to highly nonlinear, irreversible and path dependent technological transitions. The model uses a dynamic coupled set of logistic differential equations. As opposed to traditional bottom-up energy models based on systems optimisation, such differential equations offer an appropriate treatment of the times and structure of change involved in sectoral technology transformations, as well as a much reduced computational load. Resource use and depletion are represented by local cost-supply curves, which give rise to different regional...

Mercure, J -F

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Global distribution and climate forcing of marine organic aerosol: 1. Model improvements and evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Marine organic aerosol emissions have been implemented and evaluated within the National Center of Atmospheric Research (NCAR)'s Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5) with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's 7-mode Modal Aerosol Module (MAM-7). Emissions of marine primary organic aerosols (POA), phytoplanktonproduced isoprene- and monoterpenes-derived secondary organic aerosols (SOA) and methane sulfonate (MS{sup -}) are shown to affect surface concentrations of organic aerosols in remote marine regions. Global emissions of submicron marine POA is estimated to be 7.9 and 9.4 Tg yr{sup -1}, for the Gantt et al. (2011) and Vignati et al. (2010) emission parameterizations, respectively. Marine sources of SOA and particulate MS{sup -} (containing both sulfur and carbon atoms) contribute an additional 0.2 and 5.1 Tg yr{sup -1}, respectively. Widespread areas over productive waters of the Northern Atlantic, Northern Pacific, and the Southern Ocean show marine-source submicron organic aerosol surface concentrations of 100 ngm{sup -3}, with values up to 400 ngm{sup -3} over biologically productive areas. Comparison of long-term surface observations of water insoluble organic matter (WIOM) with POA concentrations from the two emission parameterizations shows that despite revealed discrepancies (often more than a factor of 2), both Gantt et al. (2011) and Vignati et al. (2010) formulations are able to capture the magnitude of marine organic aerosol concentrations, with the Gantt et al. (2011) parameterization attaining better seasonality. Model simulations show that the mixing state of the marine POA can impact the surface number concentration of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The largest increases (up to 20 %) in CCN (at a supersaturation (S) of 0.2 %) number concentration are obtained over biologically productive ocean waters when marine organic aerosol is assumed to be externally mixed with sea-salt. Assuming marine organics are internally-mixed with sea-salt provides diverse results with increases and decreases in the concentration of CCN over different parts of the ocean. The sign of the CCN change due to the addition of marine organics to seasalt aerosol is determined by the relative significance of the increase in mean modal diameter due to addition of mass, and the decrease in particle hygroscopicity due to compositional changes in marine aerosol. Based on emerging evidence for increased CCN concentration over biologically active surface ocean areas/periods, our study suggests that treatment of sea spray in global climate models (GCMs) as an internal mixture of marine organic aerosols and sea-salt will likely lead to an underestimation in CCN number concentration.

Meskhidze, N.; Xu, J.; Gantt, Brett; Zhang, Yang; Nenes, Athanasios; Ghan, Steven J.; Liu, Xiaohong; Easter, Richard C.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

149

Intercomparison and Evaluation of Global Aerosol Microphysical Properties among AeroCom Models of a Range of Complexity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many of the next generation of global climate models will include aerosol schemes which explicitly simulate the microphysical processes that determine the particle size distribution. These models enable aerosol optical properties and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations to be determined by fundamental aerosol processes, which should lead to a more physically based simulation of aerosol direct and indirect radiative forcings. This study examines the global variation in particle size distribution simulated by twelve global aerosol microphysics models to quantify model diversity and to identify any common biases against observations. Evaluation against size distribution measurements from a new European network of aerosol supersites shows that the mean model agrees quite well with the observations at many sites on the annual mean, but there are some seasonal biases common to many sites. In particular, at many of these European sites, the accumulation mode number concentration is biased low during winter and Aitken mode concentrations tend to be overestimated in winter and underestimated in summer. At high northern latitudes, the models strongly underpredict Aitken and accumulation particle concentrations compared to the measurements, consistent with previous studies that have highlighted the poor performance of global aerosol models in the Arctic. In the marine boundary layer, the models capture the observed meridional variation in the size distribution, which is dominated by the Aitken mode at high latitudes, with an increasing concentration of accumulation particles with decreasing latitude. Considering vertical profiles, the models reproduce the observed peak in total particle concentrations in the upper troposphere due to new particle formation, although modelled peak concentrations tend to be biased high over Europe. Overall, the results suggest that most global aerosol microphysics models simulate the global variation of the particle size distribution with a good degree of skill, but some models are in poor agreement with the observations. Further work is required to better constrain size-resolved primary and secondary particle number sources, and an improved understanding of nucleation and growth (e.g. the role of nitrate and secondary organics) will improve the fidelity of simulated particle size distributions.

Mann, G. W.; Carslaw, K. S.; Reddington, C. L.; Pringle, K. J.; Schulz, M.; Asmi, A.; Spracklen, D. V.; Ridley, D. A.; Woodhouse, M. T.; Lee, L. A.; Zhang, Kai; Ghan, Steven J.; Easter, Richard C.; Liu, Xiaohong; Stier, P.; Lee, Y. H.; Adams, P. J.; Tost, H.; Lelieveld, J.; Bauer, S.; Tsigaridis, Kostas; van Noije, T.; Strunk, A.; Vignati, E.; Bellouin, N.; Dalvi, M.; Johnson, C. E.; Bergman, T.; Kokkola, H.; Von Salzen, Knut; Yu, Fangqun; Luo, Gan; Petzold, A.; Heintzenberg, J.; Clarke, A. D.; Ogren, J. A.; Gras, J.; Baltensperger, Urs; Kaminski, U.; Jennings, S. G.; O'Dowd, C. D.; Harrison, R. M.; Beddows, D. C.; Kulmala, M.; Viisanen, Y.; Ulevicius, V.; Mihalopoulos, Nikos; Zdimal, V.; Fiebig, M.; Hansson, H. C.; Swietlicki, E.; Henzing, J. S.

2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

150

Modeling of shippingModeling of shipping NONOxx emissions in globalemissions in global GeertGeert VinkenVinken11,, FolkertFolkert BoersmaBoersma22, and Daniel J. Jacob, and Daniel J. Jacob33  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) emissions 5-7% of global sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions 3-4% of global carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions ShipModeling of shippingModeling of shipping NONOxx emissions in globalemissions in global CTMs 70% of the ship emissions occur within 400 km of land Only industrial sector not regulated under

Haak, Hein

151

Modeling the barotropic response of the global ocean to atmospheric wind and pressure forcing -comparisons with observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-G. Model outputs are compared to in situ observations with tide gauge data (TG) and bottom pressure gauge data (BPR), and also with T/P altimetric cross over points (noted CO). Intercomparisons were performed/P and Jason altimeters deliver very accurate data sets (within 2 centimeter global error for T/P). How- ever

152

Global estimation of evapotranspiration using a leaf area index-based surface energy and water balance model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

using Advanced Very High Res- olution Radiometer Lai data, Climate Research Unit climate dataGlobal estimation of evapotranspiration using a leaf area index-based surface energy and water-relative-humidity-based two-source (ARTS) E model that simulates the surface energy balance, soil water balance

Martin, Timothy

153

Enhancing the resolution of sea ice in long-term global ocean general circulation model (gcm) integrations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Open water in sea ice, such as leads and polynyas, plays a crucial role in determining the formation of deep- and bottom-water, as well as their long-term global properties and circulation. Ocean general circulation models (GCMs) designed...

Kim, Joong Tae

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

154

Global modeling of cancer gene expression signa-Cancer leads to permanent changes in cell's physiological state and various  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global modeling of cancer gene expression signa- tures Cancer leads to permanent changes in cell cancer types. Less is known about the underlying biological processes, or relationships between different cancer types with respect to these changes. While each specific cancer type has a set of unique

Kaski, Samuel

155

The Role of Stratification-Dependent Mixing for the Stability of the Atlantic Overturning in a Global Climate Model*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in a Global Climate Model* BEN MARZEION Nansen Environmental and Remote Sensing Center, and Bjerknes Centre oceanic heat transport. Subsequently, and in opposition to results from previous studies, the overturning, as seen, for example, in temperature reconstructions from Greenland ice cores, are often ex- plained

Marzeion, Ben

156

COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: CONTINUOUS DYNAMIC GRID ADAPTATION IN A GLOBAL ATMOSPHERIC MODEL: APPLICATION AND REFINEMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project had goals of advancing the performance capabilities of the numerical general circulation model EULAG and using it to produce a fully operational atmospheric global climate model (AGCM) that can employ either static or dynamic grid stretching for targeted phenomena. The resulting AGCM combined EULAG's advanced dynamics core with the "physics" of the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model (CAM). Effort discussed below shows how we improved model performance and tested both EULAG and the coupled CAM-EULAG in several ways to demonstrate the grid stretching and ability to simulate very well a wide range of scales, that is, multi-scale capability. We leveraged our effort through interaction with an international EULAG community that has collectively developed new features and applications of EULAG, which we exploited for our own work summarized here. Overall, the work contributed to over 40 peer-reviewed publications and over 70 conference/workshop/seminar presentations, many of them invited. 3a. EULAG Advances EULAG is a non-hydrostatic, parallel computational model for all-scale geophysical flows. EULAG's name derives from its two computational options: EULerian (flux form) or semi-LAGrangian (advective form). The model combines nonoscillatory forward-in-time (NFT) numerical algorithms with a robust elliptic Krylov solver. A signature feature of EULAG is that it is formulated in generalized time-dependent curvilinear coordinates. In particular, this enables grid adaptivity. In total, these features give EULAG novel advantages over many existing dynamical cores. For EULAG itself, numerical advances included refining boundary conditions and filters for optimizing model performance in polar regions. We also added flexibility to the model's underlying formulation, allowing it to work with the pseudo-compressible equation set of Durran in addition to EULAG's standard anelastic formulation. Work in collaboration with others also extended the demonstrated range of validity of soundproof models, showing that they are more broadly applicable than some had previously thought. Substantial testing of EULAG included application and extension of the Jablonowski-Williamson baroclinic wave test - an archetype of planetary weather - and further analysis of multi-scale interactions arising from collapse of temperature fronts in both the baroclinic wave test and simulations of the Held-Suarez idealized climate. These analyses revealed properties of atmospheric gravity waves not seen in previous work and further demonstrated the ability of EULAG to simulate realistic behavior over several orders of magnitude of length scales. Additional collaborative work enhanced capability for modeling atmospheric flows with adaptive moving meshes and demonstrated the ability of EULAG to move into petascale computing. 3b. CAM-EULAG Advances We have developed CAM-EULAG in collaboration with former project postdoc, now University of Cape Town Assistant Professor, Babatunde Abiodun. Initial study documented good model performance in aqua-planet simulations. In particular, we showed that the grid adaptivity (stretching) implemented in CAM-EULAG allows higher resolution in selected regions without causing anomalous behavior such as spurious wave reflection. We then used the stretched-grid version to analyze simulated extreme precipitation events in West Africa, comparing the precipitation and event environment with observed behavior. The model simulates fairly well the spatial scale and the interannual and intraseasonal variability of the extreme events, although its extreme precipitation intensity is weaker than observed. In addition, both observations and the simulations show possible forcing of extreme events by African easterly waves. 3c. Other Contributions Through our collaborations, we have made contributions to a wide range of outcomes. For research focused on terrestrial behavior, these have included (1) upwind schemes for gas dynamics, (2) a nonlinear perspective on the dynamics of the Madden-Julian Oscillation, (3) numerical realism of thermal co

Gutowski, William J.; Prusa, Joseph M.; Smolarkiewicz, Piotr K.

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

157

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ELECTROMAGNETIC COMPATIBILITY, VOL. 51, NO. 3, AUGUST 2009 471 New Insights Into Lightning Return-Stroke Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Into Lightning Return-Stroke Models With Specified Longitudinal Current Distribution Grzegorz Maslowski, Member, IEEE, and Vladimir A. Rakov, Fellow, IEEE (Invited Paper) Abstract--We show that any lightning return-stroke-current-source-type) models, it is also unipolar but directed into the channel core. The conversion between LCS and DCS return-stroke

Florida, University of

158

Insights from a Simple Hotelling Model of the World Oil Market C.-Y. Cynthia Lina1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

data used in this study were acquired with the help of Brian Greene and with funds from the Littauer Kennedy School Pre-Doctoral Fellowship in energy policy. All errors are my own. #12;1 1 INTRODUCTION. In a 1980-1981 study by Stanford University's Energy Modeling Forum of ten prominent models of the world oil

Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia

159

Modeling the Oil Transition: A Summary of the Proceedings of the DOE/EPA Workshop on the Economic and Environmental Implications of Global Energy Transitions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The global energy system faces sweeping changes in the next few decades, with potentially critical implications for the global economy and the global environment. It is important that global institutions have the tools necessary to predict, analyze and plan for such massive change. This report summarizes the proceedings of an international workshop concerning methods of forecasting, analyzing, and planning for global energy transitions and their economic and environmental consequences. A specific case, it focused on the transition from conventional to unconventional oil and other energy sources likely to result from a peak in non-OPEC and/or global production of conventional oil. Leading energy models from around the world in government, academia and the private sector met, reviewed the state-of-the-art of global energy modeling and evaluated its ability to analyze and predict large-scale energy transitions.

Greene, David L [ORNL

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Modeling disease-related proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae : insights into alpha-synuclein and TorsinA biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has long been used to model complex cellular processes. As a eukaryote, much of its fundamental biology is conserved with higher organisms. As a single-celled, genetically tractable ...

Valastyan, Julie S. (Julie Suzanne)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global insight model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Planetary boundary layer depth in Global climate models induced biases in surface climatology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Earth has warmed in the last century with the most rapid warming occurring near the surface in the arctic. This enhanced surface warming in the Arctic is partly because the extra heat is trapped in a thin layer of air near the surface due to the persistent stable-stratification found in this region. The warming of the surface air due to the extra heat depends upon the amount of turbulent mixing in the atmosphere, which is described by the depth of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). In this way the depth of the ABL determines the effective response of the surface air temperature to perturbations in the climate forcing. The ABL depth can vary from tens of meters to a few kilometers which presents a challenge for global climate models which cannot resolve the shallower layers. Here we show that the uncertainties in the depth of the ABL can explain up to 60 percent of the difference between the simulated and observed surface air temperature trends and 50 percent of the difference in temperature variability...

Davy, Richard

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

JUNE 2002 311S H M A K I N E T A L . Global Modeling of Land Water and Energy Balances. Part III  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

JUNE 2002 311S H M A K I N E T A L . Global Modeling of Land Water and Energy Balances. Part III of basin discharge. 1. Introduction Global models of land water and energy balance can provide information 44 large river basins for which relatively accurate time series of monthly precipitation (a primary

163

Global Warming, endogenous risk and irreversibility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The economics of global warming, Institute for InternationalEconomic Models of Global Warming, Cambridge, Mass. MITstochastic losses from global warming, Risk Analysis 16(2):

Fisher, Anthony C.; Narain, Urvashi

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Global Statistics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1996). Globalization in Question: International Economy andGlobalization; Justice; Poverty; Underground Economy; United

Crow, Ben D

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Development of an atmospheric aerosol model for studies of global budgets and effects of airborne particulate material  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A microphysics-removal atmospheric aerosol model (AAM) is developed for use in general circulation models (GCMs) to study global budgets and effects of particulate material. In this model the particle population is composed of a set of log-normal modes whose time evolution due to microphysical processes is described via prognostic equations for an appropriate number of moments of the particle-size distribution. Detailed parameterizations of particle coagulation, sedimentation, dry deposition, and wet removal are developed and implemented into the AAM. The AAM is incorporated into a GCM and is applied to two types of studies: (1) characteristics of the particle wet and dry removal processes, and (2) climatic impact of massive particulate injections following a global nuclear war, with emphasis on the sensitivity of the simulated effects to the inclusion of particle microphysics. Results are discussed.

Giorgi, F.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Climate change and agriculture : global and regional effects using an economic model of international trade  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Empirical estimates of the economic welfare implications of the impact of climate change on global agricultural production are made. Agricultural yield changes resulting from climate scenarios associated with a doubling ...

Reilly, John M.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Global precipitation retrieval algorithm trained for SSMIS using a numerical weather prediction model: Design and evaluation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents and evaluates a global precipitation retrieval algorithm for the Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS). It is based on those developed earlier for the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) ...

Surussavadee, Chinnawat

168

Moral purpose, economic incentive and global trade : why new business models are needed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Globalization has occurred in various forms over the past century, yet only recently has it become daily news. This evolving process has created numerous underlying tensions that are not well understood. While western ...

Samel, Hiram M

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Using a total landed cost model to foster global logistics strategy in the electronics industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global operation strategies have been widely used in the last several decades as many companies and industries have taken advantage of lower production costs. However, in choosing a location, companies often only consider ...

Jearasatit, Apichart

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Precipitation and Air Pollution at Mountain and Plain Stations in Northern China: Insights Gained from Observations and Modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We analyzed 40 year data sets of daily average visibility (a proxy for surface aerosol concentration) and hourly precipitation at seven weather stations, including three stations located on the Taihang Mountains, during the summertime in northern China. There was no significant trend in summertime total precipitation at almost all stations. However, light rain decreased, whereas heavy rain increased as visibility decreased over the period studied. The decrease in light rain was seen in both orographic-forced shallow clouds and mesoscale stratiform clouds. The consistent trends in observed changes in visibility, precipitation, and orographic factor appear to be a testimony to the effects of aerosols. The potential impact of large-scale environmental factors, such as precipitable water, convective available potential energy, and vertical wind shear, on precipitation was investigated. No direct links were found. To validate our observational hypothesis about aerosol effects, Weather Research and Forecasting model simulations with spectral-bin microphysics at the cloud-resolving scale were conducted. Model results confirmed the role of aerosol indirect effects in reducing the light rain amount and frequency in the mountainous area for both orographic-forced shallow clouds and mesoscale stratiform clouds and in eliciting a different response in the neighboring plains. The opposite response of light rain to the increase in pollution when there is no terrain included in the model suggests that orography is likely a significant factor contributing to the opposite trends in light rain seen in mountainous and plain areas.

Guo, Jianping; Deng, Minjun; Fan, Jiwen; Li, Zhanqing; Chen, Qian; Zhai, Panmao; Dai, Zhijian; Li, Xiaowen

2014-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

171

A polar stratospheric cloud parameterization for the global modeling initiative three-dimensional model and its response to stratospheric aircraft  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe a new parameterization of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) which was written for and incorporated into the three-dimensional (3-D) chemistry and transport model (CTM) developed for NASA's Atmospheric Effects of Aviation Project (AEAP) by the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI). The parameterization was designed to respond to changes in NO{sub y} and H{sub 2}O produced by high-speed civilian transport (HSCT) emissions. The parameterization predicts surface area densities (SADs) of both Type 1 and Type 2 PSCs for use in heterogeneous chemistry calculations. Type 1 PSCs are assumed to have a supercooled ternary sulfate (STS) composition, and Type 2 PSCs are treated as water ice with a coexisting nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) phase. Sedimentation is treated by assuming that the PSC particles obey lognormal size distributions, resulting in a realistic mass flux of condensed phase H{sub 2}O and HNO{sub 3}. We examine a simulation of the Southern Hemisphere high-latitude lower stratosphere winter and spring seasons driven by temperature and wind fields from a modified version of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Middle Atmosphere Community Climate Model Version 2 (MACCM2). Predicted PSC SADs and median radii for both Type 1 and Type 2 PSCs are consistent with observations. Gas phase HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}O concentrations in the high-latitude lower stratosphere qualitatively agree with Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) HNO{sub 3} and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) H{sub 2}O observations. The residual denitrification and dehydration of the model polar vortex after polar winter compares well with atmospheric trace molecule spectroscopy (ATMOS) observations taken during November 1994. When the NO{sub x} and H{sub 2}O emissions of a standard 500-aircraft HSCT fleet with a NO{sub x} emission index of 5 are added, NO{sub x} and H{sub 2}O concentrations in the Southern Hemisphere polar vortex before winter increase by up to 3%. This results in earlier onset of PSC formation, denitrification, and dehydration. Active Cl{sub y} increases and produces small ({approx}1%) decreases in lower stratospheric vortex O{sub 3} concentrations during the spring relative to the HSCT-free run. (c) 2000 American Geophysical Union.

Considine, D. B. [Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center and Department of Meteorology, University of Maryland, College Park (United States)] [Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center and Department of Meteorology, University of Maryland, College Park (United States); Douglass, A. R. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland (United States)] [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland (United States); Connell, P. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California (United States); Kinnison, D. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California (United States); Rotman, D. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California (United States)

2000-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

172

Simulated diurnal rainfall physics in a multi-scale global climate model with embedded explicit convection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

their Community Earth System Model (Richard Neale, personaldevelopment of Earth system models capable of reproducing

Pritchard, Michael Stephen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Global Statistics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Globalization: Statistics Weiss, L. (1997). "of Globalization: Statistics Milanovic, B. (1999). Truethe focus of global statistics, particularly in relation to

Crow, Ben D

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Global data set of biogenic VOC emissions calculated by the MEGAN model over the last 30 years  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGANv2.1) together with the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) meteorological fields were used to create a global emission dataset of biogenic VOCs available on a monthly basis for the time period of 1980 - 2010. This dataset is called MEGAN-MACC. The model estimated mean annual total BVOC emission of 760 Tg(C) yr1 consisting of isoprene (70%), monoterpenes (11%), methanol (6%), acetone (3%), sesquiterpenes (2.5%) and other BVOC species each contributing less than 2 %. Several sensitivity model runs were performed to study the impact of different model input and model settings on isoprene estimates and resulted in differences of * 17% of the reference isoprene total. A greater impact was observed for sensitivity run applying parameterization of soil moisture deficit that led to a 50% reduction of isoprene emissions on a global scale, most significantly in specific regions of Africa, South America and Australia. MEGAN-MACC estimates are comparable to results of previous studies. More detailed comparison with other isoprene in ventories indicated significant spatial and temporal differences between the datasets especially for Australia, Southeast Asia and South America. MEGAN-MACC estimates of isoprene and*-pinene showed a reasonable agreement with surface flux measurements in the Amazon andthe model was able to capture the seasonal variation of emissions in this region.

Sindelarova, K.; Granier, Claire; Bouarar, I.; Guenther, Alex B.; Tilmes, S.; Stavrakou, T.; Muller, J. F.; Kuhn, U.; Stefani, P.; Knorr, W.

2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

175

Insights Into the P-To-Q Conversion in the Catalytic Cycle of Methane Monooxygenase From a Synthetic Model System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the catalytic cycle of soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO), it has been proposed that cleavage of the O-O bond in the ({mu}-peroxo)diiron(III) intermediate P gives rise to the diiron(IV) intermediate Q with an Fe{sub 2}({mu}-O){sub 2} diamond core, which oxidizes methane to methanol. As a model for this conversion, ({mu}-oxo) diiron(III) complex 1 ([Fe{sup III}{sub 2}({mu}-O)({mu}-O{sub 2}H{sub 3})(L){sub 2}]{sup 3+}, L = tris(3,5-dimethyl-4-methoxypyridyl-2-methyl)amine) has been treated consecutively with one eq of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and one eq of HClO{sub 4} to form 3 ([Fe{sup IV}{sub 2}({mu}-O){sub 2}(L){sub 2}]{sup 4+}). In the course of this reaction a new species, 2, can be observed before the protonation step; 2 gives rise to a cationic peak cluster by ESI-MS at m/z 1,399, corresponding to the [Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}L{sub 2}H](OTf){sub 2}{sup +} ion in which 1 oxygen atom derives from 1 and the other two originate from H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Moessbauer studies of 2 reveal the presence of two distinct, exchange coupled iron(IV) centers, and EXAFS fits indicate a short Fe-O bond at 1.66 {angstrom} and an Fe-Fe distance of 3.32 {angstrom}. Taken together, the spectroscopic data point to an HO-Fe{sup IV}-O-Fe{sup IV} = O core for 2. Protonation of 2 results in the loss of H{sub 2}O and the formation of 3. Isotope labeling experiments show that the [Fe{sup IV}{sub 2}({mu}-O){sub 2}] core of 3 can incorporate both oxygen atoms from H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The reactions described here serve as the only biomimetic precedent for the conversion of intermediates P to Q in the sMMO reaction cycle and shed light on how a peroxodiiron(III) unit can transform into an [Fe{sup IV}{sub 2}({mu}-O){sub 2}] core.

Xue, G.; Fiedler, A.T.; Martinho, M.; Munck, E.; Que, L.; Jr.

2009-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

176

The Tropical Atmospheric El Nio Signal in Satellite Precipitation Data and a Global Climate Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) ABSTRACT Aspects of the tropical atmospheric response to El Ni√Īo related to the global energy and water and the Advanced Micro- wave Scanning Radiometer-E and simulations from the Goddard Institute for Space Studies are highly correlated, but anomalies in stratiform¬≠convective rainfall partitioning in the two datasets

177

Development of Multilingual Acoustic Models in the GlobalPhone Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, namely Ara≠ bic, Chinese (Mandarin and Wu), Croatian, English, French, German, Japanese, Korean] #words vocabulary Arabic 100 u.w. 20 u.w. u.w. Croatian (+30) 83 4019 14 106K 20K Japanese 121 9785 25 1. The GlobalPhone Database (u.w.=under way) For training and testing we use Croatian, Japanese

Schultz, Tanja

178

Multi-century Changes to Global Climate and Carbon Cycle: Results from a Coupled Climate and Carbon Cycle Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we use a coupled climate and carbon cycle model to investigate the global climate and carbon cycle changes out to year 2300 that would occur if CO{sub 2} emissions from all the currently estimated fossil fuel resources were released to the atmosphere. By year 2300, the global climate warms by about 8 K and atmospheric CO{sub 2} reaches 1423 ppmv. The warming is higher than anticipated because the sensitivity to radiative forcing increases as the simulation progresses. In our simulation, the rate of emissions peak at over 30 PgC yr{sup -1} early in the 22nd century. Even at year 2300, nearly 50% of cumulative emissions remain in the atmosphere. In our simulations both soils and living biomass are net carbon sinks throughout the simulation. Despite having relatively low climate sensitivity and strong carbon uptake by the land biosphere, our model projections suggest severe long-term consequences for global climate if all the fossil-fuel carbon is ultimately released to the atmosphere.

Bala, G; Caldeira, K; Mirin, A; Wickett, M; Delire, C

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

179

Global Simulation of Bioenergy Crop Productivity: Analytical framework and Case Study for Switchgrass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Contemporary global assessments of the deployment potential and sustainability aspects of biofuel crops lack quantitative details. This paper describes an analytical framework capable of meeting the challenges associated with global scale agro-ecosystem modeling. We designed a modeling platform for bioenergy crops, consisting of five major components: (i) standardized global natural resources and management data sets, (ii) global simulation unit and management scenarios, (iii) model calibration and validation, (iv) high-performance computing (HPC) modeling, and (v) simulation output processing and analysis. A case study with the HPC- Environmental Policy Integrated Climate model (HPC-EPIC) to simulate a perennial bioenergy crop, switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) and global biomass feedstock analysis on grassland demonstrates the application of this platform. The results illustrate biomass feedstock variability of switchgrass and provide insights on how the modeling platform can be expanded to better assess sustainable production criteria and other biomass crops. Feedstock potentials on global grasslands and within different countries are also shown. Future efforts involve developing databases of productivity, implementing global simulations for other bioenergy crops (e.g. miscanthus, energycane and agave), and assessing environmental impacts under various management regimes. We anticipated this platform will provide an exemplary tool and assessment data for international communities to conduct global analysis of biofuel biomass feedstocks and sustainability.

Nair, S. Surendran [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Nichols, Jeff A. {Cyber Sciences} [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL] [ORNL; Wang, Dali [ORNL] [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL] [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL] [ORNL; Wei, Yaxing [ORNL] [ORNL; Singh, Nagendra [ORNL] [ORNL; Kang, Shujiang [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Moisture Flux Convergence in Regional and Global Climate Models: Implications for Droughts in the Southwestern United States Under Climate Change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The water cycle of the southwestern United States (SW) is dominated by winter storms that maintain a positive annual net precipitation. Analysis of the control and future climate from four pairs of regional and global climate models (RCMs and GCMs) shows that the RCMs simulate a higher fraction of transient eddy moisture fluxes because the hydrodynamic instabilities associated with flow over complex terrain are better resolved. Under global warming, this enables the RCMs to capture the response of transient eddies to increased atmospheric stability that allows more moisture to converge on the windward side of the mountains by blocking. As a result, RCMs simulate enhanced transient eddy moisture convergence in the SW compared to GCMs, although both robustly simulate drying due to enhanced moisture divergence by the divergent mean flow in a warmer climate. This enhanced convergence leads to reduced susceptibility to hydrological change in the RCMs compared to GCMs.

Gao, Yanhong; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Salathe, E.; Dominguez, Francina; Nijssen, Bart; Lettenmaier, D. P.

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global insight model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Development of an atmospheric aerosol model for studies of global budgets and effects of airborne particulate material  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A microphysics-removal Atmospheric Aerosol Model (AAM) is developed for use in General Circulation Models (GCM) to study global budgets and effects of particulate material. In this model the particle population is assumed to be composed of a set of log-normal modes whose time evolution due to microphysical processes is described via prognostic equations for an appropriate number of moments of the particle size distribution. This newly devised technique, by making use of a small number of prognostic equations for the aerosol variables and utilizing optimized numerical procedures, renders the model computationally efficient, hence particularly suitable for use in complex 3D GCMs. Detailed parameterizations of particle coagulation, sedimentation, dry deposition, and wet removal are incorporated into the AAM.

Giorgi, F.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Scientific Final Report: COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: CONTINUOUS DYNAMIC GRID ADAPTATION IN A GLOBAL ATMOSPHERIC MODEL: APPLICATION AND REFINEMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project had goals of advancing the performance capabilities of the numerical general circulation model EULAG and using it to produce a fully operational atmospheric global climate model (AGCM) that can employ either static or dynamic grid stretching for targeted phenomena. The resulting AGCM combined EULAG's advanced dynamics core with the 'physics' of the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model (CAM). Effort discussed below shows how we improved model performance and tested both EULAG and the coupled CAM-EULAG in several ways to demonstrate the grid stretching and ability to simulate very well a wide range of scales, that is, multi-scale capability. We leveraged our effort through interaction with an international EULAG community that has collectively developed new features and applications of EULAG, which we exploited for our own work summarized here. Overall, the work contributed to over 40 peer-reviewed publications and over 70 conference/workshop/seminar presentations, many of them invited.

William J. Gutowski; Joseph M. Prusa, Piotr K. Smolarkiewicz

2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

183

Statistical Global Modeling of Beta-Decay Halflives Systematics Using Multilayer Feedforward Neural Networks and Support Vector Machines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work, the beta-decay halflives problem is dealt as a nonlinear optimization problem, which is resolved in the statistical framework of Machine Learning (LM). Continuing past similar approaches, we have constructed sophisticated Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) and Support Vector Regression Machines (SVMs) for each class with even-odd character in Z and N to global model the systematics of nuclei that decay 100% by the beta-minus-mode in their ground states. The arising large-scale lifetime calculations generated by both types of machines are discussed and compared with each other, with the available experimental data, with previous results obtained with neural networks, as well as with estimates coming from traditional global nuclear models. Particular attention is paid on the estimates for exotic and halo nuclei and we focus to those nuclides that are involved in the r-process nucleosynthesis. It is found that statistical models based on LM can at least match or even surpass the predictive performance of the best conventional models of beta-decay systematics and can complement the latter.

N. J. Costiris; E. Mavrommatis; K. A. Gernoth; J. W. Clark; H. Li

2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

184

An examination of urban heat island characteristics in a global climate model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and urban properties devel- oped by Jackson et al. (2010). Urban extent, defined for four classes [tall building district (TBD), and high, medium and low density (HD, MD, LD)], was derived from LandScan 2004 [Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL) 2005, Land...Scan? Global Population Database, Oak Ridge, TN (http://www.ornl.gov/landscan/)], a pop- ulation density dataset derived from census data, night- time lights satellite observations, road proximity and slope (Dobson et al., 2000). The urban extent data...

Oleson, Keith W.; Bonan, Gordon B.; Feddema, Johannes J.; Jackson, Trisha L.

2010-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

185

Draft only. This version: July 2011 GPE-VN: A general equilibrium model for the study of globalization,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of economies with global markets, for growth, economic welfare, income distribution and the environment, but the implications of integration with the global economy for income distribution, poverty change of globalization, poverty and the environment in Vietnam1 Ian Coxhead, University

Coxhead, Ian

186

Effect of Terrestrial and Marine Organic Aerosol on Regional and Global Climate: Model Development, Application, and Verification with Satellite Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this DOE project the improvements to parameterization of marine primary organic matter (POM) emissions, hygroscopic properties of marine POM, marine isoprene derived secondary organic aerosol (SOA) emissions, surfactant effects, new cloud droplet activation parameterization have been implemented into Community Atmosphere Model (CAM 5.0), with a seven mode aerosol module from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)√?¬?√?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?s Modal Aerosol Model (MAM7). The effects of marine aerosols derived from sea spray and ocean emitted biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) on microphysical properties of clouds were explored by conducting 10 year CAM5.0-MAM7 model simulations at a grid resolution 1.9√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬į√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?2.5√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬į with 30 vertical layers. Model-predicted relationship between ocean physical and biological systems and the abundance of CCN in remote marine atmosphere was compared to data from the A-Train satellites (MODIS, CALIPSO, AMSR-E). Model simulations show that on average, primary and secondary organic aerosol emissions from the ocean can yield up to 20% increase in Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) at 0.2% Supersaturation, and up to 5% increases in droplet number concentration of global maritime shallow clouds. Marine organics were treated as internally or externally mixed with sea salt. Changes associated with cloud properties reduced (absolute value) the model-predicted short wave cloud forcing from -1.35 Wm-2 to -0.25 Wm-2. By using different emission scenarios, and droplet activation parameterizations, this study suggests that addition of marine primary aerosols and biologically generated reactive gases makes an important difference in radiative forcing assessments. All baseline and sensitivity simulations for 2001 and 2050 using global-through-urban WRF/Chem (GU-WRF) were completed. The main objective of these simulations was to evaluate the capability of GU-WRF for an accurate representation of the global atmosphere by exploring the most accurate configuration of physics options in GWRF for global scale modeling in 2001 at a horizontal grid resolution of 1√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬į x 1√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬į. GU-WRF model output was evaluated using observational datasets from a variety of sources including surface based observations (NCDC and BSRN), model reanalysis (NCEP/ NCAR Reanalysis and CMAP), and remotely-sensed data (TRMM) to evaluate the ability of GU-WRF to simulate atmospheric variables at the surface as well as aloft. Explicit treatment of nanoparticles produced from new particle formation in GU-WRF/Chem-MADRID was achieved by expanding particle size sections from 8 to 12 to cover particles with the size range of 1.16 nm to 11.6 √?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ķm. Simulations with two different nucleation parameterizations were conducted for August 2002 over a global domain at a 4√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬ļ by 5√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬ļ horizontal resolution. The results are evaluated against field measurement data from the 2002 Aerosol Nucleation and Real Time Characterization Experiment (ANARChE) in Atlanta, Georgia, as well as satellite and reanalysis data. We have also explored the relationship between √?¬?√?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?clean marine√?¬?√?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ě aerosol optical properties and ocean surface wind speed using remotely sensed data from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) on board the CALIPSO satellite and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) on board the AQUA satellite. Detailed data analyses

Meskhidze, Nicholas; Zhang, Yang; Kamykowski, Daniel

2012-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

187

LONG-TERM GLOBAL WATER USE PROJECTIONS USING SIX SOCIOECONOMIC SCENARIOS IN AN INTEGRATED ASSESSMENT MODELING FRAMEWORK  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we assess future water demands for the agricultural (irrigation and livestock), energy (electricity generation, primary energy production and processing), industrial (manufacturing and mining), and municipal sectors, by incorporating water demands into a technologically-detailed global integrated assessment model of energy, agriculture, and climate change Ė the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM). Base-year water demandsóboth gross withdrawals and net consumptive useóare assigned to specific modeled activities in a way that maximizes consistency between bottom-up estimates of water demand intensities of specific technologies and practices, and top-down regional and sectoral estimates of water use. The energy, industrial, and municipal sectors are represented in fourteen geopolitical regions, with the agricultural sector further disaggregated into as many as eighteen agro-ecological zones (AEZs) within each region. We assess future water demands representing six socioeconomic scenarios, with no constraints imposed by future water supplies. The scenarios observe increases in global water withdrawals from 3,578 km3 year-1 in 2005 to 5,987 Ė 8,374 km3 year-1 in 2050, and to 4,719 Ė 12,290 km3 year-1 in 2095. Comparing the projected total regional water withdrawals to the historical supply of renewable freshwater, the Middle East exhibits the highest levels of water scarcity throughout the century, followed by India; water scarcity increases over time in both of these regions. In contrast, water scarcity improves in some regions with large base-year electric sector withdrawals, such as the USA and Canada, due to capital stock turnover and the almost complete phase-out of once-through flow cooling systems. The scenarios indicate that: 1) water is likely a limiting factor in climate change mitigation policies, 2) many regions can be expected to increase reliance on non-renewable groundwater, water reuse, and desalinated water, but they also highlight an important role for development and deployment of water conservation technologies and practices.

Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Wise, Marshall A.; Patel, Pralit L.; Eom, Jiyong; Calvin, Katherine V.; Moss, Richard H.; Kim, Son H.

2014-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

188

Global Climate Modeling of the Martian water cycle with improved microphysics and radiatively active water ice clouds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiative effects of water ice clouds have noteworthy consequences on the Martian atmosphere, its thermal structure and circulation. Accordingly, the inclusion of such effects in the LMD Mars Global Climate Model (GCM) greatly modifies the simulated Martian water cycle. The intent of this paper is to address the impact of radiatively active clouds on atmospheric water vapor and ice in the GCM and improve its representation. We propose a new enhanced modeling of the water cycle, consisting of detailed cloud microphysics with dynamic condensation nuclei and a better implementation of perennial surface water ice. This physical modeling is based on tunable parameters. This new version of the GCM is compared to the Thermal Emission Spectrometer observations of the water cycle. Satisfying results are reached for both vapor and cloud opacities. However, simulations yield a lack of water vapor in the tropics after Ls=180{\\deg} which is persistent in simulations compared to observations, as a consequence of aphelion c...

Navarro, Thomas; Forget, FranÁois; Spiga, Aymeric; Millour, Ehouarn; Montmessin, Franck

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Predicting tropospheric ozone and hydroxyl radical in a global, three-dimensional, chemistry, transport, and deposition model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two of the most important chemically reactive tropospheric gases are ozone (O{sub 3}) and the hydroxyl radical (OH). Although ozone in the stratosphere is a necessary protector against the sun`s radiation, tropospheric ozone is actually a pollutant which damages materials and vegetation, acts as a respiratory irritant, and is a greenhouse gas. One of the two main sources of ozone in the troposphere is photochemical production. The photochemistry is initiated when hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide (CO) react with nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x} = NO + NO{sub 2}) in the presence of sunlight. Reaction with the hydroxyl radical, OH, is the main sink for many tropospheric gases. The hydroxyl radical is highly reactive and has a lifetime on the order of seconds. Its formation is initiated by the photolysis of tropospheric ozone. Tropospheric chemistry involves a complex, non-linear set of chemical reactions between atmospheric species that vary substantially in time and space. To model these and other species on a global scale requires the use of a global, three-dimensional chemistry, transport, and deposition (CTD) model. In this work, I developed two such three dimensional CTD models. The first model incorporated the chemistry necessary to model tropospheric ozone production from the reactions of nitrogen oxides with carbon monoxide (CO) and methane (CH{sub 4}). The second also included longer-lived alkane species and the biogenic hydrocarbon isoprene, which is emitted by growing plants and trees. The models` ability to predict a number of key variables (including the concentration of O{sub 3}, OH, and other species) were evaluated. Then, several scenarios were simulated to understand the change in the chemistry of the troposphere since preindustrial times and the role of anthropogenic NO{sub x} on present day conditions.

Atherton, C.S.

1995-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

190

Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program | U.S. DOE Office of  

Office of Science (SC) Website

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 IndustrialIsadore Perlman,BiosScience (SC) Regional & Global Climate

191

A Vast Machine: Computer Models, Climate Data, and the Politics of Global Warming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review: A Vast Machine: Computer Models, Climate Data, andEdwards, Paul N. A Vast Machine: Computer Models, ClimateEdwards, Paul N. 2004. "A vast machine: standards as social

Maret, Susan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

BIOMETRICS55, 580-584 A Global Goodness-of-Fit Statistic for Cox Regression Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the models would be helpful. Schoenfeld (1980), Moreau, O'Quigley, and Mesbah (1985), and Moreau, O'Quigley

Parzen, Michael

193

Global economics/energy/environmental (E{sup 3}) modeling of long-term nuclear energy futures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A global energy, economics, environment (E{sup 3}) model has been adopted and modified with a simplified, but comprehensive and multi-regional, nuclear energy module. Using this model, consistent nuclear energy scenarios are constructed. A spectrum of future is examined at two levels in a hierarchy of scenario attributes in which drivers are either external or internal to nuclear energy. Impacts of a range of nuclear fuel-cycle scenarios are reflected back to the higher-level scenario attributes. An emphasis is placed on nuclear materials inventories (in magnitude, location, and form) and their contribution to the long-term sustainability of nuclear energy and the future competitiveness of both conventional and advanced nuclear reactors.

Krakowski, R.A.; Davidson, J.W.; Bathke, C.G.; Arthur, E.D.; Wagner, R.L. Jr.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

The Role Of Modeling Assumptions And Policy Instruments in Evaluating The Global Implications Of U.S. Biofuel Policies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of current U.S. biofuel law the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) is to reduce dependence on imported oil, but the law also requires biofuels to meet carbon emission reduction thresholds relative to petroleum fuels. EISA created a renewable fuel standard with annual targets for U.S. biofuel use that climb gradually from 9 billion gallons per year in 2008 to 36 billion gallons (or about 136 billion liters) of biofuels per year by 2022. The most controversial aspects of the biofuel policy have centered on the global social and environmental implications of its potential land use effects. In particular, there is an ongoing debate about whether indirect land use change (ILUC) make biofuels a net source, rather sink, of carbon emissions. However, estimates of ILUC induced by biofuel production and use can only be inferred through modeling. This paper evaluates how model structure, underlying assumptions, and the representation of policy instruments influence the results of U.S. biofuel policy simulations. The analysis shows that differences in these factors can lead to divergent model estimates of land use and economic effects. Estimates of the net conversion of forests and grasslands induced by U.S. biofuel policy range from 0.09 ha/1000 gallons described in this paper to 0.73 ha/1000 gallons from early studies in the ILUC change debate. We note that several important factors governing LUC change remain to be examined. Challenges that must be addressed to improve global land use change modeling are highlighted.

Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Phase separation and charge-ordered phases of the d=3 Falicov-Kimball model at nonzero temperature: Temperature-density-chemical potential global phase diagram from renormalization-group theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The global phase diagram of the spinless Falicov-Kimball model in d=3 spatial dimensions is obtained by renormalization-group theory. This global phase diagram exhibits five distinct phases. Four of these phases are ...

Sariyer, Ozan S.

196

An isospin dependent global nucleon-nucleus optical model at intermediate energies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A global nucleon-nucleus optical potential for elastic scattering has been produced which replicates experimental data to high accuracy and compares well with other recently formulated potentials. The calculation that has been developed describes proton and neutron scattering from target nuclei ranging from carbon to nickel and is applicable for projectile energies from 30 to 160 MeV. With these ranges it is suitable for calculations associated with experiments performed by exotic beam accelerators. The potential is also isospin dependent and has both real and imaginary isovector asymmetry terms to better describe the dynamics of chains of isotopes and mirror nuclei. An analysis of the validity and strength of the asymmetry term is included with connections established to other optical potentials and charge-exchange reaction data. An on-line observable calculator is available for this optical potential.

S. P. Weppner; R. B. Penney; G. W. Diffendale; G. Vittorini

2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

197

Author's personal copy Two-way coupling of an ENSO model to the global climate model CLIMBER-3a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

it is possible to introduce ENSO variability to an Earth system Model of Intermediate Complexity (EMIC we are using here. In this study we couple the Earth system model of intermediate complexity (EMIC

Levermann, Anders

198

CliCrop: a Crop Water-Stress and Irrigation Demand Model for an Integrated Global Assessment Model Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper describes the use of the CliCrop model in the context of climate change general assessment

Fant, C.A.

199

A Global Interactive Chemistry and Climate Model Chien Wang, Ronald G. Prinn and Andrei P. Sokolov  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with calculated or estimated trace gas emissions from both anthropogenic and natural sources, it is designed to the chemistry sub-model. Model predictions of the surface trends of several key species are close, if the current increasing trends of anthropogenic emissions of climate-relevant gases are continued over the next

200

Analysis of the singular vectors of the full-physics FSU Global Spectral Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the numerical weather prediction models has been the subject of numerous studies. For the barotropic atmosphere-growth estimation in numerical weather prediction and atmospheric predictability (Molteni and Palmer, 1993 predictability of an idealized model. However, singular vector analysis was carried out for the realistic meteo

Aluffi, Paolo

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201

Malthusian assumptions lead to Boserupian phenology in a global model of the transitions to agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the many transitions from foraging to agropastoralism it is debated whether innovation in technology or increase of population is the primary driver. The driver discussion traditionally separates Malthusian (technology driven) from Boserupian (population driven) theories. I present a numerical model of the transition to agriculture and discuss this model in the light of the population versus technology debate and in Boserup's analytical frame- work in development theory. Although my model is based on ecological-Neomalthusian- principles, the coevolutionary positive feedback relationship between technology and population results in apparent Boserupian behaviour: innovation is greatest when population pressure is highest. This outcome is not only visible in the theory-driven reduced model, but is also present in a corresponding "real world" simulator which was tested against archaeological data, and which thus demonstrates the relevance and validity of the coevolutionary model. The lesson to be learned is th...

Lemmen, Carsten

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Direct Insertion of MODIS Radiances in a Global Aerosol Transport Model CLARK WEAVER,* ARLINDO DA SILVA, MIAN CHIN,# PAUL GINOUX,@ OLEG DUBOVIK,&,@@  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is directly inserted into the Goddard Chemistry and Aerosol Radiation Transport model (GOCART), which aerosol radiative forcing in the thermody- namic equation of GCMs, 3) to account for the reduc- tionDirect Insertion of MODIS Radiances in a Global Aerosol Transport Model CLARK WEAVER,* ARLINDO DA

Chin, Mian

203

Sensitivity of Remote Aerosol Distributions to Representation of Cloud-Aerosol Interactions in a Global Climate Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many global aerosol and climate models, including the widely used Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5), have large biases in predicting aerosols in remote regions such as upper troposphere and high latitudes. In this study, we conduct CAM5 sensitivity simulations to understand the role of key processes associated with aerosol transformation and wet removal affecting the vertical and horizontal long-range transport of aerosols to the remote regions. Improvements are made to processes that are currently not well represented in CAM5, which are guided by surface and aircraft measurements together with results from a multi-scale aerosol-climate model (PNNL-MMF) that explicitly represents convection and aerosol-cloud interactions at cloud-resolving scales. We pay particular attention to black carbon (BC) due to its importance in the Earth system and the availability of measurements. We introduce into CAM5 a new unified scheme for convective transport and aerosol wet removal with explicit aerosol activation above convective cloud base. This new implementation reduces the excessive BC aloft to better simulate observed BC profiles that show decreasing mixing ratios in the mid- to upper-troposphere. After implementing this new unified convective scheme, we examine wet removal of submicron aerosols that occurs primarily through cloud processes. The wet removal depends strongly on the sub-grid scale liquid cloud fraction and the rate of conversion of liquid water to precipitation. These processes lead to very strong wet removal of BC and other aerosols over mid- to high latitudes during winter months. With our improvements, the Arctic BC burden has a10-fold (5-fold) increase in the winter (summer) months, resulting in a much better simulation of the BC seasonal cycle as well. Arctic sulphate and other aerosol species also increase but to a lesser extent. An explicit treatment of BC aging with slower aging assumptions produces an additional 30-fold (5-fold) increase in the Arctic winter (summer) BC burden. This BC aging treatment, however, has minimal effect on other under-predicted species. Interestingly, our modifications to CAM5 that aim at improving prediction of high-latitude and upper tropospheric aerosols also produce much better AOD and AAOD over various other regions globally when compared to multi-year AERONET retrievals. The improved aerosol distributions have impacts on other aspects of CAM5, improving the simulation of global mean liquid water path and cloud forcing.

Wang, Hailong; Easter, Richard C.; Rasch, Philip J.; Wang, Minghuai; Liu, Xiaohong; Ghan, Steven J.; Qian, Yun; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Ma, Po-Lun; Vinoj, V.

2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

204

Do Coupled Climate Models Correctly SImulate the Upward Branch of the Deept Ocean Global Conveyor?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The large-scale meridional overturning circulation (MOC) connects the deep ocean, a major reservoir of carbon, to the other components of the climate system and must therefore be accurately represented in Earth System Models. Our project aims to address the specific question of the pathways and mechanisms controlling the upwelling branch of the MOC, a subject of significant disagreement between models and observational syntheses, and among general circulation models. Observations of these pathways are limited, particularly in regions of complex hydrography such as the Southern Ocean. As such, we rely on models to examine theories of the overturning circulation, both physically and biogeochemically. This grant focused on a particular aspect of the meridional overturning circulation (MOC) where there is currently significant disagreement between models and observationally based analyses of the MOC, and amongst general circulation models. In particular, the research focused on addressing the following questions: 1. Where does the deep water that sinks in the polar regions rise to the surface? 2. What processes are responsible for this rise? 3. Do state-of-the-art coupled GCMs capture these processes? Our research had three key components: observational synthesis, model development and model analysis. In this final report we outline the key results from these areas of research for the 2007 to 2012 grant period. The research described here was carried out primarily by graduate student, Daniele Bianchi (now a Postdoc at McGill University, Canada), and Postdoc Stephanie Downes (now a Research Fellow at The Australian national University, Australia). Additional support was provided for programmers Jennifer Simeon as well as Rick Slater.

Sarmiento, Jorge L; Downes, Stephanie; Bianchi, Daniele

2013-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

205

Optimization and sensitivity of a global biogeochemistry ocean model using combined in situ DIC, alkalinity, and phosphate data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

anthropogenic CO 2 in the Pacific Ocean, Global Biogeochem.dissolution in the Pacific Ocean, Global Biogeochem. Cycles,PO 4 ] in the equatorial Pacific Ocean by approximately 70%.

Kwon, Eun Young; Primeau, Francois

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Observed Scaling in Clouds and Precipitation and Scale Incognizance in Regional to Global Atmospheric Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We use observations of robust scaling behavior in clouds and precipitation to derive constraints on how partitioning of precipitation should change with model resolution. Our analysis indicates that 90-99% of stratiform precipitation should occur in clouds that are resolvable by contemporary climate models (e.g., with 200 km or finer grid spacing). Furthermore, this resolved fraction of stratiform precipitation should increase sharply with resolution, such that effectively all stratiform precipitation should be resolvable above scales of ~50 km. We show that the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) and the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model also exhibit the robust cloud and precipitation scaling behavior that is present in observations, yet the resolved fraction of stratiform precipitation actually decreases with increasing model resolution. A suite of experiments with multiple dynamical cores provides strong evidence that this `scale-incognizant' behavior originates in one of the CAM4 parameterizations. An additional set of sensitivity experiments rules out both convection parameterizations, and by a process of elimination these results implicate the stratiform cloud and precipitation parameterization. Tests with the CAM5 physics package show improvements in the resolution-dependence of resolved cloud fraction and resolved stratiform precipitation fraction.

O'Brien, Travis A.; Li, Fuyu; Collins, William D.; Rauscher, Sara; Ringler, Todd; Taylor, Mark; Hagos, Samson M.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

REGIONAL IMPACTS OF THE GLOBAL CARBON STAKES: LONG-TERM PROSPECTIVE WITH THE TIMES INTEGRATED ASSESSMENT MODEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the progress of primary energy consumption and the energy mix. This paper compares global efforts on CO2 and Nadia Ma√Įzi 33rd IAEE International Conference: "The future of energy: global challenges, diverse the carbon constraints. JEL O21, Q29, Q4, Q54, Q58 Keywords Global energy system, CO2 mitigation targets

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

208

Marine geochemical data assimilation in an efficient Earth System Model of global biogeochemical cycling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract. We have extended the 3-D ocean based ďGrid ENabled Integrated Earth system model Ē (GENIE-1) to help understand the role of ocean biogeochemistry and marine sediments in the long-term (?100 to 100 000 year) regulation of atmospheric CO2, and the importance of feedbacks between CO2 and climate. Here we describe the ocean carbon cycle, which in its first incarnation is based around a simple single nutrient (phosphate) control on biological productivity. The addition of calcium carbonate preservation in deep-sea sediments and its role in regulating atmospheric CO2 is presented elsewhere (Ridgwell and Hargreaves, 2007). We have calibrated the model parameters controlling ocean carbon cycling in GENIE-1 by assimilating 3-D observational datasets of phosphate and alkalinity using an ensemble Kalman filter method. The calibrated (mean) model predicts

A. Ridgwell; J. C. Hargreaves; N. R. Edwards; J. D. Annan; T. M. Lenton; R. Marsh; A. Yool; A. Watson

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Sandia National Laboratories: Global Climate & Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

20, 2013, in Advanced Materials Laboratory, Energy Efficiency, Facilities, Global Climate & Energy, Materials Science, Modeling, Modeling & Analysis, Partnership, Research &...

210

Documentation of the Tangent Linear and Adjoint Models of New MPI Version of the FSU Global  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

over the optimal interpolation and 3-D data assimilation and con- sidering the ever increasing types of observational data, especially the asynoptic data, 4-D variational data assimilation has attracted more and more(Li, Navon and Zhu 2000). The objective of the 4-D variational data assimilation is to fit the model

Navon, Michael

211

Using Citizen Science Data to Model the Distributions of Common Songbirds of Turkey Under Different Global  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using Citizen Science Data to Model the Distributions of Common Songbirds of Turkey Under Different¬łit Bilgin1 * 1 Institute of Environmental Sciences, Bogazic¬łi University, Istanbul, Turkey, 2 Department of Biology, Natural History Museum Research and Application Center, Ege University, Izmir, Turkey, 3

Tipple, Brett

212

The Transition-Zone Water Filter Model for Global Material Circulation: Where Do We Stand?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with a small melt fraction, highly incompatible elements including hydro- gen, helium and argon are sequestered the fraction of water is small. Models have been developed to understand the structure of a melt layer Hilst, et al., 1997]), then the whole mantle is depleted with only a small volume (~10%) of relatively

213

From global change science to action with social sciences  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

US efforts to integrate social and biophysical sciences to address the issue of global change exist within a wider movement to understand global change as a societal challenge and to inform policy. Insights from the social sciences can help transform global change research into action.

Weaver, C. P.; Mooney, Sian; Allen, D.; Beller-Simms, Nancy; Fish, T.; Grambsch, A.; Hohenstein, W.; Jacobs, Kathy; Kenney, Melissa A.; Lane, Meredith A.; Langner, L.; Larson, E.; McGinnis, D. L.; Moss, Richard H.; Nichols, L. G.; Nierenberg, Claudia; Seyller, E. A.; Stern, Paul; Winthrop, R.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Project goals: (1) Use the routine surface and airborne measurements at the ARM SGP site, and the routine surface measurements at the NSA site, to continue our evaluations of model aerosol simulations; (2) Determine the degree to which the Raman lidar measurements of water vapor and aerosol scattering and extinction can be used to remotely characterize the aerosol humidification factor; (3) Use the high temporal resolution CARL data to examine how aerosol properties vary near clouds; and (4) Use the high temporal resolution CARL and Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) data to quantify entrainment in optically thin continental cumulus clouds.

Richard A. Ferrare; David D. Turner

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Consumer Energy Use Insights  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pike Powers Lab and Center for Commercialization Pecan Street Research Institute Data driven insights from the nationís deepest ever customer energy research ESL-KT-13-12-23 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San... Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 5:15 pm! ! ! March 9, 2011! 31,262 MW! ! ! August 3, 2011! 68,416 MW Source: ERCOT 35,000 70,000 Mar 9, 2011 Aug 3, 2011 Residential Small! commercial Large C&I 51.2 % 25.2 % 23.7 % Residential Small! commercial Large C&I 27...

McCracken, B.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

A Cross-model Comparison of Global Long-term Technology Diffusion under a 2?C Climate Change Control Target  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the long-term global energy technology diffusion patterns required to reach a stringent climate change target with a maximum average atmospheric temperature increase of 2įC. If the anthropogenic temperature increase is to be limited to 2įC, total CO2 emissions have to be reduced massively, so as to reach substantial negative values during the second half of the century. Particularly power sector CO2 emissions should become negative from around 2050 onwards according to most models used for this analysis in order to compensate for GHG emissions in other sectors where abatement is more costly. The annual additional capacity deployment intensity (expressed in GW/yr) for solar and wind energy until 2030 needs to be around that recently observed for coal-based power plants, and will have to be several times higher in the period 2030Ė2050. Relatively high agreement exists across models in terms of the aggregated low-carbon energy system cost requirements on the supply side until 2050, which amount to about 50 trillion US$.

van der Zwaan, Bob; Rosler, Hilke; Kober, Tom; Aboumahboub, Tino; Calvin, Katherine V.; Gernaat, David; Marangoni, Giacomo; McCollum, David

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Global SAXS Data Analysis for Multilamellar Vesicles: Evolution of the Scattering Density Profile (SDP) Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The highly successful scattering density profile (SDP) model, used to jointly analyze small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering data from unilamellar vesicles, has been adapted for use with data from fully hydrated, liquid crystalline multilamellar vesicles (MLVs). Using a genetic algorithm, this new method is capable of providing high-resolution structural information, as well as determining bilayer elastic bending fluctuations from standalone X-ray data. Structural parameters such as bilayer thickness and area per lipid were determined for a series of saturated and unsaturated lipids, as well as binary mixtures with cholesterol. The results are in good agreement with previously reported SDP data, which used both neutron and X-ray data. The inclusion of deuterated and non-deuterated MLV neutron data in the analysis improved the lipid backbone information but did not improve, within experimental error, the structural data regarding bilayer thickness and area per lipid.

Heftberger, Peter [University of Graz, Institute of Molecular Biosciences, Austria] [University of Graz, Institute of Molecular Biosciences, Austria; Kollmitzer, Benjamin [University of Graz, Institute of Molecular Biosciences, Austria] [University of Graz, Institute of Molecular Biosciences, Austria; Heberle, Frederick A [ORNL] [ORNL; Pan, Jianjun [ORNL] [ORNL; Rappolt, Michael [University of Leeds, UK] [University of Leeds, UK; Amenitsch, Heinz [Graz University of Technology] [Graz University of Technology; Kucerka, Norbert [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), Canadian Neutron Beam Centre (CNBC) and Comenius University,] [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), Canadian Neutron Beam Centre (CNBC) and Comenius University,; Katsaras, John [ORNL] [ORNL; Pabst, georg [University of Graz, Institute of Molecular Biosciences, Austria] [University of Graz, Institute of Molecular Biosciences, Austria

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

The Resilience of the Indian Economy to Rising Oil Prices as a Validation Test for a Global Energy-Environment-Economy CGE Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as on how short-term mechanisms ­ and policy action ­ can smooth the negative impacts of energy price shocks1 The Resilience of the Indian Economy to Rising Oil Prices as a Validation Test for a Global Energy-Environment-Economy CGE Model Céline Guivarcha, * , Stéphane Hallegattea,b , Renaud Crassousa

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

219

UC Irvine's Earth System Science Department has opportunities for postdocs and grad. students interested in global-scale cryospheric modeling. Our projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

interested in global-scale cryospheric modeling. Our projects (http://www.ess.uci.edu/~zender#ans and http://www.ess among the groups of Professors Charlie Zender (Aerosols, Radiation, http://www.ess.uci.edu/~zender), Jay Famiglietti (Hydrology, http://www.ess.uci.edu/~famiglietti), and Jim Randerson (Fire, C, H2O, http://www.ess

Zender, Charles

220

Using NASA Remote Sensing Data to Reduce Uncertainty of Land-Use Transitions in Global Carbon-Climate Models: Data Management Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-use transitions and their inherent uncertainty. Our plan for managing these datasets includes quality assessmentUsing NASA Remote Sensing Data to Reduce Uncertainty of Land-Use Transitions in Global Carbon-Climate Models: Data Management Plan L. Chini, G.C. Hurtt, M. Hansen, and P. Potapov Department of Geography

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global insight model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Global MHD modeling of the impact of a solar wind pressure change Kristi A. Keller, Michael Hesse, Maria Kuznetsova, Lutz Rastatter, and Therese Moretto  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global MHD modeling of the impact of a solar wind pressure change Kristi A. Keller, Michael Hesse of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA Received 26 February 2001; revised 21 December 2001; accepted 21 December 2001; published 23 July 2002. [1] A sudden increase in the solar wind dynamic pressure compresses

De Zeeuw, Darren L.

222

Introduction Literature Review Supply Chain Network Model Simulation Studies Conclusions Supply Chain Networks with Global Outsourcing and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chain Networks with Global Outsourcing and Quick-Response Production under Demand and Cost Uncertainty Literature review Supply chain network with global outsourcing and quick-response production under demand of Management University of Massachusetts at Amherst INFORMS 2012 Annual Meeting, Nov 13-16, 2011 #12

Nagurney, Anna

223

Introduction Literature Review Supply Chain Network Model Simulation Studies Conclusions Supply Chain Networks with Global Outsourcing and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chain Networks with Global Outsourcing and Quick-Response Production under Demand and Cost Uncertainty Literature review Supply chain network with global outsourcing and quick-response production under demand of Management University of Massachusetts at Amherst INFORMS 2012 Annual Meeting, Oct 14-17, 2012 #12

Nagurney, Anna

224

Introduction Literature Review Supply Chain Network Model Simulation Studies Conclusions Supply Chain Networks with Global Outsourcing and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chain Networks with Global Outsourcing and Quick-Response Production under Demand and Cost Uncertainty of Management University of Massachusetts at Amherst DSI 2012 Annual Meeting, Nov 17-20, 2012 San Francisco, CA Introduction Literature review Supply chain network with global outsourcing and quick-response production under

Nagurney, Anna

225

Downscaling Global Land Cover Projections from an Integrated Assessment Model for Use in Regional Analyses: Results and Evaluation for the US from 2005 to 2095  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Projections of land cover change generated from Integrated Assessment Models (IAM) and other economic-based models can be applied for analyses of environmental impacts at subregional and landscape scales. For those IAM and economic models that project land use at the sub-continental or regional scale, these projections must be downscaled and spatially distributed prior to use in climate or ecosystem models. Downscaling efforts to date have been conducted at the national extent with relatively high spatial resolution (30m) and at the global extent with relatively coarse spatial resolution (0.5 degree).

West, Tristram O.; Le Page, Yannick LB; Huang, Maoyi; Wolf, Julie; Thomson, Allison M.

2014-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

226

Intern Shares Insight Into Researchers' Minds |GE Global Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

them valuable. The fact that I work with wind turbine aerodynamics in Blacksburg and gas turbine heat transfer in Niskayuna did not slow me down; in fact a number of people in...

227

Sandia National Laboratories: Global Insight, Inc. / Department of Labor  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive SolarEducation Programs:CRFProvideAidsCanal, Yakima,Geothermal

228

A Comparison of Simulated Cloud Radar Output from the Multiscale Modeling Framework Global Climate Model with CloudSat Cloud Radar Observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the last few years a new type of global climate model (GCM) has emerged in which a cloud-resolving model is embedded into each grid cell of a GCM. This new approach is frequently called a multiscale modeling framework (MMF) or superparameterization. In this article we present a comparison of MMF output with radar observations from the NASA CloudSat mission, which uses a near-nadir-pointing millimeter-wavelength radar to probe the vertical structure of clouds and precipitation. We account for radar detection limits by simulating the 94 GHz radar reflectivity that CloudSat would observe from the high-resolution cloud-resolving model output produced by the MMF. Overall, the MMF does a good job of reproducing the broad pattern of tropical convergence zones, subtropical belts, and midlatitude storm tracks, as well as their changes in position with the annual solar cycle. Nonetheless, the comparison also reveals a number of model shortfalls including (1) excessive hydrometeor coverage at all altitudes over many convectively active regions, (2) a lack of low-level hydrometeors over all subtropical oceanic basins, (3) excessive low-level hydrometeor coverage (principally precipitating hydrometeors) in the midlatitude storm tracks of both hemispheres during the summer season (in each hemisphere), and (4) a thin band of low-level hydrometeors in the Southern Hemisphere of the central (and at times eastern and western) Pacific in the MMF, which is not observed by CloudSat. This band resembles a second much weaker ITCZ but is restricted to low levels.

Marchand, Roger T.; Haynes, J. M.; Mace, Gerald G.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Stephens, Graeme L.

2009-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

229

global integrated assessment model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, including emissions trading schemes and adaptation meas- ures. · Using GIAM, an illustrative long run include emissions trading schemes, carbon taxes, research and develop- ment schemes to encourage energy

Phipps, Steven J.

230

Trend analysis from 1970 to 2008 and model evaluation of EDGARv4 global gridded anthropogenic mercury emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Emission Database for Global Atmospheric Research (EDGAR) provides a time-series of man-made emissions of greenhouse gases and short-lived atmospheric pollutants from 1970 to 2008. Mercury is included in EDGARv4.tox1, ...

Muntean, Marilena

231

A comparison of the gravity field over Central Europe from superconducting gravimeters, GRACE and global hydrological models, using EOF analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

retrieve absolute storage. To compute the ground gravity,storage in four layers within the first 2 m of the ground (ground gravity arises from the local cell (within about 20 km), and the rest comes from global water storage (

Crossley, David; de Linage, Caroline; Hinderer, Jacques; Boy, Jean-Paul; Famiglietti, James

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Estimation of methane and carbon dioxide surface fluxes using a 3-D global atmospheric chemical transport model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methane (CH?) and carbon dioxide (CO?) are the two most radiatively important greenhouse gases attributable to human activity. Large uncertainties in their source and sink magnitudes currently exist. We estimate global ...

Chen, Yu-Han, 1973-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

DECIPHERING THE EVOLUTIONARY HISTORY OF THE MONTANE NEW GUINEA AVIFAUNA: COMPARATIVE PHYLOGEOGRAPHY AND INSIGHTS FROM PALEODISTRIBUTIONAL MODELING IN A DYNAMIC LANDSCAPE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integrating comparative phylogeographic methods with taxon-specific paleodistributional modeling provides a powerful approach for assessing historical environmental factors that have contributed to patterns of population ...

Benz, Brett W.

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

234

A self-consistent global model of solenoidal-type inductively coupled plasma discharges including the effects of radio-frequency bias power  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We developed a self-consistent global simulator of solenoidal-type inductively coupled plasma discharges and observed the effect of the radio-frequency (rf) bias power on the plasma density and the electron temperature. We numerically solved a set of spatially averaged fluid equations for charged particles, neutrals, and radicals. Absorbed power by electrons is determined by using an analytic electron heating model including the anomalous skin effect. To analyze the effects of rf bias power on the plasma properties, our model also combines the electron heating and global transport modules with an rf sheath module in a self-consistent manner. The simulation results are compared with numerical results by using the commercial software package cfd-ace + (ESI group) and experimental measurements by using a wave cutoff probe and a single Langmuir probe.

Kwon, D. C.; Chang, W. S.; Song, M. Y.; Yoon, J.-S. [Convergence Plasma Research Center, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Park, M. [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); You, D. H. [Kyoungwon Tech, Inc., Seongnam 462-806 (Korea, Republic of); You, S. J. [Center for Vacuum Technology, Korea Research Institute of Standard and Science, Daejeon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of); Im, Y. H. [Division of Chemical Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

AVTA: Honda Insight HEV 2010 Testing Results  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following reports describe results of testing done on a 2010 Honda Insight hybrid-electric vehicle. Baseline and other data collected at Idaho National Laboratory is in the attached documents. Baseline and battery testing data collected at Argonne National Laboratory is available in summary and CSV form on the Argonne Downloadable Dynometer Database site (http://www.transportation.anl.gov/D3/2010_honda_insight.html). Taken together, these reports give an overall view of how this vehicle functions under extensive testing.

236

Insights from UT Austin Energy Poll  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Insights from UT Austin Energy Poll, Insights from UT Austin Energy Poll on U.S. Consumer Attitudes, July 24, 2013, Sheril Kirshenbaum, director of The Energy Poll.

237

LONDON'S GLOBAL UNIVERSITY THE GRAND CHALLENGE OF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is under threat from social tension, pollution and climate change. The prospect of global peace and Capacity-Building 11 ­ 14 / Health Effects of Climate Change 15 ­ 16 / Maternal and Child Health 17 ­ 22 security to health informatics and environmental law ­ our world-leading researchers apply their insight

Saunders, Mark

238

Response of precipitation extremes to idealized global warming in an aqua-planet climate model: Towards robust projection across different horizontal resolutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current climate models produce quite heterogeneous projections for the responses of precipitation extremes to future climate change. To help understand the range of projections from multimodel ensembles, a series of idealized 'aquaplanet' Atmospheric General Circulation Model (AGCM) runs have been performed with the Community Atmosphere Model CAM3. These runs have been analysed to identify the effects of horizontal resolution on precipitation extreme projections under two simple global warming scenarios. We adopt the aquaplanet framework for our simulations to remove any sensitivity to the spatial resolution of external inputs and to focus on the roles of model physics and dynamics. Results show that a uniform increase of sea surface temperature (SST) and an increase of low-to-high latitude SST gradient both lead to increase of precipitation and precipitation extremes for most latitudes. The perturbed SSTs generally have stronger impacts on precipitation extremes than on mean precipitation. Horizontal model resolution strongly affects the global warming signals in the extreme precipitation in tropical and subtropical regions but not in high latitude regions. This study illustrates that the effects of horizontal resolution have to be taken into account to develop more robust projections of precipitation extremes.

Li, F.; Collins, W.D.; Wehner, M.F.; Williamson, D.L.; Olson, J.G.

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

239

Gravity modeling of the Song Hong basin: an insight into its crustal structure and implication for the formation of the basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3-D gravity inversion and rift stretching models are used in the Song Hong basin to determine the general configuration of the upper mantle and the mechanism for its formation in the region. The basin approximately 200 km wide by 600 km in length...

Nguyen, Vu Giang

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Global Warming  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky LearningGet Assistance GetGiantOn The VergeGlobal Threat1 Global

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global insight model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Ice Formation in Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds: Insights from a 3-D Cloud-Resolving Model with Size-Resolved Aerosol and Cloud Microphysics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The single-layer mixed-phase clouds observed during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) programís Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) are simulated with a 3-dimensional cloud-resolving model the System for Atmospheric Modeling (SAM) coupled with an explicit bin microphysics scheme and a radar-lidar simulator. Two possible ice enhancement mechanisms Ė activation of droplet evaporation residues by condensation-followed-by-freezing and droplet freezing by contact freezing inside-out, are scrutinized by extensive comparisons with aircraft and radar and lidar measurements. The locations of ice initiation associated with each mechanism and the role of ice nuclei (IN) in the evolution of mixed-phase clouds are mainly addressed. Simulations with either mechanism agree well with the in-situ and remote sensing measurements on ice microphysical properties but liquid water content is slightly underpredicted. These two mechanisms give very similar cloud microphysical, macrophysical, dynamical, and radiative properties, although the ice nucleation properties (rate, frequency and location) are completely different. Ice nucleation from activation of evaporation nuclei is most efficient near cloud top areas concentrated on the edges of updrafts, while ice initiation from the drop freezing process has no significant location preference (occurs anywhere that droplet evaporation is significant). Both enhanced nucleation mechanisms contribute dramatically to ice formation with ice particle concentration of 10-15 times higher relative to the simulation without either of them. The contribution of ice nuclei (IN) recycling from ice particle evaporation to IN and ice particle concentration is found to be very significant in this case. Cloud can be very sensitive to IN initially and form a nonquilibrium transition condition, but become much less sensitive as cloud evolves to a steady mixed-phase condition. The parameterization of Meyers et al. [1992] with the observed MPACE IN concentration is able to predict the observed mixed-phase clouds reasonably well. This validation may facilitate the application of this parameterization in the cloud and climate models to simulate Arctic clouds.

Fan, Jiwen; Ovtchinnikov, Mikhail; Comstock, Jennifer M.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Khain, Alexander

2009-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

242

4, 40694124, 2007 Global-scale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into evapotranspiration and total runoff. We estimate that global groundwater recharge was 12 666 km3 /yr for the climateHESSD 4, 4069­4124, 2007 Global-scale modeling of groundwater recharge P. D¨oll and K. Fiedler System Sciences Global-scale modeling of groundwater recharge P. D¨oll and K. Fiedler Institute

Boyer, Edmond

243

Estimates of the Global Indirect Energy-Use Emission Impacts of USA Biofuel Policy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper evaluates the indirect energy-use emission implications of increases in the use of biofuels in the USA between 2001 and 2010 as mandates within a dynamic global computable general equilibrium model. The study incorporates explicit markets for biofuels, petroleum and other fossil fuels, and accounts for interactions among all sectors of an 18-region global economy. It considers bilateral trade, as well as the dynamics of capital allocation and investment. Simulation results show that the biofuel mandates in the USA generate an overall reduction in global energy use and emissions over the simulation period from 2001 to 2030. Consequently, the indirect energy-use emission change or emission leakage under the mandate is negative. That is, global emission reductions are larger than the direct emission savings from replacing petroleum with biofuels under the USA RFS2 over the last decade. Under our principal scenario this enhanced the direct emission reduction from biofuels by about 66%. The global change in lifecycle energy-use emissions for this scenario was estimated to be about 93 million tons of CO2e in 2010, 45 million tons of CO2e in 2020, and an increase of 5 million tons of CO2e in 2030, relative to the baseline scenario. Sensitivity results of six alternative scenarios provided additional insights into the pattern of the regional and global effects of biofuel mandates on energy-use emissions.

Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

2.5D global-disk oscillation models of the Be shell star {\\zeta} Tauri I. Spectroscopic and polarimetric analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Context. Various Be stars exhibit intensity variations of the violet and red emission peaks in their HI lines observed in emission. This so-called $V/R$ phenomenon is usually explained by the precession of a one-armed spiral density perturbation in the circumstellar disk. That global-disk oscillation scenario was confirmed, both observationally and theoretically, in the previous series of two papers analyzing the Be shell star {\\zeta} Tauri. The vertically averaged (2D) global-disk oscillation model used at the time was able to reproduce the $V/R$ variations observed in H{\\alpha}, as well as the spatially resolved interferometric data from AMBER/VLTI. Unfortunately, that model failed to reproduce the $V/R$ phase of Br15 and the amplitude of the polarization variation, suggesting that the inner disk structure predicted by the model was incorrect. Aims. The first aim of the present paper is to quantify the temporal variations of the shell-line characteristics of {\\zeta} Tauri. The second aim is to better unders...

Escolano, C; Okazaki, A T; Rivinius, T; Baade, D; Stefl, S

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Global Optimization of Chemical Reactors and Kinetic Optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Model; 3-D; Monolith; Reactor; Optimization Introduction TheAngeles Global Optimization of Chemical Reactors and KineticGlobal Optimization of Chemical Reactors and Kinetic

ALHUSSEINI, ZAYNA ISHAQ

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Global Health Research | 2 Global Health Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global Health Research | 2 Global Health Research Supporting researchers in low- and middle-income countries to carry out health- related research within their own countries. Gl bal Health #12;3 | Global Health Research #12;Global Health Research | 4 We are a global charitable foundation dedicated

Rambaut, Andrew

247

Diagnosis of the Marine Low Cloud Simulation in the NCAR Community Earth System Model (CESM) and the NCEP Global Forecast System (GFS)-Modular Ocean Model v4 (MOM4) coupled model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a diagnostic analysis of the marine low cloud climatology simulated by two state-of-the-art coupled atmosphere-ocean models: the NCAR Community Earth System Model (CESM) and the NCEP Global Forecasting System (GFS). In both models, the shallow convection and boundary layer turbulence parameterizations have been recently updated: both models now use a mass-flux scheme for the parameterization of shallow convection, and a turbulence parameterization capable of handling Stratocumulus (Sc)-topped Planetary Boundary Layers (PBLs). For shallow convection, both models employ a convective trigger function based on the concept of convective inhibition and both include explicit convective overshooting/penetrative entrainment formulation. For Sc-topped PBL, both models treat explicitly turbulence mixing and cloud-top entrainment driven by cloud-top radiative cooling. Our focus is on the climatological transition from Sc to shallow Cumulus (Cu)-topped PBL in the subtropical eastern oceans. We show that in the CESM the coastal Sc-topped PBLs in the subtropical Eastern Pacific are well-simulated but the climatological transition from Sc to shallow Cu is too abrupt and happens too close to the coast. By contrast, in the GFS coupled simulation the coastal Sc amount and PBL depth are severely underestimated while the transition from Sc to shallow Cu is ≥delayed≤ and offshore Sc cover is too extensive in the subtropical Eastern Pacific. We discuss the possible connections between such differences in the simulations and differences in the parameterizations of shallow convection and boundary layer turbulence in the two models.

Xiao, Heng; Mechoso, C. R.; Sun, Rui; Han, J.; Pan, H. L.; Park, S.; Hannay, Cecile; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Teixeira, J.

2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

248

MODELS OF THE INTRACLUSTER MEDIUM WITH HEATING AND COOLING: EXPLAINING THE GLOBAL AND STRUCTURAL X-RAY PROPERTIES OF CLUSTERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cooling or entropy injection (and/or redistribution) plays a central role in mediating the thermal in excess of observationally estab- lished limits. On the other hand, the simplest entropy-injection models consider models that marry radiative cooling with entropy injection, and confront model predictions

Balogh, Michael L.

249

Long range global warming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper explores one of the causes of global warming that is often overlooked, the direct heating of the environment by engineering systems. Most research and studies of global warming concentrate on the modification that is occurring to atmospheric air as a result of pollution gases being added by various systems; i.e., refrigerants, nitrogen oxides, ozone, hydrocarbons, halon, and others. This modification affects the thermal radiation balance between earth, sun and space, resulting in a decrease of radiation outflow and a slow rise in the earth`s steady state temperature. For this reason the solution to the problem is perceived as one of cleaning up the processes and effluents that are discharged into the environment. In this paper arguments are presented that suggest, that there is a far more serious cause for global warming that will manifest itself in the next two or three centuries; direct heating from the exponential growth of energy usage by humankind. Because this is a minor contributor to the global warming problem at present, it is overlooked or ignored. Energy use from the combustion of fuels and from the output of nuclear reactions eventually is manifest as warming of the surroundings. Thus, as energy is used at an ever increasing rate the consequent global warming also increases at an ever increasing rate. Eventually this rate will become equal to a few percent of solar radiation. When this happens the earth`s temperature will have risen by several degrees with catastrophic results. The trends in world energy use are reviewed and some mathematical models are presented to suggest future scenarios. These models can be used to predict when the global warming problem will become undeniably apparent, when it will become critical, and when it will become catastrophic.

Rolle, K.C.; Pulkrabek, W.W.; Fiedler, R.A. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Platteville, WI (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

250

Global parameter optimization of Mather type plasma focus in the framework of the Gratton-Vargas two-dimensional snowplow model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) is known to produce highly energetic ions, electrons and plasma environment which can be used for breeding of short-lived isotopes, plasma nanotechnology and other material processing applications. Commercial utilization of DPF in such areas would need a design tool which can be deployed in an automatic search for the best possible device configuration for a given application. The recently revisited [S K H Auluck, Physics of Plasmas 20, 112501 (2013)] Gratton-Vargas (GV) two-dimensional analytical snowplow model of plasma focus provides a numerical formula for dynamic inductance of a Mather type plasma focus fitted to thousands of automated computations, which enables construction of such design tool. This inductance formula is utilized in the present work to explore global optimization, based on first-principles optimality criteria, in a 4-dimensional parameter-subspace of the zero-resistance GV model. The optimization process is shown to reproduce the empirically observed constancy ...

Auluck, S K H

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Understanding Global Capitalism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sociology; globalization; political economy; development;economy fueled through 700 billion dollars injected into globalizationGlobalization Studies, also called CGS. I would economy and

Robinson, William I.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Review: Global Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

introduction to global climate change, the greenhouseReview: Global Climate Change: A Primer By Orrin H PilkeyPilkey, Keith C. Global Climate Change: a primer. Durham,

Smith, Jennifer

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Benchmark experiments with global climate models applicable to extra-solar gas giant planets in the shallow atmosphere approximation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The growing field of exoplanetary atmospheric modelling has seen little work on standardised benchmark tests for its models, limiting understanding of the dependence of results on specific models and conditions. With spatially resolved observations as yet difficult to obtain, such a test is invaluable. Although an intercomparison test for models of tidally locked gas giant planets has previously been suggested and carried out, the data provided were limited in terms of comparability. Here, the shallow PUMA model is subjected to such a test, and detailed statistics produced to facilitate comparison, with both time means and the associated standard deviations displayed, removing the time dependence and providing a measure of the variability. Model runs have been analysed to determine the variability between resolutions, and the effect of resolution on the energy spectra studied. Superrotation is a robust and reproducible feature at all resolutions.

Bending, V L; Kolb, U

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Global warming and global dioxide emission: An empirical study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, the dynamic relationship between global surface temperature (global warming) and global carbon dioxide emission (CO{sub 2}) is modelled and analyzed by causality and spectral analysis in the time domain and frequency domain, respectively. Historical data of global CO{sub 2} emission and global surface temperature anomalies over 129 years from 1860-1988 are used in this study. The causal relationship between the two phenomena is first examined using the Sim and Granger causality test in the time domain after the data series are filtered by ARIMA models. The Granger causal relationship is further scrutinized and confirmed by cross-spectral and multichannel spectral analysis in the frequency domain. The evidence found from both analyses proves that there is a positive causal relationship between the two variables. The time domain analysis suggests that Granger causality exists between global surface temperature and global CO{sub 2} emission. Further, CO{sub 2} emission causes the change in temperature. The conclusions are further confirmed by the frequency domain analysis, which indicates that the increase in CO{sub 2} emission causes climate warming because a high coherence exists between the two variables. Furthermore, it is proved that climate changes happen after an increase in CO{sub 2} emission, which confirms that the increase in CO{sub 2} emission does cause global warming. 27 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

Linyan Sun [Xian Jiaotong Univ., Shaanxi (China); Wang, M. [Saint Mary`s Univ., Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Ecological insights from bacterial networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microbes occupy a wide range of important niches ranging from global biogeochemical cycles to metabolism in the human gut. Yet microbes rarely act in isolation. Instead, they thrive in complex communities with myriad ...

Smith, Mark Burnham

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Application Insight Through Performance Modeling Gabriel Marin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that estimate the maximum gain expected from tuning different parts of an application, or from increasing the number of machine resources. We show how this metric helped iden- tify a bottleneck in the ASCI Sweep3D benchmark where the lack of instruction-level parallelism limited performance. Transforming one frequently

Marin, Gabriel

257

Engineering Insights 2006 Complex Fluids Design Consortium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineering Insights 2006 Complex Fluids Design Consortium (CFDC) www.mrl.ucsb.edu/cfdc Overview;Engineering Insights 2006 Objectives -- continued · Create a world-class center for complex fluid and soft and Research Highlights Glenn Fredrickson October 18, 2006 #12;Engineering Insights 2006 What is the CFDC

California at Santa Barbara, University of

258

Global climate feedbacks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The important physical, chemical, and biological events that affect global climate change occur on a mesoscale -- requiring high spatial resolution for their analysis. The Department of Energy has formulated two major initiatives under the US Global Change Program: ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurements), and CHAMMP (Computer Hardware Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics). ARM is designed to use ground and air-craft based observations to document profiles of atmospheric composition, clouds, and radiative fluxes. With research and models of important physical processes, ARM will delineate the relationships between trace gases, aerosol and cloud structure, and radiative transfer in the atmosphere, and will improve the parameterization of global circulation models. The present GCMs do not model important feedbacks, including those from clouds, oceans, and land processes. The purpose of this workshop is to identify such potential feedbacks, to evaluate the uncertainties in the feedback processes (and, if possible, to parameterize the feedback processes so that they can be treated in a GCM), and to recommend research programs that will reduce the uncertainties in important feedback processes. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases.

Manowitz, B.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Optimization of California's Water Supply System: Results and Insights  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

headings: Optimization; California; Water supply; Water shortage. Introduction Water is scarceOptimization of California's Water Supply System: Results and Insights Marion W. Jenkins1 ; Jay R-engineering optimization model of California's water supply system. The results of this 4-year effort illustrate the value

Pasternack, Gregory B.

260

Academy for Global Engagement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Academy for Global Engagement 2013-2014 Global Fellows #12;Meredith Gore and Wildlife #12;Global Research Interests · risk percepHon and public support and Agricultural Engineering #12;Global Research Interests · catalyHc conversion of biomass

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global insight model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

global warming's six indias  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

global warming's six indias: An Audience Segmentation Analysis #12;Global Warming's Six Indias 1............................................................................................................................................20 2. Global Warming Beliefs and Attitudes................................................................................ 21 Knowledge about global warming varies widely by group

Haller, Gary L.

262

Observed Characteristics of Clouds and Precipitating Systems Associated with the Tropical Circulation in Global Models and Reanalyses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation presents a series of work related to the representation of the Hadley circulation (HC) in atmospheric reanalyses and general circulation models (GCMs), with connections to the underlying tropical and subtropical cloud systems...

Stachnik, Justin Paul

2013-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

263

Past and Future Effects of Ozone on Net Primary Production and Carbon Sequestration Using a Global Biogeochemical Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exposure of plants to ozone inhibits photosynthesis and therefore reduces vegetation production and carbon sequestration. Simulations with the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM) for the historical period (1860-1995) show ...

Felzer, Benjamin Seth.

264

A Steady-State Picture of Solar Wind Acceleration and Charge State Composition Derived from a Global Wave-Driven MHD Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The higher charge states found in slow ($<$400km s$^{-1}$) solar wind streams compared to fast streams have supported the hypothesis that the slow wind originates in closed coronal loops, and released intermittently through reconnection. Here we examine whether a highly ionized slow wind can also form along steady and open magnetic field lines. We model the steady-state solar atmosphere using AWSoM, a global magnetohydrodynamic model driven by Alfv{\\'e}n waves, and apply an ionization code to calculate the charge state evolution along modeled open field lines. This constitutes the first charge states calculation covering all latitudes in a realistic magnetic field. The ratios $O^{+7}/O^{+6}$ and $C^{+6}/C^{+5}$ are compared to in-situ Ulysses observations, and are found to be higher in the slow wind, as observed; however, they are under-predicted in both wind types. The modeled ion fractions of S, Si, and Fe are used to calculate line-of-sight intensities, which are compared to EIS observations above a cor...

Oran, Rona; van der Holst, Bart; Lepri, Susan T; Frazin, Alberto M VŠsquez Federico A Nuevo Richard; Manchester, Ward B; Sokolov, Igor V; Gombosi, Tamas I

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Evaluation of cloud fraction and its radiative effect simulated by IPCC AR4 global models against ARM surface observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cloud Fraction (CF) is the dominant modulator of radiative fluxes. In this study, we evaluate CF simulations in the IPCC AR4 GCMs against ARM ground measurements, with a focus on the vertical structure, total amount of cloud and its effect on cloud shortwave transmissivity, for both inter-model deviation and model-measurement discrepancy. Our intercomparisons of three CF or sky-cover related dataset reveal that the relative differences are usually less than 10% (5%) for multi-year monthly (annual) mean values, while daily differences are quite significant. The results also show that the model-observation and the inter-model deviations have a similar magnitude for the total CF (TCF) and the normalized cloud effect, and they are twice as large as the surface downward solar radiation and cloud transmissivity. This implies that the other cloud properties, such as cloud optical depth and height, have a similar magnitude of disparity to TCF among the GCMs, and suggests that a better agreement among the GCMs in solar radiative fluxes could be the result of compensating errors in either cloud vertical structure, cloud optical depth or cloud fraction. Similar deviation pattern between inter-model and model-measurement suggests that the climate models tend to generate larger bias against observations for those variables with larger inter-model deviation. The simulated TCF from IPCC AR4 GCMs are very scattered through all seasons over three ARM sites: Southern Great Plains (SGP), Manus, Papua New Guinea and North Slope of Alaska (NSA). The GCMs perform better at SGP than at Manus and NSA in simulating the seasonal variation and probability distribution of TCF; however, the TCF in these models is remarkably underpredicted and cloud transmissivity is less susceptible to the change of TCF than the observed at SGP. Much larger inter-model deviation and model bias are found over NSA than the other sites in estimating the TCF, cloud transmissivity and cloud-radiation interaction, suggesting that the Arctic region continues to challenge cloud simulations in climate models. Most of the GCMs tend to underpredict CF and fail to capture the seasonal variation of CF at middle and low levels in the tropics. The high altitude CF is much larger in the GCMs than the observation and the inter-model variability of CF also reaches maximum at high levels in the tropics. Most of the GCMs tend to underpredict CF by 50-150% relative to the measurement average at low and middle levels over SGP. While the GCMs generally capture the maximum CF in the boundary layer and vertical variability, the inter-model deviation is largest near surface over the Arctic. The internal variability of CF simulated in ensemble runs with the same model is very minimal.

Qian, Yun; Long, Charles N.; Wang, Hailong; Comstock, Jennifer M.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Xie, Shaocheng

2012-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

266

Integrated Assessment Modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses the role of Integrated Assessment models (IAMs) in climate change research. IAMs are an interdisciplinary research platform, which constitutes a consistent scientific framework in which the large-scale interactions between human and natural Earth systems can be examined. In so doing, IAMs provide insights that would otherwise be unavailable from traditional single-discipline research. By providing a broader view of the issue, IAMs constitute an important tool for decision support. IAMs are also a home of human Earth system research and provide natural Earth system scientists information about the nature of human intervention in global biogeophysical and geochemical processes.

Edmonds, James A.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Clarke, Leon E.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Kim, Son H.; Wise, Marshall A.; McJeon, Haewon C.

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

267

Comparison of optical model results from a microscopic SchrŲdinger approach to nucleon-nucleus elastic scattering with those from a global Dirac phenomenology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparisons are made between results of calculations for intermediate energy nucleon-nucleus scattering for 12C, 16O, 40Ca, 90Zr, and 208Pb, using optical potentials obtained from global Dirac phenomenology and from a microscopic Schr\\"odinger model. Differential cross sections and spin observables for scattering from the set of five nuclei at 65 MeV and 200 MeV have been studied to assess the relative merits of each approach. Total reaction cross sections from proton-nucleus and total cross sections from neutron-nucleus scattering have been evaluated and compared with data for those five targets in the energy range 20 MeV to 800 MeV. The methods of analyses give results that compare well with experimental data in those energy regimes for which the procedures are suited.

P. K. Deb; B. C. Clark; S. Hama; K. Amos; S. Karataglidis; E. D. Cooper

2005-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

268

Global and local cancer risks after the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant accident as seen from Chernobyl: A modeling study for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chernobyl: A modeling study for radiocaesium (134 Cs & 137 Cs) Nikolaos Evangeliou a, , Yves Balkanski risks, prior to epidemiology, and compare them with those occurred after the Chernobyl accident the accident of Chernobyl. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Accidental releases

Mousseau, Timothy A.

269

Voices of Experience | Insights into Advanced Distribution Management...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Voices of Experience | Insights into Advanced Distribution Management Systems (February 2015) Voices of Experience | Insights into Advanced Distribution Management Systems...

270

Energy Insight | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Power Basics (The followingDirectLowDiscussion Page PostedForms orInsight Jump

271

ROSSBY WAVE INSTABILITY AT DEAD ZONE BOUNDARIES IN THREE-DIMENSIONAL RESISTIVE MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICAL GLOBAL MODELS OF PROTOPLANETARY DISKS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has been suggested that the transition between magnetorotationally active and dead zones in protoplanetary disks should be prone to the excitation of vortices via Rossby wave instability (RWI). However, the only numerical evidence for this has come from alpha disk models, where the magnetic field evolution is not followed, and the effect of turbulence is parameterized by Laplacian viscosity. We aim to establish the phenomenology of the flow in the transition in three-dimensional resistive-magnetohydrodynamical models. We model the transition by a sharp jump in resistivity, as expected in the inner dead zone boundary, using the PENCIL CODE to simulate the flow. We find that vortices are readily excited in the dead side of the transition. We measure the mass accretion rate finding similar levels of Reynolds stress at the dead and active zones, at the {alpha} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -2} level. The vortex sits in a pressure maximum and does not migrate, surviving until the end of the simulation. A pressure maximum in the active zone also triggers the RWI. The magnetized vortex that results should be disrupted by parasitical magneto-elliptic instabilities, yet it subsists in high resolution. This suggests that either the parasitic modes are still numerically damped or that the RWI supplies vorticity faster than they can destroy it. We conclude that the resistive transition between the active and dead zones in the inner regions of protoplanetary disks, if sharp enough, can indeed excite vortices via RWI. Our results lend credence to previous works that relied on the alpha-disk approximation, and caution against the use of overly reduced azimuthal coverage on modeling this transition.

Lyra, Wladimir; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark, E-mail: wlyra@jpl.nasa.gov, E-mail: mordecai@amnh.org [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, 79th Street at Central Park West, New York, NY 10024 (United States)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Global Simulations of Ice nucleation and Ice Supersaturation with an Improved Cloud Scheme in the Community Atmosphere Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process-based treatment of ice supersaturation and ice-nucleation is implemented in the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). The new scheme is designed to allow (1) supersaturation with respect to ice, (2) ice nucleation by aerosol particles and (3) ice cloud cover consistent with ice microphysics. The scheme is implemented with a 4-class 2 moment microphysics code and is used to evaluate ice cloud nucleation mechanisms and supersaturation in CAM. The new model is able to reproduce field observations of ice mass and mixed phase cloud occurrence better than previous versions of the model. Simulations indicate heterogeneous freezing and contact nucleation on dust are both potentially important over remote areas of the Arctic. Cloud forcing and hence climate is sensitive to different formulations of the ice microphysics. Arctic radiative fluxes are sensitive to the parameterization of ice clouds. These results indicate that ice clouds are potentially an important part of understanding cloud forcing and potential cloud feedbacks, particularly in the Arctic.

Gettelman, A.; Liu, Xiaohong; Ghan, Steven J.; Morrison, H.; Park, Sungsu; Conley, Andrew; Klein, Stephen A.; Boyle, James; Mitchell, David; Li, J-L F.

2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

273

Global residential appliance standards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In most countries, residential electricity consumption typically ranges from 20% to 40% of total electricity consumption. This energy is used for heating, cooling, refrigeration and other end-uses. Significant energy savings are possible if new appliance purchases are for models with higher efficiency than that of existing models. There are several ways to ensure or encourage such an outcome, for example, appliance rebates, innovative procurement, and minimum efficiency standards. This paper focuses on the latter approach. At the present time, the US is the only country with comprehensive appliance energy efficiency standards. However, many other countries, such as Australia, Canada, the European Community (EC), Japan and Korea, are considering enacting standards. The greatest potential impact of minimum efficiency standards for appliances is in the developing countries (e.g., China and India), where saturations of household appliances are relatively low but growing rapidly. This paper discusses the potential savings that could be achieved from global appliance efficiency standards for refrigerators and freezers. It also could be achieved from global appliance efficiency standards for refrigerators and freezers. It also discusses the impediments to establishing common standards for certain appliance types, such as differing test procedures, characteristics, and fuel prices. A methodology for establishing global efficiency standards for refrigerators and freezers is described.

Turiel, I.; McMahon, J.E. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Lebot, B. (Agence Francaise pour la Maitrise de l'Energie, Valbonne (France))

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

QUESTIONS ABOUT GLOBAL WARMING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

QUESTIONS ABOUT GLOBAL WARMING ¬•IS IT REAL? ¬•IS IT IMPORTANT? ¬•WHAT IS IT DUE TO? ¬•HOW MUCH MORE in the atmosphere, giving Earth its temperate climate. Global Atmosphere, Global Warming GLOBAL TEMPERATURE TREND√?t a cure for global warming! Aerosols only last a short while in the atmosphere, they would have

275

Anatomy of the AGN in NGC 5548: I. A global model for the broadband spectral energy distribution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An extensive multi-satellite campaign on NGC 5548 has revealed this archetypal Seyfert-1 galaxy to be in an exceptional state of persistent heavy absorption. Our observations taken in 2013-2014 with XMM-Newton, Swift, NuSTAR, INTEGRAL, Chandra, HST and two ground-based observatories have together enabled us to establish that this unexpected phenomenon is caused by an outflowing stream of weakly ionised gas (called the obscurer), extending from the vicinity of the accretion disk to the broad-line region. In this work we present the details of our campaign and the data obtained by all the observatories. We determine the spectral energy distribution of NGC 5548 from near-infrared to hard X-rays by establishing the contribution of various emission and absorption processes taking place along our line of sight towards the central engine. We thus uncover the intrinsic emission and produce a broadband continuum model for both obscured (average summer 2013 data) and unobscured ($<$ 2011) epochs of NGC 5548. Our res...

Mehdipour, M; Kriss, G A; Cappi, M; Petrucci, P -O; Steenbrugge, K C; Arav, N; Behar, E; Bianchi, S; Boissay, R; Branduardi-Raymont, G; Costantini, E; Ebrero, J; Di Gesu, L; Harrison, F A; Kaspi, S; De Marco, B; Matt, G; Paltani, S; Peterson, B M; Ponti, G; NuŮez, F Pozo; De Rosa, A; Ursini, F; de Vries, C P; Walton, D J; Whewell, M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Decision insight into stakeholder conflict for ERN.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Participatory modeling has become an important tool in facilitating resource decision making and dispute resolution. Approaches to modeling that are commonly used in this context often do not adequately account for important human factors. Current techniques provide insights into how certain human activities and variables affect resource outcomes; however, they do not directly simulate the complex variables that shape how, why, and under what conditions different human agents behave in ways that affect resources and human interactions related to them. Current approaches also do not adequately reveal how the effects of individual decisions scale up to have systemic level effects in complex resource systems. This lack of integration prevents the development of more robust models to support decision making and dispute resolution processes. Development of integrated tools is further hampered by the fact that collection of primary data for decision-making modeling is costly and time consuming. This project seeks to develop a new approach to resource modeling that incorporates both technical and behavioral modeling techniques into a single decision-making architecture. The modeling platform is enhanced by use of traditional and advanced processes and tools for expedited data capture. Specific objectives of the project are: (1) Develop a proof of concept for a new technical approach to resource modeling that combines the computational techniques of system dynamics and agent based modeling, (2) Develop an iterative, participatory modeling process supported with traditional and advance data capture techniques that may be utilized to facilitate decision making, dispute resolution, and collaborative learning processes, and (3) Examine potential applications of this technology and process. The development of this decision support architecture included both the engineering of the technology and the development of a participatory method to build and apply the technology. Stakeholder interaction with the model and associated data capture was facilitated through two very different modes of engagement, one a standard interface involving radio buttons, slider bars, graphs and plots, while the other utilized an immersive serious gaming interface. The decision support architecture developed through this project was piloted in the Middle Rio Grande Basin to examine how these tools might be utilized to promote enhanced understanding and decision-making in the context of complex water resource management issues. Potential applications of this architecture and its capacity to lead to enhanced understanding and decision-making was assessed through qualitative interviews with study participants who represented key stakeholders in the basin.

Siirola, John; Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Benz, Zachary O.; Stansbury, Melanie; Richards, Elizabeth H.; Turnley, Jessica Glicken (Galisteo Consulting); Warrender, Christina E.; Morrow, James Dan

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Options in ISEEM Global Energy Model: 2010-2050 Scenario Analysis for Least-Cost Carbon Reduction in Iron and Steel Sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the modeling work carried out in this project was to quantify long-term scenarios for the future emission reduction potentials in the iron and steel sector. The main focus of the project is to examine the impacts of carbon reduction options in the U.S. iron and steel sector under a set of selected scenarios. In order to advance the understanding of carbon emission reduction potential on the national and global scales, and to evaluate the regional impacts of potential U.S. mitigation strategies (e.g., commodity and carbon trading), we also included and examined the carbon reduction scenarios in Chinaís and Indiaís iron and steel sectors in this project. For this purpose, a new bottom-up energy modeling framework, the Industrial Sector Energy Efficiency Modeling (ISEEM), (Karali et al. 2012) was used to provide detailed annual projections starting from 2010 through 2050. We used the ISEEM modeling framework to carry out detailed analysis, on a country-by-country basis, for the U.S., Chinaís, and Indiaís iron and steel sectors. The ISEEM model applicable to iron and steel section, called ISEEM-IS, is developed to estimate and evaluate carbon emissions scenarios under several alternative mitigation options - including policies (e.g., carbon caps), commodity trading, and carbon trading. The projections will help us to better understand emission reduction potentials with technological and economic implications. The database for input of ISEEM-IS model consists of data and information compiled from various resources such as World Steel Association (WSA), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), China Steel Year Books, India Bureau of Mines (IBM), Energy Information Administration (EIA), and recent LBNL studies on bottom-up techno-economic analysis of energy efficiency measures in the iron and steel sector of the U.S., China, and India, including long-term steel production in China. In the ISEEM-IS model, production technology and manufacturing details are represented, in addition to the extensive data compiled from recent studies on bottom-up representation of efficiency measures for the sector. We also defined various mitigation scenarios including long-term production trends to project country-specific production, energy use, trading, carbon emissions, and costs of mitigation. Such analyses can provide useful information to assist policy-makers when considering and shaping future emissions mitigation strategies and policies. The technical objective is to analyze the costs of production and CO{sub 2} emission reduction in the U.S, China, and Indiaís iron and steel sectors under different emission reduction scenarios, using the ISEEM-IS as a cost optimization model. The scenarios included in this project correspond to various CO{sub 2} emission reduction targets for the iron and steel sector under different strategies such as simple CO{sub 2} emission caps (e.g., specific reduction goals), emission reduction via commodity trading, and emission reduction via carbon trading.

Karali, Nihan; Xu, Tengfang; Sathaye, Jayant

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Global Health Seminar Series  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bay Area Global Health Seminar Series Moving beyond millennium targets in global health: The challenges of investing in health and universal health coverage Although targets can help to focus global health efforts, they can also detract attention from deeper underlying challenges in global health

Klein, Ophir

279

Global Warming Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global Warming Observations: 1. Global temperature has been gradually rising in recent years #15 in range 8000 12000 nm { CFC's, methane and N 2 O important for global warming even though concentra- tions in concentration of \\greenhouse gases" like CO 2 What determines global temperature? Energy budget of earth: 1

Schofield, Jeremy

280

Insight into Alzheimer's, cancer, anemia gleaned from ribosome...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Insights from ribosome research Insight into Alzheimer's, cancer, anemia gleaned from ribosome research Groundbreaking study of the human ribosome reveals tiny molecular machine is...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global insight model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

ALS Gives Chevron Scientists New Insights into Corrosion Resistance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ALS Gives Chevron Scientists New Insights into Corrosion Resistance ALS Gives Chevron Scientists New Insights into Corrosion Resistance Print Thursday, 25 July 2013 13:44 In the...

282

The Inhibitor DBMIB Provides Insight into the Functional Architecture...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Inhibitor DBMIB Provides Insight into the Functional Architecture of the Qo Site in the Cytochrome b(6)f Complex . The Inhibitor DBMIB Provides Insight into the Functional...

283

RCx Insights and Best Practices from Utilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation covers the RCx Insights and Best Practices from Utilities and is given at the Spring 2010 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting in Rapid City, South Dakota.

284

The Science of Global Warming Energy Balance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Science of Global Warming ·Energy Balance ·Feedback Loops Global Warming can be understood complexities ·Introduce a Simple Model of Energy Balance ·Understand the Vocabulary ·Point out some units of energy input from the Sun = Temperature: 5.3 oC Greenhouse Effect 101: A Balance is Achieved

Blais, Brian

285

A High-Resolution Global Climate Simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major factor limiting the quality and usefulness of global climate models is the coarse spatial resolution of these models. Global climate models today are typically run at resolutions of {approx}300 km (or even coarser) meaning that the smallest features represented are 300 km across. As Figure 1 shows, this resolution does not allow adequate representation of small or even large topographic features (e.g. the Sierra Nevada mountains). As a result of this and other problems, coarse-resolution global models do not come close to accurately simulating climate on regional spatial scales (e.g. within California). Results on continental and larger sales are much more realistic. An important consequence of this inability to simulate regional climate is that global climate model results cannot be used as the basis of assessments of potential societal impacts of climate change (e.g. effects on agriculture in the Central Valley, on management of water resources, etc.).

Duffy, P B

2001-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

286

IBM Global Business Services Executive Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-based strategic insights for senior executives around critical public and private sector issues. This executive perspectives Creating new business models for a changing world of energy Energy and Utilities #12;IBM Institute to facilitate not only traditional energy generation and delivery, but also emerging products and services

287

Global Cooling: Effect of Urban Albedo on Global Temperature  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In many urban areas, pavements and roofs constitute over 60% of urban surfaces (roof 20-25%, pavements about 40%). The roof and the pavement albedo can be increased by about 0.25 and 0.10, respectively, resulting in a net albedo increase for urban areas of about 0.1. Many studies have demonstrated building cooling-energy savings in excess of 20% upon raising roof reflectivity from an existing 10-20% to about 60%. We estimate U.S. potential savings in excess of $1 billion (B) per year in net annual energy bills. Increasing albedo of urban surfaces can reduce the summertime urban temperature and improve the urban air quality. Increasing the urban albedo has the added benefit of reflecting more of the incoming global solar radiation and countering the effect of global warming. We estimate that increasing albedo of urban areas by 0.1 results in an increase of 3 x 10{sup -4} in Earth albedo. Using a simple global model, the change in air temperature in lowest 1.8 km of the atmosphere is estimated at 0.01K. Modelers predict a warming of about 3K in the next 60 years (0.05K/year). Change of 0.1 in urban albedo will result in 0.01K global cooling, a delay of {approx}0.2 years in global warming. This 0.2 years delay in global warming is equivalent to 10 Gt reduction in CO2 emissions.

Akbari, Hashem; Menon, Surabi; Rosenfeld, Arthur

2007-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

288

Globalization of biopharmaceutical manufacturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The biomanufacturing industry is changing due to increasing globalization. However, it is changing differently from other high tech industries like software/ semiconductor/ automobiles. In this study we use global ...

Pande, Rachna

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Nonsingular static global string  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new solution for the spacetime outside the core of a U(1) static global string has been presented which is nonsingular. This is the first example of a nonsingular spacetime around a static global string.}}

A. A. Sen; N. Banerjee

2000-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

290

Review: Globalization of Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review: Globalization of Water: Sharing the PlanetísAshok K. Globalization of Water: Sharing the Planetís140) liters of virtual water (p. 15). This is one of the

Tennant, Matthew Aaron

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Global Environmental Course Title  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department Global Environmental Studies Room Course Title Frontier of Sustainability Science Instructor Akihisa MORI, Global Environmental Studies Satoshi KONISHI, Institute of Advanced consisting from a variety of academic field, including philosophy, politics, economics, energy, architecture

Takada, Shoji

292

Cows Causing Global Warming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Broadcast Transcript: Remember when President Reagan blamed trees for air pollution? Well now the Japanese are blaming cows for global warming. Apparently, the methane emissions from burping cows account for 5% of all global greenhouse gases. Simple...

Hacker, Randi

2008-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

293

The Contribution of Biomass to Emissions Mitigation under a Global Climate Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

What will large-scale global bioenergy production look like? We investigate this question by developing a detailed representation of bioenergy in a global economy-wide model. We develop a scenario with a global carbon ...

Winchester, N.

294

Qualitative insights on fundamental mechanics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The gap between classical mechanics and quantum mechanics has an important interpretive implication: the Universe must have an irreducible fundamental level, which determines the properties of matter at higher levels of organization. We show that the main parameters of any fundamental model must be theory-independent. They cannot be predicted, because they cannot have internal causes. However, it is possible to describe them in the language of classical mechanics. We invoke philosophical reasons in favor of a specific model, which treats particles as sources of real waves. Experimental considerations for gravitational, electromagnetic, and quantum phenomena are outlined.

G. N. Mardari

2006-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

295

BLUE VIEW VISION INSIGHT! Good news--your vision plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WELCOME TO BLUE VIEW VISION INSIGHT! Good news--your vision plan is flexible and easy to use, your discounts, and much more! Blue View Vision InsightSM University of California Student Health Insurance Plan (UC SHIP) 2013/14 Your Blue View Vision Insight Network Blue View Vision Insight offers you

California at Santa Cruz, University of

296

BLUE VIEW VISION INSIGHT! Good news--your vision plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WELCOME TO BLUE VIEW VISION INSIGHT! Good news--your vision plan is flexible and easy to use, your discounts, and much more! Blue View Vision InsightSM University of California Student Health Insurance Plan (UC SHIP) 2012/13 Your Blue View Vision Insight Network Blue View Vision Insight offers you

Barrett, Jeffrey A.

297

Atomistic insights into aqueous corrosion of copper.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corrosion is a fundamental problem in electrochemistry and represents a mode of failure of technologically important materials. Understanding the basic mechanism of aqueous corrosion of metals such as Cu in presence of halide ions is hence essential. Using molecular dynamics simulations incorporating reactive force-field (ReaxFF), the interaction of copper substrates and chlorine under aqueous conditions has been investigated. These simulations incorporate effects of proton transfer in the aqueous media and are suitable for modeling the bond formation and bond breakage phenomenon that is associated with complex aqueous corrosion phenomena. Systematic investigation of the corrosion process has been carried out by simulating different chlorine concentration and solution states. The structural and morphological differences associated with metal dissolution in the presence of chloride ions are evaluated using dynamical correlation functions. The simulated atomic trajectories are used to analyze the charged states, molecular structure and ion density distribution which are utilized to understand the atomic scale mechanism of corrosion of copper substrates under aqueous conditions. Increased concentration of chlorine and higher ambient temperature were found to expedite the corrosion of copper. In order to study the effect of solution states on the corrosion resistance of Cu, partial fractions of proton or hydroxide in water were configured, and higher corrosion rate at partial fraction hydroxide environment was observed. When the Cl{sup -} concentration is low, oxygen or hydroxide ion adsorption onto Cu surface has been confirmed in partial fraction hydroxide environment. Our study provides new atomic scale insights into the early stages of aqueous corrosion of metals such as copper.

Jeon, B.; Sankaranarayanan, S. K. R. S.; van Duin, A. C. T.; Ramanathan, S. (Center for Nanoscale Materials); (Harvard Univ.); (Penn State Univ.)

2011-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

298

NatioNal aNd Global Forecasts West VirGiNia ProFiles aNd Forecasts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· NatioNal aNd Global Forecasts · West VirGiNia ProFiles aNd Forecasts · eNerGy · Healt Global Insight, paid for by the West Virginia Department of Revenue. 2013 WEST VIRGINIA ECONOMIC OUTLOOKWest Virginia Economic Outlook 2013 is published by: Bureau of Business & Economic Research West

Mohaghegh, Shahab

299

Design Editorial Globalization and Internationalism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; especially, the development of an increasingly integrated global economy marked especially by free tradeJournal of Mechanical Design Editorial Globalization and Internationalism There has always been and Strabo, but to Friedman's empirical observations of globalization. According to Wikipedia, "globalization

Papalambros, Panos

300

Development of a Scalable Global Discontinuous  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by building the model in the High Order Method Modeling Environment (HOMME) developed at the National Center, scalability, and the ability to handle complex geometries. However, a major disadvantage of SE atmosphericDevelopment of a Scalable Global Discontinuous Galerkin Atmospheric Model J.M. Dennis, R.D. Nair

Tufo III, Henry M.

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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301

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS &INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS &INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS & THE GLOBAL ECONOMYTHE GLOBAL ECONOMYTHE GLOBAL ECONOMY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GLOBAL ECONOMYTHE GLOBAL ECONOMY This major offers students rigorous interdisciplinary training 331: The Global Economy 2030 -- Examination of key ideas from economics, demography and technology. Guest lecturers illuminate possible conditions of the global economy in 2030. IR 454: International

Krylov, Anna I.

302

Prediction and Optimization of Global Systems using Mathematical...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Prediction and Optimization of Global Systems using Mathematical and Statistical Modelling Event Sponsor: Mathematics and Computing Science - LANS Seminar Start Date: Jan 14 2015 -...

303

NEW INSIGHTS INTO BRAIN SWELLING AFTER STROKE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NEW INSIGHTS INTO BRAIN SWELLING AFTER STROKE W Taylor Kimberly MD PhD 6 May 2013 #12;OBJECTIVES · Background: introduction to stroke · Mechanism: types of cerebral edema · Specific target: preclinical data-Pilot imaging and plasma biomarkers · Next steps: GAMES-RP #12;BACKGROUND · 800,000 strokes occur each year · 4

Sabatini, David M.

304

Insights from Agricultural GHG Offset studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sequestration MMt arising at an offset price giving $/tonne carbon equiv ·Many contributions ·DifferentInsights from Agricultural GHG Offset studies Bruce A. McCarl Regents Professor of Agricultural Economics Texas A&M University Presented at EPRI Workshop on Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration Alexandria VA

McCarl, Bruce A.

305

Academy Insights Vol. 4, No. 10  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Academy Insights Vol. 4, No. 10 Medical Education Fellows Selected for 2014-2015 Twenty HMS faculty-2015. They were selected on a competitive basis by four fellowship programs: the HMS Academy Fellowships, curriculum development, assessment, and feedback. The Academy Fellowship in Medical Education, sponsored

Goodrich, Lisa V.

306

Insights from US ITER: Strategies for Accelerating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Insights from US ITER: Strategies for Accelerating Fusion Energy as a Project Ned Sauthoff US ITER Project Manager SOFE Town Hall Meeting | June 27, 2011 #12;1. Treat fusion energy as a project, rather than a program. Mission: ·Rapid materials and fusion systems development, leading

307

Engineering the global ecosystem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of humans deliberately engineering agricultural landscapes.010-0302-8 EDITORIAL Engineering the global ecosystemtale about human explorers engineering the ecosystem of Mars

Stringfellow, William T.; Jain, Ravi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Global Nuclear Security  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Global Nuclear Security Both DOE and the National Nuclear Security Administration are working to reduce the risk of nuclear proliferation and provide technologies to improve...

309

Subsidizing Global Solar Power.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? With national cuts on solar PV subsidies and the current ďoversupplyĒ of panels, the global solar market is clearly threatened by a contraction. Yet,Ö (more)

Arnesson, Daniel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Climate Insights 101 discussion points: bite size 1 Climate Insights 101 discussion points: bite size  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is the connection between global warming and increased levels of water vapour? Increased methane in the atmosphere are the main sources of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere? How are greenhouse gases driving global warming? How and which ones are also centres of industry? Which is more of a problem for global warming ≠ population

Pedersen, Tom

311

Global Dynamics in Galactic Triaxial Systems I  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we present a theoretical analysis of the global dynamics in a triaxial galactic system using a 3D integrable Hamiltonian as a simple representation. We include a thorough discussion on the effect of adding a generic non--integrable perturbation to the global dynamics of the system. We adopt the triaxial Stackel Hamiltonian as the integrable model and compute its resonance structure in order to understand its global dynamics when a perturbation is introduced. Also do we take profit of this example in order to provide a theoretical discussion about diffussive processes taking place in phase space.

Pablo M. Cincotta; Claudia M. Giordano; Josefa Perez; .

2006-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

312

Global Development Our Responsibility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of expertise cover urgent global issues such as food production, energy supply, climate change, biodiversity e ort to address urgent global issues particularly a ecting developing countries e.g. climate change of Communication, 2012 · Project Leader: Karin Nilsson · Graphic Design: Viktor Wrange & Michael Kvick Cover Photo

313

CHILLING CONSIDERATIONS GLOBAL WARMING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(millionsofsquarekilometers) 30 20 10 MELTING OF GREENLAND ICE CAP Satellite determination of maximum extent of glacial melt Complete melt of the Greenland ice sheet would raise the level of the global ocean 23 feet. ASAN Steffen IS INCREASING Global carbon dioxide concentration over the last thousand years Polar ice cores #12;Mann et al

Schwartz, Stephen E.

314

Global Change Sustainability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global Change and Sustainability Center The GCSC is an inclusionary and interdisciplinary hub that promotes, coordinates, and conducts local to global environmental- and sustainability-related research to complex environmental and sustainability issues and challenges. 2012 Annual Report #12;1GCSC 2012 ANNUAL

Tipple, Brett

315

Role of positive ions on the surface production of negative ions in a fusion plasma reactor type negative ion sourceóInsights from a three dimensional particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collisions model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results from a 3D self-consistent Particle-In-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions (PIC MCC) model of a high power fusion-type negative ion source are presented for the first time. The model is used to calculate the plasma characteristics of the ITER prototype BATMAN ion source developed in Garching. Special emphasis is put on the production of negative ions on the plasma grid surface. The question of the relative roles of the impact of neutral hydrogen atoms and positive ions on the cesiated grid surface has attracted much attention recently and the 3D PIC MCC model is used to address this question. The results show that the production of negative ions by positive ion impact on the plasma grid is small with respect to the production by atomic hydrogen or deuterium bombardment (less than 10%)

Fubiani, G.; Boeuf, J. P. [Universitť de Toulouse, UPS, INPT, LAPLACE (Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d'Energie), 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse cedex 9 (France) [Universitť de Toulouse, UPS, INPT, LAPLACE (Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d'Energie), 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse cedex 9 (France); CNRS, LAPLACE, F-31062 Toulouse (France)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

316

Model-data Fusion Approaches for Retrospective and Predictive Assessment of the Pan-Arctic Scale Permafrost Carbon Feedback to Global Climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

representation of the Arctic system carbon cycle in Earth System Modeling frameworks. This proposed study of permafrost carbon processes in terrestrial biogeochemistry models, to operate within coupled Earth system modeling frameworks. PROJECT SIGNIFICANCE This work will provide a critical bridge between the abundant

317

Structural Insight into RNA Hairpin Folding Intermediates Gregory R. Bowman,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the Folding@home infrastructure to obtain better sampling and, therefore, greater insight into RNA folding

Guibas, Leonidas J.

318

How strong is carbon cycle-climate feedback under global warming?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and physical climate system in a global warming scenario is studied using an Earth system model including

Maryland at College Park, University of

319

MODIS Collection 5 global land cover: Algorithm refinements and characterization of new datasets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

information is required to parameterize land surface processes in regional-to-global scale Earth system models

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

320

Impact of mesophyll diffusion on estimated global land CO2 fertilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by Earth system models. Without this correction, the CFE for global GPP is underestimated by 0.05 Pg

Hoffman, Forrest M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global insight model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Insights from Agricultural and Forestry GHG Offset Bruce A. McCarl  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Insights from Agricultural and Forestry GHG Offset Studies Bruce A. McCarl Regents Professor EPA but with contributions from USDA and DOE. Presented at the EPRI Workshop on Terrestrial Carbon Agricultural and Forestry GHG Offset Studies that Might Influence IAM Modeling," that will appear in the book

McCarl, Bruce A.

322

New Insight into Photoalignment of Liquid Crystals on Coumarin-Containing Polymer Films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Laboratory for Laser Energetics, UniVersity of Rochester, 240 East RiVer Road, Rochester, New York 14623New Insight into Photoalignment of Liquid Crystals on Coumarin-Containing Polymer Films Chunki Kim order predicted by the kinetic model, and the energetics of molecular interaction. Introduction

Chen, Shaw H.

323

Global warming, bad weather, insurance losses and the global economy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Global warming causes extremely bad weather in the near term. The impact on the insurance industry is described. Why global warming in the near term causes very bad weather is explained. The continuing trend of very bad weather and the future impact on the insurance industry is explored. How very bad weather can affect the global financial market is explained. Taking a historical view of the development of the modern economy, the authors describe in the near term the impact of global warming on the global economy. The long term impact of global warming on the global economy and the human race is explored. Opportunities presented by global warming are described.

Low, N.C. [UOB Life Assurance Ltd., Singapore (Singapore); Shen, S. [Global Warming International Center, Woodridge, IL (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

"In terms of the long-term outlook for biomass and biofuels, the largest proportion of Business Insights industry survey respondents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"In terms of the long-term outlook for biomass and biofuels, the largest proportion of Business Insights industry survey respondents (47%) thought that biofuels would account for 5-10% of total global fuel production by 2017. A further 25% of respondents thought that biofuels would account for 2

325

Insights into the issues facing pharmaceutical companies for information provision: a report on the P-D-R special meeting, La Grande Motte, 28-29  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the pharmaceutical industry. The pharmaceutical industry is the only corporate sector with a long and profitable1 Insights into the issues facing pharmaceutical companies for information provision: a report: The article reports on the use of primary information in pharmaceutical companies, on global services arising

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

326

Toward a more physical representation of precipitation scavenging in global chemistry models: cloud overlap and ice physics and their impact on tropospheric ozone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

more of a test of model climatology. In all cases, the HNO 3results to a gridded air- craft climatology is the issue of

Neu, J. L; Prather, M. J

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Climate Effects of Global Land Cover Change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are two competing effects of global land cover change on climate: an albedo effect which leads to heating when changing from grass/croplands to forest, and an evapotranspiration effect which tends to produce cooling. It is not clear which effect would dominate in a global land cover change scenario. We have performed coupled land/ocean/atmosphere simulations of global land cover change using the NCAR CAM3 atmospheric general circulation model. We find that replacement of current vegetation by trees on a global basis would lead to a global annual mean warming of 1.6 C, nearly 75% of the warming produced under a doubled CO{sub 2} concentration, while global replacement by grasslands would result in a cooling of 0.4 C. These results suggest that more research is necessary before forest carbon storage should be deployed as a mitigation strategy for global warming. In particular, high latitude forests probably have a net warming effect on the Earth's climate.

Gibbard, S G; Caldeira, K; Bala, G; Phillips, T; Wickett, M

2005-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

328

INSIGHT On Transforming Our Global Energy Economy, 2015 Annual Report (Brochure)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinementEtching. | EMSL Bubblesstructure21 Friday,JISEA 2015

329

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nations began to seek out oil reserves around the world. 3on the limited global oil reserves and spiking prices. Manyto the largest proven oil reserves, making up 61 percent of

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

KRFTWRK Ė Global Human Electricity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power Network 2.1.1 Virtual Power Plants The Global Powernetwork, based on "Virtual Power Plants", called "VPP". A "participant runs a virtual human power plant. Per every "

Prohaska, Rainer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

China's Global Oil Strategy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

21, 2008. Ying, Wang. ď China, Venezuela firms to co-developoilfields. Ē China Daily (27 August 2005) http://David and Bi Jianhai. ďChinaís Global Hunt for Energy. Ē

Thomas, Bryan G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Global Cool Cities Alliance  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Energy (DOE) is currently supporting the Global Cool Cities Alliance (GCCA), a non-profit organization that works with cities, regions, and national governments to speed the...

333

Global warming elucidated  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The meaning of global warming and its relevance to everyday life is explained. Simple thermodynamics is used to predict an oscillatory nature of the change in climate due to global warming. Global warming causes extreme events and bad weather in the near term. In the long term it may cause the earth to transition to another equilibrium state through many oscillation in climatic patterns. The magnitudes of these oscillations could easily exceed the difference between the end points. The author further explains why many no longer fully understands the nature and magnitudes of common phenomena such as storms and wind speeds because of these oscillations, and the absorptive properties of clouds. The author links the increase in duration of the El Nino to global warming, and further predicts public health risks as the earth transitions to another equilibrium state in its young history.

Shen, S. [Global Warming International Center, Woodridge, IL (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Reconciling multidecadal land-sea global temperature with rising CO2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reconciling multidecadal land-sea global temperature with rising CO2 Vaughan Pratt Stanford CO2 1 / 35 #12;Goal Additional insight into 1 Similarity of the 1860-1880 & 1910-1940 rises to 1970-2000. 2 The recent pause 3 No sign of 3 C per doubling of CO2. Some applicable audiences: Average reader

Pratt, Vaughan

335

Reconciling multidecadal land-sea global temperature with rising CO2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reconciling multidecadal land-sea global temperature with rising CO2 Vaughan Pratt Stanford CO2 1 / 29 #12;Goal Additional insight into 1 Similarity of the 1860-1880 & 1910-1940 rises to 1970-2000. 2 The recent pause (2001-2013). 3 No sign of 3 C per doubling of CO2. Simple reasoning (no opaque

Pratt, Vaughan

336

Material World: Forecasting Household Appliance Ownership in a Growing Global Economy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the past years the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has developed an econometric model that predicts appliance ownership at the household level based on macroeconomic variables such as household income (corrected for purchase power parity), electrification, urbanization and climate variables. Hundreds of data points from around the world were collected in order to understand trends in acquisition of new appliances by households, especially in developing countries. The appliances covered by this model are refrigerators, lighting fixtures, air conditioners, washing machines and televisions. The approach followed allows the modeler to construct a bottom-up analysis based at the end use and the household level. It captures the appliance uptake and the saturation effect which will affect the energy demand growth in the residential sector. With this approach, the modeler can also account for stock changes in technology and efficiency as a function of time. This serves two important functions with regard to evaluation of the impact of energy efficiency policies. First, it provides insight into which end uses will be responsible for the largest share of demand growth, and therefore should be policy priorities. Second, it provides a characterization of the rate at which policies affecting new equipment penetrate the appliance stock. Over the past 3 years, this method has been used to support the development of energy demand forecasts at the country, region or global level.

Letschert, Virginie; McNeil, Michael A.

2009-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

337

Global latitudinal-asymmetric vegetation growth trends and their driving mechanisms: 1982-2009  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using a recent Leaf Area Index (LAI) dataset and the Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4), we investigate percent changes and controlling factors of global vegetation growth for the period 1982 to 2009. Over that 28-year period, both the remote-sensing estimate and model simulation show a significant increasing trend in annual vegetation growth. Latitudinal asymmetry appeared in both products, with small increases in the Southern Hemisphere (SH) and larger increases at high latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere (NH). The south-to-north asymmetric land surface warming was assessed to be the principal driver of this latitudinal asymmetry of LAI trend. Heterogeneous precipitation functioned to decrease this latitudinal LAI gradient, and considerably regulated the local LAI change. CO2 fertilization during the last three decades, was simulated to be the dominant cause for the enhanced vegetation growth. Our study, though limited by observational and modeling uncertainties, adds further insight into vegetation growth trends and environmental correlations. These validation exercises also provide new quantitative and objective metrics for evaluation of land ecosystem process models at multiple spatio-temporal scales.

Mao, Jiafu [ORNL; Shi, Xiaoying [ORNL; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Zhu, Zaichun [Boston University; Myneni, Ranga B. [Boston University

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Discriminating robust and non-robust atmospheric circulation responses to global warming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Discriminating robust and non-robust atmospheric circulation responses to global warming Michael response to global warming in a set of atmospheric general circulation models (AGCMs) is investigated. The global-warmed climate is forced by a global pattern of warmed ocean surface temperatures

339

Global optimization for the phase stability problem  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Gibbs tangent plane criterion is an important tool in determining the quality of obtained solutions to the phase and chemical equilibrium problem. The ability to determine if a postulated solution is thermodynamically stable is very useful in the search for the equilibrium solution. In this work simpler formulations are presented for the phase stability problem where non-ideal liquid phases are modeled using the NRTL and UNIQUAC models. It is shown how the global minimum of the tangent plane distance function can be obtained. Computational results demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed global optimization algorithms.

Floudas, C.; McDonald, C.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

340

GE Global Research News | GE Global Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky Learning Fun with Big SkyDIII-D Performance ToolsGlobal

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global insight model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

GLOBAL GOVERNANCE FIGHTING POVERTY 26 GLOBAL AGENDA 2003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, they would discover a nearly total disparity between global commitments and domestic politics. Bush hasGLOBAL GOVERNANCE FIGHTING POVERTY 26 GLOBAL AGENDA 2003 the world promised to put real resources credible document spelling out the US role in a global war against AIDS. The planned US financial

342

Will Nano-Butlers Work for Micro-Payments? Innovation in Business Services Model may Reduce Cost of Delivering Global Healthcare Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper represents an emerging view of personalized care and patient-centric systems approach. It integrates biomedical informatics and business services. A potentially innovative model may evolve from this convergence ...

Datta, Shoumen

2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

343

Exascale Insights (2011) | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofofOxford SiteToledoSamplingProcess | NationalAboutInsights (2011) |

344

BAYESIAN INSIGHTS ON DISCLOSURE LIMITATION: MASK OR IMPUTE?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Statistical agencies seek to disseminate useful data while keeping low the risk of statistical confidentiality disclosure. Recognizing that reidentification of data is generally inadequate to protect its confidentiality against attack by a data snooper, agencies restrict the data they release for general use. Typically, these restricted data procedures have involved transformation or masking of the original, collected data through such devices as adding noise, topcoding, data swapping, and recoding. Recently, proposals have been put forth for the release of synthetic data, simulated from models constructed from the original data. This paper gives a framework for the comparison of masking and synthetic data as two approaches to disclosure limitation. Particular attention is paid to data utility and disclosure risk. Examples of instantiation of masking and of synthetic data construction are provided to illustrate the concepts. Particular attention is paid to data swapping. Insights drawn from the Bayesian paxadigm are provided.

S. KELLER-MCNULTY; G. DUNCAN

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Original article Predicted global warming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Original article Predicted global warming and Douglas-fir chilling requirements DD McCreary1 DP to predicted global warming. Douglas-fir / chilling / global warming / bud burst / reforestation R√©sum√© offer evidence that mean global warming of 3-4 ¬įC could occur within the next century, particularly

Boyer, Edmond

346

The Tourism Global Value Chain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Tourism Global Value Chain ECONOMIC UPGRADING AND WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT Michelle Christian 2011 CENTER on GLOBALIZATION, GOVERNANCE & COMPETITIVENESS #12;The Tourism Global Value Chain: Economic: November 17, 2011 #12;The Tourism Global Value Chain: Economic Upgrading and Workforce Development i Table

Richardson, David

347

Applying insights from repository safety assessments.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite decades of international consensus that deep geological disposal is the best option for permanent management of long-lived high-level radioactive wastes, no repositories for used nuclear fuel or high-level waste are in operation. Detailed long-term safety assessments have been completed worldwide for a wide range of repository designs and disposal concepts, however, and valuable insights from these assessments are available to inform future decisions about managing radioactive wastes. Qualitative comparisons among the existing safety assessments for disposal concepts in clay, granite, salt, and unsaturated volcanic tuff show how different geologic settings can be matched with appropriate engineered barrier systems to provide a high degree of confidence in the long-term safety of geologic disposal. Review of individual assessments provides insights regarding the release pathways and radionuclides that are most likely to contribute to estimated doses to humans in the far future for different disposal concepts, and can help focus research and development programs to improve management and disposal technologies. Lessons learned from existing safety assessments may be particularly relevant for informing decisions during the process of selecting potential repository sites.

Swift, Peter N.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Estimating future global per capita water availability based on changes in climate and population  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Human populations are profoundly affected by water stress, or the lack of sufficient per capita available freshwater. Water stress can result from overuse of available freshwater resources or from a reduction in the amount of available water due to decreases in rainfall and stored water supplies. Analyzing the interrelationship between human populations and water availability is complicated by the uncertainties associated with climate change projections and population projections. We present a simple methodology developed to integrate disparate climate and population data sources and develop first-order per capita water availability projections at the global scale. Simulations from the coupled land-ocean-atmosphere Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3) forced with a range of hypothetical greenhouse gas emissions scenarios are used to project grid-based changes in precipitation minus evapotranspiration as proxies for changes in runoff, or fresh water supply. Population growth changes according to several Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) storylines are used as proxies for changes in fresh water demand by 2025, 2050 and 2100. These freshwater supply and demand projections are then combined to yield estimates of per capita water availability aggregated by watershed and political unit. Results suggest that important insights might be extracted from the use of the process developed here, notably including the identification of the globe s most vulnerable regions in need of more detailed analysis and the relative importance of population growth versus climate change in in altering future freshwater supplies. However, these are only exemplary insights and, as such, could be considered hypotheses that should be rigorously tested with multiple climate models, multiple observational climate datasets, and more comprehensive population change storylines.

Parish, Esther S [ORNL; Kodra, Evan [Northeastern University; Ganguly, Auroop R [Northeastern University; Steinhaeuser, Karsten [University of Minnesota

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Explicit global integrators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be advantageous. For this purpose, forward interpolation utilizing Radau Quadrature will be employed. An explicit method of global integration has been developed to estimate a solution to a differential equation. A set of functions P (x), P (x), , P (x) and a... set of points n+1 x , x , , x can be found such that n+1 r x n+1 f(u)du = g P. (x)i'(x. ) 0 i=1 for all x when f(u) is a polynomial of degree n or less. The above process is described by Axelsson as global integration. In . th the cases...

Merriam, Robert Stevens

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

350

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONSINTERNATIONAL RELATIONSINTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (GLOBAL BUSINESS)(GLOBAL BUSINESS)(GLOBAL BUSINESS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONSINTERNATIONAL RELATIONSINTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (GLOBAL BUSINESS)(GLOBAL BUSINESS)(GLOBAL BUSINESS) Future leaders in business, government, and law need to understand how global, and internship opportunities, it is an ideal major for those interested in entering the realms of business

Krylov, Anna I.

351

Mechanisms for Tropical Tropospheric Circulation Change in Response to Global Warming*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mechanisms for Tropical Tropospheric Circulation Change in Response to Global Warming* JIAN MA change in global warming is studied by comparing the response of an atmospheric general circulation model globally in response to SST warming. A diagnostic framework is developed based on a linear baroclinic model

Xie, Shang-Ping

352

New estimates of global emissions of N2O from rivers and estuaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from rivers and estuaries. We present total global emissions, as well as regional shares. 2New estimates of global emissions of N2O from rivers and estuaries CAROLIEN KROEZE1 , EGON DUMONT1 rivers and estuaries, using the NEWS-DIN model. NEWS-DIN is a model of the global transport of dissolved

Seitzinger, Sybil

353

GLOBAL OPTIMIZATION FOR THE PHASE STABILITY PROBLEM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

where nonideal liquid phases can be adequately modeled using the NRTL and UNIQUAC activity coefficient equilibrium one, unlike available local algorithms. For the case of the NRTL equation, the GOP algorithm the NRTL equation. McDonald and Floudas (1994b) also applied a global optimization algorithm when

Neumaier, Arnold

354

Networks and globalization policies Douglas R. White  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

9 Networks and globalization policies Douglas R. White 1 This Chapter argues for connecting models economy (e.g., Reichardt and White, 2007), nor of changes of position in the core-periphery economic structure (Smith and White, 1992) entail that core-periphery exchange structures are everywhere

White, Douglas R.

355

Pax Global: Noncompliance Determination (2013-SE-1413)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to Pax Global, Inc. finding that freezer basic models (1) Crosley CCF51; (2) Crosley CCF69; (3) Crosley CCF106; and (4) Daewoo DCF-106W do not comport with the energy conservation standards.

356

4, 35833626, 2007 An integrated global  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

around the world. The integrated model closes both energy and water balances on land surfaces. Global approximately 70% of total water withdrawal in the world. The estimated crop calendar showed good agreement water withdrawal also15 showed fair agreement with country statistics, but tended to underestimate

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

357

Section 1603 Treasury Grant Expiration: Industry Insight on Financing...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1603 Treasury Grant Expiration: Industry Insight on Financing and Market Implications Michael Mendelsohn National Renewable Energy Laboratory John Harper Birch Tree Capital, LLC...

358

achilles insight qus: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for Research in Environmental Sciences, University Sun, Dezheng 386 Is the Internet for Porn? An Insight Into the Online Adult Industry Computer Technologies and Information...

359

accretionary orogens insights: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for Research in Environmental Sciences, University Sun, Dezheng 447 Is the Internet for Porn? An Insight Into the Online Adult Industry Computer Technologies and Information...

360

aminotransferase ehpsat insights: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for Research in Environmental Sciences, University Sun, Dezheng 359 Is the Internet for Porn? An Insight Into the Online Adult Industry Computer Technologies and Information...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global insight model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

alsophila spinulosa insights: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for Research in Environmental Sciences, University Sun, Dezheng 355 Is the Internet for Porn? An Insight Into the Online Adult Industry Computer Technologies and Information...

362

acorn weevil insight: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for Research in Environmental Sciences, University Sun, Dezheng 452 Is the Internet for Porn? An Insight Into the Online Adult Industry Computer Technologies and Information...

363

Radiation tolerance of ceramicsóInsights from atomistic...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

different radiation response as the damage accumulates. Citation: Devanathan R, WJ Weber, and JD Gale.2010."Radiation tolerance of ceramicsInsights from atomistic simulation...

364

Worldwide Trends in Energy Use and Efficiency: Key Insights from...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Efficiency: Key Insights from International Energy Agency (IEA) Indicator Analysis in Support of the Group of Eight (G8) Plan of Action Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary...

365

Ecofys-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions: Insights from...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Actions: Insights from Example Development1 "Ecofys elaborated in several projects, concrete examples of NAMAs to understand the issues arising from this concept. This report...

366

Energy metabolism in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough: insights from transcriptome analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sulphate-reducing bacteria are important players in the global sulphur and carbon cycles, with considerable economical and ecological impact. However, the process of sulphate respiration is still incompletely understood. Several mechanisms of energy conservation have been proposed, but it is unclear how the different strategies contribute to the overall process. In order to obtain a deeper insight into the energy metabolism of sulphate-reducers whole-genome microarrays were used to compare the transcriptional response of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough grown with hydrogen/sulphate, pyruvate/sulphate, pyruvate with limiting sulphate, and lactate/thiosulphate, relative to growth in lactate/sulphate. Growth with hydrogen/sulphate showed the largest number of differentially expressed genes and the largest changes in transcript levels. In this condition the most up-regulated energy metabolism genes were those coding for the periplasmic [NiFeSe]hydrogenase, followed by the Ech hydrogenase. The results also provide evidence for the involvement of formate cycling and the recently proposed ethanol pathway during growth in hydrogen. The pathway involving CO cycling is relevant during growth on lactate and pyruvate, but not during growth in hydrogen as the most down-regulated genes were those coding for the CO-induced hydrogenase. Growth on lactate/thiosulphate reveals a down-regulation of several energymetabolism genes similar to what was observed in the presence of nitrite. This study identifies the role of several proteins involved in the energy metabolism of D. vulgaris and highlights several novel genes related to this process, revealing a more complex bioenergetic metabolism than previously considered.

Pereira, Patricia M.; He, Qiang; Valente, Filipa M.A.; Xavier, Antonio V.; Zhou, Jizhong; Pereira, Ines A.C.; Louro, Ricardo O.

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

CHILLING CONSIDERATIONS GLOBAL WARMING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHANGE AND ENERGY USE IN TODAY'S WORLD #12;Brookhaven National Laboratory's Speakers' Bureau ∑ Community, Ph.D. Climate Change and Energy Use in Today's World Some Chilling Considerations About Global owned by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science, which provides most of the Lab

Schwartz, Stephen E.

368

Global Lightning Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;Climatology: Basics ¬∑ 5 years of OTD, 6 years of LIS data ¬∑ Adjusted for detection efficiency J.Atmos. Oc ¬∑ Global flash rate: 45 fl / sec ¬Ī 10% J. Geophys. Res., 2003 #12;High Resolution Full Climatology Annual (4/95-3/00) and LIS (1/98-12/03) instruments #12;#12;#12;Climatology: Diurnal cycle ( Local hour

California at Berkeley, University of

369

global warming's six americas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vehicles & Solar Panels 23 Regulating CO2 as a Pollutant 24 A 20 Percent National Renewable Energy Standard the spring and fall of 2012. Perceived Benefits and Costs of Reducing Fossil Fuel Use and Global Warming Introduction 5 The Six Americas Audience Segments 6 Changes in the Size of Segments 7 Perceived Benefits

Haller, Gary L.

370

Patterns in Global Hydrothermal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Patterns in Global Hydrothermal Activity noaa ocean exploration Presenter: Edward T. Baker #12) High-T vents High = hydrothermal discharge Low = active or inactive discharge sites B. Davy, GNS NZ #12 Lc(km) #12;Future Directions Quantify processes: ·Employ or develop new technologies (AUVs, solid

371

Global Threat Reduction Initiative  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global Threat Reduction Initiative ­ Conversion Program: Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test the dual application of splitting the atom, U.S. policy towards civilian use of highly enriched uranium and test reactors fueled first with low enriched uranium (LEU) and then later with HEU. By the early 1970s

Kemner, Ken

372

Global Health Seminar Series  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bay Area Global Health Seminar Series Monday, January 27, 2014 2:30pm ­ 4:00pm (Reception to follow at the Center for Health Policy and the Woods Institute for the Environment. He studies how economic, political, and natural environments affect population health in developing countries using a mix of experimental

Klein, Ophir

373

GLOBAL TAXONOMY INITIATIVE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;THE GLOBAL TAXONOMY INITIATIVE: Using Systematic Inventories to Meet Country and Regional Needs International #12;Table of Contents Introduction 1 I. Using Inventories to Build Capacity and Advance the GTI 2 for systematic inventories. A major component of the workshop addressed how systematic inventories can serve

Grant, Taran

374

Global Biodiversity Conservation Priorities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global Biodiversity Conservation Priorities T. M. Brooks,1,2,3 * R. A. Mittermeier,1 G. A. B. da is essential to minimize biodiversity loss. To address this need, biodiversity conservation organizations have conservation funding. H uman actions are causing a biodiversity crisis, with species extinction rates up

Wilmers, Chris

375

Global Climate & Catastrophic Risk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global Climate & Catastrophic Risk Forum 2012 A Joint Program with LA RIMS Education Day Rethinking Catastrophic Risk in Risk Management: Earthquake-Related Challenges Featuring: Keynote Speaker Dr. Frank Beuthin, Willis Group Holdings Plc. Yohei Miyamoto, Aon Risk Solutions Curtis deVera, Marsh

de Lijser, Peter

376

Preliminary performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, December 1992. Volume 3, Model parameters: Sandia WIPP Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume documents model parameters chosen as of July 1992 that were used by the Performance Assessment Department of Sandia National Laboratories in its 1992 preliminary performance assessment of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Ranges and distributions for about 300 modeling parameters in the current secondary data base are presented in tables for the geologic and engineered barriers, global materials (e.g., fluid properties), and agents that act upon the WIPP disposal system such as climate variability and human-intrusion boreholes. The 49 parameters sampled in the 1992 Preliminary Performance Assessment are given special emphasis with tables and graphics that provide insight and sources of data for each parameter.

Not Available

1992-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

377

Local and Seasonal Effects in the U.S. of Global Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Though the facts of global climate change are beyond doubt, there has been relatively limited information about its local consequences. Global climate models and their derivatives have provided often differing and unspecific ...

Eckaus, Richard S.

2012-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

378

Rendering the Electromechanical Valve Actuator Globally Asymptotically Stable Katherine S. Peterson*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rendering the Electromechanical Valve Actuator Globally Asymptotically Stable Katherine S. Peterson to render the electromechanical valve actuator (EVA) globally asymptotically stable (GAS). Elec model. Here, we demonstrate and prove that our controller renders the system GAS without any assumption

Stefanopoulou, Anna

379

An Urban Parameterization for a Global Climate Model. Part II: Sensitivity to Input Parameters and the Simulated Urban Heat Island in Offline Simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tempera- tures of urban systems as impervious fraction increases. In general, these findings are in agreement with those observed for real urban ecosystems. Thus, the model appears to be a useful tool for examining the nature of the urban climate within... of the physical processes controlling energy and water fluxes and 2) the charac- terization of urban morphology and urban materials with respect to aerodynamic, radiative, and heat trans- fer properties (e.g., Terjung and OíRourke 1980; Arn- field 2000; Masson...

Oleson, Keith W.; Bonan, Gordon B.; Feddema, Johannes J.; Vertenstein, M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Nitrogen trifluoride global emissions estimated from updated atmospheric measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nitrogen trifluoride global emissions estimated from updated atmospheric measurements Tim Arnolda,1's radiative budget; however, our understand- ing of its atmospheric burden and emission rates has been limited together with an atmo- spheric model and inverse method, we estimate that the global emissions of NF3

Severinghaus, Jeffrey P.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global insight model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Simulating land use change in China from a global perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and consequent crop production with prescribed population, GDP and yield data. The model simulates a decline markets and turbulence in global energy markets can affect food prices and supply costs. Therefore% of the global population with less than 9% of the world's cultivated land (Chen 2007). Furthermore, heavy

Palmer, Paul

382

Energy and Water Interactions: Insights from Mathematical Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EnergyUse Water Use or Environmental Impact More More Less Less 0 0 Biofuels Production? Seawater desalting Water-Water TradeoffsEnergyUse Water Use or Environmental Impact More More Less Less 0 0 Biofuels Production? Seawater improvements Solar generation agriculture substitution? Pumping Shale oil Production? Drip irrigation-SW Trade

Keller, Arturo A.

383

Sensitivity analysis techniques for models of human behavior.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Human and social modeling has emerged as an important research area at Sandia National Laboratories due to its potential to improve national defense-related decision-making in the presence of uncertainty. To learn about which sensitivity analysis techniques are most suitable for models of human behavior, different promising methods were applied to an example model, tested, and compared. The example model simulates cognitive, behavioral, and social processes and interactions, and involves substantial nonlinearity, uncertainty, and variability. Results showed that some sensitivity analysis methods create similar results, and can thus be considered redundant. However, other methods, such as global methods that consider interactions between inputs, can generate insight not gained from traditional methods.

Bier, Asmeret Brooke

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Global interrupt and barrier networks  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system and method for generating global asynchronous signals in a computing structure. Particularly, a global interrupt and barrier network is implemented that implements logic for generating global interrupt and barrier signals for controlling global asynchronous operations performed by processing elements at selected processing nodes of a computing structure in accordance with a processing algorithm; and includes the physical interconnecting of the processing nodes for communicating the global interrupt and barrier signals to the elements via low-latency paths. The global asynchronous signals respectively initiate interrupt and barrier operations at the processing nodes at times selected for optimizing performance of the processing algorithms. In one embodiment, the global interrupt and barrier network is implemented in a scalable, massively parallel supercomputing device structure comprising a plurality of processing nodes interconnected by multiple independent networks, with each node including one or more processing elements for performing computation or communication activity as required when performing parallel algorithm operations. One multiple independent network includes a global tree network for enabling high-speed global tree communications among global tree network nodes or sub-trees thereof. The global interrupt and barrier network may operate in parallel with the global tree network for providing global asynchronous sideband signals.

Blumrich, Matthias A. (Ridgefield, CT); Chen, Dong (Croton-On-Hudson, NY); Coteus, Paul W. (Yorktown Heights, NY); Gara, Alan G. (Mount Kisco, NY); Giampapa, Mark E (Irvington, NY); Heidelberger, Philip (Cortlandt Manor, NY); Kopcsay, Gerard V. (Yorktown Heights, NY); Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D. (Mount Kisco, NY); Takken, Todd E. (Mount Kisco, NY)

2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

385

Global vs local Casimir effect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper continues the investigation of the Casimir effect with the use of the algebraic formulation of quantum field theory in the initial value setting. Basing on earlier papers by one of us (AH) we approximate the Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions by simple interaction models whose nonlocality in physical space is under strict control, but which at the same time are admissible from the point of view of algebraic restrictions imposed on models in the context of Casimir backreaction. The geometrical setting is that of the original parallel plates. By scaling our models and taking appropriate limit we approach the sharp boundary conditions in the limit. The global force is analyzed in that limit. One finds in Neumann case that although the sharp boundary interaction is recovered in the norm resolvent sense for each model considered, the total force per area depends substantially on its choice and diverges in the sharp boundary conditions limit. On the other hand the local energy density outside the interaction region, which in the limit includes any compact set outside the strict position of the plates, has a universal limit corresponding to sharp conditions. This is what one should expect in general, and the lack of this discrepancy in Dirichlet case is rather accidental. Our discussion pins down its precise origin: the difference in the order in which scaling limit and integration over the whole space is carried out.

Andrzej Herdegen; Mariusz Stopa

2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

386

The Carnal Global Sex for Sale on the Global Market  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Carnal Global Economy: Sex for Sale on the Global Market Sarah Gormady POLT 762 Spring 2009 #12;Human Trafficking is: Process + Way/Means + Goal A Global Free Market James Tassie #12;Commonwealth Queens Brothel Total Monthly Revenue $72,480 Total Operating Expenses $21,780 Gross Profit $50

New Hampshire, University of

387

Analysing the Carbon Footprint of Food Insights for Consumer Communication  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysing the Carbon Footprint of Food Insights for Consumer Communication Elin Röös Faculty of Food. Insights for Consumer Communication. Abstract In Europe, food consumption is responsible, and communicating these to consumers to enable them to make informed choices. This thesis provides additional

388

This Letter presented projections of future sea-level rise based on simulations of the past 22,000 years of sea-level history using a simple, empirical model linking sea-level rise to global mean-temperature anomalies. One of the main conclusions of the L  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This Letter presented projections of future sea-level rise based on simulations of the past 22,000 years of sea-level history using a simple, empirical model linking sea-level rise to global mean of sea-level rise during the twenty-first century that are reported in the Fourth Assessment Report

Siddall, Mark

389

A KNOWLEDGE DISCOVERY STRATEGY FOR RELATING SEA SURFACE TEMPERATURES TO FREQUENCIES OF TROPICAL STORMS AND GENERATING PREDICTIONS OF HURRICANES UNDER 21ST-CENTURY GLOBAL WARMING SCENARIOS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The connections among greenhouse-gas emissions scenarios, global warming, and frequencies of hurricanes or tropical cyclones are among the least understood in climate science but among the most fiercely debated in the context of adaptation decisions or mitigation policies. Here we show that a knowledge discovery strategy, which leverages observations and climate model simulations, offers the promise of developing credible projections of tropical cyclones based on sea surface temperatures (SST) in a warming environment. While this study motivates the development of new methodologies in statistics and data mining, the ability to solve challenging climate science problems with innovative combinations of traditional and state-of-the-art methods is demonstrated. Here we develop new insights, albeit in a proof-of-concept sense, on the relationship between sea surface temperatures and hurricane frequencies, and generate the most likely projections with uncertainty bounds for storm counts in the 21st-century warming environment based in turn on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Special Report on Emissions Scenarios. Our preliminary insights point to the benefits that can be achieved for climate science and impacts analysis, as well as adaptation and mitigation policies, by a solution strategy that remains tailored to the climate domain and complements physics-based climate model simulations with a combination of existing and new computational and data science approaches.

Race, Caitlin [University of Minnesota; Steinbach, Michael [University of Minnesota; Ganguly, Auroop R [ORNL; Semazzi, Fred [North Carolina State University; Kumar, Vipin [University of Minnesota

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Is an Alternative Globalization Possible?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global Democracy. 94. Amartya Sen, Development as Freedom (trump card. Recently, Amartya Senís ďcapability approachĒ 94

Evans, Peter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

A Hierarchy of Linear Threshold Models for the Spread of Political Revolutions on Social Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study a linear threshold agent-based model (ABM) for the spread of political revolutions on social networks using empirical network data. We propose new techniques for building a hierarchy of simplified ordinary differential equation (ODE) based models that aim to capture essential features of the ABM, including effects of the actual networks, and give insight in the parameter regime transitions of the ABM. We relate the ABM and the hierarchy of models to a population-level compartmental ODE model that we proposed previously for the spread of political revolutions [1], which is shown to be mathematically consistent with the proposed ABM and provides a way to analyze the global behaviour of the ABM. This consistency with the linear threshold ABM also provides further justification a posteriori for the compartmental model of [1]. Extending concepts from epidemiological modelling, we define a basic reproduction number $R_0$ for the linear threshold ABM and apply it to predict ABM behaviour on empirical networ...

Lang, John C

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Globalization, Labor, Transformation of Work  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in an Increasingly Global Economy Edited by Jonathan H. Westover THE ORGANISATION #12;First published in Australia in an increasingly global economy Jonathan H. Westover (editor) Bibliography. 978 1 86335 660 2 (pbk.) 978 1 86335 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 Economic Globalization and Caribbean Economies, Syed H. Akhter, Paul Pounder

393

GLOBAL WARMING THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GLOBAL WARMING THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT AND YOUR FAMILY'S CONTRIBUTION TO IT Stephen E. Schwartz GREENHOUSE EFFECT #12;GLOBAL ENERGY BALANCE Global and annual average energy fluxes in watts per square meter about it.But nobody does anything about it. ­ Mark Twain­ Mark Twain Now with the greenhouse effect, we

Schwartz, Stephen E.

394

Global Warming: Connecting the Dots  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global Warming: Connecting the Dots from Causes to Solutions* Jim Hansen 26 February 2007 National://www.columbia.edu/~jeh1/worldwatch_nov2006.pdf) 5. Communicating dangers and opportunities in global warming, Amer-16, 2006. (http://pubs.giss.nasa.gov/docs/2006/2006_Hansen.pdf) 8. Global warming: Connecting the dots from

Hansen, James E.

395

4, 10591092, 2007 Global warming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BGD 4, 1059­1092, 2007 Global warming potential of agro-ecosystems S. Lehuger et al. Title Page Predicting the global warming potential of agro-ecosystems S. Lehuger, B. Gabrielle, E. Larmanou, P. Laville Correspondence to: S. Lehuger (simon.lehuger@grignon.inra.fr) 1059 #12;BGD 4, 1059­1092, 2007 Global warming

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

396

Agricultural Sciences for Global Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's areas of expertise cover other urgent global issues such as energy supply, climate change, biodiversity, like food security and climate change, are truly global. The global arena is changing fast therefore and the environment in developing countries. Our research is conducted in close cooperation with partners in a large

397

Thinking about global climate change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Opinions regarding issues related to global climate change are presented. The focus is on socioeconomic and historical aspects. World War II is discussed as an intellectual and emotional turning point in global issues, and global climate change is identified as a possible turning point of similar significance. Political, scientific, and public points of view regarding the issue are discussed.

Russell, M. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

398

Tropical Cyclone Changes in the Western North Pacific in a Global Warming Scenario MARKUS STOWASSER, YUQING WANG, AND KEVIN HAMILTON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tropical Cyclone Changes in the Western North Pacific in a Global Warming Scenario MARKUS STOWASSER The influence of global warming on the climatology of tropical cyclones in the western North Pacific basin Model version 2 (CCSM2) coupled global climate model. The regional model is first tested in 10 yr

Wang, Yuqing

399

Developing a global strategy for a Brazilian engineering services provider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Delta Model framework is used in this work to assess a engineering services provider's current and desired level of customer bonding and define a Strategic Plan towards a global operation. Several other frameworks serve ...

Oliveira, Abner Lima de

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Long Run Macroeconomic Relations in the Global Economy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper focuses on testing long run macroeconomic relations for interest rates, equity, prices and exchange rates within a model of the global economy. It considers a number of plausible long run relationships suggested by arbitrage in financial...

Dees, S; Holly, Sean; Pesaran, M Hashem; Smith, L Vanessa

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global insight model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation Ann E. Carlson*2008]HEAT WAVES, GLOBAL WARMING, AND MITIGATION 175 stroke2001). 2008]HEAT WAVES, GLOBAL WARMING, AND MITIGATION 177

Carlson, Ann E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Insights from the downhole dynamometer database  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Downhole Dynamometer Database is a compilation of test data collected with a set of five downhole tools built by Albert Engineering under contract to Sandia National Laboratories. The downhole dynamometer tools are memory tools deployed in the sucker rod string with sensors to measure pressure, temperature, load, and acceleration. The acceleration data is processed to yield position, so that a load vs. position dynagraph can be generated using data collected downhole. With five tools in the hole at one time, all measured data and computed dynagraphs from five different positions in the rod string are available. The purpose of the Database is to provide industry with a complete and high quality measurement of downhole sucker rod pumping dynamics. To facilitate use of the database, Sandia has developed a Microsoft Windows-based interface that functions as a visualizer and browser to the more than 40 MBytes of data. The interface also includes a data export feature to allow users to extract data from the database for use in their own programs. Following a brief description of the downhole dynamometer tools, data collection program, and database content, this paper will illustrate a few of the interesting and unique insights gained from the downhole data.

Waggoner, J.R.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Response and impact of equatorial ocean dynamics and tropical instability waves in the tropical Atlantic under global warming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atlantic under global warming: A regional coupled downscaling study Hyodae Seo1,2 and ShangPing Xie1. Under global warming, both global and regional models exhibit an increased (decreased) rainfall thermal stratification is suggested to be more important under global warming. The strengthened upwelling

Xie, Shang-Ping

404

Timeline | GE Global Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearchScheduled System BurstLong TermScience&Time-ResolvedGlobal

405

The Global Energy Challenge  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The expected doubling of global energy demand by 2050 challenges our traditional patterns of energy production, distribution and use.†† The continued use of fossil fuels raises concerns about supply, security, environment and climate.† New routes are needed for the efficient conversion of energy from chemical fuel, sunlight, and heat to electricity or hydrogen as an energy carrier and finally to end uses like transportation, lighting, and heating. Opportunities for efficient new energy conversion routes based on nanoscale materials will be presented, with emphasis on the sustainable energy technologies they enable.

George Crabtree

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

406

Sandia National Laboratories: Global  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -theErik Spoerke SSLS Exhibit at ExploraGlobal Sandia Co-Hosts "Climate Risk

407

Sandia National Laboratories: Global  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -theErik Spoerke SSLS Exhibit at ExploraGlobal Sandia Co-Hosts "Climate

408

Analysis of Global Economic and Environmental Impacts of a Substantial Increase in Bioenergy Wallace E. Tyner (wtyner@purdue.edu), Thomas W. Hertel, Farzad Taheripour*, and Dileep K. Birur  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis of Global Economic and Environmental Impacts of a Substantial Increase in Bioenergy much insight into how alternative bioenergy production scenarios could change global agricultural markets and land-use, with repercussions for international trade. As the World Bank reports, nearly 70

409

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide ...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Guide Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide Uses lessons learned from Better Buildings grantees, existing data, and private sector insights to highlight...

410

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Uses lessons learned from Better Buildings grantees, existing data, and private sector insights to highlight business models that can help develop a sustainable residential energy efficiency market.

411

Improved computer models support genetics research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Simple computer models unravel genetic stress reactions in cells Integrated biological and computational methods provide insight into why genes are activated. February 8, 2013 When...

412

Global tree network for computing structures enabling global processing operations  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system and method for enabling high-speed, low-latency global tree network communications among processing nodes interconnected according to a tree network structure. The global tree network enables collective reduction operations to be performed during parallel algorithm operations executing in a computer structure having a plurality of the interconnected processing nodes. Router devices are included that interconnect the nodes of the tree via links to facilitate performance of low-latency global processing operations at nodes of the virtual tree and sub-tree structures. The global operations performed include one or more of: broadcast operations downstream from a root node to leaf nodes of a virtual tree, reduction operations upstream from leaf nodes to the root node in the virtual tree, and point-to-point message passing from any node to the root node. The global tree network is configurable to provide global barrier and interrupt functionality in asynchronous or synchronized manner, and, is physically and logically partitionable.

Blumrich; Matthias A. (Ridgefield, CT); Chen, Dong (Croton-On-Hudson, NY); Coteus, Paul W. (Yorktown Heights, NY); Gara, Alan G. (Mount Kisco, NY); Giampapa, Mark E. (Irvington, NY); Heidelberger, Philip (Cortlandt Manor, NY); Hoenicke, Dirk (Ossining, NY); Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D. (Mount Kisco, NY); Takken, Todd E. (Mount Kisco, NY); Vranas, Pavlos M. (Bedford Hills, NY)

2010-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

413

VIRGINIA CENTER FOR COAL & ENERGY RESEARCH WINTER 1998-99 / VOL. XVIII, NO. 1 Global Warming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VIRGINIA CENTER FOR COAL & ENERGY RESEARCH WINTER 1998-99 / VOL. XVIII, NO. 1 Global Warming Our over global warming continue, becoming more strident again as differing models predict widely varying, following the warmth of 1998, here are our two cents worth on global warming, written in the knowledge

414

Can Oceanic Freshwater Flux Amplify Global Warming? LIPING ZHANG AND LIXIN WU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Can Oceanic Freshwater Flux Amplify Global Warming? LIPING ZHANG AND LIXIN WU Physical Oceanography in global warming are studied using simulations of a climate model in which the freshwater flux changes that the warm climate leads to an acceleration of the global water cycle, which causes freshening in the high

415

Global Proteomics Reveal An Atypical Strategy for Carbon/Nitrogen Assimilation by a Cyanobacterium Under Diverse Environmental Perturbations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cyanobacteria, the only prokaryotes capable of oxygenic photosynthesis, are present in diverse ecological niches and play crucial roles in global carbon and nitrogen cycles. To proliferate in nature, cyanobacteria utilize a host of stress responses to accommodate periodic changes in environmental conditions. A detailed knowledge of the composition of, as well as the dynamic changes in, the proteome is necessary to gain fundamental insights into such stress responses. Toward this goal, we have performed a largescale proteomic analysis of the widely studied model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 under 33 different environmental conditions. The resulting high-quality dataset consists of 22,318 unique peptides corresponding to 1,955 proteins, a coverage of 53% of the predicted proteome. Quantitative determination of protein abundances has led to the identification of 1,198 differentially regulated proteins. Notably, our analysis revealed that a common stress response under various environmental perturbations, irrespective of amplitude and duration, is the activation of atypical pathways for the acquisition of carbon and nitrogen from urea and arginine. In particular, arginine is catabolized via putrescine to produce succinate and glutamate, sources of carbon and nitrogen, respectively. This study provides the most comprehensive functional and quantitative analysis of the Synechocystis proteome to date, and shows that a significant stress response of cyanobacteria involves an uncommon mode of acquisition of carbon and nitrogen. Oxygenic phototrophic prokaryotes, the progenitors of the chloroplast, are crucial to global oxygen production and worldwide carbon and nitrogen cycles. These microalgae are robust organisms capable carbon neutral biofuel production. Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 has historically been a model cyanobacterium for photosynthetic research and is emerging as a promising biofuel platform. Cellular responses are severely modified by environmental conditions, such as temperature and nutrient availability. However the global protein responses of Synechocystis 6803 under physiological relevant environmental stresses have not been characterized. Here we present the first global proteome analysis of a photoautotrophic bacteria and the most complete coverage to date of a photosynthetic prokaryotic proteome. To obtain a more complete description of the protein components of Synechocystis 6803, we have performed an in-depth proteome analysis of this organism utilizing the Accurate Mass and Time (AMT) tag approach1 utilizing 33 growth conditions and timepoints. The resulting proteome consists of 22,318 unique peptides, corresponding to 2,369 unique proteins, covering 65% of the predicted proteins. Quantitative analysis of protein abundance ratios under nutrient stress revealed that Synechocystis 6803 resorts to a universal mechanism for nitrogen utilization under phosphate, sulfate, iron, and nitrogen depletion. Comparison of this proteomic data with previously published microarray studies under similar environmental conditions showed that the general response predicted by both types of analyses are common but that the actual levels of protein expression can not be inferred from gene expression data. Our results demonstrate a global nitrogen response to multiple stressors that may be similar to that used by other cyanobacteria under various stress conditions. We anticipate that this protein expression data will be a foundation for the photosynthetic and biofuel communities to better understand metabolic changes under physiological conditions relevant to global productivity. Further more, this comparison of correlation between gene and protein expression data provides deeper insight into the ongoing debate as to whether gene expression can be used to infer cellular response.

Wegener, Kimberly M.; Singh, Abhay K.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Elvitigala, Thanura R.; Welsh, Eric A.; Keren, Nir S.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Ghosh, Bijoy K.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Computational Methodologies and Physical Insights into Electronic Energy Transfer in Photosynthetic Light-Harvesting Complexes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We examine computational techniques and methodologies currently in use to explore electronic excitation energy transfer in the context of light-harvesting complexes in photosynthetic antenna systems, and comment on some new insights into the underlying physics. Advantages and pitfalls of these methodologies are discussed, as are some physical insights into the photosynthetic dynamics. By combining results from molecular modelling of the complexes (structural description) with an effective non-equilibrium statistical description (time evolution), we identify some general features, regardless of the particular distribution in the protein scaffold, that are central to light-harvesting dynamics and, that could ultimately be related to the high efficiency of the overall process. Based on these general common features, some possible new directions in the field are discussed.

Leonardo A. Pachon; Paul Brumer

2012-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

417

Global and Convex Optimization in Modeling Environments ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aug 12, 2002 ... scientific and technical computing, visualization, and documentation ... development/maintenance, overall level of integration, immediate ... develop and to run 'silent' LGO implementations (without the Windows interface); a ... Figure 4) lets the user to control solver choices and several heuristic approaches.

Administrator

2002-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

418

Global Biofuels Modeling and Land Use  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional Subject: Guidance forGeospatialSession)

419

A Global Cloud Resolving Model Goals  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered¬ČPNGExperience hands-onASTROPHYSICSHe ő≤-Research and EducationF OAGlobal Cloud

420

Global Transportation Roadmap Model | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat Jump to: navigation,GigaCreteInformation| Open EnergyTransportation

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global insight model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid anew insights Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

University of Wisconsin at Madison Collection: Biology and Medicine 13 insight review articles NATURE | VOL 409 | 11 JANUARY 2001 | www.nature.com 253 Summary: insight...

422

Novel Insights into the Downstream Pathways and Targets Controlled by Transcription Factors CREM in the Testis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

proteins in spermatids: Downstream targets and implicationsNovel Insights into the Downstream Pathways and TargetsNovel Insights into the Downstream Pathways and Targets

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

E-Print Network 3.0 - activation state insights Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

- ment the state of the visualization at the time an insight occurs. Of course, an exploration process... Evaluating an InfoVis Technique Using Insight Reports Markus...

424

Suppressions and cascades : insights from gauge/gravity dualities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

At present, there are no non-perturbative analytic methods available for investigating gauge theories at large couplings. Consequently, it is desirable to explore more avenues to gain qualitative and quantitative insights. ...

Ejaz, Qudsia Jabeen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging Print XPD helicase is an enzyme that unwinds the DNA double helix; it is one component of an essential repair mechanism...

426

2010 Honda Insight VIN 0141 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2 2010 Honda Insight VIN 0141 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results Tyler Gray Mathew Shirk January 2013 The Idaho National Laboratory is a U.S. Department of Energy...

427

2010 Honda Insight VIN 1748 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3 2010 Honda Insight VIN 1748 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results Tyler Gray Matthew Shirk January 2013 The Idaho National Laboratory is a U.S. Department of Energy...

428

Genome sequence of the Brown Norway rat yields insights into  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Genome sequence of the Brown Norway rat yields insights into mammalian evolution Rat Genome Norway (BN) rat strain. The sequence represents a high-quality `draft' covering over 90% of the genome

Pachter, Lior

429

Maintenance Records for 2010 Honda Insight EX vin 0141  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Insight EX VIN JHMZE2H78AS010141 Date Mileage Description Cost 12102009 5,947 Changed oil and filter and inspected brake system 30.44 252010 11,011 Changed oil and filter and...

430

active site insights: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

disassembly of C-site. Our current results Lee, Keun Woo 2 Theoretic Insight into CO2 Reduction at Active Sites of Molybdenum and Tungsten Enzymes: a pi Interaction between CO2...

431

Global Studies Course List Fall 2010 (2111) COURSE LIST  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

...........................................................................5 2. Global Economy and Global Governance .................................................9 3 from one of six Global Concentrations (Sustainable Development; Global Economy and Global GovernanceGlobal Studies Course List ≠ Fall 2010 (2111) Page 1 COURSE LIST Fall 2010 (2111) Global Studies

Jiang, Huiqiang

2111-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Global health care injustice: an analysis of the demands of the basic right to health care.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Henry Shueís model of basic rights and their correlative duties provides an excellent framework for analysing the requirements of global distributive justice, and for theorisingÖ (more)

West-Oram, Peter George Negus

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Technical Insights for Saltstone PA Maintenance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) is a collaborative program sponsored by the US DOE Office of Waste Processing. The objective of the CBP is to develop a set of computational tools to improve understanding and prediction of the long-term structural, hydraulic, and chemical performance of cementitious barriers and waste forms used in nuclear applications. CBP tools are expected to better characterize and reduce the uncertainties of current methodologies for assessing cementitious barrier performance and increase the consistency and transparency of the assessment process, as the five-year program progresses. In September 2009, entering its second year of funded effort, the CBP sought opportunities to provide near-term tangible support to DOE Performance Assessments (PAs). The Savannah River Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) was selected for the initial PA support effort because (1) cementitious waste forms and barriers play a prominent role in the performance of the facility, (2) certain important long-term behaviors of cementitious materials composing the facility are uncertain, (3) review of the SDF PA by external stakeholders is ongoing, and (4) the DOE contractor responsible for the SDF PA is open to receiving technical assistance from the CBP. A review of the current (SRR Closure & Waste Disposal Authority 2009) and prior Saltstone PAs (e.g., Cook et al. 2005) suggested five potential opportunities for improving predictions. The candidate topics considered were (1) concrete degradation from external sulfate attack, (2) impact of atmospheric exposure to concrete and grout before closure, such as accelerated slag and Tc-99 oxidation, (3) mechanistic prediction of geochemical conditions, (4) concrete degradation from rebar corrosion due to carbonation, and (5) early age cracking from drying and/or thermal shrinkage. The candidate topics were down-selected considering the feasibility of addressing each issue within approximately six months, and compatibility with existing CBP expertise and already-planned activities. Based on these criteria, the five original topics were down-selected to two: external sulfate attack and mechanistic geochemical prediction. For each of the selected topics, the CBP communicated with the PA analysts and subject matter experts at Savannah River to acquire input data specific to the Saltstone facility and related laboratory experiments. Simulations and analyses were performed for both topics using STADIUM (SIMCO 2008), LeachXS/ORCHESTRA (ECN 2007, Meeussen 2003), and other software tools. These supplemental CBP analyses produced valuable technical insights that can be used to strengthen the Saltstone PA using the ongoing PA maintenance process. This report in part summarizes key information gleaned from more comprehensive documents prepared by Sarkar et al. (2010), Samson (2010), and Sarkar (2010).

Flach, G.; Sarkar, S.; Mahadevan, S.; Kosson, D.

2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

434

Global Scratch Upgrade in Progress  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the facility is now positioned to meet the performance demands of all its clusters. By upgrading the consolidated Global Scratch, users will be able to continue taking advantage...

435

Environmental Regulation, Globalization, and Innovation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This essay explores the complex relationship between environmental regulation, innovation, and sustainable development within the context of an increasingly globalizing economy. It will be argued that industrial policy, ...

Ashford, Nicholas

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Machine Learning for Global Optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Noname manuscript No. (will be inserted by the editor). Machine Learning for Global Optimization. A. Cassioli?. ∑ D. Di Lorenzo. ?. ∑ M. Locatelli. ??. ∑ F. Schoen.

schoen,,,

437

CLIMATE CHANGE GLOBAL ECONOMY How to decarbonise the global economy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CLIMATE CHANGE · GLOBAL ECONOMY How to decarbonise the global economy Today's report on deep efforts of independent experts from 15 countries to find national pathways to making economies based-zero emissions sometime in the second half of this century. This deep cut should occur in a growing world economy

438

For Submission to IEEE Transactions on Medical Imaging 1 Mean Field Annealing Deformable Contour Method: A Constrained Global  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

global optimization approach based on mean field annealing (MFA) theory to the problem of contour energy contour energy function, different target boundaries can be modeled as constrained global optimal are modeled as constrained global energy minimum contours with different constraint parameters

Neumaier, Arnold

439

Computer Modeling Illuminates Degradation Pathways of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computer Modeling Illuminates Degradation Pathways of Cations in Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cells Cation degradation insights obtained by computational modeling could result in better performance are effective in increasing cation stability. With the help of computational modeling, more cations are being

440

An Integrated Assessment Framework for Uncertainty Studies in Global and Regional Climate Change: The IGSM-CAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper describes an integrated assessment framework for uncertainty studies in global and regional climate change. In this framework, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Integrated Global System Model (IGSM), ...

Monier, Erwan

2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global insight model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

GLOBAL IMPACT FROM THE HEART  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GLOBAL IMPACT FROM THE HEART OF NORTHERN IRELAND #12;A first-class student experience in world-CLASS 18 CONTACT 26 CONTENTS 3GLOBAL IMPACT FROM THE HEART OF NORTHERN IRELAND #12;Queen's is a powerhouse THE HEART OF NORTHERN IRELANDGLOBAL IMPACT FROM THE HEART OF NORTHERN IRELAND CHANCELLOR'S WELCOME

Paxton, Anthony T.

442

RENEWABLES 2005 GLOBAL STATUS REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RENEWABLES 2005 GLOBAL STATUS REPORT Paper prepared for the REN21 Network by The Worldwatch Institute Lead Author: Eric Martinotwww.ren21.net #12;Renewable Energy Policy Network for the 21st Century REN21 is a global policy network aimed at providing a forum for international leadership on renewable

Kammen, Daniel M.

443

GLOBAL IMPACT FROM THE HEART  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GLOBAL IMPACT FROM THE HEART OF NORTHERN IRELAND #12;#12;CHANCELLOR'S WELCOME 4 VICE: INNOVATIVE AND WORLD-CLASS 18 CONTACT 26 CONTENTS 3GLOBAL IMPACT FROM THE HEART OF NORTHERN IRELAND #12;Queen THE HEART OF NORTHERN IRELANDGLOBAL IMPACT FROM THE HEART OF NORTHERN IRELAND CHANCELLOR'S WELCOME

M√ľller, Jens-Dominik

444

GLOBAL WARMING THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GLOBAL WARMING THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT AND YOUR FAMILY'S CONTRIBUTION TO IT Stephen E. Schwartz September 22, 2004 http://www.ecd.bnl.gov/steve/schwartz.html #12;#12;THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT #12;GLOBAL does anything about it. ­ Mark Twain­ Mark Twain Now with the greenhouse effect, we ARE doing something

Schwartz, Stephen E.

445

Impact of the Southern ocean winds on sea-ice - ocean interaction and its associated global ocean circulation in a warming world  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation discusses a linkage between the Southern Ocean (SO) winds and the global ocean circulation in the framework of a coarse-resolution global ocean general circulation model coupled to a sea-ice model. In addition to reexamination...

Cheon, Woo Geunn

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

446

Global Patterns of Ecological Productivity and Tropical Forest Biomass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

those measurements in addition to climate data to construct a suite of empirical models of NPP productivity (NPP) on a global scale and biomass accumulation across thee tropics. Scientists have been model of terrestrial net primary productivity (NPP), and its simplicity and relative accuracy has led

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

447

Using Numerical Simulations to Gain Insight into the Structure of Superbubbles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent high resolution observations of Galactic superbubbles have motivated us to re-examine several classes of superbubble models. We compare three classes of hydrodynamic models (the Kompaneets approximation, the thin shell model, and numerical simulations) in order to understand the structure of superbubbles and to gain insight into observations. In particular, we apply models to the W4 superbubble, which has been observed in the Pilot project of the arcminute resolution Canadian Galactic Plane Survey (Normandeau et al. 1996). Magnetohydrodynamic simulations are also performed and point the way to a fuller understanding of the W4 superbubble. We suggest that the highly collimated bubble and apparent lack of a Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the superbubble shell can be explained by the presence of a magnetic field.

Philip T. Komljenovic; Shantanu Basu; Doug Johnstone

1999-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

448

Model Evaluation and Hindcasting: An Experiment with an Integrated Assessment Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Integrated assessment models have been extensively used for analyzing long term energy and greenhouse emissions trajectories and have influenced key policies on this subject. Though admittedly these models are focused on the long term trajectories, how well these models are able to capture historical dynamics is an open question. In a first experiment of its kind, we present a framework for evaluation of such integrated assessment models. We use Global Change Assessment Model for this zero order experiment, and focus on the building sector results for USA. We calibrate the model for 1990 and run it forward up to 2095 in five year time steps. This gives us results for 1995, 2000, 2005 and 2010 which we compare to observed historical data at both fuel level and service level. We focus on bringing out the key insights for the wider process of model evaluation through our experiment with GCAM. We begin with highlighting that creation of an evaluation dataset and identification of key evaluation metric is the foremost challenge in the evaluation process. Our analysis highlights that estimation of functional form of the relationship between energy service demand, which is an unobserved variable, and its drivers is a significant challenge in the absence of adequate historical data for both the dependent and driver variables. Historical data availability for key metrics is a serious limiting factor in the process of evaluation. Interestingly, service level data against which such models need to be evaluated are itself a result of models. Thus for energy services, the best we can do is compare our model results with other model results rather than observed and measured data. We show that long term models, by the nature of their construction, will most likely underestimate the rapid growth in some services observed in a short time span. Also, we learn that modeling saturated energy services like space heating is easier than modeling unsaturated services like space cooling and understanding that how far a service is from its saturation level is a key question which we probably donít have an answer to. Finally and most importantly, even if long term models partially miss the short term dynamics, the long term insights provides by these models is fairly robust. We conclude by highlighting that our work is the first step in the much wider process of integrated assessment model evaluation and will hence have its own limitations. Future evaluation research work should build upon this zero order experiment for improving our modeling of human and coupled earth systems.

Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Kim, Son H.; Smith, Steven J.; Clarke, Leon E.; Zhou, Yuyu; Kyle, G. Page; Patel, Pralit L.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Using Information on Uncertainty to Improve Environmental Fate Modeling: A Case Study on DDT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Present and future concentrations of DDT in the environment are calculated with the global multi-media model CliMoChem. Monte Carlo simulations are used to assess the importance of uncertainties in substance property data, emission rates, and environmental parameters for model results. Uncertainties in the model results, expressed as 95percent confidence intervals of DDT concentrations in various environmental media, in different geographical locations, and at different points in time are typically between one and two orders of magnitude. An analysis of rank correlations between model inputs and predicted DDT concentrations indicates that emission estimates and degradation rate constants, in particular in the atmosphere, are the most influential model inputs. For DDT levels in the Arctic, temperature dependencies of substance properties are also influential parameters. A Bayesian Monte Carlo approach is used to update uncertain model inputs based on measurements of DDT in the field. The updating procedure suggests a lower value for half-life in air and a reduced range of uncertainty for KOW of DDT. As could be expected, the Bayesian updating yields model results that are closer to observations, and model uncertainties have decreased. The combined sensitivity analysis and Bayesian Monte Carlo approach provide new insight into important processes that govern the global fate and persistence of DDT in the environment.

Schenker, Urs; Scheringer, Martin; Sohn, Michael D.; Maddalena, Randy L.; McKone, Thomas E.; Hungerbuhler, Konrad

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Resisting globalization- ATTAC in France: local discourses, global terrain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The debate over the "globalization" process has been influenced by the emergence of social movements who deplore this process. This research focuses on the French social movement ATTAC (Action for a Tobin Tax for the Aid of Citizens...

Leonard, Marie des Neiges

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

451

Specific Examples of Global Activities Environmental assessment in Azerbaijan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, global warming, and global entrepreneurship. Discovery Park works syner- gistically with the Office competitiveness, global energy security, global warming, and global entrepreneurship. Discovery Park worksSpecific Examples of Global Activities · Environmental assessment in Azerbaijan · Study abroad

452

PARTNERSHIP PROFILE: THE GLOBAL FUND | 1 About the Global Fund to Fight AIDS,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

grants worth a total of US$29 billion in more than 140 countries. The Global Fund provided 22% of allPARTNERSHIP PROFILE: THE GLOBAL FUND | 1 MARCH 2014 About the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (Global Fund) is a global

Klein, Ophir

453

Global energy demand to 2060  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The projection of global energy demand to the year 2060 is of particular interest because of its relevance to the current greenhouse concerns. The long-term growth of global energy demand in the time scale of climatic change has received relatively little attention in the public discussion of national policy alternatives. The sociological, political, and economic issues have rarely been mentioned in this context. This study emphasizes that the two major driving forces are global population growth and economic growth (gross national product per capita), as would be expected. The modest annual increases assumed in this study result in a year 2060 annual energy use of >4 times the total global current use (year 1986) if present trends continue, and >2 times with extreme efficiency improvements in energy use. Even assuming a zero per capita growth for energy and economics, the population increase by the year 2060 results in a 1.5 times increase in total annual energy use.

Starr, C. (Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Tropospheric chemistry: A global perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a global Openshaw, K. , Wood fuels the developing world, Newbetween 6 and 40% of wood fuel is converted to charcoalsimilar to that for wood fuel. The source for CO given in

Logan, Jennifer A; Prather, Michael J; Wofsy, Steven C; McElroy, Michael B

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Global Environment Facility Evaluation Office  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global Environment Facility Evaluation Office PROTECTED AREAS AND AVOIDED DEFORESTATION #12;Protected Areas and Avoided Deforestation: An Econometric Evaluation - i - TABLE OF CONTENTS 1................................................................................4 3.3 ESTIMATED EFFECTS OF PROTECTED AREAS ON DEFORESTATION

Pfaff, Alex

456

Global optimization in reduced space  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimization is a key activity in any engineering discipline. Global optimization methods, in particular, strive to solve nonconvex problems, which often arise in chemical engineering, and deterministic algorithms such as ...

Wechsung, Achim

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Global Sensitivity Measures from Given Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Simulation models support managers in the solution of complex problems. International agencies recommend uncertainty and global sensitivity methods as best practice in the audit, validation and application of scientific codes. However, numerical complexity, especially in the presence of a high number of factors, induces analysts to employ less informative but numerically cheaper methods. This work introduces a design for estimating global sensitivity indices from given data (including simulation inputĖoutput data), at the minimum computational cost. We address the problem starting with a statistic based on the L1-norm. A formal definition of the estimators is provided and corresponding consistency theorems are proved. The determination of confidence intervals through a bias-reducing bootstrap estimator is investigated. The strategy is applied in the identification of the key drivers of uncertainty for the complex computer code developed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) assessing the risk of lunar space missions. We also introduce a symmetry result that enables the estimation of global sensitivity measures to datasets produced outside a conventional inputĖoutput functional framework.

Elmar Plischke; Emanuele Borgonovo; Curtis L. Smith

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Post-doctoral Position Title Quantify the net global climate impacts of past and future land-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

objective is to make this protocol widely available so that other earth system modeling groups outside uses and land use changes in global earth system models, and test the impact of various implementation

Pouyanne, Nicolas

459

NERSC Calculations Provide Independent Confirmation of Global...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Calculations Provide Independent Confirmation of Global Land Warming Since 1901 NERSC Calculations Provide Independent Confirmation of Global Land Warming Since 1901 September 9,...

460

Future generations, environmental ethics, and global environmental change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The elements of a methodology to be employed by the global community to investigate the consequences of global environmental change upon future generations and global ecosystems are outlined in this paper. The methodology is comprised of two major components: A possible future worlds model; and a formal, citizen-oriented process to judge whether the possible future worlds potentially inheritable by future generations meet obligational standards. A broad array of descriptors of future worlds can be encompassed within this framework, including survival of ecosystems and other species and satisfaction of human concerns. The methodology expresses fundamental psychological motivations and human myths journey, renewal, mother earth, and being-in-nature-and incorporates several viewpoints on obligations to future generations-maintaining options, fairness, humility, and the cause of humanity. The methodology overcomes several severe drawbacks of the economic-based methods most commonly used for global environmental policy analysis.

Tonn, B.E.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global insight model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Global terrestrial biogeochemistry: Perturbations, interactions, and time scales  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Global biogeochemical processes are being perturbed by human activity, principally that which is associated with industrial activity and expansion of urban and agricultural complexes. Perturbations have manifested themselves at least since the beginning of the 19th Century, and include emissions of CO{sub 2} and other pollutants from fossil fuel combustion, agricultural emissions of reactive nitrogen, and direct disruption of ecosystem function through land conversion. These perturbations yield local impacts, but there are also global consequences that are the sum of local-scale influences. Several approaches to understanding the global-scale implications of chemical perturbations to the Earth system are discussed. The lifetime of anthropogenic CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere is an important concept for understanding the current and future commitment to an altered atmospheric heat budget. The importance of the terrestrial biogeochemistry relative to the lifetime of excess CO{sub 2} is demonstrated using dynamic, aggregated models of the global carbon cycle.

Braswell, B.H. Jr.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Economics of Defense in a Globalized World  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be influenced by economic incentives --- economic carrots orto identify the economic and strategic incentives by whicheconomic insight that this system is driven by incentives,

MCGUIRE, MARTIN C

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Executive Summary  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Uses lessons learned from Better Buildings grantees, existing data, and private sector insights to highlight business models that can help develop a sustainable residential energy efficiency market.

464

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Introduction  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Uses lessons learned from Better Buildings grantees, existing data, and private sector insights to highlight business models that can help develop a sustainable residential energy efficiency market.

465

Physiological Insights Towards Improving Fish Culture L. CURRY WOODS III*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physiological Insights Towards Improving Fish Culture L. CURRY WOODS III* Department of Animal, and American Fisheries Society (AFS) Fish Culture Section, was held February 26 through March 2, 2007, in San Antonio, Texas. At this meeting, the AFS Fish Culture and Fish Physiol- ogy Sections co

Hamza, Iqbal

466

Nuclear magnetic resonance offers new insights into Pu 239  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- 1 - Nuclear magnetic resonance offers new insights into Pu 239 May 29, 2012 Nuclear magnetic signal of plutonium 239's unique nuclear magnetic resonance signature has been detected by scientists on the subject, "Observation of 239 Pu Nuclear Magnetic Resonance," was published in the May 18 issue of Science

467

Responsive Systems Comparison Method: Dynamic Insights into Designing a Satellite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

System (SRS) Critical issue in national security space ­ Unique all-weather surveillance capability) National Security Strategy/Policy National Security Strategy/Policy Resources (fungible assetsResponsive Systems Comparison Method: Dynamic Insights into Designing a Satellite Radar System Adam

de Weck, Olivier L.

468

Theoretical insights into multibandgap hybrid perovskites for photovoltaic applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-processable low-cost materials for high efficient hybrid photovoltaic cells [3-6, 9-14]. Tremendous progress hasTheoretical insights into multibandgap hybrid perovskites for photovoltaic applications J. Even to open "a new era and a new avenue of research and development for low-cost solar cells ... likely

469

Global view of energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book contains selected papers presented at the fourth interdisciplinary international forum on the Geopolitics of Energy. Topics included: energy demand; energy modeling; urgency of world energy problems; nuclear fission; progress in nuclear fusion; financing energy investments; conservation of energy in developed countries; public safety - risks and benefits; and atmospheric carbon dioxide. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 25 papers for inclusion in the Energy Data Base; all will appear in Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis and five in Energy Research Abstracts (ERA). (RJC)

Kursunoglu, B.N.; Millunzi, A.C.; Perlmutter, A. (eds.)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

NNLO global parton analysis.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NNLO charm model. In principle one can even produce an approximate NNLO FFNS coefficient function from the known small x limit [35] and known threshold logarithms [36]. 9 References [1] C. Anastasiou, E.W.N. Glover, C. Oleari and M.E. Tejeda... -Yeomans, Nucl. Phys. B601 (2001) 318; ibid B601 (2001) 341; ibid B605 (2001) 486; E.W.N. Glover, C. Oleari and M.E. Tejeda-Yeomans, Nucl. Phys. B605 (2001) 467; E.W.N. Glover and M.E. Tejeda-Yeomans, JHEP 0105:010, 2001; J.M. Campbell and E.W.N. Glover, Nucl...

Martin, A D; Roberts, R G; Stirling, W James; Thorne, Robert S

471

Moving | GE Global Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Regionat Cornell Batteries & Fuel CellsModelsTotal Queues

472

Dynamical insight into dark-matter haloes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate, using the spherical Jeans equation, self-gravitating dynamical equilibria satisfying a relation rho/sigma_r^3 propto r^-alpha, which holds for simulated dark-matter haloes over their whole resolved radial range. Considering first the case of velocity isotropy, we find that this problem has only one solution with realistic density profile, which occurs only for a critical value of alpha_crit = 35/18 ~= 1.94, which is consistent with the empirical value of 1.9+/-0.05. We extend our analysis in two ways: first we introduce a parameter epsilon to allow for a more general relation rho/\\sigma_r^epsilon propto r^-alpha; second we consider velocity anisotropy. If we assume beta(r) := 1- sigma_theta^2 / sigma_r^2 to be linearly related to the logarithmic density slope gamma(r) := -dln(rho)/dln(r), which is in agreement with simulations, the problem remains analytically tractable and is equivalent to the simpler isotropic case: there exists only one physical solution, which occurs at a critical alpha value. Remarkably, this value of alpha and the density and velocity-dispersion profiles depend only on epsilon and the value beta_0 := beta(r=0), but not on the slope of the linear beta-gamma relation. For epsilon=3, alpha_crit = 35/18 - 2beta_0/9 and the resulting density profile is fully analytic (as are the velocity dispersion and circular speed) with an inner cusp rho propto r^{-(7+10beta_0)/9} and a very smooth transition to a steeper outer power-law asymptote. These models are in excellent agreement with the density, velocity-dispersion and anisotropy profiles of simulated dark-matter haloes over their full resolved radial range. If epsilon=3 is a universal constant, some scatter in beta_0 ~= 0 may account for some diversity in the density profiles. (ABRIDGED)

Walter Dehnen; Dean McLaughlin

2005-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

473

Climate Change over the Equatorial Indo-Pacific in Global Warming* CHIE IHARA, YOCHANAN KUSHNIR, AND MARK A. CANE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Change over the Equatorial Indo-Pacific in Global Warming* CHIE IHARA, YOCHANAN KUSHNIR to global warming is investigated using model outputs submitted to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate equatorial Indian Ocean warm more than the SSTs in the eastern equatorial Indian Ocean under global warming

474

The WAMME regional model intercomparison study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

has produced a multi-model climatology of land surface ?uxesThe Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) combined

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Case Study #1 "The Global Warming Debate"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHEM 001A Case Study #1 "The Global Warming Debate" Global warming is one of the most contentious issues of our time. There is an ongoing debate about whether global warming is caused by human activity.S., and because the scientific evidence used to determine if global warming is man-made is so difficult

Reed, Christopher A.

476

PRINT ONLY: GLOBAL WARMING Alexeev V. A.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PRINT ONLY: GLOBAL WARMING Alexeev V. A. Global Warming: 0.6¬įC or Less? [#1035] The peculiarities of global warming on the Earth during the last century are discussed. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXVIII (2007) full818.pdf #12;GLOBAL WARMING: 0.6 OR LESS? V.A.Alexeev; Vernadsky Institute of Geochemistry

Rathbun, Julie A.

477

Shrinking Global Population: A futuristic scenario  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

global population it will not be a game-changer. #12;Measures for changes in total births 1. TotalShrinking Global Population: A futuristic scenario or a current challenge. Hillel Bar of RSAI - Atlanta November 15, 2013 #12;The evolution of global population Year Global Population

Nagurney, Anna

478

Geographic trends in research output and citations in veterinary medicine: insight into global research capacity, species specialization, and interdisciplinary relationships  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3. Poland 4. Slovakia 5. Croatia 1. So. Africa 2. Kenya 3.Soltanska 2, 21000, Split, Croatia. Received: 21 FebruaryVeterinarski Arhiv (Croatia) Veterinary Anaesthesia and

Christopher, Mary M; Marusic, Ana

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Using Visualizations to Monitor Changes and Harvest Insights from a Global-Scale Logging Infrastructure at Twitter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Infrastructure at Twitter Krist Wongsuphasawat and Jimmy Lin Fig. 1. Scribe Radar (Icicle View is with Twitter, Inc.. E-mail: kristw@twitter.com. · Jimmy Lin is with Twitter, Inc.. E-mail: jimmy

Lin, Jimmy

480

Global budgets of oceanic and atmospheric methyl iodide: development of methyl iodide as a tracer for marine convection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), wetlands (7 Gg yr \\Gamma1 ) and wood fuel (3 Gg yr \\Gamma1 ) are also included in the model. A global

Jacob, Daniel J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "global insight model" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Electric Dipole Moments: A Global Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We perform a global analysis of searches for the permanent electric dipole moments (EDMs) of the neutron, neutral atoms, and molecules in terms of six leptonic, semileptonic, and nonleptonic interactions involving photons, electrons, pions, and nucleons. Translating the results into fundamental CP-violating effective interactions through dimension six involving Standard Model particles, we obtain rough lower bounds on the scale of beyond the Standard Model CP-violating interactions ranging from 1.5 TeV for the electron EDM to 1300 TeV for the nuclear spin-independent electron-quark interaction. We show that future measurements involving systems or combinations of systems with complementary sensitivities to the low-energy parameters may extend the mass reach by an order of magnitude or more.

Timothy Chupp; Michael Ramsey-Musolf

2014-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

482

Globalization: Ecological Consequences of Global-Scale Connectivity in People,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 2005; Rial et al., 2004). For example, increasing atmospheric CO2 and other greenhouse gases of Agriculture ­ Agricultural Research Service, Las Cruces, New Mexico USA 1. Introduction Globalization). Movement of humans through improved transportation is leading to spread of pests and pathogens

483

Understanding Clusters in Multidimensional Spaces: Making Meaning by Combining Insights from Coordinated Views of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- 1 - Understanding Clusters in Multidimensional Spaces: Making Meaning by Combining Insights from: Cluster Analysis, Interactive Design, Information Visualization, Coordination, Domain Knowledge, Graphical. #12;- 2 - Understanding Clusters in Multidimensional Spaces: Making Meaning by Combining Insights from

Golbeck, Jennifer

484

Insights from Smart Meters: The Potential for Peak-Hour Savings from Behavior-Based Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2014. †Insights†from†Smart† Meters:†The†Potential†for†Peak†available data captured by smart meters and other sources,series Insights from Smart Meters. DRAFT Ė DO NOT CIRCULATE

Todd, Annika

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Global change: Acronyms and abbreviations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This list of acronyms and abbreviations is compiled to provide the user with a ready reference to dicipher the linguistic initialisms and abridgements for the study of global change. The terms included in this first edition were selected from a wide variety of sources: technical reports, policy documents, global change program announcements, newsletters, and other periodicals. The disciplinary interests covered by this document include agriculture, atmospheric science, ecology, environmental science, oceanography, policy science, and other fields. In addition to its availability in hard copy, the list of acronyms and abbreviations is available in DOS-formatted diskettes and through CDIAC`s anonymous File Transfer Protocol (FTP) area on the Internet.

Woodard, C.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Stoss, F.W. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment and Resources Center

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Making Globalization Work for Sustainable Human Development The Global Programme Paradigm : A Synthesis Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the best practices and strategies to manage their integration into the global economy and therefore bringMaking Globalization Work for Sustainable Human Development The Global Programme Paradigm-UNDP Global Programme on Globalization, Liberalization and Sustainable Human Development* Gabriela Tejada

487

Structure and Controls of the Global Virtual Water Trade Network  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recurrent or ephemeral water shortages are a crucial global challenge, in particular because of their impacts on food production. The global character of this challenge is reflected in the trade among nations of virtual water, i.e. the amount of water used to produce a given commodity. We build, analyze and model the network describing the transfer of virtual water between world nations for staple food products. We find that all the key features of the network are well described by a model that reproduces both the topological and weighted properties of the global virtual water trade network, by assuming as sole controls each country's gross domestic product and yearly rainfall on agricultural areas. We capture and quantitatively describe the high degree of globalization of water trade and show that a small group of nations play a key role in the connectivity of the network and in the global redistribution of virtual water. Finally, we illustrate examples of prediction of the structure of the network under fut...

Suweis, S; Dalin, C; Hanasaki, N; Rinaldo, A; Rodriguez-Iturbe, I; 10.1029/2011GL046837

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Global Optimization for Scheduling Refinery Crude Oil Operations Ramkumar Karuppiaha  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global Optimization for Scheduling Refinery Crude Oil Operations Ramkumar Karuppiaha , Kevin C at the front-end of a petroleum refinery. The model relies on a continuous time representation making use-412-268-7139. Email address: grossmann@cmu.edu (I.E. Grossmann) #12;2 Keywords: Refinery scheduling; Nonconvex MINLP

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

489

Global Dynamics of Zooplankton and Harmful Algae in Flowing Habitats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global Dynamics of Zooplankton and Harmful Algae in Flowing Habitats Sze-Bi Hsu Feng-Bin Wang Xiao from the dynamics of harmful algae and zooplankton in flowing- water habitats where a main channel. For the system modeling the dynamics of algae and their toxin that contains little limiting nutrient, we

Hsu, Sze-Bi

490

GLOBAL OPTIMIZATION FOR THE PHASE AND CHEMICAL EQUILIBRIUM PROBLEM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GLOBAL OPTIMIZATION FOR THE PHASE AND CHEMICAL EQUILIBRIUM PROBLEM: APPLICATION TO THE NRTL is adequately modeled by the Non≠Random Two Liquid (NRTL) activity coefficient expression and the vapor phase property of the Gibbs free energy expression involving the NRTL equation is provided. It is subsequently

Neumaier, Arnold

491

Global minimization of rational functions using semidefinite programming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) with p and q relatively prime. We will consider the optimization problem: p := inf xS p(x) q(x) where prime. We will consider the optimization problem: p := inf xS p(x) q(x) where S is the semi.); · stability analysis of certain dynamical systems, including biochemical reactor models. Global minimization

Neumaier, Arnold

492

Phase relation between global temperature and atmospheric carbon dioxide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The primary ingredient of Anthropogenic Global Warming hypothesis is the assumption that atmospheric carbon dioxide variations are the cause for temperature variations. In this paper we discuss this assumption and analyze it on basis of bi-centenary measurements and using a relaxation model which causes phase shifts and delays.

Stallinga, Peter

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Norwich Union Life Case Study IBM Global Business Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,ProfessionalDevelopmentand Practices - InfusedIBMpractitionerstodrive sustainability - SupportedbyatransformationalchangeNorwich Union Life Case Study IBM Global Business Services Aviva is the world's sixth approach to the problem and was one that appealed to NUL. Overview Leveraging the IBM Practice Model IBM

494

Modeling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

an implementation of a single-fluid inter- face model in the ALE-AMR code to simulate surface tension effects. The model does not require explicit information on the physical...

495

Conservation and Global Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

V.6 Conservation and Global Climate Change Diane M. Debinski and Molly S. Cross OUTLINE 1. Introduction 2. How climate is changing 3. Environmental responses to climate change 4. Consequences of climate the coming decades will be preserving biodiversity in the face of climate change. It has become increasingly

Landweber, Laura

496

RENEWABLES 2007 GLOBAL STATUS REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RENEWABLES 2007 GLOBAL STATUS REPORT www.ren21.net #12;Renewable Energy Policy Network for the 21st renewable energy. It provides a forum for leadership and exchange in international policy processes. It bolsters appropriate policies that increase the wise use of renewable energies in developing

Kammen, Daniel M.

497

GLOBAL WOOD SUPPLY Sten Nilsson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GLOBAL WOOD SUPPLY Sten Nilsson Biomass and Resource Efficiency: the need for a supply led approach to forest productivity European Parliament, Brussels, 10 November 2011 #12;MEGATREND WOOD SUPPLY ≠ 2020 the trees on the right Source: JP Management Consulting (Asia-Pacific) Ltd., 2006 #12;BAMBOO FOREST Source

498

Workshop report Impact of Global  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with an emphasis on low-to-middle-income countries 21­23 March 2012 Wellcome Trust, London #12;IMPACT OF GLOBALWorkshop report Impact of Global Environmental Change on Food/Nutrition and Water in Relation ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE ON FOOD/NUTRITION AND WATER IN RELATION TO HUMAN HEALTH 21­23 March 2012 Wellcome Trust

Rambaut, Andrew

499

Cambio global y polucin atmosfrica  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pollution and forest ecosystems Atmospheric pollution is referred as a component of global change. The role on the interaction between pollution and climate change. Key words: atmospheric pollution, acidic rain, anatomical anat√≥micos y fisiol√≥gicos, micorrizas, recursos ge- n√©ticos, masas forestales espa√Īolas. Abstract Atmospheric

Espigares, Tíscar

500

7, 38373857, 2007 Global transports  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and 180 are still transporting into soil and water. It is found that lighter PCBs have more long range international concern with identifying and managing environmentally persistent substances that are bothACPD 7, 3837­3857, 2007 Global transports and budgets of PCBs P. Huang et al. Title Page Abstract

Paris-Sud XI, Université de